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Sample records for xenon dioxide molecule

  1. Photoionization of atoms and molecules. [of hydrogen, helium, and xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review on the present state of knowledge in photoionization is presented. Various experimental techniques that have been developed to study photoionization, such as fluorescence and photoelectron spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, are examined. Various atoms and molecules were chosen to illustrate these techniques, specifically helium and xenon atoms and hydrogen molecules. Specialized photoionization such as in positive and negative ions, excited states, and free radicals is also treated. Absorption cross sections and ionization potentials are also discussed.

  2. Migration of defect clusters and xenon-vacancy clusters in uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Deng, Huiqiu; Hu, Wangyu; Sun, Xin

    2014-07-01

    The possible transition states, minimum energy paths and migration mechanisms of defect clusters and xenon-vacancy defect clusters in uranium dioxide have been investigated using the dimer and the nudged elastic-band methods. The nearby O atom can easily hop into the oxygen vacancy position by overcoming a small energy barrier, which is much lower than that for the migration of a uranium vacancy. A simulation for a vacancy cluster consisting of two oxygen vacancies reveals that the energy barrier of the divacancy migration tends to decrease with increasing the separation distance of divacancy. For an oxygen interstitial, the migration barrier for the hopping mechanism is almost three times larger than that for the exchange mechanism. Xe moving between two interstitial sites is unlikely a dominant migration mechanism considering the higher energy barrier. A net migration process of a Xe-vacancy pair containing an oxygen vacancy and a xenon interstitial is identified by the NEB method. We expect the oxygen vacancy-assisted migration mechanism to possibly lead to a long distance migration of the Xe interstitials in UO2. The migration of defect clusters involving Xe substitution indicates that Xe atom migrating away from the uranium vacancy site is difficult.

  3. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyoung S.; Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Yong C.; Choi, Eun H.

    2015-01-01

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study of carbon dioxide disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in the carbon dioxide plasma of a microwave plasma torch under atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of carbon dioxide disintegration indicates that substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules disintegrate and form other compounds in the torch. For example, the normalized particle densities at center of plasma are given by nCO2/nN = 6.12 × 10−3, nCO/nN = 0.13, nC/nN = 0.24, nO/nN = 0.61, nC2/nN = 8.32 × 10−7, nO2/nN = 5.39 × 10−5, where nCO2, nCO, nC, nO, nC2, and nO2 are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon and oxygen atom, carbon and oxygen molecule densities, respectively. nN is the neutral particle density. Emission profiles of the oxygen and carbon atom radicals and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch. PMID:26674957

  4. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyoung S; Uhm, Han S; Hong, Yong C; Choi, Eun H

    2015-01-01

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study of carbon dioxide disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in the carbon dioxide plasma of a microwave plasma torch under atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of carbon dioxide disintegration indicates that substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules disintegrate and form other compounds in the torch. For example, the normalized particle densities at center of plasma are given by nCO2/nN = 6.12 × 10(-3), nCO/nN = 0.13, nC/nN = 0.24, nO/nN = 0.61, nC2/nN = 8.32 × 10(-7), nO2/nN = 5.39 × 10(-5), where nCO2, nCO, nC, nO, nC2, and nO2 are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon and oxygen atom, carbon and oxygen molecule densities, respectively. nN is the neutral particle density. Emission profiles of the oxygen and carbon atom radicals and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch. PMID:26674957

  5. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Hyoung S.; Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Yong C.; Choi, Eun H.

    2015-12-01

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study of carbon dioxide disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in the carbon dioxide plasma of a microwave plasma torch under atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of carbon dioxide disintegration indicates that substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules disintegrate and form other compounds in the torch. For example, the normalized particle densities at center of plasma are given by nCO2/nN = 6.12 × 10-3, nCO/nN = 0.13, nC/nN = 0.24, nO/nN = 0.61, nC2/nN = 8.32 × 10-7, nO2/nN = 5.39 × 10-5, where nCO2, nCO, nC, nO, nC2, and nO2 are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon and oxygen atom, carbon and oxygen molecule densities, respectively. nN is the neutral particle density. Emission profiles of the oxygen and carbon atom radicals and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch.

  6. Low energy decomposition of carbon dioxide and other molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamfiloff, Eugene

    2013-05-01

    Since the observation of elevating quantities of atmospheric greenhouse gases, finding a practical method other than the capture-and-sequestration scheme for the reduction and disposal of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been an important objective. Recently, an efficient low-energy process has been developed allowing the selective molecular decomposition of CO2, CO, and other molecules. Thus, CO2 can be broken down into C + O + O. This permits the O2 molecules to be stored or released while the clean carbon atoms can be bagged and utilized in various industries. For the control of carbon dioxide or other gas emissions at their source, it can be scaled up for power plants or down for smaller facilities. The process also allows the production of a beam of exclusively positive ions or exclusively negative ions and contrary to other devices, excludes the probability of beam contamination by plasma or neutral particles, making it ideal for electronic thin-films manufacturing and spectroscopy systems. Because the system allows the simultaneous production of ion beams containing selectable ratios of positive to negative ions, it simplifies construction of favored or complex molecules through varied ionic bonds. Also discussed are several methods to apply the new technology as an upgrade to spectrometers and other devices. For further information contact the author: epamfiloff@mattertech.com.

  7. Comment on ``Interplay of defect cluster and the stability of xenon in uranium dioxide from density functional calculations''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorado, Boris; Amadon, Bernard; Jomard, Gérald; Freyss, Michel; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2011-09-01

    Geng [H. Y. Geng, Y. Chen, Y. Kaneta, M. Kinoshita, and Q. Wu, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.82.094106 82, 094106 (2010)] recently reported DFT+U calculations of xenon behavior in uranium dioxide UO2. One of the main conclusions of their work is that the quasiannealing (QA) procedure allowed them to avoid metastable states created by the DFT+U approximation. However, based on a comparison of total energies, they stated that an incomplete implementation of occupation matrix control (OMC) had been done in our previous work [B. Dorado, G. Jomard, M. Freyss, and M. Bertolus, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.82.035114 82, 035114 (2010)] and that we failed to reach the ground state of the perfect UO2 fluorite structure. In this Comment, we show that the discrepancy they observed does not stem from an incomplete implementation of OMC, but from the calculation of the compensation charge used in the projector augmented-wave formalism.

  8. Dynamical mean-field theory for transition metal dioxide molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Nan; Zgid, Dominika; Marianetti, Chris; Reichman, David; Millis, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    The utility of the dynamical mean-field approximation in quantum chemistry is investigated in the context of transition metal dioxide molecules including TiO2 and CrO2. The choice of correlated orbitals and correlations to treat dynamically is discussed. The dynamical mean field solutions are compared to state of the art quantum chemical calculations. The dynamical mean-field method is found to capture about 50% of the total correlation energy, and to produce very good results for the d-level occupancies and magnetic moments. We also present the excitation spectrum in these molecules which is inaccessible in many wave-function based methods. Conceptual and technical difficulties will be outlined and discussed.

  9. Radiochemical Reactions Between Tritium Molecule and Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, W.M.; O'Hira, S.; Suzuki, T.; Nishi, M. F.

    2005-07-15

    To have better understanding of radiochemical reactions among oxygen baking products in a fusion reactor, reactions in equimolar tritium molecule (T{sub 2}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) were examined by laser Raman spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. After mixing them at room temperature, T{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} decreased rapidly in the first 30 minutes and then the reactions between them became much slower. As the predominant products of the reactions, carbon monoxide (CO) and tritiated water (T{sub 2}O) were found in gaseous phase and condensed phase, respectively. However, there likely existed also some solid products that were thermally decomposed into CO, CO{sub 2}, T{sub 2}, T{sub 2}O, etc. during baking up to 523 K.

  10. Development of a functionalized Xenon biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, Megan M.; Ruiz, E. Janette; Rubin, Seth M.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Winssinger, Nicolas; Schultz, Peter G.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-03-25

    NMR-based biosensors that utilize laser-polarized xenon offer potential advantages beyond current sensing technologies. These advantages include the capacity to simultaneously detect multiple analytes, the applicability to in vivo spectroscopy and imaging, and the possibility of remote amplified detection. Here we present a detailed NMR characterization of the binding of a biotin-derivatized caged-xenon sensor to avidin. Binding of functionalized xenon to avidin leads to a change in the chemical shift of the encapsulated xenon in addition to a broadening of the resonance, both of which serve as NMR markers of ligand-target interaction. A control experiment in which the biotin-binding site of avidin was blocked with native biotin showed no such spectral changes, confirming that only specific binding, rather than nonspecific contact, between avidin and functionalized xenon leads to the effects on the xenon NMR spectrum. The exchange rate of xenon (between solution and cage) and the xenon spin-lattice relaxation rate were not changed significantly upon binding. We describe two methods for enhancing the signal from functionalized xenon by exploiting the laser-polarized xenon magnetization reservoir. We also show that the xenon chemical shifts are distinct for xenon encapsulated in different diastereomeric cage molecules. This demonstrates the potential for tuning the encapsulated xenon chemical shift, which is a key requirement for being able to multiplex the biosensor.

  11. Intense-Field Photoionization of Molecules using Ultrashort Radiation Pulses: Carbon Disulfide and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Joshua; Uiterwaal, Cornelis

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the photoionization and photofragmentation of molecules using intense fields from an 800 nm, femtosecond laser source and an experimental method that eliminates the focal volume effect without the need for data deconvolution. Targets include carbon disulfide and carbon dioxide. We show that ionization is insignificant for intensities that maximize alignment of carbon disulfide, which validates ultrafast electron diffraction experiments from aligned carbon disulfide. For comparison, we also investigate the analogous molecule carbon dioxide. In this molecule the molecular bonding orbitals include the n = 2 atomic orbitals of the oxygen atom, while in carbon disulfide the n = 3 orbitals of the sulfur atom contribute to the bonding. Recent work will be presented. This work supported by U.S. Dept. of Education GAANN Grants Nos. P200A090156 and P200A120188 and National Science Foundation EPSCoR RII Track-2 CA Award No. IIA-1430519 (Cooperative Nebraska-Kansas Grant).

  12. Carbon Dioxide Influence on the Thermal Formation of Complex Organic Molecules in Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Duvernay, F.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Chiavassa, T.; Cottin, H.

    2015-08-01

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H2O, NH3, CO2, H2CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  13. Systematization of published spectral data on sulfur dioxide molecule and its isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronina, S. S.; Akhlestin, A. Yu.; Kozodoev, A. V.; Lavrentiev, N. A.; Privezentsev, A. I.; Fazliev, A. Z.; Naumenko, O. V.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents a description of properties of published spectral data on spectral lines' parameters of sulfur dioxide molecule and its isotopologues. These data were acquired from more than 150 publications for a period of 50 years. Data properties as well as data sources classification according to validity and trust criteria are presented in a form of an ontological knowledge base on information resources. Data source properties values are computed during the assessment of validity and trust1. Published ro-vibrational transitions, energy levels, spectral lines' parameters, knowledge base on information resources of sulfur dioxide molecule and its isotopologues are available in the Internet accessible information system W@DIS (http://wadis.saga.iao.ru/).

  14. Core localization and {sigma}* delocalization in the O 1s core-excited sulfur dioxide molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, Andreas; Kivimaeki, Antti; Sorensen, Stacey L.; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; Burmeister, Florian; Naves de Brito, Arnaldo

    2008-03-21

    Electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements of sulfur dioxide at discrete resonances near the O 1s ionization edge are reported. The spectra are analyzed using a model based upon molecular symmetry and on the geometry of the molecule. We find clear evidence for molecular alignment that can be ascribed to symmetry properties of the ground and core-excited states. Configuration interaction (CI) calculations indicate geometry changes in accord with the measured spectra. For the SO{sub 2} molecule, however, we find that the localized core hole does not produce measurable evidence for valence localization, since the transition dipole moment is not parallel to a breaking {sigma}* O-S bond, in contrast to the case of ozone. The dissociation behavior based upon the CI calculations using symmetry-broken orbitals while fixing a localized core-hole site is found to be nearly equivalent to that using symmetry-adapted orbitals. This implies that the core-localization effect is not strong enough to localize the {sigma}* valence orbital.

  15. Chemically-bound xenon in fibrous silica.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Räsänen, Markku; Gerber, R Benny

    2014-06-21

    High-level quantum chemical calculations reported here predict the existence and remarkable stability, of chemically-bound xenon atoms in fibrous silica. The results may support the suggestion of Sanloup and coworkers that chemically-bound xenon and silica account for the problem of "missing xenon" (by a factor of 20!) from the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. So far, the host silica was assumed to be quartz, which is in contradiction with theory. The xenon-fibrous silica molecule is computed to be stable well beyond room temperature. The calculated Raman spectra of the species agree well with the main features of the experiments by Sanloup et al. The results predict computationally the existence of a new family of noble-gas containing materials. The fibrous silica species are finite molecules, their laboratory preparation should be feasible, and potential applications are possible. PMID:24807740

  16. HXeOBr in a xenon matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Tapio, Salla; Domanskaya, Alexandra V.; Raesaenen, Markku; Isokoski, Karoliina; Lundell, Jan

    2011-03-28

    We report on a new noble-gas molecule HXeOBr prepared in a low-temperature xenon matrix from the HBr and N{sub 2}O precursors by UV photolysis and thermal annealing. This molecule is assigned with the help of deuteration experiments and ab initio calculations including anharmonic methods. The H-Xe stretching frequency of HXeOBr is observed at 1634 cm{sup -1}, which is larger by 56 cm{sup -1} than the frequency of HXeOH identified previously. The experiments show a higher thermal stability of HXeOBr molecules in a xenon matrix compared to HXeOH.

  17. Is xenon eldest?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that the solubility of noble gases in magmas decreases with increasing atomic weight. Xenon, the weightiest of the stable noble gases, is the least soluble atmospheric gas in magma. It is not unreasonable to suppose that the noble gases should have degassed from (or equilibrated with) a bubbling mantle in order of increasing solubility, such that xenon was the most rapidly degassed and helium the least. The apparent relative ages of the famous radiogenic noble gas isotopes agrees, at least qualitatively, with this premise. When atmospheric loss processes are assigned their proper place, several long-standing xenonological puzzles become added evidence for xenon's relative antiquity. Xenon being the afore-mentioned sense the oldest atmospheric gas, will have been most greatly subject to escape, be it impact-driven or EUV-driven. Nonradiogenic xenon's pronounced isotopic fractionation has already been attributed to escape; why it should be more fractionated than krypton would be assigned to xenon's greater atmospheric age. The small atmospheric inventory of xenon relative to the other nonradiogenic noblegases, known as the 'missing xenon' problem, could easily be explained by differential escape. The relatively tiny atmospheric inventories of the radiogenic daughter products of 129 Iodine and 244 Plutonium, both much smaller than would be expected from the inferred abundances of the parents in meteorites, offer a third and fourth data to support the hypothesis that Earth has lost most of its xenon.

  18. Is xenon eldest?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, K.

    It is well known that the solubility of noble gases in magmas decreases with increasing atomic weight. Xenon, the weightiest of the stable noble gases, is the least soluble atmospheric gas in magma. It is not unreasonable to suppose that the noble gases should have degassed from (or equilibrated with) a bubbling mantle in order of increasing solubility, such that xenon was the most rapidly degassed and helium the least. The apparent relative ages of the famous radiogenic noble gas isotopes agrees, at least qualitatively, with this premise. When atmospheric loss processes are assigned their proper place, several long-standing xenonological puzzles become added evidence for xenon's relative antiquity. Xenon being the afore-mentioned sense the oldest atmospheric gas, will have been most greatly subject to escape, be it impact-driven or EUV-driven. Nonradiogenic xenon's pronounced isotopic fractionation has already been attributed to escape; why it should be more fractionated than krypton would be assigned to xenon's greater atmospheric age. The small atmospheric inventory of xenon relative to the other nonradiogenic noblegases, known as the 'missing xenon' problem, could easily be explained by differential escape. The relatively tiny atmospheric inventories of the radiogenic daughter products of 129 Iodine and 244 Plutonium, both much smaller than would be expected from the inferred abundances of the parents in meteorites, offer a third and fourth data to support the hypothesis that Earth has lost most of its xenon.

  19. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The sample cell at the heart of CVX-2 will sit inside a thermostat providing three layers of insulation. The cell itself comprises a copper body that conducts heat efficiently and smoothes out thermal variations that that would destroy the xenon's uniformity. Inside the cell, the oscillating screen viscometer element is supported between two pairs of electrodes that deflect the screen and then measure screen motion.

  20. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Because xenon near the critical point will collapse under its own weight, experiments on Earth (green line) are limited as they get closer (toward the left) to the critical point. CVX in the microgravity of space (red line) moved into unmeasured territory that scientists had not been able to reach.

  1. The incorporation and migration of a single xenon atom in ceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yinbin; Chen, Wei-Ying; Oaks, Aaron; Mo, Kun; Stubbins, James F.

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of xenon gas is crucial for the performance of nuclear fuel materials. We report molecular statics calculation results for the characteristics of a single xenon atom in cerium oxide, a non-radioactive surrogate of uranium dioxide. A variety of possible xenon incorporation sites, including the octahedral interstitial position, single-Ce-vacancy clusters, and double-Ce-vacancy clusters were considered. The binding energies and corresponding xenon incorporation energies were computed to reveal the preferred xenon positions in ceria. Different migration mechanisms of single xenon atoms were found to be involved with various incorporation sites. The energy barriers of all possible migration pathways were calculated. Only the mobility of single xenon atoms in the double-Ce-vacancy sites, which is due to the vacancy-assisted xenon migration, can account for the xenon diffusivity implied by bubble formation observed in experiments. The results also validated the role of ceria as a reliable surrogate of uranium dioxide in studies involving xenon gas.

  2. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of liquid xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Resembling a tiny bit of window screen, the oscillator at the heart of CVX-2 will vibrate between two pairs of paddle-like electrodes. The slight bend in the shape of the mesh has no effect on the data. What counts are the mesh's displacement in the xenon fluid and the rate at which the displacement dampens. The unit shown here is encased in a small test cell and capped with a sapphire windown to contain the xenon at high pressure.

  3. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Shear thirning will cause a normally viscous fluid -- such as pie filling or whipped cream -- to deform and flow more readily under high shear conditions. In shear thinning, a pocket of fluid will deform and move one edge forward, as depicted here.

  4. Antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon.

    PubMed

    Spaggiari, Sabrina; Kepp, Oliver; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Chaba, Kariman; Adjemian, Sandy; Pype, Jan; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Lemaire, Marc; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-08-15

    Although chemically non-reactive, inert noble gases may influence multiple physiological and pathological processes via hitherto uncharacterized physical effects. Here we report a cell-based detection system for assessing the effects of pre-defined gas mixtures on the induction of apoptotic cell death. In this setting, the conventional atmosphere for cell culture was substituted with gas combinations, including the same amount of oxygen (20%) and carbon dioxide (5%) but 75% helium, neon, argon, krypton, or xenon instead of nitrogen. The replacement of nitrogen with noble gases per se had no effects on the viability of cultured human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Conversely, argon and xenon (but not helium, neon, and krypton) significantly limited cell loss induced by the broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor staurosporine, the DNA-damaging agent mitoxantrone and several mitochondrial toxins. Such cytoprotective effects were coupled to the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity, as demonstrated by means of a mitochondrial transmembrane potential-sensitive dye and by assessing the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. In line with this notion, argon and xenon inhibited the apoptotic activation of caspase-3, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy coupled to automated image analysis. The antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon may explain their clinically relevant cytoprotective effects. PMID:23907115

  5. Carbon Dioxide Activation by Scandium Atoms and Scandium Monoxide Molecules: Formation and Spectroscopic Characterization of ScCO3 and OCScCO3 in Solid Neon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingnan; Qu, Hui; Chen, Mohua; Zhou, Mingfei

    2016-01-28

    The reactions of carbon dioxide with scandium monoxide molecules and scandium atoms are investigated using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy in solid neon. The species formed are identified by the effects of isotopic substitution on their infrared spectra as well as density functional calculations. The results show that the ground state ScO molecule reacts with carbon dioxide to form the carbonate complex ScCO3 spontaneously on annealing. The ground state Sc atom reacts with two carbon dioxide molecules to give the carbonate carbonyl complex OCScCO3 via the previously reported OScCO insertion intermediate on annealing. The observation of these spontaneous reactions is consistent with theoretical predictions that both the Sc + 2CO2 → OCScCO3 and ScO + CO2 → ScCO3 reactions are thermodynamically exothermic and are kinetically facile, requiring little or no activation energy. PMID:26738558

  6. [Xenon light therapy].

    PubMed

    Kanai, Akifumi

    2012-07-01

    The xenon light, generated by high-intensity electrical stimulation of xenon gas, is used to sterilize wounds, aid tissue repair, and relieve pain as a low-level light therapy. The light produced consists of non-coherent beams of multiple wavelengths in the ultraviolet to infrared spectrum. This broad-band light can be emitted in a continuous wave or pulsed mode, with the wave band chosen and the energy distribution controlled for the purpose. Specifically, wavelengths in the 500-700 nm range are suitable for treating superficial tissue, and wavelengths between 800 and 1,000 nm are suitable for deeper-seated tissues, due to longer optical penetration distances through tissue. One of the most common benefits in the xenon light therapy is considered to be the wide and deep irradiation of optimal rays to living tissue. Research into the use of xenon light for tissue repair and pain reduction is restricted within open-label studies and case reports. The present review expounded the effects of xenon light therapy on the basis of the available evidence in vitro and in vivo studies using a laser beam of single wavelength. PMID:22860297

  7. The formation of carbonic and silicon dioxide structured films through the decomposition of molecules on the surface of ionic crystals under the action of IR femtosecond laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompanets, V. O.; Laptev, V. B.; Pigul’skii, S. V.; Ryabov, E. A.; Chekalin, S. V.; Blank, V. D.; Denisov, V. N.; Kravchuk, K. S.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    This study relates to the formation of carbon and silicon dioxide films that occurs as a result of the decomposition of organic and silicon-containing molecules on the surface of ionic crystals under IR femtosecond laser radiation of moderate intensity (~1011 W cm‑2) without molecular decomposition in the gas phase. We found that transparent graphite oxide films formed in the case of CO2 molecule decomposition.

  8. Separation and purification of xenon

    DOEpatents

    Schlea, deceased, Carl Solomon

    1978-03-14

    Xenon is separated from a mixture of xenon and krypton by extractive distillation using carbon tetrafluoride as the partitioning agent. Krypton is flushed out of the distillation column with CF.sub.4 in the gaseous overhead stream while purified xenon is recovered from the liquid bottoms. The distillation is conducted at about atmospheric pressure or at subatmospheric pressure.

  9. Scalability study of solid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, J.; Cease, H.; Jaskierny, W. F.; Markley, D.; Pahlka, R. B.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Saab, T.; Filipenko, M.

    2015-04-01

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employed a cryostat cooled by liquid nitrogen combined with a xenon purification and chiller system. A modified {\\it Bridgeman's technique} reproduces a large scale optically transparent solid xenon.

  10. A Molecular Dynamics Study on the Confinement of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazor, Meagan; Rende, Deniz; Baysal, Nihat; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2012-02-01

    The influence of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on global warming is considered as one of the primary environmental issues of the past two decades. The main source of CO2 emission is human activity, such as the use of fossil fuels in transportation and industrial plants. Following the release of Kyoto Protocol in 1997, effective ways of controlling CO2 emissions received much attention. As a result, various materials such as activated carbon, zeolites, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated for their CO2 adsorbing properties. CNTs were reported to have CO2 adsorption capability twice that of activated carbon, hence they received the most attention. In the current study, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were used as one dimensional nanoporous materials and their CO2 adsorption capacity was analyzed with Molecular Dynamics simulations. Results indicated that SWNTs are excellent CO2 adsorbers and their effectiveness increase at low CO2 concentrations. In addition, we showed that by varying temperature, CO2 can be removed from the SWNTs, providing a simple method to reuse SWNTs.

  11. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. This is a detail view of MSFC 0100143.

  12. Chemistry of sulfur-containing molecules on Au( 1 1 1 ): thiophene, sulfur dioxide, and methanethiol adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Rodriguez, José A.; Dvorak, Joseph; Hrbek, Jan; Jirsak, Tomas

    2002-05-01

    The interactions of three sulfur-containing molecules (C 4H 4S, SO 2, CH 3SH) with a clean Au(1 1 1) surface have been studied with a combination of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and synchrotron-based high-resolution soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption and reactivity of the three molecules on Au(1 1 1) are very different. Thiophene adsorbs molecularly on Au(1 1 1) at 100 K and desorbs completely below 330 K without further decomposition. In the submonolayer range, three different adsorption states for chemisorbed thiophene are identified in TDS. It is suggested that thiophene preferably adsorbs on the defect sites at the lowest exposure. After the defect sites are saturated, the change from a flat-lying geometry to a tilted adsorption configuration follows as the exposure increases. Sulfur dioxide also does not decompose on Au(1 1 1). For SO 2 adsorption at 100 K, in addition to the multilayer desorption feature (˜130 K), only one distinct monolayer peak with a tail extending to higher temperature appears in TDS. The desorption temperature difference between the SO 2 monolayer and multilayer is only 15 K, indicating a weak binding between SO 2 and Au. For methanethiol adsorption on Au(1 1 1) at 100 K, three desorption states appear in the submonolayer range for the parent thiol. All of them appear below 300 K. The only desorption products at higher temperature are methane or methyl radicals (˜540 K), and dimethyl disulfide (˜470 K). Apart from the intact methyl thiol molecule, which exists at low temperatures (⩽150 K), two inequivalent intermediate thiolates, are seen to coexist on Au(1 1 1) in the 150-400 K temperature range, with one of them existing as low as 100 K. Atomic sulfur is present on the surface from 200 to 950 K.

  13. Requirements for Xenon International

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  14. Requirements for Xenon International

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Harper, Warren W.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Humble, Paul H.; Madison, Jill C.; Morris, Scott J.; Panisko, Mark E.; Ripplinger, Mike D.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2015-12-30

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  15. Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide on pyrite as a pathway for abiogenic formation of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, M G; Ryzhkov, Y F; Alekseev, V A; Bogdanovskaya, V A; Otroshchenko, V A; Kritsky, M S

    2004-08-01

    A wide spectrum of electrode potentials of minerals that compose sulfide ores enables the latter, when in contact with hydrothermal solutions, to form galvanic pairs with cathode potentials sufficient for electrochemical reduction of CO2. The experiments performed demonstrated the increase of cathode current on the rotating pyrite disc electrode in a range of potentials more negative than -800 mV in presence of CO2. In high-pressure experiments performed in a specially designed electrochemical cell equipped with a pyrite cathode and placed into autoclave, accumulation of formate was demonstrated after 24 hr passing of CO2 (50 atm, room temperature) through electrolyte solution. The formation of this product started on increasing the cathode potential to -800 mV (with respect to saturated silver chloride electrode). The yield grew exponentially upon cathode potential increase up to -1200 mV. The maximum current efficiency (0.12%) was registered at cathode potentials of about -1000 mV. No formate production was registered under normal atmospheric pressure and in the absence of imposed cathode potential. Neither in experiments, nor in control was formaldehyde found. It is proposed that the electrochemical reduction of CO2 takes part in the formation of organic molecules in hydrothermal solutions accompanying sulfide ore deposits and in 'black smokers' on the ocean floor. PMID:15279170

  16. Molecular interaction between DNA molecules and nanoscale modifications of titanium dioxide with the structures of anatase and η-TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsev, M. G.; Kuz'micheva, G. M.; Obolenskaya, L. N.; Savinkina, E. V.

