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Sample records for yeast cytosine deaminase

  1. Combined QM(DFT)/MM molecular dynamics simulations of the deamination of cytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yuan; Yan, Honggao; Cao, Zexing; Mo, Yirong

    2016-05-15

    Extensive combined quantum mechanical (B3LYP/6-31G*) and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to elucidate the hydrolytic deamination mechanism of cytosine to uracil catalyzed by the yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD). Though cytosine has no direct binding to the zinc center, it reacts with the water molecule coordinated to zinc, and the adjacent conserved Glu64 serves as a general acid/base to shuttle protons from water to cytosine. The overall reaction consists of several proton-transfer processes and nucleophilic attacks. A tetrahedral intermediate adduct of cytosine and water binding to zinc is identified and similar to the crystal structure of yCD with the inhibitor 2-pyrimidinone. The rate-determining step with the barrier of 18.0 kcal/mol in the whole catalytic cycle occurs in the process of uracil departure where the proton transfer from water to Glu64 and nucleophilic attack of the resulting hydroxide anion to C2 of the uracil ring occurs synchronously. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26813441

  2. Three-Dimensional Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Cytosine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    R Hall; A Fedorov; C Xu; E Fedorov; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K{sub i} of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  3. Improved cytotoxic effects of Salmonella-producing cytosine deaminase in tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the cytotoxic activity of a Salmonella strain carrying a salicylate-inducible expression system that controls cytosine deaminase production, we have modified both, the vector and the producer bacterium. First, the translation rates of the expression module containing the Escherichia coli codA gene cloned under the control of the Pm promoter have been improved by using the T7 phage gene 10 ribosome binding site sequence and replacing the original GUG start codon by AUG. Second, to increase the time span in which cytosine deaminase may be produced by the bacteria in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, a 5-fluorouracyl resistant Salmonella strain has been constructed by deleting its upp gene sequence. This new Salmonella strain shows increased cytosine deaminase activity and, after infecting tumour cell cultures, increased cytotoxic and bystander effects under standard induction conditions. In addition, we have generated a purD mutation in the producer strain to control its intracellular proliferation by the presence of adenine and avoid the intrinsic Salmonella cell death induction. This strategy allows the analysis and comparison of the cytotoxic effects of cytosine deaminase produced by different Salmonella strains in tumour cell cultures. PMID:25227763

  4. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia induced cytosine deaminase expression in microencapsulated E. coli for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Ennis, Riley C; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-06-10

    Engineered bacterial cells that are designed to express therapeutic enzymes under the transcriptional control of remotely inducible promoters can mediate the de novo conversion of non-toxic prodrugs to their cytotoxic forms. In situ cellular expression of enzymes provides increased stability and control of enzyme activity as compared to isolated enzymes. We have engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli), designed to express cytosine deaminase at elevated temperatures, under the transcriptional control of thermo-regulatory λpL-cI857 promoter cassette which provides a thermal switch to trigger enzyme synthesis. Enhanced cytosine deaminase expression was observed in cultures incubated at 42°C as compared to 30°C, and enzyme expression was further substantiated by spectrophotometric assays indicating enhanced conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil. The engineered cells were subsequently co-encapsulated with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in immunoprotective alginate microcapsules, and cytosine deaminase expression was triggered remotely by alternating magnetic field-induced hyperthermia. The combination of 5-fluorocytosine with AMF-activated microcapsules demonstrated tumor cell cytotoxicity comparable to direct treatment with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Such enzyme-prodrug therapy, based on engineered and immunoisolated E. coli, may ultimately yield an improved therapeutic index relative to monotherapy, as AMF mediated hyperthermia might be expected to pre-sensitize tumors to chemotherapy under appropriate conditions. PMID:25820125

  5. Cytosine Deaminase/5-Fluorocytosine Exposure Induces Bystander and Radiosensitization Effects in Hypoxic Glioblastoma Cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jennifer K.; Hu, Lily J.; Wang Dongfang; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Deen, Dennis F. . E-mail: dennisdeen@juno.com

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) is limited by therapeutic ratio; therefore, successful therapy must be specifically cytotoxic to cancer cells. Hypoxic cells are ubiquitous in GBM, and resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and, thus, are logical targets for gene therapy. In this study, we investigated whether cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) enzyme/prodrug treatment induced a bystander effect (BE) and/or radiosensitization in hypoxic GBM cells. Methods and Materials: We stably transfected cells with a gene construct consisting of the SV40 minimal promoter, nine copies of a hypoxia-responsive element, and the yeast CD gene. During hypoxia, a hypoxia-responsive element regulates expression of the CD gene and facilitates the conversion of 5-FC to 5-fluorouracil, a highly toxic antimetabolite. We used colony-forming efficiency (CFE) and immunofluorescence assays to assess for BE in co-cultures of CD-expressing clone cells and parent, pNeo- or green fluorescent protein-stably transfected GBM cells. We also investigated the radiosensitivity of CD clone cells treated with 5-FC under hypoxic conditions, and we used flow cytometry to investigate treatment-induced cell cycle changes. Results: Both a large BE and radiosensitization occurred in GBM cells under hypoxic conditions. The magnitude of the BE depended on the number of transfected cells producing CD, the functionality of the CD, the administered concentration of 5-FC, and the sensitivity of cell type to 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: Hypoxia-inducible CD/5-FC therapy in combination with radiation therapy shows both a pronounced BE and a radiosensitizing effect under hypoxic conditions.

  6. Effect of alginate microencapsulation on the catalytic efficiency and in vitro enzyme-prodrug therapeutic efficacy of cytosine deaminase and of recombinant E. coli expressing cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Funaro, Michael G; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Chen, Zhihang; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CD) catalyses the enzymatic conversion of the non-toxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the potent chemotherapeutic form, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Intratumoral delivery of CD localises chemotherapy dose while reducing systemic toxicity. Encapsulation in biocompatible microcapsules immunoisolates CD and protects it from degradation. We report on the effect of alginate encapsulation on the catalytic and functional activity of isolated CD and recombinant E. coli engineered to express CD (E. coli(CD)). Alginate microcapsules containing either CD or Escherichia coli(CD) were prepared using ionotropic gelation. Conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU was quantitated in unencapsulated and encapsulated CD/E. coli(CD) using spectrophotometry, with a slower rate of conversion observed following encapsulation. Both encapsulated CD/5-FC and E. coli(CD)/5-FC resulted in cell kill and reduced proliferation of 9?L rat glioma cells, which was comparable to direct 5-FU treatment. Our results show that encapsulation preserves the therapeutic potential of CD and E. coli(CD) is equally effective for enzyme-prodrug therapy. PMID:26642874

  7. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-encoded cytidine deaminase efficiently inactivates cytosine-based anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Vande Voorde, Johan; Vervaeke, Peter; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas may colonize tumor tissue in patients. The cytostatic activity of gemcitabine was dramatically decreased in Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected tumor cell cultures compared with non-infected tumor cell cultures. This mycoplasma-driven drug deamination could be prevented by exogenous administration of the cytidine deaminase (CDA) inhibitor tetrahydrouridine, but also by the natural nucleosides or by a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor. The M. hyorhinis-encoded CDAHyor gene was cloned, expressed as a recombinant protein and purified. CDAHyor was found to be more catalytically active than its human equivalent and efficiently deaminates (inactivates) cytosine-based anticancer drugs. CDAHyor expression at the tumor site may result in selective drug inactivation and suboptimal therapeutic efficiency. PMID:26322268

  8. Markerless Gene Deletion with Cytosine Deaminase in Thermus thermophilus Strain HB27.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hoffmann, Jana; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2015-01-01

    We developed a counterselectable deletion system for Thermus thermophilus HB27 based on cytosine deaminase (encoded by codA) from Thermaerobacter marianensis DSM 12885 and the sensitivity of T. thermophilus HB27 to the antimetabolite 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). The deletion vector comprises the pUC18 origin of replication, a thermostable kanamycin resistance marker functional in T. thermophilus HB27, and codA under the control of a constitutive putative trehalose promoter from T. thermophilus HB27. The functionality of the system was demonstrated by deletion of the bglT gene, encoding a β-glycosidase, and three carotenoid biosynthesis genes, CYP175A1, crtY, and crtI, from the genome of T. thermophilus HB27. PMID:26655764

  9. Mutation Processes in 293-Based Clones Overexpressing the DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3B

    PubMed Central

    Quist, Jelmar S.; Temiz, Nuri A.; Tutt, Andrew N. J.; Grigoriadis, Anita; Harris, Reuben S.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular, cellular, and clinical studies have combined to demonstrate a contribution from the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) to the overall mutation load in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, ovarian, and other cancer types. However, the complete landscape of mutations attributable to this enzyme has yet to be determined in a controlled human cell system. We report a conditional and isogenic system for A3B induction, genomic DNA deamination, and mutagenesis. Human 293-derived cells were engineered to express doxycycline-inducible A3B-eGFP or eGFP constructs. Cells were subjected to 10 rounds of A3B-eGFP exposure that each caused 80–90% cell death. Control pools were subjected to parallel rounds of non-toxic eGFP exposure, and dilutions were done each round to mimic A3B-eGFP induced population fluctuations. Targeted sequencing of portions of TP53 and MYC demonstrated greater mutation accumulation in the A3B-eGFP exposed pools. Clones were generated and microarray analyses were used to identify those with the greatest number of SNP alterations for whole genome sequencing. A3B-eGFP exposed clones showed global increases in C-to-T transition mutations, enrichments for cytosine mutations within A3B-preferred trinucleotide motifs, and more copy number aberrations. Surprisingly, both control and A3B-eGFP clones also elicited strong mutator phenotypes characteristic of defective mismatch repair. Despite this additional mutational process, the 293-based system characterized here still yielded a genome-wide view of A3B-catalyzed mutagenesis in human cells and a system for additional studies on the compounded effects of simultaneous mutation mechanisms in cancer cells. PMID:27163364

  10. Retrovirus-mediated transduction of a cytosine deaminase gene preserves the stemness of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Sung; Chang, Da-Young; Kim, Ji-Hoi; Jung, Jin Hwa; Park, JoonSeong; Kim, Se-Hyuk; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as attractive cellular vehicles to deliver therapeutic genes for ex-vivo therapy of diverse diseases; this is, in part, because they have the capability to migrate into tumor or lesion sites. Previously, we showed that MSCs could be utilized to deliver a bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene to brain tumors. Here we assessed whether transduction with a retroviral vector encoding CD gene altered the stem cell property of MSCs. MSCs were transduced at passage 1 and cultivated up to passage 11. We found that proliferation and differentiation potentials, chromosomal stability and surface antigenicity of MSCs were not altered by retroviral transduction. The results indicate that retroviral vectors can be safely utilized for delivery of suicide genes to MSCs for ex-vivo therapy. We also found that a single retroviral transduction was sufficient for sustainable expression up to passage 10. The persistent expression of the transduced gene indicates that transduced MSCs provide a tractable and manageable approach for potential use in allogeneic transplantation. PMID:23429359

  11. Retrovirus-mediated transduction of a cytosine deaminase gene preserves the stemness of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sung Park, Jin; Chang, Da-Young; Kim, Ji-Hoi; Hwa Jung, Jin; Park, JoonSeong; Kim, Se-Hyuk; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as attractive cellular vehicles to deliver therapeutic genes for ex-vivo therapy of diverse diseases; this is, in part, because they have the capability to migrate into tumor or lesion sites. Previously, we showed that MSCs could be utilized to deliver a bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene to brain tumors. Here we assessed whether transduction with a retroviral vector encoding CD gene altered the stem cell property of MSCs. MSCs were transduced at passage 1 and cultivated up to passage 11. We found that proliferation and differentiation potentials, chromosomal stability and surface antigenicity of MSCs were not altered by retroviral transduction. The results indicate that retroviral vectors can be safely utilized for delivery of suicide genes to MSCs for ex-vivo therapy. We also found that a single retroviral transduction was sufficient for sustainable expression up to passage 10. The persistent expression of the transduced gene indicates that transduced MSCs provide a tractable and manageable approach for potential use in allogeneic transplantation. PMID:23429359

  12. Adenosine potentiates the therapeutic effects of neural stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase against metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonyoung; Seol, Ho Jun; Seong, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jandi; Kim, Yonghyun; Kim, Seung U; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2013-09-01

    Tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) provide a novel approach with which to deliver targeting therapeutic genes to brain tumors. Previously, we developed a therapeutic strategy against metastatic brain tumors using a human NSC line (F3) expressing cytosine deaminase (F3.CD). F3.CD converts systemically administered 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), a blood-brain barrier permeable nontoxic prodrug, into the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In this study, we potentiated a therapeutic strategy of treatment with nucleosides in order to chemically facilitate the endogenous conversion of 5-FU to its toxic metabolite 5-FU ribonucleoside (5-FUR). In vitro, 5-FUR showed superior cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-435 cancer cells when compared to 5-FU. Although adenosine had little cytotoxic activity, the addition of adenosine significantly potentiated the in vitro cytotoxicity of 5-FU. When MDA-MB‑435 cells were co-cultured with F3.CD cells, F3.CD cells and 5-FC inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-435 cells more significantly in the presence of adenosine. Facilitated 5-FUR production by F3.CD was confirmed by an HPLC analysis of the conditioned media derived from F3.CD cells treated with 5-FC and adenosine. In vivo systemic adenosine treatment also significantly potentiated the therapeutic effects of F3.CD cells and 5-FC in an MDA-MB-435 metastatic brain tumor model. Simple adenosine addition improved the antitumor activity of the NSCs carrying the therapeutic gene. Our results demonstrated an increased therapeutic potential, and thereby, clinical applicability of NSC-based gene therapy. PMID:23828015

  13. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-01-01

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. 20/34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access substrate DNA cytosines. PMID:22181350

  14. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-04-04

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. Twenty of 34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access to substrate DNA cytosines.

  15. Three-dimensional assessment of bystander effects of mesenchymal stem cells carrying a cytosine deaminase gene on glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jin Hwa; Kim, Andrew Aujin; Chang, Da-Young; Park, Yoo Ra; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Sung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells carrying a suicide gene have emerged as therapeutic candidates for their cytotoxic bystander effects on neighboring cancers, while being non-toxic to other parts of the body. However, traditional cytotoxicity assays are unable to adequately assess the therapeutic effects of bystander cells. Here, we report a method to assess bystander effects of therapeutic stem cells against 3-dimensionally grown glioma cells in real time. U87 glioma cells were stably transduced to express a green fluorescence protein and co-cultivated with mesenchymal stem cells engineered to carry a bacterial cytosine deaminase gene (MSC/CD). Following addition of a 5-fluorocytine (5-FC) prodrug to the co-culture, fluorescence from U87 cells was obtained and analyzed in real time. Notably, the IC50 of 5-FC was higher when U87 cells were grown 3-dimensionally in soft agar medium for 3 weeks, as compared to those grown for one week in two-dimensional monolayer cultures. Additionally, more MSC/CD cells were required to maintain a similar level of efficacy. Since three-dimensional growth of glioma cells under our co-culture condition mimics the long-term expansion of cancer cells in vivo, our method can extend to an in vitro assay system to assess stem cell-mediated anti-cancer effects before advancing into preclinical animal studies. PMID:26609476

  16. Computational modeling and functional analysis of Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase and Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jufeng; Wang, Zhanli; Wei, Fang; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Liangren; Huang, Qian . E-mail: qhuang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2007-08-17

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1TK) and Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase (CD) fusion protein was designed using InsightII software. The structural rationality of the fusion proteins incorporating a series of flexible linker peptide was analyzed, and a suitable linker peptide was chosen for further investigated. The recombinant plasmid containing the coding regions of HSV-1TK and CD cDNA connected by this linker peptide coding sequence was generated and subsequently transfected into the human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293). The Western blotting indicated that the recombinant fusion protein existed as a dimer with a molecular weight of approximately 90 kDa. The toxicity of the prodrug on the recombinant plasmid-transfected human lung cancer cell line NCIH460 was evaluated, which showed that TKglyCD-expressing cells conferred upon cells prodrug sensitivities equivalent to that observed for each enzyme independently. Most noteworthy, cytotoxicity could be enhanced by concurrently treating TKglyCD-expressing cells with prodrugs GCV and 5-FC. The results indicate that we have successfully constructed a HSV-1TKglyCD fusion gene which might have a potential application for cancer gene therapy.

  17. A cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin E2 pathway augments activation-induced cytosine deaminase expression within replicating human B cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjoo; Trott, Joshua S; Haque, Shabirul; McCormick, Steven; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Mongini, Patricia K A

    2010-11-01

    Within inflammatory environments, B cells encountering foreign or self-Ag can develop tertiary lymphoid tissue expressing activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID). Recently, this DNA-modifying enzyme was detected in nonlymphoid cells within several inflamed tissues and strongly implicated in malignant transformation. This study examines whether a cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) pathway, often linked to inflammation, influences AID expression in activated B lymphocytes. In this paper, we report that dividing human B cells responding to surrogate C3d-coated Ag, IL-4, and BAFF express AID, as well as COX-2. A progressive increase in AID with each division was paralleled by a division-related increase in a COX-2-linked enzyme, microsomal PGE(2) synthase-1, and the PGE(2)R, EP2. Cells with the greatest expression of AID expressed the highest levels of EP2. Although COX-2 inhibitors diminished both AID expression and IgG class switching, exogenous PGE(2) and butaprost, a selective EP2 agonist, augmented AID mRNA/protein and increased the numbers of IgG(+) progeny. Despite the latter, the proportion of IgG(+) cells within viable progeny generally declined with PGE(2) supplementation. This was not due to PGE(2)-promoted differentiation to plasma cells or to greater downstream switching. Rather, because phosphorylated ataxia telangiectasia mutated levels were increased in progeny of PGE(2)-supplemented cultures, it appears more likely that PGE(2) facilitates AID-dependent DNA double-strand breaks that block B cell cycle progression or promote activation-induced cell death, or both. Taken together, the results suggest that a PGE(2) feed-forward mechanism for augmenting COX-2 pathway proteins promotes progressively increased levels of AID mRNA, protein, and function. PMID:20921530

  18. Genome-Wide Mutation Avalanches Induced in Diploid Yeast Cells by a Base Analog or an APOBEC Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Lada, Artem G.; Stepchenkova, Elena I.; Waisertreiger, Irina S. R.; Noskov, Vladimir N.; Dhar, Alok; Eudy, James D.; Boissy, Robert J.; Hirano, Masayuki; Rogozin, Igor B.; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic information should be accurately transmitted from cell to cell; conversely, the adaptation in evolution and disease is fueled by mutations. In the case of cancer development, multiple genetic changes happen in somatic diploid cells. Most classic studies of the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis have been performed in haploids. We demonstrate that the parameters of the mutation process are different in diploid cell populations. The genomes of drug-resistant mutants induced in yeast diploids by base analog 6-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP) or AID/APOBEC cytosine deaminase PmCDA1 from lamprey carried a stunning load of thousands of unselected mutations. Haploid mutants contained almost an order of magnitude fewer mutations. To explain this, we propose that the distribution of induced mutation rates in the cell population is uneven. The mutants in diploids with coincidental mutations in the two copies of the reporter gene arise from a fraction of cells that are transiently hypersensitive to the mutagenic action of a given mutagen. The progeny of such cells were never recovered in haploids due to the lethality caused by the inactivation of single-copy essential genes in cells with too many induced mutations. In diploid cells, the progeny of hypersensitive cells survived, but their genomes were saturated by heterozygous mutations. The reason for the hypermutability of cells could be transient faults of the mutation prevention pathways, like sanitization of nucleotide pools for HAP or an elevated expression of the PmCDA1 gene or the temporary inability of the destruction of the deaminase. The hypothesis on spikes of mutability may explain the sudden acquisition of multiple mutational changes during evolution and carcinogenesis. PMID:24039593

  19. Non-invasive molecular and functional imaging of cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase fused with red fluorescence protein

    PubMed Central

    XING, LIGANG; DENG, XUELONG; KOTEDIA, KHUSHALI; ACKERSTAFF, ELLEN; PONOMAREV, VLADIMIR; LING, C. CLIFTON; KOUTCHER, JASON A.; LI, GLORIA C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Increased expression of cytosine deaminase (CD) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) may improve the antitumoral effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and thereby enhance the potential of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy. For the applicability of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy in a clinical setting, it is essential to be able to monitor the transgene expression and function in vivo. Thus, we developed a preclinical tumor model to investigate the feasibility of using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and optical imaging to measure non-invasively CD and UPRT expression and function. Materials and methods Expression vectors of CD or CD/UPRT fused to monomeric DsRed (mDsRed) were constructed and rat prostate carcinoma (R3327-AT) cell lines stably expressing either CD/mDsRed or CD/UPRT/mDsRed were generated. The expression of the fusion proteins was evaluated by flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and Western blot analysis. The function of the fusion protein was confirmed in vitro by assessing 5-FC and 5-FU cytotoxicity. In vivo fluorine-19 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F MRS) was used to monitor the conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU in mice bearing the R3327-CD/mDsRed and R3327-CD/UPRT/mDsRed tumor xenografts. Results Sensitivity to 5-FC and 5-FU was higher in cells stably expressing the CD/UPRT/mDsRed fusion gene than in cells stably expressing CD/mDsRed alone or wild-type cells. Whole tumor 19F MRS measurements showed rapid conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU within 20 min after 5-FC was administered intravenously in both CD/mDsRed and CD/UPRT/mDsRed tumors with subsequent anabolism to cytotoxic fluoronucleotides (FNucs). CD/UPRT/mDsRed tumor was more efficient in these processes. Conclusion This study demonstrates the utility of these tumor models stably expressing CD or CD/UPRT to non-invasively evaluate the efficacy of the transgene expression/activity by monitoring drug metabolism in vivo using MRS, with potential applications in preclinical and clinical settings. PMID:18661431

  20. An Insight into the Environmental Effects of the Pocket of the Active Site of the Enzyme. Ab initio ONIOM-Molecular Dynamics (MD) Study on Cytosine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2008-02-01

    We applied the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method to cytosine deaminase to examine the environmental effects of the amino acid residues in the pocket of the active site on the substrate taking account of their thermal motion. The ab initio ONIOM-MD simulations show that the substrate uracil is strongly perturbed by the amino acid residue Ile33, which sandwiches the uracil with His62, through the steric contact due to the thermal motion. As a result, the magnitude of the thermal oscillation of the potential energy and structure of the substrate uracil significantly increases. TM and MA were partly supported by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  1. The structure of a yeast RNA-editing deaminase provides insight into the fold and function of activation-induced deaminase and APOBEC-1

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kefang; Sowden, Mark P.; Dance, Geoffrey S. C.; Torelli, Andrew T.; Smith, Harold C.; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2004-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) uses base deamination for class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation and is related to the mammalian RNA-editing enzyme apolipoprotein B editing catalytic subunit 1 (APOBEC-1). CDD1 is a yeast ortholog of APOBEC-1 that exhibits cytidine deaminase and RNA-editing activity. Here, we present the crystal structure of CDD1 at 2.0-Å resolution and its use in comparative modeling of APOBEC-1 and AID. The models explain dimerization and the need for trans-acting loops that contribute to active site formation. Substrate selectivity appears to be regulated by a central active site “flap” whose size and flexibility accommodate large substrates in contrast to deaminases of pyrimidine metabolism that bind only small nucleosides or free bases. Most importantly, the results suggested both AID and APOBEC-1 are equally likely to bind single-stranded DNA or RNA, which has implications for the identification of natural AID targets. PMID:15148397

  2. Cytosine DNA methylation is found in Drosophila melanogaster but absent in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and other yeast species.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Floriana; Mülleder, Michael; Kok, Robert; Blom, Henk J; Ralser, Markus

    2014-04-15

    The methylation of cytosine to 5-methylcytosine (5-meC) is an important epigenetic DNA modification in many bacteria, plants, and mammals, but its relevance for important model organisms, including Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, is still equivocal. By reporting the presence of 5-meC in a broad variety of wild, laboratory, and industrial yeasts, a recent study also challenged the dogma about the absence of DNA methylation in yeast species. We would like to bring to attention that the protocol used for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry involved hydrolysis of the DNA preparations. As this process separates cytosine and 5-meC from the sugar phosphate backbone, this method is unable to distinguish DNA- from RNA-derived 5-meC. We employed an alternative LC-MS/MS protocol where by targeting 5-methyldeoxycytidine moieties after enzymatic digestion, only 5-meC specifically derived from DNA is quantified. This technique unambiguously identified cytosine DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana (14.0% of cytosines methylated), Mus musculus (7.6%), and Escherichia coli (2.3%). Despite achieving a detection limit at 250 attomoles (corresponding to <0.00002 methylated cytosines per nonmethylated cytosine), we could not confirm any cytosine DNA methylation in laboratory and industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces paradoxus, or Pichia pastoris. The protocol however unequivocally confirmed DNA methylation in adult Drosophila melanogaster at a value (0.034%) that is up to 2 orders of magnitude below the detection limit of bisulphite sequencing. Thus, 5-meC is a rare DNA modification in drosophila but absent in yeast. PMID:24640988

  3. Absence of a gene encoding cytosine deaminase in the genome of the agaricomycete Coprinopsis cinerea enables simple marker recycling through 5-fluorocytosine counterselection.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Takehito; Honda, Yoichi

    2015-08-01

    Coprinopsis cinerea is a model species for molecular genetics studies of sexual development in agaricomycetes or homobasidiomycetes. Recently, efficient gene targeting was established in this fungus by generating Cc.ku70 or Cc.lig4 disruptants. To determine the molecular mechanisms underlying sexual development, which involves many genes, generating multiple gene disruptants is required. However, the number of transformation markers available for C. cinerea is limited. This problem would be solved by establishing marker recycling. In this study, we found that C. cinerea lacks a gene encoding a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytosine deaminase (Fcy1p) in its genome, which is present in many other fungi. We also observed that C. cinerea is resistant to 5-fluorocytosine. Based on these findings, we established a simple marker recycling method in this fungus using 5-fluorocytosine counterselection after heterologous expression of FCY1 derived from Pleurotus ostreatus, together with the hygromycin resistance gene. This study proposes a simple genetic manipulation system that can be performed using wild-type strains of several fungi that lack a gene homologous to S. cerevisiae FCY1 in their genomes. PMID:26223587

  4. Cytosine deaminase as a negative selectable marker for the microalgal chloroplast: a strategy for the isolation of nuclear mutations that affect chloroplast gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Young, Rosanna E B; Purton, Saul

    2014-01-01

    Negative selectable markers are useful tools for forward-genetic screens aimed at identifying trans-acting factors that are required for expression of specific genes. Transgenic lines harbouring the marker fused to a gene element, such as a promoter, may be mutagenized to isolate loss-of-function mutants able to survive under selection. Such a strategy allows the molecular dissection of factors that are essential for expression of the gene. Expression of individual chloroplast genes in plants and algae typically requires one or more nuclear-encoded factors that act at the post-transcriptional level, often through interaction with the 5′ UTR of the mRNA. To study such nuclear control further, we have developed the Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase gene codA as a conditional negative selectable marker for use in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that a codon-optimized variant of codA with three amino acid substitutions confers sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) when expressed in the chloroplast under the control of endogenous promoter/5′ UTR elements from the photosynthetic genes psaA or petA. UV mutagenesis of the psaA transgenic line allowed recovery of 5-FC-resistant, photosynthetically deficient lines harbouring mutations in the nuclear gene for the factor TAA1 that is required for psaA translation. Similarly, the petA line was used to isolate mutants of the petA mRNA stability factor MCA1 and the translation factor TCA1. The codA marker may be used to identify critical residues in known nuclear factors and to aid the discovery of additional factors required for expression of chloroplast genes. PMID:25234691

  5. Increased sensitivity of glioma cells to 5-fluorocytosine following photo-chemical internalization enhanced nonviral transfection of the cytosine deaminase suicide gene

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Genesis; Sun, Chung-Ho; Trinidad, Anthony; Chun, Changho; Kwon, Young Jik; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the outcomes of patients with GBM have not significantly improved. Tumor recurrence in the resection margins occurs in more than 80 % of cases indicating aggressive treatment modalities, such as gene therapy are warranted. We have examined photochemical internalization (PCI) as a method for the non-viral transfection of the cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene into glioma cells. The CD gene encodes an enzyme that can convert the nontoxic antifungal agent, 5-fluorocytosine, into the chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil. Multicell tumor spheroids derived from established rat and human glioma cell lines were used as in vitro tumor models. Plasmids containing either the CD gene alone or together with the uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (UPRT) gene combined with the gene carrier protamine sulfate were employed in all experiments. PCI was performed with the photosensitizer AlPcS2a and 670 nm laser irradiance. Protamine sulfate/CD DNA polyplexes proved nontoxic but inefficient transfection agents due to endosomal entrapment. In contrast, PCI mediated CD gene transfection resulted in a significant inhibition of spheroid growth in the presence of, but not in the absence of, 5-FC. Repetitive PCI induced transfection was more efficient at low CD plasmid concentration than single treatment. The results clearly indicate that AlPcS2a-mediated PCI can be used to enhance transfection of a tumor suicide gene such as CD, in malignant glioma cells and cells transfected with both the CD and UPRT genes had a pronounced bystander effect. PMID:24610460

  6. Cytosine deaminase as a negative selectable marker for the microalgal chloroplast: a strategy for the isolation of nuclear mutations that affect chloroplast gene expression.

    PubMed

    Young, Rosanna E B; Purton, Saul

    2014-12-01

    Negative selectable markers are useful tools for forward-genetic screens aimed at identifying trans-acting factors that are required for expression of specific genes. Transgenic lines harbouring the marker fused to a gene element, such as a promoter, may be mutagenized to isolate loss-of-function mutants able to survive under selection. Such a strategy allows the molecular dissection of factors that are essential for expression of the gene. Expression of individual chloroplast genes in plants and algae typically requires one or more nuclear-encoded factors that act at the post-transcriptional level, often through interaction with the 5' UTR of the mRNA. To study such nuclear control further, we have developed the Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase gene codA as a conditional negative selectable marker for use in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that a codon-optimized variant of codA with three amino acid substitutions confers sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) when expressed in the chloroplast under the control of endogenous promoter/5' UTR elements from the photosynthetic genes psaA or petA. UV mutagenesis of the psaA transgenic line allowed recovery of 5-FC-resistant, photosynthetically deficient lines harbouring mutations in the nuclear gene for the factor TAA1 that is required for psaA translation. Similarly, the petA line was used to isolate mutants of the petA mRNA stability factor MCA1 and the translation factor TCA1. The codA marker may be used to identify critical residues in known nuclear factors and to aid the discovery of additional factors required for expression of chloroplast genes. PMID:25234691

  7. Active RNAP pre-initiation sites are highly mutated by cytidine deaminases in yeast, with AID targeting small RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin JM; Wu, Yee Ling; Rada, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Cytidine deaminases are single stranded DNA mutators diversifying antibodies and restricting viral infection. Improper access to the genome leads to translocations and mutations in B cells and contributes to the mutation landscape in cancer, such as kataegis. It remains unclear how deaminases access double stranded genomes and whether off-target mutations favor certain loci, although transcription and opportunistic access during DNA repair are thought to play a role. In yeast, AID and the catalytic domain of APOBEC3G preferentially mutate transcriptionally active genes within narrow regions, 110 base pairs in width, fixed at RNA polymerase initiation sites. Unlike APOBEC3G, AID shows enhanced mutational preference for small RNA genes (tRNAs, snoRNAs and snRNAs) suggesting a putative role for RNA in its recruitment. We uncover the high affinity of the deaminases for the single stranded DNA exposed by initiating RNA polymerases (a DNA configuration reproduced at stalled polymerases) without a requirement for specific cofactors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03553.001 PMID:25237741

  8. Regional 'pro-drug' gene therapy: intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector expressing the E. coli cytosine deaminase gene and systemic administration of 5-fluorocytosine suppresses growth of hepatic metastasis of colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Topf, N; Worgall, S; Hackett, N R; Crystal, R G

    1998-04-01

    Direct administration of an adenoviral vector expressing the cytosine deaminase gene (AdCMV.CD) to tumors of colon carcinoma cells, with concomitant systemic administration of 5-fluorocytosine (5FC), results in local production of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and suppression of tumor growth. Based on the demonstration that in vivo adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to intrahepatic tumors is relatively inefficient compared with in vivo gene transfer to hepatocytes, we developed a 'regional' prodrug strategy using in vivo Ad-mediated CD gene transfer to normal liver, permitting hepatocytes to convert 5FC into 5FU to treat local metastasis effectively in a 'trans' fashion. To show that hepatocytes can generate and export sufficient 5FU to achieve this goal, primary rat hepatocytes were exposed to AdCMV.CD and 5FC. Evaluation of the supernatants by spectrophotometry and by HPLC demonstrated significant conversion of 5FC into 5FU. When supernatants of hepatocytes exposed to AdCMV.CD and 5FC were transferred to cultures of CT26 mouse colon carcinoma cells, the CT26 viability was reduced by 80%. To show that this regional AdCMV.CD/5FC prodrug strategy can suppress tumor growth in vivo, a model of metastatic colon carcinoma was established by injecting CT26 cells into the left lobe of the liver of syngeneic Balb/c mice. The next day, AdCMV.CD was transferred to hepatocytes by intravenous administration, and 5FC treatment was started the following day. Evaluation of tumor growth after 15 days showed marked suppression of tumor growth in AdCMV.CD- and 5FC- treated animals compared to control groups (P < 0.007). We conclude that primary hepatocytes are capable of converting 5FC into 5FU and exporting sufficient amounts of 5FU to the local milieu to suppress the growth of liver metastases of colon carcinoma cells. PMID:9614575

  9. Human Sulfatase-1 Improves the Effectiveness of Cytosine Deaminase Suicide Gene Therapy with 5-Fluorocytosine Treatment on Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line HepG2 In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ling; Wang, Ping; Ma, Sheng-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human sulfatase-1 (Hsulf-1) is an endosulfatase that selectively removes sulfate groups from heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), altering the binding of several growth factors and cytokines to HSPG to regulate cell proliferation, cell motility, and apoptosis. We investigated the role of combined cancer gene therapy with Hsulf-1 and cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine (CD/5-FC) suicide gene on a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line, HepG2, in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the expression of Hsulf-1 in HCC. Cell apoptosis was observed through flow cytometry instrument and mechanism of Hsulf-1 to enhance the cytotoxicity of 5-FC against HCC was analyzed in HCC by confocal microscopy. We also establish a nude mice model of HCC to address the effect of Hsulf-1 expression on the CD/5-FC suicide gene therapy in vivo. Results: A significant decrease in HepG2 cell proliferation and an increase in HepG2 cell apoptosis were observed when Hsulf-1 expression was combined with the CD/5-FC gene suicide system. A noticeable bystander effect was observed when the Hsulf-1 and CD genes were co-expressed. Intracellular calcium was also increased after HepG2 cells were infected with the Hsulf-1 gene. In vivo studies showed that the suppression of tumor growth was more pronounced in animals treated with the Hsulf-1 plus CD than those treated with either gene therapy alone, and the combined treatment resulted in a significant increase in survival. Conclusions: Hsulf-1 expression combined with the CD/5-FC gene suicide system could be an effective treatment approach for HCC. PMID:25963362

  10. Rescue of the Orphan Enzyme Isoguanine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    D Hitchcock; A Fedorov; E Fedorov; L Dangott; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from Escherichia coli was shown to catalyze the deamination of isoguanine (2-oxoadenine) to xanthine. Isoguanine is an oxidation product of adenine in DNA that is mutagenic to the cell. The isoguanine deaminase activity in E. coli was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration, and anion exchange chromatography. The active protein was identified by peptide mass fingerprint analysis as cytosine deaminase. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoguanine at pH 7.7 are as follows: k{sub cat} = 49 s{sup -1}, K{sub m} = 72 {micro}M, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 6.7 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The kinetic constants for the deamination of cytosine are as follows: k{sub cat} = 45 s{sup -1}, K{sub m} = 302 {micro}M, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 1.5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Under these reaction conditions, isoguanine is the better substrate for cytosine deaminase. The three-dimensional structure of CDA was determined with isoguanine in the active site.

