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Sample records for xerostomia

  1. Dry Mouth or Xerostomia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Xerostomia Request Permissions Print to PDF Dry Mouth or Xerostomia Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... a dry mouth. Signs and symptoms of dry mouth The signs and symptoms of dry mouth include ...

  2. Xerostomia: current streams of investigation.

    PubMed

    Quock, Ryan L

    2016-07-01

    Xerostomia is the subjective feeling of dry mouth, and it is often related to salivary hypofunction. Besides medication-related salivary hypofunction, Sjögren syndrome and head-and-neck radiation are two common etiologies that have garnered considerable attention. Approaches to treating and/or preventing salivary hypofunction in patients with these conditions will likely incorporate gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and tissue engineering. Advances in these disciplines are central to current research in the cure for xerostomia and will be key to eventual treatment. PMID:27189896

  3. Diagnosis and management of xerostomia and hyposalivation

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Alessandro; Connell, Christopher L; Abati, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Xerostomia, the subjective complaint of dry mouth, and hyposalivation remain a significant burden for many individuals. Diagnosis of xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction is dependent upon a careful and detailed history and thorough oral examination. There exist many options for treatment and symptom management: salivary stimulants, topical agents, saliva substitutes, and systemic sialogogues. The aim of this review is to investigate the current state of knowledge on management and treatment of patients affected by xerostomia and/or hyposalivation. PMID:25653532

  4. Xerostomia in the Geriatric Patient: Causes, Oral Manifestations, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ouanounou, Aviv

    2016-05-01

    Xerostomia, or dry mouth, is common among elderly people and is typically associated with decreased salivary gland function. Causes of xerostomia in the geriatric population have been attributed to the use of medications, chronic disorders, and radiation therapy to the head and neck region. Patients with chronic xerostomia may have multiple oral and dental consequences such as dental caries, periodontal disease, fungal infections, ill-fitting dentures, and taste alterations. Xerostomia can seriously impact quality of life and may alter speech, eating, and swallowing. Current therapeutics for the management of xerostomia are grouped as local and systemic salivary stimulation. This article reviews the main reasons for xerostomia and the complications it causes in the oral cavity. It also discusses the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic agents used to treat this condition. PMID:27213776

  5. Metabolic Imaging Biomarkers of Postradiotherapy Xerostomia

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Blake; Schwartz, David L.; Dong Lei

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Xerostomia is a major complication of head and neck radiotherapy (RT). Available xerostomia measures remain flawed. [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET-CT) is routinely used for staging and response assessment of head and neck cancer. We investigated quantitative measurement of parotid gland FDG uptake as a potential biomarker for post-RT xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight locally advanced head and neck cancer patients receiving definitive RT underwent baseline and post-RT FDG-PET-CT on a prospective imaging trial. A separate validation cohort of 14 patients underwent identical imaging while prospectively enrolled in a second trial collecting sialometry and patient-reported outcomes. Radiation dose and pre- and post-RT standard uptake values (SUVs) for all voxels contained within parotid gland ROI were deformably registered. Results: Average whole-gland or voxel-by-voxel models incorporating parotid D{sub Met} (defined as the pretreatment parotid SUV weighted by dose) accurately predicted posttreatment changes in parotid FDG uptake (e.g., fractional parotid SUV). Fractional loss of parotid FDG uptake closely paralleled early parotid toxicity defined by posttreatment salivary output (p < 0.01) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia scores (p < 0.01). Conclusions: In this pilot series, loss of parotid FDG uptake was strongly associated with acute clinical post-RT parotid toxicity. D{sub Met} may potentially be used to guide function-sparing treatment planning. Prospective validation of FDG-PET-CT as a convenient, quantifiable imaging biomarker of parotid function is warranted and ongoing.

  6. Update on xerostomia: current treatment modalities and future trends.

    PubMed

    Givens, Edward

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses some of the current treatment modalities available to those who suffer from xerostomia and looks at some therapies currently being explored to ameliorate the condition. With the number of elderly patients in the U.S. population expected to increase--concomitant with the increase in incidence of xerostomia in this group as well as other special patient population groups (that is, postradiation, Sjogren's syndrome, and so forth)--it is increasingly important that dentists maintain an awareness of the clinical implications of xerostomia and a knowledge of appropriate treatment recommendations. PMID:16689063

  7. Xerostomia of Various Etiologies: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Tanasiewicz, Marta; Hildebrandt, Tomasz; Obersztyn, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the etiopathogenesis, symptomatology, evaluation and treatment of mouth dryness. Xerostomia affects 1-29% of the population, mostly women. It is observed in geriatric patients and in individuals using certain medications, those subjected to radiotherapy of the head and neck region or affected with autoimmune conditions. The main signs of xerostomia include the impression of a dry mouth, problems with food ingestion and dryness of the oral mucosa and skin. Evaluation is based on structured interviews (the Fox test) and determinations of unstimulated and stimulated salivary volume. The signs of xerostomia can be attenuated with saliva substitutes, cevimeline or malic acid. Only palliative treatment of this condition is available at present. Untreated xerostomia significantly impairs the quality of life, which can potentially lead to depression. PMID:26935515

  8. IMRT for head and neck cancer: reducing xerostomia and dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XiaoShen; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia and xerostomia are the main sequellae of chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and the main factors in reducing long-term patient quality of life. IMRT uses advanced technology to focus the high radiation doses on the targets and avoid irradiation of non-involved tissues. The decisions about sparing organs and tissues whose damage causes xerostomia and dysphagia depends on the evidence for dose–response relationships for the organs causing these sequellae. This paper discusses the evidence for the contribution of radiotherapy to xerostomia via damage of the major salivary glands (parotid and submandibular) and minor salivary glands within the oral cavity, and the contribution of radiotherapy-related effect on important swallowing structures causing dysphagia. Recommendations for dose limits to these organs, based on measurements of xerostomia and dysphagia following radiotherapy, are provided here. PMID:27538846

  9. IMRT for head and neck cancer: reducing xerostomia and dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Wang, XiaoShen; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia and xerostomia are the main sequellae of chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and the main factors in reducing long-term patient quality of life. IMRT uses advanced technology to focus the high radiation doses on the targets and avoid irradiation of non-involved tissues. The decisions about sparing organs and tissues whose damage causes xerostomia and dysphagia depends on the evidence for dose-response relationships for the organs causing these sequellae. This paper discusses the evidence for the contribution of radiotherapy to xerostomia via damage of the major salivary glands (parotid and submandibular) and minor salivary glands within the oral cavity, and the contribution of radiotherapy-related effect on important swallowing structures causing dysphagia. Recommendations for dose limits to these organs, based on measurements of xerostomia and dysphagia following radiotherapy, are provided here. PMID:27538846

  10. Treatment of xerostomia: a systematic review of therapeutic trials.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Michael T; Shariff, Galib; Lockhart, Peter B; Fox, Philip C

    2002-10-01

    The results of the present systematic review of randomized controlled trials published in peer-reviewed journals demonstrate the presence of a wide variety of biases and the weakness of the existing literature of xerostomia treatment. The report of statistically significant efficacy on an outcome measure is only meaningful in the setting of a well-controlled, appropriately designed clinical trial. This points to the importance of evaluating the quality of the clinical trial closely when deciding if study results are applicable to a specific patient population. Future studies in the management of xerostomia will require an increased effort on the part of investigators to eliminate easily recognized flaws during the planning stages of a clinical trial. Minimizing bias in clinical studies will allow for easier interpretation and comparisons of different studies. Better clinical trial design is vital to provide maximal confidence in the efficacy of xerostomia interventions. PMID:12436835

  11. How should we measure and report radiotherapy-induced xerostomia?

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Rhodus, Nelson; Rosenthal, David; Murphy, Barbara; Rasch, Coen; Sonis, Stephen; Scarantino, Charles; Brizel, David

    2003-07-01

    Xerostomia is commonly measured and graded using objective measures of major salivary gland output and observer-rated toxicity grading. The separation between the different grades is somewhat ambiguous in the current toxicity grading systems. We propose a new grading system based primarily on the functional deficits associated with xerostomia. Salivary flow rates have been added as a criterion to the grading system, notwithstanding the weak correlation reported in most studies between the symptoms and objective functional measures. In addition to the observer-rated toxicity grading, recording of patient-reported quality of life, using validated instruments, is encouraged. PMID:12903012

  12. The prevention and treatment of radiotherapy - induced xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Rhodus, Nelson; Rosenthal, David; Murphy, Barbara; Rasch, Coen; Sonis, Stephen; Scarantino, Charles; Brizel, David

    2003-07-01

    Efforts to reduce the severity of postradiotherapy xerostomia include the use of salivary substitutes to gain symptomatic relief, salivary gland stimulants, agents delivered to protect the glands during radiotherapy (RT), and physical means to partially spare the major salivary glands from RT while adequately irradiating tumor targets. These means include advanced RT treatment planning and salivary tissue transfer to nonirradiated areas. The relative potential gain from each of these strategies is discussed in this article. The combination of partial salivary gland sparing and radiation protectors/stimulants may provide additive or synergistic gains in reducing the severity of xerostomia. PMID:12903018

  13. Chronic xerostomia increases esophageal acid exposure and is associated with esophageal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Korsten, M.A.; Rosman, A.S.; Fishbein, S.; Shlein, R.D.; Goldberg, H.E.; Biener, A. )

    1991-06-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of chronic xerostomia on parameters of gastroesophageal reflux and esophagitis. DESIGN: Observational study of a cohort of male patients with xerostomia and age-matched control subjects. SETTING: Tertiary-care Veterans Affairs Medical Center. SUBJECTS: Sixteen male patients with chronic xerostomia secondary to radiation for head and neck cancers or medications. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects with comparable alcohol and smoking histories. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Esophageal motility was similar in patients with xerostomia and controls. Clearance of acid from the esophagus and 24-hour intraesophageal pH were markedly abnormal in patients with xerostomia. Symptoms and signs of esophagitis were significantly more frequent in subjects with xerostomia. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic xerostomia may predispose to esophageal injury, at least in part, by decreasing the clearance of acid from the esophagus and altering 24-hour intraesophageal pH. Esophageal injury is a previously unreported complication of long-term salivary deficiency.

  14. Dry Eye Disease Patients with Xerostomia Report Higher Symptom Load and Have Poorer Meibum Expressibility

    PubMed Central

    Eidet, Jon R.; Utheim, Tor P.; Ræder, Sten; Lagali, Neil S.; Messelt, Edvard B.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate if xerostomia (dry mouth) is associated with symptoms and signs of dry eye disease (DED). At the Norwegian Dry Eye Clinic, patients with symptomatic DED with different etiologies were consecutively included in the study. The patients underwent a comprehensive ophthalmological work-up and completed self-questionnaires on symptoms of ocular dryness (Ocular Surface Disease Index [OSDI] and McMonnies Dry Eye Questionnaire) and the Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) questionnaire (SSQ). Three hundred and eighteen patients (52% women and 48% men) with DED were included. Patient demographics were: 0 to 19 years (1%), 20 to 39 (25%), 40 to 59 (34%), 60 to 79 (35%) and 80 to 99 (5%). Xerostomia, defined as “daily symptoms of dry mouth the last three months” (as presented in SSQ) was reported by 23% of the patients. Female sex was more common among patients with xerostomia (81%) than among non-xerostomia patients (44%; P<0.001). Patients with xerostomia (60 ± 15 years) were older than those without xerostomia (51 ± 17; P<0.001). The use of prescription drugs was more prevalent among xerostomia patients (65%) than among non-xerostomia patients (35%; P<0.021; adjusted for age and sex). Patients with xerostomia had a higher OSDI score (19.0 ± 10.0) than those without xerostomia (12.9 ± 8.0; P<0.001). Moreover, xerostomia patients had more pathological meibum expressibility (0.9 ± 0.7) than those without xerostomia (0.7 ± 0.8; P = 0.046). Comparisons of OSDI and ocular signs were performed after controlling for the effects of sex, age and the number of systemic prescription drugs used. In conclusion, xerostomia patients demonstrated a higher DED symptom load and had poorer meibum expressibility than non-xerostomia patients. PMID:27148875

  15. Dry Eye Disease Patients with Xerostomia Report Higher Symptom Load and Have Poorer Meibum Expressibility.

    PubMed

    Fostad, Ida G; Eidet, Jon R; Utheim, Tor P; Ræder, Sten; Lagali, Neil S; Messelt, Edvard B; Dartt, Darlene A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate if xerostomia (dry mouth) is associated with symptoms and signs of dry eye disease (DED). At the Norwegian Dry Eye Clinic, patients with symptomatic DED with different etiologies were consecutively included in the study. The patients underwent a comprehensive ophthalmological work-up and completed self-questionnaires on symptoms of ocular dryness (Ocular Surface Disease Index [OSDI] and McMonnies Dry Eye Questionnaire) and the Sjögren's syndrome (SS) questionnaire (SSQ). Three hundred and eighteen patients (52% women and 48% men) with DED were included. Patient demographics were: 0 to 19 years (1%), 20 to 39 (25%), 40 to 59 (34%), 60 to 79 (35%) and 80 to 99 (5%). Xerostomia, defined as "daily symptoms of dry mouth the last three months" (as presented in SSQ) was reported by 23% of the patients. Female sex was more common among patients with xerostomia (81%) than among non-xerostomia patients (44%; P<0.001). Patients with xerostomia (60 ± 15 years) were older than those without xerostomia (51 ± 17; P<0.001). The use of prescription drugs was more prevalent among xerostomia patients (65%) than among non-xerostomia patients (35%; P<0.021; adjusted for age and sex). Patients with xerostomia had a higher OSDI score (19.0 ± 10.0) than those without xerostomia (12.9 ± 8.0; P<0.001). Moreover, xerostomia patients had more pathological meibum expressibility (0.9 ± 0.7) than those without xerostomia (0.7 ± 0.8; P = 0.046). Comparisons of OSDI and ocular signs were performed after controlling for the effects of sex, age and the number of systemic prescription drugs used. In conclusion, xerostomia patients demonstrated a higher DED symptom load and had poorer meibum expressibility than non-xerostomia patients. PMID:27148875

  16. Xerostomia, Hyposalivation, and Salivary Flow in Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Casañas, Elisabeth; Ramírez, Lucía; de Arriba, Lorenzo; Hernández, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The presence of xerostomia and hyposalivation is frequent among diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. It is not clear if the presence of xerostomia and hyposalivation is greater in DM than non-DM patients. The aims of this systematic review are (1) to compare the prevalence rates of xerostomia, (2) to evaluate the salivary flow rate, and (3) to compare the prevalence rates of hyposalivation in DM versus non-DM population. This systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA group guidelines by performing systematic literature searches in biomedical databases from 1970 until January 18th, 2016. All studies showed higher prevalence of xerostomia in DM patients in relation to non-DM population, 12.5%–53.5% versus 0–30%. Studies that analyzed the quantity of saliva in DM population in relation to non-DM patients reported higher flow rates in non-DM than in DM patients. The variation flow rate among different studies in each group (DM/CG) is very large. Only one existing study showed higher hyposalivation prevalence in DM than non-DM patients (45% versus 2.5%). In addition, quality assessment showed the low quality of the existing studies. We recommend new studies that use more precise and current definitions concerning the determination and diagnosis of DM patients and salivary flow collection. PMID:27478847

  17. A Clinical Evaluation Denture Adhesives Used by Patients With Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Bogucki, Zdzislaw A.; Napadlek, Piotr; Dabrowa, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of study was to analyze the participants’ opinions concerning the effectiveness of 6 denture adhesives (DA). The study group included 60 participants. Criteria for selecting the patients were as follows: reduced retention and stabilization of maxillary complete dentures and xerostomia. These features were evaluated on basis of clinical examination and standard sialometry tests (u-SFR). Retention of maxillary dentures was scored by modified Kapur index before application of DA. All participants were divided randomly into 6 groups regarding the use of the 6 DA during a 6-month period. After this time, participants completed an HRQL questionnaire. DA noticeably improved retention and stabilization of maxillary complete dentures. DA in the glue form had the best retention effectiveness in participants with xerostomia. These materials are difficult to clean from the denture base. The data are presented in tables and figures. The results of the study collected positive influence of adhesives on retention of dentures in xerostomia patients. The cleaning dentures and denture bearing tissues was difficult. DA help in the use of prostheses, but it is also necessary for the treatment of the causes and symptoms of xerostomia. PMID:25700320

  18. Xerostomia in geriatric patients: a burgeoning global concern.

    PubMed

    Anil, Sukumaran; Vellappally, Sajith; Hashem, Mohamed; Preethanath, Reghunathan S; Patil, Shankargouda; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-02-01

    Saliva plays a key role in maintaining oral homeostasis, function, and health. The prevalence of xerostomia and its consequences are rising due to the increasing aging population, the effects of some systemic diseases, medical management, and commonly-prescribed medications that reduce saliva production. When salivary function is diminished, patients are at a greater risk of developing caries, discomfort in wearing dentures, and opportunistic diseases, such as candidiasis. The psychosocial aspects of xerostomia can range from a mild effect on self-rated oral health to frustration, embarrassment, unhappiness, or substantial disruptions in quality of life. This article reviews the clinical features, diagnosis, and prevalence of dry mouth, as well as its treatment strategies. PMID:25175324

  19. Prevalence of xerostomia in patients attending Shorish dental speciality in Sulaimani city

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of xerostomia among dental patients and explore the possible risk factors and symptoms associated with this condition. Patient and Methods: The prevalence of xerostomia and its associations were investigated among patients (n=1132) who were visiting the department of oral medicine at shorish dental speciality in sulaimani city. The age range was between 10-79 years. 512 (45.2%) of participants were males and 620 (54.8%) were females. The data collected were age, sex, systemic diseases, medications and habit of smoking. Logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used to investigate the association of xerostomia with age, systemic diseases and medications and Chi Square test was also used to analyze the data. Results: Prevalence of xerostomia was 16.07%. Prevalence of xerostomia was significantly higher among females (19.51%) than males (11.91%) (P=0.001). The most common diseases with the highest prevalence of xerostomia were psychological disorders (57.14%) followed by diabetes mellitus (53.84%), neurological disorders (40%), thyroid disorders (37.5%) and hypertension (36.48%). The most common medication with the highest prevalence of xerostomia was antihistamine (66.66%) followed by psychotherapeutic medications (60%), pain medications (55.88%), endocrinologic agents (51.21%), antidyslipidic agents (50%) and antihypertensive medication (38.98%). Xerostomia was significantly associated with ageing (OR: 1.02, P=0.000), systemic diseases (OR: 2.80, P=0.000) and medications (OR: 5.17, P=0.000). There was a high prevalence of reported symptoms of xerostomia and these symptoms were more prevalent among females, Prevalence of xerostomia was higher in heavy smoker patients (19.48%) than non smoker patients but not significantly (16.14%) (p= 0.44). Conclusions: There was a high prevalence of xerostomia among dental patients; xerostomia was significantly more

  20. How much saliva is enough for avoidance of xerostomia?

    PubMed

    Dawes, C

    2004-01-01

    Xerostomia, the subjective sensation of dry mouth, occurs when the salivary flow rate is less than the rate of fluid loss from the mouth by evaporation and by absorption of water through the oral mucosa. Evaporation can only occur during mouth-breathing but could reach a maximum rate of about 0.21 ml/min at rest, although normally it would be much less. Water absorption through the mucosa can occur because saliva has one sixth the osmotic pressure of extracellular fluid, thus creating a water gradient across the mucosa. The maximum absorption rate is calculated to be about 0.19 ml/min, declining to zero as the saliva reaches isotonicity. A recent study found the residual saliva volume, the volume of saliva left in the mouth after swallowing, to be 71% of normal in patients with severe hyposalivation and whose mouths felt very dry. Saliva in the residual volume is present as a thin film which varies in thickness with site. The hard palate has the thinnest film and when this is <10 microm thick, evaporation during mouth-breathing and/or fluid absorption may rapidly decrease it to zero, resulting in xerostomia. This is also generally associated with reduced secretion from the soft palate minor glands, which may contribute to the film on the hard palate. Thus, xerostomia appears to be due, not to a complete absence of oral fluid, but to localized areas of mucosal dryness, notably in the palate. Unstimulated salivary flow rates >0.1-0.3 ml/min may be necessary for this condition to be avoided. PMID:15153694

  1. Xerostomia due to systemic disease: a review of 20 conditions and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, H; Baharvand, M; Movahhedian, A; Mohammadi, M; Khodadoustan, A

    2014-07-01

    Xerostomia is a common complaint of nearly half of the elderly population and about one-fifth of younger adults. It causes several signs and symptoms, and compromise oral functions and health-related quality-of-life. Multiple reasons are proposed to describe the etiology of xerostomia such as local factors, psychogenic factors, and systemic diseases. In order to manage xerostomia effectively, identification of the main causality is mandatory. The aim of this review was to present systemic diseases leading to xerostomia with their mechanisms of action. We used various general search engines and specialized databases such as Google, Google Scholar, Yahoo, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Medknow, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Scopus, WebMD, EMBASE, and authorized textbooks to find relevant topics by means of Medical Subject Headings keywords such as "xerostomia," "hyposalivations," "mouth dryness," "disease," and "systemic." We appraised 97 English-language articles published over the last 40 years in both medical and dental journals including reviews, meta-analysis, original papers, and case reports. Upon compilation of relevant data, it was concluded that autoimmune diseases most frequently involve salivary glands and cause xerostomia followed by diabetes mellitus, renal failure, and graft-versus-host disease. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms of systemic disease-related xerostomia are: autoimmunity, infiltration of immunocompetent cells, granuloma formation, fibrosis and dehydration, deposition of proteinaceous substances, bacterial infection, and side-effects of medications. PMID:25221694

  2. Postradiotherapy quality of life for head-and-neck cancer patients is independent of xerostomia

    SciTech Connect

    Ringash, Jolie . E-mail: jolie.ringash@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Warde, Padraig; Lockwood, Gina; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Cummings, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between quality of life (QOL) and xerostomia over time for patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck cancer in a prospective clinical trial. Methods and materials: Patients with head-and-neck cancer were randomized to pilocarpine (n = 65) vs. placebo (n = 65) during RT. QOL was measured using the McMaster Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ). Xerostomia was measured on a linear analog scale. No statistically significant differences were observed between arms; all 130 patients were analyzed together. Results: Baseline QOL data were obtained for 98.5% of participants. The baseline HNRQ score of 5.7 declined significantly to 4.0 (p <0.0001) by RT Week 6 and returned to baseline (5.8) by 6 months after treatment. This represents a large, clinically important change of 1.7 of 7 (24%; effect size 1.34). The decline in HNRQ score during RT paralleled the onset of xerostomia on the linear analog scale (r = 0.36 at 1 month). After treatment, the QOL scores recovered without improvement in xerostomia. The trajectory of the linear analog scale score resembled that of the HNRQ's single xerostomia question (r = 0.75 at 1 month). Conclusion: Quality of life recovers to baseline after RT, despite persistent xerostomia. Either a response shift occurs or xerostomia in the absence of acute mucositis has a relatively small influence on overall QOL.

  3. Impact of Radiation-Induced Xerostomia on Quality of Life After Primary Radiotherapy Among Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jellema, Anke Petra Slotman, Ben J.; Doornaert, Patricia; Leemans, C. Rene M.D.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of xerostomia on overall quality of life (QoL) outcome and related dimensions among head and neck cancer patients treated with primary radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 288 patients with Stage I-IV disease without distant metastases were included. Late xerostomia according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG-xerostomia) and QoL (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLC-C30) were assessed at baseline and every 6th month from 6 months to 24 months after radiotherapy. Results: A significant association was found between RTOG-xerostomia and overall QoL outcome (effect size [ES] 0.07, p < 0.001). A significant relationship with global QoL, all functioning scales, and fatigue and insomnia was observed. A significant interaction term was present between RTOG-xerostomia and gender and between RTOG-xerostomia and age. In terms of gender, RTOG-xerostomia had a larger impact on overall QoL outcome in women (ES 0.13 for women vs. 0.07 for men). Furthermore, in women ES on individual scales were larger, and a marked worsening was observed with increasing RTOG-xerostomia. No different ES according to age was seen (ES 0.10 for 18-65 years vs. 0.08 for >65 years). An analysis of the impact of RTOG-xerostomia on overall QoL outcome over time showed an increase from 0.09 at 6 months to 0.22 at 24 months. With elapsing time, a worsening was found for these individual scales with increasing RTOG-xerostomia. Conclusions: The results of this prospective study are the first to show a significant impact of radiation-induced xerostomia on QoL. Although the incidence of Grade {>=}2 RTOG-xerostomia decreases with time, its impact on QoL increases. This finding emphasizes the importance of prevention of xerostomia.

  4. Biotechnological advances in neuro-electro-stimulation for the treatment of hyposalivation and xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Lafaurie, Gloria; Fedele, Stefano; López, Rafael Martín-Granizo; Wolff, Andy; Strietzel, Frank; Porter, Stephen R; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2009-02-01

    Treatment of xerostomia is a common clinical challenge in the oral medicine practice. Although some treatments have been used to improve the symptoms of xerostomia, none is completely satisfactory for the patients who suffer of this alteration. In the last years non-pharmacological treatments based on electro-stimulation for the treatment of xerostomia have been developed. This review is aimed at presenting new developments for the treatment of xerostomia, applying neuro-electro-stimulation by miniaturized intra-oral electro-stimulators. These devices increase salivary secretion and improve symptoms of oral dryness. Their effect is obtained by means of stimulation of the lingual nerve, in whose proximity the electrodes of the apparatus are placed. The objective of this mechanism is both to directly stimulate the salivary glands controlled by that nerve and to enhance the salivary reflex. Clinical studies have been carried out that have demonstrated the wetting effect of the method described in this article. PMID:19179954

  5. Sleep quality in patients with xerostomia: a prospective and randomized case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Jornet, Pia; Lucero Berdugo, Maira; Fernandez-Pujante, Alba; C, Castillo Felipe; Lavella C, Zamora; A, Pons-Fuster; J, Silvestre Rangil; Silvestre, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate sleep quality, anxiety/depression and quality-of-life in patients with xerostomia. Materials and methods This prospective, observational, cross-sectional study was conducted among a group of xerostomia patients (n = 30) compared with 30 matched control subjects. The following evaluation scales were used to assess the psychological profile of each patient: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14), the Xerostomia Inventory, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Results The PSQI obtained 5.3 3 ± 1.78 for patients with xerostomia compared with 4.26 ± 1.01 for control subjects (p = 0.006); ESS obtained 5.7 ± 2.1 for test patients vs 4.4 0 ± 1 for control subjects (p = 0.010). Statistical regression analysis showed that xerostomia was significantly associated with depression (p = 0.027). Conclusions Patients with xerostomia exhibited significant decreases in sleep quality compared with control subjects. PMID:26473793

  6. Trismus, xerostomia and nutrition status in nasopharyngeal carcinoma survivors treated with radiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-J; Chen, S-C; Wang, C-P; Fang, Y-Y; Lee, Y-H; Lou, P-J; Ko, J-Y; Chiang, C-C; Lai, Y-H

    2016-05-01

    The aims of the study were to: (1) examine levels of trismus, xerostomia and nutritional status; (2) compare levels of trismus, xerostomia and nutritional status in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) receiving different types of radiation modalities; and (3) identify factors related to NPC survivors' risk status for malnutrition and existing malnutrition. A cross-sectional study with consecutive sampling was conducted. NPC survivors were recruited from otolaryngology/oncology outpatient clinics in a medical centre in Northern Taiwan. Study measures included (1) Mandibular Function Impairment Questionnaire, (2) Xerostomia Questionnaire, (3) Mini Nutrition Assessment, (4) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale - Depression subscale, and (5) Symptom Severity Scale. A total of 110 subjects were recruited. Those receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy had less trismus and xerostomia than patients receiving two-dimensional radiation therapy. Patients with female gender, advanced stage, completion of treatments within 1 year, higher levels of depression, more severe trismus and higher symptom severity tended to have malnutrition or were at risk of malnutrition. Trismus and xerostomia are long-term problems in some NPC survivors and may contribute to malnutrition. To better manage a patient's trismus and xerostomia and to enhance nutritional status, clinicians should develop a patient-specific care programme based on careful assessment and targeted measures to improve oral function and insure adequate nutritional intake. PMID:25495287

  7. An Evidence-Based Review Literature About Risk Indicators and Management of Unknown-Origin Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Agha-Hosseini, Farzaneh; Moosavi, Mahdieh-Sadat

    2013-01-01

    This evidence-based article reviews risk indicators and management of unknown-origin xerostomia. Xerostomia and hyposalivation refer to different aspects of dry mouth. Xerostomia is a subjective sensation of dry mouth, whilst hyposalivation is defined as an objective assessment of reduced salivary flow rate. About 30% of the elderly (65 years and older) experience xerostomia and hyposalivation. Structural and functional factors, or both may lead to salivary gland dysfunction. The EBM literature search was conducted by using the medical literature database MEDLINE via PubMed and OvidMedline search engines. Results were limited to English language articles (1965 to present) including clinical trials (CT), randomized controlled trials (RCT), systematic reviews and review articles. Case control or cohort studies were included for the etiology. Neuropathic etiology such as localized oral alteration of thermal sensations, saliva composition change (for example higher levels of K, Cl, Ca, IgA, amylase, calcium, PTH and cortisol), lower levels of estrogen and progesterone, smaller salivary gland size, and illnesses such as lichen planus, are risk indicators for unknown-origin xerostomia. The management is palliative and preventative. Management of symptoms includes drug administration (systemic secretogogues, saliva substitutes and bile secretion-stimulator), night guard, diet and habit modifications. Other managements may be indicated to treat adverse effects. Neuropathic etiology, saliva composition change, smaller salivary gland size, and illnesses such as oral lichen planus can be suggestive causes for unknown-origin xerostomia. However, longitudinal studies will be important to elucidate the causes of unknown-origin xerostomia. PMID:25512755

  8. Reducing Xerostomia After Chemo-IMRT for Head and Neck Cancer: Beyond Sparing the Parotid Glands

    PubMed Central

    Little, Michael; Schipper, Matthew; Feng, Felix Y.; Vineberg, Karen; Cornwall, Craig; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether in addition to sparing parotid glands (PGs), xerostomia after chemo-IMRT of head and neck cancer is affected by reducing doses to other salivary glands. Methods Prospective study: 78 patients with stages III/IV oropharynx/nasopharynx cancers received chemo-IMRT aiming to spare the parts outside the targets of bilateral PGs, oral cavity (OC) containing the minor salivary glands, and contralateral submandibular gland (SMG) (when contralateral level I was not a target). Pretherapy and periodically through 24 months, validated patient-reported xerostomia questionnaires (XQ) scores and observer-graded xerostomia were recorded, and stimulated and unstimulated saliva measured selectively from each of the PGs and SMGs. Mean OC doses served as surrogates of minor salivary glands dysfunction. Regression models assessed XQ and observer-graded xerostomia predictors. Results Statistically significant predictors of the XQ score in univariate analysis included OC, PG, and SMG mean doses, as well as baseline XQ score, time since RT, and both stimulated and unstimulated PG saliva flow rates. Similar factors were statistically significant predictors of observer-graded xerostomia. OC, PG and SMG mean doses were moderately inter-correlated (r=0.47–0.55). In multivariate analyses, after adjusting for PG and SMG doses, OC mean dose (p < 0.0001), time from RT (p < 0.0001), and stimulated PG saliva (p < 0.0025) were significant predictors for XQ scores, and OC mean dose and time for observer-graded xerostomia. While scatter plots showed no thresholds, OC mean doses <40 Gy and contralateral SMG mean <50 Gy were each associated with low patient-reported and observer-rated xerostomia at almost all post-therapy time points. Conclusion PG, SMG and OC mean doses were significant predictors of both patient-reported and observer-rated xerostomia after chemo-IMRT, with OC doses remaining significant after adjusting for PG and SMG doses. These results support efforts to

  9. Salivary Gland Dysplasia in Fgf10 Heterozygous Mice: A New Mouse Model of Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    May, A.J.; Chatzeli, L.; Proctor, G.B.; Tucker, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Xerostomia, or chronic dry mouth, is a common syndrome caused by a lack of saliva that can lead to severe eating difficulties, dental caries and oral candida infections. The prevalence of xerostomia increases with age and affects approximately 30% of people aged 65 or older. Given the large numbers of sufferers, and the potential increase in incidence given our aging population, it is important to understand the complex mechanisms that drive hyposalivation and the consequences for the dentition and oral mucosa. From this study we propose the Fgf10 +/- mouse as a model to investigate xerostomia. By following embryonic salivary gland development, in vivo and in vitro, we show that a reduction in Fgf10 causes a delay in branching of salivary glands. This leads to hypoplasia of the glands, a phenotype that is not rescued postnatally or by adulthood in both male and female Fgf10 +/- mice. Histological analysis of the glands showed no obvious defect in cellular differentiation or acini/ductal arrangements, however there was a significant reduction in their size and weight. Analysis of saliva secretion showed that hypoplasia of the glands led to a significant reduction in saliva production in Fgf10 +/- adults, giving rise to a reduced saliva pellicle in the oral cavity of these mice. Mature mice were shown to drink more and in many cases had severe tooth wear. The Fgf10 +/- mouse is therefore a useful model to explore the causes and effects of xerostomia.

  10. Clinical Management of Salivary Gland Hypofunction and Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients: Successes and Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Vissink, Arjan; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.; Limesand, Kirsten H.; Jensen, Siri Beier; Fox, Philip C.; Elting, Linda S.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; Reyland, Mary E.

    2010-11-15

    The most significant long-term complication of radiotherapy in the head-and-neck region is hyposalivation and its related complaints, particularily xerostomia. This review addresses the pathophysiology underlying irradiation damage to salivary gland tissue, the consequences of radiation injury, and issues contributing to the clinical management of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia. These include ways to (1) prevent or minimize radiation injury of salivary gland tissue, (2) manage radiation-induced hyposalivation and xerostomia, and (3) restore the function of salivary gland tissue damaged by radiotherapy.

  11. Xerostomia After Treatment for Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Using the University of Washington Saliva Domain and a Xerostomia-Related Quality-of-Life Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Simon N.; Johnson, Ian A.; Lowe, Derek

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: The first aim of this study was to identify which clinical factors are associated with xerostomia in patients after treatment for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, using the Xerostomia-Related Quality-of-Life Scale (XeQoLS) and the University of Washington Quality-of-Life Questionnaire Version 4 dry mouth item (UW-QOL v4). The second aim was to compare these two questionnaires and postulate a cutoff in the UW-QOL below which patients are doing sufficient badly to warrant further evaluation and support. Methods and Materials: In all, 371 patients alive and disease free treated between 1992 and 2005 were sent the survey, of whom 250 (67%) responded. Various clinical factors correlated with xerostomia, particularly adjuvant radiotherapy and Pstage. Results: In logistic regression analyses to predict three or more problems on the XeQoLS, only adjuvant radiotherapy (p < 0.001) was significant at the 5% level. There were significant (p < 0.001) correlations between the XeQoLS scores (total average and domain) with all the UW-QOL domain scores, the strongest with swallowing (-0.69), taste (-0.64), chewing (-0.64), mood (-0.60), and saliva (-0.59) domains. Patients scoring <70 (i.e., 0 or 30) on the UW-QOL could be used as a screening cutoff because it formed 1 in 5 of all patients (49/242) but accounted for half (299/566) of the significant problems generated by the XeQoLS. This also identified 13/21 patients with 10 or more problems. Conclusion: The UW-QOL saliva domain seems to be a suitable means of screening for dry mouth in head-and-neck clinics and could be used to trigger interventions.

  12. Two-stage autotransplantation of human submandibular gland: a novel approach to treat postradiogenic xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Rudolf; Scheich, Matthias; Kleinsasser, Norbert; Burghartz, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Xerostomia is a persistent side effect of radiotherapy (RT), which severely reduces the quality of life of the patients affected. Besides drug treatment and new irradiation strategies, surgical procedures aim for tissue protection of the submandibular gland. Using a new surgical approach, the submandibular gland was autotransplanted in 6 patients to the patient's forearm for the period of RT and reimplanted into the floor of the mouth 2-3 months after completion of RT. Saxon's test was performed during different time points to evaluate patient's saliva production. Furthermore patients had to answer EORTC QLQ-HN35 questionnaire and visual analog scale. Following this two-stage autotransplantation, xerostomia in the patients was markedly reduced due to improved saliva production of the reimplanted gland. Whether this promising novel approach is a reliable treatment option for RT patients in general should be evaluated in further studies. PMID:26285780

  13. Parotid gland sparing IMRT for head and neck cancer improves xerostomia related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    van Rij, CM; Oughlane-Heemsbergen, WD; Ackerstaff, AH; Lamers, EA; Balm, AJM; Rasch, CRN

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose To assess the impact of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) versus conventional radiation on late xerostomia and Quality of Life aspects in head and neck cancer patients. Patients and nethods Questionnaires on xerostomia in rest and during meals were sent to all patients treated between January 1999 and December 2003 with a T1-4, N0-2 M0 head and neck cancer, with parotid gland sparing IMRT or conventional bilateral neck irradiation to a dose of at least 60 Gy, who were progression free and had no disseminated disease (n = 192). Overall response was 85% (n = 163); 97% in the IMRT group (n = 75) and 77% in the control group (n = 88) the median follow-up was 2.6 years. The prevalence of complaints was compared between the two groups, correcting for all relevant factors at multivariate ordinal regression analysis. Results Patients treated with IMRT reported significantly less difficulty transporting and swallowing their food and needed less water for a dry mouth during day, night and meals. They also experienced fewer problems with speech and eating in public. Laryngeal cancer patients in general had fewer complaints than oropharynx cancer patients but both groups benefited from IMRT. Within the IMRT group the xerostomia scores were better for those patients with a mean parotid dose to the "spared" parotid below 26 Gy. Conclusion Parotid gland sparing IMRT for head and neck cancer patients improves xerostomia related quality of life compared to conventional radiation both in rest and during meals. Laryngeal cancer patients had fewer complaints but benefited equally compared to oropharyngeal cancer patients from IMRT. PMID:19068126

  14. Treatment of xerostomia and hyposalivation in the elderly: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Montoya, José-Antonio; Silvestre, Francisco-Javier; Barrios, Rocío

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic strategies for xerostomia, regardless of etiology, have so far not had definitive or clearly effective results. Objectives. To systematically revise the latest scientific evidence available regarding the treatment of dry mouth, regardless of the cause of the problem. Material and Methods The literature search was conducted in March 2015, using the Medline and Embase databases. The “Clinical Trial”, from 2006 to March 2015, was carried out in English and only on human cases. The draft of the systematic review and assessment of the methodological quality of the trials was carried out following the criteria of PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) and the “Oxford Quality Scale”. Results Finally, a total of 26 trials were identified that met the previously defined selection and quality criteria; 14 related to drug treatments for dry mouth, 10 with non-pharmacological treatment and 2 with alternative treatments. Conclusions Pilocarpine continues to be the best performing sialogogue drug for subjects with xerostomia due to radiation on head and neck cancer or diseases such as Sjogren’s Syndrome. For patients with dry mouth caused solely by medication, there are some positive indications from the use of malic acid, along with other elements that counteract the harmful effect on dental enamel. In general, lubrication of oral mucous membrane reduces the symptoms, although the effects are short-lived. Key words:Systematic review, xerostomia, clinical trial, hyposalivation. PMID:27031061

  15. Influence of parotid-sparing radiotherapy on xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Malouf, J Gabriel; Aragon, Cecilia; Henson, Brad S; Eisbruch, Avraham; Ship, Jonathan A

    2003-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancers causes permanent salivary gland dysfunction (SGD) and xerostomia. We have previously demonstrated the effectiveness of parotid-sparing RT on salivary function. The aim of this was to characterize the relationship between radiation dosages to parotid glands, SGD, xerostomia, and impaired quality of life (QOL). Ninety-three patients received unilateral (n=38) and bilateral (n=44) neck RT with parotid-sparing techniques, or standard three-field technique RT (n=11). Unstimulated and stimulated parotid saliva was collected pre-RT and 1 year post-RT. Assessment of QOL and xerostomia was conducted with three questionnaires. The results demonstrated that reduced radiation dosages to parotid glands were strongly associated with percentage of baseline parotid flow rates measured at 1 year post-RT. Unilateral and bilateral neck RT with parotid-sparing techniques were successful in preserving salivary output, compared to standard three beam RT techniques. Lower radiation dose to contralateral parotid glands was associated with greater percentage of baseline salivary flow rates at 1 year post-RT, fewer xerostomic complaints, and an enhanced QOL. PMID:12893079

  16. Reservoir Complete Denture in a Patient with Xerostomia Secondary to Radiotherapy for Oral Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ladda, R; Kasat, VO; Gangadhar, SA; Baheti, S; Bhandari, AJ

    2014-01-01

    Xerostomia refers to a subjective sensation of dry mouth. A variety of factors can cause xerostomia including radiotherapy (RT) given for the treatment of oral carcinoma. Depending on the cause, treatment is provided to a patient suffering from xerostomia. In severe xerostomia salivary substitutes can be used and if the xerostomic patient is edentulous, then reservoir space for artificial salivary substitute can be created in partial as well as complete upper or lower dentures. The methods advocated so far for incorporating reservoir space in mandibular complete denture are costly, time consuming and require extra-laboratory steps. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to report a simpler method for fabrication of mandibular reservoir denture in a 67-year-old edentulous male patient suffering from xerostomia due to RT for oral carcinoma. PMID:24761252

  17. Reducing Xerostomia After Chemo-IMRT for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Beyond Sparing the Parotid Glands

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Michael; Schipper, Matthew; Feng, Felix Y.; Vineberg, Karen; Cornwall, Craig; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To assess whether, in addition to sparing the parotid glands (PGs), xerostomia after chemotherapy plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (chemo-IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer is affected by reducing the dose to the other salivary glands. Patients and Methods: In a prospective study, 78 patients with Stage III-IV oropharynx/nasopharynx cancer underwent chemo-IMRT, with the aim of sparing the parts of the bilateral PGs, oral cavity (OC) containing the minor salivary glands, and contralateral submandibular gland (SMG) outside the target (when contralateral level I was not a target). Before therapy and periodically for 24 months, validated patient-reported xerostomia questionnaire (XQ) scores and observer-graded xerostomia scores were recorded. Also, the stimulated and unstimulated saliva was measured selectively from each of the PGs and SMGs. The mean OC doses served as surrogates of minor salivary gland dysfunction. Regression models assessed the XQ and observer-graded xerostomia predictors. Results: Statistically significant predictors of the XQ score on univariate analysis included the OC, PG, and SMG mean doses and the baseline XQ score, time since RT, and both stimulated and unstimulated PG saliva flow rates. Similar factors were statistically significant predictors of observer-graded xerostomia. The OC, PG, and SMG mean doses were moderately intercorrelated (r = 0.47-0.55). On multivariate analyses, after adjusting for the PG and SMG doses, the OC mean dose (p < .0001), interval from RT (p < .0001), and stimulated PG saliva (p < .0025) were significant predictors of the XQ scores and the OC mean dose and time for observer-graded xerostomia. Although scatter plots showed no thresholds, an OC mean dose of <40 Gy and contralateral SMG mean dose of <50 Gy were each associated with low patient-reported and observer-rated xerostomia at almost all post-therapy points. Conclusion: The PG, SMG, and OC mean doses were significant predictors of both patient

  18. Cevimeline for the Treatment of Postirradiation Xerostomia in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Mark S. . E-mail: mchamber@mdanderson.org; Posner, Marshall; Jones, Christopher Uwe; Biel, Merrill A.; Hodge, Kenneth M.; Vitti, Robert; Armstrong, Ingrid; Yen, Cindy; Weber, Randal S.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To study the efficacy and safety of cevimeline in two double-blind trials (Studies 003 and 004) enrolling patients with head and neck cancer in whom xerostomia developed after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were randomly assigned to receive cevimeline, 30 mg three times daily, or placebo for 12 weeks, with the possibility of dose escalation to 45 mg three times daily at 6 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the patient's final global evaluation of oral dryness; change in unstimulated salivary flow was a secondary endpoint. Results: Five hundred seventy subjects (284 in Study 003 and 286 in Study 004) were randomized. Significantly more cevimeline-treated subjects than placebo recipients (47.4% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.0162) in Study 003 reported improvement in dry mouth in the final global evaluation of oral dryness. No significant difference between groups in the final global evaluation was seen in Study 004, in which a high placebo response rate of 47.6% was observed. In both studies, cevimeline-treated subjects had significantly greater increases in the objective measure of unstimulated salivary flow than placebo recipients (p 0.0093 [Study 003] and p = 0.0215 [Study 004]), whereas no significant differences in stimulated salivary flow were observed. The most frequent adverse event was increased sweating. Conclusion: Cevimeline was well tolerated by patients with xerostomia after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and oral administration of 30-45 mg of cevimeline three times daily increased unstimulated salivary flow.

  19. Cost-effectiveness landscape analysis of treatments addressing xerostomia in patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sasportas, Laura S.; Hosford, Andrew T.; Sodini, Maria A.; Waters, Dale J.; Zambricki, Elizabeth A.; Barral, Joëlle K.; Graves, Edward E.; Brinton, Todd J.; Yock, Paul G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Sirjani, Davud

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck (H&N) radiation therapy (RT) can induce irreversible damage to the salivary glands thereby causing long-term xerostomia or dry mouth in 68%–85% of the patients. Not only does xerostomia significantly impair patients’ quality-of-life (QOL) but it also has important medical sequelae, incurring high medical and dental costs. In this article, we review various measures to assess xerostomia and evaluate current and emerging solutions to address this condition in H&N cancer patients. These solutions typically seek to accomplish 1 of the 4 objectives: (1) to protect the salivary glands during RT, (2) to stimulate the remaining gland function, (3) to treat the symptoms of xerostomia, or (4) to regenerate the salivary glands. For each treatment, we assess its mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, clinical utilization, and cost. We conclude that intensity-modulated radiation therapy is both the most widely used prevention approach and the most cost-effective existing solution and we highlight novel and promising techniques on the cost-effectiveness landscape. PMID:23643579

  20. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy: an overview of the physiopathology, clinical evidence, and management of the oral damage

    PubMed Central

    Pinna, Roberto; Campus, Guglielmo; Cumbo, Enzo; Mura, Ida; Milia, Egle

    2015-01-01

    Background The irradiation of head and neck cancer (HNC) often causes damage to the salivary glands. The resulting salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia seriously reduce the patient’s quality of life. Purpose To analyze the literature of actual management strategies for radiation-induced hypofunction and xerostomia in HNC patients. Methods MEDLINE/PubMed and the Cochrane Library databases were electronically evaluated for articles published from January 1, 1970, to June 30, 2013. Two reviewers independently screened and included papers according to the predefined selection criteria. Results Sixty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. The systematic review of the literature suggests that the most suitable methods for managing the clinical and pathophysiological consequences of HNC radiotherapy might be the pharmacological approach, for example, through the use of cholinergic agonists when residual secretory capacity is still present, and the use of salivary substitutes. In addition, a modified diet and the patient’s motivation to enhance oral hygiene can lead to a significant improvement. Conclusion Radiation-induced xerostomia could be considered a multifactorial disease. It could depend on the type of cancer treatment and the cumulative radiation dose to the gland tissue. A preventive approach and the correct treatment of the particular radiotherapeutic patient can help to improve the condition of xerostomia. PMID:25691810

  1. The role of stem cells in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Nevens, Daan; Nuyts, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Xerostomia is an important complication following radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. Current treatment approaches are insufficient and can only temporarily relieve symptoms. New insights into the physiopathology of radiation-induced xerostomia might help us in this regard. This review discusses the current knowledge of salivary gland stem cells in radiation-induced xerostomia and their value in the prevention and treatment of this complication. Salivary gland stem cell transplantation, bone marrow-derived cell mobilization, molecular regulation of parotid stem cells, stem cell sparing RT, and adaptive RT are promising techniques that are discussed in this study. PMID:26880659

  2. Grading xerostomia by physicians or by patients after intensity-modulated radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Meirovitz, Amichay; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol Anne; Schipper, Mathew; Pan, Charlie; Eisbruch, Avraham . E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To assess observer-based vs. patient self-reported scoring of xerostomia after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of head-and-neck (HN) cancer. Methods: A total of 38 patients who had received IMRT for HN cancer underwent xerostomia evaluations 6 to 24 months after completion of therapy using three methods each time: (1) Grading by 3 observers according to the Radiotherapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Therapy of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) system; (2) patient self-reported validated xerostomia questionnaire (XQ); and (3) major salivary gland flow measurements. Results: The interobserver agreement regarding the RTOG/EORTC grades was moderate: {kappa}-coefficient 0.54 (95% CI = 0.31-0.76). The correlations between the average RTOG/EORTC grades and the salivary flow rates were not statistically significant. A trend for significant correlation was observed between these grades and the percent (relative to the pretherapy) nonstimulated salivary flow rates (p = 0.07), but not with the percent stimulated flow rates. Better correlations were found between grading made more than the median time (15 min) after the last liquid sipping and the nonstimulated (but not the stimulated) flows compared with grading made shortly after sipping. In contrast, significant correlations were found between the XQ scores and the nonstimulated (p < 0.005) and the stimulated (p < 0.005) salivary flow rates, as well as with the percentages of the corresponding pretherapy values (p = 0.002 and 0.038, respectively). No significant correlation was found between the RTOG/EORTC grades and the XQ scores. The observer-based grades underestimated the severity of xerostomia compared with the patient self-reported scores. Conclusions: Patient self-reported, rather than physician-assessed scores, should be the main end points in evaluating xerostomia.

  3. Open-Label, Long-Term Safety Study of Cevimeline in the Treatment of Postirradiation Xerostomia

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Mark S. Jones, Christopher Uwe; Biel, Merrill A.; Weber, Randal S.; Hodge, Kenneth M.; Chen, Y.; Holland, John M.; Ship, Jonathan; Vitti, Robert; Armstrong, Ingrid; Garden, Adam S.; Haddad, Robert

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety of long-term cevimeline treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head-and-neck cancer; and to assess the efficacy of cevimeline in these patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 255 adults with head-and-neck cancer who had received more than 40 Gy of radiation 4 months or more before entry and had clinically significant salivary gland dysfunction received cevimeline hydrochloride 45 mg t.i.d. orally for 52 weeks. Adverse events (AEs), their severity, and their relationship to the study medication were assessed by each investigator. The efficacy assessment was based on subjects' global evaluation of oral dryness on a scale of 0 (none) to 3 (severe). Results: Overall, 175 subjects (68.6%) experienced expected treatment-related AEs, most mild to moderate. The most frequent was increased sweating (47.5%), followed by dyspepsia (9.4%), nausea (8.2%), and diarrhea (6.3%). Fifteen subjects (5.9%) experienced Grade 3 treatment-related AEs, of which the most frequent was increased sweating. Eighteen subjects (7.1%) reported at least one serious AE, and 45 subjects (17.6%) discontinued study medication because of an AE. The global efficacy evaluation at the last study visit showed that cevimeline improved dry mouth in most subjects (59.2%). Significant improvement was seen at each study visit in the mean change from baseline of the numeric global evaluation score (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Cevimeline 45 mg t.i.d. was generally well tolerated over a period of 52 weeks in subjects with xerostomia secondary to radiotherapy for cancer in the head-and-neck region.

  4. Yukmijihwang-tang for the treatment of xerostomia in the elderly: study protocol for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-center trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Xerostomia, a subjective sense of dry mouth, is not generally regarded a disease despite its high prevalence among the elderly, and therefore continues to impair affected patients’ quality of life. In traditional Korean medicine, ‘Yin-Deficiency’ has been implicated in the pathogenesis of xerostomia among the elderly. Yukmijihwang-tang is a famous herbal prescription used to relieve ‘Yin-Deficiency’, and reportedly has antioxidant effects; therefore, it is postulated that Yukmijihwang-tang can be used to treat xerostomia in the elderly. However, to our knowledge, no clinical trial has been conducted on the effects of Yukmijihwang-tang on xerostomia. Thus, we designed a randomized clinical trial to investigate the effects and safety of Yukmijihwang-tang on xerostomia in the elderly. In addition, we will clarify the aforementioned assumption that ‘Yin-Deficiency’ is the major cause of xerostomia in the elderly by identifying a correlation between xerostomia and ‘Yin-Deficiency’. Methods/Design This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial will be carried out at two centers: Kyung Hee University Korean Medicine Hospital and Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong. We will recruit 96 subjects aged 60-80 years who have experienced xerostomia for 3 months prior to participation. Subjects who present with score >40 on the visual analogue scale for xerostomia and unstimulated salivary flow rate under 0.3mL/min will be included and the randomization will be carried out by an independent statistician by using a random number creation program. The subjects and all researchers except the statistician will be blinded to the group assignment. Yukmijihwang-tang or placebo will be administered to each group for 8 weeks. The primary outcome is change in the scores for the visual analogue scale for xerostomia and the dry mouth symptom questionnaire from 0 to 8 weeks. Discussion It will be assessed whether Yukmijihwang-tang can be used as a

  5. Translation and Validation of a Korean Version of the Xerostomia Inventory in Patients with Primary Sjögren's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer; Koh, Jung Hee; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Park, Sung-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to generate and validate a cross-culturally adapted Korean version of the xerostomia inventory (XI), an 11-item questionnaire designed to measure the severity of xerostomia. The original English version of the XI was translated into Korean according to the guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation of health-related quality-of-life measures. Among a prospective cohort of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) in Korea, 194 patients were analyzed. Internal consistency was evaluated by using Cronbach's alpha, and test-retest reliability was obtained by using an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis. Construct validity was investigated by performing a correlation analysis between XI total score and salivary flow rate (SFR). Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency was 0.868, and the ICC for test-retest reliability ranged from 0.48 to 0.827, with a median value of 0.72. Moderate negative correlations between XI score and stimulated SFR, unstimulated SFR, and differential (stimulated minus unstimulated) SFR were observed (Spearman's rho, ρ = -0.515, -0.447, and -0.482, respectively; P < 0.001). The correlation analysis between the visual analogue scale (VAS) score of overall dryness and SFR indicated a smaller ρ value (-0.235 [P = 0.006], -0.243 [P = 0.002], and -0.252 [P = 0.003], respectively), which supports that XI more accurately reflects the degree of xerostomia in the pSS patients. In conclusion, the Korean version of the XI is a reliable tool to estimate the severity of xerostomia in patients with pSS. PMID:27134493

  6. A Phase II Study of Submandibular Gland Transfer Prior to Radiation for Prevention of Radiation-induced Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer (RTOG 0244)

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Naresh; Harris, Jonathan; Seikaly, Hadi; Jacobs, John R.; McEwan, A.J.B.; Robbins, K. Thomas; Grecula, John; Sharma, Anand K.; Ang, K. Kian

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: We report the results of a phase II study to determine the reproducibility of a submandibular salivary gland transfer (SGT) surgical technique for prevention of radiation (XRT)-induced xerostomia in a multi-institutional setting and to assess severity of xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had surgery for primary, neck dissection, and SGT, followed by XRT, during which the transferred salivary gland was shielded. Intensity modulated radiation therapy, amifostine, and pilocarpine were not allowed, but postoperative chemotherapy was allowed. Each operation was reviewed by 2 reviewers and radiation by 1 reviewer. If 13 or more (of 43) were 'not per protocol,' then the technique would be considered not reproducible as per study design. The secondary endpoint was the rate of acute xerostomia, grade 2 or higher, and a rate of {<=}51% was acceptable. Results: Forty-four of the total 49 patients were analyzable: male (81.8%), oropharynx (63.6%), stage IV (61.4%), median age 56.5 years. SGT was 'per protocol' or within acceptable variation in 34 patients (77.3%) and XRT in 79.5%. Nine patients (20.9%) developed grade 2 acute xerostomia; 2 had grade 0-1 xerostomia (4.7%) but started on amifostine/pilocarpine. Treatment for these 11 patients (25.6%) was considered a failure for the xerostomia endpoint. Thirteen patients died; median follow-up for 31 surviving patients was 2.9 years. Two-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 76.4% and 71.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The technique of submandibular SGT is reproducible in a multicenter setting. Seventy-four percent of patients were prevented from XRT-induced acute xerostomia.

  7. Autotransplantation of cryopreserved minor salivary glands: a new approach for management of radiation-induced xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Kolahi, Jafar; Mansourian, Marjan

    2010-01-01

    To date, it still is impossible to successfully prevent radiation-induced xerostomia. Therefore, further research, particularly regarding treatment, is urgently warranted. Lower labial mucosa with its submucosal minor salivary glands (MSGs) of approximately 2.5 x 3 cm can be prepared by means of a surgical knife or Ellman Surgitron high-frequency/low-temperature radiosurgical device. Also we can consider area of the palatine fovea to find and remove MSGs. We can find locations containing more MSGs via scintigraphy techniques and positron emission tomography. Removing of MSGs can be done 1-2 weeks before start of radiotherapy. Subsequently the MSGs containing complex graft should be cryopreserved via liquid nitrogen for long-term storage. Autotransplantation surgery will be carried out 2-3 months after radiotherapy. The frozen tissue could be thawed rapidly in a 37 degrees C water bath for 2-3 min. Host site should be as far as possible to the radiation zone and has a good blood supply. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (30 treatment sessions before and 10 sessions after re-implantation) is strongly recommended. An aggressive short or medium-term antibiotic treatment will necessary to avoid infection. Immunosuppressive treatment will not require. The main criticism with this hypothesis is viability and usefulness of MSGs containing graft, after being frozen and subsequently thawed. PMID:19729251

  8. Treatment Planning Constraints to Avoid Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy: An Independent Test of QUANTEC Criteria Using a Prospectively Collected Dataset

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Wu, Jonn; Hovan, Allan; Saleh, Ziad; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O.; Harrow, Stephen; Rabuka, Carman; Muggli, Adam; Thompson, Anna

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The severe reduction of salivary function (xerostomia) is a common complication after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Consequently, guidelines to ensure adequate function based on parotid gland tolerance dose-volume parameters have been suggested by the QUANTEC group and by Ortholan et al. We perform a validation test of these guidelines against a prospectively collected dataset and compared with a previously published dataset. Methods and Materials: Whole-mouth stimulated salivary flow data from 66 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) were measured, and treatment planning data were abstracted. Flow measurements were collected from 50 patients at 3 months, and 60 patients at 12-month follow-up. Previously published data from a second institution, Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL), were used for comparison. A logistic model was used to describe the incidence of Grade 4 xerostomia as a function of the mean dose of the spared parotid gland. The rate of correctly predicting the lack of xerostomia (negative predictive value [NPV]) was computed for both the QUANTEC constraints and Ortholan et al. recommendation to constrain the total volume of both glands receiving more than 40 Gy to less than 33%. Results: Both datasets showed a rate of xerostomia of less than 20% when the mean dose to the least-irradiated parotid gland is kept to less than 20 Gy. Logistic model parameters for the incidence of xerostomia at 12 months after therapy, based on the least-irradiated gland, were D{sub 50} = 32.4 Gy and and {gamma} = 0.97. NPVs for QUANTEC guideline were 94% (BCCA data), and 90% (WUSTL data). For Ortholan et al. guideline NPVs were 85% (BCCA) and 86% (WUSTL). Conclusion: These data confirm that the QUANTEC guideline effectively avoids xerostomia, and this is somewhat more effective than constraints on the volume receiving more than 40 Gy.

