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Sample records for xvi calorimetric determination

  1. Thermochemistry of uranium compounds: XVI, Calorimetric determination of the standard molar enthalpy of formation at 298.15 K, low-temperature heat capacity, and high-temperature enthalpy increments of UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O (schoepite)

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, I.R.; O`Hare, P.A.G.; Lewis, B.M.; Johnson, G.K.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.

    1987-08-01

    Three precise calorimetric methods, viz., low-temperature adiabatic, high-temperatuare drop, and solution-reaction, have been used to determine as a function of temperature the key chemical thermodynamic properties of a pure sample of schoepite, UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O. The following results have been obtained at the standard reference temperature T = 298.15 K:standard molar enthalpy of formation {Delta}/sub f/H/sub m/{sup 0}(T) = {minus}1825.4 +- 2.1 kJ mol/sup {minus}1/; molar heat capacity C/sub p,m/{sup 0}(T) = 172.07 +- 0.34 JK/sup {minus}1/; and the standard molar entropy S/sub m/{sup 0}(T) = 188.54 +- 0.38 JK/sup {minus}1/ mol/sup {minus}1/. The molar enthalpy increments relative to 298.15 K and the molar heat capacity are given by the polynomials: {H{sub m}{sup 0}(T) {minus} H{sub m}{sup 0}(298.15 K)}/(J mol/sup {minus}1/) = {minus}38209.0 + 84.2375 (T/K) + 0.1472958 (T/K){sup 2} and C/sub p,m/{sup 0}(T)/(JK/sup {minus}1/ mol/sup {minus}1/) = 84.238 + 0.294592 (T/K), where 298.15 K < T < 400 K. The present result for {Delta}/sup f/H/sub m/{sup 0} at 298.15 K has been combined with three other closely-agreeing values from the literature to give a recommended weighted mean {Delta}/sub f/H/sub m/{sup 0} = {minus}1826.4 +- 1.7 kJ mol/sup {minus}1/, from which is calculated the standard Gibbs energy of formation {Delta}/sub f/G/sub m/{sup 0} = {minus}1637.0 +- 1.7 kJ mol/sup {minus}1/ at 298.15 K. Complete thermodynamic properties of schoepite are tabulated from 298.15 to 423.15 K. 19 refs., 6 tabs.

  2. Calorimetric method for determination of {sup 51}Cr neutrino source activity

    SciTech Connect

    Veretenkin, E. P. Gavrin, V. N.; Danshin, S. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kozlova, Yu. P.; Mirmov, I. N.

    2015-12-15

    Experimental study of nonstandard neutrino properties using high-intensity artificial neutrino sources requires the activity of the sources to be determined with high accuracy. In the BEST project, a calorimetric system for measurement of the activity of high-intensity (a few MCi) neutrino sources based on {sup 51}Cr with an accuracy of 0.5–1% is created. In the paper, the main factors affecting the accuracy of determining the neutrino source activity are discussed. The calorimetric system design and the calibration results using a thermal simulator of the source are presented.

  3. Significance of partial and total cohesion parameters of pharmaceutical solids determined from dissolution calorimetric measurements.

    PubMed

    Rey-Mermet, C; Ruelle, P; Nam-Trân, H; Buchmann, M; Kesselring, U W

    1991-05-01

    The total and partial adhesion-derived cohesion parameters of three solid pharmaceutical substances (caffeine, theophylline, and phenylbutazone) were determined from dissolution calorimetric measurements, a new technique devised for this purpose. Calorimetry has the advantage of leading directly to enthalpies, from which the solute cohesion parameter(s) is(are) deduced. An equation was developed that relates partial molar enthalpies of mixing (obtained by subtracting enthalpies of fusion from enthalpies of dissolution) to the cohesion parameters of the solute and of the solvents. Solvents were selected on the basis of their known cohesion parameters by applying the experimental research methodology. PMID:1866379

  4. Kinetics of degradation of diclofenac sodium in aqueous solution determined by a calorimetric method.

    PubMed

    Chadha, R; Kashid, N; Jain, D V S

    2003-09-01

    An isothermal heat conduction microcalorimeter has been used to study the stability of diclofenac sodium both alone and its inclusion complex with beta-cyclodextrin in aqueous solution. The rates of heat evolved during degradation of diclofenac sodium have been measured by a highly sensitive microcalorimetric technique as function of concentration, pH and temperature. The calorimetric accessible data have been incorporated in the equations for determination of rate constants, change in enthalpy and order of reaction. The decomposition of diclofenac sodium both alone and its inclusion complex with beta-cyclodextrin in solution corresponds to a pseudo-first order reaction. The values of rate constants, k's at 338.15 K, (calculated from the variation of heat evolution with the time) for the degradation of diclofenac sodium at pH 5, 6, 7, 8 and its inclusion complex with beta-cyclodextrin at pH 7 are found to be 4.71 x 10(-4), 5.69 x 10(-4), 6.12 x 10(-)4, 6.57 x 10(-4) and 4.26 x 10(-4) h(-1) respectively. There is good agreement between calorimetric determined t(0.5) and literature values. It has been found that beta-cyclodextrin retards the degradation of diclofenac sodium. The kinetic parameters have been calculated for the reaction. The negative entropy of activation suggests the formation of an ordered transition state. PMID:14531458

  5. Specific volume study of a bulk metallic glass far below its calorimetrically determined glass transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckabauer, M.; Kühn, U.; Eckert, J.; Sprengel, W.

    2014-05-01

    High-precision LASER dilatometry with a unique measurement setup was applied to the bulk metallic glass alloy Zr52.5Ti5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10 (Vit105) for specific volume studies. Employing small temperature steps of ΔT =5 and 10 K and long measurement times effective heating rates of the order of 10-2 K/min were realized and changes of the specific volume were measured with a resolution of ΔV /V=10-6 down to 573 K. The temperature regime of these experiments is far below a calorimetrically determined glass transition of Tgcalor=659 K (5 K/min). The experimental results strongly support theoretical predictions for the existence of an ideal glass transition that was observed in this study at Tg=628 K for this bulk metallic glass model alloy.

  6. Device for calorimetric measurement

    DOEpatents

    King, William P; Lee, Jungchul

    2015-01-13

    In one aspect, provided herein is a single crystal silicon microcalorimeter, for example useful for high temperature operation and long-term stability of calorimetric measurements. Microcalorimeters described herein include microcalorimeter embodiments having a suspended structure and comprising single crystal silicon. Also provided herein are methods for making calorimetric measurements, for example, on small quantities of materials or for determining the energy content of combustible material having an unknown composition.

  7. First calorimetric determination of heat of extraction of 248Cm in a bi-phasic system

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh R. Martin; Peter R. Zalupski

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M21SW050201, 'Complete the first calorimetric determination of heat of extraction of 248Cm in a bi-phasic system'. This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics FCR&D work package. To complement previous work undertaken under this work package we have extended out heat of extraction studies by di-2-ethyl-hexyl-phosphoric acid to curium. This report also details the heat of extraction of samarium in the same system. This work was performed to not only test the methodology but also to check for consistency with the heats of extraction obtained with those in the prior literature. The heat of extraction for samarium that was obtained in this study was -9.6 kJ mol-1, which is in reasonable agreement with the previously obtained value of -10.9 kJ mol-1. The curium heat of extraction was performed under two sets of conditions and the obtained heats of extraction were in reasonable agreement with each other at -16.0 {+-} 1.1 and -16.8 {+-} 1.5 kJ mol-1.

  8. Calorimetric determination of the thermoneutral potential of Li/BCX and Li/SOCl2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalu, E. E.; White, R. E.; Darcy, E. C.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of the calorimetric determination of the effective thermoneutral potential, Eetp, of Li/BCS and Li/SOCl2 cells in the temperature range 0-60 C through a continuous recording of the cell voltage, heat flow, and current. The average effective thermoneutral potential at 25 C was 4.0 and 3.84 V for BCX and Li/SOCl2 cells, respectively. Based on the classical approach, the reversible cell potential, Er, and temperature dependence of reversible cell potential, dEr/dT, for BCX cell were 3.74 V and -0.952 mV/K, respectively, and for Li/SOCl2, Er = 3.67 V and dEr/dT = 0.567 mV/K. The thermal polarization (Eetp-E1), where E1 is the load voltage, for both cells, showed that they are the most thermally efficient near 40 C. An overall reaction proposed for the BCX chemistry is supported by the calculated thermodynamic parameters.

  9. Calorimetric determination of the enthalpy of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide synthesis: a key quantity in thermodynamics of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Paulechka, Yauheni U; Kabo, Andrey G; Blokhin, Andrey V

    2009-11-01

    The enthalpy of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide [C(4)mim]Br ionic liquid synthesis reaction 1-methylimidazole (liq) + 1-bromobutane (liq) --> [C(4)mim]Br (liq) was determined in a homemade small-volume isoperibol calorimeter to be Delta(r)H degrees (298) = -87.7 +/- 1.6 kJ x mol(-1). The activation energy for this reaction in a homogeneous system E(A) = 73 +/- 4 kJ x mol(-1) was found from the results of calorimetric measurements. The formation enthalpies for the crystalline and liquid [C(4)mim]Br were determined from the calorimetric data: Delta(f)H degrees (298)(cr) = -178 +/- 5 kJ x mol(-1) and Delta(f)H degrees (298)(liq) = -158 +/- 5 kJ x mol(-1). The ideal-gas formation enthalpy of this compound Delta(f)H degrees (298)(g) = 16 +/- 7 kJ x mol(-1) was calculated using the methods of quantum chemistry and statistical thermodynamics. The vaporization enthalpy of [C(4)mim]Br, Delta(vap)H degrees (298) = 174 +/- 9 kJ x mol(-1), was estimated from the experimental and calculated formation enthalpies. It was demonstrated that vapor pressure of this ionic liquid cannot be experimentally determined. PMID:19821605

  10. Calorimetric determination of thermal parameters for the Li/BrCl in SOCl2 (BCX) chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric C.; Kalu, Eric E.; White, Ralph E.

    1990-01-01

    The heat capacity of a Li-BCX DD-cell was found to be dependent on its state of charge by drop calorimetry measurements. The method of drop calorimetry involves measuring the energy (joules) gained or lost from a sample that is transferred from a bath at temperature A to one at temperature B. The thermoneutral potential is defined as the cell potential where the cell electrochemical reactions are neither exothermic nor endothermic. A Hart scientific calorimeter system, Model No. S77XX, designed for heat conduction calorimetry and drop calorimetry was used. Calorimetric analysis yielded a thermoneutral potential of 4.14 volts and a cell heat capacity dependent on the state of charge.

  11. Calorimetric determination of the enthalpy change for the alpha-helix to coil transition of an alanine peptide in water.

    PubMed Central

    Scholtz, J M; Marqusee, S; Baldwin, R L; York, E J; Stewart, J M; Santoro, M; Bolen, D W

    1991-01-01

    The enthalpy change (delta H) accompanying the alpha-helix to random coil transition in water has been determined calorimetrically for a 50-residue peptide of defined sequence that contains primarily alanine. The enthalpy of helix formation is one of the basic parameters needed to predict thermal unfolding curves for peptide helices and it provides a starting point for analysis of the peptide hydrogen bond. The experimental uncertainty in delta H reflects the fact that the transition curve is too broad to measure in its entirety, which precludes fitting the baselines directly. A lower limit for delta H of unfolding, 0.9 kcal/mol per residue, is given by assuming that the change in heat capacity (delta Cp) is zero, and allowing the baseline to intersect the transition curve at the lowest measured Cp value. Use of the van't Hoff equation plus least-squares fitting to determine a more probable baseline gives delta H = 1.3 kcal/mol per residue. Earlier studies of poly(L-lysine) and poly(L-glutamate) have given 1.1 kcal/mol per residue. Those investigations, along with our present result, suggest that the side chain has little effect on delta H. The possibility that the peptide hydrogen bond shows a correspondingly large delta H, and the implications for protein stability, are discussed. PMID:2011594

  12. Determination of Nuclear Charge Distributions of Fission Fragments from ^{235} U (n_th , f) with Calorimetric Low Temperature Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabitz, P.; Andrianov, V.; Bishop, S.; Blanc, A.; Dubey, S.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Faust, H.; Gönnenwein, F.; Gomez-Guzman, J. M.; Köster, U.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Mutterer, M.; Scholz, P.; Stolte, S.

    2016-03-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors (CLTD's) for heavy-ion detection have been combined with the LOHENGRIN recoil separator at the ILL Grenoble for the determination of nuclear charge distributions of fission fragments produced by thermal neutron-induced fission of ^{235} U. The LOHENGRIN spectrometer separates fission fragments according to their mass-to-ionic-charge ratio and their kinetic energy, but has no selectivity with respect to nuclear charges Z. For the separation of the nuclear charges, one can exploit the nuclear charge-dependent energy loss of the fragments passing through an energy degrader foil (absorber method). This separation requires detector systems with high energy resolution and negligible pulse height defect, as well as degrader foils which are optimized with respect to thickness, homogeneity, and energy loss straggling. In the present, contribution results of test measurements at the Maier Leibnitz tandem accelerator facility in Munich with ^{109} Ag and ^{127} I beams with the aim to determine the most suitable degrader material, as well as measurements at the Institut Laue-Langevin will be presented. These include a systematic study of the quality of Z-separation of fission fragments in the mass range 82≤ A ≤ 132 and a systematic measurement of ^{92} Rb fission yields, as well as investigations of fission yields toward the symmetry region.

  13. New methodology for simultaneous volumetric and calorimetric measurements: Direct determination of {alpha}{sub p} and C{sub p} for liquids under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Casas, L. M.

    2009-12-15

    A new batch cell has been developed to measure simultaneously both isobaric thermal expansion and isobaric heat capacity from calorimetric measurements. The isobaric thermal expansion is directly proportional to the linear displacement of an inner flexible below and the heat capacity is calculated from the calorimetric signal. The apparatus used was a commercial Setaram C-80 calorimeter and together with this type of vessels can be operated up to 20 MPa and in the temperature range of 303.15-523.15 K, In this work, calibration was carried out using 1-hexanol and subsequently both thermophysical properties were determined for 3-pentanol, 3-ethyl-3-pentanol, and 1-octanol at atmospheric pressure, 5 and 10 MPa, and from 303.15 to 423.15 K in temperature. Finally experimental values were compared with the literature in order to validate this new methodology, which allows a very accurate determination of isobaric thermal expansion and isobaric heat capacity.

  14. Calorimetric determination of the thermoneutral potential for Li/BrCl in SOCl2 (BCX) cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric C.; Kalu, Eric E.; White, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    Proliferation of lithium cells into large modular battery packs are projected for future space applications. Assuring battery design safety while maintaining high energy density requires accurate and precise knowledge of the thermal parameters of the battery cell. Specifically, the thermoneutral potential was determined using heat conduction calorimetry on Li/BrCl in SOCl2 (BCX) DD-cells and compared to measurements obtained on Li/SOCl2 D-cells. Over 20 to 60 C, the Li/BCX cells were found to have a thermoneutral potential significantly higher (near 4.0 volts) than that for the Li/SOCl2 cells tested. The higher heat generation measured during discharge reflects the higher electrochemical polarization observed with the BCX cells.

  15. Approaches to determine the enthalpy of crystallisation, and amorphous content, of lactose from isothermal calorimetric data.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, Sarah E; Buckton, Graham; Gaisford, Simon; Ramos, Rita

    2004-10-13

    Amorphous lactose will crystallise rapidly if its glass transition temperature is reduced below its storage temperature. This is readily achieved by storing samples at ambient temperature and a relative humidity (RH) of greater than 50%. If the sample is monitored in an isothermal microcalorimeter as it crystallises, the heat changes associated with the event can be measured; indeed this is one of the methods used to quantify the amorphous content of powders and formulations. However, variations in the calculation methods used to determine these heat changes have led to discrepancies in the values reported in the literature and frequently make comparison of data from different sources difficult. Data analysis and peak integration software allow the selection and integration of specific areas of complex traces with great reproducibility; this has led to the observation that previously ignored artefacts are in fact of sufficient magnitude to affect calculated enthalpies. In this work a number of integration methodologies have been applied to the analysis of amorphous spray-dried lactose, crystallised under 53 or 75% RH at 25 degrees C. The data allowed the selection of a standard methodology from which reproducible heat changes could be determined. The method was subsequently applied to the analysis of partially amorphous lactose samples (containing 1-100% (w/w) amorphous content) allowing the quantification limit of the technique to be established. It was found that the best approach for obtaining reproducible results was (i) to crystallise under an RH of 53%, because this slowed the crystallisation response allowing better experimental measurement and (ii) to integrate all the events occurring in the ampoule, rather than trying to select only that region corresponding to crystallisation, since it became clear that the processes occurring in the cell overlapped and could not be deconvoluted. The technique was able to detect amorphous contents as low as 1% (w/w), using this integration strategy, although it was observed that the calibration plot constructed showed a negative deviation from linearity. It is suggested that such non-ideal behaviour results from the formation of varying ratios of alpha-lactose monohydrate, anhydrous alpha-lactose and anhydrous beta-lactose. PMID:15454300

  16. Quantitative schlieren diagnostics for the determination of ambient species density, gas temperature and calorimetric power of cold atmospheric plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Bleker, A.; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2015-05-01

    A measurement and evaluation technique for performing quantitative Schlieren diagnostics on an argon-operated cold atmospheric plasma jet is presented. Combined with computational fluid dynamics simulations, the method not only yields the temporally averaged ambient air density and temperature in the effluent of the fully turbulent jet, but also allows for an estimation of the calorimetric power deposited by the plasma. The change of the refractive index due to mixing of argon and air is in the same range as caused by the temperature increase of less than 35 K in the effluent of the plasma jet. The Schlieren contrast therefore needs to be corrected for the contribution from ambient air diffusion. The Schlieren system can be calibrated accurately using the signal obtained from the argon flow when the plasma is turned off. The temperature measured in this way is compared to the value obtained using a fibre-optics temperature probe and shows excellent agreement. By fitting a heat source in a fluid dynamics simulation to match the measured temperature field, the calorimetric power deposited by the plasma jet can be estimated as 1.1 W.

  17. Calorimetric determination of the magnetic phase diagram of underdoped ortho II YBa2Cu3O6.54 single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Marcenat, C.; Demuer, A.; Beauvois, K.; Michon, B.; Grockowiak, A.; Liang, R.; Hardy, W.; Bonn, D. A.; Klein, T.

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of a charge order in underdoped YBa2Cu3Oy raised the question of the interplay between superconductivity and this competing phase. Understanding the normal state of high-temperature superconductors is now an essential step towards the description of the pairing mechanism in those materials and determining the upper critical field is therefore of fundamental importance. We present here a calorimetric determination of the field–temperature phase diagram in underdoped YBa2Cu3Oy single crystals. We show that the specific heat saturates in high magnetic fields. This saturation is consistent with a normal state without any significant superconducting contribution and a total Sommerfeld coefficient γN∼6.5±1.5 mJ mol−1 K−2 putting strong constraints on the theoretical models for the Fermi surface reconstruction. PMID:26294047

  18. Prototype of calorimetric flow microsensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, Oleg

    2012-11-01

    An analytical model of calorimetric flow sensor has been developed. The results of the application of this model are utilized to develop a calorimetric flow microsensor with optimal functional characteristics. The technology to manufacture the microsensor is described. A prototype of the microsensor suitable to be used in the mass air flow meter has been designed. The basic characteristics of the microsensor are presented.

  19. Use of the BIPM calorimetric and ionometric standards in megavoltage photon beams to determine Wair and Ic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, D. T.; Picard, S.; Kessler, C.; Roger, P.

    2014-03-01

    The BIPM graphite calorimeter standard for absorbed dose to water has been used in conjunction with an ionization chamber of known volume and with Monte Carlo simulations of these arrangements to determine the value for Wair in 60Co radiation and in accelerator photon beams up to 25 MV. The results show no evidence for a variation in Wair at the 0.2% level over this energy range. Taking the constancy of Wair as established, the best estimate is Wair = 34.03 eV with a standard uncertainty of 0.21%. Consistent with this analysis, and assuming the use of the grain density in evaluating the stopping power of graphite, is the value Ic = 81.1 eV for the mean excitation energy for graphite, with standard uncertainty 1.8 eV.

  20. The use of selective extraction chromatographic columns as an alternative to solvent extraction for the separation of uranium followed by the use of Arsenazo III as a calorimetric reagent for uranium determination

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.J.; Del Mastro, J.R.

    1994-10-01

    The use of U/TEVA{reg_sign} Spec columns as an alternative to solvent extraction for separation of uranium prior to its determination by various techniques (calorimetric, phosphorescence, and mass spectroscopy) was investigated. U/TEVA{reg_sign} Spec columns have several advantages over the widely used 4-methyl-2-pentanone solvent extraction method. Among the advantages are: (1) no hazardous liquid organic waste, that creates regulatory waste disposal problems, is generated; (2) a clean separation of U from Zr, F, and fission products is obtained; (3) the sample preparation time is reduced; and (4) the exposure of analysts to ionizing radiation is reduced because the entire procedure may be performed in a hot cell using remote operations. This study also investigated the use of Arsenazo III (1,8-dihydroxynapthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid-2,7-bis [<-azo-2>-phenylarsonic acid]) as a calorimetric reagent to determine uranium concentrations over a wide range in waste streams and product streams at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Process and waste stream samples were passed through a U/TEVA{reg_sign} Spec column to selectively remove the uranium. The uranium bearing fraction is compatible with the pH range for color development with Arsenazo III. Arsenazo III may be added to the uranium fraction, at a 3:1 mole ratio (Arsenazo:Uranium) at the high end of the method (10 {mu}/mL). Arsenazo III forms a highly stable complex with uranium. Stability tests from this and other studies show that the colored complex of Arsenazo III with U(VI) forms within one minute and remains stable for several hours. The complex with U(VI) varies in color with pH. However, with excess reagent, the color is varying shades of purple. Since the samples were passed through a highly selective extraction chromatographic column prior to adding the calorimetric reagent, no interferences were observed.

  1. Calorimetric gas sensor

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, A.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Smith, J.H.; Moreno, D.J.; Manginell, R.P.; Senturia, S.D.; Huber, R.J.

    1998-11-10

    A combustible gas sensor is described that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 {micro}m thick {times} 10{micro}m wide {times} 100, 250, 500, or 1000 {micro}m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 {micro}m-thick protective CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac){sub 2} onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 C; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300 C (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H{sub 2} concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used. 11 figs.

  2. Calorimetric gas sensor

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Hughes, Robert C.; Smith, James H.; Moreno, Daniel J.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Senturia, Stephen D.; Huber, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A combustible gas sensor that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 .mu.m thick.times.10 .mu.m wide.times.100, 250, 500, or 1000 .mu.m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 .mu.m-thick protective CVD Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac).sub.2 onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500.degree. C.; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300.degree. C. (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H.sub.2 concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N.sub.2 /O.sub.2 mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used.

  3. PREFACE: Symmetries in Science XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    This volume of the proceedings ''Symmetries in Science XVI'' is dedicated to the memory of Miguel Lorente and Allan Solomon who both participated several times in these Symposia. We lost not only two great scientists and colleagues, but also two wonderful persons of high esteem whom we will always remember. Dieter Schuch, Michael Ramek There is a German saying ''all good things come in threes'' and ''Symmetries in Science XVI'', convened July 20-26, 2013 at the Mehrerau Monastery, was our third in the sequel of these symposia since taking it over from founder Bruno Gruber who instigated it in 1988 (then in Lochau). Not only the time seemed to have been perfect (one week of beautiful sunshine), but also the medley of participants could hardly have been better. This time, 34 scientists from 16 countries (more than half outside the European Union) came together to report and discuss their latest results in various fields of science, all related to symmetries. The now customary grouping of renowned experts and talented newcomers was very rewarding and stimulating for all. The informal, yet intense, discussions at ''Gasthof Lamm'' occurred (progressively later) each evening till well after midnight and finally till almost daybreak! However, prior to the opening ceremony and during the conference, respectively, we were informed that Miguel Lorente and Allan Solomon had recently passed away. Both attended the SIS Symposia several times and had many friends among present and former participants. Professor Peter Kramer, himself a long-standing participant and whose 80th birthday commemoration prevented him from attending SIS XVI, kindly agreed to write the obituary for Miguel Lorente. Professors Richard Kerner and Carol Penson (both also former attendees) penned, at very short notice, the tribute to Allan Solomon. The obituaries are included in these Proceedings and further tributes have been posted to our conference website. In 28 lectures and an evening poster-session, topics ranging from theoretical chemistry and molecular physics via fundamental problems in quantum theory to thermodynamics, nonlinear dynamics, soliton theory and finally cosmology, were examined and lively discussed. Nearly all the talks can also be viewed on the conference website. The majority of participants contributed to these Proceedings but some were unable to do so as their results were either previously submitted or published elsewhere. We refer to: · Quesne C 2013, J. Math. Phys. 54, 102102. · Spera M 2013, (Nankai Series in Pure, Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics): 11 Symmetries and Groups in Contemporary Physics: pp. 593-598 Proceedings of the XXIX International Colloquium on Group-Theoretical Methods in Physics Tianjin, China, 20 - 26 August 2012 (World Scientific, Singapore) · Snobl L and Winternitz P 2014, Classification and Identification of Lie Algebras, CRM Monograph Series 33 (Montreal) ISBN-10: 0-8218-4355-9, ISBN-13: 978-0-8218-4355-0 (http://www.ams.org/bookstore?fn=20&arg1=crmmseries&ikey=CRMM-33). Our personal thanks to Daniel and family! Endless support from the Schenk Family who, among other things, sponsored (yet again) the entire conference dinner (including wines and banquet hall) meant that some costs could be alleviated. We could therefore assist various colleagues from economically-weak countries, despite the lack of external funding. A financial deficit meant we would have had to forego the Conference Proceedings, published in previous years by IOP. After long deliberations, and with donations from Gerhard Berssenbrügge, Dr. Dr. Stephan Hauk and Dr. Volker Weisswange, this could be facilitated. We are very grateful to these private donors for their generous and wholehearted support. The staff of Collegium Mehrerau is also to be thanked for their hospitality. Finally, our sincere thanks to Yvette not only for her preparatory work and support during the conference, but also for her persistent interest and help in producing the Proceedings within a reasonable time. Dieter Schuch, Frankfurt am Main, Germany Michael Ramek, Graz, Austria August 2014

  4. Calorimetric system and method

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Moorman, Jack O.

    1998-09-15

    Apparatus for measuring heat capacity of a sample where a series of measurements are taken in succession comprises a sample holder in which a sample to be measured is disposed, a temperature sensor and sample heater for providing a heat pulse thermally connected to the sample, and an adiabatic heat shield in which the sample holder is positioned and including an electrical heater. An electrical power supply device provides an electrical power output to the sample heater to generate a heat pulse. The electrical power from a power source to the heat shield heater is adjusted by a control device, if necessary, from one measurement to the next in response to a sample temperature-versus-time change determined before and after a previous heat pulse to provide a subsequent sample temperature-versus-time change that is substantially linear before and after the subsequent heat pulse. A temperature sensor is used and operable over a range of temperatures ranging from approximately 3K to 350K depending upon the refrigerant used. The sample optionally can be subjected to dc magnetic fields such as from 0 to 12 Tesla (0 to 120 kOe).

  5. Calorimetric system and method

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Moorman, J.O.

    1998-09-15

    Apparatus is described for measuring heat capacity of a sample where a series of measurements are taken in succession comprises a sample holder in which a sample to be measured is disposed, a temperature sensor and sample heater for providing a heat pulse thermally connected to the sample, and an adiabatic heat shield in which the sample holder is positioned and including an electrical heater. An electrical power supply device provides an electrical power output to the sample heater to generate a heat pulse. The electrical power from a power source to the heat shield heater is adjusted by a control device, if necessary, from one measurement to the next in response to a sample temperature-versus-time change determined before and after a previous heat pulse to provide a subsequent sample temperature-versus-time change that is substantially linear before and after the subsequent heat pulse. A temperature sensor is used and operable over a range of temperatures ranging from approximately 3K to 350K depending upon the refrigerant used. The sample optionally can be subjected to dc magnetic fields such as from 0 to 12 Tesla (0 to 120 kOe). 18 figs.

  6. Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Baker, John; Collins, Leland F.; Kuklo, Thomas C.; Micali, James V.

    1992-01-01

    A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

  7. Calorimetric Power Measurements of the DIII-D Gyrotron System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, I.; Lohr, J.; Callis, R. W.; Cary, W. P.; Ponce, D.; Pinsker, R. I.; Chiu, H.; Baity, F. W.

    2001-10-01

    Gyrotron power measurements are an integral part of rf experiments on DIII-D. The ECH complex at General Atomics is built up from four 110 GHz, 1 MW gyrotrons, one from Communication and Power Industry (CPI) and three from Russia's Gyrotron Company (Gycom). Power measurements are made calorimetrically using the temperature and flow measurements of the gyrotron cooling circuits. Three such circuits are measured on the Gycom gyrotrons: window, MOU and dummy load. Interior cooling circuits are additionally measured on the CPI gyrotron that are very useful when tuning for maximum power and efficiency. Calorimetric signals from each cooling circuit are acquired by computer, where the dissipated energy is calculated with a LabView program. From these calculations, total rf power and efficiency were determined. Thus, calorimetry measurements were effectuated during gyrotron operations to provide the average power of each pulse.

  8. Determination of the enthalpy of phase change materials by inverse method from calorimetric experiments. Applications to pure substances or binary solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibout, Stéphane; Maréchal, William; Franquet, Erwin; Bédécarrats, Jean-Pierre; Haillot, Didier; Dumas, Jean-Pierre

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an inverse identification method to determine specific enthalpy of PCM from calorimetry experiments. We will focus on the cases of pure substances and ideal binary solutions including the eutectic equilibrium. The corresponding direct model, based on energy balance, is first presented. A classical enthalpy method is then used, which presents the advantage of easily decoupling the thermal transfers from the specific energetic behavior of the material (i.e. thermodynamical phenomenon). In the second part of the paper, we will present the used inverse method (genetic algorithms). The sensibilities of the different parameters for the identification are analyzed. Finally, we will present the identification from DSC experiments (1) at different rates of heating for pure substances and (2) at different concentrations of aqueous solutions of NHACl. In each case, we identify the thermodynamical parameters of the model and compare the corresponding thermograms with the experimental ones. A good agreement is obtained for both cases.

  9. Thermal Analysis of Calorimetric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aulerio, L.; Violante, V.; Castagna, E.; Fiore, R.; Capobianco, L.; Del Prete, Pr.; Tanzella, F.; McKubre, M.

    Calorimetric analysis has been carried out for both electrochemical and gas loading experiment. A finite element modeling for steady state and transient gave a satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. For electrochemical cells modeling was applied for isoperibolic and flow calorimeters with the main goal to optimize the system. For high-temperature gas loading experiments the modeling was applied to translate the temperature field (steady state and transient three-dimensional analysis), then, in such a case calculations allowed to perform the calorimetry. This experiment was a replication of the MATRIX experiment performed at SRI by some of the authors.1,2 A correlation between 4He production and excess of power during gas loading of deuterium in palladium was observed. Excess of power was estimated by means of the temperature measurements and by comparing experimental data with both the calibration data and the modeling results. Also the effect of the room temperature evolution was considered in the mathematical model of the experiment. 4He tights stainless steel cell have been filled first with a Pd-based catalyst then loaded with deuterium or hydrogen (blank). After filling cells with gas we observed a different thermal behavior of the cells C1 and C2 containing deuterium, compared to the cell C4 containing hydrogen. The temperature increasing in cells C1 and C2 was estimated to be produced by an additional power source of 0.1 W. The measured excess of helium was consistent with expected value obtained by assuming that the excess of energy was produced by a D+D reaction giving 4He+heat (24 MeV). The slope of the temperature increasing was larger in cells C1 and C2, and after achieving a stationary condition for the system the temperature of cells C1 and C2 increased again. During the thermal effect an analysis of the gas was done for the cells C1 and C2. An increasing of the helium content was revealed for both the cells. The He concentration increased up to a factor larger than 2 in both cells C1 and C2.

  10. 78 FR 11939 - Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-2p.; Titles II and XVI: Evaluating Cases Involving Drug Addiction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ...We are giving notice of SSR 13-2p, in which we explain our policies for how we consider whether ``drug addiction and alcoholism'' (DAA) is material to our determination of disability in disability claims and continuing disability reviews. This SSR rescinds and replaces SSR 82-60, Titles II and XVI: Evaluation of Drug Addiction and Alcoholism. This SSR obsoletes EM...

  11. The Level-0 calorimetric trigger of the NA62 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, R.; Barbanera, M.; Bizzarri, M.; Bonaiuto, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Checcucci, B.; De Simone, N.; Fantechi, R.; Federici, L.; Fucci, A.; Lupi, M.; Paoluzzi, G.; Papi, A.; Piccini, M.; Ryjov, V.; Salamon, A.; Salina, G.; Sargeni, F.; Venditti, S.

    2016-02-01

    The NA62 experiment at the CERN SPS aims at measuring the branching ratio of the very rare kaon decay K+ → π+ ν bar nu (expected 10-10) with a 10% background. Since an high-intensity kaon beam is required to collect enough statistics, the Level-0 trigger plays a fundamental role in both the background rejection and in the particle identification. The calorimetric trigger collects data from various calorimeters and it is able to identify clusters of energy deposit and determine their position, fine-time and energy. This paper describes the complete hardware commisioning and the setup of the trigger for the 2015 physics data taking.

  12. Measurement of the calorimetric energy scale in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnell, Jeffrey J.

    2005-06-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. A neutrino beam is created at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois and fired down through the Earth. Measurements of the energy spectra and composition of the neutrino beam are made both at the source using the Near detector and 735 km away at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota using the Far detector. By comparing the spectrum and flavour composition of the neutrino beam between the two detectors neutrino oscillations can be observed. Such a comparison depends on the accuracy of the relative calorimetric energy scale. This thesis details a precise measurement of the calorimetric energy scale of the MINOS Far detector and Calibration detector using stopping muons with a new ''track window'' technique. These measurements are used to perform the relative calibration between the two detectors. This calibration has been accomplished to 1.7% in data and to significantly better than 2% in the Monte Carlo simulation, thus achieving the MINOS relative calibration target of 2%. A number of cross-checks have been performed to ensure the robustness of the calorimetric energy scale measurements. At the Calibration detector the test-beam energy between run periods is found to be consistent with the detector response to better than 2% after the relative calibration is applied. The muon energy loss in the MINOS detectors determined from Bethe-Bloch predictions, data and Monte Carlo are compared and understood. To estimate the systematic error on the measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters caused by a relative miscalibration a study is performed. A 2% relative miscalibration is shown to cause a 0.6% bias in the values of {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}(2{theta}).

  13. PIXE analysis of Italian ink drawings of the XVI century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchiatti, A.; Climent-Font, A.; Enguita, O.; Fernandez-Jimenez, M. T.; Finaldi, G.; Garrido, C.; Matillas, J. M.

    2005-10-01

    The composition of inks in a group of 24 drawings of ten XVI century Italian painters, has been determined by PIXE at the external micro-beam line of the Centro de Micro Análisis de Materiales of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Ink elemental thicknesses have been determined by comparison with a set of certified thin standards. A comprehensive comparison of inks has also been performed by renormalisation of spectra and definition of an ink-to-ink distance. The elemental compositions and the ink-to-ink distances give consistent results that are generally in line with the appearance of the drawings and add relevant instrumental information to the stylistic observation, revealing for example the presence of retouches and additions in different parts of a drawing. Cluster analysis performed on a subgroup of 13 artefacts from the Genoese painter Luca Cambiaso and his school has revealed a partition that separates neatly the work of the master from that of his followers.

  14. ASIC for calorimetric measurements in the astrophysical experiment NUCLEON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, E.; Voronin, A.; Karmanov, D.; Kudryashov, I.; Kovalev, I.; Shumikhin, V.

    2016-02-01

    A satellite with the NUCLEON apparatus was launched in Dec. 2014. The space NUCLEON project of ROSCOSMOS is designed to investigate cosmic ray nuclei energy spectra from 100 GeV to 1000 TeV as well as cosmic ray electron spectra from 20 GeV to 3 TeV. The method of energy determination by means of a silicon instrument for measuring the particle charge of cosmic rays and the calorimetric system were developed. The main parameters, that determine the quality of calorimetric systems are linearity of transfer characteristic and the dynamic range of input signals, which should reach 30 000 MIPs (minimum ionizing particles). The ASIC, satisfying these requirements, consisting of 32 channels with a unique dynamic range from 1 to 40000 MIPs, signal to noise ratio not less than 2.5 at a shaper peaking time of 2 μs and a low power consumption of 1.5 mW/channel has been designed. The first results of the ASIC functionality in space are presented.

  15. Adiabatic calorimetric decomposition studies of 50 wt.% hydroxylamine/water.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, L O; Rogers, W J; Mannan, M S

    2001-03-19

    Calorimetric data can provide a basis for determining potential hazards in reactions, storage, and transportation of process chemicals. This work provides calorimetric data for the thermal decomposition behavior in air of 50wt.% hydroxylamine/water (HA), both with and without added stabilizers, which was measured in closed cells with an automatic pressure tracking adiabatic calorimeter (APTAC). Among the data provided are onset temperatures, reaction order, activation energies, pressures of noncondensable products, thermal stability at 100 degrees C, and the effect of HA storage time. Discussed also are the catalytic effects of carbon steel, stainless steel, stainless steel with silica coating, inconel, titanium, and titanium with silica coating on the reaction self-heat rates and onset temperatures. In borosilicate glass cells, HA was relatively stable at temperatures up to 133 degrees C, where the HA decomposition self-heat rate reached 0.05 degrees C/min. The added stabilizers appeared to reduce HA decomposition rates in glass cells and at ambient temperatures. The tested metals and metal surfaces coated with silica acted as catalysts to lower the onset temperatures and increase the self-heat rates. PMID:11165058

  16. Fast Electron Thermometry for Ultrasensitive Calorimetric Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparinetti, S.; Viisanen, K. L.; Saira, O.-P.; Faivre, T.; Arzeo, M.; Meschke, M.; Pekola, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate radio-frequency thermometry on a micrometer-sized metallic island below 100 mK. Our device is based on a normal-metal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction coupled to a resonator with transmission readout. In the first generation of the device, we achieve 90 μ K /√{Hz } noise-equivalent temperature with 10 MHz bandwidth. We measure the thermal relaxation time of the electron gas in the island, which we find to be of the order of 100 μ s . Such a calorimetric detector, upon optimization, can be seamlessly integrated into superconducting circuits, with immediate applications in quantum-thermodynamics experiments down to single quanta of energy.

  17. Calorimetric thermobarometry of experimentally shocked quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocker, Katherine D.; Gooding, James L.; Hoerz, Friedrich

    1994-01-01

    Structural damage in experimentally shock-metamorphosed, granular quartz is quantitatively measurable by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Shock-induced loss of crystallinity is witnessed by disappearance of the alpha/beta phase transformation and evolution of a broad endoenthalpic strain peak at 650-900 K. The strain-energy peak grows rapidly at less than 10 GPa but declines with increasing shock pressure; it approaches zero at 32 GPa where vitrification is extensive. Effects of grain size and post-shock thermal history must be better understood before calorimetric thermobarometry of naturally shocked samples becomes possible.

  18. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR 31.7. All student activity accounts shall be audited annually. (h) The school shall provide for... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard XVI-Student activities. 36.43 Section 36.43 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MINIMUM ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR...

  19. Nanoclay modified polycarbonate blend nanocomposites: Calorimetric and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zicans, Janis; Meri, Remo Merijs; Ivanova, Tatjana; Berzina, Rita; Kalnins, Martins; Maksimovs, Roberts

    2014-05-01

    The research is devoted to characterization of polycarbonate (PC)/acrylonitrile-butadiene styrene (ABS) blend nanocomposites in respects to it mechanical and calorimetric properties. It is shown that PC blend with 10wt% of ABS is more suitable for development of polymer-clay nanocomposites than PC blend with 40wt.% of ABS. It is revealed that the greatest modulus and strength increment is observed for PC/10wt.%ABS blend nanocomposites, containing aromatic organomodifier treated clay (Dellite 43B). It is also determined that optimal nanofiller content for the investigated PC/10%ABS blend is 1.5 wt.%. Increase of mechanical characteristics of PC/10wt.%ABS blend nanocomposites is accompanied with the rise of glass transition temperatures of both polymeric phases, particularly that of PC.

  20. Calorimetric and calorimetric-fluorimetric methods for the measurement of singlet oxygen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikonnikov, V. K.; Sirotin, S. A.; Kharchenko, S. S.; Lacour, B.; Puech, V.

    2007-05-01

    Considered is the method of isothermal calorimeter intended for the measurement of singlet oxygen (SO) concentrations in oxygen flow. The method is distinguished for its simplicity and does not require expensive equipment. However, by now no calculation methods were available that would grant the necessary properties of the calorimeter at designed conditions. In this our work such calculation method is developed for calorimeters. Compared are the concentrations of SO produced in electric discharge generators as measured by calorimetric and optical methods.

  1. New calorimetric all-particle energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    Both the maximum size N sub m and the sea level muon size N sub mu have been used separately to find the all-particle energy spectrum in the air shower domain. However the conversion required, whether from N sub m to E or from N sub mu to E, has customarily been carried out by means of calculations based on an assumed cascase model. It is shown here that by combining present data on N sub m and N sub mu spectra with data on: (1); the energy spectrum of air shower muons and (2) the average width of the electron profile, one can obtain empirical values of the N sub m to E and N sub mu to E conversion factors, and an empirical calorimetric all-particle spectrum, in the energy range 2 x 10 to the 6th power E 2 x 10 to the 9th power GeV.

  2. Calorimetric sensors for energy deposition measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbrunner, J.; Cooper, R.; Morgan, G.

    1998-12-31

    A calorimetric sensor with several novel design features has been developed. These sensors will provide an accurate sampling of thermal power density and energy deposition from proton beams incident on target components of accelerator-based systems, such as the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project (APT) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A small, solid slug (volume = 0.347 cc) of target material is suspended by kevlar fibers and surrounded by an adiabatic enclosure in an insulating vacuum canister of stainless steel construction. The slug is in thermal contact with a low-mass, calibrated, 100-k{Omega} thermistor. Power deposition caused by the passage of radiation through the slug is calculated from the rate of temperature rise of the slug. The authors have chosen slugs composed of Pb, Al, and LiAl.

  3. Anomalous thermodynamic properties of ice XVI and metastable hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2016-02-01

    A new ice polymorph, called ice XVI, has recently been discovered experimentally by extracting the guest molecules from Ne hydrate. The ice and its filled form (clathrate hydrate) have a unique network topology which results in several interesting properties. Here we provide a theoretical method to calculate thermodynamic properties of a semiopen system in equilibrium with guest gas and thus occupancy of the guest can be varied with temperature and pressure. Experimental observations such as the disappearance of negative thermal expansivity and contraction of the host lattice upon encaging guest molecules are well reproduced, and those behaviors are elucidated in terms of the free energy of cage occupation and its temperature and pressure dependence. We propose an application of the method for preparing ice XVI to create metastable clathrate hydrates having intriguing properties with much lower occupancy of guest molecules than that at equilibrium, which otherwise cannot form.

  4. EDITORIAL: Special issue: CAMOP MOLEC XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenzi, Daniela; Franceschi, Pietro; Tosi, Paolo

    2007-09-01

    In this special issue of CAMOP/Physica Scripta we would like to present a picture of the state-of-the-art in the field of the dynamics of molecular systems. It contains a collection of papers submitted in association with the most recent MOLEC meeting (MOLEC XVI), which was held in September 2006 in Levico Terme (Italy) to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the MOLEC conference series. The series of biennial European Conferences on the Dynamics of Molecular Systems (MOLEC) started in 1976, when the first meeting was held in Trento (Italy). Successive conferences were organized in Brandbjerg Højskole (Denmark, 1978), Oxford (UK, 1980), Nijmegen (The Netherlands, 1982), Jerusalem (Israel, 1984), Aussois (France, 1986), Assisi (Italy, 1988), Bernkastel-Kues (Germany, 1990), Prague (Czech Republic, 1992), Salamanca (Spain, 1994), Nyborg Strand (Denmark, 1996), Bristol (UK, 1998), Jerusalem (Israel, 2000), Istanbul (Turkey, 2002) and Nunspeet (The Netherlands, 2004). This is the second time that Physica Scripta has hosted a special issue dedicated to MOLEC. The previous issue ( Physica Scripta (2006) 73 C1-C89) was edited by Steven Stolte and Harold Linnartz following the MOLEC 2004 conference. Following the philosophy of CAMOP, we have asked invited speakers to summarize important problems in their research area, with the objective of setting forth the current thinking of leading researchers in atomic, molecular and optical physics. This comprises discussions of open questions, important new applications, new theoretical and experimental approaches and also predictions of where the field is heading. In addition to being authoritative contributions of acknowledged experts, we hope that the papers also appeal to non-specialists as each work contains a clear and broad introduction and references to the accessible literature. The present special issue comprises 17 papers, which are arranged according to the following topics: theoretical and experimental studies of molecular collisions and chemically reactive systems (papers by Toennies, Cavalli et al, Varandas, Nyman, Allan et al, Liu et al, Boxford et al); cooling and alignment of molecular systems (papers by Kumarappan et al, van de Meerakker et al); photon-matter interactions, spectroscopy and photodissociation (papers by Fárník and Buck, Golan et al, Borghesani et al, Coreno et al); theory of complex systems (papers by Villarreal et al, Bodo et al, Yurtsever and Calvo). The final contribution concerns the dynamics of systems of biological relevance (paper by Denicke et al). The paper by Toennies, one of the founding fathers of the MOLEC conference and winner of the MOLEC award in 1996, presents a comprehensive account of the experimental developments in the field of low energy collisions over the last 30 years, and provides a short outlook on how the most recent cooling and ultra cooling techniques (helium droplets and electro-magnetic laser traps) could open up new perspectives in the field of chemical reaction dynamics. Cavalli et al present a theoretical interpretation of overlapping resonances in the reactive cross section for the benchmark reaction F + H2→HF + H, explained by the formation of a short-lived state located in the transition state region and of a van der Waals metastable state in the exit valley. The subject of accurate ab initio calculations for potential energy surfaces is addressed by Varandas in a paper describing suitable modelling strategies to obtain intermolecular potentials at near spectroscopic resolution. In the following paper, Nyman gives an overview of how thermal rate constants for polyatomic chemical reactions can be calculated from first principles: the reaction H2 + CH3→CH4 + H is used as an example and theoretical results are compared with experimental ones. The `uncharted territory' of collision dynamics at the gas-liquid interface is explored in the pioneering contribution by Allan et al, in which experimental results on the reactivity of O atoms with long chain liquid hydrocarbons are interpreted with the aid of molecular dynamics calculations. The contribution of Liu et al shifts towards the reactivity of charged systems, by presenting results of crossed beam experiments on the reaction dynamics of ethylene with OD+ and D2O+ ions. Boxford et al continue with an experimental and theoretical study of the systematics of multiply-charged anion fragmentation in dianion-cation contact ion pairs. The next two contributions present the latest findings in the field of cooling and alignment of molecular systems. Kumarappan et al provide an overview of adiabatic and non-adiabatic laser-induced alignment of linear and asymmetric top molecules. van de Meerakker and Meijer discuss the state-of-the-art of Stark deceleration of OH radicals and the prospects for future applications of such tools in scattering experiments are presented. The third section of this issue comprises spectroscopy and photodissociation studies. Fárník and Buck discuss the photodissociation of HBr molecules in three different cluster environments: pure hydrogen bonded (HBr)n clusters, large van der Waals bonded HBr.Arn and HBr.(H2O)n clusters. Differences in the photofragmentation of rovibrationally excited methylamine and propyne molecules are taken as an example by Golan et al to demonstrate the importance of vibrationally mediated photodissociation for understanding energy flows in molecular systems. A study of the IR luminescence in excited and weakly bound rare gas complexes is reported in the contribution by Borghesani et al. Coreno et al discuss the generation of core hole states by soft x-ray absorption of molecules by presenting results on the visible and UV fluorescence decay from H2O, NH3 and CH4 molecules following core electron excitation and by proposing a mechanism of molecular dissociation. The fourth section includes three theoretical contributions. In the first one, by Villarreal et al, the simulation of IR spectra of molecules solvated in atomic clusters is reviewed by presenting a method to obtain energies and wave functions for systems composed of a molecular impurity immersed in He clusters. Bodo et al continue with an application of variational and diffusion Monte Carlo calculation procedure to the `solvation' of molecular and atomic ions in small He clusters. Yurtsever and Calvo describe the influence of a central point defect on the structure of 2D clusters consisting of point charge particles that are confined by an isotropic trap. Finally, Denicke et al review the imaging technique of single-beam and multi-beam two-photon laser-scanning microscopy for biomedical research by showing applications to the study of cell metabolism via NADH imaging. We are grateful to all the authors who participated with their contributions to this issue. We thank Physica Scripta for providing us with a platform for the publication of the MOLEC special issue and we hope that such a recently established tradition will continue to bring to readers new insights into the advances in the field of molecular dynamics.

  5. Application of Electrical and Calorimetric Methods to the A.C. Loss Characterization of Cable Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Coletta, C.; Gherardi, L.; Gomory, F.; Cereda, E.; Ottoboni, V.; Daney, D.E.; Maley, M.P.; Zannella, S.

    1998-09-13

    Due to the higher currents (and therefore higher losses) compared to individual wires and tapes, the ac loss characterization of HTS cable conductors carrying transport current can be performed using calorimetric as well as electrical methods. We discuss the main features of two calorimetric methods, one based on temperature profile determination, and one, more recently developed, based on nitrogen boil-off rate, and of the electrical method, substantially derived from that already established for tapes, based on voltage measurement by a Lock-In amplifier. Advantages and limits of each approach are analyzed and compared. Tests have been carried out with the three methods on samples 1 to 1.5 m long cut from a Bi-2223 cable conductor prototype fabricated by Pirelli in a longer length. Results obtained from measurements covering a wide range of currents are compared and thoroughly discussed.

  6. An Improved Formulation for Calorimetric Emittance Testing of Spacecraft Thermal Control Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauder, Lonny R.

    2008-01-01

    Spacecraft often really heavily on passive thermal control to maintain operating temperature. An important parameter in the spacecraft heat balance equation is the emittance of thermal control coatings as a function of coating temperature. One method for determining the emittance of spacecraft thermal control from elevated temperature to cryogenic temperatures relies on a calorimetric technique. The fundamental equation governing this test method can be found in numerous places in the literature and although it generally provides reasonable results, its formulation is based on a conceptual flaw that only becomes apparent when the sample temperature approaches the wall temperature during testing. This paper investigates the cause for this error and develops the correct formulation for calorimetric emittance testing. Experimental data will also be presented that illustrates the difference between the two formulations and the resulting difference in the calculated emittance.

  7. ESTIMATION OF BARE-SOIL EVAPORATION USING A CALORIMETRIC APPROACH WITH HEAT FLUX MEASURED AT MULTIPLE DEPTHS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An assumption in calorimetric methods for soil heat flux is that sensible heat terms can be balanced (i.e., if the heat flux is known at one depth, the heat flux at another depth may be determined by monitoring the change in heat storage). Latent heat from water evaporation is assigned to the energy...

  8. Calorimetric study of peroxycarboxylic ester synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fritzsche, L; Knorr, A

    2009-04-30

    Exothermic reactions involving organic peroxides carry a high potential hazard and must be considered with care. A safe handling requires, among others, the assessment of thermal process safety, for which safety characteristics like overall heat production and the resulting adiabatic temperature rise are essential. The article presents the results of the calorimetric investigation of the synthesis of four peroxycarboxylic esters, three tert-Butyl and one tert-Amyl peroxycarboxylic ester. In the two-step synthesis the second one clearly shows the higher exothermic potential. The overall heat production lies in the range of 126-135 kJ/mol and is nearly independent of the carboxylic acid residual in the tert-Butyl peroxycarboxylic ester. The calculated adiabatic temperature rise is 70-80K. Influence of temperature and feed rate on the heat generation is discussed for one species. A grading of the synthesis with respect to temperature levels according to the criticality classes by Stoessel leads to the most critical for an exothermic reaction. PMID:18722058

  9. Adiabatic Heat of Hydration Calorimetric Measurements for Reference Saltstone Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, James

    2006-01-12

    The production of nuclear materials for weapons, medical, and space applications from the mid-1950's through the late-1980's at the Savannah River Site (SRS) generated approximately 35 million gallons of liquid high-level radioactive waste, which is currently being processed into vitrified glass for long-term storage. Upstream of the vitrification process, the waste is separated into three components: high activity insoluble sludge, high activity insoluble salt, and very low activity soluble salts. The soluble salt represents 90% of the 35 million gallons of overall waste and is processed at the SRS Saltstone Facility, where it mixed with cement, blast furnace slag, and flyash, creating a grout-like mixture. The resulting grout is pumped into aboveground storage vaults, where it hydrates into concrete monoliths, called saltstone, thus immobilizing the low-level radioactive salt waste. As the saltstone hydrates, it generates heat that slowly diffuses out of the poured material. To ensure acceptable grout properties for disposal and immobilization of the salt waste, the grout temperature must not exceed 95 C during hydration. Adiabatic calorimetric measurements of the heat generated for a representative sample of saltstone were made to determine the time-dependent heat source term. These measurements subsequently were utilized as input to a numerical conjugate heat transfer model to determine the expected peak temperatures for the saltstone vaults.

  10. Calorimetric versus Growth Microbial Analysis of Cellulase Enzymes Acting on Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Lovrien, Rex E.; Williams, Karl K.; Ferrey, Mark L.; Ammend, David A.

    1987-01-01

    Assay of cellulase enzymology on cellulose was investigated by two methods: (i) plate colony counting to determine microbial growth and (ii) microbial calorimetry. These methods were chosen because they accept raw samples and have the potential to be far more specific than spectrophotometric reducing sugar assays. Microbial calorimetry requires ca. 0.5 to 1 h and 10 to 100 μM concentrations of cellulolytic lower sugars (glucose and cellobiose). Growth assay (liquid culture, plating, colony counting) requires 15 to 20 h and ca. 0.5 mM sugars. Microbial calorimetry requires simply aerobic metabolism, whereas growth assay requires completion of the cell cycle. A stripping technique is described for use in conjunction with the calorimetric method to enable separate analysis of the two sugars. Mixtures of glucose and cellobiose are equilibrated with Escherichia coli and spun out to remove glucose. The supernatant is calorimetrically combusted with Klebsiella sp. to quantitate cellobiose, and the same organism combusting the nonstripped mixture gives heat proportional to the sum of the two sugars. Calorimetry of cellulolysis products from individual exo- and endocellulases, and from their reconstituted mixture, was carried out to develop a microbial calorimetric means for demonstrating enzyme synergism. PMID:16347508

  11. Sensitivity and systematics of calorimetric neutrino mass experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nucciotti, A.; Cremonesi, O.; Ferri, E.

    2009-12-16

    A large calorimetric neutrino mass experiment using thermal detectors is expected to play a crucial role in the challenge for directly assessing the neutrino mass. We discuss and compare here two approaches for the estimation of the experimental sensitivity of such an experiment. The first method uses an analytic formulation and allows to obtain readily a close estimate over a wide range of experimental configurations. The second method is based on a Montecarlo technique and is more precise and reliable. The Montecarlo approach is then exploited to study some sources of systematic uncertainties peculiar to calorimetric experiments. Finally, the tools are applied to investigate the optimal experimental configuration of the MARE project.

  12. Planck 2013 results. XVI. Cosmological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Haissinski, J.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the first cosmological results based on Planck measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and lensing-potential power spectra. We find that the Planck spectra at high multipoles (ℓ ≳ 40) are extremely well described by the standard spatially-flat six-parameter ΛCDM cosmology with a power-law spectrum of adiabatic scalar perturbations. Within the context of this cosmology, the Planck data determine the cosmological parameters to high precision: the angular size of the sound horizon at recombination, the physical densities of baryons and cold dark matter, and the scalar spectral index are estimated to be θ∗ = (1.04147 ± 0.00062) × 10-2, Ωbh2 = 0.02205 ± 0.00028, Ωch2 = 0.1199 ± 0.0027, and ns = 0.9603 ± 0.0073, respectively(note that in this abstract we quote 68% errors on measured parameters and 95% upper limits on other parameters). For this cosmology, we find a low value of the Hubble constant, H0 = (67.3 ± 1.2) km s-1 Mpc-1, and a high value of the matter density parameter, Ωm = 0.315 ± 0.017. These values are in tension with recent direct measurements of H0 and the magnitude-redshift relation for Type Ia supernovae, but are in excellent agreement with geometrical constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) surveys. Including curvature, we find that the Universe is consistent with spatial flatness to percent level precision using Planck CMB data alone. We use high-resolution CMB data together with Planck to provide greater control on extragalactic foreground components in an investigation of extensions to the six-parameter ΛCDM model. We present selected results from a large grid of cosmological models, using a range of additional astrophysical data sets in addition to Planck and high-resolution CMB data. None of these models are favoured over the standard six-parameter ΛCDM cosmology. The deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity isinsensitive to the addition of tensor modes and to changes in the matter content of the Universe. We find an upper limit of r0.002< 0.11 on the tensor-to-scalar ratio. There is no evidence for additional neutrino-like relativistic particles beyond the three families of neutrinos in the standard model. Using BAO and CMB data, we find Neff = 3.30 ± 0.27 for the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom, and an upper limit of 0.23 eV for the sum of neutrino masses. Our results are in excellent agreement with big bang nucleosynthesis and the standard value of Neff = 3.046. We find no evidence for dynamical dark energy; using BAO and CMB data, the dark energy equation of state parameter is constrained to be w = -1.13-0.10+0.13. We also use the Planck data to set limits on a possible variation of the fine-structure constant, dark matter annihilation and primordial magnetic fields. Despite the success of the six-parameter ΛCDM model in describing the Planck data at high multipoles, we note that this cosmology does not provide a good fit to the temperature power spectrum at low multipoles. The unusual shape of the spectrum in the multipole range 20 ≲ ℓ ≲ 40 was seen previously in the WMAP data and is a real feature of the primordial CMB anisotropies. The poor fit to the spectrum at low multipoles is not of decisive significance, but is an "anomaly" in an otherwise self-consistent analysis of the Planck temperature data.

  13. A calorimetric determination of the standard enthalpies of formation of huntite, CaMg3 (CO3)4 , and artinite, Mg2(OH)2 CO3 * 3H2O, and their standard Gibbs free energies of formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, Bruce S.; Robie, Richard A.

    1973-01-01

    The enthalpies of formation, ΔH°f, of huntite, CaMg3(CO3)4 , and artinite, Mg2(OH)2CO3 * 3H2O, have been determined by HCl solution calorimetry using a constant-volume isoperibol reaction calorimeter. For the reaction CaO(c) + 3MgO(c) + 4CO2 (g) = CaMg3(CO3)4 (c), the enthalpy change at 298.15 K, ΔH°298 , is -123,203±145 cal mol-1. For the reaction 2MgO(c) + 4H2O(l) + CO2(g)=Mg2(OH)2CO3 * 3H2O(c), we obtained -45,132±100 cal mol-1. These results combined with the standard enthalpies of formation of CaO, MgO, H2O, and CO2 lead to ΔH°298 (huntite) = -1,082,600±375 cal mol-1 and ΔH°298  (artinite) = -698,043±170 cal mol-1. Using recently determined values for the standard entropies of huntite, CaMg3(CO3)4, and artinite, Mg2(OH)2CO3 * 3H2O, and of Mg, Ca, C, O2 , and H2 , we calculate ΔG°f,298 (huntite) = -1,004,707±390 cal mol-1 and ΔG°f,298 (artinite) = -613,924±180 cal mol-1.

  14. Calorimetric evaluation of selective surfaces in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, W.S.; Hodgson, D.

    1999-07-01

    The properties of selective absorber coatings are calorimetrically evaluated in situ in evacuated solar collector tubes. This paper provides the details of the testing and evaluation procedures and presents preliminary results of the current round of testing that is now beginning.

  15. Calorimetric study on the state of aromatic molecules sorbed on silicalite

    SciTech Connect

    Thamm, H.

    1987-01-01

    Differential heats of sorption have been determined calorimetrically for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-xylene on silicate as a function of pore filling. In all cases abrupt changes in the state of the sorbed molecules are observed when the amount sorbed exceeds 1 molecule per 1/4 unit cell. While in the case of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene sorbate-sorbate interaction occurs only above 1 molecule per 1/4 unit cell, the sorbed p-xylene molecules interact with each other below this loading.

  16. Calorimetric support of directional-hemispherical reflection measurements in the infrared spectral range.

    PubMed

    Richter, W; Sarge, S M; Kämmer, F

    1994-03-01

    Measurements of the directional-hemispherical reflectance ρ with the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt IR sphere reflectometer have been confirmed by calorimetric determination of the absorptance α in the same geometrical conditions (irradiation at 10°, hemispherical reflection). The good agreement of ρ with (1 - α) on both highly reflecting and low-reflecting surfaces indicates that in the mid-IR spectral range the integrating sphere reflectometer is capable of essentially correct reflectance measurements of diffusely reflecting surfaces, with an estimated uncertainty of 0.01 after correction for a small systematic deviation. This capability opens up the possibility of developing IR reflectance standards. PMID:20862150

  17. Thermodynamic properties of anhydrous smectite MX-80, illite IMt-2 and mixed-layer illite smectite ISCz-1 as determined by calorimetric methods. Part I: Heat capacities, heat contents and entropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailhanou, H.; van Miltenburg, J. C.; Rogez, J.; Olives, J.; Amouric, M.; Gaucher, E. C.; Blanc, P.

    2007-11-01

    The heat capacities of the anhydrous international reference clay minerals, smectite MX-80, illite IMt-2 and mixed-layer illite-smectite ISCz-1, were measured by low temperature adiabatic calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, from 6 to 520 K (at 1 bar). The samples were chemically purified and Na-saturated. Dehydrated clay fractions <2 μm were studied. The structural formulae of the corresponding clay minerals, obtained after subtracting the remaining impurities, are K0.026NaCa(SiAl) ( AlFe3+0.184MgFe2+0.038Ti) O(OH)2 for smectite MX-80, K0.762Na(SiAl) ( AlFe3+0.292MgFe2+0.084)O(OH)2 for illite IMt-2 and K0.530Na(SiAl)( AlFe3+0.051MgFe2+0.017Ti) O(OH)2for mixed-layer ISCz-1. From the heat capacity values, we determined the molar entropies, standard entropies of formation and heat contents of these minerals. The following values were obtained at 298.15 K and 1 bar: Cp0 (J mol -1 K -1) S0 (J mol -1 K -1) Smectite MX-80 326.13 ± 0.10 280.56 ± 0.16 Illite IMt-2 328.21 ± 0.10 295.05 ± 0.17 Mixed-layer ISCz-1 320.79 ± 0.10 281.62 ± 0.15

  18. A Calorimetric Method for Determination of Heat Capacity of Ceramics for Concentrated Solar Thermal Systems / Skenējošās Kalorimetrijas Metode Siltumietilpības Noteikšanai Saules Kolektoru Keramikā

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnačs, J.; Grehovs, V.; Mežinskis, G.; Bidermanis, L.