  11. Yeast Kre33 and human NAT10 are conserved 18S rRNA cytosine acetyltransferases that modify tRNAs assisted by the adaptor Tan1/THUMPD1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunny; Langhendries, Jean-Louis; Watzinger, Peter; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Lafontaine, Denis L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The function of RNA is subtly modulated by post-transcriptional modifications. Here, we report an important crosstalk in the covalent modification of two classes of RNAs. We demonstrate that yeast Kre33 and human NAT10 are RNA cytosine acetyltransferases with, surprisingly, specificity toward both 18S rRNA and tRNAs. tRNA acetylation requires the intervention of a specific and conserved adaptor: yeast Tan1/human THUMPD1. In budding and fission yeasts, and in human cells, we found two acetylated cytosines on 18S rRNA, one in helix 34 important for translation accuracy and another in helix 45 near the decoding site. Efficient 18S rRNA acetylation in helix 45 involves, in human cells, the vertebrate-specific box C/D snoRNA U13, which, we suggest, exposes the substrate cytosine to modification through Watson–Crick base pairing with 18S rRNA precursors during small subunit biogenesis. Finally, while Kre33 and NAT10 are essential for pre-rRNA processing reactions leading to 18S rRNA synthesis, we demonstrate that rRNA acetylation is dispensable to yeast cells growth. The inactivation of NAT10 was suggested to suppress nuclear morphological defects observed in laminopathic patient cells through loss of microtubules modification and cytoskeleton reorganization. We rather propose the effects of NAT10 on laminopathic cells are due to reduced ribosome biogenesis or function. PMID:25653167

  12. Alternative induction of meiotic recombination from single-base lesions of DNA deaminases.

    PubMed

    Pauklin, Siim; Burkert, Julia S; Martin, Julie; Osman, Fekret; Weller, Sandra; Boulton, Simon J; Whitby, Matthew C; Petersen-Mahrt, Svend K

    2009-05-01

    Meiotic recombination enhances genetic diversity as well as ensures proper segregation of homologous chromosomes, requiring Spo11-initiated double-strand breaks (DSBs). DNA deaminases act on regions of single-stranded DNA and deaminate cytosine to uracil (dU). In the immunoglobulin locus, this lesion will initiate point mutations, gene conversion, and DNA recombination. To begin to delineate the effect of induced base lesions on meiosis, we analyzed the effect of expressing DNA deaminases (activation-induced deaminase, AID, and APOBEC3C) in germ cells. We show that meiotic dU:dG lesions can partially rescue a spo11Delta phenotype in yeast and worm. In rec12 Schizosaccharomyces pombe, AID expression increased proper chromosome segregation, thereby enhancing spore viability, and induced low-frequency meiotic crossovers. Expression of AID in the germ cells of Caenorhabditis elegans spo-11 induced meiotic RAD-51 foci formation and chromosomal bivalency and segregation, as well as an increase in viability. RNAi experiments showed that this rescue was dependent on uracil DNA-glycosylase (Ung). Furthermore, unlike ionizing radiation-induced spo-11 rescue, AID expression did not induce large numbers of DSBs during the rescue. This suggests that the products of DNA deamination and base excision repair, such as uracil, an abasic site, or a single-stranded nick, are sufficient to initiate and alter meiotic recombination in uni- and multicellular organisms. PMID:19237686

  13. Cytosine methylation and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Walsh, C P; Xu, G L

    2006-01-01

    Cytosine methylation is a common form of post-replicative DNA modification seen in both bacteria and eukaryotes. Modified cytosines have long been known to act as hotspots for mutations due to the high rate of spontaneous deamination of this base to thymine, resulting in a G/T mismatch. This will be fixed as a C-->T transition after replication if not repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway or specific repair enzymes dedicated to this purpose. This hypermutability has led to depletion of the target dinucleotide CpG outside of special CpG islands in mammals, which are normally unmethylated. We review the importance of C-->T transitions at non-island CpGs in human disease: When these occur in the germline, they are a common cause of inherited diseases such as epidermolysis bullosa and mucopolysaccharidosis, while in the soma they are frequently found in the genes for tumor suppressors such as p53 and the retinoblastoma protein, causing cancer. We also examine the specific repair enzymes involved, namely the endonuclease Vsr in Escherichia coli and two members of the uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) superfamily in mammals, TDG and MBD4. Repair brings its own problems, since it will require remethylation of the replacement cytosine, presumably coupling repair to methylation by either the maintenance methylase Dnmt1 or a de novo enzyme such as Dnmt3a. Uncoupling of methylation from repair may be one way to remove methylation from DNA. We also look at the possible role of specific cytosine deaminases such as Aid and Apobec in accelerating deamination of methylcytosine and consequent DNA demethylation. PMID:16570853

  14. Processive DNA Demethylation via DNA Deaminase-Induced Lesion Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Hugh; Incorvaia, Elisabetta; Rangam, Gopinath; Dean, Wendy; Santos, Fatima; Reik, Wolf; Petersen-Mahrt, Svend K.

    2014-01-01

    Base modifications of cytosine are an important aspect of chromatin biology, as they can directly regulate gene expression, while DNA repair ensures that those modifications retain genome integrity. Here we characterize how cytosine DNA deaminase AID can initiate DNA demethylation. In vitro, AID initiated targeted DNA demethylation of methyl CpGs when in combination with DNA repair competent extracts. Mechanistically, this is achieved by inducing base alterations at or near methyl-cytosine, with the lesion being resolved either via single base substitution or a more efficient processive polymerase dependent repair. The biochemical findings are recapitulated in an in vivo transgenic targeting assay, and provide the genetic support of the molecular insight into DNA demethylation. This targeting approach supports the hypothesis that mCpG DNA demethylation can proceed via various pathways and mCpGs do not have to be targeted to be demethylated. PMID:25025377

  15. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... All Open All Close All Description Adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) deficiency is a disorder characterized by abnormal ...

  16. Strand-biased cytosine deamination at the replication fork causes cytosine to thymine mutations in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Ashok S; Hao, Weilong; Townes, Jesse P; Lee, Heewook; Tang, Haixu; Foster, Patricia L

    2016-02-23

    The rate of cytosine deamination is much higher in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) than in double-stranded DNA, and copying the resulting uracils causes C to T mutations. To study this phenomenon, the catalytic domain of APOBEC3G (A3G-CTD), an ssDNA-specific cytosine deaminase, was expressed in an Escherichia coli strain defective in uracil repair (ung mutant), and the mutations that accumulated over thousands of generations were determined by whole-genome sequencing. C:G to T:A transitions dominated, with significantly more cytosines mutated to thymine in the lagging-strand template (LGST) than in the leading-strand template (LDST). This strand bias was present in both repair-defective and repair-proficient cells and was strongest and highly significant in cells expressing A3G-CTD. These results show that the LGST is accessible to cellular cytosine deaminating agents, explains the well-known GC skew in microbial genomes, and suggests the APOBEC3 family of mutators may target the LGST in the human genome. PMID:26839411

  17. The crystal structure of the bifunctional deaminase/reductase RibD of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in Escherichia coli: implications for the reductive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Stenmark, Pl; Moche, Martin; Gurmu, Daniel; Nordlund, Pr

    2007-10-12

    We have determined the crystal structure of the bi-functional deaminase/reductase enzyme from Escherichia coli (EcRibD) that catalyzes two consecutive reactions during riboflavin biosynthesis. The polypeptide chain of EcRibD is folded into two domains where the 3D structure of the N-terminal domain (1-145) is similar to cytosine deaminase and the C-terminal domain (146-367) is similar to dihydrofolate reductase. We showed that EcRibD is dimeric and compared our structure to tetrameric RibG, an ortholog from Bacillus subtilis (BsRibG). We have also determined the structure of EcRibD in two binary complexes with the oxidized cofactor (NADP(+)) and with the substrate analogue ribose-5-phosphate (RP5) and superposed these two in order to mimic the ternary complex. Based on this superposition we propose that the invariant Asp200 initiates the reductive reaction by abstracting a proton from the bound substrate and that the pro-R proton from C4 of the cofactor is transferred to C1 of the substrate. A highly flexible loop is found in the reductase active site (159-173) that appears to control cofactor and substrate binding to the reductase active site and was therefore compared to the corresponding Met20 loop of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (EcDHFR). Lys152, identified by comparing substrate analogue (RP5) coordination in the reductase active site of EcRibD with the homologous reductase from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MjaRED), is invariant among bacterial RibD enzymes and could contribute to the various pathways taken during riboflavin biosynthesis in bacteria and yeast. PMID:17765262

  18. High-throughput mutagenesis reveals functional determinants for DNA targeting by activation-induced deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Gajula, Kiran S.; Huwe, Peter J.; Mo, Charlie Y.; Crawford, Daniel J.; Stivers, James T.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Kohli, Rahul M.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody maturation is a critical immune process governed by the enzyme activation-induced deaminase (AID), a member of the AID/APOBEC DNA deaminase family. AID/APOBEC deaminases preferentially target cytosine within distinct preferred sequence motifs in DNA, with specificity largely conferred by a small 9–11 residue protein loop that differs among family members. Here, we aimed to determine the key functional characteristics of this protein loop in AID and to thereby inform our understanding of the mode of DNA engagement. To this end, we developed a methodology (Sat-Sel-Seq) that couples saturation mutagenesis at each position across the targeting loop, with iterative functional selection and next-generation sequencing. This high-throughput mutational analysis revealed dominant characteristics for residues within the loop and additionally yielded enzymatic variants that enhance deaminase activity. To rationalize these functional requirements, we performed molecular dynamics simulations that suggest that AID and its hyperactive variants can engage DNA in multiple specific modes. These findings align with AID's competing requirements for specificity and flexibility to efficiently drive antibody maturation. Beyond insights into the AID-DNA interface, our Sat-Sel-Seq approach also serves to further expand the repertoire of techniques for deep positional scanning and may find general utility for high-throughput analysis of protein function. PMID:25064858

  19. Adenosine deaminase activity in rheumatoid pleural effusion.

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña, I; Ribera, E; Martinez-Vázquez, J M; Ruiz, I; Bejarano, E; Pigrau, C; Pahissa, A

    1988-01-01

    The activity of adenosine deaminase was studied in nine cases of rheumatoid pleural effusion, showing an increase in enzyme activity in all. Rheumatoid arthritis seems unique, however, as it cannot be differentiated from pleural tuberculosis on the basis of this test. Selective increase of adenosine deaminase in both conditions is attributed to stimulation of T lymphocytes in the pleural fluid. PMID:3389927

  20. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Mutations in the AMPD1 gene cause AMP deaminase deficiency. ... a role in producing energy within muscle cells. Mutations in the AMPD1 gene disrupt the function of ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... to adenosine deaminase deficiency University of Utah Genetic Science Learning Center Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (4 links) Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases Immune Deficiency Foundation Jeffrey Modell Foundation National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Gene Reviews (1 ...

  2. Bacillus halodurans Strain C125 Encodes and Synthesizes Enzymes from Both Known Pathways To Form dUMP Directly from Cytosine Deoxyribonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Oehlenschlæger, Christian Berg; Løvgreen, Monika Nøhr; Reinauer, Eva; Lehtinen, Emilia; Pind, Marie-Louise Lindberg; Martinussen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the genome of Bacillus halodurans strain C125 indicated that two pathways leading from a cytosine deoxyribonucleotide to dUMP, used for dTMP synthesis, were encoded by the genome of the bacterium. The genes that were responsible, the comEB gene and the dcdB gene, encoding dCMP deaminase and the bifunctional dCTP deaminase:dUTPase (DCD:DUT), respectively, were both shown to be expressed in B. halodurans, and both genes were subject to repression by the nucleosides thymidine and deoxycytidine. The latter nucleoside presumably exerts its repression after deamination by cytidine deaminase. Both comEB and dcdB were cloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to homogeneity. Both enzymes were active and displayed the expected regulatory properties: activation by dCTP for dCMP deaminase and dTTP inhibition for both enzymes. Structurally, the B. halodurans enzyme resembled the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme the most. An investigation of sequenced genomes from other species of the genus Bacillus revealed that not only the genome of B. halodurans but also the genomes of Bacillus pseudofirmus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus hemicellulosilyticus, Bacillus marmarensis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus megaterium encode both the dCMP deaminase and the DCD:DUT enzymes. In addition, eight dcdB homologs from Bacillus species within the genus for which the whole genome has not yet been sequenced were registered in the NCBI Entrez database. PMID:25746996

  3. Replication Fork Collapse and Genome Instability in a Deoxycytidylate Deaminase Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Arancha; Sharma, Sushma; Rozenzhak, Sophie; Roguev, Assen; Krogan, Nevan J.; Chabes, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) and deoxycytidylate deaminase (dCMP deaminase) are pivotal allosteric enzymes required to maintain adequate pools of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) for DNA synthesis and repair. Whereas RNR inhibition slows DNA replication and activates checkpoint responses, the effect of dCMP deaminase deficiency is largely unknown. Here, we report that deleting the Schizosaccharomyces pombe dcd1+ dCMP deaminase gene (SPBC2G2.13c) increases dCTP ∼30-fold and decreases dTTP ∼4-fold. In contrast to the robust growth of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae dcd1Δ mutant, fission yeast dcd1Δ cells delay cell cycle progression in early S phase and are sensitive to multiple DNA-damaging agents, indicating impaired DNA replication and repair. DNA content profiling of dcd1Δ cells differs from an RNR-deficient mutant. Dcd1 deficiency activates genome integrity checkpoints enforced by Rad3 (ATR), Cds1 (Chk2), and Chk1 and creates critical requirements for proteins involved in recovery from replication fork collapse, including the γH2AX-binding protein Brc1 and Mus81 Holliday junction resolvase. These effects correlate with increased nuclear foci of the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA and the homologous recombination repair protein Rad52. Moreover, Brc1 suppresses spontaneous mutagenesis in dcd1Δ cells. We propose that replication forks stall and collapse in dcd1Δ cells, burdening DNA damage and checkpoint responses to maintain genome integrity. PMID:22927644

  4. Evolution of vitamin B2 biosynthesis: eubacterial RibG and fungal Rib2 deaminases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng Chia; Shen, Chieh Yi; Yen, Te Ming; Yu, Hui Chia; Chang, Ting Hao; Lai, Wen Lin; Liaw, Shwu Huey

    2013-02-01

    Eubacterial RibG and yeast Rib2 possess a deaminase domain for pyrimidine deamination in the second and third steps, respectively, of riboflavin biosynthesis. These enzymes are specific for ribose and ribitol, respectively. Here, the crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis RibG in complex with a deaminase product is reported at 2.56 Å resolution. Two loops move towards the product on substrate binding, resulting in interactions with the ribosyl and phosphate groups and significant conformational changes. The product carbonyl moiety is bent out of the pyrimidine ring to coordinate to the catalytic zinc ion. Such distortions in the bound substrate and product may play an essential role in enzyme catalysis. The yeast Rib2 structure was modelled and a mutational analysis was carried out in order to understand the mechanism of substrate recognition in these two enzymes. Detailed structural comparisons revealed that the two consecutive carbonyl backbones that occur prior to the PCXXC signature constitute a binding hole for the target amino group of the substrate. This amino-binding hole is essential in B. subtilis RibG and is also conserved in the RNA/DNA-editing deaminases. PMID:23385458

  5. Discovery and structure determination of the orphan enzyme isoxanthopterin deaminase .

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard S; Agarwal, Rakhi; Hitchcock, Daniel; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Raushel, Frank M

    2010-05-25

    Two previously uncharacterized proteins have been identified that efficiently catalyze the deamination of isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The genes encoding these two enzymes, NYSGXRC-9339a ( gi|44585104 ) and NYSGXRC-9236b ( gi|44611670 ), were first identified from DNA isolated from the Sargasso Sea as part of the Global Ocean Sampling Project. The genes were synthesized, and the proteins were subsequently expressed and purified. The X-ray structure of Sgx9339a was determined at 2.7 A resolution (Protein Data Bank entry 2PAJ ). This protein folds as a distorted (beta/alpha)(8) barrel and contains a single zinc ion in the active site. These enzymes are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and belong to cog0402 within the clusters of orthologous groups (COG). Enzymes in cog0402 have previously been shown to catalyze the deamination of guanine, cytosine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, and 8-oxoguanine. A small compound library of pteridines, purines, and pyrimidines was used to probe catalytic activity. The only substrates identified in this search were isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoxanthopterin with Sgx9339a were determined to be 1.0 s(-1), 8.0 muM, and 1.3 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) (k(cat), K(m), and k(cat)/K(m), respectively). The active site of Sgx9339a most closely resembles the active site for 8-oxoguanine deaminase (Protein Data Bank entry 2UZ9 ). A model for substrate recognition of isoxanthopterin by Sgx9339a was proposed on the basis of the binding of guanine and xanthine in the active site of guanine deaminase. Residues critical for substrate binding appear to be conserved glutamine and tyrosine residues that form hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen at C4, a conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with N5, and another conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl group at C7. These conserved active site residues were used to identify 24 other genes which are predicted to deaminate isoxanthopterin. PMID:20415463

  6. Discovery and Structure Determination of the Orphan Enzyme Isoxanthopterin Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Agarwal, R.; Hitchcock, D.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2010-05-25

    Two previously uncharacterized proteins have been identified that efficiently catalyze the deamination of isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The genes encoding these two enzymes, NYSGXRC-9339a (gi|44585104) and NYSGXRC-9236b (gi|44611670), were first identified from DNA isolated from the Sargasso Sea as part of the Global Ocean Sampling Project. The genes were synthesized, and the proteins were subsequently expressed and purified. The X-ray structure of Sgx9339a was determined at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution (Protein Data Bank entry 2PAJ). This protein folds as a distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrel and contains a single zinc ion in the active site. These enzymes are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and belong to cog0402 within the clusters of orthologous groups (COG). Enzymes in cog0402 have previously been shown to catalyze the deamination of guanine, cytosine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, and 8-oxoguanine. A small compound library of pteridines, purines, and pyrimidines was used to probe catalytic activity. The only substrates identified in this search were isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoxanthopterin with Sgx9339a were determined to be 1.0 s{sup -1}, 8.0 {micro}M, and 1.3 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} (k{sub cat}, K{sub m}, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, respectively). The active site of Sgx9339a most closely resembles the active site for 8-oxoguanine deaminase (Protein Data Bank entry 2UZ9). A model for substrate recognition of isoxanthopterin by Sgx9339a was proposed on the basis of the binding of guanine and xanthine in the active site of guanine deaminase. Residues critical for substrate binding appear to be conserved glutamine and tyrosine residues that form hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen at C4, a conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with N5, and another conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl group at C7. These conserved active site residues were used to identify 24 other genes which are predicted to deaminate isoxanthopterin.

  7. Dehydration of cytosine monohydrate at physiological temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, P.; Powell, B.M.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron diffraction, thermogravimetric, and mass spectrographic measurements have been used to show that cytosine monohydrate loses its water of hydration at physiological temperatures (approx. = 37/sup 0/C) and converts to cytosine. The ''activation energy'' for the dehydration process has been determined from isothermal weight curves and is 27.1 +/- 0.6 kcal . mol/sup -1/. It is suggested that pyrimidine dehydration may be involved in structural changes in DNA.

  8. Specific and Modular Binding Code for Cytosine Recognition in Pumilio/FBF (PUF) RNA-binding Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Shuyun; Wang, Yang; Cassidy-Amstutz, Caleb; Lu, Gang; Bigler, Rebecca; Jezyk, Mark R.; Li, Chunhua; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2011-10-28

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) proteins possess a recognition code for bases A, U, and G, allowing designed RNA sequence specificity of their modular Pumilio (PUM) repeats. However, recognition side chains in a PUM repeat for cytosine are unknown. Here we report identification of a cytosine-recognition code by screening random amino acid combinations at conserved RNA recognition positions using a yeast three-hybrid system. This C-recognition code is specific and modular as specificity can be transferred to different positions in the RNA recognition sequence. A crystal structure of a modified PUF domain reveals specific contacts between an arginine side chain and the cytosine base. We applied the C-recognition code to design PUF domains that recognize targets with multiple cytosines and to generate engineered splicing factors that modulate alternative splicing. Finally, we identified a divergent yeast PUF protein, Nop9p, that may recognize natural target RNAs with cytosine. This work deepens our understanding of natural PUF protein target recognition and expands the ability to engineer PUF domains to recognize any RNA sequence.

  9. Specific and Modular Binding Code for Cytosine Recognition in Pumilio/FBF (PUF) RNA-binding Domains*♦

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shuyun; Wang, Yang; Cassidy-Amstutz, Caleb; Lu, Gang; Bigler, Rebecca; Jezyk, Mark R.; Li, Chunhua; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka; Wang, Zefeng

    2011-01-01

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) proteins possess a recognition code for bases A, U, and G, allowing designed RNA sequence specificity of their modular Pumilio (PUM) repeats. However, recognition side chains in a PUM repeat for cytosine are unknown. Here we report identification of a cytosine-recognition code by screening random amino acid combinations at conserved RNA recognition positions using a yeast three-hybrid system. This C-recognition code is specific and modular as specificity can be transferred to different positions in the RNA recognition sequence. A crystal structure of a modified PUF domain reveals specific contacts between an arginine side chain and the cytosine base. We applied the C-recognition code to design PUF domains that recognize targets with multiple cytosines and to generate engineered splicing factors that modulate alternative splicing. Finally, we identified a divergent yeast PUF protein, Nop9p, that may recognize natural target RNAs with cytosine. This work deepens our understanding of natural PUF protein target recognition and expands the ability to engineer PUF domains to recognize any RNA sequence. PMID:21653694

  10. Specific and modular binding code for cytosine recognition in Pumilio/FBF (PUF) RNA-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuyun; Wang, Yang; Cassidy-Amstutz, Caleb; Lu, Gang; Bigler, Rebecca; Jezyk, Mark R; Li, Chunhua; Hall, Traci M Tanaka; Wang, Zefeng

    2011-07-29

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) proteins possess a recognition code for bases A, U, and G, allowing designed RNA sequence specificity of their modular Pumilio (PUM) repeats. However, recognition side chains in a PUM repeat for cytosine are unknown. Here we report identification of a cytosine-recognition code by screening random amino acid combinations at conserved RNA recognition positions using a yeast three-hybrid system. This C-recognition code is specific and modular as specificity can be transferred to different positions in the RNA recognition sequence. A crystal structure of a modified PUF domain reveals specific contacts between an arginine side chain and the cytosine base. We applied the C-recognition code to design PUF domains that recognize targets with multiple cytosines and to generate engineered splicing factors that modulate alternative splicing. Finally, we identified a divergent yeast PUF protein, Nop9p, that may recognize natural target RNAs with cytosine. This work deepens our understanding of natural PUF protein target recognition and expands the ability to engineer PUF domains to recognize any RNA sequence. PMID:21653694

  11. Crystal Structure of the DNA Deaminase APOBEC3B Catalytic Domain.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ke; Carpenter, Michael A; Kurahashi, Kayo; Harris, Reuben S; Aihara, Hideki

    2015-11-20

    Functional and deep sequencing studies have combined to demonstrate the involvement of APOBEC3B in cancer mutagenesis. APOBEC3B is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that functions normally as a nuclear-localized restriction factor of DNA-based pathogens. However, it is overexpressed in cancer cells and elicits an intrinsic preference for 5'-TC motifs in single-stranded DNA, which is the most frequently mutated dinucleotide in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, and several other tumor types. In many cases, APOBEC3B mutagenesis accounts for the majority of both dispersed and clustered (kataegis) cytosine mutations. Here, we report the first structures of the APOBEC3B catalytic domain in multiple crystal forms. These structures reveal a tightly closed active site conformation and suggest that substrate accessibility is regulated by adjacent flexible loops. Residues important for catalysis are identified by mutation analyses, and the results provide insights into the mechanism of target site selection. We also report a nucleotide (dCMP)-bound crystal structure that informs a multistep model for binding single-stranded DNA. Overall, these high resolution crystal structures provide a framework for further mechanistic studies and the development of novel anti-cancer drugs to inhibit this enzyme, dampen tumor evolution, and minimize adverse outcomes such as drug resistance and metastasis. PMID:26416889

  12. Yeast Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a yeast infection and what causes it?  Yeast vaginitis is the second most common vaginal infection after ... risk for yeast Signs and symptoms of yeast vaginitis  Yeast infections may cause no symptoms  Sometimes yeast ...

  13. Crystal Structure of Staphylococcus aureus tRNA Adenosine Deaminase TadA in Complex with RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Losey,H.; Ruthenburg, A.; Verdine, G.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial tRNA adenosine deaminases (TadAs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine at the wobble position of tRNA(Arg2), a process that enables this single tRNA to recognize three different arginine codons in mRNA. In addition, inosine is also introduced at the wobble position of multiple eukaryotic tRNAs. The genes encoding these deaminases are essential in bacteria and yeast, demonstrating the importance of their biological activity. Here we report the crystallization and structure determination to 2.0 A of Staphylococcus aureus TadA bound to the anticodon stem-loop of tRNA(Arg2) bearing nebularine, a non-hydrolyzable adenosine analog, at the wobble position. The cocrystal structure reveals the basis for both sequence and structure specificity in the interactions of TadA with RNA, and it additionally provides insight into the active site architecture that promotes efficient hydrolytic deamination.

  14. Photofragmentation of guanine, cytosine, leucine and methionine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plekan, O.; Feyer, V.; Richter, R.; Coreno, M.; de Simone, M.; Prince, K. C.

    2007-04-01

    The photofragmentation spectra of guanine, cytosine, leucine and methionine were measured with noble gas resonance radiation at energies from 8.43 to 21.2 eV, and the spectra are related to the published valence band photoemission spectra. As expected, lower photon energies lead to "softer" ionization and reduced fragmentation. For the nucleobases guanine and cytosine, photoionization below 16.67 eV leads predominantly to the parent ion. The fragmentation pattern of leucine is similar to that of published spectra of other amino acids with aliphatic side chains, and whose outer orbitals are similar, with oxygen and nitrogen lone pair character. Methionine behaves very differently because the outer orbital has sulphur lone pair character, and reduced fragmentation is observed.

  15. Dispersed sites of HIV Vif-dependent polyubiquitination in the DNA deaminase APOBEC3F

    PubMed Central

    Albin, John S.; Anderson, John S.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Harjes, Elena; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Krogan, Nevan J.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2013-01-01

    APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G are DNA cytosine deaminases that potently restrict Human Immunodeficiency Virus-type 1 replication when the virus is deprived of its accessory protein Vif. Vif counteracts these restriction factors by recruiting APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G to an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that mediates their polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. While previous efforts have identified single amino acid residues in APOBEC3 proteins required for Vif recognition, less is known about the downstream ubiquitin acceptor sites that are targeted. One prior report identified a cluster of polyubiquitinated residues in APOBEC3G and proposed an antiparallel model of APOBEC3G interaction with the Vif-E3 ubiquitin ligase complex wherein Vif binding at one terminus of APOBEC3G orients the opposite terminus for polyubiquitination [Iwatani Y, et al. (2009) PNAS 106(46):19539–19544]. To test the generalizability of this model, we carried out a complete mutagenesis of the lysine residues in APOBEC3F and used a complementary, unbiased proteomic approach to identify ubiquitin acceptor sites targeted by Vif. Our data indicate that internal lysines are the dominant ubiquitin acceptor sites in both APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G. In contrast with the proposed antiparallel model, however, we find that the Vif-dependent polyubiquitination of APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G can occur at multiple acceptor sites dispersed along predicted lysine-enriched surfaces of both the N- and C-terminal deaminase domains. These data suggest an alternative model for binding of APOBEC3 proteins to the Vif-E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and diminish enthusiasm for the amenability of APOBEC3 ubiquitin acceptor sites to therapeutic intervention. PMID:23318957

  16. Adenosine deaminase in disorders of purine metabolism and in immune deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Tritsch, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the selection titles are: Adenosine Deaminase Impairment and Ribonucleotide Reductase in Human Cells; Adenosine Deaminase and Malignant Cells; Inhibition of Adenosine Deaminase to Increase the Antitumor Activity of Adenine Nucleoside Analogues; and Molecular Biology of the Adenosine Deaminase Gene and Messenger RNA.

  17. AID/APOBEC deaminases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rebhandl, Stefan; Huemer, Michael; Greil, Richard; Geisberger, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Mutations are the basis for evolution and the development of genetic diseases. Especially in cancer, somatic mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes alongside the occurrence of passenger mutations have been observed by recent deep-sequencing approaches. While mutations have long been considered random events induced by DNA-replication errors or by DNA damaging agents, genome sequencing led to the discovery of non-random mutation signatures in many human cancer. Common non-random mutations comprise DNA strand-biased mutation showers and mutations restricted to certain DNA motifs, which recently have become attributed to the activity of the AID/APOBEC family of DNA deaminases. Hence, APOBEC enzymes, which have evolved as key players in natural and adaptive immunity, have been proposed to contribute to cancer development and clonal evolution of cancer by inducing collateral genomic damage due to their DNA deaminating activity. This review focuses on how mutagenic events through AID/APOBEC deaminases may contribute to cancer development. PMID:26097867

  18. Neuroprotective effects of adenosine deaminase in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Risa; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Yasushi; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Nibuya, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catabolizes adenosine and deoxyadenosine. During cerebral ischemia, extracellular adenosine levels increase acutely and adenosine deaminase catabolizes the increased levels of adenosine. Since adenosine is a known neuroprotective agent, adenosine deaminase was thought to have a negative effect during ischemia. In this study, however, we demonstrate that adenosine deaminase has substantial neuroprotective effects in the striatum, which is especially vulnerable during cerebral ischemia. We used temporary oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) to simulate ischemia in rat corticostriatal brain slices. We used field potentials as the primary measure of neuronal damage. For stable and efficient electrophysiological assessment, we used transgenic rats expressing channelrhodopsin-2, which depolarizes neurons in response to blue light. Time courses of electrically evoked striatal field potential (eFP) and optogenetically evoked striatal field potential (optFP) were recorded during and after oxygen/glucose deprivation. The levels of both eFP and optFP decreased after 10 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation. Bath-application of 10 µg/ml adenosine deaminase during oxygen/glucose deprivation significantly attenuated the oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced reduction in levels of eFP and optFP. The number of injured cells decreased significantly, and western blot analysis indicated a significant decrease of autophagic signaling in the adenosine deaminase-treated oxygen/glucose deprivation slices. These results indicate that adenosine deaminase has protective effects in the striatum. PMID:26746865

  19. A combined nuclear and nucleolar localization motif in activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) controls immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Ericsson, Ida; Torseth, Kathrin; Methot, Stephen P; Sundheim, Ottar; Liabakk, Nina B; Slupphaug, Geir; Di Noia, Javier M; Krokan, Hans E; Kavli, Bodil

    2013-01-23

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a DNA mutator enzyme essential for adaptive immunity. AID initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination (CSR) by deaminating cytosine to uracil in specific immunoglobulin (Ig) gene regions. However, other loci, including cancer-related genes, are also targeted. Thus, tight regulation of AID is crucial to balance immunity versus disease such as cancer. AID is regulated by several mechanisms including nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Here we have studied nuclear import kinetics and subnuclear trafficking of AID in live cells and characterized in detail its nuclear localization signal. Importantly, we find that the nuclear localization signal motif also directs AID to nucleoli where it colocalizes with its interaction partner, catenin-β-like 1 (CTNNBL1), and physically associates with nucleolin and nucleophosmin. Moreover, we demonstrate that release of AID from nucleoli is dependent on its C-terminal motif. Finally, we find that CSR efficiency correlates strongly with the arithmetic product of AID nuclear import rate and DNA deamination activity. Our findings suggest that directional nucleolar transit is important for the physiological function of AID and demonstrate that nuclear/nucleolar import and DNA cytosine deamination together define the biological activity of AID. This is the first study on subnuclear trafficking of AID and demonstrates a new level in its complex regulation. In addition, our results resolve the problem related to dissociation of deamination activity and CSR activity of AID mutants. PMID:23183374

  20. DNA cytosine and methylcytosine deamination by APOBEC3B: enhancing methylcytosine deamination by engineering APOBEC3B

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yang; Ito, Fumiaki; Zhang, Gewen; Fernandez, Braulio; Yang, Hanjing; Chen, XiaojiangS.

    2015-01-01

    APOBEC (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like) is a family of enzymes that deaminates cytosine (C) to uracil (U) on nucleic acid. APOBEC3B (A3B) functions in innate immunity against intrinsic and invading retroelements and viruses. A3B can also induce genomic DNA mutations to cause cancer. A3B contains two cytosine deaminase domains (CD1, CD2), and there are conflicting reports about whether both domains are active. Here we demonstrate that only CD2 of A3B (A3BCD2) has C deamination activity. We also reveal that both A3B and A3BCD2 can deaminate methylcytosine (mC). Guided by structural and functional analysis, we successfully engineered A3BCD2 to gain over two orders of magnitude higher activity for mC deamination. Important determinants that contribute to the activity and selectivity for mC deamination have been identified, which reveals that multiple elements, rather than single ones, contribute to the mC deamination activity and selectivity in A3BCD2 and possibly other APOBECs. PMID:26195824

  1. Evolution of the deaminase fold and multiple origins of eukaryotic editing and mutagenic nucleic acid deaminases from bacterial toxin systems.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Zhang, Dapeng; Rogozin, Igor B; Aravind, L

    2011-12-01

    The deaminase-like fold includes, in addition to nucleic acid/nucleotide deaminases, several catalytic domains such as the JAB domain, and others involved in nucleotide and ADP-ribose metabolism. Using sensitive sequence and structural comparison methods, we develop a comprehensive natural classification of the deaminase-like fold and show that its ancestral version was likely to operate on nucleotides or nucleic acids. Consequently, we present evidence that a specific group of JAB domains are likely to possess a DNA repair function, distinct from the previously known deubiquitinating peptidase activity. We also identified numerous previously unknown clades of nucleic acid deaminases. Using inference based on contextual information, we suggest that most of these clades are toxin domains of two distinct classes of bacterial toxin systems, namely polymorphic toxins implicated in bacterial interstrain competition and those that target distantly related cells. Genome context information suggests that these toxins might be delivered via diverse secretory systems, such as Type V, Type VI, PVC and a novel PrsW-like intramembrane peptidase-dependent mechanism. We propose that certain deaminase toxins might be deployed by diverse extracellular and intracellular pathogens as also endosymbionts as effectors targeting nucleic acids of host cells. Our analysis suggests that these toxin deaminases have been acquired by eukaryotes on several independent occasions and recruited as organellar or nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA modifiers, operating on tRNAs, mRNAs and short non-coding RNAs, and also as mutators of hyper-variable genes, viruses and selfish elements. This scenario potentially explains the origin of mutagenic AID/APOBEC-like deaminases, including novel versions from Caenorhabditis, Nematostella and diverse algae and a large class of fast-evolving fungal deaminases. These observations greatly expand the distribution of possible unidentified mutagenic processes catalyzed by nucleic acid deaminases. PMID:21890906

  2. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Siddhesh S; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Tichy, Shane E; Gheyi, Tarun; Zheng, Xiaojing; Bain, Kevin; Groshong, Chris; Emtage, Spencer; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Lindahl, Paul A; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-01-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn2+ before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO4. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [FeII/FeII]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H2O2 to O2 and H2O. The values of kcat and kcat/Km for the catalase activity are 200 s−1 and 2.4 × 104 M−1 s−1, respectively. [FeII/FeII]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H2O2 before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with gave = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H2O2 by [FeII/FeII]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS. PMID:21998098

  3. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is localized to subnuclear domains enriched in splicing factors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yi Ericsson, Ida Doseth, Berit Liabakk, Nina B. Krokan, Hans E. Kavli, Bodil

    2014-03-10

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is the mutator enzyme in adaptive immunity. AID initiates the antibody diversification processes in activated B cells by deaminating cytosine to uracil in immunoglobulin genes. To some extent other genes are also targeted, which may lead to genome instability and B cell malignancy. Thus, it is crucial to understand its targeting and regulation mechanisms. AID is regulated at several levels including subcellular compartmentalization. However, the complex nuclear distribution and trafficking of AID has not been studied in detail previously. In this work, we examined the subnuclear localization of AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 and found that they associate with spliceosome-associated structures including Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. Moreover, protein kinase A (PKA), which activates AID by phosphorylation at Ser38, is present together with AID in nuclear speckles. Importantly, we demonstrate that AID physically associates with the major spliceosome subunits (small nuclear ribonucleoproteins, snRNPs), as well as other essential splicing components, in addition to the transcription machinery. Based on our findings and the literature, we suggest a transcription-coupled splicing-associated model for AID targeting and activation. - Highlights: • AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 localize to Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. • AID associates with its activating kinase PKA in nuclear speckles. • AID is linked to the splicing machinery in switching B-cells. • Our findings suggest a transcription-coupled splicing associated mechanism for AID targeting and activation.

