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Sample records for year case study

  1. A Three Year Clinicopathological Study of Cases of Rupture Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Setu; Swain, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rupture uterus is a life threatening obstetric complication with serious maternal and fetal side-effects. We report a 3 year (2010-2013) retrospective clinical study of pregnancy with rupture uterus cases attending a tertiary care hospital. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of rupture uterus, incidence as per age, parity, clinical presentations, risk factors, complications and management. Materials and Methods Retrospective data of 74 cases of rupture uterus in SCB Medical college, Cuttack was collected from case records of 26,547 deliveries during a 3 year span (2010-2013). Parameters like cause of rupture, type, site of rupture and outcome were recorded. The collected data was analysed by SPSS software v19. Results Out of 26,547 deliveries during the three year period, there were 74 cases of rupture uterus with an incidence of rupture 1 in 359 (0.28%). The mean age of rupture uterus was 27.4 years. 95.8% were multigravida and majority were referred cases from low socioeconomic status. Only 40.5% had the required minimum of four antenatal visits as recommended by WHO (World Health Organisation). A total of 48.6% of cases with rupture uterus had history of previous Caesarean section. Prolonged labour was present in 75.6% of the cases. Only 12.2% of the cases had history of oxytocin use whereas 9.5% had undergone an operative vaginal delivery. Obstructed labour was the cause in 24.3% of cases, 85.1% had complete rupture. Majority had a rupture in the anterior wall (69%) and 81.1% had rupture in lower segment of uterus. Only 17.6% had broad ligament haematoma, 10.8% colporrhexis and 6.8% had associated bladder injury. Repair was possible in only 39.2% of cases, whereas majority landed up in hysterectomy. Internal iliac ligation was done in 2.7% of cases. Perinatal mortality was 90.5% whereas maternal death was seen in 13.5% cases. One patient developed VVF (vesicovaginal fistula). Duration of hospital stay was upto 14 days in 81

  2. The Possible Value of a Gap Year: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coetzee, M.; Bester, S.

    2009-01-01

    The taking of a "gap year", immediately after completing their secondary school education, to explore life before embarking on formal studies or starting their career, is a growing phenomenon among young people in South Africa. This research study explores the experiences of three young people who engaged in a gap year and focuses on the influence…

  3. Case studies of first-year critical science teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Kurt A.

    technical controls (i.e. district-wide curriculum, state testing, district-wide common assessments, and state standards) and bureaucratic controls (i.e. mandates from administration that reinforce compliance to the technical controls) (Edwards, 1979; Irwin, 1996), sociocultural cues from administrators, colleagues, and students, and were made seemingly impenetrable via intensification, or high workloads that prevent reflective and critical thinking (Apple, 1988; Irwin, 1996). The internalized hegemonic pressures included their own feelings of internalized domination, surplus powerlessness (driven by feelings of isolation and self-blame) (Irwin, 1996; Lerner, 1986), and internalized dispositional views of their students (driven by feelings that their students were not capable of critical social thinking). Each of their case studies focus on how the philosophical differences between the first-year teachers and the sociocultural contexts contrasted providing constant tension for each of the three teachers in terms of their decision-making and their teaching practices. The technical controls seemed to be at the root of most of the external hegemonic pressures and even their internal hegemonic pressures. This paper will focus on the philosophical underpinnings of the state standards in science, the statewide tests, the district curricula, and district-wide common assessments that drove the teachers' practices. The philosophical foundations of their sociocultural contexts were: (1) knowledge as static and objectified, (2) curricular knowledge as the preferred knowledge, (3) standardized testing as a preferred method of gaining data about students' understandings of content, (4) uniform, decontextualized information as "neutral" facts and preferred knowledge, and (5) the summative view of 1-4 as a schooling process that produces learning that is preferred. The first-year teachers' philosophies together contrasted the philosophies of their sociocultural contexts. The first-year

  4. Selective single blastocyst transfer study: 604 cases in 6 years

    PubMed Central

    Sadasivam, Nirmala; Sadasivam, Narayanan M.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the credibility of single blastocyst transfer (SBT) method in selected group of patients. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of SBT cases based on computerized data in a private Fertility research centre. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 604 cases of SBTs, done during June 2000 to June 2006, have been analyzed retrospectively to assess the credibility of the method as a method of choice in selective high fertile group of patients. Women between 28 and 42 years have been included in the retrospective analysis, who had adequate number of eggs for fertilization, between 6 and 12. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Grade I blastocyst transfer resulted in 46.6% of clinical pregnancy and grade II blastocyst transfer resulted in 17.4% of clinical pregnancy rates. Overall pregnancy rate was 64%. Pregnancy loss, as early and late fetal wastages, was 11.06%. PMID:19562057

  5. Case studies of first-year critical science teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Kurt A.

    technical controls (i.e. district-wide curriculum, state testing, district-wide common assessments, and state standards) and bureaucratic controls (i.e. mandates from administration that reinforce compliance to the technical controls) (Edwards, 1979; Irwin, 1996), sociocultural cues from administrators, colleagues, and students, and were made seemingly impenetrable via intensification, or high workloads that prevent reflective and critical thinking (Apple, 1988; Irwin, 1996). The internalized hegemonic pressures included their own feelings of internalized domination, surplus powerlessness (driven by feelings of isolation and self-blame) (Irwin, 1996; Lerner, 1986), and internalized dispositional views of their students (driven by feelings that their students were not capable of critical social thinking). Each of their case studies focus on how the philosophical differences between the first-year teachers and the sociocultural contexts contrasted providing constant tension for each of the three teachers in terms of their decision-making and their teaching practices. The technical controls seemed to be at the root of most of the external hegemonic pressures and even their internal hegemonic pressures. This paper will focus on the philosophical underpinnings of the state standards in science, the statewide tests, the district curricula, and district-wide common assessments that drove the teachers' practices. The philosophical foundations of their sociocultural contexts were: (1) knowledge as static and objectified, (2) curricular knowledge as the preferred knowledge, (3) standardized testing as a preferred method of gaining data about students' understandings of content, (4) uniform, decontextualized information as "neutral" facts and preferred knowledge, and (5) the summative view of 1-4 as a schooling process that produces learning that is preferred. The first-year teachers' philosophies together contrasted the philosophies of their sociocultural contexts. The first-year

  6. INNOVATIVE CLEAN TECHNOLOGIES CASE STUDIES - SECOND YEAR PROJECT REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Innovative Clean Technologies Case Studies contained herein are the products of the "Pollution Prevention by and far Small Business" Program (P2SB). he P2SB was an outreach program directed to small businesses that had developed innovative concepts for pollution prevention in...

  7. The Learning Organization Ten Years On: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter A. C.

    1999-01-01

    A learning organization is viable when the learning climate successfully changes managers' mindsets. A case study of a financial services enterprise illustrates ways to keep mind sets from hardening and shows how changing learning activities and tools can change habits of thinking and learning. (Contains 30 references.) (SK)

  8. Using Case Studies to Visualize Success with First Year Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a discussion of one element of a principal preparation graduate program that uses visualization as a technique to practice decision making. Design/methodology/approach: The author analyzed information collected from participants who created personal case studies using a visualization technique. Data…

  9. Year-Round School Program: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servetter, Leonard, Comp.

    This book describes the year-round school program of Chula Vista City School District. It begins with a discussion of the planning that occurred prior to the implementation of the program that includes descriptions of the problem, the legislation needed, and school relations with teachers and parents. The second section examines the first year of…

  10. Teamwork and Communication: A 3-Year Case Study of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Susan R.

    1994-01-01

    Assesses the effectiveness of a teambuilding intervention among a group of department leaders. Finds that, three years after the intervention began, group members reported an increase in ability to raise issues and manage conflict; increases in mutual praise, support, and cooperation; clarification of roles and responsibilities; and a long-term…

  11. The Effects of Year-Round School on Students with Learning Disabilities: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, John, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This case study investigated the effects of year-round school on students with learning disabilities at Abraxas High School in Poway, California. Abraxas is an alternative school that operates on a block schedule and year-round calendar. The researcher attempted to answer the question: How does year-round school impact students with learning…

  12. Successful Aging in a 70-Year-Old Man with Down Syndrome: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Devenny, Darlynne A.; Gu, Hong; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Kittler, Phyllis; Murty, Vundavalli V.; Schupf, Nicole; Scotto, Luigi; Tycko, Benjamin; Urv, Tiina K.; Ye, Lingling; Zigman, Warren B.; Silverman, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    The authors present a case study of a 70-year-old man with Down syndrome ("Mr. C.") who they followed for 16 years and who does not exhibit declines in cognitive or functional capacities indicative of dementia, despite having well-documented, complete trisomy 21. The authors describe the age-associated changes that occurred over 16 years as well…

  13. [Studies on current trend of imported malaria in Japan--pediatric cases in recent 20 years].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Y; Ohtomo, H; Kimura, M; Takeuchi, T

    2000-09-01

    Imported malaria has been increasing according to the recent globalization of Japan. There are about 120 clinical cases of malaria which include a few pediatric cases (approximately 1%) every year. Generally, pediatric cases often have an atypical onset and course compared to adult cases, and also develop serious and fatal effects in a short time. In this study, we examined imported malaria cases in subjects under 15 years old from 1980 to 1999 conducted by Research group on clinical evaluation against orphan drugs in the treatment of imported tropical diseases and parasitic diseases. During the 20 years we found 44 clinical cases in children. Of these 70% were foreign cases. Among the species of parasites, there were 21 cases of Vivax malaria and 17 cases of Falciparum malaria and a few cases of Malariae and Ovale malaria were also found, which is rare even in adults. Concerning the drugs chosen in Japan for chemotherapy to treat malaria, chloroquine and primaquine seemed to be employed most frequently before 1990, however mefloquine or artesunate seemed to be more common after 1990. Also, most pediatric cases were former residents or refugees from tropical countries, however some cases were in Japanese children who had recently visited those areas with their families. There have been no fatalities in pediatric cases of malaria, however tropical diseases, including malaria, must be rule out, when examining pyretic children, considering the number of travelers going abroad has been increasing. PMID:11068361

  14. Lasting Connections: A Case Study of Relationships Formed during a First-Year Seminar Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enke, Kathryn A. E.

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the evolution of friendships formed during a first-year seminar for honors students enrolled in a private liberal arts college. Through an electronic survey and interviews with former students who had participated in the seminar course six years prior to the research, this case study examined why some friendships were…

  15. Science of Materials: A Case Study of Intentional Teaching in the Early Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackling, Mark; Barratt-Pugh, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Australia's Early Years Learning Framework and leading international researchers argue for more intentional and purposeful teaching of science in the early years. This case study of exemplary practice illustrates intentional teaching of science materials which opened-up learning opportunities in literacy and number. Student-led hands-on…

  16. The Asset-Burden Paradox of Giftedness: A 15-Year Phenomenological, Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Jean Sunde

    2012-01-01

    A 15-year phenomenological case study of an exceptional female from age 15 through 30 was focused on exploring the subjective experience of development during adolescence and young adulthood, with attention to how giftedness and context interacted. The main focus became her response to trauma, which was revealed early in the study. Data, including…

  17. Students' Perceptions of Meaningfulness in First Year Experience Courses: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Nancy J.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study, framed by a constructivist perspective, addresses a deficit in the literature and the knowledge base of a first year experience (FYE) academic program at a large, urban university regarding freshmen perceptions of meaningfulness in their courses. Existing studies identify concepts related to meaningfulness, but do not…

  18. The Quality-Defining Process in Early Years Services: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Emily; Welsh, Elaine; Lewis, Jane

    2006-01-01

    In this article we argue, through a case study in a large, urban local authority in England, that local stakeholders in early years provision express a variety of perspectives on quality but are constrained by a national framework which promotes an "official" definition of quality. We offer a quality-defining model that captures the role of both…

  19. Pearls and Pitfalls in Evaluating a Student Assistance Program: A Five-Year Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilburn, Sharon T.; Wilburn, Kenneth T.; Weaver, Dax M.; Bowles, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    This article presents data from a five-year evaluation-research case study of a large urban schools district's internal Student Assistance Program (SAP). The district employed specially trained and licensed school-based counselors to implement an internal SAP expanded to include tertiary prevention, and modeled after an employee assistance program…

  20. Using Facebook to Enhance Independent Student Engagement: A Case Study of First-Year Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    A case study was conducted to assess the efficacy of online communication tools for enhancing independent student engagement in a first-year undergraduate class. Material relevant to course topics was shared with students through three communication platforms and data were extracted to measure student engagement. A questionnaire was also used to…

  1. Lessons Learned from a Four Year Case Study of Preparing Teachers for Inner-City Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallings, Jane

    A 4-year case study was done of a partnership program between the Houston (Texas) Independent School District and Texas A&M University's College of Education (College Station) designed to prepare student teachers for work in inner-city public schools. The two institutions worked together through four collaborative decision-making councils to form…

  2. Letterer-Siwe disease: a study of thirteen cases over a 21 - year period.

    PubMed

    Bingham, E A; Bridges, J M; Kelly, A M; Burrows, D; Nevin, N C

    1982-02-01

    In Northern Ireland, with a population of 1.5 million, thirteen cases of Letterer-Siwe disease have been diagnosed over the past 21 years. The average age of onset was 10.5 months. There was a 69% mortality with an average survival time from diagnosis to death of 3.3 months. Four children survived with no morbidity. All deaths were from pulmonary complications, but two cases with pulmonary infiltration responded to treatment with quadruple chemotherapy. There were no familial cases in this study. PMID:7059511

  3. Propeller Flaps and Its Outcomes - A Prospective Study of 15 Cases Over Two-years

    PubMed Central

    K.T., Ramesha; J., Vijay; M., Shankarappa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cover flaps are needed in management of any bodily defect involving bone, tendon, nerve & vessels. The major objective of a plastic surgeon, facing a complex soft-tissue defect, is to replace “like with like” tissues at minimal donor site “cost” and with maximal accuracy & efficacy. Aims: To study the “Propeller Flaps” utility in reconstructive surgeries, evaluate its planning and complications involving donor site morbidity. Methodology: The prospective study was conducted on 15 cases (11 males/4 females) of propeller flaps during the period of two years (2010-12) in Department of Plastic Surgery and Burns, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute (BMCRI), Karnataka, India. The propeller flaps were performed in cases with defects due to any cause. Exclusion criteria: Cases with Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD). Flaps were performed and details recorded. Results: Overall results revealed problem resolution in 87% cases (13 cases). Comprehensive description of each flap type and its related cases are given in the table. It has been categorically found that there were 2 flap partial losses. Partial necrosis has been reported in heavy-smoker patients. Conclusion: This current study clearly justifies that careful application, optimal designing & judicious scientific application of local perforator flaps for lower-limb wounds including rest of the body is successful in many aspects providing high-quality reconstruction ensuring minimal morbidity. It is cost-effective as well as time-saving. PMID:24596732

  4. [Neonatal meningitis. Study of 26 cases and a review of its sequelae after 5 years].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Pardo, A; Tauler Girona, M C; López Soler, C; Puche Mira, A; Casas Fernández, C; Rodríguez Costa, T

    1988-06-01

    Twenty-six cases of neonatal meningitis in term newborns are studied. Incidence, etiological features, treatment, clinical and biochemical evolution and mortality are analysed. Lief motif of this paper is the search for deficits in psychomotor growth in propositi of four and six years old, finding an important relation between neonatal bacterial meningitis and neuropsychological deficits (hyperkinesia, perceptive area impairment, reading-writing disorders, etc.) in contrast to the good evolution of lymphocytic meningitis. PMID:2461673

  5. Exposure therapy for emetophobia: a case study with three-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Maack, Danielle J; Deacon, Brett J; Zhao, Mimi

    2013-06-01

    Emetophobia, also referred to as a specific phobia of vomiting, is a largely under-researched and poorly understood disorder with prevalence estimates of ranging between 1.7 and 3.1% for men and 6 and 7% for women (Hunter & Antony, 2009; Philips, 1985). The current case study, therefore, sought to methodically apply exposure-based behavioral treatment to the treatment of a 26 year-old, Hispanic, female suffering from emetophobia. Although not as powerful as a randomized design, this description may still add to the existing emetophobia literature through the illustration of adaptation of published behavioral treatments for other specific phobias. The case presented was successful in terms of outcome, and includes a three-year follow up wherein treatment gains were measurably maintained. PMID:23973742

  6. Re-defining one's occupational self 2 years after breast cancer: a case study.

    PubMed

    Newman, Robin M

    2013-01-01

    Margaret*, a 56 year-old Caucasian Stage III breast cancer survivor, participated in a 5 week occupational therapy pilot program, called Take Action. This program was designed for breast cancer survivors who self-reported changes in cognitive function following completion of chemotherapy. The goals of the program were to improve participants' knowledge and use of strategies to enhance occupational performance and to improve satisfaction and performance of meaningful daily activities or occupations. Through a client-centered and evidence-based approach, this case study highlights the importance of incorporating the survivors' sense of self into an occupation-based intervention. Occupational therapists play an important role in facilitating exploration of sense of self in the survivorship phase of care to support occupational performance in self care, productivity, work, leisure and social participation. This case study highlights the important work of redefining oneself in the survivorship phase of care. (*denotes name change). PMID:24004739

  7. Case Studies of Schools Receiving School Improvement Grants: Findings after the First Year of Implementation. NCEE 2014-4015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Floch, Kerstin Carlson; Birman, Beatrice; O'Day, Jennifer; Hurlburt, Steven; Mercado-Garcia, Diana; Goff, Rose; Manship, Karen; Brown, Seth; Therriault, Susan Bowles; Rosenberg, Linda; Angus, Megan Hague; Hulsey, Lara

    2014-01-01

    The Study of School Turnaround examines the improvement process in a purposive sample of 35 case study schools receiving federal School Improvement Grants (SIG) over a three-year period (2010-11 to 2012-13 school years). Using site visit, teacher survey, and fiscal data, the case studies describe the school contexts, the principals' leadership…

  8. Case Studies of Schools Receiving School Improvement Grants: Findings after the First Year of Implementation. NCEE 2014-4015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Floch, Kerstin Carlson; Birman, Beatrice; O'Day, Jennifer; Hurlburt, Steven; Mercado-Garcia, Diana; Goff, Rose; Manship, Karen; Brown, Seth; Therriault, Susan Bowles; Rosenberg, Linda; Angus, Megan Hague; Hulsey, Lara

    2014-01-01

    The Study of School Turnaround examines the improvement process in a purposive sample of 35 case study schools receiving federal School Improvement Grants (SIG) over a three-year period (2010-11 to 2012-13 school years). Using site visit, teacher survey, and fiscal data, the case studies describe the school contexts, the principals'…

  9. Hypnotic intervention in a 7-year-old thumbsucker: a case study.

    PubMed

    Grayson, David N

    2012-01-01

    Thumbsucking is a common habit among younger children. Usually, the child outgrows this habit by age 6. When a child over the age of 6 continues to suck his or her thumb, it can be a cause of potential harm due to peer pressure, ridicule, and shunning. It can also lead to malocclusions requiring eventual orthodontic interventions. In this case study, the author demonstrates a hypnotic intervention in a 7-year-old girl. Validation of her habit and imaging a role model sucking her thumb were employed in trance. Using this approach, the child was able to end her dependence on thumbsucking in 1 session. PMID:22443022

  10. Acute lead poisoning in western Canadian cattle - A 16-year retrospective study of diagnostic case records.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Vanessa; Blakley, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of acute lead poisoning in western Canadian cattle over the 16-year period of 1998 to 2013 and reports background bovine tissue lead concentrations. Case records from Prairie Diagnostic Services, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, identified 525 cases of acute lead toxicity over the investigational period. Poisonings were influenced by year (P < 0.0001) and month (P < 0.0001). Submissions were highest in 2009 (15.6%), 2001 (11.2%), and 2006 (9.9%). Most cases were observed during May, June, and July (62.3%). Cattle 6 months of age and younger were frequently poisoned (53.5%; P < 0.0001). Beef breeds were predominantly poisoned. Mean toxic lead concentrations (mg/kg wet weight) in the blood, liver, and kidney were 1.30 ± 1.70 (n = 301), 33.5 ± 80.5 (n = 172), and 56.3 ± 39.7 (n = 61). Mean normal lead concentrations in the blood, liver, and kidney were 0.036 ± 0.003 mg/kg (n= 1081), 0.16 ± 0.63 mg/kg (n = 382), and 0.41 ± 0.62 mg/kg (n = 64). PMID:27041761

  11. A Case of Dentin Dysplasia with Full Mouth Rehabilitation: A 3-year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dheeraj; Likhyani, Lalit

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dentin dysplasia, a rare hereditary disorder of dentin formation, is characterized by normal enamel but atypical dentin formation along with abnormal pulpal morphology. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It has been divided into two clinical entities: type I (radicular) and type II (coronal). Early diagnosis and initiation of effective regular dental treatments may help the patients with this condition to delay or prevent the loss of the entire dentition and help them in cope up with edentulous state in early ages. The condition undoubtedly has a negative impact on the physical and psychological well-being of the affected individual. Numerous factors have to be considered during the prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with dentin dysplasia. Treatment protocol varies according to clinical case. Although literature reports suggest general guidelines for treatment planning, the present case report describes a full mouth rehabilitation of an 8-year-old female patient with dentin dysplasia. How to cite this article: Khandelwal S, Gupta D, Likhyani L. A Case of Dentin Dysplasia with Full Mouth Rehabilitation: A 3-year Longitudinal Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2): 119-124. PMID:25356011

  12. A 5-year follow-up study of an atypical case of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Macniven, J A B; Graham, N L; Davies, R R; Wilson, B A

    2005-12-20

    This study presents 5-year follow-up data on NG, a woman with adult onset myotonic dystrophy and progressive cognitive decline who was first described by Wilson et al. The extent of the cognitive impairment is atypical of symptom-onset in adulthood and of paternal inheritance, both of which apply to this case. Together, the present and earlier studies report the results of regular neuropsychological assessments over a 16-year period. Severe impairment in executive functioning, episodic and semantic memory were apparent early in the history, while visuospatial skills and working memory were only mildly impaired after 16 years of follow-up. There was also a progressive dyslexia, initially characterized by the regularization errors typical of surface dyslexia, but subsequently dominated by visual/phonological reading errors. This pattern of impairment is not typical of myotonic dystrophy but resembles semantic dementia. Whilst the deficits may be attributable wholly to myotonic dystrophy pathology, the co-existence of a form of semantic dementia is also possible. It is noted that the aggregation of tau protein is a neuropathological feature common to both diseases. PMID:16286337

  13. A six-year monitoring case study of a top-10 cycling Grand Tour finisher.

    PubMed

    Pinot, Julien; Grappe, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    This study analysed the evolution of the physical potential of a twice top-10 Grand Tour cycling finisher (Tour de France and Vuelta a España) whose training was monitored between the ages of 18 and 23 years. The world-class cyclist's power output (PO) data and training indices were analysed over six years to determine the evolution of his record power profile and training load (TL), which were estimated by using the session rating of perceived exertion (RPE) method. The total annual duration and TL increased through six seasons by 79% and 83%, respectively. The record POs in all exercise intensity zones improved over the six years. The increases in TL, monotony (+34%) and strain (+162%) from the junior category to the world-class level significantly correlated with an improvement in his aerobic potential, which was characterised by an increase in the record POs between 5 min and 4 h. This case study of the performance level and training parameters of a world-class cyclist provides comprehensive insight into the evolution of a cyclist to the top level. Furthermore, determining the record power profile of this athlete over six competitive seasons illuminates the maturation of the physical potential of a top-10 Grand Tour finisher. PMID:25357188

  14. Energy-water analysis of the 10-year WECC transmission planning study cases.

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Passell, Howard David; Castillo, Cesar; Moreland, Barbara

    2011-11-01

    calculating water withdrawal and consumption for current and planned electric power generation; projected water demand from competing use sectors; and, surface and groundwater availability. WECC's long range planning is organized according to two target planning horizons, a 10-year and a 20-year. This study supports WECC in the 10-year planning endeavor. In this case the water implications associated with four of WECC's alternative future study cases (described below) are calculated and reported. In future phases of planning we will work with WECC to craft study cases that aim to reduce the thermoelectric footprint of the interconnection and/or limit production in the most water stressed regions of the West.

  15. Evaluation of the National Science Foundation's Statewide Systemic Initiatives (SSI) Program. Second-Year Case Studies: Connecticut, Delaware, and Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucker, Andrew A.; Shields, Patrick M.