    2013-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry was carried out to determine the heat capacity (Cp) of the high temperature resistant ceramic materials to be used as protective coatings for stainless steel tubes of parabolic trough solar collectors in concentrated solar power (CSP) systems. The Ср(Т) measurements and calculations were performed at continuous scanning in the temperature range 20-800 °С. In the work, calibration curves have been derived for conversion of measuring units from mcV into mW. To achieve a better repeatability of measurements, methods for stabilization of the thermal contact between the sample-containing vessel and the probe have been developed. The Ср(Т) dependence was obtained for different ceramic materials. Rakstā izklāstīta izstrādātā metodika keramikas un emalju siltumietilpības noteikšanai pēc diferenciālās skenējošās kalorimetrijas mērījumiem. Parādīta virkne traucējošo faktoru kalibrēšanas līknes un mērījumu veikšanai, piedāvātas metodes to samazināšanai vai novēršanai, precīzāku rezultātu ieguvei. Noteikta siltumietilpības atkarība no temperatūras virknei emalju, kas var tikt izmantotas saules siltuma kolektoros, kā aizsargpārklājumi. Parādīta siltumietilpības noteikšanas atkārtojamības atkarība no siltuma kontakta. Izstrādāta metode termiskā kontakta stabilizācijai. Virknei emalju noteikta siltumietilpības atkarība no temperatūras diapazonā 20 - 800°С.

  19. Thermodynamic properties by non-calorimetric methods. Progress report, August 1, 1988--July 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Collier, W.B.; Strube, M.M. |

    1989-12-31

    This three year research program provides a valuable complement to the experimental programs currently in progress at NIPER for the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR and TD) and Advanced Exploration and Process Technology (AEPT) divisions of the Department of Energy. These experimental programs are focused on the calorimetric determination of thermodynamic properties of key polynuclear heteroatom-containing aromatic molecules. This project for the Office of Energy Research focuses on the non-calorimetric determination of thermodynamic properties through the extension of existing correlation methodologies and through molecular spectroscopy with statistical mechanics. The paper discusses progress in three areas: (1) Improvement of thermochemical and thermophysical property predictions via enhancement of group-contribution methods using two approaches, namely, development and improvement of group-contribution parameters via correlations involving the expanded modern thermodynamics data base and development of group-contribution parameters via molecular spectroscopy and statistical mechanics of key monocyclic organic compounds; (2) Molecular spectroscopy and statistical mechanics: equipment development and developments in interpretation and assignment of spectra; and (3) Thermophysical property correlations.

  20. Micro-calorimetric sensor for trace explosive particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Jesper K.; Greve, Anders; Privorotskaya, N.; Senesac, L.; Thundat, T.; King, W. P.; Boisen, A.

    2010-04-01

    A micro differential thermal analysis (DTA) system is used for detection of trace explosive particles. The DTA system consists of two silicon micro chips with integrated heaters and temperature sensors. One chip is used for reference and one for the measurement sample. The sensor is constructed as a small silicon nitride bridge incorporating heater elements and a temperature measurement resistor. In this manuscript the DTA system is described and tested by measuring calorimetric response of DNT (2,4-Dinitrotoluene). The design of the senor is described and the temperature uniformity investigated using finite element modelings and Raman temperature measurements. The functionality is tested using two different kinds of explosive deposition techniques and calorimetric responses are obtained. Under the framework of the Xsense project at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) which combines four independent sensing techniques, these micro DNT sensors will be included in handheld explosives detectors with applications in homeland security and landmine clearance.

  1. Stabilization of Cu(I) for binding and calorimetric measurements in aqueous solution†

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Destinee K.; Stevenson, Michael J.; Almadidy, Zayed A.; Jenkins, Sharon E.; Wilcox, Dean. E.; Grossoehme, Nicholas E.

    2015-01-01

    Conditions have been developed for the comproportionation reaction of Cu2+ and copper metal to prepare aqueous solutions of Cu+ that are stabilized from disproportionation by MeCN and other Cu+-stabilizing ligands. These solutions were then used in ITC measurements to quantify the thermodynamics of formation of a set of Cu+ complexes (CuI(MeCN)3+, CuIMe6Trien+, CuI(BCA)23−, CuI(BCS)23−), which have stabilities ranging over 15 orders of magnitude, for their use in binding and calorimetric measurements of Cu+ interaction with proteins and other biological macromolecules. These complexes were then used to determine the stability and thermodynamics of formation of a 1 : 1 complex of Cu+ with the biologically important tri-peptide glutathione, GSH. These results identify Me6Trien as an attractive Cu+-stabilizing ligand for calorimetric experiments, and suggest that caution should be used with MeCN to stabilize Cu+ due to its potential for participating in unquantifiable ternary interactions. PMID:26327397

  2. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Jen, Chun -Min; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-10-22

    To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two νμ → νμ disappearance experiments operating in different energymore » regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with an O(10%) accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. Thus, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.« less

  3. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Jen, Chun -Min; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-10-22

    To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two νμ → νμ disappearance experiments operating in different energy regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with an O(10%) accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. Thus, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.

  4. 20 CFR 408.930 - Are title II and title XVI benefits subject to adjustment to recover title VIII overpayments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Underpayments and Overpayments Adjustment of Title II Benefits § 408.930 Are title II and title XVI benefits subject to adjustment to... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Are title II and title XVI benefits...

  5. 20 CFR 408.930 - Are title II and title XVI benefits subject to adjustment to recover title VIII overpayments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Underpayments and Overpayments Adjustment of Title II Benefits § 408.930 Are title II and title XVI benefits subject to adjustment to... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are title II and title XVI benefits...

  6. 20 CFR 408.930 - Are title II and title XVI benefits subject to adjustment to recover title VIII overpayments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Underpayments and Overpayments Adjustment of Title II Benefits § 408.930 Are title II and title XVI benefits subject to adjustment to... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Are title II and title XVI benefits...

  7. 20 CFR 408.930 - Are title II and title XVI benefits subject to adjustment to recover title VIII overpayments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Underpayments and Overpayments Adjustment of Title II Benefits § 408.930 Are title II and title XVI benefits subject to adjustment to... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Are title II and title XVI benefits...

  8. 20 CFR 408.930 - Are title II and title XVI benefits subject to adjustment to recover title VIII overpayments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Underpayments and Overpayments Adjustment of Title II Benefits § 408.930 Are title II and title XVI benefits subject to adjustment to... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Are title II and title XVI benefits...

  9. Setup for calorimetric measurements at temperatures below 1 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eropkin, V. N.; Chagovets, T. V.

    2003-11-01

    A compact, top-loading 3He evaporation refrigerator is built for doing heat-capacity studies on various samples at temperatures below 1 K. It uses adsorption pumping and utilizes a portable helium Dewar of the STG-40 type as the cryostat. A calorimetric cell is built which permits investigation of the heat capacity of samples with masses of less than one gram. The lowest measurement temperature is 0.32 K. The dependence of the temperature of the 3He evaporation chamber on the power delivered to it is established. The refrigerator can operate continuously for two hours at a heat load of 50 μW.

  10. On the measurement of energy fluxes in plasmas using a calorimetric probe and a thermopile sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Pierre-Antoine; Stahl, Marc; Thomann, Anne-Lise; Dussart, Rémi; Wolter, Matthias; Semmar, Nadjib; Mathias, Jacky; Kersten, Holger

    2010-11-01

    Two different diagnostics for the determination of the energy influx in plasma processes were used to characterize an ion beam source and an asymmetric RF discharge. The related energy fluxes were measured in dependence on the ion energy and on the RF power, respectively. The first sensor, called HFM (Heat Flux Microsensor) is a thermopile which allows for direct energy flux measurements. With the second sensor, a calorimetric probe, the energy influx has been calculated from the temporal temperature evolution preliminarily registered. Although the working principle of both sensors is different, the obtained results are in good agreement. In the ion beam (<1.5 keV)) rather high energy influxes are achieved (up to 700 mW cm-2), whereas the values measured in the asymmetric RF discharge were lower than 50 mW cm-2 for discharge powers in the range 10-100 W. The performances and limitations of both sensors are compared and discussed.

  11. Empirical free energy calculation: comparison to calorimetric data.

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Z.; Delisi, C.; Vajda, S.

    1997-01-01

    An effective free energy potential, developed originally for binding free energy calculation, is compared to calorimetric data on protein unfolding, described by a linear combination of changes in polar and nonpolar surface areas. The potential consists of a molecular mechanics energy term calculated for a reference medium (vapor or nonpolar liquid), and empirical terms representing solvation and entropic effects. It is shown that, under suitable conditions, the free energy function agrees well with the calorimetric expression. An additional result of the comparison is an independent estimate of the side-chain entropy loss, which is shown to agree with a structure-based entropy scale. These findings confirm that simple functions can be used to estimate the free energy change in complex systems, and that a binding free energy evaluation model can describe the thermodynamics of protein unfolding correctly. Furthermore, it is shown that folding and binding leave the sum of solute-solute and solute-solvent van der Waals interactions nearly invariant and, due to this invariance, it may be advantageous to use a nonpolar liquid rather than vacuum as the reference medium. PMID:9300497

  12. Novel micro-calorimetric spectroscopy for mine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G. |; Rajic, S.; Egert, C.M.; Datskou, I.

    1998-03-01

    The authors have developed a novel micro-calorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used in mine detection applications. In this technique target molecules are allowed to adsorb on the surface of sub-femtojoule sensitive micromechanical thermal detectors. The adsorption of molecules on the thermal detector surface causes a differential surface stress resulting in an initial trigger. By exposing each element in an array of thermal detectors to different photon wavelengths, an extremely sensitive and unique photothermal signature response can be obtained. The authors present their results on target chemicals adsorbed on the detector surface at sub-monolayer coverage levels. They will present infrared photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), and trinitrotoluene (TNT) over the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 microns. They found that in the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 microns the photothermal spectra of DIMP and TNT exhibit a number of peaks and are in excellent agreement with infrared absorption spectra found in the literature. Chemical detectors based on micro-calorimetric spectroscopy can be used to sensitively sense small number of molecules adsorbed on a thermal detector surface. The photothermal signature resulting from photon irradiation can be used for improved chemical characterization.

  13. A TEMPORAL MAP IN GEOSTATIONARY ORBIT: THE COVER ETCHING ON THE EchoStar XVI ARTIFACT

    SciTech Connect

    Weisberg, Joel M.; Paglen, Trevor

    2012-10-01

    Geostationary satellites are unique among orbital spacecraft in that they experience no appreciable atmospheric drag. After concluding their respective missions, geostationary spacecraft remain in orbit virtually in perpetuity. As such, they represent some of human civilization's longest lasting artifacts. With this in mind, the EchoStar XVI satellite, to be launched in fall 2012, will play host to a time capsule intended as a message for the deep future. Inspired in part by the Pioneer Plaque and Voyager Golden Records, the EchoStar XVI Artifact is a pair of gold-plated aluminum jackets housing a small silicon disk containing 100 photographs. The Cover Etching, the subject of this paper, is etched onto one of the two jackets. It is a temporal map consisting of a star chart, pulsar timings, and other information describing the epoch from which EchoStar XVI came. The pulsar sample consists of 13 rapidly rotating objects, 5 of which are especially stable, having spin periods <10 ms and extremely small spin-down rates. In this paper, we discuss our approach to the time map etched onto the cover and the scientific data shown on it, and we speculate on the uses that future scientists may have for its data. The other portions of the EchoStar XVI Artifact will be discussed elsewhere.

  14. The ISLANDS Project. I. Andromeda XVI, An Extremely Low Mass Galaxy Not Quenched by Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monelli, Matteo; Martínez-Vázquez, Clara E.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Gallart, Carme; Skillman, Evan D.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Cole, Andrew A.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Aparicio, Antonio; Cassisi, Santi; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Mayer, Lucio; McConnachie, Alan; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Navarro, Julio F.

    2016-03-01

    Based on data aquired in 13 orbits of Hubble Space Telescope time, we present a detailed evolutionary history of the M31 dSph satellite Andromeda XVI, including its lifetime star formation history (SFH), the spatial distribution of its stellar populations, and the properties of its variable stars. And XVI is characterized by prolonged star formation activity from the oldest epochs until star formation was quenched ˜6 Gyr ago, and, notably, only half of the mass in stars of And XVI was in place 10 Gyr ago. And XVI appears to be a low-mass galaxy for which the early quenching by either reionization or starburst feedback seems highly unlikely, and thus it is most likely due to an environmental effect (e.g., an interaction), possibly connected to a late infall in the densest regions of the Local Group. Studying the SFH as a function of galactocentric radius, we detect a mild gradient in the SFH: the star formation activity between 6 and 8 Gyr ago is significantly stronger in the central regions than in the external regions, although the quenching age appears to be the same, within 1 Gyr. We also report the discovery of nine RR Lyrae (RRL) stars, eight of which belong to And XVI. The RRL stars allow a new estimate of the distance, (m - M)0 = 23.72 ± 0.09 mag, which is marginally larger than previous estimates based on the tip of the red giant branch. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #13028.

  15. Formation and properties of ice XVI obtained by emptying a type sII clathrate hydrate.

    PubMed

    Falenty, Andrzej; Hansen, Thomas C; Kuhs, Werner F

    2014-12-11

    Gas hydrates are ice-like solids, in which guest molecules or atoms are trapped inside cages formed within a crystalline host framework (clathrate) of hydrogen-bonded water molecules. They are naturally present in large quantities on the deep ocean floor and as permafrost, can form in and block gas pipelines, and are thought to occur widely on Earth and beyond. A natural point of reference for this large and ubiquitous family of inclusion compounds is the empty hydrate lattice, which is usually regarded as experimentally inaccessible because the guest species stabilize the host framework. However, it has been suggested that sufficiently small guests may be removed to leave behind metastable empty clathrates, and guest-free Si- and Ge-clathrates have indeed been obtained. Here we show that this strategy can also be applied to water-based clathrates: five days of continuous vacuum pumping on small particles of neon hydrate (of structure sII) removes all guests, allowing us to determine the crystal structure, thermal expansivity and limit of metastability of the empty hydrate. It is the seventeenth experimentally established crystalline ice phase, ice XVI according to the current ice nomenclature, has a density of 0.81 grams per cubic centimetre (making it the least dense of all known crystalline water phases) and is expected to be the stable low-temperature phase of water at negative pressures (that is, under tension). We find that the empty hydrate structure exhibits negative thermal expansion below about 55 kelvin, and that it is mechanically more stable and has at low temperatures larger lattice constants than the filled hydrate. These observations attest to the importance of kinetic effects and host-guest interactions in clathrate hydrates, with further characterization of the empty hydrate expected to improve our understanding of the structure, properties and behaviour of these unique materials. PMID:25503235

  16. Formation and properties of ice XVI obtained by emptying a type sII clathrate hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falenty, Andrzej; Hansen, Thomas C.; Kuhs, Werner F.

    2014-12-01

    Gas hydrates are ice-like solids, in which guest molecules or atoms are trapped inside cages formed within a crystalline host framework (clathrate) of hydrogen-bonded water molecules. They are naturally present in large quantities on the deep ocean floor and as permafrost, can form in and block gas pipelines, and are thought to occur widely on Earth and beyond. A natural point of reference for this large and ubiquitous family of inclusion compounds is the empty hydrate lattice, which is usually regarded as experimentally inaccessible because the guest species stabilize the host framework. However, it has been suggested that sufficiently small guests may be removed to leave behind metastable empty clathrates, and guest-free Si- and Ge-clathrates have indeed been obtained. Here we show that this strategy can also be applied to water-based clathrates: five days of continuous vacuum pumping on small particles of neon hydrate (of structure sII) removes all guests, allowing us to determine the crystal structure, thermal expansivity and limit of metastability of the empty hydrate. It is the seventeenth experimentally established crystalline ice phase, ice XVI according to the current ice nomenclature, has a density of 0.81 grams per cubic centimetre (making it the least dense of all known crystalline water phases) and is expected to be the stable low-temperature phase of water at negative pressures (that is, under tension). We find that the empty hydrate structure exhibits negative thermal expansion below about 55 kelvin, and that it is mechanically more stable and has at low temperatures larger lattice constants than the filled hydrate. These observations attest to the importance of kinetic effects and host-guest interactions in clathrate hydrates, with further characterization of the empty hydrate expected to improve our understanding of the structure, properties and behaviour of these unique materials.

  17. Preparation, structural, and calorimetric characterization of bicomponent metallic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, M. E.; Murthy, N. S.; Udod, I.; Khayrullin, I. I.; Baughman, R. H.; Zakhidov, A. A.

    2007-03-01

    We report preparation and characterization of novel bicomponent metal-based photonic crystals having submicron three-dimensional (3D) periodicity. Fabricated photonic crystals include SiO2 sphere lattices infiltrated interstitially with metals, carbon inverse lattices filled with metal or metal alloy spheres, Sb inverse lattices, and Sb inverse lattices filled with Bi spheres. Starting from a face centered SiO2 lattice template, these materials were obtained by sequences of either templating and template extraction or templating, template extraction, and retemplating. Surprising high fidelity was obtained for all templating and template extraction steps. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to characterize the structure and the effects of the structure on calorimetric properties. To the best of our knowledge, SAXS data on metallic photonic crystals were collected for first time.

  18. Remote calorimetric detection of urea via flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaddes, David E; Demirel, Melik C; Reeves, W Brian; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2015-12-01

    The design and development of a calorimetric biosensing system enabling relatively high throughput sample analysis are reported. The calorimetric biosensor system consists of a thin (∼20 μm) micromachined Y-cut quartz crystal resonator (QCR) as a temperature sensor placed in close proximity to a fluidic chamber packed with an immobilized enzyme. Layer by layer enzyme immobilization of urease is demonstrated and its activity as a function of the number of layers, pH, and time has been evaluated. This configuration enables a sensing system where a transducer element is physically separated from the analyte solution of interest and is thereby free from fouling effects typically associated with biochemical reactions occuring on the sensor surface. The performance of this biosensing system is demonstrated by detection of 1-200 mM urea in phosphate buffer via a flow injection analysis (FIA) technique. Miniaturized fluidic systems were used to provide continuous flow through a reaction column. Under this configuration the biosensor has an ultimate resolution of less than 1 mM urea and showed a linear response between 0-50 mM. This work demonstrates a sensing modality in which the sensor itself is not fouled or contaminated by the solution of interest and the enzyme immobilized Kapton® fluidic reaction column can be used as a disposable cartridge. Such a system enables reuse and reliability for long term sampling measurements. Based on this concept a biosensing system is envisioned which can perform rapid measurements to detect biomarkers such as glucose, creatinine, cholesterol, urea and lactate in urine and blood continuously over extended periods of time. PMID:26479269

  19. Relativistic close-coupling calculation of photoionization and photorecombination of Fe XVI

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Guoxin

    2008-02-15

    Large-scale relativistic close-coupling calculation of photoionization and photorecombination of Fe XVI reveal strong resonance structures at low energies. The Breit-Pauli R-matrix method was employed in the calculations with the inclusion of 89 spectroscopic states in the close-coupling eigenfunction expansion. Our unified photorecombination cross sections show significant differences from previous results. The Gaussian averaged effective photorecombination cross sections to the 2p{sup 6}3d{sub 3/2,5/2} states of Fe XVI are shown to be 24% larger than those used for normalization by Brown et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253201 (2006)]. This result should help resolve the issue raised in Brown's paper on the puzzling large discrepancy between theoretical and experimental electron impact excitation cross sections of Fe XVII.

  20. Genomic analysis of the blood attributed to Louis XVI (1754–1793), king of France

    PubMed Central

    Olalde, Iñigo; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Datta, Debayan; Marigorta, Urko M.; Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Fernández-Callejo, Marcos; González, Irene; Montfort, Magda; Matas-Lalueza, Laura; Civit, Sergi; Luiselli, Donata; Charlier, Philippe; Pettener, Davide; Ramírez, Oscar; Navarro, Arcadi; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2014-01-01

    A pyrographically decorated gourd, dated to the French Revolution period, has been alleged to contain a handkerchief dipped into the blood of the French king Louis XVI (1754–1793) after his beheading but recent analyses of living males from two Bourbon branches cast doubts on its authenticity. We sequenced the complete genome of the DNA contained in the gourd at low coverage (~2.5×) with coding sequences enriched at a higher ~7.3× coverage. We found that the ancestry of the gourd's genome does not seem compatible with Louis XVI's known ancestry. From a functional perspective, we did not find an excess of alleles contributing to height despite being described as the tallest person in Court. In addition, the eye colour prediction supported brown eyes, while Louis XVI had blue eyes. This is the first draft genome generated from a person who lived in a recent historical period; however, our results suggest that this sample may not correspond to the alleged king. PMID:24763138

  1. Genomic analysis of the blood attributed to Louis XVI (1754-1793), king of France.

    PubMed

    Olalde, Iñigo; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Datta, Debayan; Marigorta, Urko M; Chiang, Charleston W K; Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Fernández-Callejo, Marcos; González, Irene; Montfort, Magda; Matas-Lalueza, Laura; Civit, Sergi; Luiselli, Donata; Charlier, Philippe; Pettener, Davide; Ramírez, Oscar; Navarro, Arcadi; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2014-01-01

    A pyrographically decorated gourd, dated to the French Revolution period, has been alleged to contain a handkerchief dipped into the blood of the French king Louis XVI (1754-1793) after his beheading but recent analyses of living males from two Bourbon branches cast doubts on its authenticity. We sequenced the complete genome of the DNA contained in the gourd at low coverage (~2.5×) with coding sequences enriched at a higher ~7.3× coverage. We found that the ancestry of the gourd's genome does not seem compatible with Louis XVI's known ancestry. From a functional perspective, we did not find an excess of alleles contributing to height despite being described as the tallest person in Court. In addition, the eye colour prediction supported brown eyes, while Louis XVI had blue eyes. This is the first draft genome generated from a person who lived in a recent historical period; however, our results suggest that this sample may not correspond to the alleged king. PMID:24763138

  2. Energy calibration of Calorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niita, Tae; Torii, Shoji; Akaike, Yosui; Asaoka, Yoichi; Kasahara, Katsuaki; Ozawa, Shunsuke; Tamura, Tadahisa

    2015-06-01

    The Calorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a space experiment, currently under development by Japan in collaboration with Italy and the United States. CALET will measure the flux of cosmic ray electrons (including positrons) up to 20 TeV, gamma-rays up to 10 TeV and nuclei from Z = 1 up to 40 up to 1000 TeV during a two-year mission on the International Space Station (ISS), extendable to five years. The unique feature of CALET is its thick, fully active calorimeter that allows measurements well into the TeV energy region with excellent energy resolution (< 3 %), coupled with a fine imaging upper calorimeter to accurately identify the starting point of electromagnetic showers. For continuous high performance of the detector, it is required to calibrate each detector component on orbit. We use the measured response to minimum ionizing particles for the energy calibration, taking data in a dedicated trigger mode and selecting useful events in off-line analysis. In this paper, we present on-orbit and off-line data handling methods for the energy calibration developed through beam tests at CERN-SPS and Monte Carlo simulations.

  3. A calorimetric study of the hydrolysis and peroxide complex formation of the uranyl(VI) ion.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2014-02-14

    The enthalpies of reaction for the formation of uranyl(vi) hydroxide {[(UO2)2(OH)2](2+), [(UO2)3(OH)4](2+), [(UO2)3(OH)5](+), [(UO2)3(OH)6](aq), [(UO2)3(OH)7](-), [(UO2)3(OH)8](2-), [(UO2)(OH)3](-), [(UO2)(OH)4](2-)} and peroxide complexes {[UO2(O2)(OH)](-) and [(UO2)2(O2)2(OH)](-)} have been determined from calorimetric titrations at 25 °C in a 0.100 M tetramethyl ammonium nitrate ionic medium. The hydroxide data have been used to test the consistency of the extensive thermodynamic database published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (I. Grenthe, J. Fuger, R. J. M. Konings, R. J. Lemire, A. B. Mueller, C. Nguyen-Trung and H. Wanner, Chemical Thermodynamics of Uranium, North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1992 and R. Guillaumont, T. Fanghänel, J. Fuger, I. Grenthe, V. Neck, D. J. Palmer and M. R. Rand, Update on the Chemical Thermodynamics of Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium, Americium and Technetium, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2003). A brief discussion is given about a possible structural relationship between the trinuclear complexes [(UO2)3(OH)n](6-n), n = 4-8. PMID:24301256

  4. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., 1972, had in effect a State plan approved under title XIX of the Social Security Act, section 1121 of... titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233.145 Public Welfare..., XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. (a) Under the provisions of section 121(b) of Pub. L....

  5. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., 1972, had in effect a State plan approved under title XIX of the Social Security Act, section 1121 of... titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233.145 Public Welfare..., XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. (a) Under the provisions of section 121(b) of Pub. L....

  6. Finite size effects on calorimetric cooperativity of two-state proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mai Suan; Klimov, D. K.; Thirumalai, D.

    2005-05-01

    Finite size effects on the calorimetric cooperatity of the folding-unfolding transition in two-state proteins are considered using the Go lattice models with and without side chains. We show that for models without side chains a dimensionless measure of calorimetric cooperativity ?2 defined as the ratio of the vant Hoff to calorimetric enthalpy does not depend on the number of amino acids N. The average value ?2bar?{3}/{4} is lower than the experimental value ?2?1. For models with side chains ?2 approaches unity as ?2?N?, where ??0.17. Above the critical chain length Nc?135 these models can mimic the truly all-or-non folding-unfolding transition.

  7. Comparing M31 and Milky Way Satellites: The Extended Star Formation Histories of Andromeda II and Andromeda XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Skillman, Evan D.; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Monelli, Matteo; Dolphin, Andrew E.; McConnachie, Alan; Bernard, Edouard J.; Gallart, Carme; Aparicio, Antonio; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Cassisi, Santi; Cole, Andrew A.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Irwin, Mike; Martin, Nicolas F.; Mayer, Lucio; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Navarro, Julio F.; Stetson, Peter B.

    2014-07-01

    We present the first comparison between the lifetime star formation histories (SFHs) of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites. Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we obtained deep optical imaging of Andromeda II (And II; MV = -12.0 log(M sstarf/M ⊙) ~ 6.7) and Andromeda XVI (And XVI; MV = -7.5 log(M sstarf/M ⊙) ~ 4.9) yielding color-magnitude diagrams that extend at least 1 mag below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, and are similar in quality to those available for the MW companions. And II and And XVI show strikingly similar SFHs: both formed 50%-70% of their total stellar mass between 12.5 and 5 Gyr ago (z ~ 5-0.5) and both were abruptly quenched ~5 Gyr ago (z ~ 0.5). The predominance of intermediate age populations in And XVI makes it qualitatively different from faint companions of the MW and clearly not a pre-reionization fossil. Neither And II nor And XVI appears to have a clear analog among MW companions, and the degree of similarity in the SFHs of And II and And XVI is not seen among comparably faint-luminous pairs of MW satellites. These findings provide hints that satellite galaxy evolution may vary substantially among hosts of similar stellar mass. Although comparably deep observations of more M31 satellites are needed to further explore this hypothesis, our results underline the need for caution when interpreting satellite galaxies of an individual system in a broader cosmological context. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #13028.

  8. Comparing M31 and Milky Way satellites: The extended star formation histories of Andromeda II and Andromeda XVI

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Aparicio, Antonio; McConnachie, Alan; Stetson, Peter B.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Cassisi, Santi; Cole, Andrew A.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Irwin, Mike; Martin, Nicolas F.; Mayer, Lucio; Navarro, Julio F.

    2014-07-01

    We present the first comparison between the lifetime star formation histories (SFHs) of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites. Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we obtained deep optical imaging of Andromeda II (And II; M{sub V} = –12.0; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 6.7) and Andromeda XVI (And XVI; M{sub V} = –7.5; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 4.9) yielding color-magnitude diagrams that extend at least 1 mag below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, and are similar in quality to those available for the MW companions. And II and And XVI show strikingly similar SFHs: both formed 50%-70% of their total stellar mass between 12.5 and 5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 5-0.5) and both were abruptly quenched ∼5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 0.5). The predominance of intermediate age populations in And XVI makes it qualitatively different from faint companions of the MW and clearly not a pre-reionization fossil. Neither And II nor And XVI appears to have a clear analog among MW companions, and the degree of similarity in the SFHs of And II and And XVI is not seen among comparably faint-luminous pairs of MW satellites. These findings provide hints that satellite galaxy evolution may vary substantially among hosts of similar stellar mass. Although comparably deep observations of more M31 satellites are needed to further explore this hypothesis, our results underline the need for caution when interpreting satellite galaxies of an individual system in a broader cosmological context.

  9. Calorimetric measurement of afterheat in target materials for the accelerator production of tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.B.; Zucker, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    The estimate of afterheat in a spallation target of lead (Pb) or tungsten (W), by calorimetry, is the purpose of this experiment in support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT). Such measurements are needed to confirm code calculations, these being the only practical way of gaining this type of information in a form suitable to aid the design of the APT machine. Knowledge of the magnitude and duration of afterheat resulting from decay of activation products produced by proton bombardment of the target is necessary to quantify APT safety assumptions, to design target cooling and safety systems, and to reduce technical risk. Direct calorimetric measurement of the afterheat for the appropriate incident proton energies is more reliable than the available alternative, which is indirect, based on data from gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. The basic concept, a direct measurement of decay afterheat which bypasses the laborious classical way of determining this quantity, has been demonstrated to work. The gamma-ray energy given off by the decay products produced in the activation of lead or tungsten with high-energy protons apparently does represent a significant fraction of the total decay energy. A calorimeter designed for measurement of isotopes decaying by alpha emission must be modified to reduce energy lost with escaping gamma rays. Replacement of the aluminum liner with a tungsten liner in the SSC measurement chamber resulted in a 270% increase in measured heat, proving that the energy loss in the earlier (1992) measurements was significant. Gamma-ray measurements are needed to confirm the gamma-ray absorption calculations for the calorimeter to determine the correction for loss of heat due to transmission of high-energy gamma rays through the calorimeter walls. The experiments at BLIP have shown that calorimetry can be a useful tool in measuring the afterheat in APT target materials.

  10. Heat capacty, relative enthalpy, and calorimetric entropy of silicate minerals: an empirical method of prediction.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, G.R., Jr.; Haas, J.L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Through the evaluation of experimental calorimetric data and estimates of the molar isobaric heat capacities, relative enthalpies and entropies of constituent oxides, a procedure for predicting the thermodynamic properties of silicates is developed. Estimates of the accuracy and precision of the technique and examples of its application are also presented. -J.A.Z.

  11. 78 FR 17744 - Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-2p; Titles II and XVI: Evaluating Cases Involving Drug Addiction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Federal Register on February 20, 2013. (78 FR 11939). On page 11940, in the first column, under the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-2p; Titles II and XVI: Evaluating Cases Involving Drug...

  12. 76 FR 45309 - Social Security Ruling 11-1p; Titles II and XVI: Procedures for Handling Requests To File...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Social Security Ruling 11-1p; Titles II and XVI: Procedures for Handling Requests To File Subsequent Applications for Disability Benefits AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Notice...

  13. Planck early results. XVI. The Planck view of nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Madden, S.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2011-12-01

    The all-sky coverage of the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) provides an unsurpassed survey of galaxies at submillimetre (submm) wavelengths, representing a major improvement in the numbers of galaxies detected, as well as the range of far-IR/submm wavelengths over which they have been observed. We here present the first results on the properties of nearby galaxies using these data. We match the ERCSC catalogue to IRAS-detected galaxies in the Imperial IRAS Faint Source Redshift Catalogue (IIFSCz), so that we can measure the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these objects from 60 to 850μm. This produces a list of 1717 galaxies with reliable associations between Planck and IRAS, from which we select a subset of 468 for SED studies, namely those with strong detections in the three highest frequency Planck bands and no evidence of cirrus contamination. The SEDs are fitted using parametric dust models to determine the range of dust temperatures and emissivities. We find evidence for colder dust than has previously been found in external galaxies, with T < 20K. Such cold temperatures are found using both the standard single temperature dust model with variable emissivity β, or a two dust temperature model with β fixed at 2. We also compare our results to studies of distant submm galaxies (SMGs) which have been claimed to contain cooler dust than their local counterparts. We find that including our sample of 468 galaxies significantly reduces the distinction between the two populations. Fits to SEDs of selected objects using more sophisticated templates derived from radiative transfer models confirm the presence of the colder dust found through parametric fitting. We thus conclude that cold (T < 20K) dust is a significant and largely unexplored component of many nearby galaxies. Corresponding author: D. L. Clements, e-mail: d.clements@imperial.ac.uk

  14. The NC11 domain of human collagen XVI induces vasculogenic mimicry in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bedal, Konstanze B; Grässel, Susanne; Spanier, Gerrit; Reichert, Torsten E; Bauer, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Collagen XVI, a fibril-associated collagen with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) collagen, is involved in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and glioblastoma progression. The NC11 domain of collagen XVI has been described previously with a strong implication in physiological processes. We detected the non-collagenous (NC) 11-domain in supernatants of OSCC cells after recombinant expression of full-length collagen XVI and in sera from OSCC patients and healthy individuals. Stable expression of NC11-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein in OSCC cells initiated proliferation control and block of anchorage-independent growth. Moreover, the NC11 domain triggered the generation of tubular-like net structures on laminin-rich matrix in contrast to mock-GFP control cells and cells expressing full-length collagen XVI. Taqman® quantitative PCR and diaminobenzidine staining in 2D- and 3D cell culture revealed a significantly increased gene and protein expression of VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and uPAR in recombinant NC11-GFP-expressing cells. Specific VEGF receptor inhibition with Axitinib or fetal calf serum heat inactivation prevented formation of tubular-like net structures. Accordantly, NC11-GFP coated culture slides led to an increase of focal adhesion contact formation and the upregulation of VEGFR1 and uPAR in three different non-transfected OSCC cell lines. In summary, we suggest that the NC11 domain of collagen XVI is a potential biomarker for OSCC and triggers vasculogenic mimicry via upregulation of endothelial receptors VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and uPAR in 2D- and 3D OSCC cell culture conditions. PMID:26424749

  15. Investigation of the accuracy of MV radiation isocentre calculations in the Elekta cone-beam CT software XVI.

    PubMed

    Riis, Hans L; Moltke, Lars N; Zimmermann, Sune J; Ebert, Martin A; Rowshanfarzad, Pejman

    2016-06-01

    Accurate determination of the megavoltage (MV) radiation isocentre of a linear accelerator (linac) is an important task in radiotherapy. The localization of the MV radiation isocentre is crucial for correct calibration of the in-room lasers and the cone-beam CT scanner used for patient positioning prior to treatment. Linac manufacturers offer tools for MV radiation isocentre localization. As a user, there is no access to the documentation for the underlying method and calculation algorithm used in the commercial software. The idea of this work was to evaluate the accuracy of the software tool for MV radiation isocentre calculation as delivered by Elekta using independent software. The image acquisition was based on the scheme designed by the manufacturer. Eight MV images were acquired in each series of a ball-bearing (BB) phantom attached to the treatment couch. The images were recorded at cardinal angles of the gantry using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Eight Elekta linacs with three different types of multileaf collimators (MLCs) were included in the test. The influence of MLC orientation, x-ray energy, and phantom modifications were examined. The acquired images were analysed using the Elekta x-ray volume imaging (XVI) software and in-house developed (IHD) MATLAB code. Results from the two different software were compared. A discrepancy in the longitudinal direction of the isocentre localization was found averaging 0.23 mm up to a maximum of 0.75 mm. The MLC orientation or the phantom asymmetry in the longitudinal direction do not appear to cause the discrepancy. The main cause of the differences could not be clearly identified. However, it is our opinion that the commercial software delivered by the linac manufacturer should be improved to reach better stability and precise results in the MV radiation isocentre calculations. PMID:27183466

  16. Non-destructive testing of an original XVI century painting on wood by ESPI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, G.; Paturzo, M.; Fatigati, G.; Grilli, M.; Pezzati, L.; Ferraro, P.

    2015-03-01

    Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI), a non-contact and non-destructive optical techniques, was employed for assessing the conservation state of a XVI Century painting on wood (72x88x1,9 cm). By a long term analysis, the whole structure alterations, induced by the room temperature and relative humidity variations, were evaluated. Measurement of the whole painting structural bends was achieved. Local flaws and hidden detachments of pictorial layers from the support, which cannot be recognized by traditional art-restorer methods, were also revealed. This work was prevalently aimed at achieving a simple approach, in the laboratory practice, to get an intuitively user-friendly method for art conservators, not accustomed to high-tech or math based methods. The results demonstrate that ESPI can largely improve the traditional art conservation survey techniques.

  17. PREFACE: XVI International Youth Scientific School 'Actual Problems of Magnetic Resonance and its Applications'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salakhov, M. Kh; Tagirov, M. S.; Dooglav, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    In 1997, A S Borovik-Romanov, the Academician of RAS, and A V Aganov, the head of the Physics Department of Kazan State University, suggested that the 'School of Magnetic Resonance', well known in the Soviet Union, should recommence and be regularly held in Kazan. This school was created in 1968 by G V Scrotskii, the prominent scientist in the field of magnetic resonance and the editor of many famous books on magnetic resonance (authored by A Abragam, B. Bleaney, C. Slichter, and many others) translated and edited in the Soviet Union. In 1991 the last, the 12th School, was held under the supervision of G V Scrotskii. Since 1997, more than 600 young scientists, 'schoolboys', have taken part in the School meetings, made their oral reports and participated in heated discussions. Every year a competition among the young scientist takes place and the Program Committee members name the best reports, the authors of which are invited to prepare full-scale scientific papers. The XVI International Youth Scientific School 'Actual problems of the magnetic resonance and its application' in its themes is slightly different from previous ones. A new section has been opened this year: Coherent Optics and Optical Spectroscopy. Many young people have submitted interesting reports on optical research, many of the reports are devoted to the implementation of nanotechnology in optical studies. The XVI International Youth Scientific School has been supported by the Program of development of Kazan Federal University. It is a pleasure to thank the sponsors (BRUKER Ltd, Moscow, the Russian Academy of Science, the Dynasty foundation of Dmitrii Zimin, Russia, Russian Foundation for Basic Research) and all the participants and contributors for making the International School meeting possible and interesting. A V Dooglav, M Kh Salakhov and M S Tagirov The Editors

  18. A Calorimetric Study of Almandine: Are the Thermodynamic Properties of the End-Member Aluminosilicate Garnets Finally Known Quantitatively?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachs, E.; Geiger, C. A.; Benisek, A.

    2012-12-01

    The aluminosilicate garnets (E3Al2Si3O12 with E = Fe2+, Mn2+, Ca, Mg) form an important rock-forming mineral group. Much study has been directed toward determining their thermodynamic properties. The iron end-member almandine (Fe3Al2Si3O12) is a key phase in many petrologic investigations. As part of an ongoing calorimetric and thermodynamic study of the aluminosilicate garnets, the heat capacity of three synthetic well-characterized polycrystalline almandine garnets and one natural almandine-rich single crystal was measured. The various garnets were characterized by optical microscopy, electron-microprobe analysis, X-ray powder diffraction and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Heat capacity measurements were performed in the temperature range 3 to 300 K using relaxation calorimetry and between 282 and 764 K using DSC methods. From the former, So values between 336.7 ± 0.8 and 337.8 ± 0.8 J/molK are calculated for the different samples. The smaller value is considered the best So for end-member stoichiometric almandine, because it derives from the "best" Fe3+-free synthetic sample. The Cp behavior for almandine at T > 298 K is given by the polynomial (in J/molK): Cp = 649.06(±4) - 3837.57(±122)T-0.5 - 1.44682(±0.06)107T-2 + 1.94834(±0.09)109T-3, which is calculated using DSC data together with one published heat-content datum determined by transposed-drop calorimetry along with a new determination that gives H1181K - H302K = 415.0 ± 3.2 kJ/mole. Almandine shows a λ-type heat-capacity anomaly at low temperatures resulting from a paramagnetic-antiferromagnetic phase transition at about 9 K. The lattice heat capacity was calculated using the single-parameter phonon dispersion model of Komada and Westrum (1997), which allows the non-lattice heat capacity (Cex) behavior to be modelled. An analysis shows the presence of an electronic heat-capacity contribution (Cel - Schottky anomaly) around 17 K that is superimposed on a larger magnetic heat-capacity effect (Cmag). The calculated lattice entropy at 298.15 K is Svib = 303.3 J/molK and it contributes about 90% to the total standard entropy at 298 K. The non-lattice entropy is Sex = 33.4 J/molK and consists of Smag = 32.1 J/molK and Sel = 1.3 J/molK contributions. Using the So = 336.7 J/molK value and the Cp polynomial for almandine, we derived its enthalpy of formation, ΔHof, from an analysis of experimental phase equilibrium results on the reactions almandine + 3rutile = 3ilmenite + sillimanite + 2quartz and 2ilmenite = 2iron + 2rutile + O2. ΔHof = -5269.63 kJ/mol was obtained. So for grossular, pyrope, spessartine, and almandine, as well as their Cp behavior to high temperatures, have all been measured calorimetrically. Uncertainties in older calorimetric studies appear to have been resolved. The standard thermodynamic properties Vo and So are now well determined for all four garnets. In addition, ΔHof for all, except possibly spessartine, also appear to be well known.

  19. Calorimetric thermal-vacuum performance characterization of the BAe 80 K space cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotsubo, V. Y.; Johnson, D. L.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive characterization program is underway at JPL to generate test data on long-life, miniature Stirling-cycle cryocoolers for space application. The key focus of this paper is on the thermal performance of the British Aerospace (BAe) 80 K split-Stirling-cycle cryocooler as measured in a unique calorimetric thermal-vacuum test chamber that accurately simulates the heat-transfer interfaces of space. Two separate cooling fluid loops provide precise individual control of the compressor and displacer heatsink temperatures. In addition, heatflow transducers enable calorimetric measurements of the heat rejected separately by the compressor and displacer. Cooler thermal performance has been mapped for coldtip temperatures ranging from below 45 K to above 150 K, for heatsink temperatures ranging from 280 K to 320 K, and for a wide variety of operational variables including compressor-displacer phase, compressor-displacer stroke, drive frequency, and piston-displacer dc offset.

  20. The calorimetric spectrum of the electron-capture decay of 163Ho. The spectral endpoint region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rújula, A.; Lusignoli, M.

    2016-05-01

    The electron-neutrino mass (or masses and mixing angles) may be directly measurable in weak electron-capture decays. The favoured experimental technique is "calorimetric". The optimal nuclide is 163Ho, and several experiments (ECHo, HOLMES and NuMECS) are currently studying its decay. The most relevant range of the calorimetric-energy spectrum extends for the last few hundred eV below its endpoint. It has not yet been well measured. We explore the theory, mainly in the cited range, of electron capture in 163Ho decay. A so far neglected process turns out to be most relevant: electron-capture accompanied by the shake-off of a second electron. Our two main conclusions are very encouraging: the counting rate close to the endpoint may be more than an order of magnitude larger than previously expected; the "pile-up" problem may be significantly reduced.

  1. Thermodynamics of H in disordered Pd-Ag alloys from calorimetric and equilibrium pressure-composition-temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Ted B; Wang, Da; Luo, S

    2007-09-13

    In this research, the thermodynamics of H2 solution and hydride formation in a series of disordered Pd-Ag alloys has been determined using both reaction calorimetry and equilibrium PH2-composition-T data. Trends of DeltaHH and DeltaSH with both H and Ag concentration have been determined. For the Pd0.76Ag0.24 alloy, which does not form a hydride phase, DeltaHH and DeltaSH both exhibit minima with H/(Pd0.76Ag0.24) followed by a linear increase of the former. A linear increase of DeltaHH is found for all of the alloys in the high H content region beyond the two-phase region or, if, there is no two-phase region, in the high H content region. DeltaHH degrees at infinite dilution of H decreases with atom fraction Ag, XAg, up to about 0.40 and then increases. Enthalpies for hydride formation/decomposition, 1/2H2(g) + dilute <--> hydride, have been determined calorimetrically for alloys which form two phases (303 K). The enthalpies for hydride formation become more exothermic with XAg while the corresponding entropy magnitudes are nearly constant, 46 +/- 2 J/K mol H. PMID:17711332

  2. Use of calorimetric assay for operational and accountability measurements of pure plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, Teresa L; Sampson, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Plutonium pure metal products (PMP) are high purity plutonium metal items produced by electrorefining. The plutonium metal is produced as an approximately 3-kg ring. Accountability measurements for the electro-refining runs are typically balance/weight factor (incoming impure metal), chemistry (pure metal rings), and calorimetric assay or neutron counting of the crucibles and other wastes. The PMP items are qualified for their end use by extensive chemical assay. After PMP materials are made they are often sent to the vault for storage before being sent to the casting process, the next step in the production chain. The chemical assay of PMP items often takes a few weeks; however, before the metal items are allowed into the vault they must be measured. Non-destructive assay personnel measure the metals either by multiplicity neutron counting or calorimetric assay, depending on which instrument is available, thus generating comparisons between non-destructive assay and chemical assay. The suite of measurements, calorimetric assay, chemical assay, and neutron mUltiplicity counting is compared for a large group of PMP items.

  3. Ultra-Responsive Thermal Sensors for the Detection of Explosives Using Calorimetric Spectroscopy (CalSpec)

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.; Datskou, I.; Marlar, T.A.; Rajic, S.

    1999-04-05

    We have developed a novel chemical detection technique based on infrared micro-calorimetric spectroscopy that can be used to identify the presence of trace amounts of very low vapor pressure target compounds. Unlike numerous recently developed low-cost sensor approaches, the selectivity is derived from the unique differential temperature spectrum and does not require the questionable reliability of highly selective coatings to achieve the required specificity. This is accomplished by obtaining the infrared micro-calorimetric absorption spectrum of a small number of molecules absorbed on the surface of a thermal detector after illumination through a scanning monochromator. We have obtained infrared micro-calorimetric spectra for explosives such as TNT over the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 Mu-m. Thus both sophisticated and relatively crude explosive compounds and components are detectable with these ultra-sensitive thermal-mechanical micro-structures. In addition to the above mentioned spectroscopy technique and associated data, the development of these advanced thermal detectors is also presented in detail.

  4. Chemical trends of the luminescence in wide band gap II 1-xMn xVI semimagnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benecke, C.; Busse, W.; Gumlich, H.-E.

    1990-04-01

    Time resolved emission and excitation spectroscopy is used to investigate the Mn correlated luminescence in wide band gap II-VI compounds, i.e. Zn 1-xMn xS, Cd 1-xMn xSe, Zn 1-xMn xTe and Cd 1-xMn xTe. Additional Information has been obtained with CdxZnyMnzTe( x+ y+ z=1) in checking the luminescence by variation of the ratio of the cations Cd and Zn. Generally speaking, at least two distinct emissions bands can be observed for each II 1- xMn xVI compound. One emissions band is attributed to the internal transition 4T 1(G)→ 6A 1(S) of the 3d 5 electron of the Mn 2+ on regular metal sites with energies of about ≈2 eV. The other emission band is found to occur in the near infrared range of about ≈1.3 eV. This emission band is tentatively interpreted as a transition of Mn 2+ ions on interstitial sites or in small Mn chalcogenide clusters, both interpretations assuming cubic symmetry. This model is supported by the existence of low energy excitation bands and by the great similarity of the shape of the two emission bands which lead to comparable Huang-Rhys factors and effective phonon energies. Also the established trend in the experimental data of the II-VI compounds under consideration confirm this interpretation. For both the IR and the yellow Mn 2+ center, the Racah parameters B and C and the crystal field parameter Dq are determined on the basis of experimental data. As a result, the energy of both the emission and the excitation bands is predominantly determined by the sorrounding anions. These bands shift to higher energies when the anions are changed in the fixed order: Te→Se→S. Regularly, there is also a spectral shift when Zn is replaced by Cd, which is smaller than the shift due to the variation of onions.

  5. Calorimetric evaluation of commercial Ni-MH cells and charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric C.; Hughes, Brent M.

    1995-01-01

    The test objectives are to evaluate the electrical and thermal performance of commercial Ni-MH cells and to evaluate the effectiveness of commercial charge control circuits. The ultimate design objectives are to determine which cell designs are most suitable for scale-up and to guide the design of future Shuttle and Station based battery chargers.

  6. Calorimetric studies of freeze-induced dehydration of phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Bronshteyn, V L; Steponkus, P L

    1993-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to determine the amount of water that freezes in an aqueous suspension of multilamellar dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes. The studies were performed with dehydrated suspensions (12-20 wt% water) and suspensions containing an excess of water (30-70 wt% water). For suspensions that contained > or = 18 wt% water, two ice-formation events were observed during cooling. The first was attributed to heterogeneous nucleation of extraliposomal ice; the second was attributed to homogeneous nucleation of ice within the liposomes. In suspensions with an initial water concentration between 13 and 16 wt%, ice formation occurred only after homogeneous nucleation at temperatures below -40 degrees C. In suspensions containing < 13 wt% water, ice formation during cooling was undetectable by DSC, however, an endotherm resulting from ice melting during warming was observed in suspensions containing > or = 12 wt% water. In suspensions containing < 12 wt% water, an endotherm corresponding to the melting of ice was not observed during warming. The amount of ice that formed in the suspensions was determined by using an improved procedure to calculate the partial area of the endotherm resulting from the melting of ice during warming. The results show that a substantial proportion of water associated with the polar headgroup of phosphatidylcholine can be removed by freeze-induced dehydration, but the amount of ice depends on the thermal history of the samples. For example, after cooling to -100 degrees C at rates > or = 10 degrees C/min, a portion of water in the suspension remains supercooled because of a decrease in the diffusion rate of water with decreasing temperature. A portion of this supercooled water can be frozen during subsequent freeze-induced dehydration of the liposomes under isothermal conditions at subfreezing storage temperature Ts. During isothermal storage at Ts > or = -40 degrees C, the amount of unfrozen water decreased with decreasing Ts and increasing time of storage. After 30 min of storage at Ts = -40 degrees C and subsequent cooling to -100 degrees C, the amount of water associated with the polar headgroups was < 0.1 g/g of DPPC. At temperatures > -50 degrees C, the amount of unfrozen water associated with the polar headgroups of DPPC decreased with decreasing temperature in a manner predicted from the desorption isotherm of DPPC. However, at lower temperatures, the amount of unfrozen water remained constant, in large part, because the unfrozen water underwent a liquid-to-glass transformation at a temperature between -50 degrees and -140 degrees C. PMID:8298015

  7. Calorimetric glass transition explained by hierarchical dynamic facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Keys, Aaron S.; Garrahan, Juan P.; Chandler, David

    2013-01-01

    The glass transition refers to the nonequilibrium process by which an equilibrium liquid is transformed to a nonequilibrium disordered solid, or vice versa. Associated response functions, such as heat capacities, are markedly different on cooling than on heating, and the response to melting a glass depends markedly on the cooling protocol by which the glass was formed. This paper shows how this irreversible behavior can be interpreted quantitatively in terms of an East-model picture of localized excitations (or soft spots) in which molecules can move with a specific direction, and from which excitations with the same directionality of motion can appear or disappear in adjacent regions. As a result of these facilitated dynamics, excitations become correlated in a hierarchical fashion. These correlations are manifested in the dynamic heterogeneity of the supercooled liquid phase. Although equilibrium thermodynamics is virtually featureless, a nonequilibrium glass phase emerges when the model is driven out of equilibrium with a finite cooling rate. The correlation length of this emergent phase is large and increases with decreasing cooling rate. A spatially and temporally resolved fictive temperature encodes memory of its preparation. Parameters characterizing the model can be determined from reversible transport data, and with these parameters, predictions of the model agree well with irreversible differential scanning calorimetry.

  8. Energetics of target peptide recognition by calmodulin: a calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Wintrode, P L; Privalov, P L

    1997-03-14

    Calmodulin is a small protein involved in the regulation of a wide variety of intracellular processes. The cooperative binding of Ca2+ to calmodulin's two Ca2+ binding domains induces conformational changes which allow calmodulin to activate specific target enzymes. The association of calmodulin with a peptide corresponding to the calmodulin binding site of rabbit smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCKp) was studied using isothermal titration microcalorimetry. The dependence of the binding energetics on temperature, pH, Ca2+ concentration, and NaCl concentration were determined. It is found that the binding of calmodulin to smMLCKp proceeds with negative changes in enthalpy (deltaH), heat capacity (deltaCp), and entropy (deltaS) near room temperature, indicating that it is an enthalpically driven process that is entropically unfavorable. From these results it is concluded that the hydrophobic effect, an entropic effect which favors the removal of non-polar protein groups from water, is not a major driving force in calmodulin-smMLCKp recognition. Although a large number of non-polar side-chains are buried upon binding, these stabilize the complex primarily by forming tightly packed van der Waals interactions with one another. Binding at acidic pH was studied in order to assess the contribution of electrostatic interactions to binding. It is found that moving to acidic pH results in a large decrease in the Gibbs free energy of binding but no change in the enthalpy, indicating that electrostatic interactions contribute only entropically to the binding energetics. The accessible surface area and atomic packing density of the calmodulin-smMLCKp crystal structure are analyzed, and the results discussed in relation to the experimental data. PMID:9086281

  9. Nanowell-patterned TiO{sub 2} microcantilevers for calorimetric chemical sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongkyu Chae, Inseok; Thundat, Thomas; Kim, Seonghwan; Jeon, Sangmin

    2014-04-07

    A sensitive calorimetric sensor using a TiO{sub 2} microcantilever with nanowells patterned on one of its sides is described. This single material cantilever is sensitive to temperature change without relying on the metal deposition-based bimetallic effect. The thermomechanical sensitivity originates from the structure dependent variations in both the elastic modulus and thermal expansion coefficient due to the presence of ordered nanowells. These cantilever beams offer an alternate and efficient chemical sensing route for vapor phase analytes using photothermal spectroscopy. Selective and sensitive detection of organophosphorus compounds, as well as their photocatalytic decomposition under ultraviolet light exposure are demonstrated.

  10. Method for measurement of diffusivity: Calorimetric studies of Fe/Ni multilayer thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, JX; Barmak, K

    2015-07-15

    A calorimetric method for the measurement of diffusivity in thin film multilayers is introduced and applied to the Fe Ni system. Using this method, the diffusivity in [Fe (25 nm)/Ni (25 nm)](20) multilayer thin films is measured as 4 x 10(-3)exp(-1.6 +/- 0.1 eV/ k(B)T) cm(2)/s, respectively. The diffusion mechanism in the multilayers and its relevance to laboratory synthesis of L1(0) ordered FeNi are discussed. (C) 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. XVI IAGA workshop on geomagnetic observatory instruments, data acquisition and processing. Hyderabad, India, October 2014: Brief review XVI IAGA workshop on geomagnetic observatory in-struments, data acquisition and processing. Hyderabad, India, October 2014: Brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomutov, Sergey

    2015-12-01

    The brief review of the XVI IAGA Workshop on Geomagnetic Observatory Instruments Data Acquisition and Processing (Hyderabad, India, October 2014) is presented. Much attention is given to new magnetometers and software for practical work of magnetologists as well as to archive data. Reports on new devices point to the tendency that in the near future, the technique for obtaining the total field vector data adopted by INTERMAGNET will remain changeless as the combination of absolute (manual) and variation measurements. Besides, a low interest of the community to software necessary for full processing of magnetic measurements directly in observatories should be also noticed.

  12. Calorimetric thermoelectric gas sensor for the detection of hydrogen, methane and mixed gases.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam-Hee; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Itoh, Toshio; Izu, Noriya; Shin, Woosuck

    2014-01-01

    A novel miniaturized calorimeter-type sensor device with a dual-catalyst structure was fabricated by integrating different catalysts on the hot (Pd/θ-Al2O3) and cold (Pt/α-Al2O3) ends of the device. The device comprises a calorimeter with a thermoelectric gas sensor (calorimetric-TGS), combining catalytic combustion and thermoelectric technologies. Its response for a model fuel gas of hydrogen and methane was investigated with various combustor catalyst compositions. The calorimetric-TGS devices detected H2, CH4, and a mixture of the two with concentrations ranging between 200 and 2000 ppm at temperatures of 100-400 °C, in terms of the calorie content of the gases. It was necessary to reduce the much higher response voltage of the TGS to H2 compared to CH4. We enhanced the H2 combustion on the cold side so that the temperature differences and response voltages to H2 were reduced. The device response to H2 combustion was reduced by 50% by controlling the Pt concentration in the Pt/α-Al2O3 catalyst on the cold side to 3 wt%. PMID:24818660

  13. Calorimetric method of ac loss measurement in a rotating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, P K; Coombs, T A; Campbell, A M

    2010-07-01

    A method is described for calorimetric ac-loss measurements of high-T(c) superconductors (HTS) at 80 K. It is based on a technique used at 4.2 K for conventional superconducting wires that allows an easy loss measurement in parallel or perpendicular external field orientation. This paper focuses on ac loss measurement setup and calibration in a rotating magnetic field. This experimental setup is to demonstrate measuring loss using a temperature rise method under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. The slight temperature increase of the sample in an ac-field is used as a measure of losses. The aim is to simulate the loss in rotating machines using HTS. This is a unique technique to measure total ac loss in HTS at power frequencies. The sample is mounted on to a cold finger extended from a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger (HEX). The thermal insulation between the HEX and sample is provided by a material of low thermal conductivity, and low eddy current heating sample holder in vacuum vessel. A temperature sensor and noninductive heater have been incorporated in the sample holder allowing a rapid sample change. The main part of the data is obtained in the calorimetric measurement is used for calibration. The focus is on the accuracy and calibrations required to predict the actual ac losses in HTS. This setup has the advantage of being able to measure the total ac loss under the influence of a continuous moving field as experienced by any rotating machines. PMID:20687748

  14. Calorimetric method of ac loss measurement in a rotating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoshal, P. K.; Coombs, T. A.; Campbell, A. M.

    2010-07-15

    A method is described for calorimetric ac-loss measurements of high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTS) at 80 K. It is based on a technique used at 4.2 K for conventional superconducting wires that allows an easy loss measurement in parallel or perpendicular external field orientation. This paper focuses on ac loss measurement setup and calibration in a rotating magnetic field. This experimental setup is to demonstrate measuring loss using a temperature rise method under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. The slight temperature increase of the sample in an ac-field is used as a measure of losses. The aim is to simulate the loss in rotating machines using HTS. This is a unique technique to measure total ac loss in HTS at power frequencies. The sample is mounted on to a cold finger extended from a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger (HEX). The thermal insulation between the HEX and sample is provided by a material of low thermal conductivity, and low eddy current heating sample holder in vacuum vessel. A temperature sensor and noninductive heater have been incorporated in the sample holder allowing a rapid sample change. The main part of the data is obtained in the calorimetric measurement is used for calibration. The focus is on the accuracy and calibrations required to predict the actual ac losses in HTS. This setup has the advantage of being able to measure the total ac loss under the influence of a continuous moving field as experienced by any rotating machines.

  15. Calorimetric Thermoelectric Gas Sensor for the Detection of Hydrogen, Methane and Mixed Gases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Nam-Hee; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Itoh, Toshio; Izu, Noriya; Shin, Woosuck

    2014-01-01

    A novel miniaturized calorimeter-type sensor device with a dual-catalyst structure was fabricated by integrating different catalysts on the hot (Pd/θ-Al2O3) and cold (Pt/α-Al2O3) ends of the device. The device comprises a calorimeter with a thermoelectric gas sensor (calorimetric-TGS), combining catalytic combustion and thermoelectric technologies. Its response for a model fuel gas of hydrogen and methane was investigated with various combustor catalyst compositions. The calorimetric-TGS devices detected H2, CH4, and a mixture of the two with concentrations ranging between 200 and 2000 ppm at temperatures of 100–400 °C, in terms of the calorie content of the gases. It was necessary to reduce the much higher response voltage of the TGS to H2 compared to CH4. We enhanced the H2 combustion on the cold side so that the temperature differences and response voltages to H2 were reduced. The device response to H2 combustion was reduced by 50% by controlling the Pt concentration in the Pt/α-Al2O3 catalyst on the cold side to 3 wt%. PMID:24818660

  16. Electronic Nose for Recognition of Volatile Vapor Mixtures Using a Nanopore-Enhanced Opto-Calorimetric Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chae, Inseok; Lee, Dongkyu; Kim, Seonghwan; Thundat, Thomas

    2015-07-21

    An electronic nose (e-nose) for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) vapor mixtures was developed using nanopore-enhanced opto-calorimetric spectroscopy. Opto-calorimetric spectroscopy based on specific molecular vibrational transitions in the mid infrared (IR) "molecular fingerprint" regime allows highly selective detection of VOCs vapor mixtures. Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) microcantilevers, fabricated using a two-step anodization and simple photolithography process, were utilized as highly sensitive thermomechanical sensors for opto-calorimetric signal transduction. The AAO microcantilevers were optimized by fine-tuning AAO nanopore diameter in order to enhance their thermomechanical sensitivity as well as their surface area. The thermomechanical sensitivity of a bilayer AAO microcantilever with a 60 nm pore diameter was approximately 1 μm/K, which is far superior to that of a bilayer plain silicon (Si) microcantilever. The adsorbed molecules of VOCs mixtures on the AAO microcantilever were fully recognized and quantified by variations of peak positions and amplitudes in the opto-calorimetric IR spectra as well as by shifts in the resonance frequency of the AAO microcantilever with the adsorbed molecules. Furthermore, identification of complex organic compounds with a real industrial sample was demonstrated by this e-nose system. PMID:26111073

  17. Soluble expression and sodium channel activity of lt16a, a novel framework XVI conotoxin from the M-superfamily.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Maojun; Wang, Lei; Wu, Yun; Liu, Junliang; Sun, Dandan; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Feng, Yuchao; Qin, Mengying; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2015-05-01

    A peptide toxin, lt16a, from the venom of the worm-hunting Conus litteratus, shares the typical signal peptide sequences of M-superfamily conotoxins, which usually contain six cysteine residues that are arranged in a CC-C-C-CC pattern. Interestingly, lt16a comprises 21 amino acid residues in its mature region and has a cysteine framework XVI, which is arranged in a C-C-CC pattern. The coding region of lt16a was cloned into the pTRX vector and the fusion protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. After cleaving the fusion protein and purifying the protein lt16a using chromatography, the mass of lt16a was found by mass spectrometry to be consistent with the expected mass of 2357.7 Da. Whole-cell patch clamp experiments demonstrated that lt16a could inhibit both the TTX-sensitive and TTX-resistant sodium currents in adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. The inhibition of lt16a on TTX-resistant sodium currents was stronger than on TTX-sensitive sodium currents. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a framework XVI conotoxin that can inhibit voltage-gated sodium channel currents in mammalian sensory neurons. This report helps facilitates an understanding of the sequence diversity of conotoxins. PMID:25600641

  18. Total hemispherical emittance measured at high temperatures by the calorimetric method

    SciTech Connect

    DiFilippo, F.; Mirtich, M.J.; Banks, B.A.; Stidham, C.; Kussmaul, M.

    1994-09-01

    A calorimetric vacuum emissometer (CVE) capable of measuring total hemispherical emittance of surfaces at elevated temperatures was designed, built, and tested. Several materials with a wide range of emittances were measured in the CVE between 773 to 923 K. These results were compared to values calculated from spectral emittance curves measured in a room temperature Hohlraum reflectometer and in an open-air elevated temperature emissometer. The results differed by as much as 0.2 for some materials but were in closer agreement for the more highly-emitting, diffuse-reflecting samples. The differences were attributed to temperature, atmospheric, and directional effects, and errors in the Hohlraum and emissometer measurements ({+-} 5 percent). The probable error of the CVE measurements was typically less than 1 percent.