    2012-11-01

    The interaction of linear DNA molecules (hydrolysis products of Lambda phage DNA) with nanoscale modifications of titanium dioxide with anatase and η-TiO2 structures is studied. The photosensitization of adsorption and degradation processes of DNA under the effects of visible light is revealed. It is established that the anatase exhibits increased activity towards DNA in a low salt buffer, while η-TiO2 has a higher adsorption capacity in a buffer with high ionic strength. Recommendations on the practical application of nanoscale modifications of titanium dioxide with the structures of anatase and η-TiO2 are given.

  17. Solid Xenon Project

    SciTech Connect

    Balakishiyeva, Durdana N.; Saab, Tarek; Mahapatra, Rupak; Yoo, Jonghee

    2010-08-30

    Crystals like Germanium and Silicon need to be grown in specialized facilities which is time and money costly. It takes many runs to test the detector once it's manufactured and mishaps are very probable. It is of a great challenge to grow big germanium crystals and that's why stacking them up in a tower is the only way at the moment to increase testing mass. Liquid Noble gas experiments experiencing contamination problems, their predicted energy resolution at 10 keV and lower energy range is not as good as predicted. Every experiment is targeting one specific purpose, looking for one thing. Why not to design an experiment that is diverse and build a detector that can search for Dark Matter, Solar Axions, Neutrinoless Double Beta decay, etc. Solid Xenon detector is such detector. We designed a simple Xenon crystal growing chamber that was put together at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The first phase of this experiment was to demonstrate that a good, crack free Xenon crystal can be grown (regardless of many failed attempts by various groups) and our first goal, 1 kg crystal, was successful.

  18. Solid Xenon Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakishiyeva, Durdana N.; Mahapatra, Rupak; Saab, Tarek; Yoo, Jonghee

    2010-08-01

    Crystals like Germanium and Silicon need to be grown in specialized facilities which is time and money costly. It takes many runs to test the detector once it's manufactured and mishaps are very probable. It is of a great challenge to grow big germanium crystals and that's why stacking them up in a tower is the only way at the moment to increase testing mass. Liquid Noble gas experiments experiencing contamination problems, their predicted energy resolution at 10 keV and lower energy range is not as good as predicted. Every experiment is targeting one specific purpose, looking for one thing. Why not to design an experiment that is diverse and build a detector that can search for Dark Matter, Solar Axions, Neutrinoless Double Beta decay, etc. Solid Xenon detector is such detector. We designed a simple Xenon crystal growing chamber that was put together at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The first phase of this experiment was to demonstrate that a good, crack free Xenon crystal can be grown (regardless of many failed attempts by various groups) and our first goal, 1 kg crystal, was successful.

  19. Nuclear excited xenon flashlamp

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The optical emissions of nuclear excited Xenon plasmas were investigated to determine basic parameters important to photolytic pumping of lasers. Gas mixtures of Helium-3 and Xenon were irradiated in the steady state mode in the University of Florida Training Reactor at neutron flux levels of about 10/sup 12//cm/sup 2/.s, generating a power density in the gas of approximately 3 milliwatts/cm/sup 3/. Optical emissions from the gas were primarily due to Xe/sub 2/* band emission at 172 nm with a few Xell lines in the visible and ir. Energy transfer from the /sup 3/He(n,p)T reaction to the Xe/sub 2/* 172 nm band was 67.0% +- 10%. High pressure gas mixtures (4 atm.) of Helium-3 and Xenon were irradiated in the pulse mode (250 ..mu..s FWHM) at the fast burst reactor at the Aberdeen Pulsed Radiation Facility at thermal neutron flux levels of about 10/sup 17//cm/sup 2/.s, generating a power density in the gas of about 1 kilowatt/cm/sup 3/. Optical emissions from the gas extended from the vacuum ultraviolet through the visible to the infrared, resembling a discharge excited lamp with a current density of about 1500 amp./cm/sup 2/. Such a lamp could pump a Neodymium YAG or liquid laser.

  20. Photoinduced conversion of carbon dioxide and water molecules to methanol on the surface of molybdenum oxide MoO x ( x < 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silaev, I. V.; Khubezhov, S. A.; Ramonova, A. G.; Grigorkina, G. S.; Kaloeva, A. G.; Demeev, Z. S.; Bliev, A. P.; Sekiba, D.; Ogura, S.; Fukutani, K.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray and UV photoelectron spectroscopic data are used to demonstrate that, when pulsed laser light with a photon energy of 6.4 eV acts on the surface of nonstoichiometric molybdenum oxide MoO x ( x < 2), methanol is effectively formed from adsorbed molecules of carbon dioxide and water. The processes in which CO2 and H2O molecules are adsorbed on substrate surface defects and their bonds are activated, enhanced under the effect of photons, should be regarded as the key factors.

  1. The XENON dark matter search experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naganoma, Junji

    2016-02-01

    The XENON experiment searches for xenon nuclear recoils resulting from the scattering of weakly interacting massive particles, using liquid/gas dual-phase xenon time projection chambers. The XENON100 experiment ended its science runs for the direct WIMP search. A ton-scale next phase detector, XENON1T, is currently at the commissioning phase. These proceedings focus on the technical challenges and status of the XENON1T experiment.

  2. Shear Thinning in Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergm Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids such as molten plastics or ketchup, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of dimensionless shear rate: the product of the shear rate and the relaxation time of critical fluctuations was greater than 0.001 and was less than 700. As predicted by theory, shear thinning occurred when this product was greater than 1. The measurements were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia to avoid the density stratification caused by Earth's gravity.

  3. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  4. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  5. Status of the XENON Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbini, Marco; XENON Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Astronomical and cosmological observations indicate that a large amount of the energy content of the Universe is made of dark matter. The most promising dark matter candidates are the so-called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles. The search for these particles is performed with various experimental approaches. The XENON Project, at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, is devoted to the direct search of dark matter particles. It consists in operating a double-phase time projection chamber using ultra-pure liquid Xenon as both target and detection medium for dark matter particle interactions. The WIMPs can be indeed detected via their elastic scattering off Xenon nuclei. The XENON100 detector with 160 kg of liquid Xenon has reached in 2012 the sensitivity of 2×10-45 cm2 at 55 GeV/c 2 and 90% confidence level on spin-independent elastic WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section. The next generation XENON1T detector, that will host 3.3 tonnes of ultra-pure liquid Xenon, is in its final stage of construction and will likely start taking data by the end of 2015. The detector is designed to increase the sensitivity by two orders of magnitude.

  6. Venus, Earth, Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Xenon has been regarded as an important goal of many proposed missions to Venus. This talk is intended to explain why. Despite its being the heaviest gas found in natural planetary atmospheres, there is more evidence that Xe escaped from Earth than for any element apart from helium: (i) Atmospheric Xe is very strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) from any known solar system source. This suggests fractionating escape that preferentially left the heavy Xe isotopes behind. (ii) Xe is underabundant compared to Kr, a lighter noble gas that is not strongly mass fractionated in air. (iii) Radiogenic Xe is strongly depleted by factors of several to ~100 compared to the quantities expected from radioactive decay of primordial solar system materials. In these respects Xe on Mars is similar to Xe on Earth, but with one key difference: Xe on Mars is readily explained by a simple process like hydrodynamic escape that acts on an initially solar or meteoritic Xe. This is not so for Earth. Earth's Xe cannot be derived by an uncontrived mass fractionating process acting on any known type of Solar System Xe. Earth is a stranger, made from different stuff than any known meteorite or Mars or even the Sun. Who else is in Earth's family? Comets? We know nothing. Father Zeus? Data from Jupiter are good enough to show that jovian Xe is not strongly mass-fractionated but not good enough to determine whether Jupiter resembles the Earth or the Sun. Sister Venus? Noble gas data from Venus are incomplete, with Kr uncertain and Xe unmeasured. Krypton was measured by several instruments on several spacecraft. The reported Kr abundances are discrepant and were once highly controversial. These discrepancies appear to have been not so much resolved as forgotten. Xenon was not detected on Venus. Upper limits were reported for the two most abundant xenon isotopes 129Xe and 132Xe. From the limited data it is not possible to tell whether Venus's affinities lie with the solar wind, or with

  7. Critical Viscosity of Xenon investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Dr. Robert F. Berg (right), principal investigator and Dr. Micheal R. Moldover (left), co-investigator, for the Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX/CVX-2) experiment. They are with the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of chemicals.

  8. [Concept of mechanisms of anesthetic and therapeutic properties of xenon].

    PubMed

    Burov, N E

    2011-01-01

    The molecular theory of L. Poling is a genius example of scientific prediction, made in the middle of 20th century, when the studies about clathrates and methods of roentgen structured analysis were doing their first steps. The views expressed in this message are some additions on the structure of xenon clathrates, function-free xenon water associates and the use of cameras in the liberated associates of the water molecules, for the process of supramolecular detoxification and attempts to develop this theory more widely, to better understand the mechanisms of xenon anesthesia and treatment for further justification of its therapeutic features as well as for the use of other inert gases (Ar, Kr) in modern medicine. PMID:21692221

  9. Liquid xenon purification, de-radonation (and de-kryptonation)

    SciTech Connect

    Pocar, Andrea

    2015-08-17

    Liquid xenon detectors are at the forefront of rare event physics, including searches for neutrino-less double beta decay and WIMP dark matter. The xenon for these experiments needs to be purified from chemical impurities such as electronegative atoms and molecules, which absorb ionization electrons, and VUV (178 nm) scintillation light-absorbing chemical species. In addition, superb purification from radioactive impurities is required. Particularly challenging are radioactive noble isotopes ({sup 85}Kr,{sup 39,42}Ar,{sup 220,222}Rn). Radon is a particularly universal problem, due to the extended decay sequence of its daughters and its ubiquitous presence in detector materials. Purification and de-radonation of liquid xenon are addressed with particular focus on the experience gained with the EXO-200 neutrino-less double beta decay detector.

  10. A Decade of Xenon Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Presents reactions for the formation of xenon compounds and compounds of the other inert gases. Provides bonding and structure theories for noble gas compounds and speculates on possible applications. (GS)

  11. Solubilized xenon 133 lung scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-11-01

    Lung scanning using solubilized xenon 133 can provide important information concerning both pulmonary perfusion and ventilation. This technique proved valuable in establishing the diagnosis of congenital lobar emphysema in a 7-month-old baby.

  12. The XENON1T Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnik, Ran; Aprile, Elena; Choi, Bin; Contreras, Hugo; Goetzke, Luke; Lim, Kyungeun; Lang, Rafael; Melgarejo, Antonio; Persiani, Rino; Plante, Guillaume; Rizzo, Alfio; Shagin, Peter

    2012-03-01

    We present the results from a facility called the XENON1T Demonstrator at Columbia University, that has been designed and built as a prototype for the XENON1T cryogenic system and TPC. Its primary goal is to demonstrate that the high LXe purity (<1 part per billion O2 equivalent) required for electrons to drift freely over a distance of 1 meter, as in the XENON1T TPC, can be achieved and on a time scale of weeks. The approach adopted in all XENON detectors thus far is that of gas purification with continuous circulation with a diaphragm pump through a heated getter. We show results for high speed recirculation, above 100 slpm, the development of a high voltage feedthrough which is radio pure and the design and application of a prototype TPC to test the purity.

  13. Direct WIMP searches with XENON100 and XENON1T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfredo Davide, Ferella

    2015-05-01

    The XENON100 experiment is the second phase of the XENON direct Dark Matter search program. It consists of an ultra-low background double phase (liquid-gas) xenon filled time projection chamber with a total mass of 161 kg (62 in the target region and 99 in the active shield), installed at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS). Here the results from the 224.6 live days of data taken between March 2011 and April 2012 are reported. The experiment set one of the most stringent limits on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section to date (2 × 10-45 cm2 for a 55 Gev/c2 WIMP mass at 90 % confidence level) and the most stringent on the spin-dependent WIMP-neutron interaction (3.5 × 10-40 for a 45 GeV/c2 WIMP mass). With the same dataset, XENON100 excludes also solar axion coupling to electrons at gAe > 7.7 × 10-12 for a mass of mAxion <1 keV/c2 and galactic axion couplings by gAe > 1 × 10-12 at a mass range of mAxion = 5-10 keV/c2 (both 90 % C.L.). Moreover an absolute spectral comparison between simulated and measured nuclear recoil distributions of light and charge signals from a 241AmBe source demonstrates a high level of detector and systematics understanding. Finally, the third generation of the XENON experiments, XENON1T, is the first tonne scale direct WIMP search experiment currently under construction. The commissioning phase of XENON1T is expected to start in early 2015 followed, a few months after, by the first science run. The experiment will reach sensitivities on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section down to 2 ×10-47 cm2 after two years of data taking.

  14. A technique for administering xenon gas anesthesia during surgical procedures in mice.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Arne Mathias; Schmidt, Michaela; Ludiro, Alessia; Riva, Marco A; Gass, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Carrying out invasive procedures in animals requires the administration of anesthesia. Xenon gas offers advantages as an anesthetic agent compared with other agents, such as its protection of the brain and heart from hypoxia-induced damage. The high cost of xenon gas has limited its use as an anesthetic in animal experiments, however. The authors designed and constructed simple boxes for the induction and maintenance of xenon gas and isoflurane anesthesia in small rodents in order to minimize the amount of xenon gas that is wasted. While using their anesthesia delivery system to anesthetize pregnant mice undergoing caesarean sections, they measured the respiratory rates of the anesthetized mice, the survival of the pups and the percentages of oxygen and carbon dioxide within the system to confirm the system's safety. PMID:25333593

  15. Design and comparison of exchange spectroscopy approaches to cryptophane-xenon host-guest kinetics.

    PubMed

    Korchak, Sergey; Kilian, Wolfgang; Schröder, Leif; Mitschang, Lorenz

    2016-04-01

    Exchange spectroscopy is used in combination with a variation of xenon concentration to disentangle the kinetics of the reversible binding of xenon to cryptophane-A. The signal intensity of either free or crytophane-bound xenon decays in a manner characteristic of the underlying exchange reactions when the spins in the other pool are perturbed. Three experimental approaches, including the well-known Hyper-CEST method, are shown to effectively entail a simple linear dependence of the signal depletion rate, or of a related quantity, on free xenon concentration. This occurs when using spin pool saturation or inversion followed by free exchange. The identification and quantification of contributions to the binding kinetics is then straightforward: in the depletion rate plot, the intercept at the vanishing free xenon concentration represents the kinetic rate coefficient for xenon detachment from the host by dissociative processes while the slope is indicative of the kinetic rate coefficient for degenerate exchange reactions. Comparing quantified kinetic rates for hyperpolarized xenon in aqueous solution reveals the high accuracy of each approach but also shows differences in the precision of the numerical results and in the requirements for prior knowledge. Because of their broad range of applicability the proposed exchange spectroscopy experiments can be readily used to unravel the kinetics of complex formation of xenon with host molecules in the various situations appearing in practice. PMID:26896869

  16. Design and comparison of exchange spectroscopy approaches to cryptophane-xenon host-guest kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchak, Sergey; Kilian, Wolfgang; Schröder, Leif; Mitschang, Lorenz

    2016-04-01

    Exchange spectroscopy is used in combination with a variation of xenon concentration to disentangle the kinetics of the reversible binding of xenon to cryptophane-A. The signal intensity of either free or crytophane-bound xenon decays in a manner characteristic of the underlying exchange reactions when the spins in the other pool are perturbed. Three experimental approaches, including the well-known Hyper-CEST method, are shown to effectively entail a simple linear dependence of the signal depletion rate, or of a related quantity, on free xenon concentration. This occurs when using spin pool saturation or inversion followed by free exchange. The identification and quantification of contributions to the binding kinetics is then straightforward: in the depletion rate plot, the intercept at the vanishing free xenon concentration represents the kinetic rate coefficient for xenon detachment from the host by dissociative processes while the slope is indicative of the kinetic rate coefficient for degenerate exchange reactions. Comparing quantified kinetic rates for hyperpolarized xenon in aqueous solution reveals the high accuracy of each approach but also shows differences in the precision of the numerical results and in the requirements for prior knowledge. Because of their broad range of applicability the proposed exchange spectroscopy experiments can be readily used to unravel the kinetics of complex formation of xenon with host molecules in the various situations appearing in practice.

  17. Xenon porometry at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Lounila, Juhani; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2006-01-01

    Xenon porometry is a method in which porous material is immersed in a medium and the properties of the material are studied by means of Xe129 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of xenon gas dissolved in the medium. For instance, the chemical shift of a particular signal (referred to as signal D) arising from xenon inside small pockets formed in the pores during the freezing of the confined medium is highly sensitive to the pore size. In the present study, we show that when naphthalene is used as the medium the pore size distribution of the material can be determined by measuring a single one-dimensional spectrum near room temperature and converting the chemical shift scale of signal D to the pore radius scale by using an experimentally determined correlation. A model has been developed that explains the curious behavior of the chemical shift of signal D as a function of pore radius. The other signals of the spectra measured at different temperatures have also been identified, and the influence of xenon pressure on the spectra has been studied. For comparison, Xe129 NMR spectra of pure xenon gas adsorbed to porous materials have been measured and analyzed.

  18. Vibrationally state selected ion molecule experimental and computational studies of both reactant charge states of [nitrogen dioxide + ethyne]+ and HOD+ with nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Jason M.

    2011-12-01

    Ion molecule studies have not only determined reactivity of systems that would have otherwise been unavailable, but also provide a perspective that improves the understanding of the mechanisms that drive reaction. Presented here are studies of three ion molecule systems one of which is accompanied by an extensive set of direct dynamics trajectory calculations. In the first system presented, NO2+ in six different vibrational states was reacted with C2H2 over the center-of-mass energy range from 0.03 to 3.3 eV. The effects of the symmetric bend overtone (0200) excitation are particularly strong (factor of 4) while the delta overtone (0220) effects are much weaker. A large set of quasi-classical trajectories were calculated at the PBE1PBE/6-311G** level of theory, in an attempt to understand the mechanistic origins of this observation. The trajectories reproduce experiment where comparable. Analysis of these trajectories resolves the mechanistic origins of this vibrational effect. Similar experimental measurements were made for the first excited electronic state of this system where the charge is localized on the acetylene. The C 2H2+ reactant was prepared in four distinct modes. Because both reactants have one unpaired electron, collisions can occur with either singlet or triplet coupling of these unpaired electrons, and the contributions the three channels (charge, O-, and O transfer) are separated based on distinct recoil dynamics. The effects of C2H 2+ vibration are modest, but mode specific. Integral cross sections and product recoil velocity distributions were also measured for reaction of HOD+ with NO2, in which the HOD+ reactant was prepared in its ground state, and with mode-selective excitation in the 001 (OH stretch), 100 (OD stretch) and bend (010) modes. In addition, we measured the 300 K thermal kinetics in a selected ion flow tube reactor and report product branching ratios different from previous measurements. Reaction is found to occur on both the

  19. [Xenon: From rare gaz to doping product].

    PubMed

    Tassel, Camille; Le Daré, Brendan; Morel, Isabelle; Gicquel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Doping is defined as the use of processes or substances to artificially increase physical or mental performance. Xenon is a noble gas used as an anesthetic and recently as a doping agent. Xenon is neuroprotective as an antagonist of NMDA glutamate receptors. Xenon stimulates the synthesis of erythropoietin (EPO) by increase of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Xenon would be a new doping product, maintaining doping methods ahead of detection. PMID:26922993

  20. Xenon Filled Silicon Germanium Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewinter, F.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is presented that shows the desirability and feasibility of using a xenon fill in the initial stages of operation of a silicon-germanium radioisotope thermoelectric generator to be used in outer-planetary exploration. The xenon cover gas offers protection against oxidation and against material sublimation, and allows the generator to deliver required power throughout the prelaunch and launch phases. The protective mechanisms afforded by the xenon cover gas and the mechanization of a xenon supply system are also discussed.

  1. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (left) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  2. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  3. Inhalation anaesthesia: from diethyl ether to xenon.

    PubMed

    Bovill, J G

    2008-01-01

    Modern anaesthesia is said to have began with the successful demonstration of ether anaesthesia by William Morton in October 1846, even though anaesthesia with nitrous oxide had been used in dentistry 2 years before. Anaesthesia with ether, nitrous oxide and chloroform (introduced in 1847) rapidly became commonplace for surgery. Of these, only nitrous oxide remains in use today. All modern volatile anaesthetics, with the exception of halothane (a fluorinated alkane), are halogenated methyl ethyl ethers. Methyl ethyl ethers are more potent, stable and better anaesthetics than diethyl ethers. They all cause myocardial depression, most markedly halothane, while isoflurane and sevoflurane cause minimal cardiovascular depression. The halogenated ethers also depress the normal respiratory response to carbon dioxide and to hypoxia. Other adverse effects include hepatic and renal damage. Hepatitis occurs most frequently with halothane, although rare cases have been reported with the other agents. Liver damage is not caused by the anaesthetics themselves, but by reactive metabolites. Type I hepatitis occurs fairly commonly and takes the form of a minor disturbance of liver enzymes, which usually resolves without treatment. Type II, thought to be immune-mediated, is rare, unpredictable and results in a severe fulminant hepatitis with a high mortality. Renal damage is rare, and was most often associated with methoxyflurane because of excessive plasma fluoride concentrations resulting from its metabolism. Methoxyflurane was withdrawn from the market because of the high incidence of nephrotoxicity. Among the contemporary anaesthetics, the highest fluoride concentrations have been reported with sevoflurane, but there are no reports of renal dysfunction associated with its use. Recently there has been a renewed interest in xenon, one of the noble gases. Xenon has many of the properties of an ideal anaesthetic. The major factor limiting its more widespread is the high cost, about

  4. Viscosity of Xenon Examined in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Why does water flow faster than honey? The short answer, that honey has a greater viscosity, merely rephrases the question. The fundamental answer is that viscosity originates in the interactions between a fluid s molecules. These interactions are so complicated that, except for low-density gases, the viscosity of a fluid cannot be accurately predicted. Progress in understanding viscosity has been made by studying moderately dense gases and, more recently, fluids near the critical point. Modern theories predict a universal behavior for all pure fluids near the liquid-vapor critical point, and they relate the increase in viscosity to spontaneous fluctuations in density near this point. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX) experiment tested these theories with unprecedented precision when it flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85) in August 1997. Near the critical point, xenon is a billion times more compressible than water, yet it has about the same density. Because the fluid is so "soft," it collapses under its own weight when exposed to the force of Earth s gravity - much like a very soft spring. Because the CVX experiment is conducted in microgravity, it achieves a very uniform fluid density even very close to the critical point. At the heart of the CVX experiment is a novel viscometer built around a small nickel screen. An oscillating electric field forces the screen to oscillate between pairs of electrodes. Viscosity, which dampens the oscillations, can be calculated by measuring the screen motion and the force applied to the screen. So that the fluid s delicate state near the critical point will not be disrupted, the screen oscillations are set to be both slow and small.

  5. Conversion of Carbon Dioxide by Methane Reforming under Visible-Light Irradiation: Surface-Plasmon-Mediated Nonpolar Molecule Activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Meng, Xianguang; Dao, Thang Duy; Zhang, Huabin; Li, Peng; Chang, Kun; Wang, Tao; Li, Mu; Nagao, Tadaaki; Ye, Jinhua

    2015-09-21

    A novel CO2 photoreduction method, CO2 conversion through methane reforming into syngas (DRM) was adopted as an efficient approach to not only reduce the environmental concentration of the greenhouse gas CO2 but also realize the net energy storage from solar energy to chemical energy. For the first time it is reported that gold, which was generally regarded to be inactive in improving the performance of a catalyst in DRM under thermal conditions, enhanced the catalytic performance of Rh/SBA-15 in DRM under visible-light irradiation (1.7 times, CO2 conversion increased from 2100 to 3600 μmol g(-1) s(-1)). UV/Vis spectra and electromagnetic field simulation results revealed that the highly energetic electrons excited by local surface plasmon resonances of Au facilitated the polarization and activation of CO2 and CH4 with thermal assistance. This work provides a new route for CO2 photoreduction and offers a distinctive method to photocatalytically activate nonpolar molecules. PMID:26271348

  6. Light emission spectra of molecules in negative and positive back discharges in nitrogen with carbon dioxide mixture at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Tadeusz; Sobczyk, Arkadiusz Tomasz; Jaworek, Anatol

    2015-10-01

    Results of spectroscopic investigations and current-voltage characteristics of back discharge generated in point-plane electrode geometry with plate covered fly ash layer in a mixture of N2 + CO2 at atmospheric pressure, for positive and negative polarity of the discharge electrode are presented in this paper. Point-plane electrode configuration was chosen in these studies in order to simulate the physical processes occurring in electrostatic precipitator. Three forms of back discharge for both polarities were investigated: glow, streamers and low-current back-arc. Diatomic reactions and dissociation products of N2 and CO2 (OH, NO, CN), atoms from fly ash layer (N, Ti, Na), free radicals, molecules or ions, which have unpaired valence electrons, and other active species, e.g., N2 (in C,B,A-state), N 2 + (B) were identified in the discharges by the method of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The measurements shown that atomic and molecular optical emission spectral lines from back discharge depend on the forms of discharge and the discharge current. In normal electrical discharges, the emission spectra are dominated by gaseous components, but in the case of back discharge, atomic lines belonging to chemical compounds of fly ash were also recorded and identified.

  7. Investigation of xenon metastable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Tian; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2007-06-01

    The electron configuration of a xenon atom in its metastable state consists of tightly bound core electrons with a single missing electron in the 5P shell, and a loosely bound ``valence electron'' in the 6S shell. For our current work, we have been using pyrex cells with internal tungsten electrodes, filled with isotopically enriched Xe129 gas. Ti-sapphire laser is used to pump the metastable atom from 6S2 to 6P2 and 6P3 at 823nm and 882nm respectively. The absorption spectrum is able to resolve the hyperfine structure of Xe129 in 6S2, 6P2 and 6P3 state. The hyperfine coefficients for 6S2, 6P2 agree with previously reported measurements. And the hyperfine coefficient for 6P3 state has not been reported before. If the pumping wavelength is locked at any one of the hyperfine transitions of Xenon129 atom, zero-field magnetic resonances of metastable Xenon atoms could be observed by pumping with circularly polarized laser beam. Since relaxation between magnetic sublevels is very fast due to the big depolarization collisional cross section, the linewidth of the magnetic resonant signal is broad.

  8. Xenon Fractionation and Archean Hydrogen Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Xenon is the heaviest gas found in significant quantities in natural planetary atmospheres. It would seem the least likely to escape. Yet there is more evidence for xenon escape from Earth than for any element other than helium and perhaps neon. The most straightforward evidence is that most of the radiogenic Xe from the decay of (129)I (half-life 15.7 Myr) and (244)Pu (half-life 81 Myr) that is Earth's birthright is missing. The missing xenon is often attributed to the impact erosion of early atmospheres of Earth and its ancestors. It is obvious that if most of the radiogenic xenon were driven off by impacts, most of the rest of the atmophiles fared the same fate. The other line of evidence is in the nonradiogenic isotopes of xenon and its silent partner, krypton. Atmospheric xenon is strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) compared to any known solar system source (Figure 1). This is in stark contrast to krypton, which may not be fractionated at all: atmospheric Kr is slightly heavier than solar Kr (at about 0.5% per amu), but it is the same as in carbonaceous chondrites. Nonradiogenic xenon is also under abundant relative to krypton (the so-called "missing xenon" problem). Together these observations imply that xenon has been subject to fractionating escape and krypton not.

  9. Xenon fluoride solutions effective as fluorinating agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, H. H.; Quarterman, L. A.; Sheft, I.

    1967-01-01

    Solutions of xenon fluorides in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride have few disruptive effects and leave a residue consisting of gaseous xenon, which can be recovered and refluorinated. This mild agent can be used with materials which normally must be fluorinated with fluorine alone at high temperatures.

  10. Spectrum of carbonaceous-chondrite fission xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1976-01-01

    Estimations of the fission spectrum in xenon isotopes from the progenitor of the strange carbonaceous-chondrite xenon must take account of p-process nucleosynthesis if the latter is the source of anomalous Xe-124, 126. Sample calculations of the p-process yields illustrate the magnitude of the effect, which can greatly increase the estimated Xe-132 fission yield.