    During the first and second years of the national evaluation of the Statewide Systemic Initiatives (SSI) program, a sample of 11 case study states was drawn from the universe of awards the National Science Foundation made to 25 states and Puerto Rico. This document reports on three case studies for Connecticut, Delaware, and Montana. The cases…

  16. Reflections on Tutoring Ancient Greek Philosophy: A Case Study of Teaching First-Year Undergraduates in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vázquez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This is a case study of my reflections on teaching a first-year undergraduate tutorial on Ancient Greek Philosophy in the UK. This study draws upon the notion of reflective practice as an essential feature of teaching, in this case applied to Higher Education. My aim is to show how a critical engagement with my teaching practices and the overall…

  17. Designed for Learning: A Case Study in Rethinking Teaching and Learning for a Large First Year Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldacre, Lisa; Bolt, Susan; Lambiris, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a case study in which the principles of scholarship were applied to designing an approach to learning suitable for large classes. While this case study describes an Australian first year Business Law unit, the findings presented in this paper would be relevant to a wide range of teachers faced with large enrollments in first…

  18. Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two case studies using online surveys for evaluation. The authors begin with an example of a needs assessment survey designed to measure the amount of help new students at a university require in their first year. They then discuss the follow-up survey conducted by the same university to measure the effectiveness of the…

  19. First-Year Students' Expectations of Conduct and Consequence: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crance Gutmann, Gina-Lyn

    2008-01-01

    Research on first-year students' expectations about college has explored areas of academic and social expectations, but not first-year college students' expectations about judicial conduct and consequence. The purpose of this study was to empirically explore two questions: what are first year students' expectations about campus conduct and…

  20. Contributions of Early Work-Based Learning: A Case Study of First Year Pharmacy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting, Kang Nee; Wong, Kok Thong; Thang, Siew Ming

    2009-01-01

    Generally work-based learning opportunities are only offered to students in their penultimate year of undergraduate study. Little is known about the benefits and shortcomings of such experiential learning for students in the early stages of their undergraduate education. This is a mixed method study investigating first year undergraduate pharmacy…

  1. [Tertiary syphilis of the pancreas and liver in 82-year-old patient: case study].

    PubMed

    Denisova, T L; Tiul'tiaeva, L A; Lipatova, T E; Bakulev, A L; Alipova, L N; Apanasevich, A V; Bezrodnaia, L A; Borisova, E A

    2013-01-01

    It has been described a clinical case of late diagnosis of syphilis of the pancreas and liver of elderly patients. Two years before that it was wrongly diagnosed with cancer of the pancreas with liver metastases, and the patient was operated on with the imposition of cholecystostomy. It was conducted appropriate therapy and reconstructive surgery after verification of the diagnosis of syphilis of the pancreas and liver. PMID:24772875

  2. A case study of systemic curricular reform: A forty-year history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubach, Timothy Alan

    What follows is a description of the development of a particular inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum program and how its theoretical underpinnings positively influenced a school district's (K-12) science program and also impacted district- and state-wide curriculum reform initiatives. The district's science program has evolved since the inception of the inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum reform forty years ago. Therefore, a historical case study, which incorporated grounded theory methodology, was used to convey the forty-year development of a science curriculum reform effort and its systemic influences. Data for this study were collected primarily through artifacts, such as technical and non-technical documents, and supported and augmented with interviews. Fifteen people comprised the interview consortium with professional responsibilities including (a) administrative roles, such as superintendents, assistant superintendents, principals, and curriculum consultants/coordinators; (b) classroom roles, such as elementary and secondary school teachers who taught science; (c) partnership roles, such as university faculty who collaborated with those in administrative and classroom positions within the district; and (d) the co-director of SCIS who worked with the SCIS trial center director. Data were analyzed and coded using the constant comparative method. The analysis of data uncovered five categories or levels in which the curriculum reform evolved throughout its duration. These themes are Initiation, Education, Implementation, Confirmation, and Continuation. These five categories lead to several working hypotheses that supported the sustaining and continuing of a K-12 science curriculum reform effort. These components are a committed visionary; a theory base of education; forums promoting the education of the theory base components; shared-decision making; a university-school partnership; a core group of committed educators and teachers

  3. What Account of Science Shall We Give? a Case Study of Scientists Teaching First-Year University Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dorothy V.; Mulhall, Pamela J.; Gunstone, Richard F.; Hart, Christina E.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a case study of four academic scientists. These academics teach in the first year of a Bachelor of Science degree at a large research-focused Australian university that has demanded and supported a greater focus on undergraduate learning. Taken as a whole, the accounts of science that the first-year academics in this case…

  4. Appointments and Disappointments: Six Years of Department Building. A Case Study Written by a Former Chair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selby, Stuart A.

    The role of a department chairperson is considered, based on personal experience in six years of department building at the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Windsor in Ontario, Canada. The leadership position was assumed when the department was small, consisting of five faculty members. In six years, it grew to 12 faculty…

  5. Femoroacetabular Impingement: A Retrospective Case Study With 8-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Stobert, Julia R.; Emary, Peter C.; Taylor, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) who was initially misdiagnosed and treated for a hip flexor strain. Clinical Features A 36-year-old male patient presented with insidious onset of progressive anterior right hip and groin pain of 7 years' duration. He was diagnosed with a right-sided hip flexor muscle strain and was discharged from care 1 month later. The patient then returned to the office 8 years later for treatment of unrelated lower back pain. This time, the doctor of chiropractic learned that the patient was misdiagnosed years before. The patient's past radiographs in fact revealed FAI, including severe hip joint osteoarthritis on the right and mild osteoarthritis on the left. As a result, the patient had undergone right hip joint replacement surgery. Recent radiographs also revealed FAI in the contralateral hip. Intervention and Outcome After investigating for FAI, the doctor of chiropractic was able to identify through symptomatology, history, physical examination, and radiographs the presence of FAI in the patient's left hip. An “active surveillance” approach is being taken. Conclusion This case illustrates the importance of an increasing awareness of FAI, as doctors of chiropractic are frequently the primary contact for patients with this condition. PMID:26793042

  6. Dispelling the Notion of Inconsistencies in Teachers' Mathematics Beliefs and Practices: A 3-Year Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross Francis, Dionne I.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers in the field of mathematics education have focused on beliefs as a significant area of study because of the influence of beliefs on what is taught and learned. Much of the research in this area speaks about inconsistency between teachers' beliefs about mathematics teaching and learning and their classroom practices. In this case study,…

  7. Why Are They Leaving: A Collective Case Study of Teacher Attrition during the First Five Career Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Donna G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factors that impact teachers' decisions to leave the profession during their first five years. A qualitative method was suitable based on the identified problem and goals of the study. Data was collected using the qualitative case study research design, which included responses to interview questions.…

  8. Struggle as Pedagogical Approach: A Singaporean Case Study of a Composition Class in IB (International Baccalaureate) Year 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Chee-Hoo; Stromberg, Dirk; Xueyan, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research study is an examination of a music artist-teacher's pedagogical approaches and practices in teaching composition to a Year 5 IB (International Baccalaureate) class in a Singaporean specialized arts school. The study is approached as a qualitative case study spanning a 5-month period involving observation and recording…

  9. Supervision, Mentoring, and Self-Discovery: A Case Study of a First-Year Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullough, Robert V., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Presents the case study of Heidi, a beginning Spanish teacher struggling with self-definition while shifting from content-area expert to friend to caring adult. The technical approach to supervision failed Heidi. To discover Heidi's actual experiences would have required relating to her in ways not encouraged by the existing evaluation system.…

  10. Identifying with Science: A Case Study of Two 13-Year-Old "High Achieving Working Class" British Asian Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Billy

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an in-depth, "case study" style analysis of the experiences of two 13-year-old British Asian girls from a larger qualitative study investigating minority ethnic students' aspirations in science. Through the lens of identity as performativity and Bourdieu's notions of "habitus" and capital, the ways in which two girls engage…

  11. Patterns of Alcohol Use: A Two-Year College and Four-Year University Comparison Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cremeens-Matthews, Jennifer; Chaney, Beth

    2016-01-01

    With more than 12 million students enrolled in over 1,150 two-year institutions, enrollment at these institutions constitutes approximately 44% of all undergraduates in the United States. Despite this, research and prevention efforts related to drinking behaviors among college students attending two-year institutions are limited, with similar…

  12. Learning Community Transitions in the First Year: A Case Study of Academic and Social Network Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel A.

    2011-01-01

    Residential learning communities often focus on easing first-year students' transitions to college by emphasizing the creation of peer social and academic relationships. However, this relational process is most often examined through analyzing individual student characteristics, behaviors, and attitudes. This study used network analysis to…

  13. Emerging Musicality during the Pre-School Years: A Case Study of One Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of communication in early infancy and childhood have highlighted the significance of rhythm, sound and music for emotional and social development. There is, however, little detailed empirical data on the emergence of naturalistic music-related behaviour by children in the early years. The aim of this work is to examine instances of…

  14. Study of Selected Children in Head Start Planned Variation, 1969-1970. First Year Report: 3 - Case Studies of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittmann, Laura L.; And Others

    To test the feasibility of using case study techniques in national evaluations, the case study approach was used to study the experiences of a boy and a girl in each of eight Head Start curricular models and two children in a classroom not under the sponsorship of a program developer. Teachers and mothers were also interviewed. The purpose of the…

  15. A case study on open innovation on Procter & Gamble. Part I: Innovation strategy over years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafitei, I. G.; Avasilcai, S.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to analyse how product innovation process has been organized by a multinational company, such as Procter & Gamble. Since open innovation is a new approach on the local market, we have chosen to conduct a research in form of a case study showing the steps that the company has taken in order to involve other organizations to contribute to the development of new products. The paper will first describe what innovation management theory is suggesting. Following this, the mission and vision of Procter & Gamble will be analysed emphasizing its innovation efforts in time. The approach that the company has nowadays, related to development of new products, has its roots in several complex initiatives in the past, initiatives that have in their central attention the customer. Finally, it provides the research limitations and implications for future analysis on the case of Procter & Gamble open innovation approach.

  16. One hundred years: A collective case study of climate change education in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Leonard Mark

    This collective case study examined how five K-12 science teachers taught about climate change during Fall 2013, and asked how the University of Georgia can support climate change education. The participants were all experienced teachers, and included: three high school teachers, a middle school teacher, and an elementary school teacher. 'Postcarbonism', an emerging theoretical framework, shaped the research and guided the analysis. The teachers varied in their teaching practices and in their conceptions of 'climate change', but they were united in: 1) their focus on mitigation over adaptation, and 2) presenting climate change as a remote problem with simple solutions. The teachers drew on varied resources, but in all cases, their most valuable resources were their own skills, knowledge and personality. The University of Georgia can support climate change education by developing locally relevant educational resources. Curriculum developers might consider building upon the work of outstanding teach.

  17. Is Endoscopy Really Necessary in My Case? A Four Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Dinesh, HN; Kumar, CD Jagadish; Sachin, V; Basavaraju

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: About 40% of the general population report dyspepsia at some time in their life making it a fairly common disease. Uncomplicated dyspepsia refers to patients whose dyspepsia is not accompanied by alarm features or associated with NSAIDS usage. Aim: To assess the need for UGI Endoscopy and find out the patterns of different endoscopic presentations in patients presenting with uncomplicated dyspepsia. Materials and Methods: Our study conducted in KR Hospital, Mysore, Department of General Surgery is a retrospective endoscopic study of 1450 patients with uncomplicated dysepsia. Results: A significant 64% of the patients presenting with uncomplicated dyspepsia were found to have findings on endoscopy. The most common age range for positive endoscopic findings was 40-50 years in our hospital. Malignancy was diagnosed in 2.5% patients. Conclusion: We recommend upper GI endoscopy in patients presenting with uncomplicated dyspepsia for patients above 40 years of age in our hospital. PMID:26417553

  18. Change analysis of karst rocky desertification for almost 40 years: a case study of Guangxi, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Guoqing; Mao, Guodong; Shi, Yujun; Zhang, Rongting; Su, Chengjie

    2015-12-01

    The paper first studied the geometric correction of historical CORONA satellite imagery in the 1960s and used the historical imagery to extract KRD (karst rocky desertification). The study area is located in the karst region of Guangxi Province, China. Finally, we used the Landsat-5 imagery to extract rocky desertification in 2005, then we could find the changes of the karst rocky desertification in Guangxi from 1960s to 2005 about nearly 40 years. And comparison analysis was conducted and the results showed that, over the 40 years, Guangxi karst rocky desertification area has significantly changed. Guangxi has typical karst environment and is one of the most serious areas of rocky desertification in southwest China provinces, thus our research on this has great practical significance.

  19. A 17-Year Case Study of an Elementary School's Journey: From Traditional School to Learning Community to Democratic School Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cate, Jean McGregor; Vaughn, Courtney Ann; O'Hair, Mary John

    2006-01-01

    This case study explores one elementary school's 17-year evolution from a traditional Title I elementary school into a learning community and, eventually, a high-achieving democratic school community. The investigation adds specificity and context to the existing theoretical framework outlining this change process. The school's journey is…

  20. An Institutional Approach to First-Year Adjustment: The "Projeto FEUP" Case Study of a Portuguese University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouraz, Ana; Sousa, Armando

    2016-01-01

    This article intends to debate the institutional modes of first-year adjustment to higher education. Specifically, the aim is to analyze and consider the need to include social and academic integration activities in the curricular programs. The presented contributions are based on the investigations over the case study course that was studied…

  1. Factors Associated with Adolescent Physical Activity during Middle School Physical Education: A One-Year Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senne, Terry; Rowe, David; Boswell, Boni; Decker, James; Douglas, Shaun

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive component of a larger, exploratory case study was to examine associations among lesson contexts, teacher behaviors, and adolescent physical activity over a year of physical education (PE) at one school. Middle school students (n = 206) and their PE teachers (n = 4) were observed twice-weekly across one academic…

  2. Characterizing 1341 cases of veterinary toxicoses confirmed in western Canada: A 16-year retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Vanessa; Blakley, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Veterinary toxicoses are frequently observed in western Canada. This study reports the frequency and characteristics of intoxications in animals reported between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2013. Information was obtained from toxicological case records from the Prairie Diagnostic Services, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. There were 1341 animal poisonings with 19 compounds over the investigational period. Lead poisoning was the most common toxicity (43.7%). Poisoning with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and strychnine were also common events. Poisonings were most common in 2001, 2009, and 2012. Intoxications occurred most frequently during the months of May through July. Cattle were the most commonly poisoned species (n = 696), followed by dogs and eagles. PMID:26740698

  3. Characterizing 1341 cases of veterinary toxicoses confirmed in western Canada: A 16-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Vanessa; Blakley, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Veterinary toxicoses are frequently observed in western Canada. This study reports the frequency and characteristics of intoxications in animals reported between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2013. Information was obtained from toxicological case records from the Prairie Diagnostic Services, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. There were 1341 animal poisonings with 19 compounds over the investigational period. Lead poisoning was the most common toxicity (43.7%). Poisoning with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and strychnine were also common events. Poisonings were most common in 2001, 2009, and 2012. Intoxications occurred most frequently during the months of May through July. Cattle were the most commonly poisoned species (n = 696), followed by dogs and eagles. PMID:26740698

  4. Black Studies Year One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Richard A.

    Though Dubois tried to begin a series of scientific studies on the Negro problem in America more than 70 years ago, only recently have attempts been made to present a true history of the Black man in institutions of higher learning. Until that time, the experience of the Black man was defined in Euro-American terms, or in most cases was completely…

  5. Chinese and Australian Year 3 Children's Conceptual Understanding of Science: A multiple comparative case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ying; Colette Oliver, Mary; Venville, Grady Jane

    2012-04-01

    Children have formal science instruction from kindergarten in Australia and from Year 3 in China. The purpose of this research was to explore the impact that different approaches to primary science curricula in China and Australia have on children's conceptual understanding of science. Participants were Year 3 children from three schools of high, medium and low socio-economic status in Hunan Province, central south China (n = 135) and three schools of similar socio-economic status in Western Australia (n = 120). The students' understanding was assessed by a science quiz, developed from past Trends in Mathematics and Science Study science released items for primary children. In-depth interviews were carried out to further explore children's conceptual understanding of living things, the Earth and floating and sinking. The results revealed that Year 3 children from schools of similar socio-economic status in the two countries had similar conceptual understandings of life science, earth science and physical science. Further, in both countries, the higher the socio-economic status of the school, the better the students performed on the science quiz and in interviews. Some idiosyncratic strengths and weaknesses were observed, for example, Chinese Year 3 children showed relative strength in classification of living things, and Australian Year 3 children demonstrated better understanding of floating and sinking, but children in both countries were weak in applying and reasoning with complex concepts in the domain of earth science. The results raise questions about the value of providing a science curriculum in early childhood if it does not make any difference to students' conceptual understanding of science.

  6. Haematogenous Staphylococcus aureus meningitis. A 10-year nationwide study of 96 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Michael; Benfield, Thomas L; Skinhoej, Peter; Jensen, Allan G

    2006-01-01

    Background Haematogenous Staphylococcus aureus meningitis is rare but associated with high mortality. Knowledge about the disease is still limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate demographic and clinical prognostic features of bacteraemic S. aureus meningitis. Methods Nationwide surveillance in Denmark from 1991 to 2000 with clinical and bacteriological data. Risks of death were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results Among 12480 cases of S. aureus bacteraemia/sepsis, we identified 96 cases of non-surgical bacteraemic S. aureus meningitis (0.8%). Incidence rates were 0.24 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.30)/100 000 population between 1991–1995 and 0.13 (CI, 0.08 to 0.17)/100 000 population between 1996–2000. Mortality was 56%. After adjustment, only co morbidity (hazard ratio [HR], 3.45; CI, 1.15 to 10.30) and critical illness (Pitt score ≥ 4) (HR, 2.14; CI, 1.09 to 4.19) remained independent predictors of mortality. Conclusion The incidence, but not mortality of bacteraemic S. aureus meningitis decreased during the study period. Co morbidity and critical illness were independent predictors of a poor outcome. PMID:16542437

  7. How Can I Describe Social Studies Curriculum in the First Three Years of Primary School? A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aktan, Sümer

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the opinions of a multigrade class teacher on the nature of social studies lesson, the structure of the social studies curriculum, and the teaching process of social studies lesson. The study was structured in line with a holistic single case design which is contained in the tradition of qualitative research.…

  8. Forty-five years of open plan office experience: An unusual case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, Dennis A.

    2005-09-01

    The open plan office design concept has been around for at least 45 years. Through research, design, and practical experience, the basic concepts and parameters that impact acoustics and speech privacy have been fairly well developed and documented. The psychological aspects of human response and expectation to open plan environments, and the conceptual designs that emerge from the architect and interior designers are frontiers that still allow for ongoing study. A large open plan project completed during the dot-com bubble allowed an opportunity to design and experience an unusual open plan environment that utilized exposed sound masking system loudspeakers and minimal sound absorption.

  9. Clinico-Epidemiological Profile of Snakebite Cases Admitted in a Tertiary Care Centre in South India: A 5 Years Study

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Rekha; Darshan, B. B.; Unnikrishnan, Bhaskaran; Mithra, Prasanna; Kumar, Nithin; Kulkarni, Vaman; Holla, Ramesh; Kumar, Avinash; Kanchan, Tanuj

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to assess the clinic-epidemiological profile of snakebite cases admitted at a Tertiary Care Centre in South India. Materials and Methods: A record based retrospective study was carried out at Kasturbha Medical College affiliated hospitals in Mangalore. All the snakebite cases admitted to the hospitals from January 2007 to December 2011 were included in the study. Data were collected using a pretested semi-structured questionnaire and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 11.5). The results are expressed as percentages. Results: The study included 198 cases of snakebite victims. The majority of the cases were males (68.2%). The mean age of the study population was 34.8 years. Maximum numbers of snakebite cases were reported during the month of September to December (47.9%). The peak time of snakebite was between 18.01 and 24.00 h which was reported in 40.5% of the cases. Lower extremities were the most common site of bite in more than three-fourth of the cases (80.9%). The most common symptoms were a pain (45.9%) and swelling (44.9%). The case fatality rate was observed to be 3.0%. Conclusion: Snakebite still remains a major public health problem in this part of the world. Knowledge must be imparted regarding the prevention of snakebites through community health programs. Messages regarding prompt reporting of such cases and importance of effective treatment must be disseminated among people through mass media and role plays. PMID:26862263

  10. Thermal stress in Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus broodstock: a 28 year case study.

    PubMed

    Jeuthe, H; Brännäs, E; Nilsson, J

    2015-03-01

    Temperature and egg viability data from an Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus hatchery covering a period of 28 years were analysed. During the study period, there was a significant increase in the mean water temperature in May, July, August and September of c. 2° C. Independent of year, the egg viability showed a negative correlation with the mean monthly temperatures in July, August and September as well as with the temperature difference between October and November. The negative effect of high summer temperatures was further supported by a comparison of egg viability from replicate broodstock reared at two sites differing mainly in summer water temperature. The eggs from the colder site were, on average, significantly larger (4·4 mm compared with 4·0 mm) and had higher hatching rates (57% compared with 37%). These results suggest that unfavourable temperature conditions during the summer and autumn can explain much of the excessive egg mortality experienced at the main facility used for the Swedish S. alpinus breeding programme. The main effect was supra-optimal temperatures during the period July to September, but there also appears to have been an effect from the temperature regime before and during spawning (October to November) that was unrelated to the summer temperatures. These findings emphasize the importance of site selection and sustainable management of aquaculture hatcheries in the light of the ongoing climate change. PMID:25683742

  11. Corneal infection in Shandong peninsula of China: a 10-year retrospective study on 578 cases

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiao-Jing; Jiang, Tao; Zhu, Hai; Liu, Peng-Peng; Zhou, Zhan-Yu; Mao, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the epidemiological characteristics, clinical signs, laboratory findings, and outcomes in patients with corneal infection in Shandong peninsula of China. METHODS The medical records of 578 inpatients (578 eyes) with corneal infection were reviewed retrospectively for demographic characteristics, risk factors, seasonal variation, clinical signs, laboratory findings, and treatment strategy. Patient history, ocular examination findings using slit-lamp biomicroscopy, laboratory findings resulted from microbiological cultures, and treatment. RESULTS Fungal keratitis constituted 58.48% of cases of infectious keratitis among the inpatients, followed by herpes simplex keratitis (20.76%), bacterial keratitis (19.03%) and acanthamoeba keratitis (1.73%). The most common risk factor was corneal trauma (71.80%). The direct microscopic examination (338 cases) using potassium hydroxide (KOH) wet mounts was positive in 296 cases (87.57%). Among the 298 fungal culture-positive cases, Fusarium species were the most common isolates (70.47%). A total of 517 cases (89.45%) received surgical intervention, including 255 (44.12%) cases of penetrating keratoplasty, 74 (12.80%) cases of lamellar keratoplasty which has become increasingly popular, and 77 cases (13.32%) of evisceration or enucleation. CONCLUSION At present, infectious keratitis is a primary corneal disease causing blindness in China. With Fusarium species being the most commonly identified pathogens, fungal keratitis is the leading cause of severe infectious corneal ulcers in Shandong peninsula of China. PMID:26949610

  12. What Account of Science Shall We Give? A Case Study of Scientists Teaching First-year University Subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Dorothy V.; Mulhall, Pamela J.; Gunstone, Richard F.; Hart, Christina E.

    2015-06-01

    This article presents a case study of four academic scientists. These academics teach in the first year of a Bachelor of Science degree at a large research-focused Australian university that has demanded and supported a greater focus on undergraduate learning. Taken as a whole, the accounts of science that the first-year academics in this case study gave, and which they are presenting to their students, challenge the images of science and scientists typically presented in school science curricula. Using Roberts' heuristic of Vision 1 and Vision 2 for the broad purposes of learning science, we consider various accounts given of science by these academic scientists and consider how science might appear to a student who takes all four of their subjects.

  13. Chinese and Australian Year 3 Children's Conceptual Understanding of Science: A Multiple Comparative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Ying; Oliver, Mary Colette; Venville, Grady Jane

    2012-01-01

    Children have formal science instruction from kindergarten in Australia and from Year 3 in China. The purpose of this research was to explore the impact that different approaches to primary science curricula in China and Australia have on children's conceptual understanding of science. Participants were Year 3 children from three schools of high,…

  14. Sporadic community-acquired Legionnaires' disease in France: a 2-year national matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Che, D; Campese, C; Santa-Olalla, P; Jacquier, G; Bitar, D; Bernillon, P; Desenclos, J-C

    2008-12-01

    Legionnaires' disease (LD) is an aetiology of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in adults, with a high case-fatality ratio (CFR). We conducted a matched case-control study to identify risk factors for sporadic, community-acquired LD. Cases of sporadic, community-acquired and biologically confirmed LD, in metropolitan France from 1 September 2002 to 31 September 2004, were matched with a control subject according to age, sex, underlying illness and location of residence within 5 km. We performed a conditional logistic regression on various host-related factors and exposures. Analysis was done on 546 matched pairs. The CFR was 3.5%. Age ranged from 18-93 years (mean 57 years), with a 3.6 male:female sex ratio. Cases were more likely to have smoked with the documentation of a dose-effect relation, to have travelled with a stay in a hotel (OR 6.1, 95% CI 2.6-14.2), or to have used a wash-hand basin for personal hygiene (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.6-7.7) than controls. Tobacco and travel have been previously described as risk factors for LD, but this is the first time that such a dose-effect for tobacco has been documented among sporadic cases. These findings will provide helpful knowledge about LD and help practitioners in identifying patients at high risk. PMID:18211725

  15. Middle Years Students' Experiences in Nature: A Case Study on Nature-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Marj; Paige, Kathy; Lloyd, David

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, children today are becoming disconnected from the natural environments resulting in a diminished sense of self, place and community. In an attempt to find out their perceptions, attitudes and values about the natural world, twenty-five Year 6 and 7 students from a northern Adelaide primary school participated in a nature-play case…

  16. Attitude and CAS Use in Senior Secondary Mathematics: A Case Study of Seven Year 11 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Scott; Ball, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the possible influence of attitude on seven Year 11 students' use of a Computer Algebra System (CAS) during a class activity where students could choose to use CAS or pen-and-paper in solving a range of problems. Investigation of anxiety, confidence, liking and usefulness through a survey and interview revealed that these…

  17. CASE STUDY OF MULTI-YEAR PRECIPITATION VARIATIONS AND THE HYDROLOGY OF FORT COBB RESERVOIR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impacts of decadal precipitation variations on reservoir inflow, flood releases, and pool elevation were investigated for the Fort Cobb Reservoir, a reservoir that controls runoff from an 800 km2 agricultural watershed in central Oklahoma. Difference in mean annual precipitation between multi-year d...