  19. Rapid discrimination of DNA strands using an opto-calorimetric microcantilever sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongkyu; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Kim, Seonghwan; Thundat, Thomas

    2014-12-21

    A rapid technique for quantitative detection and discrimination of DNA strands without using immobilized probe molecules is demonstrated using an opto-calorimetric, self-powered sensor based on a Pb(Zr(0.52)Ti(0.48))O3 (PZT) microcantilever. Microcalorimetric infrared (IR) spectroscopy provides excellent chemical selectivity based on the unique molecular vibrational characteristics of each nucleotide in the mid IR region. The piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of the PZT microcantilever were exploited in the quantitative detection and discrimination of adsorbed DNA strands with their spectral characteristics. We report the unique spectral characteristics of different DNA nucleotides that are monitored by wavelength-dependent temperature variations for different relative molar ratio of each nucleotide. This approach offers a fast, label-free technique which is highly sensitive and selective for the detection of single nucleotide differences in DNA strands and has the potential to be used as a rapid prescreening biosensor for various biomolecules. PMID:25300415

  20. The Bayer Facts of Science Education XVI: "US STEM Workforce Shortage--Myth or Reality? Fortune 1000 Talent Recruiters on the Debate"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Science Education and Technology, 2014

    2014-01-01

    A major debate is currently underway in the USA about whether there is, in fact, a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce shortage in the country or not. This is the subject of the "Bayer Facts of Science Education XVI: US STEM Workforce Shortage--Myth or Reality? Fortune 1000 Talent Recruiters on the Debate."…

  1. The Bayer Facts of Science Education XVI: "US STEM Workforce Shortage--Myth or Reality? Fortune 1000 Talent Recruiters on the Debate"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Science Education and Technology, 2014

    2014-01-01

    A major debate is currently underway in the USA about whether there is, in fact, a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce shortage in the country or not. This is the subject of the "Bayer Facts of Science Education XVI: US STEM Workforce Shortage--Myth or Reality? Fortune 1000 Talent Recruiters on the Debate."

  2. Calorimetric quantification of linked equilibria in cyclodextrin/lipid/detergent mixtures for membrane-protein reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Textor, Martin; Vargas, Carolyn; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Reconstitution from detergent micelles into lipid bilayer membranes is a prerequisite for many in vitro studies on purified membrane proteins. Complexation by cyclodextrins offers an efficient and tightly controllable way of removing detergents for membrane-protein reconstitution, since cyclodextrins sequester detergents at defined stoichiometries and with tuneable affinities. To fully exploit the potential advantages of cyclodextrin for membrane-protein reconstitution, we establish a quantitative model for predicting the supramolecular transition from mixed micelles to vesicles during cyclodextrin-mediated detergent extraction. The model is based on a set of linked equilibria among all pseudophases present in the course of the reconstitution process. Various isothermal titration-calorimetric protocols are used for quantifying a detergent's self-association as well as its colloidal and stoichiometric interactions with lipid and cyclodextrin, respectively. The detergent's critical micellar concentration, the phase boundaries in the lipid/detergent phase diagram, and the dissociation constant of the cyclodextrin/detergent complex thus obtained provide all thermodynamic parameters necessary for a quantitative prediction of the transition from micelles to bilayer membranes during cyclodextrin-driven reconstitution. This is exemplified and validated by stepwise complexation of the detergent lauryldimethylamine N-oxide in mixtures with the phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine upon titration with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, both in the presence and in the absence of the membrane protein Mistic. The calorimetric approach presented herein quantitatively predicts the onset and completion of the reconstitution process, thus obviating cumbersome trial-and-error efforts and facilitating the rational optimisation of reconstitution protocols, and can be adapted to different cyclodextrin/lipid/detergent combinations. PMID:25583305

  3. Characterization of hidden defects of an original XVI century painting on wood by Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, G.

    2015-03-01

    Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry, a non-contact and non-destructive optical diagnostic technique, was employed for evaluating the conservation state of a XVI century painting on wood. The whole structure alterations, induced by the laboratory temperature and relative humidity variations, were evaluated. Long-term analysis, by sequential recording and subsequent off-line processing of the fringes progression, was carried out. Local flaws and hidden detachments of pictorial layers from the support, which could not be recognized by traditional art-restorer survey methods, were also easily revealed. In such a case, a simple measurement approach was utilized, with the aim to get a user-friendly method for art conservators. The results demonstrate that the interferometry method can largely improve the traditional art conservation survey techniques.

  4. Calorimetric output power measurements on a CW 20 kW 7.16 GHz microwave transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Raul M.; Conroy, Bruce L.

    1991-01-01

    A calorimetric measurement technique developed for NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) transmitters that does not require data on the coolant's thermal parameters is described. Calibration of the measurement system is achieved by measuring the DC input power to the klystron and relating coolant temperature increases to this known power dissipation. Agreement between calorimetric and electrical measurements of total system power was good, the difference being less than 2 percent. The operation of the system was not greatly affected by the composition of the coolant, which was varied from pure water to 40 percent ethylene glycol by mass. Good accuracy was also shown at output power levels, which varied over a 3.6:1 range.

  5. Calorimetric studies of the ammonia-water system with application to the outer solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarger, J.; Lunine, J. I.; Burke, M.

    1993-07-01

    A series of heating experiments was performed on the condensed ammonia-water system using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The water-rich samples were cooled quickly to below 130 K, then heated at a variety of rates. Rather than a single peritectic melt at 176 K, expected for the equilibrium system of water ice and ammonia dihydrate, four enthalpic transitions were repeatedly seen in the temperature range 150-176 K. These transitions are generally consistent with the earlier calorimetric results of Van Kasteren (1973), who interpreted the lowest temperature exotherm as crystallization of an amorphous ammonia-water compound formed during cooling. We propose that both sets of experiments are seeing the crystallization of ammonia monohydrate, which is metastable relative to the dihydrate, followed by partial remelting and crystallization of dihydrate upon further heating. The apparent stability of the monohydrate in the dihydrate equilibrium field implies a potentially complex behavior of ammonia-water ices in satellites. Possible self-heating of the mixture by several tens of degrees up to the 170 K eutectic could make mobilization of ammonia-water liquids in icy satellite interiors energetically easier than previously thought.

  6. The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) for high-energy astroparticle physics on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Akaike, Y.; Asano, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Binns, W. R.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Castellini, G.; Cherry, M. L.; Collazuol, G.; Ebisawa, K.; Di Felice, V.; Fuke, H.; Guzik, T. G.; Hams, T.; Hareyama, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hibino, K.; Ichimura, M.; Ioka, K.; Israel, M. H.; Javaid, A.; Kamioka, E.; Kasahara, K.; Kataoka, J.; Kataoka, R.; Katayose, Y.; Kawanaka, N.; Kitamura, H.; Kotani, T.; Krawczynski, H. S.; Krizmanic, J. F.; Kubota, A.; Kuramata, S.; Lomtadze, T.; Maestro, P.; Marcelli, L.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Mitchell, J. W.; Miyake, S.; Mizutani, K.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, K.; Mori, M.; Mori, N.; Motz, H. M.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, H.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Nakahira, S.; Nishimura, J.; Okuno, S.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozawa, S.; Palma, F.; Papini, P.; Rauch, B. F.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasaki, M.; Shibata, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Shiomi, A.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Takahashi, I.; Takayanagi, M.; Takita, M.; Tamura, T.; Tateyama, N.; Terasawa, T.; Tomida, H.; Torii, S.; Tunesada, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Ueno, S.; Vannuccini, E.; Wefel, J. P.; Yamaoka, K.; Yanagita, S.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, K.; Yuda, T.

    2015-08-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a space experiment, currently under development by Japan in collaboration with Italy and the United States, which will measure the flux of cosmic-ray electrons (and positrons) up to 20 TeV energy, of gamma rays up to 10 TeV, of nuclei with Z from 1 to 40 up to 1 PeV energy, and will detect gamma-ray bursts in the 7 keV to 20 MeV energy range during a 5 year mission. These measurements are essential to investigate possible nearby astrophysical sources of high energy electrons, study the details of galactic particle propagation and search for dark matter signatures. The main detector of CALET, the Calorimeter, consists of a module to identify the particle charge, followed by a thin imaging calorimeter (3 radiation lengths) with tungsten plates interleaving scintillating fibre planes, and a thick energy measuring calorimeter (27 radiation lengths) composed of lead tungstate logs. The Calorimeter has the depth, imaging capabilities and energy resolution necessary for excellent separation between hadrons, electrons and gamma rays. The instrument is currently being prepared for launch (expected in 2015) to the International Space Station ISS, for installation on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposure Facility (JEM-EF).

  7. The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) for high-energy astroparticle physics on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Akaike, Y.; Asano, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Binns, W. R.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Castellini, G.; Cherry, M. L.; Collazuol, G.; Ebisawa, K.; Di Felice, V.; Fuke, H.; Guzik, T. G.; Hams, T.; Hareyama, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hibino, K.; Ichimura, M.; Ioka, K.; Israel, M. H.; Javaid, A.; Kamioka, E.; Kasahara, K.; Kataoka, J.; Kataoka, R.; Katayose, Y.; Kawanaka, N.; Kitamura, H.; Kotani, T.; Krawczynski, H. S.; Krizmanic, J. F.; Kubota, A.; Kuramata, S.; Lomtadze, T.; Maestro, P.; Marcelli, L.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Mitchell, J. W.; Miyake, S.; Mizutani, K.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, K.; Mori, M.; Mori, N.; Motz, H. M.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, H.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Nakahira, S.; Nishimura, J.; Okuno, S.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozawa, S.; Palma, F.; Papini, P.; Rauch, B. F.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasaki, M.; Shibata, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Shiomi, A.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Takahashi, I.; Takayanagi, M.; Takita, M.; Tamura, T.; Tateyama, N.; Terasawa, T.; Tomida, H.; Torii, S.; Tunesada, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Ueno, S.; Vannuccini, E.; Wefel, J. P.; Yamaoka, K.; Yanagita, S.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, K.; Yuda, T.

    2015-05-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a space experiment, currently under development by Japan in collaboration with Italy and the United States, which will measure the flux of cosmic-ray electrons (and positrons) up to 20 TeV energy, of gamma rays up to 10 TeV, of nuclei with Z from 1 to 40 up to 1 PeV energy, and will detect gamma-ray bursts in the 7 keV to 20 MeV energy range during a 5 year mission. These measurements are essential to investigate possible nearby astrophysical sources of high energy electrons, study the details of galactic particle propagation and search for dark matter signatures. The main detector of CALET, the Calorimeter, consists of a module to identify the particle charge, followed by a thin imaging calorimeter (3 radiation lengths) with tungsten plates interleaving scintillating fibre planes, and a thick energy measuring calorimeter (27 radiation lengths) composed of lead tungstate logs. The Calorimeter has the depth, imaging capabilities and energy resolution necessary for excellent separation between hadrons, electrons and gamma rays. The instrument is currently being prepared for launch (expected in 2015) to the International Space Station ISS, for installation on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposure Facility (JEM-EF).

  8. Calorimetric studies of the ammonia-water system with application to the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarger, Jeffery; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Burke, Michael

    1993-01-01

    A series of heating experiments was performed on the condensed ammonia-water system using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The water-rich samples were cooled quickly to below 130 K, then heated at a variety of rates. Rather than a single peritectic melt at 176 K, expected for the equilibrium system of water ice and ammonia dihydrate, four enthalpic transitions were repeatedly seen in the temperature range 150-176 K. These transitions are generally consistent with the earlier calorimetric results of Van Kasteren (1973), who interpreted the lowest temperature exotherm as crystallization of an amorphous ammonia-water compound formed during cooling. We propose that both sets of experiments are seeing the crystallization of ammonia monohydrate, which is metastable relative to the dihydrate, followed by partial remelting and crystallization of dihydrate upon further heating. The apparent stability of the monohydrate in the dihydrate equilibrium field implies a potentially complex behavior of ammonia-water ices in satellites. Possible self-heating of the mixture by several tens of degrees up to the 170 K eutectic could make mobilization of ammonia-water liquids in icy satellite interiors energetically easier than previously thought.

  9. Calorimetric measurement of electron energy deposition in extended media. Theory vs experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, G.J.; Ruggles, L.E.; Miller, G.H.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A new calorimetric technique has been developed for measuring electron energy deposition profiles in one dimension. The experimental procedures and theoretical analyses required in the application of the new method are reviewed. Extensive results are presented for electron energy deposition profiles in semi-infinite homogeneous and multilayer configurations. These data cover a range of elements from beryllium through uranium at source energies from 0.3 to 1.0 MeV (selected data at 0.5 and 0.1 MeV) and at incident angles from 0/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/. In every case, the experimental profiles are compared with the predictions of a coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code. Overall agreement between theory and experiment is very good. However, there appears to be a tendency for the theoretical profiles to be higher near the peaks and lower near the tails, especially in high-Z materials. There is also a discrepancy between theory and experiment in low-Z materials near high-Z/low-Z interfaces.

  10. Towed-grid system for production and calorimetric study of homogenous quantum turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciapurin, Roman; Thompson, Kyle; Ihas, Gary G.

    2011-10-01

    The decay of quantum turbulence is not fully understood in superfluid helium at milikelvin temperatures where the viscous normal component is absent. Vibrating grid experiments performed periously produced inhomogeneous turbulence, making the results hard to interpret. We have developed experimental methods to produce homogeneous isotropic turbulence by pulling a grid at a variable constant velocity through superfluid 4He. While using calorimetric technique to measure the energy dissipation, the Meissner effect was employed to eliminate all heat sources except from turbulent decay. A controlled divergent magnetic field provides the lift to a hollow cylindrical superconducting actuator to which the grid is attached. Position sensing is performed by measuring the inductance change of a coil when a superconductor, similar to that of the actuator, is moved inside it. This position sensing technique proved to be reliable under varying temperatures and magnetic fields, making it perfect for use in the towed-grid experiment where a rise in temperature emerges from turbulent decay. Additionally, the reproducible dependency of the grid's position on the applied magnetic field enables complete control of the actuator's motion.

  11. Status and performance of the CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Akaike, Y.; Asaoka, Y.; Asano, K.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Binns, W. R.; Bongi, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Cassese, A.; Castellini, G.; Cherry, M. L.; Collazuol, G.; Ebisawa, K.; Di Felice, V.; Fuke, H.; Guzik, T. G.; Hams, T.; Hasebe, N.; Hareyama, M.; Hibino, K.; Ichimura, M.; Ioka, K.; Israel, M. H.; Javaid, A.; Kamioka, E.; Kasahara, K.; Katayose, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kataoka, R.; Kawanaka, N.; Kitamura, H.; Kotani, T.; Krawczynski, H. S.; Krizmanic, J. F.; Kubota, A.; Kuramata, S.; Lomtadze, T.; Maestro, P.; Marcelli, L.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Mitchell, J. W.; Miyake, S.; Mizutani, K.; Motz, H. M.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, K.; Mori, M.; Mori, N.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, H.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Nakahira, S.; Nishimura, J.; Okuno, S.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozawa, S.; Palma, F.; Papini, P.; Rauch, B. F.; Ricciarini, S.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasaki, M.; Shibata, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Shiomi, A.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Takahashi, I.; Takayanagi, M.; Takita, M.; Tamura, T.; Tateyama, N.; Terasawa, T.; Tomida, H.; Torii, S.; Tunesada, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Ueno, S.; Vannuccini, E.; Wefel, J. P.; Yamaoka, K.; Yanagita, S.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, K.; Yuda, T.

    2014-11-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) space experiment, currently under development by Japan in collaboration with Italy and the United States, will measure the flux of cosmic-ray electrons (including positrons) to 20 TeV, gamma rays to 10 TeV and nuclei with Z=1 to 40 up to 1,000 TeV during a two-year mission on the International Space Station (ISS), extendable to five years. These measurements are essential to search for dark matter signatures, investigate the mechanism of cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation in the Galaxy and discover possible astrophysical sources of high-energy electrons nearby the Earth. The instrument consists of two layers of segmented plastic scintillators for the cosmic-ray charge identification (CHD), a 3 radiation length thick tungsten-scintillating fiber imaging calorimeter (IMC) and a 27 radiation length thick lead-tungstate calorimeter (TASC). CALET has sufficient depth, imaging capabilities and excellent energy resolution to allow for a clear separation between hadrons and electrons and between charged particles and gamma rays. The instrument will be launched to the ISS within 2014 Japanese Fiscal Year (by the end of March 2015) and installed on the Japanese Experiment Module-Exposed Facility (JEM-EF). In this paper, we will review the status and main science goals of the mission and describe the instrument configuration and performance.

  12. Algorithms for Identification of Nearly-Coincident Events in Calorimetric Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, B.; Ferri, E.; Bennett, D.; Faverzani, M.; Fowler, J.; Giachero, A.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Maino, M.; Nucciotti, A.; Puiu, A.; Swetz, D.; Ullom, J.

    2015-12-01

    For experiments with high arrival rates, reliable identification of nearly-coincident events can be crucial. For calorimetric measurements to directly measure the neutrino mass such as HOLMES, unidentified pulse pile-ups are expected to be a leading source of experimental error. Although Wiener filtering can be used to recognize pile-up, it suffers from errors due to pulse shape variation from detector nonlinearity, readout dependence on subsample arrival times, and stability issues from the ill-posed deconvolution problem of recovering Dirac delta-functions from smooth data. Due to these factors, we have developed a processing method that exploits singular value decomposition to (1) separate single-pulse records from piled-up records in training data and (2) construct a model of single-pulse records that accounts for varying pulse shape with amplitude, arrival time, and baseline level, suitable for detecting nearly-coincident events. We show that the resulting processing advances can reduce the required performance specifications of the detectors and readout system or, equivalently, enable larger sensor arrays and better constraints on the neutrino mass.

  13. Electron energy and charge albedos - calorimetric measurement vs Monte Carlo theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, G.J.; Ruggles, L.E.; Miller, G.H.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    A new calorimetric method has been employed to obtain saturated electron energy albedos for Be, C, Al, Ti, Mo, Ta, U, and UO/sub 2/ over the range of incident energies from 0.1 to 1.0 MeV. The technique was so designed to permit the simultaneous measurement of saturated charge albedos. In the cases of C, Al, Ta, and U the measurements were extended down to about 0.025 MeV. The angle of incidence was varied from 0/sup 0/ (normal) to 75/sup 0/ in steps of 15/sup 0/, with selected measurements at 82.5/sup 0/ in Be and C. In each case, state-of-the-art predictions were obtained from a Monte Carlo model. The generally good agreement between theory and experiment over this extensive parameter space represents a strong validation of both the theoretical model and the new experimental method. Nevertheless, certain discrepancies at low incident energies, especially in high-atomic-number materials, and at all energies in the case of the U energy albedos are not completely understood.

  14. Optical and Calorimetric Studies of Cholesterol-Rich Filamentous, Helical Ribbon and Crystal Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Miroshnikova, Y. A.; Elsenbeck, M.; Zastavker, Y. V.; Kashuri, K; Iannacchione, G. S.

    2009-04-19

    Formation of biological self-assemblies at all scales is a focus of studies in fields ranging from biology to physics to biomimetics. Understanding the physico-chemical properties of these self-assemblies may lead to the design of bio-inspired structures and technological applications. Here we examine self-assembled filamentous, helical ribbon, and crystal microstructures formed in chemically defined lipid concentrate (CDLC), a model system for cholesterol crystallization in gallbladder bile. CDLC consists of cholesterol, bilayer-forming amphiphiles, micelle-forming amphiphiles, and water. Phase contrast and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy indicate the presence of three microstructure types in all samples studied, and allow for an investigation of the structures' unique geometries. Additionally, confocal microscopy is used for qualitative assessment of surface and internal composition. To complement optical observations, calorimetric (differential-scanning and modulation) experiments, provide the basis for an in-depth understanding of collective and individual thermal behavior. Observed ''transition'' features indicate clustering and ''straightening'' of helical ribbons into short, increasingly thickening, filaments that dissolve with increasing temperature. These results suggest that all microstructures formed in CDLC may coexist in a metastable chemical equilibrium. Further investigation of the CDLC thermal profile should uncover the process of cholesterol crystallization as well as the unique design and function of microstructures formed in this system.

  15. Calorimetric and acoustic emission study of martensitic transformation in single-crystalline Ni2MnGa alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, László Z.; Szabó, Sándor; Daróczi, Lajos; Beke, Dezső L.

    2014-12-01

    The jerky character of austenite-martensite phase transformation in Ni2MnGa single crystals (with 10M martensite structure) has been investigated by thermal cycling using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and by detection of acoustic emissions (AEs) at low cooling and heating rates (0.1 K/min and below). It is illustrated that, besides the low cooling and heating rate, mass and surface roughness are also important parameters in optimizing the best signal/noise ratio in order to obtain individual peaks suitable for statistical analysis. Three types of samples, differing in the twin structure and twin boundary behavior, were investigated with and without surface roughening made by electro-erosion. The statistical analysis, carried out for both (thermal and acoustic) types of signals, provided power-law behavior. In calorimetric measurements the energy exponents, obtained in cooling, were the same within the experimental errors (ɛ =1.7 ±0.2 ) for the three samples investigated. In acoustic emission experiments the energy and amplitude, α , exponents were determined both for cooling and heating. The exponents for cooling and heating runs are slightly different. They are larger for heating for both α and ɛ , in accordance with the asymmetric acoustic activity: we observed higher acoustic activity (higher number of hits) during cooling. The effect of the surface roughness is negligible in the exponents (but higher acoustic activity corresponds to higher roughness) and the following values were obtained: ɛ =1.5 ±0.1 and α =2.1 ±0.1 for cooling as well as ɛ =1.8 ±0.1 and α =2.6 ±0.1 for heating. Our results are in accordance with the results of Gallardo et al. [Phys. Rev. B 81, 174102 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.174102] obtained in Cu based alloys: the exponents of the energy distributions, for both DSC and AE signals, were the same within the experimental errors. Furthermore, our exponents obtained from the AE measurements are close to the values obtained by Ludwig et al. (α =2.6 ±0.1 and ɛ =1.75 ±0.1 ) [App. Phys. Lett. 94 121901 (2009), 10.1063/1.3103289] and Niemann et al. (ɛ =1.9 ±0.1 ) [Phys. Rev. B 86, 214101 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevB.86.214101] in Ni2MnGa alloys with similar 10M martensite structure.

  16. Measurement and Modeling of Inner-Shell Satellites of Na-like Fe XVI between 14.5 Å and 18 Å

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, A; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Gu, M F

    2007-09-10

    We have used the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's EBIT-I electron beam ion trap to perform measurements of the wavelengths and relative intensities of the X-ray lines from inner-shell satellite transitions in sodium-like Fe XVI. The measurements were carried out with high-resolution crystal and grating spectrometers and covered the 14.5-18 {angstrom} wavelength band. Contrary to predicted line strengths and positions found in the literature, our results show that the strongest inner-shell satellites of Fe XVI are located near 15.2 {angstrom}. This is near the location of the 3d {yields} 2p intercombination line in Fe XVII. Calculations using the Flexible Atomic Code are presented, which agree well with the EBIT-I measurements.

  17. Collagen XVI Induces Expression of MMP9 via Modulation of AP-1 Transcription Factors and Facilitates Invasion of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bedal, Konstanze B.; Grssel, Susanne; Oefner, Peter J.; Reinders, Joerg; Reichert, Torsten E.; Bauer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Collagen XVI belongs to the family of fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices (FACIT). It is overexpressed during the progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The present data show a strong collagen XVI-dependent induction of MMP9 and an increase in OSCC cell invasion. We found activated integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in a complex with kindlin-1 and activation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) to be responsible for MMP9 induction. Inhibition of the formation of focal adhesions reduced MMP9 expression. Moreover, collagen XVI overexpressing OSCC cell clones (COLXVI cell clones) transfected with vectors containing different MMP9 promoter fragments adjacent to a luciferase reporter revealed an increase in luciferase signal dependent on AP-1 binding sites. Deletion of the AP-1 binding site 98 bp upstream of the reported transcription start site and inhibition of AP-1 with Tanshinone IIA resulted in decreased MMP9 expression. The AP-1 subunit JunB showed differential expression between COLXVI cell clones and mock control cells. Additionally, mass spectrometric analysis of immunoprecipitates revealed that c-Fos interacted strongly with dyskerin in COLXVI cell clones compared to mock controls. PMID:24466237

  18. Calorimetric studies of the kinetic unfreezing of molecular motions in hydrated lysozyme, hemoglobin, and myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, G; Mayer, E; Johari, G P

    1994-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) studies of the glassy states of as-received and hydrated lysozyme, hemoglobin, and myoglobin powders, with water contents of < or = 0.25, < or = 0.30, and < or = 0.29 g/g of protein, show that their heat capacity slowly increases with increasing temperature, without showing an abrupt increase characteristic of glass-->liquid transition. Annealing (also referred to as physical aging) of the hydrated proteins causes their DSC scans to show an endothermic region, similar to an overshoot, immediately above the annealing temperature. This annealing effect appears at all temperatures between approximately 150 and 300 K. The area under these peaks increases with increasing annealing time at a fixed temperature. The effects are attributed to the presence of a large number of local structures in which macromolecular segments diffuse at different time scales over a broad range. The lowest time scale corresponds to the > N-H and -O-H group motions which become kinetically unfrozen at approximately 150-170 K on heating at a rate of 30 K min-1 and which have a relaxation time of 5-10 s in this temperature range. The annealing effects confirm that the individual glass transition of the relaxing local regions is spread over a temperature range up to the denaturation temperature region of the proteins. The interpretation is supported by simulation of DSC scans in which the distribution of relaxation times is assumed to be exceptionally broad and in which annealing done at several temperatures over a wide range produces endothermic effects (or regions of DSC scans) qualitatively similar to those observed for the hydrated proteins. PMID:8130342

  19. A high-temperature calorimetric flow sensor employing ion conduction in zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, A.; Lekholm, V.; Thornell, G.; Klintberg, L.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the use of the temperature-dependent ion conductivity of 8 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ8) in a miniature high-temperature calorimetric flow sensor. The sensor consists of 4 layers of high-temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) YSZ8 tape with a 400 μm wide, 100 μm deep, and 12 500 μm long internal flow channel. Across the center of the channel, four platinum conductors, each 80 μm wide with a spacing of 160 μm, were printed. The two center conductors were used as heaters, and the outer, up- and downstream conductors were used to probe the resistance through the zirconia substrate around the heaters. The thermal profile surrounding the two heaters could be made symmetrical by powering them independently, and hence, the temperature sensing elements could be balanced at zero flow. With nitrogen flowing through the channel, forced convection shifted the thermal profile downstream, and the resistance of the temperature sensing elements diverged. The sensor was characterized at nitrogen flows from 0 to 40 sccm, and resistances at zero-flow from 10 to 50 MΩ. A peak sensitivity of 3.1 MΩ/sccm was obtained. Moreover, the sensor response was found to be linear over the whole flow range, with R2 of around 0.999, and easy to tune with the individual temperature control of the heaters. The ability of the sensor to operate in high temperatures makes it promising for use in different harsh environments, e.g., for close integration with microthrusters.

  20. Seasonal Variability in Calorimetric Energy Content of Two Caribbean Mesophotic Corals

    PubMed Central

    Brandtneris, Viktor W.; Brandt, Marilyn E.; Glynn, Peter W.; Gyory, Joanna; Smith, Tyler B.

    2016-01-01

    Energetic responses of zooxanthellate reef corals along depth gradients have relevance to the refugia potential of mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs). Previous observations suggested that MCEs in the Caribbean are thermally buffered during the warmest parts of the year and occur within or just below the chlorophyll maximum, suggesting abundant trophic resources. However, it is not known if mesophotic corals can maintain constant energy needs throughout the year with changing environmental and biological conditions. The energetic content of tissues from the stony coral species Orbicella faveolata and Agaricia lamarcki was measured on the southern insular shelf of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands (USVI), using micro-bomb calorimetry. Three sites for each species, at depths of 6m, 25m, 38m and 63m, were selected to capture energetic differences across the major vertical range extent of both species in the USVI—and sampled over five periods from April 2013 to April 2014. Mesophotic colonies of O. faveolata exhibited a significant reduction in energetic content during the month of September 2013 compared to mid-depth and shallow colonies (p = 0.032), whereas A. lamarcki experienced similar energetic variability, but with a significant reduction in energy content that occurred in July 2013 for colonies at sites deeper than 25m (p = 0.014). The results of calorimetric analyses indicate that O. faveolata may be at risk during late summer stress events, possibly due to the timing of reproductive activities. The low-point of A. lamarcki energy content, which may also coincide with reproduction, occurs prior to seasonal stress events, indicating contrasting, species-specific responses to environmental variability on MCEs. PMID:27050430

  1. Head-group contributions to bilayer stability: monolayer and calorimetric studies on synthetic, stereochemically uniform glucolipids.

    PubMed

    Hinz, H J; Six, L; Ruess, K P; Liefländer, M

    1985-01-29

    Monolayer and differential scanning calorimetry studies have been performed on synthetic, stereochemically uniform glyceroglucolipids having saturated, ether-linked alkyl chains. The limiting area, A0 = 40 A2 X molecule-1, resulting from the monolayer measurements of the glucolipids is comparable to the A0 value found for phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. The area corresponds to twice the value observed with saturated straight chain fatty acids, which indicates that at high surface pressure the space requirement of the glucose head group does not exceed that of the two alkyl chains. The apparent specific heat capacities of the glucolipid dispersions have been found to be higher than those of corresponding phospholipids. They can be approximated from group parameters with the additional assumption that the experimental partial molar heat capacity of glucose is valid for the glucose head groups of the lipids. The transition enthalpies of the C16 and C18 glyceroglucolipids are clearly larger than the delta H values of corresponding phospholipids, while the C14 glyceroglucolipid has the same transition enthalpy as dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine or ditetradecylphosphatidylethanolamine. Glucolipids exhibit gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition temperatures which are only slightly lower than those of their phosphatidylethanolamine analogues, although they are uncharged molecules. Like phosphatidylethanolamine the glucolipids do not show a pretransition; however, with the C14 glucolipid a highly cooperative posttransition, approximately 5 deg above the main transition, has been found. Calorimetric experiments with a C14 glucolipid, in which the hydroxyl protons of the glucose moiety have been exchanged by deuterium, suggest that the posttransition might reflect structural changes of the head group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3994987

  2. Seasonal Variability in Calorimetric Energy Content of Two Caribbean Mesophotic Corals.

    PubMed

    Brandtneris, Viktor W; Brandt, Marilyn E; Glynn, Peter W; Gyory, Joanna; Smith, Tyler B

    2016-01-01

    Energetic responses of zooxanthellate reef corals along depth gradients have relevance to the refugia potential of mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs). Previous observations suggested that MCEs in the Caribbean are thermally buffered during the warmest parts of the year and occur within or just below the chlorophyll maximum, suggesting abundant trophic resources. However, it is not known if mesophotic corals can maintain constant energy needs throughout the year with changing environmental and biological conditions. The energetic content of tissues from the stony coral species Orbicella faveolata and Agaricia lamarcki was measured on the southern insular shelf of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands (USVI), using micro-bomb calorimetry. Three sites for each species, at depths of 6m, 25m, 38m and 63m, were selected to capture energetic differences across the major vertical range extent of both species in the USVI-and sampled over five periods from April 2013 to April 2014. Mesophotic colonies of O. faveolata exhibited a significant reduction in energetic content during the month of September 2013 compared to mid-depth and shallow colonies (p = 0.032), whereas A. lamarcki experienced similar energetic variability, but with a significant reduction in energy content that occurred in July 2013 for colonies at sites deeper than 25m (p = 0.014). The results of calorimetric analyses indicate that O. faveolata may be at risk during late summer stress events, possibly due to the timing of reproductive activities. The low-point of A. lamarcki energy content, which may also coincide with reproduction, occurs prior to seasonal stress events, indicating contrasting, species-specific responses to environmental variability on MCEs. PMID:27050430

  3. Interaction of Antiinflammatory Drugs with EPC Liposomes: Calorimetric Study in a Broad Concentration Range

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Carla; Lima, José L. C.; Reis, Salette; Lopes, António; Bastos, Margarida

    2004-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to characterize and quantify the partition of indomethacin and acemetacin between the bulk aqueous phase and the membrane of egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles. Significant electrostatic effects were observed due to binding of the charged drugs to the membrane, which implied the use of the Gouy-Chapman theory to calculate the interfacial concentrations. The binding/partition phenomenon was quantified in terms of the partition coefficient (Kp), and/or the equilibrium constant (Kb). Mathematical expressions were developed, either to encompass the electrostatic effects in the partition model, or to numerically relate partition coefficients and binding constants. Calorimetric titrations conducted under a lipid/drug ratio >100:1 lead to a constant heat release and were used to directly calculate the enthalpy of the process, ΔH, and indirectly, ΔG and ΔS. As the lipid/drug ratio decreased, the constancy of reaction enthalpy was tested in the fitting process. Under low lipid/drug ratio conditions simple partition was no longer valid and the interaction phenomenon was interpreted in terms of binding isotherms. A mathematical expression was deduced for quantification of the binding constants and the number of lipid molecules associated with one drug molecule. The broad range of concentrations used stressed the biphasic nature of the interaction under study. As the lipid/drug ratio was varied, the results showed that the interaction of both drugs does not present a unique behavior in all studied regimes: the extent of the interaction, as well as the binding stoichiometry, is affected by the lipid/drug ratio. The change in these parameters reflects the biphasic behavior of the interaction—possibly the consequence of a modification of the membrane's physical properties as it becomes saturated with the drug. PMID:14747330

  4. Thermodynamic model for calorimetric and phase coexistence properties of coal derived fluids. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kabadi, V.N.

    1992-10-01

    The work on this project was initiated on September 1, 1989. The project consisted of three different tasks. 1. A thermodynamic model to predict VLE and calorimetric properties of coal liquids. 2. VLE measurements at high temperature and high pressure for coal model compounds and 3. Chromatographic characterization of coal liquids for distribution of heteroatoms. The thermodynamic model developed is an extension of the previous model developed for VLE of coal derived fluids (DOE Grant no. FG22-86PC90541). The model uses the modified UNIFAC correlation for the liquid phase. Some unavailable UNIFAC interactions parameters have been regressed from experimental VLE and excess enthalpy data. The model is successful in predicting binary VLE and excess enthalpy data. Further refinements of the model are suggested. An apparatus for the high pressure high temperature VLE data measurements has been built and tested. Tetralin-Quinoline is the first binary system selected for data measurements. The equipment was tested by measuring 325{degree}C isotherm for this system and comparing it with literature data. Additional isotherms at 350{degree}C and 370{degree}C have been measured. The framework for a characterization procedure for coal derived liquids has been developed. A coal liquid is defined by a true molecular weight distribution and distribution of heteroatoms as a function of molecular weights. Size exclusions liquid chromatography, elemental analysis and FTIR spectroscopy methods are used to obtain the molecular weight and hetroatom distributions. Further work in this area should include refinements of the characterization procedure, high temperature high pressure VLE data measurements for selective model compound binary systems, and improvement of the thermodynamic model using the new measured data and consistent with the developments in the characterization procedure.

  5. Crop changes from the XVI century to the present in a hill/mountain area of eastern Liguria (Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Gentili, Rodolfo; Gentili, Elio; Sgorbati, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronological information on the composition and structure of agrocenoses and detailed features of land cover referring to specific areas are uncommon in ethnobotanical studies, especially for periods before the XIX century. The aim of this study was to analyse the type of crop or the characteristics of soil cover from the XVI century to the present. Methods This diachronic analysis was accomplished through archival research on the inventories of the Parish of St. Mary and those of the Municipality of Pignone and from recent surveys conducted in an area of eastern Liguria (Italy). Results Archival data revealed that in study area the primary means of subsistence during the last five centuries, until the first half of the XX century, was chestnuts. In the XVIII and XIX centuries, crop diversification strongly increased in comparison with previous and subsequent periods. In more recent times, the abandonment of agricultural practices has favoured the re-colonisation of mixed woodland or cluster-pine woodland. Conclusion Ancient documents in the ecclesiastic or municipal inventories can be a very useful tool for enhancing the knowledge of agricultural practice, as well as of subsistence methods favoured by local populations during a particular time and for reconstructing land use change over time. PMID:19361339

  6. Analbite - Sanidine Thermodynamic Mixing Properties: Highly Precise HF Solution Calorimetric Data Across A Twenty-Member Crystalline Solution Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    Enthalpies of K-Na mixing for the analbite - sanidine feldspar series were investigated by Hovis (1988, J. Petrology) in the early 80's. That work was based on data at a limited number of compositions, owing to the large sample sizes required for HF solution calorimetric measurements at the time. Thermodynamic mixing properties for mineral series, especially those exhibiting compositionally asymmetric mixing quantities, are best defined when samples at a large number of compositions are utilized. Enabled by the small sample sizes now possible for HF solution calorimetric dissolutions (Hovis et al., 1998, Amer. Mineral.), we revisit feldspar thermodynamic properties, having synthesized an analbite - sanidine series consisting of samples at 20 compositions. Solution calorimetric experiments on these samples at 50 °C in 20.1 wt% HF under isoperibolic conditions have resulted in highly precise calorimetric data (standard deviation per sample averaging 0.06 % of the heat of solution). Although enthalpies of K-Na mixing based on the new data display some degree of compositional asymmetry, with a maximum value of 4.8 kJ/mol at a mole fraction potassium of 0.47, the distribution of enthalpy-of-mixing values remains nearly symmetric with respect to K content. This contrasts significantly with data for Al-Si ordered low albite - microcline crystalline solutions, reinvestigated via synthesis of a 21-member series, which show significantly higher mixing magnitudes and considerably greater asymmetry with respect to composition. The maximization of enthalpies of K-Na mixing at sodic compositions correlates well with the sodic critical compositions for both solvi. The lower mixing magnitudes for analbite - sanidine are consistent with the comparatively lower critical temperature of the analbite - sanidine solvus (e.g., Smith & Parsons, 1974, Mineral. Mag.) relative to that for low albite - microcline (Bachinski & Müller, 1971, J. Petrology). Entropies of K-Na mixing for analbite - sanidine have been calculated by combining present enthalpy data with Gibbs free energies of mixing derived from the earlier phase equilibrium study of Hovis et al. (1991, Amer. Mineral.). These may be compared with directly measured entropy data for analbite - sanidine based on the heat capacity measurements of Haselton et al. (1983, Amer. Mineral.). Thanks to the National Science Foundation for funding this research.

  7. Analbite - Sanidine Thermodynamic Mixing Properties: Highly Precise HF Solution Calorimetric Data Across A Twenty-Member Crystalline Solution Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, G. L.

    2012-12-01

    Enthalpies of K-Na mixing for the analbite - sanidine feldspar series were investigated by Hovis (1988, J. Petrology) in the early 80's. That work was based on data at a limited number of compositions, owing to the large sample sizes required for HF solution calorimetric measurements at the time. Thermodynamic mixing properties for mineral series, especially those exhibiting compositionally asymmetric mixing quantities, are best defined when samples at a large number of compositions are utilized. Enabled by the small sample sizes now possible for HF solution calorimetric dissolutions (Hovis et al., 1998, Amer. Mineral.), we revisit feldspar thermodynamic properties, having synthesized an analbite - sanidine series consisting of samples at 20 compositions. Solution calorimetric experiments on these samples at 50 °C in 20.1 wt% HF under isoperibolic conditions have resulted in highly precise calorimetric data (standard deviation per sample averaging 0.06 % of the heat of solution). Although enthalpies of K-Na mixing based on the new data display some degree of compositional asymmetry, with a maximum value of 4.8 kJ/mol at a mole fraction potassium of 0.47, the distribution of enthalpy-of-mixing values remains nearly symmetric with respect to K content. This contrasts significantly with data for Al-Si ordered low albite - microcline crystalline solutions, reinvestigated via synthesis of a 21-member series, which show significantly higher mixing magnitudes and considerably greater asymmetry with respect to composition. The maximization of enthalpies of K-Na mixing at sodic compositions correlates well with the sodic critical compositions for both solvi. The lower mixing magnitudes for analbite - sanidine are consistent with the comparatively lower critical temperature of the analbite - sanidine solvus (e.g., Smith & Parsons, 1974, Mineral. Mag.) relative to that for low albite - microcline (Bachinski & Müller, 1971, J. Petrology). Entropies of K-Na mixing for analbite - sanidine have been calculated by combining present enthalpy data with Gibbs free energies of mixing derived from the earlier phase equilibrium study of Hovis et al. (1991, Amer. Mineral.). These may be compared with directly measured entropy data for analbite - sanidine based on the heat capacity measurements of Haselton et al. (1983, Amer. Mineral.).

  8. Investigation of a zirconia co-fired ceramic calorimetric microsensor for high-temperature flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekholm, Ville; Persson, Anders; Klintberg, Lena; Thornell, Greger

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and characterization of a flow sensor for high-temperature, or otherwise aggressive, environments, like, e.g. the propulsion system of a small spacecraft. The sensor was fabricated using 8 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ8) high-temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) tape and screen printed platinum paste. A calorimetric flow sensor design was used, with five 80 µm wide conductors, separated by 160 µm, in a 0.4 mm wide, 0.1 mm deep and 12.5 mm long flow channel. The central conductor was used as a heater for the sensor, and the two adjacent conductors were used to resistively measure the heat transferred from the heater by forced convection. The two outermost conductors were used to study the influence of an auxiliary heat source on the sensor. The resistances of the sensor conductors were measured using four-point connections, as the gas flow rate was slowly increased from 0 to 40 sccm, with different power supplied through the central heater, as well as with an upstream or downstream heater powered. In this study, the thermal and electrical integrability of microcomponents on the YSZ8 substrate was of particular interest and, hence, the influence of thermal and ionic conduction in the substrate was studied in detail. The effect of the ion conductivity of YSZ8 was studied by measuring the resistance of a platinum conductor and the resistance between two adjacent conductors on YSZ8, in a furnace at temperatures from 20 to 930 °C and by measuring the resistance with increasing current through a conductor. With this design, the influence of ion conductivity through the substrate became apparent above 700 °C. The sensitivity of the sensor was up to 1 mΩ sccm-1 in a range of 0-10 sccm. The results show that the signal from the sensor is influenced by the integrated auxiliary heating conductors and that these auxiliary heaters provide a way to balance disturbing heat sources, e.g. thrusters or other electronics, in conjunction with the flow sensor.

  9. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for High Precision Measurements of Calorimetric Re-187 and Ho-163 Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranitzsch, P. C.-O.; Porst, J.-P.; Kempf, S.; Pies, C.; Schafer, S.; Hengstler, D.; Fleischmann, A.; Enss, C.; Gastaldo, L.

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of calorimetric spectra following atomic weak decays, beta (b) and electron capture (EC), of nuclides having a very low Q-value, can provide an impressively high sensitivity to a non-vanishing neutrino mass. The achievable sensitivity in this kind of experiments is directly connected to the performance of the used detectors. In particular an energy resolution of a few eV and a pulse formation time well below 1 microsecond are required. Low temperature Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters (MMCs) for soft X-rays have already shown an energy resolution of 2.0 eV FWHM and a pulse rise-time of about 90 ns for fully micro-fabricated detectors. We present the use of MMCs for high precision measurements of calorimetric spectra following the beta-decay of Re-187 and the EC of Ho-163. We show results obtained with detectors optimized for Re-187 and for Ho-163 experiments respectively. While the detectors equipped with superconducting Re absorbers have not yet reached the aimed performance, a first detector prototype with a Au absorber having implanted Ho-163 ions already shows excellent results. An energy resolution of 12 eV FWHM and a rise time of 90 ns were measured.

  10. Low-temperature heat capacity of diopside glass (CaMgSi2O6): A calorimetric test of the configurational-entropy theory applied to the viscosity of liquid silicates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richet, P.; Robie, R.A.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    Heat-capacity measurements have been made between 8 and 370 K on an annealed and a rapidly quenched diopside glass. Between 15 and 200 K, Cp does not depend significantly on the thermal history of the glass. Below 15 K Cp is larger for the quenched than for the annealed specimen. The opposite is true above 200 K as a result of what is interpreted as a secondary relaxation around room temperature. The magnitude of these effects, however, is small enough that the relative entropies S(298)-S(0) of the glasses differ by only 0.5 J/mol K, i.e., a figure within the combined experimental uncertainties. The insensitivity of relative entropies to thermal history supports the assumption that the configurational heat capacity of the liquid may be taken as the heat capacity difference between the liquid and the glass (??Cp). Furthermore, this insensitivity allows calculation of the residual entropies at 0 K of diopside glasses as a function of the fictive temperature from the entropy of fusion of diopside and the heat capacities of the crystalline, glassy and liquid phases. For a glass with a fictive temperature of 1005 K, for example, this calorimetric residual entropy is 24.3 ?? 3 J/mol K, in agreement with the prediction made by RICHET (1984) from an analysis of the viscosity data with the configurational-entropy theory of relaxation processes of Adam and Gibbs (1965). In turn, all the viscosity measurements for liquid diopside, which span the range 0.5-4?? 1013 poise, can be quantitatively reproduced through this theory with the calorimetrically determined entropies and ??Cp data. Finally, the unclear significance of "activation energies" for structural interpretations of viscosity data is emphasized, and the importance of ??Cp and glass-transition temperature systematics for determining the composition and temperature dependences of the viscosity is pointed out. ?? 1986.

  11. Emission Line Spectra from Fe VII to XVI in the Soft X-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kahn, S. M.; Liedahl, D. A.; Utter, S. B.

    2000-10-01

    Stellar coronae are rich emitters of iron radiation in the soft x-ray and EUV. This spectral region has been opened up first by the EUV Explorer and now by the Chandra X-ray Observatory for detailed observations with high resolution. Lines in this region are a valuable diagnostic tool for temperature and density, but accurate analysis and interpretation requires accurate spectral models and data. We have shown in previous laboratory measurements that the line lists available for the low charge states of iron, especially Fe VII through Fe XIII are strikingly incomplete. Many of the lines left out in the line lists are weak, but because there are many of them, a substantial amount of spectral flux (more than 50%) is missing. Incomplete accounting of these lines can have marked consequences when modeling the coronae of cool stars, such as α Cen, both by underestimating the flux of the lowest iron charge states and by incorrect assignments of the base level of those strong lines that sit on top of the flux caused by many unresolved weak lines. We are addressing this problem by using the unique spectroscopic abilities of the Lawrence Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap to compile a catalogue of the relevant line emission in the soft x-ray and EUV region. As part of this catalogue we present here spectra and line lists for Fe VII - Fe XVI between 50-140 Å. Our line lists include wavelengths and line intensities that allow us to estimate the contributions from unresolved lines relative to those of known lines from the same charge state. We also compare these line lists and spectra with the MeKa and CHIANTI models and HULLAC calculations.

  12. Geant4 simulation of the Elekta XVI kV CBCT unit for accurate description of potential late toxicity effects of image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, F. M.; Burnet, N. G.; Jena, R.; Plaistow, R.; Parker, M. A.; Thomas, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the modelisation of the Elekta XVI Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) machine components with Geant4 and its validation against calibration data taken for two commonly used machine setups. Preliminary dose maps of simulated CBCTs coming from this modelisation work are presented. This study is the first step of a research project, GHOST, aiming to improve the understanding of late toxicity risk in external beam radiotherapy patients by simulating dose depositions integrated from different sources (imaging, treatment beam) over the entire treatment plan. The second cancer risk will then be derived from different models relating irradiation dose and second cancer risk.

  13. Follow-Up Study of Former Students of the Criminal Justice Program. Volume XVI, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, George; Lucas, John A.

    A follow-up study was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) of students who had completed several courses in the Criminal Justice Program to determine why students left the criminal justice field, examine Criminal Justice students' enrollment and course-taking patterns, and to analyze withdrawal and failure rates in the course,…

  14. Magnetic structure in cool stars. XVI - Emissions from the outer atmosphere of M-type dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutten, R. G. M.; Zwaan, C.; Schrijver, C. J.; Duncan, D. K.; Mewe, R.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to emission from the outer atmospheres of M-type dwarfs in several spectral lines originating from the chromosphere, the transition-region, and the soft X-ray emission from the corona. It is shown that M-type dwarfs systematically deviate from relations between flux densities in soft X-rays and chromospheric and transition-region emission lines. The quantitative relation between the equivalent width of H-alpha and the Ca II, H, and K emission index is determined. It is suggested that the emission in the Balmer spectrum may result from back heating by coronal soft X-rays.

  15. MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF Na-LIKE Fe XVI INNER-SHELL SATELLITES BETWEEN 14.5 A AND 18 A

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Gu, M. F.

    2009-04-20

    We have used the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's EBIT-I electron beam ion trap to perform measurements of the wavelengths and relative intensities of the X-ray lines from inner-shell satellite transitions in sodium-like Fe XVI. The measurements were carried out with high-resolution crystal and grating spectrometers and covered the 14.5-18 A wavelength band. In contrast to some predicted line strengths and positions found in the literature, our results show that the strongest relatively unblended inner-shell satellites of Fe XVI are located near 15.2 A. This is near the location of the 3d{yields} 2p intercombination line in Fe XVII. Calculations using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) are presented. The average deviation between the EBIT-I measurements and the FAC calculations for the wavelength positions and line ratios are 22 mA and a factor of 2.3, respectively, where the average is taken over the ten features included in this work.

  16. Evaluation of the Thermodynamic Functions for Aqueous Sodium Chloride from Equilibrium and Calorimetric Measurements below 154 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, E. Colin W.; Glew, David N.

    1985-04-01

    A new weighted least-squares method is described which is generally applicable for the nonsubjective evaluation of the best set of thermodynamic functions from a given data set of equilibrium (ΔG) and calorimetric (ΔH, Cp) measurements. The method, applied to model a wide range of 2428 measurements for the water-sodium chloride system between -21 and 154 °C, accurately represents all measurements within experimental error. The resulting model is used to predict the thermodynamic functions and their standard errors for aqueous sodium chloride up to 110 °C. Tables are given for freezing point, solubility, boiling point, osmotic and activity coefficients, vapor pressure, apparent molal relative enthalpy, partial molal relative enthalpies, integral heat of solution, specific heat, apparent molal heat capacity, partial molal heat capacities, apparent molal relative heat capacity, partial molal relative heat capacities, standard thermodynamic functions, and their changes for dissolution.

  17. Calorimetric analysis of the two way memory effect in a NiTi alloy -- Experiments and calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, E.P. da

    1999-04-23

    In addition to the well known one-way memory effect in heating, some shape memory alloys may also exhibit a shape recovery upon cooling, i.e. they show the two-way memory effect (TWME). This is not an inherent property of such alloys, and to obtain it, the alloy must be trained. Besides the two-way memory effect, the training processes can also cause changes such as a shift of the transformation temperatures. In this work a calorimetric investigation of a one-way and two-way NiTi memory alloy is presented. The heat flow was measured by use of a Differential Scanning Calorimeter. The differences in the temperatures and enthalpy of transformations between one-way and two-way memory samples are presented, compared and discussed. A mathematical prediction of the heat and temperatures of transformation is presented.

  18. A micromachined calorimetric gas sensor: an application of electrodeposited nanostructured palladium for the detection of combustible gases.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Philip N; Guerin, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    Palladium films with regular nanoarchitectures were electrochemically deposited from the hexagonal (H1) lyotropic liquid crystalline phase of the nonionic surfactant octaethyleneglycol monohexadecyl ether (C16EO8) onto micromachined silicon hotplate structures. The H1-e Pd films were shown to have high surface areas (approximately 28 m2 g(-1)) and to act as effective and stable catalysts for the detection of methane in air on heating to 500 degrees C. The response of the H1-e Pd-coated planar pellistors was found to be linearly proportional to the concentration of methane between 0 and 2.5% in air with a detection limit below 0.125%. Our results show that the electrochemical deposition of nanostructured metal films offers a promising approach to the fabrication of micromachined calorimetric gas sensors for combustible gases. PMID:12530828

  19. Comparative dose evaluations between XVI and OBI cone beam CT systems using Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot optical stimulated luminescence dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Giaddui, Tawfik; Cui Yunfeng; Galvin, James; Yu Yan; Xiao Ying

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of energy (kVp) and filters (no filter, half Bowtie, and full Bowtie) on the dose response curves of the Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot optical stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in CBCT dose fields. To measure surface and internal doses received during x-ray volume imager (XVI) (Version R4.5) and on board imager (OBI) (Version 1.5) CBCT imaging protocols using these two types of dosimeters. Methods: Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot OSLD dose response curves were generated at different kV imaging settings used by XVI (software version R4.5) and OBI (software version 1.5) CBCT systems. The settings for the XVI system were: 100 kVp/F0 (no filter), 120 kVp/F0, and 120 kVp/F1 (Bowtie filter), and for the OBI system were: 100 kVp/full fan, 125 kVp/full fan, and 125 kVp/half fan. XRQA2 film was calibrated in air to air kerma levels between 0 and 11 cGy and scanned using reflection scanning mode with the Epson Expression 10000 XL flat-bed document scanner. NanoDot OSLDs were calibrated on phantom to surface dose levels between 0 and 14 cGy and read using the inLight{sup TM} MicroStar reader. Both dosimeters were used to measure in field surface and internal doses in a male Alderson Rando Phantom. Results: Dose response curves of XRQA2 film and nanoDot OSLDs at different XVI and OBI CBCT settings were reported. For XVI system, the surface dose ranged between 0.02 cGy in head region during fast head and neck scan and 4.99 cGy in the chest region during symmetry scan. On the other hand, the internal dose ranged between 0.02 cGy in the head region during fast head and neck scan and 3.17 cGy in the chest region during chest M20 scan. The average (internal and external) dose ranged between 0.05 cGy in the head region during fast head and neck scan and 2.41 cGy in the chest region during chest M20 scan. For OBI system, the surface dose ranged between 0.19 cGy in head region during head scan and 4.55 cGy in the pelvis region during spot light scan. However, the internal dose ranged between 0.47 cGy in the head region during head scan and 5.55 cGy in the pelvis region during spot light scan. The average (internal and external) dose ranged between 0.45 cGy in the head region during head scan and 3.59 cGy in the pelvis region during spot light scan. Both Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot OSLDs gave close estimation of dose (within uncertainties) in many cases. Though, discrepancies of up to 20%-30% were observed in some cases. Conclusions: Dose response curves of Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot OSLDs indicated that the dose responses of these two dosimeters were different even at the same photon energy when different filters were used. Uncertainty levels of both dosimetry systems were below 6% at doses above 1 cGy. Both dosimetry systems gave almost similar estimation of doses (within uncertainties) in many cases, with exceptions of some cases when the discrepancy was around 20%-30%. New versions of the CBCT systems (investigated in this study) resulted in lower imaging doses compared with doses reported on earlier versions in previous studies.

  20. Minerals from Macedonia. XVI. Vibrational spectra of some common appearing pyroxenes and pyroxenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makreski, Petre; Jovanovski, Gligor; Gajović, Andreja; Biljan, Tomislav; Angelovski, Dejan; Jaćimović, Radojko

    2006-05-01

    Vibrational spectra of three pyroxenes: augite, (Ca,Na)(Mg,Fe,Mn,Al)(Si,Al) 2O 6, ferrojohannsenite, Ca(Fe,Mn)Si 2O 6 and carpholite, MnAl 2Si 2O 6(OH) 4 as well as two pyroxenoids: rhodonite, (Mn,Ca)MnSi 2O 6 and bustamite, (Ca,Mn,Fe) 3Si 3O 9 were described and interpreted. The spectral behaviour was discussed in terms of their common structural characteristics since the pyroxenoids differ from pyroxenes by having distorted or twisted tetrahedral SiO 4 chains. It results with the subtle differences in the IR spectra mostly pronounced in the 800-650 cm -1 region. The bands in this region could serve as an indication about the number of the tetrahedra in repeating unit. The existence of the Raman counterparts of the IR bands (so called IR-Raman doublets) were observed although the centre of inversion is present in the structures of the minerals. It was explained by the existence of TOT I-strips in the structures whose stacking sequence symmetry dominates over the crystal symmetry and determines the symmetry and the activity of the normal modes.

  1. Oral Histories in Meteoritics and Planetary Science--XVI: Grenville Turner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Derek W. G.

    2012-03-01

    In this interview, Grenville Turner (Fig. 1) recounts how he became interested in meteorites during postdoctoral research with John Reynolds at the University of California, Berkeley, after completing a DPhil with Ken Mayne at the University of Oxford. At Berkeley, he worked on xenon isotopes with fellow students Bob Pepin and Craig Merrihue, but Reynolds' insistence that they analyze all the inert gases in their samples meant that they also made important contributions to Ne isotope studies and potassium-argon dating leading to the Ar-Ar technique. In 1964, Grenville obtained a teaching position at the University of Sheffield where he developed his own laboratory for inert gas isotope measurements. After the return of samples from the Moon by the Apollo program, he became involved in determining the chronology of volcanism and major impacts on the Moon. In 1988, Grenville and his team moved to the University of Manchester as part of a national reorganization of earth science departments. During the post Apollo years, Grenville's interest turned to the development of new instrumentation (resonance ionization mass spectrometry and the ion microprobe), and to problems in terrestrial isotope geochemistry, particularly the source of inert gases in fluid inclusions. He received the Leonard Medal of the Meteoritical Society in 1999, and he has also received awards from the Royal Society, the European Association of Geochemistry, and the Royal Astronomical Society.

  2. XVI Workshop on High Energy Spin Physics (D-SPIN2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednicky, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Dear Colleagues, Ladies and Gentlemen, on behalf of the Directorate of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) it is a pleasure for me to welcome you here to Dubna for the 16th International Workshop on High Energy Spin Physics. It provides an opportunity to present and discuss the news accumulated during last year. Another important feature of this series of workshops has always been the participation of a large number of physicists from the former Soviet Union and Eastern European countries, for which long trips have previously been limited by financial (and earlier also by bureaucratic) reasons. It thus represents an important addition to the series of large International Symposia on spin physics held in even-numbered years in different countries, including the Symposium held in Dubna in 2012. JINR has a long-lasting tradition of experimental and theoretical studies of spin phenomena. The workshops on high energy spin physics started in Dubna in 1981 due to the initiative of L. Lapidus, an outstanding theoretical physicist. Since then, these meetings have been held in Dubna in every odd year and have become regular thanks to Anatoly Vasilievich Efremov, the chairman for many years. Recent years have brought a lot of new experimental results, and above all the discovery and determination of quantum characteristics of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider.

  3. Studies of molybdena-alumina catalysts XVI. Effect of high-temperature sulfiding

    SciTech Connect

    Miciukiewicz, J. ); Massoth, F.E. )

    1989-10-01

    Candia et. al. recently reported an increase in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) activity of CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts sulfided at 600 C. They attributed the increase in activity to a more active CoMoS phase (Type II) compared to the regular Type I CoMoS phase found in catalysts sulfided at 400 C. Breysse et. al. found a similar effect with NiW/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Prada Silvy et. al., however, reported no change in HDS activity in sulfiding CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts up to 700 C. In these studies, sintering of the support occurred due to the higher sulfiding temperatures employed compared with the original calcining temperature of the catalyst ({approximately}500 C). The authors decided to determine the effect of sulfiding temperature on the HDS and hydrogenation (HYD) activity of Mo and CoMo catalysts on an alumina support stabilized by calcining at a higher temperature than that used in the sulfiding treatments in order to avoid the complications due to support sintering during sulfiding. The catalysts were sulfided at 400, 550, or 700 C. Sulfided catalysts were characterized by CO{sub 2} and NO chemisorption using a pulse technique. At least duplicate measurements were made on each sample. Catalytic activities for HDS of thiophene and HYD of hexene were carried out at 350 C and under atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed reactor. Pseudo first-order rate constants were calculated from conversions.

  4. Non-exponential nature of calorimetric and other relaxations: Effects of 2 nm-size solutes, loss of translational diffusion, isomer specificity, and sample size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.; Khouri, J.

    2013-03-01

    Certain distributions of relaxation times can be described in terms of a non-exponential response parameter, β, of value between 0 and 1. Both β and the relaxation time, τ0, of a material depend upon the probe used for studying its dynamics and the value of β is qualitatively related to the non-Arrhenius variation of viscosity and τ0. A solute adds to the diversity of an intermolecular environment and is therefore expected to reduce β, i.e., to increase the distribution and to change τ0. We argue that the calorimetric value βcal determined from the specific heat [Cp = T(dS/dT)p] data is a more appropriate measure of the distribution of relaxation times arising from configurational fluctuations than β determined from other properties, and report a study of βcal of two sets of binary mixtures, each containing a different molecule of ˜2 nm size. We find that βcal changes monotonically with the composition, i.e., solute molecules modify the nano-scale composition and may increase or decrease τ0, but do not always decrease βcal. (Plots of βcal against the composition do not show a minimum.) We also analyze the data from the literature, and find that (i) βcal of an orientationally disordered crystal is less than that of its liquid, (ii) βcal varies with the isomer's nature, and chiral centers in a molecule decrease βcal, and (iii) βcal decreases when a sample's thickness is decreased to the nm-scale. After examining the difference between βcal and β determined from other properties we discuss the consequences of our findings for theories of non-exponential response, and suggest that studies of βcal may be more revealing of structure-freezing than studies of the non-Arrhenius behavior. On the basis of previous reports that β → 1 for dielectric relaxation of liquids of centiPoise viscosity observed at GHz frequencies, we argue that its molecular mechanism is the same as that of the Johari-Goldstein (JG) relaxation. Its spectrum becomes broader on cooling and its unimodal distribution reversibly changes to a bimodal distribution, each of β < 1. Kinetic freezing of the slower modes of the bimodal distribution produces a glass. After this bifurcation, the faster, original relaxation persists as a weak JG relaxation at T → Tg, and in the glassy state.

  5. Protonation and Complexation of Isosaccharinic Acid with U(VI) and Fe(III) in Acidic Solutions: Potentiometric and Calorimetric Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Linfeng; Garnov, A Y.; Rai, Dhanpat; Xia, Yuanxian; Moore, R C.

    2004-12-01

    Protonation and complexation of {alpha}-isosaccharinic acid with U(VI) and Fe(III) have been studied in acidic solutions at t=25 C and I=1.0 mol dm{sup -3} NaClO{sub 4}. From the potentiometric titrations, the protonation constant of the carboxylate group is calculated to be 3.65 {+-} 0.05 and the data are consistent with the presence of three and four successive mononuclear complexes for U(VI) and Fe(III), respectively. The formation constants of the complexes, log {beta}{sub j}for the reactions of M+L=ML{sub j} where j=1-3 for U(VI), j=1-4 for Fe(III) and L stands for isosaccharinate, are determined to be 2.91 {+-} 0.15 (UO{sub 2}L), 5.37 {+-} 0.07 (UO{sub 2}L{sub 2}), 7.25 {+-} 0.18 (UO{sub 2}L{sub 3}), 5.06 {+-} 0.17 (FeL), 8.51 {+-} 0.15 (FeL{sub 2}), 11.00 {+-} 0.16 (FeL{sub 3}), and 12.99 {+-} 0.17 (FeL{sub 4}). From the calorimetric titrations, the enthalpy of protonation of the carboxylate group is determined to be -(7.94 {+-} 0.03)kJ mol{sup -1}, similar to that of other ?-hydroxycarboxylates. The enthalpies of complexation between U(VI) and isosaccharinate are quite small: {Delta} H{sub 1} = -(1.0 {+-} 1.0)kJ mol{sup -1}, {Delta} H{sub 2}=1.4 {+-} 1.8 kJ mol{sup -1} and {Delta} H{sub 3}=-(6.2 {+-} 3.0)kJ mol{sup -1}, typical of the interactions between carboxylates and hard-acid cations. The complexation between U(VI) and isosaccharinate is mainly entropy-driven. In comparison, the enthalpies of complexation for FeL{sub 3} and FeL{sub 4} are large and exothermic, contributing significantly to the stability of the complexes.