  9. Preserved salivary output and xerostomia-related quality of life in head and neck cancer patients receiving parotid-sparing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Henson, B S; Inglehart, M R; Eisbruch, A; Ship, J A

    2001-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancers causes salivary dysfunction and diminished xerostomia-related quality of life. We have demonstrated that three-dimensional treatment planning and conformational dose-delivery techniques can minimize RT doses to contralateral parotid glands while providing therapeutic doses to tumors. This study's purpose was to assess parotid salivary function up to 1 year post-RT in patients receiving bilateral neck parotid-sparing RT, and to determine if parotid preservation would significantly improve xerostomia-related quality of life. Unstimulated (UPFR) and stimulated (SPFR) parotid flow rates were collected from 20 head and neck cancer patients. All subjects completed a 15-item xerostomia-related quality of life scale (XeQoLS) prior to RT, at the completion of RT, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months post-RT. Salivary flow rates from spared and treated glands were significantly decreased at the completion of RT. After RT completion, spared UPFR and SPFR function increased and was not significantly different from baseline values. Output from treated glands remained statistically indistinguishable from zero throughout the post-RT period. Subjects had a significantly worse xerostomia-related quality of life at the completion of RT compared to baseline, and XeQoLS responses improved significantly 1 month post-RT. Responses at 1 year were markedly better than at the completion of RT, but still significantly worse than baseline. These findings suggest that despite parotid-sparing RT, salivary flow rates from treated and spared glands and xerostomia-related quality of life decrease at the completion of RT. However, with the use of parotid-sparing RT, contralateral glands are preserved at 1 year post-RT with a concomitant improvement in xerostomia-related quality of life. PMID:11120488

  10. Hyperglycemia and xerostomia are key determinants of tooth decay in type 1 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chih-Ko; Harris, Stephen E; Mohan, Sumathy; Horn, Diane; Fajardo, Roberto; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; Jorgensen, James; MacDougall, Mary; Abboud-Werner, Sherry

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and oral diseases are closely interrelated. Poor metabolic control in diabetics is associated with a high risk of gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth loss. Salivary flow declines in diabetics and patients suffer from xerostomia. Reduced saliva predisposes to enamel hypomineralization and caries formation; however, the mechanisms that initiate and lead to progression of tooth decay and periodontitis in type 1 DM have not been explored. To address this issue, we analyzed tooth morphology in Akita −/− mice that harbor a point mutation in the Ins2 insulin gene, which leads to progressive hyperglycemia. Mandibles from Akita −/− and wild-type littermates were analyzed by microCT, scanning EM and histology; teeth were examined for amelogenin (Amel) and ameloblastin (Ambn) expression. Mice were injected with pilocarpine to assess saliva production. As hyperglycemia may alter pulp repair, the effect of high glucose levels on the proliferation/differentiation of cultured MD10-F2 pulp cells was also analyzed. Results showed that Akita −/− mice at 6 weeks of age showed chalky white incisors that correlated with marked hyperglycemia and impaired saliva production. MicroCT of Akita −/− teeth revealed excessive enamel wearing and hypomineralization; immunostaining for Amel and Ambn was decreased. A striking feature was invasion of dentinal tubules with Streptococcus mitis and microabcesses that originated in the coronal pulp and progressed to pulp necrosis and periapical periodontitis. High levels of glucose also inhibited MD10-F2 cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia in combination with reduced saliva in a model of type1 DM leads to decreased enamel mineralization/matrix proteins and predisposes to excessive wearing and decay. Importantly, hyperglycemia adversely affects enamel matrix proteins and pulp repair. Early detection and treatment of hyperglycemia

  11. Corticosteroid irrigation of parotid gland for treatment of xerostomia in patients with Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, M.; Eguchi, K.; Nakamura, H.; Takagi, Y.; Kawabe, Y.; Nakamura, T.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the efficacy of corticosteroid irrigation of the parotid gland in relieving salivary flow deficiency in patients with Sjögren's syndrome.
METHODS—The parotid glands of 31 patients with primary (24) or secondary (seven) Sjögren's syndrome were irrigated either with saline solution followed by corticosteroid solution, or with saline solution alone. Salivary function was assessed by Saxon test.
RESULTS—Corticosteroid irrigation significantly increased the salivary flow rate in patients with Sjögren's syndrome (p< 0.0001), with clinical improvement detectable 3.7 (2.4) weeks (mean (SD)) after initial corticosteroid irrigation. The extent of improvement in salivary function was reciprocal to the clinical severity of the disease, with patients at the early stages obtaining 1.20 (0.57) g net increase in salivary flow rate, and patients at the most advanced stages obtaining 0.20 (0.47) g net increase. Repeated corticosteroid irrigations did not evoke corticosteroid refractoriness of the salivary gland; similar levels of net increase in salivary flow rate were observed after the second to fourth challenge of the corticosteroid in these patients. The sustained period was 8.4 (3.5) months (mean (SD)).
CONCLUSION—These findings suggest the clinical usefulness of corticosteroid irrigation therapy in relieving xerostomia in patients with Sjögren's syndrome.

 Keywords: Sjögren's syndrome; xerostomia; corticosteroids PMID:9797551

  12. Recombinant AAV9-TLK1B Administration Ameliorates Fractionated Radiation-Induced Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Prakash Srinivasan Timiri; Dayton, Robert D.; Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Abreo, Fleurette; Caldito, Gloria; Klein, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    against radiation assists in preserving submandibular gland function. AAV2/9-TLK1B treatment could prove beneficial in attenuating xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy. PMID:23614651

  13. Patient- and therapy-related factors associated with the incidence of xerostomia in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients receiving parotid-sparing helical tomotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tsair-Fwu; Liou, Ming-Hsiang; Ting, Hui-Min; Chang, Liyun; Lee, Hsiao-Yi; Wan Leung, Stephen; Huang, Chih-Jen; Chao, Pei-Ju

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the incidence of moderate to severe patient-reported xerostomia among nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with helical tomotherapy (HT) and identified patient- and therapy-related factors associated with acute and chronic xerostomia toxicity. The least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models were developed using quality-of-life questionnaire datasets from 67 patients with NPC. For acute toxicity, the dosimetric factors of the mean doses to the ipsilateral submandibular gland (Dis) and the contralateral submandibular gland (Dcs) were selected as the first two significant predictors. For chronic toxicity, four predictive factors were selected: age, mean dose to the oral cavity (Doc), education, and T stage. The substantial sparing data can be used to avoid xerostomia toxicity. We suggest that the tolerance values corresponded to a 20% incidence of complications (TD20) for Dis = 39.0 Gy, Dcs = 38.4 Gy, and Doc = 32.5 Gy, respectively, when mean doses to the parotid glands met the QUANTEC 25 Gy sparing guidelines. To avoid patient-reported xerostomia toxicity, the mean doses to the parotid gland, submandibular gland, and oral cavity have to meet the sparing tolerance, although there is also a need to take inherent patient characteristics into consideration. PMID:26289304

  14. Translation and Validation of a Korean Version of the Xerostomia Inventory in Patients with Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to generate and validate a cross-culturally adapted Korean version of the xerostomia inventory (XI), an 11-item questionnaire designed to measure the severity of xerostomia. The original English version of the XI was translated into Korean according to the guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation of health-related quality-of-life measures. Among a prospective cohort of primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) in Korea, 194 patients were analyzed. Internal consistency was evaluated by using Cronbach’s alpha, and test-retest reliability was obtained by using an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis. Construct validity was investigated by performing a correlation analysis between XI total score and salivary flow rate (SFR). Cronbach’s alpha for internal consistency was 0.868, and the ICC for test-retest reliability ranged from 0.48 to 0.827, with a median value of 0.72. Moderate negative correlations between XI score and stimulated SFR, unstimulated SFR, and differential (stimulated minus unstimulated) SFR were observed (Spearman’s rho, ρ = −0.515, −0.447, and −0.482, respectively; P < 0.001). The correlation analysis between the visual analogue scale (VAS) score of overall dryness and SFR indicated a smaller ρ value (−0.235 [P = 0.006], −0.243 [P = 0.002], and −0.252 [P = 0.003], respectively), which supports that XI more accurately reflects the degree of xerostomia in the pSS patients. In conclusion, the Korean version of the XI is a reliable tool to estimate the severity of xerostomia in patients with pSS. PMID:27134493

  15. Using Multivariate Regression Model with Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) to Predict the Incidence of Xerostomia after Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Hui-Min; Chang, Liyun; Huang, Yu-Jie; Wu, Jia-Ming; Wang, Hung-Yu; Horng, Mong-Fong; Chang, Chun-Ming; Lan, Jen-Hong; Huang, Ya-Yu; Fang, Fu-Min; Leung, Stephen Wan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to develop a multivariate logistic regression model with least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) to make valid predictions about the incidence of moderate-to-severe patient-rated xerostomia among head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with IMRT. Methods and Materials Quality of life questionnaire datasets from 206 patients with HNC were analyzed. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-H&N35 and QLQ-C30 questionnaires were used as the endpoint evaluation. The primary endpoint (grade 3+ xerostomia) was defined as moderate-to-severe xerostomia at 3 (XER3m) and 12 months (XER12m) after the completion of IMRT. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models were developed. The optimal and suboptimal numbers of prognostic factors for a multivariate logistic regression model were determined using the LASSO with bootstrapping technique. Statistical analysis was performed using the scaled Brier score, Nagelkerke R2, chi-squared test, Omnibus, Hosmer-Lemeshow test, and the AUC. Results Eight prognostic factors were selected by LASSO for the 3-month time point: Dmean-c, Dmean-i, age, financial status, T stage, AJCC stage, smoking, and education. Nine prognostic factors were selected for the 12-month time point: Dmean-i, education, Dmean-c, smoking, T stage, baseline xerostomia, alcohol abuse, family history, and node classification. In the selection of the suboptimal number of prognostic factors by LASSO, three suboptimal prognostic factors were fine-tuned by Hosmer-Lemeshow test and AUC, i.e., Dmean-c, Dmean-i, and age for the 3-month time point. Five suboptimal prognostic factors were also selected for the 12-month time point, i.e., Dmean-i, education, Dmean-c, smoking, and T stage. The overall performance for both time points of the NTCP model in terms of scaled Brier score, Omnibus, and Nagelkerke R2 was satisfactory and corresponded well with the expected values. Conclusions

  16. Normal tissue complication probability model parameter estimation for xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients based on scintigraphy and quality of life assessments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With advances in modern radiotherapy (RT), many patients with head and neck (HN) cancer can be effectively cured. However, xerostomia is a common complication in patients after RT for HN cancer. The purpose of this study was to use the Lyman–Kutcher–Burman (LKB) model to derive parameters for the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for xerostomia based on scintigraphy assessments and quality of life (QoL) questionnaires. We performed validation tests of the Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) guidelines against prospectively collected QoL and salivary scintigraphic data. Methods Thirty-one patients with HN cancer were enrolled. Salivary excretion factors (SEFs) measured by scintigraphy and QoL data from self-reported questionnaires were used for NTCP modeling to describe the incidence of grade 3+ xerostomia. The NTCP parameters estimated from the QoL and SEF datasets were compared. Model performance was assessed using Pearson’s chi-squared test, Nagelkerke’s R2, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and the Hosmer–Lemeshow test. The negative predictive value (NPV) was checked for the rate of correctly predicting the lack of incidence. Pearson’s chi-squared test was used to test the goodness of fit and association. Results Using the LKB NTCP model and assuming n=1, the dose for uniform irradiation of the whole or partial volume of the parotid gland that results in 50% probability of a complication (TD50) and the slope of the dose–response curve (m) were determined from the QoL and SEF datasets, respectively. The NTCP-fitted parameters for local disease were TD50=43.6 Gy and m=0.18 with the SEF data, and TD50=44.1 Gy and m=0.11 with the QoL data. The rate of grade 3+ xerostomia for treatment plans meeting the QUANTEC guidelines was specifically predicted, with a NPV of 100%, using either the QoL or SEF dataset. Conclusions Our study shows the agreement between the NTCP

  17. A Novel Dose Constraint to Reduce Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Giovinazzo, Giuseppe; Marucci, Laura

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the predictors of incidence and duration of xerostomia (XT) based on parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SMG), and both glands taken as a whole organ (TG) in head-and-neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was initiated in May 2003. Sixty-three head-and-neck patients (44 with nasopharynx cancer) were included in the analysis. Using the dose-volume histogram the PG, SMG, and TG mean doses were calculated. Unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow were measured and XT-related questionnaires were compiled before and at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after radiotherapy. Salivary gland toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, and Grade >=3 toxicity was used as the endpoint. The XT incidence was investigated according to descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate analysis. The Bonferroni method was used for multiple comparison adjustment. Results: After a reduced flow at 3 months after radiotherapy, recovery of salivary flow was observed over time. Primary site and salivary gland mean doses and volumes were identified in univariate analysis as prognostic factors. Multivariate analysis confirmed that TG mean dose (p = 0.00066) and pretreatment stimulated salivary flow (p = 0.00420) are independent factors for predicting XT. Conclusion: The TG mean dose correlates with XT as assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria, salivary output, and XT-related questionnaires. Our results suggest that TG mean dose is a candidate dose constraint for reducing XT, requiring considerably more validation in non-nasopharyngeal cancer patients.

  18. Acupuncture-Like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Versus Pilocarpine in Treating Radiation-Induced Xerostomia: Results of RTOG 0537 Phase 3 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Raimond K.W.; Deshmukh, Snehal; Wyatt, Gwen; Sagar, Stephen; Singh, Anurag K.; Sultanem, Khalil; Nguyen-Tân, Phuc F.; Yom, Sue S.; Cardinale, Joseph; Yao, Min; Hodson, Ian; Matthiesen, Chance L.; Suh, John; Thakrar, Harish; Pugh, Stephanie L.; Berk, Lawrence

    2015-06-01

    Purpose and Objectives: This report presents the analysis of the RTOG 0537 multicenter randomized study that compared acupuncture-like transcutaneous stimulation (ALTENS) with pilocarpine (PC) for relieving radiation-induced xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were randomized to twice-weekly 20-minute ALTENS sessions for 24 sessions during 12 weeks or PC (5 mg 3 times daily for 12 weeks). The primary endpoint was the change in the University of Michigan Xerostomia-Related Quality of Life Scale (XeQOLS) scores from baseline to 9 months from randomization (MFR). Secondary endpoints included basal and citric acid primed whole salivary production (WSP), ratios of positive responders (defined as patients with ≥20% reduction in overall radiation-induced xerostomia symptom burden), and the presence of adverse events based on the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. An intention-to-treat analysis was conducted. Results: One hundred forty-eight patients were randomized. Only 96 patients completed the required XeQOLS and were evaluable at 9 MFR (representing merely 68.6% statistical power). Seventy-six patients were evaluable at 15 MFR. The median change in the overall XeQOLS in ALTENS and PC groups at 9 and 15 MFR were −0.53 and −0.27 (P=.45) and −0.6 and −0.47 (P=.21). The corresponding percentages of positive responders were 81% and 72% (P=.34) and 83% and 63% (P=.04). Changes in WSP were not significantly different between the groups. Grade 3 or less adverse events, mostly consisting of grade 1, developed in 20.8% of patients in the ALTENS group and in 61.6% of the PC group. Conclusions: The observed effect size was smaller than hypothesized, and statistical power was limited because only 96 of the recruited 148 patients were evaluable. The primary endpoint—the change in radiation-induced xerostomia symptom burden at 9 MFR—was not significantly different between the ALTENS and PC groups. There was significantly less

  19. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Xerostomia and trismus (Part 2). Literature review and consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Bossi, Paolo; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Berruti, Alfredo; Trippa, Fabio; Nicolai, Pietro; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is a well-known radical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Nevertheless acute side effects (such as moist desquamation, skin erythema, loss of taste, mucositis etc.) and in particular late toxicities (osteoradionecrosis, xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.) are often debilitating and underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for this consensus and external experts evaluated the conclusions. The paper contains 20 clusters of statements about the clinical definition and management of stomatological issues that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecrosis (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia (10 clusters of statements). PMID:27061883

  20. Differences in Salivary Flow Level, Xerostomia, and Flavor Alteration in Mexican HIV Patients Who Did or Did Not Receive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    López-Verdín, Sandra; Andrade-Villanueva, Jaime; Zamora-Perez, Ana Lourdes; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Cervantes-Cabrera, José Justino; Molina-Frechero, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Objective and subjective alterations related to salivary flow have been reported in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and these alterations are associated with the introduction of antiretroviral therapy. The aim of the current study was to discern whether these alterations are disease induced or secondary to drug therapy. Objective. The objective was to determine the relationships between low salivary flow, xerostomia, and flavor alterations in HIV patients who did or did not receive antiretroviral therapy. Materials and Methods. In this cross-sectional study, HIV patients were divided into two groups based on whether they had received antiretroviral therapy. Those patients with a previous diagnosis of any salivary gland disease were excluded. A survey was used to assess subjective variables, and colorimetry and salivary flow rates were measured using the Schirmer global test. Results. A total of 293 patients were included. The therapy group showed a significantly lower average salivary flow than did the group without therapy, and we observed that the flow rate tended to decrease after one year of therapy. The results were not conclusive, despite significant differences in xerostomia and flavor alteration between the groups. Conclusion. The study results suggest that antiretroviral therapy can cause cumulative damage that affects the amount of salivary flow. PMID:24455222

  1. Differences in Salivary Flow Level, Xerostomia, and Flavor Alteration in Mexican HIV Patients Who Did or Did Not Receive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    López-Verdín, Sandra; Andrade-Villanueva, Jaime; Zamora-Perez, Ana Lourdes; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Cervantes-Cabrera, José Justino

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Objective and subjective alterations related to salivary flow have been reported in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and these alterations are associated with the introduction of antiretroviral therapy. The aim of the current study was to discern whether these alterations are disease induced or secondary to drug therapy. Objective. The objective was to determine the relationships between low salivary flow, xerostomia, and flavor alterations in HIV patients who did or did not receive antiretroviral therapy. Materials and Methods. In this cross-sectional study, HIV patients were divided into two groups based on whether they had received antiretroviral therapy. Those patients with a previous diagnosis of any salivary gland disease were excluded. A survey was used to assess subjective variables, and colorimetry and salivary flow rates were measured using the Schirmer global test. Results. A total of 293 patients were included. The therapy group showed a significantly lower average salivary flow than did the group without therapy, and we observed that the flow rate tended to decrease after one year of therapy. The results were not conclusive, despite significant differences in xerostomia and flavor alteration between the groups. Conclusion. The study results suggest that antiretroviral therapy can cause cumulative damage that affects the amount of salivary flow. PMID:24455222

  2. Reducing the Risk of Xerostomia and Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis: The Potential Benefits of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy in Advanced Oral Cavity Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Merina; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2009-10-01

    Radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity may be curative, but carries a risk of permanent damage to bone, salivary glands, and other soft tissues. We studied the potential of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to improve target volume coverage, and normal tissue sparing for advanced oral cavity carcinoma (OCC). Six patients with advanced OCC requiring bilateral irradiation to the oral cavity and neck were studied. Standard 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and inverse-planned IMRT dose distributions were compared by using dose-volume histograms. Doses to organs at risk, including spinal cord, parotid glands, and mandible, were assessed as surrogates of radiation toxicity. PTV1 mean dose was 60.8 {+-} 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and 59.8 {+-} 0.1 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.04). PTV1 dose range was 24.7 {+-} 6 Gy for 3DCRT and 15.3 {+-} 4 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.001). PTV2 mean dose was 54.5 {+-} 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and for IMRT was 54.2 {+-} 0.2 Gy (p = 0.34). PTV2 dose range was improved by IMRT (7.8 {+-} 3.2 Gy vs. 30.7 {+-} 12.8 Gy, p = 0.006). Homogeneity index (HI) values for PTV2 were closer to unity using IMRT (p = 0.0003). Mean parotid doses were 25.6 {+-} 2.7 Gy for IMRT and 42.0 {+-} 8.8 Gy with 3DCRT (p = 0.002). The parotid V30 in all IMRT plans was <45%. The mandible V50, V55, and V60 were significantly lower for the IMRT plans. Maximum spinal cord and brain stem doses were similar for the 2 techniques. IMRT provided superior target volume dose homogeneity and sparing of organs at risk. The magnitude of reductions in dose to the salivary glands and mandible are likely to translate into reduced incidence of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis for patients with OCC.

  3. Reducing the risk of xerostomia and mandibular osteoradionecrosis: the potential benefits of intensity modulated radiotherapy in advanced oral cavity carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Merina; Hansen, Vibeke N; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    Radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity may be curative, but carries a risk of permanent damage to bone, salivary glands, and other soft tissues. We studied the potential of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to improve target volume coverage, and normal tissue sparing for advanced oral cavity carcinoma (OCC). Six patients with advanced OCC requiring bilateral irradiation to the oral cavity and neck were studied. Standard 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and inverse-planned IMRT dose distributions were compared by using dose-volume histograms. Doses to organs at risk, including spinal cord, parotid glands, and mandible, were assessed as surrogates of radiation toxicity. PTV1 mean dose was 60.8 +/- 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and 59.8 +/- 0.1 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.04). PTV1 dose range was 24.7 +/- 6 Gy for 3DCRT and 15.3 +/- 4 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.001). PTV2 mean dose was 54.5 +/- 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and for IMRT was 54.2 +/- 0.2 Gy (p = 0.34). PTV2 dose range was improved by IMRT (7.8 +/- 3.2 Gy vs. 30.7 +/- 12.8 Gy, p = 0.006). Homogeneity index (HI) values for PTV2 were closer to unity using IMRT (p = 0.0003). Mean parotid doses were 25.6 +/- 2.7 Gy for IMRT and 42.0 +/- 8.8 Gy with 3DCRT (p = 0.002). The parotid V30 in all IMRT plans was <45%. The mandible V50, V55, and V60 were significantly lower for the IMRT plans. Maximum spinal cord and brain stem doses were similar for the 2 techniques. IMRT provided superior target volume dose homogeneity and sparing of organs at risk. The magnitude of reductions in dose to the salivary glands and mandible are likely to translate into reduced incidence of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis for patients with OCC. PMID:19647632

  4. Influence of intravenous amifostine on xerostomia, tumor control, and survival after radiotherapy for head-and- neck cancer: 2-year follow-up of a prospective, randomized, phase III trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, Todd H. . E-mail: twasserman@bellsouth.net; Brizel, David M.; Henke, Michael; Monnier, Alain; Eschwege, Francois; Sauer, Rolf; Strnad, Vratislav

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate chronic xerostomia and tumor control 18 and 24 months after initial treatment with amifostine in a randomized controlled trial of patients with head-and-neck cancer; at 12 months after radiotherapy (RT), amifostine had been shown to reduce xerostomia without changing tumor control. Methods and Materials: Adults with head-and-neck cancer who underwent once-daily RT for 5-7 weeks (total dose, 50-70 Gy) received either open-label amifostine (200 mg/m{sup 2} i.v.) 15-30 min before each fraction of radiation (n = 150) or RT alone (control; n = 153). Results: Amifostine administration was associated with a reduced incidence of Grade {>=}2 xerostomia over 2 years of follow-up (p = 0.002), an increase in the proportion of patients with meaningful (>0.1 g) unstimulated saliva production at 24 months (p = 0.011), and reduced mouth dryness scores on a patient benefit questionnaire at 24 months (p < 0.001). Locoregional control rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival were not significantly different between the amifostine group and the control group. Conclusions: Amifostine administration during head-and-neck RT reduces the severity and duration of xerostomia 2 years after treatment and does not seem to compromise locoregional control rates, progression-free survival, or overall survival.

  5. Phase II Results of RTOG 0537: A Phase II/III Study Comparing Acupuncture-like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Versus Pilocarpine in Treating Early Radiation-Induced Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Raimond K. W.; James, Jennifer L.; Sagar, Stephen; Wyatt, Gwen; Nguyen-Tân, Phuc Felix; Singh, Anurag K.; Lukaszczyk, Barbara; Cardinale, Francis; Yeh, Alexander M.; Berk, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This phase II component of a multi-institutional phase II/III randomized trial assessed the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (ALTENS) in reducing radiation-induced xerostomia. Methods Head and neck cancer patients who were 3–24 months from completing radiotherapy ± chemotherapy (RT±C) and experiencing xerostomia symptoms with basal whole saliva production ≥0.1 ml/min and without recurrence were eligible. Patients received twice weekly ALTENS sessions (24 over 12 weeks) using a Codetron™ unit. The primary objective assessed the feasibility of ALTENS treatment. A patient was considered compliant if 19/24 ALTENS were delivered, with a targeted 85% compliance rate. Secondary objectives measured treatment-related toxicities and ALTENS effect on overall radiation-induced xerostomia burden using the University of Michigan Xerostomia-Related Quality of Life Scale (XeQOLS). Results Of 48 accrued patients, 47 were evaluable. Median age was 60 years; 84% were male, 70% completed RT±C for > 12 months and 21% had received prior pilocarpine. All ALTENS sessions were completed in 34 patients, but 9 and 1 completed 20–23 and 19 sessions respectively, representing a 94% total compliance rate. 6-month XeQOLS scores were available for 35 patients; 30 (86%) achieved a positive treatment response with a mean reduction of 35.9% (SD 36.1). Five patients developed grade 1–2 gastrointestinal toxicity and one had grade 1 pain event. Conclusions ALTENS treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia can be uniformly delivered in a cooperative multicenter setting and has possible beneficial treatment response. Given these results, the phase III component of this study was initiated. PMID:22252927

  6. Dry Mouth (Xerostomia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic ... mouth trouble chewing, swallowing, tasting, or speaking a burning feeling in the mouth a dry feeling in the throat cracked lips ...

  7. In vivo effects of fluoride, chlorhexidine and zinc ions on acid formation by dental plaque and salivary mutans streptococcus counts in patients with irradiation-induced xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Giertsen, E; Scheie, A A

    1993-10-01

    Irradiation therapy including major salivary glands may result in xerostomia and enhanced susceptibility to dental caries. The present aim was to assess the ability of mouthrinses with F-, Zn2+, and chlorhexidine (CH), in various combinations, to reduce acidogenic potential of dental plaque and salivary mutans streptococcus counts (SMSC) in 7 patients with xerostomia secondary to irradiation. The patients rinsed twice daily for 3 weeks with the following test solutions: (1) 12 mmol/l NaF (F; control), (2) NaF + 20 mmol/l ZnCl2 (F-Zn), and (3) NaF + 1.1 mmol/l CH (F-CH). Resting periods (F) of varying lengths were incorporated. Acid formation by dental plaque was monitored as plaque pH response to a sucrose mouthrinse, at the end of each test period, 4 h after mouthrinsing with test solution. Plaque pH was measured repeatedly at 2-8 sites in each patient before, and up to 60 min after the sucrose mouthrinse using touch microelectrodes. SMSC were determined using Dentocult SM-Strip mutans. Compared with F, F-CH significantly (P < or = 0.02) reduced acid formation by plaque and SMSC, whereas F-Zn did not affect acid formation or SMSC significantly. Pilot experiments in 4 patients showed mouthrinses with NaF + 0.55 mmol/l CH + 10 mmol/l Zn2+ to be ineffective, whereas NaF + 2.2 mmol/l CH was highly effective, but no better than F-CH. Twice daily mouthrinses with 12 mmol/l NaF in combination with 1.1 mmol/l CH may be an effective regimen to prevent post-irradiation caries. PMID:11706427

  8. SU-E-T-399: Determination of the Radiobiological Parameters That Describe the Dose-Response Relations of Xerostomia and Disgeusia From Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mavroidis, P; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Peixoto Xavier, C; Costa Ferreira, B; Khouri, L; Carmo Lopes, M do

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate the radiobiological parameters that describe the doseresponse relations of xerostomia and disgeusia from head and neck cancer radiotherapy. To identify the organs that are best correlated with the manifestation of those clinical endpoints. Finally, to evaluate the goodnessof- fit by comparing the model predictions against the actual clinical results. Methods: In this study, 349 head and neck cancer patients were included. For each patient the dose volume histograms (DVH) of parotids (separate and combined), mandible, submandibular glands (separate and combined) and salivary glands were calculated. The follow-up of those patients was recorded at different times after the completion of the treatment (7 weeks, 3, 7, 12, 18 and 24 months). Acute and late xerostomia and acute disgeusia were the clinical endpoints examined. A maximum likelihood fitting was performed to calculate the best estimates of the parameters used by the relative seriality model. The statistical methods of the error distribution, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the Pearson's test and the Akaike's information criterion were utilized to assess the goodness-of-fit and the agreement between the pattern of the radiobiological predictions with that of the clinical records. Results: The estimated values of the radiobiological parameters of salivary glands are D50 = 25.2 Gy, γ = 0.52, s = 0.001. The statistical analysis confirmed the clinical validity of those parameters (area under the ROC curve = 0.65 and AIC = 38.3). Conclusion: The analysis proved that the treatment outcome pattern of the patient material can be reproduced by the relative seriality model and the estimated radiobiological parameters. Salivary glands were found to have strong volume dependence (low relative seriality). Diminishing the biologically effective uniform dose to salivary glands below 30 Gy may significantly reduce the risk of complications to the patients irradiated for prostate cancer.

  9. Acupuncture-like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation versus Pilocarpine in Treating Radiation-Induced Xerostomia: Results of RTOG 0537 Phase 3 Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Raimond K. W.; Deshmukh, Snehal; Wyatt, Gwen; Sagar, Stephen; Singh, Anurag K.; Sultanem, Khalil; Nguyen-Tân, Phuc F.; Yom, Sue S.; Cardinale, Joseph; Yao, Min; Hodson, Ian; Matthiesen, Chance L.; Suh, John; Thakrar, Harish; Pugh, Stephanie L.; Berk, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and Objectives This report presents the analysis of the RTOG 0537 multi-center randomized study that compared acupuncture-like transcutaneous stimulation (ALTENS) to pilocarpine (PC) for relieving radiation-induced xerostomia (RIX). Methods and Materials Eligible patients were randomized to twice weekly 20 minute ALTENS sessions for 24 sessions over 12 weeks or PC (5mg, 3 times daily for 12 weeks). The primary endpoint was the change in the University of Michigan Xerostomia-Related Quality of Life Scale (XeQOLS) scores from baseline to 9 months from randomization (mfr). Secondary endpoints included basal and citric acid primed whole salivary production (WSP), ratios of positive responders (defined as patients with ≥ 20% reduction in overall RIX symptom burden), and the presence of adverse events based on CTCAE v.3. An intention-to-treat analysis was conducted. Results 148 patients were randomized. Only 96 patients completed the required XeQOLS and were evaluable at 9 mfr (representing merely 68.6% statistical power). Seventy-six patients were evaluable at 15 mfr. The median change in the overall XeQOLS in ALTENS/PC groups at 9 and 15 mfr were −0.53/−0.27 (P=0.45) and −0.6/−0.47 (P=0.21). The corresponding percentages of positive responders were 81%/72% (P=0.34) and 83%/63% (P=0.04). Changes in WSP were not significantly different between the groups. Grade 3 or less adverse events, mostly consisting of Grade 1, developed in 20.8% of patients in the ALTENS group and in 61.6% of the PC group. Conclusions The observed effect size was smaller than hypothesized and statistical power was limited, since only 96 of the recruited 148 patients were evaluable. The primary endpoint -- the change in RIX symptom burden at 9 mfr, was not significantly different between the ALTENS and PC groups. There was significantly less toxicity in patients receiving ALTENS. PMID:25841622

  10. Influence of oral moisturizing jelly as a saliva substitute for the relief of xerostomia in elderly patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dalodom, Supranee; Lam-Ubol, Aroonwan; Jeanmaneechotechai, Sutha; Takamfoo, Lalana; Intachai, Watanyoo; Duangchada, Kochaporn; Hongsachum, Buakhao; Kanjanatiwat, Panitnart; Vacharotayangul, Piamkamon; Trachootham, Dunyaporn

    2016-01-01

    Dry mouth is common in elderly patients. However, the use of saliva substitute has been limited due to its inedibility. This study investigated the efficacy of oral moisturizing jelly (OMJ), a novel edible saliva substitute. A pre-post design was conducted in 118 elderly patients diagnosed with hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus. After using OMJ, signs and symptoms of dry mouth were compared with baseline data. The properties of saliva were compared between the OMJ use and non-use periods. The use of OMJ for 2 weeks significantly reduced symptoms of dry mouth, while the use for 1 month reduced the signs of xerostomia, prevented the decline of salivary pH(s) and improved buffering capacities. OMJ was equally effective in patients taking 1 to 2 and 3 to 7 medications. Furthermore, 65% of patients preferred OMJ over a commercial product. OMJ could be new edible saliva substitute for elderly patients suffering from dry mouth. Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT02317172. PMID:26631691

  11. Xerostomia and quality of life after intensity-modulated radiotherapy vs. conventional radiotherapy for early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Initial report on a randomized controlled clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pow, Edmond; Kwong, Dora; McMillan, Anne S. . E-mail: annemcmillan@hku.hk; Wong, May; Sham, Jonathan; Leung, Lucullus; Leung, W. Keung

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To compare directly the effect of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) on salivary flow and quality of life (QoL) in patients with early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with T2, N0/N1, M0 NPC took part in a randomized controlled clinical study and received IMRT or CRT. Stimulated whole (SWS) and parotid (SPS) saliva flow were measured and Medical Outcomes Short Form 36 (SF-36), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core quetionnaire, and EORTC head-and-neck module (QLQ-H and N35) were completed at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 months after radiotherapy. Results: Forty-six patients (88%) were in disease remission 12 months after radiotherapy. At 12 months postradiotherapy, 12 (50.0%) and 20 patients (83.3%) in the IMRT group had recovered at least 25% of preradiotherapy SWS and SPS flow respectively, compared with 1 (4.8%) and 2 patients (9.5%), respectively, in the CRT group. Global health scores showed continuous improvement in QoL after both treatments (p < 0.001). However, after 12 months subscale scores for role-physical, bodily pain, and physical function were significantly higher in the IMRT group, indicating a better condition (p < 0.05). Dry mouth and sticky saliva were problems in both groups 2 months after treatment. In the IMRT group, there was consistent improvement over time with xerostomia-related symptoms significantly less common than in the CRT group at 12 months postradiotherapy. Conclusions: IMRT was significantly better than CRT in terms of parotid sparing and improved QoL for early-stage disease. The findings support the case for assessment of health-related QoL in relation to head-and-neck cancer using a site-specific approach.

  12. Impact of Salivary Gland Dosimetry on Post-IMRT Recovery of Saliva Output and Xerostomia Grade for Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With or Without Contralateral Submandibular Gland Sparing: A Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhonghe; Yan Chao; Zhang Zhiyuan; Zhang Chenping; Hu Haisheng; Tu Wenyong; Kirwan, Jessica; Mendenhall, William M.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To observe the recovery of saliva output and effect on xerostomia grade after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with or without contralateral submandibular gland (cSMG) sparing and to assess the impact of salivary gland dosimetry on this recovery among patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and May 2008, 52 patients with head-and-neck cancer received definitive (n = 5 patients) and postoperative (n = 47 patients) IMRT at our institution, with at least one parotid gland spared. Of these patients, 26 patients with a low risk of recurrence in the cSMG region underwent IMRT and had their cSMGs spared (cSMG-sparing group). The remaining 26 high-risk patients had no cSMGs spared (cSMG-unspared group). Xerostomia grades and salivary flow rates were monitored at five time points (before IMRT and at 2, 6, 12, and 18 months after IMRT). Results: Average mean doses and mean volumes receiving 30 Gy (V30) of the cSMGs were lower in the cSMG-sparing group than in the cSMG-unspared group (mean dose, 20.4 Gy vs. 57.4 Gy; mean V30, 14.7% vs. 99.8%, respectively). Xerostomia grades at 2 and 6 months post-IMRT were also significantly lower among patients in the cSMG-sparing group than in the cSMG-unspared group, but differences were not significant at 12 and 18 months after IMRT. Patients in the cSMG-sparing group had significantly better mean unstimulated salivary flow rates at each time point post- IMRT as well as better mean stimulated salivary flow rates at 2 months post-IMRT. Conclusions: Recovery of saliva output and grade of xerostomia post-IMRT in patients whose cSMGs were spared were much better than in patients whose cSMGs were not spared. The influence of the mean doses to the cSMG and parotid gland on the recovery of saliva output was equivalent to that of the mean V30 to the glands.

  13. TH-E-BRF-09: Gaussian Mixture Model Analysis of Radiation-Induced Parotid-Gland Injury: An Ultrasound Study of Acute and Late Xerostomia in Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Yu, D; Beitler, J; Curran, W; Yang, X; Tridandapani, S; Bruner, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Xerostomia (dry mouth), secondary to parotid-gland injury, is a distressing side-effect in head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT). This study's purpose is to develop a novel ultrasound technique to quantitatively evaluate post-RT parotid-gland injury. Methods: Recent ultrasound studies have shown that healthy parotid glands exhibit homogeneous echotexture, whereas post-RT parotid glands are often heterogeneous, with multiple hypoechoic (inflammation) or hyperechoic (fibrosis) regions. We propose to use a Gaussian mixture model to analyze the ultrasonic echo-histogram of the parotid glands. An IRB-approved clinical study was conducted: (1) control-group: 13 healthy-volunteers, served as the control; (2) acutetoxicity group − 20 patients (mean age: 62.5 ± 8.9 years, follow-up: 2.0±0.8 months); and (3) late-toxicity group − 18 patients (mean age: 60.7 ± 7.3 years, follow-up: 20.1±10.4 months). All patients experienced RTOG grade 1 or 2 salivary-gland toxicity. Each participant underwent an ultrasound scan (10 MHz) of the bilateral parotid glands. An echo-intensity histogram was derived for each parotid and a Gaussian mixture model was used to fit the histogram using expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. The quality of the fitting was evaluated with the R-squared value. Results: (1) Controlgroup: all parotid glands fitted well with one Gaussian component, with a mean intensity of 79.8±4.9 (R-squared>0.96). (2) Acute-toxicity group: 37 of the 40 post-RT parotid glands fitted well with two Gaussian components, with a mean intensity of 42.9±7.4, 73.3±12.2 (R-squared>0.95). (3) Latetoxicity group: 32 of the 36 post-RT parotid fitted well with 3 Gaussian components, with mean intensities of 49.7±7.6, 77.2±8.7, and 118.6±11.8 (R-squared>0.98). Conclusion: RT-associated parotid-gland injury is common in head-and-neck RT, but challenging to assess. This work has demonstrated that the Gaussian mixture model of the echo-histogram could quantify acute and late

  14. Hyposalivation and Xerostomia: Etiology, Complications, and Medical Management.

    PubMed

    Turner, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    Saliva is one of the most versatile, multifunctional substances produced by the body and has a critical role in the preservation of the oropharyngeal health. It comprises a serous and mucinous component and is secreted by the major salivary glands. The mucins in the saliva serve to protect and lubricate the hard and soft tissues of the mouth, protecting them from chemical and mechanical damage. Hyposalivation can be managed by various salivary substitutes, peripheral sialagogues, and central sialagogues. PMID:27040294

  15. Effect of 0.1% pilocarpine mouthwash on xerostomia: double-blind, randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Ahn, H-J; Choi, J-H; Jung, D W; Kwon, J-S

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of 0.1% pilocarpine mouthwash in xerostomic patients. Sixty volunteers were randomly allocated to two groups. The experimental group used 0.1% pilocarpine solution, and the control group used 0.9% saline. The short- and long-term effects of pilocarpine were investigated by measuring the severity of oral dryness, minor salivary flow rates and unstimulated whole salivary flow rate at predetermined times. The severity of oral dryness was decreased in both groups at 0, 30 and 60 min after mouthwashing, with no significant difference between the groups. Buccal and labial secretions were increased in both groups, but only the experimental group exhibited increased palatal secretion. Labial and palatal secretions, but not buccal secretion, differed between the groups. The unstimulated whole salivary flow rate was increased in the experimental group and differed from that in the control group. After 4 weeks, the severity of oral dryness was decreased in both groups and did not differ between them. The oral dryness at night or on awakening significantly decreased in both groups, with no significant difference between them, but the oral dryness at other times of the day and the difficulty in swallowing foods were not significantly changed in both groups. Minor salivary and unstimulated whole salivary flow rates did not increase in both groups. Until 1 h after mouthwashing, 0.1% pilocarpine mouthwash increased minor salivary and unstimulated whole salivary secretions, but was not superior compared with 0.9% saline at relieving subjective oral dryness. PMID:24527846

  16. Salivary Pacemakers: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sarapur, Shriprasad; Shilpashree, H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Xerostomia is the medical term for the subjective complaint of dry mouth due to a lack of saliva. Xerostomia is sometimes colloquially called pasties, cottonmouth, drooth, doughmouth or des (like a desert). Several diseases, treatments and medications can cause xerostomia. It is also common in smokers. Treatment of xerostomia is a common clinical challenge in the oral medicine practice. Although some treatments have been used to improve the symptoms of xerostomia, none is completely satisfactory for the patients who suffer of this alteration. This review is aimed at presenting new developments for the treatment of xerostomia. PMID:23814557

  17. "Dry mouth" from the perspective of traditional Persian medicine and comparison with current management.

    PubMed

    Heydarirad, Ghazaleh; Choopani, Rasool

    2015-04-01

    Xerostomia is a common problem, particularly in an elderly population, with a range of causes that affect important aspects of life, such as chewing, swallowing, and speaking. Xerostomia has been explained in traditional medicine throughout history. Traditional Persian medicine, with more than 4000 years of history, consists of the sum total of all the knowledge and practices used in diagnosis, prevention, and exclusion in Iran from ancient times to the present. Based on leading Persian medical manuscripts, the current study focuses on the medieval concept of xerostomia as an important general disorder to review the aetiology of xerostomia and xerostomia types, the control and treatment of xerostomia by lifestyle modification, and medicinal plants for xerostomia suppression according to the theory and practice of traditional Persian medicine. Xerostomia was treated with 3 major approaches in traditional Persian medicine: lifestyle modification, simple single herbal remedies, and compound medicines. It appears that all the factors that cause xerostomia in current studies can be described by using the theories of traditional Persian medicine; furthermore, therapies aimed at both medicines (current and traditional) focus on protecting salivary glands and salivary flow. As a conclution while current managements of xerostomia are still inadequate and traditional approaches have found experimental support over the centuries, some of these traditional treatments may still be useful to current medicine as alternative medicine. PMID:25488323

  18. [An electro-stimulating oral splint for dry mouth treatment].

    PubMed

    Fedele, S; Wolff, A; Strietzel, F P; Granizo López, R M; Porter, S; Konttinen, Y T

    2008-11-01

    Dentists encounter regularly patients with xerostomia, which is the accepted term for dry mouth complaint. Left untreated, xerostomia can lead to psychosocial distress and to impaired quality of life. Oral complications of the most frequent cause of xerostomia, salivary gland hypofunction, include dental caries and candidiasis. In addition, quality of life is significantly hampered. The etiology of xerostomia is multiple, but the most common conditions are Sjögren's syndrome, radiotherapy to the head and neck and use of medications. Current therapies offered by dentists rely on saliva substitutes and stimulants such as chewing gum, and are somewhat limited by their short-term efficacy. Oral mucosal electro-stimulation increases salivary secretion and relieves symptoms of dry mouth in patients with xerostomia. Therefore, intra-oral electronic devices have been developed aimed at stimulating salivary gland function. They offer promise as an optional safe and non-chemical treatment of xerostomia. PMID:19263865

  19. Stimulating the discussion on saliva substitutes: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Dost, F; Farah, C S

    2013-03-01

    Xerostomia is a significant problem commonly faced by patients and oral health practitioners. There is no cure for this condition, which commonly manifests as a side effect of medications, head and neck irradiation and other systemic conditions, such as Sjögren's syndrome and type 2 diabetes. It may also arise idiopathically. Therefore, treatment is palliative and takes the form of oral lubricants and saliva substitutes which aim to reduce symptoms associated with xerostomia as well as prevent oral disease secondary to it. Recently there has been an expansion of the number and range of products available in Australia for the palliative management of xerostomia. It is imperative then that oral health professionals have a sound understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of using such products as patients tend to be well informed about new products which are commercially available. This article discusses some of the most commonly available products used for the symptomatic relief and preventive management of xerostomia. Amongst the plethora of products available to the patient suffering from xerostomia, no single product or product range adequately reproduces the properties of natural saliva and therefore consideration of patients' concerns, needs and oral health state should be taken into account when formulating a home care regime. With Australia's ageing population and its heavier reliance on medications and treatments which may induce xerostomia, oral health professionals are likely to encounter this condition more than ever before and therefore an understanding of xerostomia and its management is essential to patient care. PMID:23441787

  20. A Phase II trial of subcutaneous amifostine and radiation therapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Anne, Pramila Rani . E-mail: rani.anne@mail.tju.edu; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I.; Brizel, David M.; Morrison, William H.; Irwin, David H.; Chougule, Prakash B.; Estopinal, Noel C.; Berson, Anthony; Curran, Walter J.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Intravenous amifostine 200 mg/m{sup 2} reduces xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients. This Phase II study evaluated subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine in a similar patient population. Patients and Methods: Patients received amifostine 500 mg, administered as two 250-mg s.c. injections 60 min before once-daily radiation for head-and-neck cancer (50-70 Gy in 5-7 weeks). The primary endpoint was the incidence of {>=}Grade 2 acute xerostomia. Results: Fifty-four patients received s.c. amifostine and radiotherapy. The incidence of {>=}Grade 2 acute xerostomia was 56% (95% CI, 43-69%) and the incidence of {>=}Grade 2 late xerostomia at 1 year was 45% (95% CI, 29-61%). The incidence of acute xerostomia was lower than reported previously with no amifostine in a controlled study; rates of acute xerostomia were similar between s.c. and i.v. amifostine in the two studies. The rate of late xerostomia with s.c. amifostine was intermediate between rates for i.v. amifostine and no amifostine, and not statistically significantly different from either historical control. Grades 1-2 nausea and emesis were the most common amifostine-related adverse events. Grade 3 amifostine-related adverse events reported by >1 patient included: dehydration (11%); rash (6%); and weight decrease, mucositis, dyspnea, and allergic reaction (each 4%). Seven patients (13%) had serious cutaneous adverse events outside the injection site. One-year rates of locoregional control, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 78%, 75%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Subcutaneous amifostine provides a well-tolerated yet simpler alternative to i.v. amifostine for reducing acute xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients.

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Reduces Radiation-Induced Morbidity and Improves Health-Related Quality of Life: Results of a Nonrandomized Prospective Study Using a Standardized Follow-Up Program

    SciTech Connect

    Vergeer, Marije R. Doornaert, Patricia A.H.; Rietveld, Derek H.F.; Leemans, C. Rene; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conventional radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with regard to patient-rated xerostomia, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute and late xerostomia and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Included were 241 patients with HNSCC treated with bilateral irradiation {+-} chemotherapy. Since 2000, all patients treated with HNSCC were included in a program, which prospectively assessed acute and late morbidity according to the RTOG and HRQoL on a routine basis at regular intervals. Before October 2004, all patients were treated with 3D-CRT (N = 150). After clinical implementation in October 2004, 91 patients received IMRT. In this study, the differences regarding RTOG toxicity, xerostomia, and other items of HRQoL were analyzed. Results: The use of IMRT resulted in a significant reduction of the mean dose of the parotid glands (27 Gy vs. 43 Gy (p < 0.001). During radiation, Grade 2 RTOG xerostomia was significantly less with IMRT than with 3D-CRT. At 6 months, the prevalence of patient-rated moderate to severe xerostomia and Grade 2 or higher RTOG xerostomia was significantly lower after IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Treatment with IMRT also had a positive effect on several general and head and neck cancer-specific HRQoL dimensions. Conclusions: IMRT results in a significant reduction of patient- and observer-rated xerostomia, as well as other head and neck symptoms, compared with standard 3D-CRT. These differences translate into a significant improvement of the more general dimensions of HRQoL.

  2. [Process in Citation].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Miho; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Salivary gland hypofunction, or xerostomia (dry mouth syndrome), induces various clinical problems, such as dental decay, bacterial infection, and swallowing dysfunction. Xerostomia caused by autoimmune disease and aging affects an increasing number of patients. The development of novel functional treatments for xerostomia is needed, as currently available therapies are only palliative in nature. Tissue stem cell transplantation and gene therapy are currently being investigated as potential approaches to the restoration of salivary gland function. The final goal of regenerative therapy is fully functional regenerative organ replacement for dysfunctional organs. Previously, we developed a technology to reconstitute the organ germ (Organ Germ Method) using epithelial and mesenchymal stem cells. We have recently reported the regeneration of fully functional organs, such as teeth, hair and lacrimal glands, can be achieved by the transplantation of bioengineered organ germs. In this review, we describe the regeneration of the salivary gland as part of a feasibility study of a next-generation regenerative therapy. PMID:26016636

  3. Radiotherapy Dose-Volume Effects on Salivary Gland Function

    SciTech Connect

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marks, Lawrence; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Nam, Jiho; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2010-03-01

    Publications relating parotid dose-volume characteristics to radiotherapy-induced salivary toxicity were reviewed. Late salivary dysfunction has been correlated to the mean parotid gland dose, with recovery occurring with time. Severe xerostomia (defined as long-term salivary function of <25% of baseline) is usually avoided if at least one parotid gland is spared to a mean dose of less than {approx}20 Gy or if both glands are spared to less than {approx}25 Gy (mean dose). For complex, partial-volume RT patterns (e.g., intensity-modulated radiotherapy), each parotid mean dose should be kept as low as possible, consistent with the desired clinical target volume coverage. A lower parotid mean dose usually results in better function. Submandibular gland sparing also significantly decreases the risk of xerostomia. The currently available predictive models are imprecise, and additional study is required to identify more accurate models of xerostomia risk.

  4. Radiotherapy Dose-Volume Effects on Salivary Gland Function

    PubMed Central

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marks, Lawrence; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nam, Jiho; Eilsbruch, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    Publications relating parotid dose-volume characteristics to radiotherapy-induced salivary toxicity were reviewed. Late salivary dysfunction has been correlated to the mean parotid gland dose, with recovery occurring with time. Severe xerostomia (defined as long-term salivary function of <25% of baseline) is usually avoided if at least one parotid gland is spared to a mean dose of less than ≈20 Gy or if both glands are spared to less than ≈25 Gy (mean dose). For complex, partial-volume RT patterns (e.g., intensity-modulated radiotherapy), each parotid mean dose should be kept as low as possible, consistent with the desired clinical target volume coverage. A lower parotid mean dose usually results in better function. Submandibular gland sparing also significantly decreases the risk of xerostomia. The currently available predictive models are imprecise, and additional study is required to identify more accurate models of xerostomia risk. PMID:20171519

  5. The Effects of Diabetes on Salivary Gland Protein Expression of Tetrahydrobiopterin and Nitric Oxide Synthesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Cassandra R.; Obi, Nneka; Epane, Elodie C.; Akba, Alexander A.; Halpern, Leslie; Southerland, Janet H.; Gangula, Pandu R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Xerostomia is defined as dry mouth resulting from a change in the amount and/or composition of saliva and often a major oral health complication associated with diabetes. Studies have shown that xerostomia is more common in females in the onset of diabetes. Evidence suggests that nitric oxide (NO) plays a critical role in healthy salivary gland function. However, the specific mechanisms by which NO regulates salivary gland function at the onset of diabetes have yet to be determined. This study had two aims: 1. To determine whether protein expression and/or dimerization of NO synthase enzymes (nNOS, eNOS) are altered in the onset of diabetic xerostomia and 2. To determine whether the changes in nNOS/eNOS protein expression/dimerization are correlated with changes in NO cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) biosynthetic enzymes (GTP Cyclohydrolase-1, Dihydrofolate reductase). Methods Functional and western blot studies were performed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic (type 1 diabetes) and control Sprague Dawley female rats using standardized protocols. Confirmation of xerostomia was determined by increased water intake and decreased salivary flow rate. Results In diabetic female rats, salivary hypofunction is correlated with decreased submandibular and parotid gland sizes. Furthermore, our results show a decrease in NOS and BH4 biosynthetic enzyme in submandibular glands. Conclusion Our results indicate that a decrease in submandibular NO-BH4 protein expression may provide insight pertaining to mechanisms for the development of hyposalivation in diabetes-induced xerostomia. Furthermore, understanding the role of NO-BH4 pathway may give insight to possible treatment options for the diabetic patient experiencing xerostomia. PMID:26777763

  6. Wetting the whistle: neurotropic factor improves salivary function

    PubMed Central

    Swick, Adam; Kimple, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Xerostomia, or dry mouth, is a common side effect of head and neck radiotherapy, Sjögren syndrome, diabetes, old age, and numerous medications. In this issue of the JCI, Xiao and colleagues identified glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) as a potential stimulus for salivary stem cell growth. Due to its ability to promote neuronal growth, differentiation, and survival, GDNF is currently being used in clinical trials as a treatment for Parkinson disease; therefore, the findings of Xiao and colleagues may initiate a potential treatment for the millions of patients who suffer from xerostomia each year. PMID:25036702

  7. Wetting the whistle: neurotropic factor improves salivary function.

    PubMed

    Swick, Adam; Kimple, Randall J

    2014-08-01

    Xerostomia, or dry mouth, is a common side effect of head and neck radiotherapy, Sjögren syndrome, diabetes, old age, and numerous medications. In this issue of the JCI, Xiao and colleagues identified glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) as a potential stimulus for salivary stem cell growth. Due to its ability to promote neuronal growth, differentiation, and survival, GDNF is currently being used in clinical trials as a treatment for Parkinson disease; therefore, the findings of Xiao and colleagues may initiate a potential treatment for the millions of patients who suffer from xerostomia each year. PMID:25036702

  8. Treatment and maintenance of a dentate patient with 'radiation caries'.

    PubMed

    Craddock, H L

    2008-11-01

    Patients with xerostomia are presenting dental practitioners with challenges in caries control, long-term restoration and prosthodontic difficulties. In many cases, extraction may be the best option, but for younger, dentate patients, this may be inappropriate. This paper describes the management of a young partially dentate patient with severe xerostomia following irradiation of the salivary glands. Preventive and restorative management are discussed, together with treatment and healing of peri-radicular pathology. The case report demonstrates that long-term stabilization and management of caries and peri-radicular lesions are possible over a seven-year period for a patient with severe radiation caries. PMID:19322963

  9. Secondary Sjogren's syndrome presenting with hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Dormohammadi Toosi, Taraneh; Naderi, Neda; Movassaghi, Shafieh; Seradj, Mehran Heydari; Khalvat, Ali; Shahbazi, Fatemeh

    2014-11-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) may develop in a large population of patients with Sjogren's syndrome (SS), but most of the subjects are asymptomatic. Here, we report a patient with known rheumatoid arthritis and symptoms of xerostomia, xerophthalmia and periodic paralysis. SS should be considered as a cause of RTA. The treatment of the underlying disorder may ameliorate the symptoms. PMID:25988057

  10. Secondary Sjogren's syndrome presenting with hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Dormohammadi Toosi, Taraneh; Naderi, Neda; Movassaghi, Shafieh; Seradj, Mehran Heydari; Khalvat, Ali; Shahbazi, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) may develop in a large population of patients with Sjogren's syndrome (SS), but most of the subjects are asymptomatic. Here, we report a patient with known rheumatoid arthritis and symptoms of xerostomia, xerophthalmia and periodic paralysis. SS should be considered as a cause of RTA. The treatment of the underlying disorder may ameliorate the symptoms. PMID:25988057

  11. 78 FR 73549 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... mutations in the methylmalonyl CoA mutase (MUT) gene encoding a key enzyme required to break down amino... gren's Syndrome Description of Technology: Sj gren's syndrome is a chronic inflammatory disease... alleviates xerostomia in an animal model of Sj gren's syndrome. This technology consists of local delivery...

  12. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors (MR3) in saliva of patients with oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Agha-Hosseini, Farzaneh; Mirzaii-Dizgah, Iraj; Mohammadpour, Neda

    2016-09-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a relatively common, chronic, and inflammatory mucocutaneous disease. Xerostomia is also a common complaint of most OLP patients. Considering the significant role of M3 muscarinic receptors (M3R) in secretion of saliva, this study sought to compare the level of this receptor in saliva between OLP patients and healthy controls. Forty OLP patients and 40 healthy controls filled out two questionnaires regarding xerostomia to assess its degree of severity. Unstimulated and stimulated salivary samples were obtained of both groups and the stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rates were calculated. Salivary level of M3 muscarinic receptors was measured using the ELISA kit. Data were analyzed and compared using unpaired student's t test. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rates and M3 muscarinic receptors levels were significantly lower but degree of xerostomia was significantly higher in OLP patients compared to healthy controls. Salivary M3 muscarinic receptor seems to be low in the patients with OLP and these patients suffer from xerostomia and reduced salivary flow rate. PMID:27371099

  13. Root bark extracts of Juncus effusus and Paeonia suffruticosa protect salivary gland acinar cells from apoptotic cell death induced by cis-platinum (II) diammine dichloride.

    PubMed

    Mukudai, Yoshiki; Kondo, Seiji; Shiogama, Sunao; Koyama, Tomoyuki; Li, Chunnan; Yazawa, Kazunaga; Shintani, Satoru

    2013-12-01

    Cis-platinum (II) diammine dichloride (CDDP) is a platinum-based anticancer agent, and is often used for chemotherapy for malignant tumors, albeit CDDP has serious side-effects, including xerostomia (dry mouth). Since patients with xerostomia have reduced quality of life, it is urgent and important to identify nontoxic and natural agents capable of reducing the adverse effect of chemotherapy on salivary gland function. Therefore, we commenced an institutional collaborative project in which candidates of herbal extracts were selected from more than 400 bioactive herbal products for their potential therapeutic effects not only on xerostomia, but also on oral diseases. In the present study, we report on two Chinese medical herbal extracts from the root barks of Juncus effusus and Paeonia suffruticosa. The two extracts showed a protective effect in NS-SV-Ac cells from the cytotoxicity and apoptosis caused by CDDP. The effect was dependent on the p53 pathway, protein kinase B/Akt 1 and mitochondrial apoptosis-related proteins (i.e. Bcl-2 and Bax), but was not dependent on nuclear factor κB. Notably, the apoptosis-protective effect of the extracts was not observed in adenocystic carcinoma cell lines. Although these extracts have been utilized in traditional Chinese medicine for hundreds of years, there are no reports to our knowledge, on their therapeutic effects on xerostomia. Thus, in the present study, we elucidated the potency of these herbal extracts as novel candidates for xerostomia to improve the quality of life of patients undergoing chemotherapy. PMID:24064583

  14. Biomaterials-based strategies for salivary gland tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Tugba; Fowler, Eric W; Hao, Ying; Ravikrishnan, Anitha; Harrington, Daniel A; Witt, Robert L; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Jia, Xinqiao

    2016-04-01

    The salivary gland is a complex, secretory tissue that produces saliva and maintains oral homeostasis. Radiation induced salivary gland atrophy, manifested as "dry mouth" or xerostomia, poses a significant clinical challenge. Tissue engineering recently has emerged as an alternative, long-term treatment strategy for xerostomia. In this review, we summarize recent efforts towards the development of functional and implantable salivary glands utilizing designed polymeric substrates or synthetic matrices/scaffolds. Although the in vitro engineering of a complex implantable salivary gland is technically challenging, opportunities exist for multidisciplinary teams to assemble implantable and secretory tissue modules by combining stem/progenitor cells found in the adult glands with biomimetic and cell-instructive materials. PMID:26878077

  15. Complete Occlusal Rehabilitation of Patient with Radiation Caries – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gandhewar, Mahesh Arvind

    2014-01-01

    One of the most distressing and dramatic causes of xerostomia is radiotherapy for the cure of maxillofacial and neck carcinomas. Patient with radiotherapy induced xerostomia presents with challenges in prosthodontic management and in unique radiation caries control. This clinical report illustrates step by step execution of complex treatment planning that lead to successful outcome in 34-year-old man, who had been treated with Radical Neck Dissection (RND) and therapeutic radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of tongue and due to radiation caries, was presented with chief complaint of difficulty in mastication. Rehabilitation was carried out with metal-ceramic fixed restorations and cast removable prostheses after extensive endodontic intervention. This article also discusses the maintenance strategies for radiation caries patient requiring complete occlusal reconstruction, who certainly presents with special needs in post-treatment management. PMID:25386544

  16. Evaluation of the oral component of Sjögren's syndrome: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Georges; Nasseh, Ibrahim; Berberi, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by lymphocytic infiltration, and consequently hypofunction of lacrimal and salivary glands. The loss of salivary function induces oral dryness (xerostomia). This review focuses on methods for determining salivary gland function including clinical signs, salivary flow rate measurements (sialometry), analysis of salivary composition (sialochemistry), histopathological and radiologic examinations, and other recent advanced techniques. PMID:27583213

  17. Evaluation of the oral component of Sjögren's syndrome: An overview.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Georges; Nasseh, Ibrahim; Berberi, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by lymphocytic infiltration, and consequently hypofunction of lacrimal and salivary glands. The loss of salivary function induces oral dryness (xerostomia). This review focuses on methods for determining salivary gland function including clinical signs, salivary flow rate measurements (sialometry), analysis of salivary composition (sialochemistry), histopathological and radiologic examinations, and other recent advanced techniques. PMID:27583213

  18. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced (Stage II and worse) head-and-neck cancer: Dosimetric and clinical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Portaluri, Maurizio . E-mail: portaluri@hotmail.com; Fucilli, Fulvio I.M.; Castagna, Roberta; Bambace, Santa; Pili, Giorgio; Tramacere, Francesco; Russo, Donatella; Francavilla, Maria Carmen

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric parameters of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in locally advanced head-and-neck tumors (Stage II and above) and the effects on xerostomia. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients with histologically proven squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were consecutively treated with 3D-CRT using a one-point setup technique; 17 had larynx cancer, 12 oropharynx, 12 oral cavity, and 6 nasopharynx cancer; 2 had other sites of cancer. Of the 49 patients, 41 received postoperative RT and 8 definitive treatment. Also, 13 were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy before and during RT; in 6 cases, 5-fluorouracil was added. The follow-up time was 484-567 days (median, 530 days). Results: One-point setup can deliver 96% of the prescribed dose to the isocenter, to the whole planning target volume, including all node levels of the neck and without overdosages. The mean dose to the primary planning target volume was 49.54 {+-} 4.82 Gy (51.53 {+-} 5.47 Gy for larynx cases). The average dose to the contralateral parotid gland was approximately 38 Gy (30 Gy for larynx cases). The maximal dose to the spinal cord was 46 Gy. A Grade 0 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia score corresponded to a mean dose of 30 Gy to one parotid gland. A lower xerostomia score with a lower mean parotid dose and longer follow-up seemed to give rise to a sort of functional recovery phenomenon. Conclusion: Three dimensional-CRT in head-and-neck cancers permits good coverage of the planning target volume with about 10-11 segments and one isocenter. With a mean dose of approximately 30 Gy to the contralateral parotid, we observed no or mild xerostomia.