  18. Direct Loan Evaluation. Case Study Summary Report: Academic Year 1995-96.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macro International, Inc., Calverton, MD.

    As part of a 5-year evaluation of the Direct Loan and the Federal Family Education Loan programs, 19 institutions of higher education participating in the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program were visited to examine the diversity of approaches used by schools in planning for and implementing the Direct Loan program. The schools included…

  19. Case Study: Youth Transitions Task Force--A Ten-Year Retrospective, Spring 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulos, Jennifer; d'Entremont, Chad; Culbertson, Nina

    2015-01-01

    In 2004, Boston Public Schools reported that more than 8% of its students dropped out of school that year. The city faced a crisis. Thousands of students were failing to earn a high-school diploma, a necessary credential for entrance into postsecondary education and/or the twenty-first century workforce. Factors driving students' decisions to…

  20. The Development of Writing Habitus: A Ten-Year Case Study of a Young Writer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton-Lilly, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Peter, an African American writer from a low-income community, is followed across a 10-year period as he progresses from first grade through high school. Drawing on writing samples and interviews, the author identifies a set of interrelated dispositions that contribute to his development of "habitus" as a writer. This article considers…

  1. Training to Use the Scientific Method in a First-Year Physics Laboratory: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarasola, Ane; Rojas, Jose Félix; Okariz, Ana

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a specific implementation of a so-called experimental or open-ended laboratory is proposed and evaluated. Keeping in mind the scheduling limitations imposed by the context, first-year engineering physics laboratory practices have been revised in order to facilitate acquisition of the skills that are required in the experimental work.…

  2. Looking Beyond the Valley: A Five-Year Case Study of Course Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Gary K.; Wedman, John F.; Folk, Lillian C.

    2001-01-01

    Examined longitudinal changes in student course evaluations throughout the process of implementing information technology-enhanced delivery of a veterinary immunology course. Found that student ratings of almost all aspects of the course and instruction declined significantly during the five-year period of technology implementation and then…

  3. Neonatal Infection with Neisseria meningitidis: Analysis of a 97-Year Period Plus Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Bülbül, Ali; Cömert, Serdar; Uslu, Sinan; Arslan, Selda; Nuhoglu, Asiye

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is one of the major causes of meningitis in children and adolescents, but it is rarely found during the neonatal period. Here, we describe a neonate with meningococcal sepsis who was admitted to the hospital on postnatal day 10, and we discuss the clinical features of neonatal infection with N. meningitidis in relation to the literature (analysis of a 97-year period). PMID:25031437

  4. Cognitive function fifty-six years after surgical treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy: A case study.

    PubMed

    Banks, Sarah Jane; Feindel, William; Milner, Brenda; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    We report a long-term follow-up investigation of a patient who was operated in 1954 to relieve intractable temporal lobe seizures characterized by automatism and amnesia. Neuropsychological review at 16 months after surgery showed a slight residual impairment of verbal comprehension and verbal recall and good nonverbal skills. Seizure-free since the operation except for two attacks in the early postoperative years, the patient has been off medication for 25 years and has pursued a successful career as an artist. Our investigation at 56 postoperative years focused on cognitive skills, with some emphasis on learning and memory; a clinical examination was also performed, and the anatomical extent of the resection was determined on 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Four age- and IQ-appropriate women were tested as healthy control subjects. The patient showed material-specific impairments in language and verbal memory compared with the control subjects and also compared with her own earlier performance, but her performance on other cognitive tasks did not differ from that of the control subjects. Thus, her specific deficits had worsened over time, and she was also impaired compared with healthy individuals of her age, but her deficits remained confined to the verbal sphere, consistent with her temporal lobe seizure focus and surgery. PMID:25667864

  5. EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia: a clinical and epidemiological study of 112 cases, with 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bizzaro, N

    1995-10-01

    In the past 10 years, we have observed 112 cases of EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) due to in vitro platelet clumping at room temperature. 93 patients had antiplatelet antibodies (48 IgM, 30 IgG, 3 IgA, and 12 had two different isotypes concomitantly). In 20% of patients, the presence of IgM antibodies characteristically accompanied platelet agglutination also at 37 degrees C, and in citrated blood. The phenomenon was not age or sex related, nor was it associated with any particular pathology or use of specific drugs, and was present in both healthy subjects and patients with various diseases. Flow cytofluorimetric analysis of CD5-positive B cells, which are responsible for autoantibody production, did not demonstrate any changes in the percentage and absolute number of this lymphocyte subset. Average follow-up was 5 years (6 months-10 years); however, previous clinical records disclosed that PTCP was present for more than 15 years in four cases, and more than 20 years in three others, with no clinical manifestation of disease. This study confirms that EDTA-dependent PTCP is a phenomenon related to the presence of natural autoantibodies with antiplatelet activity, devoid of pathological significance. Its clinical interest resides in the need for its prompt and certain recognition in order to avoid unnecessary examinations and therapeutic interventions. The best and most rapid technique for obtaining accurate platelet counts in PTCP subjects is to collect and examine EDTA blood at 37 degrees C; however, clumping will still be present in about 20% of these cases, and even in citrated blood. To obviate this phenomenon, blood should be collected in ammonium oxalate, and platelets counted in a Burker chamber. PMID:7572988

  6. Training to Use the Scientific Method in a First-Year Physics Laboratory: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarasola, Ane; Rojas, Jose Félix; Okariz, Ana

    2015-10-01

    In this work, a specific implementation of a so-called experimental or open-ended laboratory is proposed and evaluated. Keeping in mind the scheduling limitations imposed by the context, first-year engineering physics laboratory practices have been revised in order to facilitate acquisition of the skills that are required in the experimental work. These skills concern different conceptual and procedural abilities related to designing experiments, taking measurements, analyzing the results and reporting properly the whole process. The employed approach is described, and the achieved results are evaluated by a series of tests at the beginning and end of the academic year. Additionally, the students' laboratory reports are used to quantify the evolution of acquiring these scientific skills. The evaluation of the results obtained from the aforementioned tests and laboratory reports gives enlightening information about students' apprehension of the experimental method itself, as well as the difficulties they find in each of the different, complex tasks that they must carry out during this process.

  7. Interracial Friendships across the College Years: Evidence from a Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Nathan D.; Tobin, William; Spenner, Kenneth I.

    2014-01-01

    In this study the authors explored factors that influence the degree to which students' campus friends are of a different race or ethnicity. They focused on relationships that were more sustained and that involved greater trust than routine interactions on campus, but were less intimate than best or closest friends. Recent studies show that…

  8. Building Strong Geoscience Departments: Case Studies and Findings from Six Years of Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, E. A.; Lee, S.; Ormand, C. J.; Feiss, P. G.; Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Richardson, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Begun in 2005, the Building Strong Geoscience Departments project sought to help geoscience departments respond to changes in geosciences research, academic pressures, and the changing face of the geosciences workforce by working as a team, planning strategically, and learning from the experiences of other geoscience departments. Key strategies included becoming more central to their institution's mission and goals; articulating the department's learning goals for students; designing coordinated curricula, co-curricular activities, and assessments to meet these goals; and recruiting students effectively. A series of topical workshops identified effective practices in use in the U.S. and Canada. These practices were documented on the project website and disseminated through a national workshop for teams of faculty, through activities at the AGU Heads and Chairs workshops, and in a visiting workshop program bringing leaders to campuses. The program has now involved over 450 participants from 185 departments. To understand the impact of the program, we engaged in ongoing discussion with five departments of various sizes and institutional types, and facing a variety of immediate challenges. In aggregate they made use of the full spectrum of project offerings. These departments all reported that the project brought an important new perspective to their ability to work as a department: they have a better understanding of how their departments' issues relate to the national scene, have more strategies for making the case for the entire department to college administrators, and are better poised to make use of campus resources including the external review process. These results were consistent with findings from end-of-workshop surveys. Further they developed the ability to work together as a team to address departmental challenges through collective problem solving. As a result of their workshop participation, two of the departments who considered their department to be

  9. Forest Schools and Environmental Attitudes: A Case Study of Children Aged 8-11 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turtle, Christina; Convery, Ian; Convery, Katie

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that children in the UK are suffering from a lack of engagement with nature and the outdoor environment. This paper investigates the attitudes of children towards the natural environment and focuses on Forest School programmes as a mechanism to promote a "pro-environmental" attitude. The study identified that…

  10. Azo dyes and related compounds as important aquatic contaminants: a ten-year case study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutagenicity has been found in several aquatic systems in the world; however, this activity usually is not associated with any of the compounds that are currently regulated. Attempting to identify these hazardous compounds, an integrated study was conducted, employing several dif...

  11. Teachers' and Children's Personal Epistemologies for Moral Education: Case Studies in Early Years Elementary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlee, Jo; Syu, Jia-Jia; Mascadri, Julia; Cobb-Moore, Charlotte; Walker, Sue; Johansson, Eva; Boulton-Lewis, Gillian; Ailwood, Jo

    2012-01-01

    While there is strong interest in teaching values in Australia and internationally there is little focus on young children's moral values learning in the classroom. Research shows that personal epistemology influences teaching and learning in a range of education contexts, including moral education. This study examines relationships between…

  12. Engaging Hispanic Students in Agricultural Education and the FFA: A 3-Year Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, T. Grady; Hall, Johnathan L.; Briers, Gary E.; Gill, Ernie; Shinn, Glen C.; Larke, Alvin, Jr.; Jaure, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the outcomes of field-based efforts to increase diversity in agricultural education programs and the FFA. This study focused on three schools in San Antonio, Texas. Guided by Rogers' (2003) theories of diffusion of innovations, a series of six intervention strategies was implemented: (a) provide specific FFA or agricultural…

  13. A 20-Year Examination of the Perceptions of Business School Interns: A Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Sherry James; Stokes, Amy; Parker, Richard Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined students' attitudes toward specific elements of an ongoing internship program. The study sample consisted of 816 student interns from 25 different colleges and universities. Results indicate that despite significant changes in instructional design and the incorporation of new technologies into the learning environment,…

  14. Political Engagement during a Presidential Election Year: A Case Study of Media Literacy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Elia; Moeller, Susan; Yuan, Yacong

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory, mixed-methods study uses data gathered during the previous U.S. presidential election in 2012 to evaluate student political engagement and digital culture. Survey results and media diary entries revealed that college students enrolled in a media literacy course during Super Tuesday or Election Day gravitated toward low-barrier…

  15. Somatic and psychological problems in a cohort of sexually abused boys: a six year follow up case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Price, L; Maddocks, A; Davies, S; Griffiths, L

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To obtain information about the health and well being of 108 boys six years after their involvement with the same paedophile. Methods: Case–control study of the health records of 93 male victims of a major episode of school based child sexual abuse and 93 matched controls. Interviews with a sample of their general practitioners. Results: The number and frequency of reported health problems were similar in both cases and controls. However, abused boys were more likely than controls to present with symptoms that persisted for more than a year (31 cases compared with 10 controls). Conclusions: Boys who have previously suffered sexual abuse at school did not utilise primary health care services more than a group of age matched controls. They did not present with psychological or somatic problems different from those presented by non-abused boys. However, abused boys were more likely to complain of persistent somatic or psychological problems lasting more than a year. This pattern appeared to persist after the abuse had stopped and the perpetrator imprisoned. PMID:11861230

  16. Clinical characteristics and presentation of ameloblastomas: an 8-year retrospective study of 240 cases in Eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chukwuneke, F N; Anyanechi, C E; Akpeh, J O; Chukwuka, A; Ekwueme, O C

    2016-05-01

    Our aim was to summarise the clinical characteristics and presentation of ameloblastomas in eastern Nigeria. We organised a retrospective study of 240 patients who presented with ameloblastomas to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery units of five specialist hospitals in the eastern states of Nigeria over an eight-year period (2004-2011). We analysed the casenotes, and categorised the cases by site of tumour, age, sex, and time of presentation. There were 117 men (49%) (mean (SD) age 43 (6.2) years) and 123 women (51%) (mean (SD) age 32 (4.7) years), a male:female ratio of 1:1.1. The largest age group was 20-39 years (n=102, 43%), and the most common site was the anterior mandible (n=140, 58%). Most of the patients presented late. Our results show that the most common site of ameloblastomas in Eastern Nigeria is the anterior mandible and that women are affected more than men, which is at variance with the results of most other studies. PMID:26387072

  17. The Effectiveness of a Case Study-Based First-Year Biology Class at a Black Women's College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pai, Aditi; Benning, Tracy; Woods, Natasha; McGinnis, Gene; Chu, Joanne; Netherton, Josh; Bauerle, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The authors used a case study-based approach in the introductory biology course at Spelman College. The course taught to entering freshmen was divided into three modules--ecology, evolution, and biodiversity, each designed around a case study. They noted that (1) case study teaching was dramatically more effective than the traditional lecture…

  18. Case Study of the Development of an Infant with Autism from Birth to Two Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Geraldine; Osterling, Julie; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Kuhl, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a case study of the development of an infant with autism who was observed closely by professionals from birth and to whom a comprehensive psychological evaluation was administered at approximately 1 and 2 years of age. During the first 6 months of life, this infant displayed difficulties in oral motor coordination and muscle tone that fluctuated between hypotonia and hypertonia. He startled easily, had poor state regulation, and was hypersensitive to touch. Notably, however, during the first 6 months, this infant vocalized and responded socially to others by smiling and cooing. During the second half of the first year, he continued to demonstrate diffuse sensorimotor difficulties and diminished oral motor control. Hypersensitivity now extended to a wider range of stimuli. He had problems in sleep regulation. Motor stereotypies, including rocking, head banging, and toe walking, were observed. Difficulties in the domain of social interaction began to emerge during the second 6 months, including poor eye contact, failure to engage in imitative games, and lack of imitative vocal responses. By a little over 1 year of age, this infant met diagnostic criteria for autism based on the Autism Diagnostic Interview. There were several domains in which this toddler with autism did not show impairments. In the areas of immediate memory for actions, working memory, response inhibition, and speech perception, this 1-year old with autism displayed no evidence of significant impairment on the tests administered. This case study offers clues regarding the nature of autism at its earliest stages. Understanding early development in autism will be important for developing early screening and diagnostic tools. PMID:23667283

  19. Consistent codling moth population decline by two years of mating disruption in apple: a Flemish case study.

    PubMed

    Bangels, E; Beliën, T

    2012-01-01

    Codling moth (Cydia pomonella) is one of the most important pests in apple and pear. In 2010 mating disruption became a key pest management tactic in Flemish pip fruit orchards, largely due to a government subsidy and demonstrating projects aiming to widen the area treated by pheromones as large as possible. As a consequence, the mating disruption strategy was applied at approximately 7.500 ha, or half of the pip fruit area, in 2010 and 2011. The sudden large-scale implementation of this technique changed the codling moth management landscape. Here we present a case study of a commercially managed orchard that suffered from high codling moth pressures for many years, as did the surrounding area. The RAK3 mating disruption system was introduced at this location in 2010, and was continued in 2011. Systematic detailed codling moth flight data for this location are available for many years. In addition, comprehensive data on damage levels of chemically untreated windows spread all over the test orchard in a randomized block design were obtained in successive years, enabling us to thoroughly evaluate the effect of the changed codling moth management strategy. Data from 2011 included damage levels in chemically treated windows when the entire orchard was applied once at the flight peak of Cydia pomonella. In 2009, before introduction of mating disruption, a mean of 8.25 +/- 5.54% of the fruits were infested at harvest when assessed in completely untreated windows. After two years of mating disruption, supported with a full chemical support in 2010, except for the untreated assessment windows, and only one application on the flight peak of 2011, damage was reduced to less than 0.03% at harvest. This is a valuable case study to demonstrate the benefits of the mating disruption approach. PMID:23885433

  20. Direct Loan Evaluation. Case Study Summary Report: Academic Year 1996-97. Volume One--Study Findings [and] Volume Two-- Case Study Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macro International, Inc., Calverton, MD.

    As part of a 5-year evaluation of the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program, 12 participating institutions of higher education were visited to examine the diversity of approaches used by schools in planning for and implementing the program. The schools included public and private two- and four-year institutions and proprietary schools. Major…

  1. When a 520 million-year-old Chengjiang fossil meets a modern micro-CT – a case study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Scholtz, Gerhard; Hou, Xianguang

    2015-01-01

    The 520 million-year-old Chengjiang biota of China (UNESCO World Heritage) presents the earliest known evidence of the so-called Cambrian Explosion. Studies, however, have mainly been limited to the information exposed on the surface of the slabs. Thus far, structures preserved inside the slabs were accessed by careful removal of the matrix, in many cases with the unfortunate sacrifice of some “less important” structures, which destroys elements of exceptionally preserved specimens. Here, we show for the first time that microtomography (micro-CT) can reveal structures situated inside a Chengjiang fossil slab without causing any damage. In the present study a trilobitomorph arthropod (Xandarella spectaculum) can be reliably identified only with the application of micro-CT. We propose that this technique is an important tool for studying three-dimensionally preserved Chengjiang fossils and, most likely, also those from other biota with a comparable type of preservation, specifically similar iron concentrations. PMID:26238773

  2. When a 520 million-year-old Chengjiang fossil meets a modern micro-CT--a case study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Scholtz, Gerhard; Hou, Xianguang

    2015-01-01

    The 520 million-year-old Chengjiang biota of China (UNESCO World Heritage) presents the earliest known evidence of the so-called Cambrian Explosion. Studies, however, have mainly been limited to the information exposed on the surface of the slabs. Thus far, structures preserved inside the slabs were accessed by careful removal of the matrix, in many cases with the unfortunate sacrifice of some "less important" structures, which destroys elements of exceptionally preserved specimens. Here, we show for the first time that microtomography (micro-CT) can reveal structures situated inside a Chengjiang fossil slab without causing any damage. In the present study a trilobitomorph arthropod (Xandarella spectaculum) can be reliably identified only with the application of micro-CT. We propose that this technique is an important tool for studying three-dimensionally preserved Chengjiang fossils and, most likely, also those from other biota with a comparable type of preservation, specifically similar iron concentrations. PMID:26238773

  3. When a 520 million-year-old Chengjiang fossil meets a modern micro-CT - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Scholtz, Gerhard; Hou, Xianguang

    2015-08-01

    The 520 million-year-old Chengjiang biota of China (UNESCO World Heritage) presents the earliest known evidence of the so-called Cambrian Explosion. Studies, however, have mainly been limited to the information exposed on the surface of the slabs. Thus far, structures preserved inside the slabs were accessed by careful removal of the matrix, in many cases with the unfortunate sacrifice of some “less important” structures, which destroys elements of exceptionally preserved specimens. Here, we show for the first time that microtomography (micro-CT) can reveal structures situated inside a Chengjiang fossil slab without causing any damage. In the present study a trilobitomorph arthropod (Xandarella spectaculum) can be reliably identified only with the application of micro-CT. We propose that this technique is an important tool for studying three-dimensionally preserved Chengjiang fossils and, most likely, also those from other biota with a comparable type of preservation, specifically similar iron concentrations.

  4. Identifying with Science: A case study of two 13-year-old `high achieving working class' British Asian girls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Billy

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an in-depth, 'case study' style analysis of the experiences of two 13-year-old British Asian girls from a larger qualitative study investigating minority ethnic students' aspirations in science. Through the lens of identity as performativity and Bourdieu's notions of habitus and capital, the ways in which two girls engage with the field of science is examined. Samantha is British Indian and Fay is British Bangladeshi and they are both 'top set' students in science, but only one aspired to study triple science, while the other desired to be 'famous'. The experiences of the two girls are explicated in this paper, teasing out their experiences and constructions of science. It is argued that cultural discourses of family, peers and teacher expectations can shape students' perceptions of science and education.

  5. Odontogenic tumors: A collaborative study of 218 cases diagnosed over 12 years and comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nazlım, Sinan; Etoz, Meryem; Denız, Kemal; Yasa, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to analyze the frequency and distribution of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in the Cappadocia region of Turkey, and to compare the findings with those reported in the literature. Study Design: The records of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Pathology Departments at Erciyes University, with histologic diagnosis of odontogenic tumors (based on the World Health Organization classification, 2005), over a 12-year period, were analyzed. The relative frequency of different types of tumors was also analyzed and compared with the literature. Results: OTs in the present study constituted 2.74% of all the 7,942 registered biopsies. A total of 218 cases of OTs were collected and reviewed. Of these, (94.04%) were benign and (5.96%) were malignant. The mandible was the most commonly affected anatomic location, with 170 cases (77.9%). Ameloblastoma with a predilection for the posterior mandible was the most frequent odontogenic tumor (30.28%), followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (19.5%), odontoma (13.4%), and odontogenic myxoma (8.5%). Conclusions: OTs are rare neoplasms and appear to show geographic variations in the world. In Cappadocia, Turkey, they are more common in the mandible, with ameloblastoma followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumors with the incidences observed in the present study being similar to those of previous studies from Asia and Africa, and in contrast to those reported from American countries. Key words:Odontogenic tumors, WHO classification, prevalence, jaws. PMID:25481228

  6. A 10-year retrospective study of free anterolateral thigh flap application in 872 head and neck tumour cases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Zhao, X P; Yan, T L; Wang, M; Wang, L; Wu, H J; Shang, Z J

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to report the clinical features, reliability, and various applications of free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flaps and to provide a 10-year retrospective review of the application of this flap in head and neck tumour patients. A retrospective study was performed of 872 patients who underwent immediate reconstruction of head and neck tumour-induced defects with ALT flaps between April 2005 and April 2014. The study sample consisted of 609 males and 263 females aged 18-79 years. The shapes and sizes of the flaps were designed individually to meet various demands of reconstruction in the head and neck region. The overall rate of successful reconstruction was 97.4%. The reasons for 57 cases of flap compromise were analyzed. The time to detection of flap crisis was often within the first 8h after surgery (64.9%). One- and two-vein anastomosis strategies in microsurgery were compared, and significant differences were observed in terms of the time to detection of flap compromise and the rate of successful flap salvage. In conclusion, the free ALT flap provides unique features for the reconstruction of oral and facial defects in a reliable and versatile approach. The ALT flap is a favourable and versatile 'workhorse' flap for head and neck reconstruction. PMID:26154948

  7. Legionella pneumonia cases over a five-year period: a descriptive, retrospective study of outcomes in a UK district hospital.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Tom; Rowell, Sam; Peel, Alex; Puli, Deeksha; Guleri, Achyut; Sharma, Rashmi

    2013-04-01

    As the recent outbreaks in Edinburgh and Camarthen, UK, have shown, Legionella pneumonia (LP) remains a significant public health problem, which is not only confined to those who have travelled abroad. In both outbreaks and sporadic cases, diagnosis can go unrecognised. We reviewed the demographics, comorbidities, diagnosis, treatment and clinical outcome of LP cases over five years in a district general hospital in northwest England. Over half of LP cases were UK acquired and 'classic' clinical features were common. Clinical criteria for diagnosing LP were confirmed, but few sputum samples were sent to reference laboratories, limiting further essential epidemiological mapping of UK cases. Following current UK community-acquired pneumonia guidance would have missed nearly one quarter of LP cases in our series, potentially leading to further morbidity and mortality. PMID:23681863

  8. Exposure to air pollutants and mortality in hypertensive patients according to demography: a 10 year case-crossover study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Tam, Wilson W S; Wang, Harry H X; Lao, X Q; Zhang, Daisy Dexing; Chan, Sky W M; Kwan, Mandy W M; Fan, Carmen K M; Cheung, Clement S K; Tong, Ellen L H; Cheung, N T; Tse, L A; Yu, Ignatius T S

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated whether short term exposures to NO2, O3, particulate matter <10 mm in diameter (PM10) were associated with higher risk of mortality. A total of 223,287 hypertensive patients attended public health-care services and newly prescribed at least 1 antihypertensive agent were followed-up for up to 5 years. A time-stratified, bi-directional case-crossover design was adopted. For all-cause mortality, significant positive associations were observed for NO2 and PM10 at lag 0-3 days per 10 μg/m(3) increase in concentration (excess risks 1.187%-2.501%). Significant positive associations were found for O3 at lag 1 and 2 days and the excess risks were 1.654% and 1.207%, respectively. We found similarly positive associations between these pollutants and respiratory disease mortality. These results were significant among those aged ≥65 years and in cold seasons only. Older hypertensive patients are susceptible to all-cause and respiratory disease-specific deaths from these air pollutants in cold weather. PMID:24953346