  4. Mucosal adenosine deaminase activity and gastric ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Namiot, Z; Marcinkiewicz, M; Jaroszewicz, W; Stasiewicz, J; Gorski, J

    1993-10-26

    Adenosine deaminase activity was studied in gastric corpus mucosa close to an ulcer crater. It was found that 6 weeks of therapy with ranitidine was accompanied by a decrease in enzyme activity in the mucosa around healed ulcers and an increase around those which failed to heal. The different activities of adenosine deaminase in the vicinity of healed and unhealed ulcers may indicate its possible role in peptic ulcer healing. PMID:8276083

  5. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  6. Information Thermodynamics of Cytosine DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a stable epigenetic modification to the genome and a widespread regulatory process in living organisms that involves multicomponent molecular machines. Genome-wide cytosine methylation patterning participates in the epigenetic reprogramming of a cell, suggesting that the biological information contained within methylation positions may be amenable to decoding. Adaptation to a new cellular or organismal environment also implies the potential for genome-wide redistribution of CDM changes that will ensure the stability of DNA molecules. This raises the question of whether or not we would be able to sort out the regulatory methylation signals from the CDM background (“noise”) induced by thermal fluctuations. Here, we propose a novel statistical and information thermodynamic description of the CDM changes to address the last question. The physical basis of our statistical mechanical model was evaluated in two respects: 1) the adherence to Landauer’s principle, according to which molecular machines must dissipate a minimum energy ε = kBT ln2 at each logic operation, where kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the absolute temperature and 2) whether or not the binary stretch of methylation marks on the DNA molecule comprise a language of sorts, properly constrained by thermodynamic principles. The study was performed for genome-wide methylation data from 152 ecotypes and 40 trans-generational variations of Arabidopsis thaliana and 93 human tissues. The DNA persistence length, a basic mechanical property altered by CDM, was estimated with values from 39 to 66.9 nm. Classical methylome analysis can be retrieved by applying information thermodynamic modelling, which is able to discriminate signal from noise. Our finding suggests that the CDM signal comprises a language scheme properly constrained by molecular thermodynamic principles, which is part of an epigenomic communication system that obeys the same thermodynamic rules as do current human communication systems. PMID:26963711

  7. Effects of bacterial ACC deaminase on Brassica napus gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stearns, Jennifer C; Woody, Owen Z; McConkey, Brendan J; Glick, Bernard R

    2012-05-01

    Plants in association with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria can benefit from lower plant ethylene levels through the action of the bacterial enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase. This enzyme cleaves the immediate biosynthetic precursor of ethylene, ACC. Ethylene is responsible for many aspects of plant growth and development but, under stressful conditions, it exacerbates stress symptoms. The ACC deaminase-containing bacterium Pseudomonas putida UW4 is a potent plant growth-promoting strain and, as such, was used to elaborate the detailed role of bacterial ACC deaminase in Brassica napus (canola) plant growth promotion. Transcriptional changes in bacterially treated canola plants were investigated with the use of an Arabidopsis thaliana oligonucleotide microarray. A heterologous approach was necessary because there are few tools available at present to measure global expression changes in nonmodel organisms, specifically with the sensitivity of microarrays. The results indicate that the transcription of genes involved in plant hormone regulation, secondary metabolism, and stress response was altered in plants by the presence of the bacterium, whereas the upregulation of genes for auxin response factors and the downregulation of stress response genes was observed only in the presence of bacterial ACC deaminase. These results support the suggestion that there is a direct link between ethylene and the auxin response, which has been suggested from physiological studies, and provide more evidence for the stress-reducing benefits of ACC deaminase-expressing plant growth-promoting bacteria. PMID:22352713

  8. Folic acid deaminase activity during development in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Kakebeeke, P I; de Wit, R J; Konijn, T M

    1980-01-01

    Folic acid attracts vegetative amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum. Secreted by bacteria, it may act as a food-seeking device. The inactivation of this attractant is catalyzed by a deaminase. As assay has been developed to measure the folic acid deaminase activity. In addition to cell-surface an intracellular deaminase, the amoebae of D. discoideum release the enzyme into the medium. The pH optimum of the extracellular enzyme was 6.0, and higher for the cell-associated deaminases. The extracellular enzyme was secreted maximally by vegetative amoebae, and its activity diminished during cell differentiation. The cell-surface bound enzyme was less active than the extracellular enzyme, and its activity decreased twofold during a 6-h starvation period. The enzyme activity of homogenates and 48,000 x g pellets diminished during this period 35 to 40%. The supernatant of a homogenate had a higher deaminase activity than the homogenate itself or its pellet; this suggests the presence of an inhibitor in the particulate fraction. The underlying mechanism for inactivation of folic acid has similar characteristics as that for inactivation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. PMID:7400095

  9. Intraspecies diversity of the industrial yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces pastorianus based on analysis of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the D1/D2 region of 26S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Miho; Fujii, Tsutomu; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2007-07-01

    We divided industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae into three groups based on the sequences of their internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. One group contained sake yeasts, shochu yeasts, and one bakery yeast, another group contained wine yeasts, and the third group contained beer and whisky yeasts, including seven bakery yeasts. The three groups were distinguished by polymorphisms at two positions, designated positions B and C, corresponding to nucleotide numbers 279 and 301 respectively in the S288C strain. The yeasts in the Japanese group had one thymine at position B and one thymine at position C. The wine yeasts had one thymine at position B and one cytosine at position C. And the beer and whisky yeasts had two thymines at position B and one cytosine at position C. Strains of S. pastorianus were divided into three groups based on the sequences of their 26S rDNA D1/D2 and ITS regions. PMID:17617725

  10. Mucosal adenosine deaminase activity and stump ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Namiot, Z; Namiot, A; Stasiewicz, J; Marcinkiewicz, M; Jaroszewicz, W; Górski, J

    1995-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase activity was studied in endoscopically taken slices from gastric mucosa in patient after partial gastric resection performed due to complicated duodenal ulcer, and currently with peptic ulcer in the stump. The samples of gastric mucosa were taken before and after 6 weeks of treatment with ranitidine, 150 mg twice daily, at a distance within 2 cm and greater than 2 cm from the ulcer crater. Adenosine deaminase activity was measured in mucosa homogenates by determination of ammonia liberated from substrate. It was found that therapy with ranitidine was accompanied by an increase in enzyme activity in the mucosa surrounding unhealed stump ulcers, while no changes were noted in mucosa around healed stump ulcers. A possible role of mucosal adenosine deaminase activity in stump ulcer healing is postulated. PMID:7670131

  11. Surface expression of adenosine deaminase in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, M; Centelles, J J; Huguet, J; Echevarne, F; Colomer, D; Vives-Corrons, J L; Franco, R

    1993-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) expression on the surface of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes was studied by flow cytometry. The gate for lymphocytes was located by cell size (forward scatter), cytoplasmic complexity (side scatter) and by expression of the markers CD2, CD4, CD8 and CD19. After mitogenic proliferation two populations appeared, one corresponding to non-stimulated cells, and the other consisting of larger cells which showed relatively high expression of adenosine deaminase on their surface. The increase was similar to that observed for CD71 expression, and paralleled the increase in 3H-thymidine incorporation. There was a correlation between ADA and CD71 expression (r = 0.92 for phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and 0.97 for pokeweed mitogen (PWM)). These results suggest a role for ecto-adenosine deaminase in lymphocyte proliferation and/or triggering. PMID:8348757

  12. Nanopores Discriminate among Five C5-Cytosine Variants in DNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Individual DNA molecules can be read at single nucleotide precision using nanopores coupled to processive enzymes. Discrimination among the four canonical bases has been achieved, as has discrimination among cytosine, 5-methylcytosine (mC), and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC). Two additional modified cytosine bases, 5-carboxylcytosine (caC) and 5-formylcytosine (fC), are produced during enzymatic conversion of hmC to cytosine in mammalian cells. Thus, an accurate picture of the cytosine epigenetic status in target cells should also include these C5-cytosine variants. In the present study, we used a patch clamp amplifier to acquire ionic current traces caused by phi29 DNA polymerase-controlled translocation of DNA templates through the M2MspA pore. Decision boundaries based on three consecutive ionic current states were implemented to call mC, hmC, caC, fC, or cytosine at CG dinucleotides in ?4400 individual DNA molecules. We found that the percentage of correct base calls for single pass reads ranged from 91.6% to 98.3%. This accuracy depended upon the identity of nearest neighbor bases surrounding the CG dinucleotide. PMID:25347819

  13. Guanine Deaminase Functions as Dihydropterin Deaminase in the Biosynthesis of Aurodrosopterin, a Minor Red Eye Pigment of Drosophila*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaekwang; Park, Sang Ick; Ahn, Chiyoung; Kim, Heuijong; Yim, Jeongbin

    2009-01-01

    Dihydropterin deaminase, which catalyzes the conversion of 7,8-dihydropterin to 7,8-dihydrolumazine, was purified 5850-fold to apparent homogeneity from Drosophila melanogaster. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 48 kDa by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE, indicating that it is a monomer under native conditions. The pI value, temperature, and optimal pH of the enzyme were 5.5, 40 °C, and 7.5, respectively. Interestingly the enzyme had much higher activity for guanine than for 7,8-dihydropterin. The specificity constant (kcat/Km) for guanine (8.6 × 106 m−1·s−1) was 860-fold higher than that for 7,8-dihydropterin (1.0 × 104 m−1·s−1). The structural gene of the enzyme was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis as CG18143, located at region 82A1 on chromosome 3R. The cloned and expressed CG18143 exhibited both 7,8-dihydropterin and guanine deaminase activities. Flies with mutations in CG18143, SUPor-P/Df(3R)A321R1 transheterozygotes, had severely decreased activities in both deaminases compared with the wild type. Among several red eye pigments, the level of aurodrosopterin was specifically decreased in the mutant, and the amount of xanthine and uric acid also decreased considerably to 76 and 59% of the amounts in the wild type, respectively. In conclusion, dihydropterin deaminase encoded by CG18143 plays a role in the biosynthesis of aurodrosopterin by providing one of its precursors, 7,8-dihydrolumazine, from 7,8-dihydropterin. Dihydropterin deaminase also functions as guanine deaminase, an important enzyme for purine metabolism. PMID:19567870

  14. Streptomyces lividans Blasticidin S Deaminase and Its Application in Engineering a Blasticidin S-Producing Strain for Ease of Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Wu, Jun; Deng, Zixin; Zabriskie, T. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Blasticidin S is a peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic produced by Streptomyces griseochromogenes that exhibits strong fungicidal activity. To circumvent an effective DNA uptake barrier system in the native producer and investigate its biosynthesis in vivo, the blasticidin S biosynthetic gene cluster (bls) was engrafted to the chromosome of Streptomyces lividans. However, the resulting mutant, LL2, produced the inactive deaminohydroxyblasticidin S instead of blasticidin S. Subsequently, a blasticidin S deaminase (SLBSD, for S. lividans blasticidin S deaminase) was identified in S. lividans and shown to govern this in vivo conversion. Purified SLBSD was found to be capable of transforming blasticidin S to deaminohydroxyblasticidin S in vitro. It also catalyzed deamination of the cytosine moiety of cytosylglucuronic acid, an intermediate in blasticidin S biosynthesis. Disruption of the SLBSD gene in S. lividans LL2 led to successful production of active blasticidin S in the resultant mutant, S. lividans WJ2. To demonstrate the easy manipulation of the blasticidin S biosynthetic gene cluster, blsE, blsF, and blsL, encoding a predicted radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) protein, an unknown protein, and a guanidino methyltransferase, were individually inactivated to access their role in blasticidin S biosynthesis. PMID:23377931

  15. Streptomyces lividans blasticidin S deaminase and its application in engineering a blasticidin S-producing strain for ease of genetic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wu, Jun; Deng, Zixin; Zabriskie, T Mark; He, Xinyi

    2013-04-01

    Blasticidin S is a peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic produced by Streptomyces griseochromogenes that exhibits strong fungicidal activity. To circumvent an effective DNA uptake barrier system in the native producer and investigate its biosynthesis in vivo, the blasticidin S biosynthetic gene cluster (bls) was engrafted to the chromosome of Streptomyces lividans. However, the resulting mutant, LL2, produced the inactive deaminohydroxyblasticidin S instead of blasticidin S. Subsequently, a blasticidin S deaminase (SLBSD, for S. lividans blasticidin S deaminase) was identified in S. lividans and shown to govern this in vivo conversion. Purified SLBSD was found to be capable of transforming blasticidin S to deaminohydroxyblasticidin S in vitro. It also catalyzed deamination of the cytosine moiety of cytosylglucuronic acid, an intermediate in blasticidin S biosynthesis. Disruption of the SLBSD gene in S. lividans LL2 led to successful production of active blasticidin S in the resultant mutant, S. lividans WJ2. To demonstrate the easy manipulation of the blasticidin S biosynthetic gene cluster, blsE, blsF, and blsL, encoding a predicted radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) protein, an unknown protein, and a guanidino methyltransferase, were individually inactivated to access their role in blasticidin S biosynthesis. PMID:23377931

  16. Degradation of the cancer genomic DNA deaminase APOBEC3B by SIV Vif

    PubMed Central

    Land, Allison M.; Wang, Jiayi; Law, Emily K.; Aberle, Ryan; Kirmaier, Andrea; Krupp, Annabel; Johnson, Welkin E.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2015-01-01

    APOBEC3B is a newly identified source of mutation in many cancers, including breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, and ovarian. APOBEC3B is a member of the APOBEC3 family of enzymes that deaminate DNA cytosine to produce the pro-mutagenic lesion, uracil. Several APOBEC3 family members function to restrict virus replication. For instance, APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G, and APOBEC3H combine to restrict HIV-1 in human lymphocytes. HIV-1 counteracts these APOBEC3s with the viral protein Vif, which targets the relevant APOBEC3s for proteasomal degradation. While APOBEC3B does not restrict HIV-1 and is not targeted by HIV-1 Vif in CD4-positive T cells, we asked whether related lentiviral Vif proteins could degrade APOBEC3B. Interestingly, several SIV Vif proteins are capable of promoting APOBEC3B degradation, with SIVmac239 Vif proving the most potent. This likely occurs through the canonical polyubiquitination mechanism as APOBEC3B protein levels are restored by MG132 treatment and by altering a conserved E3 ligase-binding motif. We further show that SIVmac239 Vif can prevent APOBEC3B mediated geno/cytotoxicity and degrade endogenous APOBEC3B in several cancer cell lines. Our data indicate that the APOBEC3B degradation potential of SIV Vif is an effective tool for neutralizing the cancer genomic DNA deaminase APOBEC3B. Further optimization of this natural APOBEC3 antagonist may benefit cancer therapy. PMID:26544511

  17. Degradation of the cancer genomic DNA deaminase APOBEC3B by SIV Vif.

    PubMed

    Land, Allison M; Wang, Jiayi; Law, Emily K; Aberle, Ryan; Kirmaier, Andrea; Krupp, Annabel; Johnson, Welkin E; Harris, Reuben S

    2015-11-24

    APOBEC3B is a newly identified source of mutation in many cancers, including breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, and ovarian. APOBEC3B is a member of the APOBEC3 family of enzymes that deaminate DNA cytosine to produce the pro-mutagenic lesion, uracil. Several APOBEC3 family members function to restrict virus replication. For instance, APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G, and APOBEC3H combine to restrict HIV-1 in human lymphocytes. HIV-1 counteracts these APOBEC3s with the viral protein Vif, which targets the relevant APOBEC3s for proteasomal degradation. While APOBEC3B does not restrict HIV-1 and is not targeted by HIV-1 Vif in CD4-positive T cells, we asked whether related lentiviral Vif proteins could degrade APOBEC3B. Interestingly, several SIV Vif proteins are capable of promoting APOBEC3B degradation, with SIVmac239 Vif proving the most potent. This likely occurs through the canonical polyubiquitination mechanism as APOBEC3B protein levels are restored by MG132 treatment and by altering a conserved E3 ligase-binding motif. We further show that SIVmac239 Vif can prevent APOBEC3B mediated geno/cytotoxicity and degrade endogenous APOBEC3B in several cancer cell lines. Our data indicate that the APOBEC3B degradation potential of SIV Vif is an effective tool for neutralizing the cancer genomic DNA deaminase APOBEC3B. Further optimization of this natural APOBEC3 antagonist may benefit cancer therapy. PMID:26544511

  18. Excited-state tautomerization of gas-phase cytosine.

    PubMed

    Triandafillou, Catherine G; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2013-11-21

    In order to investigate experimentally observed phototautomerization of gas-phase cytosine, several excited-state tautomerization mechanisms were characterized at the EOM-CCSD and TDDFT levels. All pathways that took place exclusively on the S1 surface were found to have significant barriers that were much higher than the barriers involved in radiationless decay of cytosine tautomers through conical intersections back to the ground state; tautomerization in this fashion cannot compete with radiationless relaxation. However, an alternative possibility is that the conical intersections that facilitate radiationless decay could also facilitate tautomerization. Barrierless pathways indicate that it is energetically possible that bifurcation at the conical intersections can lead to a subset of the population reaching different tautomers. This could be an explanation for the observed tautomerization of keto cytosine after exposure to low-energy UV light. PMID:24094271

  19. Haploinsufficiency of activation-induced deaminase for antibody diversification and chromosome translocations both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sernández, Isora V; de Yébenes, Virginia G; Dorsett, Yair; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2008-01-01

    The humoral immune response critically relies on the secondary diversification of antibodies. This diversification takes places through somatic remodelling of the antibody genes by two molecular mechanisms, Class Switch Recombination (CSR) and Somatic Hypermutation (SHM). The enzyme Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) initiates both SHM and CSR by deaminating cytosine residues on the DNA of immunoglobulin genes. While crucial for immunity, AID-catalysed deamination is also the triggering event for the generation of lymphomagenic chromosome translocations. To address whether restricting the levels of AID expression in vivo contributes to the regulation of its function, we analysed mice harbouring a single copy of the AID gene (AID(+/-)). AID(+/-) mice express roughly 50% of normal AID levels, and display a mild hyperplasia, reminiscent of AID deficient mice and humans. Moreover, we found that AID(+/-) cells have an impaired competence for CSR and SHM, which indicates that AID gene dose is limiting for its physiologic function. We next evaluated the impact of AID reduction in AID(+/-) mice on the generation of chromosome translocations. Our results show that the frequency of AID-promoted c-myc/IgH translocations is reduced in AID(+/-) mice, both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, AID is haploinsufficient for antibody diversification and chromosome translocations. These findings suggest that limiting the physiologic levels of AID expression can be a regulatory mechanism that ensures an optimal balance between immune proficiency and genome integrity. PMID:19079594

  20. Attenuation of exercise vasodilatation by adenosine deaminase in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Goonewardene, I P; Karim, F

    1991-10-01

    1. In dogs anaesthetized with sodium pentobarbitone and artificially ventilated, the gracilis muscles were vascularly isolated and perfused at a constant flow of 28.4 +/- 4.6 ml min-1 (100 g muscle tissue)-1 (99.8 +/- 4.5% of maximum free flow, means +/- standard error of the mean (S.E.M.), n = 9). 2. Three to five minutes of electrical stimulation of the cut peripheral end of the obturator nerve (4 Hz, 6 V, 0.2 ms) resulted in muscle contraction (0.61 +/- 0.14 kg (100 g)-1 during solvent infusion and 0.56 +/- 0.10 kg (100 g)-1 during intra-arterial adenosine deaminase infusion (50 U min-1) and an immediate decrease in arterial perfusion pressure from 184.5 +/- 8.1 mmHg to 148.2 +/- 5.7 mmHg (18.7 +/- 3.4% decrease) during solvent infusion, and from 193.5 +/- 7.16 to 142.0 +/- 10.2 mmHg (25.4 +/- 6.1% decrease) during adenosine deaminase infusion 10 s after the commencement of muscle stimulation. After about 5 min of muscle contractions, the arterial perfusion pressure decreased to 120.8 +/- 7.8 mmHg (32.9 +/- 5.8% decrease) during solvent infusion, and to 152.8 +/- 11.2 mmHg (20.9 +/- 5.3% decrease) during adenosine deaminase infusion (i.e. 37.9 +/- 6.2% attenuation of the fall in arterial perfusion pressure). The time taken for 90% recovery of the arterial perfusion pressure was 72.1 +/- 10.9 s during solvent infusion, and 51.5 +/- 9.3 s during adenosine deaminase infusion (P less than 0.05). 3. Adenosine (2 x 10(-3) mol l-1) infusion in the resting muscle during solvent infusion (final concentration in arterial blood 1.3 x 10(-4) +/- 6.0 x 10(-5) mol l-1) resulted in a 34.8 +/- 7.2% fall in arterial perfusion pressure but a fall of only 7.2 +/- 1.8% during adenosine deaminase infusion (50 U min-1; P less than 0.05; n = 5) indicating that adenosine deaminase infused at 50 U min-1 was more than adequate to metabolize endogenous adenosine produced during muscle contractions. 4. These data suggest that adenosine contributes about 40% to the sustained-exercise vasodilatation under constant high-flow conditions and also in post-exercise vasodilatation, but does not contribute to the initiation of exercise vasodilatation. PMID:1798047

  1. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the identity of the rate-limiting steps.

  2. Characterization of unexplored amidohydrolase enzyme-pterin deaminase.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Angayarkanni; Thandeeswaran, Murugesan; Priyadarsini, Ulaganathan; Sabarathinam, Shanmugam; Nawaz, K A Ayub; Palaniswamy, Muthusamy

    2016-06-01

    Pterin deaminase is an amidohydrolase enzyme hydrolyzing pteridines to form lumazine derivatives and ammonia. The enzyme captured the attention of scientists as early as 1959 and had been patented for its application as an anticancer agent. It is ubiquitously present in prokaryotes and has been reported in some eukaryotes such as honey bee, silkworm and rats. The enzyme has been observed to have a spectrum of substrates with the formation of respective lumazines. The role of the substrates of the enzyme in various metabolic pathways warrants a significant role in the biological activity of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Even though the functions of the enzyme have been explored in prokaryotes, their niche in the eukaryotic system is not clear. There is very few information on the structural and functional properties of the enzyme. This review has been congregated to emphasize the significance of pterin deaminase and analyzes the lacunae in understanding the biological characters of the enzyme. PMID:27094187

  3. Nuclear distribution of porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) in glioma cells: a regulatory role in cancer transformation?

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, L; Gozlan, Y; Schwartz, D; Katcoff, D J; Malik, Z

    2002-01-01

    Recently, considerable interest has been directed to red-fluorescence photodiagnosis of brain and other tumours during surgery using the protoporphyrin IX natural precursor, 5-aminolaevulinic acid. In the present study we focused on the role of the rate-limiting enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase in glioma C6 cell activity, differentiation and sub-cellular distribution. Over-expression of the human housekeeping porphobilinogen deaminase in the glioma cells, using the housekeeping-porphobilinogen deaminase plasmid, induced a G1 cell cycle attenuation accompanied by increases in enzyme activity and c6 differentiation toward astrocytes. Visualisation of subcellular localisation of the porphobilinogen deaminase using the independent techniques of fluorescence immuno-staining with specific anti-human porphobilinogen deaminase antibodies and cellular expression of porphobilinogen deaminase fused to green fluorescent protein, revealed (unexpectedly) a major fraction of porphobilinogen deaminase in the nucleus and only a minor fraction in the cytoplasm. Both C and N terminals of porphobilinogen deaminase fused to green fluorescent protein revealed a major fraction of the newly synthesized fused porphobilinogen deaminase in the nucleus. Furthermore, newborn rat brain cells grown in a primary culture showed the same localisation pattern of porphobilinogen deaminase in the nuclei. Stimulation of C6 glioma cell differentiation by butyrate induced a marked decrease in porphobilinogen deaminase both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm as determined by Western blotting and fluorescence immuno-localisation. These findings suggest a possible dual role for housekeeping porphobilinogen deaminase in fast dividing glioma cells, one related to the porphyrin synthesis pathway and another coupled to nuclear function, which might be linked to tumorigenesis. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 10061011. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600173 www.bjcancer.com 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11953837

  4. Safety evaluation of AMP deaminase from Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Okado, Nobuo; Sugi, Mai; Ueda, Maya; Mizuhashi, Fukutaro; Lynch, Barry S; Vo, Trung D; Roberts, Ashley S

    2015-12-01

    Adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) deaminase is an enzyme used to increase concentrations of 5'-inosine monophosphate in certain foods and beverages for flavoring purposes. One commercial source of this enzyme is Aspergillus oryzae, a filamentous fungus with a history of safe use in Asia as a fermentation organism used in the production of miso sauce and sake liquors. Noting the use of the enzyme in food intended for human consumption and potential presence at trace levels in finished goods, a series of safety studies including an in vitro Ames test and chromosome aberration assay with Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts were conducted along with a 90-day oral toxicity study in rats. AMP deaminase showed no evidence of genotoxicity in the in vitro tests. Following gavage administration of Sprague-Dawley rats at dosages of 19.8, 198.4, or 1984 mg total organic solids (TOS)/kg body weight (bw)/day for 90 days, no adverse effects on body weight gain, food consumption, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, ophthalmological and histopathological examinations were observed. The no-observed-adverse-effect level was considered to be 1984 mg TOS/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. Results of the genotoxicity studies and subchronic rat study support the safe use of AMP deaminase produced from A. oryzae in food production. PMID:26559900

  5. A Phenotypic Screen for Functional Mutants of Human Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuru; Havel, Jocelyn; Beal, Peter A

    2015-11-20

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are RNA-editing enzymes responsible for the conversion of adenosine to inosine at specific locations in cellular RNAs. ADAR1 and ADAR2 are two members of the family that have been shown to be catalytically active. Earlier, we reported a phenotypic screen for the study of human ADAR2 using budding yeast S. cerevisiae as the host system. While this screen has been successfully applied to the study of ADAR2, it failed with ADAR1. Here, we report a new reporter that uses a novel editing substrate and is suitable for the study of ADAR1. We screened plasmid libraries with randomized codons for two important residues in human ADAR1 (G1007 and E1008). The screening results combined with in vitro deamination assays led to the identification of mutants that are more active than the wild type protein. Furthermore, a screen of the ADAR1 E1008X library with a reporter construct bearing an A•G mismatch at the editing site suggests one role for the residue at position 1008 is to sense the identity of the base pairing partner for the editing site adenosine. This work has provided a starting point for future in vitro evolution studies of ADAR1 and led to new insight into ADAR's editing site selectivity. PMID:26372505

  6. ACTIVATION OF A CRYPTIC D-SERINE DEAMINASE (DSD) GENE FROM PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA 17616

    EPA Science Inventory

    D-serine inhibits growth of P. cepacia 17616; however, resistant mutants able to express an ordinarily cryptic D-serine deaminase (dsd) gene were isolated readily. The resistant strains formed high levels of a D-serine deaminase active on D-threonine as well as D-serine. IS eleme...

  7. Disappearance of porphobilinogen deaminase activity in leaves before the onset of senescence.

    PubMed

    Frydman, R B; Frydman, B

    1979-06-01

    The activity of porphobilinogen deaminase was measured in young and senescent or mature leaves of pepper (Capsicum annuum), and poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima). Whereas high activity was found in the crude extracts of the young leaves, almost no activity was found in the extracts of senescent or mature leaves. The decrease in deaminase activity was not due to the presence of an isolatable inhibitor. By purifying the crude enzyme extracts from leaves of different ages on DEAE-cellulose columns it was shown that the decrease in deaminase activity was due to a real decrease in the amount of enzyme. Fruiting also decreased porphobilinogen deaminase activity. Several kinetic constants of the C. annuum deaminase were determined. PMID:16660874

  8. Communication: UV photoionization of cytosine catalyzed by Ag(+).

    PubMed

    Taccone, Martín I; Féraud, Geraldine; Berdakin, Matías; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Pino, Gustavo A

    2015-07-28

    The photo-induced damages of DNA in interaction with metal cations, which are found in various environments, still remain to be characterized. In this paper, we show how the complexation of a DNA base (cytosine (Cyt)) with a metal cation (Ag(+)) changes its electronic properties. By means of UV photofragment spectroscopy of cold ions, it was found that the photoexcitation of the CytAg(+) complex at low energy (315-282) nm efficiently leads to ionized cytosine (Cyt(+)) as the single product. This occurs through a charge transfer state in which an electron from the p orbital of Cyt is promoted to Ag(+), as confirmed by ab initio calculations at the TD-DFT/B3LYP and RI-ADC(2) theory level using the SV(P) basis set. The low ionization energy of Cyt in the presence of Ag(+) could have important implications as point mutation of DNA upon sunlight exposition. PMID:26233098

  9. Communication: UV photoionization of cytosine catalyzed by Ag+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccone, Martín I.; Féraud, Geraldine; Berdakin, Matías; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Pino, Gustavo A.

    2015-07-01

    The photo-induced damages of DNA in interaction with metal cations, which are found in various environments, still remain to be characterized. In this paper, we show how the complexation of a DNA base (cytosine (Cyt)) with a metal cation (Ag+) changes its electronic properties. By means of UV photofragment spectroscopy of cold ions, it was found that the photoexcitation of the CytAg+ complex at low energy (315-282) nm efficiently leads to ionized cytosine (Cyt+) as the single product. This occurs through a charge transfer state in which an electron from the p orbital of Cyt is promoted to Ag+, as confirmed by ab initio calculations at the TD-DFT/B3LYP and RI-ADC(2) theory level using the SV(P) basis set. The low ionization energy of Cyt in the presence of Ag+ could have important implications as point mutation of DNA upon sunlight exposition.

  10. New Insights into 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Phylogeny, Evolution and Ecological Significance

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Francisco X.; Rossi, Márcio J.; Soares, Cláudio R. F. S.; McConkey, Brendan J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work is the study of the phylogeny, evolution and ecological importance of the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, the activity of which represents one of the most important and studied mechanisms used by plant growth–promoting microorganisms. The ACC deaminase gene and its regulatory elements presence in completely sequenced organisms was verified by multiple searches in diverse databases, and based on the data obtained a comprehensive analysis was conducted. Strain habitat, origin and ACC deaminase activity were taken into account when analyzing the results. In order to unveil ACC deaminase origin, evolution and relationships with other closely related pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes a phylogenetic analysis was also performed. The data obtained show that ACC deaminase is mostly prevalent in some Bacteria, Fungi and members of Stramenopiles. Contrary to previous reports, we show that ACC deaminase genes are predominantly vertically inherited in various bacterial and fungal classes. Still, results suggest a considerable degree of horizontal gene transfer events, including interkingdom transfer events. A model for ACC deaminase origin and evolution is also proposed. This study also confirms the previous reports suggesting that the Lrp-like regulatory protein AcdR is a common mechanism regulating ACC deaminase expression in Proteobacteria, however, we also show that other regulatory mechanisms may be present in some Proteobacteria and other bacterial phyla. In this study we provide a more complete view of the role for ACC deaminase than was previously available. The results show that ACC deaminase may not only be related to plant growth promotion abilities, but may also play multiple roles in microorganism's developmental processes. Hence, exploring the origin and functioning of this enzyme may be the key in a variety of important agricultural and biotechnological applications. PMID:24905353

  11. Human erythroid porphobilinogen deaminase exists in 2 splice variants.

    PubMed

    Gubin, A N; Miller, J L

    2001-02-01

    Human porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) is, reportedly, encoded by 2 distinct messenger RNAs (mRNAs) transcribing from a single gene. The ubiquitous form of the PBGD gene product is often used as an endogenous reference in gene expression studies because it is pseudogene free and has minimal transcriptional variability among tissues. A distinct erythroid-specific gene product has also been described because of the alternate splicing of the gene. Here is reported the existence of an additional erythroid-specific isoform of PBGD mRNA in primary cells. PMID:11157504

  12. An efficient prebiotic synthesis of cytosine and uracil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, M. P.; Miller, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the purines, the routes that have been proposed for the prebiotic synthesis of pyrimidines from simple precursors give only low yields. Cytosine can be synthesized from cyanoacetylene and cyanate; the former precursor is produced from a spark discharge in a CH4/N2 mixture and is an abundant interstellar molecule. But this reaction requires relatively high concentrations of cyanate (> 0.1 M), which are unlikely to occur in aqueous media as cyanate is hydrolysed rapidly to CO2 and NH3. An alternative route that has been explored is the reaction of cyanoacetaldehyde (formed by hydrolysis of cyanoacetylene) with urea. But at low concentrations of urea, this reaction produces no detectable quantities of cytosine. Here we show that in concentrated urea solution--such as might have been found in an evaporating lagoon or in pools on drying beaches on the early Earth--cyanoacetaldehyde reacts to form cytosine in yields of 30-50%, from which uracil can be formed by hydrolysis. These reactions provide a plausible route to the pyrimidine bases required in the RNA world.

  13. Deaminase Activity on Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) Occurs in Vitro when APOBEC3G Cytidine Deaminase Forms Homotetramers and Higher-order Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, William M.; Okany, Chinelo; Smith, Harold C.

    2011-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a cytidine deaminase that catalyzes deamination of deoxycytidine (dC) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The oligomeric state of A3G required to support deaminase activity remains unknown. We show under defined in vitro conditions that full-length and native A3G formed complexes with ssDNA in an A3G concentration-dependent but temperature-independent manner. Complexes assembled and maintained at 4 °C did not have significant deaminase activity, but their enzymatic function could be restored by subsequent incubation at 37 °C. This approach enabled complexes of a defined size range to be isolated and subsequently evaluated for their contribution to enzymatic activity. The composition of A3G bound to ssDNA was determined by protein-protein chemical cross-linking. A3G-ssDNA complexes of 16 S were necessary for deaminase activity and consisted of cross-linked A3G homotetramers and homodimers. At lower concentrations, A3G only formed 5.8 S homodimers on ssDNA with low deaminase activity. Monomeric A3G was not identified in 5.8 S or 16 S complexes. We propose that deaminase-dependent antiviral activity of A3G in vivo may require a critical concentration of A3G in viral particles that will promote oligomerization on ssDNA during reverse transcription. PMID:21737457

  14. Counting Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, Jonathan; Welton, Briana

    1998-01-01

    Describes changes to a traditional study of population in yeast colonies. Changes to the procedures include: (1) only one culture per student team; (2) cultures are inoculated only once; and (3) the same tube is sampled daily. (DDR)

  15. Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Candida is the scientific name for yeast. It is a fungus that lives almost everywhere, including in ... infection that causes white patches in your mouth Candida esophagitis is thrush that spreads to your esophagus, ...

  16. Role of Adenosine Deaminase in Common Chronic ENT Infections

    PubMed Central

    Santosh, U.P.; Renukananda, G.S.

    2016-01-01

    Intoduction Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) has been suggested to be an important enzyme which is associated with the cell mediated immunity. But its clinical significance in ENT infections needs to be correlated. Aim To evaluate the role of serum adenosine deaminase level estimation in common chronic ENT infections. Materials and Methods This was a prospective randomized study. The subjects were divided into 4 groups. Group A consisted of 25 normal healthy individuals who served as the controls. Group B consisted of 25 patients, who were clinically diagnosed as chronic tonsillitis. Group C consisted of 25 patients, clinically diagnosed as chronic rhinosinusitis and Group D consisted of 25 patients, clinically diagnosed as chronic otitis media of mucosal type. The serum levels of ADA were estimated in all the subjects. Results The level of serum ADA was found to be elevated in common chronic ENT infections (Group B,C and D), when compared to control group(Group A) and p<0.05, which is statistically significant. Conclusion From the present study, it can be concluded that serum ADA level can be considered as one of the essential diagnostic tool in diagnosing common chronic ENT infections.

  17. Plant growth-promoting traits of yeasts isolated from the phyllosphere and rhizosphere of Drosera spatulata Lab.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shih-Feng; Sun, Pei-Feng; Lu, Hsueh-Yu; Wei, Jyuan-Yu; Xiao, Hong-Su; Fang, Wei-Ta; Cheng, Bai-You; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms can promote plant growth through direct and indirect mechanisms. Compared with the use of bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi, the use of yeasts as plant growth-promoting (PGP) agents has not been extensively investigated. In this study, yeast isolates from the phyllosphere and rhizosphere of the medicinally important plant Drosera spatulata Lab. were assessed for their PGP traits. All isolates were tested for indole-3-acetic acid-, ammonia-, and polyamine-producing abilities, calcium phosphate and zinc oxide solubilizing ability, and catalase activity. Furthermore, the activities of siderophore, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase, and fungal cell wall-degrading enzymes were assessed. The antagonistic action of yeasts against pathogenic Glomerella cingulata was evaluated. The cocultivation of Nicotiana benthamiana with yeast isolates enhanced plant growth, indicating a potential yeast-plant interaction. Our study results highlight the potential use of yeasts as plant biofertilizers under controlled and field conditions. PMID:26895872

  18. Measurement of human placental 5'-AMP deaminase activity by radiometric assay

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.H.; Aronson, D.M.

    1981-09-01

    The level of 5'-AMP deaminase in homogenates of human term placenta has been measured by means of a simple radiometric assay. The assay uses /sup 14/C-labeled AMP as substrate and incorporates conditions of pH and K/sup +/ concentration, which optimize the 5'-AMP deaminase activity, and inhibitors of 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase to reduce interferences from these enzymes. Assay products are separated by descending paper chromatography and quantitated by liquid scintillation counting. The activity of 5'-AMP deaminase in human term placenta determined by this assay was 474 +/- 37 nmol min/sup -1/ g/sup -1/ at 30/sup o/C and was less than the 5'-AMP phosphatase activity evident under the same assay conditions. The assay is suitable for measurement of 5'-AMP deaminase in extracts of other tissues in which high levels of phosphates and adenosine deaminase preclude assay of 5'-AMP deaminase by such techniques as ultraviolet absorption changes or ammonia estimation.