  11. A liquid xenon radioisotope camera.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaklad, H.; Derenzo, S. E.; Muller, R. A.; Smadja, G.; Smits, R. G.; Alvarez, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A new type of gamma-ray camera is discussed that makes use of electron avalanches in liquid xenon and is currently under development. It is shown that such a radioisotope camera promises many advantages over any other existing gamma-ray cameras. Spatial resolution better than 1 mm and counting rates higher than one million C/sec are possible. An energy resolution of 11% FWHM has recently been achieved with a collimated Hg-203 source using a parallel-plate ionization chamber containing a Frisch grid.

  12. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  13. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  14. Xenon Gamma Detector Project Support

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier,P.E.; Forman, L.

    2008-04-01

    This project provided funding of $48,500 for part of one year to support the development of compressed xenon spectrometers at BNL. This report describes upgrades that were made to the existing detector system electronics during that period, as well as subsequent testing with check sources and Special Nuclear Materials. Previous testing of the equipment extended only up to the energy of 1.3 MeV, and did not include a spectrum of Pu-239. The new electronics allowed one-button activation of the high voltage ramp that was previously controlled by manual adjustments. Mechanical relays of the charging circuit were replaced by a tera-ohm resistor chain and an optical switch. The preamplifier and shaping amplifier were replaced by more modern custom designs. We found that the xenon purity had not been degraded since the chamber was filled 10 years earlier. The resulting spectra showed significantly better resolution than sodium iodide spectra, and could be analyzed quite effectively by methods using peak area templates.

  15. The atmosphere of Mars - Detection of krypton and xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.; Biemann, K.; Biller, J. E.; Lafleur, A. L.; Rushneck, D. R.; Howarth, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Krypton and xenon have been discovered in the Martian atmosphere with the mass spectrometer on the second Viking lander. Krypton is more abundant than xenon. The relative abundances of the krypton isotopes appear normal, but the ratio of xenon-129 to xenon-132 is enhanced on Mars relative to the terrestrial value for this ratio. Some possible implications of these findings are discussed.

  16. Xenon spill distribution and room clearance.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, C A; Telepak, R J

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of these studies was to investigate actual xenon gas clearance times under different exhaust conditions, to compare them with the calculated clearance times, to observe the distribution of the xenon gas while it was being exhausted from the room, and to determine the cause of a stationary xenon cloud that appeared on some clinical images. Clearance times with and without a flexible exhaust hose placed next to a simulated 133Xe gas spill were compared with clearance times measured in a room with all exhaust closed off. Two gamma cameras were used to observe the transport and exhaust of xenon following a simulated spill. Clearance times with the flexible exhaust hose were less than one minute because the xenon gas was removed before it had a chance to disperse into the room. Conventional room clearance calculations based on uniform mixing and measured exhaust rates yielded a clearance time of 22 min. The source of an artifactual stationary cloud image was discovered to be a small amount of xenon trapped between the collimator and camera face. A negative pressure and dedicated exhaust can be even more effective in exhausting spilled xenon from a room than air transfer calculations predict. The authors believe the flexible hose should always be used. PMID:10524516

  17. Structures of xenon oxides at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, Nicholas; Pickard, Chris; Needs, Richard; Dewaele, Agnes; Loubeyre, Paul; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-03-01

    For many years, it was believed that noble gases such as xenon were entirely inert. It was only in 1962 that Bartlett first synthesized a compound of xenon. Since then, a number of other xenon compounds, including oxides, have been synthesized. Xenon oxides are unstable under ambient conditions but have been predicted to stabilize under high pressure. Here we present the results of a combined theoretical and experimental study of xenon oxides at pressures of 80-100 GPa. We have synthesized new xenon oxides at these pressures and they have been characterized with X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Calculations were performed with a density-functional theory framework. We have used the ab-initio random structure searching (AIRSS) method together with a data-mining technique to determine the stable compounds in the xenon-oxygen system in this pressure range. We have calculated structural and optical properties of these phases, and a good match between theoretical and experimental results has been obtained. Funding for computational research provided by the engineering and physical sciences research council (EPSRC; UK). Computing resources provided by Cambridge HPC and HECToR. X-ray diffraction experiments performed at ESRF.

  18. Hyperpolarized Xenon for NMR and MRI Applications

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Christopher; Kunth, Martin; Döpfert, Jörg; Rossella, Federica; Schröder, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) suffer from intrinsic low sensitivity because even strong external magnetic fields of ~10 T generate only a small detectable net-magnetization of the sample at room temperature 1. Hence, most NMR and MRI applications rely on the detection of molecules at relative high concentration (e.g., water for imaging of biological tissue) or require excessive acquisition times. This limits our ability to exploit the very useful molecular specificity of NMR signals for many biochemical and medical applications. However, novel approaches have emerged in the past few years: Manipulation of the detected spin species prior to detection inside the NMR/MRI magnet can dramatically increase the magnetization and therefore allows detection of molecules at much lower concentration 2. Here, we present a method for polarization of a xenon gas mixture (2-5% Xe, 10% N2, He balance) in a compact setup with a ca. 16000-fold signal enhancement. Modern line-narrowed diode lasers allow efficient polarization 7 and immediate use of gas mixture even if the noble gas is not separated from the other components. The SEOP apparatus is explained and determination of the achieved spin polarization is demonstrated for performance control of the method. The hyperpolarized gas can be used for void space imaging, including gas flow imaging or diffusion studies at the interfaces with other materials 8,9. Moreover, the Xe NMR signal is extremely sensitive to its molecular environment 6. This enables the option to use it as an NMR/MRI contrast agent when dissolved in aqueous solution with functionalized molecular hosts that temporarily trap the gas 10,11. Direct detection and high-sensitivity indirect detection of such constructs is demonstrated in both spectroscopic and imaging mode. PMID:22986346

  19. Multiple ionization of xenon by proton impact

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, S.T.; DuBois, R.D.

    1987-12-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of multiple ionization of xenon for 0.2- to 2.0-MeV proton impact was made. Absolute cross sections for producing xenon ions with charges from +1 to +3 were measured, and calculations of subshell cross sections were performed. Experiment and theory are consistent and indicate that multiple ionization of xenon by fast protons occurs via inner-shell ionization. This is in contrast to the lighter noble gases where direct multiple outer shell ionization can be predominant.

  20. Alternative hypothesis for the origin of CCF xenon. [Carbonaceous-Chondrite-Fission xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    The relative abundances and origins of the xenon isotopes found in carbonaceous meteorites are discussed. It is proposed that carbonaceous-chondrite-fission (CCF) xenon is not caused by fission, but is the direct result of a modified r-process nucleosynthesis which produces a peak at Z = 54 and N = 82. The xenon produced in this way would have been trapped in dust grains which were subsequently incorporated in the solar system with minimal degassing.

  1. Extreme confinement of xenon by cryptophane-111 in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Akil I; Lapidus, Saul H; Kane, Christopher M; Holman, K Travis

    2015-01-26

    Solids that sorb, capture and/or store the heavier noble gases are of interest because of their potential for transformative rare gas separation/production, storage, or recovery technologies. Herein, we report the isolation, crystal structures, and thermal stabilities of a series of xenon and krypton clathrates of (±)-cryptophane-111 (111). One trigonal crystal form, Xe@111⋅y(solvent), is exceptionally stable, retaining xenon at temperatures of up to about 300 °C. The high kinetic stability is attributable not only to the high xenon affinity and cage-like nature of the host, but also to the crystal packing of the clathrate, wherein each window of the molecular container is blocked by the bridges of adjacent containers, effectively imprisoning the noble gas in the solid state. The results highlight the potential of discrete molecule materials exhibiting intrinsic microcavities or zero-dimensional pores. PMID:25504739

  2. Xenon Blocks Neuronal Injury Associated with Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; David, Hélène N.; Vallée, Nicolas; Meckler, Cedric; Demaistre, Sebastien; Lambrechts, Kate; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Abraini, Jacques H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment, about 30% of patients suffering neurologic decompression sickness (DCS) exhibit incomplete recovery. Since the mechanisms of neurologic DCS involve ischemic processes which result in excitotoxicity, it is likely that HBO in combination with an anti-excitotoxic treatment would improve the outcome in patients being treated for DCS. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of the noble gas xenon in an ex vivo model of neurologic DCS. Xenon has been shown to provide neuroprotection in multiple models of acute ischemic insults. Fast decompression compared to slow decompression induced an increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a well-known marker of sub-lethal cell injury. Post-decompression administration of xenon blocked the increase in LDH release induced by fast decompression. These data suggest that xenon could be an efficient additional treatment to HBO for the treatment of neurologic DCS. PMID:26469983

  3. Xenon Blocks Neuronal Injury Associated with Decompression.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; David, Hélène N; Vallée, Nicolas; Meckler, Cedric; Demaistre, Sebastien; Lambrechts, Kate; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Abraini, Jacques H

    2015-01-01

    Despite state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment, about 30% of patients suffering neurologic decompression sickness (DCS) exhibit incomplete recovery. Since the mechanisms of neurologic DCS involve ischemic processes which result in excitotoxicity, it is likely that HBO in combination with an anti-excitotoxic treatment would improve the outcome in patients being treated for DCS. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of the noble gas xenon in an ex vivo model of neurologic DCS. Xenon has been shown to provide neuroprotection in multiple models of acute ischemic insults. Fast decompression compared to slow decompression induced an increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a well-known marker of sub-lethal cell injury. Post-decompression administration of xenon blocked the increase in LDH release induced by fast decompression. These data suggest that xenon could be an efficient additional treatment to HBO for the treatment of neurologic DCS. PMID:26469983

  4. Surface diffusion of xenon on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, D. Laurence; George, Steven M.

    1993-06-01

    The surface diffusion of xenon on the Pt(111) surface was investigated using laser induced thermal desorption (LITD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) techniques. The surface diffusion coefficient at 80 K decreased dramatically from D=8×10-7 cm2/s at θ=0.05θs to approximately D=2×10-8 cm2/s at θ=θs, where θs denotes the saturation coverage at 85 K, corresponding to a commensurate monolayer coverage of 5.0×1014 xenon atoms/cm2. This coverage dependence was consistent with attractive interactions between the adsorbed xenon atoms and the existence of two-dimensional condensed phases of xenon on Pt(111). The kinetic parameters for surface diffusion at θ=θs were Edif=1.3±0.1 kcal/mol and D0=1.1×10-4±0.2 cm2/s. The magnitude of Edif at θ=θs represented the combined effect of the intrinsic corrugation of the adsorbate-surface potential and attractive interactions between the adsorbed xenon atoms. LITD experiments at θ=0.25 θs revealed diffusion kinetic parameters of Edif=1.2±0.2 kcal/mol and D0=3.4×10-4±0.5 cm2/s. The constant Edif at low and high coverage was attributed to the ``breakaway'' of xenon atoms from the edges of condensed phase xenon islands. The coverage dependence of the surface diffusion coefficient for Xe/Pt(111) was explained by a multiple site diffusion mechanism, where collisions with xenon islands limit diffusional motion. Thermal desorption kinetics for xenon on Pt(111) were determined using TPD experiments. Using the variation of heating rates method, the desorption parameters were Edes=6.6±0.2 kcal/mol and νdes=1.3×1013±0.4 s-1, in good agreement with previous studies. The xenon TPD peak shifted to higher temperature versus initial coverage at a fixed heating rate, providing further evidence for attractive interactions between the adsorbed xenon atoms.

  5. Transportable Xenon Laboratory (TXL-1) Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Robert C.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Willett, Jesse A.; Woods, Vincent T.

    2011-03-07

    The Transportable Xenon Laboratory Operations Manual is a guide to set up and shut down TXL, a fully contained laboratory made up of instruments to identify and measure concentrations of the radioactive isotopes of xenon by taking air samples and analyzing them. The TXL is housed in a standard-sized shipping container. TXL can be shipped to and function in any country in the world.

  6. Ventilator-driven xenon ventilation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, R.T.; Thomas, F.D.; Gerson, J.I.

    1984-07-01

    A modification of a common commercial Xe-133 ventilation device is described for mechanically assisted ventilation imaging. The patient's standard ventilator serves as the power source controlling the ventilatory rate and volume during the xenon study, but the gases in the two systems are not intermixed. This avoids contamination of the ventilator with radioactive xenon. Supplemental oxygen and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) are provided if needed. The system can be converted quickly for conventional studies with spontaneous respiration.

  7. Ventilator-driven xenon ventilation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, R.T.; Thomas, F.D.; Gerson, J.I.

    1984-07-01

    A modification of a common commerical Xe-133 ventilation device is described for mechanically assisted ventilation imaging. The patient's standard ventilator serves as the power source controlling the ventilator rate and volume during the xenon study, but the gases in the two systems are not intermixed. This avoids contamination of the ventilator with radioactive xenon. Supplemental oxygen and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) are provided if needed. The system can be converted quickly for conventional studies with spontaneous respiration.

  8. Reactions of vanadium dioxide molecules with acetylene: infrared spectra of VO2(η(2)-C2H2)(x) (x = 1, 2) and OV(OH)CCH in solid neon.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaojie; Chen, Mohua; Zhou, Mingfei

    2013-07-01

    Reactions of vanadium dioxide molecules with acetylene have been studied by matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Reaction intermediates and products are identified on the basis of isotopic substitutions as well as density functional frequency calculations. Ground state vanadium dioxide molecule reacts with acetylene in forming the side-on-bonded VO2(η(2)-C2H2) and VO2(η(2)-C2H2)2 complexes spontaneously on annealing in solid neon. The VO2(η(2)-C2H2) complex is characterized to have a (2)B2 ground state with C2v symmetry, whereas the VO2(η(2)-C2H2)2 complex has a (2)A ground state with C2 symmetry. The VO2(η(2)-C2H2) and VO2(η(2)-C2H2)2 complexes are photosensitive. The VO2(η(2)-C2H2) complex rearranges to the OV(OH)CCH molecule upon UV-vis light excitation. PMID:23718542

  9. XENON dark matter searches: Results and the future

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Andrew; Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    XENON100 is a dark matter search experiment looking for elastic WIMP scattering using a 62 kg liquid target. WIMP search data from XENON100 published in 2012 has set the world's strongest limits on WIMP-nucleus spinindependent, elastic scattering. It has also set the strongest limits on WIMP-nucleus spin-dependent scattering considering neutron scattering only, and competitive limits considering proton scattering only. The successor experiment to XENON100, XENON1T, is currently under construction, with commissioning scheduled to begin in 2014. XENON1T's design goal is a 100 fold increase in sensitivity for elastic WIMP searches over XENON100.

  10. The Search for Dark Matter with the XENON100 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aprile, Elena

    2008-11-23

    The XENON Dark Matter Experiment aims at the direct detection of dark matter Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with dual phase (liquid/gas) xenon time projection chambers (XeTPCs). Following the successful performance of the XENON10 detector, which has shown in 2007 the best sensitivity to spin-independent coupling of WIMPs to matter, we have designed and completed the construction of a new TPC with an active LXe shield, containing a total of 170 kg of xenon. The detector is currently undergoing final commissioning at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory. I will review the XENON10 results and present the status of the XENON100 experiment.

  11. Molecular oxygen migration through the xenon docking sites of human hemoglobin in the R-state.

    PubMed

    Lepeshkevich, Sergei V; Gilevich, Syargey N; Parkhats, Marina V; Dzhagarov, Boris M

    2016-09-01

    A nanosecond laser flash-photolysis technique was used to study bimolecular and geminate molecular oxygen (O2) rebinding to tetrameric human hemoglobin and its isolated α and β chains in buffer solutions equilibrated with 1atm of air and up to 25atm of xenon. Xenon binding to the isolated α chains and to the α subunits within tetrameric hemoglobin was found to cause a decrease in the efficiency of O2 escape by a factor of ~1.30 and 3.3, respectively. A kinetic model for O2 dissociation, rebinding, and migration through two alternative pathways in the hemoglobin subunits was introduced and discussed. It was shown that, in the isolated α chains and α subunits within tetrameric hemoglobin, nearly one- and two-third escaping molecules of O2 leave the protein via xenon docking sites, respectively. The present experimental data support the idea that O2 molecule escapes from the β subunits mainly through the His(E7) gate, and show unambiguously that, in the α subunits, in addition to the direct E7 channel, there is at least one alternative escape route leading to the exterior via the xenon docking sites. PMID:27288155

  12. Xenon lighting adjusted to plant requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koefferlein, M.; Doehring, T.; Payer, Hans D.; Seidlitz, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    Xenon lamps are available as low and high power lamps with relatively high efficiency and a relatively long lifetime up to several thousand hours. Different construction types of short-arc and long-arc lamps permit a good adaptation to various applications in projection and illumination techniques without substantial changes of the spectral quality. Hence, the xenon lamp was the best choice for professional technical purposes where high power at simultaneously good spectral quality of the light was required. However, technical development does not stand still. Between the luminous efficacy of xenon lamps of 25-50 lm/W and the theoretical limit for 'white light' of 250 lm/W is still much room for improvement. The present development mainly favors other lamp types, like metal halide lamps and fluorescent lamps for commercial lighting purposes. The enclosed sections deal with some of the properties of xenon lamps relevant to plant illumination; particularly the spectral aspects, the temporal characteristics of the emission, and finally the economy of xenon lamps will be addressed. Due to radiation exceeding the natural global radiation in both the ultraviolet (UV) and the infrared (IR) regions, filter techniques have to be included into the discussion referring to the requirements of plant illumination. Most of the presented results were obtained by investigations in the GSF phytotron or in the closed Phytocell chambers of the University of Erlangen. As our experiences are restricted to area plant illumination rather than spot lights our discussion will concentrate on low pressure long-arc xenon lamps which are commonly used for such plant illuminations. As the spectral properties of short-arc lamps do not differ much from those of long-arc lamps most of our conclusions will be valid for high pressure xenon lamps too. These lamps often serve as light sources for small sun simulators and for monochromators which are used for action spectroscopy of plant responses.

  13. Stirring Up an Elastic Fluid: Critical Viscosity of Xenon-2 (CVX-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Motil, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Whipped cream stays in place even when turned upside down. Yet it readily flows through the nozzle of a spray can to reach the dessert plate. This demonstrates the phenomenon of shear thinning that is important to many industrial and physical processes. Paints, film emulsions, and other complex solutions that are highly viscous under normal conditions but become thin and flow easily under shear forces. A simple fluid, such as water, does not exhibit shear thinning under normal conditions. Very close to the liquid-vapor critical point, where the distinction between liquid and vapor disappears, the fluid becomes more complex and is predicted to display shear thinning. At the critical point, xenon atoms interact over long distances in a classical model of cooperative phenomena. Physicists rely on this system to learn how long-range order arises. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of fluids. Viscosity originates from the interactions of individual molecules. It is so complicated that, except for the simplest gas, it cannot be calculated accurately from theory. Tests with critical fluids can provide key data, but are limited on Earth because critical fluids are highly compressed by gravity. CVX-2 employs a tiny metal screen vibrating between two electrodes in a bath of critical xenon. The vibrations and how they dampen are used to measure viscosity. CVX flew on STS-85 (1997), where it revealed that, close to the critical point, the xenon is partly elastic: it can 'stretch' as well as flow. For STS-107, the hardware has been enhanced to determine if critical xenon is a shear-thinning fluid.

  14. Stirring Up an Elastic Fluid: Critical Viscosity of Xenon-2 (CVX-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2002-12-01

    Whipped cream stays in place even when turned upside down. Yet it readily flows through the nozzle of a spray can to reach the dessert plate. This demonstrates the phenomenon of shear thinning that is important to many industrial and physical processes. Paints, film emulsions, and other complex solutions that are highly viscous under normal conditions but become thin and flow easily under shear forces. A simple fluid, such as water, does not exhibit shear thinning under normal conditions. Very close to the liquid-vapor critical point, where the distinction between liquid and vapor disappears, the fluid becomes more complex and is predicted to display shear thinning. At the critical point, xenon atoms interact over long distances in a classical model of cooperative phenomena. Physicists rely on this system to learn how long-range order arises. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of fluids. Viscosity originates from the interactions of individual molecules. It is so complicated that, except for the simplest gas, it cannot be calculated accurately from theory. Tests with critical fluids can provide key data, but are limited on Earth because critical fluids are highly compressed by gravity. CVX-2 employs a tiny metal screen vibrating between two electrodes in a bath of critical xenon. The vibrations and how they dampen are used to measure viscosity. CVX flew on STS-85 (1997), where it revealed that, close to the critical point, the xenon is partly elastic: it can 'stretch' as well as flow. For STS-107, the hardware has been enhanced to determine if critical xenon is a shear-thinning fluid.

  15. The Xenon record of Earth's early differentiaiton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peto, M. K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Kelley, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Xenon isotopes in mantle derived rocks provide information on the early differentiation of the silicate mantle of our planet. {131,132 134,136}Xe isotopes are produced by the spontaneous fission of two different elements: the now extinct radionuclide 244Pu, and the long-lived 238U. These two parent nuclides, however, yield rather different proportion of fissiogenic Xenon isotopes. Hence, the proportion of Pu- to U-derived fission xenon is indicative of the degree and rate of outgassing of a mantle reservoir. Recent data obtained from Iceland in our lab confirm that the Xenon isotopic composition of the plume source(s) is characterized by lower 136Xe/130Xe ratios than the MORB source and the Iceland plume is more enriched in the Pu-derived Xenon component. These features are interpreted as reflecting different degrees of outgassing and appear not to be the result of preferential recycling of Xenon to the deep mantle. To further investigate how representative the Icelandic measurements might be of other mantle plumes, we measured noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Xe) in gas-rich basalt glasses from the Rochambeau Ridge (RR) in the Northern Lau Basin. Recent work suggests the presence of a "Samoan-like" OIB source in the northern Lau Basin and our measurements were performed on samples with plume-like 3He/4He ratios (15-28 RA) [1]. The Xenon isotopic measurements indicate that the maximum measured 136Xe/130Xe ratios in the Rochambeau samples are similar to Iceland. In particular, for one of the gas rich samples we were able to obtain 77 different isotopic measurements through step-crushing. Preliminary investigation of this sample suggests higher Pu- to U-derived fission Xenon than in MORBs. To quantitatively evaluate the degree and rate of outgassing of the plume and MORB reservoirs, particularly during the first few hundred million years of Earth's history, we have modified a geochemical reservoir model that was previously developed to investigate mantle overturn and mixing

  16. Xenon Isotope Releases from Buried Transuranic Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresel, P. E.; Waichler, S. R.; Kennedy, B. M.; Hayes, J. C.; McIntyre, J. I.; Giles, J. R.; Sondrup, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    Xenon is an inert rare gas produced as a fission product in nuclear reactors and through spontaneous fission of some transuranic isotopes. Thus, xenon will be released from buried transuranic waste. Two complementary methods are used to measure xenon isotopes: radiometric analysis for short-lived radioxenon isotopes and mass spectrometry for detection of stable xenon isotopes. Initial measurements near disposal facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site show radioxenon and stable xenon isotopic signatures that are indicative of transuranic waste. Radioxenon analysis has greater sensitivity due to the lower background concentrations and indicates spontaneous fission due to the short half life of the isotopes. Stable isotope ratios may be used to distinguish irradiated fuel sources from pure spontaneous fission sources and are not as dependent on rapid release from the waste form. The release rate is dependent on the type of waste and container integrity and is the greatest unknown in application of this technique. Numerical multi-phase transport modeling of burial grounds at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory indicates that, under generalized conditions, the radioxenon isotopes will diffuse away from the waste and be found in the soil cap and adjacent to the burial ground at levels many orders of magnitude above the detection limit.

  17. Direct Dark Matter search with XENON100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrigo, S. E. A.

    2016-07-01

    The XENON100 experiment is the second phase of the XENON program for the direct detection of the dark matter in the universe. The XENON100 detector is a two-phase Time Projection Chamber filled with 161 kg of ultra pure liquid xenon. The results from 224.6 live days of dark matter search with XENON100 are presented. No evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs is found, excluding spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross sections above 2 × 10-45 cm2 for a 55 GeV/c2 WIMP at 90% confidence level (C.L.). The most stringent limit is established on the spin-dependent WIMP-neutron interaction for WIMP masses above 6 GeV/c2, with a minimum cross section of 3.5 × 10-40 cm2 (90% C.L.) for a 45 GeV/c2 WIMP. The same dataset is used to search for axions and axion-like-particles. The best limits to date are set on the axion-electron coupling constant for solar axions, gAe < 7.7 × 10-12 (90% C.L.), and for axion-like-particles, gAe < 1 × 10-12 (90% C.L.) for masses between 5 and 10 keV/c2.

  18. Cosmogenic activation of xenon and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudis, Laura; Kish, Alexander; Piastra, Francesco; Schumann, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Rare event search experiments using liquid xenon as target and detection medium require ultra-low background levels to fully exploit their physics potential. Cosmic ray induced activation of the detector components and, even more importantly, of the xenon itself during production, transportation and storage at the Earth's surface, might result in the production of radioactive isotopes with long half-lives, with a possible impact on the expected background. We present the first dedicated study on the cosmogenic activation of xenon after 345 days of exposure to cosmic rays at the Jungfraujoch research station at 3470 m above sea level, complemented by a study of copper which has been activated simultaneously. We have directly observed the production of ^7Be, ^{101}Rh, ^{125}Sb, ^{126}I and ^{127}Xe in xenon, out of which only ^{125}Sb could potentially lead to background for a multi-ton scale dark matter search. The production rates for five out of eight studied radioactive isotopes in copper are in agreement with the only existing dedicated activation measurement, while we observe lower rates for the remaining ones. The specific saturation activities for both samples are also compared to predictions obtained with commonly used software packages, where we observe some underpredictions, especially for xenon activation.

  19. Dendrite engineering on xenon crystals.

    PubMed

    Fell, Marco; Bilgram, Jörg

    2007-06-01

    The experimental work presented focuses on transient growth, morphological transitions, and control of xenon dendrites. Dendritic free growth is perturbed by two different mechanisms: Shaking and heating up to the melting temperature. Spontaneous and metastable multitip configurations are stabilized, coarsening is reduced, leading to a denser sidebranch growth, and a periodic tip splitting is found during perturbation by shaking. On the other hand, heating leads to controlled sidebranching and characteristic transitions of the tip shape. A deterministic behavior is found besides the random-noise-driven growth. The existence of a limit cycle is supported by the findings. Together the two perturbation mechanisms allow a "dendrite engineering"--i.e., a reproducible controlling of the crystal shape during its growth. The tip splitting for dendritic free growth is found not to be a splitting of the tip in two; rather, the respective growth velocities of the main tip and the fins change. The latter then surpass the main tip and develop into new tips. The occurrence of three- and four-tip configurations is explained with this mechanism. Finite-element calculations of the heat flow and the convective flow in the growth vessel show that the idea of a single axisymmetric toroidal convection roll across the whole growth vessel has to be dropped. The main effect of convection under Earth's gravity is the compression of the diffusive temperature field around the downward-growing tip. A model to explain the symmetry of dendritic crystals--e.g., snow crystals--is developed, based on the interaction of crystal shape and heat flow in the crystal. PMID:17677269

  20. Reflectance of polytetrafluoroethylene for xenon scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Pereira, A.; Chepel, V.; Lopes, M. I.; Solovov, V.; Neves, F.

    2010-03-01

    Gaseous and liquid xenon particle detectors are being used in a number of applications including dark matter search and neutrino-less double beta decay experiments. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is often used in these detectors both as electrical insulator and as a light reflector to improve the efficiency of detection of scintillation photons. However, xenon emits in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region (λ ≃175 nm) where the reflecting properties of PTFE are not sufficiently known. In this work, we report on measurements of PTFE reflectance, including its angular distribution, for the xenon scintillation light. Various samples of PTFE, manufactured by different processes (extruded, expanded, skived, and pressed) have been studied. The data were interpreted with a physical model comprising both specular and diffuse reflections. The reflectance obtained for these samples ranges from about 47% to 66% for VUV light. Other fluoropolymers, namely, ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP), and perfluoro-alkoxyalkane (PFA) were also measured.