  19. Toxicities Affecting Quality of Life After Chemo-IMRT of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Study of Patient-Reported, Observer-Rated, and Objective Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Klaudia U.; Schipper, Matthew; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Mark; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne; Cornwall, Benjamin; Lee, Connie S.Y.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) aiming to spare the salivary glands and swallowing structures would reduce or eliminate the effects of xerostomia and dysphagia on quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: In this prospective, longitudinal study, 72 patients with stage III-IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated uniformly with definitive chemo-IMRT sparing the salivary glands and swallowing structures. Overall QOL was assessed by summary scores of the Head Neck QOL (HNQOL) and University of Washington QOL (UWQOL) questionnaires, as well as the HNQOL “Overall Bother” question. Quality of life, observer-rated toxicities (Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effects scale, version 2), and objective evaluations (videofluoroscopy assessing dysphagia and saliva flow rates assessing xerostomia) were recorded from before therapy through 2 years after therapy. Correlations between toxicities/objective evaluations and overall QOL were assessed using longitudinal repeated measures of analysis and Pearson correlations. Results: All observer-rated toxicities and QOL scores worsened 1-3 months after therapy and improved through 12 months, with minor further improvements through 24 months. At 12 months, dysphagia grades 0-1, 2, and 3, were observed in 95%, 4%, and 1% of patients, respectively. Using all posttherapy observations, observer-rated dysphagia was highly correlated with all overall QOL measures (P<.0001), whereas xerostomia and mucosal and voice toxicities were significantly correlated with some, but not all, overall QOL measures, with lower correlation coefficients than dysphagia. Late overall QOL (≥6 or ≥12 months after therapy) was primarily associated with observer-rated dysphagia, and to a lesser extent with xerostomia. Videofluoroscopy scores, but not salivary flows, were significantly correlated with some of the overall QOL measures. Conclusion: After chemo-IMRT, although late dysphagia was on average mild

  20. Sjögren's syndrome: a challenge for dentistry.

    PubMed

    Gobetti, J P; Froeschle, M L

    1997-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome presents dentists with many challenges, from diagnosis to therapy. The secondary effects of xerostomia cause a spectrum of oral problems, including caries, candidal infection, and inflammation of the oral mucosa. The oral signs and symptoms may be the first manifestations of systemic aspects of the disease. Sjögren's syndrome requires both dental and medical management, and a program of home care. PMID:9515428

  1. Protection of Salivary Function by Concomitant Pilocarpine During Radiotherapy: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, Fred R. Roesink, Judith M.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Coppes, Rob P.; Terhaard, Chris; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Luijk, Peter van; Stokman, Monique A.; Vissink, Arjan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of concomitant administration of pilocarpine during radiotherapy for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) on postradiotherapy xerostomia. Methods and Materials: A prospective, double blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial including 170 patients with HNSCC was executed to study the protective effect of pilocarpine on radiotherapy-induced parotid gland dysfunction. The primary objective endpoint was parotid flow rate complication probability (PFCP) scored 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after radiotherapy. Secondary endpoints included Late Effects of Normal Tissue/Somatic Objective Management Analytic scale (LENT SOMA) and patient-rated xerostomia scores. For all parotid glands, dose-volume histograms were assessed because the dose distribution in the parotid glands is considered the most important prognostic factor with regard to radiation-induced salivary dysfunction. Results: Although no significant differences in PFCP were found for the two treatments arms, a significant (p = 0.03) reduced loss of parotid flow 1 year after radiotherapy was observed in those patients who received pilocarpine and a mean parotid dose above 40 Gy. The LENT SOMA and patient-rated xerostomia scores showed similar trends toward less dryness-related complaints for the pilocarpine group. Conclusions: Concomitant administration of pilocarpine during radiotherapy did not improve the PFCP or LENT SOMA and patient-rated xerostomia scores. In a subgroup of patients with a mean dose above 40 Gy, pilocarpine administration resulted in sparing of parotid gland function. Therefore, pilocarpine could be provided to patients in whom sufficient sparing of the parotid is not achievable.

  2. Oral complications in patients receiving treatment for malignancies other than of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Sonis, S T; Sonis, A L; Lieberman, A

    1978-09-01

    Oral complications in patients being treated for malignancies that were not in the head and neck were studied. Age, type of therapy, and type of malignancy were factors related to the prevalence of oral complications. Mucosal ulcerations, xerostomia, and bacterial and fungal infections were the most frequently encountered oral problems. The frequency of oral complications in these patients indicates the need for an awareness and involvement of dental practitioners in their management. PMID:279602

  3. Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    BERTI-COUTO, Soraya de Azambuja; COUTO-SOUZA, Paulo Henrique; JACOBS, Reinhilde; NACKAERTS, Olivia; RUBIRA-BULLEN, Izabel Regina Fischer; WESTPHALEN, Fernando Henrique; MOYSÉS, Samuel Jorge; IGNÁCIO, Sérgio Aparecido; da COSTA, Maitê Barroso; TOLAZZI, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical criteria for the diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients. Material and Methods A clinical study was carried out on 145 subjects (48 males; 97 females; aged 20 to 90 years). Each subject was clinically examined, in the morning and in the afternoon, along 1 day. A focused anamnesis allowed identifying symptoms of hyposalivation, like xerostomia complaints (considered as a reference symptom), chewing difficulty, dysphagia and increased frequency of liquid intake. Afterwards, dryness of the mucosa of the cheecks and floor of the mouth, as well as salivary secretion during parotid gland stimulation were assessed during oral examination. Results Results obtained with Chi-square tests showed that 71 patients (48.9%) presented xerostomia complaints, with a significant correlation with all hyposalivation symptoms (p<0.05). Furthermore, xerostomia was also significantly correlated with all data obtained during oral examination in both periods of evaluation (p<0.05). Conclusion Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients is feasible and can provide an immediate and appropriate therapy avoiding further problems and improving their quality of life. PMID:22666830

  4. Retrograde Ductal Administration of the Adenovirus-mediated NDRG2 Gene Leads to Improved Sialaden Hypofunction in Estrogen-deficient Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Liu, Changhao; Hou, Wugang; Li, Yang; Ma, Ji; Lin, Kaifeng; Situ, Zhenqiang; Xiong, Lize; Li, Shaoqing; Yao, Libo

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common oral manifestations of menopause is xerostomia. Oral dryness can profoundly affect quality of life and interfere with basic daily functions, such as chewing, deglutition, and speaking. Although the feeling of oral dryness can be ameliorated after estrogen supplementation, the side effects of estrogen greatly restrict its application. We previously found that N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) is involved in estrogen-mediated ion and fluid transport in a cell-based model. In the present study, we used an ovariectomized rat model to mimic xerostomia in menopausal women and constructed two adenovirus vectors bearing NDRG2 to validate their therapeutic potential. Ovariectomized rats exhibited severe sialaden hypofunction, including decreased saliva secretion and ion reabsorption as well as increased water intake. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression of NDRG2 and Na+ reabsorption-related Na+/K+-ATPase and epithelial sodium channels (EnaC) decreased in ovariectomized rat salivary glands. We further showed that the localized delivery of NDRG2 improved the dysfunction of Na+ and Cl− reabsorption. In addition, the saliva flow rate and water drinking recovered to normal. This study elucidates the mechanism of estrogen deficiency-mediated xerostomia or sialaden hypofunction and provides a promising strategy for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24343104

  5. The effect of two artificial salivas on the adhesion of Candida albicans to heat-polymerized acrylic resin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Xerostomia can diminish the quality of life, leads to changes in normal chemical composition of saliva and oral microbiata, and increases the risk for opportunistic infections, such as Candida albicans. Various artificial salivas have been considered for patients with xerostomia. However, the knowledge on the antifungal and antiadhesive activity of artificial saliva substitutes is limited. The aim of the present study was to evaluate influence of two artificial salivas on the adhesion of Candida albicans to the polymethylmethacrylate disc specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two commercial artificial salivas (Saliva Orthana and Biotene Oral Balance Gel) were selected. 45 polymethylmethacrylate disc specimens were prepared and randomly allocated into 3 groups; Saliva Orthana, Biotene-Oral Balance gel and distilled water. Specimens were stored in the artificial saliva or in the sterile distilled water for 60 minutes at 37℃. Then they were exposed to yeast suspensions including Candida albicans. Yeast cells were counted using ×40 magnification under a light microscope and data were analysed. RESULTS Analysis of data indicated statistically significant difference in adhesion of Candida albicans among all experimental groups (P=.000). Findings indicated that Saliva Orthana had higher adhesion scores than the Biotene Oral Balance gel and distilled water (P<.05). CONCLUSION In comparison of Saliva Orthana, the use of Biotene Oral Balance Gel including lysozyme, lactoferrin and peroxidase may be an appropriate treatment method to prevent of adhesion of Candida albicans and related infections in patients with xerostomia. PMID:25932306

  6. Intravenous amifostine during chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: A randomized placebo-controlled phase III study

    SciTech Connect

    Buentzel, Jens . E-mail: jens.buentzel@shk-ndh.de; Micke, Oliver; Adamietz, Irenaus A.; Monnier, Alain; Glatzel, Michael; Vries, Alexander de

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: Clinical trials demonstrated the efficacy and safety of intravenous (i.v.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine for reducing xerostomia and mucositis after radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. This randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase III study evaluated the efficacy and safety of i.v. amifostine during radiochemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients from European and American study centers received i.v. amifostine 300 mg/m{sup 2} (n = 67) or placebo (n = 65) before carboplatin 70 mg/m{sup 2} and radiotherapy on Days 1 to 5 and 21 to 25, and i.v. amifostine 200 mg/m{sup 2} or placebo before radiotherapy on other days. Results: Toxicity incidences were (amifostine, placebo, p value): Grade 2 or higher acute xerostomia (39%, 34%, 0.715), Grade 3 or higher acute mucositis (39%, 22%, 0.055), Grade 2 or higher late xerostomia (37%, 24%, 0.235), and Grade 3 or higher treatment-related adverse events (42%, 20%, 0.008). One-year rates of locoregional failure, progression-free survival, and overall survival were not significantly different between treatments. Conclusions: The used amifostine doses were not able to reduce the toxicity of simultaneous radiochemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. The safety of amifostine and the lack of tumor protection were consistent with previous studies.

  7. Salivary gland sparing and improved target irradiation by conformal and intensity modulated irradiation of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Ship, Jonathan A; Dawson, Laura A; Kim, Hyungjin M; Bradford, Carol R; Terrell, Jeffrey E; Chepeha, Douglas B; Teknos, Theodore N; Hogikyan, Norman D; Anzai, Yoshimi; Marsh, Lon H; Ten Haken, Randall K; Wolf, Gregory T

    2003-07-01

    The goals of this study were to facilitate sparing of the major salivary glands while adequately treating tumor targets in patients requiring comprehensive bilateral neck irradiation (RT), and to assess the potential for improved xerostomia. Since 1994 techniques of target irradiation and locoregional tumor control with conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) have been developed. In patients treated with these modalities, the salivary flow rates before and periodically after RT have been measured selectively from each major salivary gland and the residual flows correlated with glands' dose volume histograms (DVHs). In addition, subjective xerostomia questionnaires have been developed and validated. The pattern of locoregional recurrence has been examined from computed tomography (CT) scans at the time of recurrence, transferring the recurrence volumes to the planning CT scans, and regenerating the dose distributions at the recurrence sites. Treatment plans for target coverage and dose homogeneity using static, multisegmental IMRT were found to be significantly better than standard RT plans. In addition, significant parotid gland sparing was achieved in the conformal plans. The relationships among dose, irradiated volume, and the residual saliva flow rates from the parotid glands were characterized by dose and volume thresholds. A mean radiation dose of 26 Gy was found to be the threshold for preserved stimulated saliva flow. Xerostomia questionnaire scores suggested that xerostomia was significantly reduced in patients irradiated with bilateral neck, parotid-sparing RT, compared to patients with similar tumors treated with standard RT. Examination of locoregional tumor recurrence patterns revealed that the large majority of recurrences occurred inside targets, in areas that had been judged to be at high risk and that had received RT doses according to the perceived risk. Tangible gains in salivary gland sparing and target coverage are being

  8. Using a Reduced Spot Size for Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Potentially Improves Salivary Gland-Sparing in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Water, Tara A. van de; Lomax, Antony J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Hug, Eugen B.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether intensity-modulated proton therapy with a reduced spot size (rsIMPT) could further reduce the parotid and submandibular gland dose compared with previously calculated IMPT plans with a larger spot size. In addition, it was investigated whether the obtained dose reductions would theoretically translate into a reduction of normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). Methods: Ten patients with N0 oropharyngeal cancer were included in a comparative treatment planning study. Both IMPT plans delivered simultaneously 70 Gy to the boost planning target volume (PTV) and 54 Gy to the elective nodal PTV. IMPT and rsIMPT used identical three-field beam arrangements. In the IMPT plans, the parotid and submandibular salivary glands were spared as much as possible. rsIMPT plans used identical dose-volume objectives for the parotid glands as those used by the IMPT plans, whereas the objectives for the submandibular glands were tightened further. NTCPs were calculated for salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Results: Target coverage was similar for both IMPT techniques, whereas rsIMPT clearly improved target conformity. The mean doses in the parotid glands and submandibular glands were significantly lower for three-field rsIMPT (14.7 Gy and 46.9 Gy, respectively) than for three-field IMPT (16.8 Gy and 54.6 Gy, respectively). Hence, rsIMPT significantly reduced the NTCP of patient-rated xerostomia and parotid and contralateral submandibular salivary flow dysfunction (27%, 17%, and 43% respectively) compared with IMPT (39%, 20%, and 79%, respectively). In addition, mean dose values in the sublingual glands, the soft palate and oral cavity were also decreased. Obtained dose and NTCP reductions varied per patient. Conclusions: rsIMPT improved sparing of the salivary glands and reduced NTCP for xerostomia and parotid and submandibular salivary dysfunction, while maintaining similar target coverage results. It is expected that rsIMPT improves quality

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Subcutaneous Amifostine in Minimizing Radiation-Induced Toxicities in Patients Receiving Combined-Modality Treatment for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Amy; Wood, Craig

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To report long-term data from a prospective trial of subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine in patients who received chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods and Materials: Patients {>=}18 years of age with previously untreated Stage III/IV SCCHN received fractionated radiotherapy, 1.8-2.0 Gy/day, 5 days per week, to a total dose of 70-72 Gy, plus weekly paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) and carboplatin (100 mg/m{sup 2}) administered intravenously (i.v.) for 6 weeks. All patients received 500 mg s.c. amifostine 30-60 min before radiotherapy with antihistamine and antiemetic prophylaxis. Results: Twenty patients were evaluable (median age, 55 years). The incidence of Grade 2 xerostomia was 42% and 29% at 12 and 18 months, respectively; there were no reports of Grade {>=}3 xerostomia. Grade {>=}3 mucositis occurred in 30% of patients, with median time to resolution of 12.5 weeks (range, 5-17 weeks). Survival estimates at 1 and 2 years were 95% and 71%, respectively. All patients experienced Grade 2 weight loss; 7 patients (35%) experienced Grade {<=}2 nausea/vomiting. There were no reports of Grade {>=}3 amifostine-related adverse events. Conclusions: Subcutaneous amifostine was well tolerated by patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for SCCHN, with lower rates of nausea/vomiting than reported in trials with i.v. amifostine. Xerostomia and mucositis rates were similar to those reported in trials with i.v. amifostine.

  10. The efficacy and toxicity of individualized intensity-modulated radiotherapy based on the tumor extension patterns of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guan-Qun; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yuan; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Lu-Lu; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ma, Jun; Sun, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using individualized clinical target volumes (CTVs) based on the loco-regional extension patterns of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods From December 2009 to February 2012, 220 patients with histologically-proven, non-disseminated NPC were prospectively treated with IMRT according to an individualized delineation protocol. CTV1 encompassed the gross tumor volume, entire nasopharyngeal mucosa and structures within the pharyngobasilar fascia with a margin. CTV2 encompassed bilateral high risk anatomic sites and downstream anatomic sites adjacent to primary tumor, bilateral retropharyngeal regions, levels II, III and Va, and prophylactic irradiation was gave to one or two levels beyond clinical lymph nodes involvement. Clinical outcomes and toxicities were evaluated. Results Median follow-up was 50.8 (range, 1.3–68.0) months, four-year local relapse-free, regional relapse-free, distant metastasis-free, disease-free and overall survival rates were 94.7%, 97.0%, 91.7%, 87.2% and 91.9%, respectively. Acute severe (≥ grade 3) mucositis, dermatitis and xerostomia were observed in 27.6%, 3.6% and zero patients, respectively. At 1 year, xerostomia was mild, with frequencies of Grade 0, 1, 2 and 3 xerostomia of 27.9%, 63.3%, 8.3% and 0.5%, respectively. Conclusions IMRT using individualized CTVs provided high rates of local and regional control and a favorable toxicity profile in NPC. Individualized CTV delineation strategy is a promising one that may effectively avoid unnecessary or missed irradiation, and deserve optimization to define more precise individualized CTVs. PMID:26980744

  11. Evaluation of Parotid Gland Function following Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seok Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Joo Young; Park, Sung Yong; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Joo Young

    2006-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to determine the parotid gland tolerance dose levels following intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for treating patients who suffered with head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods From February 2003 through June 2004, 34 head and neck patients with 6 months of follow-up were evaluated for xerostomia after being treated by IMRT. Their median age was 59 years (range: 29~78). Xerostomia was assessed using a 4-question xerostomia questionnaire score (XQS) and a test for the salivary flow rates (unstimulated and stimulated: USFR and SSFR, respectively). The patients were also given a validated LENT SOMA scale (LSS) questionnaire. Evaluations were performed before IMRT and at 1, 3 and 6 months after IMRT. Results All 34 patients showed significant changes in the XQS, LSS and Salivary Flow rates (USFR and SSFR) after IMRT. No significant changes in the XQS or LSS were noted in 12 patients who received a total parotid mean dose of ≤3,100 cGy at 1, 3 and 6 months post-IMRT relative to the baseline values. However, for the 22 patients who received >3,100 cGy, significant increases in the XQS and LSS were observed. The USFR and SSFR from the parotid glands in 7 patients who received ≤2,750 cGy were significantly preserved at up to 6 months after IMRT. However, the USFR and SSFR in 27 patients who were treated with >2,750 cGy were significantly lower than the baseline values at all times after IMRT. Conclusion We suggest that the total parotid mean dose should be limited to ≤2,750 cGy to preserve the USFR and SSFR and so improve the subsequent quality of life. PMID:19771265

  12. Predictors of Poor Sleep Quality Among Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shuman, Andrew G.; Duffy, Sonia A.; Ronis, David L.; Garetz, Susan L.; McLean, Scott A.; Fowler, Karen E.; Terrell, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The objective of this study was to determine the predictors of sleep quality among head and neck cancer patients 1 year after diagnosis. Study Design This was a prospective, multisite cohort study of head and neck cancer patients (N = 457). Methods Patients were surveyed at baseline and 1 year after diagnosis. Chart audits were also conducted. The dependent variable was a self-assessed sleep score 1 year after diagnosis. The independent variables were a 1 year pain score, xerostomia, treatment received (radiation, chemotherapy, and/or surgery), presence of a feeding tube and/or tracheotomy, tumor site and stage, comorbidities, depression, smoking, problem drinking, age, and sex. Results Both baseline (67.1) and 1-year post-diagnosis (69.3) sleep scores were slightly lower than population means (72). Multivariate analyses showed that pain, xerostomia, depression, presence of a tracheotomy tube, comorbidities, and younger age were statistically significant predictors of poor sleep 1 year after diagnosis of head and neck cancer (P < .05). Smoking, problem drinking, and female sex were marginally significant (P < .09). Type of treatment (surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy), primary tumor site, and cancer stage were not significantly associated with 1-year sleep scores. Conclusions Many factors adversely affecting sleep in head and neck cancer patients are potentially modifiable and appear to contribute to decreased quality of life. Strategies to reduce pain, xerostomia, depression, smoking, and problem drinking may be warranted, not only for their own inherent value, but also for improvement of sleep and the enhancement of quality of life. PMID:20513034

  13. Microvascular transplantation of the rat submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, J H; Zhang, F; Levin, D E; Singer, M I; Buncke, H J

    2000-11-01

    Xerostomia results from salivary gland irradiation during treatment of head and neck malignancies. In addition to having difficulty with speech and swallowing, these patients experience loss of taste, dental caries, and chronic fungal infections. The paired submandibular glands provide 70 percent of the normal salivary flow and are difficult to shield during radiation therapy. Another sicca condition, xerophthalmia, may result from facial nerve injury or other medical disorders and results in pain, corneal ulceration, and possible vision loss. Treatment options for xerostomia are limited, and management of xerophthalmia usually focuses on the eyelids, rather than the fundamental problem of inadequate secretory protection. In this study, a rat model for submandibular gland microvascular transplantation was developed to assess the feasibility of salivary tissue transfer. Sixteen rats underwent submandibular gland transplantation from the neck to the groin. Fourteen of these rats underwent microvascular anastomosis of the vascular pedicle. Ten glands were assessed for viability at 4 days after transplantation, and four glands were examined after 7, 10, 14, or 21 days. By gross and histologic examination, 93 percent of transplanted glands showed expected long-term viability after at least 4 postoperative days. Microvascular techniques were shown to be applicable to the transplantation of submandibular gland salivary tissue. This has not previously been shown in a rat model. It is possible that submandibular glands could be transplanted to the eye for treatment of xerophthalmia and out of the neck during irradiation of the head and neck, with subsequent replantation after treatment as a means of preventing permanent xerostomia. PMID:11083564

  14. [Side effects of drugs on the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Cristina

    2015-02-01

    Although drugs are the most powerful therapeutic tools we have for improving the quality of life of the population, their use is not free of adverse effects. Today there are many polymedicated patients, and it is difficult to find the cause of their adverse effects that increase exponentially when more than 4 drugs are combined. There are a large number of drugs that can result in numerous adverse effects in the oral cavity. The most common are xerostomia, altered taste, gingival enlargement and mucositis caused by cancer treatment. We also review other disorders of the salivary glands, oral mucosal changes, pigmentations, halitosis, osteonecrosis, opportunistic infections and bleeding diathesis. PMID:24629691

  15. [Electrostimulation for the treatment of a dry mouth feeling].

    PubMed

    Janssen, M J E J; Bots, C P; Brand, H S

    2015-10-01

    A 67-year-old woman suffered from a burning mouth feeling for 1.5 years and was referred by her dentist to a saliva clinic. At the clinic persistent xerostomia was diagnosed, and Sjögren's syndrome was suspected. After 1 year, a new measurement of the saliva secretion was carried out, which revealed a further decline in saliva secretion rate. The patient was consequently treated with an intra-oral electrostimulating device in order to stimulate the saliva secretion rate and reduce the feeling of a dry mouth. After 2 weeks, the patient experienced a considerable improvement of the subjective oral dryness. PMID:26465014

  16. Analysis of serial CT images for studying the RT effects in head-neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Belli, Maria Luisa; Broggi, Sara; Scalco, Elisa; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Dell'Oca, Italo; Logghe, Gerlinde; Moriconi, Stefano; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Valentini, Vincenzo; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fiorino, Claudio; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Images taken during and after RT for head and neck cancer have the potential to quantitatively assess xerostomia. Image information may be used as biomarkers of RT effects on parotid glands with significant potential to support adaptive treatment strategies. We investigated the possibility to extract information based on in-room CT images (kVCT, MVCT), acquired for daily image-guided radiotherapy treatment of head-and-neck cancer patients, in order to predict individual response in terms of toxicity. Follow-up MRI images were also used in order to investigate long term parotid gland deformation. PMID:26737472

  17. Complete agenesis of major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Berta, E; Bettega, G; Jouk, P S; Billy, G; Nugues, F; Morand, B

    2013-10-01

    A 4 year-old female patient was treated for persistent right-sided dacryocystitis and xerostomia. MRI was performed to screen for a dry syndrome; which resulted in the diagnosis of agenesis of the parotid and submandibular glands as well as lacrimal duct malformation. An MRI of each parent was normal. The mother's history revealed 4 days of pyrexia during the 8th week of amenorrhea. This was an isolated case, with no family history, characterized by a febrile episode during pregnancy at the period of main salivary gland genesis. Epigenetic mechanisms could be implicated. PMID:23993206

  18. Complications of head and neck radiation therapy and their management

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmeier, R.L.; King, G.E.

    1983-04-01

    Patients who receive radiation therapy to the head and neck suffer potential complications and undesirable side-effects of this therapy. The extent of undesirable responses is dependent on the source of irradiation, the fields of irradiation, and the dose. The radiotherapist determines these factors by the extent, location, and radiosensitivity of the tumor. The potential undesirable side-effects are xerostomia, mucositis, fibrosis, trismus, dermatitis, photosensitivity, radiation caries, soft tissue necrosis, and osteoradionecrosis. Each of these clinical entities and their proposed management have been discussed.

  19. Systemic conditions, oral findings and dental management of chronic renal failure patients: general considerations and case report.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Mahmud Juma Abdalla Abdel; Dummer, Claus Dieter; Pinto, Lourenço Schmidt

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is a relatively common systemic disease. Systemic abnormalities such as anemia, platelet disorders and hypertension as well as oral manifestations including xerostomia, uremic stomatitis, periodontal disease and maxillary and mandibular radiographic alterations can be observed in individuals with chronic renal disease. In view of its frequent occurrence and the need of knowledge by dentists dealing with this condition, this paper discusses the most important issues regarding chronic renal failure, addressing its systemic and oral manifestations and the dental management of chronic renal patients. A case report is presented. PMID:16924347

  20. Ecstasy (MDMA) and oral health.

    PubMed

    Brand, H S; Dun, S N; Nieuw Amerongen, A V

    2008-01-26

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), more commonly known as 'ecstasy' or XTC, is frequently used by young adults in the major cities. Therefore, it is likely that dentists might be confronted with individuals who use ecstasy. This review describes systemic and oral effects of ecstasy. Life-threatening complications include hyperthermia, hyponatraemia and liver failure. In addition, psychotic episodes, depression, panic disorders and impulsive behaviour have been reported. Oral effects include xerostomia, bruxism, and an increased risk of developing dental erosion. Mucosal changes have also been reported. Recent use of ecstasy may interfere with dental treatment. Finally, the potential use of saliva for non-invasive detection of ecstasy is discussed. PMID:18268544

  1. [Ecstasy use and oral health].

    PubMed

    Brand, H S; Dun, S N; van Nieuw Amerongen, A

    2007-02-01

    Ecstacy is a frequently used drug, especially by young adults in the big cities.Therefore, it is likely that dentists might be confronted with individuals that use XTC. This review of the literature describes the systemic and oral effects of XTC. Life-threatening complications include hyperthermia, hyponatreaemia and liver failure. In addition, psychotic episodes, depression, panic disorders and impulsive behaviour have been reported. Oral effects include mucosal changes, xerostomia and an increased risk of developing dental erosion and bruxism. Finally, the potential use of saliva for detection of XTC is discussed. PMID:17361788

  2. Clinical aspects of IMRT for head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham

    2002-01-01

    The tightly conformal doses produced by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the existence of many critical structures in close proximity to the target, and the lack of internal organ motion in the head and neck, provide the potential for organ sparing and improved tumor irradiation. Many studies of treatment planning for head-and-neck cancer have demonstrated the dosimetric superiority of IMRT over conventional techniques in these respects. The initial results of clinical studies demonstrate reduced xerostomia. They suggest an improvement in tumor control, which needs to be verified in larger studies and longer follow-up. PMID:12074474

  3. Toxicities affecting Quality of Life After Chemo-IMRT of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Study of Patient-Reported, Observer-Rated, and Objective Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Klaudia U; Schipper, Mathew; Feng, Felix Y; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Mark; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne; Cornwall, Benjamin; Lee, Connie SY; Chepeha, Douglas B; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2012-01-01

    Purpose After conventional radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, xerostomia has traditionally been the major effector of patient-reported quality of life (QOL), and recent publications suggest that dysphagia has an even stronger effect. We hypothesized that IMRT aiming to spare the salivary glands and swallowing structures reduced, or eliminated, the effects of these toxicities on QOL. Methods and Materials Prospective longitudinal study: 72 patients with Stage III-IV oropharyngeal cancer treated uniformly with definitive chemo-IMRT sparing the salivary glands and swallowing structures. Overall QOL was assessed by summary scores of the Head Neck QOL (HNQOL) and University of Washington QOL (UWQOL) questionnaires, as well as HNQOL “Overall Bother” question. QOL, observer-rated toxicities (CTCAE v2), and objective evaluations (videofluoroscopy assessing dysphagia and saliva flow rates assessing xerostomia) were recorded pre-therapy through 2 years post-therapy. Correlations between toxicities/objective evaluations and overall QOL were assessed using longitudinal repeated measures of analysis and Pearson correlations. Results All observer-rated toxicities and QOL scores worsened 1-3 months after therapy and improved through 12 months, with minor further improvements through 24 months. At 12 months, dysphagia grades 0-1, 2, and 3, were observed in 95%, 4%, and 1% of patients, respectively. Using all post-therapy observations, observer-rated dysphagia was highly correlated with all overall QOL measures (p<0.0001), while xerostomia, mucosal, and voice toxicities were significantly correlated with some, but not all, overall QOL measures, with lower correlation coefficients than dysphagia. Late overall QOL (≥6 or ≥12 months post-therapy) was primarily associated with observer-rated dysphagia, and to a lesser extent with xerostomia. Videofluoroscopy scores, but not salivary flows, were significantly correlated with some of the overall QOL measures. Conclusion After

  4. Complementary therapies for cancer-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie R; Yeung, K Simon

    2004-01-01

    Relief of cancer-related symptoms is essential in the supportive and palliative care of cancer patients. Complementary therapies such as acupuncture, mind-body techniques, and massage therapy can help when conventional treatment does not bring satisfactory relief or causes undesirable side effects. Controlled clinical trials show that acupuncture and hypnotherapy can reduce pain and nausea. Meditation, relaxation therapy, music therapy, and massage mitigate anxiety and distress. Pilot studies suggest that complementary therapies may treat xerostomia, hot flashes, and fatigue. Botanicals or dietary supplements are popular but often problematic. Concurrent use of herbal products with mainstream medical treatment should be discouraged. PMID:15524070

  5. Radionuclide salivary imaging usefulness in a private otolaryngology practice

    SciTech Connect

    Schall, G.L.; Smith, R.R.; Barsocchini, L.M.

    1981-01-01

    Radionuclide salivary gland scans were performed on 44 patients using sodium pertechnetate Tc 99m. The accuracy of the scans and their usefulness in the clinical treatment of the patients were reviewed. The scan provided helpful information in 31 of 38 cases in which adequate follow-up data were available, although it proved diagnostic in only six patients. It was particularly useful in the evaluation of primary salivary gland neoplasms, acute and chronic sialadenitis, and sialolithiasis, as well as in the differential diagnosis of xerostomia. The value of this procedure in the elucidation of a variety of morphologic and functional diseases of these glands warrants its greater application in private otolaryngologic practices.

  6. Death from a possible anaphylactic reaction to ecstasy.

    PubMed

    Sauvageau, Anny

    2008-02-01

    Ecstasy (3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine, or MDMA) is a recreational drug widely used among young people in discos or rave parties (1,2). MDMA is taken because it gives a feeling of euphoria, enhances energy and sociability, and heightens sensations and sexual arousal. However, several side effects have been described: headache, nausea, anorexia, xerostomia, insomnia, myalgia, trismus, and bruxism (2,3). More serious complications have also been reported, sometimes even leading to death: hyperthermia, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure, liver failure, and water intoxication (2,3). We report the unusual case of a death due to an apparent allergic reaction following ecstasy ingestion. PMID:18259964

  7. Genetic aspects of Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bolstad, Anne Isine; Jonsson, Roland

    2002-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a multisystem inflammatory rheumatic disease that is classified into primary and secondary forms, with cardinal features in the eye (keratoconjunctivitis sicca) and mouth (xerostomia). The aetiology behind this autoimmune exocrinopathy is probably multifactorial and influenced by genetic as well as by environmental factors that are as yet unknown. A genetic predisposition to Sjögren's syndrome has been suggested on the basis of familial aggregation, animal models and candidate gene association studies. Recent advances in molecular and genetic methodologies should further our understanding of this complex disease. The present review synthesizes the current state of genetics in Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:12453311

  8. Advances in radiation oncology for the management of oropharyngeal tumors.

    PubMed

    Gunn, G Brandon; Frank, Steven J

    2013-08-01

    The major benefits of modern radiation therapy (eg, intensity-modulated [x-ray] radiation therapy [IMRT]) for oropharyngeal cancer are reduced xerostomia and better quality of life. Intensity-modulated proton therapy may provide additional advantages over IMRT by reducing radiation beam-path toxicities. Several acute and late treatment-related toxicities and symptom constellations must be kept in mind when designing and comparing future treatment strategies, particularly because currently most patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma present with human papillomavirus-positive disease and are expected to have a high probability of long-term survival after treatment. PMID:23910474

  9. Management of Sjogren's Syndrome Patient: A Case Report of Prosthetic Rehabilitation with 6-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    de Mendonça Invernici, Marcos; Vale Nicolau, Gastão; Naval Machado, Maria Ângela; Soares de Lima, Antônio Adilson

    2014-01-01

    Completely and partially edentulous patients with Sjogren's syndrome (SS) experience severe hyposalivation, xerostomia, and considerable difficulty in using tissue-supported prosthesis. This clinical paper describes the management, treatment, and 6-year follow-up of a patient diagnosed with SS type II, who uses corticosteroids and antihyperglycemic drugs. The patient received restorative, periodontal, and surgical treatments followed by implant-supported fixed prosthesis. Radiographic evaluation and probing depth showed gingival health and no bone loss after 6 years. Treatment with implant-retained dental prosthesis greatly increased comfort and function, offering an alternative to patients with SS. PMID:25478245

  10. World Workshop on Oral Medicine VI: a systematic review of medication-induced salivary gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Villa, A; Wolff, A; Narayana, N; Dawes, C; Aframian, D J; Lynge Pedersen, A M; Vissink, A; Aliko, A; Sia, Y W; Joshi, R K; McGowan, R; Jensen, S B; Kerr, A R; Ekström, J; Proctor, G

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper was to perform a systematic review of the pathogenesis of medication-induced salivary gland dysfunction (MISGD). Review of the identified papers was based on the standards regarding the methodology for systematic reviews set forth by the World Workshop on Oral Medicine IV and the PRISMA statement. Eligible papers were assessed for both the degree and strength of relevance to the pathogenesis of MISGD as well as on the appropriateness of the study design and sample size. A total of 99 papers were retained for the final analysis. MISGD in human studies was generally reported as xerostomia (the sensation of oral dryness) without measurements of salivary secretion rate. Medications may act on the central nervous system (CNS) and/or at the neuroglandular junction on muscarinic, α-and β-adrenergic receptors and certain peptidergic receptors. The types of medications that were most commonly implicated for inducing salivary gland dysfunction were those acting on the nervous, cardiovascular, genitourinary, musculoskeletal, respiratory, and alimentary systems. Although many medications may affect the salivary flow rate and composition, most of the studies considered only xerostomia. Thus, further human studies are necessary to improve our understanding of the association between MISGD and the underlying pathophysiology. PMID:26602059

  11. Treatment outcomes and late toxicities of 869 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy: new insight into the value of total dose of cisplatin and radiation boost

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaomin; Zhou, Xin; Shi, Qi; Xing, Xing; Yang, Youqi; Xu, Tingting; Shen, Chunying; Wang, Xiaoshen; He, Xiayun; Kong, Lin; Ying, Hongmei; Hu, Chaosu

    2015-01-01

    This study was to report the long-term outcomes and toxicities of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). From 2009 to 2010, 869 non-metastatic NPC patients treated with IMRT were retrospectively enrolled. With a median follow-up of 54.3 months, the 5-year estimated local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), regional recurrence-free survival (RRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 89.7%, 94.5%, 85.6%, 76.3%, 84.0%, respectively. In locally advanced NPC, gender, T, N, total dose of cisplatin more than 300 mg/m2 and radiation boost were independent prognostic factors for DMFS and DFS. Age, T, N and total dose of cisplatin were independent prognostic factors for OS. Radiation boost was an adverse factor for LRFS, RRFS, DMFS and DFS. Concurrent chemotherapy was not an independent prognostic factor for survival, despite marginally significant for DMFS in univariate analysis. Concurrent chemotherapy increased xerostomia and trismus, while higher total dose of cisplatin increased xerostomia and otologic toxicities. In conclusion, IMRT provided satisfactory long-term outcome for NPC, with acceptable late toxicities. Total dose of cisplatin was a prognostic factor for distant metastasis and overall survival. The role of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation boost in the setting of IMRT warrants further investigation. PMID:26485757

  12. Current cell models for bioengineering a salivary gland: a mini-review of emerging technologies

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, J; Manzella, K; Baker, OJ

    2013-01-01

    Saliva plays a major role in maintaining oral health. Patients afflicted with a decrease in saliva secretion (symptomatically, xerostomia) exhibit difficulty in chewing and swallowing foods, tooth decay, periodontal disease, and microbial infections. Despite recent improvements in treating xerostomia (e.g., saliva stimulants, saliva substitutes, and gene therapy), there is a need of more scientific advancements that can be clinically applied toward restoration of compromised salivary gland function. Here we provide a summary of the current salivary cell models that have been used to advance restorative treatments via development of an artificial salivary gland. These models represent initial steps toward clinical and translational research, to facilitate creation of clinically safe salivary glands. Further studies in salivary cell lines and primary cells are necessary to improve survival rates, cell differentiation, and secretory function. Additionally, the characterization of salivary progenitor and stem cell markers are necessary. Although these models are not fully characterized, their improvement may lead to the construction of an artificial salivary gland that is in high demand for improving the quality of life of many patients suffering from salivary secretory dysfunction. PMID:22805753

  13. Radiobiological evaluation of intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments of patients with head and neck cancer: A dual-institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Narayanasamy, G.; Pyakuryal, A. P.; Pandit, S.; Vincent, J.; Lee, C.; Mavroidis, P.; Papanikolaou, N.; Kudrimoti, M.; Sio, T. T.

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, evaluation of clinical efficacy of treatment planning stems from the radiation oncologist's experience in accurately targeting tumors, while keeping minimal toxicity to various organs at risk (OAR) involved. A more objective, quantitative method may be raised by using radiobiological models. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the potential correlation of OAR-related toxicities to its radiobiologically estimated parameters in simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans of patients with head and neck tumors at two institutions. Lyman model for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and the Poisson model for tumor control probability (TCP) models were used in the Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy (HART) analysis. In this study, 33 patients with oropharyngeal primaries in the head and neck region were used to establish the correlation between NTCP values of (a) bilateral parotids with clinically observed rates of xerostomia, (b) esophagus with dysphagia, and (c) larynx with dysphagia. The results of the study indicated a strong correlation between the severity of xerostomia and dysphagia with Lyman NTCP of bilateral parotids and esophagus, respectively, but not with the larynx. In patients without complications, NTCP values of these organs were negligible. Using appropriate radiobiological models, the presence of a moderate to strong correlation between the severities of complications with NTCP of selected OARs suggested that the clinical outcome could be estimated prior to treatment. PMID:26500403

  14. Salivary hypofunction: an update on aetiology, diagnosis and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Jamil; Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro; Cherubini, Karen; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2015-02-01

    Saliva is of paramount importance for the maintenance of oral and general homeostasis. Salivary hypofunction predispose patients to disorders such as dysgeusia, pain and burning mouth, caries and other oral infectious diseases, dysphagia and dysphonia. The aim of this study was to provide an update on the aetiology, diagnostic methods and therapeutic strategies for the management of hyposalivation and xerostomia. The present paper describes subjective and objective methods for the diagnosis of salivary dysfunctions; moreover a number of drugs, and systemic disorders associated with decreased salivary flow rate are listed. We also focused on the underlying mechanisms to radiotherapy-induced salivary damage. Therapeutics for hyposalivation and xerostomia were discussed and classified as preventive, symptomatic, topical and systemic stimulants, disease-modifying agents, and regenerative. New therapeutic modalities have been studied and involve stem cells transplantation, with special attention to regeneration of damage caused by ionizing radiation to the salivary glands. More studies in this area are needed to provide new perspectives in the treatment of patients with salivary dysfunctions. PMID:25463902

  15. Non-neoplastic salivary gland diseases.

    PubMed

    Arduino, P G; Carrozzo, M; Pentenero, M; Bertolusso, G; Gandolfo, S

    2006-05-01

    A wide range of non neoplastic disorders can affect the salivary glands, although the more common are: mumps, acute suppurative sialadenitis, Sjögren's syndrome and drug-induced xerostomia. Salivary dysfunction is not a normal consequence of old age, and can be due to systemic diseases, medications or head and neck radiotherapy. Diagnosis of salivary disorders begins with a careful medical history, followed by a cautious examination. While complaints of xerostomia may be indicative of a salivary gland disorder, salivary diseases can present without symptoms. Therefore, routine examination of salivary function must be part of any head, neck, and oral examination. Health-care professionals can play a vital role in identifying patients at risk for developing salivary dysfunction, and should provide appropriate preventive and interventive techniques that will help to preserving a person's health, function, and quality of life. The present work provides an overview of most of the non neoplastic disorders of the salivary glands, in which the general presentation, pathology, and treatments are discussed. PMID:16688102

  16. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Compared With Conventional Radiotherapy in Patients Treated With Concurrent Carboplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Clavel, Sebastien; Nguyen, David H.A.; Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe; Khaouam, Nader; Donath, David; Soulieres, Denis; Guertin, Louis; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, the toxicity and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in patients treated with concomitant carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and December 2007, 249 patients were treated with definitive chemoradiation. One hundred patients had 70 Gy in 33 fractions using IMRT, and 149 received CRT at 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months. Three-year actuarial rates for locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 95.1% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.005), 85.3% vs. 69.3% (p = 0.001), and 92.1% vs. 75.2% (p < 0.001) for IMRT and CRT, respectively. The benefit of the radiotherapy regimen on outcomes was also observed with a Cox multivariate analysis. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with less acute dermatitis and less xerostomia at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Conclusions: This study suggests that simultaneous integrated boost using IMRT is associated with favorable locoregional control and survival rates with less xerostomia and acute dermatitis than CRT when both are given concurrently with chemotherapy.

  17. Multi-atlas-based segmentation of the parotid glands of MR images in patients following head-and-neck cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanghui; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Ning; Xu, Zhijian; Zhao, Hongfu; Wang, Yuefeng; Liu, Tian

    2013-02-01

    Xerostomia (dry mouth), resulting from radiation damage to the parotid glands, is one of the most common and distressing side effects of head-and-neck cancer radiotherapy. Recent MRI studies have demonstrated that the volume reduction of parotid glands is an important indicator for radiation damage and xerostomia. In the clinic, parotid-volume evaluation is exclusively based on physicians' manual contours. However, manual contouring is time-consuming and prone to inter-observer and intra-observer variability. Here, we report a fully automated multi-atlas-based registration method for parotid-gland delineation in 3D head-and-neck MR images. The multi-atlas segmentation utilizes a hybrid deformable image registration to map the target subject to multiple patients' images, applies the transformation to the corresponding segmented parotid glands, and subsequently uses the multiple patient-specific pairs (head-and-neck MR image and transformed parotid-gland mask) to train support vector machine (SVM) to reach consensus to segment the parotid gland of the target subject. This segmentation algorithm was tested with head-and-neck MRIs of 5 patients following radiotherapy for the nasopharyngeal cancer. The average parotid-gland volume overlapped 85% between the automatic segmentations and the physicians' manual contours. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the feasibility of an automatic multi-atlas based segmentation algorithm to segment parotid glands in head-and-neck MR images.

  18. Salivary gland dysfunction markers in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Aitken-Saavedra, Juan; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Maturana-Ramírez, Andrea; Escobar-Álvarez, Alejandro; Cortes-Coloma, Andrea; Reyes-Rojas, Montserrat; Viera -Sapiain, Valentina; Villablanca-Martínez, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease of the carbohydrate metabolism that, when not rigorously controlled, compromises systemic and organ integrity, thereby causing renal diseases, blindness, neuropathy, arteriosclerosis, infections, and glandular dysfunction, including the salivary glands. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the qualitative and quantitative parameters of salivary alteration, which are indicators of salivary gland dysfunction, and the level of metabolic control of type 2 diabetes patients. Material and Methods A convenience sample of 74 voluntary patients with type 2 DM was selected, each of whom donated a sample of unstimulated saliva. Salivary parameters such as salivary flow rate, protein concentration, pH, and xerostomia were studied. Results There is a positive relationship between the level of metabolic control measured with HbA1 and the protein concentration in saliva (Spearman rho = 0.329 and p = 0.004). The same assay showed an inverse correlation between HbA1 and pH (Spearman rho = -0.225 and p = 0.05). Conclusions The protein concentration in saliva and, to a lesser extent, the pH may be useful as glandular dysfunction indicators in DM2 patients. Key words:Saliva, type 2 diabetes mellitus, pH, protein concentration, xerostomia. PMID:26535097

  19. Polaprezinc prevents oral mucositis associated with radiochemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomoko; Ishihara, Masashi; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Mizuta, Keisuke; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2010-10-15

    Oral mucositis is frequent but serious adverse event associated with radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy in head and neck cancer severely impairs health-related quality of life, leading to poor prognosis due to discontinuation of the therapy. Although a number of compounds have been tested for prophylaxis of oral mucositis, few of them are satisfactory. We investigated the effect of polaprezinc (zinc L-carnosine), a gastric mucosal protective drug, on radiochemotherapy-induced oral mucositis, pain, xerostomia and taste disturbance in patients with head and neck cancer. Patients were randomly assigned to receive polaprezinc (n = 16) or azulene oral rinse as the control (n = 15). The incidence rates of mucositis, pain, xerostomia and taste disturbance were all markedly lower in polaprezinc group than in control. Moreover, the use of analgesics was significantly (p = 0.003) less frequent and the amount of food intake was significantly (p = 0.002) higher in polaprezinc group than in control. On the other hand, tumor response rate in patients with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy was not significantly affected by polaprezinc, in which the response rate (complete plus partial response) was 88% for polaprezinc and 92% for control (p = 1.000). Therefore, it is highly assumable that polaprezinc is potentially useful for prevention of oral mucositis and improvement of quality of life without reducing the tumor response. PMID:20104529

  20. Amifostine reduces side effects and improves complete response rate during radiotherapy: Results of a meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sasse, Andre Deeke; Gontijo de Oliveira Clark, Luciana; Sasse, Emma Chen . E-mail: sasse@evidencias.com.br; Clark, Otavio Augusto Camara

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of amifostine in diminishing radiotherapy side effects and whether or not it protects the tumor. Methods and Materials: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of 14 included randomized controlled trials, comprising 1451 patients, comparing the use of radiotherapy vs. radiotherapy plus amifostine for cancer treatment. Results: The use of amifostine significantly reduced the risk of developing mucositis (odds ratio [OR], 0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.48; p < 0.00001), esophagitis (OR, 0.38; CI, 0.26-0.54; p < 0.00001), acute xerostomia (OR, 0.24; CI, 0.15-0.36; p < 0.00001), late xerostomia (OR, 0.33; CI, 0.21-0.51; p < 0.00001), dysphagia (OR, 0.26; CI, 0.07-0.92; p 0.04), acute pneumonitis (OR, 0.15; CI, 0.07-0.31; p < 0.00001) and cystitis (OR, 0.17; CI, 0.09-0.32; p < 0.00001). There was no difference in overall response rate between the groups. However, complete response rate was superior for patients using amifostine (OR, 1.81; CI, 1.10-2.96; p = 0.02). Conclusions: This systematic review shows that amifostine significantly reduces the side effects of radiation therapy. The efficacy of radiotherapy was not itself affected by the use of this drug and patients receiving amifostine were able to achieve higher rates of complete response.

  1. Primary Sjögren’s syndrome accompanied by pleural effusion: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dedong; Lu, Hongxiu; Qu, Yiqing; Wang, Shanshan; Ying, Yangyang; Xiao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by the infiltration of lymphocytes in exocrine glands, specifically the salivary and lacrimal glands, resulting in the typical symptoms of xerophthalmia and xerostomia. SS may be accompanied by pleural effusion when the lung is involved, but this occurrence has been reported in only 10 cases in the literature. We report the case of a 42 year-old woman with severe bilateral pleural effusion for eight years. Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome was finally diagnosed based on the presence of xerophthalmia and xerostomia, biopsy of the minor salivary glands, and positive anti-SS-A antibody in the serum and pleural effusion. Biopsy of the parietal pleura through video-assisted thoracoscopy revealed infiltration of lymphocytes. The patient had a long history of pleural effusion without clear etiology. Malignant disease was first suspected because of abnormal density lesion on the left lung and malignant cells found on cytology, but PET-CT revealed no malignant lesion. Examinations did not support infection, malignant tumor, pulmonary sarcoidosis, or other connective tissue diseases. This data could be useful for the future study of pleural effusion in SS. PMID:26823888

  2. Value of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Stage IV Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To review outcome and toxicity of Stage IVa and IVb head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with concomitant chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) according to a hybrid fractionation schedule. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 42 patients with Stage IV head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma were irradiated according to a hybrid fractionation schedule consisting of 20 fractions of 2 Gy (once daily), followed by 20 fractions of 1.6 Gy (twice daily), to a total dose of 72 Gy. Chemotherapy (cisplatinum, 100mg/m{sup 2}) was administered at the start of Weeks 1 and 4. Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with a previous patient group (n = 55), treated according to the same schedule, but without intensity modulation. Results: Locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival were 81% and 56% after 2 years, respectively. In comparison with the previous cohort, no significant differences were observed regarding either LRC (66%, p = 0.38) or overall survival (73%, p = 0.29). No Grade 4 or 5 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of late Grade 2 or 3 xerostomia (52.9% vs. 90.2%, p < 0.001). No difference was observed regarding late Grade 2 or 3 dysphagia (p = 0.66). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated chemoradiotherapy does not compromise LRC and significantly reduces late toxicity, especially regarding xerostomia.

  3. Why aging leads to increased susceptibility to infection.

    PubMed

    Terpenning, M S; Bradley, S F

    1991-02-01

    The elderly are predisposed to various infections through a multitude of factors. Although intrinsic, unalterable defects occur in the aging immune system and nonspecific host defenses, there are factors that physician and patient can concentrate on to reduce the risk of infection. For example, meticulous attention to skin care can reduce the risk of soft tissue infection. Improvement in oral hygiene and relief of xerostomia might promote recolonization with normal oral flora. Correction of urinary tract obstruction where possible, relying on the use of indwelling urinary catheters only when necessary, can significantly reduce the risk of UTIs. Medications that impair cognitive function should be prescribed judiciously, since they can promote aspiration with subsequent pneumonia, xerostomia, and urinary retention. Correction of protein malnutrition may improve cell-mediated immunity and skin integrity, thereby reducing the risk of infection. The signs and symptoms of infection in the aged may be subtle. Therefore, the primary care physician should approach this susceptible population with a heightened clinical suspicion, thus expediting possibly life-saving early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:1991623

  4. Sparing the region of the salivary gland containing stem cells preserves saliva production after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Luijk, Peter; Pringle, Sarah; Deasy, Joseph O.; Moiseenko, Vitali V.; Faber, Hette; Hovan, Allan; Baanstra, Mirjam; van der Laan, Hans P.; Kierkels, Roel G. J.; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Witjes, Max J.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wu, Jonn; Coppes, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Each year, 500,000 patients are treated with radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, resulting in relatively high survival rates. However, in 40% of patients, quality of life is severely compromised because of radiation-induced impairment of salivary gland function and consequent xerostomia (dry mouth). New radiation treatment technologies enable sparing of parts of the salivary glands. We have determined the parts of the major salivary gland, the parotid gland, that need to be spared to ensure that the gland continues to produce saliva after irradiation treatment. In mice, rats, and humans, we showed that stem and progenitor cells reside in the region of the parotid gland containing the major ducts. We demonstrated in rats that inclusion of the ducts in the radiation field led to loss of regenerative capacity, resulting in long-term gland dysfunction with reduced saliva production. Then we showed in a cohort of patients with head and neck cancer that the radiation dose to the region of the salivary gland containing the stem/progenitor cells predicted the function of the salivary glands one year after radiotherapy. Finally, we showed that this region of the salivary gland could be spared during radiotherapy, thus reducing the risk of post-radiotherapy xerostomia. PMID:26378247

  5. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Dental pathologies and osteoradionecrosis (Part 1) literature review and consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Sottocornola, Lara; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Paganelli, Corrado; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Bossi, Paolo; Berruti, Alfredo; Pavanato, Giovanni; Nicolai, Piero; Maroldi, Roberto; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is the typical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Acute side effects (such as oral mucositis, dermatitis, salivary changes, taste alterations, etc.), and late toxicities in particular (such as osteo-radionecrosis, hypo-salivation and xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.), are often debilitating. These effects tend to be underestimated and insufficiently addressed in the medical community. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on clinical definitions and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for developing the consensus, and external experts evaluated the conclusions. This paper contains 10 clusters of statements about the clinical definitions and management of head and neck cancer treatment sequels (dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses) that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia. PMID:26318095

  6. Primary Sjögren's syndrome in Moroccan patients: characteristics, fatigue and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Ibn Yacoub, Yousra; Rostom, Samira; Laatiris, Assia; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-09-01

    Our aim was to evaluate fatigue and quality of life (QoL) in Moroccan patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (PSS) and determine their correlates with disease-related parameters. Fifty-seven consecutive patients with PSS according to the American-European Consensus group (AEGG) criteria were included. Demographic, clinical, biological and immunological characteristics for all patients were collected. Xerostomia was demonstrated by histological grading of lower lip glandular biopsy. A Schirmer test was performed to measure lachrymal flow. Oral, ocular, skin, vaginal and tracheal dryness were evaluated by using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Fatigue was assessed by the Multidimensional assessment of fatigue (MAF) and the QoL by using the generic instrument: SF-36. 90% of our patients were women. The mean age of patients was 53.73 ± 7.69 years, and the mean disease duration was 5.38 ± 4.11 years. The mean oral dryness was 68.38 ± 20.29, and the mean ocular dryness was 51.91 ± 14.03. The mean total score of the MAF was 26.73 ± 8.33, and 87.5% of our patients experienced severe fatigue. Also, physical and mental domains of QoL were altered in a significant way, and the severity of fatigue had a negative impact on SF-36 scores. MAF and SF-36 scores were correlated with the delay of diagnosis, the intensity of xerostomia and the activity of joint involvement. A low socioeconomic and educational level had a negative impact on fatigue scores and QoL. Histological grading of lower lip glandular biopsy, immunological status and the severity of systemic involvement had no correlations with fatigue scores or the alteration of QoL. Patients receiving antidepressant have lesser fatigue and those receiving Methotrexate have better SF-36 scores. In our data, there was a high prevalence of fatigue in Moroccan patients with PSS associated with altered QoL. Severe fatigue and reduced QoL seem to be related to the severity of joint involvement, xerostomia and both educational

  7. Science behind human saliva

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Manjul

    2011-01-01

    Saliva is a complex fluid, which influences oral health through specific and nonspecific physical and chemical properties. The importance of saliva in our everyday activities and the medicinal properties it possesses are often taken for granted. However, when disruptions in the quality or quantity of saliva do occur in an individual, it is likely that he or she will experience detrimental effects on oral and systemic health. Often head and neck radiotherapy has serious and detrimental side effects on the oral cavity including the loss of salivary gland function and a persistent complaint of a dry mouth (xerostomia). Thus, saliva has a myriad of beneficial functions that are essential to our well-being. Although saliva has been extensively investigated as a medium, few laboratories have studied saliva in the context of its role in maintaining oral and general health. PMID:22470235

  8. [Dental state in patients with head and neck cancers].

    PubMed

    Rouers, M; Truntzer, P; Dubourg, S; Guihard, S; Antoni, D; Noël, G

    2015-05-01

    In France, in 2005, there were approximately 16,000 new cases of head and neck cancer. These cancers have an unfavourable prognosis: the survival rates at 3 and 10 years are 50% and 10% respectively. The consumption of alcohol and tobacco is the most important risk factor; in some countries HPV infection was identified as a risk factor of head and neck tumours. Furthermore, a poor oral hygiene seems to raise this risk. We found many decay and periodontium problems in patients with an upper aerodigestive tract cancer. An evaluation of dental state is necessary before any cancer treatment. Treatments by radiotherapy engender noxious effects: hypocellular, hypovascularization, hypoxie of the irradiated tissues, which lead to immediate and chronically oral complications such as mucositis, fibrosis, xerostomia, decay, or osteoradionecrosis. An oral follow-up of these patients can prevent these complications, or reduce the severity of oral complications, and promote a good oral state. PMID:25937188

  9. Total lymphoid irradiation therapy in refractory rheumatoid arthritis. Fifteen- to forty-month followup

    SciTech Connect

    Brahn, E.; Helfgott, S.M.; Belli, J.A.; Anderson, R.J.; Reinherz, E.L.; Schlossman, S.F.; Austen, K.F.; Trentham, D.E.

    1984-05-01

    Twelve patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) to a total cumulative dose of 3,000 rads. Post-TLI morbidity/mortality included 8 patients with xerostomia, 4 with weight loss of greater than 10 kg, 3 with loss of 4 or more teeth, 3 with herpes zoster, 4 with bacterial infection that was fatal in 2, 3 with hypothyroidism, 1 with cutaneous vasculitis, and death from myocardial infarction in 1 patient and cardiorespiratory arrest in another. Ten of the patients were reevaluated 15-40 months (mean +/- SE, 30 +/- 2) after completion of TLI, and significant improvement was noted in several disease parameters including number of swollen joints, duration of morning stiffness, and 50-foot walking time. Blood lymphopenia and a decrease in helper T cells (T4) were also noted. These data suggest that changes in immunoregulation induced by TLI can produce longlasting alterations in rheumatoid arthritis, although adverse effects may limit its efficacy.