  19. Melamine Deaminase and Atrazine Chlorohydrolase: 98 Percent Identical but Functionally Different

    PubMed Central

    Seffernick, Jennifer L.; de Souza, Mervyn L.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2001-01-01

    The gene encoding melamine deaminase (TriA) from Pseudomonas sp. strain NRRL B-12227 was identified, cloned into Escherichia coli, sequenced, and expressed for in vitro study of enzyme activity. Melamine deaminase displaced two of the three amino groups from melamine, producing ammeline and ammelide as sequential products. The first deamination reaction occurred more than 10 times faster than the second. Ammelide did not inhibit the first or second deamination reaction, suggesting that the lower rate of ammeline hydrolysis was due to differential substrate turnover rather than product inhibition. Remarkably, melamine deaminase is 98% identical to the enzyme atrazine chlorohydrolase (AtzA) from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP. Each enzyme consists of 475 amino acids and differs by only 9 amino acids. AtzA was shown to exclusively catalyze dehalogenation of halo-substituted triazine ring compounds and had no activity with melamine and ammeline. Similarly, melamine deaminase had no detectable activity with the halo-triazine substrates. Melamine deaminase was active in deamination of a substrate that was structurally identical to atrazine, except for the substitution of an amino group for the chlorine atom. Moreover, melamine deaminase and AtzA are found in bacteria that grow on melamine and atrazine compounds, respectively. These data strongly suggest that the 9 amino acid differences between melamine deaminase and AtzA represent a short evolutionary pathway connecting enzymes catalyzing physiologically relevant deamination and dehalogenation reactions, respectively. PMID:11274097

  20. Tautomerization in the formation and collision-induced dissociation of alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhibo; Rodgers, M T

    2012-04-01

    Noncovalent interactions between alkali metal cations and the various low-energy tautomeric forms of cytosine are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) of M(+)(cytosine) complexes with Xe is studied using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, where M(+) = Li(+), Na(+), and K(+). In all cases, the only dissociation pathway observed corresponds to endothermic loss of the intact cytosine molecule. The cross-section thresholds are interpreted to yield 0 and 298 K bond dissociation energies (BDEs) for the M(+)(cytosine) complexes after accounting for the effects of multiple ion-neutral collisions, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the reactants, and dissociation lifetimes. Ab initio calculations are performed at the MP2(full)/6-31G* level of theory to determine the structures of the neutral cytosine tautomers, the M(+)(cytosine) complexes, and the TSs for unimolecular tautomerization. The molecular parameters derived from these structures are employed for the calculation of the unimolecular rates for tautomerization and the thermochemical analysis of the experimental data. Theoretical BDEs of the various M(+)(cytosine) complexes and the energy barriers for the unimolecular tautomerization of these complexes are determined at MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p) level of theory using the MP2(full)/6-31G* optimized geometries. In addition, BDEs for the Li(+)(cytosine) complexes are also determined at the G3 level of theory. Based upon the tautomeric mixture generated upon thermal vaporization of cytosine, calculated M(+)-cytosine BDEs and barriers to tautomerization for the low-energy tautomeric forms of M(+)(cytosine), and measured thresholds for CID of M(+)(cytosine) complexes, we conclude that tautomerization occurs during both complex formation and CID. PMID:22361913

  1. Cytosinium–hydrogen maleate–cytosine (1/1/1)

    PubMed Central

    Benali-Cherif, Nourredine; Falek, Wahiba; Direm, Amani

    2009-01-01

    The title organic salt, C4H6N3O+·C4H3O4 −·C4H5N3O, was synthesized from cytosine base and maleic acid. An intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond occurs in the hydrogen maleate anion. The crystal packing is stabilized by inter­molecular N—H⋯O, N—H⋯N and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, giving rise to a nearly planar two-dimensional network parallel to (101). PMID:21578789

  2. [Adenosine deaminase as costimulatory molecule and marker of cellular immunity].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguilar, Mary Carmen; Goncalves, Loredana; Ibarra, Alba; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael

    2010-12-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is an enzyme of purine metabolism which has been the subject of much interest because the congenital defect of this enzyme causes severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome. One of the three isoforms of the enzyme (ecto-ADA) is capable of binding to the glycoprotein CD26 and adenosine receptors A1 and A2B. ADA-CD26 interaction produces a costimulatory signal in the events of T cell activation and secretion of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and IL-6. During this activation, the enzyme activity is regulated positively by IL-2 and IL-12 and negatively by IL-4, based on the mechanism of translocation. Diverse studies suggest that seric and plasmatic levels of ADA rise in some diseases caused by microorganisms infecting mainly the macrophages and in hypertensive disorders, which may represent a compensatory mechanism resulting from increased adenosine levels and the release of hormones and inflammatory mediators estimulated by hipoxia. PMID:21365880

  3. Serum adenosine deaminase activity in bovine liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Abd Ellah, Mahmoud Rushdi; Nishimori, Kazuhiro; Goryo, Masanobu; Okada, Keiji; Yasuda, Jun

    2004-11-01

    A total of 60 cattle were examined for the presence of pathological liver lesions. The liver lesions were classified as glycogen degeneration, liver abscess, sawdust liver and fatty degeneration. The value of serum adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was investigated as a pilot study for diagnosing liver diseases in cattle. Serum ADA activity was significantly higher in cases with glycogen degeneration (9.8 +/- 3.8 U/l) , liver abscess (10.4 +/- 3.2 U/l), sawdust liver (11.5 +/- 7.3 U/l) and fatty degeneration (20.8 +/- 7.7 U/l) than in the controls. The results indicate that ADA activity increases with the degree of hepatocellular damage. We concluded that serum ADA activity may be of value in bovine liver disease diagnosis. PMID:15585959

  4. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  5. Adenosine deaminase and nucleoside phosphorylase activities in normal human blood mononuclear cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Macdermott, R. P.; Tritsch, G. L.; Formeister, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase and nucleoside phosphorylase activity is highest in T cells and macrophages; null cells have approximately half the amount and B cells have the least amount of both enzyme activities PMID:6781801

  6. Safety and Efficacy of Suicide Gene Therapy with Adenosine Deaminase 5-Fluorocytosine Silmutaneously in in Vitro Cultures of Melanoma and Retinal Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Sakkas, Antonios; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Domvri, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Bougiouklis, Dimitris; Kakolyris, Stylianos; Zarampoukas, Thomas; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Meditskou, Soultana; Tsiouda, Theodora; Pezirkianidis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Local treatment as a treatment modality is gaining increased general acceptance over time. Novel drugs and methodologies of local administration are being investigated in an effort to achieve disease local control. Suicide gene therapy is a method that has been investigated as a local treatment with simultaneously distant disease control. In our current experiment we purchased HTB-70 (melanoma cell line, derived from metastatic axillary node) and CRL-2302 (human retinal epithelium) were from ATCC LGC Standards and Ancotil®, 2.5 g/250 ml (1 g/00ml) (5-Flucytosine) MEDA; Pharmaceuticals Ltd. UK. Adenosine Cytosine Deaminase (Ad.CD) was also used in order to convert the pro-drug 5-Flucytosine to the active 5-Fluoracil. Three different concentrations of 5-Flucytosine (5-FC) were administered (0.2ml, 0.8ml and 1.2ml). At indicated time-points (4h, 8h and 24h) cell viability and apoptosis were measured. Our concept was to investigate whether suicide gene therapy with Ad. CD-5-FC could be used with safety and efficiency as a future local treatment for melanoma located in the eye cavity. Indeed, our results indicated that in every 5-FC administration had mild cytotoxicity for the retinal cells, while increased apoptosis was observed for the melanoma cell line. PMID:24799955

  7. Detection of Cytosine Methylation in Ancient DNA from Five Native American Populations Using Bisulfite Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rick W. A.; Monroe, Cara; Bolnick, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    While cytosine methylation has been widely studied in extant populations, relatively few studies have analyzed methylation in ancient DNA. Most existing studies of epigenetic marks in ancient DNA have inferred patterns of methylation in highly degraded samples using post-mortem damage to cytosines as a proxy for cytosine methylation levels. However, this approach limits the inference of methylation compared with direct bisulfite sequencing, the current gold standard for analyzing cytosine methylation at single nucleotide resolution. In this study, we used direct bisulfite sequencing to assess cytosine methylation in ancient DNA from the skeletal remains of 30 Native Americans ranging in age from approximately 230 to 4500 years before present. Unmethylated cytosines were converted to uracils by treatment with sodium bisulfite, bisulfite products of a CpG-rich retrotransposon were pyrosequenced, and C-to-T ratios were quantified for a single CpG position. We found that cytosine methylation is readily recoverable from most samples, given adequate preservation of endogenous nuclear DNA. In addition, our results indicate that the precision of cytosine methylation estimates is inversely correlated with aDNA preservation, such that samples of low DNA concentration show higher variability in measures of percent methylation than samples of high DNA concentration. In particular, samples in this study with a DNA concentration above 0.015 ng/μL generated the most consistent measures of cytosine methylation. This study presents evidence of cytosine methylation in a large collection of ancient human remains, and indicates that it is possible to analyze epigenetic patterns in ancient populations using direct bisulfite sequencing approaches. PMID:26016479

  8. Analysis of normal and mutant forms of human adenosine deaminase - a review.

    PubMed

    Daddona, P E; Kelley, W N

    1980-02-01

    A deficiency of the enzyme adenosine deaminase is associated with an autosomal recessive form of severe combined immunodeficiency disease in man. The molecular forms of the normal human enzyme have now been well characterized in an effort to better understand the nature of the enzyme defect in affected patients. In some human tissues adenosine deaminase exists predominantly as a small molecular form while in other tissues a large form composed of adenosine deaminase (small form) and an adenosine deaminase-binding protein predominates. The small form of the enzyme purified to homogeneity by antibody affinity chromatography is a monomer of native molecular weight of 37,600. The adenosine deaminase-binding protein, purified by adenosine deaminase affinity chromatography, appears to be a dimer of native molecular weight 213,000 and contains carbohydrate. Based on direct binding measurements, chemical cross-linking studies and sedimentation equilibrium analyses, small form adenosine deaminase has been shown to combine with purified binding protein in a molar ratio of 2:1 respectively to produce the large form adenosine deaminase. Reduced, but widely ranging levels of adenosine deaminating activity, have been reported in various tissues of adenosine deaminase deficient patients. Further, the characteristics of this residual enzyme activity have been analyzed immunochemically to substantiate genetic heterogeneity in this disorder. While many types of immunodeficiency are currently recognized in man, in most cases the molecular defect is unknown. The discovery of a deficiency of the enzyme, adenosine deaminase, ADA, (EC 3.5.4.4), in some patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disease represented an early clue to the pathogenesis of immune dysfunction at the molecular level 1-4. Affected patients with markedly reduced levels of ADA exhibit a defect of both cellular and humoral immunity characterized clinically by severe recurrent infections with a fatal outcome if untreated. Attempts to elucidate the nature of the genetic mutation(s) leading to the reduction of ADA activity in these immunodeficient patients have been complicated in part by an incomplete understanding of the nature of ADA in normal tissues. In this review we will consider the structural characteristics of the normal and mutant forms of ADA as they are currently understood. PMID:6988697

  9. Photochemical selectivity in guanine–cytosine base-pair structures

    PubMed Central

    Abo-Riziq, Ali; Grace, Louis; Nir, Eyal; Kabelac, Martin; Hobza, Pavel; de Vries, Mattanjah S.

    2005-01-01

    Prebiotic chemistry presumably took place before formation of an oxygen-rich atmosphere and thus under conditions of intense short wavelength UV irradiation. Therefore, the UV photochemical stability of the molecular building blocks of life may have been an important selective factor in determining the eventual chemical makeup of critical biomolecules. To investigate the role of UV irradiation in base-pairing we have studied guanine (G) and cytosine (C) base pairs in the absence of the RNA backbone. We distinguished base-pair structures by IR–UV hole-burning spectroscopy as well as by high-level correlated ab initio calculations. The Watson–Crick structure exhibits broad UV absorption, in stark contrast to other GC structures and other base-pair structures. This broad absorption may be explained by a rapid internal conversion that makes this specific base pair arrangement uniquely photochemically stable. PMID:15618394

  10. Watson-Crick and sugar-edge base pairing of cytosine in the gas phase: UV and infrared spectra of cytosine·2-pyridone.

    PubMed

    Frey, Jann A; Ottiger, Philipp; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-01-23

    While keto-amino cytosine is the dominant species in aqueous solution, spectroscopic studies in molecular beams and in noble gas matrices show that other cytosine tautomers prevail in apolar environments. Each of these offers two or three H-bonding sites (Watson-Crick, wobble, sugar-edge). The mass- and isomer-specific S1 ← S0 vibronic spectra of cytosine·2-pyridone (Cyt·2PY) and 1-methylcytosine·2PY are measured using UV laser resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI), UV/UV depletion, and IR depletion spectroscopy. The UV spectra of the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge isomers of Cyt·2PY are separated using UV/UV spectral hole-burning. Five different isomers of Cyt·2PY are observed in a supersonic beam. We show that the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge dimers of keto-amino cytosine with 2PY are the most abundant in the beam, although keto-amino-cytosine is only the third most abundant tautomer in the gas phase. We identify the different isomers by combining three different diagnostic tools: (1) methylation of the cytosine N1-H group prevents formation of both the sugar-edge and wobble isomers and gives the Watson-Crick isomer exclusively. (2) The calculated ground state binding and dissociation energies, relative gas-phase abundances, excitation and the ionization energies are in agreement with the assignment of the dominant Cyt·2PY isomers to the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge complexes of keto-amino cytosine. (3) The comparison of calculated ground state vibrational frequencies to the experimental IR spectra in the carbonyl stretch and NH/OH/CH stretch ranges strengthen this identification. PMID:24383817

  11. Cytosine deamination plays a primary role in the evolution of mammalian isochores.

    PubMed

    Fryxell, K J; Zuckerkandl, E

    2000-09-01

    DNA melting is rate-limiting for cytosine deamination, from which we infer that the rate of cytosine deamination should decline twofold for each 10% increase in GC content. Analysis of human DNA sequence data confirms that this is the case for 5-methylcytosine. Several lines of evidence further confirm that it is also the case for unmethylated cytosine and that cytosine deamination causes the majority of all C-->T and G-->A transitions in mammals. Thus, cytosine deamination and DNA base composition each affect the other, forming a positive feedback loop that facilitates divergent genetic drift to high or low GC content. Because a 10 degrees C increase in temperature in vitro increases the rate of cytosine deamination 5. 7-fold, cytosine deamination must be highly dependent on body temperature, which is consistent with the dramatic differences between the isochores of warm-blooded versus cold-blooded vertebrates. Because this process involves both DNA melting and positive feedback, it would be expected to spread progressively (in evolutionary time) down the length of the chromosome, which is consistent with the large size of isochores in modern mammals. PMID:10958853

  12. Prebiotic cytosine synthesis: A critical analysis and implications for the origin of life

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Robert

    1999-01-01

    A number of theories propose that RNA, or an RNA-like substance, played a role in the origin of life. Usually, such hypotheses presume that the Watson–Crick bases were readily available on prebiotic Earth, for spontaneous incorporation into a replicator. Cytosine, however, has not been reported in analyses of meteorites nor is it among the products of electric spark discharge experiments. The reported prebiotic syntheses of cytosine involve the reaction of cyanoacetylene (or its hydrolysis product, cyanoacetaldehyde), with cyanate, cyanogen, or urea. These substances undergo side reactions with common nucleophiles that appear to proceed more rapidly than cytosine formation. To favor cytosine formation, reactant concentrations are required that are implausible in a natural setting. Furthermore, cytosine is consumed by deamination (the half-life for deamination at 25°C is ≈340 yr) and other reactions. No reactions have been described thus far that would produce cytosine, even in a specialized local setting, at a rate sufficient to compensate for its decomposition. On the basis of this evidence, it appears quite unlikely that cytosine played a role in the origin of life. Theories that involve replicators that function without the Watson–Crick pairs, or no replicator at all, remain as viable alternatives. PMID:10200273

  13. Hydroxyl radical induced cross-linking of cytosine and tyrosine in nucleohistone

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, E.; Dizdaroglu, M. )

    1990-01-30

    Hydroxyl radical induced formation of a DNA-protein cross-link involving cytosine and tyrosine in nucleohistone in buffered aqueous solution is reported. The technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for this investigation. A {gamma}-irradiated aqueous mixture of cytosine and tyrosine was first investigated in order to obtain gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric properties of possible cytosine-tyrosine cross-links. One cross-link was observed, and its structure was identified as the product from the formation of a covalent bond between carbon 6 of cytosine and carbon 3 of tyrosine. With the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring, this cytosine-tyrosine cross-link was identified in acidic hydrolysates of calf thymus nucleohistone {gamma}-irradiated in N{sub 2}O-saturated aqueous solution. The yield of this DNA-protein cross-link in nucleohistone was found to be a linear function of the radiation dose in the range of 100-500 Gy (J{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}). This yield amounted to 0.05 nmol{center dot}J{sup {minus}1}. Mechanisms underlying the formation of the cytosine-tyrosine cross-link in nucleohistone were proposed to involve radical-radical and/or radical addition reactions of hydroxyl adduct radicals of cytosine and tyrosine moieties, forming a covalent bond between carbon 6 of cytosine and carbon 3 of tyrosine. When oxygen was present in irradiated solutions, no cytosine-tyrosine cross-links were observed.

  14. Alkali metal cation binding affinities of cytosine in the gas phase: revisited.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-08-14

    Binding of metal cations to the nucleobases can influence base pairing, base stacking and nucleobase tautomerism. Gas-phase condensation of dc discharge generated alkali metal cations and thermally vaporized cytosine (DC/FT) has been found to produce kinetically trapped excited tautomeric conformations of the M(+)(cytosine) complexes, which influences the threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) behavior. In order to elucidate the effects of the size of alkali metal cation on the strength of binding to the canonical form of cytosine, the binding affinities of Na(+) and K(+) to cytosine are re-examined here, and studies are extended to include Rb(+) and Cs(+) again using TCID techniques. The M(+)(cytosine) complexes are generated in an electrospray ionization source, which has been shown to produce ground-state tautomeric conformations of M(+)(cytosine). The energy-dependent cross sections are interpreted to yield bond dissociation energies (BDEs) using an analysis that includes consideration of unimolecular decay rates, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the reactants, and multiple M(+)(cytosine)-Xe collisions. Revised BDEs for the Na(+)(cytosine) and K(+)(cytosine) complexes exceed those previously measured by 31.9 and 25.5 kJ mol(-1), respectively, consistent with the hypothesis proposed by Yang and Rodgers that excited tautomeric conformations are accessed when the complexes are generated by DC/FT ionization. Experimentally measured BDEs are compared to theoretical values calculated at the B3LYP and MP2(full) levels of theory using the 6-311+G(2d,2p)_HW* and def2-TZVPPD basis sets. The B3LYP/def2-TZVPPD level of theory is found to provide the best agreement with the measured BDEs, suggesting that this level of theory can be employed to provide reliable energetics for similar metal-ligand systems. PMID:24967574

  15. ADA (adenosine deaminase) gene therapy enters the competition

    SciTech Connect

    Culliton, B.J.

    1990-08-31

    Around the world, some 70 children are members of a select and deadly club. Born with an immune deficiency so severe that they will die of infection unless their immune systems can be repaired, they have captured the attention of would-be gene therapists who believe that a handful of these kids--the 15 or 20 who lack functioning levels of the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA)--could be saved by a healthy ADA gene. A team of gene therapists is ready to put the theory to the test. In April 1987, a team of NIH researchers headed by R. Michael Blaese and W. French Anderson came up with the first formal protocol to introduce a healthy ADA gene into an unhealthy human. After 3 years of line-by-line scrutiny by five review committees, they have permission to go ahead. Two or three children will be treated in the next year, and will be infused with T lymphocytes carrying the gene for ADA. If the experiment works, the ADA gene will begin producing normal amounts of ADA. An interesting feature of ADA deficiency, that makes it ideal for initial gene studies, is that the amount of ADA one needs for a healthy immune system is quite variable. Hence, once inside a patient's T cells, the new ADA gene needs only to express the enzyme in moderate amounts. No precise gene regulation is necessary.

  16. The ONIOM molecular dynamics method for biochemical applications: cytidine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2007-03-22

    Abstract We derived and implemented the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method for biochemical applications. The implementation allows the characterization of the functions of the real enzymes taking account of their thermal motion. In this method, the direct MD is performed by calculating the ONIOM energy and gradients of the system on the fly. We describe the first application of this ONOM-MD method to cytidine deaminase. The environmental effects on the substrate in the active site are examined. The ONIOM-MD simulations show that the product uridine is strongly perturbed by the thermal motion of the environment and dissociates easily from the active site. TM and MA were supported in part by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  17. Regulation of Adenosine Deaminase on Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dongchun; Zuo, Aijun; Zhao, Ronglan; Shao, Hui; Kaplan, Henry J; Sun, Deming

    2016-03-15

    Adenosine is an important regulator of the immune response, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibits this regulatory effect by converting adenosine into functionally inactive molecules. Studies showed that adenosine receptor agonists can be anti- or proinflammatory. Clarification of the mechanisms that cause these opposing effects should provide a better guide for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we investigated the effect of ADA on the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) induced by immunizing EAU-prone mice with a known uveitogenic peptide, IRBP1-20. Our results showed that the effective time to administer a single dose of ADA to suppress induction of EAU was 8-14 d postimmunization, shortly before EAU expression; however, ADA treatment at other time points exacerbated disease. ADA preferentially inhibited Th17 responses, and this effect was γδ T cell dependent. Our results demonstrated that the existing immune status strongly influences the anti- or proinflammatory effects of ADA. Our observations should help to improve the design of ADA- and adenosine receptor-targeted therapies. PMID:26856700

  18. Structural and biological function of NYD-SP15 as a new member of cytidine deaminases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yidan; Li, Lei; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Qinghuai

    2016-05-25

    Recent studies were mainly focus on the cytidine deaminase family genes, which contained a lot of members that varied on the function of catalytic deamination in RNA or DNA and were involved in the process of growth maintenance, host immunity, retroviral infection, tumorigenesis, and drug resistance with a feature of C-U deamination. In this study, we identified a new member of cytidine deaminase family, NYD-SP15. Previous work showed that the deduced structure of the protein contained two dCMP_cyt_deam domains, which were involved in zinc ion binding. NYD-SP15 was expressed variably in a wide range of tissues, indicating its worthy biological function and creative significances. Sequence analysis, RT-PCR, western blot, flow cytometry, direct-site mutation and GST pull-down assay were performed to analyze the construction and function of NYD-SP15. The results in our studies showed that NYD-SP15 was closely related to deoxycytidylate deaminase and cytidine deaminase, with authentic cytidine deaminase activity in vivo and vitro as well as homo dimerization effects. NYD-SP15 contained nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and nuclear export-signal (NES) and could dynamically shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Furthermore, NYD-SP15 gene over-expression reduced the cells growth and blocked G1 to S phase, which implied a potential inhibition effect on cell growth. PMID:26945630

  19. A Cytidine Deaminase Edits C to U in Transfer RNAs in Archaea

    SciTech Connect

    Randau, L.; Stanley, B; Kohlway, A; Mechta, S; Xiong, Y; Söll, D

    2009-01-01

    All canonical transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have a uridine at position 8, involved in maintaining tRNA tertiary structure. However, the hyperthermophilic archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri harbors 30 (out of 34) tRNA genes with cytidine at position 8. Here, we demonstrate C-to-U editing at this location in the tRNA's tertiary core, and present the crystal structure of a tRNA-specific cytidine deaminase, CDAT8, which has the cytidine deaminase domain linked to a tRNA-binding THUMP domain. CDAT8 is specific for C deamination at position 8, requires only the acceptor stem hairpin for activity, and belongs to a unique family within the cytidine deaminase-like superfamily. The presence of this C-to-U editing enzyme guarantees the proper folding and functionality of all M. kandleri tRNAs.

  20. Enzymatic conformational fluctuations along the reaction coordinate of cytidine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Ryan C.; Carter, Charles W.; Bagdassarian, Carey K.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the crystal structures for cytidine deaminase complexed with substrate analog 3-deazacytidine, transition-state analog zebularine 3,4-hydrate, and product uridine establishes significant changes in the magnitude of atomic-scale fluctuations along the (approximate) reaction coordinate of this enzyme. Differences in fluctuations between the substrate analog complex, transition-state analog complex, and product complex are monitored via changes in corresponding crystallographic temperature factors. Previously, we reported that active-site conformational disorder is substantially reduced in the transition-state complex relative to the two ground-state complexes. Here, this result is statistically corroborated by crystallographic data for fluorinated zebularine 3,4-hydrate, a second transition-state analog, and by multiple regression analysis. Multiple regression explains 70% of the total temperature factor variation through a predictive model for the average B-value of an amino acid as a function of the catalytic state of the enzyme (substrate, transition state, product) and five other physical and structural descriptors. Furthermore, correlations of atomic fluctuation magnitudes throughout the body of each complex are quantified through an auto-correlation function. The transition-state analog complex shows the greatest correlations between temperature factor magnitudes for spatially separated atoms, underscoring the strong ability of this reaction-coordinate species to "organize" enzymatic fluctuations. The catalytic significance for decreased atomic-scale motions in the transition state is discussed. A thermodynamic argument indicates that the significant decreases in local enzymatic conformational entropy at the transition state result in enhanced energetic stabilization there. PMID:12021441

  1. Structural and Metabolic Specificity of Methylthiocoformycin for Malarial Adenosine Deaminases

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Cassera, M; Madrid, D; Ting, L; Tyler, P; Kim, K; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is a purine auxotroph requiring hypoxanthine as a key metabolic precursor. Erythrocyte adenine nucleotides are the source of the purine precursors, making adenosine deaminase (ADA) a key enzyme in the pathway of hypoxanthine formation. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a substrate for most malarial ADAs, but not for human ADA. The catalytic site specificity of malarial ADAs permits methylthiocoformycin (MT-coformycin) to act as a Plasmodium-specific transition state analogue with low affinity for human ADA. The structural basis for MTA and MT-coformycin specificity in malarial ADAs is the subject of speculation. Here, the crystal structure of ADA from Plasmodium vivax (PvADA) in a complex with MT-coformycin reveals an unprecedented binding geometry for 5?-methylthioribosyl groups in the malarial ADAs. Compared to malarial ADA complexes with adenosine or deoxycoformycin, 5?-methylthioribosyl groups are rotated 130 degrees. A hydrogen bonding network between Asp172 and the 3?-hydroxyl of MT-coformycin is essential for recognition of the 5?-methylthioribosyl group. Water occupies the 5?-hydroxyl binding site when MT-coformycin is bound. Mutagenesis of Asp172 destroys the substrate specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Kinetic, mutagenic, and structural analyses of PvADA and kinetic analysis of five other Plasmodium ADAs establish the unique structural basis for its specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Plasmodium gallinaceum ADA does not use MTA as a substrate, is not inhibited by MT-coformycin, and is missing Asp172. Treatment of P. falciparum cultures with coformycin or MT-coformycin in the presence of MTA is effective in inhibiting parasite growth.

  2. Electron attachment to the cytosine-centered DNA single strands: does base stacking matter?

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiande; Wang, Jing; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2012-02-01

    Electron attachment to the trimer of nucleotide, dGpdCpdG, has been investigated by a quantum mechanical approach at a reliable level of theory. The study of the electron attached dGpdCpdG species demonstrates that cytosine contained DNA single strands have a strong tendency to capture low-energy electrons and to form electronically stable cytosine-centered radical anions. The comparative study of the model molecules pdCpdG and dGpdCp reveals that base stacking has little contribution to the adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of cytosine in DNA single strands. Additionally, the base-base stacking does not affect the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of the cytosine-centered radicals. Intrastrand H-bonding is found to be critical in increasing the values of the AEA and VDE. However, base-base stacking is revealed to be important in enlarging the vertical electron affinity (VEA) of cytosine. The electron attachment to the cytosine moiety intensifies the intrastrand H-bonding between the neighboring G and C bases. This process disrupts the base-base stacking interaction in the radical anion of dGpdCpdG. PMID:22225006

  3. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K. PMID:26317826

  4. Paradoxical expression of adenosine deaminase in T cells cultured from a patient with adenosine deaminase deficiency and combine immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Vega, F X; Kurtzberg, J; Chaffee, S; Santisteban, I; Reisner, E; Povey, M S; Hershfield, M S

    1990-01-01

    T lymphocytes cultured from a patient (T.D.) with adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency expressed ADA activity in the normal range, inconsistent with her severe immunodeficiency, metabolic abnormalities, and with the absence of ADA activity in her B lymphocytes and other nucleated hematopoietic cells. ADA from T.D. T cells had normal Km, heat stability, and sensitivity to ADA inhibitors. Examination of HLA phenotype and polymorphic DNA loci indicated that T.D. was neither chimeric nor a genetic mosaic. Amplified and subcloned ADA cDNA from ADA+ T.D. T cells was shown by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization to possess the same mutations (Arg101----Trp, Arg211----His) previously found in the ADA-T.D. B cell line GM 2606 (Akeson, A. L., D. A. Wiginton, M. R. Dusing, J. C. States, and J. J. Hutton. 1988. J. Biol. Chem. 263:16291-16296). Our findings suggest that one of these mutant alleles can be expressed selectively in IL-2-dependent T cells as stable, active enzyme. Cultured T cells from other patients with the Arg211----His mutation did not express significant ADA activity, while some B cell lines from a patient with an Arg101----Gln mutation have been found to express normal ADA activity. We speculate that Arg101 may be at a site that determines degradation of ADA by a protease that is under negative control by IL-2 in T cells, and is variably expressed in B cells. Il-2 might increase ADA expression in T cells of patients who possess mutations of Arg101. Images PMID:1974554

  5. Reduced activity of Arabidopsis chromosome-cohesion regulator gene CTF7/ECO1 alters cytosine methylation status and retrotransposon expression

    PubMed Central

    Bolaños-Villegas, Pablo; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular organisms such as higher plants require timely regulation of DNA replication and cell division to grow and develop. Recent work in Arabidopsis has shown that chromosome segregation during meiosis and mitosis depends on the activity of several genes that in yeast are involved in the establishment of chromosomal cohesion. In this process, proteins of the STRUCTURAL MAINTENANCE OF CHROMOSOMES (SMC) family tether chromosomes and establish inter- and intrachromosomal connections. In Arabidopsis, recruitment of SMC proteins and establishment of cohesion during key stages of the cell cycle depend on the activity of CHROMOSOME TRANSMISSION FIDELITY 7/ESTABLISHMENT OF COHESION 1 (CTF7/ECO1). Here we show that loss of CTF7/ECO1 activity alters the status of cytosine methylation in both intergenic regions and transposon loci. An increase in expression was also observed for transposon copia28, which suggests a link between CTF7/ECO1 activity, DNA methylation and gene silencing. More work is needed to determine the mechanistic relationships that intervene in this process. PMID:26039473

  6. Disruption of Transcriptional Coactivator Sub1 Leads to Genome-Wide Re-distribution of Clustered Mutations Induced by APOBEC in Active Yeast Genes.

    PubMed

    Lada, Artem G; Kliver, Sergei F; Dhar, Alok; Polev, Dmitrii E; Masharsky, Alexey E; Rogozin, Igor B; Pavlov, Youri I

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in genomes of species are frequently distributed non-randomly, resulting in mutation clusters, including recently discovered kataegis in tumors. DNA editing deaminases play the prominent role in the etiology of these mutations. To gain insight into the enigmatic mechanisms of localized hypermutagenesis that lead to cluster formation, we analyzed the mutational single nucleotide variations (SNV) data obtained by whole-genome sequencing of drug-resistant mutants induced in yeast diploids by AID/APOBEC deaminase and base analog 6-HAP. Deaminase from sea lamprey, PmCDA1, induced robust clusters, while 6-HAP induced a few weak ones. We found that PmCDA1, AID, and APOBEC1 deaminases preferentially mutate the beginning of the actively transcribed genes. Inactivation of transcription initiation factor Sub1 strongly reduced deaminase-induced can1 mutation frequency, but, surprisingly, did not decrease the total SNV load in genomes. However, the SNVs in the genomes of the sub1 clones were re-distributed, and the effect of mutation clustering in the regions of transcription initiation was even more pronounced. At the same time, the mutation density in the protein-coding regions was reduced, resulting in the decrease of phenotypically detected mutants. We propose that the induction of clustered mutations by deaminases involves: a) the exposure of ssDNA strands during transcription and loss of protection of ssDNA due to the depletion of ssDNA-binding proteins, such as Sub1, and b) attainment of conditions favorable for APOBEC action in subpopulation of cells, leading to enzymatic deamination within the currently expressed genes. This model is applicable to both the initial and the later stages of oncogenic transformation and explains variations in the distribution of mutations and kataegis events in different tumor cells. PMID:25941824

  7. Serum Adenosine Deaminase as Inflammatory Marker in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vinapamula, Kiranmayi S.; Bhattaram, Siddartha Kumar; Bitla, Aparna R.; Manohar, Suchitra M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a prototypical inflammatory joint disease. The degree of inflammation is reflected in the extent of joint damage, which further has influence on the quality of life of patients with RA, including risk of atherosclerosis. Hence, besides clinical indices, estimation of degree of inflammation using biochemical markers helps in effecting optimum treatment strategies. C-reactive protein (CRP) is established as an inflammatory marker in patients with RA. Adenosine deaminase (ADA), an enzyme of purine metabolism is considered as a marker of cell mediated immunity and has also been suggested as a marker of inflammatory process in RA. The present study attempts to study the efficacy of serum ADA activity as an inflammatory marker in RA. Materials and Methods Forty six RA patients and forty six age and sex matched healthy controls were included in the study. ADA activity and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels in serum were measured in all the subjects. Statistical analyses were done using Medcalc statistical software version 12.2.2. Results ADA activity and hsCRP levels were increased in RA patients compared to controls (p<0.0001 and 0.0001 respectively). Significant positive correlation was obtained between hsCRP and ADA in patients (r=0.316, p=0.033). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed statistically significant area under curve (AUC) for ADA that is comparable to that obtained for hsCRP (0.776, p<0.0001 for ADA, 0.726, p<0.0001 for hsCRP). Similar diagnostic utility was obtained with ROC generated cut-off value of 25.3 IU/L (82.6% sensitivity and 65.2% specificity) and with control mean value of 23.48 IU/L (86.96% sensitivity and 54.35% specificity) for ADA. Conclusion Findings of the present study indicate the importance of ADA as a marker of inflammation. Considering the higher sensitivity obtained, we propose control mean (23.48 IU/L) as a cut-off for serum ADA activity as an inflammatory marker. Owing to the simplicity and also the cost effectiveness of ADA assay, ADA may be recommended as a marker of inflammation in patients with RA. However, further larger and well controlled studies are needed to establish its role as inflammatory marker. PMID:26500897

  8. Isolation, sequence, and expression in Escherichia coli of the Pseudomonas sp. strain ACP gene encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase.

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, R E; Honma, M; Yamada, M; Sasaki, T; Martineau, B; Hiatt, W R

    1991-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain ACP is capable of growth on 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) as a nitrogen source owing to induction of the enzyme ACC deaminase and the subsequent conversion of ACC to alpha-ketobutyrate and ammonia (M. Honma, Agric. Biol. Chem. 49:567-571, 1985). The complete amino acid sequence of purified ACC deaminase was determined, and the sequence information was used to clone the ACC deaminase gene from a 6-kb EcoRI fragment of Pseudomonas sp. strain ACP DNA. DNA sequence analysis of an EcoRI-PstI subclone demonstrated an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide with a deduced amino acid sequence identical to the protein sequence determined chemically and a predicted molecular mass of 36,674 Da. The ORF also contained an additional 72 bp of upstream sequence not predicted by the amino acid sequence. Escherichia coli minicells containing the 6-kb clone expressed a major polypeptide of the size expected for ACC deaminase which was reactive with ACC deaminase antiserum. Furthermore, a lacZ fusion with the ACC deaminase ORF resulted in the expression of active enzyme in E. coli. ACC is a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of ethylene in plants, and the use of the ACC deaminase gene to manipulate this pathway is discussed. Images PMID:1885510

  9. Ionization of cytosine monomer and dimer studied by VUV photoionization and electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Kostko, Oleg; Bravaya, Ksenia; Krylov, Anna; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-28

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of ionization of cytosine monomers and dimers. Gas-phase molecules are generated by thermal vaporization of cytosine followed by expansion of the vapor in a continuous supersonic jet seeded in Ar. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Energy onsets for the measured photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra are 8.60 +/- 0.05 eV and 7.6 +/- 0.1 eV for the monomer and the dimer, respectively, and provide an estimate for the adiabatic ionization energies (AIE). The first AIE and the ten lowest vertical ionization energies (VIEs) for selected isomers of cytosine dimer computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) method are reported. The comparison of the computed VIEs with the derivative of the PIE spectra suggests that multiple isomers of the cytosine dimer are present in the molecular beam. The calculations reveal that the large red shift (0.7 eV) of the first IE of the lowest-energy cytosine dimer is due to strong inter-fragment electrostatic interactions, i.e., the hole localized on one of the fragments is stabilized by the dipole moment of the other. A sharp rise in the protonated cytosine ion (CH(+)) signal at 9.20 +/- 0.05 eV is ascribed to the formation of protonated cytosine by dissociation of the ionized dimers. The dominant role of this channel is supported by the computed energy thresholds for the CH(+) appearance and the barrierless or nearly barrierless ionization-induced proton transfer observed for five isomers of the dimer. PMID:20449376

  10. Direct Evidence that RNA Inhibits APOBEC3G ssDNA Cytidine Deaminase Activity

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, William M.; Smith, Harold C.

    2011-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a deoxycytidine deaminase active on ssDNA substrates. In HIV infected cells A3G interacted with reverse transcription complexes where its activity as a deoxycytidine deaminase led to mutation of the viral genome. A3G not only bound ssDNA, but it also had an intrinsic ability to bind RNA. In many cell types that can support HIV replication, A3G ssDNA deaminase activity was suppressed and the enzyme resided in high molecular mass, ribonucleoprotein complexes associated with cytoplasmic P-bodies and stress granules. Using a defined in vitro system, we show that RNA alone was sufficient to suppress A3G deaminase activity and did so in an RNA concentration-dependent manner. RNAs of diverse sequences and as short as 25 nucleotides were effective inhibitors. Native PAGE analyses showed that RNA formed ribonucleoprotein complexes with A3G and in so doing prevented ssDNA substrates from binding to A3G. The data provided direct evidence that A3G binding to cellular RNAs constituted a substantial impediment to the enzyme’s ability to interact with ssDNA. PMID:21856286

  11. The Effect of Acute Exercise upon Adenosin Deaminase Oxidant and Antioxidant Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafkas, M. Emin; Karabulut, Aysun Bay; Sahin, Armagan; Otlu, Onder; Savas, Seyfi; Aytac, Aylin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the changes of MDA, glutation (GSH), Adenozine deaminase (ADA) and superoxidase dismutaze (SOD) levels with exercise training in obese middle-aged women (body mass index, MMI [greater than or equal to] 30.0). Twelve obese middle-aged women participated in this study. The descriptive statistics of some of…

  12. IMMUNE FUNCTION IN MICE EXPOSED TO THE ADENOSINE DEAMINASE INHIBITOR 2'-DEOXYCOFORMYCIN DURING IMMUNE SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pregnant mice were administered 2'-deoxycoformycin (2dCF), a potent inhibitor of adensoine deaminase activity, by intraperitoneal injection on day 7 or 15 of gestation or from day 8-12 or 14-18 of gestation. A total dose of 0, 0.5 or 2.0 micrograms 2dCF/g of maternal body weight ...