  1. Reflectance of polytetrafluoroethylene for xenon scintillation light

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, C.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Pereira, A.; Chepel, V.; Lopes, M. I.; Solovov, V.; Neves, F.

    2010-03-15

    Gaseous and liquid xenon particle detectors are being used in a number of applications including dark matter search and neutrino-less double beta decay experiments. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is often used in these detectors both as electrical insulator and as a light reflector to improve the efficiency of detection of scintillation photons. However, xenon emits in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region ({lambda}{approx_equal}175 nm) where the reflecting properties of PTFE are not sufficiently known. In this work, we report on measurements of PTFE reflectance, including its angular distribution, for the xenon scintillation light. Various samples of PTFE, manufactured by different processes (extruded, expanded, skived, and pressed) have been studied. The data were interpreted with a physical model comprising both specular and diffuse reflections. The reflectance obtained for these samples ranges from about 47% to 66% for VUV light. Other fluoropolymers, namely, ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP), and perfluoro-alkoxyalkane (PFA) were also measured.

  2. 129Xe spin relaxation in frozen xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, R. J.; Gatzke, M.; Fox, David C.; Cates, G. D.; Happer, W.

    1999-04-01

    We discuss the longitudinal spin relaxation of 129Xe nuclei in frozen xenon. Over a large range of temperatures and magnetic fields, the dominant spin-lattice relaxation mechanism is shown to be nuclear spin-flip Raman scattering of lattice phonons. Two closely related interactions couple the lattice phonons to the spins of 129Xe nuclei: (1) the nuclear spin-rotation interaction between nearest-neighbor atoms, and (2) the paramagnetic antishielding of the externally applied field at the site of 129Xe nuclei by the electrons of neighboring Xe atoms. We show that relaxation rates can be predicted by using measured chemical shifts of gaseous and condensed xenon. The predicted relaxation rates are in good agreement with measurements. We outline a simple way to estimate the spin-rotation coupling and paramagnetic antishielding in terms of the small perturbations of the outermost electron orbitals of one xenon atom due to a neighboring atom.

  3. Transdermal diffusion of xenon in vitro using diffusion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovsky, A.; Petrov, E.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this research was to study the diffusion rate of xenon through guinea pig skin and how viscosity of cosmetic component capryl/capric triglyceride (CCT) facilitates to deliver xenon to surface of skin patches. They were placed in Franz cell for 24 hours and diffusion rate and permeability of xenon were calculated. Thus diffusion rate was 0.031 mg/hour*cm2 and permeability was 0.003 cm/hour. Using Brookfield viscometer it was shown that viscosity of CCT decreased upon increasing xenon concentration. Obtained results can be utilized in developing of new xenon containing drugs for topical administration.

  4. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. M.; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-31

    Abstract: The rare gases krypton, xenon, and radon pose both an economic opportunity and a potential environmental hazard. Xenon is used in commercial lighting, medical imaging, and anesthesia, and can sell for $5,000 per kilogram. Radon, by contrast, Is naturally radioactive and the second largest cause of lung cancer, and radioactive xenon, 133Xe, was a major pollutant released In the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. We describe an organic cage molecule that can capture xenon and radon with unprecedented selectivity, suggesting new technologies for environmental monitoring, removal of pollutants, or the recovery of rare, valuable elements from air.

  5. Xenon fluorides show potential as fluorinating agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernick, C. L.; Shieh, T. C.; Yang, N. C.

    1967-01-01

    Xenon fluorides permit the controlled addition of fluorine across an olefinic double bond. They provide a series of fluorinating agents that permit ready separation from the product at a high purity. The reactions may be carried out in the vapor phase.

  6. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  7. DFT-MD simulations of shocked Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2009-03-01

    Xenon is not only a technologically important element used in laser technologies, jet propulsion and dental anesthesia, but it is also arguably the simplest material in which to study the metal-insulator transition at high pressure. Because of its closed shell electronic configuration, Xenon is often assumed to be chemically inert, interacting almost entirely through the van der Waals interaction, and at liquid density, is typically modeled well using Leonard-Jones potentials. However, such modeling has a limited range of validity as Xenon is known to form compounds at normal conditions and likely exhibits considerably more chemistry at higher densities when hybridization of occupied orbitals becomes significant. In this talk, we present DFT-MD simulations of shocked liquid Xenon with the goal of developing an improved equation of state. The relative importance of the van der Waals interaction compared to other Coulomb interactions is considered, and estimates of the relative accuracy of various density functionals are quantified. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Atomistic study of stability of xenon nanoclusters in uranium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, A.; Van Brutzel, L.; Freyss, M.

    2010-05-01

    Density-functional theory calculations of the xenon incorporation energies in point defects in urania have been done in order to fit empirical potentials. With this set of parameters, we have considered the incorporation of xenon in small and extended defects such as planar interstitials, grain boundaries, faceted, and spherical voids. The results show that xenon atoms are more likely to aggregate than to be homogeneously distributed in the urania grains. SIGMA5 grain boundary and spherical shape voids are the most favorable defects of xenon atom incorporation. The presence of xenon atoms in nanovoids affects their shape. The energy gain to aggregate xenon atoms into clusters saturates for cluster sizes of about 15-20 Schottky defects. This demonstrates that medium size defects are just as favorable as big size defects for xenon incorporation.

  9. Anticipatory control of xenon in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Impink, A.J. Jr.

    1987-02-10

    A method is described for automatically dampening xenon-135 spatial transients in the core of a pressurized water reactor having control rods which regulate reactor power level, comprising the steps of: measuring the neutron flu in the reactor core at a plurality of axially spaced locations on a real-time, on-line basis; repetitively generating from the neutron flux measurements, on a point-by-point basis, signals representative of the current axial distribution of xenon-135, and signals representative of the current rate of change of the axial distribution of xenon-135; generating from the xenon-135 distribution signals and the rate of change of xenon distribution signals, control signals for reducing the xenon transients; and positioning the control rods as a function of the control signals to dampen the xenon-135 spatial transients.

  10. Preliminary Measurements of the Xenon Triple Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steur, P. P. M.; Giraudi, D.

    2014-04-01

    Ever since the construction and definition of the highly successful International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90), one severe deficiency of the scale has been recognized, without a reliable remedy. The problem is the fact that the only then available high-quality fixed point between the argon triple point and the water triple point was the mercury triple point, which unfortunately is situated rather closely to the water triple point, thus having an extremely strong influence on the interpolation function of SPRTs in the range. Already before 1990, measurements on possible fixed points better placed in this temperature range have been investigated, such as the triple points of krypton and xenon. However, results have been rather elusive, mainly regarding the rather large melting range of their transition. A turning point was the 2005 paper from the National Research Council (NRC, Canada), where it was established that the relatively high content of krypton was the culprit for the large melting range of the xenon transitions published previously. Indeed, measurements on a xenon sample with very low krypton content produced a very high-quality plateau, of the same level as other ITS-90 fixed points. However, no follow-up measurements have been reported, and thus neither have comparison measurements been reported. Shortly, after the appearance of the NRC paper, Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM, Italy) acquired a batch of the same high-purity xenon as used by NRC with the aim of preparing a few sealed cells with it and trying to reproduce the NRC results. However, with the start of the Neon Project (Euromet Project 770), the realization of these intentions had to be postponed until now. Last December, three cells of different design have been filled with this high-quality xenon and preliminary results of the measurements on the triple point are reported.

  11. Bisphosphine dioxides

    SciTech Connect

    Moloy, K.G.

    1990-02-20

    A process is described for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  12. Bisphosphine dioxides

    DOEpatents

    Moloy, Kenneth G.

    1990-01-01

    A process for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  13. An automated multidimensional preparative gas chromatographic system for isolation and enrichment of trace amounts of xenon from ambient air.

    PubMed

    Larson, Tuula; Östman, Conny; Colmsjö, Anders

    2011-04-01

    The monitoring of radioactive xenon isotopes is one of the principal methods for the detection of nuclear explosions in order to identify clandestine nuclear testing. In this work, a miniaturized, multiple-oven, six-column, preparative gas chromatograph was constructed in order to isolate trace quantities of radioactive xenon isotopes from ambient air, utilizing nitrogen as the carrier gas. The multidimensional chromatograph comprised preparative stainless steel columns packed with molecular sieves, activated carbon, and synthetic carbon adsorbents (e.g., Anasorb®-747 and Carbosphere®). A combination of purification techniques--ambient adsorption, thermal desorption, back-flushing, thermal focusing, and heart cutting--was selectively optimized to produce a well-defined xenon peak that facilitated reproducible heart cutting and accurate quantification. The chromatographic purification of a sample requires approximately 4 h and provides complete separation of xenon from potentially interfering components (such as water vapor, methane, carbon dioxide, and radon) with recovery and accuracy close to 100%. The preparative enrichment process isolates and concentrates a highly purified xenon gas fraction that is suitable for subsequent ultra-low-level γ-, ß/γ-spectroscopic or high-resolution mass spectrometric measurement (e.g., to monitor the gaseous fission products of nuclear explosions at remote locations). The Xenon Processing Unit is a free-standing, relatively lightweight, and transportable system that can be interfaced to a variety of sampling and detection systems. It has a relatively inexpensive, rugged, and compact modular (19-inch rack) design that provides easy access to all parts for maintenance and has a low power requirement. PMID:21347675

  14. Xenon and iodine reveal multiple distinct exotic xenon components in Efremovka "nanodiamonds"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Holland, G.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Fisenko, A. V.; Crowther, S. A.; Turner, G.

    2016-03-01

    We identify new xenon components in a nanodiamond-rich residue from the reduced CV3 chondrite Efremovka. We demonstrate for the first time that these, and the previously identified xenon components Xe-P3 and Xe-P6, are associated with elevated I/Xe ratios. The 129I/127I ratio associated with xenon loss from these presolar compositions during processing on planetesimals in the early solar system was (0.369 ± 0.019) × 10-4, a factor of 3-4 lower than the canonical value. This suggests either incorporation of iodine into carbonaceous grains before the last input of freshly synthesized 129I to the solar system's precursor material, or loss of noble gases during processing of planetesimals around 30 Myr after solar system formation. The xenon/iodine ratios and model closure ages were revealed by laser step pyrolysis analysis of a neutron-irradiated, coarse-grained nanodiamond separate. Three distinct low temperature compositions are identified by characteristic I/Xe ratios and 136Xe/132Xe ratios. There is some evidence of multiple compositions with distinct I/Xe ratios in the higher temperature releases associated with Xe-P6. The presence of iodine alongside Q-Xe and these components in nanodiamonds constrains the pathway by which extreme volatiles entered the solid phase and may facilitate the identification of their carriers. There is no detectable iodine contribution to the presolar Xe-HL component, which is released at intermediate temperatures; this suggests a distinct trapping process. Releases associated with the other components all include significant contributions of 128Xe produced from iodine by neutron capture during reactor irradiation. We propose a revised model relating the origin of Xe-P3 (which exhibits an s-process deficit) through a "Q-process" to the Q component (which makes the dominant contribution to the heavy noble gas budget of primitive material). The Q-process incorporates noble gases and iodine into specific carbonaceous phases with mass

  15. Hyperpolarized xenon magnetic resonance of the lung and the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind Krishnamachari

    2001-04-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a new diagnostic modality that has been used successfully for lung imaging. Xenon is soluble in blood and inhaled xenon is transported to the brain via circulating blood. Xenon also accumulates in the lipid rich white matter of the brain. Hyperpolarized xenon can hence be used as a tissue- sensitive probe of brain function. The goals of this study were to identify the NMR resonances of xenon in the rat brain and evaluate the role of hyperpolarized xenon for brain MRI. We have developed systems to produce sufficient volumes of hyperpolarized xenon for in vivo brain experiments. The specialized instrumentation developed include an apparatus for optical pump-cell manufacture and high purity gas manifolds for filling cells. A hyperpolarized gas delivery system was designed to ventilate small animals with hyperpolarized xenon for transport to the brain. The T1 of xenon dissolved in blood indicates that the lifetime of xenon in the blood is sufficient for significant magnetization to be transferred to distal tissues. A variety of carrier agents for intravenous delivery of hyperpolarized xenon were tested for transport to distal tissues. Using our new gas delivery system, high SNR 129Xe images of rat lungs were obtained. Spectroscopy with hyperpolarized xenon indicated that xenon was transported from the lungs to the blood and tissues with intact magnetization. After preliminary studies that indicated the feasibility for in vivo rat brain studies, experiments were performed with adult rats and young rats with different stages of white matter development. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments showed the prominence of one peak from xenon in the rat brain, which was assigned to brain lipids. Cerebral brain perfusion was calculated from the wash-out of the hyperpolarized xenon signal in the brain. An increase in brain perfusion during maturation was observed. These experiments showed that hyperpolarized xenon MRI

  16. Xenon ion propulsion for orbit transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.; Patterson, M. J.; Gruber, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    The status of critical ion propulsion system elements is reviewed. Electron bombardment ion thrusters for primary propulsion have evolved to operate on xenon in the 5-10 kW power range. Thruster efficiencies of 0.7 and specific impulse values of 4000 s have been documented. The baseline thruster currently under development by NASA LeRC includes ring-cusp magnetic field plasma containment and dished two-grid ion optics. Based on past experience and demonstrated simplifications, power processors for these thrusters should have approximately 500 parts, a mass of 40 kg, and an efficiency near 0.94. Thrust vector control, via individual thruster gimbals, is a mature technology. High pressure, gaseous xenon propellant storage and control schemes, using flight qualified hardware, result in propellant tankage fractions between 0.1 and 0.2. In-space and ground integration testing has demonstrated that ion propulsion systems can be successfully integrated with their host spacecraft.

  17. Spectroscopy of Ba and Ba+ deposits in solid xenon for barium tagging in nEXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mong, B.; Cook, S.; Walton, T.; Chambers, C.; Craycraft, A.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Hall, K.; Fairbank, W.; Albert, J. B.; Auty, D. J.; Barbeau, P. S.; Basque, V.; Beck, D.; Breidenbach, M.; Brunner, T.; Cao, G. F.; Cleveland, B.; Coon, M.; Daniels, T.; Daugherty, S. J.; DeVoe, R.; Didberidze, T.; Dilling, J.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dunford, M.; Fabris, L.; Farine, J.; Feldmeier, W.; Fierlinger, P.; Fudenberg, D.; Giroux, G.; Gornea, R.; Graham, K.; Gratta, G.; Heffner, M.; Hughes, M.; Jiang, X. S.; Johnson, T. N.; Johnston, S.; Karelin, A.; Kaufman, L. J.; Killick, R.; Koffas, T.; Kravitz, S.; Krücken, R.; Kuchenkov, A.; Kumar, K. S.; Leonard, D. S.; Licciardi, C.; Lin, Y. H.; Ling, J.; MacLellan, R.; Marino, M. G.; Moore, D.; Odian, A.; Ostrovskiy, I.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Retiere, F.; Rowson, P. C.; Rozo, M. P.; Schubert, A.; Sinclair, D.; Smith, E.; Stekhanov, V.; Tarka, M.; Tolba, T.; Twelker, K.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Walton, J.; Weber, M.; Wen, L. J.; Wichoski, U.; Yang, L.; Yen, Y.-R.; Zhao, Y. B.; nEXO Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    Progress on a method of barium tagging for the nEXO double beta decay experiment is reported. Absorption and emission spectra for deposits of barium atoms and ions in solid xenon matrices are presented. Excitation spectra for prominent emission lines, temperature dependence, and bleaching of the fluorescence reveal the existence of different matrix sites. A regular series of sharp lines observed in Ba+ deposits is identified with some type of barium hydride molecule. Lower limits for the fluorescence quantum efficiency of the principal Ba emission transition are reported. Under current conditions, an image of fewer than or equal to 104 Ba atoms can be obtained. Prospects for imaging single Ba atoms in solid xenon are discussed.

  18. Port and harbor patrol car loaded Xenon search light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoh, Hiroshi; Takenami, Takashi

    2005-05-01

    The container ship yard is brighten by the lighting, but after Sunset of the sea side is dark during a crescent. On the sea side lighting, we propose to use to patrol car loaded Xenon search light. Generally, the Pacific Ocean of a surface of the sea swimming fishes such as Samma (Mackerel pike) likes strong visible light as a Xenon search light beam. In the feeling of the human eyes and brains with a strong visible light beam such as Xenon search light, the reaction is divided two kind of types, to avoid reaction's humans have a feeling that bad conscience, and no reaction's humans tend to have a feeling of good mind. For the black painted unmanned objects of visible watching is needed as possible as strong visible light beam of the Xenon search light. The optical system of the Xenon search light consists of a Xenon lamp, a parabolic mirror and the filters.

  19. Optimization of Xenon Biosensors for Detection of ProteinInteractions

    SciTech Connect

    Lowery, Thomas J.; Garcia, Sandra; Chavez, Lana; Ruiz, E.Janette; Wu, Tom; Brotin, Thierry; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre; King, David S.; Schultz, Peter G.; Pines, Alex; Wemmer, David E..

    2005-08-03

    Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR can detect the presence of specific low-concentration biomolecular analytes by means of the xenon biosensor, which consists of a water-soluble, targeted cryptophane-A cage that encapsulates xenon. In this work we use the prototypical biotinylated xenon biosensor to determine the relationship between the molecular composition of the xenon biosensor and the characteristics of protein-bound resonances. The effects of diastereomer overlap, dipole-dipole coupling, chemical shift anisotropy, xenon exchange, and biosensor conformational exchange on protein-bound biosensor signal were assessed. It was found that optimal protein-bound biosensor signal can be obtained by minimizing the number of biosensor diastereomers and using a flexible linker of appropriate length. Both the linewidth and sensitivity of chemical shift to protein binding of the xenon biosensor were found to be inversely proportional to linker length.

  20. High-pressure transformations in xenon hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Sanloup, Chrystèle; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2002-01-01

    A high-pressure investigation of the Xe⋅H2O chemical system was conducted by using diamond-anvil cell techniques combined with in situ Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and laser heating. Structure I xenon clathrate was observed to be stable up to 1.8 GPa, at which pressure it transforms to a new Xe clathrate phase stable up to 2.5 GPa before breaking down to ice VII plus solid xenon. The bulk modulus and structure of both phases were determined: 9 ± 1 GPa for Xe clathrate A with structure I (cubic, a = 11.595 ± 0.003 Å, V = 1,558.9 ± 1.2 Å3 at 1.1 GPa) and 45 ± 5 GPa for Xe clathrate B (tetragonal, a = 8.320 ± 0.004 Å, c = 10.287 ± 0.007 Å, V = 712.1 ± 1.2 Å3 at 2.2 GPa). The extended pressure stability field of Xe clathrate structure I (A) and the discovery of a second Xe clathrate (B) above 1.8 GPa have implications for xenon in terrestrial and planetary interiors. PMID:11756690

  1. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Rakcheeva, L. P.; Murashov, S. V.; Melnikov, A. S.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  2. Recovering Residual Xenon Propellant for an Ion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathi, Gani; Skakkottai, P.; wu, Jiunn Jeng

    2006-01-01

    Future nuclear-powered Ion-Propulsion- System-propelled spacecraft such as Jupiter Icy Moon Orbiter (JIMO) will carry more than 10,000 kg of xenon propellant. Typically, a small percentage of this propellant cannot be used towards the end of the mission because of the pressure drop requirements for maintaining flow. For large missions such as JIMO, this could easily translate to over 250 kg of unusable xenon. A proposed system, the Xenon Recovery System (XRS), for recovering almost all of the xenon remaining in the tank, would include a cryopump in the form of a condenser/evaporator that would be alternatively cooled by a radiator, then heated electrically. When the pressure of the xenon in the tank falls below 0.7 MPa (100 psia), the previously isolated XRS will be brought online and the gas from the tank would enter the cryopump that is initially cooled to a temperature below saturation temperature of xenon. This causes xenon liquefaction and further cryopumping from the tank till the cryopump is full of liquid xenon. At this point, the cryopump is heated electrically by small heaters (70 to 80 W) to evaporate the liquid that is collected as high-pressure gas (<7 MPa; 1,000 psia) in an intermediate accumulator. Check valves between the tank and the XRS prevent the reverse flow of xenon during the heating cycle. The accumulator serves as the high-pressure source of xenon gas to the Xenon Feed System (XFS) downstream of the XRS. This cycle is repeated till almost all the xenon is recovered. Currently, this system is being baselined for JIMO.

  3. Liquid-xenon detector under the intensive pulse irradiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsanov, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of intense pulsed irradiation on the operation of the liquid xenon spectrometer was studied. The ionization chamber filled with liquid xenon was irradiated by bremsstrahlung pulses of the microtron. The pulse repetition rate was 400 Hz. The absorbed dose ranged from 10-7 to 0.1 Gy per pulse. Stable operation of the liquid xenon spectrometer in the intervals between the pulses of the accelerator was shown for a long time.

  4. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Melnikov, A. S.; Rakcheeva, L. P. Murashov, S. V.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  5. High-Rydberg Xenon Submillimeter-Wave Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara

    1987-01-01

    Proposed detector for infrared and submillimeter-wavelength radiation uses excited xenon atoms as Rydberg sensors instead of customary beams of sodium, potassium, or cesium. Chemically inert xenon easily stored in pressurized containers, whereas beams of dangerously reactive alkali metals must be generated in cumbersome, unreliable ovens. Xenon-based detector potential for infrared astronomy and for Earth-orbiter detection of terrestrial radiation sources. Xenon atoms excited to high energy states in two stages. Doubly excited atoms sensitive to photons in submillimeter wavelength range, further excited by these photons, then ionized and counted.

  6. Liquid xenon detectors for particle physics and astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Aprile, E.; Doke, T.

    2010-07-15

    This article reviews the progress made over the last 20 years in the development and applications of liquid xenon detectors in particle physics, astrophysics, and medical imaging experiments. A summary of the fundamental properties of liquid xenon as radiation detection medium, in light of the most current theoretical and experimental information is first provided. After an introduction of the different type of liquid xenon detectors, a review of past, current, and future experiments using liquid xenon to search for rare processes and to image radiation in space and in medicine is given. Each application is introduced with a survey of the underlying scientific motivation and experimental requirements before reviewing the basic characteristics and expected performance of each experiment. Within this decade it appears likely that large volume liquid xenon detectors operated in different modes will contribute to answering some of the most fundamental questions in particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology, fulfilling the most demanding detection challenges. From detectors based solely on liquid xenon (LXe) scintillation, such as in the MEG experiment for the search of the rare ''{mu}{yields}e{gamma}'' decay, currently the largest liquid xenon detector in operation, and in the XMASS experiment for dark matter detection, to the class of time projection chambers which exploit both scintillation and ionization of LXe, such as in the XENON dark matter search experiment and in the Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay, unrivaled performance and important contributions to physics in the next few years are anticipated.

  7. Measuring and Modeling Xenon Uptake in Plastic Beta-Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, R.; Hayes, J. C.; Harper, W. W.; Humble, P.; Ripplinger, M. D.; Stephenson, D. E.; Williams, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    The precision of the stable xenon volume measurement in atmospheric monitoring radio-xenon systems is a critical parameter used to determine the activity concentration of a radio-xenon sample. Typically these types of systems use a plastic scintillating beta-cell as part of a beta-gamma detection scheme to measure the radioactivity present in the gas sample. Challenges arise when performing the stable xenon calculation during or after radioactive counting of the sample due to xenon uptake into the plastic beta-cells. Plastic beta cells can adsorb as much as 5% of the sample during counting. If quantification is performed after counting, the uptake of xenon into the plastic results in an underestimation of the xenon volume measurement. This behavior also causes what is typically known as 'memory effect' in the cell. Experiments were conducted using a small volume low pressure range thermal conductivity sensor to quantify the amount of xenon uptake into the cell over a given period of time. Understanding the xenon uptake in the cell provides a better estimate of the stable volume which improves the overall measurement capability of the system. The results from these experiments along with modeling will be presented.

  8. Adsorption of xenon on vicinal copper and platinum surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Layton

    The adsorption of xenon was studied on Cu(111), Cu(221), Cu(643) and on Pt(111), Pt(221), and Pt(531) using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of xenon, and ultraviolet photoemission of adsorbed xenon (PAX). These experiments were performed to study the atomic and electronic structure of stepped and step-kinked, chiral metal surfaces. Xenon TPD and PAX were performed on each surface in an attempt to titrate terrace, step edge, and kink adsorption sites by adsorption energetics (TPD) and local work function differences (PAX). Due to the complex behavior of xenon on the vicinal copper and platinum metal surfaces, adsorption sites on these surfaces could not be adequately titrated by xenon TPD. On Cu(221) and Cu(643), xenon desorption from step adsorption sites was not apparent leading to the conclusion that the energy difference between terrace and step adsorption is minuscule. On Pt(221) and Pt(531), xenon TPD indicated that xenon prefers to bond at step edges and that the xenon-xenon interaction at step edges in repulsive but no further indication of step-kink adsorption was observed. The Pt(221) and Pt(531) TPD spectra indicated that the xenon overlayer undergoes strong compression near monolayer coverage on these surfaces due to repulsion between step-edge adsorbed xenon and other encroaching xenon atoms. The PAX experiments on the copper and platinum surfaces demonstrated that the step adsorption sites have lower local work functions than terrace adsorption sites and that higher step density leads to a larger separation in the local work function of terrace and step adsorption sites. The PAX spectra also indicated that, for all surfaces studied at 50--70 K, step adsorption is favored at low coverage but the step sites are not saturated until monolayer coverage is reached; this observation is due to the large entropy difference between terrace and step adsorption states and to repulsive interactions between xenon atoms

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of convection in laser-polarized xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Tseng, C. H.; Wong, G. P.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the flow and diffusion of laser-polarized xenon (129Xe) gas undergoing convection above evaporating laser-polarized liquid xenon. The large xenon NMR signal provided by the laser-polarization technique allows more rapid imaging than one can achieve with thermally polarized gas-liquid systems, permitting shorter time-scale events such as rapid gas flow and gas-liquid dynamics to be observed. Two-dimensional velocity-encoded imaging shows convective gas flow above the evaporating liquid xenon, and also permits the measurement of enhanced gas diffusion near regions of large velocity variation.