  6. Calorimetric and thermomechanical properties of titanium-based orthodontic wires: DSC-DMA relationship to predict the elastic modulus.

    PubMed

    Laino, Giuliana; De Santis, Roberto; Gloria, Antonio; Russo, Teresa; Quintanilla, David Suárez; Laino, Alberto; Martina, Roberto; Nicolais, Luigi; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2012-03-01

    Orthodontic treatment is strongly dependent on the loads developed by metal wires, and the choice of an orthodontic archwire should be based on its mechanical performance. The desire of both orthodontists and engineers would be to predict the mechanical behavior of archwires. To this aim, Gum Metal (Toyota Central R&L Labs., Inc.), TMA (ORMCO), 35°C Copper NiTi (SDS ORMCO), Thermalloy Plus (Rocky Mountain), Nitinol SE (3M Unitek), and NiTi (SDS ORMCO) were tested according to dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. A model was also developed to predict the elastic modulus of superelastic wires. Results from experimental tests have highlighted that superelastic wires are very sensitive to temperature variations occurring in the oral environment, while the proposed model seems to be reliable to predict the Young's modulus allowing to correlate calorimetric and mechanical data. Furthermore, Gum Metal wire behaves as an elastic material with a very low Young's modulus, and it can be particularly useful for the initial stage of orthodontic treatments. PMID:21343211

  7. Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors for X-Ray Spectroscopy on Trapped Highly-Charged Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Ilieva, S.; Kilbourne, C.; McCammon, D.

    2012-01-01

    The application of Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors (CLTDs) has been proposed at the Heavy-Ion TRAP facility HITRAP which is currently being installed at the Helmholtz Research Center for Heavy Ion Research GSI. This cold ion trap setup will allow the investigation of X-rays from ions practically at rest, for which the excellent energy resolution of CLTDs can be used to its full advantage. However, the relatively low intensities at HITRAP demand larger solid angles and an optimized cryogenic setup. The influence of external magnetic fields has to be taken into account. CLTDs will also be a substantial part of the instrumental equipment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Heavy Ion Research (FAIR), for which a wide variety of high-precision X-ray spectroscopy experiments has been proposed. This contribution will give an overview on the chances and challenges for the application of CLTDs at HITRAP as well as perspectives for future experiments at the FAIR facility.

  8. Thermogravimetric, Calorimetric, and Structural Studies of the Co3 O4 /CoO Oxidation/Reduction Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Karl; Cichocki, Ronald; Kelly, Brian; Poirier, Gerald

    2015-03-01

    To better assess the potential of cobalt oxide for thermal energy storage (TES), the Co3O4/CoO oxidation/reduction reaction has been studied by thermogravimetric (TGA), calorimetric (DSC), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in N2 and atmospheric air environments. TGA measurements showed an abrupt mass loss of about 6.6% in both N2 and air, consistent with the stoichiometric reduction of Co3O4 to CoO and structural measurements. The onset temperature of the reduction of Co3O4 in air was only weakly dependent on the sample heating rate and occurred at about 910 C. The onset temperature for the oxidation of CoO varied between about 850 and 875 C for cooling rates between 1 and 20 C/min, but complete re-conversion to Co3O4 could only be achieved at the slowest cooling rates. Due to the dependence of the rate constant on the oxygen partial pressure, the oxidation of Co3O4 in a N2 environment occurred at temperatures between about 775 and 825 C for heating rates between 1 and 20 C/min and no subsequent re-oxidation of the reduced Co3O4 was observed on cooling to room temperature. In conjunction with a measured transition heat of about 600 J/g of Co3O4, these measurements indicate that cobalt oxide is a viable TES material.

  9. pH-tuneable binding of 2′-phospho-ADP-ribose to ketopantoate reductase: a structural and calorimetric study

    SciTech Connect

    Ciulli, Alessio; Lobley, Carina M. C.; Tuck, Kellie L.; Smith, Alison G.; Blundell, Tom L.; Abell, Chris

    2007-02-01

    A combined crystallographic, calorimetric and mutagenic study has been used to show how changes in pH give rise to two distinct binding modes of 2′-phospho-ADP-ribose to ketopantoate reductase. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli ketopantoate reductase in complex with 2′-monophosphoadenosine 5′-diphosphoribose, a fragment of NADP{sup +} that lacks the nicotinamide ring, is reported. The ligand is bound at the enzyme active site in the opposite orientation to that observed for NADP{sup +}, with the adenine ring occupying the lipophilic nicotinamide pocket. Isothermal titration calorimetry with R31A and N98A mutants of the enzyme is used to show that the unusual ‘reversed binding mode’ observed in the crystal is triggered by changes in the protonation of binding groups at low pH. This research has important implications for fragment-based approaches to drug design, namely that the crystallization conditions and the chemical modification of ligands can have unexpected effects on the binding modes.

  10. Introduction of Differential Scanning Calorimetry in a General Chemistry Laboratory Course: Determination of Thermal Properties of Organic Hydrocarbons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amelia, Ronald; Franks, Thomas; Nirode, William F.

    2007-01-01

    In first-year general chemistry undergraduate courses, thermodynamics and thermal properties such as melting points and changes in enthalpy ([Delta]H) and entropy ([Delta]S) of phase changes are frequently discussed. Typically, classical calorimetric methods of analysis are used to determine [Delta]H of reactions. Differential scanning calorimetry…

  11. Introduction of Differential Scanning Calorimetry in a General Chemistry Laboratory Course: Determination of Thermal Properties of Organic Hydrocarbons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amelia, Ronald; Franks, Thomas; Nirode, William F.

    2007-01-01

    In first-year general chemistry undergraduate courses, thermodynamics and thermal properties such as melting points and changes in enthalpy ([Delta]H) and entropy ([Delta]S) of phase changes are frequently discussed. Typically, classical calorimetric methods of analysis are used to determine [Delta]H of reactions. Differential scanning calorimetry

  12. Calorimetric and thermodielectrical measurements of water interactions with some food materials.

    PubMed

    Ollivon, M R

    1991-01-01

    A new thermoanalytical method, which allows the measurement of complex dielectrical permittivities as a function of temperature in the microwave frequency domain, is described and compared to Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) with respect to the characterization of water in food materials. Ice crystallization temperatures and melting enthalpies, measured by DSC dynamically on the same sample, allowed precise determination of the amount of frozen water and its enthalpy as a function of total water content, especially at low water contents near the unfrozen water limit. Thermal and Dielectrical Analysis (TDA) measurements provide immediate information about water interactions in food materials, even down to the lowest water contents, which are generally difficult to assess by other techniques. Dielectrical behaviour of eight glucose-water melts, containing from 0 to 24% water, has been examined as a function of temperature. The dependence of the observed dielectric relaxations on water content and temperature are discussed, and the results obtained by TDA are compared to those from conventional frequency sweeping determinations. The influence of temperature, hydration, and state of the material on dielectrical relaxation determinations are also discussed, with reference to glucose and sorbitol behaviour. The variations in dielectric constant during starch heating and dehydration are presented and analysed, with the aim of understanding the microwave drying process. PMID:1746326

  13. Acyclic diterpene glycosides, capsianosides VIII, IX, X, XIII, XV and XVI from the fruits of Paprika Capsicum annuum L. var. grossum BAILEY and Jalapeño Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Hyun; Kiyota, Naoko; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Nohara, Toshihiro

    2006-10-01

    Paprika and Jalapeño are used as vegetables and spices. We have obtained six new acyclic diterpene glycosides, called capsianosides XIII (2), XV (3), IX (4), XVI (5), X (6) and VIII (7) together with known capsianoside II (1) from the fruits of the Paprika and Jalapeño. The structures of these compounds have been elucidated by the (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra and two-dimensional NMR methods. PMID:17015971

  14. Calorimetric investigation of triazole-bridged Fe(II) spin-crossover one-dimensional materials: measuring the cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Roubeau, Olivier; Castro, Miguel; Burriel, Ramón; Haasnoot, Jaap G; Reedijk, Jan

    2011-03-31

    The relevance of abrupt magnetic and optical transitions exhibiting bistability in spin-crossover solids has been pointed out for their potential applications in optical or memory devices. In this respect, triazole-based one-dimensional coordination polymers are widely recognized as one of the most interesting systems. The measure of the interaction among spin-crossover centers at the origin of such cooperative behavior is of paramount importance and has so far been realized through modeling of spin-crossover curves derived mostly from magnetic measurements. Here, a new series of triazole-based one-dimensional coordination polymers of formula [Fe(Rtrz)(3)](A)(2)·xH(2)O with R = methoxyethyl and A = monovalent anion has been prepared that show complete and abrupt spin-crossover phenomenon as shown by magnetic measurements. The spin-crossover transition in these and related compounds is studied by differential scanning calorimetry, and the thermodynamic excess enthalpies and entropies associated with the phenomenon are derived systematically. Then the cooperative character of the spin-crossover in these materials is quantified by use of two widely used models, so-called Slichter and Drickamer and domain models. The same procedure is applied to spin-crossover curves of similar compounds available in the literature and for which calorimetric studies have been reported. The experimental thermodynamic figures, in particular the excess enthalpies, are shown to be clearly correlated to the output parameters of both models, thus providing a direct, experimental, quantitative measure of the cooperative character of the spin-crossover phenomenon. PMID:21381636

  15. Calorimetric and spectroscopic studies on solvation energetics for H2 storage in the CO2/HCOOH system.

    PubMed

    Fink, Cornel; Katsyuba, Sergey; Laurenczy, Gabor

    2016-04-20

    Solvents playing a crucial role in many chemical reactions and additives can be used to shift the reaction equilibrium. Herein we study the enthalpy of mixing for selected solvents (aqueous, organic) and basic additives (amines, aqueous KOH) when mixed with formic acid with the aim to optimize hydrogen storage/delivery in the CO2/HCOOH system. Formic acid, resulting from carbon dioxide hydrogenation, reaches highest yields when effectively "removed" from the reaction equilibrium. In terms of energy efficiency, any heat released during CO2 hydrogenation has to be reused in the reverse reaction, during the production of hydrogen. In any scenario, the usage of basic chemicals, non-innocent solvents, causes higher energy release in CO2 hydrogenation, which has to be reused in the hydrogen delivery process. Therefore, the enthalpy of mixing is a valuable parameter for designing hydrogen storage devices since it allows the estimation of energy balance for the CO2 hydrogenation/H2 liberation cycle. The highest formic acid concentrations in direct catalytic CO2 hydrogenation under acidic conditions were reached in DMSO. DMSO exhibits considerably stronger interactions with formic acid compared to water as was observed in calorimetric measurements. This difference can be ascribed, at least partly, to stronger hydrogen bonding of FA to DMSO than to water in the corresponding solutions, examined by a combination of IR spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies. Furthermore, the investigation of DMSO/FA- and water/FA systems by (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy revealed that only 1 : 1 aggregates are formed in the DMSO solutions of FA in a broad concentration range, while the stoichiometry and the number of the FA-water aggregates essentially depend on the concentration of aqueous solutions. PMID:26890151

  16. Spectroscopic and calorimetric studies on the binding of an indoloquinoline drug to parallel and antiparallel DNA triplexes.

    PubMed

    Riechert-Krause, Fanny; Autenrieth, Karolin; Eick, Andrea; Weisz, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    11-Phenyl-substituted indoloquinolines have been found to exhibit significant antiproliferative potency in cancer cells but to show only moderate affinity toward genomic double-helical DNA. In this study, parallel as well as antiparallel triple-helical DNA targets are employed to evaluate the triplex binding of these ligands. UV melting experiments with parallel triplexes indicate considerable interactions with the drug and a strong preference for TAT-rich triplexes in line with an increasing number of potential intercalation sites of similar binding strength between two TAT base triads. Via substitution of a singly charged aminoethylamine side chain by a longer and doubly charged bis(aminopropyl)amine substituent at the ligand, binding affinities increase and also start to exhibit long-range effects as indicated by a strong correlation between the binding affinity and the overall length of the TAT tract within the triplex stem. Compared to parallel triplexes, an antiparallel triplex with a GT-containing third strand constitutes a preferred target for the indoloquinoline drug. On the basis of pH-dependent titration experiments and corroborated by a Job analysis of continuous variation, binding of the drug to the GT triplex not only is strongly enhanced when the solution pH is lowered from 7 to 5 but also reveals a pH-dependent stoichiometry upon formation of the complex. Calorimetric data demonstrate that stronger binding of a protonated drug at acidic pH is associated with a more exothermic binding process. However, at pH 7 and 5, binding is enthalpically driven with additional favorable entropic contributions. PMID:23234257

  17. Localized Recrystallization in Cast Al-Si-Mg Alloy during Solution Heat Treatment: Dilatometric and Calorimetric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, S. K.; Warke, V.; Shankar, S.; Apelian, D.

    2011-10-01

    During heat treatment, the work piece experiences a range of heating rates depending upon the sizes and types of furnace. When the Al-Si-Mg cast alloy is heated to the solutionizing temperature, recrystallization takes place during the ramp-up stage. The effect of heating rate on recrystallization in the A356 (Al-Si-Mg) alloy was studied using dilatometric and calorimetric methods. Recrystallization in as-cast Al-Si alloys is a localized event and is confined to the elasto-plastic zone surrounding the eutectic Si phase; there is no evidence of recrystallization in the center of the primary Al dendritic region. The size of the elasto-plastic zone is of the same order of magnitude as the Si particles, and recrystallized grains are observed in the elasto-plastic region near the Si particles. The coefficient of thermal expansion of Al is an order of magnitude greater than Si, and thermal stresses are generated due to the thermal mismatch between the Al phase and Si particles providing the driving force for recrystallization. In contrast, recrystallization in Al wrought alloy (7075) occurs uniformly throughout the matrix, stored energy due to cold work being the driving force for recrystallization in wrought alloys. The activation energy for recrystallization in as-cast A356 alloy is 127 KJ/mole. At a slow heating rate of 4.3 K/min, creep occurs during the heating stage of solution heat treatment. However, creep does not occur in samples heated at higher heating rates, namely, 520, 130, and 17.3 K/min.

  18. Structure-energy relationship in barbituric acid: a calorimetric, computational, and crystallographic study.

    PubMed

    Roux, María Victoria; Temprado, Manuel; Notario, Rafael; Foces-Foces, Concepción; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Verevkin, Sergey P

    2008-08-14

    This paper reports the value of the standard (p(o) = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation in the gas phase at T = 298.15 K for barbituric acid. The enthalpies of combustion and sublimation were measured by static bomb combustion calorimetry and transference (transpiration) method in a saturated N2 stream and a gas-phase enthalpy of formation value of -(534.3 +/- 1.7) kJ x mol(-1) was determined at T = 298.15 K. G3-calculated enthalpies of formation are in very good agreement with the experimental value. The behavior of the sample as a function of the temperature was studied by differential scanning calorimetry, and a new polymorph of barbituric acid at high temperature was found. In the solid state, two anhydrous forms are known displaying two out of the six hydrogen-bonding patterns observed in the alkyl/alkenyl derivatives retrieved from the Cambridge Crystallographic Database. The stability of these motifs has been analyzed by theoretical calculations. X-ray powder diffraction technique was used to establish to which polymorphic form corresponds to the commercial sample used in this study and to characterize the new form at high temperature. PMID:18646743

  19. Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC) Analysis of Rotary Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) Endodontic File (RNEF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ray Chun Tung; Chung, C. Y.

    2012-12-01

    To determine the variation of A f along the axial length of rotary nickel-titanium endodontic files (RNEF). Three commercial brands of 4% taper RNEF: GTX (#20, 25 mm, Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK, USA), K3 (#25, 25 mm) and TF (Twisted File #25, 27 mm) (Sybron Kerr, Orange, CA, USA) were cut into segments at 4 mm increment from the working tip. Regional specimens were measured for differential heat-flow over thermal cycling, generally with continuous heating or cooling (5 °C/min) and 5 min hold at set temperatures (start, finish temperatures): GTX: -55, 90 °C; K3: -55, 45 °C; TF: -55, 60 °C; using differential scanning calorimeter. This experiment demonstrated regional differences in A f along the axial length of GTX and K3 files. Similar variation was not obvious in the TF samples. A contributory effect of regional difference in strain-hardening due to grinding and machining during manufacturing is proposed.

  20. Calorimetric studies of Cu–Li, Li–Sn, and Cu–Li–Sn

    PubMed Central

    Fürtauer, S.; Tserenjav, E.; Yakymovych, A.; Flandorfer, H.

    2013-01-01

    Integral molar enthalpies of mixing were determined by drop calorimetry for Cu–Li–Sn at 1073 K along five sections xCu/xSn ≈ 1:1, xCu/xSn ≈ 2:3, xCu/xSn ≈ 1:4, xLi/xSn ≈ 1:1, and xLi/xSn ≈ 1:4. The integral and partial molar mixing enthalpies of Cu–Li and Li–Sn were measured at the same temperature, for Li–Sn in addition at 773 K. All binary data could be described by Redlich–Kister-polynomials. Cu–Li shows an endothermic mixing effect with a maximum in the integral molar mixing enthalpy of ∼5300 J · mol−1 at xCu = 0.5, Li–Sn an exothermic minimum of ∼ −37,000 J · mol−1 at xSn ∼ 0.2. For Li–Sn no significant temperature dependence between 773 K and 1073 K could be deduced. Our measured ternary data were fitted on the basis of an extended Redlich–Kister–Muggianu model for substitutional solutions. Additionally, a comparison of these results to the extrapolation model of Chou is given. PMID:23814314

  1. Calorimetric studies of Cu-Li, Li-Sn, and Cu-Li-Sn.

    PubMed

    Fürtauer, S; Tserenjav, E; Yakymovych, A; Flandorfer, H

    2013-06-01

    Integral molar enthalpies of mixing were determined by drop calorimetry for Cu-Li-Sn at 1073 K along five sections x Cu/x Sn ≈ 1:1, x Cu/x Sn ≈ 2:3, x Cu/x Sn ≈ 1:4, x Li/x Sn ≈ 1:1, and x Li/x Sn ≈ 1:4. The integral and partial molar mixing enthalpies of Cu-Li and Li-Sn were measured at the same temperature, for Li-Sn in addition at 773 K. All binary data could be described by Redlich-Kister-polynomials. Cu-Li shows an endothermic mixing effect with a maximum in the integral molar mixing enthalpy of ∼5300 J · mol(-1) at x Cu = 0.5, Li-Sn an exothermic minimum of ∼ -37,000 J · mol(-1) at x Sn ∼ 0.2. For Li-Sn no significant temperature dependence between 773 K and 1073 K could be deduced. Our measured ternary data were fitted on the basis of an extended Redlich-Kister-Muggianu model for substitutional solutions. Additionally, a comparison of these results to the extrapolation model of Chou is given. PMID:23814314

  2. Thermodynamic properties of autunite, uranyl hydrogen phosphate, and uranyl orthophosphate from solubility and calorimetric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Shareva, Tatiana; kubatko, Karrie-Ann; burns, Peter; Wellman, Dawn M.; McNamara, Bruce K.; szymanowski, jennifer; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2009-10-01

    In this study, we use solubility and oxide melt solution calorimetry measurements to determine the thermodynamic properties of the uranyl phosphate phases autunite (abbreviated: CaUP), uranyl hydrogen phosphate (HUP), and uranyl orthophosphate (UP). Solubility measurements from both supersaturated and undersaturated conditions, as well as under different pH conditions, rigorously demonstrate attainment of equilibrium and yield well-constrained solubility product values of -48.36 (-0.03 /+ 0.03), -13.17 (-0.11 / +0.07), and -49.36 (-0.04 / +0.02) for CaUP, HUP, and UP, respectively. We use the solubility data to calculate standard state Gibbs free energies of formation for all phases (-7630.61 ± 9.69, -3072.27 ± 4.76, and -6138.95 ± 12.24 kJ mol-1 for CaUP, HUP, and UP, respectively), and calorimetry data to calculate standard state enthalpies of formation of -3223.22 ± 4.00 and -7001.01 ± 15.10 kJ mol-1 for HUP and UP, respectively. Combining these results allows us also to calculate the standard state entropies of formation of -506.54 ± 10.48 and -2893.12 ± 19.44 kJ mol-1 K-1 for HUP and UP phases, respectively. The results from this study are part of a combined effort to develop reliable and internally consistent thermodynamic data for environmentally relevant uranyl minerals. Data such as these are required in order to optimize and quantitatively assess the effect of phosphate amendment remediation technologies for uranium contaminated systems.

  3. Thermochemistry of alkyl pyridinium bromide ionic liquids: calorimetric measurements and calculations.

    PubMed

    Tong, Bo; Liu, Qing-Shan; Tan, Zhi-Cheng; Welz-Biermann, Urs

    2010-03-25

    Two ionic liquids, 1-ethylpyridinium bromide (EPBr) and 1-propylpyridinium bromide (PPBr), were prepared and the structures were characterized by 1H NMR. The thermodynamic properties of EPBr and PPBr were studied with adiabatic calorimetry (AC) and thermogravimatric analysis (TG-DTG). The heat capacity was precisely measured in the temperature range from 78 to 410 K by means of a fully automated adiabatic calorimeter. For EPBr, the melting temperature, enthalpy, and entropy of solid-liquid phase transition were determined to be 391.31 +/- 0.28 K, 12.77 +/- 0.09 kJ x mol(-1), and 32.63 +/- 0.22 J x K(-1) x mol(-1), respectively, and for PPBr they were 342.83 +/- 0.69 K, 10.97 +/- 0.05 kJ x mol(-1), and 32.00 +/- 0.10 J x K(-1) x mol(-1), respectively. The thermodynamic functions (H(T)(0) - H(298.15)(0)) and (S(T)(0) - S(298.15)(0)) were derived from the heat capacity data in the experimental temperature range with an interval of 5 K. The thermostablility of the compounds was further studied by TGA measurements. The phase change behavior and thermodynamic properties were compared and estimated in a series of alkyl pyridinium bromide ionic liquids. Results indicate that EPBr has higher melting and decomposition temperature, as well as phase transition enthalpy and entropy but lower heat capacity than PPBr due to their different molecular structures. PMID:20235601

  4. Synthesis, calorimetric, structural and conductivity studies in a new thallium selenate tellurate adduct compound

    SciTech Connect

    Ktari, L.; Abdelhedi, M.; Bouhlel, N.; Dammak, M.; Cousson, A.

    2009-08-05

    The crystal structure of the thallium selenate tellurate Tl{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}.Te(OH){sub 6} (TlSeTe) was determined by X-ray diffraction method. The title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system with P2{sub 1}/c space group. The following parameters are: a = 12.358(3) A; b = 7.231(1) A; c = 11.986(2) A; {beta} = 111.092(2){sup o}; Z = 4. The structure can be regarded as being built of isolated TeO{sub 6} octahedra and SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra. The Tl{sup +} cations are intercalated between these kinds of polyhedra. The main feature of this structure is the coexistence of two different and independent anions (SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and TeO{sub 6}{sup 6-}) in the same unit cell. The structure is stable due to O-H...O hydrogen bonds which link tetrahedral and octahedral groups. Crystals of Tl{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}.Te(OH){sub 6} undergo three endothermal transitions at 373, 395 and 437 K. These transitions are detected by DSC and analyzed by dielectric measurements with impedance spectroscopy. The evolution of conductivity versus temperature showed the presence of a protonic conduction phase transition at 437 K. The phase transition at 373 K can be related to a structural phase transition, whereas the one at 395 K is ascribed as likely due to a ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition.

  5. Calorimetric and x-ray diffraction studies of rye glucocerebroside mesomorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, D. V.; Caffrey, M.; Hogan, J. L.; Steponkus, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    Glucocerebrosides (GlcCer) isolated from the leaves of winter rye (Secale cereale L. cv Puma) differ from the more commonly investigated natural and synthetic cerebrosides, in that greater than 95% of the fatty acids are saturated and monounsaturated hydroxy fatty acids. Isomers of the trihydroxy long chain base hydroxysphingenine (t1(8:18 cis or trans)) and isomers of sphingadienine (d18:2(4trans, 8 cis or trans)) comprise 77% and 17%, respectively, of the total long chain bases. The phase behavior of fully hydrated and dry rye leaf GlcCer was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction. On initial heating, aqueous dispersions of GlcCer exhibit a single endothermic transition at 56 degrees C and have an enthalpy (delta H) of 46 J/g. Cooling to 0 degrees C is accompanied by a small exothermic transition (delta H = -8 J/g) at 8 degrees C. On immediate reheating, a broad exothermic transition (delta H = -39 J/g) is observed between 10 and 20 degrees C in addition to a transition at 56 degrees C. These transitions are not reversible, and the exothermic transition rapidly diminishes when the sample is held at low temperature. Using x-ray diffraction, it was determined that the endotherm at 56 degrees C represents a transition from a highly ordered lamellar crystalline phase (Lc) with a d-spacing of 57 A and a series of wide-angle reflections in the 3-10 A range, to a lamellar liquid crystalline (L alpha) phase having a d-spacing of 55 A and a diffuse wide-angle scattering peak centered at 4.7 A. Cooling leads to the formation of a metastable gel phase (L beta) with a d-spacing of 64.0 A and a single broad reflection at 4.28 A. Subsequent warming to above 15 degrees C restores the original Lc phase. Thus, rye GlcCer in excess water exhibit a series of irreversible transitions and gel phase metastability. Dry GlcCer undergo an initial heating endothermic transition at 130 degrees C, which is ascribed to a transformation into the HII phase from a two phase state characterized by the coexistence of phases with disordered (alpha) and helical (delta) type chain conformations but of unknown lattice identity: An exotherm at 67.5 degrees C observed upon subsequent cooling is of unknown origin. Since an undercooled HII phase persists down to 19 degrees C, the exotherm may derive in part from an alpha-to-delta type chain packing conformational change especially under slow cooling conditions. Upon reheating from low temperatures to 65 degrees C, a phase with a two-dimensional, primitive rectangular lattice and delta-like chain packing (R8 phase) in coexistence with the HI, phase emerges. With continued heating to 90 degrees C these coexisting phases give way to a phase with a two-dimensional, centered rectangular lattice and delta-like chain packing (P8phase) which again coexists with the HI, phase. Above 130 degrees C, the Pb phase disappears and the sample converts completely to the HI, phase as observed upon initial heating. These results indicate that the mesomorphic behavior of rye leaf GIcCer is distinct from that of other cerebrosides. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:1600084

  6. Introduction of Differential Scanning Calorimetry in a General Chemistry Laboratory Course: Determination of Heat Capacity of Metals and Demonstration of Law of Dulong and Petit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amelia, Ronald P.; Stracuzzi, Vincent; Nirode, William F.

    2008-01-01

    Today's general chemistry students are introduced to many of the principles and concepts of thermodynamics. In first-year general chemistry undergraduate courses, thermodynamic properties such as heat capacity are frequently discussed. Classical calorimetric methods of analysis and thermal equilibrium experiments are used to determine heat…

  7. Introduction of Differential Scanning Calorimetry in a General Chemistry Laboratory Course: Determination of Heat Capacity of Metals and Demonstration of Law of Dulong and Petit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amelia, Ronald P.; Stracuzzi, Vincent; Nirode, William F.

    2008-01-01

    Today's general chemistry students are introduced to many of the principles and concepts of thermodynamics. In first-year general chemistry undergraduate courses, thermodynamic properties such as heat capacity are frequently discussed. Classical calorimetric methods of analysis and thermal equilibrium experiments are used to determine heat

  8. Trophic relay and prey switching - A stomach contents and calorimetric investigation of an ambassid fish and their saltmarsh prey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, Jack J.; Platell, Margaret E.; Schreider, Maria J.

    2015-12-01

    Trophic relay is an ecological model that involves the movement of biomass and energy from vegetation, such as saltmarshes, within estuaries to the open sea via a series of predator-prey relationships. Any potential for trophic relay is therefore affected by water movements within an estuary and by the ability of a predator to "switch" prey in response to fluctuating abundances of those prey. Saltmarsh-dwelling grapsid crabs, which feed on saltmarsh-derived detritus and microphytobenthos, release zoeae into ebbing tides that inundate saltmarshes during spring-tide cycles within tidally-dominated estuaries, such as Brisbane Water Estuary, therefore providing an opportunity to examine whether prey-switching and/or trophic relay may occur in fish that feed on those zoeae (such as the highly abundant estuarine ambassid, Ambassis jacksoniensis). This model was examined by sampling A. jacksoniensis near saltmarshes in a large, temperate south-eastern Australian estuary during flood and ebb tides on days of saltmarsh inundation and non-inundation over four spring-tide events in 2012. Stomach fullnesses of A. jacksoniensis were generally highest during ebb tides on days of saltmarsh inundation, implying that feeding was most marked at these times. Caridean decapods dominated diets during flood tides and on days of no saltmarsh inundation, while crab zoeae dominated diets during ebb tides and on days of inundation, suggesting that, when saltmarsh-derived zoeae became abundant, A. jacksoniensis switched to feeding on those prey. Three potential zooplankton prey (calanoid copepods, caridean decapods and crab zoeae) did not differ calorimetrically, indicating that switching of prey by A. jacksoniensis is not directly related to their preying on energetically greater prey, but reflects opportunistic feeding on more abundant and/or less elusive prey. As A. jacksoniensis is able to switch prey from estuarine caridean decapods to saltmarsh-derived crab zoeae, this very abundant ambassid would be well-placed to promote any trophic relay, via further water movements or other predator-prey relationships, to the adjacent marine environment.

  9. Calorimetric and Spectroscopic Studies of the Thermotropic Phase Behavior of the n-Saturated 1,2-Diacylphosphatidylglycerols

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan-Peng; Lewis, Ruthven N. A. H.; McElhaney, Ronald N.

    1997-01-01

    The polymorphic phase behavior of a homologous series of n-saturated 1,2-diacyl phosphatidylglycerols (PGs) was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. When dispersed in aqueous media under physiologically relevant conditions, these compounds exhibit two thermotropic phase transitions that are structurally equivalent to the well-characterized pretransitons and gel/liquid-crystalline phase transitions exhibited by bilayers of the corresponding 1,2-diacyl phosphatidylcholines. Furthermore, when incubated at low temperatures, their gel phases spontaneously transform into one or more solid-like phases that appear to be highly ordered, quasicrystalline bilayers that are probably partially dehydrated. The quasicrystalline structures, which form upon short-term, low-temperature annealing of these lipids, are meta-stable with respect to more stable structures, to which they eventually transform upon prolonged low-temperature incubation. The rates of formation of the quasicrystalline phases of the PGs generally tend to decrease as hydrocarbon chain length increases, and PGs whose hydrocarbon chains contain an odd number of carbon atoms tend to be slower than those of neighboring even-numbered homologs. The calorimetric data also indicate that the quasicrystalline phases of these compounds become progressively less stable relative to both their gel and liquid-crystalline phases as the length of the hydrocarbon chain increases and that they decompose either to the liquid-crystalline phase (short- and medium-chain compounds) or to the normal gel phase (long-chain compounds) upon heating. The spectroscopic data indicate that although there is odd-even alternation in the structures of the quasicrystalline phases formed upon short-term low-temperature incubation of these compounds, the structural features of the stable quasicrystalline phases eventually formed are all similar. Furthermore, the degree of hydration and the nature of hydrogen bonding interactions in the headgroup and interfacial regions of these PG bilayers differ significantly from that observed in all other phospholipid bilayers studied so far. We suggest that many of the properties of PG bilayers can be rationalized by postulating that the glycerol moiety of the polar headgroup is directly involved in shielding the negative charges at the surface of the bilayer by means of hydration-like hydrogen bonding interactions with the phosphate moiety. PMID:9017203

  10. Micromechanical calorimetric sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2000-01-01

    A calorimeter sensor apparatus is developed utilizing microcantilevered spring elements for detecting thermal changes within a sample containing biomolecules which undergo chemical and biochemical reactions. The spring element includes a bimaterial layer of chemicals on a coated region on at least one surface of the microcantilever. The chemicals generate a differential thermal stress across the surface upon reaction of the chemicals with an analyte or biomolecules within the sample due to the heat of chemical reactions in the sample placed on the coated region. The thermal stress across the spring element surface creates mechanical bending of the microcantilever. The spring element has a low thermal mass to allow detection and measuring of heat transfers associated with chemical and biochemical reactions within a sample placed on or near the coated region. A second surface may have a different material, or the second surface and body of microcantilever may be of an inert composition. The differential thermal stress between the surfaces of the microcantilever create bending of the cantilever. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers. The microcantilever is extremely sensitive to thermal changes in samples as small as 30 microliters.

  11. Calorimetric Study of Phase Stability and Phase Transformation in U- xZr ( x = 2, 5, 10 wt pct) Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Arun Kumar; Subramanian, Raju; Hajra, Raj Narayan; Tripathy, Haraprasanna; Rengachari, Mythili; Saibaba, Saroja

    2015-11-01

    A comprehensive calorimetric study of high-temperature phase equilibria and phase transformation characteristics in U- xZr ( x = 2, 5, 10 wt pct) alloys has been undertaken, as a function of heating and cooling rates. It is found that the following sequence of phase transformation takes place upon slow heating in annealed U-2 wt pct Zr alloy: α + α' + δ-UZr2 → α + γ 2 → β + γ 2 → β + γ 1 → γ. For alloys of 5 and 10 wt pct Zr, the additional presence of a miscibility gap ( γ 1 U-rich bcc + γ 2 Zr-rich bcc) in the high-temperature γ(bcc) phase region resulted in the following transformation sequence: α + α' + δ-UZr2 → α + γ 2 → β + γ 2 → γ 1 + γ 2 → γ. Further, it has been demonstrated that depending on the nature of starting microstructure, namely whether it is α eq + δ-UZr2, or a mix of α' + α eq + δ-UZr2 phases, the relative extents of two possible co-occurring modes of the first on-heating phase transformation step differ. In case of starting microstructure having mixture of three phases α' + α eq + δ-UZr2, it is found that α'-martensite relaxation via α' + α eq + δ-UZr2 → α eq + δ-UZr2 constitutes the first on-heating thermal response. The α'-martensitic relaxation is very closely followed by the dissolution of δ-UZr2. The co-occurrence of these two events gives rise to a composite thermal arrest in a normal dynamic calorimetry profile. However, if the starting microstructure is the one having the equilibrium mix of α eq and δ-UZr2, then only the peritectoidal dissolution of δ-UZr2 is found in the calorimetry profile. Unless, a very slow cooling rate of the order of 0.1 K min-1 is adopted from high-temperature γ(bcc) phase, it is not possible to obtain 100 pct of α eq phase along with equilibrium amount of δ-UZr2. At normal and high cooling rates, it is possible to suppress the diffusional decomposition of γ to varying extents. The direct γ → α'-martensite transformation has been observed at sufficiently higher cooling rates. It has been also noticed that even after γ → α'-martensite transformation the precipitation of δ-UZr2 phase is possible at lower temperature during non-isothermal cooling. Further, the critical cooling rate required for γ → α' displacive transformation is found to decrease with increasing Zr content. For U-2, 5, and 10 wt pct Zr alloys, it is found to be of the order of, 60, 20, 10 K min-1, respectively. The cooling rate from high-temperature γ(bcc) is found have a strong influence on microstructure evolution as well. The kinetic aspects of α → β diffusional transformation that occurs on heating have been modeled in terms of Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami formalism, and it is found that the transformation is effectively controlled by the diffusion of Zr in α'-orthorhombic phase. Continuous heating and cooling transformation diagrams have also been obtained for U-2 wt pct Zr alloy.

  12. Calorimetric, X-Ray Diffraction, and Spectroscopic Studies of the Thermotropic Phase Behavior and Organization of Tetramyristoyl Cardiolipin Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ruthven N. A. H.; Zweytick, Dagmar; Pabst, Georg; Lohner, Karl; McElhaney, Ronald N.

    2007-01-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior and organization of aqueous dispersions of the quadruple-chained, anionic phospholipid tetramyristoyl diphosphatidylglycerol or tetramyristoyl cardiolipin (TMCL) was studied by differential scanning calorimetry, x-ray diffraction, 31P NMR, and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. At physiological pH and ionic strength, our calorimetric studies indicate that fully equilibrated aqueous dispersions of TMCL exhibit two thermotropic phase transitions upon heating. The lower temperature transition is much less cooperative but of relatively high enthalpy and exhibits marked cooling hysteresis, whereas the higher temperature transition is much more cooperative and also exhibits a relatively high enthalpy but with no appreciable cooling hysteresis. Also, the properties of these two-phase transitions are sensitive to the ionic strength of the dispersing buffer. Our spectroscopic and x-ray diffraction data indicate that the lower temperature transition corresponds to a lamellar subgel (Lc?) to gel (L?) phase transition and the higher temperature endotherm to a L? to lamellar liquid-crystalline (L?) phase transition. At the Lc?/L? phase transition, there is a fivefold increase of the thickness of the interlamellar aqueous space from ?11 to ?50 , and this value decreases slightly at the L?/L? phase transition. The bilayer thickness (i.e., the mean phosphate-phosphate distance across the bilayer) increases from 42.8 to 43.5 at the Lc?/L? phase transition, consistent with the loss of the hydrocarbon chain tilt of ?12, and decreases to 37.8 at the L?/L? phase transition. The calculated cross-sectional areas of the TMCL molecules are ?79 2 and ?83 2 in the Lc? and L? phases, respectively, and we estimate a value of ?100 2 in the L? phase. The combination of x-ray and FTIR spectroscopic data indicate that in the Lc? phase, TMCL molecules possess tilted all-trans hydrocarbon chains packed into an orthorhombic subcell in which the zig-zag planes of the chains are parallel, while in the L? phase the untilted, all-trans hydrocarbon chains possess rotational mobility and are packed into a hexagonal subcell, as are the conformationally disordered hydrocarbon chains in the L? phase. Our FTIR spectroscopic results demonstrate that the four carbonyl groups of the TMCL molecule become progressively more hydrated as one proceeds from the Lc? to the L? and then to the L? phase, while the two phosphate moieties of the polar headgroup are comparably well hydrated in all three phases. Our 31P-NMR results indicate that although the polar headgroup retains some mobility in the Lc? phase, its motion is much more restricted in the L? and especially in the L? phase than that of other phospholipids. We can explain most of our experimental results on the basis of the relatively small size of the polar headgroup of TMCL relative to other phospholipids and the covalent attachment of the two phosphate moieties to a single glycerol moiety, which results in a partially immobilized polar headgroup that is more exposed to the solvent than in other glycerophospholipids. Finally, we discuss the biological relevance of the unique properties of TMCL to the structure and function of cardiolipin-containing biological membranes. PMID:17293402

  13. The Bayer Facts of Science Education XVI: US STEM Workforce Shortage— Myth or Reality? Fortune 1000 Talent Recruiters on the Debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer Corporation

    2014-10-01

    A major debate is currently underway in the USA about whether there is, in fact, a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce shortage in the country or not. This is the subject of the Bayer Facts of Science Education XVI: US STEM Workforce Shortage—Myth or Reality? Fortune 1000 Talent Recruiters on the Debate. An ongoing public opinion research project commissioned by Bayer Corporation, the Bayer Facts surveys examine US STEM education, diversity and workforce issues. The 16th in the series, the newest survey asks talent recruiters at some of the country's largest employers—those included in the Fortune 1000—to weigh in on current and future demand for new hires with 2- and 4-year STEM degrees. As professionals responsible for scouting, recruiting and hiring talent at Fortune 1000 companies, both STEM and non-STEM alike, these individuals are on the frontlines, tasked with assessing and filling their companies' workforce needs. The survey asks the recruiters whether new hires with 2- and 4-year STEM degrees are as, more or less in demand than their peers without STEM degrees? Are more new STEM jobs being created at their companies than non-STEM jobs? Can they find adequate numbers of qualified candidates in a timely manner and how fierce is the competition for STEM degree holders? To answer these and other questions, the survey polled 150 talent recruiters at Fortune 1000 companies, both STEM and non-STEM alike. The survey also asks the recruiters about diversion in STEM, workforce diversity in the pipeline, the role of community colleges in developing the STEM pipeline and the desired skills and competencies of new hires.

  14. 77 FR 43640 - Social Security Ruling, SSR 12-2p; Titles II and XVI: Evaluation of Fibromyalgia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Determinable Physical and Mental Impairments, and Exertional and Nonexertional Limitations, 61 FR 34488 (July 2... Not ``Acceptable Medical Sources'' in Disability Claims, 71 FR 45593 (August 9, 2006), (also available...: Evaluation of Symptoms in Disability Claims: Assessing the Credibility of an Individual's Statements, 61...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix Xvi to Part 86 - Pollutant Mass Emissions Calculation Procedure for Gaseous-Fueled Vehicles and for Vehicles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) for determination.) (c) Fuel Economy Calculations for Gaseous Fuels Based on the Cold Start CVS-1975... (vi) Fuel economy: ER06JN97.001 ER06JN97.002 Where: HC = CVS HC in grams/mile CO = CVS CO in grams/mile CO2 = CVS CO2 in grams/mile For gasoline: = 2421 / ((0.866)(HC) + (0.429)(CO) + (0.273)(CO2))...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix Xvi to Part 86 - Pollutant Mass Emissions Calculation Procedure for Gaseous-Fueled Vehicles and for Vehicles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) for determination.) (c) Fuel Economy Calculations for Gaseous Fuels Based on the Cold Start CVS-1975... (vi) Fuel economy: ER06JN97.001 ER06JN97.002 Where: HC = CVS HC in grams/mile CO = CVS CO in grams/mile CO2 = CVS CO2 in grams/mile For gasoline: = 2421 / ((0.866)(HC) + (0.429)(CO) + (0.273)(CO2))...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix Xvi to Part 86 - Pollutant Mass Emissions Calculation Procedure for Gaseous-Fueled Vehicles and for Vehicles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) for determination.) (c) Fuel Economy Calculations for Gaseous Fuels Based on the Cold Start CVS-1975... (vi) Fuel economy: ER06JN97.001 ER06JN97.002 Where: HC = CVS HC in grams/mile CO = CVS CO in grams/mile CO2 = CVS CO2 in grams/mile For gasoline: = 2421 / ((0.866)(HC) + (0.429)(CO) + (0.273)(CO2))...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix Xvi to Part 86 - Pollutant Mass Emissions Calculation Procedure for Gaseous-Fueled Vehicles and for Vehicles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) for determination.) (c) Fuel Economy Calculations for Gaseous Fuels Based on the Cold Start CVS-1975... (vi) Fuel economy: ER06JN97.001 ER06JN97.002 Where: HC = CVS HC in grams/mile CO = CVS CO in grams/mile CO2 = CVS CO2 in grams/mile For gasoline: = 2421 / ((0.866)(HC) + (0.429)(CO) + (0.273)(CO2))...

  19. Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this Letter, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage-assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for ten live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of 170 eVee (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV /c2.

  20. Calorimetric Studies of the Energetics of Order-Disorder in the System Mg(1-x)Fe(x)Ca(CO(3))(2)

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, P.; Dooley, D.; Navrotsky, A.; Reeder, R.

    1999-02-10

    Calorimetric studies by Chai and Navrotsky (1996) on dolomite-ankerite energetic have been extended by including two additional types of samples: a very disordered stoichiometric MgCa(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} prepared from low temperature aqueous solution and three largely ordered natural samples of intermediate iron content. Combining these data with previous work, three distinct trends of energetic can be seen: those for samples with nearly complete order, nearly complete disorder, and intermediate order. From these trends, the enthalpy of complete disordering is estimated to be 33 {+-} 6 kJ/mol for MgCa(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} and 18 {+-} 5 kJ/mol for FeCa(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.

  1. Spectroscopic and calorimetric studies of formation of the supramolecular complexes of PAMAM G5-NH₂ and G5-OH dendrimers with 5-fluorouracil in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Buczkowski, Adam; Olesinski, Tomasz; Zbicinska, Elzbieta; Urbaniak, Pawel; Palecz, Bartlomiej

    2015-07-25

    The results of spectroscopic measurements (increase in solubility, equilibrium dialysis, (1)H NMR titration) and calorimetric measurements (isothermal titration ITC) indicate exothermic (ΔH<0) and spontaneous (ΔG < 0) combination of an antitumor drug, 5-fluorouracil, by both cationic PAMAM G5-NH2 dendrimer and its hydroxyl analog PAMAM G5-OH in aqueous solutions at room temperature. PAMAM G5-NH2 dendrimer combines about 70 molecules of the drug with equilibrium constant K ≅ 300, which is accompanied by an increase in the system order (ΔS < 0). Hydroxyl dendrimer, PAMAM G5-OH, combines about 14 molecules of 5-fluorouracil with equilibrium constant K ≅ 100. This process is accompanied by an increase in the system disorder (ΔS > 0). PMID:25997661

  2. Thermodynamic properties of illite, smectite and beidellite by calorimetric methods: Enthalpies of formation, heat capacities, entropies and Gibbs free energies of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailhanou, H.; Blanc, P.; Rogez, J.; Mikaelian, G.; Kawaji, H.; Olives, J.; Amouric, M.; Denoyel, R.; Bourrelly, S.; Montouillout, V.; Vieillard, P.; Fialips, C. I.; Michau, N.; Gaucher, E. C.

    2012-07-01

    The thermodynamic properties of three aluminous 2:1 clay minerals were acquired at 1.013 bars and at temperatures between 5 and 500 K using various calorimetric methods. Calorimetric measurements were performed on hydrated and dehydrated <2 μm clay fractions of smectite MX-80 (Wyoming), illite IMt-2 (Silver Hill) and beidellite SBId-1 (Black Jack Mine). After purification, the mineralogical analyses gave the following structural formulae: Na0.409K0.024Ca0.009 (Si3.738Al0.262) (Al1.598Mg0.214Fe 0.173 3 + Fe 0.035 2 +)O10(OH)2,K0.762Na0.044 (Si3.387Al0.613) (Al1.427Mg0.241Fe 0.292 3 + Fe 0.084 2 +)O10(OH)2 and Ca0.185K0.104 (Si3.574Al0.426) (Al1.812Mg0.09Fe 0.112 3 +)O10(OH)2 for smectite MX-80, illite IMt-2 and beidellite SBId-1, respectively. Heat capacities were measured by low temperature adiabatic calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, from 5 to 500 K. Standard enthalpies of formation were obtained from solution-reaction calorimetry at 298.15 K. The standard Gibbs free energies of formation of the clay minerals were also calculated, together with the equilibrium constants at 25 °C, for anhydrous and hydrated minerals. A comparison between these experimental data and estimated values obtained from prediction models available in the literature, enabled the calculation method that appears to be the most relevant to be selected, at least for aluminous 2:1 clay minerals.

  3. A calorimetric determination of the enthalpy of formation and a description of the defect structure of the ordered beta-phase /Ni, Cu/ /1-x/ Al/x/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henig, E. T.; Lukas, H. L.

    1988-01-01

    In order to describe thermodynamically the defect structure of an ordered B-Hume-Rothery phase, the heat of formation of (Ni,Cu)(1-x)Al(x) was measured at 1100 K as a function of concentration in the range x (sub Al) = 0.4 and 0.55 for three substitution rations x (sub Ni)/x (sub Cu) = infinity; 11; 5. The heat of formation of the NiAl beta-phase is strongly negative. For the stoichiometric composition it is -72.2 kJ/g-atom. On both the nickel-rich side and the aluminum-rich side the magnitude of the enthalpy of formation decreases linearly with concentration. Substitution of nickel for copper decreases the magnitude of the enthalpy of formation over the entire homogeneity range for the phase (Ni,Cu)(1-x)Al(x). The curve for the enthalpy of formation as well as the literature values for the chemical potential of aluminum are described with great accuracy by the disorder model of Wagner-Schottky.

  4. An active thermal control surfaces experiment. [spacecraft temperature determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, D. R.; Brown, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    An active flight experiment is described that has the objectives to determine the effects of the low earth natural environment and the Shuttle induced environment on selected thermal control and optical surfaces. The optical and thermal properties of test samples will be measured in-situ using an integrating sphere reflectrometer and using calorimetric methods. This experiment has been selected for the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) flight which will be carried to orbit by the NASA Space Shuttle. The LDEF will remain in orbit to be picked up by a later Shuttle mission and returned for postflight evaluation.

  5. A calorimetric study of the folding-unfolding of an alpha-helix with covalently closed N and C-terminal loops.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J W; Greenfield, N J; Wu, B; Privalov, P L

    1999-08-27

    The thermal melting of a dicyclic 29-residue peptide, having helix-stabilizing side-chain to side-chain covalent links at each terminal, has been studied by circular dichroism spectropolarimetry (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The CD spectra for this dicyclic peptide indicate that it is monomeric, almost fully alpha-helical at -10 degrees C, and undergoes a reversible transition from the folded to the disordered state with increasing temperature. The temperature dependencies of the ellipticity at 222 nm and the excess heat capacity measured calorimetrically are well fit by a two-state model, which indicates a cooperative melting transition that is complete within the temperature ranges of these experiments (from -10 degrees C to 100 degrees C). This allows a complete analysis of the thermodynamics of helix formation. The helix unfolding is found to proceed with a small positive heat-capacity increment, consistent with the solvation of some non-polar groups upon helix unfolding. It follows that the hydrogen bonds are not the only factors responsible for the formation of the alpha-helix, and that hydrophobic interactions are also playing a role in its stabilization. At 30 degrees C, the calorimetric enthalpy and entropy values are estimated to be 650(+/-50) cal mol(-1)and 2.0(+/-0.2) cal K(-1)mole(-1), respectively, per residue of this peptide. Comparison with the thermodynamic characteristics obtained for the unfolding of double-stranded alpha-helical coiled-coils shows that at that temperature the enthalpic contribution of non-polar groups to the stabilization of the alpha-helix is insignificant and the estimated transition enthalpy can be assigned to the hydrogen bonds. With increasing temperature, the increasing magnitude of the negative enthalpy of hydration of the exposed polar groups should decrease the helix-stabilizing enthalpy of the backbone hydrogen bonds. However, the helix-stabilizing negative entropy of hydration of these groups should also increase in magnitude with increasing temperature, offsetting this effect. PMID:10452900

  6. Thermodynamic property determination in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margrave, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques for determining heat capacities and other properties of molten metals were investigated and critically evaluated. Precisely determining heat capacities calorimetrically in space poses several problems. The weight of a drop calorimeter block along with the necessity of obtaining a large number of data points tend to make traditional approaches appear infeasible. However, for many substances exhibiting sufficiently high thermal conductivities and with known emissivities, it appears possible to investigate their properties by observing the rate of cooling of a levitated sphere which is initially at a uniform temperature above the melting point. A special advantage of the levitation method is that considerable supercooling is expected, making the study of the heat capacities of molten metals both above and below their melting points possible.

  7. PREFACE: Sensors & their Applications XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriacou, Panicos; O'Riordan, Alan

    2011-08-01

    This volume records the Proceedings of the sixteenth conference in the biennial Sensors and Their Applications series which took place at the Clarion Hotel, Cork, Ireland between 12-14 September 2011. The conference is organized by the Instrument Science and Technology Group of the Institute of Physics. On this occasion, the conference was hosted by Tyndall National Institute at University College Cork. This year the conference returns to Ireland, having last been held in Limerick in 2003. The conference proceedings record the continuing growth of the sensors community nationally and internationally. The conferences bring together contributions from scientists and engineers from academia, research institutes and industrial establishments, and therefore provide an excellent opportunity for these communities to present and discuss the latest results in the field of sensors, instrumentation and measurement. Amongst the more traditional themes, such as optical sensing, there is growth in new areas such as biomedical sensing and instrumentation, and nanosensing, which is reflected in this volume. Similarly the contribution of modelling and simulation techniques in sensor and instrumentation design and their applications is acknowledged by a session in this area. The sessions across the conference are supported by notable contributions from invited speakers. We would like to thank all of our colleagues in the sensor and instrumentation community who have supported this event by contributing manuscripts. Our thanks also go to Tyndall National Institute for hosting this conference and all the sponsors who, with their generous financial and in-kind contributions, enabled the better organization of this conference. We would also like to thank all the members of the Instrument Science and Technology Group for their support, and in particular for refereeing the submitted manuscripts. We are also pleased to express our thanks to the Conference Department of the Institute of Physics for their invaluable support in organising this event. We are especially grateful to Dawn Stewart for her responsive and efficient day-to-day handling of this event, as well as to Claire Garland for her planning and management of this event. We hope that the conference authors, participants and a wider audience will find these proceedings to be of interest and to serve as a useful reference text. Panicos KyriacouConference ChairmanAlan O'RiordanConference Local Chairman

  8. Thermally induced rearrangement of hydrogen-bonded helices in solid 4-isopropylphenol as studied by calorimetric, proton NMR, dielectric and near IR spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, G.; Szostak, M. M.; Misiaszek, T.; Pająk, Z.; Wąsicki, J.; Kołodziej, H. A.; Freundlich, P.

    1999-11-01

    Calorimetric, dielectric and Fourier transform near infrared (IR) spectroscopic methods were used to study molecular dynamics and structural transition in solid 4-isopropylphenol (4IP) above room temperature. Pulse proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements were performed in the 100-340 K temperature range. A phase transition was found at 331.5 K, 1.5 K below the melting point. Energetically inequivalent methyl groups reorientations were observed in differently prepared samples and this suggested that a high-temperature polymorph occurs below the transition point as a metastable phase. Dielectric relaxation measurements showed an electric conductivity similar in value to that in water. This was detected as a pronounced contribution to the imaginary part of dielectric permittivity at temperatures higher than 310 K. Near IR spectra revealed that hydrogen bondings are stronger in the high-temperature phase than in the room-temperature-stable one. We propose that thermally induced molecular rearrangements enable proton transfer in hydrogen bonds (HBs) and this stimulates protonic conduction.

  9. Calorimetric study of crystal growth of ice in hydrated methemoglobin and of redistribution of the water clusters formed on melting the ice.

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, G; Mayer, E

    1994-01-01

    Calorimetric studies of the melting patterns of ice in hydrated methemoglobin powders containing between 0.43 and 0.58 (g water)/(g protein), and of their dependence on annealing at subzero temperatures and on isothermal treatment at ambient temperature are reported. Cooling rates were varied between approximately 1500 and 5 K min-1 and heating rate was 30 K min-1. Recrystallization of ice during annealing is observed at T > 228 K. The melting patterns of annealed samples are characteristically different from those of unannealed samples by the shifting of the melting temperature of the recrystallized ice fraction to higher temperatures toward the value of "bulk" ice. The "large" ice crystals formed during recrystallization melt on heating into "large" clusters of water whose redistribution and apparent equilibration is followed as a function of time and/or temperature by comparison with melting endotherms. We have also studied the effect of cooling rate on the melting pattern of ice with a methemoglobin sample containing 0.50 (g water)/(g protein), and we surmise that for this hydration cooling at rates of > or = approximately 150 K min-1 preserves on the whole the distribution of water molecules present at ambient temperature. PMID:7819504

  10. Ferric ion (hydr)oxo clusters in the "Venus flytrap" cleft of FbpA: Mössbauer, calorimetric and mass spectrometric studies.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arindam; Bilton, Paul R; Mackay, Logan; Janoschka, Adam; Zhu, Haizhong; Rea, Dean; Langridge-Smith, Pat R R; Campopiano, Dominic J; Teschner, Thomas; Trautwein, Alfred X; Schünemann, Volker; Sadler, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Isothermal calorimetric studies of the binding of iron(III) citrate to ferric ion binding protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae suggested the complexation of a tetranuclear iron(III) cluster as a single step binding event (apparent binding constant K(app) (ITC) = 6.0(5) × 10(5) M(-1)). High-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric data supported the binding of a tetranuclear oxo(hydroxo) iron(III) cluster of formula [Fe(4)O(2)(OH)(4)(H(2)O)(cit)](+) in the interdomain binding cleft of FbpA. The mutant H9Y-nFbpA showed a twofold increase in the apparent binding constant [K(app) (ITC) = 1.1(7) × 10(6) M(-1)] for the tetranuclear iron(III) cluster compared to the wild-type protein. Mössbauer spectra of Escherichia coli cells overexpressing FbpA and cultured in the presence of added (57)Fe citrate were indicative of the presence of dinuclear and polynuclear clusters. FbpA therefore appears to have a strong affinity for iron clusters in iron-rich environments, a property which might endow the protein with new biological functions. PMID:22349975

  11. SU-E-J-39: Comparison of PTV Margins Determined by In-Room Stereoscopic Image Guidance and by On-Board Cone Beam Computed Tomography Technique for Brain Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesh, T; Paul, S; Munshi, A; Sarkar, B; Krishnankutty, S; Sathya, J; George, S; Jassal, K; Roy, S; Mohanti, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereoscopic in room kV image guidance is a faster tool in daily monitoring of patient positioning. Our centre, for the first time in the world, has integrated such a solution from BrainLAB (ExacTrac) with Elekta's volumetric cone beam computed tomography (XVI). Using van Herk's formula, we compared the planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated by both these systems for patients treated with brain radiotherapy. Methods: For a total of 24 patients who received partial or whole brain radiotherapy, verification images were acquired for 524 treatment sessions by XVI and for 334 sessions by ExacTrac out of the total 547 sessions. Systematic and random errors were calculated in cranio-caudal, lateral and antero-posterior directions for both techniques. PTV margins were then determined using van Herk formula. Results: In the cranio-caudal direction, systematic error, random error and the calculated PTV margin were found to be 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.41 cm with XVI and 0.14 cm, 0.13 cm and 0.44 cm with ExacTrac. The corresponding values in lateral direction were 0.13 cm 0.1 cm and 0.4 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.42 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The same parameters for antero-posterior were for 0.1 cm, 0.11 cm and 0.34 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.16 cm and 0.43 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The margins estimated with the two imaging modalities were comparable within ± 1 mm limit. Conclusion: Verification of setup errors in the major axes by two independent imaging systems showed the results are comparable and within ± 1 mm. This implies that planar imaging based ExacTrac can yield equal accuracy in setup error determination as the time consuming volumetric imaging which is considered as the gold standard. Accordingly PTV margins estimated by this faster imaging technique can be confidently used in clinical setup.

  12. Spectrophotometric and Calorimetric Studies of Np(V) Complexation with Acetate at Variable Temperatures (T = 283 - 343 K)

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin; Srinivasan, Thandankorai G.; Zanonato, PierLuigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio

    2009-12-21

    Spectrophotometric titrations were performed to identify the Np(V)/acetate complex and determine the equilibrium constants at variable temperatures (T = 283 - 343 K) and at the ionic strength of 1.05 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}. The enthalpy of complexation at corresponding temperatures was determined by microcalorimetric titrations. Results show that the complexation of Np(V) with acetate is weak but strengthened as the temperature is increased. The complexation is endothermic and is entropy-driven. The enhancement of the complexation at elevated temperatures is primarily due to the increasingly larger entropy gain when the solvent molecules are released from the highly-ordered solvation spheres of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and acetate to the bulk solvent where the degree of disorder is higher at higher temperatures.

  13. Effects of methoxy and formyl substituents on the energetics and reactivity of α-naphthalenes: a calorimetric and computational study.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana L R; Freitas, Vera L S; Ribeiro da Silva, Maria D M C

    2014-07-01

    A combined experimental and computational study was developed to evaluate and understand the energetics and reactivity of formyl and methoxy α-naphthalene derivatives. Static bomb combustion calorimetry and the Calvet microcalorimetry were the experimental techniques used to determine the standard (p(o)=0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation, in the liquid phase, ΔfHm(o)(l), and of vaporization, Δl(g)Hm(o), at T=298.15K, respectively, of the two liquid naphthalene derivatives. Those experimental values were used to derive the values of the experimental standard molar enthalpies of formation, in the gaseous phase, ΔfHm(o)(g), of 1-methoxynaphthalene, (-3.0 ± 3.1)kJmol(-1), and of 1-formylnaphthalene, (36.3 ± 4.1)kJ mol(-1). High-level quantum chemical calculations at the composite G3(MP2)//B3LYP level were performed to estimate the values of the ΔfHm(o)(g) of the two compounds studied resulting in values in very good agreement with experimental ones. Natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations were also performed to determine more about the structure and reactivity of this class of compounds. PMID:24444416

  14. Interaction of cationic dodecyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide with oxy-HbGp by isothermal titration and differential scanning calorimetric studies: Effect of proximity of isoelectric point.

    PubMed

    Alves, Fernanda Rosa; Carvalho, Francisco Adriano O; Carvalho, José Wilson P; Tabak, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    In this work, isothermal titration and differential scanning calorimetric methods, in combination with pyrene fluorescence emission and dynamic light scattering have been used to investigate the interaction of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) with the giant extracellular Glossoscolex paulistus hemoglobin (HbGp) in the oxy-form, at pH values around the isoelectric point (pI ≈ 5.5). Our ITC results have shown that the interaction of DTAB with the hemoglobin is more intense at pH 7.0, with a smaller cac (critical aggregation concentration) value. The increase of protein concentration does not influence the cac value of the interaction, at both pH values. Therefore, the beginning of the DTAB-oxy-HbGp premicellar aggregates formation, in the cac region, is not affected by the increase of protein concentration. HSDSC studies show higher Tm values at pH 5.0, in the absence and presence of DTAB, when compared with pH 7.0. Furthermore, at pH 7.0, an aggregation process is observed with DTAB in the range from 0.75 to 1.5 mmol/L, noticed by the exothermic peak, and similar to that observed for pure oxy-HbGp, at pH 5.0, and in the presence of DTAB. DLS melting curves show a decrease on the hemoglobin thermal stability for the oxy-HbGp-DTAB mixtures and formation of larger aggregates, at pH 7.0. Our present data, together with previous results, support the observation that the protein structural changes, at pH 7.0, occur at smaller DTAB concentrations, as compared with pH 5.0, due to the acidic pI of protein that favors the oxy-HbGp-cationic surfactant interaction at neutral pH. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 199-211, 2016. PMID:26574155

  15. Spectrophotometric and Calorimetric Studies of Np(V) Complexation with Sulfate at 10-70oC

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin; Xia, Yuanxian; Friese, Judah I.

    2008-06-16

    Sulfate, one of the inorganic constituents in the groundwater of nuclear waste repository, could affect the migration of radioactive materials by forming complexes. Spectrophotometric and microcalorimetric titrations were performed to identify the Np(V)/sulfate complex and determine the equilibrium constants and enthalpy of complexation at 10-70 C. Results show that the complexation of Np(V) with sulfate is weak but slightly enhanced by the increase in temperature. The complexation is endothermic and becomes more endothermic with the increase in temperature. The enhanced complexation at elevated temperatures is due to the increasingly larger entropy of complexation that exceeds the increase in enthalpy, suggesting that the complexation of Np(V) with sulfate is entropy-driven.