  10. An overview of burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Carmen; Di Stasio, Dario; Petruzzi, Massimo; Lauritano, Dorina; Gentile, Enrica; Guida, Agostino; Maio, Claudio; Tammaro, Mariasofia; Serpico, Rosario; Lucchese, Alberta

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterised by the presence of a burning sensation in the oral mucosa in the absence of any clinically apparent mucosal sign. It occurs more commonly in older women and often affects the tongue tip and lateral borders, lips, and hard and soft palates. Besides the burning sensation, patients with BMS may complain of unremitting oral mucosal pain, dysgeusia, and xerostomia. The exact pathophysiology of primary BMS remains unknown. A major challenge for the clinician is the treatment of BMS: identifying possible causative factors is the first step, but BMS is often idiopathic. Drug therapy, in addition to behavioural therapy and psychotherapy, may help to eliminate the symptoms. Considering the growing incidence of BMS in older people, further research is required to determine the true efficacy of current management strategies for patients with this disorder. PMID:26709657

  11. Burning mouth syndrome: an enigmatic disorder.

    PubMed

    Javali, M A

    2013-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic oral pain or burning sensation affecting the oral mucosa, often unaccompanied by mucosal lesions or other evident clinical signs. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women and may be accompanied by xerostomia and altered taste. Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by an intense burning or stinging sensation, preferably on the tongue or in other areas of mouth. This disorder is one of the most common, encountered in the clinical practice. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin; however the exact underlying etiology remains uncertain. This article discusses several aspects of BMS, updates current knowledge about the etiopathogenesis and describes the clinical features as well as the diagnosis and management of BMS patients. PMID:24096230

  12. Implant Treatment in Patients with Sjogren's Syndrome: A Review of the Literature and Two Clinical Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Chatzistavrianou, Despoina; Shahdad, Shakeel

    2016-03-01

    Implant rehabilitation in patients with Sjogren's Syndrome is reported to offer an improvementin the quality of life, but the scientific evidence on implant survival in patients with Sjogren's Syndrome is scarce. The paper presents a review of the literature on the performance of dental implants in patients with Sjogren's Syndrome and two case reports of patients with Sjogren's Syndrome treated successfully with dental implants. Two female patients suffering from Sjogren's Syndrome were rehabilitated with implant-supported prostheses. After eighteen months and two years respectively, the patients were satisfied with function and aesthetics; restorations were comfortable, stable radiographic bone levels were noted and xerostomia was not reported to affect the function anymore. PMID:27039478

  13. Structured review of papers reporting specific functions in patients with cancer of the head and neck: 2006 - 2013.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S N; Heseltine, N; Flexen, J; Winstanley, H R; Cole-Hawkins, H; Kanatas, A

    2016-07-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) focuses on 4 core domains: physical and psychological function, social interaction, disease, and treatment-related symptoms, and is a key outcome in patients with cancer of the head and neck. We reviewed papers published between 2006 and 2013 that used validated questionnaires to report functional outcome in this group. A total of 572 papers were identified and 118 of them concerned function. Specific outcomes included anxiety, chewing, maxillectomy, mucositis, pain, shoulder function, and trismus. The specific functions most often identified were xerostomia, speech or voice, and swallowing or dysphagia. A considerable body of evidence has now accumulated on HRQoL and functional outomes although the precise role of HRQoL during the planning of treatment remains controversial. Over time, the emphasis of the studies included has tended to move away from the reporting of outcomes in general to more hypothesis-driven and group-specific work. PMID:26923873

  14. Recurrent Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis Unmasks Sjogren Syndrome without Sicca Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yao-Min; Huang, Neng-Chyan; Wann, Shue-Ren; Chang, Yun-Te; Wang, Jyh-Seng

    2015-04-01

    Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis (HPP) may occur as a rare complication of Sjogren Syndrome (SS) and Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA). A 64-year male patient came with HPP, and was later diagnosed with distal RTA. The patient, who had no xerostomia and xerophthalmia, was diagnosed with primary SS from serologic and histologic findings of minor salivary gland biopsy. The patient recovered after potassium replacement therapy. Renal biopsy was also performed and revealed evidence of tubulointerstitial nephritis. Corticosteroids were administered and there was no recurrence of HPP during a 4-year follow-up period. The case highlights the significance of acute hypokalemia management in emergency department as it can unmask SS even if the SS is not associated with sicca symptoms. Hypokalemic paralysis associated with normal anion gap metabolic acidosis should prompt toward the diagnosis of SS. PMID:25933458

  15. A primary Sjögren's syndrome patient with distal renal tubular acidosis, who presented with symptoms of hypokalemic periodic paralysis: Report of a case study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Soy, Mehmet; Pamuk, Omer Nuri; Gerenli, Murat; Celik, Yahya

    2005-11-01

    Although renal tubular acidosis (RTA), secondary to autoimmune interstitial nephritis, develops in a large proportion of patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS), most of the subjects are asymptomatic. Here, we shall present a 39-year-old female patient who came to us with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP), and who was later diagnosed with distal RTA. The patient, who had xerostomia and xerophthalmia for a long period of time, was diagnosed with primary SS from serologic and histologic findings. The patient recovered by being prescribed potassium replacement therapy. Although renal biopsy was not performed, corticosteroids were administered because HPP indicated severe interstitial nephritis. HPP did not reoccur during a 2-year follow-up period. We also review cases with SS-related distal RTA and HPP. PMID:15690142

  16. Prosthodontic Management of Xerostomic Patient: A Technical Modification.

    PubMed

    Gurkar, Haraswarupa; Venkatesh, Omprakash Yadahally; Somashekar, Jagadeesh Mandya; Gowda, Muthuraj Hariharapura Lakshme; Dwivedi, Madhavi; Ningthoujam, Ishani

    2016-01-01

    Xerostomia is often a contributing factor in both minor and serious health problems. It can affect nutrition and dental as well as psychological health. Common problems faced by such patients are glossitis, mucositis, angular cheilitis, dysgeusia, and difficulty in chewing and swallowing. One of the major problems associated with xerostomic patients is the poor tolerance and retention of removable dental prostheses because of thin dry atrophic mucosa and lack of a saliva film. This paper describes a new technique of incorporating a salivary reservoir in the maxillary complete denture. The salivary reservoir fabricated by this technique provided good lubrication of the oral tissues and was easily cleansed by the wearer and was fabricated from routine denture materials. PMID:26977325

  17. Cardiovascular drugs-induced oral toxicities: A murky area to be revisited and illuminated.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Kavitha, Muthu; Nanditha, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    Oral health is an imperative part of overall human health. Oral disorders are often unreported, but are highly troublesome to human health in a long-standing situation. A strong association exists between cardiovascular drugs and oral adverse effects. Indeed, several cardiovascular drugs employed clinically have been reported to cause oral adverse effects such as xerostomia, oral lichen planus, angioedema, aphthae, dysgeusia, gingival enlargement, scalded mouth syndrome, cheilitis, glossitis and so forth. Oral complications might in turn worsen the cardiovascular disease condition as some reports suggest an adverse correlation between periodontal oral disease pathogenesis and cardiovascular disease. These are certainly important to be understood for a better use of cardiovascular medicines and control of associated oral adverse effects. This review sheds lights on the oral adverse effects pertaining to the clinical use of cardiovascular drugs. Above and beyond, an adverse correlation between oral disease and cardiovascular disease has been discussed. PMID:26409645

  18. Effect of reserpine on salivary gland radioiodine uptake in thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, H.A.; Park, C.H.

    1987-04-01

    Nine patients with thyroid cancer were treated with reserpine in an attempt to reduce radiation exposure to the salivary glands from 100-150 mCi doses of I-131 therapy to thyroid remnants or metastases. Three control patients were not treated with reserpine but did receive 100-150 mCi of I-131. Parotid/background ratios of activity after radioablative doses of I-131 in patients not treated with reserpine were significantly higher than the patients treated with reserpine, and this was also true seven days after the radioablative dose. Combined therapy with reserpine, chewing gum, lemon candies, and hydration is suggested for the prevention of sialadenitis and xerostomia due to large doses of radioiodine.

  19. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizen, S. )

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references.

  20. Impact of inhalation therapy on oral health

    PubMed Central

    Godara, Navneet; Godara, Ramya; Khullar, Megha

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation therapy has been employed as the mainstay of the treatment in chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Beta-2 agonists, anticholinergic bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, and sodium cromoglycate are often used alone or in combination in an inhaled form. Studies have shown that inhaled drugs used in the treatment have some adverse effects on the oral health based on their dosage, frequency, and duration of use. Several oral conditions such as xerostomia, dental caries, candidiasis, ulceration, gingivitis, periodontitis, and taste changes have been associated with inhalation therapy. Since the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases is rising, it is important to provide optimal oral care to the individuals receiving inhalation therapy. This article will review the influence of inhaled drugs on the oral health of individuals and adequate management and prevention of the same. PMID:22084541

  1. Impact of Statistical Learning Methods on the Predictive Power of Multivariate Normal Tissue Complication Probability Models

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Chengjian; Schaaf, Arjen van der; Schilstra, Cornelis; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Veld, Aart A. van't

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To study the impact of different statistical learning methods on the prediction performance of multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models. Methods and Materials: In this study, three learning methods, stepwise selection, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), and Bayesian model averaging (BMA), were used to build NTCP models of xerostomia following radiotherapy treatment for head and neck cancer. Performance of each learning method was evaluated by a repeated cross-validation scheme in order to obtain a fair comparison among methods. Results: It was found that the LASSO and BMA methods produced models with significantly better predictive power than that of the stepwise selection method. Furthermore, the LASSO method yields an easily interpretable model as the stepwise method does, in contrast to the less intuitive BMA method. Conclusions: The commonly used stepwise selection method, which is simple to execute, may be insufficient for NTCP modeling. The LASSO method is recommended.

  2. Oral involvement in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. Multidisciplinary care by dentists and rheumatologists.

    PubMed

    López-Pintor, Rosa María; Fernández Castro, Mónica; Hernández, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease that causes destruction of lacrimal and salivary glands. The most common and earliest symptoms are oral and ocular dryness. Dry mouth makes talking difficult, tasting and chewing properly, impairing quality of life of these patients. The most common oral signs and symptoms are hyposialia with or without xerostomia, tooth decay, fungal infections, traumatic oral lesions, dysphagia, dysgeusia, and inflammation of salivary glands. There are different therapeutic strategies, depending on the severity of each case, and the increase in the amount of saliva, to reduce the number of cavities and oral infections. It is particularly important to establish a close relationship between the dentist and the rheumatologist in order to make an early and correct diagnosis, promoting appropriate dietary and hygiene measures, as well as to treat and prevent potential oral complications. PMID:26022574

  3. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  4. Medulloblastoma: Long-term follow-up of patients treated with electron irradiation of the spinal field

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, L.E.; Dawson, D.J.; Tilley-Gulliford, S.A.; Banerjee, P. )

    1991-09-01

    Thirty-two patients with posterior fossa medulloblastoma underwent treatment with electron irradiation to the spinal field. The 5- and 10-year actuarial survival rates were 57% and 50%, respectively. Late complications observed in the 15 patients followed up for more than 5 years were short stature (six patients), decreased sitting-standing height ratio (four patients), scoliosis (two patients), poor school performance (seven patients), xerostomia (one patient), esophageal stricture (one patient), pituitary dysfunction (four patients), primary hypothyroidism (one patient), bilateral eighth-nerve deafness (one patient), and carcinoma of the thyroid (one patient). Complications following treatment with electrons to a spinal field are compared with reported complications following treatment with photons to the spinal field. Although short-term reactions were minimal, the authors found no difference in late complications. More sophisticated treatment planning may show such a long-term benefit in the future.

  5. Current status of IMRT in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Millan, Jaime; Fernández, Jesús Romero; Medina Carmona, Jose Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background IMRT provides highly conformal dose distributions creating non uniform spatial intensity using different segments in the beam. Material & Methods and Results Different retrospective studies have shown a high capability of IMRT to treat tumours close to the base of skull. Prospective studies have shown a decrease in xerostomia compared with conventional 3D conformal treatment (3DCRT). Modulation of intensity is performed by the movement of the multileaf collimator (MLC) that can deliver the radiation in different ways, such as static field segments, dynamic field segments and rotational delivery (arc therapy and tomotherapy). There are slight differences among the different techniques in terms of homogeneity, dose conformity and treatment delivery time. Conclusions The best method to deliver IMRT will depend on multiple factors such as deliverability, practicality, user training and plan quality. PMID:24416581

  6. [The oral cavity condition in patients with high blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Rosiak, Joanna; Kubić-Filiks, Beata; Szymańska, Jolanta

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of high blood pressure in adults is estimated at ca. 30-40% of the general population. Both hypertension disease and hypertensive drugs affect the condition of the patients' oral cavity. A review of the current literature shows that disorders most frequently found in the masticatory organ of patients with hypertension include: xerostomia, changes in salivary glands, gum hypertrophy, lichenoid lesions, taste disorders, and paraesthesias. The authors emphasize that patients with high blood pressure, along with the treatment of the underlying disease, should receive prophylactic and therapeutic dental care. This would enable reduction and/or elimination of unpleasant complaints, and also help prevent the emergence of secondary disorders in the patients' oral cavity as a result of hypertension pharmacotherapy. PMID:26608497

  7. Selenomethionine in Reducing Mucositis in Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Who Are Receiving Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-08

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Mucositis; Radiation Toxicity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Xerostomia

  8. [Oral health, dental state and nutrition in older adults].

    PubMed

    Müller, F; Nitschke, I

    2005-10-01

    The loss of natural teeth impairs essentially the chewing function and can only partly be restored by the insertion of dental prostheses. Equally, xerostomia and dysphagia may aggravate the nutritional intake in older adults. Often denture wearers do subjectively not notice the adjustment of their food choice and the employment of special preparation techniques. Finally the dental state influences the nutritional intake. A reduced number of teeth correlates with the intake of less calories, proteins, fat, non-starch polysaccharides and vitamins. Often missing calories are compensated by an increased consumption of sugar and fat. Especially edentulous persons with a low level of education choose a diet which is rich in fat and sugar. Further the daily intake of fruit and vegetables diminishes along with fewer occlusal contacts in posterior teeth. The restoration of the chewing function by dental intervention does not lead to an improvement of the nutritional intake by itself and should therefore always be complemented by nutritional advice. PMID:16244818

  9. Anterior horn syndrome: A rare manifestation of primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zahlane, Safaa; Louhab, Nissrine; El Mellakh, Meriem; Kissani, Najib

    2016-07-01

    The authors report an exceptional case of an anterior horn syndrome associated with Sjögren's syndrome in a 58-year-old patient with a flaccid tetraparesis revealed by asymmetric atrophy and diffuse fasciculations associated with xerostomia and xerophthalmia. The electroneuromyography objectified a diffuse anterior horn syndrome. The brain MRI and spinal cord were normal. Laboratory tests revealed positive anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibody. The salivary glands biopsy objectified lymphocytic sialadenitis grade 3 of Chisholm. The Schirmer's test was abnormally low. Diagnosis of anterior horn syndrome as part of Sjögren's syndrome was retained. The methylprednisolone bolus allowed partial clinical improvement after 12 months of evolution. Therefore, in patients with isolated anterior horn involvement, a correct diagnosis of the underlying SS is often delayed or overlooked entirely; in these instances, standard clinicoserological assessment is recommendable. PMID:27118221

  10. Current Concepts in Osteoradionecrosis after Head and Neck Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhanda, J; Pasquier, D; Newman, L; Shaw, R

    2016-07-01

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaws is a feared complication of head and neck radiotherapy. ORN causes significant morbidity for patients and controversy among clinicians. This overview considers the variations in definition and classification of the condition that affect estimates of incidence and also the interpretation of evidence. The influence of newer radiotherapy techniques in reducing ORN through reduced dose and xerostomia is balanced against a probable increase in a vulnerable population through a rising head and neck cancer incidence. Theories of pathophysiology of ORN include radiation-induced osteomyelitis, hypoxic and hypovascular theory and fibroatrophic theory. Prevention strategies include restorative dentistry and radiation planning techniques. Treatments range from conservative 'watch and wait' through to more radical surgical strategies. Newer medical management strategies are available with a limited evidence base. The use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy remains controversial and the background and need for newer hyperbaric oxygen trials is discussed. PMID:27038708

  11. Dental management of the geriatric patient with major depression.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, A H; Kawakami, K K; Ganzell, S; Fitten, L J

    1993-01-01

    Major depression is a psychiatric disorder in which mood, thought content, and behavioral patterns are impaired, often for an extended period of time. The condition is encountered among elderly persons admitted to the hospital and those residing in nursing homes. Major depression is predominantly biologic in origin and may arise from dysfunction of the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. It is associated with personal neglect, including a disinterest in performing appropriate preventive oral hygiene techniques. The majority of antidepressant medications cause xerostomia and magnify the incidence of dental disease. Appropriate dental management of patients with the disorder necessitates the use of anti-caries agents containing fluoride, saliva substitutes, and special precautions when analgesics and local anesthetics are being prescribed or administered. Dental treatment helps to improve the patient's self-image and quality of life. PMID:8042134

  12. Treatment planning for parotid sparing in the patient requiring bilateral neck irradiation.

    PubMed

    Marsh, L; Eisbruch, A; Watson, B; Martel, M K

    1996-01-01

    The use of three dimensional (3-D) planning techniques for treatment of head and neck cancers has primarily been used in cases which require only unilateral neck irradiation. However, tumors that require bilateral neck irradiation are commonly managed with parallel opposed treatment portals. A common morbidity associated with this standard form of treatment is xerostomia. In an effort to reduce the incidence of this debilitating side effect, a protocol has been developed which attempts to balance effective tumor control with preservation of salivary flow. Key to this protocol is the use of 3-D treatment planning. The close proximity of the targeted tissues to critical structures and the related dose requirements and/or restrictions of these tissues often require the treatment planner to utilize "non-standard" approaches to achieve the unique dose distributions necessary to meet protocol eligibility. This may include treatment planning options such as non-coplanar, non-axial beams; and modulation of beam intensity. PMID:8679070

  13. Two-year longitudinal study of parotid salivary flow rates in head and neck cancer patients receiving unilateral neck parotid-sparing radiotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Henson, B S; Eisbruch, A; D'Hondt, E; Ship, J A

    1999-05-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is a common treatment for head and neck cancers, and frequently causes permanent salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. This 2-year longitudinal study evaluated unstimulated and stimulated parotid flow rates in 11 patients with head and neck cancers who received unilateral neck parotid-sparing RT. The results demonstrated that treated parotid glands had essentially no output up to 2 years post-RT. Alternatively, spared parotid flow rates were indistinguishable from pre-RT values at 1 and 2 years post-RT, and increased slightly over time. Total unstimulated and stimulated parotid flow rates 2 years after completion of RT were similar to pre-RT values, suggesting that spared parotid function may compensate for lost function from treated parotid glands. These results demonstrate that unilateral neck parotid-sparing techniques are effective in preserving contralateral parotid glands up to 2 years after the completion of RT. PMID:10621842

  14. Assessing the relationship between dental disease and coronary heart disease in elderly U.S. veterans.

    PubMed

    Loesche, W J; Schork, A; Terpenning, M S; Chen, Y M; Dominguez, B L; Grossman, N

    1998-03-01

    Several recent studies have shown a link between dental disease and coronary heart disease. The authors studied 320 U.S. veterans in a convenience sample to assess the relationship between oral health and systemic diseases among older people. They present cross-sectional data confirming that a statistically significant association exists between a diagnosis of coronary heart disease and certain oral health parameters, such as the number of missing teeth, plaque benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide test scores, salivary levels of Streptococcus sanguis and complaints of xerostomia. The oral parameters in these subjects were independent of and more strongly associated with coronary heart disease than were recognized risk factors, such as serum cholesterol levels, body mass index, diabetes and smoking status. However, because of the convenience sample studied, these findings cannot be generalized to other populations. PMID:9529805

  15. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: emphasis on the selection and delineation of the targets.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Foote, Robert L; O'Sullivan, Brian; Beitler, Jonathan J; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2002-07-01

    The head and neck contain many critical, noninvolved structures in close vicinity to the targets. The tightly conformal doses produced by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and the lack of internal organ motion in the head and neck, provide the potential for organ sparing and improved tumor irradiation. Many studies of treatment planning for head and neck cancer have demonstrated the dosimetric superiority of IMRT over conventional techniques in these respects. The initial results of clinical studies demonstrate reduced xerostomia. They suggest an improvement in tumor control, which needs to be verified in larger studies and longer follow-up. Critical issues for successful outcome of head and neck IMRT are accurate selection of the neck lymph nodes that require adjuvant treatment, and accurate delineation on the planning computed tomography (CT) of the lymph-node bearing areas and subclinical disease adjoining the gross tumor. This review emphasizes these topics and provides some guidelines. PMID:12118389

  16. Are your patients depressed? Implications for dental practice.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Dale A

    2003-05-01

    Depressive disorders traditionally reside outside the realm of customary dental practice. Nonetheless, one in every five patients who visits a dentist experiences clinically significant symptoms of depression. The clinical implications of this are substantial. Depression is associated with diminished salivary flow and the complaint of dryness of mouth. It is associated with a diminished and distorted taste sensation, and a higher oral lactobacillus count. Depression is a risk factor for the development of dental caries, periodontal disease, and the erosive variant of oral lichen planus. Antidepressant medications can produce xerostomia, dysgeusia and bruxism. Depressive illness is a legitimate medical condition, with recognizable signs and symptoms, definable pathophysiology, and a significant response to treatment. Unfortunately, despite the availability of effective therapeutic measures, the majority of patients remain untreated. Routine dental checkup visits provide an opportunity for screening. PMID:12756671

  17. Oral complaints related to climacteric symptoms in oöphorectomized women.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, M M; Carter, J; Boyle, P; Hart, D M; Lindsay, R

    1981-01-01

    Numerous oral complaints have been attributed to the female climacteric including altered taste, a burning sensation and xerostomia. However, the data relating these symptoms to the climacteric require elucidation as there have been no adequately controlled studies. In the present investigation, a group of 145 oöphorectomized women were followed for one year. Approximately half were treated with oestrogen replacement and the remainder with a placebo. The results indicate that the hormone had no direct effect upon the oral symptoms but that there was a general increase in somatic complaints which appeared to be related to the degree of neurosis experienced. This is turn can be attributed to vasomotor changes which are under the control of oestrogen. PMID:7265072

  18. Prosthodontic Management of Xerostomic Patient: A Technical Modification

    PubMed Central

    Gurkar, Haraswarupa; Venkatesh, Omprakash Yadahally; Somashekar, Jagadeesh Mandya; Gowda, Muthuraj Hariharapura Lakshme; Dwivedi, Madhavi; Ningthoujam, Ishani

    2016-01-01

    Xerostomia is often a contributing factor in both minor and serious health problems. It can affect nutrition and dental as well as psychological health. Common problems faced by such patients are glossitis, mucositis, angular cheilitis, dysgeusia, and difficulty in chewing and swallowing. One of the major problems associated with xerostomic patients is the poor tolerance and retention of removable dental prostheses because of thin dry atrophic mucosa and lack of a saliva film. This paper describes a new technique of incorporating a salivary reservoir in the maxillary complete denture. The salivary reservoir fabricated by this technique provided good lubrication of the oral tissues and was easily cleansed by the wearer and was fabricated from routine denture materials. PMID:26977325

  19. [Stomatological manifestations in Sjögren's disease and syndrome].

    PubMed

    Simonova, M V; Gritsman, N N; Venikova, M S; Mylov, N M

    1988-01-01

    For diagnosis of SS and SD and the detection of early stages of disease one should necessarily take into account the symptom complex of "major" (salivary gland enlargement, xerostomia, exacerbation of parotitis) and "minor" stomatological signs (multiple cervical caries, dry lips, perlèche, mycotic and herpetic stomatitis, lymphadenopathy). The initial, marked and late stages were defined according to a degree of expression of stomatological manifestations. The initial stage prevailed in SS, the late stage in SD. The chief method of examination were sialometry, sialography and minor salivary gland biopsy. Sialography was widely used as a less traumatic diagnostic procedure. In addition to common signs with SD, salivary gland involvement was characterized by changes typical of SS combined with rheumatic disease (sclerosis in sclerodermia, vasculitis in RA and SLE, nuclear pathology in SLE). PMID:3394093

  20. Fixed Implant Supported Rehabilitation of Partially Edentulous Posterior Maxilla in a Patient With Systemic Scleroderma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Baptist, Benjamin A

    2016-02-01

    Systemic Scleroderma (SSc) is an autoimmune disease that affects connective tissue, resulting in hardening skin, reduced vascular perfusion, gingival fibrosis, enlarged periodontal ligament, xerostomia, and trigeminal neuralgia. Secondary effects, including reduced oral opening and reduced manual dexterity may exacerbate the primary effects. Severe bone loss and premature tooth loss are common eventualities of SSc. Removable prosthetics can be a tedious option for these patients as the progression of the disease often leads to the impossibility of obtaining minimal standards of care, including stability, retention, and hygienic maintainability. Implant treatment of patients with Systemic Scleroderma is poorly documented, and common medications used to treat SSc have been considered relative contraindications to the prescription of dental implant therapy. This report describes 1 case after 2 years in function, where dental implants were successfully utilized to offer definitive fixed rehabilitation to a patient with SSc. PMID:26671839

  1. Factors which influence levels of selected organisms in saliva of older individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Loesche, W J; Schork, A; Terpenning, M S; Chen, Y M; Stoll, J

    1995-01-01

    The most commonly measured bacterial parameters in saliva are the levels of the mutans group streptococci and lactobacilli, which have diagnostic implications for the incidence of dental decay. Diagnostic guidelines which are applicable to children and young adults in whom most, if not all, teeth are present and in whom the rate of stimulated saliva is almost always greater than 0.5 ml/min have been developed. Dental decay is a potential health problem of considerable magnitude among elderly individuals. In elderly individuals, missing teeth, the presence of dentures, and a reduced salivary flow could confound the interpretation of salivary levels of cariogenic bacteria. In the present study, in which saliva was collected from more than 560 elderly individuals (average age, 70 +/- 8 years), there was a significant positive relationship between the salivary levels of Streptococcus mutans and increased numbers of teeth. There was a positive association between the salivary levels of S. mutans and decay when the data were stratified for the presence of a complaint of xerostomia and the presence of dentures. However, a similar analysis indicated that lactobacilli and yeasts were more likely to be associated with decay. The various variables which could influence the bacterial counts per milliliter of saliva, e.g., independent or dependent living status, complaint of xerostomia, stimulated salivary flow, salivary pH, the presence of dentures, number of teeth, and decay, were analyzed simultaneously by using a multivariable linear model. In that analysis the number of decayed teeth was significantly associated with the presence of lactobacilli (P = 0.0001) and yeasts (P = 0.025) but not with the presence of S. mutans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8567881

  2. Total lymphoid irradiation for multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Devereux, C.K.; Vidaver, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Troiano, R.; Dowling, P.C.; Cook, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Although chemical immunosuppression has been shown to benefit patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), it appears that chemotherapy has an appreciable oncogenic potential in patients with multiple sclerosis. Accordingly, we developed a modified total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) regimen designed to reduce toxicity and applied it to a randomized double blind trial of TLI or sham irradiation in MS. Standard TLI regimens were modified to reduce dose to 1,980 rad, lowering the superior mantle margin to midway between the thyroid cartilage and angle of the mandible (to avert xerostomia) and the lower margin of the mantle field to the inferior margin of L1 (to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity by dividing abdominal radiation between mantle and inverted Y), limiting spinal cord dose to 1,000 rad by custom-made spine blocks in the mantle and upper 2 cm of inverted Y fields, and also protecting the left kidney even if part of the spleen were shielded. Clinical efficacy was documented by the less frequent functional scale deterioration of 20 TLI treated patients with chronic progressive MS compared to to 20 sham-irradiated progressive MS patients after 12 months (16% versus 55%, p less than 0.03), 18 months (28% versus 63%, p less than 0.03), and 24 months (44% versus 74%, N.S.). Therapeutic benefit during 3 years follow-up was related to the reduction in lymphocyte count 3 months post-irradiation (p less than 0.02). Toxicity was generally mild and transient, with no instance of xerostomia, pericarditis, herpes zoster, or need to terminate treatment in TLI patients. However, menopause was induced in 2 patients and staphylococcal pneumonia in one.

  3. Ultrasound-assisted nonviral gene transfer of AQP1 to the irradiated minipig parotid gland restores fluid secretion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Zourelias, L; Wu, C; Edwards, P C; Trombetta, M; Passineau, M J

    2015-09-01

    Xerostomia is a common side effect of ionizing radiation used to treat head and neck cancer. A groundbreaking Phase I human clinical trial using Adenoviral gene transfer of Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) to a single salivary gland of individuals suffering from radiation-induced xerostomia has recently been reported. Unfortunately, the limitations of the Adenoviral vector system used in this pioneering trial preclude its advancement to a Phase II trial, and we have thus undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic potential of ultrasound-assisted nonviral gene transfer (UAGT) as an alternative means of delivering AQP1 gene therapy to the salivary gland by comparing head-to-head with the canonical Adenoviral vector in a swine model. Swine irradiated unilaterally with a 10-Gy electron beam targeted at the parotid gland suffered from significant, sustained hyposalivation that was bilateral, despite irradiation being confined to the targeted gland. Unilateral AQP1 gene therapy with UAGT resulted in bilateral restoration of stimulated salivary flow at 48 h and 1 week post treatment (1.62±0.48 ml and 1.87±0.45 ml) to preinjury levels (1.34±0.14 ml) in a manner comparable to Adenoviral delivery (2.32±0.6 ml and 1.33±0.97 ml). UAGT can replace the Adenoviral vector as a means of delivering AQP1 gene therapy in the irradiated swine model, and it is a candidate for advancement to a Phase I human clinical trial. PMID:25871828

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Koutcher, Lawrence; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rowan, Nicholas; Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Pfister, David G.; Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang; Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27-91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3-135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia {>=}Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  5. Potential Benefits of Scanned Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Advanced Photon Therapy With Regard to Sparing of the Salivary Glands in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Water, Tara A. van de; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Jong, Marije E. de; Schilstra, Cornelis; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that scanned intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) results in a significant dose reduction to the parotid and submandibular glands as compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with photons (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. In addition, we investigated whether the achieved dose reductions would theoretically translate into a reduction of salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with N0 oropharyngeal carcinoma were used. The intensity-modulated plans delivered simultaneously 70 Gy to the boost planning target volume (PTV2) and 54 Gy to the elective nodal areas (PTV1). The 3D-CRT technique delivered sequentially 70 Gy and 46 Gy to PTV2 and PTV1, respectively. Normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Results: Planning target volume coverage results were similar for IMPT and IMRT. Intensity-modulated proton therapy clearly improved the conformity. The 3D-CRT results were inferior to these results. The mean dose to the parotid glands by 3D-CRT (50.8 Gy), IMRT (25.5 Gy), and IMPT (16.8 Gy) differed significantly. For the submandibular glands no significant differences between IMRT and IMPT were found. The dose reductions obtained with IMPT theoretically translated into a significant reduction in normal tissue complication probability. Conclusion: Compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT, IMPT improved sparing of the organs at risk, while keeping similar target coverage results. The dose reductions obtained with IMPT vs. IMRT and 3D-CRT varied widely per individual patient. Intensity-modulated proton therapy theoretically translated into a clinical benefit for most cases, but this requires clinical validation.

  6. Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy Y. O'Meara, William; Chan, Kelvin; Della-Bianca, Cesar; Mechalakos, James G.; Zhung, Joanne; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Narayana, Ashwatha; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin P.; Pfister, David G.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective review of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal carcinomas treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and June 2005, 20 laryngeal and 11 hypopharyngeal carcinoma patients underwent IMRT with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy; most patients had Stage IV disease. The prescription of the planning target volume for gross, high-risk, and low-risk subclinical disease was 70, 59.4, and 54 Gy, respectively. Acute/late toxicities were retrospectively scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria scale. The 2-year local progression-free, regional progression-free, laryngectomy-free, distant metastasis-free, and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up of the living patients was 26 months (range, 17-58 months). The 2-year local progression-free, regional progression-free, laryngectomy-free, distant metastasis-free, and overall survival rate was 86%, 94%, 89%, 92%, and 63%, respectively. Grade 2 mucositis or higher occurred in 48% of patients, and all experienced Grade 2 or higher pharyngitis during treatment. Xerostomia continued to decrease over time from the end of RT, with none complaining of Grade 2 toxicity at this analysis. The 2-year post-treatment percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy-dependency rate for those with hypopharyngeal and laryngeal tumors was 31% and 15%, respectively. The most severe late complications were laryngeal necrosis, necrotizing fascitis, and a carotid rupture resulting in death 3 weeks after salvage laryngectomy. Conclusion: These preliminary results have shown that IMRT achieved encouraging locoregional control of locoregionally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas. Xerostomia improved over time. Pharyngoesophageal stricture with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy dependency remains a problem, particularly for patients with hypopharyngeal carcinoma and, to a lesser

  7. Evaluation of Salivary Secretory Immunoglobulin A Levels in Diabetic Patients and Association with Oral and Dental Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Kakoei, Shahla; Hosseini, Bahareh; Haghdoost, Ali-Akbar; Sanjari, Mojgan; Gholamhosseinian, Ahmad; Afshar, Vahid F. N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Oral and dental manifestations in diabetic patients can arise due to numerous factors, including elevated salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) levels. This study aimed to evaluate s-IgA concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to investigate the association between s-IgA levels and oral and dental manifestations of T2DM. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out between October 2011 and September 2012 in Kerman, Iran, and included 260 subjects (128 patients with T2DM and 132 healthy controls). Unstimulated salivary samples were collected from all subjects and s-IgA levels were determined using the immunoturbidimetric method. The oral cavities and teeth of T2DM patients were evaluated for oral and dental manifestations. Results: Both diabetic and control subjects with higher concentrations of s-IgA had significantly higher numbers of decayed, missing or filled teeth (DMFT) and periodontal index (PDI) scores (P <0.050). s-IgA levels were significantly higher in subjects with oral candidiasis (P <0.050). Among diabetic patients, significantly higher s-IgA levels were concomitant with xerostomia and denture stomatitis (P ≤0.050). There were no significant differences between s-IgA concentrations and other oral or dental manifestations in either group. Conclusion: Individuals with a greater number of DMFT, a higher PDI score and oral candidiasis had significantly higher s-IgA levels. s-IgA levels were not significantly higher among diabetic patients in comparison to the control group. However, significantly higher s-IgA levels occurred with xerostomia and denture stomatitis in diabetic patients. In addition, s-IgA was significantly higher in patients with uncontrolled diabetes compared to those with controlled diabetes. PMID:26629378

  8. The dentist's role within the multi-disciplinary team maintaining quality of life for oral cancer patients in light of recent advances in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brody, Sarah; Omer, Osama; McLoughlin, Jacinta; Stassen, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Every year in Ireland over 400 people are diagnosed with head and neck cancer. Oral cancer, a specific type of head and neck cancer, is usually treated with surgery and often requires radiotherapy (RT). However, side effects of RT treatment, which include mucositis, xerostomia, radiation caries, trismus and osteoradionecrosis, can seriously compromise a patient's quality of life. Treatment for oral cancer patients is managed in a multidisciplinary team. General dental practitioners (GDPs), consultant/specialist dentists and oral-maxillofacial surgeons play an important role in these patients' care. Recent advances in the delivery of RT have not only improved locoregional control and survival rates, but have also reduced the incidence and severity of RT-associated side effects; however, no mode of RT delivery has successfully eliminated side effects. The role of dentists is essential in maintaining oral health and all patients should be dentally screened prior to commencing RT. Recent reports have attempted to standardise the quality of care for the oral cancer patient and have highlighted the significance of the role of the GDP. Despite the advancements in RT delivery, the dental team is still faced with a number of challenges, including the high number of patients lost to follow-up dental care, lack of an effective treatment for xerostomia, poor patient compliance, and a lack of standardised guidelines and funding. Addressing these challenges will involve increased communication between all members of the multidisciplinary team and increased involvement of the GDP, thereby ensuring that dental care continues to evolve concurrently with new methods of RT delivery. PMID:23858630

  9. Cervical Lymph Node Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Hugo; Despres, Philippe; Fortin, Bernard; Filion, Edith; Donath, David; Soulieres, Denis; Guertin, Louis; Ayad, Tarek; Christopoulos, Apostolos; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness and rate of complications of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 2005 and November 2008, 25 patients with an unknown primary cancer underwent IMRT, with a median radiation dose of 70 Gy. The bilateral neck and ipsilateral putative pharyngeal mucosa were included in the target volume. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma, except for 1 patient who had adenosquamous differentiation. They were all treated with curative intent. Of the 25 included patients, 20 were men and 5 were women, with a median age of 54 years. Of these patients, 3 had Stage III, 18 had Stage IVa, and 4 had Stage IVb. Of the 25 patients, 18 (72%) received platinum-based chemotherapy in a combined-modality setting. Neck dissection was reserved for residual disease after definitive IMRT. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: With a median follow-up of 38 months, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control rates were all 100% at 3 years. No occurrence of primary cancer was observed during the follow-up period. The reported rates of xerostomia reduced with the interval from the completion of treatment. Nine patients (36%) reported Grade 2 or greater xerostomia at 6 months, and only 2 (8%) of them reported the same grade of salivary function toxicity after 24 months of follow-up. Conclusion: In our institution, IMRT for unknown primary cancer has provided good overall and disease-free survival in all the patients with an acceptable rate of complications. IMRT allowed us to address the bilateral neck and ipsilateral putative pharyngeal mucosa with minimal late salivary function toxicity. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT for more advanced disease led to good clinical results with reasonable toxicities.

  10. Evaluation of the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on whole salivary flow rate

    PubMed Central

    Pal-Singh, Mohit; Mathur, Hemant; Astekar, Sowmya; Gulati, Pranay; Lakhani, Shruta

    2015-01-01

    Background: Saliva plays a critical role in maintaining oral homeostasis; it modulates the ecosystem through lubrication of the alimentary bolus, protection against microorganisms, buffer and repair of the oral mucosa, and helps in dental re-mineralization. Various local and systemic factors such as medications, radiation therapy, systemic conditions, etc. can lead to reduction in salivary flow. A decrease in salivary function, known as Xerostomia, increases a patient’s risk for caries and other oral infections. Palliative management of Xerostomia includes wetting agents such as ice chips, drugs and saliva substitutes. Systemic agents stimulate salivary flow but often have unfavorable side effects. Newer modalities like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), which has fewer side effects, have been used to stimulate salivary flow. The aim of the present study was to assess and evaluate the effect of TENS on whole salivary flow rates in healthy adult subjects. Study design: A total of 80 healthy adult subjects were enrolled in the study. Unstimulated and stimulated saliva (using TENS) was collected for 5 minutes and the mean salivary flow rates were calculated. Data obtained was analyzed using the SPSS (Statistical package for social sciences) version 15. Students ‘t’ test was employed for comparative analysis. Results: Sixty-five of the 80 subjects demonstrated an increase in the salivary flow rate on application of TENS. Twelve subjects demonstrated a mild reduction in the salivary flow rates. Seven subjects experienced transient mild twitching of facial musculature as side effects. Conclusion: Significant increase in salivary flow rates was observed on application of TENS with minimal or no side effects. Key words:Stimulated saliva, whole salivary flow, TENS. PMID:25810824

  11. Development of Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Hydrogels for Salivary Gland Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shubin, Andrew D.; Felong, Timothy J.; Graunke, Dean; Ovitt, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    More than 40,000 patients are diagnosed with head and neck cancers annually in the United States with the vast majority receiving radiation therapy. Salivary glands are irreparably damaged by radiation therapy resulting in xerostomia, which severely affects patient quality of life. Cell-based therapies have shown some promise in mouse models of radiation-induced xerostomia, but they suffer from insufficient and inconsistent gland regeneration and accompanying secretory function. To aid in the development of regenerative therapies, poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels were investigated for the encapsulation of primary submandibular gland (SMG) cells for tissue engineering applications. Different methods of hydrogel formation and cell preparation were examined to identify cytocompatible encapsulation conditions for SMG cells. Cell viability was much higher after thiol-ene polymerizations compared with conventional methacrylate polymerizations due to reduced membrane peroxidation and intracellular reactive oxygen species formation. In addition, the formation of multicellular microspheres before encapsulation maximized cell–cell contacts and increased viability of SMG cells over 14-day culture periods. Thiol-ene hydrogel-encapsulated microspheres also promoted SMG proliferation. Lineage tracing was employed to determine the cellular composition of hydrogel-encapsulated microspheres using markers for acinar (Mist1) and duct (Keratin5) cells. Our findings indicate that both acinar and duct cell phenotypes are present throughout the 14 day culture period. However, the acinar:duct cell ratios are reduced over time, likely due to duct cell proliferation. Altogether, permissive encapsulation methods for primary SMG cells have been identified that promote cell viability, proliferation, and maintenance of differentiated salivary gland cell phenotypes, which allows for translation of this approach for salivary gland tissue engineering applications. PMID:25762214

  12. Efficacy and Toxicity of Chemoradiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Unknown Primary of Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Haddad, Robert I.; Norris, Charles M.; Posner, Marshall R.; Wirth, Lori J.; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: No single standard treatment paradigm is available for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma of an unknown primary (HNCUP). Bilateral neck radiotherapy with mucosal axis irradiation is widely used, with or without chemotherapy and/or surgical resection. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a highly conformal method for delivering radiation that is becoming the standard of care and might reduce the long-term treatment-related sequelae. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for HNCUP. Patients and Materials: A retrospective study of all patients treated at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for HNCUP with IMRT between August 2004 and January 2009. The primary endpoint was overall survival; the secondary endpoints were locoregional and distant control, and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: A total of 24 patients with HNCUP were included. Of these patients, 22 had Stage N2 disease or greater. All patients underwent neck computed tomography, positron emission tomography-computed tomography, and examination under anesthesia with directed biopsies. Of the 24 patients, 22 received concurrent chemotherapy, and 7 (29%) also underwent induction chemotherapy. The median involved nodal dose was 70 Gy, and the median mucosal dose was 60 Gy. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years, the 2-year actuarial overall survival and locoregional control rate was 92% and 100%, respectively. Only 25% of the patients had Grade 2 xerostomia, although 11 patients (46%) required esophageal dilation for stricture. Conclusion: In a single-institution series, IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for HNCUP was associated with superb overall survival and locoregional control. The xerostomia rates were promising, but the aggressive therapy was associated with significant rates of esophageal stenosis.

  13. Orofacial Manifestations and Temporomandibular Disorders of Systemic Scleroderma: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Crincoli, Vito; Fatone, Laura; Fanelli, Margherita; Rotolo, Rossana Patricia; Chialà, Angela; Favia, Gianfranco; Lapadula, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Scleroderma is a disorder involving oral and facial tissues, with skin hardening, thin lips, deep wrinkles, xerostomia, tongue rigidity, and microstomia. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of oral manifestations and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) patients compared with healthy people. Eighty patients (6 men, 74 women) fulfilling ACR/EULAR SSc Criteria were enrolled. A randomly selected group of 80 patients, matched by sex and age served as control group. The examination for TMD signs and symptoms was based on the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) through a questionnaire and clinical examination. SSc patients complained more frequently (78.8%) of oral symptoms (Xerostomia, dysgeusia, dysphagia and stomatodynia) than controls (28.7%) (χ2 = 40.23 p = 0.001). TMD symptoms (muscle pain on chewing, difficulty in mouth opening, headaches) were complained by 92.5% of SSc patients and by 76.2% of controls (χ2 = 8.012 p = 0.005). At the clinical examination, 85% of SSc patients showed restricted opening versus 20.0% of controls (χ2 = 67.77 p = 0.001), 81.2% of SSc showed reduced right lateral excursion versus 50% of controls (χ2 = 17.316 p = 0.001); 73.8% of SSc showed limited left lateral excursion versus 53.8% of controls (χ2 = 6.924 p = 0.009); and 73.8% of SSc had narrow protrusion versus 56.2% of controls (χ2 = 5.385 p = 0.02). PMID:27455250

  14. TAT-Mediated Delivery of Tousled Protein to Salivary Glands Protects Against Radiation-Induced Hypofunction

    SciTech Connect

    Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan; Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Richardson, Charles; De Benedetti, Arrigo; Schrott, Lisa; Caldito, Gloria

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer invariably suffer its deleterious side effect, xerostomia. Salivary hypofunction ensuing from the irreversible destruction of glands is the most common and debilitating oral complication affecting patients undergoing regional radiotherapy. Given that the current management of xerostomia is palliative and ineffective, efforts are now directed toward preventive measures to preserve gland function. The human homolog of Tousled protein, TLK1B, facilitates chromatin remodeling at DNA repair sites and improves cell survival against ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we wanted to determine whether a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to rat salivary glands could protect against IR-induced salivary hypofunction. Methods: The cell-permeable TAT-TLK1B fusion protein was generated. Rat acinar cell line and rat salivary glands were pretreated with TAT peptide or TAT-TLK1B before IR. The acinar cell survival in vitro and salivary function in vivo were assessed after radiation. Results: We demonstrated that rat acinar cells transduced with TAT-TLK1B were more resistant to radiation (D{sub 0} = 4.13 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 0 Gy) compared with cells transduced with the TAT peptide (D{sub 0} = 4.91 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 20.2 Gy). Correspondingly, retroductal instillation of TAT-TLK1B in rat submandibular glands better preserved salivary flow after IR (89%) compared with animals pretreated with Opti-MEM or TAT peptide (31% and 39%, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results demonstrate that a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to the salivary glands effectively attenuates radiation-mediated gland dysfunction. Prophylactic TLK1B-protein therapy could benefit patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  15. Correlation between viral load, plasma levels of CD4 - CD8 T lymphocytes and AIDS-related oral diseases: a multicentre study on 30 HIV+ children in the HAART era.

    PubMed

    Nesti, M; Carli, E; Giaquinto, C; Rampon, O; Nastasio, S; Giuca, M R

    2012-01-01

    This experimental retrospective multicenter study carried out on 30 seropositive children treated with Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART), between the ages of 18 months and 14 years, in the clinical categories Centers for Disease Control (CDC) classification 1993 A (mildly symptomatic), B (moderately symptomatic) and C (severely symptomatic) aims to: 1) clinically and immunologically demonstrate the therapeutic benefits of HAART; 2) monitor the frequency of AIDS-related oral diseases in seropositive children with HAART therapy; 3) monitor the plasma levels of total CD4, CD4 percent, CD8 percent, CD4-CD8 lymphocytes and viral load from 1997 to 30 April, 2011. The statistic methods used are the analysis of covariance and the Bonferroni Test. More than 100 AIDS-related oral diseases were found in the study samples, the most frequent being: oral candidiasis, oropharyngeal candidiasis, HSV-1 herpetic esophagyitis, herpetic gingivolstomatitis (RHOG), recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), parotid swelling, oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL), Herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1), linear gingival erythema (LGE), necrotizing gingivitis (NUG), facial lipodistrophy, facial-cervical lymphadenopathy (FCL), xerostomia, dysgeusia, hyposmia, oral mucosa hyperpigmentation (OMP). The Bonferroni test showed a significant difference between the mean plasma values (mpVTL) of total CD4, CD4 percentage, CD4-CD8 T lymphocytes and Viral Load (VL) of the various oral diseases found in the study samples. The therapeutic benefits of HAART are: immune reconstitution; reduction of the HIV/AIDS-related stomatology diseases; prevention and cure of the AIDS correlated neoplasias; reduction in maternal-fetal transmission of the HIV virus. The negative effects of HAART in relation to odontostomatolgy are: increase in oral lesions from HPV; xerostomia; dysgeusia/ageusia, hyposmia, perioral paresthesia; hyperpigmentation of oral mucosa; facial lipodystrophy, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). No case of

  16. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide enhances saliva secretion via direct binding to PACAP receptors of major salivary glands in mice.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Yuko; Nonaka, Naoko; Takagi, Yoshitoki; Imamura, Eisaku; Narukawa, Masayuki; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Shioda, Seiji; Banks, William A; Nakamura, Masanori

    2016-09-01

    Xerostomia, or dry mouth, is a common syndrome that is generally treated with artificial saliva; however, no other effective methods have yet been established. Saliva secretion is mainly under the control of the autonomic nervous system. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is recognized as a multifunctional neuropeptide in various organs. In this study, we examined the effect of PACAP on saliva secretion, and detected the distribution of the PACAP type 1 receptor (PAC1R) in major salivary glands, including the parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands, in 9-week-old male C57BL/6 mice. Intranasal administration of PACAP 38 increased the amount of saliva secreted, which was not inhibited by atropine pretreatment. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that PAC1R was distributed in the three major salivary glands. In the parotid and sublingual glands, PAC1R was detected in striated duct cells, whereas in the submandibular gland, a strong PAC1R immunoreaction was detected in tall columnar epithelial cells in the granular ducts (i.e., pillar cells), as well as in some striated duct cells. PACAP significantly increased the concentration of epidermal growth factor in saliva. These results suggest that PACAP directly regulates saliva secretion by controlling the absorption activity in the ducts, and that pillar cells regulate the function of granular epithelial cells in the granular duct, such as the secretion of growth factors into the saliva. Collectively, these results suggest the possibility of PACAP as a new effective treatment of xerostomia. Anat Rec, 299:1293-1299, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27339371

  17. Robust Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Increases Estimated Clinical Benefit in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Lisanne V.; Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; ten Haken, Bennie; van der Laan, Hans Paul; van ‘t Veld, Aart A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the clinical benefit of robust optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (minimax IMPT) with current photon Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and PTV-based IMPT for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. The clinical benefit is quantified in terms of both Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) and target coverage in the case of setup and range errors. Methods and Materials For 10 HNC patients, PTV-based IMRT (7 fields), minimax and PTV-based IMPT (2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 fields) plans were tested on robustness. Robust optimized plans differed from PTV-based plans in that they target the CTV and penalize possible error scenarios, instead of using the static isotropic CTV-PTV margin. Perturbed dose distributions of all plans were acquired by simulating in total 8060 setup (±3.5 mm) and range error (±3%) combinations. NTCP models for xerostomia and dysphagia were used to predict the clinical benefit of IMPT versus IMRT. Results The robustness criterion was met in the IMRT and minimax IMPT plans in all error scenarios, but this was only the case in 1 of 40 PTV-based IMPT plans. Seven (out of 10) patients had relatively large NTCP reductions in minimax IMPT plans compared to IMRT. For these patients, xerostomia and dysphagia NTCP values were reduced by 17.0% (95% CI; 13.0–21.1) and 8.1% (95% CI; 4.9–11.2) on average with minimax IMPT. Increasing the number of fields did not contribute to plan robustness, but improved organ sparing. Conclusions The estimated clinical benefit in terms of NTCP of robust optimized (minimax) IMPT is greater than that of IMRT and PTV-based IMPT in HNC patients. Furthermore, the target coverage of minimax IMPT plans in the presence of errors was comparable to IMRT plans. PMID:27030987

  18. Two-Year and Lifetime Cost-Effectiveness of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Racquel E.; Sheets, Nathan C.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Nutting, Chris; Hall, Emma; Chera, Bhishamjit S.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of head-and neck-cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: We used a Markov model to simulate radiation therapy-induced xerostomia and dysphagia in a hypothetical cohort of 65-year-old HNC patients. Model input parameters were derived from PARSPORT (CRUK/03/005) patient-level trial data and quality-of-life and Medicare cost data from published literature. We calculated average incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from the US health care perspective as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and compared our ICERs with current cost-effectiveness standards whereby treatment comparators less than $50,000 per QALY gained are considered cost-effective. Results: In the first 2 years after initial treatment, IMRT is not cost-effective compared with 3D-CRT, given an average ICER of $101,100 per QALY gained. However, over 15 years (remaining lifetime on the basis of average life expectancy of a 65-year-old), IMRT is more cost-effective at $34,523 per QALY gained. Conclusion: Although HNC patients receiving IMRT will likely experience reduced xerostomia and dysphagia symptoms, the small quality-of-life benefit associated with IMRT is not cost-effective in the short term but may be cost-effective over a patient's lifetime, assuming benefits persist over time and patients are healthy and likely to live for a sustained period. Additional data quantifying the long-term benefits of IMRT, however, are needed.

  19. Serum zinc levels in 368 patients with oral mucosal diseases: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhe-Xuan; Yang, Xiao-Wen; Shi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the serum zinc levels in patients with common oral mucosal diseases by comparing these to healthy controls. Material and Methods A total of 368 patients, which consisted of 156 recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) patients, 57 oral lichen planus (OLP) patients, 55 burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients, 54 atrophic glossitis (AG) patients, 46 xerostomia patients, and 115 sex-and age-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. Serum zinc levels were measured in all participants. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA, t-test, and Chi-square test. Results The mean serum zinc level in the healthy control group was significantly higher than the levels of all other groups (p < 0.001). No individual in the healthy control group had a serum zinc level less than the minimum normal value. However, up to 24.7% (13/54) of patients with AG presented with zinc deficiency, while 21.2% (33/156) of patients with RAS, 16.4% (9/55) of patients with BMS, 15.2% (7/46) of patients with xerostomia, and 14.0% (8/57) of patients with OLP were zinc deficient. Altogether, the zinc deficiency rate was 19.02% (70/368) in the oral mucosal diseases (OMD) group (all patients with OMD). The difference between the OMD and healthy control group was significant (p <0.001). Gender differences in serum zinc levels were also present, although not statistically significant. Conclusions Zinc deficiency may be involved in the pathogenesis of common oral mucosal diseases. Zinc supplementation may be a useful treatment for oral mucosal diseases, but this requires further investigation; the optimal serum level of zinc, for the prevention and treatment of oral mucosal diseases, remains to be determined. Key words:Oral mucosal diseases, Zinc deficiency, pathogenesis. PMID:27031065

  20. High-Dose and Extended-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage NK/T-Cell Lymphoma of Waldeyer's Ring: Dosimetric Analysis and Clinical Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Xi-Wen; Li, Ye-Xiong Fang, Hui; Jin, Jing; Wang, Wei-Hu; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Song, Yong-Wen; Ren, Hua; Dai, Jian-Rong

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric benefit, treatment outcome, and toxicity of high-dose and extended-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with early-stage NK/T-cell lymphoma of Waldeyer's ring (WR-NKTCL). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with early-stage WR-NKTCL who received extended-field IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy to the primary involved regions and positive cervical lymph nodes (planning target volume requiring radical irradiation [PTV{sub 50}]) and 40 Gy to the negative cervical nodes (PTV{sub 40}). Dosimetric parameters for the target volume and critical normal structures were evaluated. Locoregional control (LRC), overall survival (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median mean doses to the PTV{sub 50} and PTV{sub 40} were 53.2 Gy and 43.0 Gy, respectively. Only 1.4% of the PTV{sub 50} and 0.9% of the PTV{sub 40} received less than 95% of the prescribed dose, indicating excellent target coverage. The average mean doses to the left and right parotid glands were 27.7 and 28.4 Gy, respectively. The 2-year OS, PFS, and LRC rates were 71.2%, 57.4%, and 87.8%. Most acute toxicities were grade 1 to 2, except for grade ≥3 dysphagia and mucositis. The most common late toxicity was grade 1-2 xerostomia, and no patient developed any ≥grade 3 late toxicities. A correlation between the mean dose to the parotid glands and the degree of late xerostomia was observed. Conclusions: IMRT achieves excellent target coverage and dose conformity, as well as favorable survival and locoregional control rates with acceptable toxicities in patients with WR-NKTCL.

  1. The Clinical Characteristics of Primary Sjogren's Syndrome With Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder in China

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Lin; Wang, Qian; Fei, Yunyun; Zhang, Wen; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Yan; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to analyze the clinical characteristics of primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS) with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 616 patients who were admitted to the Peking Union Medical College Hospital from 1985 to 2013. Of these patients, 43 developed NMOSD. The median duration of symptoms was 60 months and 72% of the patients experienced neurological complications onset in the pSS with NMOSD group. Twenty-one out of 43 patients had neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and 22 exhibited a limited form of NMO. Serum anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody positivity was detected in 89.3% of the patients. A total of 60.5% of the patients (26 patients) complained of dry mouth, 72.1% were positive for objective xerostomia, 53.5% complained of dry eyes, and 74.4% had a positive ocular test. Biopsy of the minor salivary glands was performed in 33 patients, 28 of whom (84.8%) had a lymphocytic focus score of ≥1. Anti-Ro/SSA or anti-La/SSB antibodies were detected in 41 patients (95.3%). Compared with the pSS patients without NMOSD, the incidences of xerophthalmia, xerostomia, arthritis, interstitial lung disease, and renal tubular acidosis were significantly lower in the patients with NMOSD. NMOSD is a neurologic complication of pSS. The presence of anti-AQP4 antibody may be a predictor for pSS patients with NMOSD. Neurological manifestations are prominent in these patients. In clinical scenarios involving pSS or NMOSD, rheumatologists and neurologists should be aware of this association and perform the appropriate tests. PMID:26181553

  2. Factors which influence levels of selected organisms in saliva of older individuals.

    PubMed

    Loesche, W J; Schork, A; Terpenning, M S; Chen, Y M; Stoll, J

    1995-10-01

    The most commonly measured bacterial parameters in saliva are the levels of the mutans group streptococci and lactobacilli, which have diagnostic implications for the incidence of dental decay. Diagnostic guidelines which are applicable to children and young adults in whom most, if not all, teeth are present and in whom the rate of stimulated saliva is almost always greater than 0.5 ml/min have been developed. Dental decay is a potential health problem of considerable magnitude among elderly individuals. In elderly individuals, missing teeth, the presence of dentures, and a reduced salivary flow could confound the interpretation of salivary levels of cariogenic bacteria. In the present study, in which saliva was collected from more than 560 elderly individuals (average age, 70 +/- 8 years), there was a significant positive relationship between the salivary levels of Streptococcus mutans and increased numbers of teeth. There was a positive association between the salivary levels of S. mutans and decay when the data were stratified for the presence of a complaint of xerostomia and the presence of dentures. However, a similar analysis indicated that lactobacilli and yeasts were more likely to be associated with decay. The various variables which could influence the bacterial counts per milliliter of saliva, e.g., independent or dependent living status, complaint of xerostomia, stimulated salivary flow, salivary pH, the presence of dentures, number of teeth, and decay, were analyzed simultaneously by using a multivariable linear model. In that analysis the number of decayed teeth was significantly associated with the presence of lactobacilli (P = 0.0001) and yeasts (P = 0.025) but not with the presence of S. mutans. Our findings indicate that salivary levels of lactobacilli and yeasts, as well as the salivary levels of S. mutans, should be monitored when seeking microbial indicators that might predict the incidence of caries in elderly individuals. PMID:8567881

  3. Predictors of Pain among Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shuman, Andrew G.; Terrell, Jeffrey E.; Light, Emily; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; Chepeha, Douglas; Jiang, Yunyun; McLean, Scott; Ghanem, Tamer A.; Duffy, Sonia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pain is a strong contributor to cancer patients’ quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine predictors of pain 1 year after the diagnosis of head and neck cancer. Design Prospective, multi-site cohort study. Setting Three academically-affiliated medical centers. Patients Previously untreated patients with carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract (n=374). Main Outcome Measures Participants were surveyed pre-treatment and 1 year thereafter. Multivariate analyses were conducted to determine predictors of the SF-36 bodily pain score 1 year after diagnosis. Results The mean SF-36 bodily pain score at 1 year was 65, compared to 61 at diagnosis (p=.004), compared to 75 among population norms (lower scores indicate worse pain). Variables independently associated with pain included pre-treatment pain score (p<0.001), less education (p=0.02), neck dissection (p=0.001), feeding tube (p=0.05), xerostomia (p<0.001), depressive symptoms (p<0.001), taking more pain medication (p<0.001), less physical activity (p=.02), and poor sleep quality (p=0.006). Current smoking and problem drinking were marginally significant (p=0.07 and 0.08, respectively). Conclusions Aggressive pain management may be indicated for head and neck cancer patients who undergo neck dissections, complain of xerostomia, require feeding tubes, and have medical comorbidities. Treatment of modifiable risk factors such as depression, poor sleep quality, tobacco and alcohol abuse may also reduce pain and improve quality of life among head and neck cancer patients. PMID:23165353

  4. Ultrasound-assisted non-viral gene transfer of AQP1 to the irradiated minipig parotid gland restores fluid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Zourelias, L; Wu, C; Edwards, PC; Trombetta, M; Passineau, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Xerostomia is a common side effect of ionizing radiation used to treat head and neck cancer. A groundbreaking Phase I human clinical trial utilizing Adenoviral gene transfer of Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) to a single salivary gland of individuals suffering from radiation-induced xerostomia has recently been reported. Unfortunately, the limitations of the Adenoviral vector system utilized in this pioneering trial preclude its advancement to a Phase II trial and we have thus undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic potential of ultrasound-assisted non-viral gene transfer (UAGT) as an alternative means of delivering AQP1 gene therapy to the salivary gland by comparing head-to-head with the canonical Adenoviral vector in a swine model. Findings Swine irradiated unilaterally with a 10Gy electron beam targeted at the parotid gland suffered from significant, sustained hyposalivation that was bilateral, despite irradiation being confined to the targeted gland. Unilateral AQP1 gene therapy with UAGT resulted in bilateral restoration of stimulated salivary flow at 48 hours and one week post-treatment (1.62+/−0.48ml, 1.87+/−0.45ml) to pre-injury levels (1.34+/−0.14ml) in a manner comparable to Adenoviral delivery (2.32+/−0.6ml, 1.33+/−0.97ml). Conclusions UAGT can replace the Adenoviral vector as a means of delivering AQP1 gene therapy in the irradiated swine model and is a candidate for advancement to a Phase I human clinical trial. PMID:25871828

  5. Orofacial Manifestations and Temporomandibular Disorders of Systemic Scleroderma: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Crincoli, Vito; Fatone, Laura; Fanelli, Margherita; Rotolo, Rossana Patricia; Chialà, Angela; Favia, Gianfranco; Lapadula, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Scleroderma is a disorder involving oral and facial tissues, with skin hardening, thin lips, deep wrinkles, xerostomia, tongue rigidity, and microstomia. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of oral manifestations and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) patients compared with healthy people. Eighty patients (6 men, 74 women) fulfilling ACR/EULAR SSc Criteria were enrolled. A randomly selected group of 80 patients, matched by sex and age served as control group. The examination for TMD signs and symptoms was based on the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) through a questionnaire and clinical examination. SSc patients complained more frequently (78.8%) of oral symptoms (Xerostomia, dysgeusia, dysphagia and stomatodynia) than controls (28.7%) (χ² = 40.23 p = 0.001). TMD symptoms (muscle pain on chewing, difficulty in mouth opening, headaches) were complained by 92.5% of SSc patients and by 76.2% of controls (χ² = 8.012 p = 0.005). At the clinical examination, 85% of SSc patients showed restricted opening versus 20.0% of controls (χ² = 67.77 p = 0.001), 81.2% of SSc showed reduced right lateral excursion versus 50% of controls (χ² = 17.316 p = 0.001); 73.8% of SSc showed limited left lateral excursion versus 53.8% of controls (χ² = 6.924 p = 0.009); and 73.8% of SSc had narrow protrusion versus 56.2% of controls (χ² = 5.385 p = 0.02). PMID:27455250

  6. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharynx cancer: Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering experience

    SciTech Connect

    Wolden, Suzanne L. . E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org; Chen, William C.; Pfister, David G.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Berry, Sean L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We previously demonstrated that intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) significantly improves radiation dose distribution over three-dimensional planning for nasopharynx cancer and reported positive early clinical results. We now evaluate whether IMRT has resulted in improved outcomes for a larger cohort of patients with longer follow-up. Methods and Materials: Since 1998, all 74 patients with newly diagnosed, nonmetastatic nasopharynx cancer were treated with IMRT using accelerated fractionation to 70 Gy; 59 received a hyperfractionated concomitant boost, and more recently 15 received once-daily treatment with dose painting. With the exception of Stage I disease (n = 5) and patient preference (n = 1), 69 patients received concurrent and adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy similar to that in the Intergroup 0099 trial. Results: Patient characteristics: median age 45; 32% Asian; 72% male; 65% World Health Organization III; 6% Stage I, 16% Stage II, 30% Stage III, 47% Stage IV. Median follow-up is 35 months. The 3-year actuarial rate of local control is 91%, and regional control is 93%; freedom from distant metastases, progression-free survival, and overall survival at 3 years are 78%, 67%, and 83%, respectively. There was 100% local control for Stage T1/T2 disease, compared to 83% for T3/T4 disease (p = 0.01). Six patients failed at the primary site, with median time to local tumor progression 16 months; 5 were exclusively within the 70 Gy volume, and 1 was both within and outside the target volume. There is a trend for improved local control with IMRT when compared to local control of 79% for 35 patients treated before 1998 with three-dimensional planning and chemotherapy (p 0.11). Six months posttherapy, 21%, 13%, 15%, and 0% of patients with follow-up audiograms (n = 24 patients) had Grade 1, 2, 3, and 4 sensorineural hearing loss, respectively. For patients with >1 year follow-up (n = 59), rates of long-term xerostomia were as follows: 26% none

  7. Oral disease profiles in chronic graft versus host disease.

    PubMed

    Bassim, C W; Fassil, H; Mays, J W; Edwards, D; Baird, K; Steinberg, S M; Cowen, E W; Naik, H; Datiles, M; Stratton, P; Gress, R E; Pavletic, S Z

    2015-04-01

    At least half of patients with chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD), the leading cause of morbidity and non-relapse mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, have oral manifestations: mucosal lesions, salivary dysfunction, and limited mouth-opening. cGVHD may manifest in a single organ or affect multiple organ systems, including the mouth, eyes, and the skin. The interrelationship of the 3 oral manifestations of cGVHD with each other and with the specific manifestations of extraoral cGVHD has not been studied. In this analysis, we explored, in a large group of patients with cGVHD, the potential associations between: (1) oral mucosal disease and erythematous skin disease, (2) salivary gland dysfunction and lacrimal gland dysfunction, and (3) limited mouth-opening and sclerotic skin cGVHD. Study participants, enrolled in a cGVHD Natural History Protocol (NCT00331968, n = 212), underwent an oral examination evaluating: (1) mucosal cGVHD [NIH Oral Mucosal Score (OMS)], (2) salivary dysfunction (saliva flow and xerostomia), and (3) maximum mouth-opening measurement. Parameters for dysfunction (OMS > 2, saliva flow ≤ 1 mL/5 min, mouth-opening ≤ 35 mm) were analyzed for association with skin cGVHD involvement (erythema and sclerosis, skin symptoms), lacrimal dysfunction (Schirmer's tear test, xerophthalmia), Lee cGVHD Symptom Scores, and NIH organ scores. Oral mucosal disease (31% prevalence) was associated with skin erythema (P < 0.001); salivary dysfunction (11% prevalence) was associated with lacrimal dysfunction (P = 0.010) and xerostomia with xerophthalmia (r = 0.32, P = 0.001); and limited mouth-opening (17% prevalence) was associated with skin sclerosis (P = 0.008) and skin symptoms (P = 0.001). There was no association found among these 3 oral cGVHD manifestations. This analysis supports the understanding of oral cGVHD as 3 distinct diseases: mucosal lesions, salivary gland dysfunction, and mouth sclerosis. Clear classification of oral c

  8. Implantable Three-Dimensional Salivary Spheroid Assemblies Demonstrate Fluid and Protein Secretory Responses to Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Harrington, Daniel A.; Duncan, Randall L.; Jia, Xinqiao; Witt, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation treatment in patients with head and neck tumors commonly results in hyposalivation and xerostomia due to the loss of fluid-secreting salivary acinar cells. Patients develop susceptibility to oral infections, dental caries, impaired speech and swallowing, reducing the quality of life. Clinical management is largely unsatisfactory. The development of a tissue-engineered, implantable salivary gland will greatly benefit patients suffering from xerostomia. This report compares the ability of a 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) and a three-dimensional (3D) hyaluronic acid (HA)-based culture system to support functional salivary units capable of producing fluid and phenotypic proteins. Parotid cells seeded on 2.5D, as well as those encapsulated in 3D HA hydrogels, self-assembled into acini-like structures and expressed functional neurotransmitter receptors. Structures in 3D hydrogels merged to form organized 50 μm spheroids that could be maintained in culture for over 100 days and merged to form structures over 500 μm in size. Treatment of acini-like structures with the β-adrenergic agonists norepinephrine or isoproterenol increased granule production and α-amylase staining in treated structures, demonstrating regain of protein secretion. Upon treatment with the M3 muscarinic agonist acetylcholine, acini-like structures activated the fluid production pathway by increasing intracellular calcium levels. The increase in intracellular calcium seen in structures in the 3D hydrogel culture system was more robust and prolonged than that in 2.5D. To compare the long-term survival and retention of acini-like structures in vivo, cell-seeded 2.5D and 3D hydrogels were implanted into an athymic rat model. Cells in 2.5D failed to maintain organized acini-like structures and dispersed in the surrounding tissue. Encapsulated cells in 3D retained their spheroid structure and structural integrity, along with the salivary biomarkers and maintained viability for over 3 weeks in vivo

  9. Regional radiation dose susceptibility within the parotid gland: Effects on salivary loss and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Haley Reinsberg, Stefan; Hovan, Allan; Thomas, Steven; Wu, Jonn

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Xerostomia is one of the most likely late toxic effects of radiotherapy treatment in patients with head-and-neck cancers. Modern treatment techniques can incorporate knowledge of complication risk into treatment plans. To this end, the authors attempt to quantify the regional radiotherapy dose-dependence of salivary output loss and recovery in a prospective study. Methods: Salivary output was collected from patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment for head-and-neck cancers at the BC Cancer Agency between February 2008 and May 2013. Regional dose-dependence (i.e., dose susceptibility) of loss and recovery is quantified using nonparametric (Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients, local linear regression) and parametric (least-sum of squares, least-median of squares) techniques. Results: Salivary flow recovery was seen in 79 of 102 patients considered (p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon sign rank test). Output loss was strongly correlated with left- and right parotid combined dose φ = min (D{sub L},  45 Gy) + min (D{sub R},  45 Gy), and can be accurately predicted. Median early loss (three months) was 72% of baseline, while median overall loss (1 yr) was 56% of baseline. Fitting an exponential model to whole parotid yields dose sensitivities A{sub 3m} = 0.0604 Gy{sup −1} and A{sub 1y} = 0.0379 Gy{sup −1}. Recovery was not significantly associated with dose. Hints of lateral organ sub-segment dose–response dimorphism were observed. Conclusions: Sub-segmentation appears to predict neither loss nor recovery with any greater precision than whole parotid mean dose, though it is not any worse. Sparing the parotid to a combined dose φ of <50 Gy is recommended for a patient to keep ≈40% of baseline function and thus avoid severe xerostomia at 12 months post-treatment. It seems unlikely that a population’s mean recovery will exceed 20%–30% of baseline output at 1 yr after radiotherapy treatment using current (whole-organ based) clinical guidelines.