  13. Macrophages increase the resistance of pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells to gemcitabine by upregulating cytidine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Moran; Gil, Ziv

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages play a central role in tumor progression and metastasis. Macrophages can also promote the resistance of malignant cells to chemotherapy by stimulating the upregulation of cytidine deaminase, an intracellular enzyme that catabolizes the active form of gemcitabine. Targeting macrophage-dependent chemoresistance may reduce tumor-associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:24498570

  14. SELECTIVE IMMUNOTOXIC EFFECTS IN MICE TREATED WITH THE ADENOSINE DEAMINASE INHIBITOR 2-DEOXYCOFORMYCIN (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mice given the adenosine deaminase inhibitor 2-deoxycoformycin, for five days were evaluated 24 h, 72 h and 6 days after the final dose. Spleen weight was decreased for up to 6 days after treatment. The number and relative percentage of circulating lymphocytes were decreased 24 a...

  15. Purification and characterization of developmentally regulated AMP deaminase from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Malliaros, D P; Kozwich, D L; Jahngen, E G

    1991-04-01

    AMP deaminase, the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to inosine monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia, was purified from the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum in the nutrient-deprived state. The native enzyme had an apparent molecular weight of 199,000 daltons. Its apparent Km was 1.6 mM and its Vmax was 1.0 mumol min-1 mg-1, as measured by the release of IMP From AMP. The enzyme, like other AMP deaminases, was found to be activated by ATP, and inhibited either by GTP or inorganic phosphate. It was also specific for the deamination of AMP. Deaminase activity was increased either when vegetative cells were placed in a nutrient-deprived medium (for up to 6 h) or when vegetative cells were treated with the drug hadacidin. In cells actively growing in complete media, enzyme activity was more non-specific, hydrolyzing adenosine as well as AMP. AMP deaminase in D. discoideum appears to be stage-specific and developmentally regulated, possibly serving to regulate the adenylated nucleotide pool and the interconversion to guanylated nucleotides during early morphodifferentiation. PMID:1916064

  16. A computational study of adenine, uracil, and cytosine adsorption upon AlN and BN nano-cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baei, Mohammad T.; Taghartapeh, Mohammad Ramezani; Lemeski, E. Tazikeh; Soltani, Alireza

    Density-functional theory calculations are used to investigate the interaction of Al12N12 and B12N12 clusters with the adenine (A), uracil (U), and cytosine (C) molecules. The current calculations demonstrate that these hybrid adsorbent materials are able to adsorb the adenine, uracil, and cytosine molecules through exothermic processes. Our theoretical results reveal improvement in the adsorption of adenine, uracil, and cytosine on Al12N12 and B12N12. It is observed that B12N12 is highly sensitive to adenine, uracil, and cytosine compared with Al12N12 to serve as a biochemical sensor.

  17. Zinc enhancement of cytidine deaminase activity highlights a potential allosteric role of loop-3 in regulating APOBEC3 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Galilee, Meytal; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    The strong association of APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases with somatic mutations leading to cancers accentuates the importance of their tight intracellular regulation to minimize cellular transformations. We reveal a novel allosteric regulatory mechanism of APOBEC3 enzymes showing that APOBEC3G and APOBEC3A coordination of a secondary zinc ion, reminiscent to ancestral deoxycytidylate deaminases, enhances deamination activity. Zinc binding is pinpointed to loop-3 which whilst highly variable harbors a catalytically essential and spatially conserved asparagine at its N-terminus. We suggest that loop-3 may play a general role in allosterically tuning the activity of zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family members. PMID:26678087

  18. Zinc enhancement of cytidine deaminase activity highlights a potential allosteric role of loop-3 in regulating APOBEC3 enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Ailie; Galilee, Meytal; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    The strong association of APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases with somatic mutations leading to cancers accentuates the importance of their tight intracellular regulation to minimize cellular transformations. We reveal a novel allosteric regulatory mechanism of APOBEC3 enzymes showing that APOBEC3G and APOBEC3A coordination of a secondary zinc ion, reminiscent to ancestral deoxycytidylate deaminases, enhances deamination activity. Zinc binding is pinpointed to loop-3 which whilst highly variable harbors a catalytically essential and spatially conserved asparagine at its N-terminus. We suggest that loop-3 may play a general role in allosterically tuning the activity of zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family members. PMID:26678087

  19. Effectiveness of rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase for growth promotion of peas (Pisum sativum) under drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Zahir, Z A; Munir, A; Asghar, H N; Shaharoona, B; Arshad, M

    2008-05-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to assess the effectiveness of rhizobacteria containing 1-aminocyclopropane- 1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase for growth promotion of peas under drought conditions. Ten rhizobacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of different crops (peas, wheat, and maize) were screened for their growth promoting ability in peas under axenic condition. Three rhizobacterial isolates, Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype G (ACC-5), P. fluorescens (ACC-14), and P. putida biotype A (Q-7), were selected for pot trial on the basis of their source, ACC deaminase activity, root colonization, and growth promoting activity under axenic conditions. Inoculated and uninoculated (control) seeds of pea cultivar 2000 were sown in pots (4 seeds/pot) at different soil moisture levels (25, 50, 75, and 100% of field capacity). Results revealed that decreasing the soil moisture levels from 100 to 25% of field capacity significantly decreased the growth of peas. However, inoculation of peas with rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase significantly decreased the "drought stress imposed effects" on growth of peas, although with variable efficacy at different moisture levels. At the lowest soil moisture level (25% field capacity), rhizobacterial isolate Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype G (ACC-5) was found to be more promising compared with the other isolates, as it caused maximum increases in fresh weight, dry weight, root length, shoot length, number of leaves per plant, and water use efficiency on fresh and dry weight basis (45, 150, 92, 45, 140, 46, and 147%, respectively) compared with respective uninoculated controls. It is highly likely that rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase might have decreased the drought-stress induced ethylene in inoculated plants, which resulted in better growth of plants even at low moisture levels. Therefore, inoculation with rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase could be helpful in eliminating the inhibitory effects of drought stress on the growth of peas. PMID:18633298

  20. Single-Cell Quantification of Cytosine Modifications by Hyperspectral Dark-Field Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolei; Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2015-12-22

    Epigenetic modifications on DNA, especially on cytosine, play a critical role in regulating gene expression and genome stability. It is known that the levels of different cytosine derivatives are highly dynamic and are regulated by a variety of factors that act on the chromatin. Here we report an optical methodology based on hyperspectral dark-field imaging (HSDFI) using plasmonic nanoprobes to quantify the recently identified cytosine modifications on DNA in single cells. Gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with specific antibodies were used as contrast-generating agents due to their strong local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties. With this powerful platform we have revealed the spatial distribution and quantity of 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) at the different stages in cell cycle and demonstrated that 5caC was a stably inherited epigenetic mark. We have also shown that the regional density of 5caC on a single chromosome can be mapped due to the spectral sensitivity of the nanoprobes in relation to the interparticle distance. Notably, HSDFI enables an efficient removal of the scattering noises from nonspecifically aggregated nanoprobes, to improve accuracy in the quantification of different cytosine modifications in single cells. Further, by separating the LSPR fingerprints of AuNPs and AgNPs, multiplex detection of two cytosine modifications was also performed. Our results demonstrate HSDFI as a versatile platform for spatial and spectroscopic characterization of plasmonic nanoprobe-labeled nuclear targets at the single-cell level for quantitative epigenetic screening. PMID:26505210

  1. Global cytosine methylation in Daphnia magna depends on genotype, environment, and their interaction.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Jansen, Mieke; Decaestecker, Ellen; De Meester, Luc; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Janssen, Colin R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2015-05-01

    The authors characterized global cytosine methylation levels in 2 different genotypes of the ecotoxicological model organism Daphnia magna after exposure to a wide array of biotic and abiotic environmental stressors. The present study aimed to improve the authors' understanding of the role of cytosine methylation in the organism's response to environmental conditions. The authors observed a significant genotype effect, an environment effect, and a genotype × environment effect. In particular, global cytosine methylation levels were significantly altered after exposure to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, and sodium chloride compared with control conditions. Significant differences between the 2 genotypes were observed when animals were exposed to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, Cryptomonas, and sodium chloride. Despite the low global methylation rate under control conditions (0.49-0.52%), global cytosine methylation levels upon exposure to Triops demonstrated a 5-fold difference between the genotypes (0.21% vs 1.02%). No effects were found in response to arsenic, cadmium, fish, lead, pH of 5.5, pH of 8, temperature, hypoxia, and white fat cell disease. The authors' results point to the potential role of epigenetic effects under changing environmental conditions such as predation (i.e., Triops), diet (i.e., Cryptomonas and Microcystis), and salinity. The results of the present study indicate that, despite global cytosine methylation levels being low, epigenetic effects may be important in environmental studies on Daphnia. PMID:25639773

  2. Vaginal Yeast Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Vaginal Yeast Infections Print ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  3. Yeast based sensors.

    PubMed

    Shimomura-Shimizu, Mifumi; Karube, Isao

    2010-01-01

    Since the first microbial cell sensor was studied by Karube et al. in 1977, many types of yeast based sensors have been developed as analytical tools. Yeasts are known as facultative anaerobes. Facultative anaerobes can survive in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The yeast based sensor consisted of a DO electrode and an immobilized omnivorous yeast. In yeast based sensor development, many kinds of yeast have been employed by applying their characteristics to adapt to the analyte. For example, Trichosporon cutaneum was used to estimate organic pollution in industrial wastewater. Yeast based sensors are suitable for online control of biochemical processes and for environmental monitoring. In this review, principles and applications of yeast based sensors are summarized. PMID:20087724

  4. Quantum chemical investigations on the nonradiative deactivation pathways of cytosine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Akira; Yamazaki, Shohei; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    2014-10-01

    The nonradiative deactivation pathways of cytosine derivatives (cytosine, 5-fluorocytosine, 5-methylcytosine, and 1-methycytosine) and their tautomers are investigated by quantum chemical calculations, and the substituent effects on the deactivation process are examined. The MS-CASPT2 method is employed in the excited-state geometry optimization and also in the search for conical intersection points, and the potential energy profiles connecting the Franck-Condon point, excited-state minimum energy structures, and the conical intersection points are investigated. Our calculated vertical and adiabatic excitation energies are in quite good agreement with the experimental results, and the relative barrier heights leading to the conical intersections are correlated with the experimentally observed excite-state lifetimes, where the calculated barrier heights are in the order of cytosine < 5-methylcytosine < 5-fluorocytosine. PMID:25178384

  5. DNA cytosine methylation: Structural and thermodynamic characterization of the epigenetic marking mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin; Lior-Hoffmann, Lee; Wang, Shenglong; Zhang, Yingkai; Broyde, Suse

    2013-01-01

    DNA cytosine methyltransferases regulate the expression of the genome through the precise epigenetic marking of certain cytosines with a methyl group, and aberrant methylation is a hallmark of human diseases including cancer. Targeting these enzymes for drug design is currently a high priority. We have utilized ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to extensively investigate the reaction mechanism of the representative DNA methyltransferase HhaI (M.HhaI) from prokaryotes, whose overall mechanism is shared with the mammalian enzymes. We obtain for the first time full free energy profiles for the complete reaction, together with reaction dynamics in atomistic detail. Our results show an energetically preferred mechanism in which nucleophilic attack of cytosine C5 on the S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) methyl group is concerted with formation of the Michael adduct between a conserved Cys in the active site with cytosine C6. Spontaneous and reversible proton transfer between a conserved Glu in the active site and cytosine N3 at the transition state was observed in our simulations, revealing the chemical participation of this Glu residue in the catalytic mechanism. Subsequently, the β-elimination of the C5 proton utilizes as base an OH− derived from a conserved crystal water that is part of a proton wire water channel, and this syn β-elimination reaction is the rate-limiting step. Design of novel cytosine methylation inhibitors would be advanced by our structural and thermodynamic characterization of the reaction mechanism. PMID:23528166

  6. Ionization of cytosine monomer and dimer studied by VUV photoionization and electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Bravaya, Ksenia; Krylov, Anna; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-12-14

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of ionization of cytosine monomers and dimers. Gas-phase molecules are generated by thermal vaporization of cytosine followed by expansion of the vapor in a continuous supersonic jet seeded in Ar. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Energy onsets for the measured photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra are 8.60+-0.05 eV and 7.6+-0.1 eV for the monomer and the dimer, respectively, and provide an estimate for the adiabatic ionization energies (AIE). The first AIE and the ten lowest vertical ionization energies (VIEs) for selected isomers of cytosine dimer computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) method are reported. The comparison of the computed VIEs with the derivative of the PIE spectra, suggests that multiple isomers of the cytosine dimer are present in the molecular beam. The calculations reveal that the large red shift (0.7 eV) of the first IE of the lowest-energy cytosine dimer is due to strong inter-fragment electrostatic interactions, i.e., the hole localized on one of the fragments is stabilized by the dipole moment of the other. A sharp rise in the CH+ signal at 9.20+-0.05 eV is ascribed to the formation of protonated cytosine by dissociation of the ionized dimers. The dominant role of this channel is supported by the computed energy thresholds for the CH+ appearance and the barrierless or nearly barrierless ionization-induced proton transfer observed for five isomers of the dimer.

  7. Inhibition of Growth of Salmonella typhimurium and of Threonine Deaminase and Transaminase B by β-Chloroalanine

    PubMed Central

    Arfin, Stuart M.; Koziell, David A.

    1971-01-01

    β-Chloro-l-alanine (CA) was found to inhibit the growth of Salmonella typhimurium. The inhibition was overcome by isoleucine plus valine. CA inhibited the activity of threonine deaminase and transaminase B in vitro. The inhibition of threonine deaminase was reversible and was not affected by desensitization to isoleucine inhibition. Transaminase B was irreversibly inactivated. Derepression of some of the isoleucine and valine biosynthetic enzymes was achieved by growth of wild-type cells on low levels of CA. PMID:5541528

  8. Plant Purine Nucleoside Catabolism Employs a Guanosine Deaminase Required for the Generation of Xanthosine in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Dahncke, Kathleen; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purine nucleotide catabolism is common to most organisms and involves a guanine deaminase to convert guanine to xanthine in animals, invertebrates, and microorganisms. Using metabolomic analysis of mutants, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana uses an alternative catabolic route employing a highly specific guanosine deaminase (GSDA) not reported from any organism so far. The enzyme is ubiquitously expressed and deaminates exclusively guanosine and 2’-deoxyguanosine but no other aminated purines, pyrimidines, or pterines. GSDA belongs to the cytidine/deoxycytidylate deaminase family of proteins together with a deaminase involved in riboflavin biosynthesis, the chloroplastic tRNA adenosine deaminase Arg and a predicted tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase 2 in A. thaliana. GSDA is conserved in plants, including the moss Physcomitrella patens, but is absent in the algae and outside the plant kingdom. Our data show that xanthosine is exclusively generated through the deamination of guanosine by GSDA in A. thaliana, excluding other possible sources like the dephosphorylation of xanthosine monophosphate. Like the nucleoside hydrolases NUCLEOSIDE HYDROLASE1 (NSH1) and NSH2, GSDA is located in the cytosol, indicating that GMP catabolism to xanthine proceeds in a mostly cytosolic pathway via guanosine and xanthosine. Possible implications for the biosynthetic route of purine alkaloids (caffeine and theobromine) and ureides in other plants are discussed. PMID:24130159

  9. Gas Phase Structure of Metal Mediated (Cytosine)2Ag(+) Mimics the Hemiprotonated (Cytosine)2H(+) Dimer in i-Motif Folding.

    PubMed

    Berdakin, Matias; Steinmetz, Vincent; Maitre, Philippe; Pino, Gustavo A

    2014-05-16

    The study of metal ion-DNA interaction aiming to understand the stabilization of artificial base pairing and a number of noncanonical motifs is of current interest, due to their potential exploitation in developing new technological devices and expanding the genetic code. A successful strategy has been the synthesis of metal-mediated base pairs, in which a coordinative bond to a central metal cation replaces a H-bond in a natural pair. In this work, we characterized, for the first time, the gas phase structure of the cytosine···Ag(+)···cytosine (C-Ag(+)-C) complex by means of InfraRed-MultiPhoton-Dissociation (IR-MPD) spectroscopy and theoretical calculation. The IR-spectrum was confidently assigned to one structure with the Ag(+) acting as a bridge between the heteronitrogen atoms in each cytosine (both in the keto-amino form). This structure is biologically relevant since it mimics the structure of the hemiprotonated C-H(+)-C dimer responsible for the stabilization of the i-motif structure in DNA, with the replacement of the NH···N bond by a stronger N···Ag(+)···N bond. Moreover, since the structure of the C-Ag(+)-C complex is planar, it allows an optimum intercalation between pairs of the two antiparallel strand duplex in the DNA i-motif structure. PMID:24807048

  10. APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases in Double-Strand DNA Break Repair and Cancer Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions were identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with ssDNA, double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs and clustered mutations. PMID:23598277

  11. APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases in double-strand DNA break repair and cancer promotion.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-06-15

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions was identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells, these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with single-strand DNA (ssDNA), double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs, and clustered mutations. Cancer Res; 73(12); 3494-8. ©2013 AACR. PMID:23598277

  12. Biochemical and molecular characterization of two cytidine deaminases in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Fiona J; Britton, Collette; Wheatley, Isla; Maitland, Kirsty; Walker, Glenda; Anant, Shrikant; Davidson, Nicholas O; Devaney, Eileen

    2002-01-01

    Two cytidine deaminases (CDDs) from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have been cloned and characterized. Both Ce-CDD-1 and Ce-CDD-2 are authentic deaminases and both exhibit RNA-binding activity towards AU-rich templates. In order to study their temporal and spatial expression patterns in the worm, reporter gene constructs were made using approx. 2 kb of upstream sequence. Transfection of C. elegans revealed that both genes localized to the cells of the intestine, although their temporal expression patterns were different. Expression of Ce-cdd-1 peaked in the early larval stages, whereas Ce-cdd-2 was expressed in all life cycle stages examined. RNA-interference (RNAi) assays were performed for both genes, either alone or in combination, but only cdd-2 RNAi produced a consistent visible phenotype. A proportion of eggs laid from these worms were swollen and distorted in shape. PMID:12071843

  13. A novel zinc-binding motif found in two ubiquitous deaminase families.

    PubMed Central

    Reizer, J.; Buskirk, S.; Bairoch, A.; Reizer, A.; Saier, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Two families of deaminases, one specific for cytidine, the other for deoxycytidylate, are shown to possess a novel zinc-binding motif, here designated ZBS. We have (1) identified the protein members of these 2 families, (2) carried out sequence analyses that allow specification of this zinc-binding motif, and (3) determined signature sequences that will allow identification of additional members of these families as their sequences become available. PMID:8061614

  14. Guanine Plus Cytosine Contents of the Deoxyribonucleic Acids of Some Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria: a Reassessment

    PubMed Central

    Skyring, G. W.; Jones, H. E.

    1972-01-01

    Guanine plus cytosine (GC) contents of the deoxyribonucleic acids of Desulfovibrio and Desulfotomaculum have been used as a basis for classification. Some of these data have been incorrectly calculated, resulting in errors of as much as 5% GC. This situation has been corrected by a reanalysis of existing data and by the contribution of new data. PMID:5011245

  15. Cytosine methylation of an ancient satellite family in the wild beet Beta procumbens.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin; Hense, Sarah; Minoche, André E; Dohm, Juliane C; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Schmidt, Thomas; Zakrzewski, Falk

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic feature for the regulation and maintenance of heterochromatin. Satellite DNA is a repetitive sequence component that often occurs in large arrays in heterochromatin of subtelomeric, intercalary and centromeric regions. Knowledge about the methylation status of satellite DNA is important for understanding the role of repetitive DNA in heterochromatization. In this study, we investigated the cytosine methylation of the ancient satellite family pEV in the wild beet Beta procumbens. The pEV satellite is widespread in species-specific pEV subfamilies in the genus Beta and most likely originated before the radiation of the Betoideae and Chenopodioideae. In B. procumbens, the pEV subfamily occurs abundantly and spans intercalary and centromeric regions. To uncover its cytosine methylation, we performed chromosome-wide immunostaining and bisulfite sequencing of pEV satellite repeats. We found that CG and CHG sites are highly methylated while CHH sites show only low levels of methylation. As a consequence of the low frequency of CG and CHG sites and the preferential occurrence of most cytosines in the CHH motif in pEV monomers, this satellite family displays only low levels of total cytosine methylation. PMID:24994030

  16. De novo cytosine methylation in the differentiating macronucleus of the stichotrichous ciliate Stylonychia lemnae.

    PubMed

    Juranek, Stefan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Lipps, Hans J

    2003-03-01

    Dramatic DNA reorganization and elimination processes occur during macronuclear differentiation in ciliates. In this study we analyzed whether cytosine methylation of specific sequences plays a functional role during DNA rearrangement. Three classes of sequences, macronuclear-destined sequences (MDSs, pCE7), members from a large family of transposon-like elements and micronuclear-specific sequences (pLJ01), differing in their structure and future destiny during nuclear differentiation, were studied in the micronucleus, the developing macronucleus and, when present, in the mature macronucleus. While the MDSs become processed to a 1.1 and 1.3 kb gene-sized macronuclear DNA molecule, the family of transposon-like elements represented by MaA81 becomes removed late in the course of polytene chromosome formation. The micronuclear-specific sequence pLJ01 is eliminated together with bulk micronuclear DNA during degradation of polytene chromosomes. No methylated cytosine could be detected in the vegetative macronucleus and no difference in methylation pattern was observed either between micronucleus and developing macronucleus in MDSs or in a micronuclear-specific sequence. However, a significant percentage of the cytosines contained in the transposon-like element becomes methylated de novo in the course of macronuclear differentiation. This is the first demonstration that cytosine methylation in specific sequences occurs during macronuclear differentiation and may provide a first step towards understanding epigenetic factors involved in DNA processing. PMID:12595545

  17. Various effects of fluorescent bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas containing ACC deaminase on wheat seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Magnucka, Elżbieta G; Pietr, Stanisław J

    2015-12-01

    The study evaluates the effect of rhizobacteria having 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCd) on the development of wheat seedlings. This enzyme has been proposed to play a key role in microbe-plant association. Three fluorescent pseudomonads containing this deaminase were selected from 70 strains of pseudomonads isolated from rhizosphere of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rape (Brassica napus L.). These bacteria, varied significantly in the ability to both biosynthesize auxins and hydrolyze ACC. Among them, Pseudomonas brassicacearum subsp. brassicacearum strain RZ310 presented the highest activities of ACC deaminase during 96h of growth in liquid Dworkin and Foster (DF) salt medium. Additionally, this rape rhizosphere strain did not produce indoles. Two other isolates, Pseudomonas sp. PO283 and Pseudomonas sp. PO366, secreted auxins only in the presence of their precursor. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and four other protein-encoding genes indicated that these wheat rhizosphere isolates belonged to the fluorescent Pseudomonas group. Moreover, the effects of these strains on wheat seedling growth under in vitro conditions were markedly dependent on both their cell suspensions used to grain inoculation and nutrient conditions. Strains tested had beneficial influence on wheat seedlings mainly at low cell densities. In addition, access to nutrients markedly changed bacteria action on cereal growth. Their presence generally favored the positive effects of pseudomonads on length and the estimated biomasses of wheat coleoptiles. Despite these general rules, impacts of each isolate on the growth parameters of cereal seedlings were unique. PMID:25983132

  18. Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA (ADARs) are both Antiviral and Proviral Dependent upon the Virus

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing, the deamination of adenosine (A) to inosine (I) that occurs in regions of RNA with double-stranded character, is catalyzed by a family of Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA (ADARs). In mammals there are three ADAR genes. Two encode proteins that possess demonstrated deaminase activity: ADAR1, which is interferon-inducible, and ADAR2 which is constitutively expressed. ADAR3, by contrast, has not yet been shown to bean active enzyme. The specificity of the ADAR1 and ADAR2 deaminases ranges from highly site-selective to non-selective, dependent on the duplex structure of the substrate RNA. A-to-I editing is a form of nucleotide substitution editing, because I is decoded as guanosine (G) instead of A by ribosomes during translation and by polymerases during RNA-dependent RNA replication. Additionally, A-to-I editing can alter RNA structure stability as I:U mismatches are less stable than A:U base pairs. Both viral and cellular RNAs are edited by ADARs. A-to-I editing is of broad physiologic significance. Among the outcomes of A-to-I editing are biochemical changes that affect how viruses interact with their hosts, changes that can lead to either enhanced or reduced virus growth and persistence dependent upon the specific virus. PMID:21211811

  19. Single-Cell Quantification of Cytosine Modifications by Hyperspectral Dark-Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolei; Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications on DNA, especially on cytosine, play a critical role in regulating gene expression and genome stability. It is known that the levels of different cytosine derivatives are highly dynamic and are regulated by a variety of factors that act on the chromatin. Here we report an optical methodology based on hyperspectral dark-field imaging (HSDFI) using plasmonic nanoprobes to quantify the recently identified cytosine modifications on DNA in single cells. Gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with specific antibodies were used as contrast-generating agents due to their strong Local Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) properties. With this powerful platform we have revealed the spatial distribution and quantity of 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) at the different stages in cell cycle, and demonstrated that 5caC was a stably inherited epigenetic mark. We have also shown that the regional density of 5caC on a single chromosome can be mapped due to the spectral sensitivity of the nanoprobes in relation to the inter-particle distance. Notably, HSDFI enables an efficient removal of the scattering noises from non-specifically aggregated nanoprobes, to improve accuracy in the quantification of different cytosine modifications in single cells. Further, by separating the LSPR fingerprints of AuNPs and AgNPs, multiplex detection of two cytosine modifications was also performed. Our results demonstrate HSDFI as a versatile platform for spatial and spectroscopic characterization of plasmonic nanoprobe-labeled nuclear targets at the single-cell level for quantitative epigenetic screening. PMID:26505210

  20. Linking short tandem repeat polymorphisms with cytosine modifications in human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhou; Zheng, Yinan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Cong; Joyce, Brian Thomas; Kibbe, Warren A; Hou, Lifang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Inter-individual variation in cytosine modifications has been linked to complex traits in humans. Cytosine modification variation is partially controlled by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), known as modified cytosine quantitative trait loci (mQTL). However, little is known about the role of short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs), a class of structural genetic variants, in regulating cytosine modifications. Utilizing the published data on the International HapMap Project lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), we assessed the relationships between 721 STRPs and the modification levels of 283,540 autosomal CpG sites. Our findings suggest that, in contrast to the predominant cis-acting mode for SNP-based mQTL, STRPs are associated with cytosine modification levels in both cis-acting (local) and trans-acting (distant) modes. In local scans within the ±1 Mb windows of target CpGs, 21, 9, and 21 cis-acting STRP-based mQTL were detected in CEU (Caucasian residents from Utah, USA), YRI (Yoruba people from Ibadan, Nigeria), and the combined samples, respectively. In contrast, 139,420, 76,817, and 121,866 trans-acting STRP-based mQTL were identified in CEU, YRI, and the combined samples, respectively. A substantial proportion of CpG sites detected with local STRP-based mQTL were not associated with SNP-based mQTL, suggesting that STRPs represent an independent class of mQTL. Functionally, genetic variants neighboring CpG-associated STRPs are enriched with genome-wide association study (GWAS) loci for a variety of complex traits and diseases, including cancers, based on the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) GWAS Catalog. Therefore, elucidating these STRP-based mQTL in addition to SNP-based mQTL can provide novel insights into the genetic architectures of complex traits. PMID:26714498

  1. Cytosine methylation and hydroxymethylation mark DNA for elimination in Oxytricha trifallax

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cytosine methylation of DNA is conserved across eukaryotes and plays important functional roles regulating gene expression during differentiation and development in animals, plants and fungi. Hydroxymethylation was recently identified as another epigenetic modification marking genes important for pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Results Here we describe de novo cytosine methylation and hydroxymethylation in the ciliate Oxytricha trifallax. These DNA modifications occur only during nuclear development and programmed genome rearrangement. We detect methylcytosine and hydroxymethylcytosine directly by high-resolution nano-flow UPLC mass spectrometry, and indirectly by immunofluorescence, methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation and bisulfite sequencing. We describe these modifications in three classes of eliminated DNA: germline-limited transposons and satellite repeats, aberrant DNA rearrangements, and DNA from the parental genome undergoing degradation. Methylation and hydroxymethylation generally occur on the same sequence elements, modifying cytosines in all sequence contexts. We show that the DNA methyltransferase-inhibiting drugs azacitidine and decitabine induce demethylation of both somatic and germline sequence elements during genome rearrangements, with consequent elevated levels of germline-limited repetitive elements in exconjugant cells. Conclusions These data strongly support a functional link between cytosine DNA methylation/hydroxymethylation and DNA elimination. We identify a motif strongly enriched in methylated/hydroxymethylated regions, and we propose that this motif recruits DNA modification machinery to specific chromosomes in the parental macronucleus. No recognizable methyltransferase enzyme has yet been described in O. trifallax, raising the possibility that it might employ a novel cytosine methylation machinery to mark DNA sequences for elimination during genome rearrangements. PMID:23075511

  2. Association of purified skeletal-muscle AMP deaminase with a histidine-proline-rich-glycoprotein-like molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri-Raggi, M; Montali, U; Ronca, F; Sabbatini, A; Brown, P E; Moir, A J; Raggi, A

    1997-01-01

    Denaturation of rabbit skeletal-muscle AMP deaminase in acidic medium followed by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose in 8 M urea atpH 8.0 allows separation of two main peptide components of similar apparent molecular mass (75-80 kDa) that we tentatively assume correspond to two different enzyme subunits. Whereas the amino acid composition of one of the two peptides is in good agreement with that derived from the nucleotide sequence of the known rat and human AMPD1 cDNAs, the second component shows much higher contents of proline, glycine and histidine. N-Terminal sequence analysis of the fragments liberated by limited proteolysis with trypsin of the novel peptide reveals a striking similarity to the fragments produced by plasmin cleavage of the rabbit plasma protein called histidine-proline-rich glycoprotein (HPRG). However, some divergence is observed between the sequence of one of the fragments liberated from AMP deaminase by a more extensive trypsinization and rabbit plasma HPRG in the region containing residues 472-477. A fragment with a blocked N-terminus, which was found among those liberated by proteolysis with pepsin of either whole AMP deaminase or the novel component of the enzyme, shows an amino acid composition quite different from that of the N-terminus of the known subunit of AMP deaminase. By coupling this observation with the detection in freshly prepared AMP deaminase of a low yield of the sequence (LTPTDX) corresponding to that of HPRG N-terminus, it can be deduced that in comparison with HPRG, the putative HPRG-like component of AMP deaminase contains an additional fragment with a blocked N-terminus, which is liberated by a proteolytic process during purification of the enzyme. The implications of the association to rabbit skeletal-muscle AMP deaminase of a HPRG-like protein species are discussed. PMID:9307011

  3. Clinical implications of cytosine deletion of exon 5 of P53 gene in non small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Rashid; Masroor, Mirza; Javid, Jamsheed; Ahamad, Imtiyaz; Farooq, Shazia; Yadav, Prasant; Zuberi, Mariyam; Lone, Maqbool; Ray, P. C; Saxena, Alpana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Lung cancer is considered to be the most common cancer in the world. In humans, about 50% or more cancers have a mutated tumor suppressor p53 gene thereby resulting in accumulation of p53 protein and losing its function to activate the target genes that regulate the cell cycle and apoptosis. Extensive research conducted in murine cancer models with activated p53, loss of p53, or p53 missense mutations have facilitated researchers to understand the role of this key protein. Our study was aimed to evaluate the frequency of cytosine deletion in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods: One hundred NSCLC patients were genotyped for P53 (exon5, codon168) cytosine deletion leading to loss of its function and activate the target genes by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. The P53 cytosine deletion was correlated with all the clinicopathological parameters of the patients. Results and Analysis: 59% cases were carrying P53 cytosine deletion. Similarly, the significantly higher incidence of cytosine deletion was reported in current smokers (75%) in comparison to exsmoker and nonsmoker. Significantly higher frequency of cytosine deletion was reported in adenocarcinoma (68.08%) than squamous cell carcinoma (52.83%). Also, a significant difference was reported between p53 cytosine deletion and metastasis (64.28%). Further, the majority of the cases assessed for response carrying P53 cytosine deletion were found to show faster disease progression. Conclusion: The data suggests that there is a significant association of the P53 exon 5 deletion of cytosine in codon 168 with metastasis and staging of the disease. PMID:27169122

  4. Pexophagy in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Oku, Masahide; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Pexophagy, selective degradation of peroxisomes via autophagy, is the main system for reducing organelle abundance. Elucidation of the molecular machinery of pexophagy has been pioneered in studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the methylotrophic yeasts Pichia pastoris and Hansenula polymorpha. Recent analyses using these yeasts have elucidated the molecular machineries of pexophagy, especially in terms of the interactions and modifications of the so-called adaptor proteins required for guiding autophagic membrane biogenesis on the organelle surface. Based on the recent findings, functional relevance of pexophagy and another autophagic pathway, mitophagy (selective autophagy of mitochondria), is discussed. We also discuss the physiological importance of pexophagy in these yeast systems. PMID:26409485

  5. Yeast Nop2 and Rcm1 methylate C2870 and C2278 of the 25S rRNA, respectively.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunny; Yang, Jun; Watzinger, Peter; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2013-10-01

    Yeast 25S rRNA was reported to contain a single cytosine methylation (m(5)C). In the present study using a combination of RP-HPLC, mung bean nuclease assay and rRNA mutagenesis, we discovered that instead of one, yeast contains two m(5)C residues at position 2278 and 2870. Furthermore, we identified and characterized two putative methyltransferases, Rcm1 and Nop2 to be responsible for these two cytosine methylations, respectively. Both proteins are highly conserved, which correlates with the presence of two m(5)C residues at identical positions in higher eukaryotes, including humans. The human homolog of yeast Nop2, p120 has been discovered to be upregulated in various cancer tissues, whereas the human homolog of Rcm1, NSUN5 is completely deleted in the William's-Beuren Syndrome. The substrates and function of both human homologs remained unknown. In the present study, we also provide insights into the significance of these two m(5)C residues. The loss of m(5)C2278 results in anisomycin hypersensitivity, whereas the loss of m(5)C2870 affects ribosome synthesis and processing. Establishing the locations and enzymes in yeast will not only help identifying the function of their homologs in higher organisms, but will also enable understanding the role of these modifications in ribosome function and architecture. PMID:23913415

  6. DNA base (cytosine) modified/capped ultrasmall Gd2S3:Eu3+ gadofluoroprobes for platelet isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Ranu K.; Sharma, Prashant K.; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2010-12-01

    The present letter deals with the synthesis of ultrasmall Gd2S3:Eu3+ nanoparticles and their surface modification with "cytosine," a nucleobase present in DNA/RNA. These nanoparticles show orthorhombic (Pnma) crystal symmetry with excellent magnetic and luminescent characters simultaneously. In contrast to the previous reports, cytosine modified nanoparticles do not show a significant change in their structural and magnetic properties, whereas luminescence is enhanced slightly owing to the surface passivation. The in vitro studies show better accumulation of blood platelets with cytosine modified nanoparticles as compared to unmodified posing them a potential candidate for platelet isolation from the plasma for different applications and studies.

  7. Identification of Two Pentatricopeptide Repeat Genes Required for RNA Editing and Zinc Binding by C-terminal Cytidine Deaminase-like Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Michael L.; Giang, Karolyn; Berhane, Beniam; Mulligan, R. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Many transcripts expressed from plant organelle genomes are modified by C-to-U RNA editing. Nuclear encoded pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are required as RNA binding specificity determinants in the RNA editing mechanism. Bioinformatic analysis has shown that most of the Arabidopsis PPR proteins necessary for RNA editing events include a C-terminal portion that shares structural characteristics with a superfamily of deaminases. The DYW deaminase domain includes a highly conserved zinc binding motif that shares characteristics with cytidine deaminases. The Arabidopsis PPR genes, ELI1 and DOT4, both have DYW deaminase domains and are required for single RNA editing events in chloroplasts. The ELI1 DYW deaminase domain was expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and was shown to bind two zinc atoms per polypeptide. Thus, the DYW deaminase domain binds a zinc metal ion, as expected for a cytidine deaminase, and is potentially the catalytic component of an editing complex. Genetic complementation experiments demonstrate that large portions of the DYW deaminase domain of ELI1 may be eliminated, but the truncated genes retain the ability to restore editing site conversion in a mutant plant. These results suggest that the catalytic activity can be supplied in trans by uncharacterized protein(s) of the editosome. PMID:24194514

  8. Flexible double-headed cytosine-linked 2'-deoxycytidine nucleotides. Synthesis, polymerase incorporation to DNA and interaction with DNA methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Kielkowski, Pavel; Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Hocek, Michal

    2016-03-15

    New types of double-headed 2'-deoxycytidine 5'-O-triphosphates (dC(XC)TPs) bearing another cytosine or 5-fluorocytosine linked through a flexible propargyl, homopropargyl or pent-1-ynyl linker to position 5 were prepared by the aqueous Sonogashira cross-coupling reactions of 5-iodo-dCTP with the corresponding (fluoro)cytosine-alkynes. The modified dC(XC)TPs were good substrates for DNA polymerases and were used for enzymatic synthesis of cytosine-functionalized DNA by primer extension or PCR. The cytosine- or fluorocytosine-linked DNA probes did not significantly inhibit DNA methyltransferases and did not cross-link to these proteins. PMID:26899597

  9. Stable loop in the crystal structure of the intercalated four-stranded cytosine-rich metazoan telomere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C.; Berger, I.; Lockshin, C.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1995-01-01

    In most metazoans, the telomeric cytosine-rich strand repeating sequence is d(TAACCC). The crystal structure of this sequence was solved to 1.9-A resolution. Four strands associate via the cytosine-containing parts to form a four-stranded intercalated structure held together by C.C+ hydrogen bonds. The base-paired strands are parallel to each other, and the two duplexes are intercalated into each other in opposite orientations. One TAA end forms a highly stabilized loop with the 5' thymine Hoogsteen-base-paired to the third adenine. The 5' end of this loop is in close proximity to the 3' end of one of the other intercalated cytosine strands. Instead of being entirely in a DNA duplex, this structure suggests the possibility of an alternative conformation for the cytosine-rich telomere strands.