  16. Simultaneous calorimetric and polarization microscopy investigations of light induced changes over phase transitions in a liquid crystal-napthopyran mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoloni, S.; Mercuri, F.; Marinelli, M.; Pizzoferrato, R.; Zammit, U.; Kosa, T.; Sukhomlinova, L.; Taheri, B.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the specific heat and the thermal conductivity in a 4-(n-octyl)-4'-cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal (LC)-photochromic molecules mixture, before, during, and after the photo-activation of the dispersed photochromic molecules, over both the smectic A-nematic and the nematic-isotropic phase transitions. The evaluation of the specific heat has enabled the determination of the changes of the phase transition characteristics induced by the photochromic molecules photoisomerization, while that of the thermal conductivity could be used to monitor the modifications induced in the average LC molecular orientation. The polarization microscopy imaging of the sample texture constituted a valuable support for the interpretation of the obtained thermal conductivity results.

  17. Simultaneous calorimetric and polarization microscopy investigations of light induced changes over phase transitions in a liquid crystal-napthopyran mixture.

    PubMed

    Paoloni, S; Mercuri, F; Marinelli, M; Pizzoferrato, R; Zammit, U; Kosa, T; Sukhomlinova, L; Taheri, B

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the specific heat and the thermal conductivity in a 4-(n-octyl)-4'-cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal (LC)-photochromic molecules mixture, before, during, and after the photo-activation of the dispersed photochromic molecules, over both the smectic A-nematic and the nematic-isotropic phase transitions. The evaluation of the specific heat has enabled the determination of the changes of the phase transition characteristics induced by the photochromic molecules photoisomerization, while that of the thermal conductivity could be used to monitor the modifications induced in the average LC molecular orientation. The polarization microscopy imaging of the sample texture constituted a valuable support for the interpretation of the obtained thermal conductivity results. PMID:26450328

  18. Calorimetric study and modeling of molecular mobility in amorphous organic pharmaceutical compounds using a modified Adam-Gibbs approach.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chen; Chamarthy, Sai Prasanth; Pinal, Rodolfo

    2007-11-22

    The purpose of this study is to provide a quantitative characterization of the thermal behavior of amorphous organic pharmaceutical compounds across their glass transition temperature, and to assess their molecular mobility as a function of temperature and time by combining theoretical simulations with experimental measurements using differential scanning calorimetry. A computational approach built on the Boltzmann superposition principle of nonexponential decay and the Adam-Gibbs theory of entropic-dependent structural relaxation is presented. The heat capacities of the crystalline and amorphous forms are incorporated into the simulation in order to accurately assess the entropic fictive temperature as functions of temperature and time under any arbitrary set of experimental conditions. Using this method, we evaluated properties of the glass former, D and T0, and the nonexponentiality index beta, for amorphous salicin, felodipine, and nifedipine, by fitting the simulated glass transition profile with the experimentally determined heat capacity across the glass transition region. From this fit, the evolution of the relaxation time of the model compounds following any thermal cycle, including heating, cooling, and isothermal holds can then be estimated a priori. This study reveals the profound and inextricable effect of thermal history on the molecular mobility of the amorphous materials, and the ability of the glass to undergo fast changes in its molecular motions over an aging process even at low temperatures. PMID:17967007

  19. Calorimetric study of the adsorption of poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) onto cationic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Naa Larteokor; Wagner, Norman J; Kaler, Eric W; Lynch, Matthew L

    2010-05-01

    The adsorption of two polymers, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) PVP, onto cationic nanoparticles suspended in both water and a buffer solution is studied via isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). These are model systems studied previously to understand polymer-induced phase separation and bridging flocculation in the protein limit. ITC measurements provide critical information for rationalizing the effects of polymer type and added buffer solution on the loss of stability of nanoparticle-polymer solutions. For PEO, weak segmental adsorption energies of approximately 0.2k(B)T for PEO in water and buffer are consistent with depletion phase separation. For PVP in water, segmental adsorption energies on the order of approximately 1.6k(B)T support the observed bridging flocculation, whereas a weaker adsorption energy of approximately 0.7k(B)T for PVP in buffer is consistent with depletion phase separation. Multilayer adsorption is observed in buffer solutions, which corroborates a measured increase in the hydrodynamic size of the polymer-nanoparticle complexes with added buffer. The entropy of adsorption is calculated from equilibrium constants determined by combining ITC and adsorption isotherms. PMID:20095547

  20. Spectrophotometric and Calorimetric Studies of U(VI) Complexation with Sulfate at 25-70oC

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng

    2008-10-30

    Sulfate, one of the inorganic constituents in the groundwater of nuclear waste repository, could affect the migration of radioactive materials by forming complexes. Spectrophotometric and microcalorimetric titrations were performed to identify the U(VI)/sulfate complexes and determine the equilibrium constants and enthalpy of complexation at 25-70 C. Results show that U(VI) forms moderately strong complexes with sulfate, i.e., UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(aq) and UO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup 2-}, in this temperature range and the complexes become stronger as the temperature is increased: 2-fold and 10-fold increases in the stability constants of UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(aq) and UO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}{sub 2}{sup 2-}), respectively, when the temperature is increased from 25 C to 70 C. The complexation is endothermic and entropy-driven, showing typical characteristics of inner-sphere complexation and 'hard acid'/'hard base' interactions. The thermodynamic trends are discussed in terms of dehydration of both the cation (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) and the anion (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) as well as the effect of temperature on the structure of water.

  1. Isothermal Calorimetric Observations of the Affect of Welding on Compatibility of Stainless Steels with High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy C.

    2002-01-01

    Compatibility is determined by the surface area, the chemical constituency and the surface finish of a material. In this investigation exposed area is obviously not a factor as the welded samples had a slightly smaller surface than the unwelded, but were more reactive. The chemical makeup of welded CRES 316L and welded CRES 304L have been observed in the literature to change from the parent material as chromium and iron are segregated in zones. In particular, the ratio of chromium to iron in CRES 316L increased from 0.260 to 0.79 in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the weld and to 1.52 in the weld bead itself. In CRES 304L the ratio of chromium to iron increased from 0.280 to 0.44 in the HAZ and to 0.33 in the weld bead. It is possible that the increased reactivity of the welded samples and of those welded without purge gas is due to this segregation phenomenon. Likewise the reactivity increased in keeping with the greater roughness of the welded and welded without purge gas samples. Therefore enhanced roughness may also be responsible for the increased reactivity.

  2. Combined Spectroscopic and Calorimetric Studies to Reveal Absorption Mechanisms and Conformational Changes of Protein on Nanoporous Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Saharnaz; Farokhi, Maryam; Padidar, Parisa; Falahati, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    In this study the effect of surface modification of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) on its adsorption capacities and protein stability after immobilization of beta-lactoglobulin B (BLG-B) was investigated. For this purpose, non-functionalized (KIT-6) and aminopropyl-functionalized cubic Ia3d mesoporous silica ([n-PrNH2-KIT-6]) nanoparticles were used as nanoporous supports. Aminopropyl-functionalized mesoporous nanoparticles exhibited more potential candidates for BLG-B adsorption and minimum BLG leaching than non-functionalized nanoparticles. It was observed that the amount of adsorbed BLG is dependent on the initial BLG concentration for both KIT-6 and [n-PrNH2-KIT-6] mesoporous nanoparticles. Also larger amounts of BLG-B on KIT-6 was immobilized upon raising the temperature of the medium from 4 to 55 °C while such increase was undetectable in the case of immobilization of BLG-B on the [n-PrNH2-KIT-6]. At temperatures above 55 °C the amounts of adsorbed BLG on both studied nanomaterials decreased significantly. By Differential scanning calorimetry or DSC analysis the heterogeneity of the protein solution and increase in Tm may indicate that immobilization of BLG-B onto the modified KIT-6 results in higher thermal stability compared to unmodified one. The obtained results provide several crucial factors in determining the mechanism(s) of protein adsorption and stability on the nanostructured solid supports and the development of engineered nano-biomaterials for controlled drug-delivery systems and biomimetic interfaces for the immobilization of living cells. PMID:26230687

  3. A practical method to determine the heating and cooling curves of x-ray tube assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Bottaro, M.; Moralles, M.; Viana, V.; Donatiello, G. L.; Silva, E. P.

    2007-10-15

    A practical method to determine the heating and cooling curves of x-ray tube assemblies with rotating anode x-ray tube is proposed. Available procedures to obtain these curves as described in the literature are performed during operation of the equipment, and the precision of the method depends on the knowledge of the total energy applied in the system. In the present work we describe procedures which use a calorimetric system and do not require the operation of the x-ray equipment. The method was applied successfully to a x-ray tube assembly that was under test in our laboratory.

  4. Micro-machined calorimetric biosensors

    DOEpatents

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Britton, Jr., Charles L.; Smith, Stephen F.; Oden, Patrick I.; Bryan, William L.; Moore, James A.; Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting and monitoring micro-volumetric enthalpic changes caused by molecular reactions. Micro-machining techniques are used to create very small thermally isolated masses incorporating temperature-sensitive circuitry. The thermally isolated masses are provided with a molecular layer or coating, and the temperature-sensitive circuitry provides an indication when the molecules of the coating are involved in an enthalpic reaction. The thermally isolated masses may be provided singly or in arrays and, in the latter case, the molecular coatings may differ to provide qualitative and/or quantitative assays of a substance.

  5. Steps Toward Determination of the Size and Structure of the Broad-Line Region in Active Galactic Nuclei XVI: A 13 Year Study of Spectral Variability in NGC 5548

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. M.; Berlind, P.; Bertram, R.; Bischoff, K.; Bochkarev, N. G.; Burenkov, A. N.; Calkins, M.; Carrasco, L.; Chavushyan, V. H.

    2002-01-01

    We present the final installment of an intensive 13 year study of variations of the optical continuum and broad H beta emission line in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548. The database consists of 1530 optical continuum measurements and 1248 H beta measurements. The H beta variations follow the continuum variations closely, with a typical time delay of about 20 days. However, a year-by-year analysis shows that the magnitude of emission-line time delay is correlated with the mean continuum flux. We argue that the data are consistent with the simple model prediction between the size of the broad-line region and the ionizing luminosity, r is proportional to L(sup 1/2)(sub ion). Moreover, the apparently linear nature of the correlation between the H beta response time and the nonstellar optical continuum F(sub opt) arises as a consequence of the changing shape of the continuum as it varies, specifically F(sub opt) is proportional to F(sup 0.56)(sub UV).

  6. Hair analysis for drugs of abuse. XVI. Disposition of fenethylline and its metabolite into hair and discrimination between fenethylline use and amphetamine use by hair analysis.

    PubMed

    Kikura, R; Nakahara, Y

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation tendency of fenethylline (FNT) and its metabolite into rat hair and the discrimination between FNT use and amphetamine (AP) use by hair analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring are described. After the intraperitoneal administrations of FNT to pigmented hairy rats (5 mg/kg/day, 10 days, n = 3), concentrations of FNT and its metabolite, AP, in the rat hair newly grown over 4 weeks were compared with area under the concentration versus time curves (AUCs) of the drugs in the rat plasma. The hair concentrations of FNT and AP were 52 +/- 1.4 and 4.9 +/- 0.6 ng/mg, whereas those of plasma AUCs were 55.9 +/- 23.1 and 22.3 +/- 4.9 micrograms.min/mL, respectively. The ratios of the hair concentrations to the AUCs of FNT tends to be highly incorporated into hair from suggests that FNT tends to be highly incorporated into hair from blood. The analytical method was applied to the determination of the metabolites in scalp hair of humans who were given FNT orally in multiple doses (50 mg/day, 3 days, n = 5) or in a single dose (50 mg/day, 1 day, n = 1). FNT and AP were detected at 0.51 +/- 0.23 and 0.35 +/- 0.12 ng/mg, respectively, in the proximal 1-cm hair segments from subjects given FNT orally for 3 days and 0.25 and 0.11 ng/mg, respectively, in the single-dose sample. In addition, it was found that the concentrations of FNT were 1.2 to 2.7 times greater than those of AP in the human hair samples, except for one sample, although FNT rapidly disappeared from the urine compared with AP. It was concluded that hair would be a good specimen for disclosure of drug history of FNT and for discrimination between FNT use and AP abuse. PMID:9248947

  7. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.

    1993-05-01

    The aim of this project is to elucidate the mechanisms of adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effect of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations and other inorganic and polymeric species will be determined using solids of relevant mineralogy. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability win be used to achieve the goals. The results of this study should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and also in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. Adsorption of selected individual surfactants on oxide minerals was studied. The aim was to determine the effect of structure on surfactant adsorption at the solid-liquid as well as at the liquid-air interface. Nonionic polyethoxylated alkyl phenols and anionic meta xylene sulfonates (MXS) were the surfactants studied. Electrokinetic behavior was also determined along with adsorption in order to determine the role of electrostatic forces in determining the adsorption. In addition, the effect of varying the number of ethylene oxide groups on the adsorption of polyethoxylated alkyl phenols on silica was determined since the ethoxyl groups offer unique opportunities to control adsorption as well as wettability. Effect of pH was studied both because it is a parameter with first order effect and also because pH effects can help in developing mechanisms.

  8. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.

    1993-08-31

    The aim of this contract is to elucidate the mechanisms underlying adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. The results of this study should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and also in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. Adsorption of single surfactants on silica and alumina as well as the solution behavior of surfactant mixtures was studied during this quarter. The adsorption of surfactants at the solid-liquid interface was correlated with changes in interfacial behavior such as wettability and zeta potential. Surface tension was used to study interactions between surfactant mixtures in solution. Mixed micellization of sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl phenoxy polyethoxylated alcohol was found to be non-ideal. Regular solution theory adequately describes the interactions. The adsorption isotherm of a cationic surfactant, tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (TTAC), on alumina was determined at two values of pH. Changes in the settling rate of alumina suspensions after TTAC adsorption were also followed to describe the evolution of the adsorbed layer. At high surface coverage it was observed that the alumina surface became hydrophilic suggesting the formation of a TTAC bilayer at the surface. Wettability of silica after adsorption of nonyl phenyl polyethoxylated alcohols (with number of polyethylene oxide groups varying from 10-40) was measured using flotation to determine the orientation of the adsorbed layer. Effect of number of ethylene oxide groups was also determined. The amount of silica floated after the nonionic surfactant adsorption was same irrespective of the ethylene oxide chain length.

  9. A calorimetric and spectroscopic comparison of the effects of cholesterol and its sulfur-containing analogs thiocholesterol and cholesterol sulfate on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Benesch, Matthew G K; Lewis, Ruthven N A H; McElhaney, Ronald N

    2016-02-01

    We performed differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the effects of cholesterol (Chol), thiocholesterol (tChol) and cholesterol sulfate (CholS) on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Our DSC results indicate that Chol and tChol incorporation produce small temperature increases in the main phase transition broad component while CholS markedly decreases it, but Chol decreases cooperativity and enthalpy more strongly than CholS and especially tChol. Hence, Chol and tChol thermally stabilize fluid DPPC bilayer sterol-rich domains while CholS markedly destabilizes them, and CholS and particularly tChol are less miscible in such domains. Our FTIR spectroscopic results indicate that Chol incorporation increases the rotational conformational order of fluid DPPC bilayers to a slightly and somewhat greater degree than tChol and CholS, respectively, consistent with our DSC findings. Also, Chol and CholS produce comparable degrees of H-bonding (hydration) of the DPPC ester carbonyls in fluid bilayers, whereas tChol increases H-bonding. At low temperatures, Chol is fully soluble in gel-state DPPC bilayers, whereas tChol and CholS are not. Thus tChol and CholS incorporation can produce considerably different effects on DPPC bilayers. In particular, the tChol thiol group markedly reduces its lateral miscibility and increases DPPC carbonyl H-bonding without significantly affecting the other characteristic effects of Chol itself, while the CholS sulfate group significantly reduces its ability to thermally stabilize and order fluid DPPC membranes. This latter result suggests that the molecular basis for the purported ability of CholS to "stabilize" various biological membranes should be re-examined. PMID:26585353

  10. Characterizing the secondary hydration shell on hydrated myoglobin, hemoglobin, and lysozyme powders by its vitrification behavior on cooling and its calorimetric glass-->liquid transition and crystallization behavior on reheating.

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, G; Hallbrucker, A; Mayer, E

    1995-01-01

    For hydrated metmyoglobin, methemoglobin, and lysozyme powders, the freezable water fraction of between approximately 0.3-0.4 g water/g protein up to approximately 0.7-0.8 g water/g protein has been fully vitrified by cooling at rates up to approximately 1500 K min-1 and the influence of cooling rate characterized by x-ray diffractograms. This vitreous but freezable water fraction started to crystallize at approximately 210 K to cubic ice and at approximately 240 K to hexagonal ice. Measurements by differential scanning calorimetry have shown that this vitreous but freezable water fraction undergoes, on reheating at a rate of 30 K min-1, a glass-->liquid transition with an onset temperature of between approximately 164 and approximately 174 K, with a width of between approximately 9 and approximately 16 degrees and an increase in heat capacity of between approximately 20 and approximately 40 J K-1 (mol of freezable water)-1 but that the glass transition disappears upon crystallization of the freezable water. These calorimetric features are similar to those of water imbibed in the pores of a synthetic hydrogel but very different from those of glassy bulk water. The difference to glassy bulk water's properties is attributed to hydrophilic interaction and H-bonding of the macromolecules' segments with the freezable water fraction, which thereby becomes dynamically modified. Abrupt increase in minimal or critical cooling rate necessary for complete vitrification is observed at approximately 0.7-0.8 g water/g protein, which is attributed to an abrupt increase of water's mobility, and it is remarkably close to the threshold value of water's mobility on a hydrated protein reported by Kimmich et al. (1990, Biophys. J. 58:1183). The hydration level of approximately 0.7-0.8 g water/g protein is approximately that necessary for completing the secondary hydration shell. PMID:8599674

  11. Numerical Modeling and Experimental Validation by Calorimetric Detection of Energetic Materials Using Thermal Bimorph Microcantilever Array: A Case Study on Sensing Vapors of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs).

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok-Won; Fragala, Joe; Banerjee, Debjyoti

    2015-01-01

    Bi-layer (Au-Si₃N₄) microcantilevers fabricated in an array were used to detect vapors of energetic materials such as explosives under ambient conditions. The changes in the bending response of each thermal bimorph (i.e., microcantilever) with changes in actuation currents were experimentally monitored by measuring the angle of the reflected ray from a laser source used to illuminate the gold nanocoating on the surface of silicon nitride microcantilevers in the absence and presence of a designated combustible species. Experiments were performed to determine the signature response of this nano-calorimeter platform for each explosive material considered for this study. Numerical modeling was performed to predict the bending response of the microcantilevers for various explosive materials, species concentrations, and actuation currents. The experimental validation of the numerical predictions demonstrated that in the presence of different explosive or combustible materials, the microcantilevers exhibited unique trends in their bending responses with increasing values of the actuation current. PMID:26334276

  12. Role of an invariant lysine residue in folate binding on Escherichia coli thymidylate synthase: calorimetric and crystallographic analysis of the K48Q mutant

    PubMed Central

    Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A.; Sugich-Miranda, Rocio; Arreola, Rodrigo; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Velazquez-Contreras, Enrique F.; Montfort, William R.; Maley, Frank; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.

    2008-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) catalyzes the reductive methylation of deoxyuridine monophosphate (dUMP) using methylene tetrahydrofolate (CH2THF) as cofactor, the glutamate tail of which forms a water-mediated hydrogen-bond with an invariant lysine residue of this enzyme. To understand the role of this interaction, we studied the K48Q mutant of Escherichia coli TS using structural and biophysical methods. The kcat of the K48Q mutant was 430 fold lower than wild-type TS in activity, while the the Km for the (R)-stereoisomer of CH2THF was 300 M, about 30 fold larger than Km from the wild-type TS. Affinity constants were determined using isothermal titration calorimetry, which showed that binding was reduced by one order of magnitude for folate-like TS inhibitors, such as propargyl-dideaza folate (PDDF) or compounds that distort the TS active site like BW1843U89 (U89). The crystal structure of the K48Q-dUMP complex revealed that dUMP binding is not impaired in the mutamt, and that U89 in a ternary complex of K48Q-nucleotide-U89 was bound in the active site with subtle differences relative to comparable wild type complexes. PDDF failed to form ternary complexes with K48Q and dUMP. Thermodynamic data correlated with the structural determinations, since PDDF binding was dominated by enthalpic effects while U89 had an important entropic component. In conclusion, K48 is critical for catalysis since it leads to a productive CH2THF binding, while mutation at this residue does not affect much the binding of inhibitors that do not make contact with this group. PMID:18403248

  13. Effect of temperature on the protonation of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine-N,N',N'-triacetic acid in aqueous solutions: Potentiometric and calorimetric studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xingliang; Zhang, Zhicheng; Endrizzi, Francesco; Martin, Leigh R.; Luo, Shunzhong; Rao, Linfeng

    2015-06-01

    The TALSPEAK process (Trivalent Actinide Lanthanide Separations by Phosphorus-reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes) has been demonstrated in several pilot-scale operations to be effective at separating trivalent actinides (An3+) from trivalent lanthanides (Ln3+). However, fundamental studies have revealed undesired aspects of TALSPEAK, such as the significant partitioning of Na+, lactic acid, and water into the organic phase, thermodynamically unpredictable pH dependence, and the slow extraction kinetics. In the modified TALSPEAK process, the combination of the aqueous holdback complexant HEDTA (N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine-N,N',N'-triacetic acid) with the extractant HEH[EHP] (2-ethyl(hexyl) phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester) in the organic phase has been found to exhibit a nearly flat pH dependence between 2.5 and 4.5 and more rapid phase transfer kinetics for the heavier lanthanides. To help understand the speciation of Ln3+ and An3+ in the modified TALSPEAK, systematic studies are underway on the thermodynamics of major reactions in the HEDTA system under conditions relevant to the process (e.g., higher temperatures). Thermodynamics of the protonation and complexation of HEDTA with Ln3+ were studied at variable temperatures. Equilibrium constants and enthalpies were determined by a combination of techniques including potentiometry and calorimetry. This paper presents the protonation constants of HEDTA at T = (25 to 70) °C. The potentiometric titrations have demonstrated that, stepwise, the first two protonation constants decrease and the third one slightly increases with the increase of temperature. This trend is in good agreement with the enthalpy of protonation directly determined by calorimetry. The results of NMR analysis further confirm that the first two protonation reactions occur on the diamine nitrogen atoms, while the third protonation reaction occurs on the oxygen of a carboxylate group. These data, in conjunction with the thermodynamic parameters of Ln3+/An3+ complexes with HEDTA at different temperatures, will help to predict the speciation and temperature-dependent behavior of Ln3+/An3+ in the modified TALSPEAK process.

  14. Protection of liposomes against fusion during drying by oligosaccharides is not predicted by the calorimetric glass transition temperatures of the dry sugars

    PubMed Central

    Rennecke, Petra; Oliver, Ann E.

    2007-01-01

    Sugars play an important role in the desiccation tolerance of most anhydrobiotic organisms. It has been shown in previous studies that different structural families of oligosaccharides have different efficacies to interact with phospholipid headgroups and protect membranes from solute leakage during drying. Here, we have compared three families of linear oligosaccharides (fructans (inulins), malto-oligosaccharides, manno-oligosaccharides) for their chain-length dependent protection of egg phosphatidylcholine liposomes against membrane fusion. We found increased protection with chain length up to a degree of polymerization (DP) of 5 for malto-oligosaccharides, and a decrease for inulins and manno-oligosaccharides. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements showed that for all sugars the glass transition temperature (Tg) increased with DP, although to different degrees for the different oligosaccharide families. Higher Tg values resulted in reduced membrane fusion only for malto-oligosaccharides below DP5. Contrary to expectation, for inulins, manno-oligosaccharides and malto-oligosaccharides of a DP above five, fusion increased with increasing Tg, indicating that other physical parameters are more important in determining the ability of different sugars to protect membranes against fusion during drying. Further research will be necessary to experimentally define such parameters. PMID:18064448

  15. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Annual report, September 30, 1992--September 30 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Casteel, J.

    1996-07-01

    The aim of this research project was to investigate mechanisms governing adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effects of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations, various inorganic and polymeric species, and solids mineralogy have been determined. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability is used in this study. The results obtained should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. During the three years contract period, adsorption of single surfactants and select surfactant mixtures was studied at the solid-liquid and gas-liquid interfaces. Alkyl xylene sulfonates, polyethoxylated alkyl phenols, octaethylene glycol mono n-decyl ether, and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride were the surfactants studied. Adsorption of surfactant mixtures of varying composition was also investigated. The microstructure of the adsorbed layer was characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy. Changes in interfacial properties such as wettability, electrokinetics and stability of reservoir minerals were correlated with the amounts of reagent adsorbed. Strong effects of the structure of the surfactant and position of functional groups were revealed. Changes of microstructure upon dilution (desorption) were also studied. Presence of the nonionic surfactants in mixed aggregate leads to shielding of the charge of ionic surfactants which in turn promotes aggregation but reduced electrostatic attraction between the charged surfactant and the mineral surface. Strong consequences of surfactant interactions in solution on adsorption as well as correlations between monomer concentration in mixtures and adsorption were revealed.

  16. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.

    1993-11-30

    The aim of this contract is to elucidate the mechanisms underlying adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effect of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations and other inorganic and polymeric species will also be determined. Solids of relevant mineralogy and a multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability will be used to achieve the goals. The results of this study should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and also in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. Adsorption/desorption of single surfactant and surfactant mixtures at the kaolinite-water and alumina-water interface were studied during this quarter. The adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and octaethylene glycol mono n-decyl ether (C{sub l2}EO{sub 8}) on kaolinite was found to be higher from their mixtures than as single components. This enhanced adsorption was attributed to be due to hydrophobic chain-chain interactions. The effect of pH on the adsorption of single and surfactant mixtures on kaolinite was also elucidated. Desorption of cationic tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (TTAC) studied at the alumina-water interface indicated that adsorption was reversible. Electrokinetic measurements supported this observation.

  17. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Annual report, September 30, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.

    1994-07-01

    The aim of this research project is to investigate mechanisms underlying adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effects of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations, various inorganic and polymeric species, and solids mineralogy will be determined. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability; is used in this study. The results obtained should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. During the first year of this three year contract, adsorption of single surfactants and select surfactant mixtures was studied at the solid-liquid and gas-liquid interfaces. Surfactants studied include alkyl xylene sulfonates, polyethoxylated alkyl phenols, octaethylene glycol mono n-decyl ether, and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride. Adsorption of surfactant mixtures of varying composition was also investigated. The microstructure of the adsorbed layer was characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy. Changes interfacial properties such as wettability, electrokinetics and stability of reservoir minerals were correlated with the amount of reagent adsorbed. Strong effects of the structure of the surfactant and position of functional groups were revealed.

  18. Numerical Modeling and Experimental Validation by Calorimetric Detection of Energetic Materials Using Thermal Bimorph Microcantilever Array: A Case Study on Sensing Vapors of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok-Won; Fragala, Joe; Banerjee, Debjyoti

    2015-01-01

    Bi-layer (Au-Si3N4) microcantilevers fabricated in an array were used to detect vapors of energetic materials such as explosives under ambient conditions. The changes in the bending response of each thermal bimorph (i.e., microcantilever) with changes in actuation currents were experimentally monitored by measuring the angle of the reflected ray from a laser source used to illuminate the gold nanocoating on the surface of silicon nitride microcantilevers in the absence and presence of a designated combustible species. Experiments were performed to determine the signature response of this nano-calorimeter platform for each explosive material considered for this study. Numerical modeling was performed to predict the bending response of the microcantilevers for various explosive materials, species concentrations, and actuation currents. The experimental validation of the numerical predictions demonstrated that in the presence of different explosive or combustible materials, the microcantilevers exhibited unique trends in their bending responses with increasing values of the actuation current. PMID:26334276

  19. Structural and Calorimetric Studies Demonstrate that Xeroderma Pigmentosum Type G (XPG) Can Be Imported to the Nucleus by a Classical Nuclear Import Pathway via a Monopartite NLS Sequence.

    PubMed

    Barros, Andrea C de; Takeda, Agnes A S; Dreyer, Thiago R; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Kobe, Bostjan; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2016-05-22

    Xeroderma pigmentosum type G (XPG) proteins are involved in DNA lesion recognition and promotion of nucleotide excision repair. Specific mutations in these proteins may lead to Cockayne syndrome, in which the patients may display severe developmental retardation and neurological abnormalities. No structural information is available for their spacer region or the C-terminal domain, which are important, respectively, for specific nucleotide excision repair activity and substrate specificity, as well as nuclear translocation. Immunofluorescence studies suggested two specific regions of the XPG C-terminus as potential bipartite nuclear localization sequences, which would be responsible for its translocation to the nucleus by the classical nuclear import pathway mediated by the importin-α (Impα). Thus, in order to test these hypotheses and gain insight into the structural basis for the nuclear import process for the XPG protein, we solved the crystal structures of complexes formed by the Impα and peptides corresponding to both putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences (XPG1 and XPG2) and performed isothermal titration calorimetry assays to determine their binding affinities. Structural experiments confirm the binding of both NLS peptides to Impα but, unexpectedly, they bind to the receptor as monopartite NLSs. The isothermal titration calorimetry assays demonstrated that XPG1 and XPG2 peptides bind to two separate binding sites, but with high affinity to the major NLS-binding site of the Impα, resembling classical monopartite SV40 TAg NLS. The results lead to insights about what distinguishes monopartite and bipartite NLSs, as well as the differential roles of XPG1 and XPG2 NLSs in the nuclear localization of XPG. PMID:26812207

  20. Selectivity of Ni(II) and Zn(II) binding to Sporosarcina pasteurii UreE, a metallochaperone in the urease assembly: a calorimetric and crystallographic study.

    PubMed

    Zambelli, Barbara; Banaszak, Katarzyna; Merloni, Anna; Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Rypniewski, Wojciech; Ciurli, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    Urease is a nickel-dependent enzyme that plays a critical role in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle by catalyzing the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia and carbamate. This enzyme, initially synthesized in the apo form, needs to be activated by incorporation of two nickel ions into the active site, a processdriven by the dimeric metallochaperone UreE. Previous studies reported that this protein can bind different metal ions in vitro, beside the cognate Ni(II). This study explores the metal selectivity and affinity of UreE from Sporosarcina pasteurii (Sp,formerly known as Bacillus pasteurii) for cognate [Ni(II)] and noncognate [Zn(II)] metal ions. In particular, the thermodynamic parameters of SpUreE Ni(II) and Zn(II) binding have been determined using isothermal titration calorimetry. These experiments show that two Ni(II) ions bind to the protein dimer with positive cooperativity. The high-affinity site involves the conserved solvent-exposed His(100) and theC-terminal His(145), whereas the low-affinity site comprises also the C-terminalHis(147). Zn(II) binding to the protein, occurring in the same proteinregions and with similar affinityas compared to Ni(II), causes metal-driven dimerization of the protein dimer. The crystal structure of the protein obtained in the presence of equimolar amounts of both metal ions indicates that the high-affinity metal binding site binds Ni(II) preferentially over Zn(II). The ability of the protein to select Ni(II) over Zn(II) was confirmed by competition experiments in solution as well as by analysis of X-ray anomalous dispersion data. Overall, the thermodynamics and structural parameters that modulate the metal ion specificity of thedifferent binding sites on the protein surface of SpUreEhave been established. PMID:24126709

  1. Calorimetric studies of the interaction between the insulin-enhancing drug candidate bis(maltolato)oxovanadium(IV) (BMOV) and human serum apo-transferrin.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Creagh, A Louise; Mohammadi, Fakhrossadat; Haynes, Charles A; Orvig, Chris

    2009-04-01

    Bis(maltolato)oxovanadium(IV) (BMOV), and its ethylmaltol analog, bis(ethylmaltolato)oxovanadium(IV) (BEOV), are candidate insulin-enhancing agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus; in mid-2008, BEOV advanced to phase II clinical testing. The interactions of BMOV and its inorganic congener, vanadyl sulfate (VOSO(4)), with human serum apo-transferrin (hTf) were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Addition of BMOV or VOSO(4) to apo-hTf resulted in an increase in thermal stability of both the C- and N-lobes of transferrin as a result of binding to either vanadyl compound. A series of DSC thermograms of hTf solutions containing different molar ratios of BMOV and VOSO(4) were used to determine binding constants; at 25 degrees C the binding constants of BMOV to the C- and N-lobes of apo-hTf were found to be 3 (+/-1)x10(5) and 1.8 (+/-0.7)x10(5)M(-1), respectively. The corresponding values for VOSO(4) were 1.7 (+/-0.3)x10(5) and 7 (+/-2)x10(4)M(-1). The results show that the vanadium species initially presented as either BMOV or VOSO(4) had similar affinities for human serum transferrin due to oxidation of solvated vanadyl(IV) prior to complexation to transferrin. Binding of metavanadate (VO(3)(-)) was confirmed by DSC and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments of the interaction between sodium metavanadate (NaVO(3)) and hTf. PMID:19056126

  2. Use of flow calorimetry for determining enthalpies of absorption and the solubility of CO{sub 2} in aqueous monoethanolamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mathonat, C.; Majer, V.; Grolier, J.P.E.

    1998-10-01

    A flow mixing unit adapted to a Setaram C-80 calorimeter was used for measuring enthalpies of absorption of carbon dioxide in a 30 wt% aqueous solution of monoethanolamine (MEA) at three temperatures (313.15, 353.15, and 393.15 K) and three pressures (2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 MPa). Determinations were performed both in the region where the gas is fully absorbed in the solvent and also in the region of concentrations above the saturation. Experimental data served to obtain the integral enthalpies of absorption and for indirect determination of solubility limits. Where comparison was possible, the presented results derived from calorimetric determinations were in reasonable agreement with those obtained from phase equilibria measurements.

  3. Calorimetric measurement of energy of ultrasonic cleaners

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1994-11-01

    The development of a calorimeter that measured the power within an ultrasonic cleaning tank is presented. The principle involved is explained. Several types of calorimeter that were tested are described. Measurement of the power in an ultrasonic cleaner permits: (1) comparing different ultrasonic cleaners; (2) monitoring the performance of a specific cleaner; (3) measuring the distribution of power in a cleaning tank, and (4) evaluating the effects of process variables on the power.

  4. Nanobridge SQUIDs as calorimetric inductive particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallop, John; Cox, David; Hao, Ling

    2015-08-01

    Superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs) have made dramatic progress since their invention some 65 years ago (Andrews et al 1949 Phys. Rev. 76 154-155 Irwin and Hilton 2005 Topics Appl. Phys. 99 63-149) until now there are major imaging arrays of TESs with as many as 7588 separate sensors. These are extensively used by astronomers for some ground-breaking observations (Hattori et al 2013 Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 732 299-302). The great success of TES systems has tended to overshadow other superconducting sensor developments. However there are other types (Sobolewski et al 2003 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 13 1151-7 Hadfield 2009 Nat. Photonics 3 696-705) which are discussed in papers within this special edition of the journal. Here we describe a quite different type of detector, also applicable to single photon detection but possessing possible advantages (higher sensitivity, higher operating temperature) over the conventional TES, at least for single detectors.

  5. Stochastic determination of matrix determinants.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Sebastian; Ensslin, Torsten A

    2015-07-01

    Matrix determinants play an important role in data analysis, in particular when Gaussian processes are involved. Due to currently exploding data volumes, linear operations-matrices-acting on the data are often not accessible directly but are only represented indirectly in form of a computer routine. Such a routine implements the transformation a data vector undergoes under matrix multiplication. While efficient probing routines to estimate a matrix's diagonal or trace, based solely on such computationally affordable matrix-vector multiplications, are well known and frequently used in signal inference, there is no stochastic estimate for its determinant. We introduce a probing method for the logarithm of a determinant of a linear operator. Our method rests upon a reformulation of the log-determinant by an integral representation and the transformation of the involved terms into stochastic expressions. This stochastic determinant determination enables large-size applications in Bayesian inference, in particular evidence calculations, model comparison, and posterior determination. PMID:26274302

  6. Spectroscopic and calorimetric investigation of short and intermediate-range structures and energetics of amorphous SiCO, SiCN, and SiBCN polymer-derived ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widgeon, Scarlett J.

    Polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs) are a new class of amorphous ceramics in the Si-B-C-N system that are synthesized by the pyrolysis of silicon-based organic polymers. PDCs are lightweight and are resistant to creep, crystallization, and oxidation at temperatures near 1800 K making them ideal for a variety of high temperature applications. In spite of being X-ray amorphous, these materials display structural heterogeneity at the nanometer length scale. Their structure and resulting properties can be drastically altered by the utilization of preceramic polymers with differing chemistry and architectures. Fundamental understanding of the atomic structure is critical in deciphering the structure-property relationships and ultimately in controlling their properties for specific engineering applications. The short-range atomic structure has been extensively investigated using a variety of techniques, however, the structures at length scales beyond next-nearest neighbors remained highly controversial. Here we report the results of a spectroscopic and calorimetric study of short and intermediate -range structure and energetic of SiOC and SiBCN PDCs derived from a wide variety of precursors. SiOC PDCs with different carbon contents were synthesized from polysiloxane precurors and their structures were studied using high-resolution 13C and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The results suggest that these PDCs consists of a continuous mass fractal backbone of corner-shared SiC xO4-x tetrahedral units with "voids" occupied by sp 2-hybridized graphitic carbon. The oxygen-rich SiCxO 4-x units are located at the interior of this backbone with a mass fractal dimension of ~ 2.5, while the carbon-rich units occupy the two-dimensional interface between the backbone and the free carbon nanodomains. Such fractal topology is expected to give rise to unusual mechanical and transport properties characteristic of fractal percolation networks. For example, elastic moduli and transport properties such as electrical conductivity and viscosity may show power-law dependence on composition near and above the percolation threshold of the SiOC network or that of the free-carbon phase. Si(B)CN PDCs with different carbon contents were synthesized by pyrolysis of poly(boro)silylcarbodiimides and poly(boro)silazane precursors and their structure and energetics were studied using multi-nuclear, one- and two- dimensional NMR spectroscopy and oxide melt solution calorimetry. The structure of the polysilylcarbodiimide-derived SiCN PDCs at lower carbon content and pyrolysis temperatures (800 oC) consists of amorphous nanodomains of sp2 carbon and silicon nitride with an interfacial bonding between N, C and Si atoms that is stabilized by the presence of hydrogen. The interfacial Si-C and N-C bonds are destroyed with concomitant hydrogen loss upon increasing the pyrolysis temperature to 1100 oC. Calorimetry results demonstrate that the mixed bonding in the interfacial regions play a key role in the thermodynamic stabilization of these PDCs. The size of the carbon domains increases with increasing carbon content until a continuous amorphous carbon matrix is formed with 55-60 wt % C. The polyborosilylcarbodiimide-derived SiBCN ceramics contain carbon and silicon nitride nanodomains with the BN domains being present predominantly at the interface. In contrast, the structure of the polyborosilazane-derived ceramics consists of significant amount of mixed bonding in the nearest-neighbor coordination environments of Si and B atoms leading to the formation of SiC xN4-x tetrahedral units and BCN2 triangular units. The interfacial region between the SiCN and C nanodomains is occupied by the BCN phase. These results demonstrate that the chemistry of the polymeric precursors exerts major influence on the microstructure and bonding in their derived ceramics.

  7. Virulence Determination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews the in vitro and in vivo assays that are available for determination of pathogenic potential of Listeria monocytogenes bacteria, highlighting the value of using multiplex PCR for rapid and accurate assessment of listerial virulence....

  8. IR spectroscopic determination of gel state miscibility in long-chain phosphatidylcholine mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, R; Liang, G L; Strauss, H L; Snyder, R G

    1995-01-01

    We report on the gel-state microaggregation in binary mixtures of diacylphosphatidylcholines over temperatures ranging from -19 degrees C to near the gel-to-liquid crystal transition. Microaggregates with lateral dimensions in the range 1-100 chains were detected and measured with an isotope infrared method that relates the splitting or the shape of the methylene scissors band to aggregate size. Measurements were made on fully hydrated dispersions of diC18DPC/diC20HPC, diC18DPC/diC22HPC, and diC18DPC/diC24HPC at molar ratios of 4:1. Low levels of aggregation were determined with reference to the spectrum of the random mixture diC18DPC/diC18HPC. For diC18DPC/diC20HPC at -19 degrees C, which previous calorimetric measurements have indicated is a nearly ideal, we found about 4% of the minority component chains to be involved in aggregates. For diC18DPC/diC22HPC, the value increased to about 11%. DiC18DPC/diC24HPC was found to be highly fractionated, in agreement with the earlier studies. The unit subcell, which defines the type of acyl-chain packing, was determined for the components of the mixtures. The temperature behavior of the phases and the temperatures at which the minority component domains undergo dissolution were determined. PMID:8580342

  9. Determination of fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of antimalarial drugs against Plasmodium falciparum parasites in a serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Ofulla, A O; Orago, A S; Githure, J I; Burans, J P; Aleman, G M; Johnson, A J; Martin, S K

    1994-08-01

    Plasmodium falciparum chemosensitivity to the various antimalarial drugs is presently determined in the laboratory by setting up multiple microcultures of the parasite and estimating the amount of growth inhibition caused by known concentrations of drug. Parasite growth inhibition is assessed either by microscopy, radiolabeled substrate uptake, or calorimetrically. The obligate requirement for serum in this assay presents difficulties in the direct comparison of results among laboratories. We now have evidence that antimalarial drug sensitivity assays can be reliably performed in a serum-free medium. The overall comparison of 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values obtained with serum-free media (bovine albumin, Cohn fraction V [BAM] and BAM combined with glucose and lipids-cholesterol-rich mixture) and those obtained in serum-supplemented medium was r = 0.56; n = 60; P < 0.01. PMID:8074255

  10. Climate determinism or Geomagnetic determinism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Genevey, A.; Le Goff, M.; Fluteau, F.; Courtillot, V.

    2006-12-01

    A number of episodes of sharp geomagnetic field variations (in both intensity and direction), lasting on the order of a century, have been identified in archeomagnetic records from Western Eurasia and have been called "archeomagnetic jerks". These seem to correlate well with multi-decadal cooling episodes detected in the North Atlantic Ocean and Western Europe, suggesting a causal link between both phenomena. A possible mechanism could be a geomagnetic modulation of the cosmic ray flux that would control the nucleation rate of clouds. We wish to underline the remarkable coincidence between archeomagnetic jerks, cooling events in Western Europe and drought periods in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the northern hemisphere. The latter two can be interpreted in terms of global teleconnections among regional climates. It has been suggested that these climatic variations had caused major changes in the history of ancient civilizations, such as in Mesopotamia, which were critically dependent on water supply and particularly vulnerable to lower rainfall amounts. This is one of the foundations of "climate determinism". Our studies, which suggest a geomagnetic origin for at least some of the inferred climatic events, lead us to propose the idea of a "geomagnetic determinism" in the history of humanity.

  11. Determination of ideal-gas enthalpies of formation for key compounds:

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Nguyen, A.; Hossenlopp, I.A.; Smith, N.K.

    1991-10-01

    The results of a study aimed at improvement of group-contribution methodology for estimation of thermodynamic properties of organic and organosilicon substances are reported. Specific weaknesses where particular group-contribution terms were unknown, or estimated because of lack of experimental data, are addressed by experimental studies of enthalpies of combustion in the condensed phase, vapor-pressure measurements, and differential scanning calorimetric (d.s.c.) heat-capacity measurements. Ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of ({plus minus})-butan-2-ol, tetradecan-1-ol, hexan-1,6-diol, methacrylamide, benzoyl formic acid, naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid dimethyl ester, and tetraethylsilane are reported. A crystalline-phase enthalpy of formation at 298.15 K was determined for naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid, which decomposed at 695 K before melting. The combustion calorimetry of tetraethylsilane used the proven fluorine-additivity methodology. Critical temperature and critical density were determined for tetraethylsilane with differential scanning calorimeter and the critical pressure was derived. Group-additivity parameters useful in the application of group- contribution correlations are derived. 112 refs., 13 figs., 19 tabs.

  12. 75 FR 65696 - Cost-of-Living Increase and Other Determinations for 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ..., 2009 (74 FR 55614), along with the percentage change in the average wage from 2008 to 2009 measured by... for 1951 through 1977 (published December 29, 1978, at 43 FR 61016), we multiply the 2008 national... Security Income (SSI) monthly benefit amounts for 2011, under title XVI of the Act, will remain $674 for...

  13. Cyst-based toxicity tests XVI--sensitivity comparison of the solid phase Heterocypris incongruens microbiotest with the Hyalella azteca and Chironomus riparius contact assays on freshwater sediments from Peninsula Harbour (Ontario, Canada).

    PubMed

    Belgis, Z Chial; Persoone, Guido; Blaise, Christian

    2003-07-01

    In view of the complexity and costs of "traditional" whole sediment assays, a "culture/maintenance free" direct contact microbiotest has been developed with the freshwater ostracod Heterocypris incongruens. The new Toxkit assay (named Ostracodtoxkit) has been applied to 33 sediment samples from Peninsula Harbour, located in Lake Superior of the Great Lakes water basin in Ontario, Canada. The microbiotest was applied in parallel to direct contact tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge larva Chironomus riparius, to compare its relative sensitivity with that of the two "conventional" assays. The study was undertaken in the framework of remediation action plans for specific areas of concern, to enable decision making by the Canadian authorities for the restoration of impacted aquatic environments. Most sediments were found non-toxic (<20% mortality) to both the conventional test species and the ostracod. For the large majority of samples, a very good correspondence was found between the two crustacean test species for the intensity of the toxic signal "mortality", as reflected by a 0.71 (p<0.05) correlation coefficient. Growth inhibition, which is determined in the ostracod microbiotest as a sublethal effect criterion, allowed the earmarking of some sediment samples, which were apparently more toxic for the amphipod than to the ostracod. For 20% of the samples, substantially higher mortality scores were noted with the ostracod assay than with the midge larvae tests and the overall correlation coefficient between these two tests was lower (r=0.60,p<0.05). The results obtained in the present study corroborate those of previous research on sediments collected from various rivers in Flanders, Belgium, and confirm the potential of the new ostracod microbiotest as a reliable and sensitive low cost alternative for traditional whole sediment assays. PMID:12729691

  14. Thermal and Physical Property Determinations for Ionsiv IE-911 Crystalline Silicotitanate and Savannah River Site Waste Simulant Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, D.T.; Steele, W.V.

    1999-08-01

    This document describes physical and thermophysical property determinations that were made in order to resolve questions associated with the decontamination of Savannah River Site (SRS) waste streams using ion exchange on crystalline silicotitanate (CST). The research will aid in the understanding of potential issues associated with cooling of feed streams within SRS waste treatment processes. Toward this end, the thermophysical properties of engineered CST, manufactured under the trade name, Ionsive{reg_sign} IE-911 by UOP, Mobile, AL, were determined. The heating profiles of CST samples from several manufacturers' production runs were observed using differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) measurements. DSC data were obtained over the region of 10 to 215 C to check for the possibility of a phase transition or any other enthalpic event in that temperature region. Finally, the heat capacity, thermal conductivity, density, viscosity, and salting-out point were determined for SRS waste simulants designated as Average, High NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and High OH{sup {minus}} simulants.

  15. Determination of test methods for the prediction of the behavior of mass concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Christopher C.

    Hydration at early ages results from chemical and physical processes that take place between Portland cement and water, and is an exothermic process. The resultant heat evolution and temperature rise for massive concrete placements can be so great that the temperature differentials between the internal concrete core and outer concrete stratum can cause cracking due to thermal gradients. Accurate prediction of temperature distribution and stresses in mass concrete is needed to determine if a given concrete mixture design may have problems in the field, so that adjustments to the design can be made prior to its use. This research examines calorimetric, strength, and physical testing methods in an effort to predict the thermal and physical behavior of mass concrete. Four groups of concrete mixture types containing different cementitious materials are examined. One group contains Portland cement, while the other three groups incorporate large replacements of supplementary cementitious materials: granulated blast furnace slag, fly ash, and a ternary blend (combining Portland cement, fly ash, and slag).

  16. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CFR 31.7. All student activity accounts shall be audited annually. (h) The school shall provide for... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MINIMUM ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE... develop leadership abilities and provide opportunities for student participation but not be limited...

  17. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CFR 31.7. All student activity accounts shall be audited annually. (h) The school shall provide for... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MINIMUM ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE... develop leadership abilities and provide opportunities for student participation but not be limited...

  18. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CFR 31.7. All student activity accounts shall be audited annually. (h) The school shall provide for... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MINIMUM ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE... develop leadership abilities and provide opportunities for student participation but not be limited...

  19. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... CFR 31.7. All student activity accounts shall be audited annually. (h) The school shall provide for... develop leadership abilities and provide opportunities for student participation but not be limited...

  20. [Medical practice in Rome during the XVI century].

    PubMed

    Fagiolo, Enzo

    2003-01-01

    S. Filippo Neri (1515-1595), founder of the Congregazione dell'Oratorio in Rome, was a longly debated clinic case for his various pathologies. Eminent scientists, like B. Eustachio and A. Cesalpino, treated him and drew up clinical reports, which were inserted in the Canonization Process and also published as scientific works, and which give useful informations about the history of medicine in the second half of the 16th century. Those reports relate, among others, about many diseases like frequent heart palpitation, shaking tremors heat flame and bronchitic fever episodes, that since hte age of thirty affected the saint. Autopsy revealed cardiac hypertrophia and pulmonary artery dilatation over twice the normal diameter. G. M. Lancisi was the first who formulated the hypothesis of an artery aneurysm, which, according to the present knowledge, can be produced by a post-stenotic dilatation of the pulmonary valve and/or pulmonary hypertension. Tremors and flames can be attributed to hyperthyroidism. Doctors who treated S. Filippo Neri and who shoved to be aware of his psychology, considered his pathology due to supernatural causes. Their conclusions can be understood basing on the medical way of thinking of that age, which was still linked to ancient medicine and limited by the biological and medical knowledge of the time. PMID:15682543

  1. Planck intermediate results. XVI. Profile likelihoods for cosmological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski∗, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Starck, J.-L.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-06-01

    We explore the 2013 Planck likelihood function with a high-precision multi-dimensional minimizer (Minuit). This allows a refinement of the ΛCDM best-fit solution with respect to previously-released results, and the construction of frequentist confidence intervals using profile likelihoods. The agreement with the cosmological results from the Bayesian framework is excellent, demonstrating the robustness of the Planck results to the statistical methodology. We investigate the inclusion of neutrino masses, where more significant differences may appear due to the non-Gaussian nature of the posterior mass distribution. By applying the Feldman-Cousins prescription, we again obtain results very similar to those of the Bayesian methodology. However, the profile-likelihood analysis of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) combination (Planck+WP+highL) reveals a minimum well within the unphysical negative-mass region. We show that inclusion of the Planck CMB-lensing information regularizes this issue, and provide a robust frequentist upper limit ∑ mν ≤ 0.26 eV (95% confidence) from the CMB+lensing+BAO data combination.

  2. Minor planets and related objects. XVI - Polarimetric diameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, B.; Gehrels, T.; Gradie, J.

    1974-01-01

    Polarimetric observations of 43 asteroids are presented. All objects show a well-developed negative polarization branch as an indicator of unconsolidated surface regoliths. The empirical slope-albedo law for diffusely reflecting solid surfaces is reexamined and used to compute polarimetric albedos and diameters for 30 asteroids. In many cases the results are in good agreement with infrared-radiometric diameters; the older visual diameter measurements were systematically too small. Radiometric albedos below 5%, however, are not confirmed by the polarimetry. Bimodal frequency distributions are noted for asteroid color, albedo, and the depth of the negative polarization branch. Correlations between B - V color and polarimetric parameters suggest that most of the asteroid population can be divided into silicaceous and carbonaceous opacity classes.

  3. Follow-Up of "Harbinger" Readership. Volume XVI, No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, Toni

    In spring 1987, a study was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to assess students' perceptions of the campus newspaper, "The Harbinger," in order to assist "Harbinger" staff in meeting student needs. A random sample of 240 degree credit students and 160 non-degree credit students enrolled in fall 1986 were surveyed by mail to…

  4. a GIS of SARDINIA'S Coastal Defense System (xvi - XVIII Century)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deidda, M.; Musa, C.; Vacca, G.

    2015-06-01

    The use of GIS as a tool for archival, analysis and representation of geographic information has become significantly popular in many scientific fields that are directly concerned with the "territory" as their object of study. The field of application of GIS, however, has expanded also in other areas, such as those related to humanities and architecture, in which the territory is studied in an "indirect" mode because it constitutes a kind of substrate on which to develop a specific spatial analysis for particular purposes. Among these areas are to be included certainly archeology and restoration, fields in which the GIS has become a useful tool for historical studies. In this work we present a GIS developed for the study of the historical and territorial coastal defense system of Sardinia (16th - 18th century), in order to respond to the need to store, analyze and efficiently manage the information regarding cultural heritage and landscape heritage such as that consisting of the coastal defensive towers of Sardinia. This defensive system, in fact, was composed by over 100 towers positioned around the entire coastal perimeter of Sardinia, of which more than 90 still exist today. Their position was planned on the basis of the following criteria: - Warning the neighboring towers about the sighting of enemy ships - Protecting coasts located near the towns - Monitoring the water sources near the coast - Allowing for the full visibility of the coasts of any morphology With this study we also verified, through the use of high resolution and high accuracy DTM (LiDAR) and the topographic databases, whether the positioning criteria specified in the design of the system were respected and effective.

  5. Determination of the relaxation characteristics of sugar glasses embedded in microfiber substrates.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lindong; Elliott, Gloria D

    2014-11-01

    Recently there has been considerable interest in developing sugar glasses that enable storage of biologics without refrigeration. Microfiber filter papers are good substrates for drying biologics in the presence of sugar glass-formers, providing for an even distribution of samples and an enhanced surface area for drying, but the opaqueness prevents macroscopic observation of the sample and can introduce complexities that impede physical characterization. Because drying kinetics and processing conditions can impact the relaxation dynamics (e.g., α- and β-relaxation), which can influence the efficacy of the glass as a stabilizer, methods are needed that can enable a determination of relaxation phenomena of sugar glasses in such complex environments. In this study we present a method which provides verification of the absence of crystallinity following drying on glass fiber filter paper and also enables the determination of relaxation characteristics of amorphous sugar compositions embedded within these filter substrates. Using material pockets to contain the sugar glass-embedded microfiber paper, the α-relaxation temperature, Tα, was determined as a function of the water content in trehalose and sucrose samples using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). Results were verified by comparison with previous calorimetric and spectroscopic studies. The data also demonstrated the plasticizing effects of water, as Tα was shown to correlate with water content via a Gordon-Taylor-like relationship. Our findings validate a new approach for determining the relaxation characteristics of microfiber embedded sugar glasses, and offer new insights into the relaxation characteristics of glasses prepared by microwave-assisted drying on filter papers. PMID:25280724

  6. DIPPER project 871 determination of ideal-gas enthalpies of formation for key compounds, The 1991 project results

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Knipmeyer, S.E.; Nguyen, A.; Tasker, I.R.

    1993-09-01

    Results of a study aimed at improving group-contribution methodology for estimating thermodynamic properties of organic substances are reported. Specific weaknesses where particular group-contribution terms were unknown, or estimated because of lack of experimental data, are addressed by experimental studies of enthalpies of combustion in condensed phase, vapor-pressure measurements, and differential scanning calorimetric (d.s.c.) heat-capacity measurements. Ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of cyclohexene, phthalan (2,5-dihydrobenzo-3,4-furan), isoxazole, n-octylamine, di-n-octylamine, tri-n-octylamine, phenyl isocyanate, and 1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine are reported. Two-phase (liquid + vapor) heat capacities were determined for phthalan, isoxazole, the three octylamines, and phenyl isocyanate. Liquid-phase densities along the saturation line were measured for phthalan and isoxazole at 298 to 425 K. The critical temperature and critical density of n-octylamine were determined from d.s.c. results and critical pressure derived from the fitting procedures. Fitting procedures were used to derive critical temperatures, pressures, and densities for cyclohexene (pressure and density only), phthalan, isoxazole, di-n-octylamine, and phenyl isocyanate. Group-additivity parameters or ring-correction terms are derived.

  7. An improved single crystal adsorption calorimeter for determining gas adsorption and reaction energies on complex model catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer-Wolfarth, Jan-Henrik; Hartmann, Jens; Farmer, Jason A.; Flores-Camacho, J. Manuel; Campbell, Charles T.; Schauermann, Swetlana; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2011-02-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum microcalorimeter for measuring heats of adsorption and adsorption-induced surface reactions on complex single crystal-based model surfaces is described. It has been specifically designed to study the interaction of gaseous molecules with well-defined model catalysts consisting of metal nanoparticles supported on single crystal surfaces or epitaxial thin oxide films grown on single crystals. The detection principle is based on the previously described measurement of the temperature rise upon adsorption of gaseous molecules by use of a pyroelectric polymer ribbon, which is brought into mechanical/thermal contact with the back side of the thin single crystal. The instrument includes (i) a preparation chamber providing the required equipment to prepare supported model catalysts involving well-defined nanoparticles on clean single crystal surfaces and to characterize them using surface analysis techniques and in situ reflectivity measurements and (ii) the adsorption/reaction chamber containing a molecular beam, a pyroelectric heat detector, and calibration tools for determining the absolute reactant fluxes and adsorption heats. The molecular beam is produced by a differentially pumped source based on a multichannel array capable of providing variable fluxes of both high and low vapor pressure gaseous molecules in the range of 0.005-1.5 × 1015 molecules cm-2 s-1 and is modulated by means of the computer-controlled chopper with the shortest pulse length of 150 ms. The calorimetric measurements of adsorption and reaction heats can be performed in a broad temperature range from 100 to 300 K. A novel vibrational isolation method for the pyroelectric detector is introduced for the reduction of acoustic noise. The detector shows a pulse-to-pulse standard deviation ≤15 nJ when heat pulses in the range of 190-3600 nJ are applied to the sample surface with a chopped laser. Particularly for CO adsorption on Pt(111), the energy input of 15 nJ (or 120 nJ cm-2) corresponds to the detection limit for adsorption of less than 1.5 × 1012 CO molecules cm-2 or less than 0.1% of the monolayer coverage (with respect to the 1.5 × 1015 surface Pt atoms cm-2). The absolute accuracy in energy is within ˜7%-9%. As a test of the new calorimeter, the adsorption heats of CO on Pt(111) at different temperatures were measured and compared to previously obtained calorimetric data at 300 K.

  8. An improved single crystal adsorption calorimeter for determining gas adsorption and reaction energies on complex model catalysts.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Wolfarth, Jan-Henrik; Hartmann, Jens; Farmer, Jason A; Flores-Camacho, J Manuel; Campbell, Charles T; Schauermann, Swetlana; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2011-02-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum microcalorimeter for measuring heats of adsorption and adsorption-induced surface reactions on complex single crystal-based model surfaces is described. It has been specifically designed to study the interaction of gaseous molecules with well-defined model catalysts consisting of metal nanoparticles supported on single crystal surfaces or epitaxial thin oxide films grown on single crystals. The detection principle is based on the previously described measurement of the temperature rise upon adsorption of gaseous molecules by use of a pyroelectric polymer ribbon, which is brought into mechanical∕thermal contact with the back side of the thin single crystal. The instrument includes (i) a preparation chamber providing the required equipment to prepare supported model catalysts involving well-defined nanoparticles on clean single crystal surfaces and to characterize them using surface analysis techniques and in situ reflectivity measurements and (ii) the adsorption∕reaction chamber containing a molecular beam, a pyroelectric heat detector, and calibration tools for determining the absolute reactant fluxes and adsorption heats. The molecular beam is produced by a differentially pumped source based on a multichannel array capable of providing variable fluxes of both high and low vapor pressure gaseous molecules in the range of 0.005-1.5 × 10(15) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) and is modulated by means of the computer-controlled chopper with the shortest pulse length of 150 ms. The calorimetric measurements of adsorption and reaction heats can be performed in a broad temperature range from 100 to 300 K. A novel vibrational isolation method for the pyroelectric detector is introduced for the reduction of acoustic noise. The detector shows a pulse-to-pulse standard deviation ≤15 nJ when heat pulses in the range of 190-3600 nJ are applied to the sample surface with a chopped laser. Particularly for CO adsorption on Pt(111), the energy input of 15 nJ (or 120 nJ cm(-2)) corresponds to the detection limit for adsorption of less than 1.5 × 10(12) CO molecules cm(-2) or less than 0.1% of the monolayer coverage (with respect to the 1.5 × 10(15) surface Pt atoms cm(-2)). The absolute accuracy in energy is within ∼7%-9%. As a test of the new calorimeter, the adsorption heats of CO on Pt(111) at different temperatures were measured and compared to previously obtained calorimetric data at 300 K. PMID:21361615

  9. Twist, tilt, and orientational order at the nematic to twist-bend nematic phase transition of 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane: A dielectric, 2H NMR, and calorimetric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Hernández, Beatriz; Sebastián, Nerea; de la Fuente, M. Rosario; López, David O.; Diez-Berart, Sergio; Salud, Josep; Ros, M. Blanca; Dunmur, David A.; Luckhurst, Geoffrey R.; Timimi, Bakir A.

    2015-12-01

    The nature of the nematic-nematic phase transition in the liquid crystal dimer 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane (CB9CB) has been investigated using techniques of calorimetry, dynamic dielectric response measurements, and 2H NMR spectroscopy. The experimental results for CB9CB show that, like the shorter homologue CB7CB, the studied material exhibits a normal nematic phase, which on cooling undergoes a transition to the twist-bend nematic phase (NTB), a uniaxial nematic phase, promoted by the average bent molecular shape, in which the director tilts and precesses describing a conical helix. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry has been used to analyze the nature of the NTB-N phase transition, which is found to be weakly first order, but close to tricritical. Additionally broadband dielectric spectroscopy and 2H magnetic resonance studies have revealed information on the structural characteristics of the recently discovered twist-bend nematic phase. Analysis of the dynamic dielectric response in both nematic phases has provided an estimate of the conical angle of the heliconical structure for the NTB phase. Capacitance measurements of the electric-field realignment of the director in initially planar aligned cells have yielded values for the splay and bend elastic constants in the high temperature nematic phase. The bend elastic constant is small and decreases with decreasing temperature as the twist-bend phase is approached. This behavior is expected theoretically and has been observed in materials that form the twist-bend nematic phase. 2H NMR measurements characterize the chiral helical twist identified in the twist-bend nematic phase and also allow the determination of the temperature dependence of the conical angle and the orientational order parameter with respect to the director.

  10. Viscous heating effects in silicate melts: an experimental determination.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, K.; Cordonnier, B.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D.