  10. Submandibular gland excision: long-term clinical outcome in 139 patients operated in a single institution.

    PubMed

    Springborg, Line Kanstrup; Møller, Martin Nue

    2013-03-01

    In transcervical resection of the submandibular gland for benign lesions, only a limited risk of damage to neural structures can be accepted and a cosmetically satisfactory result is mandatory. In this retrospective case series, we evaluated 139 patients operated over a 10-year period and completed long-term clinical follow-up of 113 of these patients after a median of 81 months. In all patients, the operation was effective. We found a 4.3 % risk of reoperation for wound infection or postoperative hematomas and an 18.7 % risk of early paresis of the marginal branch of the facial nerve, which decreased to 2.7 % on long-term follow-up. We found a 4.4 % risk of permanent lingual nerve paresis, and no patients had damage to the hypoglossal nerve. Xerostomia was found in 22.1 % of the patients and could be quantified by the easily performed biscuit test. Only 2.5 % reported an unsatisfactory cosmetic result and all scars were ≤ 6 on the Vancouver Scar Scale. Problems with scarring were more common if there had been postoperative infection. We continue to use the lateral transcervical approach as standard in our institution for patients who cannot be managed by gland-sparing procedures. PMID:22941392

  11. Radioprotective Effect of Lidocaine on Function and Ultrastructure of Salivary Glands Receiving Fractionated Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim, Samer George; Benedek, Geza Attila; Su Yuxiong; Jacobsen, Hans Christian; Klinger, Matthias; Dendorfer, Andreas; Hemmelmann, Claudia; Meller, Birgit; Nadrowitz, Roger; Rades, Dirk; Sieg, Peter

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced xerostomia still represents a common side effect after radiotherapy for head-and-neck malignancies. The aim of the present study was to examine the radioprotective effect of lidocaine hydrochloride during fractionated radiation in an experimental animal model. Methods and Materials: To evaluate the influence of different radiation doses on salivary gland function and the radioprotective effect of lidocaine, rabbits were irradiated with 15, 25, 30, and 35 Gy (equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions equivalent to 24, 40, 48, and 56 Gy, respectively). Lidocaine hydrochloride (10 and 12 mg/kg) was administered before every radiation fraction in the treatment groups. Salivary gland function was assessed by flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy, and the morphologic changes were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Results: Functional impairment was first observed after 35 Gy and pretreatment with lidocaine improved radiation tolerance of both parotid and submandibular glands. The use of 12 mg/kg lidocaine was superior and displayed significant radioprotection with regard to flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy. The ultrastructure was largely preserved after pretreatment with both lidocaine doses. Conclusions: Lidocaine represents an effective radioprotective agent and a promising approach for clinical application to avoid radiation-induced functional impairment of salivary glands.

  12. Palliative care for patients with head and neck cancer: "I would like a quick return to a normal lifestyle".

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Nathan E; Genden, Eric; Morrison, R Sean

    2008-04-16

    Head and neck cancers constitute a diverse group of diseases including malignancies of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, sinuses, and skull base. Treatment of these cancers includes a combination of surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation. Due to both the patterns of disease recurrence and the adverse effects of treatments, patients with head and neck cancer often have a complex and prolonged course of illness that is marked by periods of freedom from disease and symptoms interspersed with bouts of serious illness, debility, and numerous physical and psychological symptoms including pain, dysphagia, weight loss, disfigurement, depression, and xerostomia. Thus, management of this disease is best provided by an interdisciplinary team that includes individuals from the disciplines of otolaryngology, palliative care, radiation oncology, oncology, nutrition, speech, and physical and occupational therapy. Using the case of Mr K, we describe the symptoms encountered by patients with head and neck cancer and suggest options for management. We discuss the psychological aspects that affect these patients, including issues such as changes in body image, quality of life, anxiety, and guilt. Finally, we discuss the importance of the interdisciplinary team in the care of these patients and outline the roles of each team member. By providing comprehensive care to patients with malignancies of the head and neck, clinicians can increase the likelihood that patients and their families will be able to obtain the best possible outcomes and quality of life. PMID:18413876

  13. Ageing, dementia and oral health.

    PubMed

    Foltyn, P

    2015-03-01

    Neurocognitive decline and delirium, frailty, incontinence, falls, hearing and vision impairment, medication compliance and pharmacokinetics, skin breakdown, impaired sleep and rest are regarded as geriatric giants by gerontologists, geriatricians and nursing home staff. As these are all interrelated in the elderly, failure to act on one can impact on the others. However, the implications of poor oral health have for too long been ignored and deserve equal status. Mouth pain can be devastating for the elderly, compound psychosocial problems, frustrate carers and nursing home staff and disrupt family dynamics. As appearance, function and comfort suffer, so may a person's self-esteem and confidence. The contributing factors for poor oral health such as rapid dental decay, acute and chronic periodontal infections and compromised systemic health on a background of a dry mouth, coupled with xerostomia-inducing medications, reduced fine motor function, declining cognition and motivation will not only lead to an increase in both morbidity and mortality but also impact on quality of life. PMID:25762045

  14. Pathophysiology of primary burning mouth syndrome with special focus on taste dysfunction: a review.

    PubMed

    Kolkka-Palomaa, M; Jääskeläinen, S K; Laine, M A; Teerijoki-Oksa, T; Sandell, M; Forssell, H

    2015-11-01

    Primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic oral condition characterized by burning pain often accompanied with taste dysfunction and xerostomia. The most compelling evidence concerning BMS pathophysiology comes from studies on the somatosensory system using neurophysiologic or psychophysical methods such as blink reflex, thermal quantitative sensory testing, as well as functional brain imaging. They have provided convincing evidence for neuropathic involvement at several levels of the somatosensory system in BMS pain pathophysiology. The number of taste function studies trying to substantiate the subjective taste disturbances or studies on salivary factors in BMS is much more limited, and most of them suffer from definitional and methodological problems. This review aims to critically evaluate the existing literature on the pathophysiology of BMS, paying special attention to the correctness of case selection and the methodology used in published studies, and to summarize the current state of knowledge. Based on the recognition of several gaps in the current understanding of the pathophysiology of BMS especially as regards taste and pain system interactions, the review ends with future scenarios for research in this area. PMID:25962669

  15. Burning mouth syndrome: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Francisco J; Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; López-Jornet, Pía

    2015-05-16

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is mainly found in middle aged or elderly women and is characterized by intense burning or itching sensation of the tongue or other regions of the oral mucosa. It can be accompanied by xerostomia and dysgeusia. The syndrome generally manifests spontaneously, and the discomfort is typically of a continuous nature but increases in intensity during the evening and at night. Although BMS classically has been attributed to a range of factors, in recent years evidence has been obtained relating it peripheral (sensory C and/or trigeminal nerve fibers) or central neuropathic disturbances (involving the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system). The differential diagnosis requires the exclusion of oral mucosal lesions or blood test alterations that can produce burning mouth sensation. Patient management is based on the avoidance of causes of oral irritation and the provision of psychological support. Drug treatment for burning sensation in primary BMS of peripheral origin can consist of topical clonazepam, while central type BMS appears to improve with the use of antidepressants such as duloxetine, antiseizure drugs such as gabapentin, or amisulpride. PMID:25952601

  16. [The (putative) pathological impact of fibromyalgia on the orofacial system].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C; Gerritsen, A E; de Baat-Ananta, M; de Baat, P

    2016-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome without apparent aetiology, characterised by pain, fatigue, memory disorders, mood disorders, and sleep disturbances. The syndrome is considered to be one of the rheumatic diseases. In the general population, the prevalence varies from 2 to 8%, with a women-men ratio of about 2:1. Suspicion of fibromyalgia arises when a patient has pain at multiple locations that cannot be attributed to trauma or inflammation, and when the pain is especially musculoskeletal. Primary management includes explaining the syndrome and offering reassurance. In addition, one can also attempt to increase mobility, avoid overloading, and improve physical condition and the level of activity, and to activate problem-solving skills. Subsequently, behavioural therapy and pharmacotherapy may be considered. The most important manifestations of fibromyalgia in the orofacial and occlusal system seem to be temporomandibular dysfunction, headache, xerostomia, hyposalivation, burning mouth and dysgeusia. However, with respect to the precise relation of fibromyalgia with the orofacial system, much needs to be elucidated. PMID:26973987

  17. Effectiveness of acupuncture and related therapies for palliative care of cancer: overview of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinyin; Chung, Vincent CH; Hui, Edwin P; Ziea, Eric TC; Ng, Bacon FL; Ho, Robin ST; Tsoi, Kelvin KF; Wong, Samuel YS; Wu, Justin CY

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture and related therapies such as moxibustion and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are often used to manage cancer-related symptoms, but their effectiveness and safety are controversial. We conducted this overview to summarise the evidence on acupuncture for palliative care of cancer. Our systematic review synthesised the results from clinical trials of patients with any type of cancer. The methodological quality of the 23 systematic reviews in this overview, assessed using the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews Instrument, was found to be satisfactory. There is evidence for the therapeutic effects of acupuncture for the management of cancer-related fatigue, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and leucopenia in patients with cancer. There is conflicting evidence regarding the treatment of cancer-related pain, hot flashes and hiccups, and improving patients’ quality of life. The available evidence is currently insufficient to support or refute the potential of acupuncture and related therapies in the management of xerostomia, dyspnea and lymphedema and in the improvement of psychological well-being. No serious adverse effects were reported in any study. Because acupuncture appears to be relatively safe, it could be considered as a complementary form of palliative care for cancer, especially for clinical problems for which conventional care options are limited. PMID:26608664

  18. Complementary strategies for the management of radiation therapy side effects.

    PubMed

    Stubbe, Christine E; Valero, Meighan

    2013-07-01

    Patients with cancer utilize complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for a variety of purposes, one of which is the reduction of side effects of conventional treatment. With a large number of their patients using CAM, it is important for advanced practitioners in oncology to have an understanding of these therapies to better guide their patients. Side effects of radiation therapy that may have dose-limiting poten-tial include diarrhea, mucositis, skin toxicity, and xerostomia. A com-mon side effect that is not necessarily dose-limiting but considerably troublesome to patients is cancer- and treatment-related fatigue. The CAM therapies that may alleviate some of the side effects of radiation therapy include probiotics, psyllium, exercise, melatonin, honey, acu-puncture, and calendula. Therapies that require more research or have been shown to be ineffective include aloe vera, glutamine, and deglyc-yrrhizinated licorice. This article provides an overview of these thera-pies as well as related research and analysis. PMID:25032003

  19. Nandrolone decanoate (deca-durabolin) in primary Sjögren's syndrome: a double blind pilot study.

    PubMed

    Drosos, A A; van Vliet-Dascalopoulou, E; Andonopoulos, A P; Galanopoulou, V; Skopouli, F N; Moutsopoulos, H M

    1988-01-01

    The efficacy and side-effects of Deca-Durabolin (DD) were tested, in a double blind fashion, in twenty female primary Sjögren's syndrome (1 degree SS) patients. Ten randomly assigned patients received DD (100 mg IM bi-weekly) for six months, and ten others placebo, for the same period. Analysis of the results revealed that the DD-treated patients showed a moderate improvement of subjective xerostomia, a significant decrease of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and an overall improvement of their feeling of well-being, -judged by themselves and the investigator subjectively-, when compared with the placebo group. All the sicca objective parameters (results of Schirmer's I test, slit lamp eye examination after rose bengal staining, stimulated parotid flow rate measurements and labial minor salivary gland histopathology) were not significantly altered in either group. The clinical side-effects were the expected ones, i.e. hirsutism, hoarseness and an increase in libido, more pronounced in the DD-treated group. At the end of the study, one DD-treated patient, developed a diffuse well-differentiated B-lymphocytic lymphoma, which regressed spontaneously three months later. PMID:3396249

  20. Improved outcome of nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with conventional radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro . E-mail: mauro.palazzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Guzzo, Marco; Tomatis, Stefano Ph.D.; Cerrotta, Annamaria; Potepan, Paolo; Quattrone, Pasquale; Cantu, Giulio

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the outcome of patients with nonmetastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with conventional radiotherapy at a single institution. Methods and materials: From 1990 to 1999, 171 consecutive patients with NPC were treated with conventional (two-dimensional) radiotherapy. Tumor histology was undifferentiated in 82% of cases. Tumor-node-metastasis Stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer 1997 system) was I in 6%, II in 36%, III in 22%, and IV in 36% of patients. Mean total radiation dose was 68.4 Gy. Chemotherapy was given to 62% of the patients. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 6.3 years (range, 3.1-13.1 years). Results: The 5-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival rates were 72%, 74%, and 62%, respectively. The 5-year local, regional, and distant control rates were 84%, 80%, and 83% respectively. Late effects of radiotherapy were prospectively recorded in 100 patients surviving without relapse; 44% of these patients had Grade 3 xerostomia, 33% had Grade 3 dental damage, and 11% had Grade 3 hearing loss. Conclusions: This analysis shows an improved outcome for patients treated from 1990 to 1999 compared with earlier retrospective series, despite the use of two-dimensional radiotherapy. Late toxicity, however, was substantial with conventional radiotherapy.

  1. Long-term maxillofacial effects of radiotherapy in young nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Bektaş-Kayhan, K; Ozbek, C D; Yazicioğlu, O; Karagöz, G; Altun, M; Meral, R; Unür, M

    2013-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a rare and distinct malignancy that arises from the epithelium of the nasopharynx. It accounts almost 1% of all pediatric malignancies. Oral complications of radiotherapy in the head and neck region are the result of the deleterious effects of radiation on salivary glands, oral mucosa, bone, dentition, masticatory musculature, and temporomandibular joints. Here we present 3 male NPC patients 13, 14 and 15 years old. One of them had stage III and the others stage IV diseases. Administered dose of radiation was 66 Gy for case I, 70 Gy for case II and 68 Gy for case III. The follow-up period was more than 12 months except for case III and all of them were disease free in their last visit. All attended dental clinics for dental and TMJ problems. Dentitions were severely affected, trismus and severe xerostomia. Long-term effects of radiotherapy which has a great impact on patients' quality of life and the role of supportive care and minimizing the late effects of ionizing radiation are discussed. PMID:24046991

  2. Extended-term effects of head and neck irradiation in a rodent.

    PubMed

    Nagler, R M

    2001-10-01

    Radiotherapy to the head and neck is a common treatment for malignancies of the region. Unfortunately, exposure to irradiation often results in a variety of complications, most of which are localised and expressed in the short term following irradiation. However, prolonged and systemic effects may have greater clinical importance as the survival rate of head and neck irradiated patients is increasing yearly. Six groups of 18-20 rats were evaluated during a 1 year study. The non-irradiated control group was compared with 2.5 Gy, 5, 7.5, 10 and 15 Gy irradiated groups. We found a dose-dependent reduction in both survival and body weight in our rat models following a delayed, prolonged and chronic process. Dying animals were emaciated, dehydrated and starved, and many were blind and immunocompromised. While the exact underlying mechanism of this delayed, but devastating, phenomenon has not yet been determined, the delayed xerostomia inflicted on these animals may, at least partially, explain it. The clinical implications for head and neck patients require further evaluation, but our data should be considered, in the context of the available evidence for the long-term effects of head and neck irradiation in humans. PMID:11576851

  3. BAFF overexpression increases lymphocytic infiltration in Sjögren's target tissue, but only inefficiently promotes ectopic B-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Haskett, Scott; Pellerin, Alex; Xu, Shanqin; Petersen, Britta; Jandreski, Luke; Hamann, Stefan; Reynolds, Taylor L; Zheng, Timothy S; Mingueneau, Michael

    2016-08-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) levels are increased in rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). However, BAFF contribution to pathogenesis is not completely understood. In pSS, immune infiltration of the salivary and lacrimal glands leads to xerostomia and xerophtalmia. Glandular B cell hyperactivation, differentiation into germinal center (GC)-like structures and plasma cell accumulation are histopathological hallmarks that were attributed to increased BAFF. Here, we experimentally tested this hypothesis by overexpressing BAFF in a mouse model of pSS. BAFF overexpression enhanced lymphocytic infiltration and MHCII expression on B cells. Increased BAFF also induced B cell differentiation into GC B cells within the autoimmune target tissue. However, even in these conditions, GC B cells only accounted for <1% of glandular B cells, demonstrating that BAFF is not efficiently promoting ectopic GC formation in pSS and warranting further investigation of therapeutics targeting both BAFF and the related TNF-family member APRIL. PMID:27352977

  4. Ethnomedicinal Plants Used by Traditional Healers to Treat Oral Health Problems in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ashu Agbor, Michael; Naidoo, Sudeshni

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of the study was to determine the therapeutic methods used by traditional healers to treat oral diseases in Cameroon. Methods. A total of 200 traditional healers with a mean age of 50.4 ± 14.2 years from all the provinces of Cameroon were studied using questionnaires. Information elicited was the local names of the medicinal plants used for the management of oral problems, their routes of administration, and methods of usage. Identification of live or dried plants or photographs of sample of the plants was done by a taxonomist. Results. The majority of the participants were males urban dwellers aged 41-50 years, 112 (56.0%) practice as herbalists and 56 (28.0%) were trained on medications preservation, 77(56.6%) treat diseases inside or outside the mouth, and 9.0% reported being specialist in oral diseases treatment. Of the 52 plants identified, 48 are used in the management of toothache, sore throat, mouth sores, abscess, broken tooth and jaw, tooth sensitivity, mouth thrush, dental caries, gingivitis, sinusitis, tonsillitis, xerostomia, oral syphilis, oral cancer, TMJ pain, halitosis, and tooth bleaching and 4 plants are used for dental extraction. Roots, leaves, and bark were the parts of plants used and some minerals as adjuncts. Conclusion. The study provides comprehensive information on therapeutic methods employed by traditional healers for the treatment of oral diseases. PMID:26495020

  5. Hypokalemic paralysis as primary presentation of Fanconi syndrome associated with Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Chiang; Shiang, Jeng-Chuan; Huang, Wen-Te; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2010-06-01

    Hypokalemic paralysis is a rare presentation of Fanconi syndrome (FS) caused by Sjögren Syndrome (SS). We describe a 39-year-old man who manifested flaccid paralysis of 4 limbs. Laboratory investigations showed profound hypokalemia (1.6 mmol/L) with renal K wasting, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with positive urine anion gap, hypophosphatemia with hyperphosphaturia, hypouricemia with hyperuricosuria, normoglycemic glycosuria, and abnormal serum creatinine concentration 2.2 mg/dL. A thorough survey for the cause of FS revealed that he had xerophthalmia and xerostomia accompanied by high anti-Ro antibody, positive Schirmer test, and delayed saliva excretion on sialoscintigraphy, confirming the diagnosis of SS. Potassium citrate, active vitamin D3, and high phosphate diet for his FS coupled with mycophenolate mofetil for SS resolved clinical symptoms and ameliorated renal function. Early recognition of HP due to the underlying SS-related FS with prompt therapy not only could terminate potentially life-threatening hypokalemia, but also improve renal outcome. PMID:20414123

  6. [Hypokalemic paralysis: the first presentation of primary Sjögren's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Martinho, Aurélia L; Capela, Andreia; Duarte, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    The Sjögren's syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disorder characterized by chronic inflammation of the exocrine glands with extraglandular manifestations in up to 25% patients. Renal involvement occurs in 18.4-67% of cases, with tubulointerstitial nephritis being the most frequent pathology. We present the case of a 37 year-old woman admitted because of generalized grade 2 muscle weakness which developed over a week. We detected: hypokalemia, rhabdomyolysis, urinary pH 6.5, proteinuria and metabolic acidemia. The laboratory tests suggestive of distal renal tubular acidosis with hypokalaemia led to the diagnosis of lymphoplasmocytic tubulointerstitial nephritis, which was confirmed by renal biopsy, and to a clinical suspicion of Sjögren's syndrome. Primary Sjögren's syndrome was diagnosed in this patient based on the following criteria: xerophthalmia, xerostomia, sialadenitis, positive anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibodies, and absence of criteria for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. During hospitalization, the patient developed deep vein thrombosis. Tests showed positive antiphospholipid antibodies and the diagnosis of secondary antiphospholipid syndrome was made. She was treated with potassium, bicarbonate, steroids, ramipril and warfarin. The authors wish to highlight the extraglandular manifestations and in particular the rarity of hypokalemic paralysis as the presenting manifestation of primary Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:22985924

  7. ALX/FPR2 Modulates Anti-Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Submandibular Gland.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Shuen; Wee, Yinshen; Yang, Chieh-Hsiang; Melvin, James E; Baker, Olga J

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the G-protein coupled formyl peptide receptor 2 (ALX/FPR2) by the lipid mediators lipoxin A4 and resolvin D1 (RvD1) promotes resolution of inflammation. Our previous in vitro studies indicate that RvD1 activation of ALX/FPR2 resolves cytokine-mediated inflammatory responses in mammalian cells. However, the impact of ALX/FPR2 activation on salivary gland function in vivo is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine whether submandibular glands (SMG) from ALX/FPR2(-/-) mice display enhanced inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) stimulation. For these studies, C57BL/6 and ALX/FPR2(-/-) mice at age 8-12-week-old were treated with LPS by i.p for 24 h. Salivary gland structure and function were analyzed by histopathological assessment, saliva flow rate, quantitative PCR, Western blot analyses and immunofluorescence. Our results showed the following events in the ALX/FPR2(-/-) mice treated with LPS: a) upregulated inflammatory cytokines and decreased M3R (Muscarinic Acetylcholine receptor M3) and AQP5 (Aquaporin 5) protein expression, b) decreased saliva secretion, c) increased apoptosis, d) alteration of tight junction and neuronal damage. Overall, our data suggest that the loss of ALX/FPR2 results in unresolved acute inflammation and SMG dysfunction (xerostomia) in response to LPS that is similar to human salivary gland dysfunction induced by bacterial infection. PMID:27064029

  8. Evaluation of effects of Zingiber officinale on salivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Chamani, Goli; Zarei, Mohammad Reza; Mehrabani, Mitra; Taghiabadi, Yousef

    2011-01-01

    There are some herbal plants in Iranian traditional system of medicine which are believed to be excellent remedies to alleviate the symptoms of xerostomia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of systemic administration of seven different herbal extracts on the rate of salivation in rats. The extracts of 7 herbs; Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae), Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck (Rutaceae), Artemisia absinthium L. (Asteraceae), Cichorium intybus L. (Asteraceae), Pimpinella anisum L.(Apiaceae), Portulaca oleracea L.(Portulacaceae), Tribulus terrestris L. (Zygophyllaceae) were prepared. Nine groups of animals (including negative and positive control groups) were used and seven rats were tested in each group. After the injection of extracts, saliva volume was measured gravimetrically in four continuous seven-minute intervals. The results showed that after injection of ginger extracts salivation was significantly higher as compared to the negative control group and other herbal extracts in all of the four intervals (P<0.01). The peak action of the ginger was during the first 7-minute interval and following this, salivation decreased to some extent. The present study suggests that the extract of Zingiber offiicianle can increase the rate of salivation significantly in animal model. Further investigations on different constituents of ginger seem to be essential to identify the responsible constituent for stimulation of saliva secretion. PMID:21874635

  9. Oral lichen planus – retrospective study of 563 Croatian patients

    PubMed Central

    Budimir, Vice; Richter, Ivica; Andabak-Rogulj, Ana; Vučićević-Boras, Vanja

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of oral lichen planus (OLP) in a group of Croatian patients seen between 2006 and 2012. Study Design: A group of 563 patients with a diagnosis of OLP was retrospectively reviewed in our clinic. Data regarding age, gender, medical history, drugs, smoking, alcohol, chief complaint, clinical type, localization, histology, treatment and malignant transformation were registered. Results: Of the 563 patients, 414 were females and 149 were males. The average age at the diagnosis was 58 (range 11-94). The most common site was buccal mucosa (82.4%). Most of our patients did not smoke (72.5%) or consume alcohol (69.6%). Patients reported oral soreness (43.3%), mucosal roughness (7%), xerostomia (3%), gingival bleeding (2%) and altered taste (0.5%) as the chief complaint, while almost half of them were asymptomatic (44.2%). The most common types of OLP were reticular (64.8%) and erosive (22.9%). Plaque-like (5.7%) atrophic/erythemtous (4.3%) and bullous (2.3%) type were also observed. Malignant transformation rate of 0.7% was recorded. Conclusions: OLP mostly affects non-smoking middle-aged women. Buccal mucosa is the most commonly affected site. In almost half of the cases patients are asymptomatic. In spite of the small risk for malignant transformation all patients should be regularly monitored. Key words:Oral lichen planus, malignant transformation, epidemiology, retrospective study. PMID:24608217

  10. Sjögren's syndrome: a stepwise approach to the use of diagnostic tests.

    PubMed Central

    Coll, J; Porta, M; Rubiés-Prat, J; Gutiérrez-Cebollada, J; Tomás, S

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and forty two patients (62 with definite Sjögren's syndrome, 24 with probable Sjögren's syndrome, and 56 in whom Sjögren's syndrome was finally ruled out) were studied. Schirmer's test and rose bengal staining for the diagnosis of keratoconjunctivitis sicca and salivary scintigraphy and a labial biopsy sample for the diagnosis of xerostomaia were studied in all patients. Rose bengal staining showed high specificity (98%) but low sensitivity (55%). All patients with positive rose bengal staining results had associated xerostomia. In the rose bengal staining positive patients, scintigraphy had 100% specificity. A labial biopsy sample showed high sensitivity in the rose bengal staining, salivary scintigraphy positive group, and high specificity in the rose bengal staining positive, salivary scintigraphy negative group. In patients with negative rose bengal staining, salivary scintigraphy showed 96% specificity and 36% sensitivity. A labial biopsy sample had a sensitivity and specificity greater than 90% in rose bengal staining negative patients. Only 29 biopsy samples were needed to achieve a diagnosis of Sjögren's syndrome in 142 patients (20%). Hence the suggested approach may make it unnecessary to take biopsy samples in approximately 80% of patients with suspected Sjögren's syndrome. Using the stepwise approach of first rose bengal staining, then salivary scintigraphy, and eventually a labial biopsy sample in patients with suspected Sjögren's syndrome, the diagnosis is relatively simple. PMID:1616324

  11. Growth Factors Polymerized Within Fibrin Hydrogel Promote Amylase Production in Parotid Cells

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Andrew D.; Nelson, Joel W.; Leigh, Noel J.; Duffey, Michael E.; Lei, Pedro; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2013-01-01

    Salivary gland cell differentiation has been a recurring challenge for researchers as primary salivary cells show a loss of phenotype in culture. Particularly, parotid cells show a marked decrease in amylase expression, the loss of tight junction organization and proper cell function. Previously, Matrigel has been used successfully as an extracellular matrix; however, it is not practical for in vivo applications as it is tumorigenic. An alternative method could rely on the use of fibrin hydrogel (FH), which has been used extensively in biomedical engineering applications ranging from cardiovascular tissue engineering to wound-healing experiments. Although several groups have examined the effects of a three-dimensional (3D) environment on salivary cell cultures, little is known about the effects of FH on salivary cell cultures. The current study developed a 3D cell culture model to support parotid gland cell differentiation using a combination of FH and growth factor-reduced Matrigel (GFR-MG). Furthermore, FH polymerized with a combination of EGF and IGF-1 induced formation of 3D spheroids capable of amylase expression and an agonist-induced increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in salivary cells. These studies represent an initial step toward the construction of an artificial salivary gland to restore salivary gland dysfunction. This is necessary to reduce xerostomia in patients with compromised salivary function. PMID:23594102

  12. Antidepressants relevant to oral and maxillofacial surgical practice

    PubMed Central

    Lambrecht, J. Thomas; Greuter, Christian; Surber, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Depression is commonly associated with a high-carbohydrate diet, lack of interest in proper oral hygiene and xerostomia connected to the use of antidepressants. Patients often consult their dentists as a result of changes affecting the hard dental substance and the soft-tissues. Aim: The aim of this study was to identify adverse drug interactions between the antidepressants and medications commonly administered in dentistry in order to give practicing dentists an overview of the scientific literature. Objective: The objective is to identify the adverse drug interactions between antidepressants and medication commonly administered in dentistry. Study Design: The literature search was performed using PubMed, Cochrane and the specific search items. The review (1984-2009) focused on medicines used in dental practice (vasoconstrictors, non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, antifungals and benzodiazepines). Results: There are various drug interactions between antidepressants and medicines used in dentistry. When two or more drugs are co-administered, a drug interaction must always be anticipated though many of the interactions are potential problems, but do not seem to be real clinical issues. Conclusion: The probability of a drug interaction can be minimized by careful history-taking, skillful dose adjustment and safe administration of the therapeutic agent. PMID:24205476

  13. Salivary Acetylcholinesterase Activity Is Increased in Parkinson's Disease: A Potential Marker of Parasympathetic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Tatyana; Knudsen, Cindy Soendersoe; Mouridsen, Kim; Nexo, Ebba; Borghammer, Per

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Decreased salivary flow and xerostomia are frequent findings in Parkinson's disease (PD), possibly caused by alterations in the parasympathetic tonus. Here we explore salivary acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity as a potential biomarker in PD. Methods. We measured salivary flow, AChE activity, and total protein concentration in 30 PD patients and 49 healthy controls. We also performed exploratory correlation analyses with disease duration, motor symptom severity, autonomic complaints, and other nonmotor symptoms. Results. PD patients displayed significantly decreased salivary flow rate, significantly increased salivary AChE activity, and total protein concentration. Importantly, the AChE activity/total protein ratio was significantly increased in PD patients, suggesting that increased AChE activity cannot be explained solely by upconcentration of saliva. The Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) score displayed significant correlation with total salivary protein (P = 0.002) and near-significant correlation with salivary flow (P = 0.07). Color vision test scores were also significantly correlated with AChE activity (P = 0.04) and total protein levels (P = 0.002). Conclusion. Salivary AChE activity is increased in PD patients compared to healthy controls. Future studies are needed to elucidate whether this parameter reflects the extent of neuronal damage and parasympathetic denervation in the salivary glands of PD patients. PMID:25767737

  14. Pharmacological Activation of the EDA/EDAR Signaling Pathway Restores Salivary Gland Function following Radiation-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Grace; Headon, Denis; Harris, Zoey I.; Huttner, Kenneth; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy of head and neck cancers often results in collateral damage to adjacent salivary glands associated with clinically significant hyposalivation and xerostomia. Due to the reduced capacity of salivary glands to regenerate, hyposalivation is treated by substitution with artificial saliva, rather than through functional restoration of the glands. During embryogenesis, the ectodysplasin/ectodysplasin receptor (EDA/EDAR) signaling pathway is a critical element in the development and growth of salivary glands. We have assessed the effects of pharmacological activation of this pathway in a mouse model of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. We report that post-irradiation administration of an EDAR-agonist monoclonal antibody (mAbEDAR1) normalizes function of radiation damaged adult salivary glands as determined by stimulated salivary flow rates. In addition, salivary gland structure and homeostasis is restored to pre-irradiation levels. These results suggest that transient activation of pathways involved in salivary gland development could facilitate regeneration and restoration of function following damage. PMID:25409170

  15. Pharmacological activation of the EDA/EDAR signaling pathway restores salivary gland function following radiation-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Hill, Grace; Headon, Denis; Harris, Zoey I; Huttner, Kenneth; Limesand, Kirsten H

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy of head and neck cancers often results in collateral damage to adjacent salivary glands associated with clinically significant hyposalivation and xerostomia. Due to the reduced capacity of salivary glands to regenerate, hyposalivation is treated by substitution with artificial saliva, rather than through functional restoration of the glands. During embryogenesis, the ectodysplasin/ectodysplasin receptor (EDA/EDAR) signaling pathway is a critical element in the development and growth of salivary glands. We have assessed the effects of pharmacological activation of this pathway in a mouse model of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. We report that post-irradiation administration of an EDAR-agonist monoclonal antibody (mAbEDAR1) normalizes function of radiation damaged adult salivary glands as determined by stimulated salivary flow rates. In addition, salivary gland structure and homeostasis is restored to pre-irradiation levels. These results suggest that transient activation of pathways involved in salivary gland development could facilitate regeneration and restoration of function following damage. PMID:25409170

  16. Advances in Supportive Care for Late Effects of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Barbara A; Deng, Jie

    2015-10-10

    As the population of head and neck cancer survivors increases, it has become increasingly important for health care providers to understand and manage late complications of therapy. Functional deficits can be categorized as general health deficits resulting in frailty or debility, head and neck-specific functional deficits such as swallowing and speech, and musculoskeletal impairment as a result of tumor and treatment. Of critical importance is the growing data indicating that swallow therapy and physical therapy may prevent or ameliorate long-term functional deficits. Oral health complications of head and neck therapy may manifest months or years after the completion of treatment. Patients with hyposalivation are at high risk for dental caries and thus require aggressive oral hygiene regimens and routine dental surveillance. Swallowing abnormalities, xerostomia, and poor dentition may result in dietary adaptations that may cause nutritional deficiencies. Identification and management of maladaptive dietary strategies are important for long-term health. Follow-up with primary care physicians for management of comorbidities such as diabetes and hyperlipidemia may help to limit late vascular complications caused by radiation therapy. Herein, we review late effects of head and neck cancer therapy, highlighting recent advances. PMID:26351334

  17. Variants at multiple loci implicated in both innate and adaptive immune responses are associated with Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Christopher J.; Li, He; Adrianto, Indra; Ice, John A.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Grundahl, Kiely M.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Dozmorov, Mikhail G.; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Bowman, Simon; Lester, Sue; Eriksson, Per; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Brun, Johan G.; Gøransson, Lasse G.; Harboe, Erna; Guthridge, Joel M.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kvarnström, Marika; Jazebi, Helmi; Graham, Deborah S. Cunninghame; Grandits, Martha E.; Nazmul-Hossain, Abu N. M.; Patel, Ketan; Adler, Adam J.; Maier-Moore, Jacen S.; Farris, A. Darise; Brennan, Michael T.; Lessard, James A.; Chodosh, James; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Hefner, Kimberly S.; Houston, Glen D.; Huang, Andrew J.W.; Hughes, Pamela J.; Lewis, David M.; Radfar, Lida; Rohrer, Michael D.; Stone, Donald U.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; James, Judith A.; Omdal, Roald; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Illei, Gabor G.; Witte, Torsten; Jonsson, Roland; Rischmueller, Maureen; Rönnblom, Lars; Nordmark, Gunnel; Ng, Wan-Fai; Mariette, Xavier; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Segal, Barbara M.; Scofield, R. Hal; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Harley, John B.; Sivils, Kathy L. Moser

    2013-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome is a common autoimmune disease (~0.7% of European Americans) typically presenting as keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. In addition to strong association within the HLA region at 6p21 (Pmeta=7.65×10−114), we establish associations with IRF5-TNPO3 (Pmeta=2.73×10−19), STAT4 (Pmeta=6.80×10−15), IL12A (Pmeta =1.17×10−10), FAM167A-BLK (Pmeta=4.97×10−10), DDX6-CXCR5 (Pmeta=1.10×10−8), and TNIP1 (Pmeta=3.30×10−8). Suggestive associations with Pmeta<5×10−5 were observed with 29 regions including TNFAIP3, PTTG1, PRDM1, DGKQ, FCGR2A, IRAK1BP1, ITSN2, and PHIP amongst others. These results highlight the importance of genes involved in both innate and adaptive immunity in Sjögren’s syndrome. PMID:24097067

  18. Late effects after treatment of twenty children with soft tissue sarcomas of the head and neck. Experience at a single institution with a review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Fromm, M.; Littman, P.; Raney, R.B.; Nelson, L.; Handler, S.; Diamond, G.; Stanley, C.

    1986-05-15

    Twenty children with soft tissue sarcomas of the head and neck, treated at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania from 1972 to 1981, were evaluated for the late deleterious effects of treatment. All patients received radiation therapy and combination chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, and cyclophosphamide; certain patients also received Adriamycin (doxorubicin). All had ophthalmologic, otologic, growth, and cosmetic evaluations; 15 also had dental and maxillofacial examinations. The median age at diagnosis was 6 years (range, 7 months-13 years). Median follow-up from time of diagnosis was 5.5 years with a minimum of 3 years in all but four patients. The major problems encountered were related to the eyes (xerophthalmia and cataracts), ears (hearing loss), teeth (maleruption and caries), glandular structures (xerostomia, hypopituitarism), and development (craniofacial deformity). It is concluded that children treated for soft tissue sarcomas of the head and neck with combined modality therapy, including radiation enhancers, may show a variety of late treatment-related adversities. These children require close multidisciplinary follow-up for detection of late effects in order that appropriate prophylactic or symptomatic treatment can be instituted to minimize their consequences.

  19. Acupuncture: could it become everyday practice in oncology?

    PubMed Central

    Kilian-Kita, Aneta; Konopka, Kamil; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture is a complementary and alternative medical treatment (CAM) which is increasingly used in the care of cancer patients. Traditionally derived from Chinese medicine, nowadays it is becoming a part of evidence-based oncology. The use of acupuncture in these patients has been recommended by the American Cancer Society (ACS) for the treatment of side effects associated with conventional cancer therapy and cancer-related ailments. A growing body of evidence supports the use of acupuncture in the treatment of cancer-induced pain and chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting. Also other indications, such as xerostomia, fatigue, hot flashes, anxiety and peripheral neuropathy, are being constantly evaluated. This article summarizes the most important discoveries related to the possible usefulness of this method in contemporary oncology. Emphasis is placed on the results of randomized controlled trials with an adequate level of evidence. However, explanation of the mechanisms responsible for these effects requires confirmation in further studies with an adequate level of evidence. In future, acupuncture may become an interesting and valuable addition to conventional medicine. PMID:27358589

  20. Prevalence of Sjögren's syndrome in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Coll, J; Rives, A; Griñó, M C; Setoain, J; Vivancos, J; Balcells, A

    1987-01-01

    Investigations were carried out in 122 patients in order to identify features of Sjögren's syndrome (keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia). There were 78 patients with autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis 21, scleroderma 16, sicca syndrome 16, primary biliary cirrhosis 14, and other autoimmune disorders 11), 11 patients with chronic liver disease other than primary biliary cirrhosis, and 33 patients with a variety of non-autoimmune conditions or no obvious disease. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca was diagnosed by Schirmer's test and rose bengal staining. The oral component was diagnosed by labial biopsy and salivary scintigraphy. Forty nine patients had a definite Sjögren's syndrome, and 77 patients had the syndrome definitely or probably. Definite Sjögren's syndrome occurred in 62% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, in 69% of patients with scleroderma, and in 71% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Sjögren's syndrome was not present in any of the patients with non-autoimmune conditions. These results show that in an unselected group of patients with Sjögren's syndrome the prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (26%), scleroderma (22%), sicca syndrome (22%), and primary biliary cirrhosis (20%) is similar. Also the occurrence of Sjögren's syndrome in primary biliary cirrhosis is even higher than that in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:3592784

  1. Human Salivary Gland Stem Cells Functionally Restore Radiation Damaged Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Sarah; Maimets, Martti; van der Zwaag, Marianne; Stokman, Monique A; van Gosliga, Djoke; Zwart, Erik; Witjes, Max J H; de Haan, Gerald; van Os, Ronald; Coppes, Rob P

    2016-03-01

    Adult stem cells are often touted as therapeutic agents in the regenerative medicine field, however data detailing both the engraftment and functional capabilities of solid tissue derived human adult epithelial stem cells is scarce. Here we show the isolation of adult human salivary gland (SG) stem/progenitor cells and demonstrate at the single cell level in vitro self-renewal and differentiation into multilineage organoids. We also show in vivo functionality, long-term engraftment, and functional restoration in a xenotransplantation model. Indeed, transplanted human salisphere-derived cells restored saliva production and greatly improved the regenerative potential of irradiated SGs. Further selection for c-Kit expression enriched for cells with enhanced regenerative potencies. Interestingly, interaction of transplanted cells with the recipient SG may also be involved in functional recovery. Thus, we show for the first time that salispheres cultured from human SGs contain stem/progenitor cells capable of self-renewal and differentiation and rescue of saliva production. Our study underpins the therapeutic promise of salisphere cell therapy for the treatment of xerostomia. PMID:26887347

  2. Identification of Patient Benefit From Proton Therapy for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients Based on Individual and Subgroup Normal Tissue Complication Probability Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobi, Annika; Bandurska-Luque, Anna; Stützer, Kristin; Haase, Robert; Löck, Steffen; Wack, Linda-Jacqueline; Mönnich, David; Thorwarth, Daniela; and others

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine, by treatment plan comparison along with normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modeling, whether a subpopulation of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) could be identified that would gain substantial benefit from proton therapy in terms of NTCP. Methods and Materials: For 45 HNSCC patients, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was compared to intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Physical dose distributions were evaluated as well as the resulting NTCP values, using modern models for acute mucositis, xerostomia, aspiration, dysphagia, laryngeal edema, and trismus. Patient subgroups were defined based on primary tumor location. Results: Generally, IMPT reduced the NTCP values while keeping similar target coverage for all patients. Subgroup analyses revealed a higher individual reduction of swallowing-related side effects by IMPT for patients with tumors in the upper head and neck area, whereas the risk reduction of acute mucositis was more pronounced in patients with tumors in the larynx region. More patients with tumors in the upper head and neck area had a reduction in NTCP of more than 10%. Conclusions: Subgrouping can help to identify patients who may benefit more than others from the use of IMPT and, thus, can be a useful tool for a preselection of patients in the clinic where there are limited PT resources. Because the individual benefit differs within a subgroup, the relative merits should additionally be evaluated by individual treatment plan comparisons.

  3. Validation of the National Institutes of Health chronic GVHD Oral Mucosal Score using component-specific measures

    PubMed Central

    Bassim, CW; Fassil, H; Mays, JW; Edwards, D; Baird, K; Steinberg, SM; Williams, KM; Cowen, EW; Mitchell, SA; Cole, K; Taylor, T; Avila, D; Zhang, D; Pulanic, D; Grkovic, L; Fowler, D; Gress, RE; Pavletic, SZ

    2016-01-01

    Oral chronic GVHD (cGVHD) is a common, late complication of alloSCT that is associated with significant patient morbidity. The NIH Oral Mucosal Score (NIH OMS) was developed to assess oral cGVHD therapeutic response, but has not been fully validated. This study’s purpose was to conduct a rigorous construct validity and internal consistency analysis of this score and its components (erythema, lichenoid, ulcers, mucoceles) using established measures of oral pain, oral function, oral-related quality-of-life, nutrition and laboratory parameters in 198 patients with cGVHD. The construct validity of the NIH OMS was supported: a moderate correlation was observed between NIH OMS and mouth pain (rho =0.43), while a weaker correlation was observed with low albumin (rho = −0.26). Total NIH OMS, erythema and lichenoid components were associated with malnutrition, oral pain and impaired oral QOL, while ulcers were only associated with oral pain. No associations were found between mucoceles and any indicator evaluated, including salivary function or xerostomia. Kappa determined between scale components was low overall (all ≤0.35), supporting a conclusion that each component measures a distinct manifestation of oral cGVHD. This study supports the use of the NIH OMS and its components (erythema, lichenoid and ulcerations) to measure clinician-reported severity of oral cGVHD. PMID:23995099

  4. Oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus in children: An institutional study at highly active antiretroviral therapy centre in India

    PubMed Central

    Ponnam, Srinivas Rao; Srivastava, Gautam; Theruru, Kotaih

    2012-01-01

    Context: More than 1000 children are newly infected with Human immunodefi ciency virus (HIV) every day, and of these more than half will die as a result of AIDS due to lack of access to HIV treatment. HIV disease varies considerably in children. Among those infected prenatally, some experience few or no symptoms for years, whereas in others the disease progresses rapidly. The risk factors that influence the development of such oral manifestations include, low CD4+ T cell count, xerostomia and lack of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Aims: To identify the oral manifestations of HIV in children receiving HAART. Materials and Methods: The study comprised 95 children receiving HAART. 95 HIV +ve children not receiving HAART and 95 HIV –ve children were also included for comparing the manifestations of HIV. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was done using Fisher's Chi-square test. Probability value (P value) was obtained for the three groups. Results: The manifestations of HIV that were observed in children receiving HAART include dental caries (26%), periodontal diseases (23%), candidiasis (19%), hyperpigmentation (17%), ulcerative stomatitis (9%) and one case of mucocele. These manifestations were compared with HIV +ve children not receiving HAART and HIV –ve children to find manifestations with statistical significance. Conclusions: We conclude that HAART had increased the disease-free states in HIV +ve children on HAART promising them better life span. The incidence of oral lesions can further come down with adequate oral hygiene measures in HIV-infected children. PMID:22923890

  5. Radiation-induced dental caries, prevention and treatment - A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nishtha; Pal, Manoj; Rawat, Sheh; Grewal, Mandeep S.; Garg, Himani; Chauhan, Deepika; Ahlawat, Parveen; Tandon, Sarthak; Khurana, Ruparna; Pahuja, Anjali K.; Mayank, Mayur; Devnani, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck cancers (HNCs) involves radiotherapy. Patients undergoing radiotherapy for HNCs are prone to dental complications. Radiotherapy to the head and neck region causes xerostomia and salivary gland dysfunction which dramatically increases the risk of dental caries and its sequelae. Radiation therapy (RT) also affects the dental hard tissues increasing their susceptibility to demineralization following RT. Postradiation caries is a rapidly progressing and highly destructive type of dental caries. Radiation-related caries and other dental hard tissue changes can appear within the first 3 months following RT. Hence, every effort should be focused on prevention to manage patients with severe caries. This can be accomplished through good preoperative dental treatment, frequent dental evaluation and treatment after RT (with the exception of extractions), and consistent home care that includes self-applied fluoride. Restorative management of radiation caries can be challenging. The restorative dentist must consider the altered dental substrate and a hostile oral environment when selecting restorative materials. Radiation-induced changes in enamel and dentine may compromise bonding of adhesive materials. Consequently, glass ionomer cements have proved to be a better alternative to composite resins in irradiated patients. Counseling of patients before and after radiotherapy can be done to make them aware of the complications of radiotherapy and thus can help in preventing them. PMID:27390489

  6. Effect of yogurt and pH equivalent lemon juice on salivary flow rate in healthy volunteers – An experimental crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Murugesh, Jeevitha; Annigeri, Rajeshwari G.; Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Azzeghaiby, Saleh; Alshehri, Mohammad; Kujan, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Background Xerostomia is a common clinical problem, and different medications have been tried in its management. In the present study, routine dietary products are used to assess their effect on salivary flow. Aim To assess the efficacy of yogurt and lemon juice on increase in salivation and its comparison with that of unstimulated saliva. Materials and Methods A total of 40 volunteers (aged 19–48) were selected. The pH of yogurt was calculated, and equivalent pH lemon juice was prepared. First, normal resting saliva was collected as baseline followed by every 1 min for 5 min. Patients were given lemon juice or yogurt and then crossed over to the other group to assess the impact of the stimulants on salivary flow from 1 to 5 min. Results The results were analyzed statistically. Comparisons between baseline saliva secretion and that by yogurt and lemon juice (using the ANOVA test) showed that there was a significant increase after treatment at the end of the experiment for both yogurt and lemon juice. However, yogurt showed a significant increase in saliva secretion compared to baseline than lemon juice. Conclusions Our findings suggest that yogurt is a potential candidate for the treatment of dry mouth. PMID:26767120

  7. Targeting stem cells by radiation: From the biological angle to clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Vallard, Alexis; Espenel, Sophie; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Diao, Peng; Xia, Yaoxiong; El Meddeb Hamrouni, Anis; Ben Mrad, Majed; Falk, Alexander Tuan; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Rancoule, Chloé; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a cornerstone of anticancer treatment. However in spite of technical evolutions, important rates of failure and of toxicity are still reported. Although numerous pre-clinical data have been published, we address the subject of radiotherapy-stem cells interaction from the clinical efficacy and toxicity perspective. On one side, cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently evidenced in most of solid tumor primary locations and are thought to drive radio-resistance phenomena. It is particularly suggested in glioblastoma, where CSCs were showed to be housed in the subventricular zone (SVZ). In recent retrospective studies, the radiation dose to SVZ was identified as an independent factor significantly influencing overall survival. On the other side, healthy tissue stem cells radio-destruction has been recently suggested to cause two of the most quality of life-impacting side effects of radiotherapy, namely memory disorders after brain radiotherapy, and xerostomia after head and neck radiotherapy. Recent publications studying the impact of a radiation dose decrease on healthy brain and salivary stem cells niches suggested significantly reduced long term toxicities. Stem cells comprehension should be a high priority for radiation oncologists, as this particular cell population seems able to widely modulate the efficacy/toxicity ratio of radiotherapy in real life patients. PMID:27621758

  8. The stomatognathic system in the elderly. Useful information for the medical practitioner.

    PubMed

    Kossioni, Anastassia E; Dontas, Anastasios S

    2007-01-01

    Aging per se has a small effect on oral tissues and functions, and most changes are secondary to extrinsic factors. The most common oral diseases in the elderly are increased tooth loss due to periodontal disease and dental caries, and oral precancer/cancer. There are many general, medical and socioeconomic factors related to dental disease (ie, disease, medications, cost, educational background, social class). Retaining less than 20 teeth is related to chewing difficulties. Tooth loss and the associated reduced masticatory performance lead to a diet poor in fibers, rich in saturated fat and cholesterols, related to cardiovascular disease, stroke, and gastrointestinal cancer. The presence of occlusal tooth contacts is also important for swallowing. Xerostomia is common in the elderly, causing pain and discomfort, and is usually related to disease and medication. Oral health parameters (ie, periodontal disease, tooth loss, poor oral hygiene) have also been related to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, bacterial pneumonia, and increased mortality, but the results are not yet conclusive, because of the many confounding factors. Oral health affects quality of life of the elderly, because of its impact on eating, comfort, appearance and socializing. On the other hand, impaired general condition deteriorates oral condition. It is therefore important for the medical practitioner to exchange information and cooperate with a dentist in order to improve patient care. PMID:18225459

  9. Radiation-Induced Microvascular Injury as a Mechanism of Salivary Gland Hypofunction and Potential Target for Radioprotectors.

    PubMed

    Mizrachi, Aviram; Cotrim, Ana P; Katabi, Nora; Mitchell, James B; Verheij, Marcel; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    Radiation therapy is commonly used to treat patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). One of the major side effects of radiotherapy is injury to the salivary glands (SG), which is thought to be mediated by microvascular dysfunction leading to permanent xerostomia. The goal of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of radiation-induced microvasculature damage and its impact on SG function. We measured bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) apoptosis and ceramide production in response to 5 Gy irradiation, either alone or with reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers. We then investigated the effect of a single 15 Gy radiation dose on murine SG function. BAECs exposed to 5 Gy underwent apoptosis with increased ceramide production, both prevented by ROS scavengers. Among the 15 Gy irradiated mice, there was considerable weight loss, alopecia and SG hypofunction manifested by reduced saliva production and lower lysozyme levels. All of these effects, except for the lysozyme levels, were prevented by pretreatment with ROS scavengers. Microvessel density was significantly lower in the SG of irradiated mice compared to the control group, and this effect was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with Tempol. This study demonstrates that radiation-induced SG hypofunction is to a large extent mediated by microvascular dysfunction involving ceramide and ROS generation. These findings strongly suggest that ROS scavengers may serve as potential radioprotectors of SG function in patients undergoing radiotherapy for HNSCC. PMID:27459704

  10. Oral carcinoma after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation – a new classification based on a literature review over 30 years

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Astrid LD; Grätz, Klaus W

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have a higher risk of developing secondary solid tumors, in particular squamous cell carcinoma, because of several risk factors, including full-body irradiation (TBI), chemotherapy, and chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD). Based on the review presented here, a classification of oral changes is suggested in order to provide a tool to detect high-risk patients. Methods and Results The literature over the last 30 years was reviewed for development of malignoma of the oral cavity after HSCT. Overall, 64 cases were found. In 16 out of 30 cases, the tongue was the primary location, followed by the salivary gland (10 out of 30); 56.4% appeared in a latency time of 5 to 9 years after HSCT. In 76.6%, GVHD was noticed before the occurrence of oral malignancy. Premalignant changes of the oral mucosa were mucositis, xerostomia, and lichenoid changes, developing into erosive form. Conclusion All physicians involved in the treatment of post-HSCT patients should be aware of the increased risk, even after 5 years from the development of oral malignancy, in particular when oral graft versus host changes are visible. In order to develop evidence based management, screening and offer adequate therapy as early as possible in this patient group, multicenter studies, involving oncologists and head and neck surgeons, should be established. PMID:19624855

  11. Long-term oral complications of allogeneic haematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Hull, K M; Kerridge, I; Schifter, M

    2012-02-01

    This study assessed the incidence of long-term oral complications in 88 survivors of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Patients examined were between 6 months and 6 years post-HCT and aged from 19 to 65 years. Subjects were investigated for both the subjective and objective features of long-term adverse oral effects of HCT. The most common oral symptoms reported were xerostomia (44%, n=39) and reduction in taste (20%, n=18). Only a minority of patients (15%) reported that oral disease had a significant adverse impact upon their quality of life. The majority of patients (53%) had clinical markers of oral chronic GVHD (cGVHD). The most frequently identified feature was salivary hypofunction, with 34% of subjects demonstrating a reduction in stimulated saliva. Oral mucosal changes consistent with cGVHD affected 21% of subjects. Oral cGVHD commonly occurs after allogeneic HCT, often coexists with cutaneous, hepatic or ocular cGVHD and may lead to debilitating symptoms. Transplant type and pre-existing acute GVHD are the major risk factors for oral cGVHD. The identification of risk factors specific for oral cGVHD may allow clinicians some foresight into identifying patients at high risk of developing oral cGVHD and encourage attention to education, regular oral surveillance and rigorous preventative oral health strategies both pre- and post-transplant. PMID:21441960

  12. Combined treatment in carcinoma of the nasopharynx

    SciTech Connect

    Souhami, L.; Rabinowits, M.

    1988-08-01

    From October 1982 to August 1984, 30 previously untreated patients with biopsy-proven carcinoma of the nasopharynx, stage III (26.5%) and stage IV (73.5%), received combined radiotherapy (6,000 to 7,000 cGy over a period of 7 to 7.5 weeks) and chemotherapy (mitomycin-C 10 mg/M2, IV; 5-fluorouracil 750 mg/M2, IV; and methotrexate 30 mg/M2, IV) concomitantly. There were 20 males and 10 females, with a median age of 40 years. Minimal follow-up duration was 24 months. Actuarial overall survival rate at 48 months was 49%. Complete local response was achieved in 75% of the patients, with 31% of the cases failing distantly. The complication rate was high and included severe mucositis, xerostomia, and septicemia (fatal in two cases). Despite high local disease control, survival rate did not increase. A randomized trial is urgently needed to establish whether or not combined treatment is of value in advanced carcinoma of the nasopharynx.