  10. Neurodevelopmental disabilities in children with intermediate and premutation range fragile X cytosine-guanine-guanine expansions.

    PubMed

    Renda, Meredith M; Voigt, Robert G; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Highsmith, W Edward; Vinson, Sherry S; Sadowski, Christine M; Hagerman, Randi J

    2014-03-01

    To determine the range of neurodevelopmental diagnoses associated with intermediate (45-54 repeats) and premutation (55-200 repeats) range cytosine-guanine-guanine fragile X expansions, the medical records of children with intermediate or premutation range expansions were retrospectively reviewed, and all neurodevelopmental diagnoses were abstracted. Twenty-nine children (9 female, 20 male; age, 13 months to 17 years) with intermediate (n = 25) or premutation (n = 4) range expansions were identified with neurodevelopmental diagnoses, including global developmental delay/intellectual disability (n = 15), language and learning disorders (n = 9), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (n = 5), epilepsy (n = 5), and motor disorders (n = 12), including 2 boys younger than 4 years of age with tremor and ataxia. Thus, children with intermediate or premutation range fragile X cytosine-guanine-guanine expansions may be more susceptible than children without such expansions to other processes, both genetic and environmental, that contribute to neurodevelopmental disability. PMID:23266944

  11. Gas-Phase Cytosine and Cytosine-N1-Derivatives Have 0.1-1 ns Lifetimes Near the S1 State Minimum.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Susan; Trachsel, Maria A; Lobsiger, Simon; Wiedmer, Timo; Frey, Hans-Martin; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Ultraviolet radiative damage to DNA is inefficient because of the ultrafast S1 ? S0 internal conversion of its nucleobases. Using picosecond pump-ionization delay measurements, we find that the S1((1)??*) state vibrationless lifetime of gas-phase keto-amino cytosine (Cyt) is ? = 730 ps or ?700 times longer than that measured by femtosecond pump-probe ionization at higher vibrational excess energy, Eexc. N1-Alkylation increases the S1 lifetime up to ? = 1030 ps for N1-ethyl-Cyt but decreases it to 100 ps for N1-isopropyl-Cyt. Increasing the vibrational energy to Eexc = 300-550 cm(-1) decreases the lifetimes to 20-30 ps. The nonradiative dynamics of S1 cytosine is not solely a property of the amino-pyrimidinone chromophore but is strongly influenced by the N1-substituent. Correlated excited-state calculations predict that the gap between the S2((1)nO?*) and S1((1)??*) states decreases along the series of N1-derivatives, thereby influencing the S1 state lifetime. PMID:26863095

  12. Biochemistry and genetics of ACC deaminase: a weapon to “stress ethylene” produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajnish P.; Shelke, Ganesh M.; Kumar, Anil; Jha, Prabhat N.

    2015-01-01

    1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCD), a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme, is widespread in diverse bacterial and fungal species. Owing to ACCD activity, certain plant associated bacteria help plant to grow under biotic and abiotic stresses by decreasing the level of “stress ethylene” which is inhibitory to plant growth. ACCD breaks down ACC, an immediate precursor of ethylene, to ammonia and α-ketobutyrate, which can be further metabolized by bacteria for their growth. ACC deaminase is an inducible enzyme whose synthesis is induced in the presence of its substrate ACC. This enzyme encoded by gene AcdS is under tight regulation and regulated differentially under different environmental conditions. Regulatory elements of gene AcdS are comprised of the regulatory gene encoding LRP protein and other regulatory elements which are activated differentially under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The role of some additional regulatory genes such as AcdB or LysR may also be required for expression of AcdS. Phylogenetic analysis of AcdS has revealed that distribution of this gene among different bacteria might have resulted from vertical gene transfer with occasional horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Application of bacterial AcdS gene has been extended by developing transgenic plants with ACCD gene which showed increased tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. Moreover, distribution of ACCD gene or its homolog's in a wide range of species belonging to all three domains indicate an alternative role of ACCD in the physiology of an organism. Therefore, this review is an attempt to explore current knowledge of bacterial ACC deaminase mediated physiological effects in plants, mode of enzyme action, genetics, distribution among different species, ecological role of ACCD and, future research avenues to develop transgenic plants expressing foreign AcdS gene to cope with biotic and abiotic stressors. Systemic identification of regulatory circuits would be highly valuable to express the gene under diverse environmental conditions. PMID:26441873

  13. Restriction of HIV-1 by APOBEC3G is cytidine deaminase-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Edward P.; Allers, Carolina; Landau, Nathaniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Cytidine deamination is the primary mechanism by which APOBEC3G restricts HIV-1; however, several studies have reported that APOBEC3G also inhibits virus replication via a mechanism that is independent of deamination. Using active site APOBEC3G mutants, we have re-evaluated the biological relevance of deaminase-independent APOBEC3G-mediated restriction of HIV-1. APOBEC3G proteins with Glu→Ala mutations in AS1, AS2 or AS1 and AS2 were stably expressed at physiological levels in CEM-SS T cells and 293T cells and the ability of the cells to support Δvif HIV-1 replication was then tested. The AS2 and AS1/AS2 mutants were packaged efficiently into virions but in single-cycle or multi-cycle HIV-1 replication assays, were found to lack antiviral activity. The AS1 mutant, which retained deaminase activity, maintained near wild-type antiviral function. To determine the potency of APOBEC3G antiviral activity, cell lines were established that that expressed low levels of wild-type APOBEC3G and generated virions that contained as few as 1-2 APOBEC3G molecules. Even at very low copy number, APOBEC3G caused a significant reduction in infectivity, suggesting that a single molecule of packaged APOBEC3G inactivates the virus. The high potency of APOBEC3G is consistent with a catalytic mechanism of restriction in which a single molecule can induce a string of mutations but difficult to reconcile with a deaminase-independent, non-catalytic mechanism. Analysis of the reverse transcript sequences showed that the G→A mutations were clustered, likely reflecting the action of single APOBEC3G molecules acting processively. We conclude that cytidine deamination is the mechanism by which APOBEC3G restricts HIV-1. PMID:19304304

  14. AMP deaminase in Dictyostelium discoideum: increase in activity following nutrient deprivation induced by starvation or hadacidin.

    PubMed

    Jahngen, E G; Rossomando, E F

    1986-06-01

    AMP deaminase, the activity that catalyzes the deamination of AMP to form IMP and NH3 has been measured in Dictyostelium discoideum. A new procedure to assay the activity of this enzyme was developed using formycin 5'-monophosphate, a fluorescent analog of AMP as the substrate, and ion-paired reverse phase HPLC to separate the reactants and products. Quantitation of the formycin containing compounds was accomplished at 290 nm. At this wavelength adenosine containing compounds were not detected and activity could be monitored in the presence of its activator ATP. The AMP deaminase activity in vegetative cells was 7.4 nmols/min/mg proteins while the activity in cells measured at 2 and 6 hrs after starvation-induced growth-arrest was 376 nmols/min/mg protein...a 51-fold increase. When vegetative cells were treated with hadacidin, a drug that restricts de novo AMP synthesis and pinocytosis, the activity of the AMP deaminase was 511 nmols/min/mg protein...a 70-fold increase compared to that in untreated vegetative cells. Smaller increases were noted following the inhibition of growth with the drugs cerulenin and vinblastine, as well as after the inhibition of de novo GMP synthesis with the drug mycophenolic acid or the partial inhibition of de novo AMP synthesis with analogs of hadacidin, N-hydroxyglycine and N-formylglycine. In addition, when the activity of two other enzymes involved in purine metabolism, namely adenosine kinase and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, was measured in vegetative cells, and the activity of both compared to that measured in starvation and hadacidin induced growth-arrested cells, showed no significant changes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3014311

  15. The Role of Cytosine Methylation on Charge Transport through a DNA Strand

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-04

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modifi-cation remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Buttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. Specifically, we compare the results generated with the widely used B3LYP exchange-correlation (XC) functional and CAM-B3LYP based tuned range-separated hybrid density functional. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that with both functionals, the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and interstrand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with both functionals. We also study the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit. Our results suggest that the effect of the two different functionals is to alter the on-site energies of the DNA bases at the HOMO level, while the transport properties don't depend much on the two functionals.

  16. Molecular energetics of cytosine revisited: a joint computational and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Gomes, José R B; Ribeiro da Silva, Maria D M C; Freitas, Vera L S; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A V

    2007-08-01

    A static bomb calorimeter has been used to measure the standard molar energy of combustion, in oxygen, at T = 298.15 K, of a commercial sample of cytosine. From this energy, the standard (p degrees = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation in the crystalline state was derived as -(221.9 +/- 1.7) kJ.mol(-1). This value confirms one experimental value already published in the literature but differs from another literature value by 13.5 kJ.mol(-1). Using the present standard molar enthalpy of formation in the condensed phase and the enthalpy of sublimation due to Burkinshaw and Mortimer [J. Chem. Soc., Dalton Trans. 1984, 75], (155.0 +/- 3.0) kJ.mol(-1), results in a value for the gas-phase standard molar enthalpy of formation for cytosine of -66.9 kJ.mol(-1). A similar value, -65.1 kJ.mol(-1), has been estimated after G3MP2B3 calculations combined with the reaction of atomization on three different tautomers of cytosine. In agreement with experimental evidence, the hydroxy-amino tautomer is the most stable form of cytosine in the gas phase. The enthalpies of formation of the other two tautomers were also estimated as -60.7 kJ.mol(-1) and -57.2 kJ.mol(-1) for the oxo-amino and oxo-imino tautomers, respectively. The same composite approach was also used to compute other thermochemical data, which is difficult to be measured experimentally, such as C-H, N-H, and O-H bond dissociation enthalpies, gas-phase acidities, and ionization enthalpies. PMID:17616179

  17. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-01

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  18. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M P

    2015-09-01

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Bttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit. PMID:26342369

  19. Significance of the D-serine-deaminase and D-serine metabolism of Staphylococcus saprophyticus for virulence.

    PubMed

    Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Sakinc, Türkan; Kline, Kimberly; Nielsen, Hailyn V; Hultgren, Scott; Gatermann, Sören G

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species of Staphylococcus that is typically uropathogenic and possesses a gene coding for a D-serine-deaminase (DsdA). As D-serine is prevalent in urine and toxic or bacteriostatic to many bacteria, it is not surprising that the D-serine-deaminase gene is found in the genome of uropathogens. It has been suggested that D-serine-deaminase or the ability to respond to or to metabolize D-serine is important for virulence. For uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), a high intracellular D-serine concentration affects expression of virulence factors. S. saprophyticus is able to grow in the presence of high D-serine concentrations; however, its D-serine metabolism has not been described. The activity of the D-serine-deaminase was verified by analyzing the formation of pyruvate from D-serine in different strains with and without D-serine-deaminase. Cocultivation experiments were performed to show that D-serine-deaminase confers a growth advantage to S. saprophyticus in the presence of D-serine. Furthermore, in vivo coinfection experiments showed a disadvantage for the ΔdsdA mutant during urinary tract infection. Expression analysis of known virulence factors by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed that the surface-associated lipase Ssp is upregulated in the presence of D-serine. In addition, we show that S. saprophyticus is able to use D-serine as the sole carbon source, but interestingly, D-serine had a negative effect on growth when glucose was also present. Taken together, D-serine metabolism is associated with virulence in S. saprophyticus, as at least one known virulence factor is upregulated in the presence of D-serine and a ΔdsdA mutant was attenuated in virulence murine model of urinary tract infection. PMID:24082071

  20. Protonation/deprotonation processes of primary products in x-irradiated cytosine derivatives: EPR and ENDOR studies at 10 K

    SciTech Connect

    Hole, E.O.; Sagstuen, E.; Nelson, W.H.; Close, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, evidence has accumulated that cytosine is the initial electron trap in irradiated DNA. It has previously been observed that the protonation/deprotonation mechanisms and sites of the pristine purine/pyrimidine electron gain and loss centers depend upon the matrix. Local variations as e.g. water of crystallization, hydrogen bond pattern, initial protonation state of the cytosine bases, and associated counter ions may be important in the selection of reaction pathways following the initial ionization event. In response to this increased interest in the primary radical production in irradiated cytosine, five different crystalline cytosine derivatives have been investigated at 10 K following X-irradiation exposure to doses between 0.8 and 30 kGy. The techniques used are K-band EPR, ENDOR, and ENDOR-induced EPR (FSE) spectroscopy. The systems studied are: cytosine monohydrate (Cm); cytosine-HCI (C:HCl); cytidine (CR); deoxycytidine:HCI (CdR:HCl); and 2{prime}-deoxycytidine 5{prime}-monophosphate (5{prime}dCMP).

  1. Solution structures of oligonucleotides containing either a guanine or a cytosine in front of a gap of one nucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulard, Y.; Faibis, V.; Fazakerley, G. V.

    1999-10-01

    We report NMR and molecular modelling studies on two DNA duplexes containing a gap of one nucleotides. The difference between the two oligonucleotides lies in the central base face to the gap, a guanine or a cytosine. For the gapG, we observed in solution a B-form conformation where the guanine stacks in the helix. For the gapC, we reveal the existence of two species, one majority where the cytosine is inside the helix and a second for which the cytosine is extrahelical. Nous présentons une étude par RMN et modélisation moléculaire sur deux duplexes d'ADN contenant une lacune de un nucléotide. La différence entre les deux oligonucléotides réside dans la base centrale en face de la lacune, une guanine ou une cytosine. Pour le duplex appelé gapG, nous observons en solution une hélice de type B dans laquelle la guanine est empilée à l'intérieur de l'hélice. Dans le cas du duplex gapC, nous montrons l'existence de deux formes, l'une où la cytosine est à l'intérieur de l'hélice; la seconde où la cytosine est extra hélicale.

  2. Impulse oscillometry identifies peripheral airway dysfunction in children with adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Komarow, Hirsh D; Sokolic, Robert; Hershfield, Michael S; Kohn, Donald B; Young, Michael; Metcalfe, Dean D; Candotti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID) is characterized by impaired T-, B- and NK-cell function. Affected children, in addition to early onset of infections, manifest non-immunologic symptoms including pulmonary dysfunction likely attributable to elevated systemic adenosine levels. Lung disease assessment has primarily employed repetitive radiography and effort-dependent functional studies. Through impulse oscillometry (IOS), which is effort-independent, we prospectively obtained objective measures of lung dysfunction in 10 children with ADA-SCID. These results support the use of IOS in the identification and monitoring of lung function abnormalities in children with primary immunodeficiencies. PMID:26682746

  3. Use of adenosine deaminase as a diagnostic tool for tuberculous pleurisy.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, L. J.; Maritz, F. J.; Le Roux, I.; Taljaard, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--A statistical audit of adenosine deaminase (ADA) in pleural effusions was undertaken. METHODS--ADA analysis, cytological and microbiological examinations, and differential cell counts were performed on 462 pleural fluid samples. RESULTS--ADA activity in tuberculous effusions was higher than in any other diagnostic group. At a level of 50 U/l the sensitivity and specificity for the identification of tuberculosis was 90% and 89%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS--ADA activity remains a useful test in the evaluation of pleural effusions. PMID:7638812

  4. Threonine deaminase from extremely halophilic bacteria - Cooperative substrate kinetics and salt dependence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, M. M.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of salt on the activity, stability, and allosteric properties of catabolic threonine deaminase from Halobacterium cutirubrum was studied. The enzyme exhibits sigmoidal kinetics with the substrate, threonine. The Hill slope is 1.55 at pH 10. The enzyme is activated by ADP at low substrate concentrations. In the presence of this effector, sigmoidal kinetics are no longer observed. At pH 10, in the absence of ADP, enzyme activity increases with increasing NaCl concentration from 0 to 4 M.

  5. Effects of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility and nucleosome mechanical stability

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Thuy T. M.; Yoo, Jejoong; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Qiucen; He, Chuan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine can undergo modifications, forming 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and its oxidized products 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Despite their importance as epigenetic markers and as central players in cellular processes, it is not well understood how these modifications influence physical properties of DNA and chromatin. Here we report a comprehensive survey of the effect of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility. We find that even a single copy of 5-fC increases DNA flexibility markedly. 5-mC reduces and 5-hmC enhances flexibility, and 5-caC does not have a measurable effect. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these modifications promote or dampen structural fluctuations, likely through competing effects of base polarity and steric hindrance, without changing the average structure. The increase in DNA flexibility increases the mechanical stability of the nucleosome and vice versa, suggesting a gene regulation mechanism where cytosine modifications change the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA through their effects on DNA flexibility. PMID:26905257

  6. VUV photoionization of gas phase adenine and cytosine: A comparison between oven and aerosol vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touboul, D.; Gaie-Levrel, F.; Garcia, G. A.; Nahon, L.; Poisson, L.; Schwell, M.; Hochlaf, M.

    2013-03-01

    We studied the single photon ionization of gas phase adenine and cytosine by means of vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation coupled to a velocity map imaging electron/ion coincidence spectrometer. Both in-vacuum temperature-controlled oven and aerosol thermodesorption were successfully applied to promote the intact neutral biological species into the gas phase. The photoion yields are consistent with previous measurements. In addition, we deduced the threshold photoelectron spectra and the slow photoelectron spectra for both species, where the close to zero kinetic energy photoelectrons and the corresponding photoions are measured in coincidence. The photoionization close and above the ionization energies are found to occur mainly via direct processes. Both vaporization techniques lead to similar electronic spectra for the two molecules, which consist of broadbands due to the complex electronic structure of the cationic species and to the possible contribution of several neutral tautomers for cytosine prior to ionization. Accurate ionization energies are measured for adenine and cytosine at, respectively, 8.267 ± 0.005 eV and 8.66 ± 0.01 eV, and we deduce precise thermochemical data for the adenine radical cation. Finally, we performed an evaluation and a comparison of the two vaporization techniques addressing the following criteria: measurement precision, thermal fragmentation, sensitivity, and sample consumption. The aerosol thermodesorption technique appears as a promising alternative to vaporize large thermolabile biological compounds, where extended thermal decomposition or low sensitivity could be encountered when using a simple oven vaporization technique.

  7. Effects of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility and nucleosome mechanical stability.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Thuy T M; Yoo, Jejoong; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Qiucen; He, Chuan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine can undergo modifications, forming 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and its oxidized products 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Despite their importance as epigenetic markers and as central players in cellular processes, it is not well understood how these modifications influence physical properties of DNA and chromatin. Here we report a comprehensive survey of the effect of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility. We find that even a single copy of 5-fC increases DNA flexibility markedly. 5-mC reduces and 5-hmC enhances flexibility, and 5-caC does not have a measurable effect. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these modifications promote or dampen structural fluctuations, likely through competing effects of base polarity and steric hindrance, without changing the average structure. The increase in DNA flexibility increases the mechanical stability of the nucleosome and vice versa, suggesting a gene regulation mechanism where cytosine modifications change the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA through their effects on DNA flexibility. PMID:26905257

  8. Spontaneous tunneling and near-infrared-induced interconversion between the amino-hydroxy conformers of cytosine.

    PubMed

    Reva, Igor; Nowak, Maciej J; Lapinski, Leszek; Fausto, Rui

    2012-02-14

    Spontaneous and near-infrared/infrared (NIR/IR)-induced interconversions between two amino-hydroxy conformers of monomeric cytosine have been investigated for the compound isolated in a low-temperature argon matrix. Combined use of a laser source (which provides narrowband NIR radiation) and a broadband NIR/IR source of excitation light allowed a detailed investigation of mutual conversions of the two conformers in question. The experiments carried out within the current work demonstrated that upon broadband NIR/IR irradiation (with the IR source of FTIR spectrometer) the population ratio of the two amino-hydroxy conformers changes towards a ratio corresponding to a photostationary state. Evolution of the conformer population ratio towards the photostationary ratio occurred independent of the initial ratio of conformers, which could be prepared by a population shift (in favor of one of the forms) induced by narrowband NIR excitation. Moreover, spontaneous tunneling conversion of the higher-energy conformer into a lower-energy form was observed for cytosine isolated in a low-temperature argon matrix kept in the dark. This process is slow and occurs on a time scale of days. The tunneling process, studied for matrix-isolated cytosine, clearly follows a dispersive type of kinetics rather than the classical monoexponential kinetics. PMID:22360199

  9. Spontaneous tunneling and near-infrared-induced interconversion between the amino-hydroxy conformers of cytosine

    SciTech Connect

    Reva, Igor; Fausto, Rui; Nowak, Maciej J.; Lapinski, Leszek

    2012-02-14

    Spontaneous and near-infrared/infrared (NIR/IR)-induced interconversions between two amino-hydroxy conformers of monomeric cytosine have been investigated for the compound isolated in a low-temperature argon matrix. Combined use of a laser source (which provides narrowband NIR radiation) and a broadband NIR/IR source of excitation light allowed a detailed investigation of mutual conversions of the two conformers in question. The experiments carried out within the current work demonstrated that upon broadband NIR/IR irradiation (with the IR source of FTIR spectrometer) the population ratio of the two amino-hydroxy conformers changes towards a ratio corresponding to a photostationary state. Evolution of the conformer population ratio towards the photostationary ratio occurred independent of the initial ratio of conformers, which could be prepared by a population shift (in favor of one of the forms) induced by narrowband NIR excitation. Moreover, spontaneous tunneling conversion of the higher-energy conformer into a lower-energy form was observed for cytosine isolated in a low-temperature argon matrix kept in the dark. This process is slow and occurs on a time scale of days. The tunneling process, studied for matrix-isolated cytosine, clearly follows a dispersive type of kinetics rather than the classical monoexponential kinetics.

  10. Comprehensive gene expression analysis of the DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferase family in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, F; Huang, X; Lan, H X; Huma, T; Bao, Y M; Huang, J; Zhang, H S

    2014-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation is a conserved epigenetic regulatory mechanism in both plants and animals. DNA methyltransferases (DNA MTases) not only initiate (de novo) but also maintain the process of DNA methylation. Here, we characterized the genome-wide expression profiles of 10 cytosine DNA MTase genes belonging to 4 subfamilies, MET1, CMT, DNMT2, and DRM, in rice. Tissue-specific gene expression analysis showed that all family members varied widely in their expression and specificities and might be involved in some basic metabolic pathways. Similarly, the expression of all rice cytosine DNA MTase genes was not regulated by plant hormones except OsDRM1a and OsDRM1b, which were downregulated by jasmonic acid. The transcription level of 10 genes in rice shoots and roots was also measured under salt and osmotic stress. Meanwhile, quantitative polymerase chain reaction data of the japonica and indica rice cultivars revealed that there is large variation in the expression activities of all genes. The results provide a foundation to further explore the roles of DNA MTases and the epigenetic regulation of abiotic stress responses in rice. PMID:25061741

  11. Effects of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility and nucleosome mechanical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Thuy T. M.; Yoo, Jejoong; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Qiucen; He, Chuan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine can undergo modifications, forming 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and its oxidized products 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Despite their importance as epigenetic markers and as central players in cellular processes, it is not well understood how these modifications influence physical properties of DNA and chromatin. Here we report a comprehensive survey of the effect of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility. We find that even a single copy of 5-fC increases DNA flexibility markedly. 5-mC reduces and 5-hmC enhances flexibility, and 5-caC does not have a measurable effect. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these modifications promote or dampen structural fluctuations, likely through competing effects of base polarity and steric hindrance, without changing the average structure. The increase in DNA flexibility increases the mechanical stability of the nucleosome and vice versa, suggesting a gene regulation mechanism where cytosine modifications change the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA through their effects on DNA flexibility.

  12. Long-Term Expression of Human Adenosine Deaminase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells of Rats: A Model for Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Carmel M.; Clowes, Monika M.; Osborne, William R. A.; Clowes, Alexander W.; Dusty Miller, A.

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli β-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  13. Sympodiomycopsis: a new yeast-like anamorph genus with basidiomycetous nature from orchid nectar.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, J; Tokuoka, K; Suh, S O; Hirata, A; Komagata, K

    1991-02-01

    A description is provided for a new anamorph genus Sympodiomycopsis (Hyphomycetes), which is neither ballistosporogenous nor sterigmatosporogenous. The genus is typified by S. paphiopedili sp. nov. and accommodates one species which was isolated from nectar of Paphiopedilum primurinum in Japan. Phenotypically, the genus shows some similarity to Sympodiomyces because of the presence of a yeast morph with sympodial conidiogenous cell proliferation, but it is distinguished from that genus morphologically by a yeast morph with the enteroblastic-annellidic conidiogenesis and the conspicuous development of a hyphal morph with holoblastic-sympodial conidiogenous cells, and chemotaxonomically by the ubiquinone system Q-10 and 10% difference in the guanine plus cytosine (G + C) content of the nuclear DNA. Phylogenetically, the type of cell wall and septal pore ultrastructure, and the primary biochemical and chemotaxonomic characters of S. paphiopedili indicate a basidiomycetous affinity. PMID:1854191

  14. Vaginal Yeast Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to thick. Most male partners of women with yeast infections do not have any symptoms of the infection. Some men, however, have reported temporary rashes and burning sensations of the penis after intercourse if they did not use condoms. ...

  15. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnant You are obese You have diabetes A yeast infection is not spread through sexual contact. However, some men will develop symptoms such as itching and a rash on the penis after having sexual contact with an infected partner. ...

  16. Replicative Aging in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Steinkraus, K.A.; Kaeberlein, M.; Kennedy, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    Progress in aging research is now rapid, and surprisingly, studies in a single-celled eukaryote are a driving force. The genetic modulators of replicative life span in yeast are being identified, the molecular events that accompany aging are being discovered, and the extent to which longevity pathways are conserved between yeast and multicellular eukaryotes is being tested. In this review, we provide a brief retrospective view on the development of yeast as a model for aging and then turn to recent discoveries that have pushed aging research into novel directions and also linked aging in yeast to well-developed hypotheses in mammals. Although the question of what causes aging still cannot be answered definitively, that day may be rapidly approaching. PMID:18616424

  17. RNAi in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mower, Jeffrey P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Fink, Gerald R.; Bartel, David P.

    2013-01-01

    RNAi, a gene-silencing pathway triggered by double-stranded RNA, is conserved in diverse eukaryotic species but has been lost in the model budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we show that RNAi is present in other budding-yeast species, including Saccharomyces castellii and Candida albicans. These species use noncanonical Dicer proteins to generate siRNAs, which mostly correspond to transposable elements and Y’ subtelomeric repeats. In S. castellii, RNAi mutants are viable but have excess Y’ mRNA levels. In S. cerevisiae, introducing Dicer and Argonaute of S. castellii restores RNAi, and the reconstituted pathway silences endogenous retrotransposons. These results identify a novel class of Dicer proteins, bring the tool of RNAi to the study of budding yeasts, and bring the tools of budding yeast to the study of RNAi. PMID:19745116

  18. Recognition of duplex RNA by the deaminase domain of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR2

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Kelly J.; Tran, Kiet; Eifler, Tristan; Erickson, Anna I.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Beal, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) hydrolytically deaminate adenosines (A) in a wide variety of duplex RNAs and misregulation of editing is correlated with human disease. However, our understanding of reaction selectivity is limited. ADARs are modular enzymes with multiple double-stranded RNA binding domains (dsRBDs) and a catalytic domain. While dsRBD binding is understood, little is known about ADAR catalytic domain/RNA interactions. Here we use a recently discovered RNA substrate that is rapidly deaminated by the isolated human ADAR2 deaminase domain (hADAR2-D) to probe these interactions. We introduced the nucleoside analog 8-azanebularine (8-azaN) into this RNA (and derived constructs) to mechanistically trap the proteinRNA complex without catalytic turnover for EMSA and ribonuclease footprinting analyses. EMSA showed that hADAR2-D requires duplex RNA and is sensitive to 2?-deoxy substitution at nucleotides opposite the editing site, the local sequence and 8-azaN nucleotide positioning on the duplex. Ribonuclease V1 footprinting shows that hADAR2-D protects ?23 nt on the edited strand around the editing site in an asymmetric fashion (?18 nt on the 5? side and ?5 nt on the 3? side). These studies provide a deeper understanding of the ADAR catalytic domainRNA interaction and new tools for biophysical analysis of ADARRNA complexes. PMID:25564529

  19. Role of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase in the Development of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Yosuke; Kondo, Satoru; Wakisaka, Naohiro; Tsuji, Akira; Endo, Kazuhira; Murono, Shigeyuki; Ito, Makoto; Kitamura, Kouichi; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In humans, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) expression results due to inflammation and this deaminase activity is also involved in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between AID expression and the clinical classification of oral cancer tissues. Experimental Design The current study investigated the correlation between AID expression and the clinical classification of oral cancer tissues from 27 patients who underwent surgical resection using immunohistochemistry. Specific AID expression and its induction by cytokine stimulation were investigated in cultured HSC oral cancer cell lines by reverse transcriptase PCR. Results AID expression was detected in 10 of 27 specimens (37.0%). AID expression was more frequently detected in early-stage cancer, especially in early stage T, than in late-stage cancer (T1/T2 vs. T3/4; P = 0.0493, N0 vs. N1/2/3; P = 0.0793). HSC-2, a nonmetastatic oral cancer cell line, abundantly expressed endogenous AID, whereas no such expression was observed in HSC-3, a metastatic oral cancer cell line. Moreover, AID expression was substantially induced in HSC-2 cells by stimulation of an inflammation-related cytokine, TNF-α. Conclusions Aberrant AID expression in the oral epithelium would contribute to the initiation of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Avoiding persistent AID inducible condition such as frequent cleaning of oral cavity would play an important role for the prevention of developing oral cancer. PMID:23634222

  20. APOBEC3G enhances lymphoma cell radioresistance by promoting cytidine deaminase-dependent DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Wilner, Ofer I; Cheshin, Ori; Shahar, Or D; Kenig, Edan; Baraz, Leah; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nagler, Arnon; Harris, Reuben S; Goldberg, Michal; Willner, Itamar; Kotler, Moshe

    2012-07-12

    APOBEC3 proteins catalyze deamination of cytidines in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), providing innate protection against retroviral replication by inducing deleterious dC > dU hypermutation of replication intermediates. APOBEC3G expression is induced in mitogen-activated lymphocytes; however, no physiologic role related to lymphoid cell proliferation has yet to be determined. Moreover, whether APOBEC3G cytidine deaminase activity transcends to processing cellular genomic DNA is unknown. Here we show that lymphoma cells expressing high APOBEC3G levels display efficient repair of genomic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation and enhanced survival of irradiated cells. APOBEC3G transiently accumulated in the nucleus in response to ionizing radiation and was recruited to DSB repair foci. Consistent with a direct role in DSB repair, inhibition of APOBEC3G expression or deaminase activity resulted in deficient DSB repair, whereas reconstitution of APOBEC3G expression in leukemia cells enhanced DSB repair. APOBEC3G activity involved processing of DNA flanking a DSB in an integrated reporter cassette. Atomic force microscopy indicated that APOBEC3G multimers associate with ssDNA termini, triggering multimer disassembly to multiple catalytic units. These results identify APOBEC3G as a prosurvival factor in lymphoma cells, marking APOBEC3G as a potential target for sensitizing lymphoma to radiation therapy. PMID:22645179

  1. Heterogeneity of quaternary structure of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska-Semrau, Karolina; Czarnecka, Justyna; Wojciechowski, Marek; Milewski, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    The oligoHis-tagged versions of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Giardia lamblia (GlmNagB-HisN, GlmNagB-HisC) were constructed and purified to hear homogeneity, and their kinetic and structural properties were compared to those of the wild-type enzyme (GlmNagB). Introduction of the oligoHis tag at the GlmNagB C-terminus resulted in almost complete loss of the catalytic activity, while the catalytic properties of GlmNagB-HisN and GlmNagB were very similar. The recombinant and wild-type enzyme exhibits heterogeneity of the quaternary structure and in solution exists in three interconvertible forms, namely, monomeric, homodimeric, and homotetrameric. Although the monomeric form is prevalent, the monomer/dimer/tetramer ratios depended on protein concentration and fell within the range from 72:27:1 to 39:23:38. The enzyme is fully active in each of the oligomeric structures, efficiently catalyzes synthesis of D-glucosamine-6-phosphate from D-fructose-6-phosphate and ammonia, and its activity is not modified by GlcNAc6P, UDP-GlcNAc, or UDP-GalNAc. GlcN6P deaminase of G. lamblia represents a novel structural and functional type of enzyme of the NagB subfamily. PMID:25326378

  2. Identification of small molecule compounds with higher binding affinity to guanine deaminase (cypin) than guanine.

    PubMed

    Fernández, José R; Sweet, Eric S; Welsh, William J; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2010-09-15

    Guanine deaminase (GDA; cypin) is an important metalloenzyme that processes the first step in purine catabolism, converting guanine to xanthine by hydrolytic deamination. In higher eukaryotes, GDA also plays an important role in the development of neuronal morphology by regulating dendritic arborization. In addition to its role in the maturing brain, GDA is thought to be involved in proper liver function since increased levels of GDA activity have been correlated with liver disease and transplant rejection. Although mammalian GDA is an attractive and potential drug target for treatment of both liver diseases and cognitive disorders, prospective novel inhibitors and/or activators of this enzyme have not been actively pursued. In this study, we employed the combination of protein structure analysis and experimental kinetic studies to seek novel potential ligands for human guanine deaminase. Using virtual screening and biochemical analysis, we identified common small molecule compounds that demonstrate a higher binding affinity to GDA than does guanine. In vitro analysis demonstrates that these compounds inhibit guanine deamination, and more surprisingly, affect GDA (cypin)-mediated microtubule assembly. The results in this study provide evidence that an in silico drug discovery strategy coupled with in vitro validation assays can be successfully implemented to discover compounds that may possess therapeutic value for the treatment of diseases and disorders where GDA activity is abnormal. PMID:20716488

  3. A 24-Year Enzyme Replacement Therapy in an Adenosine-deaminase-Deficient Patient.

    PubMed

    Tartibi, Hana M; Hershfield, Michael S; Bahna, Sami L

    2016-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a fatal childhood disease unless immune reconstitution is performed early in life, with either hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy. One of its subtypes is caused by adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme deficiency, which leads to the accumulation of toxic metabolites that impair lymphocyte development and function. With the development of polyethylene glycol-conjugated adenosine deaminase (PEG-ADA) enzyme replacement therapy, many ADA-deficient children with SCID who could not receive a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy survived and had longer and healthier lives. We report a 24-year course of treatment in a patient who was diagnosed with ADA deficiency at 4 months of age. The patient was treated with PEG-ADA, which was the only therapy available for him. The patient's plasma ADA level was regularly monitored and the PEG-ADA dose adjusted accordingly. This treatment has resulted in near-normalization of lymphocyte counts, and his clinical course has been associated with only minor to moderate infections. Thus far, he has had no manifestations of autoimmune or lymphoproliferative disorders. This patient is among the longest to be maintained on PEG-ADA enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:26684479

  4. Identification of small molecule compounds with higher binding affinity to guanine deaminase (cypin) than guanine

    PubMed Central

    Fernndez, Jos R.; Sweet, Eric S.; Welsh, William J.; Firestein, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    Guanine deaminase (GDA; cypin) is an important metalloenzyme that processes the first step in purine catabolism, converting guanine to xanthine by hydrolytic deamination. In higher eukaryotes, GDA also plays an important role in the development of neuronal morphology by regulating dendritic arborization. In addition to its role in the maturing brain, GDA is thought to be involved in proper liver function since increased levels of GDA activity have been correlated with liver disease and transplant rejection. Although mammalian GDA is an attractive and potential drug target for treatment of both liver diseases and cognitive disorders, prospective novel inhibitors and/or activators of this enzyme have not been actively pursued. In this study, we employed the combination of protein structure analysis and experimental kinetic studies to seek novel potential ligands for human guanine deaminase. Using virtual screening and biochemical analysis, we identified common small molecule compounds that demonstrate a higher binding affinity to GDA than does guanine. In vitro analysis demonstrates that these compounds inhibit guanine deamination, and more surprisingly, affect GDA (cypin)-mediated microtubule assembly. The results in this study provide evidence that an in silico drug discovery strategy coupled with in vitro validation assays can be successfully implemented to discover compounds that may possess therapeutic value for the treatment of diseases and disorders where GDA activity is abnormal. PMID:20716488

  5. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase acts on double-strand breaks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong Ming

    2007-02-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is likely responsible for DNA cytidine deamination, although it may also act as an RNA deaminase. It functions on single-stranded DNA, the non-template strand in double-stranded DNA during transcription, or both strands in supercoiled DNA. To ask whether AID is able to deaminate cytidine at DNA breaks, plasmids, containing a SnaBI site (TAC downward arrowGTA) that forms blunt ends after digestion with SnaBI, were generated. If AID deaminates cytidine at the upstream blunt end, the ATG start codon in either of two drug resistance genes will be regenerated after ligation and replication in UDG-null E. coli cells. This study shows that AID targets cytidine at the break. The extent of deamination activity beyond the break is correlated with the base composition in the break region. If the break region is A, T-rich, C > T transitions are extensive. However, when the break region is not A, T-rich, mutations are mainly restricted to the break, similar to findings in vivo. The results indicate that AID has activity on double strand breaks (DSBs). Based on previous and current findings, a somatic hypermutation (SHM) model is proposed, in which collision between the transcription apparatus and the replication fork generates DSBs. After AID acts on break ends, the error-prone DNA repair machinery fixes and creates mutations. PMID:16697045

  6. Ab Initio ONIOM-Molecular Dynamics (MD) Study on the Deamination Reaction by Cytidine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2007-08-23

    We applied the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method to the hydrolytic deamination of cytidine by cytidine deaminase, which is an essential step of the activation process of the anticancer drug inside the human body. The direct MD simulations were performed for the realistic model of cytidine deaminase calculating the energy and its gradient by the ab initio ONIOM method on the fly. The ONIOM-MD calculations including the thermal motion show that the neighboring amino acid residue is an important factor of the environmental effects and significantly affects not only the geometry and energy of the substrate trapped in the pocket of the active site but also the elementary step of the catalytic reaction. We successfully simulate the second half of the catalytic cycle, which has been considered to involve the rate-determining step, and reveal that the rate-determing step is the release of the NH3 molecule. TM and MA were supported in part by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  7. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing enzymes of yeasts.