    2006-12-01

    Viscous heating can play an important role in the transition from effusive, low-mass flow rate to explosive, high- mass flow rate eruptions. Recent results from numerical models that calculate the fluid dynamics of explosive volcanic eruptions show that the heat generated by viscous friction produces a local increase in temperature near the tube walls. Consequently a decrease in viscosity and a strong stratification in the viscosity profile (which can trigger the onset of a sustained, steady, high mass flow rate phase of an explosive eruption, as well as for the transition from effusive to explosive behaviour) is obtained. Here we present the first experimental proof of the possibility of increasing the temperature of silicate melts by 10s of K due to dissipated mechanical energy by using a newly developed high-temperature, high-load apparatus. To study the rheology of silicate melts, we performed a viscosity study on a synthetic silicate melt (viscosity standard) and a natural calc-alkaline obsidian. The samples were placed between the two pistons of the apparatus and heated up to the desired temperature above the calorimetric glass transition temperature and the temperature was determined with 3 equi-spaced thermocouples inside the samples. After allowing the system to reach thermal equilibrium (~ 8 hours) in a parallel plate type experiment, pressure was applied (up to 110 MPa) and held up to several 10s of seconds. The temperature increase due to viscous dissipation inside the sample is a function of applied force, time and composition (up to 14 K in 8 sec at 110 MPa). In the raw data (viscosity versus time, assuming no viscous heating effect) an apparent onset of Non-Newtonian flow behaviour is observed at stress and strain rates consistent to prior data from fibre-elongation studies. However if the data are corrected for the effect of temperature on viscosity, the "apparent" onset of Non-Newtonian flow behaviour is not observed. In these deformations the viscous heating effect intercedes and generates the apparent onset of strain-rate dependence .

  11. Application of In-Line Mid-Infrared (MIR) Spectroscopy Coupled with Calorimetry for the Determination of the Molar Enthalpy of Reaction between Ammonium Chloride and Sodium Nitrite.

    PubMed

    Kartnaller, Vinicius; Mariano, Danielly C O; Cajaiba, João

    2016-03-01

    The reaction between ammonium chloride and sodium nitrite has been known for its application as a source of heat because of its large enthalpy of reaction, for which it has been used by the oil industry. There have been no known calorimetric studies for the experimental determination of its molar enthalpy of reaction, which is necessary in order to predict the limits achieved for up-scale applications. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) and reaction calorimetry were used to determine this value by using a simple methodology. Both techniques were used concomitantly as a source of information regarding the time-dependent moles converted (Δn) and the amount of exchanged heat (ΔH). The molar enthalpy of reaction was calculated to be -74 ± 4 kcal mol(-1). The percentage between the confidence interval and the calculated value was 5.4%, which shows that the methodology was precise. After the determination of the molar enthalpy of reaction, it was proved that the ATR FT-IR alone was able to be used as a substitute for the reaction calorimetry technique, in which the IR signal is converted to the heat information, presenting as an easier technique for the monitoring of the heat released by this system for future applications. PMID:26798078

  12. Study the penetration of IR laser radiation in human teeth: determination of the absorbed and scattered parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova, Pepa; Rabadgiiska, Stanislava; Uzunov, Tzonko; Kisov, Hristo; Kaimakanova, Nadejda; Deneva, Margarita; Dinkov, Emil; Nenchev, Marin

    2013-03-01

    By using the developed by us approaches and instrumentation, we have obtained and presented series of systematized data, which are important for the use of the laser light in infrared (IR) spectral region. The obtained data include: 1) reflectivity of the human tooth dentin; 2) the spatial intensity distribution in the cross-section of the light beam penetrating the tooth's dentin; 3) the absorbed and the diffused parts of the laser light that have been determined separately through combination of optical and calorimetric techniques. The last result is the most important because it permits to calculate the dentin absorption and scattering coefficients. The study is performed for the laser light at two easily generated wavelengths - 1.06 μm and 1.36 μm, emitted by the Nd:YAG laser that is well known, commercially available, economical and widely used in many laboratories and medical institutions. The study is made on the basis of fresh in-vitro teeth samples from the persons of Bulgaria, Sofia region.

  13. Genomics of sex determination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jisen; Boualem, Adnane; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Ming, Ray

    2014-04-01

    Sex determination is a major switch in the evolutionary history of angiosperm, resulting 11% monoecious and dioecious species. The genomic sequences of papaya sex chromosomes unveiled the molecular basis of recombination suppression in the sex determination region, and candidate genes for sex determination. Identification and analyses of sex determination genes in cucurbits and maize demonstrated conservation of sex determination mechanism in one lineage and divergence between the two systems. Epigenetic control and hormonal influence of sex determination were elucidated in both plants and animals. Intensive investigation of potential sex determination genes in model species will improve our understanding of sex determination gene network. Such network will in turn accelerate the identification of sex determination genes in dioecious species with sex chromosomes, which are burdensome due to no recombination in sex determining regions. The sex determination genes in dioecious species are crucial for understanding the origin of dioecy and sex chromosomes, particularly in their early stage of evolution. PMID:24682067

  14. Calorimetric glass transition in a mean-field theory approach.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Parisi, Giorgio; Rainone, Corrado

    2015-02-24

    The study of the properties of glass-forming liquids is difficult for many reasons. Analytic solutions of mean-field models are usually available only for systems embedded in a space with an unphysically high number of spatial dimensions; on the experimental and numerical side, the study of the properties of metastable glassy states requires thermalizing the system in the supercooled liquid phase, where the thermalization time may be extremely large. We consider here a hard-sphere mean-field model that is solvable in any number of spatial dimensions; moreover, we easily obtain thermalized configurations even in the glass phase. We study the 3D version of this model and we perform Monte Carlo simulations that mimic heating and cooling experiments performed on ultrastable glasses. The numerical findings are in good agreement with the analytical results and qualitatively capture the features of ultrastable glasses observed in experiments. PMID:25675523

  15. Calorimetric thermometry of meteoritic troilite: Preliminary thermometer relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Gooding, James L.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of the alpha/beta phase transformation in terrestrial troilite (FeS), as measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), vary systematically with prior thermal history of the troilite, as imposed under laboratory conditions. Both the transition temperature and enthalpy change for the alpha/beta transformation decrease with increasing maximum temperature of prior heat treatment. DSC measurements on troilite from various meteorites indicate clear differences in the alpha/beta thermodynamic properties that are consistent with differences in the natural thermal histories of the meteorites.

  16. High pressure calorimetric studies of gas-polymer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tapan

    Gas sorption in polymeric materials is marked by mass uptake, volume dilation and enthalpy release. The enthalpy of sorption is a measure of polymer-penetrant interactions that complements mass uptake and volume dilation. We have developed a novel technique for direct measurement of enthalpy release, diffusion coefficient of gases and glass transition temperature of polymers in the presence of gas by high pressure microcalorimeter. Polymers used in this study are: bisphenol-A polycarbonate (PC), tetramethyl polycarbonate, tetrachloro polycarbonate, tetrabromo polycarbonate, poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly-dimethyl siloxane (PDMS). Gas used in the study is COsb2. Sorption is an exothermic phenomena. The heat of sorption in PDMS is constant at -1.5 kcal/mole, up to 300 psig and does not change upon depressurization. In PC, the heat of sorption changes from -3.4 kcal/mole during pressurization to -7.2 kcal/mole during depressurization due to presence of excess free volume regions in the glassy polycarbonate. The magnitude of enthalpy of sorption increases with conditioning pressure. Enthalpy of carbon dioxide sorption in polycarbonate substitutes are measured All samples were preconditioned with COsb2 at 300 psig and 35sp°C for 24 hours. The magnitude of the heat of sorption does not correlate well with polymer free volume, gas solubility or gas partial molar volume. The results suggest that free volume regions are not uniformly accessible. The transient signal from enthalpy of sorption experiment is used to extract diffusion coefficient. The diffusivities appear to be independent of sorbed gas concentration due to thermal inertia of the instrument although a increasing trend is expected. Glass transition temperature of polymers in the presence of high pressure COsb2 is measured. Tsbg measurements of the COsb2 - Poly(methyl methacrylate) system as a function g of gas phase pressure were made. Foaming appears to interfere with Tsbg measurement at the highest gas pressures. The COsb2 induced Tsbg depression of a series of polycarbonates increases with decreasing glass transition temperature reflecting an increase in intrinsic chain mobility as evidenced by the glass transition temperature.

  17. Calorimetric analysis of cryopreservation and freeze-drying formulations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wendell Q

    2015-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a commonly used thermal analysis technique in cryopreservation and freeze-drying research. It has been used to investigate crystallization, eutectic formation, glass transition, devitrification, recrystallization, melting, polymorphism, molecular relaxation, phase separation, water transport, thermochemistry, and kinetics of complex reactions (e.g., protein denaturation). Such information can be used for the optimization of protective formulations and process protocols. This chapter gives an introduction to beginners who are less familiar with this technique. It covers the instrument and its basic principles, followed by a discussion of the methods as well as examples of specific applications. PMID:25428006

  18. Superconducting calorimetric alpha particle sensors for nuclear nonproliferation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horansky, Robert D.; Ullom, Joel N.; Beall, James A.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Dry, Donald E.; Hastings, Elizabeth P.; Lamont, Stephen P.; Rudy, Clifford R.; Rabin, Michael W.

    2008-09-22

    Identification of trace nuclear materials is usually accomplished by alpha spectrometry. Current detectors cannot distinguish critical elements and isotopes. We have developed a detector called a microcalorimeter, which achieves a resolution of 1.06 keV for 5.3 MeV alphas, the highest resolving power of any energy dispersive measurement. With this exquisite resolution, we can unambiguously identify the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio in Pu, a critical measurement for ascertaining the intended use of nuclear material. Furthermore, we have made a direct measurement of the {sup 209}Po ground state decay.

  19. Thermodynamic properties for polycyclic systems by non-calorimetric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, W. V.; Chirico, R. D.; Klots, T. D.

    1993-03-01

    A detailed vibrational spectroscopic study of furan, pyrrole, and thiophene has been completed. These compounds form part of the base of five-membered ring systems on which the rest of the research program will be built. Several methyl-substituted derivatives were also studied. The results will be used to confirm the model for alkyl-substitution in the ring systems. Gas-phase spectra and fundamental frequency assignments were completed for 2,3- and 2,5-dihydrofuran. Those compounds initiate work on ring-puckering within the research program. A paper describing the need for third virial estimation, when using the virial equation of state to derive thermodynamic properties at pressures greater than 1 bar was completed.

  20. Calorimetric study of carbon partitioning from martensite into austenite steel

    SciTech Connect

    De Moor, Emmanuel; Foejer, Cecilia; Penning, Jan; Clarke, Amy J.; Speer, John G.

    2010-09-01

    Quenching and partitioning (Q and P) has been developed as a novel steel heat treatment to produce advanced high-strength microstructures consisting of a martensitic matrix containing significant amounts of retained austenite. Austenite stabilization is hypothesized to result from decarburization of the martensite and transport into the austenite. Differential scanning calorimetry was employed to study Q and P microstructures. Two exothermic events were observed when heating a Q and P sample from room temperature to 600 deg. C. An activation energy suggesting a mechanism controlled by carbon diffusion in bcc iron is obtained for the first peak which is believed to be associated with carbon partitioning. The second peak is believed to be associated with austenite decomposition.

  1. Calorimetric studies of the elongation of Avena coleoptile segments.

    PubMed

    Bogie, H E; Kresheck, G C; Harmet, K H

    1976-06-01

    Elongation rate and heat produced by Avena coleoptile segments suspended in sucrose buffer solutions were measured at pH values from 3.5 to 8.5. The caloric efficiency of elongation (CEE) was defined as the ratio of the rate of elongation to the rate of heat production. Elongation and CEE were greatest at intermediate pH values, but heat production (about 1 cal/g.hr) was insensitive to pH within the limits of experimental error (+/-20%). Quantitative agreement was found between the results of previous respiration studies and the rate of heat production in an aerobic atmosphere, which indicates that oxidative metabolism accounts for essentially all energy changes in the cell, so matter flow is a significant component of the bioenergetics of cell function. Indole-3-acetic acid up to 1 mm, produced about a 10-fold increase in elongation rate, a 5-fold increase of the CEE, and a 25% increase in heat production. Above this concentration, sharp drops in both elongation and heat production occurred, without altering the CEE at pH 6.5, but greatly decreasing the CEE at pH 4.5. Elongation and CEE showed marked decreases after 4 hours in an anaerobic atmosphere, but heat production did not exhibit a proportional decrease. These studies indicate that rate of cell elongation in the presence and absence of auxin is not directly proportional to the overall metabolism of the cell. PMID:16659582

  2. Calorimetric studies of the state of water in seed tissues.

    PubMed

    Vertucci, C W

    1990-12-01

    To understand the physical state of water in hydrating biological tissues, thermodynamic properties of water in cotyledons of pea and soybean with moisture contents ranging from 0.01 g H(2)O/g dw to 1.0 g H(2)O/g dw were studied using differential scanning calorimetry. The heat capacity of the tissues increased abruptly at moisture contents above 0.08 and 0.12 g H(2)O/g dw for soybean and pea cotyledons, respectively. Melting transitions of water were observed at moisture contents >0.23 and 0.26 g H(2)O/g dw for soybean and pea. However, freezing of water was not observed unless moisture contents exceeded 0.33-0.35 g H(2)O/g dw. In both seed tissues, the temperatures of the freezing and melting varied with moisture content and showed hysterisis. The energy of the transition also varied with moisture content and was similar to the heats of fusion and crystallization of pure water only at moisture contents >0.54 and 0.58 gH(2)O/g dw for soybean and pea seeds, respectively. The thermal properties of water change distinctly as seed moisture content changes: at least five states or water can be identified. PMID:19431782

  3. Calorimetric Study of Several Cuprates with Restricted Dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masaaki; Furuta, Tomoki; Ishikawa, Masayasu

    1996-09-01

    By means of specific heat and magnetic susceptibility measurements we investigated the magnetic compounds of various crystal structure, CuWO4, LiCuVO4, CuSb2O6, CuNb2O6 and CuBi2O4. All of these cuprates revealed strong one-dimensional (1D) correlations persisting up to very high temperatures which are well explained by the S=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic linear-chain model. At lower temperatures they showed various long-range magnetic ordering except for CuNb2O6. In particular, we observed a rather unusual transition at 2.4 K for LiCuVO4 which is conjectured to be a transition to the S=1/2 quadratic Ising antiferromagnet, thereby demonstrating a dimensional cross-over of correlations from 1D to 2D. The magnetic susceptibility and specific heat exhibit a critical point and a logarithmic divergence at 2.4 K, respectively, as predicted by theory. We herein report the experimental results and the preliminary analyses of these low-dimensional cuprates.

  4. NUSAT 1 attitude determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talaga, Paul

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the methods for attitude determination using the static wide angle field of view sensors of NUSAT 1. Some supporting analysis and operational results are given. The system gives at best a crude attitude determination.

  5. [Determination of methocarbamol].

    PubMed

    Rzeszutko, W

    1990-01-01

    Method of determination of 3-(2-metoxyfenoxy)-1,3-propandiol (Methocarbamol) with Marquisa reagent was verified. New method of quantitative determination based on the coloured reaction with Ce (IV) ion was developed. PMID:12959236

  6. Quantum statistical determinism

    SciTech Connect

    Bitsakis, E.

    1988-03-01

    This paper attempts to analyze the concept of quantum statistical determinism. This is done after we have clarified the epistemic difference between causality and determinism and discussed the content of classical forms of determinism-mechanical and dynamical. Quantum statistical determinism transcends the classical forms, for it expresses the multiple potentialities of quantum systems. The whole argument is consistent with a statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics.

  7. Self-Determination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Transition Summary, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This issue of "Transition Summary" contains articles about self-determination and becoming a good self-advocate, with each article reflecting the experience of someone who has grown up with a disability. "The Many Facets of Self-Determination" (Michael Ward) discusses the concept of self-determination; offers an historical perspective of the…

  8. CALORIMETER-BASED ADJUSTMENT OF MULTIPLICITY DETERMINED 240PU EFF KNOWN-A ANALYSIS FOR THE ASSAY OF PLUTONIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Dubose, F.

    2012-02-21

    In nuclear material processing facilities, it is often necessary to balance the competing demands of accuracy and throughput. While passive neutron multiplicity counting is the preferred method for relatively fast assays of plutonium, the presence of low-Z impurities (fluorine, beryllium, etc.) rapidly erodes the assay precision of passive neutron counting techniques, frequently resulting in unacceptably large total measurement uncertainties. Conversely, while calorimeters are immune to these impurity effects, the long count times required for high accuracy can be a hindrance to efficiency. The higher uncertainties in passive neutron measurements of impure material are driven by the resulting large (>>2) {alpha}-values, defined as the ({alpha},n):spontaneous fission neutron emission ratio. To counter impurity impacts for high-{alpha} materials, a known-{alpha} approach may be adopted. In this method, {alpha} is determined for a single item using a combination of gamma-ray and calorimetric measurements. Because calorimetry is based on heat output, rather than a statistical distribution of emitted neutrons, an {alpha}-value determined in this way is far more accurate than one determined from passive neutron counts. This fixed {alpha} value can be used in conventional multiplicity analysis for any plutonium-bearing item having the same chemical composition and isotopic distribution as the original. With the results of single calorimeter/passive neutron/gamma-ray measurement, these subsequent items can then be assayed with high precision and accuracy in a relatively short time, despite the presence of impurities. A calorimeter-based known-{alpha} multiplicity analysis technique is especially useful when requiring rapid, high accuracy, high precision measurements of multiple plutonium bearing items having a common source. The technique has therefore found numerous applications at the Savannah River Site. In each case, a plutonium (or mixed U/Pu) bearing item is divided into multiple containers. A single item from that batch is then selected for both neutron and calorimetric measurements; all remaining items undergo a neutron measurement only. Using the technique mentioned above, the 'true' {alpha} value determined from the first (calorimeter and passive neutron measured) item is used in multiplicity analysis for all other items in the batch. The justification for using this {alpha} value in subsequent calculations is the assumption that the chemical composition and isotopic distribution of all batch items are the same, giving a constant ({alpha},n):spontaneous fission ratio. This analysis method has been successfully applied to the KIS Facility, significantly improving measurement uncertainties and reducing processing times for numerous items. Comprehensive plans were later developed to extend the use of this method to other applications, including the K-Area Shuffler and the H-Area Pu-Blending Project. While only the feasibility study for the Shuffler has been completed, implementation of the method in the H-Area Pu-Blending Project is currently in progress and has been successfully applied to multiple items. This report serves to document the details of this method in order to serve as a reference for future applications. Also contained herein are specific examples of the application of known-{alpha} multiplicity analysis.

  9. Nephelometric determination of fluorine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, R.E.

    1936-01-01

    Fluorine in minerals may be determined with the nephelometer to about 1 per cent of the fluorine. The determination is made on an aliquot of the sodium chloride solution of the fluorine, obtained by the Berzelius method of extraction. The fluorine is precipitated as colloidal calcium fluoride in alcoholic solution, gelatin serving as a protective colloid. Arsenates, sulfates, and phosphates, which interfere with the determination, must be removed.

  10. Independent trajectory determination system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, M. G.; Tomaszewski, I. B.

    1977-01-01

    Stand-alone subsystem calculates flight data analytically or numerically. System is orbit ephemeris generation program and is subsystem of comprehensive Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS).

  11. The Mayans: Climate Determinism or Geomagnetic Determinism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Yves; Genevey, Agnès

    2007-03-01

    Climatic variations since the end of the last ice age have been large enough to influence the fate of ancient civilizations, and deciphering the exact role of climate in the history of old societies is an active and challenging domain of research. This potential influence, which serves as the foundation of `climate determinism,' can be viewed as the response of natural-resource-dependent, agriculture-based communities to climatically driven environmental changes. In some cases, these could have provoked major damage in economic and social organization of the societies, thus paving the way for political disintegration.

  12. Sex Determination in Papaya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex determination is an intriguing system in trioecious papaya. Over the past seven decades various hypotheses, based on the knowledge and information available at the time, have been proposed to explain the genetics of the papaya's sex determination. These include a single gene with three alleles...

  13. Determinants of Education Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lave, Charles; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A model is tested of the determinants of educational attainment among peasants on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, involving family background, personal characteristics (including IQ), and years of schooling available. Results indicate that the model explains much of the variance in educational attainment, and that IQ is only a minor determinant. (RW)

  14. Induction of condensed determination

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, P.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we suggest determinations as a representation of knowledge that should be easy to understand. We briefly review determinations, which can be displayed in a tabular format, and their use in prediction, which involves a simple matching process. We describe CONDET, an algorithm that uses feature selection to construct determinations from training data, augmented by a condensation process that collapses rows to produce simpler structures. We report experiments that show condensation reduces complexity with no loss of accuracy, then discuss CONDET`s relation to other work and outline directions for future studies.

  15. Spacecraft Attitude Determination Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This document is presentation in viewgraph form, which outlines the methods of determining spacecraft attitude. The presentation reviews several parameterizations relating to spacecraft attitude, such as Euler's Theorem, Rodriques parameters, and Euler-Rodriques parameters or Quaternion. Onboard attitude determination is the norm, using either single frame or filtering methods. The presentation reviews several mathematical representations of attitude. The mechanisms for determining attitude on board the Hubble Space Telescope, the Tropical Rainfall and Measuring Mission and the Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer are reviewed. Wahba's problem, Procrustes Problem, and some solutions are also summarized.

  16. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOEpatents

    Breiland, William G.; Gurary, Alexander I.; Boguslavskiy, Vadim

    2002-01-01

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  17. Protein Nitrogen Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The protein content of foods can be determined by numerous methods. The Kjeldahl method and the nitrogen combustion (Dumas) method for protein analysis are based on nitrogen determination. Both methods are official for the purposes of nutrition labeling of foods. While the Kjeldahl method has been used widely for over a hundred years, the recent availability of automated instrumentation for the Dumas method in many cases is replacing use of the Kjeldahl method.

  18. Solids mass flow determination

    DOEpatents

    Macko, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  19. Determining postural stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, Erez (Inventor); Forth, Katharine E. (Inventor); Paloski, William H. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for determining postural stability of a person can include acquiring a plurality of pressure data points over a period of time from at least one pressure sensor. The method can also include the step of identifying a postural state for each pressure data point to generate a plurality of postural states. The method can include the step of determining a postural state of the person at a point in time based on at least the plurality of postural states.

  20. HEU age determination

    SciTech Connect

    Moorthy, A.R.; Kato, W.Y.

    1997-07-01

    A new technique has been developed to determine the age of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in solids. Uranium age is defined as the time since the uranium-containing material was last subjected to a process capable of separating uranium from its radioactive-decay daughters. [Most chemical processing, uranium enrichment, volatilization processes, and phase transformations (especially relevant for uranium hexafluoride) can result in separation of the uranium parent material from the decay-product daughters.] Determination of the uranium age, as defined here, may be relevant in verifying arms-control agreements involving uranium-containing nuclear weapons. The HEU age is determined from the ratios of relevant uranium daughter isotopes and their parents, viz {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U and {sup 231}Pa/{sup 235}U. Uranium isotopes are quantitatively measured by their characteristic gamma rays and their daughters by alpha spectroscopy. In some of the samples, where HEU is enriched more than 99%, the only mode of HEU age determination is by the measurement of {sup 231}Pa since there is negligible quantity of {sup 230}Th due to very low atom concentrations of {sup 234}U in the samples. In this report the methodology and the data for determining the age of two HEU samples are presented.

  1. Metal hydride differential scanning calorimetry as an approach to compositional determination of mixtures of hydrogen isotopologues and helium

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, David B.; Luo, Weifang; Cai, Trevor Y.; Stewart, Kenneth D.

    2015-09-26

    Gaseous mixtures of diatomic hydrogen isotopologues and helium are often encountered in the nuclear energy industry and in analytical chemistry. Compositions of stored mixtures can vary due to interactions with storage and handling materials. When tritium is present, it decays to form ions and helium-3, both of which can lead to further compositional variation. Monitoring of composition is typically achieved by mass spectrometry, a method that is bulky and energy-intensive. Mass spectrometers disperse sample material through vacuum pumps, which is especially troublesome if tritium is present. Moreover, our ultimate goal is to create a compact, fast, low-power sensor that can determine composition with minimal gas consumption and waste generation, as a complement to mass spectrometry that can be instantiated more widely. We propose calorimetry of metal hydrides as an approach to this, due to the strong isotope effect on gas absorption, and demonstrate the sensitivity of measured heat flow to atomic composition of the gas. Peak shifts are discernible when mole fractions change by at least 1%. A mass flow restriction results in a unique dependence of the measurement on helium concentration. We present a mathematical model as a first step toward prediction of the peak shapes and positions. The model includes a useful method to compute estimates of phase diagrams for palladium in the presence of arbitrary mixtures of hydrogen isotopologues. As a result, we expect that this approach can be used to deduce unknown atomic compositions from measured calorimetric data over a useful range of partial pressures of each component.

  2. Metal hydride differential scanning calorimetry as an approach to compositional determination of mixtures of hydrogen isotopologues and helium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Robinson, David B.; Luo, Weifang; Cai, Trevor Y.; Stewart, Kenneth D.

    2015-09-26

    Gaseous mixtures of diatomic hydrogen isotopologues and helium are often encountered in the nuclear energy industry and in analytical chemistry. Compositions of stored mixtures can vary due to interactions with storage and handling materials. When tritium is present, it decays to form ions and helium-3, both of which can lead to further compositional variation. Monitoring of composition is typically achieved by mass spectrometry, a method that is bulky and energy-intensive. Mass spectrometers disperse sample material through vacuum pumps, which is especially troublesome if tritium is present. Moreover, our ultimate goal is to create a compact, fast, low-power sensor that canmore » determine composition with minimal gas consumption and waste generation, as a complement to mass spectrometry that can be instantiated more widely. We propose calorimetry of metal hydrides as an approach to this, due to the strong isotope effect on gas absorption, and demonstrate the sensitivity of measured heat flow to atomic composition of the gas. Peak shifts are discernible when mole fractions change by at least 1%. A mass flow restriction results in a unique dependence of the measurement on helium concentration. We present a mathematical model as a first step toward prediction of the peak shapes and positions. The model includes a useful method to compute estimates of phase diagrams for palladium in the presence of arbitrary mixtures of hydrogen isotopologues. As a result, we expect that this approach can be used to deduce unknown atomic compositions from measured calorimetric data over a useful range of partial pressures of each component.« less

  3. HEU age determination

    SciTech Connect

    Moorthy, A.R.; Kato, W.Y.

    1995-08-01

    A technique has been developed to determine the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Age which is defined as the time since the HEU was produced in an enrichment process. The HEU age is determined from the ratios of relevant uranium parents and their daughters viz {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U and {sup 231}Pa/{sup 235}U. Uranium isotopes are quantitatively measured by their characteristic gammas and their daughters by alpha spectroscopy. In some of the samples where HEU is enriched more than 99%, the only mode of HEU age determination is by the measurement of {sup 231}Pa since there is negligible quantity of {sup 230}Th due to very low atom concentrations of {sup 234}U in the sample. In this paper we have presented data and methodology of finding the age of two HEU samples.

  4. Determinants of marriage dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim, Mohd Amirul Rafiq Abu; Shafie, Siti Aishah Mohd; Hadi, Az'lina Abdul; Razali, Nornadiah Mohd; Azid @ Maarof, Nur Niswah Naslina

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, the number of divorce cases among Muslim couples is very worrisome whereby the total cases reported in 2013 increased by half of the total cases reported in the previous year. The questions on the true key factors of dissolution of marriage continue to arise. Thus, the objective of this study is to reveal the factors that contribute to the dissolution of marriage. A total of 181 cases and ten potential determinants were included in this study. The potential determinants considered were age at marriage of husband and wife, educational level of husband and wife, employment status of husband and wife, income of husband and wife, the number of children and the presence at a counseling session. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the data. The findings revealed that four determinants, namely the income of husband and wife, number of children and the presence at a counselling session were significant in predicting the likelihood of divorce among Muslim couples.

  5. Ultrasonic determination of recrystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation was measured for cold worked Nickel 200 samples annealed at increasing temperatures. Localized dislocation density variations, crystalline order and colume percent of recrystallized phase were determined over the anneal temperature range using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and metallurgy. The exponent of the frequency dependence of the attenuation was found to be a key variable relating ultrasonic attenuation to the thermal kinetics of the recrystallization process. Identification of this key variable allows for the ultrasonic determination of onset, degree, and completion of recrystallization.

  6. Determinants of project success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. C.; Baker, B. N.; Fisher, D.

    1974-01-01

    The interactions of numerous project characteristics, with particular reference to project performance, were studied. Determinants of success are identified along with the accompanying implications for client organization, parent organization, project organization, and future research. Variables are selected which are found to have the greatest impact on project outcome, and the methodology and analytic techniques to be employed in identification of those variables are discussed.

  7. Determination of Fat Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Charles

    The term "lipid" refers to a group of compounds that are sparingly soluble in water, but show variable solubility in a number of organic solvents (e.g., ethyl ether, petroleum ether, acetone, ethanol, methanol, benzene). The lipid content of a food determined by extraction with one solvent may be quite different from the lipid content as determined with another solvent of different polarity. Fat content is determined often by solvent extraction methods (e.g., Soxhlet, Goldfish, Mojonnier), but it also can be determined by nonsolvent wet extraction methods (e.g., Babcock, Gerber), and by instrumental methods that rely on the physical and chemical properties of lipids (e.g., infrared, density, X-ray absorption). The method of choice depends on a variety of factors, including the nature of the sample (e.g., dry versus moist), the purpose of the analysis (e.g., official nutrition labeling or rapid quality control), and instrumentation available (e.g., Babcock uses simple glassware and equipment; infrared requires an expensive instrument).

  8. Determining Haugh Units

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapidly determining shell egg quality in an objective manner is not an easy task. Candling is most often utilized as a quick method for assessing egg quality in a non-destructive manner, but it is a highly subjective method. As you have experienced this week, it is almost impossible for multiple p...

  9. Gender determination in populus

    SciTech Connect

    McLetchie, D.N.; Tuskan, G.A.

    1994-12-31

    Gender, the expression of maleness or femaleness, in dioecious plants has been associated with changes in morphology, physiology, ecological position, and commercial importance of several species, including members of the Salicaceae family. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the expression of gender in Salicaceae, including sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian genes, quantitative genes, environment, and genotype-by-environment interactions. Published reports would favor a genetic basis for gender. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers associated with gender in a segregating family of hybrid poplars. Bulked segregant analysis and chi-squared analysis were used to test for the occurrence of sex chromosomes, individual loci, and chromosome ratios (i.e., ploidy levels) as the mechanisms for gender determination. Examination of 2488 PCR based RAPD markers from 1219 primers revealed nine polymorphic bands between male and female bulked samples. However, linkage analysis indicated that none of these markers were significantly associated with gender. Chisquared results for difference in male-to-female ratios between diploid and triploid genotypes also revealed no significant differences. These findings suggest gender is not controlled via sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian loci or ratios of autosome to gender-determining loci. It is possible that gender is determined genetically by regions of the genome not sampled by the tested markers or by a complex of loci operating in an additive threshold manner or in an epistatic manner. It is also possible that gender is determined environmentally at an early zygote stage, canalizing gender expression.

  10. Determining TOC in Waters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehoe, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    The instrumental method for detecting total organic carbon (TOC) in water samples is detailed. The method's limitations are discussed and certain precautions that must be taken are emphasized. The subject of TOC versus COD and BOD is investigated and TOC is determined to be a valid indication of biological demand. (BT)

  11. Ultrasonic Determination Of Recrystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1988-01-01

    State of recrystallization identified. Measurement of ultrasonic attenuation shows promise as means of detecting recrystallization in metal. Technique applicable to real-time acoustic monitoring of thermomechanical treatments. Starting with work-hardened material, one ultrasonically determines effect of annealing, using correlation between ultrasonic attenuation and temperature.

  12. Waste Determination Equivalency - 12172

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Rebecca D.

    2012-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility encompassing approximately 800 square kilometers near Aiken, South Carolina which began operations in the 1950's with the mission to produce nuclear materials. The SRS contains fifty-one tanks (2 stabilized, 49 yet to be closed) distributed between two liquid radioactive waste storage facilities at SRS containing carbon steel underground tanks with storage capacities ranging from 2,800,000 to 4,900,000 liters. Treatment of the liquid waste from these tanks is essential both to closing older tanks and to maintaining space needed to treat the waste that is eventually vitrified or disposed of onsite. Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) provides the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), a methodology to determine that certain waste resulting from prior reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are not high-level radioactive waste if it can be demonstrated that the waste meets the criteria set forth in Section 3116(a) of the NDAA. The Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the NRC, signed a determination in January 2006, pursuant to Section 3116(a) of the NDAA, for salt waste disposal at the SRS Saltstone Disposal Facility. This determination is based, in part, on the Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site and supporting references, a document that describes the planned methods of liquid waste treatment and the resulting waste streams. The document provides descriptions of the proposed methods for processing salt waste, dividing them into 'Interim Salt Processing' and later processing through the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Interim Salt Processing is separated into Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) and Actinide Removal Process/Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU). The Waste Determination was signed by the Secretary of Energy in January of 2006 based on proposed processing techniques with the expectation that it could be revised as new processing capabilities became viable. Once signed, however, it became evident that any changes would require lengthy review and another determination signed by the Secretary of Energy. With the maturation of additional salt removal technologies and the extension of the SWPF start-up date, it becomes necessary to define 'equivalency' to the processes laid out in the original determination. For the purposes of SRS, any waste not processed through Interim Salt Processing must be processed through SWPF or an equivalent process, and therefore a clear statement of the requirements for a process to be equivalent to SWPF becomes necessary. (authors)

  13. Somatic sex determination.

    PubMed Central

    Zarkower, David

    2006-01-01

    C. elegans occurs in two natural sexes, the XX hermaphrodite and the XO male, which differ extensively in anatomy, physiology, and behavior. All somatic differences between the sexes result from the differential activity of a "global" sex determination regulatory pathway. This pathway also controls X chromosome dosage compensation, which is coordinated with sex determination by the action of the three SDC proteins. The SDC proteins control somatic and germline sex by transcriptional repression of the her-1 gene. HER-1 is a secreted protein that controls a regulatory module consisting of a transmembrane receptor, TRA-2, three intracellular FEM proteins, and the zinc finger transcription factor TRA-1. The molecular workings of this regulatory module are still being elucidated. Similarity of TRA-2 to patched receptors and of TRA-1 to GLI proteins suggests that parts of the global pathway originally derived from a Hedgehog signaling pathway. TRA-1 controls all aspects of somatic sexual differentiation, presumably by regulating a variety of tissue- and cell-specific downstream targets, including the cell death regulator EGL-1 and the male sexual regulator MAB-3. Sex determination evolves rapidly, and conservation of sexual regulators between phyla has been elusive. An apparent exception involves DM domain proteins, including MAB-3, which control sexual differentiation in nematodes, arthropods, and vertebrates. Important issues needing more study include the detailed molecular mechanisms of the global pathway, the identities of additional sexual regulators acting in the global pathway and downstream of TRA-1, and the evolutionary history of the sex determination pathway. Recently developed genetic and genomic technologies and comparative studies in divergent species have begun to address these issues. PMID:18050479

  14. Spin Determination from Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, W. P.; Gelbke, C. K.; Liu, T. X.; Liu, X. D.; Lynch, W. G.; Tsang, M. B.; van Goethem, M. J.; Verde, G.; Wagner, A.; Xi, H. F.; Xu, H. S.; Beaulieu, L.; Davin, B.; Larochelle, Y.; Lefort, T.; de Souza, R. T.; Yanez, R.; Viola, V.; Charity, R. J.

    2003-04-01

    Particle correlation functions have been measured for the reaction 129Xe+197Au at E/A = 50 MeV with the Large Area Silicon-Strip/CsI detector Array (LASSA). A simple equilibrium approach has been applied for studying correlation functions without dealing with sophisticated simulation of detection efficiencies. Spins of particle unstable states can be determined by fitting resonance peaks of correlation functions. The sensitivity to spin determination of this procedure is illustrated in the p-^7Li correlation function where three groups of resonances are fitted. By fitting the p-^7Be correlation function, the spin-unmeasured 0.774 MeV state of ^8B is studied. The spin value of the 0.774 MeV state is determined to be one regardless of whether there is a state at 1.4 MeV or not. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. NSF-PHY-01-10253.

  15. Gender determination using cheiloscopy

    PubMed Central

    Padmavathi, B. N.; Makkad, Ramanpal Singh; Rajan, S. Y.; Kolli, Gopi Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although lip prints have been used as an evidence for human identification in forensic science, there exists a doubt about its role in gender determination. Aims: The present study was designed for documenting common patterns, as well as their variation in the study population, with objective of evaluating uniqueness of the lip print pattern among the study population, as well as to evaluate the possibility of gender determination. Study Design: Two hundred and thirty five lip prints were collected from volunteers among out patients of Darshan Dental College and Hospital, as well as community dental care camps of rural areas around Udaipur. Materials and Methods: Lip prints were recorded with transparent overlay and transferred on to a bond paper. It was then photographed using a Canon EOS 55OD 16 mega pixel digital camera. Software Picasa 3.6 and Microsoft Picture Manager were used to digitally enhance the quality and magnify the image bearing the groove pattern. Lip prints were later analyzed. Statistical Analysis: Pearson chi square test was adopted for statistical analysis and probability (P value) was calculated. Conclusion: In our study, none of the lip prints were identical, thus confirming the role of lip prints in individual identification. Dots, reticular and complex patterns were significant in gender determination. PMID:24255561

  16. Modelling determinants of health.

    PubMed

    Patel, M

    1981-06-01

    The linear regression procedure of stepwise elimination has been used to examine the association between a range of environmental variables and infant mortality rates (IMR) in Sri Lanka. The nature of the water supply was found to be significantly associated with IMR. Latrines were significantly associated with IMR once qualitative differences between districts were allowed for. Other 'environmental determinants of health', 3 indices of housing quality and the presence of electricity supplies, were not significant. The cost of effecting changes in IMR by extending subsidies to water supply improvements is estimated. PMID:7287277

  17. HEU age determination

    SciTech Connect

    Moorthy, A.R.; Kato, W.Y.

    1994-12-31

    A criteria that a sample of highly enriched uranium (HEU) had come from a weapons stockpile and not newly produced in an enrichment plant is to show that the HEU had been produced a significant time in the past. The time since the HEU has produced in an enrichment plant is defined as the age of the HEU in this paper. The HEU age is determined by measuring quantitatively the daughter products {sup 230}Th and {sup 231}Pa of {sup 234}U and {sup 235}U, respectively, by first chemical separation of the thorium and protactinium and then conducting alpha spectrometry of the daughter products.

  18. Sociobiology: another biological determinism.

    PubMed

    Lewontin, R C

    1980-01-01

    Sociobiology is a form of biological determinism which argues that human social organization is constrained by genes that have been selected in evolution. In particular, it regards male dominance, hierarchical society, entrepreneurial economic activity, territoriality, and aggression as a consequences of human genes. It is shown that sociobiological theory is carefully constructed to make it impossible to test, that it makes a number of fundamental errors in attempting to describe "human nature," that there is no evidence for inheritance of human social traits, and that the evolutionary arguments used are merely fanciful, adaptive stories. PMID:7419308

  19. [Determinants of mortality].

    PubMed

    Van Hoorn, W D

    1993-01-01

    "In this article determinants of mortality [in the Netherlands] are studied.... The main results are the following: For all ages women have lower mortality risks than men.... Married people live longer than those who are not. However, the cause is not certain.... In large cities mortality rates are higher than in small towns (especially due to diseases of the lungs and to narcotics, alcohol and violent causes of death). People with a high socio-economic status have lower mortality risks than those with a low status." (SUMMARY IN ENG) PMID:12285890

  20. Mass determination of neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1988-01-01

    A time-energy correlation method has been developed to determine the signature of a nonzero neutrino mass in a small sample of neutrinos detected from a distant source. The method is applied to the Kamiokande II (Hirata et al., 1987) and IMB (Bionta et al., 1987) observations of neutrino bursts from SN 1987A. Using the Kamiokande II data, the neutrino rest mass is estimated at 2.8 + 2.0, - 1.4 eV and the initial neutrino pulse is found to be less than 0.3 sec full width, followed by an emission tail lasting at least 10 sec.

  1. Allergic Rhinitis: Environmental Determinants.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Joan; Matsui, Elizabeth; Sharma, Hemant P

    2016-05-01

    The increasing prevalence of allergic rhinitis (AR) seems to be linked to several important environmental factors that interact with underlying genetic predisposition to influence the risk of this disease. This article examines these environmental determinants of AR, and the evidence for their association with disease prevalence. Exposure to a variety of aeroallergens is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of AR. Other environmental exposures have been suggested to play potential roles in the risk of AR, including bacterial exposure, air pollution, and environmental toxicants. PMID:27083109

  2. The Determination of Downwash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, Walter S

    1921-01-01

    It is obvious that, in accordance with Newton's second law, the lift on an aerofoil must be equal to the vertical momentum communicated per second to the air mass affected. Consequently a lifting aerofoil in flight is trailed by a wash which has a definite inclination corresponding to the factors producing the lift. It is thought that sufficient data, theoretical and experimental, are now available for a complete determination of this wash with respect to the variation of its angle of inclination to the originating aerofoil and with respect to the law which governs its decay in space.

  3. Determination of epsomite-hexahydrite equilibria by the humidity-buffer technique at 0.1 MPa with implications for phase equilibria in the system MgSO4-H2O.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Seal, R.R., 2nd.

    2003-01-01

    Epsomite (MgSO(4).7H(2)O) and hexahydrite (MgSO(4).6H(2)O) are common minerals found in marine evaporite deposits, in saline lakes as precipitates, in weathering zones of coal and metallic deposits, in some soils and their efflorescences, and possibly on the surface of Europa as evaporite deposits. Thermodynamic properties of these two minerals reported in the literature are in poor agreement. In this study, epsomite-hexahydrite equilibria were determined along four humidity-buffer curves at 0.1 MPa and between 25 and 45 degrees C. Results obtained for the reaction epsomite = hexahydrite + H(2)O, as demonstrated by very tight reversals along each humidity buffer, can be represented by ln K(+/- 0.012) = 20.001 - 7182.07/T, where K is the equilibrium constant, and T is temperature in Kelvin. The derived standard Gibbs free energy of reaction is 10.13 +/- 0.07 kJ/mol, which is essentially the same value as that calculated from vapor pressure measurements reported in the literature. However, this value is at least 0.8 kJ/mol lower than those calculated from the data derived mostly from calorimetric measurements.

  4. Determination of epsomite-hexahydrite equilibria by the humidity-buffer technique at 0.1 MPa with implications for phase equilibria in the system MgSO4-H2O.

    PubMed

    Chou, I-Ming; Seal, Robert R

    2003-01-01

    Epsomite (MgSO(4).7H(2)O) and hexahydrite (MgSO(4).6H(2)O) are common minerals found in marine evaporite deposits, in saline lakes as precipitates, in weathering zones of coal and metallic deposits, in some soils and their efflorescences, and possibly on the surface of Europa as evaporite deposits. Thermodynamic properties of these two minerals reported in the literature are in poor agreement. In this study, epsomite-hexahydrite equilibria were determined along four humidity-buffer curves at 0.1 MPa and between 25 and 45 degrees C. Results obtained for the reaction epsomite = hexahydrite + H(2)O, as demonstrated by very tight reversals along each humidity buffer, can be represented by ln K(+/- 0.012) = 20.001 - 7182.07/T, where K is the equilibrium constant, and T is temperature in Kelvin. The derived standard Gibbs free energy of reaction is 10.13 +/- 0.07 kJ/mol, which is essentially the same value as that calculated from vapor pressure measurements reported in the literature. However, this value is at least 0.8 kJ/mol lower than those calculated from the data derived mostly from calorimetric measurements. PMID:14678670

  5. Determination of the Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Sorghum bicolor Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase and the Structural Impact of Three brown midrib12 Mutations1[W

    PubMed Central

    Green, Abigail R.; Lewis, Kevin M.; Barr, John T.; Jones, Jeffrey P.; Lu, Fachuang; Ralph, John; Vermerris, Wilfred; Sattler, Scott E.; Kang, ChulHee

    2014-01-01

    Using S-adenosyl-methionine as the methyl donor, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor; SbCOMT) methylates the 5-hydroxyl group of its preferred substrate, 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde. In order to determine the mechanism of SbCOMT and understand the observed reduction in the lignin syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio of three brown midrib12 mutants that carry COMT gene missense mutations, we determined the apo-form and S-adenosyl-methionine binary complex SbCOMT crystal structures and established the ternary complex structure with 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde by molecular modeling. These structures revealed many features shared with monocot ryegrass (Lolium perenne) and dicot alfalfa (Medicago sativa) COMTs. SbCOMT steady-state kinetic and calorimetric data suggest a random bi-bi mechanism. Based on our structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic results, we propose that the observed reactivity hierarchy among 4,5-dihydroxy-3-methoxycinnamyl (and 3,4-dihydroxycinnamyl) aldehyde, alcohol, and acid substrates arises from the ability of the aldehyde to stabilize the anionic intermediate that results from deprotonation of the 5-hydroxyl group by histidine-267. Additionally, despite the presence of other phenylpropanoid substrates in vivo, sinapaldehyde is the preferential product, as demonstrated by its low Km for 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde. Unlike its acid and alcohol substrates, the aldehydes exhibit product inhibition, and we propose that this is due to nonproductive binding of the S-cis-form of the aldehydes inhibiting productive binding of the S-trans-form. The S-cis-aldehydes most likely act only as inhibitors, because the high rotational energy barrier around the 2-propenyl bond prevents S-trans-conversion, unlike alcohol substrates, whose low 2-propenyl bond rotational energy barrier enables rapid S-cis/S-trans-interconversion. PMID:24948836

  6. ICESat Precision Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, H.; Yoon, S.; Webb, C. E.; Kim, Y.; Schutz, B. E.

    2003-12-01

    Following the successful launch of the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) on January 13, 2003, 00:45 UTC, the GPS receiver on ICESat was turned on successfully on Jan. 17, 2003. High quality GPS data were collected since then to support Precision Orbit Determination (POD) activities. ICESat carries Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) to measure ice-sheet topography and associated temporal changes, as well as cloud and atmospheric properties. To accomplish the ICESat science objectives, the position of the GLAS instrument in space should be determined with an accuracy of 5 cm and 20 cm in radial and horizontal components, respectively. This knowledge is acquired by the POD activities using the data collected by the GPS receiver on ICESat and the ground-based satellite laser ranging (SLR) data. It has been shown from pre-launch POD studies that the gravity model error is the dominant source of ICESat orbit errors. The predicted radial orbit errors at the ICESat orbit (600 km altitude) based on pre-launch gravity models, such as TEG-4 and EGM-96, are 7-15 cm. Performance of these gravity models and the recent gravity models from GRACE on ICESat POD were evaluated. The radial orbit accuracy is approaching 1-2 cm level with the GRACE gravity model. This paper also summarizes POD activities at Center for Space Research (CSR), which is responsible to generate ICESat POD products.

  7. Determination of Survivable Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Niehaus, J. E.; Ruff, G. A.; Urban, D. L.; Takahashi, F.; Easton, J. W.; Abbott, A. A.; Graf, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    At NASA, there exists no standardized design or testing protocol for spacecraft fire suppression systems (either handheld or total flooding designs). An extinguisher's efficacy in safely suppressing any reasonable or conceivable fire is the primary benchmark. That concept, however, leads to the question of what a reasonable or conceivable fire is. While there exists the temptation to over-size' the fire extinguisher, weight and volume considerations on spacecraft will always (justifiably) push for the minimum size extinguisher required. This paper attempts to address the question of extinguisher size by examining how large a fire a crew member could successfully survive and extinguish in the confines of a spacecraft. The hazards to the crew and equipment during an accidental fire include excessive pressure rise resulting in a catastrophic rupture of the vehicle skin, excessive temperatures that burn or incapacitate the crew (due to hyperthermia), carbon dioxide build-up or other accumulation of other combustion products (e.g. carbon monoxide). Estimates of these quantities are determined as a function of fire size and mass of material burned. This then becomes the basis for determining the maximum size of a target fire for future fire extinguisher testing.

  8. Adaptive interplanetary orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, Timothy Price

    This work documents the development of a real-time interplanetary orbit determination monitoring algorithm for detecting and identifying changes in the spacecraft dynamic and measurement environments. The algorithm may either be utilized in a stand-alone fashion as a spacecraft monitor and hypothesis tester by navigators or may serve as a component in an autonomous adaptive orbit determination architecture. In either application, the monitoring algorithm serves to identify the orbit determination filter parameters to be modified by an offline process to restore the operational model accuracy when the spacecraft environment changes unexpectedly. The monitoring algorithm utilizes a hierarchical mixture-of-experts to regulate a multilevel bank organization of extended Kalman filters. Banks of filters operate on the hierarchy top-level and are composed of filters with configurations representative of a specific environment change called a macromode. Fine differences, or micromodes, within the macromodes are represented by individual filter configurations. Regulation is provided by two levels of single-layer neural networks called gating networks. A single top-level gating network regulates the weighting among macromodes and each bank uses a gating network to regulate member filters internally. Experiments are conducted on the Mars Pathfinder cruise trajectory environment using range and Doppler data from the Deep Space Network. The experiments investigate the ability of the hierarchical mixture-of-experts to identify three environment macromodes: (1) unmodeled impulsive maneuvers, (2) changes in the solar radiation pressure dynamics, and (3) changes in the measurement noise strength. Two methods of initializing the gating networks are examined in each experiment. One method gives the neurons associated with all filters equivalent synaptic weight. The other method places greater weight on the operational filter initially believed to model the spacecraft environment. The results will show that the equal synaptic weight initialization method is superior to the one favoring the operational filter and that processing range and Doppler data together is superior to processing Doppler data alone. When processing range and Doppler with an equally initialized hierarchy, all three macromodes are definitively identified by the top-level gating network weights. Additionally, in the case of multiple successive macromode changes, the hierarchy is generally able to recover from one macromode and identify a change to another macromode.

  9. Dietary determinants of obesity.

    PubMed

    Du, Huaidong; Feskens, Edith

    2010-08-01

    Obesity has become a serious public health problem worldwide, and dietary composition can play a role in its prevention and treatment. However, available literature on the impacts of different dietary factors on weight change is inconsistent, or even conflicting. In this review, we briefly summarized the mechanisms and influences of several major dietary determinants of weight change, with a focus on their potential in the prevention of weight gain or regain. We discussed the intake of fat, protein, total carbohydrates, fruits and vegetables, fibre, free sugars, fructose and sugar sweetened beverages, dietary energy density, portion size, eating outside home, glycaemic index and glycaemic load. Popular weight loss diets, including the Atkins diet, Weight Watchers, Ornish diet and Zone diet, are also briefly discussed for their safety and efficacy in the maintenance of weight loss. PMID:20821929

  10. Complexometric Determination of Calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) complexes with numerous mineral ions, including calcium and magnesium. This reaction can be used to determine the amount of these minerals in a sample by a complexometric titration. Endpoints in the titration are detected using indicators that change color when they complex with mineral ions. Calmagite and eriochrome black T (EBT) are such indicators that change from blue to pink when they complex with calcium and magnesium. In the titration of a mineral-containing solution with EDTA, the solution turns from pink to blue at the endpoint with either indicator. The pH affects a complexometric EDTA titration in several ways, and must be carefully controlled. A major application of EDTA titration is testing the hardness of water, for which the method described is an official one (Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, Method 2340C; AOAC Method 920.196).

  11. Automatic Bayesian polarity determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The polarity of the first motion of a seismic signal from an earthquake is an important constraint in earthquake source inversion. Microseismic events often have low signal-to-noise ratios, which may lead to difficulties estimating the correct first-motion polarities of the arrivals. This paper describes a probabilistic approach to polarity picking that can be both automated and combined with manual picking. This approach includes a quantitative estimate of the uncertainty of the polarity, improving calculation of the polarity probability density function for source inversion. It is sufficiently fast to be incorporated into an automatic processing workflow. When used in source inversion, the results are consistent with those from manual observations. In some cases, they produce a clearer constraint on the range of high-probability source mechanims, and are better constrained than source mechanisms determined using a uniform probability of an incorrect polarity pick.

  12. Determinants of Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Masilamani, Madhan; Commins, Scott; Shreffler, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Much has been learned by identifying the molecules that can be recognized by IgE from patients with allergies. Increasingly, by correlating patterns of sensitization with clinical features, it has become possible to distinguish molecules responsible for primary sensitization (complete allergens) from those that are more likely cross-reactive targets. In the case of animal allergens, evolutionary distance seems to be an important factor in determining allergenicity. However, until more is understood regarding the mechanistic details of primary sensitization, including the participation of molecules that stimulate innate immune responses and the repertoire of T-cell antigens, molecules that may or may not themselves be important B-cell antigens, we will not be able to explain fundamental questions, such as why peanut allergy is more severe than soy allergy or why tick exposure is associated with clinically relevant sensitization to a carbohydrate epitope. PMID:22244230

  13. Satellite altitude determination uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siry, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    Satellite altitude determination uncertainties are discussed from the standpoint of the GEOS-C satellite. GEOS-C will be tracked by a number of the conventional satellite tracking systems, as well as by two advanced systems; a satellite-to-satellite tracking system and lasers capable of decimeter accuracies which are being developed in connection with the Goddard Earth and Ocean Dynamics Applications program. The discussion is organized in terms of a specific type of GEOS-C orbit which would satisfy a number of scientific objectives including the study of the gravitational field by means of both the altimeter and the satellite-to-satellite tracking system, studies of tides, and the Gulf Stream meanders.

  14. Determining valve position

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, J.A.; Jackson, P.

    1984-08-28

    A method and apparatus for determining the position of a valve for example ball valves, plug valves, gate valves using a source of radiation such as cesium-137 located either on or adjacent to the external surface of the valve or within the valve itself, for example in the ball of a ball valve, and a radiation detector such as a Geiger-Muller tube on the external surface of the valve. Source and detector are aligned and located relative to one another so that the count rate detected is indicative of the valve position. The method is accurate and, for example, allows the position of the ball in a ball valve to be monitored to within /sub +/ or /sub -/1 mm.

  15. Satellite orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. F.; Boggs, D. H.; Born, G. H.; Christensen, E. J.; Ferrari, A. J.; Green, D. W.; Hylkema, R. K.; Mohan, S. N.; Reinbold, S. J.; Sievers, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    A historic account of the activities of the Satellite OD Group during the MM'71 mission is given along with an assessment of the accuracy of the determined orbit of the Mariner 9 spacecraft. Preflight study results are reviewed, and the major error sources described. Tracking and data fitting strategy actually used in the real time operations is itemized, and Deep Space Network data available for orbit fitting during the mission and the auxiliary information used by the navigation team are described. A detailed orbit fitting history of the first four revolutions of the satellite orbit of Mariner 9 is presented, with emphasis on the convergence problems and the delivered solution for the first orbit trim maneuver. Also included are a solution accuracy summary, the history of the spacecraft orbit osculating elements, the results of verifying the radio solutions with TV imaging data, and a summary of the normal points generated for the relativity experiment.

  16. Tracer for circulation determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, H.; Santos, S.; Wysong, R. D.

    1985-03-19

    An improved tracer particle is described comprising an ion exchange core having a polymer coating thereon, the coated ion exchange core having a reaction site capable of reacting with a compound containing an oxirane group, said coated ion exchange core having been treated with a compound containing an oxirane group to react with said coated ion exchange core causing an increase in mass of the tracer particle. Preferably, the ion exchange core is labelled with a radionuclide. These particles have improved characteristics including improved stability against leaching and improved handling properties. Such particles are useful in circulatory determinations involving the injection of the particles as a suspension in a physiologically acceptable carrier or medium into the circulatory system of animals.

  17. Determination of Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxicity assays are used for drug screening and cytotoxicity tests of chemicals. Nowadays, various reagents are used for cell viability detection. They are based on various cell functions such as enzyme activity, cell membrane permeability, cell adherence, ATP production, co-enzyme production and nucleotide uptake activity. Many have established methods such as colony formation method, crystal violet method, tritium-labelled thymidine uptake method, MTT and WST methods, which are used for counting the number of live cells. Moreover, trypan blue is a widely used assay for staining dead cells. In this method, cell viability must be determined by counting the unstained cells with a microscope or other instruments. This chapter is a collection of all these methods to be followed by researchers in a sequential manner. PMID:26939283

  18. Orbit Determination Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, James R.; Berry, Kevin; Gregpru. Late; Speckman, Keith; Hur-Diaz, Sun; Surka, Derek; Gaylor, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The Orbit Determination Toolbox is an orbit determination (OD) analysis tool based on MATLAB and Java that provides a flexible way to do early mission analysis. The toolbox is primarily intended for advanced mission analysis such as might be performed in concept exploration, proposal, early design phase, or rapid design center environments. The emphasis is on flexibility, but it has enough fidelity to produce credible results. Insight into all flight dynamics source code is provided. MATLAB is the primary user interface and is used for piecing together measurement and dynamic models. The Java Astrodynamics Toolbox is used as an engine for things that might be slow or inefficient in MATLAB, such as high-fidelity trajectory propagation, lunar and planetary ephemeris look-ups, precession, nutation, polar motion calculations, ephemeris file parsing, and the like. The primary analysis functions are sequential filter/smoother and batch least-squares commands that incorporate Monte-Carlo data simulation, linear covariance analysis, measurement processing, and plotting capabilities at the generic level. These functions have a user interface that is based on that of the MATLAB ODE suite. To perform a specific analysis, users write MATLAB functions that implement truth and design system models. The user provides his or her models as inputs to the filter commands. The software provides a capability to publish and subscribe to a software bus that is compliant with the NASA Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) standards, to exchange data with other flight dynamics tools to simplify the flight dynamics design cycle. Using the publish and subscribe approach allows for analysts in a rapid design center environment to seamlessly incorporate changes in spacecraft and mission design into navigation analysis and vice versa.

  19. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  20. Age determination of raccoons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grau, G.A.; Sanderson, G.C.; Rogers, J.P.

    1970-01-01

    Age criteria, based on 61 skulls and eye lenses from 103 known-age captives, are described for separating raccoons (Procyon lotor) into eight age-classes as follows: young-of-the-year, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-7, > 7 years. Criteria studied were eye lens nitrogen, cranial suture closure, tooth wear and incisor cementum layers. Lens nitrogen increased rapidly up to 12 months of age, but at much reduced rate thereafter. Total lens nitrogen was useful only in separating young-of-the-year from adults. The closure sequence for five cranial sutures accurately divided the total known-age sample of males into seven groups, and the adults into five groups. The tooth wear criteria divided the known-age sample into five relative age groups, but aging of individuals by this method was inaccurate. Histological sectioning of known-age teeth was the best method of observing layering in the cementum tissue. The technique of basing estimation of age on cementum ring counts, although subjective, was accurate for aging individuals through their fourth year but tended to underestimate the age of animals over 4 years old. However, suture closure or tooth wear can be used to identify males over 4 years old. In field studies, technical difficulties limit the utility of age estimation by cementum layers. Maximum root thickness of the lower canine was accurate in determining the sex of individuals from 5 months to ,at least 48 months of age.

  1. Cryogenic Laser Calorimetry for Impurity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swimm, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a one-year effort to determine the applicability of laser-calorimetric spectroscopy to the study of deep-level impurities in silicon are presented. Critical considerations for impurity analysis by laser-calorimetric spectroscopy are discussed, the design and performance of a cryogenic laser calorimeter is described, and measurements of background absorption in high-purity silicon are presented.

  2. Determination of the cis-trans isomerization barriers of L-alanyl-L-proline in aqueous solutions and at water/hydrophobic interfaces by on-line temperature-jump relaxation HPLC and dynamic on-column reaction HPLC.

    PubMed

    Shibukawa, Masami; Miyake, Ayaka; Eda, Sayaka; Saito, Shingo

    2015-09-15

    Proline cis-trans isomerization is known to play a key role in the rate-determining steps of protein folding. It is thus very important to understand the influence of environments, not only bulk solutions but also microenvironments such as interfaces, on the isomerization reaction of proline peptides. Here we present two HPLC methods for measurements of kinetic and equilibrium parameters for the isomerization reactions in bulk solutions and at liquid/solid interfaces. On-line temperature-jump relaxation HPLC (T-jump HPLC) allows the determination of forward and reverse rate constants of the isomerization in a bulk solution by monitoring the whole time course of conversion of pure isomers from both sides of the reaction, in contrast to other HPLC and capillary zone electrophoresis as well as spectrometric and calorimetric methods, which use a mixture of the isomers. We can then determine cis-trans isomerization barriers of the peptide at liquid/solid interfaces from the kinetic data obtained by dynamic on-column reaction HPLC and T-jump HPLC. We observed that the interconversion around the peptide bond for l-alanyl-l-proline (Ala-Pro) in water is accelerated at the surfaces of an alkyl-bonded silica and a poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) copolymer resin, and this is caused by a remarkable decrease in the enthalpy of activation. The molecular structures of the cis and trans forms of Ala-Pro estimated by quantum mechanics calculation reveal that an equilibrium shift toward the cis form as well as the rapid isomerization of Ala-Pro at the water/hydrophobic interfaces can be attributed to the lower polarity of the interfacial water at the surfaces of the hydrophobic materials compared to that of bulk water. PMID:26320351

  3. DETERMINATION OF CALORIES BY NIR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although NIR spectroscopy has been used to determine energy content of feeds, little is known about the capability of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for the determination of available energy in foods for human consumption. Recent studies have been conducted to determine the utilizable energy in p...

  4. Self-Determination. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IMPACT, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This theme issue explores the relevance of self-determination for persons with developmental disabilities across the life span, ways in which it is or can be expressed, and obstacles to its exercise. The articles show the futility of enhancing self-determination by teaching choice-making skills if environments offer no opportunities to exercise…

  5. Method for Determining Artillery Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuser, Wilfried

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for determining the position of artillery in which a circle of four closely spaced microphones is located at two measurement sites for acoustic radio direction finding of muzzle blasts. A method for determining the position of artillery using this procedure is discussed.

  6. Determining laboratory value: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Stein, P

    1996-03-01

    This article will describe how to determine a fair market value for a dental laboratory. Part one addresses how to define fair market value, how value is perceived and how to prepare for laboratory evaluation. Part two, to be printed in April, will address how to apply an appropriate valuation methodology to determine worth. PMID:9516267

  7. Determining laboratory value: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Stein, P

    1996-04-01

    This article describes how to determine a fair market value for a dental laboratory. Part one defined fair market value, addressed how value is perceived and how to prepare for laboratory evaluation. Part two addresses how to apply an appropriate valuation methodology to determine worth. PMID:9516270

  8. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in the Medici, Grand Dukes of Florence (XVI century)

    PubMed Central

    Giusiani, Sara; Fornaciari, Antonio; Villari, Natale; Vitiello, Angelica; Fornaciari, Gino

    2009-01-01

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a common systemic disorder characterised by the ossification of the anterior longitudinal spinal ligament involving at least three contiguous vertebrae and by diffuse extraspinal enthesopathies. The condition is associated with the male sex and with advanced age; its aetiology is uncertain, but seems to be related to obesity and diabetes. The most recent studies in archaeological series demonstrated a relation between high social status and the incidence of DISH. The present study examines two cases of DISH found amongst the members of the Medici family buried in the Basilica of San Lorenzo in Florence. The skeletons of the Grand Dukes Cosimo I (1519–1574) and his son Ferdinand I (1549–1609) showed the typical features of the condition. This result is related to the obesity of the Grand Dukes, attested by the written and artistic sources, and to the protein-based alimentation demonstrated by a paleonutritional study, thus furnishing further evidence to the significance of DISH as a life style. PMID:19669655

  9. Raman spectra of gases. XVI - Torsional transitions in ethanol and ethanethiol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durig, J. R.; Bucy, W. E.; Wurrey, C. J.; Carreira, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Raman spectra of gaseous ethanol and ethanethiol have been investigated. Thiol torsional fundamentals for the gauche conformer of EtSH and EtSD have been observed and the asymmetric potential function for this vibration has been calculated. Methyl torsional transitions and overtones have also been observed for both of these molecules. Barriers to internal rotation for the methyl top are calculated to be 3.77 and 3.84 kcal/mol for the EtSH and EtSD compounds, respectively. Hydroxyl torsional fundamentals were observed at 207 and 170 per cm in the EtOH and EtOD spectra, respectively. Overtones of the methyl torsion in both molecules yield a barrier to internal rotation of 3.62 kcal/mol for the gauche conformer.