  10. A photochemical answer to the 'xenon paradox'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébrard; Marty, B.

    2012-12-01

    Xenon is depleted by one order of magnitude relative to other volatile elements when normalized to the chondritic composition. Furthermore, atmospheric xenon is far more enriched in the heavy isotopes relatively to chondritic and solar compositions (3-4%.amu-1) than atmospheric krypton (< 1%.amu-1). This discrepancy, known as the 'xenon paradox', has led to sophisticated models of atmospheric evolution coupled with mantle geodynamics (Pepin, 1991; Tolstikhin and Marty, 1998) and cometary contributions (Dauphas, 2003; Owen et al., 1992) that could explain terrestrial noble gas patterns under ad hoc conditions during the building stages of the Earth, no more than ~200 Ma following the beginning of solar system formation. Yet, xenon having an isotopic composition intermediate between the atmospheric and the chondritic ones has been recently documented in Archean (≤3 Ga-old) sedimentary rocks (Pujol et al., 2011), suggesting that isotopic fractionation of Xe occurred over a much longer period of time than previously thought, during the Hadean and the Archean eons. In that case, assuming a Rayleigh type isotope evolution for atmospheric Xe requires an enrichment fractionation factor of 1.3% in heavy isotopes for Xe remaining in the atmosphere. This is clearly within the range of values observed in laboratory experiments aimed at trapping and fractionating Xe isotopes in solids, which is only effective upon ionization (Marrocchi et al., 2011; Kuga et al., 2012). We report here a possibility for explaining the 'xenon paradox' through interaction of the Hadean/Archean atmosphere with EUV light from the young Sun. By using a new photochemical model, we have found out that atmospheric Xe depletion and enrichment in heavy Xe isotopes could be achieved by EUV photoionization deep enough in the atmosphere to allow the preferential implantation of the heavier Xe isotopes in organic aerosols, the formation of which is itself triggered by UV photochemistry. Most of the ionized

  11. Relative scintillation efficiency of liquid xenon in the XENON10 direct dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzur, Angel

    There is almost universal agreement that most of the mass in the Universe consists of dark matter. Many lines of reasoning suggest that the dark matter consists of a weakly interactive massive particle (WIMP) with mass ranging from 10 GeV/c 2 to a few TeV/c 2 . Today, numerous experiments aim for direct or indirect dark matter detection. XENON10 is a direct detection experiment using a xenon dual phase time projection chamber. Particles interacting with xenon will create a scintillation signal ( S 1) and ionization. The charge produced is extracted into the gas phase and converted into a proportional scintillation light ( S 2), with an external electric field. The dominant background, b particles and g rays, will undergo an electron recoil (ER) interaction, while WIMPs and neutrons will undergo a nuclear recoil (NR) interaction. Event-by-event discrimination of background signals is based on log 10 ( S 2/ S 1) NR < log 10 ( S 2/ S 1) ER and the 3-D position reconstruction. In 2006 the XENON10 detector started underground operations at laboratorio Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. After 6 months of operations, totaling 58.6 live days and 5.4 kg of fiducial mass, XENON10 set the best upper limits at the time. Finding a spin- independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section s h = 8.8 × 10^-44 cm 2 and a spin- dependent WIMP-neutron cross-section s h = 1.0 × 10^-38 cm 2 for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c 2 (90% C.L.). In this work I give an overview of the dark matter evidence and review the requirements for a dark matter search. In particular I discuss the XENON10 detector, deployment, operation, calibrations, analysis and WIMP-nucleon cross- section limits. Finally, I present our latest results for the relative scintillation efficiency ([Special characters omitted.] ) for nuclear recoils in liquid xenon, which was the biggest source of uncertainty in the XENON10 limit. This quantity is essential to determine the nuclear energy scale and to determine the WIMP-nucleon cross

  12. Method for the simultaneous preparation of Radon-211, Xenon-125, Xenon-123, Astatine-211, Iodine-125 and Iodine-123

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Lambrecht, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    A method for simultaneously preparing Radon-211, Astatine-211, Xenon-125, Xenon-123, Iodine-125 and Iodine-123 in a process that includes irradiating a fertile metal material then using a one-step chemical procedure to collect a first mixture of about equal amounts of Radon-211 and Xenon-125, and a separate second mixture of about equal amounts of Iodine-123 and Astatine-211.

  13. DFT Study of the Reaction Mechanisms of Carbon Dioxide and its Isoelectronic Molecules CS2 and OCS Dissolved in Pyrrolidinium and Imidazolium Acetate Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Danten, Y; Cabaço, M I; Coutinho, J A P; Pinaud, Noël; Besnard, M

    2016-06-16

    The reaction mechanisms of CO2 and its isoelectronic molecules OCS and CS2 dissolved in N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium acetate and in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate were investigated by DFT calculations in "gas phase". The analysis of predicted multistep pathways allowed calculating energies of reaction and energy barriers of the processes. The major role played by the acetate anion in the degradation of the solutes CS2 and OCS as well as in the capture of OCS and CO2 by the imidazolium ring is highlighted. In both ionic liquids, this anion governs the conversion of CS2 into OCS and of OCS into CO2 through interatomic S-O exchanges between the anion and the solutes with formation of thioacetate anions. In imidazolium acetate, the selective capture of CS2 and OCS by the imidazolium ring competes with the S-O exchanges. From the calculated values of the energy barriers a basicity scale of the anions is proposed. The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the predicted adducts were calculated and agree well with the experimental observations. It is argued that the scenario issued from the calculated pathways is shown qualitatively to be independent from the functionals and basis set used, constitute a valuable tool in the understanding of chemical reactions taking place in liquid phase. PMID:27186961

  14. Chondritic xenon in the Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Caracausi, Antonio; Avice, Guillaume; Burnard, Peter G; Füri, Evelyn; Marty, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Noble gas isotopes are powerful tracers of the origins of planetary volatiles, and the accretion and evolution of the Earth. The compositions of magmatic gases provide insights into the evolution of the Earth's mantle and atmosphere. Despite recent analytical progress in the study of planetary materials and mantle-derived gases, the possible dual origin of the planetary gases in the mantle and the atmosphere remains unconstrained. Evidence relating to the relationship between the volatiles within our planet and the potential cosmochemical end-members is scarce. Here we show, using high-precision analysis of magmatic gas from the Eifel volcanic area (in Germany), that the light xenon isotopes identify a chondritic primordial component that differs from the precursor of atmospheric xenon. This is consistent with an asteroidal origin for the volatiles in the Earth's mantle, and indicates that the volatiles in the atmosphere and mantle originated from distinct cosmochemical sources. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the origin of Eifel magmatism being a deep mantle plume. The corresponding mantle source has been isolated from the convective mantle since about 4.45 billion years ago, in agreement with models that predict the early isolation of mantle domains. Xenon isotope systematics support a clear distinction between mid-ocean-ridge and continental or oceanic plume sources, with chemical heterogeneities dating back to the Earth's accretion. The deep reservoir now sampled by the Eifel gas had a lower volatile/refractory (iodine/plutonium) composition than the shallower mantle sampled by mid-ocean-ridge volcanism, highlighting the increasing contribution of volatile-rich material during the first tens of millions of years of terrestrial accretion. PMID:27111512

  15. Distillation purification and radon assay of liquid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Yasuo

    2005-09-08

    We succeeded to reduce the Kr contamination in liquid xenon by a factor of 1/1000 with a distillation system in Kamioka mine. Then, the remaining radioactivities (Radon and Kr) in purified liquid xenon were measured with the XMASS prototype detector. In this talk, the distillation system and the remaining internal radioactivity levels are reported.

  16. Xenon-Ion Drilling of Tungsten Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    High-velocity xenon ions used to drill holes of controlled size and distribution through tungsten layer that sheaths surface of controlled-porosity dispenser cathode of traveling wave-tube electron emitter. Controlled-porosity dispenser cathode employs barium/calcium/ aluminum oxide mixture that migrates through pores in cathode surface, thus coating it and reducing its work function. Rapid, precise drilling technique applied to films of other metals and used in other applications where micron-scale holes required. Method requires only few hours, as opposed to tens of hours by prior methods.

  17. Electron drift in a large scale solid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, J.; Jaskierny, W. F.

    2015-08-21

    A study of charge drift in a large scale optically transparent solid xenon is reported. A pulsed high power xenon light source is used to liberate electrons from a photocathode. The drift speeds of the electrons are measured using a 8.7 cm long electrode in both the liquid and solid phase of xenon. In the liquid phase (163 K), the drift speed is 0.193 ± 0.003 cm/μs while the drift speed in the solid phase (157 K) is 0.397 ± 0.006 cm/μs at 900 V/cm over 8.0 cm of uniform electric fields. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a factor two faster electron drift speed in solid phase xenon compared to that in liquid in a large scale solid xenon.

  18. Electron drift in a large scale solid xenon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yoo, J.; Jaskierny, W. F.

    2015-08-21

    A study of charge drift in a large scale optically transparent solid xenon is reported. A pulsed high power xenon light source is used to liberate electrons from a photocathode. The drift speeds of the electrons are measured using a 8.7 cm long electrode in both the liquid and solid phase of xenon. In the liquid phase (163 K), the drift speed is 0.193 ± 0.003 cm/μs while the drift speed in the solid phase (157 K) is 0.397 ± 0.006 cm/μs at 900 V/cm over 8.0 cm of uniform electric fields. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a factor twomore » faster electron drift speed in solid phase xenon compared to that in liquid in a large scale solid xenon.« less

  19. Evidence of charge exchange pumping in calcium-xenon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Charge exchange between xenon ions and calcium atoms may produce an inversion between the 5s or 4d and 4p energy levels of the calcium ions. A low power flowing xenon plasma seeded with calcium was utilized to determine if charge exchange or electron collisions populate the 5s and 4d levels Ca(+). Line intensity ratios proportional to the density ratios n5s/n4p and n4d/n4p were measured. From the dependence of these intensity ratios on power input to the xenon plasma it was concluded that charge exchange pumping of the 5s and 4d levels predominates over electron collisional pumping of these levels. Also, by comparing intensity ratios obtained using argon and krypton in place of xenon with those obtained in xenon the same conclusion was made.

  20. Xenon ion propulsion for orbit transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.; Patterson, M. J.; Gruber, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    For more than 30 years, NASA has conducted an ion propulsion program which has resulted in several experimental space flight demonstrations and the development of many supporting technologies. Technologies appropriate for geosynchronous stationkeeping, earth-orbit transfer missions, and interplanetary missions are defined and evaluated. The status of critical ion propulsion system elements is reviewed. Electron bombardment ion thrusters for primary propulsion have evolved to operate on xenon in the 5 to 10 kW power range. Thruster efficiencies of 0.7 and specific impulse values of 4000 s were documented. The baseline thruster currently under development by NASA LeRC includes ring-cusp magnetic field plasma containment and dished two-grid ion optics. Based on past experience and demonstrated simplifications, power processors for these thrusters should have approximately 500 parts, a mass of 40 kg, and an efficiency near 0.94. Thrust vector control, via individual thruster gimbals, is a mature technology. High pressure, gaseous xenon propellant storage and control schemes, using flight qualified hardware, result in propellant tankage fractions between 0.1 and 0.2. In-space and ground integration testing has demonstrated that ion propulsion systems can be successfully integrated with their host spacecraft. Ion propulsion system technologies are mature and can significantly enhance and/or enable a variety of missions in the nation's space propulsion program.

  1. The XENON1T Dark Matter Search Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghag, Chamkaur

    2012-03-01

    The worldwide race towards direct dark matter detection in the form of WIMPs has been dramatically accelerated by the remarkable progress and evolution of liquid xenon time projection chambers (LXeTPCs). With a realistic discovery potential, XENON100 has already reached a sensitivity of 7E-45 cm^2, and continues to accrue data at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy towards its ultimate sensitivity reach at the 2E-45 cm^2 level for the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section. To fully explore the favored parameter space for WIMP dark matter in search of a first robust and statistically significant discovery, or to confirm any hint of a signal from XENON100, the next phase of the XENON program will be a detector at the ton scale - XENON1T. The XENON1T detector, based on 2.2 ton of LXe viewed by low radioactivity photomultiplier tubes and housed in a water Cherenkov muon veto at LNGS, is presented. The detector design is advancing and construction of major systems will begin in 2012, with data taking beginning in 2015. Capable of probing WIMP interaction cross-sections to ˜2E-47cm^2 within 2 years of operation, XENON1T will provide the sensitivity to probe a particularly favorable region of electroweak physics.

  2. Measurement of cosmogenic radioactive products in xenon and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piastra, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Rare events searches, such as direct dark matter detection or neutrinoless double beta decay (0vββ) observation, using liquid xenon as target and detection medium require ultralow background to fully exploit the physics potential. Cosmogenic activation of the detector components, and even more importantly, of the xenon itself might have undesired impact on the background and the final sensitivity of the experiment. Since no measurement of cosmogenic activation of xenon was present in literature so far, we performed such a measurement exposing of a natural xenon sample to the cosmic radiation at the Jungfraujoch research station at an altitude of 3470 m above sea level for 245 days. This study was complemented with a ultra pure copper sample that was activated together with the xenon. We directly observed, with gamma-ray spectrometry, the production of 7Be, 101Rh, 125Sb, 126I and 127Xe in xenon, out of which only 125 Sb could potentially lead to a background relevant for multi-ton scale direct dark matter search. The production rates for five out of eight radioactive isotopes in copper are in good agreement with the only dedicated measurement present in literature. The production rates measured for both samples were compared with the predictions obtained with commonly used software packages. The latter showed a systematic under-estimation, especially for xenon.

  3. Environmental Applications of Stable Xenon and Radioxenon Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Dresel, P. Evan; Olsen, Khris B.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kennedy, B. M.

    2008-06-01

    Improved detection capabilities are needed at several Department of Energy sites to make remedial decisions about facilities and landfill cleanup. For facility monitoring air samples can be collected from within a facility and analyzed for short lived radioxenons to estimate inventories of residual plutonium holdup within the facility. For landfill cleanup activities soil gas sampling for xenon isotopes can be used to define the locations of spent fuel and transuranic wastes. Short-lived radioxenon isotopes are continuously produced by spontaneous fission of plutonium-240 in transuranic wastes. Large volume soil-gas samples provide extremely sensitive measurement of radioxenon in the subsurface; a characteristic of transuranic waste. The analysis employs a modified Automated Radioxenon Sampling and Analysis (ARSA) system. Proof of principle measurements at a Hanford Site liquid waste disposal site showed xenon-133 at levels in soil gas are approximately 16,000 times the detection limit and lower levels of xenon-135 from the spontaneous fission of plutonium-240 were also measured. Stable xenon isotopes are also produced by spontaneous fission but are subject to background concentrations in ambient air samples (facilities) but less so in soil gas where free exchange with ambient air is restricted. Rare gas mass spectrometry is used for highly precise stable xenon isotopic measurements. Stable xenon isotopic ratios from fission are distinct from natural xenon background ratios. Neutron capture on xenon-135 produces an excess of xenon-136 above fission ratios and thus provides a means of distinguishing reactor sources (e.g. spent fuel) from separated transuranic materials (plutonium).

  4. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; Miller, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Shuman, D.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Cárcel, S.; Castel, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Dias, T. H. V. T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Evtoukhovitch, P.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gil, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jinete, M. A.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Moiseenko, A.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Natal da Luz, H.; Navarro, G.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Palma, R.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Tomás, A.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R. C.; White, J.; Yahlali, N.

    2015-09-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope α-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  5. Modeling pulse characteristics in Xenon with NEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, J.; Barry, N.; Kazkaz, K.; Stolp, D.; Szydagis, M.; Tripathi, M.; Uvarov, S.; Woods, M.; Walsh, N.

    2014-04-01

    A comprehensive model for describing the characteristics of pulsed signals, generated by particle interactions in xenon detectors, is presented. An emphasis is laid on two-phase time projection chambers, but the models presented are also applicable to single phase detectors. In order to simulate the pulse shape due to primary scintillation light, the effects of the ratio of singlet and triplet dimer state populations, as well as their corresponding decay times, and the recombination time are incorporated into the model. In a two phase time projection chamber, when simulating the pulse caused by electroluminescence light, the ionization electron mean free path in gas, the drift velocity, singlet and triplet decay times, diffusion constants, and the electron trapping time, have been implemented. This modeling has been incorporated into a complete software package, which realistically simulates the expected pulse shapes for these types of detectors.

  6. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Root, Seth; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas R.; Flicker, Dawn G.

    2015-04-01

    Mixtures of light elements with heavy elements are important in inertial confinement fusion. We explore the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated temperature and pressure is used to obtain the thermodynamic state properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. To validate these simulations, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with the completion of dissociation in ethane. The DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental data along the principal Hugoniots and are used to provide insight into the dissociation and temperature along the Hugoniots as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for several compositions suggesting a limiting compression for C-C bonded systems.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of atomic xenon dissolved in Gay-Berne model liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Lintuvuori, Juho; Straka, Michal; Vaara, Juha

    2007-03-01

    We present constant-pressure Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral parameters, nuclear magnetic shielding relative to the free atom as well as nuclear quadrupole coupling, for atomic xenon dissolved in a model thermotropic liquid crystal. The solvent is described by Gay-Berne (GB) molecules with parametrization kappa=4.4, kappa{'}=20.0 , and mu=nu=1 . The reduced pressure of P{*}=2.0 is used. Previous simulations of a pure GB system with this parametrization have shown that upon lowering the temperature, the model exhibits isotropic, nematic, smectic- A , and smectic- B /molecular crystal phases. We introduce spherical xenon solutes and adjust the energy and length scales of the GB-Xe interaction to those of the GB-GB interaction. This is done through first principles quantum chemical calculations carried out for a dimer of model mesogens as well as the mesogen-xenon complex. We preparametrize quantum chemically the Xe nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling tensors when interacting with the model mesogen, and use the parametrization in a pairwise additive fashion in the analysis of the simulation. We present the temperature evolution of {129/131}Xe shielding and 131Xe quadrupole coupling in the different phases of the GB model. From the simulations, separate isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the experimentally available total shielding can be obtained. At the experimentally relevant concentration, the presence of the xenon atoms does not significantly affect the phase behavior as compared to the pure GB model. The simulations reproduce many of the characteristic experimental features of Xe NMR in real thermotropic LCs: Discontinuity in the value or trends of the shielding and quadrupole coupling at the nematic-isotropic and smectic-A-nematic phase transitions, nonlinear shift evolution in the nematic phase reflecting the behavior of the orientational order parameter, and decreasing shift in the smectic-A phase. The last

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of atomic xenon dissolved in Gay-Berne model liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintuvuori, Juho; Straka, Michal; Vaara, Juha

    2007-03-01

    We present constant-pressure Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral parameters, nuclear magnetic shielding relative to the free atom as well as nuclear quadrupole coupling, for atomic xenon dissolved in a model thermotropic liquid crystal. The solvent is described by Gay-Berne (GB) molecules with parametrization κ=4.4 , κ'=20.0 , and μ=ν=1 . The reduced pressure of P⋆=2.0 is used. Previous simulations of a pure GB system with this parametrization have shown that upon lowering the temperature, the model exhibits isotropic, nematic, smectic- A , and smectic- B /molecular crystal phases. We introduce spherical xenon solutes and adjust the energy and length scales of the GB-Xe interaction to those of the GB-GB interaction. This is done through first principles quantum chemical calculations carried out for a dimer of model mesogens as well as the mesogen-xenon complex. We preparametrize quantum chemically the Xe nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling tensors when interacting with the model mesogen, and use the parametrization in a pairwise additive fashion in the analysis of the simulation. We present the temperature evolution of Xe129/131 shielding and Xe131 quadrupole coupling in the different phases of the GB model. From the simulations, separate isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the experimentally available total shielding can be obtained. At the experimentally relevant concentration, the presence of the xenon atoms does not significantly affect the phase behavior as compared to the pure GB model. The simulations reproduce many of the characteristic experimental features of Xe NMR in real thermotropic LCs: Discontinuity in the value or trends of the shielding and quadrupole coupling at the nematic-isotropic and smectic- A -nematic phase transitions, nonlinear shift evolution in the nematic phase reflecting the behavior of the orientational order parameter, and decreasing shift in the smectic- A phase. The last

  9. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  10. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Raoul B.

    1988-01-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  11. Purging means and method for Xenon arc lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    High pressure Xenon short-arc lamp with two reservoirs which are selectively connectable to the lamp's envelope is described. One reservoir contains an absorbent which will absorb both Xenon and contaminant gases such as CO2 and O2. The absorbent temperature is controlled to evacuate the envelope of both the Xenon and the contaminant gases. The temperature of the absorbent is then raised to desorb only clean Xenon while retaining the contaminant gases, thereby clearing the envelope of the contaminant gases. The second reservoir contains a gas whose specific purpose is, to remove the objectional metal film which deposits gradually on the interior surface of the lamp envelope during normal arc operation. The origin of the film is metal transferred from the cathode of the arc lamp by sputtering or other gas transfer processes.

  12. Scintillation Efficiency of Liquid Xenon for Low Energy Nuclear Recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongjirad, Taritree; Ni, Kaixuan; Manzur, Angel; Kastens, Louis; McKinsey, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    In early 2006, the XENON and ZEPLIN collaborations announced highly stringent upper limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross-section. However, the dominant systematic uncertainty in these limits is due to the uncertainty in the nuclear recoil scintillation efficiency (NRSE) for liquid xenon. The NRSE is defined as the amount of scintillation produced by nuclear recoils, divided by the amount of scintillation produced by electron recoils, per unit energy. Though the NRSE has been measured by several groups, its value at the low energies most important for the liquid xenon WIMP searches has a large uncertainty. Furthermore, the NRSE may vary with the strength of the electric field in the liquid xenon. In an attempt to reduce these uncertainties, we have measured the NRSE down to 5 keV nuclear recoil energy for various electric fields.

  13. High-intensity xenon pulse light source for fluorescence excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Makoto; Ueno, Kazuo

    1997-05-01

    A newly developed 60W xenon flash lamp, L6604 and L6605, achieves the goals of longer operating life, higher output, and improved light stability. It operates at 2 Joules per flash input energy with approximately a 4 microsecond flash duration. The stability achieved is 2-3 percent peak-to-peak during a lifetime of 5 X 10e7 flashes, which is almost double that of conventional xenon flash lamps. This newly developed xenon flashlamp should serve as an excellent light source for analytical cytology and other fluorescence instruments. It can function as a high output, stable excitation light source for conventional fluorescence or delayed luminescence with a CCD. Besides providing powerful and stable illumination for absorption analysis of cells on slides, this lamp eliminates the optical artifacts associated with vibration of the stage which often limit throughput. This paper will describe in detail performance improvements obtained from this newly developed xenon flash lamp.

  14. Fission xenon from extinct Pu-244 in 14,301.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozd, R.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Ragan, D.

    1972-01-01

    Xenon extracted in step-wise heating of lunar breccia 14,301 contains a fission-like component in excess of that attributable to uranium decay during the age of the solar system. There seems to be no adequate source for this component other than Pu-244. Verification that this component is in fact due to the spontaneous fission of extinct Pu-244 comes from the derived spectrum which is similar to that observed from artificially produced Pu-244. It thus appears that Pu-244 was extant at the time lunar crustal material cooled sufficiently to arrest the thermal diffusion of xenon. Subsequent history has apparently maintained the isotopic integrity of plutonium fission xenon. Of major importance are details of the storage itself. Either the fission component is the result of in situ fission of Pu-244 and subsequent storage in 14,301 material, or the fission xenon was stored in an intermediate reservoir before incorporation into 14,301.

  15. The unbearable lightness of being: CDMS versus XENON

    SciTech Connect

    Frandsen, Mads T.; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Sarkar, Subir; McCabe, Christopher; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai E-mail: felix.kahlhoefer@physics.ox.ac.uk E-mail: s.sarkar@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2013-07-01

    The CDMS-II collaboration has reported 3 events in a Si detector, which are consistent with being nuclear recoils due to scattering of Galactic dark matter particles with a mass of ∼ 8.6 GeV and a cross-section on neutrons of ∼ 2 × 10{sup −41} cm{sup 2}. While a previous result from the XENON10 experiment has supposedly ruled out such particles as dark matter, we find by reanalysing the XENON10 data that this is not the case. Some tension remains however with the upper limit placed by the XENON100 experiment, independently of astrophysical uncertainties concerning the Galactic dark matter distribution. We explore possible ways of ameliorating this tension by altering the properties of dark matter interactions. Nevertheless, even with standard couplings, light dark matter is consistent with both CDMS and XENON10/100.

  16. Software tool for xenon gamma-ray spectrometer control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, I. V.; Novikov, A. S.; Shustov, A. E.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Pyae Nyein, Sone; Petrenko, D.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2016-02-01

    Software tool "Acquisition and processing of gamma-ray spectra" for xenon gamma-ray spectrometers control was developed. It supports the multi-windows interface. Software tool has the possibilities for acquisition of gamma-ray spectra from xenon gamma-ray detector via USB or RS-485 interfaces, directly or via TCP-IP protocol, energy calibration of gamma-ray spectra, saving gamma-ray spectra on a disk.

  17. Factors affecting the adsorption of xenon on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Underhill, D.W.; DiCello, D.C.; Scaglia, L.A.; Watson, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    The presence of water vapor was found to interfere strongly with the dynamic adsorption of /sup 133/Xe on coconut-base activated charcoal. The percent loss in the xenon adsorption coefficient was similar to values reported earlier for the adsorption of krypton on humidified charcoal. Attempts to increase the adsorption of xenon by (a) using a petroleum-based adsorbent with an extremely high surface area and (b) by impregnation of the adsorbent with iodine were not successful.

  18. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Xe-Implanted Uranium Dioxide Thick Films using Multilayer Laser Flash Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew T.

    2012-08-30

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program's Advanced Fuels campaign is currently pursuing use of ion beam assisted deposition to produce uranium dioxide thick films containing xenon in various morphologies. To date, this technique has provided materials of interest for validation of predictive fuel performance codes and to provide insight into the behavior of xenon and other fission gasses under extreme conditions. In addition to the structural data provided by such thick films, it may be possible to couple these materials with multilayer laser flash analysis in order to measure the impact of xenon on thermal transport in uranium dioxide. A number of substrate materials (single crystal silicon carbide, molybdenum, and quartz) containing uranium dioxide films ranging from one to eight microns in thickness were evaluated using multilayer laser flash analysis in order to provide recommendations on the most promising substrates and geometries for further investigation. In general, the uranium dioxide films grown to date using ion beam assisted deposition were all found too thin for accurate measurement. Of the substrates tested, molybdenum performed the best and looks to be the best candidate for further development. Results obtained within this study suggest that the technique does possess the necessary resolution for measurement of uranium dioxide thick films, provided the films are grown in excess of fifty microns. This requirement is congruent with the material needs when viewed from a fundamental standpoint, as this length scale of material is required to adequately sample grain boundaries and possible second phases present in ceramic nuclear fuel.

  19. Distillation column for the XENON1T experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieguth, Alexander; XENON Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The XENON1T experiment will probe a new parameter space in the direct dark matter search. Besides the enlargement of target mass to the ton scale, a further background reduction with respect to its predecessor XENON100 is necessary. A major contribution to the intrinsic contamination is the β-decaying isotope 85Kr, which leads to the requirement of a concentration less than 0.2 ppt of natural krypton in xenon. Its removal from the xenon gas is achieved by cryogenic distillation. For the new experiment a custom-build distillation column with a separation factor larger than 105 and a throughput of 3kg/h has been designed and built at the University of Muenster. Furthermore its performance has been characterized using different trace gas detection techniques, e.g. a novel 83mKr-tracer method, and its functionality has been tested successfully. The distillation column, which is installed and commissioned at the XENON1T experiment, is ready to process the 3.5 tons of xenon.

  20. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  1. Chlorine dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine dioxide ; CASRN 10049 - 04 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  2. The Significance of the Bond Angle in Sulfur Dioxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purser, Gordon H.

    1989-01-01

    Examined are the illustrations and descriptions of the molecular structure of sulfur dioxide found in selected chemistry textbooks. Inconsistencies and incorrect information are indicated. It is suggested that molecules other than sulfur dioxide be used as examples of molecules for which resonance is important. (CW)

  3. Effect of relativity on the ionization spectra of the xenon fluorides XeFn (n=2, 4, 6).

    PubMed

    Pernpointner, Markus; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2005-06-01

    Noble gas compounds exhibit special chemical bonding situations and have been investigated by various spectroscopic and theoretical techniques. In this work we calculate the ionization spectra of the xenon fluorides (XeF2,XeF4, and XeF6) in the valence and subvalence (down to Xe 4d) areas by application of the recently developed Dirac-Hartree-Fock one-particle propagator technique. In this technique, the relativistic (four-component) and electron correlation effects are computed simultaneously. The xenon compounds show considerable spin-orbit splitting strongly influencing the photoelectron spectrum not reproducible in prior calculations. Comparison to one-component methods is made and the occurring satellite structures are interpreted. The satellite structures can be attributed either to the breakdown of the one-particle picture or to a reflection of intra-atomic and interatomic Auger decay processes within the molecule. PMID:15974733

  4. Optimization of Xenon Difluoride Vapor Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Joseph; Marganski, Paul; Kaim, Robert; Wodjenski, Mike; Gregg, John; Yedave, Sharad; Sergi, Steve; Bishop, Steve; Eldridge, David; Zou Peng

    2008-11-03

    Xenon difluoride (XeF{sub 2}) has been shown to provide many process benefits when used as a daily maintenance recipe for ion implant. Regularly flowing XeF{sub 2} into the ion source cleans the deposits generated by ion source operation. As a result, significant increases in productivity have been demonstrated. However, XeF{sub 2} is a toxic oxidizer that must be handled appropriately. Furthermore, it is a low vapor pressure solid under standard conditions ({approx}4.5 torr at 25 deg. C). These aspects present unique challenges for designing a package for delivering the chemistry to an ion implanter. To address these challenges, ATMI designed a high-performance, re-usable cylinder for dispensing XeF{sub 2} in an efficient and reliable manner. Data are presented showing specific attributes of the cylinder, such as the importance of internal heat transfer media and the cylinder valve size. The impact of mass flow controller (MFC) selection and ion source tube design on the flow rate of XeF{sub 2} are also discussed. Finally, cylinder release rate data are provided.