  9. Cognitive and Learning Strategies for Longstanding Temporal Lobe Lesions in a Child Who Suffered from "Herpes Simplex" Virus Encephalitis: A Case Study over 10 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Schoor, A. N.; Naude, H.; van Rensburg, M.; Pretorius, E.; Boon, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a case study indicating that "Herpes simplex" virus (HSV) encephalitis may cause permanent learning disabilities due to damage to the temporal lobes as it discusses the results of a case study extending over 10 years to determine the long-term effects on both the anatomy of the brain and the intellectual functioning of the…

  10. Cognitive and Learning Strategies for Longstanding Temporal Lobe Lesions in a Child Who Suffered from "Herpes Simplex" Virus Encephalitis: A Case Study over 10 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Schoor, A. N.; Naude, H.; van Rensburg, M.; Pretorius, E.; Boon, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a case study indicating that "Herpes simplex" virus (HSV) encephalitis may cause permanent learning disabilities due to damage to the temporal lobes, as it discusses the results of a case study extending over 10 years to determine the long-term effects on both the anatomy of the brain and the intellectual functioning of the…

  11. Changing picture of acute kidney injury in pregnancy: Study of 259 cases over a period of 33 years.

    PubMed

    Prakash, J; Pant, P; Prakash, S; Sivasankar, M; Vohra, R; Doley, P K; Pandey, L K; Singh, U

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in pregnancy is declining in developing countries but still remains a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study was to analyze the changing trends in pregnancy related AKI (PR-AKI) over a period of thirty-three years. Clinical characteristics of PR-AKI with respect to incidence, etiology and fetal and maternal outcomes were compared in three study periods, namely 1982-1991,1992-2002 and 2003-2014. The incidence of PR-AKI decreased to 10.4% in 1992-2002, from 15.2% in 1982-1991, with declining trend continuing in 2003-2014 (4.68%).Postabortal AKI decreased to 1.49% in 2003-2014 from 9.4% in 1982-1991of total AKI cases. The AKI related to puerperal sepsis increased to 1.56% of all AKI cases in 2003-2014 from 1.4% in 1982-1991. Preeclampsia/eclampsia associated AKI decreased from 3.5% of total AKI cases in 1982-1991 to 0.54% in 2003-2014. Pregnancy associated - thrombotic microangiopathy and acute fatty liver of pregnancy were uncommon causes of AKI. Hyperemesis gravidarum associated AKI was not observed in our study. Incidence of renal cortical necrosis (RCN) decreased to 1.4% in 2003-2014 from 17% in 1982-1991.Maternal mortality reduced to 5.79% from initial high value 20% in 1982-1991. The progression of PR-AKI to ESRD decreased to1.4% in 2003-2014 from 6.15% in 1982-1991. The incidence of PR-AKI has decreased over last three decades, mainly due to decrease in incidence of postabortal AKI. Puerperal sepsis and obstetric hemorrhage were the major causes of PR-AKI followed by preeclampsia in late pregnancy. Maternal mortality and incidence and severity of RCN have significantly decreased in PR-AKI. The progression to CKD and ESRD has decreased in women with AKI in pregnancy in recent decade. However, the perinatal mortality did not change throughout study period. PMID:27512298

  12. Changing picture of acute kidney injury in pregnancy: Study of 259 cases over a period of 33 years

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, J.; Pant, P.; Prakash, S.; Sivasankar, M.; Vohra, R.; Doley, P. K.; Pandey, L. K.; Singh, U.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in pregnancy is declining in developing countries but still remains a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study was to analyze the changing trends in pregnancy related AKI (PR-AKI) over a period of thirty-three years. Clinical characteristics of PR-AKI with respect to incidence, etiology and fetal and maternal outcomes were compared in three study periods, namely 1982-1991,1992-2002 and 2003-2014. The incidence of PR-AKI decreased to 10.4% in 1992-2002, from 15.2% in 1982-1991, with declining trend continuing in 2003-2014 (4.68%).Postabortal AKI decreased to 1.49% in 2003-2014 from 9.4% in 1982-1991of total AKI cases. The AKI related to puerperal sepsis increased to 1.56% of all AKI cases in 2003-2014 from 1.4% in 1982-1991. Preeclampsia/eclampsia associated AKI decreased from 3.5% of total AKI cases in 1982-1991 to 0.54% in 2003-2014. Pregnancy associated – thrombotic microangiopathy and acute fatty liver of pregnancy were uncommon causes of AKI. Hyperemesis gravidarum associated AKI was not observed in our study. Incidence of renal cortical necrosis (RCN) decreased to 1.4% in 2003-2014 from 17% in 1982-1991.Maternal mortality reduced to 5.79% from initial high value 20% in 1982-1991. The progression of PR-AKI to ESRD decreased to1.4% in 2003-2014 from 6.15% in 1982-1991. The incidence of PR-AKI has decreased over last three decades, mainly due to decrease in incidence of postabortal AKI. Puerperal sepsis and obstetric hemorrhage were the major causes of PR-AKI followed by preeclampsia in late pregnancy. Maternal mortality and incidence and severity of RCN have significantly decreased in PR-AKI. The progression to CKD and ESRD has decreased in women with AKI in pregnancy in recent decade. However, the perinatal mortality did not change throughout study period. PMID:27512298

  13. Biography of the First Year: A Case Study Integrating Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-Developmental and Mother-Infant Systems Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Marc D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the personality development of a normal infant during the child's first year. Development is interpreted in terms of psychoanalytic, cognitive-developmental, and mother-infant systems perspectives. A working relationship among the theories is demonstrated through analysis of case material. (RJC)

  14. Early Neuropsychological Tests as Correlates of Productivity 1 Year after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Preliminary Matched Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryu, Won Hyung A.; Cullen, Nora K.; Bayley, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the relative strength of five neuropsychological tests in correlating with productivity 1 year after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Six moderate-to-severe TBI patients who returned to work at 1-year post-injury were matched with six controls who were unemployed after 1 year based on age, severity of injury, and Functional…

  15. Trends in detection of new leprosy cases at two centres in Himachal Pradesh, India: a ten-year study.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, V K; Sharma, N L; Rana, P; Sood, N

    2003-01-01

    An impressive decline in leprosy prevalence rate (PR) in all endemic districts of India is seen in the post-MDT era. However, the new case-detection rate, an important statistical indicator in leprosy control programmes, has not shown significant decline in spite of all efforts. In Himachal Pradesh, a decline in PR from 7.8 to 0.56/10000 between 1991 to 2000 is seen, and recently the State has won national acclaim for having achieved the goal of elimination of leprosy in all the districts. The vertical leprosy programme has been integrated into general health services of the state. An analysis of data from 1991 to 2000 of two leprosy control units of Himachal Pradesh, the Urban Leprosy Clinic in Shimla (ULC-S) and the District Leprosy Control Unit in Mandi (DLCU-M), showed no significant decline in the new cases detected. 277 and 271 new cases were detected at these centres respectively; these included 2.2% and 1.5% children of less than 14 years of age. Almost 75% of these cases were males and of MB type. A steadily increasing trend in the annual detection of new cases was seen at both the centres during the decade. The cases registered at DLCU-M were mainly indigenous to the district. At ULC-S, 45 migrant cases from other endemic areas-mainly from Nepal, Bihar, and Uttar Pradesh-had also contributed to the increased number of new cases. Other possible causes discussed for this higher new case detection, e.g. overdiagnosis, detection of backlog "hidden cases" and voluntary reporting of patients, do not differ from those seen in other parts of the country or the world. PMID:15253391

  16. Removal of the eye in a tertiary care center of China: a retrospective study on 573 cases in 20 years

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Mao-Nian; Wang, Xin; Chen, Xiao-Fei

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the original protopathy, direct indications, clinical characteristics, complications of orbit plants and visual conditions of eye enucleation/evisceration. METHODS A retrospective study of 573 eyes removed (573 inpatients) at Ophthalmology Department in a tertiary care center of China from January 1993 to December 2012 was completed. RESULTS Cases underwent removal of the eye accounted for 2.15% of total ophthalmology inpatients, whose annual frequency declined from 3.80% to 0.52%. There were 167 eyes (29.14%) being enucleated and 406 (70.86%) eviscerated. Annual proportion of evisceration rose from 16.67% in 1993 to 90.48% in later years. Trauma was the top one (65.62%) in original protopathies followed by neoplasm (13.44%) and ocular infections (5.76%). Phthisis bulbi (45.20%) was the most common direct indication, succeeded by malignant tumor (12.57%), loss/unreconstructed of intraocular tissues due to trauma (11.00%), untreatable inflammation (9.60%), intractable glaucoma (8.55%) and sclerocorneal staphyloma (5.24%). Exenteration was underwent in 20 (25.97%) cases (40% for recurrent carcinoma). Following evisceration, secondary prosthesis implantation was more and earlier, implant exposure occurred in less but earlier and infection and extraction/exchange of implants were more than those following enucleation. Male, phthisis bulbi, evisceration and secondary implantation meant lower risk of implant exposure; eyes removed within 24h following trauma was an independent risk factor. There were 14.37% of eyes with vision of light perception at least as been removed. In the residual contralateral eyes, low vision accounted 5.58% and blindness 3.14%. CONCLUSION Ocular trauma, tumor and infections were great threats to eyeball preservation. Early and effective controlling of any original protopathies was vital. Generally evisceration presented more superior and safe outcomes than enucleation did. Visual conditions of the sufferers should be focused

  17. Ambient Heat and Sudden Infant Death: A Case-Crossover Study Spanning 30 Years in Montreal, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, William D.; Smargiassi, Audrey; Kosatsky, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background Climate change may lead to more severe and extreme heat waves in the future, but its potential impact on sudden infant death—a leading cause of infant mortality—is unclear. Objectives We sought to determine whether risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is elevated during hot weather. Methods We undertook a case-crossover analysis of all sudden infant deaths during warm periods in metropolitan Montreal, Quebec, Canada, from 1981 through 2010. Our analysis included a total of 196 certified cases of SIDS, including 89 deaths at 1–2 months of age, and 94 at 3–12 months. We estimated associations between maximum outdoor temperatures and SIDS by comparing outdoor temperatures on the day of or day before a SIDS event with temperatures on control days during the same month, using cubic splines to model temperature and adjusting for relative humidity. Results Maximum daily temperatures of ≥ 29°C on the same day were associated with 2.78 times greater odds of sudden infant death relative to 20°C (95% CI: 1.64, 4.70). The likelihood of sudden death increased steadily with higher temperature. Associations were stronger for infants 3–12 months of age than for infants 1–2 months of age, with odds ratios of 3.90 (95% CI: 1.87, 8.13) and 1.73 (95% CI: 0.80, 3.73), respectively, for 29°C compared with 20°C on the day of the event. Conclusions High ambient temperature may be a novel risk factor for SIDS, especially at ≥ 3 months of age. Climate change and the higher temperatures that result may account for a potentially greater proportion of sudden infant deaths in the future. Citation Auger N, Fraser WD, Smargiassi A, Kosatsky T. 2015. Ambient heat and sudden infant death: a case-crossover study spanning 30 years in Montreal, Canada. Environ Health Perspect 123:712–716; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307960 PMID:25748025

  18. The Impact of Unstructured Case Studies on Surface Learners: A Study of Second-Year Accounting Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynn-Williams, Kate; Beatson, Nicola; Anderson, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    The empirical study described here uses the R-SPQ-2F questionnaire [Biggs, J., Kember, D., & Leung, D. Y. (2001). The revised two-factor study process questionnaire: R-SPQ-2F. "British Journal of Educational Psychology," 71(1), 133-149] to test deep and surface approaches to learning in a university intermediate-level accounting…

  19. The Social, Educational and Cognitive Factors of Success in the First Year of University: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morlaix, Sophie; Suchaut, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study, which evaluated a sample of first-year students enrolled at the University of Burgundy, France, in 2010-2011, is to understand the factors determining success in the first year of university. The originality of this research lies in the inclusion of specific indicators of students' skills when they start…

  20. Four Case Studies, Six Years Later: Developing System Thinking Skills in Junior High School and Sustaining Them over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Orion, Nir

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the process by which system thinking perceptions develop within the context of a water cycle curriculum. Four junior high school students undergoing an especially designed inquiry-based intervention were closely observed before, during, immediately after, and 6 years after completing a year long systems-based learning program.…

  1. Sudden Unexpected Deaths and Vaccinations during the First Two Years of Life in Italy: A Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Traversa, Giuseppe; Spila-Alegiani, Stefania; Bianchi, Clara; Ciofi degli Atti, Marta; Frova, Luisa; Massari, Marco; Raschetti, Roberto; Salmaso, Stefania; Scalia Tomba, Gianpaolo

    2011-01-01

    Background The signal of an association between vaccination in the second year of life with a hexavalent vaccine and sudden unexpected deaths (SUD) in the two days following vaccination was reported in Germany in 2003. A study to establish whether the immunisation with hexavalent vaccines increased the short term risk of SUD in infants was conducted in Italy. Methodology/Principal Findings The reference population comprises around 3 million infants vaccinated in Italy in the study period 1999–2004 (1.5 million received hexavalent vaccines). Events of SUD in infants aged 1–23 months were identified through the death certificates. Vaccination history was retrieved from immunisation registries. Association between immunisation and death was assessed adopting a case series design focusing on the risk periods 0–1, 0–7, and 0–14 days after immunisation. Among the 604 infants who died of SUD, 244 (40%) had received at least one vaccination. Four deaths occurred within two days from vaccination with the hexavalent vaccines (RR = 1.5; 95% CI 0.6 to 4.2). The RRs for the risk periods 0–7 and 0–14 were 2.0 (95% CI 1.2 to 3.5) and 1.5 (95% CI 0.9 to 2.4). The increased risk was limited to the first dose (RR = 2.2; 95% CI 1.1 to 4.4), whereas no increase was observed for the second and third doses combined. Conclusions The RRs of SUD for any vaccines and any risk periods, even when greater than 1, were almost an order of magnitude lower than the estimates in Germany. The limited increase in RRs found in Italy appears confined to the first dose and may be partly explained by a residual uncontrolled confounding effect of age. PMID:21298113

  2. "Growing Up" through the Middle Level Years: A Case Study in Leadership Actions Necessary to Meet Students' Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, M. Melissa Richard

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the journey of a suburban middle level principal, as she led a school through an educational change process. This was a single case study design involving the school leader as principal participant, and the researcher as participant observer. The theoretical model that was developed for this…

  3. Investigating the Relationship among Test Anxiety, Gender, Academic Achievement and Years of Study: A Case of Iranian EFL University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezazadeh, Mohsen; Tavakoli, Mansoor

    2009-01-01

    The construct of anxiety plays a major role in one's life. One of these anxieties is test anxiety or apprehension over academic evaluation. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between gender, academic achievement, years of study and levels of test anxiety. This investigation is a descriptive analytic study and was done…

  4. Factors controlling building susceptibility to earthquakes: 14-year recordings of Islamic archaeological sites in Old Cairo, Egypt: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamh, G. M. E.; Kallash, A.; Azzam, R.

    2008-11-01

    Cairo City has a large number and different forms of Islamic archaeological sites, in particular, at El-Gammalia and El-Moez streets, as well as Coptic archaeological sites, e.g. at Mari Gergis. Human interference and activities at these historical areas resulted in flooding such sites’ foundations with domestic water, deteriorating its basal courses by salt weathering. The 1992 earthquake is another natural environmental hazard severely affecting many of these sites. The aim of the current study is to examine some factors (of bedrock and buildings) that are expected to control building susceptibility to damage by earthquakes by taking 38 Islamic archaeological sites in the El-Gammalia area as a representative case study. Detailed field recordings of site damage category before and after the quake and continued recording of damage features generated by the 1992 quake over the last 14 years, measuring depth to sub-surface water, measuring buildings’ height before the quake and bedrock sampling at these sites for geotechnical investigations were all considered for achieving this aim. The data has been processed mathematically and graphically (using the Excel package) to examine the main factors responsible for building susceptibility to damage by earthquakes. The selected archaeological sites give an excellent representation of the factors controlling building susceptibility to damage by quakes; it is found that the sites with heights (before the quake) ranging from 12 to 14 m are the most affected ones; the sites with the highest damage category before the quake were more susceptible to more damage by the quake; the sites that had been built on alluvium soil were more affected than those built on the Eocene limestone. The age of these sites has, to a small extent, indirect control on sites’ susceptibility to damage by the quake, particularly in parts flooded with domestic water (i.e. affected by salt weathering). The depth to sub-surface water is an effective

  5. Pre-Service to In-Service: A Three-Year Case Study of Primary Literacy Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segebrecht, Lynn S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this collective case study was to investigate the transitions of three effective teachers of literacy from pre-service to in-service teaching. As their university supervisor, I selected these students out of a group of pre-service teachers assigned to me for supervision during their eight-week student teaching requirement, based…

  6. Problem Solving by 5-6 Years Old Kindergarten Children in a Computer Programming Environment: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fessakis, G.; Gouli, E.; Mavroudi, E.

    2013-01-01

    Computer programming is considered an important competence for the development of higher-order thinking in addition to algorithmic problem solving skills. Its horizontal integration throughout all educational levels is considered worthwhile and attracts the attention of researchers. Towards this direction, an exploratory case study is presented…

  7. Case Study of Employment Trends across 25 Years of Graduates of a Japanese Science and Technology University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakayama, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Graduates in the areas of Science and Technology are believed to have traditionally been employed in a number of specific industries, but the recent restructuring of some industries may have affected this phenomenon. In order to examine the trends concerning employment issues in more detail, a case study was conducted by surveying employment…

  8. Brief Report: Musical Interaction Therapy for Children with Autism: An Evaluative Case Study with Two-Year Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimpory, Dawn; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This case study reports the effects of musical interaction therapy (MIT) on the social and symbolic development of a young autistic girl. MIT fosters interpersonal contact and joint attention by synchronizing live music to adult-child interactions. Results offer preliminary evidence that MIT facilitates playful joint action formats that generalize…

  9. New Visions for the Continuum: Seven Case Studies. Final Report Year 5 Deliverable #6-5-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrag, Judy A.; Rosado, Cassandra

    This report presents seven case studies of programs across the country that have implemented innovative changes in the special education continuum. Telephone or in-person interviews with the program administrators were used to collect data. This report includes a summary of that information and a brief analysis of findings concerning common and…

  10. Exploring Inquiry in the Third Space: Case Studies of a Year in an Urban Teacher-Residency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Emily J.; Taylor, Monica; Onore, Cynthia; Strom, Kathryn; Abrams, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Using case studies, we describe what happens from novice to apprentice when preservice teachers learn to teach in an urban teacher-residency (UTR) program with a focus on inquiry. Our UTR operates within a "third space" in teacher education, seeking to realign traditional power relationships and to create an alternate arena where the…

  11. Linguistic and Narrative Development in a Japanese-English Bilingual's First Language Acquisition: A 14-Year Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taura, Hideyuki; Taura, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    In the seven decades since Leopold's groundbreaking 1939 study, there has been no longitudinal study covering more than two years of a Japanese bilingual subject's development. Despite the lack of longitudinal research, however, we have been broadly informed by the veritable outpouring of research on a short-term basis since the late twentieth…

  12. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy with a Six-Year-Old Boy with Separation Anxiety Disorder: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dia, David A.

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of separation anxiety disorder (SAD) in a six-year-old boy who was having at least one panic attack a day. It uses a four-phased program that includes a psychoeducational approach. The outcome studies demonstrated how CBT shows promise as a treatment modality with…

  13. Oral maxillofacial neoplasms in an East African population a 10 year retrospective study of 1863 cases using histopathological reports

    PubMed Central

    Kamulegeya, Adriane; Kalyanyama, Boniphace M

    2008-01-01

    Background Neoplasms of the oral maxillofacial area are an interesting entity characterized by differences in nomenclature and classification at different centers. We report neoplastic histopathological diagnoses seen at the departments of oral maxillofacial surgery of Muhimbili and Mulago referral hospitals in Tanzania and Uganda respectively over a 10-year period. Methods We retrieved histopathological reports archived at the departments of oral maxillofacial surgery of Muhimbili and Mulago referral hospitals in Tanzania and Uganda respectively over a 10-year period from June 1989–July 1999. Results In the period between June 1989 and July 1999, 565 and 1298 neoplastic oro-facial cases were retrieved of which 284 (50.53%) and 967 (74.54%) were malignant neoplasms at Muhimbili and Mulago hospitals respectively. Overall 67.28% of the diagnoses recorded were malignant with Kaposi's sarcoma (21.98%), Burkiits lymphoma (20.45%), and squamous cell carcinoma (15.22%) dominating that group while ameloblastoma (9.23%), fibromas (7.3%) and pleomorphic adenoma (4.95%) dominated the benign group. The high frequency of malignancies could be due to inclusion criteria and the clinical practice of selective histopathology investigation. However, it may also be due to higher chances of referrals in case of malignancies. Conclusion There is need to reexamine the slides in these two centers in order to bring them in line with the most recent WHO classification so as to allow for comparison with reports from else where. PMID:18651958

  14. Family-Based Treatment of a 17-Year-Old Twin Presenting with Emerging Anorexia Nervosa: A Case Study Using the "Maudsley Method"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeb, Katharine L.; Hirsch, Alicia M.; Greif, Rebecca; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the successful application of family-based treatment (FBT) for a 17-year-old identical twin presenting with a 4-month history of clinically significant symptoms of anorexia nervosa (AN). FBT is a manualized treatment that has been studied in randomized controlled trials for adolescents with AN. This case study illustrates…

  15. Building a Community of Scholars: One University's Comparison of "Typical" vs. Open Ended Ethics Case Studies in First-Year Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Ethics is among the professional skills embedded in the first year engineering curriculum in many institutions. The general format of the study of ethics is similar to many other institutions: student teams review case studies and develop written and oral presentations on the ethical issues encountered. This report investigates whether the use of…

  16. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  17. The Prediction of Academic Performance in the First-Year: A Case Study at the National University of Lesotho.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayaya, Onesmus Ongulu

    1996-01-01

    A study of 90 first-year business students at the National University of Lesotho investigated predictors of academic success. Of 29 student characteristics or attributes considered, educational attainment at the secondary level, communication skills, understanding of introductory economics, introductory instruction in law and legal method, and…

  18. Using Conference Submission Data to Uncover Broad Trends in Language Teaching: A Case Study of One Conference over 30 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapleton, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Submissions to conferences can provide rich material for analysing characteristics and trends within a conference's history and that of similar conferences, as well as the associated field at large. The present study uses data gathered over 30 years from a language teachers' conference in Japan (JALT National) to expound upon patterns related to…

  19. Prospective study of IL-18 and risk of MI and stroke in men and women aged 60–79 years: A nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Jefferis, Barbara J.; Whincup, Peter H.; Welsh, Paul; Wannamethee, S. Goya; Rumley, Ann; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lowe, Gordon D.O.

    2013-01-01

    Aim IL-18 is hypothesized to destabilise atherosclerotic plaques, leading to thrombotic events and epidemiologic studies suggest that IL-18 may increase risk of CHD or CVD. We examined prospective associations between levels of serum IL-18 and new CHD and stroke events in older men and women from a general population. Methods A case-control study was nested within a prospective cohort of men and women aged 60–79 years recruited from general practices in 25 British towns in 1998–2000 and followed-up for 7.5 years for fatal and non-fatal MI and stroke. Baseline IL-18 was measured in stored serum samples of incident cases of MI (n = 364) or stroke (n = 300) and two controls per case. Results Geometric mean IL-18 levels were higher among the 364 MI cases than the 706 controls; 417.84 pg/mL (IQR 316.25, 537.44) compared to 386.90 pg/mL (IQR 296.54, 482.33), p(difference) = 0.002. IL-18 was positively associated with adverse lipid and inflammatory profiles. Men and women in the top third of baseline IL-18 levels had an age and sex-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for MI of 1.31 (95%CI 0.92, 1.85) compared with those in the lowest third; this attenuated to 1.05 (95%CI 0.72, 1.53) after additional adjustment for established vascular and inflammatory risk factors. Each doubling of IL-18 level was associated with an increased OR for MI 1.34 (95%CI 1.04, 1.72), which was attenuated on adjustment for established vascular and inflammatory risk factors; 1.09 (95%CI 0.83, 1.44). Geometric mean IL-18 levels did not differ between stroke cases and controls. The OR for stroke associated with the highest compared to the lowest tertile of IL-18 was 1.24 (95%CI 0.84, 1.84). Results for MI and stroke did not differ by presence of pre-existing CVD, gender or age. Conclusions Circulating IL-18 levels were strongly associated with a range of established and novel risk factors but were not independently associated with risk of MI or stroke in our study. PMID:23207179

  20. Fifteen years of child drowning--a 1967-1981 analysis of all fatal cases from the Brisbane Drowning Study and an 11 year study of consecutive near-drowning cases.