  10. Oral histories in meteoritics and planetary science—XVI: Donald D. Bogard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Derek W. G.

    2012-03-01

    Donald D. Bogard (Don, Fig. 1) became interested in meteorites after seeing the Fayetteville meteorite in an undergraduate astronomy class at the University of Arkansas. During his graduate studies with Paul Kuroda at Arkansas, Don helped discover the Xe decay products of 244Pu. After a postdoctoral period at Caltech, where he learned much from Jerry Wasserburg, Peter Eberhardt, Don Burnett, and Sam Epstein, Don became one of a number of young Ph.D. scientists hired by NASA's Manned Spacecraft Center to set up the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL) and to perform a preliminary examination of Apollo samples. In collaboration with Oliver Schaeffer (SUNY), Joseph Zähringer (Max Planck, Heidelberg), and Raymond Davis (Brookhaven National Laboratory), he built a gas analysis laboratory at JSC, and the noble gas portion of this laboratory remained operational until he retired in 2010. At NASA, Don worked on the lunar regolith, performed pioneering work on cosmic ray produced noble gas isotopes and Ar-Ar dating, the latter for important insights into the thermal and shock history of meteorites and lunar samples. During this work, he discovered that the trapped gases in SNC meteorites were very similar to those of the Martian atmosphere and thus established their Martian origin. Among Don's many administrative accomplishments are helping to establish the Antarctic meteorite and cosmic dust processing programs at JSC and serving as a NASA-HQ discipline scientist, where he advanced peer review and helped create new programs. Don is a recipient of NASA's Scientific Achievement and Exceptional Service Medals and the Meteoritical Society's Leonard Medal.

  11. Infrared technology XVI; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 11-13, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiro, Irving J.

    1990-11-01

    Various papers in infrared technology are presented. Individual topics addressed include: Field Observations and Measurement Experiment, GaAs/AlGAs multiquantum-well IR detectors, 256 x 256 PtSi hybrid array for astronomy applications, compact 128 InSb focal plane assembly for thermal imaging, statistical analysis of thermal images generated by line scanning, performance comparison of platinum silicide cameras, atmospheric applications of IR heterodyne laser detection, French activity in IR astronomy from stratospheric balloons, advances in IR technology at Paris Observatory, far-IR photoconductors, applications of IR bidimensional devices in astronomy, far-IR transmission spectra of YBa2Cu3O(7-d) thin films. Also considered are: far-IR multiple-path cell without internal mirrors, optical properties of solid-state laser-type materials in the near-IR, SOFRADIR IR focal plane array production, recent developments on Isocam long-wavelength channel detector, 128 x 128 3-5 micron focal plane arrays at 77-K and 200-K operation, digital test target for display evaluation, IR radiation from rocket plumes, 128 x 128 InGaAs detector array for 1.0-1.7 micron.

  12. Limits to sustained energy intake. XVI. Body temperature and physical activity of female mice during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gamo, Yuko; Bernard, Amelie; Mitchell, Sharon E; Hambly, Catherine; Al Jothery, Aqeel; Vaanholt, Lobke M; Król, Elzbieta; Speakman, John R

    2013-06-15

    Lactation is the most energy-demanding phase of mammalian reproduction, and lactation performance may be affected by events during pregnancy. For example, food intake may be limited in late pregnancy by competition for space in the abdomen between the alimentary tract and fetuses. Hence, females may need to compensate their energy budgets during pregnancy by reducing activity and lowering body temperature. We explored the relationships between energy intake, body mass, body temperature and physical activity throughout pregnancy in the MF1 mouse. Food intake and body mass of 26 females were recorded daily throughout pregnancy. Body temperature and physical activity were monitored every minute for 23 h a day by implanted transmitters. Body temperature and physical activity declined as pregnancy advanced, while energy intake and body mass increased. Compared with a pre-mating baseline period, mice increased energy intake by 56% in late pregnancy. Although body temperature declined as pregnancy progressed, this served mostly to reverse an increase between baseline and early pregnancy. Reduced physical activity may compensate the energy budget of pregnant mice but body temperature changes do not. Over the last 3 days of pregnancy, food intake declined. Individual variation in energy intake in the last phase of pregnancy was positively related to litter size at birth. As there was no association between the increase in body mass and the decline in intake, we suggest the decline was not caused by competition for abdominal space. These data suggest overall reproductive performance is probably not constrained by events during pregnancy. PMID:23720802

  13. Follow-Up Study of Former Students of the Data Processing Program. Volume XVI, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rilki, Ernest; Lucas, John A.

    In spring 1987, a follow-up survey was conducted of former William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) students who had taken five or more data processing courses at the college between 1980 and 1986. The survey focused on the students' employment status and educational intent while attending WRHC, their present employment situation, and their evaluation…

  14. 76 FR 56263 - Titles II and XVI: Documenting and Evaluating Disability in Young Adults

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... transitional employment programs) may also help us assess the young adult's functioning. C. Psychosocial... participate in the general curriculum or in a transitional program.\\23\\ The fact that a young adult receives...(s) through a school or a community agency, such as a mental health center or...

  15. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis XVI. Kinetic Relationships of the Intermediates in Steady State Photosynthesis

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Benson, A. A.; Kawaguchi, S.; Hayes, P.; Calvin, M.

    1952-06-05

    A kinetic study of the accumulation of C{sup 14} in the intermediates of steady state photosynthesis in C{sup 14}O{sub 2} provides information regarding the sequence of reactions involved. The work described applied the radio-chromatographic technique for analysis of the labeled early products. The simultaneous carboxylation reaction resulting in malic acid as well as phosphoglycerate is demonstrated in experiments at high light intensity. A comparison of radioactivities in a number of phosphorylated sugars as a function of time reveals concurrent synthesis of fructose and sedoheptulose phosphates followed by that of ribulose phosphates and later by that of glucose phosphates. The possibility that the cleavage of C{sub 4} compounds to C{sub 2} carbon dioxide acceptors may involve C{sub 7} and C{sub 5} sugars and evidence for this mechanism is presented.

  16. International Society for Heart Research--XVI World Congress. 27-31 May 1998, Rhodes, Greece.

    PubMed

    Brown, L

    1998-07-01

    This congress was organized by David Hearse (St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK) and Roberto Ferrari (Brescia, Italy). It was intended to stimulate progress in cardiovascular biology and medicine by allowing basic and clinical scientists to interact and communicate. The 2000 delegates had the opportunity to attend more than 50 major symposia and discuss almost 800 free communications as moderated posters over the five days. The abstracts have been published in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology (1998) 30. The achievements of cardiovascular pharmacology were specifically recognized at this meeting, both the advances of the last 30 years as well as the possibilities for the future. The amount of information presented in the six to eight concurrent symposia means that this review will, of necessity, emphasize the reviewer's prejudices regarding the achievements and future directions of cardiovascular pharmacology. PMID:18465548

  17. The Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project. XVI. Cepheid Variables in an Inner Field of M101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stetson, P. B.; Saha, A.; Ferrarese, L.; Rawson, D. M.; Ford, H. C.; Freedman, W. L.; Graham, J. A.; Harding, P.; Han, M.; Hill, R. J.; Hoessel, J. G.; Huchra, J. P.; Hughes, S. M.; Illingworth, G. D.; Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.; Madore, B. F.; Mould, J. R.; Phelps, R. L.; Sakai, S.; Silbermann, N. A.; Turner, A.

    1998-01-01

    We report on the identification of 255 candidate variable stars in a field located some 1.7 from the center of the late-type spiral galaxy M101 = NGC 5457, based on observations made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope.

  18. American Association of Women in Community and Junior Colleges Quarterly; Vol. XVI, Nos. 1-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AAWCJC Quarterly, 1992

    1992-01-01

    The American Association of Women in Community and Junior Colleges (AAWCJC), an affiliated council of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges (AACJC), produces the "Quarterly" to disseminate information pertinent to the AAWCJC membership and to provide a forum for the discussion of current issues and events. Each issue of the…

  19. Dynamics of glass-forming liquids. XVI. Observation of ultrastable glass transformation via dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Sepúlveda, A.; Ediger, M. D.; Richert, R.

    2013-03-01

    The transformation of vapor-deposited ultrastable glasses of indomethacin (IMC) into the supercooled liquid state near Tg is monitored by means of dielectric spectroscopy. Films with thickness between 400 and 800 nm are deposited on differential interdigitated electrode cells and their loss profiles are measured during isothermal annealing using a dual-channel impedance technique for frequencies between 0.03 and 100 Hz. All dielectric loss spectra observed during the transformation process can be explained by a volume fraction of the supercooled liquid that increases linearly with time. From the early stages of the transformation to the liquid that is formed via complete annealing of the ultrastable glass, the average dielectric relaxation time as well as the distribution of relaxation times of the liquid component are identical to those of the conventional liquid obtained by cooling the melt. The dependence of the transformation rate on the film thickness is consistent with a growth front mechanism for the direct conversion from the ultrastable glass to the equilibrium supercooled liquid. We conclude that the IMC liquid recovered from the ultrastable glass is structurally and dynamically identical to the conventional supercooled state.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Speckle interferometry at USNO. XVI. (Mason+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Wycoff, G. L.

    2012-08-01

    The results of 1031 speckle-interferometric observations of double stars, made with the 26 inch refractor of the U.S. Naval Observatory, are presented. Each speckle-interferometric observation of a system represents a combination of over two thousand short-exposure images. These observations are averaged into 457 mean relative positions and range in separation from 0.15" to 16.94", with a median separation of 3.03". The range in V-band magnitudes for the primary (secondary) of observed targets is 3.1-12.9 (3.2-13.3). (2 data files).

  1. Proceedings of Workshop XVI; The dynamic characteristics of faulting inferred from recordings of strong ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1982-01-01

    The strong ground motions radiated by earthquake faulting are controlled by the dynamic characteristics of the faulting process. Although this assertion seems self-evident, seismologists have only recently begun to derive and test quantitative relations between common measures of strong ground motion and the dynamic characteristics of faulting. Interest in this problem has increased dramatically in past several years, however, resulting in a number of important advances. The research presented in this workshop is a significant part of this scientific development. Watching this development occur through the work of many scientists is exciting; to be able to gather a number of these scientists together in one workshop is a remarkable opportunity.

  2. Molecular Rydberg transitions. XVI. MCD of CH/sub 3/Br

    SciTech Connect

    McGlynn, S.P.; Scott, J.D.; Felps, W.S.; Findley, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Magnetic circular dichroism, first derivative (of absorption), and absorption spectra of methyl bromide are presented for the first s--Rydberg transition region, 55 000--61 000 cm/sup -1/. A straightforward analysis in terms of the ratios (MCD/derivative) of the signal amplitudes yields a unique identification of the first s--Rydberg states, /sup 3/E/sub(/sub 1/) and /sup 1/E/sub(/sub 1/). These identifications, in conjunction with oscillator strength ratios and an intermediate coupling model, lead to an assignment of the remaining first s--Rydberg states /sup 3/E/sub(/sub 2/) and /sup 3/E/sub() 0plus-or-minus/. All of these assignments are corroborative of ones based on vibrational analyses and extrapolations (S. Felps, P. Hochmann, P. Brint, and S. P. McGlynn, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 59, 355 (1976)). The power of MCD techniques in VUV Rydberg analyses is strikingly demonstrated.

  3. Economics of Higher Education. Bulletin, 1962, No. 5. OE-50027. [Chapter XVI - Appendices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mushkin, Selma J., Ed.

    1962-01-01

    In the past few years an important beginning has been made toward defining and exploring the major issues in the economics of higher education. The research of economists covers a wide range of problems, from that of the Nation's requirements for college-trained people, to detailed questions of financing. Perhaps no single area of this work offers…

  4. Selective primary health care: strategies for control of disease in the developing world. XVI. Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Marsden, P D

    1984-01-01

    Despite much research, specific chemotherapy for Chagas' disease remains problematic, and prophylaxis by vaccination seems remote. A significant proportion of today's positive seroreactive patients will burden tomorrow's hospital services with persistent cardiac failure, arrhythmias requiring pacemaker implantation, and megasyndromes requiring corrective surgical procedures. Yet the control of transmission to humans in many endemic areas is feasible by programs of residual insecticide spraying and subsequent vigilance and, in some instances, house improvement, i.e., measures to combat domiciliated vector bugs. The success of such programs will vary, depending on the dominant bug vector and degree of development of the country's public health services. The fact that the Brazilian government voted a large sum of money in 1983 for bug control by the Ministry of Health enforces this view. Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to humans could decrease considerably in the next decade in Brazil as a result of this program. There is, however, still a need for research to define the cheapest ways of interrupting transmission in different epidemiologic situations so that the maximum number of people at risk can be reached with the funds available, for the children infected today may be hospital patients of the future for whom little can be done. PMID:6084284

  5. Student Characteristics as Compared to the Community Profile, Fall, 1986. Volume XVI, No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, Toni

    In fall 1986, a study was conducted at Illinois' William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to provide a student profile for general information purposes, to gather data not available on the college's automated student data file, and to analyze WRHC's market outreach. Surveys were mailed to random samples of 500 credit degree students and 300 continuing

  6. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 2. UNIT XVI, LEARNING ABOUT AC GENERATOR (ALTERNATOR) PRINCIPLES (PART I).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 25-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE OPERATING PRINCIPLES OF ALTERNATING CURRENT GENERATORS USED ON DIESEL POWERED EQUIPMENT. TOPICS ARE REVIEWING ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS, AND OPERATING PRINCIPLES OF ALTERNATORS. THE MODULE CONSISTS OF A SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMED TRAINING FILM "AC GENERATORS…

  7. Integrated orbit/attitude determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikelson, A. D.

    1981-11-01

    The Space Sextant - Autonomous Navigation Attitude Reference System (SS-ANARS), a spacecraft subsystem that has the integrated capability of on-board orbit determination with on-board attitude determination is described. The Space Sextant is a gimballed-two telescope included angle measurement device that is driven by an on-board computer to measure the angles between celestial bodies, as seen from a spacecraft, to an accuracy of 1 arc second. Orbit determination with the system is achieved by measuring the included angles between brighter stars and the limbs of the Moon and Earth, and processing these angle measurements through a Kalman filter with an on-board digital computer. Spacecraft position accuracy from 800 to 1200 feet is determined for any Earth orbit. Attitude determination relative to the celestial sphere is determined with the same device to an accuracy of less than 1 arc second by measuring the included angles between the brighter stars and a reference platform consisting of a mirror and a Porro prism. The SS-ANARS described has progressed through critical technology development, a proof of concept model, a laboratory model, and a flight demonstration system. This flight demonstration system is to be flown as a sortie payload on the Space Transportation System (Space Shuttle) to prove its autonomous-integrated orbit and attitude determination capabilities.

  8. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne; Pickett, John Butler; Brown, Kevin George; Edwards, Thomas Barry

    1998-01-01

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  9. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  10. Evans function and Fredholm determinants

    PubMed Central

    Karambal, Issa; Malham, Simon J. A.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the relationship between the Evans function, transmission coefficient and Fredholm determinant for systems of first-order linear differential operators on the real line. The applications we have in mind include linear stability problems associated with travelling wave solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations, for example reaction–diffusion or solitary wave equations. The Evans function and transmission coefficient, which are both finite determinants, are natural tools for both analytic and numerical determination of eigenvalues of such linear operators. However, inverting the eigenvalue problem by the free-state operator generates a natural linear integral eigenvalue problem whose solvability is determined through the corresponding infinite Fredholm determinant. The relationship between all three determinants has received a lot of recent attention. We focus on the case when the underlying Fredholm operator is a trace class perturbation of the identity. Our new results include (i) clarification of the sense in which the Evans function and transmission coefficient are equivalent and (ii) proof of the equivalence of the transmission coefficient and Fredholm determinant, in particular in the case of distinct far fields. PMID:25663806

  11. Erroneous theories of sex determination.

    PubMed Central

    Mittwoch, U

    1985-01-01

    Throughout the major part of history, theories of sex determination had to be formulated in the absence of knowledge of ova and spermatozoa. The most persistent theory postulated that males are associated with the right parental side and females with the left side. At the end of the 19th century, sex was thought to be determined by nutrition. Recent findings regarding bilateral asymmetry in human hermaphrodites and of temperature dependent sex determination in reptiles may restore a small degree of credibility to certain theories predating the discovery of sex chromosomes. Images PMID:3892005

  12. Mars Science Laboratory Orbit Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruizinga, Gerhard L.; Gustafson, Eric D.; Thompson, Paul F.; Jefferson, David C.; Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Mottinger, Neil A.; Pelletier, Frederic J.; Ryne, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the orbit determination process, results and filter strategies used by the Mars Science Laboratory Navigation Team during cruise from Earth to Mars. The new atmospheric entry guidance system resulted in an orbit determination paradigm shift during final approach when compared to previous Mars lander missions. The evolving orbit determination filter strategies during cruise are presented. Furthermore, results of calibration activities of dynamical models are presented. The atmospheric entry interface trajectory knowledge was significantly better than the original requirements, which enabled the very precise landing in Gale Crater.

  13. The phase boundary between wadsleyite and ringwoodite in Mg2SiO4 determined by in situ X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Irifune, T.; Higo, Y.; Sanehira, T.; Sueda, Y.; Yamada, A.; Shinmei, T.; Yamazaki, D.; Ando, J.; Funakoshi, K.; Utsumi, W.

    2006-04-01

    The phase boundary between wadsleyite and ringwoodite in Mg2SiO4 has been determined in situ using a multi-anvil apparatus and synchrotron X-rays radiation at SPring-8. In spite of the similar X-ray diffraction profiles of these high-pressure phases with closely related structures, we were able to identify the occurrence of the mutual phase transformations based on the change in the difference profile by utilizing a newly introduced press-oscillation system. The boundary was located at ~18.9 GPa and 1,400C when we used Shims gold pressure scale (Shim et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 203:729 739, 2002), which was slightly (~0.8 GPa) lower than the pressure as determined from the quench experiments of Katsura and Ito (J Geophys Res 94:15663 15670, 1989). Although it was difficult to constrain the Clapeyron slope based solely on the present data due to the kinetic problem, the phase boundary [ P (GPa)=13.1+4.1110-3 T (K)] calculated by a combination of a P T position well constrained by the present experiment and the calorimetric data of Akaogi et al. (J Geophys Res 94:15671 15685, 1989) reasonably explains all the present data within the experimental error. When we used Andersons gold pressure scale (Anderson et al. in J Appl Phys 65:1535 1543, 1989), our phase boundary was located in ~18.1 GPa and 1,400C, and the extrapolation boundary was consistent with that of Kuroda et al. (Phys Chem Miner 27:523 532, 2000), which was determined at high temperature (1,800 2,000C) using a calibration based on the same pressure scale. Our new phase boundary is marginally consistent with that of Suzuki et al. (Geophys Res Lett 27:803 806, 2000) based on in situ X-ray experiments at lower temperatures (<1,000C) using Browns and Deckers NaCl pressure scales.

  14. Determination of plutonium metal origins

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, K.J.

    1995-02-01

    Forensic signatures are present in any Pu sample that can determine the sample`s origin: isotopic ratio of Pu, progeny species that grow into the sample, and contaminant species left over from incomplete purification of the Pu in fuel reprocessing. In the context of intelligence information, this can result in attribution of responsibility for the product of clandestine proliferant operations or material smuggled from existing stockpiles. A list of signature elements and what can be determined from them have been developed. Work needs to be done in converting concentrations of signature species into a quantitative forensic analysis, particularly in regard to reactor performance, but this should require only a small effort. A radiochemical analysis scheme has been developed for measuring these nuclides; more work is needed, particularly for determining fission product concentrations. A sample of Pu metal has been analyzed and several parameters determined that are strong indicators of its point of origin.

  15. Teacher Compensation and Its Determinants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiter, Herbert D.

    1974-01-01

    Examines the relationship among environmental influences, per pupil expenditures, and teacher salaries and debates the question whether collective negotiation or environmental influences are the prime determinant of teacher salaries. (Author/DN)

  16. Motivational Determinants of Coalition Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folkes, Valerie S.; Weiner, Bernard

    1977-01-01

    Coalition preferences of 300 male and female subjects were ascertained under varying motivational conditions. Demonstrates that coalition formation and interpersonal conflict are dependent upon the motivational determinants of group activity. (Editor/RK)

  17. Method for Determining Artillery Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Johannes; Meuser, Wilfried

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for determinig artillery positions. Two groups of four closely spaced microphones are placed at known positions, and radio bearings are determined by projectile flight time differences of muzzle blasts. The advantages of the method are discussed.

  18. Step 4: NCI Funding Determinations

    Cancer.gov

    Funding determinations are made around Oct. 1 each federal fiscal year. These decisions take into account several factors, including Congressional mandates, new scientific opportunities and program priorities when deciding which grants receive funding.

  19. Orbit determination in satellite geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, G.; Schildknecht, T.; Hugentobler, U.; Gurtner, W.

    2003-04-01

    For centuries orbit determination in Celestial Mechanics was a synonym for the determination of six so-called Keplerian elements of the orbit of a minor planet or a comet based on a short series of (three or more) astrometric places observed from one or more observatories on the Earth's surface. With the advent of the space age the problem changed considerably in several respects: (1) orbits have to be determined for a new class of celestial objects, namely for artificial Earth satellites; (2) new observation types, in particular topocentric distances and radial velocities, are available for the establishment of highly accurate satellite orbits; (3) even for comparatively short arcs (up to a few revolutions) the orbit model that has to be used is much more complicated than for comparable problems in the planetary system: in addition to the gravitational perturbations due to Moon and planets higher-order terms in the Earth's gravity field have to be taken into account as well as non-gravitational effects like atmospheric drag and/or radiation pressure; (4) the parameter space is often of higher than the sixth dimension, because not only the six osculating elements referring to the initial epoch of an arc, but dynamical parameters defining the (a priori imperfectly known) force field have to be determined, as well. It may even be necessary to account for stochastic velocity changes. Orbit determination is not a well-known task in satellit geodesy. This is mainly due to the fact that orbit determination is often imbedded in a much more general parameter estimation problem, where other parameter types (referred to station positions, Earth rotation, atmosphere, etc.) have to be determined, as well. Three examples of "pure" orbit determination problems will be discussed subsequently: ? The first problem intends to optimize the observation process of one Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) observatory. It is a filter problem, where the orbit is improved in real time with the goal to narrow down the so-called range-gate, defining the time interval when the echo of the LASER pulse is expected. ? Secondly we highlight orbit determination procedures (in particular advanced orbit parametrization techniques) related to the determination of the orbits of GPS satellites and of Low Earth Orbiters (LEOS) equipped with GPS receivers. ? We conclude by discussing the problem of determining the orbits of passive artificial satellites or of space debris using high-precision astrometric CCD-observations of these object.

  20. Gender determination of avian embryo

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Keith A.; Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  1. Determining a healthcare organization's value.

    PubMed

    Hahn, W

    1994-08-01

    As the consolidation activity among healthcare providers increases, it becomes more important than ever for healthcare financial managers to understand how to determine a healthcare organization's fair market value. There are many methods of determining an organization's value, but three general methods are the foundation of all others: the market comparable method, the underlying assets method, and the income, or cash flow, method. PMID:10146044

  2. A Predictive Framework for Determining How Journalists Determine News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudino, James L.

    To determine how to articulate a concrete definition of the substance of the journalist's occupation, this paper offers a propositional framework of news value based on Kurt Lewin's gatekeeper model. First, the paper follows the established suggestion that news decisions are best studied from a gatekeeping perspective or that "news is whatever

  3. Spectral Determinants on Mandelstam Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillairet, Luc; Kalvin, Victor; Kokotov, Alexey

    2015-11-01

    We study the regularized determinant of the Laplacian as a functional on the space of Mandelstam diagrams (noncompact translation surfaces glued from finite and semi-infinite cylinders). A Mandelstam diagram can be considered as a compact Riemann surface equipped with a conformal flat singular metric {|?|^2} , where {?} is a meromorphic one-form with simple poles such that all its periods are pure imaginary and all its residues are real. The main result is an explicit formula for the determinant of the Laplacian in terms of the basic objects on the underlying Riemann surface (the prime form, theta-functions, the canonical meromorphic bidifferential) and the divisor of the meromorphic form {?} . As an important intermediate result we prove a decomposition formula of the type of Burghelea-Friedlander-Kappeler for the determinant of the Laplacian for flat surfaces with cylindrical ends and conical singularities.

  4. Determination of radium in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Franklin Butt; Johnson, J.O.

    1964-01-01

    Radium isotopes are common radioactive constituents of natural waters. The concentration of radium-226 in potable water is of particular significance because this isotope is generally considered the most hazardous of all radionuclides with respect to ingestion. The approximate concentration of radium-226 is determined after coprecipitating radium with barium sulfate. The short-lived daughters of radium are allowed to grow for 10-12 days, then the alpha activity of the precipitate is measured and compared with that of a precipitate containing a known amount of radium-226. Concentrations of the individual alpha-emitting isotopes of radium-223, radium-224, and radium-226, are determined by coprecipitating radium first with lead sulfate, then with barium chloride, and finally with barium sulfate. This final precipitate is initially free of other alpha-emitting nuclides, thus permitting the isotopic composition to be determined by measuring the growth and decay of the alpha activity of the precipitate.

  5. Simple spectrophotometric determination of monopersulfate.

    PubMed

    Wacławek, S; Grübel, K; Černík, M

    2015-10-01

    A simple, sensitive and accurate spectrophotometric method has been developed and validated for the determination of monopersulfate (MPS) which is an active part of potassium monopersulfate triple salt that has the commercial name - Oxone. This work proposes a spectrophotometric determination of monopersulfate based on modification of the iodometric titration method. The analysis of absorption spectra was made for the concentration range from 1.35 to 13.01 ppm of MPS (with a detection and quantification limit of 0.41 and 1.35 ppm, respectively) and different pH values. The influence of several anions on the measurement was also investigated. Furthermore, the absorbance of iron and cobalt (often used as free radical initiators) proved to have no effect on the measurement of MPS concentrations. On the basis of the conducted studies, we propose 395 nm as an optimal wavelength for the determination of MPS concentrations. PMID:26004103

  6. Spectral Determinants on Mandelstam Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillairet, Luc; Kalvin, Victor; Kokotov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    We study the regularized determinant of the Laplacian as a functional on the space of Mandelstam diagrams (noncompact translation surfaces glued from finite and semi-infinite cylinders). A Mandelstam diagram can be considered as a compact Riemann surface equipped with a conformal flat singular metric {|ω|^2}, where {ω} is a meromorphic one-form with simple poles such that all its periods are pure imaginary and all its residues are real. The main result is an explicit formula for the determinant of the Laplacian in terms of the basic objects on the underlying Riemann surface (the prime form, theta-functions, the canonical meromorphic bidifferential) and the divisor of the meromorphic form {ω}. As an important intermediate result we prove a decomposition formula of the type of Burghelea-Friedlander-Kappeler for the determinant of the Laplacian for flat surfaces with cylindrical ends and conical singularities.

  7. Method for determining artillery position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Johannes; Loges, Werner; Meuser, Wilfried

    1988-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining the position of cannon from measurement sites whose distance from each other lies in the same order of magnitude as the distance between the cannons -- that distance being in the kilometer range -- with the help of the travel time evaluation of muzzle blasts received at the measurement sites. There are at least two measurement sites, consisting of a cruciform of four microphones each positioned so that one axis is oriented to an arbitrarily chosen reference direction with the microphones spaced closely together. In this arrangement of diametrically opposed microphones, the respective travel times are determined and placed in a relationship whose arctangent is a radio bearing to the reference direction in which radio bearings are determined with consideration of their position and their opposing distance from the cannon position.

  8. Determining distances using asteroseismic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Aguirre, V.; Casagrande, L.; Basu, S.; Campante, T. L.; Chaplin, W. J.; Huber, D.; Miglio, A.; Serenelli, A. M.

    2013-02-01

    Asteroseismology has been extremely successful in determining the properties of stars in different evolutionary stages with a remarkable level of precision. However, to fully exploit its potential, robust methods for estimating stellar parameters are required and independent verification of the results is needed. In this talk, I present a new technique developed to obtain stellar properties by coupling asteroseismic analysis with the infrared flux method. Using two global seismic observables and multi-band photometry, the technique determines masses, radii, effective temperatures, bolometric fluxes, and thus distances for field stars in a self-consistent manner. Applying our method to a sample of solar-like oscillators in the Kepler field that have accurate Hipparcos parallaxes, we find agreement in our distance determinations to better than 5 %. Comparison with measurements of spectroscopic effective temperatures and interferometric radii also validate our results, and show that our technique can be applied to stars evolved beyond the main-sequence phase.

  9. Lessons for Inductive Germline Determination

    PubMed Central

    Seervai, Riyad N.H.; Wessel, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Formation of the germline in an embryo marks a fresh round of reproductive potential, yet the developmental stage and location within the embryo where the primordial germ cells (PGCs) form differs wildly among species. In most animals, the germline is formed either by an inherited mechanism, in which maternal provisions within the oocyte drive localized germ-cell fate once acquired in the embryo, or an inductive mechanism that involves signaling between cells that directs germ-cell fate. The inherited mechanism has been widely studied in model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Xenopus laevis, and Danio rerio. Given the rapid generation time and the effective adaptation for laboratory research of these organisms, it is not coincidental that research on these organisms has led the field in elucidating mechanisms for germline specification. The inductive mechanism, however, is less well understood and is studied primarily in the mouse (Mus musculus). In this review, we compare and contrast these two fundamental mechanisms for germline determination, beginning with the key molecular determinants that play a role in the formation of germ cells across all animal taxa. We next explore the current understanding of the inductive mechanism of germ-cell determination in mice, and evaluate the hypotheses for selective pressures on these contrasting mechanisms. We then discuss the hypothesis that the transition between these determination mechanisms, which has happened many times in phylogeny, is more of a continuum than a binary change. Finally, we propose an analogy between germline determination and sex determination in vertebrates—two of the milestones of reproduction and development—in which animals use contrasting strategies to activate similar pathways. PMID:23450642

  10. Decoherence, determinism and chaos revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.

    1994-11-15

    We suggest that the derivation of the free space Maxwell Equations for classical electromagnetism, using a discrete ordered calculus developed by L.H. Kauffman and T. Etter, necessarily pushes the discussion of determinism in natural science down to the level of relativistic quantum mechanics and hence renders the mathematical phenomena studied in deterministic chaos research irrelevant to the question of whether the world investigated by physics is deterministic. We believe that this argument reinforces Suppes` contention that the issue of determinism versus indeterminism should be viewed as a Kantian antinomy incapable of investigation using currently available scientific tools.

  11. MEANS FOR DETERMINING CENTRIFUGE ALIGNMENT

    DOEpatents

    Smith, W.Q.

    1958-08-26

    An apparatus is presented for remotely determining the alignment of a centrifuge. The centrifage shaft is provided with a shoulder, upon which two followers ride, one for detecting radial movements, and one upon the shoulder face for determining the axial motion. The followers are attached to separate liquid filled bellows, and a tube connects each bellows to its respective indicating gage at a remote location. Vibrations produced by misalignment of the centrifuge shaft are transmitted to the bellows, and tbence through the tubing to the indicator gage. This apparatus is particularly useful for operation in a hot cell where the materials handled are dangerous to the operating personnel.

  12. Determination of pyrotechnic functional margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1992-01-01

    Following the failure of a previously qualified pyrotechnically actuated pin puller design, an investigation led to a redesign and requalification. The emphasis of the second qualification was placed on determining the functional margin of the pin puller by comparing the energy deliverable by the pyrotechnic cartridge to the energy required to accomplish the function. Also determined were the effects of functional variables. This paper describes the failure investigation, the test methods employed and the results of the evaluation, and provides a recommended approach to assure the successful functioning of pyrotechnic devices.

  13. Determination of pyrotechnic functional margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1993-01-01

    Following the failure of a previously qualified pyrotechnically actuated pin puller design, an investigation led to a redesign and requalification. The emphasis of the second qualification was placed on determining the functional margin of the pin puller by comparing the energy deliverable by the pyrotechnic cartridge to the energy required to accomplish the function. Also determined were the effects of functional variables. This paper describes the failure investigation, the test methods employed and the results of the evaluation, and provides a recommended approach to assure the successful functioning of pyrotechnic devices.

  14. Self-Determination and Bilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Rodrigue; Allard, Real; Deveau, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on additive bilingualism for minority group children, more specifically the development of strong literacy skills in English and in the children's language. The personal autonomization language learning (PALL) model is presented. It specifies eight testable hypotheses. Self-determination theory (SDT) is central in the PALL…

  15. Determinants and Polynomial Root Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Pillis, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    A little known property of determinants is developed in a manner accessible to beginning undergraduates in linear algebra. Using the language of matrix theory, a classical result by Sylvester that describes when two polynomials have a common root is recaptured. Among results concerning the structure of polynomial roots, polynomials with pairs of

  16. Determining Manpower Needs in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priebe, Don

    A long-term project entitled Agricultural Manpower Needs in North Dakota examined current and projected agriculture manpower needs in the state. Objectives of the project were to develop a methodology for obtaining and interpreting agricultural manpower needs data for North Dakota, to determine emerging employment trends and identify emerging

  17. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Haering, Christian H.; Jessberger, Rolf

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  18. Plasma digital density determining device

    DOEpatents

    Sprott, Julien C.; Lovell, Thomas W.; Holly, Donald J.

    1976-01-01

    The density of a decaying plasma in an electrically conducting enclosure is determined by applying an excitation to the cavity formed by the enclosure and counting digitally the number of resonant frequencies traversed by the combination of the cavity and the decaying plasma.

  19. Determinants and Polynomial Root Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Pillis, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    A little known property of determinants is developed in a manner accessible to beginning undergraduates in linear algebra. Using the language of matrix theory, a classical result by Sylvester that describes when two polynomials have a common root is recaptured. Among results concerning the structure of polynomial roots, polynomials with pairs of…

  20. Determining Salinity by Simple Means.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This paper describes the construction and use of a simple salinometer. The salinometer is composed, mainly, of a milliammeter and a battery and uses the measurement of current flow to determine the salinity of water. A complete list of materials is given, as are details of construction and operation of the equipment. The use of the salinometer in

  1. Videos Determine the Moon's "g"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persson, J. R.; Hagen, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    Determining the acceleration of a free-falling object due to gravity is a standard experiment in physics. Different methods to do this have been developed over the years. This article discusses the use of video-analysis tools as another method. If there is a video available and a known scale it is possible to analyse the motion. The use of video…

  2. Processing Determinants of Reading Speed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Mark D.; McClelland, James L.

    1979-01-01

    Two groups of undergraduates differing in reading ability were tested on a number of reaction-time tasks designed to determine the speed of encoding visual information at several different levels, tests of sensory functions, verbal and quantitative reasoning ability, short-term auditory memory span, and ability to comprehend spoken text.…

  3. Sex determination using maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kanthem, Ranjith Kumar; Guttikonda, Venkateswara Rao; Yeluri, Sivaranjani; Kumari, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individual identification is a subtle concept and often one of the most important priorities in mass disasters, road accidents, air crashes, fires, and even in the investigation of criminal cases. Matching specific features detected on the cadaver with data recorded during the life of an individual is an important aspect in forensics, and can be performed by fingerprint analysis, deoxyribonucleic acid matching, anthropological methods, radiological methods and other techniques which can facilitate age and sex identification. Sinus radiography is one such method that has been used for determination of the sex of an individual. Hence, an attempt is being made to use the different dimensions of the maxillary sinus in the determination of sex using coronal and axial sections of plain computed tomography (CT) scan. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients including 17 male and 13 female, visiting the Outpatient Department of the Mamata General Hospital were included as the study subjects. The dimensions of right and left maxillary sinuses of 30 subjects from plain CT were measured using SYNGO software and statistical analysis was done. Results: Sex determination using height, length, width, and volume of the maxillary sinus on both sides showed statistically significant results with a higher percentage of sexual dimorphism in the case of volume. Conclusion: Volume of the right maxillary sinus can be used as accurate diagnostic parameter for sex determination. PMID:26005308

  4. Self-Determination and Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Abery, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    Promoting self-determination and choice opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities has become best practice in the field. This article reviews the research and development activities conducted by the authors over the past several decades and provides a synthesis of the knowledge in the field pertaining to efforts to…

  5. Determining Salinity by Simple Means.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This paper describes the construction and use of a simple salinometer. The salinometer is composed, mainly, of a milliammeter and a battery and uses the measurement of current flow to determine the salinity of water. A complete list of materials is given, as are details of construction and operation of the equipment. The use of the salinometer in…

  6. Determination of inulin in foods.

    PubMed

    Simonovska, B

    2000-01-01

    A method was developed for determining fructan inulin in various foods (yogurts, honey cakes, chocolates). Warm water was applied for extraction of samples, and mono- and dissacharides were determined by a thin-layer chromatographic densitometric method. A portion of the test solution was hydrolyzed 30 min with 1% oxalic acid in a boiling water bath. Fructose was determined in the hydrolysate. The amount of inulin in a sample was calculated as the difference between the amount of fructose in the sample before and after hydrolysis. The fructose from sucrose formed during the hydrolysis was also considered. The mean recovery from yogurt fortified with 4% inulin was 95.5 +/- 4.5% (mean +/- standard deviation); from honey cakes extract fortified with 10% inulin, 97.3 +/- 5.5%; and from chocolate extract fortified with 30% inulin, 98.6 +/- 6.6% (6 replicates in all cases). Determination of glucose is not necessary for analyzing fructans with the composition expressed shortened to GFn-1 (G, glucose; F, fructosyl) with the average degree of polymerization 8 < or = n < or = 15. PMID:10868592

  7. Means of determining extrusion temperatures

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Robert E.; Canonico, Domenic A.

    1977-01-01

    In an extrusion process comprising the steps of fabricating a metal billet, heating said billet for a predetermined time and at a selected temperature to increase its plasticity and then forcing said heated billet through a small orifice to produce a desired extruded object, the improvement comprising the steps of randomly inserting a plurality of small metallic thermal tabs at different cross sectional depths in said billet as a part of said fabricating step, and examining said extruded object at each thermal tab location for determining the crystal structure at each extruded thermal tab thus revealing the maximum temperature reached during extrusion in each respective tab location section of the extruded object, whereby the thermal profile of said extruded object during extrusion may be determined.

  8. Cytokine determinants of viral tropism

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Grant; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Bartee, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The specificity of a given virus for a ceil type, tissue or species — collectively known as viral tropism — is an important factor in determining the outcome of viral infection in any particular host. Owing to the increased prevalence of zoonotic infections and the threat of emerging and re-emerging pathogens, gaining a better understanding of the factors that determine viral tropism has become particularly important. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of the central role of antiviral and pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly the interferons and tumour necrosis factor, in dictating viral tropism and how these cytokine pathways can be exploited therapeutically for cancer treatment and to better counter future threats from emerging zoonotic pathogens. PMID:19696766

  9. Luminosity determination at proton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafström, P.; Kozanecki, W.

    2015-03-01

    Luminosity is a key parameter in any particle collider, and its precise determination has proven particularly challenging at hadron colliders. After introducing the concept of luminosity in its multiple incarnations and offering a brief survey of the pp and p p bar colliders built to date, this article outlines the various methods that have been developed for relative-luminosity monitoring, as well as the complementary approaches considered for establishing an absolute luminosity scale. This is followed by a survey, from both a historical and a technical perspective, of luminosity determination at the ISR, the S p p ¯ S, the Tevatron, RHIC and the LHC. For each of these, we first delineate the interplay between the experimental context, the specificities of the accelerator, and the precision targets suggested by the physics program. We then detail how the different methods were applied to specific experimental environments and how successfully they meet the precision goals.

  10. Gravity Probe B Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestople, Paul; Small, Huntington

    2007-04-01

    The GP-B satellite is equipped with two redundant Trimble TANS Vector III GPS receivers and matching antennae, used to reconcile vehicle time with Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and to provide a satellite position measurement. Real time GPS position accuracy easily meets mission requirements of 100 m RMS per axis. The GP-B precision orbit was determined in ground processing of 18-hour and 30-hour GPS data segments. Analysis of overlapping consecutive 18-hour ephemeris segments suggest a maximum position uncertainty of 2.5 m RMS and maximum velocity uncertainty of 2.2 mm/sec RMS. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements provide independent verification of the GPS-derived GP-B orbit. We describe the GPS equipment and orbit determination operations, including pre-launch verification testing. On-orbit performance and lessons learned are discussed. GP-B ephemeris uncertainties estimated using ephemeris overlap comparisons and SLR residual computations are detailed.

  11. Nondestructive determination of mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, E.; Chu, S.-L.; Salama, K.

    1985-01-01

    The sensitivity of the velocity of ultrasonic waves to the elasticity of the materials (acousto-elastic constant - AEC) as controlled by the microstructure of the materials was examined experimentally. Rolled-plate specimens of five different Al alloys were subjected to tensile tests while being monitored for the velocity change of a 10 MHz longitudinal wave as a function of the applied tensile stress. The acoustic propagation velocity was measured perpendicularly to the stress. Determinations were made of the yield strength and the hardnesses of the specimens. Samples of the plate materials examined microscopically to characterize the solid phases. The AECs varied linearly with the percentage of solid solution phase of the alloys. The trend for strain-hardened samples was, however, opposite from that in the precipitation-hardened alloys. The results underscore the necessity of considering the microstructural dependencies of the AECs when using ultrasonic NDE methods, and also opened the potential of determining some mechanical properties with NDE techniques.

  12. Method for determining gene knockouts

    DOEpatents

    Maranas, Costa D; Burgard, Anthony R; Pharkya, Priti

    2013-06-04

    A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

  13. Is birth weight determined genetically?

    PubMed

    Carr-Hill, R; Campbell, D M; Hall, M H; Meredith, A

    1987-09-19

    Birthweight correlations were analysed among 505 intergenerational pairs of first births to women aged 18-25 identified from a large obstetric data bank. After standardisation for fetal sex, maternal height, gestational age, and proteinuric pre-eclampsia residual correlations of between 0.1402 and 0.1725 were found, suggesting only a small genetic effect. It is concluded that genetic factors play only a small part in determining birth weight. PMID:3117303

  14. Method for determining gene knockouts

    DOEpatents

    Maranas, Costas D.; Burgard, Anthony R.; Pharkya, Priti

    2011-09-27

    A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

  15. In-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    The major aspects of processes that may be used for the determination of in-flight thrust are reviewed. Basic definitions are presented as well as analytical and ground-test methods for gathering data and calculating the thrust of the propulsion system during the flight development program of the aircraft. Test analysis examples include a single-exhaust turbofan, an intermediate-cowl turbofan, and a mixed-flow afterburning turbofan.

  16. Photodamage determination of human hair.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Estibalitz; Barba, Clara; Alonso, Cristina; Martí, Meritxell; Parra, José Luis; Coderch, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Sunlight on human hair causes photo-degradation. This results in bleaching due to melanin oxidation through free radicals, and induces keratin impairment. Protein degradation, tryptophan degradation, lipidic peroxidation and electron paramagnetic resonance can be used to evaluate proteic and lipidic photodecomposition and free radical formation in hair fibres subjected to antioxidant action and different UV intensities. All these methodologies have been optimised to determine protein, lipid and melanin degradation in hair subjected to different UV intensities. PMID:22119660

  17. Range determination for scannerless imaging

    DOEpatents

    Muguira, Maritza Rosa; Sackos, John Theodore; Bradley, Bart Davis; Nellums, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A new method of operating a scannerless range imaging system (e.g., a scannerless laser radar) has been developed. This method is designed to compensate for nonlinear effects which appear in many real-world components. The system operates by determining the phase shift of the laser modulation, which is a physical quantity related physically to the path length between the laser source and the detector, for each pixel of an image.

  18. Meteorological determinants of air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turoldo, F.; Del Frate, S.; Gallai, I.; Giaiotti, D. B.; Montanari, F.; Stel, F.; Goi, D.

    2010-09-01

    Air quality is the result of complex phenomena, among which the major role is played by human emissions of pollutants. Atmospheric processes act as determinants, e.g., modulating, dumping or amplifying the effects of emissions as an orchestra's director does with musical instruments. In this work, a series of small-scale and meso-scale meteorological determinants of air-quality are presented as they are observed in an area characterized by complex orography (Friuli Venezia Giulia, in the north-eastern side of Italy). In particular, attention is devoted to: i) meso-scale flows favouring the persistence of high concentrations of particulate matter; ii) meso-scale periodic flows (breezes) favouring high values of particulate matter; iii) local-scale thermodynamic behaviour favouring high atmospheric values of nitrogen oxides. The effects of these different classes of determinants are shown through comparisons between anthropic emissions (mainly traffic) and ground-based measurements. The relevance of complex orography (relatively steep relieves near to the sea) is shown for the meso-scale flows and, in particular, for local-scale periodic flows, which favour the increase of high pollutants concentrations mainly in summer, when the breezes regime is particularly relevant. Part of these results have been achieved through the ETS - Alpine Space EU project iMONITRAF!

  19. Rate determination from vector observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Jerold L.

    1993-01-01

    Vector observations are a common class of attitude data provided by a wide variety of attitude sensors. Attitude determination from vector observations is a well-understood process and numerous algorithms such as the TRIAD algorithm exist. These algorithms require measurement of the line of site (LOS) vector to reference objects and knowledge of the LOS directions in some predetermined reference frame. Once attitude is determined, it is a simple matter to synthesize vehicle rate using some form of lead-lag filter, and then, use it for vehicle stabilization. Many situations arise, however, in which rate knowledge is required but knowledge of the nominal LOS directions are not available. This paper presents two methods for determining spacecraft angular rates from vector observations without a priori knowledge of the vector directions. The first approach uses an extended Kalman filter with a spacecraft dynamic model and a kinematic model representing the motion of the observed LOS vectors. The second approach uses a 'differential' TRIAD algorithm to compute the incremental direction cosine matrix, from which vehicle rate is then derived.

  20. Gender determination from pulpal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Khorate, Manisha M.; Dhupar, Anita; Ahmed, Junaid; Dinkar, Ajit D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of X (Barr body [BB]) and Y (F body [FB]) chromosomes observed in dental pulp tissue for gender determination of an individual. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 100 teeth (50 male and 50 female), which were indicated for extraction. The teeth were sectioned at various intervals (within 12 h to 49 days post-extraction), and the pulpal tissue was obtained. Two slides for each pulp tissue were prepared, one for 5% Quinacrine dihydrochloride stain (FB) and the other for Hemotoxylin and Eosin stain (BB). The slides were then observed under the fluorescent microscope for FB and under the light microscope for the BB respectively. Results: Gender determination from human pulp is possible up to 7 weeks. The percentage of FB and BB decrease gradually as the time interval increases. Further, an equation was derived from the data based on the canonical discriminant function coefficients. Conclusion: The determination of gender based on a joint search for the presence or absence of X (BB) and Y (FB) Chromosome is a reliable and cost-effective technique. PMID:25125918

  1. Determinism, indeterminism, and explanatory bias.

    PubMed

    Targett, M

    1997-12-01

    Actions are a subclass of human behaviours which are distinguished, on a modest view, by certain antecedent mental and neural processes and events, including desires and beliefs. Libertarian philosophies have taken a less modest view, according to which some actions come under the influence of individual persons in a way distinct from being the necessary effect of a sequence of psychoneural events. Determinism claims necessary connections between sequences of events and conditions, including those sequences that involve desires and beliefs and subsequent actions. Even if a certain interpretation of modern physics shows determinism to be false, the sense of personal influence over action which libertarians have remains obscure. It is not enlightened by the physicist's idea of inexplicable fluctuations between courses of events with greater or lesser probabilities. If libertarianism remains obscure, so do the grounds for an approach to explaining behaviour which might be called "explanatory individualism". According to the latter stance, the local outcomes of actions and larger social tendencies are only properly explained in terms of the choices of individuals, rather than, for example, their neural or environmental antecedents. Again, bare indeterminism will not help to supply the required grounds. A more justifiable stance is "explanatory pluralism", a doctrine which denies the intrinsic priority of individualistic modes of explanation over those which focus on psychoneural, environmental, social or genetic conditions. It is stressed that on a sensible pluralism, any determinism which correctly describes the history of actions would be no more "genetic", than indeterminism could be "individualistic". PMID:9421834

  2. [Do hormones determine our fate?].

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, A

    1994-01-01

    The hormonal system is a communication system between cells and organs. Hence it is not surprising that it influences almost all physiological functions and, at least partially, our behaviour and fate. The sexual phenotype is determined by the sex hormones. Normally, the phenotype is in accordance with gonadal and genetic sex, but occasionally, as a consequence of enzymatic defects in the biosynthesis of sex hormones or of androgen resistance, gonadal and genetic sex are in discordance with the phenotype, the latter determining generally the civil sex and the sex of rearing. Whereas the gender role is generally determined by the sex of rearing and the phenotype, itself under hormonal influence, homo- and transsexuality constitute notorious exceptions to this rule. Although several authors consider homo- and transsexuality to be the consequence of an impairment in androgenic impregnation in the perinatal period, there are at present no convincing arguments for an hormonal origin for either homo- or transsexuality, although such a possibility can't be excluded either. Besides their role in psychosexual behaviour, sex hormones play also a role in our life expectancy. Indeed, although maximal life expectancy of man is genetically determined, a major determinant of individual life expectancy is cardiovascular pathology. The latter is partly responsible for the difference in life expectancy between men and women, cardiovascular mortality increasing rapidly at menopause and being halved by oestrogen replacement therapy. Also atherogenesis as such is, to a large extend, under hormonal control. Indeed insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism, which develop as a corollary of the aging process, is an important cause of atherosclerosis as well as of hypertension. Other hormones also play an important role in our behaviour. We can mention here the role of the thyroid hormones in the physical and mental development of children as well as in the regression of the intellectual functions in hypothyroidism; the role of growth (and sex) hormones in the clinical symptomatology of aging; the memory enhancing effects of the antidiuretic hormone; the role of growth factors (as well as of sex hormones) in tumorigenesis; the role of corticoids (and sex hormones) in the modulation of immunological processes etc. In brief, hormones influence all aspects of our life. PMID:8209584

  3. 49 CFR 512.16 - Class determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... determinations made by the Chief Counsel are listed in Appendices B and C to this Part. (d) A class determination... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class determinations. 512.16 Section 512.16... Class determinations. (a) The Chief Counsel may issue class determinations of categories of...

  4. Soil carbon determination by thermogravimetrics

    PubMed Central

    Pallasser, Robert; McBratney, Alex B.

    2013-01-01

    Determination of soil constituents and structure has a vital role in agriculture generally. Methods for the determination of soil carbon have in particular gained greater currency in recent times because of the potential that soils offer in providing offsets for greenhouse gas (CO2-equivalent) emissions. Ideally, soil carbon which can also be quite diverse in its makeup and origin, should be measureable by readily accessible, affordable and reliable means. Loss-on-ignition is still a widely used method being suitably simple and available but may have limitations for soil C monitoring. How can these limitations be better defined and understood where such a method is required to detect relatively small changes during soil-C building? Thermogravimetric (TGA) instrumentation to measure carbonaceous components has become more interesting because of its potential to separate carbon and other components using very precise and variable heating programs. TGA related studies were undertaken to assist our understanding in the quantification of soil carbon when using methods such as loss-on-ignition. Combining instrumentation so that mass changes can be monitored by mass spectrometer ion currents has elucidated otherwise hidden features of thermal methods enabling the interpretation and evaluation of mass-loss patterns. Soil thermogravimetric work has indicated that loss-on-ignition methods are best constrained to temperatures from 200 to 430 °C for reliable determination for soil organic carbon especially where clay content is higher. In the absence of C-specific detection where mass only changes are relied upon, exceeding this temperature incurs increasing contributions from inorganic sources adding to mass losses with diminishing contributions related to organic matter. The smaller amounts of probably more recalcitrant organic matter released at the higher temperatures may represent mineral associated material and/or simply more refractory forms. PMID:23638398

  5. Shape Determination for Deformed Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Akcelik, Volkan; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Liling; Ko, Kwok; Ghattas, Omar; /Texas U.

    2006-10-04

    A realistic superconducting RF cavity has its shape deformed comparing to its designed shape due to the loose tolerance in the fabrication process and the frequency tuning for its accelerating mode. A PDE-constrained optimization problem is proposed to determine the deformation of the cavity. A reduce space method is used to solve the PDE-constrained optimization problem where design sensitivities were computed using a continuous adjoint approach. A proof-of-concept example is given in which the deformation parameters of a single cavity-cell with two different types of deformation were computed.

  6. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOEpatents

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  7. Genetic modification and genetic determinism.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  8. Crystal structure determination of Efavirenz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popeneciu, Horea; Tripon, Carmen; Borodi, Gheorghe; Pop, Mihaela Maria; Dumitru, Ristoiu

    2015-12-01

    Needle-shaped single crystals of the title compound, C14H9ClF3NO2, were obtained from a co-crystallization experiment of Efavirenz with maleic acid in a (1:1) ratio, using methanol as solvent. Crystal structure determination at room temperature revealed a significant anisotropy of the lattice expansion compared to the previously reported low-temperature structure. In both low- and room temperature structures the cyclopropylethynyl fragment in one of the asymmetric unit molecules is disordered. While at low-temperature only one C atom exhibits positional disorder, at room temperature the disorder is present for two C atoms of the cyclopropane ring.

  9. Determinants of internet poker adoption.

    PubMed

    Philander, Kahlil S; Abarbanel, B Lillian

    2014-09-01

    In nearly all jurisdictions, adoption of a new form of gambling has been a controversial and contentious subject. Online gambling has been no different, though there are many aspects that affect online gambling that do not appear in the brick and mortar environment. This study seeks to identify whether demographic, economic, political, technological, and/or sociological determinants contribute to online poker gambling adoption. A theoretical discussion of these categories' importance to online poker is provided and exploratory empirical analysis is used to examine their potential validity. The analysis revealed support for all of the proposed categories of variables thought to be predictive of online gambling legality. PMID:23661279

  10. Liquid chromatographic determination of water

    DOEpatents

    Fortier, Nancy E.; Fritz, James S.

    1990-11-13

    A sensitive method for the determination of water in the presence of common interferences is presented. The detection system is based on the effect of water on the equilibrium which results from the reaction aryl aldehydes, such as cinnamaldehyde and methanol in the eluent to form cinnamaldehyde dimethylacetal, plus water. This equilibrium is shifted in a catalytic atmosphere of a hydrogen ion form past column reactor. The extent of the shift and the resulting change in absorbance are proportional to the amount of water present.

  11. Liquid chromatographic determination of water

    DOEpatents

    Fortier, N.E.; Fritz, J.S.

    1990-11-13

    A sensitive method for the determination of water in the presence of common interferences is presented. The detection system is based on the effect of water on the equilibrium which results from the reaction aryl aldehydes, such as cinnamaldehyde and methanol in the eluent to form cinnamaldehyde dimethylacetal, plus water. This equilibrium is shifted in a catalytic atmosphere of a hydrogen ion form past column reactor. The extent of the shift and the resulting change in absorbance are proportional to the amount of water present. 1 fig.

  12. Determination of uranium in zircon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuttitta, F.; Daniels, G.J.

    1959-01-01

    A routine fluorimetric procedure is described for the determination of trace amounts of uranium in zircon. It employs the direct extraction of uranyl nitrate with ethyl acetate using phosphate as a retainer for zirconium. Submicrogram amounts or uranium are separated in the presence of 100,000 times the amount of zirconium. The modified procedure has been worked out using synthetic mixtures of known composition and zircon. Results of analyses have an accuracy of 97-98% of the contained uranium and a standard deviation of less than 2.5%. ?? 1959.

  13. COBE ground segment attitude determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, V. K.; Freedman, I.; Wright, E. L.; Patt, F. S.

    1991-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft was launched in November 1989 by NASA to survey the sky for primordial radiation left from the Big Bang explosion. The success of the mission requires an accurate determination of the spacecraft attitude. While the accuracy of the attitude obtained from the attitude sensors is adequate for two of the experiments, the higher accuracy required by the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is obtained by using the DIRBE instrument as a special type of star sensor. Presented here is an overview of the attitude processing algorithms used at the Cosmology Data Analysis Center (CDAC) and the results obtained from the flight data.

  14. Structure determination of enterovirus 71

    SciTech Connect

    Plevka, Pavel; Perera, Rushika; Cardosa, Jane; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2013-02-20

    Enterovirus 71 is a picornavirus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease but may induce fatal neurological illness in infants and young children. Enterovirus 71 crystallized in a body-centered orthorhombic space group with two particles in general orientations in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Determination of the particle orientations required that the locked rotation function excluded the twofold symmetry axes from the set of icosahedral symmetry operators. This avoided the occurrence of misleading high rotation-function values produced by the alignment of icosahedral and crystallographic twofold axes. Once the orientations and positions of the particles had been established, the structure was solved by molecular replacement and phase extension.

  15. Kaguya Orbit Determination from JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haw, Robert J.; Mottinger, N. A.; Graat, E. J.; Jefferson, D. C.; Park, R.; Menom, P.; Higa, E.

    2008-01-01

    Selene (re-named 'Kaguya' after launch) is an unmanned mission to the Moon navigated, in part, by JPL personnel. Launched by an H-IIA rocket on September 14, 2007 from Tanegashima Space Center, Kaguya entered a high, Earth-centered phasing orbit with apogee near the radius of the Moon's orbit. After 19 days and two orbits of Earth, Kaguya entered lunar orbit. Over the next 2 weeks the spacecraft decreased its apolune altitude until reaching a circular, 100 kilometer altitude orbit. This paper describes NASA/JPL's participation in the JAXA/Kaguya mission during that 5 week period, wherein JPL provided tracking data and orbit determination support for Kaguya.

  16. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  17. Genetic determinants of cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Marian, Ali J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Cardiac hypertrophy is a common phenotypic response of the heart to stimulants. It is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in various cardiovascular disorders. Genetic factors are important determinants of phenotypic expression of cardiac hypertrophy, whether in single-gene disorders or in complex traits. We focus on the molecular genetics of cardiac hypertrophy in various conditions with an emphasis on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a genetic paradigm of cardiac hypertrophic response. Recent findings The molecular genetic basis of cardiac hypertrophy in single-gene disorders has been partially elucidated. Likewise, the impact of genetics on the expression of cardiac hypertrophy in the general population has been demonstrated. Identification of mutations in the Z disk proteins has expanded the spectrum of causal mutations beyond the thin and thick filaments of the sarcomeres. In addition, modifier loci have been mapped and shown to impart considerable effects on the expression of cardiac hypertrophy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Elucidation of the molecular genetics of sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and many of the phenocopies has highlighted the limitations of clinical diagnosis as a determinant of management and prognostic advice. The findings have raised the importance of diagnosis and treatment algorithms, which are based on both genotype and phenotype information. Summary Cardiac hypertrophy, regardless of the cause, is the phenotypic consequence of complex interactions between genetic and nongenetic factors. PMID:18382207

  18. Determination of Silicon in Hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, Mark B.; Mast, Dion; Greene, Ben; Maes, Miguel J.

    2006-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a highly sensitive technique sometimes used for the trace determination of silicon at a mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio of 28, the most abundant natural isotope of silicon. Unfortunately, ICP-MS is unable to differentiate between other sources of m/z 28 and false positive results for silicon will result when other sources of m/z 28 are present. Nitrogen was a major source of m/z 28 and contributes to the m/z 28 signal when hydrazine sample or nitric acid preservative is introduced into the plasma. Accordingly, this work was performed to develop a sample preparation step coupled with an ICP-MS analysis that minimized non-silicon sources of m/z 28. In the preparatory step of this method, the hydrazine sample was first decomposed predominately to nitrogen gas and water with copper-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide. In the analysis step, ICP-MS was used without nitric acid preservative in samples or standards. Glass, a potential source of silicon contamination, was also avoided where possible. The method was sensitive, accurate, and reliable for the determination of silicon in monopropellant grade hydrazine (MPH) in AF-E-332 elastomer leaching tests. Results for silicon in MPH were comparable to those reported in the literature for other studies.

  19. Determination of a mutational spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Thilly, William G.; Keohavong, Phouthone

    1991-01-01

    A method of resolving (physically separating) mutant DNA from nonmutant DNA and a method of defining or establishing a mutational spectrum or profile of alterations present in nucleic acid sequences from a sample to be analyzed, such as a tissue or body fluid. The present method is based on the fact that it is possible, through the use of DGGE, to separate nucleic acid sequences which differ by only a single base change and on the ability to detect the separate mutant molecules. The present invention, in another aspect, relates to a method for determining a mutational spectrum in a DNA sequence of interest present in a population of cells. The method of the present invention is useful as a diagnostic or analytical tool in forensic science in assessing environmental and/or occupational exposures to potentially genetically toxic materials (also referred to as potential mutagens); in biotechnology, particularly in the study of the relationship between the amino acid sequence of enzymes and other biologically-active proteins or protein-containing substances and their respective functions; and in determining the effects of drugs, cosmetics and other chemicals for which toxicity data must be obtained.

  20. Fecal Chymotrypsin and Trypsin Determinations

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. S.; Ediss, I.; Mullinger, M. A.; Bogoch, A.