  8. Modeling brewers' yeast flocculation

    PubMed

    van Hamersveld EH; van der Lans RG; Caulet; Luyben

    1998-02-01

    Flocculation of yeast cells occurs during the fermentation of beer. Partway through the fermentation the cells become flocculent and start to form flocs. If the environmental conditions, such as medium composition and fluid velocities in the tank, are optimal, the flocs will grow in size large enough to settle. After settling of the main part of the yeast the green beer is left, containing only a small amount of yeast necessary for rest conversions during the next process step, the lagering. The physical process of flocculation is a dynamic equilibrium of floc formation and floc breakup resulting in a bimodal size distribution containing single cells and flocs. The floc size distribution and the single cell amount were measured under the different conditions that occur during full scale fermentation. Influences on flocculation such as floc strength, specific power input, and total number of yeast cells in suspension were studied. A flocculation model was developed, and the measured data used for validation. Yeast floc formation can be described with the collision theory assuming a constant collision efficiency. The breakup of flocs appears to occur mainly via two mechanisms, the splitting of flocs and the erosion of yeast cells from the floc surface. The splitting rate determines the average floc size and the erosion rate determines the number of single cells. Regarding the size of the flocs with respect to the scale of turbulence, only the viscous subrange needs to be considered. With the model, the floc size distribution and the number of single cells can be predicted at a certain point during the fermentation. For this, the bond strength between the cells, the fractal dimension of the yeast, the specific power input in the tank and the number of yeast cells that are in suspension in the tank have to be known. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10099210

  9. Forces in yeast flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  10. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase from Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 Facilitates the Growth of Rice in the Presence of Salt or Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Han, Yunlei; Wang, Rui; Yang, Zhirong; Zhan, Yuhua; Ma, Yao; Ping, Shuzhen; Zhang, Liwen; Lin, Min; Yan, Yongliang

    2015-07-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, which is encoded by some bacteria, can reduce the amount of ethylene, a root elongation inhibitor, and stimulate the growth of plants under various environmental stresses. The presence of ACC deaminase activity and the regulation of ACC in several rhizospheric bacteria have been reported. The nitrogen-fixing Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 is capable of endophytic association with rice plants and promotes the growth of rice. However, the functional identification of ACC deaminase has not been performed. In this study, the proposed effect of ACC deaminase in P. stutzeri A1501 was investigated. Genome mining showed that P. stutzeri A1501 carries a single gene encoding ACC deaminase, designated acdS. The acdS mutant was devoid of ACC deaminase activity and was less resistant to NaCl and NiCl2 compared with the wild-type. Furthermore, inactivation of acdS greatly impaired its nitrogenase activity under salt stress conditions. It was also observed that mutation of the acdS gene led to loss of the ability to promote the growth of rice under salt or heavy metal stress. Taken together, this study illustrates the essential role of ACC deaminase, not only in enhancing the salt or heavy metal tolerance of bacteria but also in improving the growth of plants, and provides a theoretical basis for studying the interaction between plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and plants. PMID:25674802

  11. Lymphospecific toxicity in adenosine deaminase deficiency and purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency: Possible role of nucleoside kinase(s)

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Dennis A.; Kaye, Jonathan; Seegmiller, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Inherited deficiencies of the enzymes adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase; EC 3.5.4.4) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (purine-nucleoside:orthophosphate ribosyltransferase; EC 2.4.2.1) preferentially interfere with lymphocyte development while sparing most other organ systems. Previous experiments have shown that through the action of specific kinases, nucleosides can be “trapped” intracellularly in the form of 5′-phosphates. We therefore measured the ability of newborn human tissues to phosphorylate adenosine and deoxyadenosine, the substrate of adenosine deaminase, and also inosine, deoxyinosine, guanosine, and deoxyguanosine, the substrates of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Substantial activities of adenosine kinase were found in all tissues studied, while guanosine and inosine kinases were detected in none. However, the ability to phosphorylate deoxyadenosine, deoxyinosine, and deoxyguanosine was largely confined to lymphocytes. Adenosine deaminase, but not purine nucleoside phosphorylase, showed a similar lymphoid predominance. Other experiments showed that deoxyadenosine, deoxyinosine, and deoxyguanosine were toxic to human lymphoid cells. The toxicity of deoxyadenosine was reversed by the addition of deoxycytidine, but not uridine, to the culture medium. Based upon these and other experiments, we propose that in adenosine deaminase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency, toxic deoxyribonucleosides produced by many tissues are selectively trapped in lymphocytes by phosphorylating enzyme(s). PMID:202960

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of the active site of porphobilinogen deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.I.; Roessner, C.A.; Stolowich, N.J.; Karuso, P.; Williams, H.J.; Grant, S.K.; Gonzalez, M.D.; Hoshino, T. )

    1988-10-18

    The active site of porphobilinogen (PBG){sup 1} deaminase from Escherichia coli has been found to contain an unusual dipyrromethane derived from four molecules of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) covalently linked to Cys-242, one of the two cysteine residues conserved in E. coli and human deaminase. By use of a hemA{sup {minus}} strain of E. coli the enzyme was enriched from (5-{sup 13}C)ALA and examined by {sup 1}H-detected multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy, which revealed all of the salient features of a dipyrromethane composed of two PBG units linked heat to tail and terminating in a CH{sub 2}-S bond to a cysteine residue. Site-specific mutagenesis of Cys-99 and Cys-242, respectively, has shown that substitution of Ser for Cys-99 does not affect the enzymatic activity, whereas substitution of Ser for Cys-242 removes essentially all of the catalytic activity as measured by the conversion of the substrate PBG to uro'gen I. The NMR spectrum of the covalent complex of deaminase with the suicide inhibitor 2-bromo-(2,11-{sup 13}C{sub 2})PBG reveals that the aminomethyl terminus of the inhibitor reacts with the enzyme's cofactor at the {alpha}-free pyrrole. NMR spectroscopy of the ES{sub 2} complex confirmed a PBG-derived head-to-tail dipyrromethane attached to the {alpha}-free pyrrole position of the enzyme. A mechanistic rationale for deaminase is presented.

  13. Characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres isolated in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, E J; Chao, S; Vongs, A; Yang, J

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to learn more about the genomic organization of chromosomal termini in plants we employed a functional complementation strategy to isolate Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Eight yeast episomes carrying A. thaliana telomeric sequences were obtained. The plant sequences carried on two episomes, YpAtT1 and YpAtT7, were characterized in detail. The telomeric origins of YpAtT1 and YpAtT7 insert DNAs were confirmed by demonstrating that corresponding genomic sequences are preferentially degraded during exonucleolytic digestion. The isolated telomeric restriction fragments contain G-rich repeat arrays characteristic of A. thaliana telomeres, as well as subterminal telomere-associated sequences (TASs). DNA sequence analysis revealed the presence of variant telomeric repeats at the centromere-proximal border of the terminal block of telomere repeats. The TAS flanking the telomeric G-rich repeat in YpAtT7 corresponds to a repetitive element present at other A. thaliana telomeres, while more proximal sequences are unique to one telomere. The YpAtT1 TAS is unique in the Landsberg strain of A. thaliana from which the clone originated; however, the Landsberg TAS cross-hybridizes weakly to a second telomere in the strain Columbia. Restriction analysis with cytosine methylation-sensitive endonucleases indicated that both TASs are highly methylated in the genome. Images PMID:1508688

  14. Cytosine methylation is a conserved epigenetic feature found throughout the phylum Platyhelminthes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The phylum Platyhelminthes (flatworms) contains an important group of bilaterian organisms responsible for many debilitating and chronic infectious diseases of human and animal populations inhabiting the planet today. In addition to their biomedical and veterinary relevance, some platyhelminths are also frequently used models for understanding tissue regeneration and stem cell biology. Therefore, the molecular (genetic and epigenetic) characteristics that underlie trophic specialism, pathogenicity or developmental maturation are likely to be pivotal in our continued studies of this important metazoan group. Indeed, in contrast to earlier studies that failed to detect evidence of cytosine or adenine methylation in parasitic flatworm taxa, our laboratory has recently defined a critical role for cytosine methylation in Schistosoma mansoni oviposition, egg maturation and ovarian development. Thus, in order to identify whether this epigenetic modification features in other platyhelminth species or is a novelty of S. mansoni, we conducted a study simultaneously surveying for DNA methylation machinery components and DNA methylation marks throughout the phylum using both parasitic and non-parasitic representatives. Results Firstly, using both S. mansoni DNA methyltransferase 2 (SmDNMT2) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (SmMBD) as query sequences, we illustrate that essential DNA methylation machinery components are well conserved throughout the phylum. Secondly, using both molecular (methylation specific amplification polymorphism, MSAP) and immunological (enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay, ELISA) methodologies, we demonstrate that representative species (Echinococcus multilocularis, Protopolystoma xenopodis, Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma japonicum, Fasciola hepatica and Polycelis nigra) within all four platyhelminth classes (Cestoda, Monogenea, Trematoda and ‘Turbellaria’) contain methylated cytosines within their genome compartments. Conclusions Collectively, these findings provide the first direct evidence for a functionally conserved and enzymatically active DNA methylation system throughout the Platyhelminthes. Defining how this epigenetic feature shapes phenotypic diversity and development within the phylum represents an exciting new area of metazoan biology. PMID:23837670

  15. Efficient retrovirus-mediated transfer and expression of a human adenosine deaminase gene in diploid skin fibroblasts from an adenosine deaminase-deficient human

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.D.; Hock, R.A.; Osborne, W.R.A.; Miller, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    Skin fibroblasts might be considered suitable recipients for therapeutic genes to cure several human genetic diseases; however, these cells are resistant to gene transfer by most methods. The authors studied the ability of retroviral vectors to transfer genes into normal human diploid skin fibroblasts. Retroviruses carrying genes for neomycin or hygromycin B resistance conferred drug resistance to greater than 50% of the human fibroblasts after a single exposure to virus-containing medium. This represents at least a 500-fold increase in efficiency over other methods. Transfer was achieved in the absence of helper virus by using amphotropic retrovirus-packaging cells. A retrovirus vector containing a human adenosine deaminase (ADA) cDNA was constructed and used to infect ADA/sup -/ fibroblasts from a patient with ADA deficiency. The infected cells produced 12-fold more ADA enzyme than fibroblasts from normal individuals and were able to rapidly metabolize exogenous deoxyadenosine and adenosine, metabolites that accumulate in plasma in ADA-deficient patients and are responsible for the severe combined immunodeficiency in these patients. These experiments indicate the potential of retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human fibroblasts for gene therapy.

  16. Cytosine substituted calix[4]pyrroles: Neutral receptors for 5′-guanosine monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Sessler, Jonathan L.; Král, Vladimír; Shishkanova, Tatiana V.; Gale, Philip A.

    2002-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of two cytosine-substituted calix[4]pyrrole conjugates, bearing the appended cytosine attached at either a β- or meso-pyrrolic position, is described. These systems were tested as nucleotide-selective carriers and as active components of nucleotide-sensing ion-selective electrodes at pH 6.6. Studies of carrier selectivity were made using a Pressman-type model membrane system consisting of an initial pH 6.0 aqueous phase, an intervening dichloromethane barrier containing the calix[4]pyrrole conjugate, and a receiving basic aqueous phase. Good selectivity for the Watson–Crick complementary nucleotide, 5′-guanosine monophosphate (5′-GMP), was seen in the case of the meso-linked conjugate with the relative rates of through-membrane transport being 7.7:4.1:1 for 5′-GMP, 5′-AMP, and 5′-CMP, respectively. By contrast, the β-substituted conjugate, while showing a selectivity for 5′-GMP that was enhanced relative to unsubstituted calix[4]pyrrole, was found to transport 5′-CMP roughly 4.5 times more quickly than 5′-GMP. Higher selectivities were also found for 5′-CMP when both the β- and meso-substituted conjugates were incorporated into polyvinyl chloride membranes and tested as ion selective electrodes at pH 6.6, whereas near-equal selectivities were observed for 5′-CMP and 5′-GMP in the case of unsubstituted calix[4]pyrroles. These seemingly disparate results are consistent with a picture wherein the meso-substituted cytosine calix[4]pyrrole conjugate, but not its β-linked congener, is capable of acting as a ditopic receptor, binding concurrently both the phosphate anion and nucleobase portions of 5′-GMP to the calixpyrrole core and cytosine “tails” of the molecule, respectively, with the effect of this binding being most apparent under the conditions of the transport experiments. PMID:11929967

  17. Supramolecular hydrogen-bonding networks in cytosine salicylic acid hydrate (2 : 3 : 2) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, B.; Ravikumar, K.

    2010-03-01

    Cytosine-cytosinium base pairs are interconnected by triple hydrogen bonds thereby resembling a pseudo-Watson-Crick pattern and generates two characteristic R {2/2}(8)-motifs. Both molecules of the salicylic acids interconnect the base pair and lead to the formation of one dimensional supramolecular hexameric tape along b-axis. This hexameric tape are sandwiched by the water molecules, one of the salicylic acid and salicylate anion which form one dimensional and two dimensional supramolecular hydrogen bonded networks in the crystal packing. Macrocylic rings of cavities are also noticed in the crystal structure.

  18. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy R.; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term transcriptional network refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24018767

  19. Oxygen requirements of yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Visser, W; Scheffers, W A; Batenburg-van der Vegte, W H; van Dijken, J P

    1990-01-01

    Type species of 75 yeast genera were examined for their ability to grow anaerobically in complex and mineral media. To define anaerobic conditions, we added a redox indicator, resazurin, to the media to determine low redox potentials. All strains tested were capable of fermenting glucose to ethanol in oxygen-limited shake-flask cultures, even those of species generally regarded as nonfermentative. However, only 23% of the yeast species tested grew under anaerobic conditions. A comparative study with a number of selected strains revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae stands out as a yeast capable of rapid growth at low redox potentials. Other yeasts, such as Torulaspora delbrueckii and Candida tropicalis, grew poorly mu max, 0.03 and 0.05 h-1, respectively) under anaerobic conditions in mineral medium supplemented with Tween 80 and ergosterol. The latter organisms grew rapidly under oxygen limitation and then displayed a high rate of alcoholic fermentation. It can be concluded that these yeasts have hitherto-unidentified oxygen requirements for growth. Images PMID:2082825

  20. Difference between deoxyribose- and tetrahydrofuran-type abasic sites in the in vivo mutagenic responses in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Chie; Sanadai, Sachi; Hata, Yasuhiro; Okuto, Hisanori; Noskov, Vladimir N.; Loakes, David; Negishi, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    We have analyzed the mutagenic specificity of an abasic site in DNA using the yeast oligonucleotide transformation assay. Oligonucleotides containing an abasic site or its analog were introduced into B7528 or its derivatives, and nucleotide incorporation opposite abasic sites was analyzed. Cytosine was most frequently incorporated opposite a natural abasic site (O) (‘C-rule’), followed by thymine. Deletion of REV1 decreased the transformation efficiency and the incorporation of cytosine nearly to a background level. In contrast, deletion of RAD30 did not affect them. We compared the mutagenic specificity with that of a tetrahydrofuran abasic site (F), an abasic analog used widely. Its mutation spectrum was clearly different from that of O. Adenine, not cytosine, was most favorably incorporated. However, deletion of REV1 decreased the transformation efficiency with F-containing oligonucleotide as in the case of O. These results suggest that the bypass mechanism of F is different from that of O, although the bypasses in both cases are dependent on REV1. We also found that the mutagenic specificity of F can be affected by not only the adjacent bases, but also a base located two positions away from F. PMID:12466536

  1. [Fructose transporter in yeasts].

    PubMed

    Lazar, Zbigniew; Dobrowolski, Adam; Robak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Study of hexoses transporter started with discovery of galactose permease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Glucose, fructose and mannose assimilation is assumed by numerous proteins encoded by different genes. To date over 20 hexoses transporters, belonging to Sugar Porter family and to Major Facilitator Superfamily, were known. Genome sequence analysis of Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, S. cerevisaie and Debaryomyces hansenii reveled potential presence of 17-48 sugar porter proteins. Glucose transporters in S. cerevisiae have been already characterized. In this paper, hexoses transporters, responsible for assimilation of fructose by cells, are presented and compared. Fructose specific transporter are described for yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Zygosaccharomyces bailli, K. lactis, Saccharomyces pastorianus, S. cerevisiae winemaking strain and for fungus Botritys cinerea and human (Glut5p). Among six yeasts transporters, five are fructose specific, acting by facilitated diffusion or proton symport. Yeasts monosaccharides transporter studies allow understanding of sugars uptake and metabolism important aspects, even in higher eukaryotes cells. PMID:25033548

  2. Strong nucleosomes of yeasts.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Edward N; Tripathi, Vijay

    2016-02-01

    Yeast genome lacks visibly periodic sequences characteristic of strong nucleosomes (SNs) originally discovered in A. thaliana, C. elegans, and H. sapiens. Yet, the sequences with good match to the (RRRRRYYYYY)n consensus of the SNs do show preference to centromere regions of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Cryptococcus neoformans - property characteristic of SNs of higher eukaryotes. Candida albicans is the first exception detected so far, where their SNs do not have any affinity to the centromeres, nor pericentromeric regions. Three of the four yeast genomes analyzed possess unique repeating centromere-specific SN sequences (C. albicans, again, is an exception). The results firmly indicate that centromeres of plants, animals, and yeasts in general have special chromatin structure, favoring SNs. PMID:25893982

  3. Yeast killer systems.

    PubMed Central

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Gerloni, M; Bertolotti, D; Polonelli, L

    1997-01-01

    The killer phenomenon in yeasts has been revealed to be a multicentric model for molecular biologists, virologists, phytopathologists, epidemiologists, industrial and medical microbiologists, mycologists, and pharmacologists. The surprisingly widespread occurrence of the killer phenomenon among taxonomically unrelated microorganisms, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, has engendered a new interest in its biological significance as well as its theoretical and practical applications. The search for therapeutic opportunities by using yeast killer systems has conceptually opened new avenues for the prevention and control of life-threatening fungal diseases through the idiotypic network that is apparently exploited by the immune system in the course of natural infections. In this review, the biology, ecology, epidemiology, therapeutics, serology, and idiotypy of yeast killer systems are discussed. PMID:9227858

  4. Stabilization of Mixed Frenkel-Charge Transfer Excitons Extended Across Both Strands of Guanine-Cytosine DNA Duplexes.

    PubMed

    Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Brazard, Johanna; Improta, Roberto; Burghardt, Irene; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2015-06-18

    The photoreactive pathways that may lead to DNA damage depend crucially upon the nature of the excited electronic states. The study of alternating guanine-cytosine duplexes by fluorescence spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations identifies a novel type of excited states that can be populated following UVB excitation. These states, denoted High-energy Emitting Long-lived Mixed (HELM) states, extend across both strands and arise from mixing between cytosine Frenkel excitons and guanine-to-cytosine charge transfer states. They emit at energies higher than ??* states localized on single bases, survive for several nanoseconds, are sensitive to the ionic strength of the solution, and are strongly affected by the structural transition from the B form to the Z form. Their impact on the formation of lesions of the genetic code needs to be assessed. PMID:26266599

  5. Analysis of a replication initiation sequence from the adenosine deaminase region of the mouse genome.

    PubMed Central

    Virta-Pearlman, V J; Gunaratne, P H; Chinault, A C

    1993-01-01

    A 4-kb HindIII fragment that supported the efficient autonomous replication of plasmid vector pDY-, a replication-defective construct based on Epstein-Barr virus sequences, in human K562 cells was rescued from amplified double-minute chromosomes containing the murine adenosine deaminase locus. Polymerase chain reaction assays of size-fractionated nascent strands demonstrated that replication initiation occurred within the same 1- to 2-kb region of this fragment in autonomously replicating plasmids containing the sequence in either orientation, in double-minute chromosomes, and in the single-copy locus at its normal chromosomal location. The complete sequence of this fragment was determined; it contains a 248-bp polypurine tract and consensus binding site sequences for several putative transcription and replication factors. Images PMID:8413198

  6. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in mice reconstituted with retrovirus-transduced hematopoietic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.M.; Danos, O.; Grossman, M.; Raulet, D.H.; Mulligan, R.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant retroviruses encoding human adenosine deaminase have been used to infect murine hematopoietic stem cells. In bone marrow transplant recipients reconstituted with the genetically modified cells, human ADA was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the recipients for at least 6 months after transplantation. In animals analyzed in detail 4 months after transplantation, human ADA and proviral sequences were detected in all hematopoietic lineages; in several cases, human ADA activity exceeded the endogenous activity. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of introducing a functional human ADA gene into hematopoietic stem cells and obtaining expression in multiple hematopoietic lineages long after transplantation. This approach should be helpful in designing effective gene therapies for severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes in humans.

  7. Epigenetic Function of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase and Its Link to Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Pilar M.; Shaknovich, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes during B cell maturation and immune response. Expression of AID is tightly regulated due to its mutagenic and recombinogenic potential, which is known to target not only Ig genes, but also non-Ig genes, contributing to lymphomagenesis. In recent years, a new epigenetic function of AID and its link to DNA demethylation came to light in several developmental systems. In this review, we summarize existing evidence linking deamination of unmodified and modified cytidine by AID to base-excision repair and mismatch repair machinery resulting in passive or active removal of DNA methylation mark, with the focus on B cell biology. We also discuss potential contribution of AID-dependent DNA hypomethylation to lymphomagenesis. PMID:25566255

  8. microRNA-155 is a negative regulator of Activation Induced Cytidine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Grace; Hakimpour, Paul; Landgraf, Pablo; Rice, Amanda; Tuschl, Thomas; Casellas, Rafael; Papavasiliou, F. Nina

    2008-01-01

    Summary B lymphocytes perform somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of the immunoglobulin locus to generate an antibody repertoire diverse in both affinity and function. These somatic diversification processes are catalyzed by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a potent DNA mutator whose expression and function are highly regulated. Here we show that AID is regulated at the post-transcriptional level by a lymphocyte-specific microRNA, miR-155. We find that miR-155 is upregulated in murine B lymphocytes undergoing CSR, and furthermore targets a conserved site in the AID 3′untranslated region. Disruption of this target site in vivo results in quantitative and temporal deregulation of AID expression, accompanied by functional consequences for CSR and affinity maturation. Thus, miR-155, which has recently been shown to play important roles in regulating the germinal center reaction, does so in part by directly downmodulating AID expression. PMID:18450484

  9. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Links Ovulation-Induced Inflammation and Serous Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sapoznik, Stav; Bahar-Shany, Keren; Brand, Hadar; Pinto, Yishay; Gabay, Orshay; Glick-Saar, Efrat; Dor, Chen; Zadok, Oranit; Barshack, Iris; Zundelevich, Adi; Gal-Yam, Einav Nili; Yung, Yuval; Hourvitz, Ariel; Korach, Jacob; Beiner, Mario; Jacob, Jasmine; Levanon, Erez Y; Barak, Michal; Aviel-Ronen, Sarit; Levanon, Keren

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the notion that ovarian carcinoma results from ovulation-induced inflammation of the fallopian tube epithelial cells (FTECs) has gained evidence. However, the mechanistic pathway for this process has not been revealed yet. In the current study, we propose the mutator protein activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) as a link between ovulation-induced inflammation in FTECs and genotoxic damage leading to ovarian carcinogenesis. We show that AID, previously shown to be functional only in B lymphocytes, is expressed in FTECs under physiological conditions, and is induced in vitro upon ovulatory-like stimulation and in vivo in carcinoma-associated FTECs. We also report that AID activity results in epigenetic, genetic and genomic damage in FTECs. Overall, our data provides new insights into the etiology of ovarian carcinogenesis and may set the ground for innovative approaches aimed at prevention and early detection. PMID:26936395

  10. A novel L-serine deaminase activity in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Su, H; Newman, E B

    1991-01-01

    We demonstrate here that Escherichia coli K-12 synthesizes two different L-serine deaminases (L-SD) catalyzing the nonoxidative deamination of L-serine to pyruvate, one coded for by the previously described sdaA gene and a second, hitherto undescribed enzyme which we call L-SD2. A strain carrying a null mutation in sdaA made no detectable L-SD in minimal medium, but had activity in Luria broth. We describe a mutation, sdaX, which affects the regulation of L-SD2 and permits its expression in minimal medium, and an insertion mutation, sdaB, which abolishes L-SD2 activity completely. Both mutations lie near 60.5 min on the E. coli genetic map. The two L-SD enzymes have similar enzyme parameters, and both require posttranslational activation. Images PMID:2013569

  11. High pleural ammonia negatively interferes with the measurement of adenosine deaminase activity

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Tze Ping; Tan, Karen Mei Ling; Chew, Suru; Chan, Douglas S G

    2013-01-01

    Pleural adenosine deaminase activity (ADA) is a sensitive and specific test for tuberculous pleurisy. Here, we report a case of undetectable ADA in the pleural fluid of a man presenting with chronic cough, fever and night sweats. Subsequent laboratory investigations and review revealed that the presence of high concentrations of ammonia in pleural fluid, commonly seen in empyema, negatively interferes with ADA results when measured by the Guisti and Galanti method. The source of ammonia may come from deamination of amino acids, ammonia-producing microbes and/or leucocytes. This interference invalidates ADA results and is present in ∼2% of our laboratory requests. It is important to keep this interference in mind when tuberculosis/ammonia-producing bacteria coinfections are suspected and during early phases of tuberculous pleurisy, when neutrophils predominate in the pleural fluids. PMID:23389721

  12. Non-infectious lung disease in patients with adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Booth, C; Algar, V E; Xu-Bayford, J; Fairbanks, L; Owens, C; Gaspar, H B

    2012-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency is a disorder of purine metabolism manifesting severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID) and systemic abnormalities. Increased levels of the substrate deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP) lead to immunodeficiency and are associated in a murine model with pulmonary insufficiency. We compared a cohort of patients with ADA-SCID and X-linked SCID and found that despite similar radiological and respiratory findings, positive microbiology is significantly less frequent in ADA-SCID patients (p < 0.0005), suggesting a metabolic pathogenesis for the lung disease. Clinicians should be aware of this possibility and correct metabolic abnormalities either through enzyme replacement or haematopoietic stem cell transplant, in addition to treating infectious complications. PMID:22350222

  13. Evolutionary history of Ascomyceteous Yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are important for many industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 20 ascomyceteous yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. A comp...

  14. Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction

    MedlinePlus

    ... preparations of red yeast rice are used in food products in Chinese cuisine, including Peking duck. Others have been sold as dietary supplements to lower blood levels of cholesterol and related lipids. Some red yeast rice products contain substances called ...

  15. Genetics of Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querol, Amparo; Fernández-Espinar, M. Teresa; Belloch, Carmela

    The use of yeasts in biotechnology processes dates back to ancient days. Before 7000 BC, beer was produced in Sumeria. Wine was made in Assyria in 3500 BC, and ancient Rome had over 250 bakeries, which were making leavened bread by 100 BC. And milk has been made into Kefyr and Koumiss in Asia for many centuries (Demain, Phaff, & Kurtzman, 1999). However, the importance of yeast in the food and beverage industries was only realized about 1860, when their role in food manufacturing became evident.

  16. Diagnostic Value of Serum Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) Level for Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Salmanzadeh, Shokrollah; Tavakkol, Heshmatollah; Bavieh, Khalid; Alavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is not always easy, thus employing methods with a short duration and acceptable sensitivity and specificity is necessary to diagnose TB. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of serum adenosine deaminase (ADA) level for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. Patients and Methods: A total of 160 sex and age-matched subjects were included in this study, and were divided to four groups; forty patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) diagnosed based on the national TB program (NTP), forty patients with non-tuberculosis bacterial pneumonia, forty patients with lung cancer and forty people who were healthy in every respect. Serum adenosine deaminase activity in patients of each group was measured by the Giusti and Galanti calorimetry method using a commercial kit (Diazyme, USA). The ANOVA analysis was used to compare groups for quantitative variables. Results: Mean serum ADA level in the PTB group was clearly higher than the mean serum ADA in the other three groups. Mean serum ADA was 26 IU/L in PTB patients, 19.48 IU/L in patients with pneumonia, 15.8 IU/L in patients with lung cancer, and 10.7 IU/L in the control group (P < 0.05). In regard to the cut off value of 26 IU/L for ADA in patients with PTB sensitivity and specificity was defined as 35% and 91%, respectively. Conclusions: Serum ADA activity with high specificity percentage may be a useful alternative test in restricted resource areas to rule out diagnosis of PTB. However, serum ADA activity is not a useful tool for TB diagnosis. PMID:25861440

  17. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase in B cells of hepatits C virus-related cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Russi, S; Dammacco, F; Sansonno, S; Pavone, F; Sansonno, D

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin variable region heavy chain (IgVH ) somatic gene diversification is instrumental in the transformation process that characterizes hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related B cell lymphoproliferative disorders. However, the extent to which activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme essential for IgV gene somatic hypermutation (SHM), is active in cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis (CV) remains unclear. AID mRNA expression in the peripheral blood of 102 chronically hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients (58 with and 44 without CV) and 26 healthy subjects was investigated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The features of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) protein and mRNA transcripts were explored in liver tissue biopsies and portal tracts isolated using laser capture microdissection. In chronically HCV-infected patients, AID mRNA expression was almost threefold higher in those with than in those without CV and sevenfold higher than in healthy subjects (median-fold: 6.68 versus 2.54, P = 0.03 and versus 0.95, P = 0.0003). AID transcript levels were significantly higher in polyclonal than in clonally restricted B cell preparations in either CV or non-CV patients (median-fold, 15.0 versus 2.70, P = 0.009 and 3.46 versus 1.58, P = 0.02, respectively). AID gene expression was found to be related negatively to age and virological parameters. AID protein was found in portal tracts containing inflammatory cells that, in several instances, expressed AID mRNA transcripts. Our data indicate that the aberrant expression of AID may reflect continuous B cell activation and sustained survival signals in HCV-related CV patients. PMID:26219420

  18. Effects of an induced adenosine deaminase deficiency on T-cell differentiation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, R.W.

    1985-10-15

    Inherited deficiency of the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) has been found in a significant proportion of patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disease and inherited defect generally characterized by a deficiency of both B and T cells. Two questions are central to understanding the pathophysiology of this disease: (1) at what stage or stages in lymphocyte development are the effects of the enzyme deficiency manifested; (2) what are the biochemical mechanisms responsible for the selective pathogenicity of the lymphoid system. We have examined the stage or stages of rat T-cell development in vivo which are affected by an induced adenosine deaminase deficiency using the ADA inhibitors, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA) and 2'-deoxycoformycin (DCF). In normal rats given daily administration of an ADA inhibitor, cortical thymocytes were markedly depleted; peripheral lymphocytes and pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) all were relatively unaffected. Since a deficiency of ADA affects lymphocyte development, the regeneration of cortical and medullary thymocytes and their precursors after sublethal irradiation was used as a model of lymphoid development. By Day 5 after irradiation the thymus was reduced to 0.10-0.5% of its normal size; whereas at Days 9 and 14 the thymus was 20-40% and 60-80% regenerated, respectively. When irradiated rats were given daily parenteral injections of the ADA inhibitor plus adenosine or deoxyadenosine, thymus regeneration at Days 9 and 14 was markedly inhibited, whereas the regeneration of thymocyte precursors was essentially unaffected. Thymus regeneration was at least 40-fold lower than in rats given adenosine or deoxyadenosine alone. Virtually identical results were obtained with both ADA inhibitors, EHNA and DCF.

  19. On the Ag(+)-cytosine interaction: the effect of microhydration probed by IR optical spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Berdakin, Matias; Steinmetz, Vincent; Maitre, Philippe; Pino, Gustavo A

    2015-10-21

    The gas-phase structures of cytosine-Ag(+) [CAg](+) and cytosine-Ag(+)-H2O [CAg-H2O](+) complexes have been studied by mass-selected infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy in the 900-1800 cm(-1) spectral region using the Free Electron Laser facility in Orsay (CLIO). The IRMPD experimental spectra have been compared with the calculated IR absorption spectra of the different low-lying isomers (computed at the DFT level using the B3LYP functional and the 6-311G++(d,p) basis set for C, H, N and O atoms and the Stuttgart effective core potential for Ag). For the [CAg](+) complex, only one isomer with cytosine in the keto-amino (KA) tautomeric form and Ag(+) interacting simultaneously with the C(2)[double bond, length as m-dash]O(7) group and N(3) of cytosine was observed. However, the mono-hydration of the complex in the gas phase leads to the stabilization of a two quasi-isoenergetic structure of the [CAg-H2O](+) complex, in which Ag(+) interacts with the O atom of the water molecule and with the N(3) or C(2)[double bond, length as m-dash]O(7) group of cytosine. The relative populations of the two isomers determined from the IRMPD kinetics plot are in good agreement with the calculated values. Comparison of these results with those of protonated cytosine [CH](+) and its mono-hydrated complex [CH-H2O](+) shows some interesting differences between H(+) and Ag(+). In particular, while a single water molecule catalyzes the isomerization reaction in the case of [CH-H2O](+), it is found that in the case of [CAg-H2O](+) the addition of water leads to the stabilization of two isomers separated by small energy barrier (0.05 eV). PMID:26068183

  20. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric; Suominen, Pirkko

    2010-12-07

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains. ##STR00001##

  1. Evolving insights on how cytosine methylation affects protein–DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Dantas Machado, Ana Carolina; Zhou, Tianyin; Rao, Satyanarayan; Goel, Pragya; Rastogi, Chaitanya; Lazarovici, Allan; Bussemaker, Harmen J.