    PubMed

    Nixon, J; Pearn, J; Wilkey, I; Corcoran, A

    1986-06-01

    A total population study of childhood fresh water drowning accidents (fatalities) for the 15 year period, 1967-1981, is reported. These data are from the ongoing Brisbane Drowning Study which has now also analysed 255 fresh water child immersions (both fatalities and near-fatalities) over the eleven year period, 1978-1981, and as such forms a consecutive unselected series for over one decade. The annual fatality (drowning) rate is 3.53 per 100,000. Details of immersion accidents by site, sex and by outcome (survivors versus fatalities) are presented. An analysis of secular trends revealed that one epidemic peak of child drownings in swimming pools and domestic baths (noted in the mid 1970s in Australia and other countries) is now passed. Evidence is presented to suggest that a vigorous education, and public awareness campaign can reduce the incidence of serious child immersion accidents by one-third. Such a campaign may have influence on all types of childhood household drownings (pools, baths, garden ponds), irrespective of site. Survival rates for unsupervised children who lose consciousness in fresh water are site-dependent, only 21% of such potential victims surviving after losing consciousness in rivers and creeks, compared with the survival rate of 65% for those in potential drowning incidents in their own backyard. Violent death continues to account for more than half of all deaths in childhood up to the age of 14 years [Gratz, 1979; Mayer, Walker and Johnson et al., 1981].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3730093

  1. Survival patterns in treated cases of carcinoma larynx in North India: A 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Jaimanti; Panda, Naresh K; Sharma, Suresh C; Gupta, Ashok; Mann, S B S

    2005-04-01

    Carcinoma of larynx is a common disease in North Indian population. It is seen commonly in smokers and alcoholics. It poses a serious health problem due to its tendency to cause airway obstruction and to make the patient aphonic if total larynxgectomy is done for curing this cancer. We conducted a retrospective analysis in 690 cases of carcinoma larynx presenting to Nehru Hospital, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. Various aspects of this disease like predisposing factors, patterns of spread, histological types, various treatment modalities, their complications and response of this disease to these therapeutic options were studied in detail. PMID:23120142

  2. The social, educational and cognitive factors of success in the first year of university: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlaix, Sophie; Suchaut, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    The main objective of this study, which evaluated a sample of first-year students enrolled at the University of Burgundy, France, in 2010-2011, is to understand the factors determining success in the first year of university. The originality of this research lies in the inclusion of specific indicators of students' skills when they start university within the explanatory models of educational achievement. These indicators include measures of academic performance (written comprehension skills) and cognitive abilities. While the impact of cognitive abilities on educational success has been examined at primary level in France, the present study is among the first to do this at higher education level, with the additional consideration of students' educational and social backgrounds. The results show the significant impact of educational background (repeated years, type of baccalaureate and baccalaureate grade) on success. The researchers also found that written comprehension skills and cognitive abilities alone play a limited role in explaining success, since the impacts of these variables are apparent throughout a student's educational career (and not just in higher education). Another finding was that subject choice based on specific career aspirations is an important factor associated with success - a significant insight which qualifies the impact of educational background.

  3. Oral Health in 4-6 Years Children with Cleft Lip/Palate: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Amandeep; Lakhanpal, Manav; Rao, Nanak Chand; Gupta, Nidhi; Vashisth, Shelja

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oro-facial clefts are a major public health problem. Children with clefts rarely escape dental complications. Aims: This study was to determine differences in the dental caries experience, gingival health, and prevalence malocclusion, enamel defects and oral mucosal lesions among 4-6 year old children with and without cleft in Panchkula. Materials and Methods: The sampling frame consisted of 4-6 year old children with clefts visiting Swami Devi Dyal Hospital and Dental College, Panchkula, India. As a control group an age (±3 months) and gender-matched sample from the same geographical areas were recruited. Dental caries status, gingival health status, developmental defect of enamel, malocclusion and oral mucosal health were assessed and compared between the two groups. Results: Significant differences in dental caries and gingival health status were found between children with and without cleft. Anterior open-bite, increased overjet and oral mucosal lesions (P < 0.05) were more prevalent among children with clefts. Children with and without clefts had similar developmental defects of enamel (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Differences of oral health status exist among 4-6 year old children with and without clefts. Children fare worse in terms of dental caries, gingival health, oral mucosal health and malocclusion. PMID:25006561

  4. First- and fifth-year medical students' intention for emigration and practice abroad: a case study of Serbia.

    PubMed

    Santric-Milicevic, Milena M; Terzic-Supic, Zorica J; Matejic, Bojana R; Vasic, Vladimir; Ricketts, Thomas C

    2014-11-01

    Health worker migration is causing profound health, safety, social, economic and political challenges to countries without special policies for health professionals' mobility. This study describes the prevalence of migration intentions among medical undergraduates, identifies underlying factors related to migration intention and describes subsequent actions in Serbia. Data were captured by survey of 938 medical students from Belgrade University (94% response rate), representing two thirds of matching students in Serbia stated their intentions, reasons and obstacles regarding work abroad. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics and a sequential multivariate logistic regression. Based on descriptive and inferential statistics we were able to predict the profile of first and fifth year medical students who intend or have plans to work abroad. This study contributes to our understanding of the causes and correlates of intent to migrate and could serve to raise awareness and point to the valuable policy options to manage migration. PMID:25458972

  5. Geothermal Case Studies

    DOE Data Explorer

    Young, Katherine

    2014-09-30

    database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  6. Influence of Soil Moisture Conditions On The Flood Frequency Distribution: A Case Study With 10000 Years Synthetic Rainfall Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martina, M.; Todini, E.

    Soil moisture conditions within the catchment have a primary importance for the anal- ysis of flood risk but insufficiency of data or unavailability of measurements make them useless for operative purposes. Therefore classical simulation techniques to es- timate design flood can not consider the effects of the catchment initial soil moisture conditions. The aim of this work is to assess the influence of the soil conditions on water flow during flood event and especially on the flood frequency distribution. The proposed technique makes use of a stochastic point process, Neyman-Scott Rectan- gular Pulse, for generating a 10000 years rainfall series combined with a physically based rainfall-runoff model, TOPKAPI, for transforming rainfall into discharge and mean soil moisture conditions within the catchment. Finally the annual maximum floods have been extracted from the discharge series and their frequency distribution has been analyzed. The results have been compared with those from a traditional sim- ulation approach which uses a rainfall intensity-duration (IDF) relationship combined with the same rainfall-runoff TOPKAPI model but initialized by arbitrary soil mois- ture conditions. As it was expected the comparison shows that the influence of the soil conditions on flood frequency distribution is not negligible and gives reasonability to the methodology applied . The chosen study area is a North-Italian catchment where several years of hourly rainfall data series were available.

  7. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  8. Recurrent falls in Parkinson's disease after one year of follow-up: A nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gazibara, Tatjana; Tepavcevic, Darija Kisic; Svetel, Marina; Tomic, Aleksandra; Stankovic, Iva; Kostic, Vladimir S; Pekmezovic, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare clinical and fall characteristics of single and recurrent falls among persons with PD and to evaluate factors associated with recurrent falls. A total of 120 consecutive persons with PD, who denied having fallen in the past 6 months, were recruited. Occurrence of falling was registered during one year. Each person was given a "fall diary" with the aim at writing characteristics of the fall and contacted by telephone each month. Over one year of follow-up 42 persons with PD (35.0%) reported falling. Of 42 persons, 19 (45.2%) went on to become single and 23 (54.8%) went on to become recurrent fallers. Indoor falls were more common among single fallers, whilst outdoor falls were more common among recurrent fallers (p=0.017). Slipping and freezing of gait was more common among single fallers (p=0.035 and p=0.024, respectively). Lower extremity weakness was more frequent among recurrent fallers (p=0.023). The most common injury both among single and recurrent fallers was the soft-tissue contusion. The only factor associated with recurrent falling among persons with PD, who did not fall in past 6 months before the start of follow-up, was worse motor performance as measured by the UPDRS III score (odds ratio [OR]=1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.11, p=0.022). These results could be used in selection of persons with PD to enroll in fall prevention programs. PMID:26921677

  9. Nickel Allergy Is a Risk Factor for Endometriosis: An 11-Year Population-Based Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yuk, Jin-Sung; Shin, Jong Seung; Shin, Ji-Yeon; Oh, Eunsuk; Kim, Hyunmee; Park, Won I.

    2015-01-01

    Background A cross-sectional study has reported that nickel allergy is associated with endometriosis. However, causal studies of this association are limited. Objective The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of nickel allergy in women with and without endometriosis. Methods We used a National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) sample cohort dataset that included approximately 1 million individuals from South Korea; the data were obtained between January 01, 2002, and December 31, 2013. We selected the endometriosis group according to diagnosis code (N80.X), surgery codes, and drug codes during the years 2009~2013. The controls were randomly matched to the endometriosis patients at a ratio of 4:1 by age and socioeconomic status. Patients with nickel allergy were defined in the cohort dataset as those with a simultaneous diagnosis code (L23.0) and patch test code during 2002~2008. Results In total, 4,985 women were selected from the NHIS cohort database and divided into an endometriosis group (997 women) and a control group (3,988 women). The number of patients with nickel allergy in the endometriosis group was eight (0.8%), and that in the control group was thirteen (0.3%). After adjustment for age and socioeconomic status, the rate of nickel allergy in was higher in the endometriosis group than in the control group [odds ratio: 2.474; 95% confidence interval: 1.023~5.988; p = 0.044]. Conclusions We found that nickel allergy is a risk factor for endometriosis. PMID:26439741

  10. Beyond the Classroom: A Case Study of First-Year Student Perceptions of Required Student-Faculty Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufka, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Instructors of first-year students must understand that many of the frustrations they encounter with this demographic are a normal part of a transition process. Not only are first-year students asked to adjust to new academic demands, they also must learn how to live independently in a new environment. An effective way to facilitate academic…

  11. [Prognostic factors of hospital mortality from diarrhea or pneumonia in infants younger than 1 year old. A case-control study].

    PubMed

    Post, C L; Victora, C G; Valente, J G; Leal, M do C; Niobey, F M; Sabroza, P C

    1992-12-01

    Diarrhea and pneumonia are common diseases in children aged under one year, for which there are simple therapeutic measures. However, infant mortality due to these diseases is still very high, varying markedly according to socio-economic status. The characteristics of children who died (cases) and of those who were hospitalized with diarrhea or pneumonia, but survived (controls), were studied. The following groups of variables were studied: socio-economic, environmental and biological conditions, nutritional status and breast-feeding. Information on cases and controls was collected from hospital records and through home interviews. Important losses occurred in the latter: 40% of cases and 50% of controls were not interviewed. There were no significant differences between cases who were included and those who were not, in terms of age, sex or place of residence. To estimate relative risks of prognostic factors unconditional Logistic Regression was used to calculate the odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. Prematurity, low birth weight, weight/age deficit, presence of edema and poor general status at hospital admission were prognostic factors for hospital case-fatality. In relation to the anthropometric variables, it was not possible to conclude for certain whether the increased case-fatality was linearly or non-linearly (threshold) associated with nutritional deficit. The duration of breast-feeding was only associated with case-fatality for pneumonia. Socio-economic factors were not important for the prognosis of children admitted to hospital with diarrhea or pneumonia. Some of the expected risk factor associations were not detected, maybe due to the small sample size (resulting from the high losses) which was insufficient to show small differences. In this study the biological conditions of children with diarrhea or pneumonia appeared to be the important prognostic factors for hospital case-fatality. PMID:1342527

  12. Brief report: an unusual manifestation of diagnostic overshadowing of pervasive developmental disorder--not otherwise specified: a five year longitudinal case study.

    PubMed

    Meera, S S; Kaipa, Ramesh; Thomas, Jaslin; Shivashankar, N

    2013-06-01

    Children with communication disorders present with a range of comorbid conditions. Occasionally one of the comorbid conditions manifests so strongly that the primary condition goes unnoticed by the clinician. This tendency to overlook comorbid health problems in the presence of a disability is referred to as diagnostic overshadowing. This is a five-year follow up case study of a 9-year-old female child. The child was initially diagnosed to have Separation anxiety disorder (SAD), but during the course of follow up she began to exhibit features of pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). This case report throws light on the severity of SAD which overshadowed PDD-NOS. Importance of follow-up and the need for a multidisciplinary team to be sensitive to the phenomenon of diagnostic overshadowing is discussed. PMID:23108987

  13. Exceptions to the rules of oil-spill behavior: Case studies of major oil spills of the past twenty years

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, M.O.

    1994-11-01

    Studies of major oil spills over the past 20 yr have allowed an evolution of our understanding of how to respond to and remediate the environmental impacts from such spills. There have been a number of spills for which follow-up research has provided major turning points that allowed the development of certain rules of oil-spill behavior. For example, the spill of over 100,000 tons of crude oil by the tanker Urquiola on the coast of Spain in May 1976 demonstrated the importance of hydrodynamic energy level in natural cleanup processes. Research on the spill of over 200,000 tons of crude oil along the coast of France by the tanker Amoco Cadiz in March 1978 allowed a better understanding of the long-term effects of spilled oil on exposed tidal flats and salt marshes. The oil spilled by the tanker Exxon Valdez in Prince William Sound, Alaska, in March 1989 impacted many miles of gravel beaches, which were treated by a number of methods, including some innovative berm-relocation techniques. A thorough understanding of the coastal geomorphology and processes of the spill site was essential for the development of meaningful contingency and response plans. Research on the impacts of intertidal habitats of the coast of Saudi Arabia during the Gulf War spill of 1991 indicates that some previously held concepts on oil behavior and fate on shorelines must be revised. One of the best established rules of oil-spill behavior was that the depth of oil penetration on sand beaches and tidal flats increases with increasing sediment grain size. However, no such correlation was found on the Saudi Arabian coast, primarily due to the presence of secondary porosity (e.g., bubble sand, extensive burrows, and gypsum crystals). The oil penetrated to depths of tens of centimeters, even in fine sand, which has significantly slowed natural removal processes and weathering rates. These sediments remained heavily oiled with incipient asphalt pavements forming two years after the spill.

  14. A case-control study of post-operative endophthalmitis diagnosed at a Spanish hospital over a 13-year-period.

    PubMed

    Asencio, M A; Huertas, M; Carranza, R; Tenias, J M; Celis, J; Gonzalez-Del Valle, F

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective case-control study of patients who had undergone cataract extraction at a Spanish hospital over a 13-year period was conducted to identify the risk factors for developing post-operative endophthalmitis (POE). During the study period, the type of antibiotic prophylaxis was changed from subconjunctival gentamicin to the addition of both vancomycin and gentamicin to the irrigating solution. The overall incidence of POE was 0·19% (35 cases/18 287 operations). For the period prior to the change in antibiotic prophylaxis, the incidence rate of POE was 3·4 cases/1000 operations while in the latter period the incidence rate decreased to 0·34 cases/1000 operations. All patients who presented a virulent microorganism had a final visual acuity worse than 20/200. The only significant risk factor identified was the type of prophylaxis used (odds ratio 1·97, 95% confidence interval 0·94-4·14, P = 0·07). There were no significant differences between cases and controls although choice of surgeon approached significance. PMID:24612657

  15. Five Years of Strategic Environmental Assessment Efforts at a Research University: A Case Study of an Organizational Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearn, James C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The development and five-year history of the University of Minnesota's environmental scanning effort, a strategic approach to institutional management, are discussed. Over time, scanning efforts became less theory-based and failed to become institutionalized. Inherent limitations in the organizational structure and culture of educational…

  16. Laying a Foundation for Lifelong Learning: Case Studies of E-Assessment in Large 1st-Year Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, David

    2007-01-01

    Concerns about noncompletion and the quality of the 1st-year student experience have been linked to recent changes in higher education such as modularisation, increased class sizes, greater diversity in the student intake and reduced resources. Improving formative assessment and feedback processes is seen as one way of addressing academic failure,…

  17. Student Effort Expectations and Their Learning in First-Year Introductory Physics: A Case Study in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wutchana, U.; Emarat, N.

    2011-01-01

    The Maryland Physics Expectations (MPEX) survey was designed to probe students' expectations about their understanding of the process of learning physics and the structure of physics knowledge--cognitive expectations. This survey was administered to first-year university students in Thailand in the first semester of an introductory calculus-based…

  18. An Atypical Eating Disorder with Crohn's Disease in a Fifteen-Year-Old Male: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holaday, Margot; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how 6 months after psychological intervention for an eating disorder, a 15-year-old male was diagnosed with Crohn's disease, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Addresses need for additional training for those from traditional school and counseling psychology programs. Advocates a team approach and consultations. (RJM)

  19. Treatment of Adjustment Disorder with Anxiety: A September 11, 2001, Case Study with a 1-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Shawn; McCone, Dave

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the application of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of a 20-year-old White male manifesting an adjustment disorder with anxiety, who initially presented on September 11, 2001, following the terrorist attacks. The initial treatment regime lasted 8 weeks. In addition, follow-up sessions at 6, 11, and 12 months…

  20. Case Study Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  1. Monitoring the Affordability of Healthy Eating: A Case Study of 10 Years of the Illawarra Healthy Food Basket

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Healthy food baskets have been used around the world for a variety of purposes, including: examining the difference in cost between healthy and unhealthy food; mapping the availability of healthy foods in different locations; calculating the minimum cost of an adequate diet for social policy planning; developing educational material on low cost eating and examining trends on food costs over time. In Australia, the Illawarra Healthy Food Basket was developed in 2000 to monitor trends in the affordability of healthy food compared to average weekly wages and social welfare benefits for the unemployed. It consists of 57 items selected to meet the nutritional requirements of a reference family of five. Bi-annual costing from 2000–2009 has shown that the basket costs have increased by 38.4% in the 10-year period, but that affordability has remained relatively constant at around 30% of average household incomes. PMID:22254001

  2. Five year spinning study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS Cotton Quality Research Station (CQRS) has complete a comprehensive study of the relationship of cotton fiber properties to the quality of ring spun yarn. Cottons in this study demonstrated fiber quality traits that allow them to operate at high speeds on the latest generation of ring ...

  3. Tropical Rainforests: A Case Study of UK, 13-Year-Olds' Knowledge and Understanding of These Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dove, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Tropical rainforests are biologically rich ecosystems, which are threatened by a variety of different human activities. This study focuses on students' knowledge and understanding of rainforest locations, their reasons for protecting these environments and their familiarity with selected concepts about rainforest vegetation and soil. These…

  4. Voices of the Oppressed in Higher Education: A Case Study of Two-Year Junior College Students in Taipei, Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chen-Wei

    2009-01-01

    In this dissertation, I study how Taiwanese vocational students as an oppressed group within the higher education system perceive, interpret, adapt or resist, and struggle to change the inequitable social structure. The theoretical framework in this research is constructed from Paulo Freire's ideas in "Pedagogy of the Oppressed," Margaret Archer's…

  5. Incidence of Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma in Low-Grade Renal Cell Carcinoma Cases: A 12-Year Retrospective Clinicopathologic Study From a Single Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simpal; Kauffman, Eric C; Kandel, Sirisa; George, Saby; Schwaab, Thomas; Xu, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) is a recently recognized subtype of renal cell carcinoma entity after 2004 World Health Organization classification of renal tumors. CCPRCC has unique histomorphological and immunohistochemical characteristics. The distinction of CCPRCC from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with clear cell morphology is crucial because the former is considered to have a favorable clinical outcome. CCPRCC may be interpreted in the past as other renal cell carcinomas, particularly low-grade clear cell RCC. In this study, the frequency of CCPRCC in previously diagnosed low-grade RCC and its clinicopathologic features were examined. A total of 126 cases of stage T1a with low nuclear grade RCC were identified from 625 consecutive RCCs removed by radical/partial nephrectomy over 12-year period (2000-2011). Archival tissue sections were retrospectively reviewed along with patient medical charts. Eight cases (1.3% of all RCC, 6.3% of pT1a low grade RCC) with characteristic histologic features of CCPRCC were confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. Seven cases were previously diagnosed as clear cell RCC and one as multilocular cystic RCC. Radiographically, CCPRCC favored a mid-pole location in the kidneys. At a median follow-up period of 52 months (range 20-114.5 months), there were no cases of local or distant recurrence. In conclusion, CCPRCC is not uncommon among small low-grade RCC tumors. CCPRCC can be correctly recognized by its unique histomorphological features and confirmed by immunohistochemistry studies, which is important due to the excellent clinical outcome following resection. PMID:26510859

  6. Aetiology of diarrhoeal disease and evaluation of viral-bacterial coinfection in children under 5 years old in China: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Li, L L; Liu, N; Humphries, E M; Yu, J M; Li, S; Lindsay, B R; Stine, O C; Duan, Z J

    2016-04-01

    Globally, diarrhoeal diseases are the second leading cause of death among children under 5 years old. Few case-control studies on the aetiology of diarrhoea have been conducted in China. A case-control study on 922 children under 5 years old who presented with diarrhoea and individually matched controls was conducted in China between May 2011 and January 2013. Quantitative PCR was used to analyze stool samples for 10 diarrhoeal pathogens. Potential enteric pathogens were detected in 377 (81.8%) of 461 children with diarrhoea and 215 controls (46.6%, p <0.001). Rotavirus, norovirus GII, Shigella and adenovirus were qualitatively associated with diarrhoea. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, the optimal cutoff threshold for defining a symptomatic individual was 72, 5840, and 10(4) copies per reaction for rotavirus (odds ratio 259), norovirus GII (odds ratio 10.6) and Shigella (odds ratio 5.1). The attributable fractions were 0.18 for rotavirus, 0.08 for norovirus GII, 0.01 for Shigella and 0.04 for adenovirus. Coinfections between pathogens were common. Two pairs, rotavirus and adenovirus, and norovirus GII and Salmonella were positively associated. The co-occurrence of rotavirus and sapovirus, astrovirus, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli or Campylobacter jejuni only occurred in children with disease. Coinfection was not correlated with clinical symptoms. Quantitative data are critical. Our results indicate that increased pathogen loads increase the OR between diarrhoea and rotavirus, norovirus GII and Shigella. Coinfections with rotavirus and norovirus GII are common and occur in a nonrandom distribution. Despite testing for ten diarrhoeal pathogens, over two-thirds of cases do not have a recognized attributable cause. PMID:26724990

  7. Effective Treatment of Manganese-Induced Occupational Parkinsonism With p-Aminosalicylic Acid: A Case of 17-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue-Ming; Mo, Xue-An; Du, Feng-Qi; Fu, Xue; Zhu, Xia-Yan; Gao, Hong-Yu; Xie, Jin-Lan; Liao, Feng-Ling; Pira, Enrico; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chronic manganese (Mn) intoxication induces syndromes resembling Parkinson disease. The clinical intervention has largely been unsuccessful. We report a 17-year follow-up study of effective treatment of occupational Mn parkinsonism with sodium para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS). Methods The patient, female and aged 50 at the time of treatment, was exposed to airborne Mn for 21 years (1963–1984). The patient had palpitations, hand tremor, lower limb myalgia, hypermyotonia, and a distinct festinating gait. She received 6 g PAS per day through an intravenous drip infusion for 4 days and rested for 3 days as one therapeutic course. Fifteen such courses were carried out between March and June 1987. Results At the end of PAS treatment, her symptoms were significantly alleviated, and handwriting recovered to normal. Recent follow-up examination at age 67 years (in 2004) showed a general normal presentation in clinical, neurologic, brain magnetic resonance imaging, and handwriting examinations with a minor yet passable gait. Conclusions This case study suggests that PAS appears to be an effective drug for treatment of severe chronic Mn poisoning with a promising prognosis. PMID:16766929

  8. A twelve-year follow-up study on a case of early-onset parkinsonism preceding clinical manifestation of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Machaczka, Maciej; Arce, Martin Paucar; Rucinska, Malgorzata; Yoshitake, Takashi; Kehr, Jan; Jurczak, Wojciech; Skotnicki, Aleksander B; Månsson, Jan-Erik; Tylki-Szymanska, Anna; Svenningsson, Per

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA1) cause Gaucher disease (GD) and are the most common genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we present a 12-year follow-up study of a male with GD and PD (diagnosed 24years ago), which PD preceded the clinical manifestation of GD by 12years. The patient is a compound heterozygote for mutations c.115+1G>A and c.1226A>G (IVS2 + 1/N370S) in the GBA1 gene. Imiglucerase had a beneficial effect on GD, but not on PD. Treatment with L-dopa and other PD drugs showed temporary efficacy but 2years later significant wearing-off phenomenon and dyskinesias appeared. Unilateral pallidotomy was performed with transient benefit. Cognitive decline appeared later and developed in to akinetic mutism. A lumbar puncture was performed to characterize the biochemical profile of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Analyses of monoamine metabolites levels in the CSF, determined by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, revealed remarkably low levels of all studied monoamine metabolites (HVA, DOPAC, 5-HIAA, MHPG). These data indicate that PD associated with GBA1 mutations may not only affect dopaminergic neurons, but also noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons. Of note, normal levels of P-tau, total tau and β-amyloid (1-42) were detected on ELISA assay. Thus, the cognitive decline, akinetic mutism and moderate cortical atrophy found on the CT scan were not paralleled by any changes of dementia markers in CSF. This single case study extends the follow-up period and adds novel CSF information; however additional data on other patients with both PD and GD may help put our observations in its ultimate proper context. PMID:23430873

  9. Risk factors associated with a breast cancer in a population of Moroccan women whose age is less than 40 years: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Laamiri, Fatima Zahra; Hasswane, Nadia; Kerbach, Aicha; Aguenaou, Hassan; Taboz, Youness; Benkirane, Hassna; Mrabet, Mustapha; Amina, Barkat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is the most common cancer in morocco women were it occupies the first place in term of incidence and mortality. The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the risk factors associated with a breast cancer in a population of Moroccan women. Methods A case-control study was conducted with population women whose age is less than 40 years during 2008-2010 at the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat. These women were interviewed for Epidemiological information and risk factor for breast cancer. Results Included in this study were 124 cases and 148 age matched controls. No statistically significant case-control difference was found for the early age of menarche (OR = 2.474; CI 95%: 1.354- 4.521), and family antecedents of first degree of breast cancer (OR = 11.556; 95% CI: 2.548-52.411). However physical activity (OR = 0.507; 95% CI: 0.339 -0.757) early maternity age (OR = 0.212; 95% CI: 0.087 - 0.514), multiparity (OR = 0.742; 95% CI: 0.359 -1.539) and breastfeeding than 6 months (OR = 0.739; 95% CI: 0.357 -1.523) appear as significant protective factors. Conclusion This study show the criminalization of only part of the known risk factors of breast cancer in this age group and confirms the probable protective role of physical activity and factors related to life reproductive women in our study (early childbearing, multiparity and lactation). PMID:27583083

  10. Etiology and Factors Associated with Pneumonia in Children under 5 Years of Age in Mali: A Prospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Messaoudi, Mélina; Sánchez Picot, Valentina; Telles, Jean-Noël; Diakite, Abdoul-Aziz; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Endtz, Hubert; Diallo, Souleymane; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background There are very limited data on children with pneumonia in Mali. The objective was to assess the etiology and factors associated with community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized children <5 years of age in Mali. Methods A prospective hospital-based case-control study was implemented in the Pediatric department of Gabriel Touré University Hospital at Bamako, Mali, between July 2011-December 2012. Cases were children with radiologically-confirmed pneumonia; Controls were hospitalized children without respiratory features, matched for age and period. Respiratory specimens, were collected to identify 19 viruses and 5 bacteria. Whole blood was collected from cases only. Factors associated with pneumonia were assessed by multivariate logistic regression. Results Overall, 118 cases and 98 controls were analyzed; 44.1% were female, median age was 11 months. Among pneumonia cases, 30.5% were hypoxemic at admission, mortality was 4.2%. Pneumonia cases differed from the controls regarding clinical signs and symptoms but not in terms of past medical history. Multivariate analysis of nasal swab findings disclosed that S. pneumoniae (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.6–7.0), human metapneumovirus (aOR = 17.2, 95% CI: 2.0–151.4), respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] (aOR = 7.4, 95% CI: 2.3–23.3), and influenza A virus (aOR = 10.7, 95% CI: 1.0–112.2) were associated with pneumonia, independently of patient age, gender, period, and other pathogens. Distribution of S. pneumoniae and RSV differed by season with higher rates of S. pneumoniae in January-June and of RSV in July-September. Pneumococcal serotypes 1 and 5 were more frequent in pneumonia cases than in the controls (P = 0.009, and P = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions In this non-PCV population from Mali, pneumonia in children was mainly attributed to S. pneumoniae, RSV, human metapneumovirus, and influenza A virus. Increased pneumococcal conjugate vaccine coverage in

  11. A new prognostic clinicopathological classification of pituitary adenomas: a multicentric case-control study of 410 patients with 8 years post-operative follow-up.