  13. Saliva between normal and pathological. Important factors in determining systemic and oral health.

    PubMed

    Iorgulescu, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    There is a tendency in current medical research to explore the importance and symptomatology of saliva. The question to which increasingly more researchers from the medico-legal, systemic and dental fields tried to answer and bring together arguments for a greater emphasis is referring to the role of saliva in the health of the patient. Up until our time, people have looked at the importance of saliva from another perspective: saliva helped in pasting envelopes or stamps, or mostly in reported cases of public speakers faced with the impossibility of having a coherent speech due to sensations of dry mouth. This 'dry mouth' condition, named xerostomia in medical terms, has been used since antiquity as a test in detecting lies, knowing since then that the inhibition of emotional salivary glands, the feeling of 'dry mouth' is caused by anxiety, thus being a potential incrimination. Although hundreds of publications have insisted on the etiology and complications of the salivary gland hypofunction, only a few health professionals used to harvest saliva tests. As in the case of urine and blood, saliva quality and quantity are affected by a multitude of medical conditions and treatments, as well as the patient's psychological state. A review of the formation, function and dysfunction of salivary glands may convey the significant role played by saliva in health and disease, especially in detection and recognition of salivary gland hypofunction, systemic disease, and the psychological states, and thus prevent complications caused by these conditions. PMID:20112475

  14. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pakfetrat, Atessa; Falaki, Farnaz; Delavarian, Zahra; Dalirsani, Zohreh; Sanatkhani, Majid; Zabihi Marani, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center. Materials and Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration. Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%). The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+. Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia. PMID:25745611

  15. Weight loss in patients receiving radical radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C A; Keane, T J; Prudo, S M

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-one patients receiving radiation therapy for localized cancer of the head and neck areas were systematically assessed before, during, and after treatment. The pathogenesis of weight loss and its association with treatment morbidity and other determinants were sought. The serial data collected consisted of a food frequency questionnaire based on Canada's Food Guide, anthropometric measurements, 10 Linear Analogue Self Assessment questions on morbidity, and biochemical and hematological indices. Twenty of 31 patients (68%) lost over 5% of their presenting weight within one month after completing treatment. The mean weight loss was 10% and the range of weight loss in this group was 5.4 to 18.9%. Pretreatment dietary habits, serum albumin, absolute lymphocyte count, serum creatinine, creatinine height index, and anthropometric measurements did not predict for weight loss. However, weight loss can be predicted on the basis of field size and site irradiated. Treatment-related morbidity involving dysguesia, xerostomia, dysphagia of solids, and mouth pain was greater and of longer duration in patients with weight loss. The sequence of development of these symptoms during treatment and their duration provide a rational basis for the timing and methods of nutritional intervention in this patient population. PMID:6891412

  16. Effect of Long-term Smoking on Whole-mouth Salivary Flow Rate and Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Maryam; Kakoie, Shahla; Niliye Brojeni, Fateme; Pourdamghan, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Change in the resting whole-mouth salivary flow rate (SFR) plays a significant role in patho-genesis of various oral conditions. Factors such as smoking may affect SFR as well as the oral and dental health. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of smoking on SFR, and oral and dental health. Materials and methods One-hundred smokers and 100 non-tobacco users were selected as case and control groups, respectively. A questionnaire was used to collect the demographic data and smoking habits. A previously used questionnaire about dry mouth was also employed. Then, after a careful oral examination, subjects’ whole saliva was collected in the resting condition. Data was analyzed by chi-square test using SPSS 15. Results The mean (±SD) salivary flow rate were 0.38 (± 0.13) ml/min in smokers and 0.56 (± 0.16) ml/min in non-smokers. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.00001). Also, 39% of smokers and 12% of non-smokers reported experiencing at least one xerostomia symptom, with statistically significant difference between groups (p=0.0001). Oral lesions including cervical caries, gingivitis, tooth mobility, calculus and halitosis were significantly higher in smokers. Conclusion Our findings indicated that long-term smoking would significantly reduce SFR and increase oral and dental disorders associated with dry mouth, especially cervical caries, gingivitis, tooth mobility, calculus, and halitosis. PMID:23346336

  17. Polaprezinc prevents oral mucositis in patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Ryo; Suzuki, Akio; Ishihara, Masashi; Nakamura, Nobuhiko; Kitagawa, Junichi; Kanemura, Nobuhiro; Kasahara, Senji; Kitaichi, Kiyoyuki; Hara, Takeshi; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    We have previously reported that polaprezinc in sodium alginate suspension (P-AG) inhibited the incidence of oral mucositis induced by radiochemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. The present study was designed to investigate whether P-AG prevents oral mucositis in all patients (36 patients) with hematological malignancy receiving high-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). P-AG dramatically reduced the incidence of moderate-to-severe oral mucositis as compared to the control group treated with azulene gargle (20% versus 82% for grade ≥ 2, p<0.01; 0% versus 45% for grade ≥ 3, p<0.01). Pain associated with oral mucositis was also significantly (p=0.004) relieved by P-AG, resulting in a reduction in the use of analgesic agents (28% versus 73%, p=0.025). The incidence of xerostomia and taste disturbance tended to be lowered but not significantly by P-AG. On the other hand, P-AG had no influence on the incidence of other adverse events, tumor remission rate or the survival rate. Therefore, P-AG was found to be highly effective in preventing oral mucositis induced not only by radiochemotherapy for head and neck cancer but also by high-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy followed by HSCT. PMID:25503160

  18. Multidisciplinary Management of Laryngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, William M. Mancuso, Anthony A.; Hinerman, Russell W.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Werning, John W.; Amdur, Robert J.; Villaret, Douglas B.

    2007-10-01

    The management of head and neck cancer has evolved into a multidisciplinary approach in which patients are evaluated before treatment and decisions depend on prospective multi-institutional trials, as well as retrospective outcome studies. The choice of one or more modalities to use in a given case varies with the tumor site and extent, as exemplified in the treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The goals of treatment include cure, laryngeal voice preservation, voice quality, optimal swallowing, and minimal xerostomia. Treatment options include transoral laser excision, radiotherapy (both definitive and postoperative), open partial laryngectomy, total laryngectomy, and neck dissection. The likelihood of local control and preservation of laryngeal function is related to tumor volume. Patients who have a relatively high risk of local recurrence undergo follow-up computed tomography scans every 3-4 months for the first 2 years after radiotherapy. Patients with suspicious findings on computed tomography might benefit from fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to differentiate post-radiotherapy changes from tumor.

  19. Black hairy tongue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Tan, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Black hairy tongue (BHT) is a benign medical condition characterized by elongated filiform lingual papillae with typical carpet-like appearance of the dorsum of the tongue. Its prevalence varies geographically, typically ranging from 0.6% to 11.3%. Known predisposing factors include smoking, excessive coffee/black tea consumption, poor oral hygiene, trigeminal neuralgia, general debilitation, xerostomia, and medication use. Clinical presentation varies but is typically asymptomatic, although aesthetic concerns are common. Differential diagnosis includes pseudo-BHT, acanthosis nigricans, oral hairy leukoplakia, pigmented fungiform papillae of the tongue, and congenital melanocytic/melanotic nevi/macules. Clinical diagnosis relies on visual observation, detailed history taking, and occasionally microscopic evaluation. Treatment involves identification and discontinuation of the offending agent, modifications of chronic predisposing factors, patient’s re-assurance to the benign nature of the condition, and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene with gentle debridement to promote desquamation. Complications of BHT (burning mouth syndrome, halitosis, nausea, gagging, dysgeusia) typically respond to therapy. Prognosis is excellent with treatment of underlying medical conditions. BHT remains an important medical condition which may result in additional burden on the patient and health care system and requires appropriate prevention, recognition and treatment. PMID:25152586

  20. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Evaluate Major Salivary Gland Function Before and After Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet Keyzer, Frederik de; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Stroobants, Sigrid; Hermans, Robert; Nuyts, Sandra

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI as a noninvasive tool to investigate major salivary gland function before and after radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: DW-MRI was performed in 8 HNC patients before and after parotid-sparing RT (mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland <26 Gy). A DW sequence was performed once at rest and then repeated continuously during salivary stimulation. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for both parotid and submandibular glands were calculated. Findings were compared with salivary gland scintigraphy. Results: Before RT, the mean ADC value at rest was significantly lower in the parotid than in the submandibular glands. During the first 5 min of stimulation, the ADC value of the salivary glands showed a decrease, followed by a steady increase until a peak ADC, significantly higher than the baseline value, was reached after a median of 17 min. The baseline ADC value at rest was significantly higher after RT than before RT in the nonspared salivary glands but not in the spared parotid glands. In the contralateral parotid glands, the same response was seen as before RT. This pattern was completely lost in the nonspared glands. These results corresponded with remaining or loss of salivary function, respectively, as confirmed by salivary gland scintigraphy. Conclusions: Diffusion-weighted-MRI allows noninvasive evaluation of functional changes in the major salivary glands after RT and is a promising tool for investigating radiation-induced xerostomia.

  1. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells migrate to healthy and damaged salivary glands following stem cell infusion.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Silke; Huss, Ralf; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Vogel, Breda; Brandau, Sven; Lang, Stephan; Rotter, Nicole

    2014-09-01

    Xerostomia is a severe side effect of radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients. To date, no satisfactory treatment option has been established. Because mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified as a potential treatment modality, we aimed to evaluate stem cell distribution following intravenous and intraglandular injections using a surgical model of salivary gland damage and to analyse the effects of MSC injections on the recruitment of immune cells. The submandibular gland ducts of rats were surgically ligated. Syngeneic adult MSCs were isolated, immortalised by simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen and characterized by flow cytometry. MSCs were injected intravenously and intraglandularly. After 1, 3 and 7 days, the organs of interest were analysed for stem cell recruitment. Inflammation was analysed by immunohistochemical staining. We were able to demonstrate that, after intravenous injection, MSCs were recruited to normal and damaged submandibular glands on days 1, 3 and 7. Unexpectedly, stem cells were recruited to ligated and non-ligated glands in a comparable manner. After intraglandular injection of MSCs into ligated glands, the presence of MSCs, leucocytes and macrophages was enhanced, compared to intravenous injection of stem cells. Our data suggest that injected MSCs were retained within the inflamed glands, could become activated and subsequently recruited leucocytes to the sites of tissue damage. PMID:24810808

  2. Risk factors for dental caries in children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Braúna, Ana Paula Vasques Sales; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães de; Resende, Vera Lúcia Silva; Castilho, Lia Silva de

    2016-06-14

    The aim of the present study was to investigate risk factors for dental caries in children with developmental disabilities who were treated at a clinical reference service for patients with special needs in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. This is a retrospective cohort study that evaluated 401 dental charts of individuals without dental caries or restorations in their first dental appointment. The dependent variable was the time of occurrence of new dental caries or restorations and was measured in months. Gender, age, International Code of Diseases (ICD), mother´s education, sugar consumption, use of fluoride toothpaste, oral hygiene, mouth breathing, reports of xerostomia, gingival status, use of psychotropic or asthma drugs, and history of asthma were covariates. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the raw and adjusted hazard ratios and their respective 95% confidence intervals. The average time that individuals remained free of dental caries/restoration was equal to 107.46 months (95%CI 95.41 to 119.51), with a median of caries-free children up to 94 months. For each point increase in the scale of sucrose consumption, the increase in caries risk was 1.07 (95%CI 1.01 to 1.15). Sucrose consumption was the only risk factor for dental caries found in this group of individuals with developmental disabilities. PMID:27305514

  3. Oral and nutritional status in frail elderly.

    PubMed

    Soini, Helena; Routasalo, Pirkko; Lauri, Sirkka; Ainamo, Anja

    2003-01-01

    This article describes associations between oral health and nutritional status among chronically ill older adults who were living at home and receiving regular professional home care services. A structured questionnaire, oral examination, and Mini-Nutritional Assessment were completed for 51 subjects (mean age 83.7 years). Two-thirds of the sample were edentulous, and one-third had between 2 and 23 teeth (mean 10.59, SD +/- 6.92). Sixty percent of subjects complained of xerostomia, while dentists found only 48% to have clinical signs of dry mouth. More than half of the subjects had stimulated saliva rates of < 0.8 ml/min. Stimulated saliva secretion rates were lower for persons with no functional natural dentition or prostheses (p = 0.012). Subjects assessed their dentures to be more functional than did the dentist (Kappa 0.338). No one was considered malnourished. 47% were at risk of malnutrition, and 52% were well nourished. The dentist's estimation of dry mouth and eating problems were significantly associated to lower MNA scores (p = 0.049 and p = 0.015, respectively). Subjects with a natural functioning dentition had higher BMI scores (p = 0.0485). PMID:15085957

  4. The relationship between oral health and nutrition in older people.

    PubMed

    Walls, A W G; Steele, J G

    2004-12-01

    The oral health of older people is changing with reducing numbers of people relying on complete dentures for function, and retaining some natural teeth. Despite this there are substantial numbers of older people whose ability to chew foods is compromised by their oral health status, either because they have few or no natural teeth. This alteration results in individuals selecting a diet that they can chew in comfort. Such diets are low in fruits and vegetables intake with associated reduction in both non-starch polysaccharide and micronutrient intakes. There is also a trend for reduced dietary intake overall. Salivary flow and function may have an impact in relation to the ability to chew and swallow. Whilst there are few differences in salivary function in fit healthy unmedicated subjects, disease resulting in reduced salivary flow and particularly polypharmacy, with xerostomia as a side effect, are likely to have a role in older people. This paper explores the relationships between oral health status and food's choice and discusses the potential consequences for the individual of such dietary change. PMID:15563930

  5. Oral manifestations of Systemic Sclerosis and Correlation with anti-Topoisomerase I Antibodies (SCL-70)

    PubMed Central

    Bajraktari, Ismet H.; Kryeziu, Avni; Sherifi, Fadil; Bajraktari, Halit; Lahu, Ali; Bajraktari, Genc

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) is a chronic autoimmune illness. Clinical oral manifestations in Scleroderma are very frequent. Aim: To explore the oral manifestations, frequent and rare, to investigate whether there are differences between gender and the observed correlation of changes in relation to Antibodies Anti-Topoisomerase I. Material and methods: in the study were included 75 patients (65 females and 10 males), their mean age was 45.2±10, duration of illness was around 5.1±12 years diagnosed according to the ACR criteria and treated in the period 2010-2013. Results: 98.7% of our patients were ANA positive, whereas 49.3% of them were Anti SCL-70 positive. Patients in 91% of cases had one or more oral manifestations of disease. The most frequent oral manifestations are: small mouth (n = 39), the lingua short frenulum (n = 21), Xerostomia (n = 24) and paradontopathia (n = 16), while more rare are: Telangiectasia (n = 14), decreased interincisal distance (n = 9), missing teeth (n = 9), absorption of dental alveoli (n = 5) and Neuralgia n. trigeminus (n = 3). Oral symptoms have been frequent in patients with Scleroderma, SCL -70 positive but not statistically significant difference. Conclusions: Oral changes have high frequency in patients with Scleroderma and these changes provide high discomfort of the mouth and lower quality of life. Oral health care to patients with Scleroderma is very important and it affects a lot in reducing the level of disease and increase the quality of life. PMID:26261381

  6. Water sorption properties of HM-pectin and liposomes intended to alleviate dry mouth.

    PubMed

    Adamczak, Małgorzata I; Martinsen, Ørjan G; Smistad, Gro; Hiorth, Marianne

    2016-06-15

    Pharmaceutical formulations intended for treatment of xerostomia (dry mouth) should be able to keep the oral mucosa hydrated for a prolonged period of time. The products already existing on the market contain water-soluble polymers, however their ability to moisturize the oral mucosa for a longer period of time seems limited. In this paper the sorption properties of water vapor of high-methoxylated pectin (HM-pectin, a hydrophilic biopolymer) and phosphatidylcholine-based (Soya-PC) liposomes have been studied and compared using a gravimetric method. The kinetics of water desorption and sorption have been recorded over the relative humidity range RH=95-0-95%, at 35°C. The obtained isotherms were found to be well described by the n-layer Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) adsorption model. The water isotherms on HM-pectin were Type II (IUPAC), while water isotherms on liposomes were Type III. The maximum water sorption capacity of liposomes (1.2mg water per mg of adsorbent at 95% RH) was found to be twice as high as for pectin. Due to the slower water release from the liposomes, as well as their high water sorption capacity, they seem to have great potential in relieving the symptoms of dry mouth syndrome. PMID:27109048

  7. Oropharyngeal reconstruction with a pedicled submandibular gland flap.

    PubMed

    Mashrah, Mubarak A; Zhou, Shang-Hui; Abdelrehem, Ahmed; Ma, Chunyue; Xu, Liqun; He, Yue; Zhang, Chen-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Locoregional flaps are widely used for reconstruction of small and medium defects in the oral cavity. The submandibular gland flap is a pedicled flap, which derives its blood supply from the facial artery, based on the submandibular gland. We describe the use of the flap in 20 patients who required oropharyngeal reconstruction with a pedicled submandibular gland flap after resection of a tumour between July 2012 and October 2014. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma were excluded. All flaps were pedicled on the facial vessels (inferiorly in 17 patients and superiorly in 3). The indications were: reconstruction of intraoral mucosal defects (n=13), filling the parapharyngeal dead space (n=6), and obliteration of the mastoid (n=1). All the flaps atrophied, but with no clinical effect. One patient developed partial loss of the flap, and one early leakage. There were no cases of xerostomia, and no signs of recurrence during the postoperative follow-up period of 3-26 months. The flap is useful, as it is simple and reliable for reconstruction of small to medium oropharyngeal defects in carefully selected cases, and gives good cosmetic and functional results. PMID:26388070

  8. Aquaporin gene therapy corrects Sjögren's syndrome phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhennan; Yin, Hongen; Cabrera-Pérez, Javier; Guimaro, Maria C; Afione, Sandra; Michael, Drew G; Glenton, Patricia; Patel, Ankur; Swaim, William D; Zheng, Changyu; Nguyen, Cuong Q; Nyberg, Fred; Chiorini, John A

    2016-05-17

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a chronic autoimmune disease that is estimated to affect 35 million people worldwide. Currently, no effective treatments exist for Sjögren's syndrome, and there is a limited understanding of the physiological mechanisms associated with xerostomia and hyposalivation. The present work revealed that aquaporin 5 expression, a water channel critical for salivary gland fluid secretion, is regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 6. Increased expression of this cytokine is strongly associated with the most common symptom of primary Sjögren's syndrome, the loss of salivary gland function. This finding led us to develop a therapy in the treatment of Sjögren's syndrome by increasing the water permeability of the gland to restore saliva flow. Our study demonstrates that the targeted increase of gland permeability not only resulted in the restoration of secretory gland function but also resolved the hallmark salivary gland inflammation and systemic inflammation associated with disease. Secretory function also increased in the lacrimal gland, suggesting this local therapy could treat the systemic symptoms associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:27140635

  9. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  10. Salivary Secretory Disorders, Inducing Drugs, and Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Rius, Jaume; Brunet-Llobet, Lluís; Lahor-Soler, Eduard; Farré, Magí

    2015-01-01

    Background: Salivary secretory disorders can be the result of a wide range of factors. Their prevalence and negative effects on the patient's quality of life oblige the clinician to confront the issue. Aim: To review the salivary secretory disorders, inducing drugs and their clinical management. Methods: In this article, a literature search of these dysfunctions was conducted with the assistance of a research librarian in the MEDLINE/PubMed Database. Results: Xerostomia, or dry mouth syndrome, can be caused by medication, systemic diseases such as Sjögren's Syndrome, glandular pathologies, and radiotherapy of the head and neck. Treatment of dry mouth is aimed at both minimizing its symptoms and preventing oral complications with the employment of sialogogues and topical acting substances. Sialorrhea and drooling, are mainly due to medication or neurological systemic disease. There are various therapeutic, pharmacologic, and surgical alternatives for its management. The pharmacology of most of the substances employed for the treatment of salivary disorders is well-known. Nevertheless, in some cases a significant improvement in salivary function has not been observed after their administration. Conclusion: At present, there are numerous frequently prescribed drugs whose unwanted effects include some kind of salivary disorder. In addition, the differing pathologic mechanisms, and the great variety of existing treatments hinder the clinical management of these patients. The authors have designed an algorithm to facilitate the decision making process when physicians, oral surgeons, or dentists face these salivary dysfunctions. PMID:26516310

  11. Oral Health of Drug Abusers: A Review of Health Effects and Care

    PubMed Central

    SHEKARCHIZADEH, Hajar; KHAMI, Mohammad R.; MOHEBBI, Simin Z.; EKHTIARI, Hamed; VIRTANEN, Jorma I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Oral health problems, among the most prevalent comorbidities related to addiction, require more attention by both clinicians and policy-makers. Our aims were to review oral complications associated with drugs, oral health care in addiction rehabilitation, health services available, and barriers against oral health promotion among addicts. Drug abuse is associated with serious oral health problems including generalized dental caries, periodontal diseases, mucosal dysplasia, xerostomia, bruxism, tooth wear, and tooth loss. Oral health care has positive effects in recovery from drug abuse: patients’ need for pain control, destigmatization, and HIV transmission. Health care systems worldwide deliver services for addicts, but most lack oral health care programs. Barriers against oral health promotion among addicts include difficulty in accessing addicts as a target population, lack of appropriate settings and of valid assessment protocols for conducting oral health studies, and poor collaboration between dental and general health care sectors serving addicts. These interfere with an accurate picture of the situation. Moreover, lack of appropriate policies to improve access to dental services, lack of comprehensive knowledge of and interest among dental professionals in treating addicts, and low demand for non-emergency dental care affect provision of effective interventions. Management of drug addiction as a multi-organ disease requires a multidisciplinary approach. Health care programs usually lack oral health care elements. Published evidence on oral complications related to addiction emphasizes that regardless of these barriers, oral health care at various levels including education, prevention, and treatment should be integrated into general care services for addicts. PMID:26060654

  12. FACTORS RELATED TO ORAL CANDIDIASIS IN ELDERLY USERS AND NON-USERS OF REMOVABLE DENTAL PROSTHESES

    PubMed Central

    BIANCHI, Cyra Maria Pires de Carvalho; BIANCHI, Hélcio Aparecido; TADANO, Tomoko; de PAULA, Claudete Rodrigues; HOFFMANN-SANTOS, Hugo Dias; LEITE, Diniz Pereira; HAHN, Rosane Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the association between oral candidiasis in elderly users and nonusers of prosthesis and its predisposing factors. To this end, we performed a cross-sectional study where saliva samples from 48 patients were collected they used prosthesis and 43 patients (control group) who did not use. Among the 91 patients, Candida spp were isolated in 40 (83.3%) who used prosthesis and in 23 (53.5%) in the control group. A statistically significant association was determined between the two groups, the isolation of yeasts and dental prosthesis (p < 0.05, OR = 4.3). The most common etiological agent was Candida albicans (37 isolates), with 23 (62.2%) in the denture group and 14 (37.8%) (control group). Among patients who presented clinical manifestations of oral candidiasis (n = 24), 83.3% (n = 20) belonged to the group that wore dentures, while only 16.7% (n = 4) belonged to the control group. Elderly patients with diabetes had 4.4 times higher estimated risk of developing oral candidiasis when compared with individuals without this condition. There was no statistically significant association between being user prostheses and have diabetes with the onset of candidiasis. No statistically significant association was determined between xerostomia, use of prosthesis and oral candidiasis. The use of prosthetics and poor oral hygiene in elderly patients predisposes to the development of oral candidiasis. PMID:27007560

  13. Oral mucosal manifestations in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and dry mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Olewicz-Gawlik, Anna; Polańska, Adriana; Nowak-Gabryel, Michalina; Kocięcki, Jarosław; Witmanowski, Henryk; Sokalski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the most important symptoms of Sjögren syndrome is xerostomia. The oral cavity deprived of saliva and its natural lubricative, protective and antibacterial properties is prone to a number of unfavourable consequences. Aim To present the most important lesions on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and in dry mouth syndrome. Material and methods The study group comprised 55 patients including 52 women and 3 men aged 20–72 years (average: 28.25 years). Results Basing on the accepted criteria, primary Sjögren syndrome was diagnosed in 22 (40%) patients, secondary Sjögren syndrome in 18 (32.7%) patients, and dry mouth syndrome in 15 (27.27%) patients. The physical examination and the examination of the mouth were performed and history was elicited from every patient. Conclusions The most common pathologies appearing on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome are angular cheilitis, cheilitis, increased lip dryness as well as non-specific ulcerations, aphthae and aphthoid conditions. PMID:26985175

  14. Outcomes of Postoperative Simultaneous Modulated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Sung Ho; Jung, Yuh-Seog; Ryu, Jun Sun; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment efficacy and toxicity of postoperative simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) for patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Between February 2003 and September 2008, 51 patients with histologically confirmed HNSCC received postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (N = 33) or helical tomotherapy (N = 18) using SMART after curative surgical resection. The sites included were the oral cavity (OC), oropharynx (OP), larynx, and hypopharynx in 23, 20, 5, and 3 patients, respectively. Results: The median follow-up duration of all patients and surviving patients were 32 (range, 5-78 months) and 39 months (range, 9-77 months), respectively. The 3-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, disease-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) in all patients were 71%, 77%, 75%, 85%, and 82%, respectively. Although no significant difference in 3-year LRRFS were found between OC (82%) and OP (82%) carcinomas, the 3-year DMFS was worse in cases of OC (66%) carcinoma compared with OP carcinoma (95%; p = 0.0414). Acute Grade 3 dermatitis, mucositis, and esophagitis occurred in 10%, 10%, and 2% of patients, respectively. At the last follow-up, Grade 3 xerostomia was documented in 10% of the patients. Young age ({<=}40 years) (p < 0.001) and OC carcinoma primary (p = 0.0142) were poor risk factors on univariate analysis for DMFS. Conclusion: Postoperative SMART was observed to be effective and safe in patients with HNSCC.

  15. Burning mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Tan, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a debilitating medical condition affecting nearly 1.3 million of Americans. Its common features include a burning painful sensation in the mouth, often associated with dysgeusia and xerostomia, despite normal salivation. Classically, symptoms are better in the morning, worsen during the day and typically subside at night. Its etiology is largely multifactorial, and associated medical conditions may include gastrointestinal, urogenital, psychiatric, neurologic and metabolic disorders, as well as drug reactions. BMS has clear predisposition to peri-/post menopausal females. Its pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated and involves peripheral and central neuropathic pathways. Clinical diagnosis relies on careful history taking, physical examination and laboratory analysis. Treatment is often tedious and is aimed at correction of underlying medical conditions, supportive therapy, and behavioral feedback. Drug therapy with alpha lipoic acid, clonazepam, capsaicin, and antidepressants may provide symptom relief. Psychotherapy may be helpful. Short term follow up data is promising, however, long term prognosis with treatment is lacking. BMS remains an important medical condition which often places a recognizable burden on the patient and health care system and requires appropriate recognition and treatment. PMID:23429751

  16. Label-Retaining Cells in the Adult Murine Salivary Glands Possess Characteristics of Adult Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chibly, Alejandro M.; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction. PMID:25238060

  17. Clinical Outcomes of Volume-Modulated Arc Therapy in 205 Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: An Analysis of Survival and Treatment Toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Tang, Ling-Long; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Qi, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Li-Zhi; Lin, Ai-Hua; Liu, Meng-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the clinical efficacy and treatment toxicity of volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Material and Methods 205 VMAT-treated NPC patients from our cancer center were prospectively entrolled. All patients received 68–70 Gy irradiation based on the planning target volume of the primary gross tumor volume. Acute and late toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. Results The median follow-up period was 37.3 months (range, 6.3–45.1 months). The 3-year estimated local failure–free survival, regional failure–free survival, locoregional failure–free survival, distant metastasis–free survival, disease–free survival and overall survival were 95.5%, 97.0%, 94.0%, 92.1%, 86.8% and 97.0%, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed primary gross tumor volume, N stage and EBV-DNA to be independent predictors of VMAT outcomes (P < 0.05). The most common acute and late side effects were grade 2–3 mucositis (78%) and xerostomia (83%, 61%, 34%, and 9% at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after VMAT), respectively. Conclusions VMAT for the primary treatment of NPC achieved very high locoregional control with a favorable toxicity profile. The time-saving benefit of VMAT will enable more patients to receive precision radiotherapy. PMID:26146828

  18. Partial irradiation of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, A; Ship, J A; Kim, H M; Ten Haken, R K

    2001-07-01

    Recent efforts to reduce xerostomia associated with irradiation (RT) of head and neck cancer include the use of conformal and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) to partly spare the major salivary glands, notably the parotid glands, from a high radiation dose while treating adequately all the targets at risk of disease. Knowledge of the dose-volume-response relationships in the salivary glands would determine treatment planning goals and facilitate optimization of the RT plans. Recent prospective studies of salivary flows following inhomogeneous irradiation of the parotid glands have utilized dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and various models to assess these relationships. These studies found that the mean dose to the gland is correlated with the reduction of the salivary output. This is consistent with a pure parallel architecture of the functional subunits (FSUs) of the salivary glands. The range of the mean doses, which have been found in these studies to cause significant salivary flow reduction is 26 to 39 Gy. PMID:11447580

  19. The effect of head and neck cancer treatment on whole salivary flow.

    PubMed

    Marunick, M T; Seyedsadr, M; Ahmad, K; Klein, B

    1991-10-01

    The effects of multimodality therapy for head and neck cancer on whole salivary flow were evaluated. Eighteen subjects with head and neck cancer were studied. Resting and stimulated whole salivary flow rates were recorded, pretreatment, after individual modality therapy, and posttreatment. Twenty-four subjects with no history of head and neck cancer matched for age, and sex distribution, served as controls. Primary site, stage, major salivary glands resected, radiation fields, and dose to major salivary glands are reported. The average salivary flow rates for 18 subjects following treatment was reduced 83% for resting and 86% for stimulated saliva from pretreatment levels. The null hypothesis that the overall resting and stimulated whole salivary flow rates are unaffected by treatment (surgery and radiation) of the head and neck cancer was rejected (P values at 0.05 level of significance). Stage and location of primary, total dose delivered to and volume of gland exposure are important factors when predicting xerostomia following multimodality therapy. PMID:1921403

  20. Treatment of primary Sjögren's syndrome with low-dose natural human interferon-alpha administered by the oral mucosal route: a phase II clinical trial. IFN Protocol Study Group.

    PubMed

    Ship, J A; Fox, P C; Michalek, J E; Cummins, M J; Richards, A B

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the safety and efficacy of four dosages of natural human interferon-alpha (nHuIFN-alpha) delivered over a 12-week period orally in lozenges (150 IU and 450 IU, once [QD] or three times [TID] daily) compared to placebo in subjects with primary Sjögren's syndrome. This randomized, double-blinded clinical trial demonstrated that nHuIFN-alpha at a dose of 150 IU administered TID by oral lozenge significantly improved stimulated whole saliva output compared to placebo after 12 weeks of treatment. The 150 IU TID dose also was suggestive of benefit for 5 of 7 subjective measures of oral and ocular comfort. IFN lozenges demonstrated a good safety profile, with no serious adverse events found in any treatment group. There were no significant differences between the placebo and the four doses of IFN for adverse events by total number, organ system, severity, dropouts, and number judged to be related to treatment. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that the use of 150 IU IFN lozenges TID for 12 weeks in subjects with primary Sjögren's syndrome improved salivary output and decreased complaints of xerostomia without causing significant adverse medical events. PMID:10476942

  1. A Bayesian mixture model relating dose to critical organs and functional complication in 3D conformal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy D; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Ten Haken, Randall K; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2005-10-01

    A goal of cancer radiation therapy is to deliver maximum dose to the target tumor while minimizing complications due to irradiation of critical organs. Technological advances in 3D conformal radiation therapy has allowed great strides in realizing this goal; however, complications may still arise. Critical organs may be adjacent to tumors or in the path of the radiation beam. Several mathematical models have been proposed that describe the relationship between dose and observed functional complication; however, only a few published studies have successfully fit these models to data using modern statistical methods which make efficient use of the data. One complication following radiation therapy of head and neck cancers is the patient's inability to produce saliva. Xerostomia (dry mouth) leads to high susceptibility to oral infection and dental caries and is, in general, unpleasant and an annoyance. We present a dose-damage-injury model that subsumes any of the various mathematical models relating dose to damage. The model is a nonlinear, longitudinal mixed effects model where the outcome (saliva flow rate) is modeled as a mixture of a Dirac measure at zero and a gamma distribution whose mean is a function of time and dose. Bayesian methods are used to estimate the relationship between dose delivered to the parotid glands and the observational outcome-saliva flow rate. A summary measure of the dose-damage relationship is modeled and assessed by a Bayesian chi(2) test for goodness-of-fit. PMID:15917377

  2. Aging and secretory reserve capacity of major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, E M; Ship, J A

    2003-10-01

    A loss of acinar cells occurs with aging, while salivary production remains age-stable in healthy adults. It is hypothesized that a secretory reserve exists to preserve function despite a loss of acinar cells in normal aging. The purpose of this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was to determine age-related differences in salivary response to an anti-sialogogue (glycopyrrolate). Thirty-six healthy subjects (18 young--20-38 yrs; 18 older--60-77 yrs) received 4.0 microg/kg i.v. glycopyrrolate. Parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva samples and xerostomia questionnaire responses were collected. Variables calculated for each subject were: times to initial and maximum suppression and xerostomic complaint; time to recovery; and durations of suppression and complaint. Salivary function was more adversely affected in older persons. There were no consistent age-associated questionnaire response differences. These findings suggest that salivary gland output is more adversely affected by an anti-sialogogue in healthy older vs. younger adults, supporting the secretory reserve hypothesis of salivary function. PMID:14514768

  3. Relief of radiation-induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Putwatana, Panwadee; Sanmanowong, Phichanee; Oonprasertpong, Ladawal; Junda, Tiraporn; Pitiporn, Supaporn; Narkwong, Ladawan

    2009-01-01

    This study was a prospective, randomized clinical trial carried out to explore the efficacy of payayor in the prevention and relief of radiation-induced oral mucositis compared with benzydamine. Sixty patients with head and neck cancer, who have started to receive radiotherapy and met predetermined criteria, were randomly assigned into each group to use assigned products 3 times a day from the first to the last day of radiation. The first group used glycerin payayor, a Thai prepared herbal product, by dripping it into the mouth. Another group rinsed their mouths with benzydamine hydrochloride. The World Health Organization Mucositis Grading System was used to assess oral status every week and 2 weeks after radiation. Comparison of time to the onset, pain, severity, xerostomia, postponement of treatment, satisfaction of the solution, and body weight between the 2 groups was performed by t test. The average time to the onset of oral mucositis in the payayor group was significantly later, and its severity and pain score were less than those of the benzydamine group throughout the study period. Significantly higher satisfaction with the solution and higher body weight at the end of the study were shown in the payayor group. Payayor seemed to be superior to benzydamine for preventing and relieving radiation-induced oral mucositis. PMID:19104205

  4. Targeting stem cells by radiation: From the biological angle to clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Vallard, Alexis; Espenel, Sophie; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Diao, Peng; Xia, Yaoxiong; El Meddeb Hamrouni, Anis; Ben Mrad, Majed; Falk, Alexander Tuan; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Rancoule, Chloé; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-08-26

    Radiotherapy is a cornerstone of anticancer treatment. However in spite of technical evolutions, important rates of failure and of toxicity are still reported. Although numerous pre-clinical data have been published, we address the subject of radiotherapy-stem cells interaction from the clinical efficacy and toxicity perspective. On one side, cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently evidenced in most of solid tumor primary locations and are thought to drive radio-resistance phenomena. It is particularly suggested in glioblastoma, where CSCs were showed to be housed in the subventricular zone (SVZ). In recent retrospective studies, the radiation dose to SVZ was identified as an independent factor significantly influencing overall survival. On the other side, healthy tissue stem cells radio-destruction has been recently suggested to cause two of the most quality of life-impacting side effects of radiotherapy, namely memory disorders after brain radiotherapy, and xerostomia after head and neck radiotherapy. Recent publications studying the impact of a radiation dose decrease on healthy brain and salivary stem cells niches suggested significantly reduced long term toxicities. Stem cells comprehension should be a high priority for radiation oncologists, as this particular cell population seems able to widely modulate the efficacy/toxicity ratio of radiotherapy in real life patients. PMID:27621758

  5. The efficacy of chlorhexidine gel in reduction of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species in patients treated with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.B.; McBride, B.C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Merilees, H.; Spinelli, J. )

    1991-02-01

    Xerostomia may develop in patients with cancer who receive radiotherapy that includes the salivary glands in the field. These patients are at high risk of rampant dental caries. Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species have been associated with dental caries. Quantitative counts of these organisms demonstrated high caries risk due to streptococci in 66% and due to lactobacilli in 100% of patients studied. Use of chlorhexidine rinse was shown to reduce S. mutans counts 1.1 logs and lactobacilli 1.1 logs. The use of chlorhexidine gel resulted in a reduction of S. mutans 1.2 logs and lactobacilli 2.2 logs. In the subjects using the rinse, caries risk due to streptococci was reduced to low levels in 44% and due to lactobacilli in only one subject, with reduction to moderate risk in one third and no change in risk in the remaining patients. The use of chlorhexidine gel was found to reduce the caries risk associated with streptococci to low levels in all patients, and the risk associated with lactobacilli to low and moderate risk in two thirds of patients.

  6. Complementary Strategies for the Management of Radiation Therapy Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Stubbe, Christine E.; Valero, Meighan

    2013-01-01

    Patients with cancer utilize complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for a variety of purposes, one of which is the reduction of side effects of conventional treatment. With a large number of their patients using CAM, it is important for advanced practitioners in oncology to have an understanding of these therapies to better guide their patients. Side effects of radiation therapy that may have dose-limiting poten­tial include diarrhea, mucositis, skin toxicity, and xerostomia. A com­mon side effect that is not necessarily dose-limiting but considerably troublesome to patients is cancer- and treatment-related fatigue. The CAM therapies that may alleviate some of the side effects of radiation therapy include probiotics, psyllium, exercise, melatonin, honey, acu­puncture, and calendula. Therapies that require more research or have been shown to be ineffective include aloe vera, glutamine, and deglyc­yrrhizinated licorice. This article provides an overview of these thera­pies as well as related research and analysis. PMID:25032003

  7. Effectiveness of low-dose doxycycline (LDD) on clinical symptoms of Sjögren's Syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Seitsalo, Hubertus; Niemelä, Raija K; Marinescu-Gava, Magdalena; Vuotila, Tuija; Tjäderhane, Leo; Salo, Tuula

    2007-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteolytic enzymes that may contribute to tissue destruction in Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Low-dose doxycycline (LDD) inhibits MMPs. We evaluated the efficacy of LDD for the subjective symptoms in primary SS patients. This was a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled cross-over study. 22 patients were randomly assigned to receive either 20 mg LDD or matching placebo twice a day for 10 weeks. The first medication period was followed by 10-week washout period, after which the patient received either LDD or placebo, depending on the first drug received, followed by the second washout period. Stimulated saliva flow rates and pH were measured before and after one and ten weeks of each medication and after washout periods. VAS scale was used to assess the effect of LDD and placebo on following six subjective symptoms: xerostomia; xerophtalmia; difficulty of swallowing; myalgia; arthralgia; and fatigue. The effect was evaluated for each medication and washout period separately. Results Overall, the effects of medications on subjective symptoms were minor. Wilcoxon test demonstrated increased fatigue with LDD during medication (p < 0.05). The differences may, however, reflect normal fluctuation of symptoms in SS patients. Conclusion LDD may not be useful in reducing the primary SS symptoms. PMID:18163919

  8. Effectiveness of acupuncture and related therapies for palliative care of cancer: overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinyin; Chung, Vincent C H; Hui, Edwin P; Ziea, Eric T C; Ng, Bacon F L; Ho, Robin S T; Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Wong, Samuel Y S; Wu, Justin C Y

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture and related therapies such as moxibustion and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are often used to manage cancer-related symptoms, but their effectiveness and safety are controversial. We conducted this overview to summarise the evidence on acupuncture for palliative care of cancer. Our systematic review synthesised the results from clinical trials of patients with any type of cancer. The methodological quality of the 23 systematic reviews in this overview, assessed using the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews Instrument, was found to be satisfactory. There is evidence for the therapeutic effects of acupuncture for the management of cancer-related fatigue, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and leucopenia in patients with cancer. There is conflicting evidence regarding the treatment of cancer-related pain, hot flashes and hiccups, and improving patients' quality of life. The available evidence is currently insufficient to support or refute the potential of acupuncture and related therapies in the management of xerostomia, dyspnea and lymphedema and in the improvement of psychological well-being. No serious adverse effects were reported in any study. Because acupuncture appears to be relatively safe, it could be considered as a complementary form of palliative care for cancer, especially for clinical problems for which conventional care options are limited. PMID:26608664

  9. Poor oral health, a potential new geriatric syndrome.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, Gert-Jan; de Baat, Cees; De Visschere, Luc; Schols, Jos

    2014-02-01

    This article presents a brief introduction to the medical aspects of ageing and age-related diseases, and to some geriatric syndromes, followed by a discussion on their impact on general and oral healthcare provision to community-dwelling older people. Recent investigations suggest that inflammation constitutes a biological foundation of ageing and the onset of age-related diseases. Multimorbidity and polypharmacy, together with alterations in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, make older people at risk of adverse medication reactions. A side effect of several medications is causing xerostomia and hyposalivation, and both the type and number of medications used are relevant. New options of general healthcare provision to community-dwelling older people are the use of mobility aids and assistive technology devices, domiciliary health care, respite care and telecare. Their oral health status may be jeopardised by frailty, disability, care dependency and limited access to professional oral health care. Recommendations for improvement are the following: better integrating oral health care into general health care, developing and implementing an oral healthcare guideline, providing customised oral hygiene care aids, domiciliary oral healthcare provision, visiting dental hygienists and/or nurses, oral hygiene telecare, easily and safely accessible dental offices, transforming dentistry into medical oral health care and upgrading dentists to oral physicians. In case oral healthcare providers do not take the responsibility of persuading society of the importance of adequate oral health, weakened oral health of community-dwelling older people will become a potential new geriatric syndrome. PMID:24446975

  10. Ethnomedicinal Plants Used by Traditional Healers to Treat Oral Health Problems in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Ashu Agbor, Michael; Naidoo, Sudeshni

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of the study was to determine the therapeutic methods used by traditional healers to treat oral diseases in Cameroon. Methods. A total of 200 traditional healers with a mean age of 50.4 ± 14.2 years from all the provinces of Cameroon were studied using questionnaires. Information elicited was the local names of the medicinal plants used for the management of oral problems, their routes of administration, and methods of usage. Identification of live or dried plants or photographs of sample of the plants was done by a taxonomist. Results. The majority of the participants were males urban dwellers aged 41–50 years, 112 (56.0%) practice as herbalists and 56 (28.0%) were trained on medications preservation, 77(56.6%) treat diseases inside or outside the mouth, and 9.0% reported being specialist in oral diseases treatment. Of the 52 plants identified, 48 are used in the management of toothache, sore throat, mouth sores, abscess, broken tooth and jaw, tooth sensitivity, mouth thrush, dental caries, gingivitis, sinusitis, tonsillitis, xerostomia, oral syphilis, oral cancer, TMJ pain, halitosis, and tooth bleaching and 4 plants are used for dental extraction. Roots, leaves, and bark were the parts of plants used and some minerals as adjuncts. Conclusion. The study provides comprehensive information on therapeutic methods employed by traditional healers for the treatment of oral diseases. PMID:26495020

  11. Clinical evaluation of the intraoral fluoride releasing system in radiation-induced xerostomic subjects. Part 2: Phase I study.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Mark S; Mellberg, James R; Keene, Harris J; Bouwsma, Otis J; Garden, Adam S; Sipos, Tibor; Fleming, Terence J

    2006-10-01

    Radiation-induced xerostomia can result in the rapid onset and progression of dental caries in head and neck cancer patients. Topically applied fluorides have been successfully used to inhibit the formation of dental caries in this population. However, because intensive daily self-application is required, compliance is an issue. The intraoral fluoride-releasing system (IFRS) containing a sodium fluoride core is a newly developed, sustained-release, passive drug delivery system that does not require patient involvement except for periodic replacement, thus reducing the effect of patient compliance on its effectiveness in dental caries prevention. Twenty-two head and neck cancer patients from U. T. M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, with radiation-induced xerostomia, were entered into a pilot study to contrast the daily home use of a 0.4% stannous fluoride-gel-containing tray (control group) to IFRS (study group) with respect to tolerability and adherence, and to obtain information on relative caries preventive efficacy. Participants were stratified on the basis of radiation exposure and randomly assigned to treatment with either IFRS or stannous fluoride gel. Patients in both groups were fitted with two IFRS retainers and also were instructed to use a 1100-ppm fluoride conventional sodium fluoride dentifrice twice daily. The study was conducted as a single-blinded, parallel-cell trial. Pre-existing carious lesions were restored prior to the beginning of the study. The efficacy variable was determined by the mean number of new or recurrent decayed surfaces. Patients were examined for caries 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks after initiation of treatment. Reports of adverse reactions were based on information volunteered by patients and that were elicited during interviews. At baseline, the resting and stimulated salivary flow rates (g/5min) were significantly greater in the control group than in the study group (p<0.05). Patients in the control group had received

  12. Salivary gland acinar cells regenerate functional glandular structures in modified hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Swati

    Xerostomia, a condition resulting from irradiation of the head and neck, affects over 40,000 cancer patients each year in the United States. Direct radiation damage of the acinar cells that secrete fluid and protein results in salivary gland hypofunction. Present medical management for xerostomia for patients treated for upper respiratory cancer is largely ineffective. Patients who have survived their terminal diagnosis are often left with a diminished quality of life and are unable to enjoy the simple pleasures of eating and drinking. This project aims to ultimately reduce human suffering by developing a functional implantable artificial salivary gland. The goal was to create an extracellular matrix (ECM) modified hyaluronic acid (HA) based hydrogel culture system that allows for the growth and differentiation of salivary acinar cells into functional acini-like structures capable of secreting large amounts of protein and fluid unidirectionally and to ultimately engineer a functional artificial salivary gland that can be implanted into an animal model. A tissue collection protocol was established and salivary gland tissue was obtained from patients undergoing head and neck surgery. The tissue specimen was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry to establish the phenotype of normal salivary gland cells including the native basement membranes. Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed normal glandular tissue structures including intercalated ducts, striated ducts and acini. alpha-Amylase and periodic acid schiff stain, used for structures with a high proportion of carbohydrate macromolecules, preferentially stained acinar cells in the tissue. Intercalated and striated duct structures were identified using cytokeratins 19 and 7 staining. Myoepithelial cells positive for cytokeratin 14 were found wrapped around the serous and mucous acini. Tight junction components including ZO-1 and E-cadherin were present between both ductal and acinar cells. Ductal and acinar

  13. Erratum to "Clinical evaluation of the intraoral fluoride releasing system in radiation-induced xerostomic subjects. Part 2: Phase I study".

    PubMed

    Chambers, Mark S; Fleming, Terence J; Toth, Béla B; Lemon, James C; Craven, Timothy E; Bouwsma, Otis J; Garden, Adam S; Espeland, Mark A; Keene, Harris J; Martin, Jack W; Sipos, Tibor

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced xerostomia can result in the rapid onset and progression of dental caries in head and neck cancer patients. Topically applied fluorides have been successfully used to inhibit the formation of dental caries in this population. However, because intensive daily self-application is required, compliance is an issue. The intraoral fluoride-releasing system (IFRS) containing a sodium fluoride core is a newly developed, sustained-release, passive drug delivery system that does not require patient involvement except for periodic replacement, thus reducing the effect of patient compliance on its effectiveness in dental caries prevention. Twenty-two head and neck cancer patients from U. T. M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, with radiation-induced xerostomia, were entered into a pilot study to contrast the daily home use of a 0.4% stannous fluoride-gel-containing tray (control group) to IFRS (study group) with respect to tolerability and adherence, and to obtain information on relative caries preventive efficacy. Participants were stratified on the basis of radiation exposure and randomly assigned to treatment with either IFRS or stannous fluoride gel. Patients in both groups were fitted with two IFRS retainers and also were instructed to use a 1100-ppm fluoride conventional sodium fluoride dentifrice twice daily. The study was conducted as a single-blinded, parallel-cell trial. Pre-existing carious lesions were restored prior to the beginning of the study. The efficacy variable was determined by the mean number of new or recurrent decayed surfaces. Patients were examined for caries 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks after initiation of treatment. Reports of adverse reactions were based on information volunteered by patients and that were elicited during interviews. At baseline, the resting and stimulated salivary flow rates (g/5min) were significantly greater in the control group than in the study group (p<0.05). Patients in the control group had received

  14. WE-E-BRE-09: Investigation of the Association Between Radiation-Induced Pain and Radiation Dose in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, H; Dyk, P; Mullen, D; Eschen, L; Fergus, S; Chin, R; Thorstad, W; Oh, J; Apte, A; Deasy, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer who undergo radiotherapy often experience several undesirable side-effects, including xerostomia, trismus, and pain in the head and neck area, but little is know about the dose-volume predictors of such pain. We investigated the association between radiation dose and both throat and esophagus pain during radiotherapy. Methods: We analyzed 124 head and neck patients who received radiotherapy at the Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis. For these patients, weekly PROs were recorded, including 16 pain and anatomical location questions. In addition, 17 observational symptoms were recorded. Patients were asked to describe their pain at each site according to a four-level scale: none (0), mild (1), moderate (2), and severe (3). We explored the association between throat pain and the mean dose received in oral cavity and between esophageal pain and the mean dose received in the esophagus. The severity of pain was determined by the difference between the baseline (week 1) pain score and the maximum pain score during treatment. The baseline pain score was defined as the first available pain score before receiving 10 Gy because radiotherapy pain originates later during treatment. Dose-volume metrics were extracted from treatment plans using CERR. To evaluate the correlation between pain and radiation dose, Spearman's correlation coefficient (Rs) was used. Results: The associations between throat pain and the mean dose to the oral cavity, and between esophagus pain and the mean dose to the esophagus, were both statistically significant, with Rs=0.320 (p=0.003) and Rs=0.424 (p<0.0001), respectively. Mean dose, for each structure, was a better predictor of pain than total integral dose. Conclusion: We demonstrated that pain during radiotherapy in head and neck patients highly correlates with the dose delivered. We will further investigate the association between other pain locations and relevant normal tissue dose

  15. INSIGHTS INTO PREVENTIVE MEASURES FOR DENTAL EROSION

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Wiegand, Annette; Rios, Daniela; Honório, Heitor Marques; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2009-01-01

    Dental erosion is defined as the loss of tooth substance by acid exposure not involving bacteria. The etiology of erosion is related to different behavioral, biological and chemical factors. Based on an overview of the current literature, this paper presents a summary of the preventive strategies relevant for patients suffering from dental erosion. Behavioral factors, such as special drinking habits, unhealthy lifestyle factors or occupational acid exposure, might modify the extent of dental erosion. Thus, preventive strategies have to include measures to reduce the frequency and duration of acid exposure as well as adequate oral hygiene measures, as it is known that eroded surfaces are more susceptible to abrasion. Biological factors, such as saliva or acquired pellicle, act protectively against erosive demineralization. Therefore, the production of saliva should be enhanced, especially in patients with hyposalivation or xerostomia. With regard to chemical factors, the modification of acidic solutions with ions, especially calcium, was shown to reduce the demineralization, but the efficacy depends on the other chemical factors, such as the type of acid. To enhance the remineralization of eroded surfaces and to prevent further progression of dental wear, high-concentrated fluoride applications are recommended. Currently, little information is available about the efficacy of other preventive strategies, such as calcium and laser application, as well as the use of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors. Further studies considering these factors are required. In conclusion, preventive strategies for patients suffering from erosion are mainly obtained from in vitro and in situ studies and include dietary counseling, stimulation of salivary flow, optimization of fluoride regimens, modification of erosive beverages and adequate oral hygiene measures. PMID:19274390

  16. Sjögren syndrome associated with multiple myeloma of the IgA κ-type.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, T; Kobayashi, S; Tamura, N; Bando, H; Ikeda, M; Fujii, T; Hirano, T; Takasaki, Y; Hashimoto, H

    2000-06-01

    Abstract We report a case of a 62-year-old female patient with Sjögren syndrome (SS) who developed multiple myeloma (MM) of the IgA κ-type. In 1986, the patient was admitted to our hospital with a facial rash, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, and xerostomia. She was diagnosed as having discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and SS. She was treated with bromhexine hydrochloride for SS and with topical fluorinated steroid for DLE. In 1992, she developed compression fractures of the lumbar vertebrae and was readmitted to our hospital. DLE was not recognized. Laboratory findings revealed IgA 2046 mg/dl, IgG 529 mg/dl, and IgM 21 mg/dl. Anti-SS-A antibody was 1 : 32 and anti-SS-B antibody was 1 : 2. M protein of IgA κ was demonstrated by immunoelectrophoresis. Aspiration biopsy of the bone marrow revealed 20.2% plasma cells. A bone scintigram demonstrated many hot spots at the cervical and lumbar vertebrae. She was diagnosed as having SS and MM of the IgA κ-type. After chemotherapy for MM, the percentage of plasma cells in the bone marrow and the concentration of serum IgA decreased to 6.2% and 532 mg/dl, respectively. SS is frequently associated with benign monoclonal gammopathy or lymphoproliferative disorders, especially Waldenström's macroglobulinemia or malignant lymphoma. Although benign monoclonal gammopathy has frequently been observed in patients with SS, SS associated with MM is extremely rare. PMID:24383565

  17. Freedom From Local and Regional Failure of Contralateral Neck With Ipsilateral Neck Radiotherapy for Node-Positive Tonsil Cancer: Results of a Prospective Management Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Kyle E. Raben, David; Schneider, Charles; Witt, Robert; Sammons, Sarah; Raben, Adam

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To review the outcomes of a prospective management approach using ipsilateral neck radiotherapy in the treatment of node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil with a well-lateralized primary lesion. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2007, 20 patients who presented with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil, without involvement of the base of the tongue or midline soft palate, and with Stage N1-N2b disease were prospectively treated with radiotherapy to the primary site and ipsilateral neck. In addition, 18 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. The actuarial freedom from contralateral nodal and in-field progression was determined. Acute and late toxicity were prospectively evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The nodal disease was Stage N1 in 4 patients, N2a in 3 patients, and N2b in 13 patients. At a median follow-up 19 months (range, 12-40), no in-field or contralateral nodal recurrences had been observed. The 2-year freedom from distant metastasis rate was 87.4%. The actuarial 2-year disease-free and overall survival rates were both 79.5%. Late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 2 xerostomia occurred in 1 patient (5%). No late Grade 3 or greater toxicity was observed. No patient was feeding tube dependent at their last follow-up visit. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with node-positive, lateralized tonsillar cancer, treatment of the ipsilateral neck and primary site does not appear to increase the risk of contralateral nodal failure and reduces late morbidity compared with historical controls. Although the outcomes with ipsilateral radiotherapy in the present series were promising, these findings require longer follow-up and validation in a larger patient cohort.

  18. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Community Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Seung, Steven Bae, Joseph; Solhjem, Matthew; Bader, Stephen; Gannett, David; Hansen, Eric K.; Louie, Jeannie; Underhill, Kelly Cha Christine

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To review outcomes with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the community setting for the treatment of nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2003 and April 2007, 69 patients with histologically confirmed cancer of the nasopharynx and oropharynx underwent IMRT in our practice. The primary sites included nasopharynx (11), base of tongue (18), and tonsil (40). The disease stage distribution was as follows: 2 Stage I, 11 Stage II, 16 Stage III, and 40 Stage IV. All were treated with a simultaneous integrated boost IMRT technique. The median prescribed doses were 70 Gy to the planning target volume, 59.4 Gy to the high-risk subclinical volume, and 54 Gy to the low-risk subclinical volume. Forty-five patients (65%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria. Progression-free and overall survival rates were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Results: Median duration of follow-up was 18 months. The estimated 2-year local control, regional control, distant control, and overall survival rates were 98%, 100%, 98%, and 90%, respectively. The most common acute toxicities were dermatitis (32 Grade 1, 32 Grade 2, 5 Grade 3), mucositis (8 Grade 1, 33 Grade 2, 28 Grade 3), and xerostomia (0 Grade 1, 29 Grade 2, 40 Grade 3). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the community setting can be accomplished safely and effectively. Systematic internal review systems are recommended for quality control until sufficient experience develops.

  19. Ipsilateral Irradiation for Oral and Oropharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Primary Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vergeer, Marije R.; Doornaert, Patricia; Jonkman, Anja; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Ende, Piet L.A. van den; Jong, Martin A. de; Leemans, C. Rene; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to evaluate the contralateral nodal control (CLNC) in postoperative patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with ipsilateral irradiation of the neck and primary site. Late radiation-induced morbidity was also evaluated. Methods and Materials: The study included 123 patients with well-lateralized squamous cell carcinomas treated with surgery and unilateral postoperative irradiation. Most patients had tumors of the gingiva (41%) or buccal mucosa (21%). The majority of patients underwent surgery of the ipsilateral neck (n = 102 [83%]). The N classification was N0 in 73 cases (59%), N1 or N2a in 23 (19%), and N2b in 27 cases (22%). Results: Contralateral metastases developed in 7 patients (6%). The 5-year actuarial CLNC was 92%. The number of lymph node metastases was the only significant prognostic factor with regard to CLNC. The 5-year CLNC was 99% in N0 cases, 88% in N1 or N2a cases, and 73% in N2b cases (p = 0.008). Borderline significance (p = 0.06) was found for extranodal spread. Successful salvage could be performed in 71% of patients with contralateral metastases. The prevalence of Grade 2 or higher xerostomia was 2.6% at 5 years. Conclusions: Selected patients with oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma treated with primary surgery and postoperative ipsilateral radiotherapy have a very high CLNC with a high probability of successful salvage in case of contralateral metastases. However, bilateral irradiation should be applied in case of multiple lymph node metastases in the ipsilateral neck, particularly in the presence of extranodal spread. The incidence of radiation-induced morbidity is considerably lower as observed after bilateral irradiation.