    1971-01-01

    Trypsin and chymotrypsin concentrations were determined in 180 spot stool specimens from 110 control patients in hospital. The lower limit of normality for each enzyme was placed at the 5% level: 95% of this population excreted feces containing more than 100 μg. of chymotrypsin and 30 μg. of trypsin per g. of feces. Chymotrypsin concentrations appeared to be a more reliable guide to pancreatic function than trypsin concentrations. Fecal chymotrypsin concentrations were subnormal in five patients with chronic pancreatitis, borderline in one patient with relapsing pancreatitis, subnormal in one patient after pancreatectomy, and subnormal in five of nine with carcinoma of the pancreas. Subnormal concentrations of fecal chymotrypsin were found in seven of 21 patients with chronic liver disease related to alcoholism, eight of 32 with a partial gastrectomy, three of 10 with adult celiac disease and five of 16 with psoriasis. It appears that the determination of fecal chymotrypsin concentrations provides a valuable screening test for pancreatic exocrine deficiency. However, normal results may be found in some patients with pancreatic disease and subnormal values may occur in some patients with other conditions. PMID:5550376

  1. Emergent evolutionism, determinism and unpredictability.

    PubMed

    Sartenaer, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    The fact that there exist in nature thoroughly deterministic systems whose future behavior cannot be predicted, no matter how advanced or fined-tune our cognitive and technical abilities turn out to be, has been well established over the last decades or so, essentially in the light of two different theoretical frameworks, namely chaos theory and (some deterministic interpretation of) quantum mechanics. The prime objective of this paper is to show that there actually exists an alternative strategy to ground the divorce between determinism and predictability, a way that is older than-and conceptually independent from-chaos theory and quantum mechanics, and which has not received much attention in the recent philosophical literature about determinism. This forgotten strategy-embedded in the doctrine called "emergent evolutionism"-is nonetheless far from being a mere historical curiosity that should only draw the attention of philosophers out of their concern for comprehensiveness. It has been indeed recently revived in the works of respected scientists. PMID:26227232

  2. Determination of a mutational spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Thilly, W.G.; Keohavong, P.

    1991-09-03

    A method is disclosed of resolving (physically separating) mutant DNA from nonmutant DNA. A method is also described of defining or establishing a mutational spectrum or profile of alterations present in nucleic acid sequences from a sample to be analyzed, such as a tissue or body fluid. The present method is based on the fact that it is possible, through the use of DGGE, to separate nucleic acid sequences which differ by only a single base change and on the ability to detect the separate mutant molecules. The present invention, in another aspect, relates to a method for determining a mutational spectrum in a DNA sequence of interest present in a population of cells. The method of the present invention is useful as a diagnostic or analytical tool in forensic science in assessing environmental and/or occupational exposures to potentially genetically toxic materials (also referred to as potential mutagens); in biotechnology, particularly in the study of the relationship between the amino acid sequence of enzymes and other biologically-active proteins or protein-containing substances and their respective functions; and in determining the effects of drugs, cosmetics and other chemicals for which toxicity data must be obtained. 3 figures.

  3. Local determinants of contour interpolation

    PubMed Central

    Maertens, Marianne; Shapley, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objects in our visual environment are perceived as integral wholes even when their retinal images are incomplete. We ask whether the perceptual precision of subjective interpolation between isolated image parts depends on the overall proportion of visible image information or rather on its geometrical arrangement. We used Varin-type subjective shapes that provide less physical stimulus information than Kanizsa-type figures because partially occluded solid inducers are replaced by partially occluded concentric arcs. We tested whether perceptual precision varies as a function of contour support, or alternatively, depends on the number of, and the distance between, line endings within the inducers. We measured performance in a probe localization task, where a small target is presented at different distances around a subjective boundary. Sensitivity, captured by the just noticeable position difference between in- and outside probes, crucially depended on the geometric arrangement of line ends in the Varin figures. This is objective evidence that the apparent subjective contour strength does not primarily depend on contour support but is determined by the number and the separation between inducers’ line endings. The results suggest that neuronal mechanisms sensitive to highly localized 2D features are crucial for determining the perceived shape of visual objects. PMID:19146236

  4. Chandra Independently Determines Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    A critically important number that specifies the expansion rate of the Universe, the so-called Hubble constant, has been independently determined using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This new value matches recent measurements using other methods and extends their validity to greater distances, thus allowing astronomers to probe earlier epochs in the evolution of the Universe. "The reason this result is so significant is that we need the Hubble constant to tell us the size of the Universe, its age, and how much matter it contains," said Max Bonamente from the University of Alabama in Huntsville and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Ala., lead author on the paper describing the results. "Astronomers absolutely need to trust this number because we use it for countless calculations." Illustration of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Illustration of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect The Hubble constant is calculated by measuring the speed at which objects are moving away from us and dividing by their distance. Most of the previous attempts to determine the Hubble constant have involved using a multi-step, or distance ladder, approach in which the distance to nearby galaxies is used as the basis for determining greater distances. The most common approach has been to use a well-studied type of pulsating star known as a Cepheid variable, in conjunction with more distant supernovae to trace distances across the Universe. Scientists using this method and observations from the Hubble Space Telescope were able to measure the Hubble constant to within 10%. However, only independent checks would give them the confidence they desired, considering that much of our understanding of the Universe hangs in the balance. Chandra X-ray Image of MACS J1149.5+223 Chandra X-ray Image of MACS J1149.5+223 By combining X-ray data from Chandra with radio observations of galaxy clusters, the team determined the distances to 38 galaxy clusters ranging from 1.4 billion to 9.3 billion light years from Earth. These results do not rely on the traditional distance ladder. Bonamente and his colleagues find the Hubble constant to be 77 kilometers per second per megaparsec (a megaparsec is equal to 3.26 million light years), with an uncertainty of about 15%. This result agrees with the values determined using other techniques. The Hubble constant had previously been found to be 72, give or take 8, kilometers per second per megaparsec based on Hubble Space Telescope observations. The new Chandra result is important because it offers the independent confirmation that scientists have been seeking and fixes the age of the Universe between 12 and 14 billion years. Chandra X-ray Image of CL J1226.9+3332 Chandra X-ray Image of CL J1226.9+3332 "These new results are entirely independent of all previous methods of measuring the Hubble constant," said team member Marshall Joy also of MSFC. The astronomers used a phenomenon known as the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, where photons in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) interact with electrons in the hot gas that pervades the enormous galaxy clusters. The photons acquire energy from this interaction, which distorts the signal from the microwave background in the direction of the clusters. The magnitude of this distortion depends on the density and temperature of the hot electrons and the physical size of the cluster. Using radio telescopes to measure the distortion of the microwave background and Chandra to measure the properties of the hot gas, the physical size of the cluster can be determined. From this physical size and a simple measurement of the angle subtended by the cluster, the rules of geometry can be used to derive its distance. The Hubble constant is determined by dividing previously measured cluster speeds by these newly derived distances. Chandra X-ray Image of Abell 1689 Chandra X-ray Image of Abell 1689 This project was championed by Chandra's telescope mirror designer, Leon Van Speybroeck, who passed away in 2002. The foundation was laid when team members John Carlstrom (University of Chicago) and Marshall Joy obtained careful radio measurements of the distortions in the CMB radiation using radio telescopes at the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Array and the Caltech Owens Valley Radio Observatory. In order to measure the precise X-ray properties of the gas in these distant clusters, a space-based X-ray telescope with the resolution and sensitivity of Chandra was required. "It was one of Leon's goals to see this project happen, and it makes me very proud to see this come to fruition," said Chandra Project Scientist Martin Weisskopf of MSFC. The results are described in a paper appearing in the August 10th issue of The Astrophysical Journal. MSFC manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center, Cambridge, Mass. Additional information and images can be found at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov

  5. Regulatory observations in bioanalytical determinations.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, C T

    2010-07-01

    The concept of measuring analytes in biological media is a long-established area of the quantitative sciences that is employed in many sectors. While academic research and R&D units of private firms have been in the forefront of developing complex methodologies, it is the regulatory environment that has brought the focus and rigor to the quality control of the quantitative determination of drug concentration in biological samples. In this article, the author examines the regulatory findings discovered during the course of several years of auditing bioanalytical work. The outcomes of these findings underscore the importance of quality method validation to ensure the reliability of the data generated. The failure to ensure the reliability of these data can lead to potential risks in the health management of millions of people in the USA. PMID:21083243

  6. Gravity Probe B orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestople, P.; Ndili, A.; Hanuschak, G.; Parkinson, B. W.; Small, H.

    2015-11-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite was equipped with a pair of redundant Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers used to provide navigation solutions for real-time and post-processed orbit determination (OD), as well as to establish the relation between vehicle time and coordinated universal time. The receivers performed better than the real-time position requirement of 100 m rms per axis. Post-processed solutions indicated an rms position error of 2.5 m and an rms velocity error of 2.2 mm s-1. Satellite laser ranging measurements provided independent verification of the GPS-derived GP-B orbit. We discuss the modifications and performance of the Trimble Advance Navigation System Vector III GPS receivers. We describe the GP-B precision orbit and detail the OD methodology, including ephemeris errors and the laser ranging measurements.

  7. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOEpatents

    Nason, Donald O.; Burger, Arnold

    1994-01-01

    An optically transparent furnace (10) having a detection apparatus (29) with a pedestal (12) enclosed in an evacuated ampule (16) for growing a crystal (14) thereon. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater (20), a base heater (24) and a cold finger (26) such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material (18) to grow the crystal (14). A quartz halogen lamp (32) projects a collimated beam (30) onto the crystal (14) and a reflected beam (34) is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer (40) and the detected peak position (48) in the reflected energy spectrum (44) of the reflected beam (34) is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal (14).

  8. Seasat. Volume 4: Attitude determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treder, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    The Seasat project was a feasibility demonstration of the use of orbital remote sensing for global ocean observation. The satellite was launched in June 1978 and was operated successfully until October 1978. A massive electrical failure occurred in the power system, terminating the mission prematurely. The actual implementation of the Seasat Attitude Determination system and the contents of the attitude data files generated by that system are documented. The deviations from plan caused by the anomalous Sun interference with horizon sensors, inflight calibration of Sun sensor head 2 alignment and horizon sensor biomass, estimation of yaw interpolation parameters, Sun and horizon sensor error sources, and yaw interpolation accuracy are included. Examples are given of flight attitude data from all modes of the Orbital Attitude Control System, of the ground processing effects on attitude data, and of cold cloud effects on pitch, and roll data.

  9. Attitude Determination Improvements for GOES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crassidis, John L.; Markley, F. Landis; Kyle, Arthur M.; Kull, Kathie

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a summary of the basic simulation parameters and results of a new study for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) is shown. The study for GOES involves the simulation of minor modifications to the current spacecraft, so that the relative performance of these modifications can be analyzed. The first modification studies requires the placement of a baseline inertial reference unit, such as the Dry Rotor Inertial Reference Unit or the Hemispherical Resonator Gyro onto the spacecraft. The imager/sounder assembly is currently used to obtain landmark and/or star observations in order to compensate for spacecraft motion and external disturbances through ground processing. The study uses the imager/sounder assembly as another attitude sensor for on-board attitude determination. Also the addition of star trackers is used to provide precise attitude knowledge.

  10. Experimental Determination of Ramsey Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Zhengbing; Chudak, Fabian; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Ramsey theory is a highly active research area in mathematics that studies the emergence of order in large disordered structures. Ramsey numbers mark the threshold at which order first appears and are extremely difficult to calculate due to their explosive rate of growth. Recently, an algorithm that can be implemented using adiabatic quantum evolution has been proposed that calculates the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n). Here we present results of an experimental implementation of this algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(m,2) for 4≤m≤8. The R(8,2) computation used 84 qubits of which 28 were computational qubits. This computation is the largest experimental implementation of a scientifically meaningful adiabatic evolution algorithm that has been done to date.

  11. Detecting determinism from point processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Mormann, Florian; Kreuz, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The detection of a nonrandom structure from experimental data can be crucial for the classification, understanding, and interpretation of the generating process. We here introduce a rank-based nonlinear predictability score to detect determinism from point process data. Thanks to its modular nature, this approach can be adapted to whatever signature in the data one considers indicative of deterministic structure. After validating our approach using point process signals from deterministic and stochastic model dynamics, we show an application to neuronal spike trains recorded in the brain of an epilepsy patient. While we illustrate our approach in the context of temporal point processes, it can be readily applied to spatial point processes as well.

  12. Experimental determination of Ramsey numbers.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhengbing; Chudak, Fabian; Macready, William G; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2013-09-27

    Ramsey theory is a highly active research area in mathematics that studies the emergence of order in large disordered structures. Ramsey numbers mark the threshold at which order first appears and are extremely difficult to calculate due to their explosive rate of growth. Recently, an algorithm that can be implemented using adiabatic quantum evolution has been proposed that calculates the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n). Here we present results of an experimental implementation of this algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(m,2) for 4≤m≤8. The R(8,2) computation used 84 qubits of which 28 were computational qubits. This computation is the largest experimental implementation of a scientifically meaningful adiabatic evolution algorithm that has been done to date. PMID:24116761

  13. Perception determinants in learning mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar, Siti Fairus; Ali, Noor Rasidah; Rashid, Nurazlina Abdul

    2015-05-01

    This article described a statistical study of students' perception in mathematics. The objective of this study is to identify factors related to perception about learning mathematics among non mathematics' student. This study also determined the relationship between of these factors among non mathematics' student. 43 items questionnaires were distributed to one hundred students in UiTM Kedah who enrolled in the Business Mathematics course. These items were measured by using a semantic scale with the following anchors: 1 = strongly disagree to 7 = strongly agree. A factor analysis of respondents were identified into five factors that influencing the students' perception in mathematics. In my study, factors identified were attitude, interest, role of the teacher, role of peers and usefulness of mathematics that may relate to the perception about learning mathematics among non mathematics' student.

  14. Mars Science Laboratory Orbit Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruizinga, Gerhard; Gustafson, Eric; Jefferson, David; Martin-Mur, Tomas; Mottinger, Neil; Pelletier, Fred; Ryne, Mark; Thompson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Orbit Determination (OD) met all requirements with considerable margin, MSL OD team developed spin signature removal tool and successfully used the tool during cruise, A novel approach was used for the MSL solar radiation pressure model and resulted in a very accurate model during the approach phase, The change in velocity for Attitude Control System (ACS) turns was successfully calibrated and with appropriate scale factor resulted in improved change in velocity prediction for future turns, All Trajectory Correction Maneuvers were successfully reconstructed and execution errors were well below the assumed pre-fight execution errors, The official OD solutions were statistically consistent throughout cruise and for OD solutions with different arc lengths as well, Only EPU-1 was sent to MSL. All other Entry Parameter Updates were waived, EPU-1 solution was only 200 m separated from final trajectory reconstruction in the B-plane

  15. Some determiners of attention1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Daniel F.; Cumming, William W.

    1968-01-01

    Three experiments, using a total of 13 pigeons, examined the stimulus control acquired by the separate components of a compound visual stimulus transilluminating the pecking key. Experiment I measured the control acquired by components of compound discriminative stimuli used in discrimination training. Experiment II sought to demonstrate the effect of pretraining a single stimulus discrimination on control acquired by each component in a compound stimulus discrimination. It also investigated the effect of training the compound stimulus discrimination before the single stimulus discrimination. Experiment III sought a continuous stimulus control function when pretraining stimulus intensities were varied. The results suggest that the extent to which a bird “pays attention” to a stimulus, defined in terms of the degree of stimulus control acquired by that stimulus, is determined by how well it previously learned to discriminate that stimulus from other stimuli. PMID:5645872

  16. Determination of tropospheric nitrous oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.F.; Keeling, C.D.; Craig, H.

    1981-08-20

    A two-step technique, in which the N/sub 2/O/CO/sub 2/ ratio is measured by ultrasonic phase-shift gas chromatography and the dry air CO/sub 2/ concentration is measured by nondispersive infrared analysis, has been developed for the determination of the mole fraction of nitrous oxide in dry air. The N/sub 2/O concentration is given by the product of these independent measurements and has a precision ( +- 1 standard deviation) ranging between 0.3 and 0.5%. The abscence of systematic errors has been verified by extensive standard intercomparisons and by independent cross checks of the sample extraction procedures. The results of extensive measurements by this technique, reported in a companion paper, fix the mean tropospheric dry air mole fraction of nitrous oxide in the northern hemisphere as of January 1, 1978 at 300.2 +- 0.6 parts per billion, including systematic uncertainties.

  17. Structure determination of lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, C R; Kharf, R S

    1978-01-01

    A method of determining the phases of X-ray reflections from oriented model membrane systems at low resolution is described. The method involves deconvolution and requires that d less than or equal to 2v where v is the width of the head group region within the bilayer and d is the thickness of the bilayer. The method can be used with a single set of X-ray data and applies to lipid bilayers which have a relatively constant density in the hydrocarbon region. Phases for the first five or six orders of phosphatidylethanolamine and lecithin are derived. A refined analysis based upon deconvolution but using information inherent in the Fourier profile is also described. PMID:698345

  18. Genetic determinants of voluntary exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Scott A.; Pomp, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Variation in voluntary exercise behavior is an important determinant of long-term human health. Increased physical activity is used as a preventative measure or therapeutic intervention for disease, and a sedentary lifestyle has generally been viewed as unhealthy. Predisposition to engage in voluntary activity is heritable and induces protective metabolic changes, but its complex genetic/genomic architecture has only recently begun to emerge. We first present a brief historical perspective and summary of the known benefits of voluntary exercise. Second, we describe human and mouse model studies using genomic and transcriptomic approaches to reveal the genetic architecture of exercise. Third, we discuss the merging of genomic information and physiological observations, revealing systems and networks that lead to a more complete mechanistic understanding of how exercise protects against disease pathogenesis. Finally, we explore potential regulation of physical activity through epigenetic mechanisms, including those that persist across multiple generations. PMID:23351966

  19. Novel gene complex structure determination

    SciTech Connect

    Gatewood, J.M.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LORD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. `Operative` chromatin containing exclusively the minor hasten variants was successfully isolated. Linker hasten H1 is quantitatively missing from operative chromatin. One of the aims of this proposal was to determine the proteins responsible for stabilizing operative chromatin. This chromatin is stabilized by microtubule proteins tar and tubulin. Another goal of this project was the structural characterization of operate chromatin nucleosomes. Using solution scattering, nucleosomes containing the minor variants were shown to be structurally distinct from major variant containing nucleosomes. The unusual structure and stabilization of operative chromatin by microtubule proteins provides a possible mechanism for direct interaction of transcription machinery with specific chromatin domains.

  20. Field method for sulfide determination

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B L; Schwarser, R R; Chukwuenye, C O

    1982-01-01

    A simple and rapid method was developed for determining the total sulfide concentration in water in the field. Direct measurements were made using a silver/sulfide ion selective electrode in conjunction with a double junction reference electrode connected to an Orion Model 407A/F Specific Ion Meter. The method also made use of a sulfide anti-oxidant buffer (SAOB II) which consists of ascorbic acid, sodium hydroxide, and disodium EDTA. Preweighed sodium sulfide crystals were sealed in air tight plastic volumetric flasks which were used in standardization process in the field. Field standards were prepared by adding SAOB II to the flask containing the sulfide crystals and diluting it to the mark with deionized deaerated water. Serial dilutions of the standards were used to prepare standards of lower concentrations. Concentrations as low as 6 ppB were obtained on lake samples with a reproducibility better than +- 10%.

  1. Calorimetric study of high-pressure polymorphs of MnSiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaogi, Masaki; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1985-11-01

    With increasing pressure, MnSiO3 rhodonite stable at atmospheric pressure transforms to pyroxmangite, then to clinopyroxene and further to tetragonal garnet, which finally decomposes into MnO (rocksalt) plus SiO2 (stishovite). High temperature solution calorimetry of synthetic rhodonite, clinopyroxene and garnet forms of MnSiO3 was used to measure the enthalpies of these transitions. Δ H {974/0}for the rhodonite-clinopyroxene and Δ H {298/0}for the clinopyroxene-garnet transition are 520±490 and 8,270±590 cal/mol, respectively. The published data on the enthalpy of the rhodonite-pyroxmangite transition, phase equilibrium boundaries, compressibility and thermal expansion data are used to calculate entropy changes for the transitions. The enthalpy, entropy and volume changes are very small for all the transitions among rhodonite, pyroxmangite and clinopyroxene. The calculated boundary for the clinopyroxene-garnet transition is consistent with the published experimental results. The pyroxene-garnet transition in several materials, including MnSiO3, is characterized by a relatively small negative entropy change and large volume decrease, resulting in a small positive P T slope. The disproportionation of MnSiO3 garnet to MnO plus stishovite and of Mn2SiO4 olivine to garnet plus MnO are calculated to occur at about 17 18 and 14 15 GPa, respectively, at 1,000 1,500 K.

  2. Trehalose Bioprotective Effects in Lysozyme Aqueous Solution Studied by Brillouin Scattering and Calorimetric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasanuma, Keita; Seshimo, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Eiji; Ike, Yuji; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-05-01

    The bioprotective effect of trehalose in lysozyme aqueous solutions has been investigated by Brillouin scattering and modulated-temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC). MDSC experiments show that the isothermal kinetics of thermally irreversible denaturation can be described by the Arrhenius equation. By the addition of trehalose, the irreversible denaturation of lysozyme is suppressed, and its activation energy is half that of the denaturation without trehalose. The sound velocity of lysozyme-trehalose-water ternary solutions obviously depends on the trehalose concentration. With increasing trehalose concentration, the sound velocity becomes higher because the hydration of trehalose reduces the hydrogen bonds between water molecules. Moreover, hydration around lysozyme molecules increases the sound velocity further. Trehalose molecules tend to aggregate with lysozyme molecules at high trehalose concentrations. The bioprotective effect of trehalose probably originates from the mechanical suppression of conformational fluctuations of lysozyme molecules.

  3. Calorimetric studies of the state of water in deeply frozen human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, T; Hirsh, A

    1985-01-01

    Intra- and extracellular phase transitions in human peripheral blood monocyte suspensions with and without the cryoprotectant 1 M dimethylsulfoxide were measured using differential scanning calorimetry. Using an fluorescence diacetate/ethidium bromide assay for membrane integrity and a phagocytosis assay for cell function, it was found that mortality was correlated with several phase transitions under a variety of cooling and warming regimens. As a result of these studies we concluded that: intracellular freezing is lethal, but avoidance of freezing during fast cooling is not sufficient to provide complete protection; a subtle freezing injury in the cryoprotected monocytes can be correlated with a measurable increase in devitrification on warming; and the cell contents form more stable glasses than the Hanks' balanced salt solution with fetal calf serum used as the extracellular medium. PMID:3978207

  4. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and calorimetric studies at low scan rates

    PubMed Central

    Tenchov, Boris G.; Yao, Haruhiko; Hatta, Ichiro

    1989-01-01

    The phase transitions in fully hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC/water/ethanol phases have been studied by lowangle time-resolved x-ray diffraction under conditions similar to those employed in calorimetry (scan rates 0.05-0.5°C/min and uniform temperature throughout the samples). This approach provides more adequate characterization of the equilibrium transition pathways and allows for close correlations between structural and thermodynamic data. No coexistence of the rippled gel (Pβ') and liquid-crystalline (Lα) phases was found in the main transition of DPPC; rather, a loss of correlation in the lamellar structure, observed as broadening of the lamellar reflections, takes place in a narrow temperature range of ∼100 mK at the transition midpoint. Formation of a long-living metastable phase, denoted by Pβ'(mst), differing from the initial Pβ' was observed in cooling direction by both x-ray diffraction and calorimetry. No direct conversion of Pβ'(mst) into Pβ' occurs for over 24 h but only by way of the phase sequence Pβ'(mst) → Lβ' → Pβ'. According to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the enthalpy of the Pβ'(mst)-Lα transition is by ∼5% lower than that of the Pβ'-Lα transition. The effects of ethanol (Rowe, E. S. 1983. Biochemistry. 22:3299-3305; Simon, S. A., and T. J. McIntosh. 1984. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 773:169-172) on the mechanism and reversibility of the DPPC main transition were clearly visualized. At ethanol concentrations inducing formation of interdigitated gel phase, the main transition proceeds through a coexistence of the initial and final phases over a finite temperature range. During the subtransition in DPPC recorded at scan rate 0.3°C/min, a smooth monotonic increase of the lamellar spacing from its subgel (Lc) to its gel (Lβ') phase value takes place. The width of the lamellar reflections remains unchanged during this transformation. This provides grounds to propose a “sequential” relaxation mechanism for the subgel-gel transition which is not accompanied by growth of domains of the final phase within the initial one. PMID:19431747

  5. Characterization of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance by calorimetric analysis of blood serum proteome.

    PubMed

    Barceló, Francisca; Cerdà, Joan J; Gutiérrez, Antonio; Jimenez-Marco, Teresa; Durán, M Antonia; Novo, Andrés; Ros, Teresa; Sampol, Antonia; Portugal, José

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a premalignant proliferative disorder that may progress to multiple myeloma, a malignant plasma cell neoplasia. We evaluated differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as an experimental tool for differentiating serum samples of MGUS patients from healthy individuals. DSC thermograms can be used for monitoring changes in the serum proteome associated with MGUS. MGUS patients showed great variability in serum thermogram characteristics, which depended on the IgG, IgA or IgM isotypes and/or the κ or λ light chains. Thermogram feature parameters distinguished patients with MGUS from healthy people. Serum samples, named as non-MGUS, were also collected from patients with subjacent immunological pathologies who were discarded of having MGUS through serum immunofixation. They were used to verify the sensitivity of DSC for discriminating MGUS from related blood dyscrasias. Only some DSC thermogram feature parameters differentiated, to a lesser extent, between MGUS and non-MGUS individuals. We contemplate DSC as a tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of MGUS. PMID:25794164

  6. Calorimetric evidence for a mobile surface layer in ultrathin polymeric films: poly(2-vinyl pyridine).

    PubMed

    Madkour, Sherif; Yin, Huajie; Füllbrandt, Marieke; Schönhals, Andreas

    2015-10-28

    Specific heat spectroscopy was used to study the dynamic glass transition of ultrathin poly(2-vinyl pyridine) films (thicknesses: 405-10 nm). The amplitude and the phase angle of the differential voltage were obtained as a measure of the complex heat capacity. In a traditional data analysis, the dynamic glass transition temperature Tg is estimated from the phase angle. These data showed no thickness dependency on Tg down to 22 nm (error of the measurement of ±3 K). A derivative-based method was established, evidencing a decrease in Tg with decreasing thickness up to 7 K, which can be explained by a surface layer. For ultrathin films, data showed broadening at the lower temperature side of the spectra, supporting the existence of a surface layer. Finally, temperature dependence of the heat capacity in the glassy and liquid states changes with film thickness, which can be considered as a confinement effect. PMID:26324951

  7. Enzymic, spectroscopic and calorimetric studies of a recombinant dextranase expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Beldarraín, Alejandro; Acosta, Niuris; Betancourt, Lázaro; González, Luis J; Pons, Tirso

    2003-12-01

    Conformational stability and structural characterization of an rDex (recombinant dextranase) expressed in Pichia pastoris were studied by enzymic assays, fluorescence, CD and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry). We also identified two disulphide bridges (Cys9-Cys14, Cys484-Cys488) and two free Cys residues (Cys336, Cys415) that are not conserved between bacterial and fungal dextranases of GH-49 (glycoside hydrolase family 49) by MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight) MS. Enzymic and fluorescence studies revealed that rDex is biological and conformationally stable at acidic pH, with maximum activity at pH 4.5-5.0, while CD spectra indicated a secondary structure basically composed of beta-sheets. rDex loses biological activity at neutral pH without total disruption of its conformation. In addition, rDex preserves its conformation close to 60 degrees C, but it is thermally denatured with appreciable aggregation at temperatures above 75 degrees C. DSC studies always displayed irreversible transitions and a strong dependence on the scan rate. Our combined analysis suggested that the denaturation process of rDex is under kinetic control, which is described reasonably well by the two-state kinetic scheme. PMID:12839491

  8. High-precision, automated integration of multiple isothermal titration calorimetric thermograms: new features of NITPIC.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, Thomas H; Brautigam, Chad A

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has become a standard and widely available tool to measure the thermodynamic parameters of macromolecular associations. Modern applications of the method, including global analysis and drug screening, require the acquisition of multiple sets of data; sometimes these data sets number in the hundreds. Therefore, there is a need for quick, precise, and automated means to process the data, particularly at the first step of data analysis, which is commonly the integration of the raw data to yield an interpretable isotherm. Herein, we describe enhancements to an algorithm that previously has been shown to provide an automated, unbiased, and high-precision means to integrate ITC data. These improvements allow for the speedy and precise serial integration of an unlimited number of ITC data sets, and they have been implemented in the freeware program NITPIC, version 1.1.0. We present a comprehensive comparison of the performance of this software against an older version of NITPIC and a current version of Origin, which is commonly used for integration. The new methods recapitulate the excellent performance of the previous versions of NITPIC while speeding it up substantially, and their precision is significantly better than that of Origin. This new version of NITPIC is therefore well suited to the serial integration of many ITC data sets. PMID:25524420

  9. Calorimetric properties of water and triacylglycerols in fern spores relating to storage at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Daniel; Walters, Christina

    2007-08-01

    Storing spores is a promising method to conserve genetic diversity of ferns ex situ. Inappropriate water contents or damaging effects of triacylglycerol (TAG) crystallization may cause initial damage and deterioration with time in spores placed at -15 degrees C or liquid nitrogen temperatures. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to monitor enthalpy and temperature of water and TAG phase transitions within spores of five fern species: Pteris vittata, Thelypteris palustris, Dryopteris filix-mas, Polystichum aculeatum, Polystichum setiferum. The analyses suggested that these fern spores contained between 26% and 39% TAG, and were comprised of mostly oleic (P. vittata) or linoleic acid (other species) depending on species. The water contents at which water melting events were first observable ranged from 0.06 (P. vittata) to 0.12 (P. setiferum)gH(2)Og(-1)dry weight, and were highly correlated with water affinity parameters. In spores containing more than 0.09 (P. vittata) to 0.25 (P. setiferum)gH(2)Og(-1)dry weight, some water partitioned into a near pure water fraction that melted at about 0 degrees C. These sharp peaks near 0 degrees C were associated with lethal freezing treatments. The enthalpy of water melting transitions was similar in fern spores, pollen and seeds; however, the unfrozen water content was much lower in fern spores compared to other forms of germplasm. Though there is a narrow range of water contents appropriate for low temperature storage of fern spores, water content can be precisely manipulated to avoid both desiccation and freezing damage. PMID:17553480

  10. Differential scanning calorimetric analysis of antifreeze protein activity in the common mealworm, Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T N; Baust, J G

    1988-11-23

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) are able to inhibit the growth of ice-crystals at temperatures below the equilibrium freezing point (Tf) of hemolymph. The analysis of AFP activity has commonly involved the use of direct microscopic observation of a sample following inoculation with ice. The resulting activity, defined as the amount of thermal hysteresis observed between Tf and the subsequent rapid growth of ice, has been reported to range up to 7 degrees C. However, most studies report high level of variation, possibly due to ice-crystal size variability and the presence of non-visible ice nuclei. We describe a new method of analysis of AFP activity using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC analysis reveals much higher activity, up to 10 degrees C, with less variation observed within a sample, and is not subject to the difficulty of accurate assessment of ice-crystal volume. PMID:3191140

  11. Advanced ac calorimetric technique for thermal diffusivity measurement at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hideyuki; Nara, Koichi; Okaji, Masahiro

    2001-05-01

    We have developed a new technique to research thermal transport properties of solid materials at cryogenic temperatures. It is based on an optical ac calorimetry for the measurement of thermal diffusivity. This paper presents new ac calorimeters with sophisticated laser heating systems that realize versatile intensity-modulation and beam-scan functions. They can provide three different measuring methods, a frequency-variation method, a distance-variation method, and a new type of constant wave number (CWN) method for various requirements. Typical experimental results for graphite materials, oxide superconductors and others are also presented. The CWN method was successfully tested to detect a small but clear anomaly accompanying with superconducting transition of Hg-1223. A large uni-axial anisotropy was observed for highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) and pyrolytic graphite sheet (GS). The similar but rather small uni-axial anisotropy was observed for oxide superconductors, Y-123 single crystal and Bi-2212 single crystal. Y-123 was measured to further show a weak in-plane anisotropy.

  12. A calorimetric study of high temperature phase stability in Fe-U alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Arun Kumar; Raju, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2013-01-01

    A differential scanning calorimetry study of high temperature phase equilibria and phase transformation kinetics in Fe100-xUx binary alloys, with x varying from 0 to 95 mass% U is undertaken. Accurate measurement of transformation temperatures pertaining to: (i) α-Fe → γ-Fe → δ-Fe polymorphic phase change, (ii) UFe2 + γ-Fe → L and U6Fe + UFe2 → L transformations and (iii) melting has been made as a function of uranium concentration. The measured transformation temperatures are used to construct the binary Fe-U phase diagram, which showed general agreement with the latest assessment. The L → UFe2 + γ-Fe eutectic reaction is found to occur at 1357 ± 5 K, with the eutectic composition of 47 mass%. The heat of transformation associated with this invariant reaction is estimated to be 19,969 ± 1736 J mol of atoms-1. The L → U6Fe + UFe2 reaction occurs at 89 mass%, and at 1001 ± 5 K, with a heat of transformation 20,250 ± 2113 J mol of atoms-1. The heat of melting of stoichiometric UFe2 is estimated to be 20,983 ± 2098 J mol of atoms-1, which is higher than the currently assessed value by 30%. A non-faceted microstructural morphology is found to accompany the eutectic solidification process of all the alloy compositions.

  13. X-ray diffraction and calorimetric study of N-lignoceryl sphingomyelin membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Maulik, P. R.; Shipley, G. G.

    1995-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray diffraction have been used to investigate hydrated multibilayers of N-lignoceryl sphingomyelin (C24:0-SM) in the hydration range 0-75 wt % H2O. Anhydrous C24:0-SM exhibits a single endothermic transition at 81.3 degrees C (delta H = 3.6 kcal/mol). At low hydration (12.1 wt % H2O), three different endothermic transitions are observed: low-temperature transition (T1) at 39.4 degrees C (transition enthalpy (delta H1) = 2.8 kcal/mol), intermediate-temperature transition (T2) at 45.5 degrees C, and high-temperature transition (T3) at 51.3 degrees C (combined transition enthalpy (delta H2 + 3) = 5.03 kcal/mol). On increasing hydration, all three transition temperatures of C24:0-SM decrease slightly to reach limiting values of 36.7 degrees C (T1), 44.4 degrees C (T2), and 48.4 degrees C (T3) at approximately 20 wt % H2O. At 22 degrees C (below T1), x-ray diffraction of C24:0-SM at different hydration levels shows two wide-angle reflections, a sharp one at 1/4.2 A-1 and a more diffuse one at 1/4.0 A-1 together with lamellar reflections corresponding to bilayer periodicities increasing from d = 65.4 A to a limiting value of 71.1 A. Electron density profiles show a constant bilayer thickness dp-p approximately 50 A. In contrast, at 40 degrees C (between T1 and T2) a single sharp wide-angle reflection at approximately 1/4.2 A-1 is observed. The lamellar reflections correspond to a larger bilayer periodicity (increasing from d = 69.3-80.2 A) and there is some increase in dp-p (52-56 A) with hydration. These structural parameters,together with calculated lipid thickness and molecular area considerations, suggest that the low temperature endotherm(T1) of hydrated C24:0-SM corresponds to a transition from a tilted, gel state (Gel I) with partially interdigitated chains to an untilted, or less tilted, gel state (Gel 11). At 600C (above T3), the usual liquid-crystalline La bilayer structure (d = 59.5-66.3A; dp p -46 A) is present at all hydrations. Comparison with the behavior of C18:0-SM indicates that the in equivalence of length of the sphingosine (C18) and lignoceryl (C24) chains results in a more complex gel phase polymorphism for the sphingosine (C18) and lignoceryl (C24) chains results in a more complex gel phase polymorphism for C24:0-SM. PMID:8580334

  14. Exploring the antioxidant property of bioflavonoid quercetin in preventing DNA glycation: A calorimetric and spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Bidisa . E-mail: bidisa@fy.chalmers.se; Uematsu, Takashi; Jacobsson, Per; Swenson, Jan

    2006-01-06

    Reducing sugars for example glucose, fructose, etc., and their phosphate derivatives non-enzymatically glycate biological macromolecules (e.g., proteins, DNA and lipids) and is related to the production of free radicals. Here we present a novel study, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) along with UV/Vis absorption and photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), on normal and glycated human placenta DNA and have explored the antioxidant property of the naturally occurring polyhydroxy flavone quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) in preventing the glycation. The decrease in the absorption intensity of DNA in presence of sugars clearly indicates the existence of sugar molecules between the two bases of a base pair in the duplex DNA molecule. Variations were perceptible in the PCS relaxation profiles of normal and glycated DNA. The melting temperature of placenta DNA was decreased when glycated suggesting a decrease in the structural stability of the double-stranded glycated DNA. Our DSC and PCS data showed, for the first time, that the dramatic changes in the structural properties of glycated DNA can be prevented to a significant extent by adding quercetin. This study provides valuable insights regarding the structure, function, and dynamics of normal and glycated DNA molecules, underlying the manifestation of free radical mediated diseases, and their prevention using therapeutically active naturally occurring flavonoid quercetin.

  15. Calorimetric Study of Gradient Block-copolymers of Poly(butylacrylate) and Poly(methylmethacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzin, A. I.; Pyda, M.; Matyjaszewski, K.; Wunderlich, B.

    2002-03-01

    The miscibility and phase separation in the diblock (AB) and triblock (ABA) copolymers consisting of poly(butyl acrylate) (block B) and gradient copolymers of butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate (block A) were investigated by means of conventional DSC as a function of the composition of the blocks A. In all copolymers studied, both blocks are presented by two separate glass transition temperatures. The low-temperature transition corresponds to devitrification of block B and is independent of composition and temperature is close to that of pure poly(butyl acrylate), while the higher transition corresponds to glass transition of the copolymeric block A, which decreases and broadens with increasing methylmethacrylate content in block A. The immiscible polymers are connected by chemical bonds, so that the mobilities of the phases influence each other. Shifts in the glass transition temperature and the broadening of the transitions as well as their asymmetry are discussed. --- Supported by NSF, Polymers Program, DMR-9703692, and the Div. of Mat. Sci., BES, DOE at ORNL, managed by UT-Batelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, under contract number DOE-AC05-00OR22725.

  16. Temperature-dependent infrared and calorimetric studies on arsenicals adsorption from solution to hematite nanoparticles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To address the lack of systematic and surface sensitive studies on the adsorption energetics of arsenic compounds on metal (oxyhydr)oxides, we conducted temperature-dependent ATR-FTIR studies for the adsorption of arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid on hematite nanoparticles a...

  17. High-precision, automated integration of multiple isothermal titration calorimetric thermograms: new features of NITPIC

    PubMed Central

    Scheuermann, Thomas H.; Brautigam, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has become a standard and widely available tool to measure the thermodynamic parameters of macromolecular associations. Modern applications of the method, including global analysis and drug screening, require the acquisition of multiple sets of data; sometimes these data sets number in the hundreds. Therefore, there is a need for quick, precise, and automated means to process the data, particularly at the first step of data analysis, which is commonly the integration of the raw data to yield an interpretable isotherm. Herein, we describe enhancements to an algorithm that previously has been shown to provide an automated, unbiased, and high-precision means to integrate ITC data. These improvements allow for the speedy and precise serial integration of an unlimited number of ITC data sets, and they have been implemented in the freeware program NITPIC, version 1.1.0. We present a comprehensive comparison of the performance of this software against an older version of NITPIC and a current version of Origin, which is commonly used for integration. The new methods recapitulate the excellent performance of the previous versions of NITPIC while speeding it up substantially, and their precision is significantly better than that of Origin. This new version of NITPIC is therefore well suited to the serial integration of many ITC data sets. PMID:25524420

  18. 1H-NMR, dielectric and calorimetric studies of molecular motions in m-nitroaniline crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, M. Magdalena; Wójcik, Grażyna; Gallier, Jean; Bertault, Marcel; Freundlich, Piotr; Kołodziej, Hubert A.

    1998-04-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame, T1 ρ, and the second moment of the resonance line measurements at 80 MHz and over the 190-380 K temperature range are reported for protons in the optically nonlinear material m-nitroaniline ( m-NA). T1 has also been measured for samples irradiated by low energy and low intensity radiation. The real and imaginary parts of electric permittivity as well as tan  δ have been recorded in the 80-380 K temperature range at frequencies ranging from 100 Hz to 1.0 MHz. DSC measurements have been performed in the 110-387 K temperature range. Two phase transitions have been found: A glassy to rotative transition at 160 K and a plastic to plastic transformation at 365 K. The main feature of the m-NA crystal is that its plasticity continues to grow as the temperature increases. The reorientations of phenyl rings, the -NH 2 group proton 180° jumps, the lattice distortions caused by anisotropic thermal expansion and the cooperative reorientations of big molecular aggregates are thought to be the reasons for phase transitions and for the subsequent intermolecular charge transfer. The results are discussed with respect to optical second harmonic generation and near-IR photochemical reaction found in the m-NA crystal.

  19. Non-Isothermal Calorimetric Studies of the Crystallization of Lithium Disilicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. S.; Day, D. E.; Huang, W.; Narayan, K. Lakshmi; Cull, T. S.; Kelton, K. F.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of preannealing treatments on the polymorphic crystallization of lithium disilicate glasses is examined. As expected, glasses heated at different rates through the temperature range where there is significant nucleation develop widely different numbers of nuclei. This can dramatically influence the stability and transformation characteristics of the annealed glass. Non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) measurements are demonstrated to be useful to probe the nucleation behavior. The first systematic investigations of particle size effects on the non-isothermal transformation behavior are presented and discussed. Based on DTA and microscopy experiments, we show that small particles of lithium disilicate glasses crystallize primarily by surface crystallization. The relative importance of surface versus volume crystallization is examined by varying particle size, by introducing nucleating agents and by exposing glasses to atmospheres of different water content. These data are analyzed quantitatively using a numerical model developed in a second paper following in this volume.

  20. Synthesis, calorimetric studies, and crystal structures of N, O-diacylethanolamines with matched chains[S

    PubMed Central

    Kamlekar, Ravi Kanth; Tarafdar, Pradip K.; Swamy, Musti J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies show that N-, O-diacylethanolamines (DAEs) can be derived by the O-acylation of N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) under physiological conditions. Because the content of NAEs in a variety of organisms increases in response to stress, it is likely that DAEs may also be present in biomembranes. In view of this, a homologous series of DAEs with matched acyl chains (n = 10–20) have been synthesized and characterized. Transition enthalpies and entropies obtained from differential scanning calorimetry show that dry DAEs with even and odd acyl chains independently exhibit linear dependence on the chainlength. Linear least-squares analyses yielded incremental values contributed by each methylene group to the transition enthalpy and entropy and the corresponding end contributions. N-, O-Didecanoylethanolamine (DDEA), N-, O-dilauroylethanolamine (DLEA), and N-, O-dimyristoylethanolamine (DMEA) crystallized in the orthorhombic space group Pbc21 with four symmetry-related molecules in the unit cell. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show that DDEA, DLEA, and DMEA are isostructural and adopt an L-shaped structure with the N-acyl chain and the central ethanolamine moiety being essentially identical to the structure of N-acylethanolamines, whereas the O-acyl chain is linear with all-trans conformation. In all three DAEs, the lipid molecules are organized in a bilayer fashion wherein the N-acyl and O-acyl chains from adjacent layers oppose each other. PMID:19597189

  1. Revisiting the glass transition and dynamics of supercooled benzene by calorimetric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Wenkang; Chen, Zeming; Li, Xiangqian; Gao, Yanqin; Liu, Riping; Wang, Li-Min

    2015-10-01

    The glass transition and dynamics of benzene are studied in binary mixtures of benzene with five glass forming liquids, which can be divided into three groups: (a) o-terphenyl and m-xylene, (b) N-butyl methacrylate, and (c) N,N-dimethylpropionamide and N,N-diethylformamide to represent the weak, moderate, and strong interactions with benzene. The enthalpies of mixing, ΔHmix, for the benzene mixtures are measured to show positive or negative signs, with which the validity of the extrapolations of the glass transition temperature Tg to the benzene-rich regions is examined. The extrapolations for the Tg data in the mixtures are found to converge around the point of 142 K, producing Tg of pure benzene. The fragility m of benzene is also evaluated by extrapolating the results of the mixtures, and a fragility m ˜ 80 is yielded. The obtained Tg and m values for benzene allow for the construction of the activation plot in the deeply supercooled region. The poor glass formability of benzene is found to result from the high melting point, which in turn leads to low viscosity in the supercooled liquid.

  2. A calorimetric investigation of recrystallization in aluminum magnesium silicon copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Khatwa, Mohamed

    The recrystallization behavior of three Al--Mg--Si--Cu alloys with varying iron and manganese additions was studied by differential power scanning calorimetry under non-isothermal annealing conditions. The influence of cold deformation on the precipitation sequence and its interaction with recrystallization was also investigated. The DSC experiments were complemented by hardness measurements and microstructural studies by optical and electron microscopy. The DSC signals, after optimization of the baseline, were used for the calculation of the kinetic parameters of the recrystallization process. Two different modeling approaches based on global JMAK kinetics were implemented. The first approach utilizes the classical isothermal JMAK expression directly, while the second approach introduces a path variable related to the thermal history of the material in the JMAK description. Model-independent estimates of the activation energy were also evaluated using the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa integral isoconversion method. The results show that the initial stages of recrystallization are not affected by the preceding precipitation processes and recrystallization always follows the precipitation of the Q' phase. However, during recrystallization enhanced coarsening of the Q' phase takes place leading to its transformation to the more stable Q phase. The Q phase exerts a Zener pinning pressures on the migrating boundaries preventing the formation of an equilibrium grain structure. Moreover, for high Fe and Mn additions, discontinuous precipitation of Mg2Si overlaps with the end of recrystallization and exerts an additional pinning pressure on the boundaries. Varying the Fe and Mn content significantly affects the recrystallization kinetics. PSN is promoted in alloys with the higher Fe and Mn content and the recrystallization temperature shifts to lower values. The modeling results show that the recrystallization process conforms to the classical JMAK type behavior. The course of the reaction was reproduced successfully by the path variable approach and the evaluated activation energies were in good agreement with the isoconversional model-independent estimates. However, when the classical JMAK expression was applied directly to non-isothermal measurements, a dependency of the recrystallization process on thermal history was observed.

  3. Crystallization kinetics of poly-(lactic acid) with and without talc: Optical microscopy and calorimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaa, Z.; Boutaous, M.; Rousset, F.; Fulchiron, R.; Zinet, M.; Xin, S.; Bourgin, P.

    2014-05-01

    Poly-(lactic acid) or PLA is a biodegradable polymer synthesized from renewable resources. Recently, the discovery of new polymerization routes has allowed increasing the produced volumes. As a consequence, PLA is becoming of great interest for reducing the dependence on petroleum-based plastics. Because of its interesting mechanical properties, PLA is seen as a potential substitute for some usual polymers. However, its relatively slow crystallization kinetics can be a disadvantage with regard to industrial applications. The crystallization kinetics of PLA can be enhanced by adding nucleating agents, which also influences on crystalline morphology and rheological behavior. In the present work, the isothermal quiescent crystallization kinetics of both neat PLA and PLA/talc composite (5 wt% talc) are investigated. The effects of talc on the overall crystallization kinetics and on the crystalline morphology are analyzed using both optical microscopy measurements and thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry.

  4. Interactions of structurally modified surfactants with reservoir minerals: Calorimetric, spectroscopic and electrokinetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.; Sivakumar, A.; Xu, Q.

    1991-03-01

    The objective of this project is to elucidate mechanisms of adsorption of structurally modified surfactants on reservoir minerals and to develop a full understanding of the effect of the surfactant structure on the nature of the adsorbed layers at the molecular level. An additional aim is to study the adsorption of surfactant mixtures on simple well-characterized minerals and on complex minerals representing real conditions. The practical goal of these studies is the identification of the optimum surfactant structures and their combinations for micellar flooding. In this work, the experiments on adsorption were focussed on the position of sulfonate and methyl groups on the aromatic ring of alkyl xylene sulfonates. A multi-pronged approach consisting of calorimetry, electrokinetics, wettability and spectroscopy is planned to elucidate the adsorption mechanism of surfactants and their mixtures on minerals such as alumina and kaolinite. 32 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Differential scanning calorimetric study of the thermal unfolding of Taka-amylase A from Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Fukada, H; Takahashi, K; Sturtevant, J M

    1987-06-30

    The thermally induced unfolding of Taka-amylase A, isolated from Aspergillus oryzae, was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The experimental curves of excess apparent specific heat vs. temperature showed a single asymmetric peak. Curve resolution indicated that this asymmetry is due to the two-state unfolding of three domains in the molecule, with dissociation of the single tightly bound Ca2+ ion occurring during the unfolding of the last domain. Further indication of the dissociation of the specifically bound Ca2+ during denaturation is afforded by the fact that the temperature of maximal excess specific heat, tm, increases with increasing protein concentration in the absence of added excess Ca2+ and with increasing Ca2+ concentration in the presence of added Ca2+. Experiments in a variety of buffers with different enthalpies of ionization indicated that 11.8 +/- 1.5 protons are lost from the protein during unfolding at pH 7.0. In apparent contradiction of this result, the value of tm was found to be essentially independent of pH in the range pH 7-8. No explanation of this anomaly is available. The enthalpy of unfolding at pH 7 and 62 degrees C in the absence of added Ca2+, corrected for the change in buffer protonation, is 2250 +/- 40 kJ mol-1 (42.5 J g-1), and the permanent change in apparent heat capacity is 36.4 +/- 4.1 kJ K-1 mol-1 (0.687 J g-1). Both of these quantities are unusually large for a globular protein. PMID:3498514

  6. CALORIMETRIC PROPERTIES OF WATER AND TRIACYLGLYCEROLS IN FERN SPORES RELATING TO STORAGE AT CRYOGENIC TEMPERATURES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storing spores is a promising method to conserve genetic diversity of ferns ex situ. Inappropriate water contents or damaging effects of triacylglycerol (TAG) crystallization may cause initial damage and deterioration with time in spores placed at -15 degrees C or liquid nitrogen temperatures. We us...

  7. Calorimetric investigation of polyaniline and 1-methyl 2-pyrrolidone (NMP) mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, Geneviàve

    2001-03-01

    Mixing polyaniline powder (Pani) with polar solvents such as 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) generates a strong interaction at RT as indicated by the immediate development on contact of color and heat. Stirring increases color only if it is vigorous.It does not lead to complete solubility.The question arises of a dispersion or a dissolution of Pani in NMP. It was found that a oxygen-free mixture undergoes a phase-change in a slow T-ramp (0.1K/min) between 72 and 120o C.The values of Δ H are large, exothermic and critically dependant on the mixture history and nominal concentration. As an example, in similar stirring conditions at RT, Δ H increases from -2,000 to -20,000 J/g when c (nominal ) diminishes from 1.3 to 0.3 mg/cm3. Stirring is achieved either with a magnetic stirrer, by sonication or by gentle shaking. The UV-visible spectra of mixtures are measured at RT as a function of stirring conditions and c (nominal).The values of Δ H obtained in different conditions, show that the formation of a dispersion is not a pre-requisite for the phase-change. Reversibility of the phase-change is being investigated.

  8. Calorimetric study on mechanically milled aluminum and multiwall carbon nanotube composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nayan, Niraj Murty, S.V.S.N.; Sharma, S.C.; Kumar, K. Sree; Sinha, P.P.

    2011-11-15

    Pure aluminum reinforced with carbon nanotube (CNT) composites have been prepared by high energy attritor milling up to 48 hrs. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) has been carried out to investigate apparent activation energy and order of the reaction between carbon nanotubes and aluminum by Kissinger equation and Crane equation under non-isothermal conditions. The DSC results clearly reveal that an exothermic reaction occurs before the melting of aluminum. The effect of milling time on the initiation of this exothermic reaction has been studied. The peak temperature of the reaction of carbon nanotubes and aluminum is found to depend on the heating rate during the continuous heating. Apparent activation energy was found to get doubled after milling for 36 hrs compared to 24 hrs milled samples. The mechanism of the reaction kinetics which depends on reaction order is instantaneous nucleation and one dimensional growth for both samples. Formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) of as-milled powders and after performing DSC of the milled powders. Highlights: {yields} Attritor milling used for processing Al-CNT composites. {yields} Powder morphology as a function of time studied. {yields} Apparent activation energy and order of the reaction calculated for Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} formation. {yields} Apparent activation energy increases two fold with increase in milling time from 24 to 36 hours.

  9. Calorimetric Properties of Dehydrating Pollen (Analysis of a Desiccation-Tolerant and an Intolerant Species).

    PubMed Central

    Buitink, J.; Walters-Vertucci, C.; Hoekstra, F. A.; Leprince, O.

    1996-01-01

    The physical state of water in the desiccation-tolerant pollen of Typha latifolia L. and the desiccation-sensitive pollen of Zea mays L. was studied using differential scanning calorimetry in an attempt to further unravel the complex mechanisms of desiccation tolerance. Melting transitions of water were not observed at water content (wc) values less than 0.21 (T. latifolia) and 0.26 (Z. mays) g H2O/g dry weight. At moisture levels at which melting transitions were not observable, water properties could be characterized by changes in heat capacity. Three hydration regions could be distinguished with the defining wc values changing as a function of temperature. Shifts in baseline power resembling second-order transitions were observed in both species and were interpreted as glass-to-liquid transitions, the glass-transition temperatures being dependent on wc. Irrespective of the extent of desiccation tolerance, both pollens exhibited similar state diagrams. The viability of maize pollen at room temperature decreased gradually with the removal of the unfrozen water fraction. In maize, viability was completely lost before grains were sufficiently dried to enter into a glassy state. Apparently, the glassy state per se cannot provide desiccation tolerance. From the existing data, we conclude that, although no major differences in the physical behavior of water could be distinguished between desiccation-tolerant and -intolerant pollens, the physiological response to the loss of water varies between the two pollen types. PMID:12226289

  10. Effect of high-pressure on calorimetric, rheological and dielectric properties of selected starch dispersions.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Jasim; Singh, Ajaypal; Ramaswamy, H S; Pandey, Pramod K; Raghavan, G S V

    2014-03-15

    Effects of high-pressure (HP) treatment on the rheological, thermal and dielectric properties of the four selected starch dispersions (two modified starches, one native and one resistant) were evaluated. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and oscillatory rheometry were employed to assess the extent of starch gelatinization and the developed gel rigidity (G') of starch gels after HP treatment. It was observed that starch dispersions gelatinized completely at 500 MPa with a 30-min holding time. The HP-treated starch samples exhibited predominantly solid-like (G'>G") behavior except for the resistant starch. Pressure-induced gel rigidity differed significantly among starch samples. The G' of starch gels increased with the pressure (400-600 MPa) in the studied frequency range (0.1-10 Hz) except for the native starch where a marginal decrease was recorded at similar condition. The holding time (15-30 min) and concentration (20-25% w/w) significantly attributed towards gel rigidity of starch samples. Measurement of dielectric properties of HP-treated samples over the frequency range 450-4450 MHz indicated differences in the dielectric constant (ɛ'), loss factor (ɛ") and penetration depth among starch gels. Pressure did not show any effect on dielectric property of the resistant starch sample. Power penetration depth decreased significantly with frequency and with the pressure. PMID:24528695

  11. Final Preparation of the CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) for Launch to the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Brian; Calet Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    CALET has been delivered to the JAXA Tsukuba Space Center and is undergoing final preflight testing for launch to the ISS on HTV5 for installation on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) with a target date in 2015. This Japanese-Italian-US astroparticle observatory consists of a main calorimeter (CAL) and a Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM) subsystem. The CAL is comprised from top to bottom of a charge detector (CHD) with two crossed layers of scintillator paddles, an imaging calorimeter (IMC) with planes of scintillating fibers interleaved with a total of 3 radiation lengths (X0) of tungsten, and a 27 X0 deep total absorption calorimeter (TASC) made of lead tungstate logs, which has the excellent energy resolution and imaging capabilities to resolve electrons, hadrons and photons. In a planned 5 year mission CALET will measure the combined cosmic ray electron and positron spectrum to 20 TeV, gamma rays to 10 TeV, nuclei 1 <= Z <= 40 to 1,000 TeV, and gamma-ray bursts between 7 keV and 20 MeV. CALET will look for signs of possible local astrophysical sources of cosmic ray electrons, search for dark matter signatures and probe the environment through which cosmic rays propagate from their source(s) to Earth. This research is supported by JAXA in Japan, ASI in Italy, and by NASA under Grant Number NNX11AE02G.

  12. New calorimetric system and some results of water phase transition research in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Bakradze, N; Kiziria, E; Sokhadze, V; Gogichaishvili, Sh; Vardidze, E

    2007-01-01

    The principle of operation and main parameters of the recently created scanning differential reverse microcalorimeter of the new generation are presented. The microcalorimeter is destined for studying water crystallization and ice melting processes in heterogeneous systems, including plant and animal cells and tissues in the temperature range of 20 to -55 degrees C. In order to obtain maximum information from the experimental results respective algorithms and applied software package were developed. The results of studies of water crystallization and ice melting processes in different parts of common plantain (Plantago major L.) root, as a certain model system, can give us information on the peculiarities of the studied processes in complex, heterogeneous systems. PMID:17522730

  13. A Simple Calorimetric Experiment that Highlights Aspects of Global Heat Retention and Global Warming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burley, Joel D.; Johnston, Harold S.

    2007-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, general chemistry students measure the heating curves for three different systems: (i) 500 g of room-temperature water heated by a small desk lamp, (ii) 500 g of an ice-water mixture warmed by conduction with room-temperature surroundings, and (iii) 500 g of an ice-water mixture heated by a small desk lamp and by…

  14. Calorimetric studies of amphiphile/oil/water systems for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, R.O.; Das, K.; Covatch, G.; Smith, D.H.

    1988-05-01

    Better experimental methods and new types of data are needed for the measurement and prediction of the phase behavior of amphiphile/oil/water systems used in various types of enhanced oil recovery (EOR), including both dispersion-based mobility control for ''gas'' flooding (emulsions and foams), and high-capillary number EOR. This paper reports progress in the use of titration calorimetry (both isoperibolic and isothermal) for the measurement of phase diagrams of cosurfactant/n-alkane/water systems. The cosurfactants studied included alcohols and low molecular weight ethoxylated alcohols. Compositions of triconjugate (lower-, middle-, upper-phase systems) were obtained without conventional compositional analyses by thermal detection of compositions at which the number of phases changed from two to three, linear regressions to get the limiting tielines, and calculation of the tietriangle corners from the interceptions of the equations for the limiting tielines. The first measurements of the heats of formation of triconjugate phases in these types of systems are also reported.

  15. Interaction of P-glycoprotein with defined phospholipid bilayers: a differential scanning calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Romsicki, Y; Sharom, F J

    1997-08-12

    One of the major causes of multidrug resistance in human cancers is expression of the P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter, which acts as a drug efflux pump. P-Glycoprotein is a member of the ABC superfamily of membrane proteins, and is composed of 12 hydrophobic membrane-spanning segments and 2 cytoplasmic nucleotide binding domains. Membrane lipids are known to play an important role in the function of P-glycoprotein. In the present study, purified P-glycoprotein of high specific ATPase activity was reconstituted into defined bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and its effects on lipid thermodynamic properties were then investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. P-Glycoprotein had a large perturbing effect on DMPC bilayers, even at relatively high lipid:protein ratios. The gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature, Tm, was lowered on inclusion of P-glycoprotein in the bilayer, and the cooperativity of the transition was markedly reduced. The phase transition enthalpy, DeltaH, declined in a linear fashion with increasing P-glycoprotein content for lipid:protein ratios between 63:1 and 16:1 (w/w). Evaluation of these data using two different analytical methods indicated that P-glycoprotein perturbed either 375 or 485 phospholipids, withdrawing them from the phase transition. The DeltaH value for those lipids undergoing melting was similar to that of pure DMPC, which implies that their thermodynamic properties are essentially unchanged in the presence of P-glycoprotein. At lipid:protein ratios below 16:1 (w/w), transition enthalpy increased with higher P-glycoprotein content, until the DeltaH value reached that of pure DMPC. However, the lipid remained highly perturbed, as indicated by a very broad phase transition peak. This behavior may arise from either aggregation/oligomerization of P-glycoprotein within the bilayer or changes in the interaction of the transporter with the membrane at high density. PMID:9245413

  16. Plate stamping of masterplates for the Tile-Cal hadronic calorimetric for ATLAS detector at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, N.F.; Petereit, E.; Wood, K.; Proudfoot, J.

    1996-05-16

    Various methods have been explored for the fabrication of the large trapezoidal plates used in the construction of the Tile-Cal hadronic calorimeter for ATLAS. The options include die stamping, laser cutting, waterjet cutting, plasma arc cutting, and a combination of machining and laser cutting. Very early in the program, the Argonne group began investigating the possibility of die stamping the master plates. At that time it was felt that two dies would be necessary to achieve the accuracy required. Quotations were received for dies for both the master and spacer plates. Concern was expressed by many members of the collaboration that due to the very precise tolerances required, die stamping, using standard dies, would not be adequate. Fine blanking techniques were felt to be adequate, but were cost prohibitive. Two methods were finally used for the initial cutting of prototype plates, laser cutting and die stamping. Only the die stamping, will be reviewed here.

  17. Calorimetric observation of the melting of free water nanoparticles at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hock, C; Schmidt, M; Kuhnen, R; Bartels, C; Ma, L; Haberland, H; van Issendorff, B

    2009-08-14

    We present an experimental study of the thermodynamics of free, size-selected water cluster anions consisting of 48 and 118 molecules. The measured caloric curves of the clusters are bulklike at low temperatures but show a well-defined, particle-size specific transition at 93+/-3 K for (H2O)48- and 118+/-3 K for (H2O)118-. At the transition temperature the heat capacity strongly increases, which marks the onset of melting. PMID:19792643

  18. Laves phase in alloy 718 fusion zone — microscopic and calorimetric studies

    SciTech Connect

    Manikandan, S.G.K.; Sivakumar, D.; Prasad Rao, K.; Kamaraj, M.

    2015-02-15

    Microstructural characterization of alloy 718 fusion zone welded with both solid solution and age hardenable filler metal has been done. The microsegregation and the aging response were studied by employing three levels of weld cooling rate. Gas Tungsten Arc welding process was used. The fusion zone of solid solution filler metal has been responding to the aging treatment due to the weld process conditions and weld metal chemistry. However the weld metal composition was modified due to the higher molybdenum (Mo) content in solid solution filler metal. The effect of this modification on the phase reaction temperatures was studied and the same was compared with the conventional filler metal. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Interdendritic segregation has been controlled by weld cooling rate. • Laves phase formation has been studied with cooling rate and weld metal chemistry. • Aging response with solid solution filler metal has been demonstrated. • Reduction in Laves phase and alloying element segregation has been confirmed. • Reaction temperatures were found modified because of Mo addition.

  19. Possible calorimetric effects at Mercury due to solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Baber, D.N.; Borovsky, J.E.; Burns, J.O.; Gisler, G.R.; Zeilik, M.

    1987-05-01

    As a result of the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere of Mercury, we expect several effects which may be observable with ground-based and/or near-earth radio and infrared telescopes: (1) there may be direct interaction of the solar wind with the surface of Mercury which could produce measurable heating effects; (2) substormlike magnetotail processes within Mercury's magnetosphere may precipitate particles carrying from 10/sup 10/ to 10/sup 12/ W (or more) of power into narrow latitudinal bands on the cold (approx. <130 K) darkside of Mercury, producing surface-heated ''auroral'' zones; and (3) the presence of Jovian electrons within the inner Hermean magnetosphere may produce transient, very low frequency synchrotron-emitting radiation belts. Hence remote radio and infrared observations hold substantial promise for providing information about the intrinsic properties of Mercury's magnetic field, about the planetary surface, and about the dynamical interaction of the Hermean magnetosphere with the solar wind at --0.4 AU. Copyright American Geophysical Union 1987.

  20. Thermodynamic properties of anthophyllite and talc: corrections and discussion of calorimetric data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.

    1991-01-01

    Arithmetic errors in calculating heat capacity values (Krupka, 1984; Krupka et al, 1985a) for anthophyllite and several errors in the Hess cycles utilized to derive enthalpies of formation of anthophyllite and talc are identified, and revised values are reported. -from Author