    PubMed

    Trouillas, Jacqueline; Roy, Pascal; Sturm, Nathalie; Dantony, Emmanuelle; Cortet-Rudelli, Christine; Viennet, Gabriel; Bonneville, Jean-François; Assaker, Richard; Auger, Carole; Brue, Thierry; Cornelius, Aurélie; Dufour, Henry; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; François, Patrick; Galland, Françoise; Mougel, François; Chapuis, François; Villeneuve, Laurent; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Raverot, Gérald; Barlier, A; Bernier, M; Bonnet, F; Borson-Chazot, F; Brassier, G; Caulet-Maugendre, S; Chabre, O; Chanson, P; Cottier, J F; Delemer, B; Delgrange, E; Di Tommaso, L; Eimer, S; Gaillard, S; Jan, M; Girard, J J; Lapras, V; Loiseau, H; Passagia, J G; Patey, M; Penfornis, A; Poirier, J Y; Perrin, G; Tabarin, A

    2013-07-01

    Pituitary adenomas are currently classified by histological, immunocytochemical and numerous ultrastructural characteristics lacking unequivocal prognostic correlations. We investigated the prognostic value of a new clinicopathological classification with grades based on invasion and proliferation. This retrospective multicentric case-control study comprised 410 patients who had surgery for a pituitary tumour with long-term follow-up. Using pituitary magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of cavernous or sphenoid sinus invasion, immunocytochemistry, markers of the cell cycle (Ki-67, mitoses) and p53, tumours were classified according to size (micro, macro and giant), type (PRL, GH, FSH/LH, ACTH and TSH) and grade (grade 1a: non-invasive, 1b: non-invasive and proliferative, 2a: invasive, 2b: invasive and proliferative, and 3: metastatic). The association between patient status at 8-year follow-up and age, sex, and classification was evaluated by two multivariate analyses assessing disease- or recurrence/progression-free status. At 8 years after surgery, 195 patients were disease-free (controls) and 215 patients were not (cases). In 125 of the cases the tumours had recurred or progressed. Analyses of disease-free and recurrence/progression-free status revealed the significant prognostic value (p < 0.001; p < 0.05) of age, tumour type, and grade across all tumour types and for each tumour type. Invasive and proliferative tumours (grade 2b) had a poor prognosis with an increased probability of tumour persistence or progression of 25- or 12-fold, respectively, as compared to non-invasive tumours (grade 1a). This new, easy to use clinicopathological classification of pituitary endocrine tumours has demonstrated its prognostic worth by strongly predicting the probability of post-operative complete remission or tumour progression and so could help clinicians choose the best post-operative therapy. PMID:23400299

  12. Case Studies Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wark, David M.

    The case histories of five students enrolled in a university course in how to study are reported. The students ranged in age from 18 to 35, included two males and three females, and varied in school experience from no college in one case and some college in two cases to college degrees in two cases. Students were initially taught to chart their…

  13. A Ten Year Retrospective Study on Adult Tetanus at the Epidemic Disease (ED) Hospital, Mysore in Southern India: A Review of 512 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Marulappa, Vamadeva Giriyapura; Manjunath, Renuka; Mahesh Babu, Nakul; Maligegowda, Laxman

    2012-01-01

    Background Tetanus still remains a major public health problem in India like in most other developing countries, with a high morbidity and mortality. Objectives To study the socio-demographic profile and the clinical profile that they presented with, as well as the outcome of the tetanus patients who were admitted to the E.D Hospital, Mysore in India. Methodology The data of all the patients of tetanus who were above the age of 15 years, who were admitted from January 2001 to December 2010, were collected, compiled and analyzed from the Medical Records Department of the Hospital. Results Out of the 512 cases of tetanus, 379 (74%) were males and 133 (26%) were females. Their ages varied from 15 to 81 years, with a mean and a standard deviation respectively of 47.7 and 15.0 years. The overall mortality rate was 42.2%. The most common presenting symptoms were trismus (95.7%), neck stiffness (89.3%), body spasms/stiffness (73%) and dysphagia (38.9%). The ages of the patients and the presence of complications had a statistically significant relationship with respect to the outcome (survival versus death). PMID:23205351

  14. Enhanced physical health screening for people with severe mental illness in Hong Kong: results from a one-year prospective case series study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background People with severe mental illness have significantly poorer physical health compared to the general population; previous health screening studies conducted outside Asian countries have demonstrated the potential in addressing this issue. This case series aimed to explore the effects and utility of integrating an enhanced physical health screening programme for community dwelling patients with severe mental illness into routine clinical practice in Hong Kong. Method This study utilises a consecutive prospective case series design. The serious mental illness Health Improvement Profile (HIP) was used as a screening tool at baseline and repeated at 12 months follow-up. Results A total of 148 community-based patients with severe mental illness completed the study. At one year follow-up analysis showed a significant improvement in self-reported levels of exercise and a reduction in the numbers of patients prescribed medications for diabetes However, mean waist circumference increased at follow-up. In addition to the statistically significant results some general trends were observed, including: a lack of deterioration in most areas of cardiovascular risk; a reduction in medicines prescribed for physical health problems; and general improvements in health behaviours over the 12 month period. Conclusions The findings demonstrate that using the HIP is feasible and acceptable in Hong Kong. The results of the enhanced physical health-screening programme are promising, but require further testing using a randomised controlled trial design in order to more confidently attribute the improvements in well-being and health behaviours to the HIP. Trial registration Clinical trial registration number: ISRCTN12582470 PMID:24576042

  15. The case study approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The case study approach allows in-depth, multi-faceted explorations of complex issues in their real-life settings. The value of the case study approach is well recognised in the fields of business, law and policy, but somewhat less so in health services research. Based on our experiences of conducting several health-related case studies, we reflect on the different types of case study design, the specific research questions this approach can help answer, the data sources that tend to be used, and the particular advantages and disadvantages of employing this methodological approach. The paper concludes with key pointers to aid those designing and appraising proposals for conducting case study research, and a checklist to help readers assess the quality of case study reports. PMID:21707982

  16. Case management in oncology rehabilitation (CAMON): The effect of case management on the quality of life in patients with cancer after one year of ambulant rehabilitation. A study protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial in oncology rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer diseases and their therapies have negative effects on the quality of life. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of case management in a sample of oncological outpatients with the intent of rehabilitation after cancer treatment. Case management wants to support the complex information needs of the patients in addition to the segmented structure of the health care system. Emphasis is put on support for self-management in order to enhance health - conscious behaviour, learning to deal with the burden of the illness and providing the opportunity for regular contacts with care providers. We present a study protocol to investigate the efficacy of a case management in patients following oncology rehabilitation after cancer treatment. Methods The trial is a multicentre, two-arm randomised controlled study. Patients are randomised parallel in either 'usual care' plus case management or 'usual care' alone. Patients with all types of cancer can be included in the study, if they have completed the therapy with chemo- and/or radiotherapy/surgery with curative intention and are expected to have a survival time >1 year. To determine the health-related quality of life the general questionnaire FACT G is used. The direct correlation between self-management and perceived self-efficacy is measured with the Jerusalem & Schwarzer questionnaire. Patients satisfaction with the care received is measured using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care 5 As (PACIC-5A). Data are collected at the beginning of the trial and after 3, 6 and 12 months. The power analysis revealed a sample size of 102 patients. The recruitment of the centres began in 2009. The inclusion of patients began in May 2010. Discussion Case management has proved to be effective regarding quality of life of patients with chronic diseases. When it comes to oncology, case management is mainly used in cancer treatment, but it is not yet common in the rehabilitation of cancer patients

  17. Adapting Japanese Lesson Study to Enhance the Teaching and Learning of Geometry and Spatial Reasoning in Early Years Classrooms: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Joan; Hawes, Zachary; Naqvi, Sarah; Caswell, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Increased efforts are needed to meet the demand for high quality mathematics in early years classrooms. Despite the foundational role of geometry and spatial reasoning for later mathematics success, the strand receives inadequate instructional time and is limited to concepts of static geometry. Moreover, early years teachers typically lack both…

  18. Vertebral Angiosarcoma. Case Study.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Bone angiosarcomas, especially vertebral angiosarcomas, are very rare. There are no studies based on large clinical samples in the literature, and only a few single case reports can be found. The symptoms of the disease are not specific. It is usually detected incidentally or at a late stage when pathological vertebral fractures or neurological complications occur. Diagnostic imaging and history help to recognize the tumour behind the symptoms, but do not allow accurate clinical diagnosis. The basis for a diagnosis is the histopathological examination supported by immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays. The case of a 26-year-old woman with an angiosarcoma involving the eighth thoracic vertebra we report reflects diagnostic problems adversely affecting the efficacy and accuracy of treatment offered to patients. The patient underwent three surgeries of the spine, including two biopsies. A needle biopsy did not provide sufficient information for the diagnosis. An open excisional biopsy, which at the same time temporarily reduced neurological deficits in the patient, was the only chance to obtain an accurate diagnosis. The third surgery was posterior decompression of the spinal cord due to the rapidly escalating paraparesis. It was not until 8 weeks later that the final diagnosis was established. At that time, the patient could not be qualified for any supplementary treatment. The patient died in hospital 6 months after the onset of disease. PMID:26468177

  19. [Qualitative case study].

    PubMed

    Debout, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The qualitative case study is a research method which enables a complex phenomenon to be explored through the identification of different factors interacting with each other. The case observed is a real situation. In the field of nursing science, it may be a clinical decision-making process. The study thereby enables the patient or health professional experience to be conceptualised. PMID:27338694

  20. SETDA Case Studies 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Educational Technology Directors Association, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA) published a series of case studies from 28 states to showcase examples of how ARRA EETT ("American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Enhancing Education Through Technology") grant funds have impacted teaching and learning. SETDA collected data for the case studies through a variety…

  1. Former Abusers of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Exhibit Decreased Testosterone Levels and Hypogonadal Symptoms Years after Cessation: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Selmer, Christian; Østergren, Peter Busch; Pedersen, Karen Boje; Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Faber, Jens; Juul, Anders; Kistorp, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Aims Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is highly prevalent among male recreational athletes. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of AAS abuse on reproductive hormone levels and symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism in current and former AAS abusers. Methods This study had a cross-sectional case-control design and involved 37 current AAS abusers, 33 former AAS abusers (mean (95%CI) elapsed duration since AAS cessation: 2.5 (1.7; 3.7) years) and 30 healthy control participants. All participants were aged 18–50 years and were involved in recreational strength training. Reproductive hormones (FSH, LH, testosterone, inhibin B and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH)) were measured using morning blood samples. Symptoms of hypogonadism (depressive symptoms, fatigue, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction) were recorded systematically. Results Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower median (25th –75th percentiles) total and free testosterone levels than control participants (total testosterone: 14.4 (11.9–17.7) nmol/l vs. 18.8 (16.6–22.0) nmol/l) (P < 0.01). Overall, 27.2% (13.3; 45.5) of former AAS abusers exhibited plasma total testosterone levels below the lower reference limit (12.1 nmol/l) whereas no control participants exhibited testosterone below this limit (P < 0.01). Gonadotropins were significantly suppressed, and inhibin B and AMH were significantly decreased in current AAS abusers compared with former AAS abusers and control participants (P < 0.01). The group of former AAS abusers had higher proportions of participants with depressive symptoms ((24.2%) (11.1; 42.2)), erectile dysfunction ((27.3%) (13.3; 45.6)) and decreased libido ((40.1%) (23.2; 57.0)) than the other two groups (trend analyses: P < 0.05). Conclusions Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower plasma testosterone levels and higher frequencies of symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism than healthy control participants years after AAS cessation

  2. Results of surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis in patients aged 80 years or more. A retrospective study of thirty-four cases.

    PubMed

    Ishac, R; Alhayek, G; Fournier, D; Mercier, P; Guy, G

    1996-03-01

    As life expectancy increases and spinal imaging techniques improve, surgery is being increasingly viewed as a therapeutic alternative for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis in patients older than 80 years. Thirty-four patients (21 men and 13 women) who had surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis in our department between 1979 and 1994 were studied retrospectively. The most common initial symptoms were walking-related disorders (n = 29) and sciatica or femoral neuralgia (n = 34). All 34 patients underwent laminectomy at one or more levels. Ten patients also had a herniated disk. There were no deaths and only two patients had serious complications (persistent foot drop in one and left-sided hemiplegia in the other). Results were evaluated immediately after surgery and after three and 12 months. The overall result on pain and walking-related disorders was good in 53% of cases, acceptable in 32%, and poor in 15%. Our data suggest that surgery is a reasonable alternative in symptomatic elderly patients who are in good general health. Satisfactory results can be obtained although disabling complications can occur. PMID:8731237

  3. Can Climate Information be relevant to decision making for Agriculture on the 1-10 year timescale? Case studies from southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Mariko

    2016-04-01

    Climate forecasts have been developed to assist decision making in sectors averse to, and affected by, climate risks, and agriculture is one of those. In agriculture and food security, climate information is now used on a range of timescales, from days (weather), months (seasonal outlooks) to decades (climate change scenarios). Former researchers have shown that when seasonal climate forecast information was provided to farmers prior to decision making, farmers adapted by changing their choice of planting seeds and timing or area planted. However, it is not always clear that the end-users' needs for climate information are met and there might be a large gap between information supplied and needed. It has been pointed out that even when forecasts were available, they were often not utilized by farmers and extension services because of lack of trust in the forecast or the forecasts did not reach the targeted farmers. Many studies have focused on the use of either seasonal forecasts or longer term climate change prediction, but little research has been done on the medium term, that is, 1 to 10 year future climate information. The agriculture and food system sector is one potential user of medium term information, as land use policy and cropping systems selection may fall into this time scale and may affect farmers' decision making process. Assuming that reliable information is provided and it is utilized by farmers for decision making, it might contribute to resilient farming and indeed to longer term food security. To this end, we try to determine the effect of medium term climate information on farmers' strategic decision making process. We explored the end-users' needs for climate information and especially the possible role of medium term information in agricultural system, by conducting interview surveys with farmers and agricultural experts. In this study, the cases of apple production in South Africa, maize production in Malawi and rice production in Tanzania

  4. Restructuring Hong Kong Higher Education: A Case Study of Lingnan University and Its Preparation for the New Four-Year Track in 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chong, Sabrina H.

    2012-01-01

    In its quest for boosting Hong Kong's world-class standing in higher education, the Hong Kong Education and Manpower Bureau implemented the 3+3+4 reform, which represents a major overhaul of higher education curriculum; the addition of one year of studies to create a four-year undergraduate degree track is set to replace its three-year track…

  5. Can a Summer Bridge Program Impact First-Year Persistence and Performance?: A Case Study of the New Start Summer Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Nolan L.; Miner, Danielle D.; Milem, Jeffrey F.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study assesses the impact of the University of Arizona's New Start Summer Program (NSSP) on participants' first year GPA and retention, controlling for incoming student characteristics. While programmatic participation significantly predicted first-year GPA and retention, this relationship became insignificant when…

  6. Beginning the Year in a Fifth-Grade Reform-Based Mathematics Classroom: A Case Study of the Development of Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheval, Kathryn Meador

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to investigate the development of social norms in a fifth-grade reform-based mathematics classroom through a close examination of one teacher's actions during the first three weeks of school. This study offers insights into the following research questions: (1) How does an elementary teacher in a…

  7. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  8. MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information taken from the arsenic demonstration program projects that have treatment systems removing multiply contaminants from drinking water. The case studies sited in the presentation consist of projects that have arsenic along with either nitrate, ...

  9. Laos case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Peuan Mit is a Lao organization working to address the needs of children and youth living and working on the streets. This case study outlines how a trusted and strong relationship with local police provides mutual benefit. PMID:22769869

  10. Termination: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Ahron L

    2015-12-01

    In this article I posit and examine certain criteria and qualities for ending an analysis. The case study describes the end phase of a four-year psychoanalysis in which the patient's decision to move to another area forced the end of his analysis. We continued to explore and work through his core neurotic conflicts that included issues of competitive rivalry, dominance and submission, control, and anxiety about birth and death. A shift in the transference from me as a negative father to me as a supportive but competitive older brother was also examined in the context of ending treatment as well as other aspects of the transference. In addition, we analyzed the meaning of his ending treatment based on an extra-analytic circumstance. In discussing this phase of treatment, the definition and history of the term "termination" and its connotations are reviewed. Various criteria for completing an analysis are examined, and technical observations about this phase of treatment are investigated. It was found that while a significant shift in the transference occurred in this phase of the patient's analysis, conflicts related to the transference were not "resolved" in the classical sense. Terminating treatment was considered as a practical matter in which the patient's autonomy and sense of choice were respected and analyzed. PMID:26583444

  11. Case Studies in Broadcast Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Howard W.

    This collection of case studies, based on factual situations which have challenged broadcast managers in recent years, is designed to stimulate thinking about and solving of "real world" problems in commercial radio and television operations. Topics of a serious, long-run nature include enlarging the radio audience; station revenue and economy;…

  12. The Role of Gestures in Making Connections between Space and Shape Aspects and Their Verbal Representations in the Early Years: Findings from a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elia, Iliada; Gagatsis, Athanasios; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja

    2014-01-01

    In recent educational research, it is well acknowledged that gestures are an important source of developing abstract thinking in early childhood and can serve as an additional window to the mind of the developing child. The present paper reports on a case study which explores the function of gestures in a geometrical activity at kindergarten…

  13. A California Case Study: Organizational Determinants of the Transfer of Hispanic Students from Two- to Four-Year Colleges in the Bay Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Caroline Sotello Viernes

    A study was conducted to identify organizational factors facilitating or inhibiting the transfer of Hispanic students from California community colleges to four-year institutions. Using the Kanter model of structural determinants for organizational behavior, the study examined opportunity structures (e.g., placement procedures and mobility…

  14. How International Field Experiences Promote Cross-Cultural Awareness in Preservice Teachers through Experiential Learning: Findings from a Six-Year Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malewski, Erik; Sharma, Suniti; Phillion, JoAnn

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: The article examines how international field experiences promote cross-cultural awareness in U.S. American preservice teachers through experiential learning. The findings presented here are based on a 6-year study of a short-term study abroad program in Honduras that included an international field experience component and took…

  15. The Meanings Assigned to Some Economic Terms: A Case Study of Some 13-14 Year Old Pupils. Research Papers in Economics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David J.