  20. Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

  1. A critical assessment of oral care protocols for patients under radiation therapy in the regional University Hospital Network of Madrid (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Lanzós, Isabel; Lanzós, Eduardo; Sanz, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Background This research was aimed to critically evaluate, under the light of the available scientific evidence, the oral care protocols recommended by different hospitals in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients under radiation therapy. Material and Methods A questionnaire requesting all the relevant information for the oral care of these patients was sent to the 9 University Hospitals in Madrid. The answers were categorized and analyzed. In addition, an electronic search was conducted to identify the most relevant papers (systematic reviews [SR] and randomized clinical trials [RCTs]) assessing oral care protocols for patients treated for HNC with radiation therapy. Results Eight out of nine centers answered the questionnaire and the retrieved information was tabulated and compared. These recommendations were analyzed by a computerized search on MEDLINE and the Cochrane Oral Health Collaboration Database. The results of the analysis clearly shown a great heterogeneity, in terms of oral health care protocols, regarding the management of irradiated patients (for HNC) within the Hospitals of Madrid region. In addition, some of the recommendations lack solid scientific support. Conclusions The present survey revealed that the recommendations provided by the different hospitals were clearly different. The available evidence, supported by SR and RCTs, suggested the need of an oral assessment before cancer treatment, in order to prevent and treat dental pathologies and avoiding potential complications; during cancer treatment, it is relevant monitoring the patient in order to decrease the severity of the side effects, and to avoid any tooth extraction or surgery and special attention should be paid to mucositis, xerostomia and candidiasis; after cancer treatment, the following are relevant aspects: the risk of osteoradionecrosis, trismus, caries and the risks associated to dental implants. Key words:Head and neck cancer, supportive care in cancer, radiotherapy

  2. Acupuncture: An Alternative Therapy in Dentistry and Its Possible Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, Ravi A.; Yalamanchal, Samatha; Kumar, Vijay A.; Goli, Suresh; Vashist, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traditional Chinese acupuncture has a history of more than 2500 years and is one of the best-known complementary and alternative therapies. Acupuncture stimulates the nervous system and alters the processing and perception of pain signals and also releases natural painkillers, such as endorphins and serotonin in the nervous system. Acupuncture's successful use for various dental conditions has been proven. Thus, it is important for the dental clinicians to be familiar with the applications of acupuncture for dental disorders. Objective: One aim of this article is to review related articles in the literature that have focused on acupuncture and its applications in dentistry. Another aim is to provide a quick sketch of acupuncture use in dentistry for dental clinicians. Materials and Methods: A detailed search was performed to identify systematic reviews and research articles, using PUBMED and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Language was restricted to English. Key search terms were acupuncture in dentistry, myofacial pain, temporomandibular disorders, xerostomia, dental pain and gag reflex. Results: All of the current the authors independently extracted data for analysis and review. Two independent reviewers screened the titles and abstracts of all the articles for eligibility. When the reviewers noted that an abstract or title of an article indicated that the article was potentially useful, full copies were retrieved. Ultimately, 40 articles underwent full-text review. Conclusions: The research to date certainly offers valid applications of acupuncture in dentistry. Meanwhile, practical strategies with the highest success rates are needed to use in further interventions. PMID:25538815

  3. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Romesser, Paul B.; Romanyshyn, Jonathan C.; Schupak, Karen D.; Setton, Jeremy; Riaz, Nadeem; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Sherman, Eric J.; Kraus, Dennis; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The clinical benefit of routine placement of prophylactic percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (pPEG) tubes was assessed in patients with oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) who are undergoing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy. METHODS From 1998 through 2009, 400 consecutive patients with OPC who underwent chemoradiation were included. Of these, 325 had a pPEG and 75 did not (nPEG). Weight and albumin change from baseline to mid-IMRT, end of IMRT, 1 month post-IMRT, and 3 months post-IMRT were evaluated. The treating physicians prospectively recorded acute and late toxicities. RESULTS Significantly lower absolute weight loss at end of IMRT (6.80 kg vs 8.38 kg, P = .007), 1 month post-IMRT (9.06 kg vs 11.33 kg, P = .006), and 3 months post-IMRT (11.10 kg vs 13.09 kg, P = .044) was noted in the pPEG versus nPEG groups. This benefit in reduction of percent weight loss was consistently significant only among patients with BMI < 25. Significant differences were noted in hospital admission rate (15.1% vs 26.7%, P = .026) and volume of nonchemotherapy hydration (8.9 liters vs 17.2 liters, P = .004). There were no differences in percent albumin change, acute dysphagia, acute mucositis, acute xerostomia, chronic dysphagia, radiation treatment duration, and overall survival. Multivariate analysis noted age >55 years (P < .001), female sex (P < .001), and T3/4 category disease (P < .001) were significantly associated with prolonged PEG use. CONCLUSIONS Although pPEG reduced absolute and percent weight loss and need for hospitalizations in our cohort of patients with OPC undergoing chemoradiation, no differences were noted in radiation treatment duration, toxicity, and overall survival. Prolonged PEG use correlated with age >55 years, female sex, and T3/T4 tumors. PMID:22707358

  4. Prevalence of Self-Perceived Oral Malodor in a Group of Thai Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    Youngnak-Piboonratanakit, P.; Vachirarojpisan, T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and correlated factors of self-reported oral malodor in Thai dental patients from Chulalongkorn Dental Hospital. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was developed to assess the self-reported perception of oral malodor in 839 patients. Significant associations between self-perceived oral malodor and sociodemographics, oral problems and oral hygiene practice variables were determined by Chi-square test. Results: The prevalence of currently self-perceived oral malodor was 61.1%. A higher prevalence of self-perceived oral malodor was significantly correlated with a number of factors including being 30 years of age or older, having a high school or lower educational level, tongue coating, xerostomia, bleeding when brushing teeth, never receiving professional tooth cleaning and a lower toothbrushing frequency. However, multivariable analysis showed that tongue coating was the factor most strongly associated with self-perceived oral malodor (OR=3.53; CI=2.05–6.08), followed by bleeding when brushing teeth (OR= 2.96) and being 30 years of age or older (OR=2.46). Subjects with oral malodor perceived by themselves and others had a higher level of self-perceived oral malodor, a higher prevalence of bad odor when talking, in the morning and throughout the whole day, and a higher prevalence of consulting with other people in comparison with those with perception by themselves alone. Conclusion: Tongue coating, bleeding when brushing teeth and being 30 years of age or older were significantly associated with self-perceived oral malodor. The level of self-perceived oral malodor and consulting with other people was more prevalent in subjects with oral malodor perceived by themselves and others. PMID:21998795

  5. [Quality of life after treatment of laryngeal carcinoma: surgery versus radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Schneider, A; Guidicelli, M; Stöckli, S J

    2000-01-01

    Radiotherapy and surgery for laryngeal cancer achieve comparable results in patient survival. Therefore, the expected quality of life is increasingly influencing the choice of treatment. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of life of patients after surgery or radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma. To evaluate quality of life, we used the validated European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the EORTC Head and Neck module (EORTC QLQ-H&N35). 65 patients who were treated with either radiotherapy or surgery for laryngeal cancer between January 1990 and December 1995, and who were alive and free of tumour in January 1999, were included in this study. In the first group with small tumours (T1/T2), 40 patients were treated by CO2-laser surgery and 16 by primary radiotherapy. In the second group with more advanced tumours (T3/T4), 5 patients underwent total laryngectomy and 4 primary radiotherapy. In the first group there was good global quality of life with no significant difference between the two treatment modalities. Surgically treated patients scored significantly better than the irradiated patients in questions about swallowing of solid food, xerostomia and dental problems. No other significant differences were found: hoarseness in particular was rated equally after both treatments. In the second group there was also good global quality of life with no significant difference between the two treatment modalities. The laryngectomized patients scored equally on questions about voice function, talking on the phone and social behaviour. As far as quality of life is concerned we can recommend both treatment modalities for patients with laryngeal cancer of all stages. PMID:10780067

  6. Short communication: oral lesions in HIV/AIDS patients undergoing HAART including efavirenz.

    PubMed

    Aquino-García, S I; Rivas, M A; Ceballos-Salobreña, A; Acosta-Gio, A E; Gaitán-Cepeda, L A

    2008-06-01

    Oral lesions (OL) have an important prognostic value for HIV/AIDS patients. However, the behavior of OL in HIV/AIDS patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy including efavirenz (HAART/EFV) has not been documented. Our objective was to establish the prevalence of OL in HIV/AIDS patients undergoing HAART/EFV and to compare it with the prevalence of OL in patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy including a protease inhibitor (HAART/PI). Seventy-three HIV/AIDS patients undergoing antiretroviral treatment for at least for 6 months at "La Raza" Medical Center's Internal Medicine Unit (IMSS, Mexico City) were included. To detect OL, a detailed examination of oral soft tissues was performed in each patient. Patient records recorded gender, seropositivity time, route of contagion, antiretroviral therapy type and duration, CD4 lymphocyte count/ml, and viral load. Two groups were formed: 38 patients receiving HAART/EFV [two nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NARTI) plus efavirenz] and 35 patients receiving HAART/PI (two NARTIs plus one PI). OL prevalence was established in each study group. The Chi-square test was applied (p < 0.05(IC95%)). OL prevalence in the HAART/EFV group (32%) was lower (p < 0.007) than in the HAART/PI group (63%). Candidosis was the most prevalent OL in both groups. Herpes labialis, HIV-associated necrotizing periodontitis, xerostomia, hairy leukoplakia, and nonspecific oral sores were identified. The highest prevalence for all OL was found in the HAART/PI group. These findings suggest that HIV/AIDS patients undergoing HAART/EFV show a lower prevalence of oral lesions than patients undergoing HAART/PI. PMID:18507528

  7. Mouse models of primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Seok; Gauna, Adrienne E.; Cha, Seunghee

    2015-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by immune cell infiltration and progressive injury to the salivary and lacrimal glands. As a consequence, patients with SjS develop xerostomia (dry mouth) and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eyes). SjS is the third most common rheumatic autoimmune disorder, affecting 4 million Americans with over 90% of patients being female. Current diagnostic criteria for SjS frequently utilize histological examinations of minor salivary glands for immune cell foci, serology for autoantibodies, and dry eye evaluation by corneal or conjunctival staining. SjS can be classified as primary or secondary SjS, depending on whether it occurs alone or in association with other systemic rheumatic conditions, respectively. Clinical manifestations typically become apparent when the disease is relatively advanced in SjS patients, which poses a challenge for early diagnosis and treatment of SjS. Therefore, SjS mouse models, because of their close resemblance to the human SjS, have been extremely valuable to identify early disease markers and to investigate underlying biological and immunological dysregulations. However, it is important to bear in mind that no single mouse model has duplicated all aspects of SjS pathogenesis and clinical features, mainly due to the multifactorial etiology of SjS that includes numerous susceptibility genes and environmental factors. As such, various mouse models have been developed in the field to try to recapitulate SjS. In this review, we focus on recent mouse models of primary SjS and describe them under three categories of spontaneous, genetically engineered, and experimentally induced development of SjS-like disease. In addition, we discuss future perspectives of SjS mouse models highlighting pros and cons of utilizing mouse models and demands for improved models. PMID:25777752

  8. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques*

    PubMed Central

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Lindsay, Patricia E; Hope, Andrew J; Deasy, Joseph O

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for ‘generalizabilty’ validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  9. Phase I/II Study of Erlotinib Combined With Cisplatin and Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Herchenhorn, Daniel; Dias, Fernando L.; Viegas, Celia M.P.; Federico, Miriam H.; Araujo, Carlos Manoel M.; Small, Isabelle; Bezerra, Marcos; Fontao, Karina M.D.; Knust, Renata E.; Ferreira, Carlos G.; Martins, Renato G.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Erlotinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is active against head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and possibly has a synergistic interaction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We investigated the safety and efficacy of erlotinib added to cisplatin and radiotherapy in locally advanced HNSCC. Methods and Materials: In this Phase I/II trial 100 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin was administered on Days 8, 29, and 50, and radiotherapy at 70 Gy was started on Day 8. During Phase I, the erlotinib dose was escalated (50 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg) in consecutive cohorts of 3 patients, starting on Day 1 and continuing during radiotherapy. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Grade 4 event requiring radiotherapy interruptions. Phase II was initiated 8 weeks after the last Phase I enrollment. Results: The study accrued 9 patients in Phase I and 28 in Phase II; all were evaluable for efficacy and safety. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred in Phase I, and the recommended Phase II dose was 150 mg. The most frequent nonhematologic toxicities were nausea/vomiting, dysphagia, stomatitis, xerostomia and in-field dermatitis, acneiform rash, and diarrhea. Of the 31 patients receiving a 150-mg daily dose of erlotinib, 23 (74%; 95% confidence interval, 56.8%-86.3%) had a complete response, 3 were disease free after salvage surgery, 4 had inoperable residual disease, and 1 died of sepsis during treatment. With a median 37 months' follow-up, the 3-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 61% and 72%, respectively. Conclusions: This combination appears safe, has encouraging activity, and deserves further studies in locally advanced HNSCC.

  10. Long-term Survival (>13 Years) in a Child With Recurrent Diffuse Pontine Gliosarcoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Burzynski, Stanislaw R.; Janicki, Tomasz J.; Marszalek, Ania

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric gliosarcoma (GS) is a rare variant of glioblastoma multiforme. The authors describe the case of an unusual pontine location of GS in a 9-year-old boy who was initially diagnosed with low-grade astrocytoma (LGA) that was successfully controlled for 4 years. Subsequently, his brain tumor transformed into a GS. Prior treatment of his LGA included subtotal tumor resection 3 times, standard radiation therapy, and Gamma Knife procedure twice. His LGA was also treated with a standard chemotherapy regimen of carboplatin and vincristine, and his GS with subtotal resection, high-dose cyclophosphamide, and thiotepa with stem cell rescue and temozolomide. Unfortunately, he developed disseminated disease with multiple lesions and leptomeningeal involvement including a tumor occupying 80% of the pons. Upon presentation at our clinic, he had rapidly progressing disease. He received treatment with antineoplastons (ANP) A10 and AS2-1 for 6 years and 10 months under special exception to our phase II protocol BT-22. During his treatment with ANP his tumor stabilized, then decreased, and, ultimately, did not show any metabolic activity. The patient’s response was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scans. His pathology diagnosis was confirmed by external neuropathologists, and his response to the treatment was determined by central radiology review. He experienced the following treatment-related, reversible toxicities with ANP: fatigue, xerostomia and urinary frequency (grade 1), diarrhea, incontinence and urine color change (grade 2), and grade 4 hypernatremia. His condition continued to improve after treatment with ANP and, currently, he complains only of residual neurological deficit from his previous surgery. He achieved a complete response, and his overall and progression-free survival is in excess of 13 years. This report indicates that it is possible to obtain long-term survival of a child with a highly aggressive recurrent GS

  11. The Oral Carriage of Candida in Oral Cancer Patients of Indian Origin Undergoing Radiotherapy and/or Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Raksha; Chandolia, Betina; Mathur, Ayush; Chauhan, Yashwant; Chawda, Jyoti; Mosby, Siddarth; Bhagalia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral cancer is a challenging disease in Indian subcontinent because of increased use of tobacco and associated products. Although surgery is the main treatment modality, radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) are employed in inaccessible cases. Both RT & CT will result in painful and debilitating adverse effects in oral cavity e.g., mucositis, ulceration, dysgeusia, xerostomia and opportunistic infections. One of the most common opportunistic infection is caused by fungus Candida. Aim Our aim was to investigate the incidence of oral colonization of Candida species with differentiation between carrier and infective state of the organism. We also investigate the effect of treatment modality (RT and CT) on the incidence of Candida, in oral cancer patients, undergoing RT and/or CT, in order to prevent and treat the Candida infection in a better way. Materials and Methods It was a cross-sectional case-control study; done in Gujarat, India. Fifty patients of oral cancer undergoing RT, CT alone or combined were investigated and compared with the healthy controls. The samples were collected from mid-dorsum of tongue by using imprint culture technique. The samples were inoculated on Sabouraud’s dextrose agar medium and the organisms were identified by wet mount, germ tube test, chlamydospore formation and sugar fermentation tests. Results There was significant increase in oral Candida colonization from 20% in healthy controls to 70% in oral cancer patients undergoing RT and/or CT (p = 0.001, < 0.05). A significant increase in infective state of Candida (71.4%) was noted (p = 0.001, < 0.05) with predominance of non-albicans species of Candida, chiefly C. tropicalis (42.8%). Conclusion RT and CT leads to increased oral colonization and infection by Candida with a shift towards growth of non-albicans species. As the pattern of candidal species infection is changing, such studies are important for better diagnosis and treatment planning to gain good control over

  12. Complete denture biofilm after brushing with specific denture paste, neutral soap and artificial saliva.

    PubMed

    Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; Salles, Antônio Eduardo Sparça; Macedo, Leandro Dorigan de; Silva-Lovato, Cláudia Helena da; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Watanabe, Evandro

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the levels of biofilm in maxillary and mandibular complete dentures and evaluated the number of colony-forming units (cfu) of yeasts, after using auxiliary brushing agents and artificial saliva. Twenty-three denture wearers with hyposalivation and xerostomia were instructed to brush the dentures 3 times a day during 3 weeks with the following products: Corega Brite denture dentifrice, neutral liquid soap, Corega Brite combined with Oral Balance (artificial saliva) or tap water. For biofilm quantification, the internal surfaces of the dentures were disclosed, photographed and measured using a software. For microbiological analysis, the biofilm was scrapped off, and the harvested material was diluted, sown in CHROMagar™ Candida and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Mandibular dentures presented a mean biofilm percentage (µ=26.90 ± 21.10) significantly greater than the maxillary ones (µ=18.0 ± 15.0) (p<0.05). Brushing using Corega Brite combined with Oral Balance (µ=15.87 ± 18.47) was more effective (p<0.05) than using the denture dentifrice (µ=19.47 ± 17.24), neutral soap (µ=23.90 ± 18.63) or tap water (control; µ=32.50 ± 20.68). For the microbiological analysis, the chi-square test did not indicate significant difference between the hygiene products for either type of denture. The more frequently isolated species of yeasts were C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. In conclusion, mandibular dentures had more biofilm formation than maxillary ones. Denture brushing with Corega Brite dentifrice combined with the use of Oral Balance was the most effective method for reduction of biofilm levels, but the use of products did not show difference in yeast cfu counts. PMID:23657413

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: A Promising Treatment Option for the Boost of Oropharyngeal Cancers Not Suitable for Brachytherapy: A Single-Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Tans, Lisa; Teguh, David N.; Rooij, Peter van; Zwijnenburg, Ellen M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 51 patients with Stage I to IV biopsy-proven OPC who were not suitable for BTB received boosts by means of SBRT (3 times 5.5 Gy, prescribed to the 80% isodose line), after 46 Gy of IMRT to the primary tumor and neck (when indicated). Endpoints of the study were local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and acute and late toxicity. Results: After a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 6-65 months), the 2-year actuarial rates of LC, DFS, and OS were 86%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, and the 3-year rates were 70%, 66%, and 54%, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated, as there were no treatment breaks and no Grade 4 or 5 toxicity reported, either acute or chronic. The overall 2-year cumulative incidence of Grade {>=}2 late toxicity was 28%. Of the patients with 2 years with no evidence of disease (n = 20), only 1 patient was still feeding tube dependent and 2 patients had Grade 3 xerostomia. Conclusions: According to our knowledge, this study is the first report of patients with primary OPC who received boosts by means of SBRT. Patients with OPC who are not suitable for the standard BTB can safely and effectively receive boosts by SBRT. With this radiation technique, an excellent outcome was achieved. Furthermore, the SBRT boost did not have a negative impact regarding acute and late side effects.

  14. Prospective study on prevalence of dermatological changes in patients under hemodialysis in hemodialysis units in Tanta University hospitals, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Mourad, Basma; Hegab, Doaa; Okasha, Kamal; Rizk, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic hemodialysis patients experience frequent and varied mucocutaneous manifestations in addition to hair and nail disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of dermatological changes among patients with end-stage renal disease under hemodialysis in a hemodialysis unit in Tanta University hospitals over a period of 6 months, and to evaluate the relations of these dermatological disorders with the duration of hemodialysis as well as with different laboratory parameters in these patients. Patients and methods Ninety-three patients with end-stage renal disease on regular hemodialysis (56 males and 37 females) were selected and included in this cross-sectional, descriptive, analytic study. Their ages ranged from 18–80 years. All patients underwent thorough general and dermatological examinations. Laboratory investigations (complete blood counts, renal and liver function tests, serum parathormone levels, serum electrolytes, alkaline phosphatase, random blood sugar, and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies) were evaluated. Results This study revealed that most patients had nonspecific skin changes, including xerosis, pruritus, pallor, ecchymosis, hyperpigmentation, and follicular hyperkeratosis. Nail and hair changes were commonly found, especially half and half nail, koilonychia, subungal hyperkeratosis, melanonychia, onychomycosis, and brittle and lusterless hair. Mucous membrane changes detected were pallor, xerostomia, macroglossia, bleeding gums, aphthous stomatitis, and yellow sclera. There was a significant positive correlation between the presence of pruritus and serum parathormone level. There was a significant negative correlation between the presence of mucous membrane changes and hemoglobin level. Conclusion Nonspecific mucocutaneous manifestations are common in patients on hemodialysis, particularly xerosis, dyspigmentation, and pruritus. Early and prompt recognition and treatment of dermatological conditions in patients

  15. Primary Sjögren syndrome in a 2-year-old patient: role of the dentist in diagnosis and dental management with a 6-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, Marcio Augusto; De Rezende, Nathalie Pepe Medeiros; Maia, Célia Márcia Fernandes; Gallottini, Marina

    2011-11-01

    BACKGROUND. Primary Sjögren syndrome is a rare autoimmune disease, especially in children, mainly affecting girls (77%), and usually diagnosed around 10 years of age. Diagnosis during childhood is difficult, especially because of the diversity of the clinical presentation and difficulty obtaining reliable history data, accounting for a higher frequency of underdiagnosed cases. Differential conditions should be considered, especially the ones that promote xerostomia, such as diabetes, ectodermal dysplasia, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, lymphoma, HIV and HTLV infection. Conditions associated with parotid enlargement should also be excluded, including juvenile recurrent parotitis (JRP), sialadenosis, sarcoidosis, lymphoma, infectious parotitis caused by streptococcal and staphylococcal infections, viral infections (paramyxovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and parvovirus), and diffuse infiltrative lymphocytosis syndrome (associated with HIV infection), and rare congenital conditions, such as polycystic parotid disease. CASE REPORT. A paediatric female patient was referred to our clinic for dental treatment complaining about dry mouth, oral discomfort, and dysphagia. The patient presented five of the required criteria to establish the diagnosis of pSS, including ocular symptoms, oral symptoms, evidence of keratoconjunctivitis sicca, focal sialadenitis confirmed by minor salivary gland biopsy, and evidence of major salivary gland involvement. Our patient did not have positive SS-A and SS-B autoantibodies. According to the literature, about 29% of individuals with pSS can present seronegativity for SS-A (anti-Ro) antibodies and about 33% can present seronegativity for SS-B (anti-La) antibodies. CONCLUSION. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest patient reported in the scientific English literature with pSS. Primary Sjögren syndrome has a wide clinical and immunologic spectrum and may progress with

  16. [Sjögren's syndrome (SS), a review of the subject and saliva as a diagnostic method].

    PubMed

    Riega-Torres, Janett Carmen Luzmila; Villarreal-Gonzalez, Antonio Jaime; Ceceñas-Falcon, Luis Ángel; Salas-Alanis, Julio Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disease whose main clinical manifestation is oral dryness (xerostomia) and ocular dryness (xerophthalmia). It is characterized by progressive mononuclear infiltration of the exocrine glands and can affect a variety of organ systems. The prevalence of primary Sjögren's syndrome varies from 0.01 up to 4.8%; this variability reflects differences in definition, application of diagnostic criteria, and geographic differences in age groups. The etiology of primary Sjögren's syndrome is unknown, but the interaction between genetic and environmental factors (viruses, hormones, vitamins, stress) is important. There are few reported cases of concordance in monozygotic twins, and it is common for patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome to have relatives with other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, psoriasis, and multiple sclerosis. Among the most common findings is hypergammaglobulinemia. Elevated levels of γ-globulins contain autoantibodies directed against nonspecific antigens such as rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibodies, and cellular antigens SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La. Regarding diagnosis, there have been 11 different published criteria for Sjögren's syndrome since 1965; none have been approved by the American College of Rheumatology or the European League Against Rheumatism. The current criteria were published in 2012 jointly with the progressive advance in the knowledge of the human salivary proteome that has gained wide acceptance in Sjögren's syndrome, with the possibility of using saliva as a useful tool in both diagnosis and prognosis in this field because the analysis of salivary proteins may reflect the state of locally underlying disease of the salivary glands, which are the target organs in this disease. PMID:27335194

  17. Mature Results of a Randomized Trial of Accelerated Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiotherapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Michele I.; Rojas, Ana M.; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Dische, Stanley

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term late adverse events and treatment outcome of a randomized, multicenter Phase III trial of continuous, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) compared with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in 918 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Survival estimates were obtained for locoregional relapse-free survival, local relapse-free survival, overall survival, disease-specific survival, disease-free survival and for late adverse events. Results: The 10-year estimates (+-1 standard error) for locoregional relapse-free survival, overall survival, disease-free survival, and disease-specific survival were 43% +- 2% for CHART and 50% +- 3% with CRT (log-rank p = 0.2); 26% +- 2% and 29% +- 3% (p = 0.4), respectively; 41% +- 2% and 46% +- 3% (p = 0.3), respectively; and 56% +- 3% and 58% +- 3% (p = 0.5), respectively. There was a small but significant reduction in the incidence of slight or worse and moderate or worse epidermal adverse events with CHART (p = 0.002 to 0.05). Severe xerostomia, laryngeal edema, and mucosal necrosis were also significantly lower with CHART (p = 0.02 to 0.05). Conclusions: Despite the reduction in total dose from 66 Gy to 54 Gy, control of locoregional disease and survival with CHART were similar to those with CRT. These findings, together with the low incidence of long-term severe adverse events, suggest that CHART is a treatment option for patients with low-risk disease and for those unable to withstand the toxicity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  18. Pilocarpine modulates the cellular electrical properties of mammalian hearts by activating a cardiac M3 receptor and a K+ current

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huizhen; Shi, Hong; Lu, Yanjie; Yang, Baofeng; Wang, Zhiguo

    1999-01-01

    Pilocarpine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist, is widely used for treatment of xerostomia and glaucoma. It can also cause many other cellular responses by activating different subtypes of mAChRs in different tissues. However, the potential role of pilocarpine in modulating cardiac function remained unstudied.We found that pilocarpine produced concentration-dependent (0.1–10 μM) decrease in sinus rhythm and action potential duration, and hyperpolarization of membrane potential in guinea-pig hearts. The effects were nearly completely reversed by 1 μM atropine or 2 nM 4DAMP methiodide (an M3-selective antagonist).Patch-clamp recordings in dispersed myocytes from guinea-pig and canine atria revealed that pilocarpine induces a novel K+ current with delayed rectifying properties. The current was suppressed by low concentrations of M3-selective antagonists 4DAMP methiodide (2–10 nM), 4DAMP mustard (4–20 nM, an ackylating agent) and p-F-HHSiD (20–200 nM). Antagonists towards other subtypes (M1, M2 or M4) all failed to alter the current.The affinity of pilocarpine (KD) at mAChRs derived from displacement binding of [3H]-NMS in the homogenates from dog atria was 2.2 μM (65% of the total binding) and that of 4DAMP methiodide was 2.8 nM (70% of total binding), consistent with the concentration of pilocarpine needed for the current induction and for the modulation of the cardiac electrical activity and the concentration of 4DAMP to block pilocarpine effects.Our data indicate, for the first time, that pilocarpine modulates the cellular electrical properties of the hearts, likely by activating a K+ current mediated by M3 receptors. PMID:10372814

  19. Prospective clinical study on long-term swallowing function and voice quality in advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy and preventive swallowing exercises.

    PubMed

    Kraaijenga, Sophie A C; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Hilgers, Frans J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2015-11-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for advanced head and neck cancer (HNC) is associated with substantial early and late side effects, most notably regarding swallowing function, but also regarding voice quality and quality of life (QoL). Despite increased awareness/knowledge on acute dysphagia in HNC survivors, long-term (i.e., beyond 5 years) prospectively collected data on objective and subjective treatment-induced functional outcomes (and their impact on QoL) still are scarce. The objective of this study was the assessment of long-term CCRT-induced results on swallowing function and voice quality in advanced HNC patients. The study was conducted as a randomized controlled trial on preventive swallowing rehabilitation (2006-2008) in a tertiary comprehensive HNC center with twenty-two disease-free and evaluable HNC patients as participants. Multidimensional assessment of functional sequels was performed with videofluoroscopy, mouth opening measurements, Functional Oral Intake Scale, acoustic voice parameters, and (study specific, SWAL-QoL, and VHI) questionnaires. Outcome measures at 6 years post-treatment were compared with results at baseline and at 2 years post-treatment. At a mean follow-up of 6.1 years most initial tumor-, and treatment-related problems remained similarly low to those observed after 2 years follow-up, except increased xerostomia (68%) and increased (mild) pain (32%). Acoustic voice analysis showed less voicedness, increased fundamental frequency, and more vocal effort for the tumors located below the hyoid bone (n = 12), without recovery to baseline values. Patients' subjective vocal function (VHI score) was good. Functional swallowing and voice problems at 6 years post-treatment are minimal in this patient cohort, originating from preventive and continued post-treatment rehabilitation programs. PMID:25381096

  20. Two-year results of a prospective preventive swallowing rehabilitation trial in patients treated with chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    van der Molen, Lisette; van Rossum, Maya A; Rasch, Coen R N; Smeele, Ludi E; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2014-05-01

    The objective of the study was the assessment of the results of a prospective clinical trial with two preventive swallowing rehabilitation programs on the long-term side effects of chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in advanced head and neck cancer patients. The study cohort consisted of 29 patients, randomized in two exercise groups: a standard (S) group receiving routine swallowing exercises (N = 14), and an experimental (E) group receiving swallowing exercises based on the TheraBite® Jaw Motion Rehabilitation System™ (N = 15). Assessment of functional changes was carried out with multidimensional outcome measures (e.g., videofluoroscopy, study-specific questionnaires) at four time points (pre-treatment, at 10 weeks, 1 year, and 2 years post-treatment). Overall, in the first year post-treatment many initial tumor- and treatment-related problems diminished significantly, except xerostomia (59%). The only additional improvement at 2 years was that the overall weight significantly further increased (p = 0.000), however, without regaining baseline value. In the subgroup analysis according to exercise group, this difference was significant in the E-group only (p = 0.002). The same was the case for the subgroup analysis according to site of disease, with a significant weight gain in the 'below the hyoid bone' group only. This study shows that the overall functional problems at 1 and 2 years post-CCRT are limited. Both rehabilitation programs produce similar results, with a slight but significant benefit for the E-group in weight gain at 2 years, as also seen in the 'below the hyoid bone' group. Both rehabilitation programs applied are feasible and show good compliance despite the burdensome CCRT. PMID:23892729

  1. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy for nondisseminated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-wook . E-mail: lsw@amc.seoul.kr; Back, Geum Mun; Yi, Byong Yong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Shin, Seong Soo; Kim, Jung-hun; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Bong-Jae; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Seung-Bae; Park, Jin-hong; Lee, Kang Kyoo; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To present preliminary results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients who underwent IMRT for nondisseminated NPC at the Asan Medical Center between September 2001 and December 2003 were prospectively evaluated. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was delivered with the 'step and shoot' SMART technique at prescribed doses of 72 Gy (2.4 Gy/day) to the gross tumor volume, 60 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinical target volume and metastatic nodal station, and 46 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinically negative neck region. Eighteen patients also received cisplatin once per week. Results: The median follow-up period was 27 months. Nineteen patients completed the treatment without interruption; the remaining patient interrupted treatment for 2 weeks owing to severe pharyngitis and malnutrition. Five patients (25%) had Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 mucositis, whereas 9 (45%) had Grade 3 pharyngitis. Seven patients (35%) lost more than 10% of their pretreatment weight, whereas 11 (55%) required intravenous fluids and/or tube feeding. There was no Grade 3 or 4 xerostomia. All patients showed complete response. Two patients had distant metastases and locoregional recurrence, respectively. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with the SMART boost technique allows parotid sparing, as shown clinically and by dosimetry, and might also be more effective biologically. A larger population of patients and a longer follow-up period are needed to evaluate ultimate tumor control and late toxicity.

  2. Analysis of Postsurgical Health-Related Quality of Life and Quality of Voice of Patients With Laryngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Wu, Jieli; Lv, Kexing; Li, Kaichun; Wu, Jianhui; Wen, Yihui; Li, Xiaoling; Tang, Haocheng; Jiang, Aiyun; Wang, Zhangfeng; Wen, Weiping; Lei, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the postsurgical health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and quality of voice (QOV) of patients with laryngeal carcinoma with an expectation of improving the treatment and HRQOL of these patients. Based on the collection of information of patients with laryngeal carcinoma regarding clinical characteristics (age, TNM stage, with or without laryngeal preservation and/or neck dissection, with or without postoperative irradiation and/or chemotherapy, etc.), QOV using Voice Handicap Index (VIH) scale and HRQOL using EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTCQLQ-H&N35 scales, the differences of postsurgical HRQOL related to their clinical characteristics were analyzed using univariate nonparametric tests, the main factors impacting the postsurgical HRQOL were analyzed using regression analyses (generalized linear models) and the correlation between QOV and HRQOL analyzed using spearman correlation analysis. A total of 92 patients were enrolled in this study, on whom the use of EORTC QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-H&N35 and VHI scales revealed that: the differences of HRQOL were significant among patients with different ages, TNM stages, and treatment modalities; the main factors impacting the postsurgical HRQOL were pain, speech disorder, and dry mouth; and QOV was significantly correlated with HRQOL. For the patients with laryngeal carcinoma included in our study, the quality of life after open surgeries were impacted by many factors predominated by pain, speech disorder, and dry mouth. It is suggested that doctors in China do more efforts on the patients' postoperative pain and xerostomia management and speech rehabilitation with the hope of improving the patients' quality of life. PMID:26735538

  3. Acceptance of hospital diets and nutritional status among inpatients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Daiane; Guimarães, Tessa Gomes; Marcadenti, Aline

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To verify acceptance of hospital diets as to the nutritional status among patients admitted to the Oncology/Hematology Unit of a tertiary care hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted among 100 patients, aged ≥18 years, of both genders. Body mass index and subjective global nutritional evaluation by patients were used to detect the nutritional status. The rest-ingestion index was used to evaluate diet acceptance, and the reasons for non-acceptance were identified by means of a questionnaire. Data were expressed in means and standard deviation, or medians and percentages. Comparisons were made using the Student's t test, Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test, and Pearson's χ2 test. Results: A total of 59% of patients were males, and mean age was 51.6±13.5 years. According to the global subjective nutritional evaluation done by the patients themselves, 33% of the participants were considered malnourished and the body mass index detected 6.3% of malnutrition. The main symptoms reported were lack of appetite, xerostomia (dry mouth), constipation, dysgeusia, odor-related nausea, and early satiety. The rest-ingestion index was approximately 37% and significantly greater among the malnourished relative to the well-nourished (58.8 versus 46.4%; p=0.04). The primary reasons reported for non-acceptance of the diet offered were lack of flavor, monotonous preparations, large quantities offered, lack of appetite, and inappropriate temperature of the meal. Conclusion: A high the rest-ingestion index was seen among the patients with cancer, especially those who were malnourished according to the global nutritional evaluation produced by the patient. PMID:23579742

  4. Long-Term Outcomes and Toxicity of Concurrent Paclitaxel and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Citrin, Deborah Mansueti, John; Likhacheva, Anna; Sciuto, Linda; Albert, Paul S.; Rudy, Susan F.; Cooley-Zgela, Theresa; Cotrim, Ana; Solomon, Beth; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Russo, Angelo; Morris, John C.; Herscher, Laurie; Smith, Sharon

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To report the long-term outcomes and toxicity of a regimen of infusion paclitaxel delivered concurrently with radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 1999, 35 patients with nonmetastatic, Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with three cycles of paclitaxel as a 120-h continuous infusion beginning on Days 1, 21, and 42, concurrent with radiotherapy. The initial 16 patients received 105 mg/m{sup 2}/cycle, and the subsequent 19 patients received 120 mg/m{sup 2}/cycle. External beam radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70.2-72 Gy at five fractions weekly. Patients were followed to evaluate the disease outcomes and late toxicity of this regimen. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 56.5 months. The median survival was 56.5 months, and the median time to local recurrence was not reached. Of the 35 patients, 15 (43%) developed hypothyroidism. Of the 33 patients who underwent percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement, 11 were percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependent until death or their last follow-up visit. Also, 5 patients (14%) required a tracheostomy until death, and 3 (9%) developed a severe esophageal stricture. All evaluated long-term survivors exhibited salivary hypofunction. Fibrosis in the radiation field occurred in 24 patients (69%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that concurrent chemoradiotherapy with a 120-h infusion of paclitaxel provides long-term local control and survival in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Xerostomia, hypothyroidism, esophageal and pharyngeal complications, and subcutaneous fibrosis were common long-term toxicities; however, the vast majority of toxicities were grade 1 or 2.

  5. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate prevents autoimmune-associated down- regulation of p21 in salivary gland cells through a p53-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Douglas; Yu, Hongfang; Ohno, Seiji; Thomas, Cristina; Derossi, Scott; Ma, Yat-Ho; Yates, Nicole; Hahn, Emily; Bisch, Frederick; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hsu, Stephen

    2014-02-01

    The submandibular salivary glands of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a model for Sjogren's syndrome and type-1 diabetes, show an elevated level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a protein involved in cell proliferation and repair of DNA damage. We reported previously that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant green tea catechin, normalizes the PCNA level. PCNA's activity can be regulated by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, which is also important for epithelial cell differentiation. In turn, expression of p21 and PCNA are partially regulated by Rb phosphorylation levels. EGCG was found to modulate p21 expression in epithelial cells, suggesting that EGCG-induced p21 could be associated with down-regulation of PCNA in vivo. The current study examined the protein levels of p21 and p53 (which can up-regulate p21) in NOD mice fed with either water or EGCG, and the effect of EGCG on p21 and p53 in cell line models with either normal or defective Rb. In NOD mice, the p21 level was low, and EGCG normalized it. In contrast to HSG cells with functional Rb, negligible expression of p21 in NS-SVAC cells that lack Rb was not altered by EGCG treatment. Inhibition of p53 by siRNA demonstrated that p21 and p53 were induced independently in HSG cells by a physiological concentration range of EGCG, suggesting p53 could be an important but not conditional factor associated with p21 expression. In conclusion, PCNA and p21 levels are altered inversely in the NOD model for SS and in HSG cells, and warrant further study as candidate new markers for salivary dysfunction associated with xerostomia. Induction of p21 by EGCG could provide clinically useful normalization of salivary glands by promoting differentiation and reducing PCNA levels. PMID:24329914

  6. Analysis of Postsurgical Health-Related Quality of Life and Quality of Voice of Patients With Laryngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jie; Wu, Jieli; Lv, Kexing; Li, Kaichun; Wu, Jianhui; Wen, Yihui; Li, Xiaoling; Tang, Haocheng; Jiang, Aiyun; Wang, Zhangfeng; Wen, Weiping; Lei, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to analyze the postsurgical health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and quality of voice (QOV) of patients with laryngeal carcinoma with an expectation of improving the treatment and HRQOL of these patients. Based on the collection of information of patients with laryngeal carcinoma regarding clinical characteristics (age, TNM stage, with or without laryngeal preservation and/or neck dissection, with or without postoperative irradiation and/or chemotherapy, etc.), QOV using Voice Handicap Index (VIH) scale and HRQOL using EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTCQLQ-H&N35 scales, the differences of postsurgical HRQOL related to their clinical characteristics were analyzed using univariate nonparametric tests, the main factors impacting the postsurgical HRQOL were analyzed using regression analyses (generalized linear models) and the correlation between QOV and HRQOL analyzed using spearman correlation analysis. A total of 92 patients were enrolled in this study, on whom the use of EORTC QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-H&N35 and VHI scales revealed that: the differences of HRQOL were significant among patients with different ages, TNM stages, and treatment modalities; the main factors impacting the postsurgical HRQOL were pain, speech disorder, and dry mouth; and QOV was significantly correlated with HRQOL. For the patients with laryngeal carcinoma included in our study, the quality of life after open surgeries were impacted by many factors predominated by pain, speech disorder, and dry mouth. It is suggested that doctors in China do more efforts on the patients’ postoperative pain and xerostomia management and speech rehabilitation with the hope of improving the patients’ quality of life. PMID:26735538

  7. Dry Mouth and Dietary Quality Among Older Adults in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Sara A.; Savoca, Margaret R.; Leng, Xiaoyan; Chen, Haiying; Bell, Ronny A.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Anderson, Andrea M.; Kohrman, Teresa; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To quantify: (1) prevalence of dry mouth; (2) association of dry mouth with beverage intake and dietary quality; and (3) association of dry mouth with self-reported dietary accommodations to oral health deficits. Design Cross-sectional study; data from self-reports. Participants A multi-stage cluster sampling design was used to recruit 622 participants aged 60+ from rural North Carolina counties with substantial African American and American Indian populations. Measurements Data included the 11-item Xerostomia Inventory (XI); higher scores connote greater impact from dry mouth; a food frequency questionnaire (converted into Health Eating Index-2005 scores); and survey items on foods modified before consumption or avoided due to oral health problems. Results Dry mouth was associated with being female, lower education, and income below the poverty level. Although overall beverage consumption did not vary with dry mouth, consumption of certain sugar-sweetened beverages was positively associated with dry mouth. Overall dietary quality did not differ with dry mouth, but more severe dry mouth was associated with lower intake of whole grains and higher intakes of total fruits. Dry mouth was strongly associated with self-reported modification and avoidance of foods. Those in the highest tertile of dry mouth were more likely to modify several foods compared to the lowest tertile, and were more likely to avoid three or more foods. Conclusion Older adults appear to modify foods or selectively avoid foods in response to perceived dry mouth. Despite these behaviors, dry mouth does not result in reduced dietary quality. PMID:21391935

  8. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Kouri, Mauri; Joensuu, Heikki

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Head and neck carcinomas that recur locally after conventional irradiation pose a difficult therapeutic problem. We evaluated safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of such cancers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with inoperable, recurred, locally advanced (rT3, rT4, or rN2) head and neck cancer were treated with BNCT in a prospective, single-center Phase I-II study. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 56-74 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed using the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) criteria and adverse effects using the National Cancer Institute common toxicity grading v3.0. Intravenously administered boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F, 400 mg/kg) was used as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Ten patients received BNCT twice; 2 were treated once. Ten (83%) patients responded to BNCT, and 2 (17%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.5 and 7.6 months. The median duration of response was 12.1 months; six responses were ongoing at the time of analysis or death (range, 4.9-19.2 months). Four (33%) patients were alive without recurrence with a median follow-up of 14.0 months (range, 12.8-19.2 months). The most common acute adverse effects were mucositis, fatigue, and local pain; 2 patients had a severe (Grade 3) late adverse effect (xerostomia, 1; dysphagia, 1). Conclusions: Boron neutron capture therapy is effective and safe in the treatment of inoperable, locally advanced head and neck carcinomas that recur at previously irradiated sites.

  9. Long term results of comparison of concurrent low-dose daily cisplatin versus the standard weekly cisplatin with six fractions per week radiotherapy in locally advanced head neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pramod Kumar; Lal, Punita; Bajpai, Ranjeet; Goel, Anshu; Yadav, Rajan; Verma, Mranalini; Kumar, Shaleen

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objective: Weekly administration of cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [CDDP]) appears more feasible and substantially more popular than the 3 weekly schedules due to better compliance. Different concurrent cisplatin schedules have been attempted including a daily schedule. We did a comparison of two consecutive single arm studies, i.e., use of weekly cisplatin versus daily cisplatin when used with concurrently with a moderately accelerated radiotherapy (RT) schedule. Patients and Methods: Two prospective feasibility, safety and efficacy studies were carried out consecutively within the department. The weekly CDDP study was done from August 2003 to August 2005 and daily CDDP study was conducted from November 2005 to June 2007. Both studies included locally advanced stage III and IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region with RT dose of 70 Gy. Concurrent single-agent cisplatin was administered weekly (35 mg/m2) in the first and daily (6 mg/m2) in the second study. Results: Weekly cisplatin study had 68 and daily CDDP study had 52 patients. The median follow-up in the two studies was 93 and 63 months, respectively. Compliance in the two studies was comparable. Acute Grade III/IV mucositis and dysphagia were significantly higher in weekly cisplatin study. Late Grade II/III toxicities such as xerostomia, dysphagia, ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity were similar. The 5 years locoregional control was 18% and 25% and 5 years overall survival rate was 32% and 31% in weekly and daily cisplatin studies, respectively. Conclusions: Modest acceleration along with either weekly or daily cisplatin, whichever is possible in one's setup, is do-able, provided due attention is paid to patient selection and supportive care. PMID:27275456

  10. A secretagogue-siRNA conjugate confers resistance to cytotoxicity in a cell model of Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pauley, Kaleb M.; Gauna, Adrienne E.; Grichtchenko, Irina I.; Chan, Edward K.L.; Cha, Seunghee

    2012-01-01

    Objective Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) is characterized by xerophthalmia and xerostomia resulting from loss of secretory function due to immune cell infiltration in lacrimal and salivary glands. Current SjS therapeutic strategies employ secretagogues to induce secretion via muscarinic receptor stimulation. Based on our expertise on muscarinic type-3-receptor (M3R), we are utilizing ligands specific for muscarinic receptor to deliver siRNA into cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis, thereby altering epithelial cell responses to external cues such as pro-inflammatory or death signals while simultaneously stimulating secretion. Methods Carbachol was synthesized with an active choline group and conjugated with siRNA targeting caspase-3, and a human salivary gland cell line (HSG) was used to test the efficacy of this conjugate. Results Lipofectamine transfection of conjugate into cells resulted in 78%-reduction in caspase-3 gene expression, while external conjugate treatment of HSG cells resulted in similar intracellular calcium release and induction of endocytosis as carbachol stimulation indicating that the siRNA and carbachol portions of conjugate retained function after conjugation. HSG cells treated with conjugate (without Lipofectamine transfection) exhibited a 50% reduction in caspase-3 gene and protein expression indicating our conjugate is effective in delivering functional siRNA into cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Furthermore, TNF-α induced apoptosis was significantly reduced in conjugate treated cells. Conclusions In conclusion, a secretagogue-siRNA conjugate prevented cytokine-induced apoptosis in salivary epithelial cells, which is critical to maintain fluid secretion and potentially reverse the clinical hallmark of SjS. PMID:21567383

  11. A comparison of mean parotid gland dose with measures of parotid gland function after radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: Implications for future trials

    SciTech Connect

    Roesink, Judith M. . E-mail: J.M.Roesink@azu.nl; Schipper, Maria; Busschers, Wim; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the most adequate parameter to measure the consequences of reducing the parotid gland dose. Methods and Materials: One hundred eight patients treated with radiotherapy for various malignancies of the head and neck were prospectively evaluated using three methods. Parotid gland function was objectively determined by measuring stimulated parotid flow using Lashley cups and scintigraphy. To assess xerostomia-related quality of life, the head-and-neck cancer module European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ (Quality of Life Questionnaire) H and N35 was used. Measurements took place before radiotherapy and 6 weeks and 12 months after the completion of radiotherapy. Complication was defined for each method using cutoff values. The correlation between these complications and the mean parotid gland dose was investigated to find the best measure for parotid gland function. Results: For both flow and scintigraphy data, the best definition for objective parotid gland toxicity seemed to be reduction of stimulated parotid flow to {<=}25% of the preradiotherapy flow. Of all the subjective variables, only the single item dry mouth 6 weeks after radiotherapy was found to be significant. The best correlation with the mean parotid gland dose was found for the stimulated flow measurements. The predictive ability was the highest for the time point 1 year after radiotherapy. Subjective findings did not correlate with the mean parotid dose. Conclusions: Stimulated flow measurements using Lashley cups, with a complication defined as flow {<=}25% of the preradiotherapy output, correlated best with the mean parotid gland dose. When reduction of the mean dose to the parotid gland is intended, the stimulated flow measurement is the best method for evaluating parotid gland function.

  12. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Improves Target Coverage and Parotid Gland Sparing When Delivering Total Mucosal Irradiation in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck of Unknown Primary Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bhide, Shreerang Clark, Catherine; Harrington, Kevin; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2007-10-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with occult primary site represents a controversial clinical problem. Conventional total mucosal irradiation (TMI) maximizes local control, but at the expense of xerostomia. IMRT has been shown to spare salivary tissue in head and cancer patients. This study has been performed to investigate the potential of IMRT to perform nodal and TMI and also allow parotid gland sparing in this patient group. Conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and IMRT plans were produced for six patients to treat the ipsilateral (involved) post-operative neck (PTV1) and the un-operated contralateral neck and mucosal axis (PTV2). Plans were produced with and without the inclusion of nasopharynx in the PTV2. The potential to improve target coverage and spare the parotid glands was investigated for the IMRT plans. There was no significant difference in the mean doses to the PTV1 using CRT and IMRT (59.7 and 60.0 respectively, p = 0.5). The maximum doses to PTV1 and PTV2 were lower for the IMRT technique as compared to CRT (P = 0.008 and P < 0.0001), respectively, and the minimum doses to PTV1 and PTV2 were significantly higher for IMRT as compared to CRT (P = 0.001 and P = 0.001), respectively, illustrating better dose homogeneity with IMRT. The mean dose to the parotid gland contralateral to PTV1 was significantly lower for IMRT (23.21 {+-} 0.7) as compared to CRT (50.5 {+-} 5.8) (P < 0.0001). There was a significant difference in parotid dose between plans with and without the inclusion of the nasopharynx. IMRT offers improved dose homogeneity in PTV1 and PTV2 and allows for parotid sparing.

  13. Comparison of long-term survival and toxicity of simultaneous integrated boost vs conventional fractionation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hengmin; Wei, Yumei; Huang, Wei; Gai, Xiujuan; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Aim In recent years, the intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy with conventional fractionation (IMRT-CF) have been involved in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, the potential clinical effects and toxicities are still controversial. Methods Here, 107 patients with biopsy-proven locally advanced NPC between March 2004 and January 2011 were enrolled in the retrospective study. Among them, 54 patients received IMRT-SIB, and 53 patients received IMRT-CF. Subsequently, overall survival (OS), 5-year progression-free survival (PFS), 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and relevant toxicities were analyzed. Results In the present study, all patients completed the treatment, and the overall median follow-up time was 80 months (range: 8–126 months). The 5-year OS analysis revealed no significant difference between the IMRT-SIB and IMRT-CF groups (80.9% vs 80.5%, P=0.568). In addition, there were also no significant between-group differences in 5-year PFS (73.3% vs 74.4%, P=0.773) and 5-year LRFS (88.1% vs 90.8%, P=0.903). Notably, the dose to critical organs (spinal cord, brainstem, and parotid gland) in patients treated by IMRT-CF was significantly lower than that in patients treated by IMRT-SIB (all P<0.05). Conclusion Both IMRT-SIB and IMRT-CF techniques are effective in treating locally advanced NPC, with similar OS, PFS, and LRFS. However, IMRT-CF has more advantages than IMRT-SIB in protecting spinal cord, brainstem, and parotid gland from acute and late toxicities, such as xerostomia. Further prospective study is warranted to confirm our findings. PMID:27099518

  14. [The fight against malnutrition in older adults: new aproaches in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Prêcheur, Isabelle; Chevalier, Marlène

    2015-03-01

    A minimal oral treatment aiming a clean and comfortable mouth could be very helpful in malnutrition control of dependent elderly persons. In such a case, it is necessary and generally it is enough to perform dental scaling and/or extractions with anxiolytic premedication (oral or rectal diazepam). Most of times, such minimal dental care can be performed at bedside, avoiding patient's stress and displacement to a dental surgery. The nursing staff can reassure the residents and their families on the absence of dentures, because saliva would be even more important than teeth. Actually, there is a tight relation between oral health, saliva, drugs, food texture and nutritional state of person. The notion of saliva includes two important criteria: 1) saliva-bacteria in the saliva, 2) fluid saliva-oral biofilm covering mucous membranes. All factors which change saliva secretion or inhibit oral bacteria community may lead to malnutrition. Several studies performed in hospital geriatric wards and in retirement homes allowed us to identify the following iatrogenic causes for malnutrition: 1) inappropriate preservation of teeth or dentures which may lead to oral reservoir (Candida albicans yeast-hyphal transition, antibiotic resistance genes transfer); 2) excessive uses of antiseptic mouthwashes for oral hygiene (leading to oral biofilm inhibition which is a cause of xerostomia); 3) drugs crushed in food (alteration of food taste and alteration of the oral biofilm); 4) exclusive recourse to a soft or mixed texture of food (alternative solutions exist, such as texture-adapted protein rich cookies). All these iatrogenic practices raise the possibility of formation of thick microbial communities in the mouth. This would explain why, despite attentive oral care, most of nurses and nurse's aides feel that in retirement homes the oral hygiene of the many residents is insufficient. PMID:25786420

  15. Diffuse Cystic Lung Disease as the Presenting Manifestation of Sjögren Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nishant; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; Fischer, Aryeh; McCormack, Francis X

    2016-03-01

    Interstitial lung diseases, especially lymphoproliferative disorders such as follicular bronchiolitis and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia, are commonly seen in association with Sjögren syndrome. Although the predominant computed tomographic (CT) findings in patients with lymphoid interstitial pneumonia/follicular bronchiolitis include poorly defined centrilobular nodules and ground-glass attenuation, cystic changes can be seen in approximately two-thirds of these patients. The objective of this study was to define the clinical, radiological, and histopathological features of cyst-predominant lymphoid interstitial pneumonia/follicular bronchiolitis in patients with Sjögren syndrome. We present four patients who were referred to our institution with diffuse cystic changes on chest CT imaging. All four had a presumptive diagnosis of lymphangioleiomyomatosis but were subsequently found to have Sjögren syndrome. The diagnosis was established based on the clinical symptoms of xerostomia and xerophthalmia along with serologic detection of antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, anti-Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen A (SSA)/Ro antibodies, and anti-Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen B (SSB)/La antibodies. The cystic pattern associated with Sjögren syndrome had a characteristic appearance on chest CT images. Typical features included a wide variation in cyst size, internal structure within cysts, geographic simplification of parenchymal architecture producing a "dissolving lung appearance," perivascular and often basilar-predominant distribution, and frequent association with ground-glass opacities and nodules. In a compatible clinical context, we submit that these findings can be sufficiently distinctive to obviate the need for lung biopsy, even in the absence of confirmatory serological studies or lip biopsy. Clinicians should consider occult Sjögren syndrome in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with idiopathic diffuse cystic lung disease. PMID

  16. A Prospective Study of Salivary Gland Function in Lymphoma Patients Receiving Head and Neck Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Neesha A.; Killion, Leah; Hickey, Gail; Silver, Barbara; Martin, Chrystalla; Stevenson, Mary Ann; Mauch, Peter M.; Ng, Andrea K.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the radiation dose-response relationship on salivary dysfunction and quality of life (QOL) over time in patients with lymphoma receiving radiation therapy (RT) to the head and neck (H and N). Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective study on salivary-gland function in lymphoma patients receiving RT to the H and N. Fifteen patients were enrolled on the study. Dose-volume histograms and mean doses to the salivary glands were generated. Radiation-related toxicities and H and N-specific QOL were assessed before treatment and at prespecified time points posttreatment. Factors predicting a decrement in QOL were explored using Fisher's exact test. Results: During RT, 47% of patients experienced Grade >= 2 acute toxicity of the salivary gland, mucous membrane, or both. QOL scores improved over time, but up to one third of patients continued to have persistent oral symptoms at 2 years. At 6 months, a mean dose to at least one of the parotids of > 31 Gy was significantly associated with persistent dry mouth (100% vs. 17%, p = 0.02) and sticky saliva (100% vs. 25%, p = 0.04); a mean dose of > 11 Gy to the minor salivary glands was significantly associated with persistent sticky saliva (100% vs. 25%, p = 0.04), although the difference was no longer significant at 1 year. Conclusions: Limiting the mean parotid dose to <= 31 Gy and mean minor salivary gland dose to <= 11 Gy in lymphoma patients treated to the H and N may help reduce the risk of subacute xerostomia.

  17. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervical Lymph Node Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Madani, Indira Vakaet, Luc; Bonte, Katrien; Boterberg, Tom; Neve, Wilfried de

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional (two-dimensional) radiotherapy in the treatment of cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary cancer (UPC). Methods and Materials: Between February 2003 and September 2006, 23 patients with UPC of squamous cell carcinoma were treated with IMRT. Extended putative mucosal and bilateral nodal sites were irradiated to a median dose of 66 Gy. In 19 patients, IMRT was performed after lymph node dissection, and in 4 patients primary radiotherapy was given. The conventional radiotherapy group (historical control group) comprised 18 patients treated to a median dose of 66 Gy between August 1994 and October 2003. Results: Twenty patients completed treatment. As compared with conventional radiotherapy, the incidence of Grade 3 acute dysphagia was significantly lower in the IMRT group (4.5% vs. 50%, p = 0.003). By 6 months, Grade 3 xerostomia was detected in 11.8% patients in the IMRT group vs. 53.4% in the historical control group (p = 0.03). No Grade 3 dysphagia or skin fibrosis was observed after IMRT but these were noted after conventional radiotherapy (26.7%, p = 0.01) and 26.7%, p = 0.03) respectively). With median follow-up of living patients of 17 months, there was no emergence of primary cancer. One patient had persistent nodal disease and another had nodal relapse at 5 months. Distant metastases were detected in 4 patients. The 2-year overall survival and distant disease-free probability after IMRT did not differ significantly from those for conventional radiotherapy (74.8% vs. 61.1% and 76.3% vs. 68.4%, respectively). Conclusions: Use of IMRT for UPC resulted in lower toxicity than conventional radiotherapy, and was similar in efficacy.

  18. Maintaining women's oral health.

    PubMed

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices. PMID:11486666

  19. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 06: The influence of regional dose sensitivity on salivary loss and recovery in the parotid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, H; Thomas, S; Moiseenko, V; Hovan, A; Wu, J

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The Quantitative Analyses of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC 2010) survey of radiation dose-volume effects on salivary gland function has called for improved understanding of intragland dose sensitivity and the effectiveness of partial sparing in salivary glands. Regional dose susceptibility of sagittally- and coronally-sub-segmented parotid gland has been studied. Specifically, we examine whether individual consideration of sub-segments leads to improved prediction of xerostomia compared with whole parotid mean dose. Methods: Data from 102 patients treated for head-and-neck cancers at the BC Cancer Agency were used in this study. Whole mouth stimulated saliva was collected before (baseline), three months, and one year after cessation of radiotherapy. Organ volumes were contoured using treatment planning CT images and sub-segmented into regional portions. Both non-parametric (local regression) and parametric (mean dose exponential fitting) methods were employed. A bootstrap technique was used for reliability estimation and cross-comparison. Results: Salivary loss is described well using non-parametric and mean dose models. Parametric fits suggest a significant distinction in dose response between medial-lateral and anterior-posterior aspects of the parotid (p<0.01). Least-squares and least-median squares estimates differ significantly (p<0.00001), indicating fits may be skewed by noise or outliers. Salivary recovery exhibits a weakly arched dose response: the highest recovery is seen at intermediate doses. Conclusions: Salivary function loss is strongly dose dependent. In contrast no useful dose dependence was observed for function recovery. Regional dose dependence was observed, but may have resulted from a bias in dose distributions.

  20. Biomacromolecule conjugated nanofiber scaffold for salivary gland tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayarathanam, Kavitha

    Xerostomia or dry mouth, resulting from loss of salivary gland secretion can be alleviated by tissue engineering approaches to restore glandular cell function. Engineering an artificial salivary gland structure requires closely mimicking the natural environment, both physically and functionally, to promote epithelial cell proliferation, monolayer formation and apico-basal polarization. While the physical structure of the salivary gland extracellular matrix (ECM) can be reconstructed using biocompatible nanofiber scaffolds, the chemical signals from ECM macromolecules are equally involved in the gland morphogenesis. In these glands, Hyaluronic acid (HA), a biomacromolecule that is a major component of the ECM, plays a crucial role in recruiting growth factors to improve cell viability and growth in these glands. Another molecule of interest that improved salivary epithelial cell viability and apico-basal differentiation is laminin, a major protein found in the basement membrane. We hypothesize that these biomacromolecules, when conjugated nanofiber scaffolds, will provide the essential chemical signals that promote cell viability, proliferation, polarity in the salivary cell line of interest. These morphological changes will in turn promote the secretory function (salivary production). The nanofiber scaffold consisting of poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid is conjugated with HA using a polyethylene glycol (PEG) diamine crosslinker. This conjugation was confirmed using fluorescence spectrometry, water contact angle test and immunocytochemistry analysis using confocal microscopy. The effect of HA in promoting cell survival in-vitro was established with MTT assay using SIMS (mouse submandibular immortalized ductal SIMS cells) cells. The effect of HA in improving the apico - basal polarity of SIMS cells will be assessed. Chemical modification of synthetic nanopolymeric scaffolds with ECM molecules e.g., HA, laminin are the next step towards developing "smart scaffolds", that

  1. ALX/FPR2 Modulates Anti-Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Submandibular Gland

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-Shuen; Wee, Yinshen; Yang, Chieh-Hsiang; Melvin, James E.; Baker, Olga J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the G-protein coupled formyl peptide receptor 2 (ALX/FPR2) by the lipid mediators lipoxin A4 and resolvin D1 (RvD1) promotes resolution of inflammation. Our previous in vitro studies indicate that RvD1 activation of ALX/FPR2 resolves cytokine-mediated inflammatory responses in mammalian cells. However, the impact of ALX/FPR2 activation on salivary gland function in vivo is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine whether submandibular glands (SMG) from ALX/FPR2−/− mice display enhanced inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) stimulation. For these studies, C57BL/6 and ALX/FPR2−/− mice at age 8-12-week-old were treated with LPS by i.p for 24 h. Salivary gland structure and function were analyzed by histopathological assessment, saliva flow rate, quantitative PCR, Western blot analyses and immunofluorescence. Our results showed the following events in the ALX/FPR2−/− mice treated with LPS: a) upregulated inflammatory cytokines and decreased M3R (Muscarinic Acetylcholine receptor M3) and AQP5 (Aquaporin 5) protein expression, b) decreased saliva secretion, c) increased apoptosis, d) alteration of tight junction and neuronal damage. Overall, our data suggest that the loss of ALX/FPR2 results in unresolved acute inflammation and SMG dysfunction (xerostomia) in response to LPS that is similar to human salivary gland dysfunction induced by bacterial infection. PMID:27064029

  2. Helical Tomotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer: A European Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Van den Weyngaert, Danielle; De Kerf, Geert; De Ost, Bie; Vanderveken, Olivier; Van Laer, Carl; Specenier, Pol; Geussens, Yasmyne; Wouters, Kristien; Meulemans, Els; Cheung, Kin Jip; Grégoire, Vincent; Vermorken, Jan B.