  5. Low-energy positron interactions with xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, J. R.; Makochekanwa, C.; Jones, A. C. L.; Caradonna, P.; Slaughter, D. S.; McEachran, R. P.; Sullivan, J. P.; Buckman, S. J.; Bellm, S.; Lohmann, B.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.; Mueller, D. W.; Stauffer, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    Low-energy interactions of positrons with xenon have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental measurements were carried out using a trap-based positron beam with an energy resolution of ˜80 meV, while the theoretical calculations were carried out using the convergent close-coupling method and the relativistic optical potential approach. Absolute values of the grand total, positronium formation and grand total minus positronium formation cross sections are presented over the energy range of 1-60 eV. Elastic differential cross sections (DCS), for selected energies, are also presented both below and above the positronium formation threshold. Fine energy-step measurements of the positronium formation cross section over the energy range of 4.4-8.4 eV, and measurements of the elastic DCS at the energies of 5.33 and 6.64 eV, have been carried out to investigate the ionization threshold regions corresponding to the 2P3/2 and 2P1/2 states of the Xe+ ion. The present results are compared with both experimental and theoretical values from the literature where available.

  6. Breakdown characteristics of xenon HID Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Sato, Ayumu; Brates, Nanu; Noro, Koji; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The breakdown characteristics of mercury free xenon high intensity discharge (HID) lamps exhibit a large statistical time lag often having a large scatter in breakdown voltages. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the processes which determine the ignition voltages for positive and negative pulses in commercial HID lamps having fill pressures of up to 20 atm. Steep voltage rise results in higher avalanche electron densities and earlier breakdown times. Circuit characteristics also play a role. Large ballast resistors may limit current to the degree that breakdown is quenched. The breakdown voltage critically depends on cathode charge injection by electric field emission (or other mechanisms) which in large part controls the statistical time lag for breakdown. For symmetric lamps, ionization waves (IWs) simultaneously develop from the bottom and top electrodes. Breakdown typically occurs when the top and bottom IWs converge. Condensed salt layers having small conductivities on the inner walls of HID lamps and on the electrodes can influence the ignition behavior. With these layers, IWs tend to propagate along the inner wall and exhibit a different structure depending on the polarity.

  7. Stable xenon nitride at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Feng; Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yunwei; Ma, Yanming

    2015-09-01

    Nitrides in many ways are fascinating since they often appear as superconductors, high-energy density, and hard materials. Though there exist a large variety of nitrides, noble gas nitrides are missing in nature. Pursuit of noble gas nitrides has therefore become the subject of topical interests, but remains as a great challenge since molecular nitrogen (N2, a major form of nitrogen) and noble gases are both inert systems and do not interact at normal conditions. We show through a first-principles swarm-structure search that high pressure enables a direct interaction of N2 and xenon (Xe) above 146 GPa. The resultant Xe nitride has a peculiar stoichiometry of XeN6, possessing a high-energy density of approximately 2.4 kJg -1, rivaling that of the modern explosives. Structurally, XeN6 is intriguing with the appearance of chaired N6 hexagons and unusually high 12-coordination of Xe bonded with N. Our work opens up the possibility of achieving Xe nitride with superior high-energy density whose formation is long sought as impossible.

  8. Optimization of Xenon Difluoride Vapor Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Joseph; Marganski, Paul; Kaim, Robert; Wodjenski, Mike; Gregg, John; Yedave, Sharad; Sergi, Steve; Bishop, Steve; Eldridge, David; Zou, Peng

    2008-11-01

    Xenon difluoride (XeF2) has been shown to provide many process benefits when used as a daily maintenance recipe for ion implant. Regularly flowing XeF2 into the ion source cleans the deposits generated by ion source operation. As a result, significant increases in productivity have been demonstrated. However, XeF2 is a toxic oxidizer that must be handled appropriately. Furthermore, it is a low vapor pressure solid under standard conditions (˜4.5 torr at 25 °C). These aspects present unique challenges for designing a package for delivering the chemistry to an ion implanter. To address these challenges, ATMI designed a high-performance, re-usable cylinder for dispensing XeF2 in an efficient and reliable manner. Data are presented showing specific attributes of the cylinder, such as the importance of internal heat transfer media and the cylinder valve size. The impact of mass flow controller (MFC) selection and ion source tube design on the flow rate of XeF2 are also discussed. Finally, cylinder release rate data are provided.

  9. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Thomas; Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Flicker, Dawn G.

    2015-04-22

    Mixtures of light elements with heavy elements are important in inertial confinement fusion. We explore the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated temperature and pressure is used to obtain the thermodynamic state properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. In order to validate these simulations, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with the completion of dissociation in ethane. Furthermore, the DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental data along the principal Hugoniots and are used to provide insight into the dissociation and temperature along the Hugoniots as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for several compositions suggesting a limiting compression for C-C bonded systems.

  10. Cerebral blood flow tomography with xenon-133

    SciTech Connect

    Lassen, N.A.

    1985-10-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) can be measured tomographically by inhalation of Xenon-/sup 133/. The calculation is based on taking a sequence of tomograms during the wash-in and wash-out phase of the tracer. Due to the dynamic nature of the process, a highly sensitive and fast moving single photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT) is required. Two brain-dedicated SPECT systems designed for this purpose are mentioned, and the method is described with special reference to the limitations inherent in the soft energy of the 133Xe primary photons. CBF tomography can be used for a multitude of clinical and investigative purposes. This article discusses in particular its use for the selection of patients with carotid occlusion for extracranial/intracranial bypass surgery, for detection of severe arterial spasm after aneurysm bleeding, and for detection of low flow areas during severe migraine attacks. The use of other tracers for CBF tomography using SPECT is summarized with emphasis on the /sup 99m/Tc chelates that freely pass the intact blood-brain barrier. The highly sensitive brain-dedicated SPECT systems described are a prerequisite for achieving high resolution tomograms with such tracers.

  11. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Thomas; Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Flicker, Dawn G.

    2015-04-22

    Mixtures of light elements with heavy elements are important in inertial confinement fusion. We explore the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated temperature and pressure is used to obtain the thermodynamic state properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. In order to validate these simulations, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with the completion of dissociation in ethane. Furthermore, themore » DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental data along the principal Hugoniots and are used to provide insight into the dissociation and temperature along the Hugoniots as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for several compositions suggesting a limiting compression for C-C bonded systems.« less

  12. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flicker, Dawn; Magyar, Rudolph; Root, Seth; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Mixtures of light and heavy elements arise in inertial confinement fusion and planetary science. We present results on the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT/QMD) at elevated-temperature and pressure is used to obtain the properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. To validate the QMD simulations, we performed high-precision shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis of the simulations correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with completion of dissociation in ethane. DFT-based simulation results compare well with experimental data and are used to provide insight into the dissociation as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for ethane, Xe-ethane, polymethyl-pentene, and polystyrene, suggesting that a limiting compression exists for C-C bonded systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Direct Dark Matter Search with the XENON100 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yuan

    Dark matter, a non-luminous, non-baryonic matter, is thought to constitute 23 % of the matter-energy components in the universe today. Except for its gravitational effects, the existence of dark matter has never been confirmed by any other means and its nature remains unknown. If a hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) were in thermal equilibrium in the early universe, it could have a relic abundance close to that of dark matter today, which provides a promising particle candidate of dark matter. Minimal Super-Symmetric extensions to the standard model predicts a stable particle with mass in the range 10 GeV/c2 to 1000 GeV/c2, and spin-independent cross-section with ordinary matter nucleon sigmax < 1 x 10--43 cm2. The XENON100 experiment deploys a Dual Phase Liquid Xenon Time Projection Chamber (LXeTPC) of 62 kg liquid xenon as its sensitive volume, to detect scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) signals from WIMP dark matter particles directly scattering off xenon nuclei. The detector is located underground at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in central Italy. 1.4 km of rock (3.7 km water equivalent) reduces the cosmic muon background by a factor of 106. The event-by-event 3D positioning capability of TPC allows volume fiducialization. With the self-shielding power of liquid xenon, as well as a 99 kg liquid xenon active veto, the electromagnetic radiation background is greatly suppressed. By utilizing the difference of (S2/S1) between electronic recoil and nuclear recoil, the expected WIMP signature, a small nuclear recoil energy deposition, could be discriminated from electronic recoil background with high efficiency. XENON100 achieved the lowest background rate (< 2.2 x 10--2 events/kg/day/keV) in the dark matter search region (< 40 keV) among all direct dark matter detectors. With 11.2 days of data, XENON100 already sets the world's best spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section limit of 2.7 x 10--44 cm2 at WIMP mass 50 GeV/c 2

  14. Xenon-enhanced CT imaging of local pulmonary ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, Jehangir K.; Tran, Binh Q.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    We are using the unique features of electron beam CT (EBCT) in conjunction with respiratory and cardiac gating to explore the use of non-radioactive xenon gas as a pulmonary ventilation contrast agent. The goal is to construct accurate and quantitative high-resolution maps of local pulmonary ventilation in humans. We are evaluating xenon-enhanced computed tomography in the pig model with dynamic tracer washout/dilution and single breath inhalation imaging protocols. Scanning is done via an EBCT scanner which offers 50 msec scan aperture speeds. CT attenuation coefficients (image gray scale value) show a linear increase with xenon concentration (r equals 0.99). We measure a 1.55 Hounsfield Unit (HU) enhancement (kV equals 130, mA equals 623) per percentage increase in xenon gas concentration giving an approximately 155 HU enhancement with 100% xenon gas concentration as measured in a plexiglass super-syringe. Early results indicate that a single breath (from functional residual capacity to total lung capacity) of 100% xenon gas provides an average 32 +/- 1.85 (SE) HU enhancement in the lung parenchyma (maximum 50 HU) and should not encounter unwanted xenon side effects. However, changes in lung density occurring during even short breath holds (as short as 10 seconds) may limit using a single breath technique to synchronous volumetric scanning, currently possible only with EBCT. Preliminary results indicate close agreement between measured regional xenon concentration-time curves and theoretical predictions for the same sample. More than 10 breaths with inspirations to as high as 25 cmH2O airway pressure were needed to clear tracer from all lung regions and some regions had nearly linear rather than mono-exponential clearance curves. When regional parenchymal xenon concentration-time curves were analyzed, vertical gradients in ventilation and redistribution of ventilation at higher inspiratory flow rates were consistent with known pulmonary physiology. We present

  15. Influence of radiation damage on xenon diffusion in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, E.; Gärtner, K.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; van der Berg, N. G.; Thabethe, T. T.

    2014-08-01

    Diffusion of xenon in poly and single crystalline silicon carbide and the possible influence of radiation damage on it are investigated. For this purpose 360 keV xenon ions were implanted in commercial 6H-SiC and CVD-SiC wafers at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C. Width broadening of the implantation profiles and xenon retention during isochronal and isothermal annealing up to temperatures of 1500 °C was determined by RBS-analysis, whilst in the case of 6H-SiC damage profiles were simultaneously obtained by α-particle channelling. No diffusion or xenon loss was detected in the initially amorphized and eventually recrystallized surface layer of cold implanted 6H-SiC during annealing up to 1200 °C. Above that temperature serious erosion of the implanted surface occurred, which made any analysis impossible. No diffusion or xenon loss is detected in the hot implanted 6H-SiC samples during annealing up to 1400 °C. Radiation damage dependent grain boundary diffusion is observed at 1300 °C in CVD-SiC.

  16. XEMIS: A liquid xenon detector for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego Manzano, L.; Bassetto, S.; Beaupere, N.; Briend, P.; Carlier, T.; Cherel, M.; Cussonneau, J.-P.; Donnard, J.; Gorski, M.; Hamanishi, R.; Kraeber Bodéré, F.; Le Ray, P.; Lemaire, O.; Masbou, J.; Mihara, S.; Morteau, E.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Stutzmann, J.-S.; Tauchi, T.; Thers, D.

    2015-07-01

    A new medical imaging technique based on the precise 3D location of a radioactive source by the simultaneous detection of 3γ rays has been proposed by Subatech laboratory. To take advantage of this novel technique a detection device based on a liquid xenon Compton telescope and a specific (β+, γ) emitter radionuclide, 44Sc, are required. A first prototype of a liquid xenon time projection chamber called XEMIS1 has been successfully developed showing very promising results for the energy and spatial resolutions for the ionization signal in liquid xenon, thanks to an advanced cryogenics system, which has contributed to a high liquid xenon purity with a very good stability and an ultra-low noise front-end electronics (below 100 electrons) operating at liquid xenon temperature. The very positive results obtained with XEMIS1 have led to the development of a second prototype for small animal imaging, XEMIS2, which is now under development. To study the feasibility of the 3γ imaging technique and optimize the characteristics of the device, a complete Monte Carlo simulation has been also carried out. A preliminary study shows very positive results for the sensitivity, energy and spatial resolutions of XEMIS2.

  17. Hugoniot measurements of double-shocked precompressed dense xenon plasmas.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Chen, Q F; Gu, Y J; Chen, Z Y

    2012-12-01

    The current partially ionized plasmas models for xenon show substantial differences since the description of pressure and thermal ionization region becomes a formidable task, prompting the need for an improved understanding of dense xenon plasmas behavior at above 100 GPa. We performed double-shock compression experiments on dense xenon to determine accurately the Hugoniot up to 172 GPa using a time-resolved optical radiation method. The planar strong shock wave was produced using a flyer plate impactor accelerated up to ∼6 km/s with a two-stage light-gas gun. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were acquired by using a multiwavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Shock velocity was measured and mass velocity was determined by the impedance-matching methods. The experimental equation of state of dense xenon plasmas are compared with the self-consistent fluid variational calculations of dense xenon in the region of partial ionization over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. PMID:23368058

  18. Spectrally Resolved Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the XenonBiosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hilty, Christian; Lowery, Thomas; Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

    2005-07-15

    Due to its ability to non-invasively record images, as well as elucidate molecular structure, nuclear magnetic resonance is the method of choice for applications as widespread as chemical analysis and medical diagnostics. Its detection threshold is, however, limited by the small polarization of nuclear spins in even the highest available magnetic fields. This limitation can, under certain circumstances, be alleviated by using hyper-polarized substances. Xenon biosensors make use of the sensitivity gain of hyperpolarized xenon to provide magnetic resonance detection capability for a specific low-concentration target. They consist of a cryptophane cage, which binds one xenon atom, and which has been connected via a linker to a targeting moiety such as a ligand or antibody. Recent work has shown the possibility of using the xenon biosensor to detect small amounts of a substance in a heterogeneous environment by NMR. Here, we demonstrate that magnetic resonance (MR) provides the capability to obtain spectrally and spatially resolved images of the distribution of immobilized biosensor, opening the possibility for using the xenon biosensor for targeted imaging.

  19. Xenon-induced changes in CNS sensitization to pain.

    PubMed

    Adolph, Oliver; Köster, Sarah; Georgieff, Michael; Bäder, Stefan; Föhr, Karl J; Kammer, Thomas; Herrnberger, Bärbel; Grön, Georg

    2010-01-01

    Electrophysiological investigations of the spinal cord in animals have shown that pain sensitizes the central nervous system via glutamate receptor dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) related to an enhancement of pain perception. To expand these findings, we used functional magnetic resonance (fMRI), blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) and perfusion imaging in combination with repeated electrical stimulation in humans. Specifically we monitored modulation of somatosensory processing during inhibition of excitatory transmission by ocular application of the glutamate receptor antagonist xenon. BOLD responses upon secondary stimulation increased in mid insular and in primary/secondary sensory cortices under placebo and decreased under xenon treatments. Xenon-induced decreases in regional perfusion were confined to stimulation responsive brain regions and correlated with time courses of xenon concentrations in the cranial blood. Moreover, effects of xenon on behavioral, fMRI and perfusion data scaled with stimulus intensity. The dependence of pain sensitization on sufficient pre-activation reflects a multistage process which is characteristic for glutamate receptor related processes of LTP. This study demonstrates how LTP related processes known from the cellular level can be investigated at the brain systems level. PMID:19703572

  20. Emergence in Elderly Patient Undergoing General Anesthesia with Xenon

    PubMed Central

    Wefki Abdelgawwad Shousha, Ahmed Abdelgawwad; Paparazzo, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. It is a consensus that the postoperative cognitive function is impaired in elderly patients after general anaesthesia, and such category patient takes more time to recover. Xenon is a noble gas with anesthetic properties mediated by antagonism of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. With a minimum alveolar concentration of 0.63, xenon is intended for maintaining hypnosis with 30% oxygen. The fast recovery after xenon anaesthesia was hypothesized to be advantageous in this scenario. Case Presentation. We report the case of 99-year-old woman who underwent sigmoid colon carcinoma resection with colorectal anastomosis. We carried out the induction phase by propofol, oxygen, fentanil, and rocuronium bromide, and then we proceeded to a rapid sequence endotracheal intubation consequently. The patient was monitored by IBP, NIBP, ECG, cardiac frequency, respiratory rate, capnometry, TOF Guard, blood gas analysis, and BIS. For maintenance we administrated oxygen, remifentanil, rocuronium bromide, and xenon gas 60–65%. Shortly after the end of surgery the patients started an autonomous respiratory activity, and a high BIS level was also recorded. Decision was made by our team to proceed into the emergence phase. The residual neuromuscular block was antagonized by sugammadex, modified Aldrete score was implicated, and we got our patient fully awake without any cognitive dysfunction or delirium. Conclusion. The rapid emergence to full orientation in very elderly patient who had been anesthetized by xenon shows concordance to the high BIS values and the clinical signs of the depth of anesthesia. PMID:23762640

  1. The krypton and xenon markets up to the year 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammarlund, Nils

    1992-05-01

    Krypton and xenon are rare gases which are found in air in concentrations of about 1.14 and 0.087 ppm, respectively. They are produced in specially equipped, very large air separation units by adding a special raw gas extraction unit. Then this raw gas is purified and the krypton and xenon are separated by cryogenic methods. These rare gases are used in the lamp industry, for medical applications and in laser and research applications. The market for krypton and xenon is growing. The production capacity for these gases is limited and this results in a cyclic behavior of availability and market price. In the next few years, 10-20 million liters of krypton and one to two million liters of xenon will become available on the market due to new investments in the USA, South Africa and the AGA AB joint venture in the USSR. The total world production capacity of krypton and xenon will increase to 60-80 million liters. To influence the availability of these gases it is important to have close partnership between user and producer, which will realize bright and unorthodox ideas for the supply and use of these rare gases.

  2. The next generation dark matter hunter: XENON1T status and perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, A.

    2016-07-01

    The XENON Dark Matter Experiment has been ongoing at LNGS since 2005 with the goal of searching for dark matter WIMPs with liquid xenon as target and detector material. With detectors of increasing target mass and decreasing background, the XENON program has achieved competitive limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction couplings, but also on axions and axion like particles. With the start of the next generation experiment, XENON1T expected in 2015, XENON Dark Matter Experiment will continue to lead field of dark matter direct detection. XENON1T will be the first experiment to use multi-tons of liquid xenon in a time projection chamber and is designed to achieve two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than the current best limits. I will review the status of construction and the scientific goals of XENON1T.

  3. Low-Energy Sputtering Studies of Boron Nitride with Xenon Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. K.; Shutthanandan, V.

    1999-01-01

    Sputtering of boron nitride with xenon ions was investigated using secondary ion (SIMS) and secondary neutral (SNMS) mass spectrometry. The ions generated from the ion gun were incident on the target at an angle of 50' with respect to the surface'normal. The energy of ions ranged from 100 eV to 3 keV. A flood electron gun was used to neutralize the positive charge build-up on the target surface. The intensities of sputtered neutral and charged particles, including single atoms, molecules, and clusters, were measured as a function of ion energy. Positive SIMS spectra were dominated by the two boron isotopes whereas BN- and B- were the two major constituents of the negative SIMS spectra. Nitrogen could be detected only in the SNMS spectra. The intensity-energy curves of the sputtered particles were similar in shape. The knees in P-SIMS and SNMS intensity-energy curves appear at around I keV which is significantly higher that 100 to 200 eV energy range at which knees appear in the sputtering of medium and heavy elements by ions of argon and xenon. This difference in the position of the sputter yield knee between boron nitride and heavier targets is due to the reduced ion energy differences. The isotopic composition of secondary ions of boron were measured by bombarding boron nitride with xenon ions at energies ranging from 100 eV to 1.5 keV using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. An ion gun was used to generate the ion beam. A flood electron gun was used to neutralize the positive charge buildup on the target surface. The secondary ion flux was found to be enriched in heavy isotopes at lower incident ion energies. The heavy isotope enrichment was observed to decrease with increasing primary ion energy. Beyond 350 eV, light isotopes were sputtered preferentially with the enrichment increasing to an asymptotic value of 1.27 at 1.5 keV. The trend is similar to that of the isotopic enrichment observed earlier when copper was sputtered with xenon ions in the same energy

  4. Study of the electromagnetic background in the XENON100 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aprile, E.; Choi, B.; Giboni, K.-L.; Lang, R. F.; Lim, K. E.; Melgarejo Fernandez, A. J.; Plante, G.; Arisaka, K.; Cline, D.; Lam, C. W.; Lung, K.; Pantic, E.; Teymourian, A.; Wang, H.; Arneodo, F.; Askin, A.; Baudis, L.; Behrens, A.; Ferella, A. D.; Kish, A.

    2011-04-15

    The XENON100 experiment, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, aims to directly detect dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles via their elastic scattering off xenon nuclei. We present a comprehensive study of the predicted electronic recoil background coming from radioactive decays inside the detector and shield materials and intrinsic radioactivity in the liquid xenon. Based on GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations using a detailed geometry together with the measured radioactivity of all detector components, we predict an electronic recoil background in the energy region of interest and 30 kg fiducial mass of less than 10{sup -2} events{center_dot}kg{sup -1{center_dot}}day{sup -1{center_dot}}keV{sup -1}, consistent with the experiment's design goal. The predicted background spectrum is in very good agreement with the data taken during the commissioning of the detector in Fall 2009.

  5. Xenon bubble chambers for direct dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, C.; Fallon, S.; Genovesi, J.; Khaitan, D.; Klimov, K.; Mock, J.; Szydagis, M.

    2016-03-01

    The search for dark matter is one of today's most exciting fields. As bigger detectors are being built to increase their sensitivity, background reduction is an ever more challenging issue. To this end, a new type of dark matter detector is proposed, a xenon bubble chamber, which would combine the strengths of liquid xenon TPCs, namely event by event energy resolution, with those of a bubble chamber, namely insensitivity to electronic recoils. In addition, it would be the first time ever that a dark matter detector is active on all three detection channels, ionization and scintillation characteristic of xenon detectors, and heat through bubble formation in superheated fluids. Preliminary simulations show that, depending on threshold, a discrimination of 99.99% to 99.9999+% can be achieved, which is on par or better than many current experiments. A prototype is being built at the University at Albany, SUNY. The prototype is currently undergoing seals, thermal, and compression testing.

  6. High-pressure xenon detectors for gamma-ray spectrometry

    PubMed

    Dmitrenko; Gratchev; Ulin; Uteshev; Viasik

    2000-03-01

    The main results of long-term research on compressed xenon detector properties conducted at the laboratory of cosmic physics of MEPhI are given along with a description of the latest gamma-ray spectrometers based on this work. It is shown that using xenon as working substance, it is possible to create a gamma-ray spectrometer with high energy resolution. The construction and the main physical, technical and operation performances of xenon gamma-ray spectrometers based on ionization chambers of various configurations are described. For a gamma-ray spectrometer with a cylindrical ionization chamber and shielding grid, an energy resolution of about 14 keV (10 keV intrinsic resolution) for gamma-ray line of 662 keV is obtained. The characteristics of these detectors allow one to apply them in various fields of science and engineering, moreover, their good spectrometric properties provide the opportunity to use them for metrology measurements. PMID:10724434

  7. High-pressure xenon detector development at Constellation Technology Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert A.; Bastian, Lloyd F.

    2006-08-01

    Xenon-filled ionization detectors, due to their high atomic number fill gas (Z=54), moderate densities (~0.3 g/cm 3-0.5 g/cm 3) and good energy resolution (2%-4% at 662 keV), fill an important niche between more familiar technologies such as NaI(Tl) scintillators and Germanium detectors. Until recently, difficulties with obtaining sufficient Xenon purity, reducing microphonic sensitivity, and developing low-noise electronics compatible with small ionization signals have hampered the development of this nuclear detection field. Constellation Technology Corporation, whose experience with xenon detectors goes back to the mid 1990's, has made significant progress in these areas and has developed a commercial line of detectors with active volumes ranging from small (35 g Xe) to large (1400 g Xe). Here we will discuss our development of a mobile, large area, spectroscopic array.

  8. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-28

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  9. Time profile of the scintillation from liquid and gaseous xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Ikuko; Nakamura, Shogo

    2014-11-01

    The decay time profile of vacuum ultraviolet scintillation induced by electronic recoils has been studied for liquid and gaseous xenon. The scintillation light from xenon excited by a gamma source was measured by using two vacuum ultraviolet sensitive photomultipliers, one for detecting scintillation and the other for counting photons of weak monochromatic light. The analysis results based on the time-correlated single photon counting method show that the time profile in the 176 nm scintillation decay curve for liquid xenon is consistent with a single exponential component and the decay time constant is 31.5±1.3 ns. This constant does not change significantly for pressure ranges between 90 kPa and 130 kPa. There is no emission wavelength dependence of the decay constant. The result corresponds to an average on electronic recoil energies up to 1.3 MeV.

  10. Modeling the Energy Resolution of Xenon with NEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, Sergey

    2013-04-01

    In addition to explaining the mean yields, NEST (the Noble Element Simulation Technique) can also address the energy resolution degrading effects in noble elements, for both electron and nuclear recoils (ER and NR). Liquid and gaseous xenon will be presented as examples. A non-binomial recombination fluctuation model will be discussed which well describes the intrinsic, supra-Poissonian resolution observed in xenon. It is combined with electric field effects, the Fano factor, and detector efforts, such as finite light collection efficiency and PMT quantum efficiency. In matters of conflicting dark matter search results observed by experiments such as XENON100 and CoGeNT, a stochastic, non-analytic, partially non-Gaussian understanding of the energy resolution for low-energy, WIMP-like nuclear recoils may be part of the solution. ER-NR discrimination can be predicted well with such an understanding.

  11. Estimation of Anomalous Single Scatter Events in XENON100 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kyungeun; Xenon100 Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    Anomalous single scatter events in XENON100 are events that have only one scintillation pulse (S1) and one ionization pulse (S2), but are multiple scatters in nature. Only one scatter takes place inside the detector's charge and light sensitive volume, resulting in a S2/S1 ratio that is lower than that of true single scatter events and typical of that expected from a WIMP interaction. The identification and suppression of these anomalous events is therefore essential for a sensitive dark matter search. I present results from a Monte Carlo (MC) study that was carried out to estimate the expected number of anomalous single scatter events in the XENON100 WIMP search data. The MC was validated with a comparison with Co-60 gamma-calibration data. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF, DOE, SNF, the Volkswagen Foundation, FCT, and STCSM. We are grateful to the LNGS for hosting and supporting the XENON program.