    A research study designed to measure understanding of economic terms among 13- and 14-year olds is summarized. For purposes of the study, two tests were constructed: a 10-item questionnaire focusing on definitions of words such as banking, production, costs, money, and wealth, and a compilation of drawings and photographs developed to reflect…

  16. Climatic change effects on hydro-metereological variables in the Alps: a case study on the upper Arve catchment at Chamonix (France) over the last 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viani, Alessandra; Condom, Thomas; Bacchi, Baldassare; Zin, Isabella; Six, Delphine; Gottardi, Frederic; Rabatel, Antoine; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological changes in partially glaciated catchments are expected under future climate scenarios, with consequences for water availability and management at catchment and regional scales. In order to correctly predict the magnitude of such changes and envisage adaptation and/or mitigation measures against water related hazards, a good understanding of the water cycle dynamics at different spatial and temporal scales is needed. The Upper Arve catchment in Chamonix (202 square kilometers), situated in the French Northern Alps, between the two massifs of Mont Blanc and Aiguilles Rouges, is a perfect case study for evaluating the sensitivity of the alpine water cycle to climate change. It is highly glaciated (32% of the total area in 2012) with three important glaciers: Glacier du Tour, Glacier d'Argentiere and Glacier de la Mer de Glace. Its elevation ranges from 1025 up to 4295 m a.s.l. and the exposure of the ice cover is generally north and east oriented. Long term time-series exist of (i) glacier mass balance, (ii) meteorological (in-situ and reanalyses) and (iii) hydrological data. The objectives of the presented study were: 1 - To characterize the inter-annual regimes of the different climatological and hydrological variables: precipitation, temperature and discharge; 2 - To estimate trends on the previous variables, at different temporal scales (annual and monthly) for different altitudes, and compare them to usually observed values in alpine regions; 3 - To infer from the previous statistical analyses and from a cross-analysis between the different considered variables the catchment's hydrological evolution during the last 50 years. Results showed precipitation, temperature and discharge regimes typical of high mountainous partially glaciated catchments. In the long term period, this catchment is characterized by an evident retreat of glacier. Long term trends over the past five decades show no significant change in the annual amount of precipitation. At the

  17. Studies in Course Design. Volume 1. Case Study I: One Year Postgraduate Course in Teaching for Biology Graduates. Case Study II: A Course for Teachers in General Medical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallas, Dorothy; And Others

    A collection of working papers from the course design process of two education courses is presented with attention focused on the category systems employed to set out course objectives and methods. The two studies illustrate the use of a grid to establish the relationships between various course objectives. The first collection of papers is based…

  18. Case Study Evaluations: A Decade of Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    In the last 10 years, there has been increased use of case study methodology, with accompanying refinement and improvement of the methods. Case studies have become legitimate research methods in evaluation, but it is too soon to say whether improvements in methodology are really resulting in improvements in the case studies conducted. (SLD)

  19. Comparison of Clinicopathological Features and Treatments between Young (≤40 Years) and Older (>40 Years) Female Breast Cancer Patients in West China: A Retrospective, Epidemiological, Multicenter, Case Only Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyuan; Zheng, Ke; Jiang, Jun; Zou, Tianning; Ma, Binlin; Li, Hui; Liu, Qilun; Ou, Jianghua; Wang, Ling; Wei, Wei; He, Jianjun; Ren, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of young cases of breast cancer is higher in China compared to the western world. We aimed to explore differences in risk factors, clinicopathological features and treatment modes of young female breast cancer compared to older patients in West China. We collected clinical information from 12,209 female breast cancer patients in West China, including risk factors, clinicopathological features and treatment modes, from January 2010 to December 2012. Chi-square tests and the multivariate logistic regression analysis were applied for statistical analysis. There were 2,682 young (≤40 years) cases and 9,527 older cases at the time of breast cancer diagnosis. Young patients had a greater tumor diameter at diagnosis, and a higher probability of axillary lymph node and distant metastasis (P < 0.05). The progesterone receptor positive expression rate, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor double positive expression rate, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative expression rate was higher in young patients compared to older patients (P < 0.05). For young patients, the age at menarche was earlier, they had lower marriage rates, fewer pregnancies and births, and a lower breastfeeding rate (P < 0.05). A higher proportion of young patients underwent advanced operations, neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and endocrine therapy compared to older patients (P < 0.05). We found significant differences in the clinicopathological features, risk factors and treatment modes between young (≤40 years) and older (>40 years) female breast cancer patients in West China. As some of these results differ from those found in the western female population, it is likely that the mechanism of tumorigenesis of young female breast cancer patients in West China may differ from that in western developed countries. Further investigation into the regional differences in breast cancer tumorigenesis is warranted. PMID:27031236

  20. Comparison of Clinicopathological Features and Treatments between Young (≤40 Years) and Older (>40 Years) Female Breast Cancer Patients in West China: A Retrospective, Epidemiological, Multicenter, Case Only Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Ren, Yu; Li, Hongyuan; Zheng, Ke; Jiang, Jun; Zou, Tianning; Ma, Binlin; Li, Hui; Liu, Qilun; Ou, Jianghua; Wang, Ling; Wei, Wei; He, Jianjun; Ren, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of young cases of breast cancer is higher in China compared to the western world. We aimed to explore differences in risk factors, clinicopathological features and treatment modes of young female breast cancer compared to older patients in West China. We collected clinical information from 12,209 female breast cancer patients in West China, including risk factors, clinicopathological features and treatment modes, from January 2010 to December 2012. Chi-square tests and the multivariate logistic regression analysis were applied for statistical analysis. There were 2,682 young (≤40 years) cases and 9,527 older cases at the time of breast cancer diagnosis. Young patients had a greater tumor diameter at diagnosis, and a higher probability of axillary lymph node and distant metastasis (P < 0.05). The progesterone receptor positive expression rate, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor double positive expression rate, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative expression rate was higher in young patients compared to older patients (P < 0.05). For young patients, the age at menarche was earlier, they had lower marriage rates, fewer pregnancies and births, and a lower breastfeeding rate (P < 0.05). A higher proportion of young patients underwent advanced operations, neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and endocrine therapy compared to older patients (P < 0.05). We found significant differences in the clinicopathological features, risk factors and treatment modes between young (≤40 years) and older (>40 years) female breast cancer patients in West China. As some of these results differ from those found in the western female population, it is likely that the mechanism of tumorigenesis of young female breast cancer patients in West China may differ from that in western developed countries. Further investigation into the regional differences in breast cancer tumorigenesis is warranted. PMID:27031236

  1. Second Language Acquisition at the Early Childhood Level: A 5-Year Longitudinal Case Study of Pre-Kindergarten through First-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billak, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    This 5-year longitudinal study investigated the English language acquisition and development of students in pre-Kindergarten through Grade 1 at a U.S.-accredited international school. Of the 1,509 students tested, the overwhelming majority were nonnative English speakers. The data provide valuable insight into the rate of second language…

  2. Academic Failure of First-Year Engineering and Technological Students in India and Assessment of Motivation Factors--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheruvalath, Reena

    2012-01-01

    This study has been conducted to show that there is a recent trend in engineering colleges in India that students who are considered to be highly intelligent show poor academic performance during their 1st year. This article is proposed to examine the role of motivation factors such as teaching methods and learning material in the academic…

  3. Case Study: Variation in fatty acid profiles in milk from adjacent organic and conventional dairy farms over a 3-year period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring the seasonal variability of fatty acids (FAs) in milk improves our understanding of the nutritional and health values of milk. In collaboration with the Rodale Institute, Kutztown, PA, a 3-year study evaluated the seasonal variation of FA profiles of milk obtained from two farms adjacent t...

  4. Final Draft Feedback in First-Year Composition: A Case Study of Non-Native English Speaking Students in North America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Gail

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Methods: This dissertation examines final draft feedback in a semester long first-year composition class consisting of both native and non-native speakers of English (NES & NNES) attending university. In addition to examining the teacher's commentary on final drafts and the students' responses to it, this study investigated…

  5. Learning about Environmental Issues in Engineering Programmes: A Case Study of First-Year Civil Engineering Students' Contextualisation of an Ecology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundholm, Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    Describes how first-year civil engineering students interpreted the content and structure of an ecology course. Students' learning processes were analysed from an intentional perspective, i.e. a perspective that takes into account the students' educational aims and conceptions of the study situation. Interviews were carried out with six civil…

  6. A Case Study: Emergent Biliteracy in English and Chinese of a 5-Year-Old Chinese Child with Wordless Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ran; Commeyras, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the development of a 5-year-old child's language and literacy development in English and Chinese within a 10-week tutoring context where the primary materials were wordless picture books. Storytelling in English and Chinese were the primary activities in each session. Extended activities included labeling,…

  7. Case Studies in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeakes, Samuel J.

    1989-01-01

    A case study writing exercise used in a course on parasitology was found to be a powerful learning experience for students because it involved discipline-based technical writing and terminology, brought the students in as evaluators, applied current learning, caused interaction among all students, and simulated real professional activities. (MSE)

  8. Management of snakebite cases by national treatment protocol at Jalpaiguri District Hospital in West Bengal in the year 2010--a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Manab Kumar

    2011-08-01

    Snakebite remains a public health problem in India, occurring most frequently in the summer and rainy seasons. Bites are maximal in lower limbs. Victims are typically male and between 17 and 27 years of age. Children and the elderly have higher mortality. The worst affected states are Kerala, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Orissa, Assam and West Bengal. There was no uniform guideline for treatment of snakebite cases. The five common venomous Indian snakes biting humans are common cobra, krait, Russell's viper, saw scaled viper and the hump nose pit viper. Seventy per cent of all snakebites are non-venomous. Even in bites by venomous snakes, envenomation occurs in only 50% of cases. Immobilisation is much more important than tight ligature, which may cause gangrene. Only a minority need antivenom, which is expensive, short in supply and may cause severe reaction. Antivenom treatment is recommended on the basis of local and systemic signs and symptoms and 20 minutes whole blood clotting test (20WBCT). Delay in starting AVS treatment is the main cause of mortality and morbidity. Skin test is of no value. But antivenom should not be used unless specifically indicated. The "Do it RIGHT" approach of national treatment protocol indicates the initial steps to be taken before reaching a hospital or primary healthcare facility. And it resulted in a 66% decline in the amount of ASV administration and an absolute reduction of mortality by 24%. However first aid treatment of the bitten limb/area with broad-spectrum antibiotics, injection tetanus antitoxin and Supportive treatment with blood transfusion, ventilatory support, anticholinesterase and peritoneal dialysis may also be required. PMID:22315862

  9. Atrial fibrillation case study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah; Wilson, Tracey

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the irregular heart rhythm caused by atrial fibrillation (AF). A brief overview of the pathophysiology will be provided. A case study is discussed to highlight the treatment and management of AF. The care provision describes common signs and symptoms and also the treatment and management of AF within the maternity care setting. The importance of maintaining the mother-baby dyad is highlighted. For the purpose of maintaining confidentiality the woman will be referred to as Shama. PMID:27044188

  10. Physical activity completed when young has residual bone benefits at 94 years of age: a within-subject controlled case study

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Stuart J.; Mantila Roosa, Sara M.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity is recommended for skeletal health because bones adapt to mechanical loading. The young skeleton shows greatest plasticity to physical activity-related mechanical loads, but bones are most at risk of failure later in life. The discrepancy raises the question of whether the skeletal benefits of physical activity completed when young persist with aging. Here we present a unique case wherein the cortical bone benefit of physical activity completed over five decades earlier could be established within an individual aged in their tenth decade of life. Specifically, we compared bone properties at the midshaft humerus between the throwing and nonthrowing arms of a 94-year-old former Major League Baseball player who ceased throwing 55 years earlier. By performing analyses within-subject, the long-term skeletal benefit of physical activity completed when young could be assessed independent of inherited and systemic traits. Also, as the subject threw left-handed during his throwing career, but was right-hand dominant in all other activities throughout life, any lasting skeletal benefits in favor of the throwing arm could not be attributable to simple arm dominance. Analyses indicated that any cortical bone mass, area and thickness benefits of throwing-related physical activity completed when young were lost with aging, possibly due to accelerated intracortical remodeling. In contrast, the subject’s throwing (nondominant) arm had greater total cross-sectional area and estimated strength (polar moment of inertia) than in his dominant arm, despite muscle indices favoring the latter. These data indicate that physical activity completed when young can have lasting benefits on bone size and strength, independent of the maintenance of bone mass benefits. PMID:24879028

  11. Monitoring desertification using the integrated CA GIS and RS with AHP-derived weights: a case study of Beijing and its neighboring areas in recent 20 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gongwen; Chen, Jianping; Li, Qing; Ding, Huoping

    2007-06-01

    This paper aims to monitor desertification evolution of different stages and assess its factors using remote sensing (RS) data and cellular automata (CA)-geographical information system (GIS) with an adaptive analytic hierarchy process (AHP) to derive weights of desertification factors. The study areas (114°E to 117°E and 39.5°to 42.2°N) are one of the important agro-pastoral transitional zone, located in Beijing and its neighboring areas, marginal desertified areas in North China. Desertification information including NDVI and desertification area were derived from the satellite images of 1987TM, 1996TM (with a resolution of 28.5), and 2006 CBERS-(with a resolution of 19.5 m) in study areas. The ancillary data in terms of meteorology, geology, 30m-DEM, hydrography can be statistical analyzed with GIS technology. A CA model based on the desertification factors with AHP-derived weights was built by AML program in ArcGIS workstation to assess the evolution of desertification in different stages (from 1987 to 1996, and from 1996 to 2006). The research results show that desertified areas was increased by 3.28% per year from 1987 to 1996, so was 0.51% per year from 1996 to 2006. Although the weights of desertification factors have some changes in different stages, the main factors including climate, NDVI, and terrain did not change except the values in study areas.

  12. The role of gestures in making connections between space and shape aspects and their verbal representations in the early years: findings from a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elia, Iliada; Gagatsis, Athanasios; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja

    2014-12-01

    In recent educational research, it is well acknowledged that gestures are an important source of developing abstract thinking in early childhood and can serve as an additional window to the mind of the developing child. The present paper reports on a case study which explores the function of gestures in a geometrical activity at kindergarten level. In the study, the spontaneous gestures of the child are investigated, as well as the influence of the teacher's gestures on the child's gestures. In the first part of the activity, the child under study transforms a spatial array of blocks she has constructed by herself into a verbal description, so that another person, i.e., the teacher, who cannot see what the child has built, makes the same construction. Next, the teacher builds a new construction and describes it so that the child can build it. Hereafter, it is again the turn of the child to build another construction and describe it to the teacher. The child was found to spontaneously use iconic and deictic gestures throughout the whole activity. These gestures, and primarily the iconic ones, helped her make apparent different space and shape aspects of the constructions. Along with her speech, gestures acted as semiotic means of objectification to successfully accomplish the task. The teacher's gestures were found to influence the child's gestures when describing aspects of shapes and spatial relationships between shapes. This influence results in either mimicking or extending the teacher's gestures. These findings are discussed and implications for further research are drawn.

  13. Fighting with Spirits: Migration Trauma, Acculturative Stress, and New Sibling Transition-A Clinical Case Study of an 8-Year-Old Girl with Absence Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chartonas, Dimitrios; Bose, Ruma

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we discuss the impact of migration and acculturation processes on the cultural, personal identity, and mental health of children who immigrate to a Western, multicultural environment, and the challenges clinicians in such environments face, when confronted with non-Western idioms of distress and healing practices. We do that by presenting a challenging clinical case of an 8-year-old girl who presented with very disorganized behavior, which matches a culturally accepted construct of spirit possession, in the context of migration trauma, acculturative stress, and new sibling transition. We identify cultural conflict in school and bullying as major mediators between acculturative stress and mental distress. We also aim at identifying vulnerability, risk and protective factors, and the importance of cultural coping resources. We explore in depth the patient's cultural background and the family's belief system and culturally shaped narratives, in order to arrive at a cultural formulation, which focuses on the significance of idioms of distress in shaping psychopathology and influencing the personal and interpersonal course of trauma- and stress-related disorders. We also call attention to the finding that in children, idioms of distress may manifest themselves in a somatic manner. We argue, together with other researchers, that spirit possession deserves more interest as an idiom of distress and a culture-specific response to traumatizing events. We finally emphasize the importance of an anti-reductionist clinical stance, that is able to use different levels of understanding processes of distress and healing, and seeks to reconciliate cultural divides and integrate different explanatory frameworks and help-seeking practices. PMID:25670159

  14. Treatment of Scaphoid Waist Nonunion Using Olecranon Bone Graft and Stryker Asnis Micro Cannulated Screw: A Retrospective Study—80 Case Studies and 6 Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Poggetti, Andrea; Rosati, Marco; Castellini, Iacopo; Evangelisti, Gisberto; Battistini, Pietro; Parchi, Paolo; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Background Screw fixation and bone grafting are the gold standard for scaphoid waist nonunion without avascular necrosis. Question/Purpose Assesses the scaphoid waist nonunion healing rate with use of an uncommon cancellous bone graft (olecranon) and an unusual fixation system (Asnis Micro Cannulated Screw System; Stryker Inc., Kalamazoo, MI, USA). Material and Methods A series of 102 consecutive patients were treated for scaphoid waist nonunion (without deformity). Of these, 80 patients subjected to clinical (Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS), Jamar hydraulic dynamometer) and radiographic examination before and after surgery were evaluated. Ipsilateral olecranon cancellous bone graft and the ASNIS Micro 3.0-mm diameter screw, were used. The average follow up was 6 years (min 3; max 10). Results Radiographic consolidation was achieved in 90% of patients; dorsal intercalated segment instability (DISI) deformities were corrected in 71.4% of cases. Ninety percent improved the range of motion of the wrist and grip strength. All patients showed a significant reduction of peak force in the operated hand. In 6.25% we observed clinical and radiographic screw head–trapezium impingement. Twenty-six patients developed a degenerative wrist sign. The MMWS yielded 68 optimal, 8 good, and 4 bad results. Conclusions To treat scaphoid waist nonunions without misalignment, low-profile headed screw and olecranon bone graft allowed a high consolidation rate with positive results to long-term follow-up. The Asnis Micro 3.0 mm diameter screw may be a suitable option for treating scaphoid waist nonunion. Level of Evidence IV. PMID:26261746

  15. Monthly variation in faeces:blood concentration ratio of persistent organic pollutants over the first year of life: a case study of one infant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiqin; McLachlan, Michael S; Kaserzon, Sarit; Wang, Xianyu; Weijs, Liesbeth; Gallen, Michael; Toms, Leisa-Maree L; Li, Yan; Aylward, Lesa L; Sly, Peter D; Mueller, Jochen F

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have found that the concentrations of a range of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in faeces is linearly proportional to the POP concentrations in blood of human adults irrespective of age and gender. In order to investigate the correlation between POP concentrations in faeces and blood in infants, the monthly variation of POP concentrations in faeces over the first year of life of one infant was investigated in this study and compared to modelled blood concentrations. Faecal samples were collected from one male infant daily. The samples were pooled by month and analysed for three selected POPs (2,2('),4,4('),5,5(')-Hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and 2,2('),4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE47)). The POP concentrations in faecal samples increased for the first four months by a factor of 2.9, 4.9 and 1.4 for PCB153, BDE47, and p,p'-DDE, respectively. The faecal concentrations of all POPs decreased rapidly following the introduction of formula and solid food to the diet and subsequent weaning of the infant. Further, a one-compartment model was developed to estimate the daily POP concentrations in the blood of the infant. The POP concentrations in blood were predicted to vary much less over the first year than those observed in faeces. The faeces:blood concentration ratio of selected POPs (Kfb) differed significantly (P<0.0001) between the period before and after weaning, and observed changes in Kfb are far greater than the uncertainty in the estimated Kfb. A more stable Kfb after weaning indicates the possibility of applying the stable Kfb values for non-invasive assessment of internal exposure in infants after weaning. The intra-individual variation in Kfb in infants is worthy of further investigation. PMID:26918839

  16. Conducting and Reporting Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Merilyn; Taylor, Satomi Izumi

    Issues and elements of case study research are explored and illustrated with the example of a case study of a kindergarten in a suburb of Tokyo (Japan). Case study research is a type of qualitative research that concentrates on a single unit or entity, with boundaries established by the researcher. The case is an example drawn from a larger class,…

  17. Mosses as an integrating tool for monitoring PAH atmospheric deposition: comparison with total deposition and evaluation of bioconcentration factors. A year-long case-study.

    PubMed

    Foan, Louise; Domercq, Maria; Bermejo, Raúl; Santamaría, Jesús Miguel; Simon, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) atmospheric deposition was evaluated at a remote site in Northern Spain using moss biomonitoring with Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) Schimp., and by measuring the total deposition fluxes of PAHs. The year-long study allowed seasonal variations of PAH content in mosses to be observed, and these followed a similar trend to those of PAH fluxes in total deposition. Generally, atmospheric deposition of PAHs is greater in winter than in summer, due to more PAH emissions from domestic heating, less photoreactivity of the compounds, and intense leaching of the atmosphere by wet deposition. However, fractionation of these molecules between the environmental compartments occurs: PAH fluxes in total deposition and PAH concentrations in mosses are correlated with their solubility (r=0.852, p<0.01) and lipophilic properties (KOW, r=0.768, p<0.01), respectively. This annual study therefore showed that atmospheric PAH fluxes can be estimated with moss biomonitoring data if the bioconcentration or 'enriching' factors are known. PMID:25084064

  18. Diagenesis in limestone-dolostone successions after 1 million years of rapid sea-level fluctuations: A case study from Grand Cayman, British West Indies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Min; Jones, Brian

    2016-08-01

    Meteoric diagenesis in young marine carbonate sediments has commonly been linked to fluctuations in Quaternary glacio-eustatic sea levels. The extent to which these sea-level changes are recorded in these carbonate successions, however, remains questionable. This is amply demonstrated by the diagenetic record found in the limestones and dolostones of the Cayman Formation (Miocene) on the Cayman Islands. On the eastern part of Grand Cayman, dolomitization that ceased by 1 million years ago created an architecture whereby the limestones in the central part of the island were surrounded by dolostones in coastal areas of the island. Since then, the upper 90 m of the Cayman Formation has been repeatedly cycled through many different marine and meteoric diagenetic zones as large, rapid eustatic oscillations in sea level affected the island. The records of these diagenetic cycles in the dolostones and limestones are, however, different and impossible to match to the cyclic changes in sea level. In the peripheral dolostones, post-dolomitization diagenetic features are sparse. In contrast, the limestones in the interior of the island exhibit a wider variety of meteoric diagenetic features, including extensive dissolution and calcite cementation. The dolostones have low porosity (< 10%) and permeability, whereas the limestones are characterized by high porosity (up to 50%), especially in the lower and middle parts of the studied limestone succession. The different phases of diagenesis found in the limestones, however, cannot be specifically matched to any sea-level fluctuations that have affected these successions. This issue is further exemplified by the fact that that the last marine transgression over the last ~ 16,000 years ago appears to have left no tangible record. The analysis of this succession clearly demonstrates that not all diagenetic regimes will be recorded in the fabrics of limestones or dolostones.

  19. PREDICT : A CASE STUDY.

    SciTech Connect

    Kerscher, W. J. III; Booker, J. M.; Meyer, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    Delphi Automotive Systems and the Los Alamos National Laboratory worked together to develop PREDICT, a new methodology to characterize the reliability of a new product during its development program. Rather than conducting testing after hardware has been built, and developing statistical confidence bands around the results, this updating approach starts with an early reliability estimate characterized by large uncertainty, and then proceeds to reduce the uncertainty by folding in fresh information in a Bayesian framework. A considerable amount of knowledge is available at the beginning of a program in the form of expert judgment which helps to provide the initial estimate. This estimate is then continually updated as substantial and varied information becomes available during the course of the development program. This paper presents a case study of the application of PREDICT, with the objective of further describing the methodology. PREDICT has been honored with an R&D 100 Award presented by R&D Magazine.

  20. Planning a Year-Round School Operation (A Case-Study of the Valley View School District 45-15 Plan). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogge, William M.

    The year-round school operation of the Valley View School District is described from its planning stages through the implementation of the plans. A "45-15 Plan" provides for each pupil forty-five days of instruction and fifteen equivalent days of vacation. With the cycle repeated four times each year, one-fourth of the pupils are on vacation at…

  1. Examining the Influence of Multimodal New Media Texts and Technologies on First-Year Writing Pedagogies: A Cross Sectional Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruefman, Daniel Lee

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, composition teachers and scholars have noted that multimodal technologies have changed the landscape of the first-year college writing classroom, causing many to consider the relevance of integrating these tools into the writing curriculum. While some suggest that it is important to teach students to write with a variety of…

  2. Bioplastique at 6 years: clinical outcome studies.

    PubMed

    Ersek, R A; Gregory, S R; Salisbury, A V

    1997-11-01

    Bioplastique is a biphasic polymer for the permanent augmentation of some soft tissues. It was developed in 1987, and clinical studies at this institution were begun in 1990. The combination of low molecular weight polyvinylpyrrolidone and solid polymer particles allows the implantation of permanent polymer spheres through a small needle under local anesthesia. In this study 127 cases are reviewed of consecutive patients who have received Bioplastique for scar revision, wrinkles, and augmentation for soft-tissue defects at 6 years after application. All patients who had not been in for follow-up recently were contacted by mail and questioned on the permanence of augmentation and migration of particles. About 30 percent of the patients were unreachable and had their charts reviewed for permanence and migration of particles. In eight of these cases, Bioplastique was removed because of overcorrection, two of them may have had infection. Bioplastique has gained wide use throughout the world and although some complications have been reported, in general, it functions quite well when used in selected cases. PMID:9385974

  3. Eleven years of itching: a case report of crusted scabies.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Nurdan S; Turan, Enver; Erdemir, Asli; Gürel, Mehmet S; Bozkurt, Erol

    2014-08-01

    Crusted scabies is a rare and highly contagious form of scabies that is characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of mites in the skin, extensive hyperkeratotic scaling, crusted lesions, and variable pruritus. We report the case of a 48-year-old man with an 11-year history of pruritic, hyperkeratotic, psoriasiform plaques and widespread erythematous papules that was diagnosed as crusted scabies. PMID:25184648

  4. High alpine ponds shift upwards as average temperatures increase: A case study of the Ortles-Cevedale mountain group (Southern Alps, Italy) over the last 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Franco; Gambelli, Sara; Viviano, Gaetano; Thakuri, Sudeep; Guyennon, Nicolas; D'Agata, Carlo; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Smiraglia, Claudio; Stefani, Fabrizio; Bocchiola, Daniele; Tartari, Gianni

    2014-09-01

    Alpine ecosystems are especially vulnerable to climate change, and lakes and ponds act as early indicators. Here, we describe our findings for the Ortles-Cevedale mountain group (Stelvio National Park, Southern Alps, Italy), where we used remote sensing to analyze more than 100 water ponds over the last 50 years (1954-2007). We found that since the 1980s, some lower elevation ponds (< 2500 m a.s.l.) have disappeared or experienced surface area reduction. We link this impact to the increased evaporation/precipitation ratio associated with climatic warming. At higher elevations (> 2900 m a.s.l.), we observed that since the 1950s, ponds have increased in size and that new ponds have appeared as a consequence of glacial shrinkage and retreat. However, these new ponds are ephemeral. The appearance of new environments is usually followed by their rapid disappearance and by a concomitant appearance of new ones, which is a clear sign of a transition from a glacial system to a paraglacial system. Surface area changes have been shown to be a highly visible and easily measurable signal of the impact of climate change on the alpine environment, as already demonstrated in other remote areas of the world. There is a clear need to extend this analysis to other sites in the Alps to gain a regional understanding of the phenomenon. The findings of this study make it possible to interpret the variations created by climate change in these environments, in terms of alteration of their ecological role and the loss of ecosystem services.

  5. Is the rare biosphere real or a technical artifact? A case study involving a multi-year deep subsurface time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnabosco, C.; Lau, M.; Lindsay, M. R.; Alleva, R.; Stepanauskas, R.; Shivambu, S.; Maphanga, S.; van Heerden, E.; Onstott, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The question of "who" is present in extreme environments is one of the major questions surrounding geobiological research. Techniques such as high-throughput sequencing and single cell genomics are illuminating previously unseen organisms that exist in low abundance. Commonly referred to as the "rare biosphere", the contribution of these low abundance organisms and the effect that they have on traditional diversity estimates is poorly understood. Here, we present a study that critically examines the effect that sequencing depth has on the Chao1 alpha diversity estimator and the Sørensen similarity index. This is achieved through (1) a theoretical analysis of simulated community distributions and (2) a comparison between subsurface Sanger-sequenced clone libraries and high-throughput amplicon sequences generated from a 1.3 km deep fracture (Be326_Bh2). The screening of single cells, metagenomics, and metatranscriptomics are then used to assess the authenticity and contribution of rare members identified in the deeply sequenced amplicon datasets of Be326_Bh2. In particular, a "rare" (<1% relative abundance in 16S rDNA V6 amplicon libraries) member of Ignavibacteria that has been identified and sequenced through single cell genomics is molecularly tracked over the course of a 3-year sampling campaign in Be326_Bh2 while other "rare" members prove to be merely sequencing artifacts. Ultimately, these results help us better understand the limitations of methods used to calculate diversity in long-tail environments like the terrestrial deep subsurface and the role that the rare biosphere plays in Be326_Bh2.