    2015-01-01

    Background. We report on a retrospective analysis of 147 patients with early and locoregionally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) treated with helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients and Methods. Included were patients with SCCHN of the oral cavity (OC), oropharynx (OP), hypopharynx (HP), or larynx (L) consecutively treated in one radiotherapy center in 2008 and 2009. The prescribed HT dose was 60–66 Gy in the postoperative setting (group A) and 66–70 Gy when given as primary treatment (group B). HT was given alone, concurrent with systemic therapy (ST), that is, chemotherapy, biotherapy, or both, and with or without induction therapy (IT). Acute and late toxicities are reported using standard criteria; locoregional failure/progression (LRF), distant metastases (DM), and second primary tumors (SPT) were documented, and event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated from the start of HT. Results. Group A patients received HT alone in 22 cases and HT + ST in 20 cases; group B patients received HT alone in 17 cases and HT + ST in 88 cases. Severe (grade ≥ 3) acute mucosal toxicity and swallowing problems increased with more additional ST. After a median follow-up of 44 months, grade ≥2 late toxicity after HT + ST was approximately twice that of HT alone for skin, subcutis, pharynx, and larynx. Forty percent had grade ≥2 late xerostomia, and 29% had mucosal toxicity. At 3 years, LRF/DM/SPT occurred in 7%/7%/17% and 25%/13%/5% in groups A and B, respectively, leading to a 3-year EFS/OS of 64%/74% and 56%/63% in groups A and B, respectively. Conclusion. The use of HT alone or in combination with ST is feasible and promising and has a low late fatality rate. However, late toxicity is nearly twice as high when ST is added to HT. PMID:25673104

  3. Multi-Institutional Trial of Accelerated Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Oropharyngeal Cancer (RTOG 00-22)

    SciTech Connect

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Harris, Jonathan; Garden, Adam S.; Chao, Clifford K.S.; Straube, William; Harari, Paul M.; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Jones, Christopher U.; Bosch, Walter R.; Ang, K. Kian

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess the results of a multi-institutional study of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for early oropharyngeal cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma Stage T1-2, N0-1, M0 requiring treatment of the bilateral neck were eligible. Chemotherapy was not permitted. Prescribed planning target volumes (PTVs) doses to primary tumor and involved nodes was 66 Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction over 6 weeks. Subclinical PTVs received simultaneously 54-60 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction. Participating institutions were preapproved for IMRT, and quality assurance review was performed by the Image-Guided Therapy Center. Results: 69 patients were accrued from 14 institutions. At median follow-up for surviving patients (2.8 years), the 2-year estimated local-regional failure (LRF) rate was 9%. 2/4 patients (50%) with major underdose deviations had LRF compared with 3/49 (6%) without such deviations (p = 0.04). All cases of LRF, metastasis, or second primary cancer occurred among patients who were current/former smokers, and none among patients who never smoked. Maximal late toxicities Grade >=2 were skin 12%, mucosa 24%, salivary 67%, esophagus 19%, osteoradionecrosis 6%. Longer follow-up revealed reduced late toxicity in all categories. Xerostomia Grade >=2 was observed in 55% of patients at 6 months but reduced to 25% and 16% at 12 and 24 months, respectively. In contrast, salivary output did not recover over time. Conclusions: Moderately accelerated hypofractionatd IMRT without chemotherapy for early oropharyngeal cancer is feasible, achieving high tumor control rates and reduced salivary toxicity compared with similar patients in previous Radiation Therapy Oncology Group studies. Major target underdose deviations were associated with higher LRF rate.

  4. A Novel Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-3 Activator (Alda-89) Protects Submandibular Gland Function from Irradiation without Accelerating Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Nan; Cao, Hongbin; Chen, Che-Hong; Kong, Christina S.; Ali, Rehan; Chan, Cato; Sirjani, Davud; Graves, Edward; Koong, Albert; Giaccia, Amato; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of Alda-89 (an ALDH3 activitor) on (1) the function of irradiated (RT) submandibular gland (SMG) in mice, (2) its toxicity profile and (3) its effect on the growth of head and neck cancer (HNC) in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design Adult mice were infused with Alda-89 or vehicle before, during and after RT. Saliva secretion was monitored weekly. Hematology, metabolic profile and post-mortem evaluation for toxicity were examined at the time of sacrifice. Alda-89 or vehicle was applied to HNC cell lines in vitro, and SCID mice transplanted with HNC in vivo with or without radiation; HNC growth was monitored. The ALDH3A1 and ALDH3A2 protein expression was evaluated in 89 HNC patients and correlated to freedom from relapse (FFR) and overall survival (OS). Results Alda-89 infusion significantly resulted in more whole saliva production and a higher percentage of preserved acini after RT compared to vehicle control. There was no difference in the complete blood count, metabolic profile, and major organ morphology between the Alda-89 and vehicle groups. Compared to vehicle control, Alda-89 treatment did not accelerate HNC cell proliferation in vitro, nor did it affect tumor growth in vivo with or without RT. Higher expression of ALDH3A1 or ALDH3A2 was not significantly associated with worse FFR or OS in either HPV-positive or HPV-negative group. Conclusion Alda-89 preserves salivary function after RT without affecting HNC growth or causing measurable toxicity in mice. It is a promising candidate to mitigate RT-related xerostomia. PMID:23812668

  5. Oral Health-Related Complications of Breast Cancer Treatment: Assessing Dental Hygienists’ Knowledge and Professional Practice

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Gomez, Grace; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2014-01-01

    Objective Approximately 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the U.S. every year. These patients commonly suffer from oral complications of their cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess dental hygienists’ knowledge and professional practice related to providing care for breast cancer patients. Methods A pre-tested 43-item survey was mailed to a random sample of 10% of all licensed dental hygienists in the State of Michigan (N=962). The survey assessed the respondents’ knowledge of potential oral complications of breast cancer treatments as well as their professional practices when treating patients with breast cancer. After two mailings, the response rate was 37% (N=331). Descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted using SAS. Results Many dental hygienists were unaware of the recommended clinical guidelines for treating breast cancer patients and lacked specific knowledge pertaining to the commonly prescribed anti-estrogen medications for pre-and postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Over 70% of the respondents indicated they were unfamiliar with the AI class of medications. Only 13% of dental hygienists correctly identified the mechanism of action of anti-estrogen therapy. Dental hygienists reported increased gingival inflammation, gingival bleeding, periodontal pocketing, xerostomia and burning tissues in patients receiving anti-estrogen therapies. Less than 10% believed that their knowledge of breast cancer treatments and the oral side effects is up to date. Conclusions Results indicate a need for more education about the potential oral effects of breast cancer therapies and about providing the best possible care for patients undergoing breast cancer treatment. PMID:24771774

  6. Dose-Effect Relationships for the Submandibular Salivary Glands and Implications for Their Sparing by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne; Vineberg, Karen A.; Ship, Jonathan

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: Submandibular salivary glands (SMGs) dysfunction contributes to xerostomia after radiotherapy (RT) of head-and-neck (HN) cancer. We assessed SMG dose-response relationships and their implications for sparing these glands by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 148 HN cancer patients underwent unstimulated and stimulated SMG salivary flow rate measurements selectively from Wharton's duct orifices, before RT and periodically through 24 months after RT. Correlations of flow rates and mean SMG doses were modeled throughout all time points. IMRT replanning in 8 patients whose contralateral level I was not a target incorporated the results in a new cost function aiming to spare contralateral SMGs. Results: Stimulated SMG flow rates decreased exponentially by (1.2%){sup Gy} as mean doses increased up to 39 Gy threshold, and then plateaued near zero. At mean doses {<=}39 Gy, but not higher, flow rates recovered over time at 2.2%/month. Similarly, the unstimulated salivary flow rates decreased exponentially by (3%){sup Gy} as mean dose increased and recovered over time if mean dose was <39 Gy. IMRT replanning reduced mean contralateral SMG dose by average 12 Gy, achieving {<=}39 Gy in 5 of 8 patients, without target underdosing, increasing the mean doses to the parotid glands and swallowing structures by average 2-3 Gy. Conclusions: SMG salivary flow rates depended on mean dose with recovery over time up to a threshold of 39 Gy. Substantial SMG dose reduction to below this threshold and without target underdosing is feasible in some patients, at the expense of modestly higher doses to some other organs.

  7. Dose-Effect Relationships for the Submandibular Salivary Glands and Implications for Their Sparing by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne; Kim, Hyugnjin M.; Vineberg, Karen A; Ship, Jonathan A.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Submandibular salivary glands (SMGs) dysfunction contributes to xerostomia after radiotherapy (RT) of head and neck (HN) cancer. We assessed SMG dose-response relationships and their implications for sparing these glands by intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Patients and Methods 148 HN cancer patients underwent unstimulated and stimulated SMG salivary flow rate measurements selectively from Wharton’s duct orifices, before RT and periodically through 24 months after RT. Correlations of flow rates and mean SMG doses were modeled throughout all time points. IMRT re-planning in eight patients whose contralateral level I was not a target incorporated the results in a new cost function aiming to spare contralateral SMGs. Results Stimulated SMG flow rates decreased exponentially by (1.2%)Gy as mean doses increased up to 39 Gy threshold, and then plateaued near zero. At mean doses ≤39 Gy, but not higher, flow rates recovered over time at 2.2%/month. Similarly, the unstimulated salivary flow rates decreased exponentially by (3%)Gy as mean dose increased and recovered over time if mean dose was <39 Gy. IMRT re-planning reduced mean contralateral SMG dose by average 12 Gy, achieving ≤39 Gy in 5/8 patients, without target under-dosing, increasing the mean doses to the parotid glands and swallowing structures by average 2–3 Gy. Conclusions SMG salivary flow rates depended on mean dose with recovery over time up to a threshold of 39 Gy. Substantial SMG dose reduction to below this threshold and without target under-dosing is feasible in some patients, at the expense of modestly higher doses to some other organs. PMID:18337023

  8. Rosai-Dorfman disease with factor XII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kasapoglu Gunal, Esen; Kamali, Sevil; Akdogan, Mehmet Fatih; Cimen, Arif Oguz; Ocal, Lale; Agan, Mehmet; Gul, Ahmet; Inanc, Murat; Konice, Meral; Aral, Orhan

    2009-06-01

    A 17-year-old female patient presented with chronic symmetrical oligoarthritis of both knees and ankles, xerostomia, xerophthalmia, multiple bilateral lymphadenopathies in the cervical region, and bilateral parotid enlargement with the histological finding of chronic sialoadenitis. She had been already given methotrexate, chloroquine, and corticosteroids with the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) before referral to our outpatient clinic. Because her complaints and the lumps did not remit and she could be classified as neither RA nor primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) according to 1987 ACR RA criteria or European preliminary criteria for SS, lymph node biopsy was repeated and revealed the diagnosis of Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) with the histological findings of histiocytes, phagocyting lymphocytes in enlarged sinuses, and mature plasma cells infiltrating the pulpa. All the medications were stopped after the pathological diagnosis of RDD and consulting with the Division of Hematology. She was reevaluated with magnetic resonance imaging, which showed dense infiltrative areas around knee and ankle joints, and computed tomography that showed a soft tissue mass surrounding the descending aorta and upper part of the abdominal aorta. Activated partial thromboplastin time was found to be prolonged in prebiopsy examinations, and factor XII deficiency was detected after detailed hematological evaluation. The symptoms of joint involvement were relieved with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. She has been followed-up without medication without obvious clinical or laboratory change. We herein report a patient with RDD mimicking RA and SS. We consider that RDD should be kept in mind especially in patients with resistant symptoms to conventional therapies, younger disease onset, and predominant parotid and lymph node enlargement. PMID:19326165

  9. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Hope, Andrew J.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for 'generalizabilty' validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  10. Salivary gland cell differentiation and organization on micropatterned PLGA nanofiber craters

    PubMed Central

    Soscia, David A.; Sequeira, Sharon J.; Schramm, Robert A.; Jayarathanam, Kavitha; Cantara, Shraddha I.; Larsen, Melinda; Castracane, James

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for an artificial salivary gland as a long-term remedy for patients suffering from salivary hypofunction, a leading cause of chronic xerostomia (dry mouth). Current salivary gland tissue engineering approaches are limited in that they either lack sufficient physical cues and surface area needed to facilitate epithelial cell differentiation, or they fail to provide a mechanism for assembling an interconnected branched network of cells. We have developed highly-ordered arrays of curved hemispherical “craters” in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using wafer-level integrated circuit (IC) fabrication processes, and lined them with electrospun poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanofibers, designed to mimic the three-dimensional (3-D) in vivo architecture of the basement membrane surrounding spherical acini of salivary gland epithelial cells. These micropatterned scaffolds provide a method for engineering increased surface area and were additionally investigated for their ability to promote cell polarization. Two immortalized salivary gland cell lines (SIMS, ductal and Par-C10, acinar) were cultured on fibrous crater arrays of various radii and compared with those grown on flat PLGA nanofiber substrates, and in 3-D Matrigel. It was found that by increasing crater curvature, the average height of the cell monolayer of SIMS cells and to a lesser extent, Par-C10 cells, increased to a maximum similar to that seen in cells grown in 3-D Matrigel. Increasing curvature resulted in higher expression levels of tight junction protein occludin in both cell lines, but did not induce a change in expression of adherens junction protein Ecadherin. Additionally, increasing curvature promoted polarity of both cell lines, as a greater apical localization of occludin was seen in cells on substrates of higher curvature. Lastly, substrate curvature increased expression of the water channel protein aquaporin-5 (Aqp-5) in Par-C10 cells, suggesting that curved nanofiber

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary: Toxicity and Preliminary Efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, Michelle L. Mechalakos, James G.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Kraus, Dennis; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin; Pfister, David G.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Unknown primary head and neck cancers often require comprehensive mucosal and bilateral neck irradiation. With conventional techniques, significant toxicity can develop. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has the potential to minimize the toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2005, 21 patients underwent IMRT for unknown primary head and neck cancer at our center. Of the 21 patients, 5 received IMRT with definitive intent and 16 as postoperative therapy; 14 received concurrent chemotherapy and 7 IMRT alone. The target volumes included the bilateral neck and mucosal surface. The median dose was 66 Gy. Acute and chronic toxicities, esophageal strictures, and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence were evaluated. Progression-free survival, regional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were estimated with Kaplan-Meier curves. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, the 2-year regional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 90%, 90%, and 85%, respectively. Acute grade 1 and 2 xerostomia was seen in 57% and 43% of patients, respectively. Salivary function improved with time. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement was required in 72% with combined modality treatment and 43% with IMRT alone. Only 1 patient required percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy support at the last follow-up visit. Two patients treated with combined modality and one treated with IMRT alone developed esophageal strictures, but all had improvement or resolution with dilation. Conclusion: The preliminary analysis of IMRT for unknown primary head and neck cancer has shown acceptable toxicity and encouraging efficacy. The analysis of the dosimetric variables showed excellent tumor coverage and acceptable doses to critical normal structures. Esophageal strictures developed but were effectively treated with dilation. Techniques to limit the esophageal dose

  12. In vivo studies of effects of antidepressants on parotid salivary secretion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Martin; Winder, Michael; Zawia, Hana; Lödöen, Ida; Tobin, Gunnar; Götrick, Bengt

    2016-07-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) are well-known xerogenic drugs, while antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are considered less xerogenic. The antimuscarinic effect of the TCAs has been considered to be the principal mechanism causing a dry mouth. Although the muscarinic receptor is commonly targeted by xerogenic pharmaceuticals, the salivation reflex arc may be affected at other levels as well. We currently wondered whether or not antidepressants exert an inhibition of the salivary reflex not only at the glandular level but at a central level as well. In this study, the effects of a TCA (clomipramine), a SSRI (citalopram) and a serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI; venlafaxine) were examined on reflex- (0.5M citric acid applied on the tongue) and methacholine-evoked salivary secretion. While all three compounds inhibited citric acid-evoked secretion (-40 to -60% at 5mg/kg i.v. of the antidepressants), only clomipramine inhibited methacholine-evoked secretion (-30% at 5mg/kg i.v.). On the contrary, both citalopram and venlafaxine increased the methacholine-evoked secretion (+44 to 49%). This was particularly obvious for the salivary protein output (>200%). In the presence of α- and β-adrenoceptor antagonists, the citalopram- and venlafaxine-induced increases were reduced. Thus, antidepressants irrespective of type may exert xerogenic effects by inhibiting the salivary reflex in the central nervous system. However, while TCAs may also hamper the secretory response by antimuscarinic effects, the SSRI and the SNRI groups of pharmaceuticals seem to lack this additional xerogenic mechanism indicating a better therapeutic profile and better opportunities for pharmacological treatment of drug-induced xerostomia. PMID:27023402

  13. Early Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Reducing Radiotherapy Side Effects: Early Results of a Randomized Trial in Oropharyngeal and Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Teguh, David N.; Levendag, Peter C.; Noever, Inge; Voet, Peter; Est, Henrie van der; Rooij, Peter van; Dumans, Antoine G.; Boer, Maarten F. de; Huls, Michiel van der; Sterk, Wouter; Schmitz, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Comparison of quality of life (QoL) and side effects in a randomized trial for early hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: From 2006, 19 patients with tumor originating from the tonsillar fossa and/or soft palate (15), base of tongue (1), and nasopharynx (3) were randomized to receive HBOT or not. HBOT consisted of 30 sessions at 2.5 ATA (15 msw) with oxygen breathing for 90 min daily, 5 days per week, applied shortly after the RT treatment was completed. As of 2005, all patients received validated questionnaires (i.e., the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ Head and Neck Cancer Module (H and N35), Performance Status Scale): before treatment; at the start of RT treatment; after 46 Gy; at the end of RT treatment; and 2, 4, and 6 weeks and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after follow-up. Results: On all QoL items, better scores were obtained in patients treated with hyperbaric oxygen. The difference between HBOT vs. non-HBOT was significant for all parameters: EORTC H and N35 Swallowing (p = 0.011), EORTC H and N35 Dry Mouth (p = 0.009), EORTC H and N35, Sticky Saliva (p = 0.01), PSS Eating in Public (p = 0.027), and Pain in Mouth (visual analogue scale; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Patients randomized for receiving hyperbaric oxygen after the RT had better QoL scores for swallowing, sticky saliva, xerostomia, and pain in mouth.

  14. Protective effect of Yashtimadhu (Glycyrrhiza glabra) against side effects of radiation/chemotherapy in head and neck malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debabrata; Agarwal, S. K.; Chandola, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the very common side effects of Radiation/Chemotherapy especially of the head and neck malignancies is mucositis. Cancer therapy or the cancer itself may cause changes in the body chemistry that results in loss of appetite, pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and very common mucositis which makes eating difficult. Loss of appetite is followed by an undesirable loss of weight due to insufficient amount of calories every day which can lead to loss of muscle mass and strength and other complications by causing interruptions of medical therapy, impeding effective cancer therapy. Mucositis cause decreased immunity and quality of life as well as poor tolerance to surgery and altered efficacy of Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy. The present study is designed with the objective to minimize the radiation induced mucositis, skin reaction, xerostomia, change in voice etc. with an Ayurvedic preparation Yashtimadhu Ghrita (processed ghee). Total 75 patients were randomly divided into four groups and drugs were administered: Group A with local application of Yashtimadhu powder and honey in the oral cavity for few minutes prior to radiotherapy along with oral intake of Yashtimadhu Ghrita; Group B with only local application of the Yashtimadhu powder and honey in the oral cavity; Group C patients administered with only local application of honey in the oral cavity; Group D on conventional modern medication controlled group. All these patients under four groups had received Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy for maximum duration of 7 weeks. Mucositis and Skin reactions were observed in 100% of patients with varying degree. The intensity of Radiation and Chemotherapy induced mucositis was reduced to a great extent by the trial drug. Yashtimadhu (Glycyrrhiza glabra) can be used effectively in prevention and treatment of oral mucositis post radiation and chemotheraphy in patients of cancer, especially of the head and neck region. It proves beneficial in two ways: (i) there were no

  15. Salivary gland acinar cells regenerate functional glandular structures in modified hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Swati

    Xerostomia, a condition resulting from irradiation of the head and neck, affects over 40,000 cancer patients each year in the United States. Direct radiation damage of the acinar cells that secrete fluid and protein results in salivary gland hypofunction. Present medical management for xerostomia for patients treated for upper respiratory cancer is largely ineffective. Patients who have survived their terminal diagnosis are often left with a diminished quality of life and are unable to enjoy the simple pleasures of eating and drinking. This project aims to ultimately reduce human suffering by developing a functional implantable artificial salivary gland. The goal was to create an extracellular matrix (ECM) modified hyaluronic acid (HA) based hydrogel culture system that allows for the growth and differentiation of salivary acinar cells into functional acini-like structures capable of secreting large amounts of protein and fluid unidirectionally and to ultimately engineer a functional artificial salivary gland that can be implanted into an animal model. A tissue collection protocol was established and salivary gland tissue was obtained from patients undergoing head and neck surgery. The tissue specimen was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry to establish the phenotype of normal salivary gland cells including the native basement membranes. Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed normal glandular tissue structures including intercalated ducts, striated ducts and acini. alpha-Amylase and periodic acid schiff stain, used for structures with a high proportion of carbohydrate macromolecules, preferentially stained acinar cells in the tissue. Intercalated and striated duct structures were identified using cytokeratins 19 and 7 staining. Myoepithelial cells positive for cytokeratin 14 were found wrapped around the serous and mucous acini. Tight junction components including ZO-1 and E-cadherin were present between both ductal and acinar cells. Ductal and acinar

  16. IMRT With Simultaneous Integrated Boost and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Montejo, Michael E.; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Bentz, Brandon G.; Hunt, Jason P.; Buchman, Luke O.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Hitchcock, Ying J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of accelerated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between April 2003 and May 2008, 43 consecutive patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma received accelerated chemoradiation with concurrent cisplatin or cetuximab. The doses for intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost were 67.5, 60.0, and 54 Gy in 30 daily fractions of 2.25, 2.0, and 1.8 Gy to the planning target volumes for gross disease, high-risk nodes, and low-risk nodes, respectively. Results: Of the patients, 90.7% completed chemoradiotherapy as prescribed. The median treatment duration was 43 days (range, 38-55 days). The complete response rate was 74.4%. With median follow-up of 36.7 months (range, 16.8-78.1 months) in living patients, the estimated 1-, 2-, and 5-year locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 82%, 82%, and 82%; 73%, 65%, and 61%; and 73%, 73%, and 70%, respectively. One treatment-related death occurred from renal failure. Grade 3 mucositis and dermatitis occurred in 13 patients (30.2%) and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Grade 2 xerostomia occurred in 12 patients (27.9%). In patients with adequate follow-up, 82% were feeding tube free by 6 months after therapy; 13% remained feeding tube dependent at 1 year. Grade 3 soft-tissue fibrosis, esophageal stricture, osteoradionecrosis, and trismus occurred in 3 patients (6.9%), 5 patients (11.6%), 1 patient (2.3%), and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Conclusions: Our results show that intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost with concurrent chemotherapy improved local and regional control. Acute and late toxicities were tolerable and acceptable. A prospective trial of this fractionation regimen is necessary for further assessment of its efficacy and toxicity compared with other approaches.

  17. The outcome of local radiation injuries: 14 years of follow-up after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Gottlöber, P; Steinert, M; Weiss, M; Bebeshko, V; Belyi, D; Nadejina, N; Stefani, F H; Wagemaker, G; Fliedner, T M; Peter, R U

    2001-03-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident on April 26, 1986 was the largest in the history of the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Of the 237 individuals initially suspected to have been significantly exposed to radiation during or in the immediate aftermath of the accident, the diagnosis of acute radiation sickness (ARS) could be confirmed in 134 cases on the basis of clinical symptoms. Of these, 54 patients suffered from cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) to varying degrees. Among the 28 patients who died from the immediate consequences of accidental radiation exposure, acute hemopoietic syndrome due to bone marrow failure was the primary cause of death only in a minority. In 16 of these 28 deaths, the primary cause was attributed to CRS. This report describes the characteristic cutaneous sequelae as well as associated clinical symptoms and diseases of 15 survivors of the Chernobyl accident with severe localized exposure who were systematically followed up by our groups between 1991 and 2000. All patients presented with CRS of varying severity, showing xerosis, cutaneous telangiectasias and subungual splinter hemorrhages, hemangiomas and lymphangiomas, epidermal atrophy, disseminated keratoses, extensive dermal and subcutaneous fibrosis with partial ulcerations, and pigmentary changes including radiation lentigo. Surprisingly, no cutaneous malignancies have been detected so far in those areas that received large radiation exposures and that developed keratoses; however, two patients first presented in 1999 with basal cell carcinomas on the nape of the neck and the right lower eyelid, areas that received lower exposures. During the follow-up period, two patients were lost due to death from myelodysplastic syndrome in 1995 and acute myelogenous leukemia in 1998, respectively. Other radiation-induced diseases such as dry eye syndrome (3/15), radiation cataract (5/15), xerostomia (4/15) and increased FSH levels (7/15) indicating impaired fertility were also

  18. Multifield Optimization Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Head and Neck Tumors: A Translation to Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J.; Cox, James D.; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe; Garden, Adam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Weber, Randal S.; Kies, Merrill S.; Lewin, Jan S.; Munsell, Mark F.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Liu, Wei; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2014-07-15

    Background: We report the first clinical experience and toxicity of multifield optimization (MFO) intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for patients with head and neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Fifteen consecutive patients with head and neck cancer underwent MFO-IMPT with active scanning beam proton therapy. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) had comprehensive treatment extending from the base of the skull to the clavicle. The doses for chemoradiation therapy and radiation therapy alone were 70 Gy and 66 Gy, respectively. The robustness of each treatment plan was also analyzed to evaluate sensitivity to uncertainties associated with variations in patient setup and the effect of uncertainties with proton beam range in patients. Proton beam energies during treatment ranged from 72.5 to 221.8 MeV. Spot sizes varied depending on the beam energy and depth of the target, and the scanning nozzle delivered the spot scanning treatment “spot by spot” and “layer by layer.” Results: Ten patients presented with SCC and 5 with adenoid cystic carcinoma. All 15 patients were able to complete treatment with MFO-IMPT, with no need for treatment breaks and no hospitalizations. There were no treatment-related deaths, and with a median follow-up time of 28 months (range, 20-35 months), the overall clinical complete response rate was 93.3% (95% confidence interval, 68.1%-99.8%). Xerostomia occurred in all 15 patients as follows: grade 1 in 10 patients, grade 2 in 4 patients, and grade 3 in 1 patient. Mucositis within the planning target volumes was seen during the treatment of all patients: grade 1 in 1 patient, grade 2 in 8 patients, and grade 3 in 6 patients. No patient experienced grade 2 or higher anterior oral mucositis. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of MFO-IMPT for head and neck tumors. Early clinical outcomes are encouraging and warrant further investigation of proton therapy in prospective clinical trials.

  19. Ultrasound transmission velocity for noninvasive evaluation of jaw bone quality in vivo before dental implantation.

    PubMed

    Klein, M O; Grötz, K A; Manefeld, B; Kann, P H; Al-Nawas, B

    2008-12-01

    For the insertion of dental implants, mechanical bone properties at the implantation site have great impact both for therapeutic regimes as well as for the overall long-term success, making a reliable method for the preoperative assessment of the bone quality desirable. Ultrasound transmission velocity (UTV) has been introduced as a noninvasive method to analyze mechanical properties of bone. The aim of this study was the first intra-oral in vivo assessment of alveolar crest UTV values of edentulous jaws. Partly or fully edentulous patients (n = 108) were enrolled in this study, taking into account possible influence factors that affect bone quality (osteoporosis, radiation therapy). Six intra-oral measurement points were used: left side region, right side region and frontal region, for upper and lower jaw, respectively. Ultrasound transmission velocity values were measured bicortically (in bucco-oral direction) and correlated to sex, age, measurement site and history of osteoporosis or radiation therapy. We found a minimum mouth opening of 30 mm, as well as a residual alveolar ridge height of 8 mm as thresholds for a reliable intra-oral placement of the device. Xerostomia was no contraindication. Assessment of intra-oral UTV showed significantly higher values both for mandibular side regions (female 1713 +/- 153 m/s, male 1734 +/- 221 m/s) and the maxillary frontal region (female 1665 +/- 189 m/s, male 1648 +/- 82 m/s) than for maxillary side regions (female 1538 +/- 177 m/s, male 1583 +/- 90 m/s). These data were even more clarified by intra-individual correlation of upper and lower jaw side region UTV values. We found no correlation between assessed UTV values and the variables sex, age, osteoporosis or radiation therapy. The use of a small UTV device in this study allowed the recording of intra-oral UTV values in a large and heterogeneous patient collective for the first time. Assessment of alveolar-ridge UTV might offer the possibility to identify critical

  20. Clinical Effects of Standard and Individualized Dialysate Sodium in Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Eftimovska–Otovic, Natasa; Stojceva-Taneva, Olivera; Grozdanovski, Risto; Stojcev, Saso

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The degree to which the dialysate prescription and, in particular, the dialysate sodium concentration influences blood pressure and interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) via changes in sodium flux, plasma volume or the other parameters is not well understood. The aim of the study was to investigate whether dialysis patients will have some beneficial effects of dialysate sodium set up according to serum sodium or sodium modeling. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ninety-two nondiabetic subjects (52 men and 40 women) performed 12 consecutive hemodialysis (HD) sessions (4 weeks) with dialysate sodium concentration set up on 138 mmol/L (standard sodium – first phase), followed by 24 sessions (second phase) wherein dialysate sodium was set up according to individualized sodium. Variables of interest were: systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure, pulse, IDWG, thirst score – (Xerostomia Inventory (XI) and Dialysis Thirst Inventory (DTI)) and side effects (occurrence of hypotension and muscle cramps). After the first phase, the subjects were divided into 3 groups: normotensive (N=76), hypertensive (N= 11) and hypotensive (N=5) based on the average pre-HD systolic BP during the whole period of the first phase. RESULTS: Sodium individualization resulted in significantly lower blood pressure (133.61 ± 11.88 versus 153.60 ± 14.26 mmHg; p=0.000) and IDWG (2.21 ± 0.93 versus 1.87 ± 0.92 kg; p=0.018) in hypertensive patients, whereas normotensive patients showed only significant decrease in IDWG (2.21 ± 0.72 versus 2.06 ± 0.65, p=0,004). Sodium profiling in hypotensive patients significantly increased IDWG (2.45 vs. 2.74, p= 0,006), and had no impact on blood pressure. Thirst score was significantly lower in normotensive patients with individualized-sodium HD and showed no change in the other two groups. During the second phase, hypotension occurred in only 1 case and muscle cramps in 10 normotensive patients. CONCLUSION: Individualized sodium resulted in clinical

  1. Prediction of clinical toxicity in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients by radio-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is treated mainly by surgery and radiotherapy. Normal tissue toxicity due to x-ray exposure is a limiting factor for treatment success. Many efforts have been employed to develop predictive tests applied to clinical practice. Determination of lymphocyte radio-sensitivity by radio-induced apoptosis arises as a possible method to predict tissue toxicity due to radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to analyze radio-induced apoptosis of peripheral blood lymphocytes in head and neck cancer patients and to explore their role in predicting radiation induced toxicity. Seventy nine consecutive patients suffering from head and neck cancer, diagnosed and treated in our institution, were included in the study. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated and irradiated at 0, 1, 2 and 8 Gy during 24 hours. Apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide. Lymphocytes were marked with CD45 APC-conjugated monoclonal antibody. Radiation-induced apoptosis increased in order to radiation dose and fitted to a semi logarithmic model defined by two constants: α and β. α, as the origin of the curve in the Y axis determining the percentage of spontaneous cell death, and β, as the slope of the curve determining the percentage of cell death induced at a determined radiation dose, were obtained. β value was statistically associated to normal tissue toxicity in terms of severe xerostomia, as higher levels of apoptosis were observed in patients with low toxicity (p = 0.035; Exp(B) 0.224, I.C.95% (0.060-0.904)). These data agree with our previous results and suggest that it is possible to estimate the radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients determining the radiation induced apoptosis with annexin V/propidium iodide staining. β values observed define an individual radiosensitivity profile that could predict late toxicity due to radiotherapy

  2. COSMIC: A Regimen of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Plus Dose-Escalated, Raster-Scanned Carbon Ion Boost for Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors: Results of the Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Alexandra D.; Nikoghosyan, Anna V.; Lossner, Karen; Haberer, Thomas; Jäkel, Oliver; Münter, Marc W.; Debus, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dose-escalated carbon ion (C12) therapy in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) and other malignant salivary gland tumors (MSGTs) of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: COSMIC (combined treatment of malignant salivary gland tumors with intensity modulated radiation therapy and carbon ions) is a prospective phase 2 trial of 24 Gy(RBE) C12 followed by 50 Gy IMRT in patients with pathologically confirmed MSGT. The primary endpoint is mucositis Common Terminology Criteria grade 3; the secondary endpoints are locoregional control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3; treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Results: Between July 2010 and August 2011, 54 patients were accrued, and 53 were available for evaluation. The median follow-up time was 42 months; patients with microscopically incomplete resections (R1, n=20), gross residual disease (R2, n=17), and inoperable disease (n=16) were included. Eighty-nine percent of patients had ACC, and 57% had T4 tumors. The most common primary sites were paranasal sinus (34%), submandibular gland, and palate. At the completion of radiation therapy, 26% of patients experienced grade 3 mucositis, and 20 patients reported adverse events of the ear (38%). The most common observed late effects were grade 1 xerostomia (49%), hearing impairment (25%, 2% ipsilateral hearing loss), and adverse events of the eye (20%), but no visual impairment or loss of vision. Grade 1 central nervous system necrosis occurred in 6%, and 1 grade 4 ICA hemorrhage without neurologic sequelae. The best response was 54% (complete response/partial remission). At 3 years, the LC, PFS, and OS were 81.9%, 57.9%, and 78.4%, respectively. No difference was found regarding resection status. The

  3. Head and neck lesions in the immunocompromised host.

    PubMed

    Marsot-Dupuch, K; Quillard, J; Meyohas, M C

    2004-03-01

    Head and neck lesions are encountered in more than 40-50% in patients with immunosuppression (HIV-infected individuals, diabetes mellitus, transplant recipients, patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs or post-radiotherapy). The organs affected are the salivary glands, the lymph nodes, the sinonasal tract, the orbits, the temporal bones, and the pharyngo-laryngeal mucosa. They are mainly involved by granulation tissue, perivascular and perineural inflammation, and neoplasms. In the pediatric population the temporal bone is the most frequent target organ. The most common clinical manifestation of salivary gland involvement is non-specific bilateral painless enlargement of the parotid gland and xerostomia. Lymphoepithelial cyst, sialosis, and lymphoma may be present. The high rate of salivary gland involvement is probably related to the presence of the human immunodeficiency virus within the saliva. Surgery, sclerotherapy by doxycycline, or low-dose radiotherapy may prevent further growth of tumoral lesions. Sinonasal diseases are the most frequent lesions which manifest in immunosuppressed adult patients (66%). They are associated with a trend of decreased survival rate. Invasive aspergillosis is defined by hyphae in the submucosa, and tumor necrosis without host inflammatory response; it may be lethal in 50-80%, especially when the skull base is involved. Computed tomography shows erosion of bone and extrasinonasal extension. The hypointensity of the lesion on T2-weighted images may suggest the diagnosis. Fungal sinus disease can affect 1-10% of transplant recipients and should be suspected when organ rejection is considered. The temporal bone is the most frequent target organ in the immunosuppressed pediatric population due to Eustachian,tube dysfunction. Otomastoïditis, necrotizing external otitis, and otosyphilis are reported. Prompt treatment may avoid lateral sinus thrombosis. Epithelial neoplasms, lymphomas, and Kaposi's sarcoma may also be considered

  4. Superiority of thoracoscopic sympathectomy over medical management for the palmoplantar subset of severe hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Fritz J; Bertin, Shana; Konecny, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    , eight with Botox, one with no medical treatment, and 144 with BTS surgery. All medical treatments failed with the exception that one patient was satisfied with anticholinergic treatment (2.6%), and this patient did not undergo BTS. BTS was successful in curing bilateral palmar hyperhidrosis in 99.3% (one unilateral failure due to adhesions). BTS was superior in treating palmar hyperhidrosis compared to aluminum chloride, anticholinergics, iontophoresis, and Botox (p < 0.001). The medically treated patients suffered significant side effects ranging from local stinging, cracking, and blistering to xerostomia, xerophthalmia, and blunted mentation. Overall, compensatory hyperhidrosis (CH) was present in 56% of patients undergoing BTS, but only 3.2% of BTS patients had severe CH with significant discomfort; all were men. There were no other significant operative complications. The safety and overwhelming efficacy of BTS compared to medical management of severe palmoplantar hyperhidrosis is demonstrated. Rather than being a "last resort," BTS can be confidently recommended as first-line treatment for the typical, severe form of palmoplantar hyperhidrosis. PMID:18619780

  5. Desmopressin versus Oxybutynin for Nocturnal Enuresis in Children in Bandar Abbas: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Kambiz; Esteghamati, Maryam; Mohammadzadeh, Malihe; Zare, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Background Nocturnal enuresis is among the most common disorders in children. Several pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments are available for nocturnal enuresis. Studies for reaching the best pharmacological treatment for this disorder are continuing. Objective To compare the effectiveness and safety of Desmopressin and oxybutynin for treatment of nocturnal enuresis in children from Bandar Abbas in 2014. Methods This randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2014 and participants included 66 children with nocturnal enuresis who were more than 5 years old. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups. The first group received 120 microgram Desmopressin daily for 2 months, then 60 microgram daily for 2 months, then 60 microgram every 2 days. The second group received 5 mg oxybutynin twice a day for 6 months. The patients were followed after 1, 3, and 6 months to track treatment response. The study outcomes were frequency of nocturnal enuresis, urinary incontinency, urgency, and frequency. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups with respects to sex, age, place of residence, and parents’ education (p<0.05). Nocturnal enuresis, incontinency, urgency, and frequency of nocturnal enuresis was significantly lower with Desmopressin treatment in comparison to the oxybutynin treated group after 1 and 3 months (p<0.05). In addition, constipation and xerostomia were more frequent among the oxybutynin group after 1, 3, and 6 months (p<0.01). Blurred vision was also more frequent among oxybutynin group after 3 months (p<0.01). After 6 months the frequency of nocturnal enuresis and its frequency was higher in oxybutynin group in comparison to the Desmopressin group (p<0.05). Conclusion Desmopressin is more effective and has lower rate of side effects in comparison to oxybutynin for treatment of nocturnal enuresis. We recommend using Desmopressin for treatment of nocturnal enuresis in children

  6. Salivary Gland Tumors Treated With Adjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, Jonathan D.; Sher, David J.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the recent single-institution experience of patients with salivary gland tumors who had undergone adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 35 salivary gland carcinoma patients treated primarily at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute between 2005 and 2010 with surgery and adjuvant IMRT. The primary endpoints were local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival. The secondary endpoints were acute and chronic toxicity. The median follow-up was 2.3 years (interquartile range, 1.2-2.8) among the surviving patients. Results: The histologic types included adenoid cystic carcinoma in 15 (43%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 6 (17%), adenocarcinoma in 3 (9%), acinic cell carcinoma in 3 (9%), and other in 8 (23%). The primary sites were the parotid gland in 17 (49%), submandibular glands in 6 (17%), tongue in 4 (11%), palate in 4 (11%), and other in 4 (11%). The median radiation dose was 66 Gy, and 22 patients (63%) received CRT. The most common chemotherapy regimen was carboplatin and paclitaxel (n = 14, 64%). A trend was seen for patients undergoing CRT to have more adverse prognostic factors, including Stage T3-T4 disease (CRT, n = 12, 55% vs. n = 4, 31%, p = .29), nodal positivity (CRT, n = 8, 36% vs. n = 1, 8%, p = .10), and positive margins (n = 13, 59% vs. n = 5, 38%, p = .30). One patient who had undergone CRT developed an in-field recurrence, resulting in an overall actuarial 3-year local control rate of 92%. Five patients (14%) developed distant metastases (1 who had undergone IMRT only and 4 who had undergone CRT). Acute Grade 3 mucositis, esophagitis, and dermatitis occurred in 8%, 8%, and 8% (1 each) of IMRT patients and in 18%, 5%, and 14% (4, 1, and 3 patients) of the CRT group, respectively. No acute Grade 4 toxicity occurred. The most common late toxicity was Grade 1 xerostomia (n = 8, 23%). Conclusions: Treatment of

  7. Doses to radiation sensitive organs and structures located outside the radiotherapeutic target volume for four treatment situations

    SciTech Connect

    Foo, M.L.; McCullough, E.C.; Foote, R.L.; Pisansky, T.M.; Shaw, E.G. )

    1993-09-20

    This study documents dosage to radiation sensitive organs/structures located outside the radiotherapeutic target volume for four treatment situations: (a) head and neck, (b) brain (pituitary and temporal lobe), (c) breast and (d) pelvis. Clinically relevant treatment fields were simulated on a tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom and subsequently irradiated with Cobalt-60 gamma rays, 6- and 18-MV x-ray beams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters and diodes were used to measure absorbed dose. The head and neck treatment resulted in significant doses of radiation to the lens and thyroid gland. The total treatment lens dose (300-400 cGy) could be cataractogenic while measured thyroid doses (1000-8000 cGy) have the potential of causing chemical hypothyroidism, thyroid neoplasms, Graves' disease and hyperparathyroidism. Total treatment retinal (400-700 cGy) and pituitary (460-1000 cGy) doses are below that considered capable of producing chronic disease. The pituitary treatment studied consisted of various size parallel opposed lateral and vertex fields (4 x 4 through 8 x 8 cm). The lens dose (40-200 cGy) with all field sizes is below those of clinical concern. Parotid doses (130-1200 cGy) and thyroid doses (350-600 cGy) are in a range where temporary xerostomia (parotid) and thyroid neoplasia development are a reasonable possibility. The retinal dose (4000 cGy) from the largest field size (8 x 8 cm[sup 2]) is in the range where retinopathy has been reported. The left temporal lobe treatment also used parallel opposed lateral and vertex fields (7 x 7 and 10 x 10 cm). Doses to the pituitary gland (5200-6200 cGy), both parotids (200-6900 cGy), left lens (200-300 cGy), and left retina (1700-4500 cGy) are capable of causing significant future clinical problems. Right-sided structures received insignificant doses. Secondary malignancies could result from the measured total treatment thyroid doses (670-980 cGy). 82 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head-and-Neck Cancer: Final Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Revitzer, Hannu; Kouri, Mauri; Kotiluoto, Petri; Seren, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy and safety of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of inoperable head-and-neck cancers that recur locally after conventional photon radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: In this prospective, single-center Phase I/II study, 30 patients with inoperable, locally recurred head-and-neck cancer (29 carcinomas and 1 sarcoma) were treated with BNCT. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 50 to 98 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed by use of the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) and adverse effects by use of the National Cancer Institute common terminology criteria version 3.0. Intravenously administered L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (400 mg/kg) was administered as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Twenty-six patients received BNCT twice; four were treated once. Of the 29 evaluable patients, 22 (76%) responded to BNCT, 6 (21%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.1 and 20.3 months, and 1 (3%) progressed. The median progression-free survival time was 7.5 months (95% confidence interval, 5.4-9.6 months). Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 20% and 30%, respectively, and 27% of the patients survived for 2 years without locoregional recurrence. The most common acute Grade 3 adverse effects were mucositis (54% of patients), oral pain (54%), and fatigue (32%). Three patients were diagnosed with osteoradionecrosis (each Grade 3) and one patient with soft-tissue necrosis (Grade 4). Late Grade 3 xerostomia was present in 3 of the 15 evaluable patients (20%). Conclusions: Most patients who have inoperable, locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma that has recurred at a previously irradiated site respond to boronophenylalanine-mediated BNCT, but cancer recurrence after BNCT remains frequent. Toxicity was

  9. New Techniques for Augmenting Saliva Collection: Bacon Rules and Lozenge Drools

    PubMed Central

    Miočević, Olga; Warner, Melissa C.; Slowey, Paul D.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Saliva is a reliable, noninvasive, and cost-effective alternative to biomarkers measured in other biological fluids. Within certain populations, saliva sampling may be difficult because of insufficient saliva flow, which may compromise disease diagnosis or research integrity. Methods to improve flow rates (eg, administering citric acid, chewing gum, or collecting cotton) may compromise biomarker integrity, especially if the methods involve the presence of a collection aid in the oral cavity. Anecdotal strategies (eg, looking at pictures of food or imagining food) have not been evaluated to date. In this study, we evaluate whether 2 novel collection techniques improve saliva flow or interfere with assay of common biomarkers (ie, cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone, and testosterone). We evaluate an over-the-counter anhydrous crystalline maltose lozenge intended to increase saliva production for patients with xerostomia long after the lozenge dissolves. We then evaluate whether the smell of freshly cooked bacon stimulates a pavlovian-type reflex. Methods Saliva was collected from 27 healthy young adults (aged 20-34 years; 12 men) on a basal day and a lozenge day, providing 5 samples at 15-minute intervals. Twenty participants then returned for the bacon day condition, providing 2 saliva samples with an interval of 15 minutes between samples. Collection times required to generate 2 mL of saliva across collection strategies were recorded, and then saliva samples were assayed for cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone, and testosterone. Findings Repeated analysis of variance measures revealed that both the lozenges and bacon significantly decreased collection time compared with the passive drool collection on the basal day. No significant effects were found related to the quantification of cortisol, testosterone, or dehydroepiandrosterone when comparing lozenge or bacon to the basal day. In addition, bivariate correlations revealed that concentrations from time

  10. SU-E-J-68: Adaptive Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Re-Planning Based On Prior Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, N; Padgett, K; Evans, J; Sleeman, W; Song, S; Fatyga, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART) with frequent CT imaging has been used to improve dosimetric accuracy by accounting for anatomical variations, such as primary tumor shrinkage and/or body weight loss, in Head and Neck (H&N) patients. In most ART strategies, the difference between the planned and the delivered dose is estimated by generating new plans on repeated CT scans using dose-volume constraints used with the initial planning CT without considering already delivered dose. The aim of this study was to assess the dosimetric gains achieved by re-planning based on prior dose by comparing them to re-planning not based-on prior dose for H&N patients. Methods: Ten locally-advanced H&N cancer patients were selected for this study. For each patient, six weekly CT imaging were acquired during the course of radiotherapy. PTVs, parotids, cord, brainstem, and esophagus were contoured on both planning and six weekly CT images. ART with weekly re-plans were done by two strategies: 1) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan without including prior dose from previous fractions (NoPriorDose) and 2) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan based on the prior dose given from previous fractions (PriorDose). Deformable image registration was used to accumulate the dose distributions between planning and six weekly CT scans. The differences in accumulated doses for both strategies were evaluated using the DVH constraints for all structures. Results: On average, the differences in accumulated doses for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 for NoPriorDose and PriorDose strategies were <2%. The differences in Dmean to the cord and brainstem were within 3%. The esophagus Dmean was reduced by 2% using PriorDose. PriorDose strategy, however, reduced the left parotid D50 and Dmean by 15% and 14% respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated significant parotid sparing, potentially reducing xerostomia, by using ART with IMRT optimization based on prior dose for weekly re-planning of H&N cancer patients.

  11. Monitoring Dosimetric Impact of Weight Loss With Kilovoltage (KV) Cone Beam CT (CBCT) During Parotid-Sparing IMRT and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Kean Fatt; Marchant, Tom; Moore, Chris; Webster, Gareth; Rowbottom, Carl; Penington, Hazel; Lee, Lip; Yap, Beng; Sykes, Andrew; Slevin, Nick

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Parotid-sparing head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce long-term xerostomia. However, patients frequently experience weight loss and tumor shrinkage during treatment. We evaluate the use of kilovoltage (kV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for dose monitoring and examine if the dosimetric impact of such changes on the parotid and critical neural structures warrants replanning during treatment. Methods and materials: Ten patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were treated with contralateral parotid-sparing IMRT concurrently with platinum-based chemotherapy. Mean doses of 65 Gy and 54 Gy were delivered to clinical target volume (CTV)1 and CTV2, respectively, in 30 daily fractions. CBCT was prospectively acquired weekly. Each CBCT was coregistered with the planned isocenter. The spinal cord, brainstem, parotids, larynx, and oral cavity were outlined on each CBCT. Dose distributions were recalculated on the CBCT after correcting the gray scale to provide accurate Hounsfield calibration, using the original IMRT plan configuration. Results: Planned contralateral parotid mean doses were not significantly different to those delivered during treatment (p > 0.1). Ipsilateral and contralateral parotids showed a mean reduction in volume of 29.7% and 28.4%, respectively. There was no significant difference between planned and delivered maximum dose to the brainstem (p = 0.6) or spinal cord (p = 0.2), mean dose to larynx (p = 0.5) and oral cavity (p = 0.8). End-of-treatment mean weight loss was 7.5 kg (8.8% of baseline weight). Despite a {>=}10% weight loss in 5 patients, there was no significant dosimetric change affecting the contralateral parotid and neural structures. Conclusions: Although patient weight loss and parotid volume shrinkage was observed, overall, there was no significant excess dose to the organs at risk. No replanning was felt necessary for this patient cohort, but a larger patient sample will be investigated

  12. Long-Term Quality of Life After Swallowing and Salivary-Sparing Chemo–Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Survivors of Human Papillomavirus–Related Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Moon, Dominic H.; Feng, Felix Y.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Stenmark, Matthew H.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in 2 prospective studies of chemo–intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Of 93 patients with stage III/IV OPC treated on prospective studies of swallowing and salivary organ-sparing chemo-IMRT, 69 were eligible for long-term HRQOL assessment. Three validated patient-reported instruments, the Head and Neck QOL (HNQOL) questionnaire, the University of Washington quality of life (UWQOL) questionnaire, and the Xerostomia Questionnaire (XQ), previously administered from baseline through 2 years in the parent studies, were readministered at long-term follow-up, along with the Short-Form 36. Long-term changes in HRQOL from before treatment and 2 years were evaluated. Results: Forty patients (58%) with a median follow-up of 6.5 years participated, 39 of whom (97.5%) had confirmed human papillomavirus–positive OPC. Long term, no clinically significant worsening was detected in mean HRQOL scores compared with 2 years, with stable or improved HRQOL from before treatment in nearly all domains. “Moderate” or greater severity problems were uncommon, reported by 5% of patients for eating, 5% for swallowing, and 2.5% and 5% by HNQOL and UWQOL summary scores, respectively. Freedom from percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence and stricture dilation beyond 2 years was 97.5% and 95%, respectively. Eleven percent and 14% of patients reported “moderate” or “severe” long-term worsening in HNQOL Pain and Overall Bother domains, respectively, which were associated with mean dose to the cervical esophagus, larynx, and pharyngeal constrictors. Conclusions: At more than 6 years' median follow-up, OPC patients treated with swallowing and salivary organ-sparing chemo-IMRT reported stable or improved HRQOL in nearly all domains compared with both before treatment and 2-year follow-up. New late toxicity after 2 years was

  13. Long-Term Quality of Life After Swallowing and Salivary sparing Chemo-IMRT in survivors of HPV-related Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Moon, Dominic H.; Feng, Felix Y.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Stenmark, Matthew H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives IMRT has improved the toxicity profile of chemo-radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Long-term patient-reported outcomes beyond two years, however, remain scarcely reported. Amidst concerns of delayed-onset dysphagia and other toxicities, we evaluated long-term health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) in two prospective studies of chemo-IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials 69 of 93 patients with stage III/IV OPC treated on prospective studies of swallowing and salivary organ-sparing chemo-IMRT were eligible for long-term HRQOL assessment. Three validated patient-reported instruments, the Head and Neck QOL [HNQOL], University of Washington [UW]QOL, and Xerostomia Questionnaire [XQ]), previously administered from baseline through two-years in the parent studies, were re-administered at long-term follow-up along with the Short-Form 36. Long-term changes in HRQOL from pre-treatment and two-years were evaluated. Results 40 patients (58%) with a median follow-up of 6.5 years participated, 39 of whom (97.5%) had confirmed HPV+ OPC. Long-term, no clinically significant worsening was detected in mean HRQOL scores compared with two-years, with stable or improved HRQOL from pre-treatment in nearly all domains. “Moderate” or greater severity problems were uncommon, reported by 5% of patients for eating, 5% for swallowing, and 2.5% and 5% by HNQOL and UWQOL summary scores, respectively. Freedom-from-PEG-tube dependence and stricture dilation beyond 2 years was 97.5% and 95%, respectively. 11% and 14% of patients reported “moderate” or “severe” long-term worsening in HNQOL Pain and Overall Bother domains, respectively, which were associated with mean dose to the cervical esophagus, larynx, and pharyngeal constrictors. Conclusions At more than 6-year median follow-up, OPC patients treated with swallowing and salivary organ-sparing chemo-IMRT reported stable or improved HRQOL in nearly all domains compared to both pre

  14. Automated Segmentation of the Parotid Gland Based on Atlas Registration and Machine Learning: A Longitudinal MRI Study in Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Ning; Cheng, Guanghui; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yu, David S.; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-12-01

    automated parotid segmentation algorithm in a longitudinal study. This segmentation method may be useful in future studies to address radiation-induced xerostomia in head and neck radiation therapy.

  15. MO-A-BRD-09: A Data-Mining Algorithm for Large Scale Analysis of Dose-Outcome Relationships in a Database of Irradiated Head-And-Neck (HN) Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, SP; Quon, H; Kiess, AP; Moore, JA; Yang, W; Cheng, Z; Sharabi, A; McNutt, TR

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for automatic extraction of clinically meaningful dosimetric-outcome relationships from an in-house, analytic oncology database. Methods: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) and clinical outcome-related structured data elements have been routinely stored to our database for 513 HN cancer patients treated from 2007 to 2014. SQL queries were developed to extract outcomes that had been assessed for at least 100 patients, as well as DVH curves for organs-at-risk (OAR) that were contoured for at least 100 patients. DVH curves for paired OAR (e.g., left and right parotids) were automatically combined and included as additional structures for analysis. For each OAR-outcome combination, DVH dose points, D(V{sub t}), at a series of normalized volume thresholds, V{sub t}=[0.01,0.99], were stratified into two groups based on outcomes after treatment completion. The probability, P[D(V{sub t})], of an outcome was modeled at each V{sub t} by logistic regression. Notable combinations, defined as having P[D(V{sub t})] increase by at least 5% per Gy (p<0.05), were further evaluated for clinical relevance using a custom graphical interface. Results: A total of 57 individual and combined structures and 115 outcomes were queried, resulting in over 6,500 combinations for analysis. Of these, 528 combinations met the 5%/Gy requirement, with further manual inspection revealing a number of reasonable models based on either reported literature or proximity between neighboring OAR. The data mining algorithm confirmed the following well-known toxicity/outcome relationships: dysphagia/larynx, voice changes/larynx, esophagitis/esophagus, xerostomia/combined parotids, and mucositis/oral mucosa. Other notable relationships included dysphagia/pharyngeal constrictors, nausea/brainstem, nausea/spinal cord, weight-loss/mandible, and weight-loss/combined parotids. Conclusion: Our database platform has enabled large-scale analysis of dose-outcome relationships. The current data

  16. Doses to radiation sensitive organs and structures located outside the radiotherapeutic target volume for four treatment situations.

    PubMed

    Foo, M L; McCullough, E C; Foote, R L; Pisansky, T M; Shaw, E G

    1993-09-30

    This study documents dosage to radiation sensitive organs/structures located outside the radiotherapeutic target volume for four treatment situations: (a) head and neck, (b) brain (pituitary and temporal lobe), (c) breast and (d) pelvis. Clinically relevant treatment fields were simulated on a tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom and subsequently irradiated with Cobalt-60 gamma rays, 6- and 18-MV x-ray beams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters and diodes were used to measure absorbed dose. The head and neck treatment resulted in significant doses of radiation to the lens and thyroid gland. The total treatment lens dose (300-400 cGy) could be cataractogenic while measured thyroid doses (1000-8000 cGy) have the potential of causing chemical hypothyroidism, thyroid neoplasms, Graves' disease and hyperparathyroidism. Total treatment retinal (400-700cGy) and pituitary (460-1000 cGy) doses are below that considered capable of producing chronic disease. The pituitary treatment studied consisted of various size parallel opposed lateral and vertex fields (4 x 4 through 8 x 8 cm). The lens dose (40-200 cGy) with all field sizes is below those of clinical concern. Parotid doses (130-1200 cGy) and thyroid doses (350-600 cGy) are in a range where temporary xerostomia (parotid) and thyroid neoplasia development are a reasonable possibility. The retinal dose (4000 cGy) from the largest field size (8 x 8 cm2) is in the range where retinopathy has been reported. The left temporal lobe treatment also used parallel opposed lateral and vertex fields (7 x 7 and 10 x 10 cm). Doses to the pituitary gland (5200-6200 cGy), both parotids (200-6900 cGy), left lens (200-300 cGy) and left retina (1700-4500 cGy) are capable of causing significant future clinical problems. Right-sided structures received insignificant doses. Secondary malignancies could result from measured total treatment thyroid doses (670-980 cGy). Analysis of three breast/chest wall and regional nodal irradiation techniques

  17. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda, Fernando F. de; Puri, Dev R.; Zhung, Joanne; Narayana, Ashwatha; Wolden, Suzanne; Hunt, Margie; Stambuk, Hilda; Pfister, David; Kraus, Dennis; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin; Lee, Nancy Y. . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org

    2006-02-01

    in 4 patients (8%), Grade 2 in 27 (54%), and Grade 3 in 19 (38%). Xerostomia decreased with increasing time interval from the end of radiotherapy, and among the patients with at least 9 months of follow-up there was 67% Grade 0-1 and 33% Grade 2 toxicity. Of the 42 patients who required upfront PEG placement, 6 were still using PEG for nutrition at the time of this analysis. Three patients had cervical esophageal strictures, and of these, 1 was still PEG dependent 1 year after treatment. Two of these patients were treated with the IMRT concomitant boost am and pm approach, whereas the other was treated with the dose painting technique. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved encouraging local control rates in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment toxicity was acceptable even in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy. Long-term follow-up is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  18. Temporal Evolution of Parotid Volume and Parotid Apparent Diffusion Coefficient in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Treated by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Investigated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Chun-Jung; Cheng, Cheng-Chieh; Chiu, Su-Chin; Jen, Yee-Min; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chiu, Hui-Chu; Kao, Hung-Wen; Wang, Chih-Wei; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To concurrently quantify the radiation-induced changes and temporal evolutions of parotid volume and parotid apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods A total of 11 NPC patients (9 men and 2 women; 48.7 ± 11.7 years, 22 parotid glands) were enrolled. Radiation dose, parotid sparing volume, severity of xerostomia, and radiation-to-MR interval (RMI) was recorded. MRI studies were acquired four times, including one before and three after radiotherapy. The parotid volume and the parotid ADC were measured. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS and MedCalc. Bonferroni correction was applied for multiple comparisons. A P value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results The parotid volume was 26.2 ± 8.0 cm3 before radiotherapy. The parotid ADC was 0.8 ± 0.15 × 10−3 mm2/sec before radiotherapy. The parotid glands received a radiation dose of 28.7 ± 4.1 Gy and a PSV of 44.1 ± 12.6%. The parotid volume was significantly smaller at MR stage 1 and stage 2 as compared to pre-RT stage (P < .005). The volume reduction ratio was 31.2 ± 13.0%, 26.1 ± 13.5%, and 17.1 ± 16.6% at stage 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The parotid ADC was significantly higher at all post-RT stages as compared to pre-RT stage reciprocally (P < .005 at stage 1 and 2, P < .05 at stage 3). The ADC increase ratio was 35.7 ± 17.4%, 27.0 ± 12.8%, and 20.2 ± 16.6% at stage 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The parotid ADC was negatively correlated to the parotid volume (R = -0.509; P < .001). The parotid ADC was positively associated with the radiation dose significantly (R2 = 0.212; P = .0001) and was negatively associated with RMI significantly (R2 = 0.203; P = .00096) significantly. Multiple regression analysis further showed that the post-RT parotid ADC was related to the radiation dose and RMI significantly (R2 = 0

  19. Phase II Study of the Addition of Bevacizumab to Standard Chemoradiation for Loco-regionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Trial 0615

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy Y.; Zhang, Ed; Pfister, David. G.; Kim, John; Garden, Adam. S.; Mechalakos, James; Hu, Kenneth; Le, Quynh T.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Ang, K. Kian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to improve the outcomes for loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by testing the feasibility/safety of adding bevacizumab to chemoradiation. Patients/Methods Eligible patients with ≥T2b and/or positive node(s) were prescribed 3 cycles of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) and cisplatin (100 mg/m2) both given on days 1, 22, and 43 of radiation (70 Gy) using IMRT delivered over 33 days on a daily basis, Monday through Friday. This is followed by 3 cycles of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg), cisplatin (80 mg/m2) both were given on days 64, 85, and 106 and fluorouracil (1000 mg/m2/d) on days 64–67, 85–88, 106–109 after radiation. The primary endpoint was to evaluate the safety of the addition of bevacizumab to chemoradiation, specifically looking at treatment-related Grade 4 hemorrhage and/or any Grade 5 adverse event in the first year. Toxicity during and after treatment were collected along with tumor control endpoints. The analysis was done per protocol. This protocol has completed its target accrual. Results There were a total of 46 patients enrolled in this study of whom 44 patients were eligible for analysis. No grade 3–4 hemorrhage or grade 5 adverse events were observed; 9 patients (20.5%) experienced grade 1–2 hemorrhage. Grade 4 adverse events were experienced by the following numbers of patients: leukopenia NOS – 6; lymphopenia – 5; neutrophil count – 5; pharyngolaryngeal pain – 2; hemoglobin – 1; infection with grade 3–4 neutrophils (blood) – 1; infection with grade 3–4 neutrophils [skin (cellulitis)] – 1; tinnitus – 1; thrombosis – 1; radiation mucositis – 1. The most common grade 3 adverse events were radiation mucositis – 33; dysphagia – 25; and mucositis/stomatitis (clinical exam) (pharynx) – 15. Two patients experienced late grade 3 xerostomia. Other late grade 3 adverse events were: dysphagia – 5; hearing impaired – 3; neuralgia NOS – 2; constitutional symptoms (other) – 1; dehydration