  12. [Perspective in the development and supply of equipment for xenon anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Burov, N E; Molchanov, I V; Potapov, V N; Nikolaev, L L

    2005-01-01

    Basic trends in development of methods and equipment for xenon-saving anesthesia are discussed. Brief description of specifications of equipment for xenon anesthesia is given. Unique models of domestic medical devices are briefly described together with methods of their adaptation to commercial equipment for anesthesia. Prospects in further upgrade of the equipment for xenon anesthesia are discussed. PMID:16491656

  13. The LUX Two-Phase-Xenon Dark Matter Search Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiegler, Tyana; Camp, Charlie; Marquez, Zach; Rodinov, Andrew; White, James

    2007-10-01

    The race to be the first experiment to detect collisions between atoms and a new type of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) that is conjectured to explain dark matter is heating up. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector is a second-generation WIMP dark matter search experiment that employs a liquid xenon target and provides background discrimination based on the ratio of ionization to scintillation produced in subatomic particle interactions. This experiment is designed to reach the heart of the favored parameter space for supersymmetric WIMPs and has a genuine chance to be the discovery experiment. The concept, design, schedule and reach of the experiment will be discussed.

  14. A Mini-helicon Thruster in Argon and Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Francis F.

    2015-11-01

    Our small helicon discharge, 5 cm in diam and 5 cm long, using a commercial Nd permanent magnet, has been used previously to eject an argon ion beam suitable for spacecraft propulsion. The specific impulse can be increased by biasing the conducting top plate of the discharge. Thrusters normally use xenon for propulsion because of its high mass and low ionization potential. We have now tested the mini-helicon thruster in xenon. The entire device is small enough to be brought to a poster session and shown there.

  15. Liquid/solid/dual phase xenon γ-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sonsbeek, R.; Bom, V. R.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Hollander, R. W.; Meijvogel, K.; Okx, W. J. C.

    1994-09-01

    It is recognized by various groups in the world that liquid xenon (LXe) is an interesting medium for the detection of γ-rays. In spite of all the experimental and theoretical effort expended during recent years, the processes that take place in this medium are not yet fully understood. We have obtained some preliminary results using an ionization chamber with a Frisch grid. This chamber could be filled with LXe and with solid xenon (SXe). We also investigated dual phase (GXe/SXe) systems. Our study will be continued with a newly developed detection cell described in this article.

  16. XENON: A 1 tonne liquid Xenon Detector for a sensitive WIMP dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberlack, U.

    The current set of cosmological observations indicates a universe consisting of about 2/3 "dark energy" and 1/3 matter, of which90% is dark. Big bang nucleosyn- thesis and deuterium abundance measurements imply that most of the dark matter is non-baryonic. Dark matter also plays a central role in structure formation, and its microscopic properties have a significant impact on the spatial distribution of mass as traced by galaxies and clusters. Several lines of arguments indicate that dark matter consists of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), the best-motivated exam- ple of which is the neutralino, the lightest supersymmetric particle. Direct detection offers the hope of studying the dark matter properties in detail, and shedding light on particle physics beyond the Standard Model. Understanding the nature of dark mat- ter is therefore highly significant from both the astrophysics and fundamental physics point of view. Current experiments are not yet sensitive enough by a factor of sev- eral 1000, to test the lowest SUSY predictions. Our approach to this challenge is XENON, a liquid Xenon experiment, based on an array of 10 self-shielded time pro- jection chambers of 100 kg fiducial mass each. The simultaneous measurement of ion- ization and scintillation signals produced by a WIMP interaction results in effective background discrimination (> 99.5%) down to a threshold of 4 keV. Event localiza- tion in 3D yields additional discrimination power. We describe this detector concept for a sensitive Dark Matter search in the context of other existing and planned experi- ments. Our target sensitivity of 4 10-10 pb is sufficient to probe the lowest predicted interaction rates for supersymmetric models.

  17. Computer simulations of the Adsorption of Xenon onto a C60 monolayer on Ag (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatica, Silvina; Cole, Milton; Diehl, Renee

    2007-03-01

    We performed Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations to study the adsorption of Xenon on a substrate composed of C60 molecules placed on top of a Ag(111) surface. The C60 molecules form a commensurate structure at a distance of 0.227 nm above the Ag surface. The interaction potential between the Xe atoms and the substrate has two contributions: from the C60 molecules and from the Ag atoms. In the simulations, the interaction with the Ag surface was computed using an ab initio van der Waals potential, varying as 1/d^3. The interaction between the Xe atoms and each C60 molecule was computed using a potential previously developed by Hernandez et.al. (E. S. Hernandez, M. W. Cole and M. Boninsegni, ``Wetting of spherical surfaces by quantum fluids'', J. Low Temp. Phys. 134, 309-314 (2004)), who integrated the Lennard Jones interaction over the surface of a spherical buckyball. The total potential has especially attractive 3-fold sites, positioned 0.4 nm above the point between each three buckyballs. The low coverage uptake populates those sites, and then continues forming a monolayer. The adsorption isotherms show several steps, typical of substrates that have distinct adsorption sites. We compare the results with the experimental data.

  18. Xenon-mediated neuroprotection in response to sustained, low-level excitotoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Lavaur, J; Lemaire, M; Pype, J; Le Nogue, D; Hirsch, E C; Michel, P P

    2016-01-01

    Noble gases such as xenon and argon have been reported to provide neuroprotection against acute brain ischemic/anoxic injuries. Herein, we wished to evaluate the protective potential of these two gases under conditions relevant to the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative disorders. For that, we established cultures of neurons typically affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology, that is, cortical neurons and basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and exposed them to L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (PDC) to generate sustained, low-level excitotoxic stress. Over a period of 4 days, PDC caused a progressive loss of cortical neurons which was prevented substantially when xenon replaced nitrogen in the cell culture atmosphere. Unlike xenon, argon remained inactive. Xenon acted downstream of the inhibitory and stimulatory effects elicited by PDC on glutamate uptake and efflux, respectively. Neuroprotection by xenon was mimicked by two noncompetitive antagonists of NMDA glutamate receptors, memantine and ketamine. Each of them potentiated xenon-mediated neuroprotection when used at concentrations providing suboptimal rescue to cortical neurons but most surprisingly, no rescue at all. The survival-promoting effects of xenon persisted when NMDA was used instead of PDC to trigger neuronal death, indicating that NMDA receptor antagonism was probably accountable for xenon's effects. An excess of glycine failed to reverse xenon neuroprotection, thus excluding a competitive interaction of xenon with the glycine-binding site of NMDA receptors. Noticeably, antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine reduced PDC-induced neuronal death but xenon itself lacked free radical-scavenging activity. Cholinergic neurons were also rescued efficaciously by xenon in basal forebrain cultures. Unexpectedly, however, xenon stimulated cholinergic traits and promoted the morphological differentiation of cholinergic neurons in these cultures. Memantine reproduced some of these

  19. Investigations of Buffer-Gases Role in Xenon and Halogen Excimer Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobotaru, L. C.; Porosnicu, C.

    2010-10-01

    Excimer- is an acronym in use for the excited dimmer, molecule which does not exist in the ground state but only in an excited state. This paper presents the role of the buffer-gas atoms (Ar, Ne, He), in the (Cl2/I2 Xe) excimer radiation emission mechanisms. The same buffer-gas produced a different effect on the excimer emission intensity: the neon and argon addition to xenon/chlorine/iodine had a negative effect while the helium and neon addition had a positive effect. The Penning reactions play an important role in the excimer radiation generation in connection with the gas-buffer addition and the halogen ionization potential value. The measurements are performed using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at moderate pressure in a panel, respectively classic coaxial geometry.

  20. Electron spin polarization in strong-field ionization of xenon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, Alexander; Morales, Felipe; Kunitski, Maksim; Henrichs, Kevin; Laucke, Alina; Richter, Martin; Jahnke, Till; Kalinin, Anton; Schöffler, Markus; Schmidt, Lothar Ph. H.; Ivanov, Misha; Smirnova, Olga; Dörner, Reinhard

    2016-08-01

    As a fundamental property of the electron, the spin plays a decisive role in the electronic structure of matter, from solids to molecules and atoms, for example, by causing magnetism. Yet, despite its importance, the spin dynamics of the electrons released during the interaction of atoms with strong ultrashort laser pulses has remained experimentally unexplored. Here, we report the experimental detection of electron spin polarization by the strong-field ionization of xenon atoms and support our results with theoretical analysis. We found up to 30% spin polarization changing its sign with electron energy. This work opens the new dimension of spin to strong-field physics. It paves the way to the production of sub-femtosecond spin-polarized electron pulses with applications ranging from probing the magnetic properties of matter at ultrafast timescales to testing chiral molecular systems with sub-femtosecond temporal and sub-ångström spatial resolutions.

  1. [Intracranial pressure changes during xenon anesthesia in neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertention].

    PubMed

    Rylova, A V; Lubnin, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    Xenon assures rapid awakening and stable hemodynamics, it also has some neuroprotective effect. This is the reason why it may become an anesthetic of choice in neurosurgery. Still there is little and controversial data on its impact upon ICP. This is the first study of xenon effect upon intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure and cerebrovascular reactivity during xenon anesthesia in neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertension. We report a slight increase in intracranial and a slight decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure during xenon anesthesia and show that cerebrovascular reactivity is preserved. Thus we conclude that xenon anesthesia is safe for neurosurgical patients without intracranial hypertension. PMID:21957614

  2. Quantifying Plasma Collision Processes in Xenon Powered Electric Propulsion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, Rainer A.; Chiu, Yu-hui

    2011-05-01

    The use of xenon plasma electrostatic space propulsion systems for low-thrust applications is growing rapidly due to the significant propellant mass savings associated with the high specific impulse of the engines. The high expense of the propellant drives the cost of ground-based testing, which lacks many attributes of in-space conditions. The cost-effective performance and integration optimization of these propulsion systems, consequently, is highly dependent on models that correctly render the static plasma properties and its outflow from the engine at arbitrary conditions. A primary impediment to the accuracy of models is quantitative data such as energy dependent cross sections for a multitude of collision processes that govern the plasma properties. We present a review of theoretical and experimental advances in determining vital cross sections and their implementation in models of electrostatic thruster plasmas. Experimentally validated theoretical charge exchange and xenon ion differential scattering cross sections have led to improved modeling of the angular distribution of Hall Effect thruster plume ion currents. New cross sections for inelastic electron and xenon ion scattering on xenon atoms, including atoms in the 5p56s J = 2 metastable state, have led to the development of a collisional radiative model that predicts local electron temperatures from near-infrared spectral intensities.

  3. Discovery of palladium, antimony, tellurium, iodine, and xenon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Kathawa, J.; Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-01-15

    Currently, thirty-eight palladium, thirty-eight antimony, thirty-nine tellurium, thirty-eight iodine, and forty xenon isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  4. Xe-129 NMR of xenon dissolved in biological media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazitov, R. K.; Kuzma, N. N.; Happer, W.; Driehuys, B.; Merrill, G. F.

    2002-03-01

    The high solubility and large chemical shift of ^129Xe in various tissues makes it an ideal, non-invasive probe for pathological conditions such as cancer or atherosclerosis. To this end, we report NMR measurements of lineshapes, chemical shifts, and relaxation times of ^129Xe dissolved in the following biological tissues in vitro: heart, muscle, sinew, stomach(R.K. Mazitov, K. M. Enikeev, et al., Dokl. Akad. Nauk) 365, 396 (1999)., and the white and yolk of egg. NMR measurements of xenon dissolved in olive and sunflower oils are also reported. Tissues weighing 160--250 mg, not exposed to freezing, were studied in a 11.75 T field at the ^129Xe resonance frequency of 138.4 MHz; the pressure of xenon in the sealed-sample ampoules was ~20 bar. The influence of drugs and water content on tissues was studied. No xenon-water clathrates(J.A. Ripmeester and D.W. Davidson, J. Mol. Struct. ) 75, 67 (1981). were observed in the tissues, even at the high pressures used. The aim of this study is to establish possible correlations between the NMR parameters of dissolved xenon and the state of the tissue.

  5. Performance of field emission cathodes in xenon environments

    SciTech Connect

    Marrese, C.M.; Polk, J.E.; Jensen, K.L.; Gallimore, A.D.; Spindt, C.; Fink, R.L.; Tolt, Z.L.; Palmer, W.D.

    1999-07-01

    Field emission (FE) cathodes are currently being considered to supply electrons in electric propulsion systems for propellant ionization and ion beam neutralization. Hollow cathodes with thermionic electron emitters typically used with Hall and ion thrusters require propellant and heaters for operation. Therefore there are lower limits on their size and power. Because FE cathodes do not require propellant or heaters they can be used with small and micropropulsion systems. The primary concern with integrating these two technologies is cathode lifetime. An FE cathode must be capable of operation in a plasma environment where xenon pressures exceed 2 x 10{sup {minus}6} Torr. Experiments were conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to evaluate the performance of silicon and molybdenum microtip field emission array cathodes, and carbon film cathodes in xenon pressures up to 2 x 10{sup {minus}5} Torr. Experimental and modeling results were used to determine energy thresholds for sputtering silicon and molybdenum by xenon ions. Experiments and theoretical results are presented for performance degradation in xenon environments.

  6. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Ion Propulsion System Information Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eirc S.; Benson, Scott W.

    2008-01-01

    This document is a guide to New Frontiers mission proposal teams. The document describes the development and status of the NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system (IPS) technology, its application to planetary missions, and the process anticipated to transition NEXT to the first flight mission.

  7. Density Functional Theory (dft) Simulations of Shocked Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.; Magyar, Rudolph J.

    2009-12-01

    Xenon is not only a technologically important element used in laser technologies and jet propulsion, but it is also one of the most accessible materials in which to study the metal-insulator transition with increasing pressure. Because of its closed shell electronic configuration, xenon is often assumed to be chemically inert, interacting almost entirely through the van der Waals interaction, and at liquid density, is typically modeled well using Leonard-Jones potentials. However, such modeling has a limited range of validity as xenon is known to form compounds under normal conditions and likely exhibits considerably more chemistry at higher densities when hybridization of occupied orbitals becomes significant. We present DFT-MD simulations of shocked liquid xenon with the goal of developing an improved equation of state. The calculated Hugoniot to 2 MPa compares well with available experimental shock data. Sandia is a mul-tiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Density Functional Theory (DFT) Simulations of Shocked Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.; Magyar, Rudolph J.

    2009-06-01

    Xenon is not only a technologically important element used in laser technologies and jet propulsion, but it is also one of the most accessible materials in which to study the metal-insulator transition with increasing pressure. Because of its closed shell electronic configuration, Xenon is often assumed to be chemically inert, interacting almost entirely through the van der Waals interaction, and at liquid density, is typically modeled well using Leonard-Jones potentials. However, such modeling has a limited range of validity as Xenon is known to form compounds at normal conditions and likely exhibits considerably more chemistry at higher densities when hybridization of occupied orbitals becomes significant. In this talk, we present DFT-MD simulations of shocked liquid Xenon with the goal of developing an improved equation of state. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Pulsed xenon flashlamp device for the treatment of psoriasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardner, Jonathan M.; Hennings, David R.; Johnston, Thomas F., Jr.; Taylor, Eric

    2003-06-01

    We present our research into a pulsed xenon lamp source for the treatment of psoriasis and other skin disorders. Various filtering techniques, lamp configurations, power supply configurations and delivery systems are discussed. Comparisons are made to existing treatment modalities. Cryogen cooling of the treatment site is discussed.

  10. Applications of highly spin-polarized xenon in NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Long, H.W. |

    1993-09-01

    The main goal of the work presented in this thesis is produce highly spin-polarized xenon to create much greater signal intensities (up to 54,000 times greater) so as to allow studies to be made on systems with low surface area and long spin-lattice relaxation times. The spin-exchange optical pumping technique used to create high nuclear spin polarization is described in detail in chapter two. This technique is initially applied to some multiple-pulse optically detected NMR experiments in low magnetic field (50G) that allow the study of quadrupoler interactions with a surface of only a few square centimeters. In chapter three the apparatus used to allow high field {sup 129}Xe NMR studies to be performed with extremely high sensitivity is described and applied to experiments on diamagnetic susceptibility effects in thin ({approximately}2000 layers) films of frozen xenon. Preliminary surface investigations of laser polarized {sup 129}Xe adsorbed an a variety of materials (salts, molecular crystals, amorphous carbon, graphite) are then discussed. A full detailed study of the surface of a particular polymer, poly(acrylic acid), is presented in chapter four which shows the kind of detailed information that can be obtained from this technique. Along with preliminary results for several similar polymers, a summary is given of xenon studies of a novel ultra-high surface area polymer, poly(triarylcarbinol). Finally in chapter five the exciting possibility of transferring the high spin order of the laser polarized xenon has been used to transfer nuclear spin order to {sup 13}CO{sub 2} in a xenon matrix and to protons on poly(triarylcarbinol).

  11. Xenon-mediated neuroprotection in response to sustained, low-level excitotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Lavaur, J; Lemaire, M; Pype, J; Nogue, D Le; Hirsch, E C; Michel, P P

    2016-01-01

    Noble gases such as xenon and argon have been reported to provide neuroprotection against acute brain ischemic/anoxic injuries. Herein, we wished to evaluate the protective potential of these two gases under conditions relevant to the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative disorders. For that, we established cultures of neurons typically affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology, that is, cortical neurons and basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and exposed them to L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (PDC) to generate sustained, low-level excitotoxic stress. Over a period of 4 days, PDC caused a progressive loss of cortical neurons which was prevented substantially when xenon replaced nitrogen in the cell culture atmosphere. Unlike xenon, argon remained inactive. Xenon acted downstream of the inhibitory and stimulatory effects elicited by PDC on glutamate uptake and efflux, respectively. Neuroprotection by xenon was mimicked by two noncompetitive antagonists of NMDA glutamate receptors, memantine and ketamine. Each of them potentiated xenon-mediated neuroprotection when used at concentrations providing suboptimal rescue to cortical neurons but most surprisingly, no rescue at all. The survival-promoting effects of xenon persisted when NMDA was used instead of PDC to trigger neuronal death, indicating that NMDA receptor antagonism was probably accountable for xenon’s effects. An excess of glycine failed to reverse xenon neuroprotection, thus excluding a competitive interaction of xenon with the glycine-binding site of NMDA receptors. Noticeably, antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine reduced PDC-induced neuronal death but xenon itself lacked free radical-scavenging activity. Cholinergic neurons were also rescued efficaciously by xenon in basal forebrain cultures. Unexpectedly, however, xenon stimulated cholinergic traits and promoted the morphological differentiation of cholinergic neurons in these cultures. Memantine reproduced some of these

  12. The Light Response of the XENON100 Time Projection Chamber and the Measurements of the Optical Parameters with the Xenon Scintillation Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bin

    The XENON program is a phased project using liquid xenon as a sensitive detector medium in search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). These particles are the leading candidates to explain the non-baryonic, cold dark matter in our Universe. XENON100, the successor experiment of XENON10, has increased the target liquid xenon mass to 61 kg with a 100 times reduction in background rate enabling a large increase in sensitivity to WIMP-nucleon interaction cross-section. To-date, the most stringent limit on this cross-section over a wide range of WIMP masses have been obtained with XENON100. XENON100 is a detector responding to the scintillation of xenon and the work of this thesis will mainly focus on the light response of the detector. Chapter 1 describes the evidences for dark matter and some of the detection methods, roughly divided by the indirect and the direct detection. In the section 1.2.2 for direct detection, a treatment of interaction rate of WIMPs is introduced. Chapter 2 is a description of the XENON100 detector, some of the main characteristics of liquid xenon, followed by the detector design. In Chapter 3, the light response of the XENON100 time projection chamber (TPC) is explained, including the Monte Carlo simulation work that was carried out prior to the main data taking. The Monte Carlo provided the basic idea of understanding the detector in the early stage of design and calibration, but the actual corrections of the light signals were determined later with the real data. Several optical parameters are critical in explaining the light response, such as the quantum efficiency (QE) of the photomultipliers (PMTs) used in the detector and the reflectivity of the teflon (Polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE) material that surrounds the liquid xenon target volume and defines the TPC. Since the few existing measurements of reflectivity of PTFE in liquid xenon were performed in different conditions and thus could not be applied, the XENON

  13. Segregation of xenon to dislocations and grain boundaries in uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Nerikar, P. V.; Casillas Trujillo, L. A.; Andersson, D. A.; Unal, C.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Stanek, C. R.; Parfitt, D. C.; Grimes, R. W.; Sinnott, S. B.

    2011-11-01

    It is well known that Xe, being insoluble in UO{sub 2}, segregates to dislocations and grain boundaries (GBs), where bubbles may form resulting in fuel swelling. Less well known is how sensitive this segregation is to the structure of the dislocation or GB. In this work we employ pair potential calculations to examine Xe segregation to dislocations (edge and screw) and several representative grain boundaries ({Sigma}5 tilt, {Sigma}5 twist, and random). Our calculations predict that the segregation trend depends significantly on the type of dislocation or GB. In particular we find that Xe prefers to segregate strongly to the random boundary as compared to the other two boundaries and to the screw dislocation rather than the edge. Furthermore, we observe that neither the volumetric strain nor the electrostatic potential of a site can be used to predict its segregation characteristics. These differences in segregation characteristics are expected to have important consequences for the retention and release of Xe in nuclear fuels. Finally, our results offer general insights into how atomic structure of extended defects influence species segregation.

  14. Uranium dioxide films with xenon filled bubbles for fission gas behavior studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usov, I. O.; Dickerson, R. M.; Dickerson, P. O.; Byler, D. D.; McClellan, K. J.

    2014-09-01

    Electron beam evaporation and ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) methods were utilized to fabricate depleted UO2 films and UO2 films with embedded Xe atoms, respectively. The films were fabricated at elevated temperature of 700 °C and also subsequently annealed at 1000 °C to induce grain growth and Xe atom redistribution. The goal of this work was to synthesize reference UO2 samples with controlled microstructures and Xe-filled bubble morphologies, without the effects attendant to rector irradiation-induced fission. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microstructural characterization revealed that fine Xe-filled bubbles nucleated in the as grown films and subsequent annealing resulted in noticeable bubble size increase. Reported results demonstrate the great potential IBAD techniques and UO2 films have for various areas of nuclear materials studies.

  15. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  16. Detection and characterization of xenon-binding sites in proteins by 129Xe NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Seth M; Lee, Seok-Yong; Ruiz, E Janette; Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E

    2002-09-13

    Xenon-binding sites in proteins have led to a number of applications of xenon in biochemical and structural studies. Here we further develop the utility of 129Xe NMR in characterizing specific xenon-protein interactions. The sensitivity of the 129Xe chemical shift to its local environment and the intense signals attainable by optical pumping make xenon a useful NMR reporter of its own interactions with proteins. A method for detecting specific xenon-binding interactions by analysis of 129Xe chemical shift data is illustrated using the maltose binding protein (MBP) from Escherichia coli as an example. The crystal structure of MBP in the presence of 8atm of xenon confirms the binding site determined from NMR data. Changes in the structure of the xenon-binding cavity upon the binding of maltose by the protein can account for the sensitivity of the 129Xe chemical shift to MBP conformation. 129Xe NMR data for xenon in solution with a number of cavity containing phage T4 lysozyme mutants show that xenon can report on cavity structure. In particular, a correlation exists between cavity size and the binding-induced 129Xe chemical shift. Further applications of 129Xe NMR to biochemical assays, including the screening of proteins for xenon binding for crystallography are considered. PMID:12217701

  17. Mesoscale Backtracking by Means of Atmospheric Transport Modeling of Xenon Plumes Measured by Radionuclide Gas Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armand, P. P.; Achim, P.; Taffary, T.

    2006-12-01

    The monitoring of atmospheric radioactive xenon concentration is performed for nuclear safety regulatory requirements. It is also planned to be used for the detection of hypothetical nuclear tests in the framework of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). In this context, the French Atomic Energy Commission designed a high sensitive and automated fieldable station, named SPALAX, to measure the activity concentrations of xenon isotopes in the atmosphere. SPALAX stations were set up in Western Europe and have been operated quite continuously for three years or more, detecting principally xenon-133 and more scarcely xenon-135, xenon-133m and xenon-131m. There are around 150 nuclear power plants in the European Union, research reactors, reprocessing plants, medical production and application facilities releasing radioactive xenon in normal or incidental operations. A numerical study was carried out aiming to explain the SPALAX measurements. The mesoscale Atmospheric Transport Modelling involves the MM5 suite (PSU- NCAR) to predict the wind fields on nested domains, and FLEXPART, a 3D Lagrangian particle dispersion code, used to simulate the backward transport of xenon plumes detected by the SPALAX. For every event of detection, at least one potential xenon source has a significant efficiency of emission. The identified likely sources are located quite close to the SPALAX stations (some tens of kilometres), or situated farther (a few hundreds of kilometres). A base line of some mBq per cubic meter in xenon-133 is generated by the nuclear power plants. Peaks of xenon-133 ranging from tens to hundreds of mBq per cubic meter originate from a radioisotope production facility. The calculated xenon source terms required to obtain the SPALAX measurements are discussed and seem consistent with realistic emissions from the xenon sources in Western Europe.

  18. Rotational spectra of the Xe-(H2O)2 van der Waals trimer: xenon as a probe of electronic structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qing; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2007-03-22

    Rotational spectra of three isotopomers of the Xe-(H2O)2 van der Waals trimer were recorded using a pulsed-nozzle, Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Nine [nine, four] a-type and twelve [eleven, seven] b-type transitions were measured for the 132Xe-(H2O)2 [129Xe-(H2O)2, 131Xe-(H2O)2] isotopomer. The determined rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were used to extract information about the structure and vibrational motions of the complex. The nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structures due to the 131Xe (nuclear spin quantum number I=3/2) nucleus were also detected. The large value of the off-diagonal nuclear quadrupole coupling constant chiab in particular provides detailed insight into the electronic environment of the xenon atom and the orientations of the water molecules within the complex. An effective structure that best reproduces the experimental 131Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is rationalized by ab initio calculations. An overall goal of this line of work is to determine how the successive solvation of a xenon atom with water molecules affects the xenon electron distribution and its intermolecular interactions. The results may provide molecular level interpretations of 129Xe NMR data from, for example, imaging experiments. PMID:17388264

  19. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. Mark; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-01

    The separation of molecules with similar size and shape is an important technological challenge. For example, rare gases can pose either an economic opportunity or an environmental hazard and there is a need to separate these spherical molecules selectively at low concentrations in air. Likewise, chiral molecules are important building blocks for pharmaceuticals, but chiral enantiomers, by definition, have identical size and shape, and their separation can be challenging. Here we show that a porous organic cage molecule has unprecedented performance in the solid state for the separation of rare gases, such as krypton and xenon. The selectivity arises from a precise size match between the rare gas and the organic cage cavity, as predicted by molecular simulations. Breakthrough experiments demonstrate real practical potential for the separation of krypton, xenon and radon from air at concentrations of only a few parts per million. We also demonstrate selective binding of chiral organic molecules such as 1-phenylethanol, suggesting applications in enantioselective separation.