  6. Twenty-three Years of Evolving "State-of-the-Art" CORK Borehole Geophysical Monitoring: A Review of Technologies and Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. E.; Becker, K.; Meldrum, R.; Heesemann, M.; Villinger, H. W.; Kinoshita, M.; Paros, J. M.; Inderbitzen, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    The first successful attempt to instrument an Ocean Drilling Program borehole for formation pressure and temperature monitoring and fluid sampling was accomplished in 1991 in Hole 857D, and the system there has been in nearly continuous operation since that time. This hole and others that followed have provided many new insights into ocean crustal and subduction zone hydrogeology and geodynamics, while at the same time being the "proving ground" for a number of technological advances in ocean borehole monitoring, including 1) the CORK scheme itself for sealing holes for hydrologic recovery to natural-state conditions after drilling; 2) the use of absolute pressure sensors for monitoring both relative formation pressures and changes in seafloor depth; 3) multi-level completions for pressure monitoring that leave cased borehole interiors open for other instrumentation; 4) the development of ultra-high-precision, low-power digital recording systems for examining the effects on the formation of seismic and microseismic loading; and 5) the proof-of-concept of an optical communications system that eliminates dependence on submersibles or ROVs for data download operations (see Tivey et al., this session). Relatively low-sample-rate data spanning the first part of the more than two decades of operations have shown how large anomalous pressures generated thermally and by deformation can be; how seafloor tidal loading influences formation pressure and can drive an "a.c." component of flow; and how seismogenic and slow strain can be observed by way of formation-fluid pressure transients. More recent instrumentation has allowed much higher fidelity observations (1 Hz sampling at a resolution of 10-8 of full-scale), and thus is permitting complementary studies of hydrologic, oceanographic, seismic, and microseismic phenomena. Plans for the future include connections to shore via observatory cable systems, such as those of NEPTUNE Canada and DONET, for unlimited power supply and

  7. Increased Immunoendocrine Cells in Intestinal Mucosa of Postinfectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients 3 Years after Acute Shigella Infection - An Observation in a Small Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Sun; Lim, Jung Hyun; Lee, Sang In

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Postinfectiously irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) develops in 3-30% of individuals with bacterial gastroenteritis. Recent studies demonstrated increases in inflammatory components in gut mucosa of PI-IBS patients even after complete resolution of infection. We aimed to investigate histological changes in colon and rectum of PI-IBS subjects after long term period of infection. Materials and Methods We recruited PI-IBS subjects who had been diagnosed IBS after complete resolution of enteritis caused by shigellosis outbreak 3 years earlier. We compared unmatched four groups, PI-IBS (n = 4), non PI-IBS (n = 7), D-IBS (n = 7, diarrhea predominant type) and healthy controls (n = 10). All of them underwent colonoscopic biopsy at three areas, including descending colon (DC), sigmoid colon (SC) and rectum, which were assessed for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)/peptide YY (PYY)-containing enterochromaffin (EC) cell, intraepithelial (IEL) and lamina propria T lymphocyte (CD3), CD8 lymphocytes, mast cells and CD68/calprotectin+ macrophages. Results All subjects had no structural or gross abnormalities at colonoscopy. In PI-IBS, 5-HT containing EC cells, PYY containing EC cells, IELs, CD3 lymphocytes, CD8 lymphocytes, mast cells, and CD68 + macrophages were increased compared to control (p < 0.05). In D-IBS, PYY containing EC cells, IELs, and CD3 lymphocytes were increased compared to control (p < 0.05). In PI-IBS, 5-HT containing EC cells tended to increase and PYY containing EC cells, CD8 lymphocytes, mast cells, and CD68+ macrophages were increased compared to non PI-IBS (p < 0.05). Calprotectin + marcrophages were decreased in PI-IBS, non PI-IBS and IBS compared to control. Conclusion The immunoendocrine cells were sporadically increased in PI-IBS, non PI-IBS and D-IBS compared with control. Our findings in a very small number of patients suggest that mucosal inflammation may play a role in long-term PI-IBS, and that other sub-groups of IBS and larger scale studies are

  8. A One-Year Case Study: Understanding the Rich Potential of Project-Based Learning in a Virtual Reality Class for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Teresa M.; Bang, EunJin; Andre, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative case analysis of a new and unique, high school, student-directed, project-based learning (PBL), virtual reality (VR) class. In order to create projects, students learned, on an independent basis, how to program an industrial-level VR machine. A constraint was that students were required to produce at least one…

  9. Firework injuries: a ten-year study.

    PubMed

    Puri, Vinita; Mahendru, Sanjay; Rana, Roshani; Deshpande, Manish

    2009-09-01

    Fireworks are used worldwide to celebrate popular events (e.g. festivals, official celebrations, weddings). The festival of lights (Diwali) is celebrated with fireworks in India. During this period, many patients from all age groups present to hospital with injuries due to fireworks. Prevalence, period of occurrence, sex and age variation, adult supervision, causative fireworks, mode of lighting, age groups prone to injury, patterns of injury caused by individual fireworks, and the body parts injured were studied. One hundred and fifty-seven cases (92 retrospective, 65 prospective) with injury due to fireworks presenting to the Department of Plastic Surgery at KEM Hospital between 1997 and 2006 were studied. The prevalence of injuries has decreased steadily over the last 10 years (41 cases in 1997, 3 cases in 2006). The maximum number of injuries (35%) was seen in the age group 5-14 years; 92% of these children were unsupervised. The commonest cause of injury was firework misuse (41% of cases), followed by device failure (35%). Device failure was commonest with flares/fountains (ground firework emitting sparks upwards) and aerial devices. Flare/fountains caused most injury (39%), sparklers the least (0.6%). Flare/fountains, ground spinners, sparklers, and gunpowder (explosive material from cracker, obtained by tearing paper wrapper and obtaining chemicals) caused only soft tissue burns; stringbombs (high-intensity fire cracker made by wrapping chemicals with jute strings/coir in layers) and rockets (aerial device that zooms upwards and bursts) caused blast injuries, leading to soft tissue disruption and bony injuries. Emergency surgery was done if indicated: tendon and/or neurovascular repair, fracture fixation, flap cover or amputation. Superficial burns were treated with dressings. Certain wounds needed only thorough cleansing of the wound and primary suturing. We concluded that, over a 10-year period, the prevalence of firework injury decreased due to increased

  10. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences…

  11. Case Studies in Wilderness Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Melissa; Tarter, Shana Lee

    Five case studies explore issues in wilderness medicine, with emphasis on evacuation decision making. The cases describe medical problems encountered during wilderness trips involving college or high school students. In each case, the situation and facts of the case are outlined, including the patient's medical history and vital signs, and at…

  12. Introduction of interdisciplinary teaching: two case studies : commentary on "teaching science, technology, and society to engineering students: a sixteen year journey".

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Hartwig

    2013-12-01

    Interdisciplinary courses on science, engineering and society have been successfully established in two cases, at Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey, and at the University of Hamburg, Germany. In both cases there were institutional and perceptual barriers that had to be overcome in the primarily disciplinary departments. The ingredients of success included a clear vision of interdisciplinary themes and didactics, and the exploitation of institutional opportunities. Haldun M. Ozaktas in Ankara used the dynamics of an accreditation process to establish courses on engineering and society. At the University of Hamburg the introduction of optional courses into all curricula allowed for the establishment of a seminar series on physics and society, as well as on peace education and peace building. Both of these approaches have a weakness in common: the courses can disappear once their initiators have left, unless the interdisciplinary themes are integrated into compulsory core curricula. PMID:24085355

  13. Ten-Year Study of a Wilson's Disease Dysarthric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Linda Susan; Parnell, Martha M.

    1987-01-01

    The 10-year longitudinal case study describes the history, speech therapy program, and treatment results for an adult male with Wilson's disease, a genetically based metabolic progressive neurological disorder which includes severe speech problems. (DB)

  14. The Use of Native Language in L2 Teaching: A Case Study of English Department and Preparatory Year, Najran University, Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Dera, Abdullah Saad

    2011-01-01

    Despite many ELT experts' opinions that while teaching a foreign language one should not use the mother tongue in the classroom, new researches show that sparing use of the mother tongue can be effective for the L2 learners. It is true that the 6- year compulsory English education of the school graduates of Saudi Arabia is not quite up to the…

  15. Figuring out How to Be a Teacher in a High-Stakes Context: A Case Study of First-Year Teachers' Conceptual and Practical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Christopher P.; Bay-Borelli, Debra E.; Scott, Jill

    2015-01-01

    High-stakes education reforms across the United States and the globe continue to alter the landscape of teaching and teacher education. One key but understudied aspect of this reform process is the experiences of first-year teachers, particularly those who participated in these high-stakes education systems as students and as a…

  16. A Democratic and Student-Centred Approach to Facilitating Teamwork Learning among First-Year Engineering Students: A Learning and Teaching Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missingham, Dorothy; Matthews, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This work examines an innovative and evolving approach to facilitating teamwork learning in a generic first-year mechanical engineering course. Principles of inclusive, student-active and democratic pedagogy were utilised to engage students on both the social and personal planes. Learner opportunities to facilitate, direct and lead the learning…

  17. A Case Study of Perceptions of Computer-Based Instruction by Nursing Students in a Two-Year College: Implications for Adult Continuing Education and Program Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leski, Joanne

    Community college nursing students' perceptions about computer-based instruction (CBI) were identified and examined from the standpoint of their implications for adult continuing education and program planning. Fifteen second-year nursing students, college faculty, and the nursing director were interviewed. The following were among the key…

  18. Kindergarteners Can Do It--So Can You: A Case Study of a Constructionist Technology-Rich First Year Seminar for Undergraduate College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisser, Sally; Gillespie, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    "Constructionism" is a theory of learning proposed by Seymour Papert of MIT. Co-instructors for a first year seminar for undergraduate students provided education students with a one-semester constructionist experience to learn by engaging with technology. Students used LEGO[R] construction bricks and pieces to solve problems by building, working…

  19. Factors Predicting Patient Dissatisfaction 2 Years After Discectomy for Lumbar Disc Herniation in a Chinese Older Cohort: A Prospective Study of 843 Cases at a Single Institution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Di; Ma, Lei; Shen, Yong; Ding, Wenyuan

    2015-10-01

    We aim to identify factors predicting patient dissatisfaction 2 years after discectomy for lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in a Chinese older cohort. Preoperative and 2-year follow-up data for 843 patients were analyzed. After 2 years of discectomy, the patients rated their satisfaction by Patient Satisfaction Index (PSI), with response of 1 or 2 defining satisfaction and a PSI response of 3 or 4 defining dissatisfaction. Associations between perioperative variables and satisfaction with the results of surgery were examined in univariate and multivariate analysis. Six hundred fifty-seven patients had a PSI of 1 or 2 and were enrolled as satisfied group, 186 patients had a PSI of 3 or 4 and were enrolled as dissatisfied group. At baseline, no significant differences were found between the 2 groups in age, occupation, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analog Scale (VAS)-leg, and VAS-back. Compared to satisfied group, dissatisfied group had a significantly higher BMI and a higher incidence of depression. Two years after discectomy, no significant differences were found between the 2 groups in decrease of ODI, decrease of VAS-back, decrease of VAS-leg, surgery complications. Compared to satisfied group, dissatisfied group experienced higher incidence of symptom recurrence and depression. Logistic regression analysis showed that obesity, pre- and postoperative depression, symptom recurrence were independently associated with patient dissatisfaction 2 years after discectomy.I n conclusion, more than 70% patients expressed satisfaction with discectomy for LDH. Two factors could predict patient dissatisfaction and be assessed before surgery: obesity and preoperative depression. Symptom recurrence and postoperative depression are also associated with diminished patient satisfaction. PMID:26448005

  20. Problems with identifying the 8200-year cold event in terrestrial records of the Atlantic seaboard: a case study from Dooagh, Achill Island, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, Katie; Turney, Chris S. M.; Pilcher, Jon R.; Palmer, J. G.; Baillie, M. G. L.

    2007-01-01

    The Northern Hemisphere cooling event 8200 years ago is believed to represent the last known major freshwater pulse into the North Atlantic as a result of the final collapse of the North American Laurentide ice sheet. This pulse of water is generally believed to have occurred independently of orbital variations and provides an analogue for predicted increases in high-latitude precipitation and ice melt as a result of anthropogenically driven future climate change. The precise timing, duration and magnitude of this event, however, are uncertain, with suggestions that the 100-yr meltwater cooling formed part of a longer-term cold period in the early Holocene. Here we undertook a multiproxy, high-resolution investigation of a peat sequence at Dooagh, Achill Island, on the west coast of Ireland, to determine whether the 8200-year cold event impacted upon the terrestrial vegetation immediately downwind of the proposed changes in the North Atlantic. We find clear evidence for an oscillation in the early Holocene using various measures of pollen, indicating a disruption in the vegetation leading to a grassland-dominated landscape, most probably driven by changes in precipitation rather than temperature. Radiocarbon dating was extremely problematic, however, with bulk peat samples systematically too young for the North Atlantic event, suggesting significant contamination from downward root penetration. The sustained disruption to vegetation over hundreds of years at Dooagh indicates the landscape was impacted by a long-term cooling event in the early Holocene, and not the single century length 8200-year meltwater event proposed in many other records in the North Atlantic region. Copyright

  1. Calciphylaxis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kauric-Klein, Zorica

    2012-01-01

    Caring for J.D. was a stressful experience. The extent of her wounds, pain, and limited options for treatment was very frustrating for the nursing staff. Although she did not survive, patient outcomes were met to some degree. Her pain was controlled to a greater extent, and there was less infection present in her wounds. The nurses worked with J.D. closely to improve her pain control and facilitate less painful dressing changes. They were vigilant in assessing the progress of her wound healing and communicating any increased signs of infections from her wounds. They sang with her to help distract her from the pain she was experiencing and to help her cope with her lengthy 8-month hospitalization. Providing care for J.D. was also a very important learning experience for nurses in terms of appropriate pain management for patients with CUA, wound care, and the need to sustain adequate nutrition to promote wound healing. CUA is a rare but potentially fatal disease that occurs in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent the devastating effects of this disease. Nephrology nurses need to reinforce the importance of keeping calcium, phosphorous, and parathyroid levels within normal ranges for their patients on dialysis. They also need to be vigilant in monitoring for potential CUA skin lesions to prevent and treat it early. To date, treatment options are mostly based on findings from case reports. Treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach with input from nephrologists, nurses, pain specialists, infectious disease specialists, and surgeons. The major goals of treatment are controlling risk factors, controlling pain, and preventing wound infection and possible sepsis. More studies need to be conducted to test interventions that may help treat CUA. PMID:23094342

  2. The First Case(s) of Botulism in Vienna in 21 Years: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, Matthias Gerhard; Gattringer, Klaus-Bernhard; Wenisch, Judith; Khalifeh, Neda; Koreny, Maria; Spertini, Verena; Allerberger, Franz; Graninger, Wolfgang; Kornschober, Christian; Lagler, Heimo; Reitner, Andreas; Sycha, Thomas; Thalhammer, Florian

    2012-01-01

    We describe two linked cases of botulinum toxin intoxication to provide the clinician with a better idea about how botulism cases may present since early diagnosis and treatment are crucial in botulism. Botulinum toxin is the strongest neurotoxin known. Methods: We review the available literature, the compiled clinical data, and observations. Results: After a slow onset of clinical signs a married couple living in Vienna presented with dysphagia, difficulties in accommodation, inability to sweat, urinary and stool retention, dizziness, and nausea. They suffered intoxication with botulinum toxin type B. Botulism is a rarely occurring disease in Austria. In the last 21 years there were only twelve reported cases. Conclusion: Both patients went to a general practitioner as well as several specialists before they were sent to and correctly diagnosed at our outpatient department. To avoid long delays between intoxication and diagnosis we think it is crucial to advert to the complex symptoms a nonsevere intoxication with botulinum toxin can produce, especially since intoxications have become rare occurrences in the industrialized societies due to the high quality of industrial food production. PMID:22779015

  3. Teaching Pharmacology by Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Sue

    1997-01-01

    Using pharmacology case studies with nursing students encourages theory-practice links and infuses real-life content. Cases provide rich qualitative data for evaluating curriculum. However, they are not a substitute for evidence-based practice. (SK)

  4. Effects of a 3-Year Nurse-Based Case Management in Aged Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction on Rehospitalisation, Mortality, Risk Factors, Physical Functioning and Mental Health. A Secondary Analysis of the Randomized Controlled KORINNA Study

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Inge; Hunger, Matthias; Stollenwerk, Björn; Seidl, Hildegard; Burkhardt, Katrin; Kuch, Bernhard; Meisinger, Christa; Holle, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Background Home-based secondary prevention programs led by nurses have been proposed to facilitate patients’ adjustment to acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The objective of this study was to conduct secondary analyses of the three-year follow-up of a nurse-based case management for elderly patients discharged from hospital after an AMI. Methods In a single-centre randomized two-armed parallel group trial of hospitalized patients with AMI ≥65 years, patients hospitalized between September 2008 and May 2010 in the Hospital of Augsburg, Germany, were randomly assigned to case management or usual care. The case-management intervention consisted of a nurse-based follow-up for three years including home visits and telephone calls. Study endpoints were time to first unplanned readmission or death, clinical parameters, functional status, depressive symptoms and malnutrition risk. Persons who assessed three-year outcomes and validated readmission data were blinded. The intention-to-treat approach was applied to the statistical analyses which included Cox Proportional Hazards models. Results Three hundred forty patients were allocated to receive case-management (n = 168) or usual care (n = 172). During three years, in the intervention group there were 80 first unplanned readmissions and 6 deaths, while the control group had 111first unplanned readmissions and 3 deaths. The intervention did not significantly affect time to first unplanned readmission or death (Hazard Ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67–1.19; p = 0.439), blood pressure, cholesterol level, instrumental activities of daily life (IADL) (only for men), and depressive symptoms. However, patients in the intervention group had a significantly better functional status, as assessed by the HAQ Disability Index, IADL (only for women), and hand grip strength, and better SCREEN-II malnutrition risk scores than patients in the control group. Conclusions A nurse-based management among elderly patients with

  5. Integrating an open-source course management system (Moodle) into the teaching of a first-year medical physiology course: a case study.

    PubMed

    Seluakumaran, Kumar; Jusof, Felicita Fedelis; Ismail, Rosnah; Husain, Ruby

    2011-12-01

    Educators in medical schools around the world are presently experimenting with innovative ways of using web-based learning to supplement the existing teaching and learning process. We have recently used a popular open-source course management system (CMS) called the modular object-oriented dynamic learning environment (Moodle) to construct an online site (DPhysiol) to facilitate our face-to-face teaching of physiology to a group of first-year students in the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program. The integration of the Moodle site into our teaching was assessed using online log activity, student examination marks, and feedback from students. The freely available Moodle platform was simple to use, helped to effectively deliver course materials, and has features that allowed cooperative learning. Students who used the CMS throughout their academic year and commented favorably regarding its use as a complement to the face-to-face classroom sessions. The group of students used the CMS obtained significantly higher scores in the final examination compared with the previous class that did not use the CMS. In addition, there was a significant correlation between student participation and performance in online quizzes and their final examination marks. However, students' overall online usage of the CMS did not correlate with their examination marks. We recommend Moodle as a useful tool for physiology educators who are interested in integrating web-based learning into their existing teaching curriculum. PMID:22139773

  6. A democratic and student-centred approach to facilitating teamwork learning among first-year engineering students: a learning and teaching case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missingham, Dorothy; Matthews, Robert

    2014-07-01

    This work examines an innovative and evolving approach to facilitating teamwork learning in a generic first-year mechanical engineering course. Principles of inclusive, student-active and democratic pedagogy were utilised to engage students on both the social and personal planes. Learner opportunities to facilitate, direct and lead the learning direction were emphasised. This emphasis encouraged a rich learning process and motivated students dismissive of the need to examine their communication skills and those who initially perceived the topic as a personal intrusion. Through a sharing of curriculum decisions, a climate of trust, ownership and shared value arose. Students chose from a range of tools across personality-type indicators, learning style indicators and hierarchies of human needs, to assist their capacity to express and discuss engineering designs and concepts. Peer teaching and collaborative exercises were incorporated to provide an authentic learning context and to further the student's sense of ownership.

  7. What is it like to be an international student at veterinary school? Perception and performance in first year-a case study at a UK veterinary school.

    PubMed

    Tötemeyer, Sabine; Dobbs, Heidi; Rutland, Catrin S

    2012-01-01

    Transition into higher education requires students to adjust to a new environment while showing greater independence in managing their own academic and personal life. This is often more difficult for international students who have to adjust to a different country, culture, and potentially another language. A cohort of first-year veterinary medicine students (17% international students) was investigated at a UK university using qualitative and quantitative questionnaires rating first-year experience and support services and statistical analysis of students' assessment performance. While the overall undergraduate perception was that they had learned a lot and progressed well, students in both groups struggled to cope with the workload. The non-UK educated students and students with English as a foreign language also struggled more with teaching delivery in lectures and participation in self-directed group learning and were more likely to feel that the veterinary degree program was too difficult. There was no statistical difference in how British and international students perceived the support system, although it was noticeable that the level of tutorial support was perceived as tutor-dependent. The international students particularly struggled with the assessments in early modules and also with the spot assessment method. However, in the practical assessments, using observed, structured practical exam stations, international and British students performed equally well. Increased support in the initial transition time, especially with regard to communication skills and confidence required for interactive teaching and learning environments such as small-group teaching, as well as increased time for specific assessment types, might benefit the needs of many international students. PMID:22718005

  8. Potential role of vegetation feedback in the climate sensitivity of high-latitude regions: A case study at 6000 years B.P.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kutzbach, J.-E.; Bartlein, P.J.; Foley, J.A.; Harrison, S.P.; Hosteller, S.W.; Liu, Z.; Prentice, I.C.; Webb, T., III

    1996-01-01

    Previous climate model simulations have shown that the configuration of the Earth's orbit during the early to mid-Holocene (approximately 10-5 kyr) can account for the generally warmer-than-present conditions experienced by the high latitudes of the northern hemisphere. New simulations for 6 kyr with two atmospheric/mixed-layer ocean models (Community Climate Model, version 1, CCM1, and Global ENvironmental and Ecological Simulation of Interactive Systems, version 2, GENESIS 2) are presented here and compared with results from two previous simulations with GENESIS 1 that were obtained with and without the albedo feedback due to climate-induced poleward expansion of the boreal forest. The climate model results are summarized in the form of potential vegetation maps obtained with the global BIOME model, which facilitates visual comparisons both among models and with pollen and plant macrofossil data recording shifts of the forest-tundra boundary. A preliminary synthesis shows that the forest limit was shifted 100-200 km north in most sectors. Both CCM1 and GENESIS 2 produced a shift of this magnitude. GENESIS 1 however produced too small a shift, except when the boreal forest albedo feedback was included. The feedback in this case was estimated to have amplified forest expansion by approximately 50%. The forest limit changes also show meridional patterns (greatest expansion in central Siberia and little or none in Alaska and Labrador) which have yet to be reproduced by models. Further progress in understanding of the processes involved in the response of climate and vegetation to orbital forcing will require both the deployment of coupled atmosphere-biosphere-ocean models and the development of more comprehensive observational data sets.

  9. Neonatal lupus erythematosis: a five-year case review.

    PubMed

    Porcel Chacón, Rocío; Tapia Ceballos, Leopoldo; Díaz Cabrera, Rocío; Gutiérrez Perandones, María Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus is an infrequent disease seen in newborns. It is caused by transplacental maternal autoantibody passage. Cutaneous involvement and congenital heart block (CHB) are the most common affections, although it may involve multiple organs like the liver, lungs, blood, nervous or digestive systems. This article present a review of the four cases diagnosed in the past five years in a Neonatal Unit, which shows the different clinical spectrum which can develop around this disease (CHB, multisystemic affection and two cutaneous cases), different autoantibodies (specially anti-SSA) with an early negativization during the first year of life and the possibility of future collagen vascular disease as occurred in one case. PMID:24296269

  10. Emotion, Engagement, and Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Terry, David R.; Lemons, Paula; Armstrong, Norris; Brickman, Peggy; Ribbens, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Three college faculty taught large general biology classes using case studies and personal response systems (clickers). Each instructor taught the same eight cases in two different sections, except the questions within the cases differed. In one section the questions were lower order (LO) factual inquiries, and in the other they were largely…