  20. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S; Chong, Samantha Y; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K Mark; Armstrong, Jayne A; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M; Thallapally, Praveen K; Cooper, Andrew I

    2014-10-01

    The separation of molecules with similar size and shape is an important technological challenge. For example, rare gases can pose either an economic opportunity or an environmental hazard and there is a need to separate these spherical molecules selectively at low concentrations in air. Likewise, chiral molecules are important building blocks for pharmaceuticals, but chiral enantiomers, by definition, have identical size and shape, and their separation can be challenging. Here we show that a porous organic cage molecule has unprecedented performance in the solid state for the separation of rare gases, such as krypton and xenon. The selectivity arises from a precise size match between the rare gas and the organic cage cavity, as predicted by molecular simulations. Breakthrough experiments demonstrate real practical potential for the separation of krypton, xenon and radon from air at concentrations of only a few parts per million. We also demonstrate selective binding of chiral organic molecules such as 1-phenylethanol, suggesting applications in enantioselective separation. PMID:25038731

  1. Driving Rabi oscillations at the giant dipole resonance in xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, Stefan; Wang, Daochen; Santra, Robin

    2015-11-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) produce short and very intense light pulses in the XUV and x-ray regimes. We investigate the possibility to drive Rabi oscillations in xenon with an intense FEL pulse by using the unusually large dipole strength of the giant dipole resonance (GDR). The GDR decays within less than 30 as due to its position, which is above the 4 d ionization threshold. We find that intensities around 1018W /cm2 are required to induce Rabi oscillations with a period comparable to the lifetime. The pulse duration should not exceed 100 as because xenon will be fully ionized within a few lifetimes. Rabi oscillations reveal themselves also in the photoelectron spectrum in the form of Autler-Townes splittings extending over several tens of electronvolts.

  2. Development of liquid xenon detectors for gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena; Suzuki, Masayo

    1989-01-01

    The application of liquid xenon in high-resolution detectors for gamma-ray astronomy is being investigated. Initial results from a pulse-shape analysis of ionization signals in a liquid-xenon gridded chamber indicate that it is possible to achieve the necessary liquid purity for the transport of free electrons with simple techniques. The energy resolution has been measured as a function of applied electric field, using electrons and gamma-rays from a 207Bi source. At a field of 12 kV/cm the noise-substracted energy resolution of the dominant 569-keV gamma-ray line is 34 keV FWHM (full width at half maximum). This value is mostly determined by recombination of electron-ion pairs on delta-electron tracks.

  3. Dark matter sensitivity of multi-ton liquid xenon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Marc; Baudis, Laura; Bütikofer, Lukas; Kish, Alexander; Selvi, Marco

    2015-10-01

    We study the sensitivity of multi ton-scale time projection chambers using a liquid xenon target, e.g., the proposed DARWIN instrument, to spin-independent and spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon scattering interactions. Taking into account realistic backgrounds from the detector itself as well as from neutrinos, we examine the impact of exposure, energy threshold, background rejection efficiency and energy resolution on the dark matter sensitivity. With an exposure of 200 t × y and assuming detector parameters which have been already demonstrated experimentally, spin-independent cross sections as low as 2.5 × 10-49 cm2 can be probed for WIMP masses around 40 GeV/c2. Additional improvements in terms of background rejection and exposure will further increase the sensitivity, while the ultimate WIMP science reach will be limited by neutrinos scattering coherently off the xenon nuclei.

  4. DAX: A Versatile Testbed for Xenon Detector R&D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutter, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    The DAX (DAvis Xenon) system serves as a test bed for liquid-xenon (LXe) detector research and development, particularly in the context of future dark matter direct detection searches. A number of important technologies are being tested in this system, including an active liquid-purity monitor, silicon photomultiplier sensors, wavelength shifters, and a direct measurement of the scintillation and ionization response of LXe to low-energy Pb-206 recoils. The last item is important because Pb-206 is a decay product of Po-210, which is a prominent surface background resulting from radon plate-out, and its behavior in LXe is poorly understood. I discuss the motivation and design of this system, along with the current status and recent results of its goals.

  5. First Dark Matter Results from the XENON100 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aprile, E.; Choi, B.; Giboni, K.-L.; Lang, R. F.; Lim, K. E.; Melgarejo Fernandez, A. J.; Plante, G.; Arisaka, K.; Brown, E.; Cline, D. B.; Lam, C. W.; Pantic, E.; Teymourian, A.; Wang, H.; Arneodo, F.; Fattori, S.; Askin, A.; Baudis, L.; Behrens, A.; Ferella, A. D.

    2010-09-24

    The XENON100 experiment, in operation at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy, is designed to search for dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) scattering off 62 kg of liquid xenon in an ultralow background dual-phase time projection chamber. In this Letter, we present first dark matter results from the analysis of 11.17 live days of nonblind data, acquired in October and November 2009. In the selected fiducial target of 40 kg, and within the predefined signal region, we observe no events and hence exclude spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering cross sections above 3.4x10{sup -44} cm{sup 2} for 55 GeV/c{sup 2} WIMPs at 90% confidence level. Below 20 GeV/c{sup 2}, this result constrains the interpretation of the CoGeNT and DAMA signals as being due to spin-independent, elastic, light mass WIMP interactions.

  6. High Pressure XENON Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Field Use

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Wehe; Zong He; Glenn K. Knoll

    2004-02-16

    This project explored a new concept for high-pressure xenon ionization chambers by replacing the Frisch grid with coplanar grid electrodes similar to those used in wide bandgap semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometers. This work is the first attempt to apply the coplanar grid anode design in a gas ionization chamber in order to achieve to improved energy resolution. Three prototype detectors, two cylindrical and one parallel plate configurations, were built and tested. While the detectors did not demonstrate energy resolutions as good as other high pressure xenon gamma-ray spectrometers, the results demonstrated that the concept of single polarity charge sending using coplanar grid electrodes will work in a gas detector.

  7. Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruopeng; Pavlin, Tina; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Mair, Ross William; Cory, David G; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    In this work we present measurements of permeability, effective porosity and tortuosity on a variety of rock samples using NMR/MRI of thermal and laser-polarized gas. Permeability and effective porosity are measured simultaneously using MRI to monitor the inflow of laser-polarized xenon into the rock core. Tortuosity is determined from measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient using thermal xenon in sealed samples. The initial results from a limited number of rocks indicate inverse correlations between tortuosity and both effective porosity and permeability. Further studies to widen the number of types of rocks studied may eventually aid in explaining the poorly understood connection between permeability and tortuosity of rock cores. PMID:15833638

  8. A portable gamma-ray spectrometer using compressed xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Smith, G.C.; Kane, W.R.; Lemley, J.R.

    1997-10-01

    An ionization chamber using compressed xenon has been designed and built for gamma-ray spectrometry. The device is based on signal measurement from a parallel plate detector, with the gas enclosure constructed specifically for packaging into a portable instrument; thus, appropriate engineering practices comprises two small containers that can be setup for operation in just a few minutes. Its sensitivity is 100 keV to over 1 MeV, with a resolution at 662 keV of 2.5% FWHM for uniform irradiation, and 2% FWHM for collimated irradiation, comparable to the best ever with compressed xenon. It also exhibits greater specificity that most scintillators, such as NaI. The device is insensitive to neutron damage and has a low power requirement.

  9. Experimental investigations of argon and xenon ion sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    The multipole thruster was used to investigate the use of argon and xenon propellants as possible alternatives to the electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. The multipole approach was used because of its general high performance level. The design employed, using flat and cylindrical rolled sections of sheet metal, was selected for ease of fabrication, design, assembly, and modification. All testing was conducted in a vacuum facility and the pumping was accomplished by a 0.8 m diffusion pump together with liquid nitrogen cooled liner. Minimum discharge losses were in the 200-250 ev. ion range for both argon and xenon. Flatness parameters were typically in the 0.70-0.75 range.

  10. Theoretical study of xenon adsorption in UO2 nanoporous matrices.

    PubMed

    Colbert, Mehdi; Tréglia, Guy; Ribeiro, Fabienne

    2014-12-01

    We present a theoretical study of xenon incorporation in UO2 nanocavities, by means of Grand Canonical Monte Carlo calculations based on semi-empirical potentials. We first characterize the reconstruction of the matrix around an empty cavity which leads to a stoechiometry change from UO2 to UO in this region. Then, we determine xenon adsorption isotherms which exhibit an abrupt transition from a dilute phase to a dense one and an increase in the density of the latter phase as a function of temperature. This last result is attributed to a vibrational entropy effect by means of a mean field analysis. Finally, the pressure calculation inside the bubble proves the limitations of the usual mesoscopic models based on gas state behaviour. PMID:25388362

  11. A Study of Radon Background in the XENON100 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Marc

    2011-04-27

    The XENON100 Dark Matter experiment has recently published first results from an analysis of 11.2 live days of data, setting an upper limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering cross section of 3.4x10{sup -44} cm{sup 2} at 55 GeV/c{sup 2} and 90% confidence level. This article focuses on one specific background component of the XENON100 detector by presenting two independent methods of measuring the {sup 222}Rn concentration during operation phase. A first estimate of radon activity is derived for the 11.2 days analysis, proving the feasibility of on-line radon monitoring. Remaining systematic uncertainties are discussed.

  12. Constraints on inelastic dark matter from XENON10

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, J; Aprile, E; Arneodo, F; Baudis, L; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A; Coelho, L C; Dahl, C E; DeViveiros, L; Ferella, A D; Fernandes, L P; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Giboni, K L; Gomez, R; Hasty, R; Kastens, L; Kwong, J; Lopes, J M; Madden, N; Manalaysay, A; Manzur, A; McKinsey, D N; Monzani, M E; Ni, K; Oberlack, U; Orboeck, J; Plante, G; Santorelli, R; dos Santos, J; Shagin, P; Shutt, T; Sorensen, P; Schulte, S; Winant, C; Yamashita, M

    2009-11-23

    It has been suggested that dark matter particles which scatter inelastically from detector target nuclei could explain the apparent incompatibility of the DAMA modulation signal (interpreted as evidence for particle dark matter) with the null results from CDMS-II and XENON10. Among the predictions of inelastically interacting dark matter are a suppression of low-energy events, and a population of nuclear recoil events at higher nuclear recoil equivalent energies. This is in stark contrast to the well-known expectation of a falling exponential spectrum for the case of elastic interactions. We present a new analysis of XENON10 dark matter search data extending to E{sub nr} = 75 keV nuclear recoil equivalent energy. Our results exclude a significant region of previously allowed parameter space in the model of inelastically interacting dark matter. In particular, it is found that dark matter particle masses m{sub x} {approx}> 150 GeV are disfavored.

  13. Gamma background discrimination in the XENON100 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melgarejo, Antonio; Xenon100 Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    Direct dark matter detection experiments rely on the ability to have an expected background close to 0 in order to be able to identify possible WIMP signals. Among the multiple strategies to achieve this goal, most of the experiments use background reduction techniques which exploit the difference between electron-like signal (most radioactive backgrounds) and neutron-like signals (neutrons and WIMPs). In this talk we will show the studies and measurements within the XENON100 experiment to distinguish signals from electrons and neutrons by comparing their light to signal ratio. A straightforward prediction of this work is the amount of events expected in the dark matter region in this experiment. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF, DOE, SNF, the Volkswagen Foundation, FCT and STCSM. We are grateful to the LNGS for hosting and supporting the XENON program.

  14. Xenon gamma-ray spectrometer for radioactive waste controlling complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulin, S.; Novikov, A.; Dmitrenko, V.; Vlasik, K.; Krivova, K.; Petrenko, D.; Uteshev, Z.; Shustov, A.; Petkovich, E.

    2016-02-01

    Xenon detector based gamma-ray spectrometer for a radioactive waste sorting complex and its characteristics are described. It has been shown that the “thin-wall” modification of the detector allows better registration of low-energy gamma rays (tens of keV). The spectrometer is capable of operation in unfavorable field conditions and can identify radionuclides of interest in less than 1 second.

  15. Quench gases for xenon- (and krypton-) filled proportional counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Agrawal, P. C.

    1988-01-01

    Xenon-filled proportional counters are used extensively in astronomy, particularly in the hard X-ray region. The choice of quench gas can have a significant effect on the operating characteristics of the instrument although the data necessary to make the choice are not easily obtainable. Results which detail the performance obtained from both cylindrical and parallel field geometries for a wide variety of readily available, ultrahigh or research grade purity, quench gases are presented.

  16. Neutrino physics with multi-ton scale liquid xenon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baudis, L.; Ferella, A.; Kish, A.; Manalaysay, A.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Schumann, M. E-mail: alfredo.ferella@lngs.infn.it E-mail: aaronm@ucdavis.edu E-mail: marc.schumann@lhep.unibe.ch

    2014-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of large-scale xenon detectors to low-energy solar neutrinos, to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and to neutrinoless double beta decay. As a concrete example, we consider the xenon part of the proposed DARWIN (Dark Matter WIMP Search with Noble Liquids) experiment. We perform detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the expected backgrounds, considering realistic energy resolutions and thresholds in the detector. In a low-energy window of 2–30 keV, where the sensitivity to solar pp and {sup 7}Be-neutrinos is highest, an integrated pp-neutrino rate of 5900 events can be reached in a fiducial mass of 14 tons of natural xenon, after 5 years of data. The pp-neutrino flux could thus be measured with a statistical uncertainty around 1%, reaching the precision of solar model predictions. These low-energy solar neutrinos will be the limiting background to the dark matter search channel for WIMP-nucleon cross sections below ∼ 2 × 10{sup −48} cm{sup 2} and WIMP masses around 50 GeV⋅c{sup −2}, for an assumed 99.5% rejection of electronic recoils due to elastic neutrino-electron scatters. Nuclear recoils from coherent scattering of solar neutrinos will limit the sensitivity to WIMP masses below ∼ 6 GeV⋅c{sup −2} to cross sections above ∼ 4 × 10{sup −45}cm{sup 2}. DARWIN could reach a competitive half-life sensitivity of 5.6 × 10{sup 26} y to the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe after 5 years of data, using 6 tons of natural xenon in the central detector region.

  17. Cryogenic Technology Development For The MEG Liquid Xenon Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Haruyama, Tomiyoshi

    2008-02-21

    Cryogenic key technologies have been developed for the muon rare decay experiment (MEG) at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. These technologies are the high power pulse tube cryocooler for precise temperature and pressure control of liquid xenon in the calorimeter, a purification system with a cryogenic liquid pump and a cryogenic dewar with 1000 L storage capacity. The paper describes the general concepts and the first test results of each technology. All the results imply a promising performance for the coming MEG experiment.

  18. Flight qualification of an 18-mN xenon thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Williams, J. D.; Robson, R. R.

    1993-02-01

    In this paper, we describe an 18-mN xenon ion propulsion subsystem (XIPS) and our plans to flight-qualify the critical component of this system. The XIPS consists of a 13-cm-diam thruster, a power supply, and a xenon storage and control unit. The thruster produces 17.8 mN of thrust at a specific impulse of 2585 s, with an input power of about 439 W. The power supply contains only about 400 parts in its 7 individual power modules: screen, accel, discharge, two keepers, and two beaters. The power supply is designed to operate from a 29- to 34-V or a 49- to 53-V power bus and achieves an overall efficiency of 88 to 90 percent over these ranges. Xenon propellant is stored at an initial pressure of 7.6 MPa (1100 psia) to give a tankage fraction of only about 12 percent. Control of the xenon flow rates is accomplished using a pressure regulator to reduce the storage pressure to 68.9 kPA (10 psia) on the upstream side of flow restrictors located in the lines leading to the discharge chamber and the discharge and neutralizer cathodes. We describe our plans to qualify the XIPS thruster by subjecting two flight units to qualification testing, including performance, thermal-vacuum, and vibration tests. In addition, we describe our plans to subject the qualification thrusters to a cyclic life test, in which we intend to accumulate at least 12,000 h and over 6,000 ON/OFF cycles. We also describe our plans to subject two XIPS cathodes to a continuous-operation life test of unspecified duration; we plan to test these cathodes until failure.

  19. A coherent understanding of low-energy nuclear recoils in liquid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Peter

    2010-09-01

    Liquid xenon detectors such as XENON10 and XENON100 obtain a significant fraction of their sensitivity to light (∼<10 GeV) particle dark matter by looking for nuclear recoils of only a few keV, just above the detector threshold. Yet in this energy regime a correct treatment of the detector threshold and resolution remains unclear. The energy dependence of the scintillation yield of liquid xenon for nuclear recoils also bears heavily on detector sensitivity, yet numerous measurements have not succeeded in obtaining concordant results. In this article we show that the ratio of detected ionization to scintillation can be leveraged to constrain the scintillation yield. We also present a rigorous treatment of liquid xenon detector threshold and energy resolution. Notably, the effective energy resolution differs significantly from a simple Poisson distribution. We conclude with a calculation of dark matter exclusion limits, and show that existing data from liquid xenon detectors strongly constrain recent interpretations of light dark matter.

  20. A Comprehensive Study of the Large Underground Xenon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Michael Austin

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter search experiment operates a time projection chamber constructed of 370 kg of xenon, currently installed in the Homestake gold mine. The goal of the experiment is to detect Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Novel calibration methods for this uniquely large detector are discussed. Background events due to standard model physics processes including cosmogenically activated xenon, alpha emission, and neutron production are shown to be negligible in recent 85 day WIMP search data. The LUX Monte Carlo simulation includes a new physical model, the Nobel Element Simulation Technique (NEST), for scintillation and ionization. NEST describes energy-, particle-, field- and medium-dependent behavior of a charge recombination model. A simulated data acquisition chain that bridges the gap between simulation and data has been developed to permit full testing of the analysis tools employed by LUX. Signal generation by cumulative photon responses are described algorithmically. Computational optimization has been performed to decrease processing time by a factor of fifty. A new technique for event depth estimation using machine learning and image analysis is introduced. Variable length waveforms are converted to fixed dimension field maps for use in machine learning. A support vector machine trained against pulse shapes with known depth successfully regressed depth without direct measurement of highly variable pulse widths. The world's most stringent limits on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section are presented.

  1. Highly ionized xenon and volumetric weighting in restricted focal geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohaber, J.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2015-08-01

    The ionization of xenon atoms subjected to 42 fs, 800 nm pulses of radiation from a Ti:Sapphire laser was investigated. In our experiments, a maximum laser intensity of ˜ 2 × 10 15 W / cm 2 was used. Xenon ions were measured using a time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer having an entrance slit with dimensions of 12 μ m × 400 μ m . The observed yields Xe n + ( n = 1 - 7 ) were partially free of spatial averaging. The ion yields showed sequential and nonsequential multiple ionization and dip structures following saturation. To investigate the dip structures and to perform a comparison between experimental and simulated data, with the goal of clarifying the effects of residual spatial averaging, we derived a hybrid analytical-numerical solution for the integration kernel in restricted focal geometries. We simulated xenon ionization using Ammosov-Delone-Krainov and Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev theories and obtained agreement with the results of observations. Since a large number of experiments suffer from spatial averaging, the results presented are important to correctly interpret experimental data by taking into account spatial averaging.

  2. Prospects for dark matter detection with inelastic transitions of xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Dark matter can scatter and excite a nucleus to a low-lying excitation in a direct detection experiment. This signature is distinct from the canonical elastic scattering signal because the inelastic signal also contains the energy deposited from the subsequent prompt de-excitation of the nucleus. A measurement of the elastic and inelastic signal will allow a single experiment to distinguish between a spin-independent and spin-dependent interaction. For the first time, we characterise the inelastic signal for two-phase xenon detectors in which dark matter inelastically scatters off the 129Xe or 131Xe isotope. We do this by implementing a realistic simulation of a typical tonne-scale two-phase xenon detector and by carefully estimating the relevant background signals. With our detector simulation, we explore whether the inelastic signal from the axial-vector interaction is detectable with upcoming tonne-scale detectors. We find that two-phase detectors allow for some discrimination between signal and background so that it is possible to detect dark matter that inelastically scatters off either the 129Xe or 131Xe isotope for dark matter particles that are heavier than approximately 010 GeV . If, after two years of data, the XENON1T search for elastic scattering nuclei finds no evidence for dark matter, the possibility of ever detecting an inelastic signal from the axial-vector interaction will be almost entirely excluded.

  3. High-pressure xenon detector development at Constellation Technology Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert A.

    2007-08-01

    Xenon-filled ionization detectors, due to their high atomic number fill gas ( Z=54), moderate densities (˜0.3-0.5 g/cm 3) and good energy resolution (2-4% at 662 keV), fill an important niche between more familiar technologies such as NaI(Tl) scintillators and germanium detectors. Until recently, difficulties with obtaining sufficient xenon purity, reducing microphonic sensitivity, and developing low-noise electronics compatible with small ionization signals have hampered the development of this nuclear detection field. Constellation Technology Corporation, whose experience with xenon detectors goes back to the mid 1990s, has made significant progress in these areas and has developed a commercial line of detectors with active volumes ranging from small (35 g Xe) to large (1400 g Xe). Current applications for Constellation's detectors are principally in the area of defense (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Advanced Spectroscopic Portals), but as awareness of this technology grows, it will surely find applications in a much expanded range of fields.

  4. [Low-flow xenon anesthesia in surgical patients with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Rashchupkin, A B; Burov, N E

    2011-01-01

    A comparative study of central hemodynamics in 60 patients with essential hypertension during low flow anesthesia with xenon and nitrous oxide is carried out. The main group consisted of 30 patients, 22 male and 8 female, in the median age of 45.9 +/- 23 years. 22 patients out of those had 2nd stage essential hypertension, while the other 8 had 3rd stage. The control group consisted of 30 patients, 20 male and 10 female, in the median age of 45.1 + 1.3 years. 4 patients had 3rd stage essential hypertension, 26 patients had 2nd stage. The both groups were clinically comparable by the character and severity of the main disease, the carried out surgery (open cholecystectomy) and the qualification of surgeons. Results of the research showed, that low flow monoanesthesia with xenon abruptly eradicated the unfavourable consequences of induction of anesthesia (3-5 mg/kg of sodium thiopental or 2-2.5 mg/kg of propofol) and had a positive effect on the parameters of central hemodynamics of patients with essential hypertension. Xenon anesthesia, compared to nitrous oxide, rapidly stabilized the parameters of blood pressure and heart rate and can be recommended as a method of choice in patients with essential hypertension and compromised myocarium. Nitrous oxide with bolus of regular fentanyl doses doesn't reliable anesthesiological protection during open cholecystectomy and shows signs of toxicity. PMID:21692217

  5. Very-low-field MRI of laser polarized xenon-129.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuan; Cates, Gordon D; Tobias, William A; Mugler, John P; Miller, G Wilson

    2014-10-17

    We describe a homebuilt MRI system for imaging laser-polarized xenon-129 at a very low holding field of 2.2mT. A unique feature of this system was the use of Maxwell coils oriented at so-called "magic angles" to generate the transverse magnetic field gradients, which provided a simple alternative to Golay coils. We used this system to image a laser-polarized xenon-129 phantom with both a conventional gradient-echo and a fully phase-encoded pulse sequence. In other contexts, a fully phase-encoded acquisition, also known as single-point or constant-time imaging, has been used to enable distortion-free imaging of short-T2(∗) species. Here we used this technique to overcome imperfections associated with our homebuilt MRI system while also taking full advantage of the long T2(∗) available at very low field. Our results demonstrate that xenon-129 image quality can be dramatically improved at low field by combining a fully phase-encoded k-space acquisition with auxiliary measurements of system imperfections including B0 field drift and gradient infidelity. PMID:25462954

  6. Very-low-field MRI of laser polarized xenon-129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuan; Cates, Gordon D.; Tobias, William A.; Mugler, John P.; Miller, G. Wilson

    2014-12-01

    We describe a homebuilt MRI system for imaging laser-polarized xenon-129 at a very low holding field of 2.2 mT. A unique feature of this system was the use of Maxwell coils oriented at so-called 'magic angles' to generate the transverse magnetic field gradients, which provided a simple alternative to Golay coils. We used this system to image a laser-polarized xenon-129 phantom with both a conventional gradient-echo and a fully phase-encoded pulse sequence. In other contexts, a fully phase-encoded acquisition, also known as single-point or constant-time imaging, has been used to enable distortion-free imaging of short-T2∗species. Here we used this technique to overcome imperfections associated with our homebuilt MRI system while also taking full advantage of the long T2∗available at very low field. Our results demonstrate that xenon-129 image quality can be dramatically improved at low field by combining a fully phase-encoded k-space acquisition with auxiliary measurements of system imperfections including B0 field drift and gradient infidelity.

  7. Allende meteorite: Isotopically anomalous xenon is accompanied by normal osmium

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, H.; Higuchi, H.; Gros, Jacques; Morgan, John W.; Anders, Edward

    1976-01-01

    The 184Os/190Os ratio of six Allende meteorite samples was determined by neutron activation analysis. Four chromite concentrates gave a ratio differing from the terrestrial ratio by only -0.1 ± 0.4%, although they contained highly anomalous xenon enriched by up to 67% in 124Xe and 93% in 136Xe. In view of this result and the normal isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in these fractions, it seems very unlikely that the xenon anomalies were produced in a supernova by the p and r processes. More probably, the xenon anomalies were established in the early solar system, by mass fractionation during trapping of noble gases in solids and by spontaneous fission of a superheavy element. Two other samples, containing osmium from the calcium,aluminum-rich inclusions, also gave an 184Os/190Os ratio within -0.1 ± 0.5% of the terrestrial value, although these inclusions show well-established anomalies in the light elements oxygen and magnesium, which appear to be due to pre-solar dust grains of distinctive nuclear history. Apparently the stellar source of the anomalous oxygen and magnesium did not synthesize heavier elements. PMID:16592365

  8. NMR investigations of surfaces and interfaces using spin-polarized xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Gaede, H C

    1995-07-01

    {sup 129}Xe NMR is potentially useful for the investigation of material surfaces, but has been limited to high surface area samples in which sufficient xenon can be loaded to achieve acceptable signal to noise ratios. In Chapter 2 conventional {sup 129}Xe NMR is used to study a high surface area polymer, a catalyst, and a confined liquid crystal to determine the topology of these systems. Further information about the spatial proximity of different sites of the catalyst and liquid crystal systems is determined through two dimensional exchange NMR in Chapter 3. Lower surface area systems may be investigated with spin-polarized xenon, which may be achieved through optical pumping and spin exchange. Optically polarized xenon can be up to 10{sup 5} times more sensitive than thermally polarized xenon. In Chapter 4 highly polarized xenon is used to examine the surface of poly(acrylonitrile) and the formation of xenon clathrate hydrates. An attractive use of polarized xenon is as a magnetization source in cross polarization experiments. Cross polarization from adsorbed polarized xenon may allow detection of surface nuclei with drastic enhancements. A non-selective low field thermal mixing technique is used to enhance the {sup 13}C signal of CO{sub 2} of xenon occluded in solid CO{sub 2} by a factor of 200. High-field cross polarization from xenon to proton on the surface of high surface area polymers has enabled signal enhancements of {approximately}1,000. These studies, together with investigations of the efficiency of the cross polarization process from polarized xenon, are discussed in Chapter 5. Another use of polarized xenon is as an imaging contrast agent in systems that are not compatible with traditional contrast agents. The resolution attainable with this method is determined through images of structured phantoms in Chapter 6.

  9. Gamma detectors based on high-pressure xenon: their development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulin, Sergey E.; Dmitrenko, Valery V.; Grachev, V. M.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Dukhvalov, A. G.; Kotler, F. G.; Pushkin, K. N.

    2004-10-01

    Various modifications of xenon detectors and their parameters in comparison with gamma-detectors of other types are considered. Prospects of xenon detectors' applicatins in gamma-spectroscopy based on experimental results are discussed including detection and control of radioactive and fissile materials displacement, definition of uranium enrichment rate, and measurements of nuclear reactor radioactive gas waste concentration. Possibilities for xenon detector use for environmental control and measurement of cosmic gamma radiation on orbital stations are considered.

  10. Gamma detectors based on high pressure xenon: their development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulin, Sergey E.; Dmitrenko, Valery V.; Grachev, V. M.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasic, K. F.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Duhvalov, A. G.; Kotler, F. G.; Pushkin, K. N.

    2004-01-01

    Various modifications of xenon detectors and their parameters in comparison with gamma-detectors of other types are considered. Prospects of xenon detectors' applications in gamma-spectroscopy based on experimental results are discussed including detection and control of radioactive and fissile materials displacement, definition of uranium enrichment rate, and measurements of nuclear reactor radioactive gas waste concentration. Possibilities for xenon detector use for environmental control and measurement of cosmic gamma radiation on orbital stations are considered.