    2015-01-01

    Many anecdotal observations exist of a regulatory effect of DNA methylation on gene expression. However, in general, the underlying mechanisms of this effect are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize what is currently known about how this important, but mysterious, epigenetic mark impacts cellular functions. Cytosine methylation can abrogate or enhance interactions with DNA-binding proteins, or it may have no effect, depending on the context. Despite being only a small chemical change, the addition of a methyl group to cytosine can affect base readout via hydrophobic contacts in the major groove and shape readout via electrostatic contacts in the minor groove. We discuss the recent discovery that CpG methylation increases DNase I cleavage at adjacent positions by an order of magnitude through altering the local 3D DNA shape and the possible implications of this structural insight for understanding the methylation sensitivity of transcription factors (TFs). Additionally, 5-methylcytosines change the stability of nucleosomes and, thus, affect the local chromatin structure and access of TFs to genomic DNA. Given these complexities, it seems unlikely that the influence of DNA methylation on protein–DNA binding can be captured in a small set of general rules. Hence, data-driven approaches may be essential to gain a better understanding of these mechanisms. PMID:25319759

  2. Ultrafast deactivation of an excited cytosine-guanine base pair in DNA.

    PubMed

    Groenhof, Gerrit; Schfer, Lars V; Boggio-Pasqua, Martial; Goette, Maik; Grubmller, Helmut; Robb, Michael A

    2007-05-30

    Multiconfigurational ab initio calculations and QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations of a photoexcited cytosine-guanine base pair in both gas phase and embedded in the DNA provide detailed structural and dynamical insights into the ultrafast radiationless deactivation mechanism. Photon absorption promotes transfer of a proton from the guanine to the cytosine. This proton transfer is followed by an efficient radiationless decay of the excited state via an extended conical intersection seam. The optimization of the conical intersection revealed that it has an unusual topology, in that there is only one degeneracy-lifting coordinate. This is the central mechanistic feature for the decay both in vacuo and in the DNA. Radiationless decay occurs along an extended hyperline nearly parallel to the proton-transfer coordinate, indicating the proton transfer itself is not directly responsible for the deactivation. The seam is displaced from the minimum energy proton-transfer path along a skeletal deformation of the bases. Decay can thus occur anywhere along the single proton-transfer coordinate, accounting for the remarkably short excited-state lifetime of the Watson-Crick base pair. In vacuo, decay occurs after a complete proton transfer, whereas in DNA, decay can also occur much earlier. The origin of this effect lies in the temporal electrostatic stabilization of dipole in the charge-transfer state in DNA. PMID:17488008

  3. Stability and isomerization of complexes formed by metal ions and cytosine isomers in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hongqi; Liu, Jingjing; Chan, Kwaichow

    2013-08-01

    We present a systematic study of the stability of the formation of complexes produced by four metal ions (M(+/2+)) and 14 cytosine isomers (Cn). This work predicts theoretically that predominant product complexes are associated with higher-energy C4M(+/2+) and C5M(+/2+) rather than the most stable C1M(+/2+). The prediction resolves successfully several experimental facts puzzling two research groups. Meanwhile, in-depth studies further reveal that direct isomerization of C1↔C4 is almost impossible, and also that the isomerization induced by either metalation or hydration, or by a combination of the two unfavorable. It is the single water molecule locating between the H1(-N1) and O2 of the cytosine that plays the dual roles of being a bridge and an activator that consequently improves the isomerization greatly. Moreover, the cooperation of divalent metal ion and such a monohydration actually leads to an energy-free C1←C4 isomerization in the gas phase. Henceforth, we are able to propose schemes inhibiting the free C1←C4 isomerization, based purely on extended hydration at the divalent metal ion. PMID:23708611

  4. The ADA*2 allele of the adenosine deaminase gene (20q13.11) and recurrent spontaneous abortions: an age-dependent association

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Daniela Prudente Teixeira; Spegiorin, Lígia Cosentino Junqueira Franco; de Mattos, Cinara Cássia Brandão; Oliani, Antonio Helio; Vaz-Oliani, Denise Cristina Mós; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adenosine deaminase acts on adenosine and deoxyadenosine metabolism and modulates the immune response. The adenosine deaminase G22A polymorphism (20q.11.33) influences the level of adenosine deaminase enzyme expression, which seems to play a key role in maintaining pregnancy. The adenosine deaminase 2 phenotype has been associated with a protective effect against recurrent spontaneous abortions in European Caucasian women. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the G22A polymorphism of the adenosine deaminase gene is associated with recurrent spontaneous abortions in Brazilian women. METHODS: A total of 311 women were recruited to form two groups: G1, with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortions (N = 129), and G2, without a history of abortions (N = 182). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood with a commercial kit and PCR-RFLP analysis was used to identify the G22A genetic polymorphism. Fisher's exact test and odds ratio values were used to compare the proportions of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between women with and without a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion (p<0.05). The differences between mean values for categorical data were calculated using unpaired t tests. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was assessed with a chi-square test. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were identified for the frequencies of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between the G1 and G2 groups when adjusted for maternal age. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the adenosine deaminase *2 allele is associated with a low risk for recurrent spontaneous abortions, but this association is dependent on older age. PMID:22086524

  5. N-terminal amino acid sequences of D-serine deaminases of wild-type and operator-constitutive strains of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Heincz, M C; McFall, E

    1975-01-01

    The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the D-serine deaminases from strains of Escherichia coli K-12 that harbor wild-type and high-level constitutive catabolite-insensitive operator-initiator regions are identical: Met-Ser-GluNH2-Ser-Gly-Arg-His-Cys. This result indicates that the operator-initiator region is probably distinct from the D-serine deaminase structural gene. Images PMID:1099073

  6. Activation of trout gill AMP deaminase by an endogenous proteinase--II. Modification of the properties of the enzyme during starvation, pollution and salinity changes.

    PubMed

    Raffin, J P

    1986-01-01

    The relative amount of modified AMP deaminase has been determined by taking advantage of the different effects of monovalent cations on the two enzymatic forms. When trout were subjected to different environmental perturbations (starvation, pollution of the water by a pesticide, transfer to sea water or reverse transfer to fresh water), modified AMP deaminase could be detected in the gill extracts. Depending on the nature of the stress and the period of experimentation, 8 to 100% of the enzyme had been modified by limited proteolysis. As a consequence of the much higher activity of the proteolyzed AMP deaminase form, a 2 to 12 times increase of the intracellular AMP deaminase activity could be expected. At the same time, limited proteolysis will modify the regulatory properties of the enzyme, since it can be estimated that 50 to 100% of the enzyme activity expressed in the cell will be an AMP deaminase form less sensitive to inhibition by inorganic phosphate and ionic strength, and to variations of the intracellular pH. Limited proteolysis will result in increased AMP deaminase activity under conditions of increased energy demand, where the concentration of inorganic phosphate is dramatically increased. The consequence should be stabilization of the adenylate energy charge. PMID:3533410

  7. Chemical genomics in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Many drugs have unknown, controversial or multiple mechanisms of action. Four recent 'chemical genomic' studies, using genome-scale collections of yeast gene deletions that were either arrayed or barcoded, have presented complementary approaches to identifying gene-drug and pathway-drug interactions. PMID:15345040

  8. Opportunistic Pathogenic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Uma

    Advances in medical research, made during the last few decades, have improved the prophylactic, diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for variety of infections/diseases. However, many of the prophylactic and therapeutic procedures have been seen in many instances to exact a price of host-vulnerability to an expanding group of opportunistic pathogens and yeasts are one of the important members in it. Fortunately amongst the vast majority of yeasts present in nature only few are considered to have the capability to cause infections when certain opportunities predisposes and these are termed as ‘opportunistic pathogenic yeasts.’ However, the term ‘pathogenic’ is quite tricky, as it depends of various factors of the host, the ‘bug’ and the environment to manifest the clinical infection. The borderline is expanding. In the present century with unprecedented increase in number of immune-compromised host in various disciplines of health care settings, where any yeast, which has the capability to grow at 37 ° C (normal body temperature of human), can be pathogenic and cause infection in particular situation

  9. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2013-02-12

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  10. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2014-09-23

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  11. Initial position of aminoacylation of individual Escherichia coli, yeast, and calf liver transfer RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chinault, A C; Tan, K H; Hassur, S M; Hecht, S M

    1977-02-22

    Transfer RNAs from Escherichia coli, yeast (Sacharomyces cerevisiae), and calf liver were subjected to controlled hydrolysis with venom exonuclease to remove 3'-terminal nucleotides, and then reconstructed successively with cytosine triphosphate (CTP) and 2'- or 3'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate in the presence of yeast CTP(ATP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferase. The modified tRNAs were purified by chromatography on DBAE-cellulose or acetylated DBAE-cellulose and then utilized in tRNA aminoacylation experiments in the presence of the homologous aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase activities. The E. coli, yeast, and calf liver aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases specific for alanine, glycine, histidine, lysine, serine, and threonine, as well as the E. coli and yeast prolyl-tRNA synthetases and the yeast glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase utilized only those homologous modified tRNAs terminating in 2'-deoxyadenosine (i.e., having an available 3'-OH group). This is interpreted as evidence that these aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases normally aminoacylate their unmodified cognate tRNAs on the 3'-OH group. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases from all three sources specific argining, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, and valine, as well as the E. coli and yeast enzymes specific for methionine and the E. coli glutamyl-tRNA synthetase, used as substrates exclusively those tRNAs terminating in 3'-deoxyadenosine. Certain aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, including the E. coli, yeast, and calf liver asparagine and tyrosine activating enzymes, the E. coli and yeast cysteinyl-tRNA synthetases, and the aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from yeast, utilized both isomeric tRNAs as substrates, although generally not at the same rate. While the calf liver aspartyl- and cysteinyl-tRNA synthetases utilized only the corresponding modified tRNA species terminating in 2'-deoxyadenosine, the use of a more concentrated enzyme preparation might well result in aminoacylation of the isomeric species. The one tRNA for which positional specificity does seem to have changed during evolution is tryptophan, whose E. coli aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase utilized predominantly the cognate tRNA terminating in 3'-deoxyadenosine, while the corresponding yeast and calf liver enzymes were found to utilize predominantly the isomeric tRNAs terminating in 2'-deoxyadenosine. The data presented indicate that while there is considerable diversity in the initial position of aminoacylation of individual tRNA isoacceptors derived from a single source, positional specificity has generally been conserved during the evolution from a prokaryotic to mammalian organism. PMID:319826

  12. Design and synthesis of a novel fluorescent benzo[g]imidazo[4,5-c]quinoline nucleoside for monitoring base-pair-induced protonation with cytosine: distinguishing cytosine via changes in the intensity and wavelength of fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Siraiwa, Shogo; Suzuki, Azusa; Katoh, Ryuzi; Saito, Yoshio

    2016-04-28

    A novel fluorescent benzo[g]imidazo[4,5-c]quinoline nucleoside (BIQ)A (1) comprising a 3-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine skeleton was developed and used to monitor (BIQ)A-C base-pair formation in oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) duplexes. The newly synthesized (BIQ)A exhibited distinct photophysical properties associated with its protonated/deprotonated forms (monomer: pKa 6.2) via dramatic changes in its absorption and fluorescence spectra. In ODN duplexes, the induced protonation of (BIQ)A occurred, even under alkalescent conditions when cytosine was the opposite base on the complementary strand; the resulting (BIQ)A-C base pairs were stable. By monitoring the protonation of (BIQ)A under neutral and alkalescent conditions, we could clearly discriminate cytosine through spectral changes in absorption and fluorescence. Similarly, we found that the demonstrated 3-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine (3z)A forms a stable base pair with cytosine via N(1) protonation in ODN duplexes under neutral and acidic conditions (pH < 7.0). At lower pH values, (3z)A-containing ODNs could clearly discriminate cytosine through melting temperature (Tm) measurements. Therefore, ODN probes containing indicator nucleosides, such as (BIQ)A and (3z)A, exhibit great potential as bioprobes for genetic analysis and structural studies of nucleic acids. PMID:27044927

  13. Associations between activation-induced cytidine deaminase/apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like cytidine deaminase expression, hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication and HBV-associated liver disease (Review)

    PubMed Central

    HE, XIUTING; LI, JIE; WU, JING; ZHANG, MANLI; GAO, PUJUN

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major risk factor in the development of chronic hepatitis (CH) and hepa-tocellular carcinoma (HCC). The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)/apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC) family of cytidine deaminases is significant in innate immunity, as it restricts numerous viruses, including HBV, through hypermutation-dependent and -independent mechanisms. It is important to induce covalently closed circular (ccc)DNA degradation by interferon-α without causing side effects in the infected host cell. Furthermore, organisms possess multiple mechanisms to regulate the expression of AID/APOBECs, control their enzymatic activity and restrict their access to DNA or RNA substrates. Therefore, the AID/APOBECs present promising targets for preventing and treating viral infections. In addition, gene polymorphisms of the AID/APOBEC family may alter host susceptibility to HBV acquisition and CH disease progression. Through G-to-A hypermutation, AID/APOBECs also edit HBV DNA and facilitate the mutation of HBV DNA, which may assist the virus to evolve and potentially escape from the immune responses. The AID/APOBEC family and their associated editing patterns may also exert oncogenic activity. Understanding the effects of cytidine deaminases in CH virus-induced hepatocarcinogenesis may aid with developing efficient prophylactic and therapeutic strategies against HCC. PMID:26398702

  14. Protein preparation and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a putative glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase from Streptococcus mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Guan-Jing; Li, Lan-Fen; Li, Dan; Liu, Cong; Wei, Shi-Cheng; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase homologue from S. mutans was expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.4 Å resolution. The SMU.636 protein from Streptococcus mutans is a putative glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase with 233 residues. The smu.636 gene was PCR-amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET-28a(+). The resultant His-tagged fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity in two steps. Crystals of the fusion protein were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.83, b = 82.13, c = 134.70 Å.

  15. A study of the excited states in cytosine and guanine stacks in the Hartree-Fock and exciton approximations.

    PubMed

    Grobelsek-Vracko, M; Zaider, M

    1994-04-01

    We report calculated exciton energies for the cytosine and guanine stacks obtained in the ab initio Hartree-Fock crystal orbital and exciton approximation, which includes the excited electron-hole interaction. This interaction plays an important role in the description of excited electron spectra in the low-energy region. The stacks were chosen as examples of polymers with helical symmetry. PMID:8146296

  16. Energetics of the lattice: packing elements in crystals of four-stranded intercalated cytosine-rich DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, I.; Cai, L.; Chen, L.; Rich, A.

    1997-01-01

    Condensation of single molecules from solution into crystals represents a transition between distinct energetic states. In solution, the atomic interactions within the molecule dominate. In the crystalline state, however, a set of additional interactions are formed between molecules in close contact in the lattice--these are the packing interactions. The crystal structures of d(CCCT), d(TAACCC), d(CCCAAT), and d(AACCCC) have in common a four-stranded intercalated cytosine segment, built by stacked layers of cytosine.cytosine+ (C.C+) base pairs coming from two parallel duplexes that intercalate into each other with opposite polarity. The intercalated cytosine segments in these structures are similar in their geometry, even though the sequences crystallized in different space groups. In the crystals, adenine and thymine residues of the sequences are used to build the three-dimensional crystal lattice by elaborately interacting with symmetry-related molecules. The packing elements observed provide novel insight about the copious ways in which nucleic acid molecules can interact with each other--for example, when folded in more complicated higher order structures, such as mRNA and chromatin.

  17. Role of adenine deaminase in purine salvage and nitrogen metabolism and characterization of the ade gene in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, P; Duckert, P; Saxild, H H

    1996-01-01

    The isolation of mutants defective in adenine metabolism in Bacillus subtilis has provided a tool that has made it possible to investigate the role of adenine deaminase in adenine metabolism in growing cells. Adenine deaminase is the only enzyme that can deaminate adenine compounds in B. subtilis, a reaction which is important for adenine utilization as a purine and also as a nitrogen source. The uptake of adenine is strictly coupled to its further metabolism. Salvaging of adenine is inhibited by the stringent response to amino acid starvation, while the deamination of adenine is not. The level of adenine deaminase was reduced when exogenous guanosine served as the purine source and when glutamine served as the nitrogen source. The enzyme level was essentially the same whether ammonia or purines served as the nitrogen source. Reduced levels were seen on poor carbon sources. The ade gene was cloned, and the nucleotide sequence and mRNA analyses revealed a single-gene operon encoding a 65-kDa protein. By transductional crosses, we have located the ade gene to 130 degrees on the chromosomal map. PMID:8550522

  18. Metal Ion Induced Pairing of Cytosine Bases: Formation of I-Motif Structures Identified by IR Ion Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Juehan; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    While the Watson-Crick structure of DNA is among the most well-known molecular structures of our time, alternative base-pairing motifs are also known to occur, often depending on base sequence, pH, or presence of cations. Pairing of two cytosine (C) bases induced by the sharing of a single proton (C-H^+-C) gives rise to the so-called i-motif, occurring particularly in the telomeric region of DNA, and particularly at low pH. At physiological pH, silver cations were recently suggested to form cytosine dimers in a C-Ag^+-C structure analogous to the hemiprotonated cytosine dimer, which was later confirmed by IR spectroscopy.^1 Here we investigate whether Ag^+ is unique in this behavior. Using infrared action spectroscopy employing the free-electron laser FELIX and a tandem mass spectrometer in combination with quantum-chemical computations, we investigate a series of C-M^+-C complexes, where M is Cu, Li and Na. The complexes are formed by electrospray ionization (ESI) from a solution of cytosine and the metal chloride salt in acetonitrile/water. The complexes of interest are mass-isolated in the cell of a FT ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, where they are irradiated with the tunable IR radiation from FELIX in the 600 - 1800 wn range. Spectra in the H-stretching range are obtained with a LaserVision OPO. Both experimental spectra as well as theoretical calculations indicate that while Cu behaves as Ag, the alkali metal ions induce a clearly different dimer structure, in which the two cytosine units are parallelly displaced. In addition to coordination to the ring nitrogen atom, the alkali metal ions coordinate to the carbonyl oxygen atoms of both cytosine bases, indicating that the alkali metal ion coordination favorably competes with hydrogen bonding between the two cytosine sub-units of the i-motif like structure. 1. Berdakin, Steinmetz, Maitre, Pino, J. Phys. Chem. A 2014, 118, 3804

  19. Cytosine chemoreceptor McpC in Pseudomonas putida F1 also detects nicotinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Hughes, Jonathan G.; Luu, Rita A.; Ditty, Jayna L.

    2014-01-01

    Soil bacteria are generally capable of growth on a wide range of organic chemicals, and pseudomonads are particularly adept at utilizing aromatic compounds. Pseudomonads are motile bacteria that are capable of sensing a wide range of chemicals, using both energy taxis and chemotaxis. Whilst the identification of specific chemicals detected by the ≥26 chemoreceptors encoded in Pseudomonas genomes is ongoing, the functions of only a limited number of Pseudomonas chemoreceptors have been revealed to date. We report here that McpC, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein in Pseudomonas putida F1 that was previously shown to function as a receptor for cytosine, was also responsible for the chemotactic response to the carboxylated pyridine nicotinic acid. PMID:25294107

  20. Cytosine chemoreceptor McpC in Pseudomonas putida F1 also detects nicotinic acid.

    PubMed

    Parales, Rebecca E; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Hughes, Jonathan G; Luu, Rita A; Ditty, Jayna L

    2014-12-01

    Soil bacteria are generally capable of growth on a wide range of organic chemicals, and pseudomonads are particularly adept at utilizing aromatic compounds. Pseudomonads are motile bacteria that are capable of sensing a wide range of chemicals, using both energy taxis and chemotaxis. Whilst the identification of specific chemicals detected by the ≥26 chemoreceptors encoded in Pseudomonas genomes is ongoing, the functions of only a limited number of Pseudomonas chemoreceptors have been revealed to date. We report here that McpC, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein in Pseudomonas putida F1 that was previously shown to function as a receptor for cytosine, was also responsible for the chemotactic response to the carboxylated pyridine nicotinic acid. PMID:25294107

  1. Absolute cross sections for vibrational excitations of cytosine by low energy electron impact

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, M.; Bazin, M.; Sanche, L.

    2013-01-01

    The absolute cross sections (CSs) for vibrational excitations of cytosine by electron impact between 0.5 and 18 eV were measured by electron-energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy of the molecule deposited at monolayer coverage on an inert Ar substrate. The vibrational energies compare to those that have been reported from IR spectroscopy of cytosine isolated in Ar matrix, IR and Raman spectra of poly-crystalline cytosine, and ab initio calculation. The CSs for the various H bending modes at 142 and 160 meV are both rising from their energy threshold up to 1.7 and 2.1 × 10−17 cm2 at about 4 eV, respectively, and then decrease moderately while maintaining some intensity at 18 eV. The latter trend is displayed as well for the CS assigned to the NH2 scissor along with bending of all H at 179 meV. This overall behavior in electron-molecule collision is attributed to direct processes such as the dipole, quadrupole, and polarization contributions, etc. of the interaction of the incident electron with a molecule. The CSs for the ring deformation at 61 meV, the ring deformation with N-H symmetric wag at 77 meV, and the ring deformations with symmetric bending of all H at 119 meV exhibit common enhancement maxima at 1.5, 3.5, and 5.5 eV followed by a broad hump at about 12 eV, which are superimposed on the contribution due to the direct processes. At 3.5 eV, the CS values for the 61-, 77-, and 119-meV modes reach 4.0, 3.0, and 4.5 × 10−17 cm2, respectively. The CS for the C-C and C-O stretches at 202 meV, which dominates in the intermediate EEL region, rises sharply until 1.5 eV, reaches its maximum of 5.7 × 10−17 cm2 at 3.5 eV and then decreases toward 18 eV. The present vibrational enhancements, correspond to the features found around 1.5 and 4.5 eV in electron transmission spectroscopy (ETS) and those lying within 1.5–2.1 eV, 5.2–6.8 eV, and 9.5–10.9 eV range in dissociative electron attachment (DEA) experiments with cytosine in gas phase. While the ETS features are ascribed to shape resonances associated with the electron occupation of the second and third antibonding π-orbitals of the molecule in its ground state, the correspondence with DEA features suggests the existence of common precursor anion states decaying with certain probabilities into the vibrationally excited ground state. PMID:22998289

  2. Semiclassical dynamics of electron attachment to guanine-cytosine base pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Tomohiro; Minoshima, Yusuke; Yokoi, Yuki; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Shiga, Motoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Electron attachment dynamics to the guanine-cytosine (G-C) base pair in the gas phase is studied using DFT and molecular dynamics. The potential energy surface of the G-C anion is constructed with the empirical-valence-bond method using force-field information obtained from long-range corrected DFT calculations. Ring-polymer molecular dynamics simulations predict that the initial dipole-bound anion readily converts into the valence-bound anion within 0.1 ps and proton-transfer occurs subsequently within 10 ps. The same process was found in classical simulations, but on a much slower time scale. This result suggests that nuclear quantum effects are important in understanding DNA damage by low-energy electrons.

  3. Paramutation of the r1 locus of maize is associated with increased cytosine methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, E L

    1998-01-01

    In paramutation two alleles of a gene interact so that one of the alleles is epigenetically silenced. The silenced state is then genetically transmissible for many generations. The large (220 kbp) multigenic complex R-r is paramutable: its level of expression is changed during paramutation. R-r was found to exhibit increases in its level of cytosine methylation (C-methylation) following paramutation. These C-methylation changes are localized to the 5' portions of the two genes in the complex that are most sensitive to paramutation. These methylation changes flank a small region called sigma that is thought to have been derived from a transposon named doppia. A mutant derivative of R-r that has a deletion of the sigma region fails to become methylated under conditions in which R-r is heavily methylated. This suggests that the presence of sigma sequences at the locus is required for the methylation changes that are observed following paramutation. PMID:9560410

  4. Ultrafast repair of irradiated DNA: Nonadiabatic ab initio simulations of the guanine-cytosine photocycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwick, Phineus R. L.; Doltsinis, Nikos L.

    2007-05-01

    Nonadiabatic first-principles molecular dynamics simulations have been performed of the photoexcited Watson-Crick guanine-cytosine (GC) DNA base pair in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. An excited state coupled proton-electron transfer (CPET) from G to C along the central hydrogen bond is observed upon excitation of the ??* state initially localized on G. In the resulting charge transfer state a conical intersection between the excited state and the ground state is easily accessible. Therefore radiationless decay is fast, of the order of 100fs, followed by a rapid CPET back reaction retrieving the initial Watson-Crick structure. A detailed analysis of the mechanism of nonradiative decay suggests a biexponential behavior in which out-of-plane motion plays a special role for the longer decay component.

  5. Assessing sensitivity in suspension to cytosine arabinoside: statistical analysis, associations with clinical outcome and experimental design.

    PubMed

    Minkin, S; Chow, A

    As part of the treatment protocol in 40 leukaemia patients using cytosine arabinoside for remission induction therapy, the sensitivity of each patient's blast cell progenitors to the drug was determined by the liquid suspension assay. To summarize the dose-response curves obtained in this assay, we considered a model that assumes the existence of a resistant subpopulation of progenitor cells. We also considered the median effect model popular in pharmacokinetics. Both models were similar in their ability to describe the data. Parameter values that characterize a low baseline number of progenitor cells exhibiting high sensitivity both at low and high dosages were found to indicate good prognosis. We also identified a simple, economical, robust and efficient design for conducting future assays. PMID:7569502

  6. Water Transport in Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Farzana; Prista, Catarina; Madeira, Ana; Moura, Teresa; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C; Soveral, Graça

    2016-01-01

    Water moves across membranes through the lipid bilayer and through aquaporins, in this case in a regulated manner. Aquaporins belong to the MIP superfamily and two subfamilies are represented in yeasts: orthodox aquaporins considered to be specific water channels and aquaglyceroporins (heterodox aquaporins). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, four aquaporin isoforms were identified, two of which are genetically close to orthodox aquaporins (ScAqy1 and ScAqy2) and the other two are more closely related to the aquaglyceroporins (ScFps1 and ScAqy3). Advances in the establishment of water channels structure are reviewed in this chapter in relation with the mechanisms of selectivity, conductance and gating. Aquaporins are important for key aspects of yeast physiology. They have been shown to be involved in sporulation, rapid freeze-thaw tolerance, osmo-sensitivity, and modulation of cell surface properties and colony morphology, although the underlying exact mechanisms are still unknown. PMID:26721272

  7. Extracellular Polysaccharides Produced by Yeasts and Yeast-Like Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; de Maeseneire, Sofie L.; Vandamme, Erick J.

    Several yeasts and yeast-like fungi are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. Most of these contain D-mannose, either alone or in combination with other sugars or phosphate. A large chemical and structural variability is found between yeast species and even among different strains. The types of polymers that are synthesized can be chemically characterized as mannans, glucans, phosphoman-nans, galactomannans, glucomannans and glucuronoxylomannans. Despite these differences, almost all of the yeast exopolysaccharides display some sort of biological activity. Some of them have already applications in chemistry, pharmacy, cosmetics or as probiotic. Furthermore, some yeast exopolysaccharides, such as pullulan, exhibit specific physico-chemical and rheological properties, making them useful in a wide range of technical applications. A survey is given here of the production, the characteristics and the application potential of currently well studied yeast extracellular polysaccharides.

  8. Nitrosative Cytosine Deamination. An Exploration of the Chemistry Emanating from Deamination with Pyrimidine Ring-Opening

    PubMed Central

    Rayat, Sundeep; Qian, Ming; Glaser, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    A discussion of nitrosative deamination of cytosine 1 is presented that argues for the formation of 6 by diazotization of 1 to cytosinediazonium ion 2 and its electrostatic complex 3, dediazoniation to 4 ↔ 5, and amide-bond cleavage to 6. The reaction channels available to 6 include hydrolytic deglycation to 3-isocyanatoacrylonitrile 7, water addition to carbamic acid 9 with the possibility for re-closure to uracil 13, and water addition to carbamic acid 9 and decarboxylation to 3-aminoacrylonitrile 10. With a view to the instability of the carbamic acid 9, the carbamate models ethyl (Z)-2-cyanovinyl-carbamate 14 and (Z)-2-cyano-1-t-butylvinylcarbamate 20 were studied. Acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of 14 leads to 2-amino-carbonylphenylcarbamate 15 and its cyclization yields the benzo-fused uracil quinazoline-2,4-dione 16. In contrast to the aromatic system 14, acid-catalyzed cyclization cannot compete with oligomerization in the case of 20 and 5-tert-butyluracil 22 is accessible only with base-catalysis. It is shown that 23, the parent of 10, also easily polymerizes. The experimental results provide a rational as to why 9, 10 and 12 would have escaped detection in in vitro studies: they would have oligomerized. In contrast to the in vitro experiments, the oligomerizations of 9, 10 or 12 clearly are not relevant in vivo because of low monomer concentrations. With the exclusion of recyclization and of oligomerization in vivo, attention thus needs to focus on (Z)-3-aminoacrylonitrile 10 as the most likely deamination product of cytosine aside from uracil. PMID:16097794

  9. Mapping global changes in nuclear cytosine base modifications in the early mouse embryo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y; Seah, Michelle K Y; O'Neill, C

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming epigenetic modifications to cytosine is required for normal embryo development. We used improved immunolocalization techniques to simultaneously map global changes in the levels of 5′-methylcytosine (5meC) and 5′-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in each cell of the embryo from fertilization through the first rounds of cellular differentiation. The male and female pronuclei of the zygote showed similar staining levels, and these remained elevated over the next three cell cycles. The inner cells of the morula showed a progressive reduction in global levels of both 5meC and 5hmC and further losses occurred in the pluripotent inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst. This was accompanied by undetectable levels of DNA methyltransferase of each class in the nuclei of the ICM, while DNA methyltransferase 3B was elevated in the hypermethylated nuclei of the trophectoderm (TE). Segregation of the ICM into hypoblast and epiblast was accompanied by increased levels in the hypoblast compared with the epiblast. Blastocyst outgrowth in vitro is a model for implantation and showed that a demethylated state persisted in the epiblast while the hypoblast had higher levels of both 5meC and 5hmC staining. The high levels of 5meC and 5hmC evident in the TE persisted in trophoblast and trophoblast giant cells after attachment of the blastocyst to the substratum in vitro. This study shows that global cytosine hypomethylation and hypohydroxymethylation accompanied the formation of the pluripotent ICM and this persisted into the epiblast after blastocyst outgrowth, and each differentiated lineage formed in the early embryo showed higher global levels of 5meC and 5hmC. PMID:26660107

  10. Mapping global changes in nuclear cytosine base modifications in the early mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Seah, Michelle K Y; O'Neill, C

    2016-02-01

    Reprogramming epigenetic modifications to cytosine is required for normal embryo development. We used improved immunolocalization techniques to simultaneously map global changes in the levels of 5'-methylcytosine (5meC) and 5'-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in each cell of the embryo from fertilization through the first rounds of cellular differentiation. The male and female pronuclei of the zygote showed similar staining levels, and these remained elevated over the next three cell cycles. The inner cells of the morula showed a progressive reduction in global levels of both 5meC and 5hmC and further losses occurred in the pluripotent inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst. This was accompanied by undetectable levels of DNA methyltransferase of each class in the nuclei of the ICM, while DNA methyltransferase 3B was elevated in the hypermethylated nuclei of the trophectoderm (TE). Segregation of the ICM into hypoblast and epiblast was accompanied by increased levels in the hypoblast compared with the epiblast. Blastocyst outgrowth in vitro is a model for implantation and showed that a demethylated state persisted in the epiblast while the hypoblast had higher levels of both 5meC and 5hmC staining. The high levels of 5meC and 5hmC evident in the TE persisted in trophoblast and trophoblast giant cells after attachment of the blastocyst to the substratum in vitro. This study shows that global cytosine hypomethylation and hypohydroxymethylation accompanied the formation of the pluripotent ICM and this persisted into the epiblast after blastocyst outgrowth, and each differentiated lineage formed in the early embryo showed higher global levels of 5meC and 5hmC. PMID:26660107

  11. Antisense targeting of CXXC finger protein 1 inhibits genomic cytosine methylation and primitive hematopoiesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Young, Suzanne R L; Mumaw, Christen; Marrs, James A; Skalnik, David G

    2006-12-01

    CXXC finger protein 1 (CFP1) binds to unmethylated CpG dinucleotides and is a component of the Set1 histone methyltransferase complex. Mice lacking CFP1 suffer a peri-implantation lethal phenotype, and CFP1-deficient embryonic stem cells are viable but unable to differentiate and exhibit a 60-80% decrease in genomic cytosine methylation. A zebrafish homolog of CFP1 has been identified, is approximately 70% similar to murine CFP1, and is widely expressed during development. Zebrafish embryos treated with a zCFP1 antisense morpholino oligonucleotide had little or no circulating red blood cells and exhibited abnormal yolk sac morphology at 48 h post-fertilization. Many of the antisense-treated zebrafish also exhibited cardiac edema, and 14% were dead at 24 h post-fertilization. Morphant zebrafish also exhibited elevated levels of apoptosis, particularly in the intermediate cell mass, the site of primitive erythropoiesis, as well as aberrations in vascular development. Genomic DNA isolated from morphant embryos exhibited a 60% reduction of global genomic cytosine methylation. A similar phenotype was observed with an independent zCFP1 antisense morpholino oligonucleotide, but not following injection of an unrelated control oligonucleotide. The morphant phenotype was rescued when mRNA encoding murine CFP1 was co-injected with the antisense oligonucleotide. Genomic data base analysis reveals the presence of a second version of zebrafish CFP1 (zCFP1b). However, the morphant phenotype observed following specific depletion of zCFP1 indicates that these related genes have nonredundant functions controlling normal zebrafish hematopoiesis and epigenetic regulation. These findings establish the importance of CFP1 during postgastrulation development. PMID:17023431

  12. Yeast Colony Embedding Method

    PubMed Central

    Piccirillo, Sarah; Honigberg, Saul M.

    2011-01-01

    Patterning of different cell types in embryos is a key mechanism in metazoan development. Communities of microorganisms, such as colonies and biofilms also display patterns of cell types. For example, in the yeast S. cerevisiae, sporulated cells and pseudohyphal cells are not uniformly distributed in colonies. The functional importance of patterning and the molecular mechanisms that underlie these patterns are still poorly understood. One challenge with respect to investigating patterns of cell types in fungal colonies is that unlike metazoan tissue, cells in colonies are relatively weakly attached to one another. In particular, fungal colonies do not contain the same extensive level of extracellular matrix found in most tissues . Here we report on a method for embedding and sectioning yeast colonies that reveals the interior patterns of cell types in these colonies. The method can be used to prepare thick sections (0.5 μ) useful for light microscopy and thin sections (0.1 μ) suitable for transmission electron microscopy. Asci and pseudohyphal cells can easily be distinguished from ovoid yeast cells by light microscopy , while the interior structure of these cells can be visualized by EM. The method is based on surrounding colonies with agar, infiltrating them with Spurr's medium, and then sectioning. Colonies with a diameter in the range of 1-2 mm are suitable for this protocol. In addition to visualizing the interior of colonies, the method allows visualization of the region of the colony that invades the underlying agar. PMID:21445054

  13. Models for yeast prions.

    PubMed

    Morgan, B J T; Ridout, M S; Ruddock, L W

    2003-09-01

    The cytoplasmic heritable determinant [PSI+] of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits prion-like properties. The properties of yeast prions are studied in the hope that this will enhance the understanding of mammalian prions, which cause mad-cow, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, and related neurodegenerative diseases. When host cells divide, the yeast prions distribute themselves without loss over the daughter cells. Experimental data provide information on how the proportion of cells with prions decreases over time when priori replication is inhibited. One feature of scientific interest is the unknown mean number, n0, of prions assumed to be present in the cells at the start of the experiment. We develop several stochastic models and by fitting them to the data, we obtain substantially larger estimates of n0 compared with a previous analysis. An interesting feature of a model with constant cell generation times is that the predicted proportion of cells with prions varies over time as a sequence of linked hyperbolic curves. Avenues for future research are outlined, which relax simplifying assumptions made in the models. We make several recommendations for the design of future experiments. PMID:14601757

  14. The Adenosine Deaminase Gene Polymorphism Is Associated with Chronic Heart Failure Risk in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    He, Hai-Rong; Li, Yuan-Jie; He, Gong-Hao; Wang, Ya-Jun; Zhai, Ya-Jing; Xie, Jiao; Zhang, Wei-Peng; Dong, Ya-Lin; Lu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine (Ado) is an important cardioprotective agent. Since endogenous Ado levels are affected by the enzyme Ado deaminase (ADA), polymorphisms within the ADA gene may exert some effect on chronic heart failure (CHF). This study applied a case-control investigation to 300 northern Chinese Han CHF patients and 400 ethnicity-matched healthy controls in which nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ADA were genotyped and association analyses were performed. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to assess the association. Overall, rs452159 polymorphism in ADA gene was significantly associated with susceptibility to CHF under the dominant model (p = 0.013, OR = 1.537, 95% CI = 1.10–2.16), after adjustment for age, sex, and traditional cardiovascular risk factors. No difference in genotype distribution and allele frequency for the rs452159 according to the functional New York Heart Association class was found. Furthermore, the values of left ventricular ejection fraction, left-ventricle end-diastolic diameter or left-ventricle end-systolic diameter did not differ significantly among the different rs452159 genotype CHF patients. Although further studies with larger cohorts and other ethnicities are required to validate the conclusions, the findings of this study potentially provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of CHF. PMID:25170811

  15. Adaptive evolution of threonine deaminase in plant defense against insect herbivores

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales-Vigil, Eliana; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2011-11-07

    Gene duplication is a major source of plant chemical diversity that mediates plant-herbivore interactions. There is little direct evidence, however, that novel chemical traits arising from gene duplication reduce herbivory. Higher plants use threonine deaminase (TD) to catalyze the dehydration of threonine (Thr) to {alpha}-ketobutyrate and ammonia as the committed step in the biosynthesis of isoleucine (Ile). Cultivated tomato and related Solanum species contain a duplicated TD paralog (TD2) that is coexpressed with a suite of genes involved in herbivore resistance. Analysis of TD2-deficient tomato lines showed that TD2 has a defensive function related to Thr catabolism in the gut of lepidopteran herbivores. During herbivory, the regulatory domain of TD2 is removed by proteolysis to generate a truncated protein (pTD2) that efficiently degrades Thr without being inhibited by Ile. We show that this proteolytic activation step occurs in the gut of lepidopteran but not coleopteran herbivores, and is catalyzed by a chymotrypsin-like protease of insect origin. Analysis of purified recombinant enzymes showed that TD2 is remarkably more resistant to proteolysis and high temperature than the ancestral TD1 isoform. The crystal structure of pTD2 provided evidence that electrostatic interactions constitute a stabilizing feature associated with adaptation of TD2 to the extreme environment of the lepidopteran gut. These findings demonstrate a role for gene duplication in the evolution of a plant defense that targets and co-opts herbivore digestive physiology.

  16. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY

    PubMed Central

    BRAVO-TOBAR, Iván Darío; NELLO-PÉREZ, Carlota; FERNÁNDEZ, Alí; MOGOLLÓN, Nora; PÉREZ, Mary Carmen; VERDE, Juan; CONCEPCIÓN, Juan Luis; RODRIGUEZ-BONFANTE, Claudina; BONFANTE-CABARCAS, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA) and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP) in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35), II (n = 29), and III (n = 18). A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease. PMID:26603224

  17. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Tobar, Iván Darío; Nello-Pérez, Carlota; Fernández, Alí; Mogollón, Nora; Pérez, Mary Carmen; Verde, Juan; Concepción, Juan Luis; Rodriguez-Bonfante, Claudina; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA) and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP) in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35), II (n = 29), and III (n = 18). A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease. PMID:26603224

  18. A source of the single stranded DNA substrate for activation-induced deaminase during somatic hypermutation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohua; Fan, Manxia; Kalis, Susan; Wei, Lirong; Scharff, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    During somatic hypermutation (SHM), activation-induced deaminase (AID) mutates deoxycytidine on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) generated by the transcription machinery, but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. Here we report a higher abundance of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) at the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (Igh-V) region compared to the constant region and partially transcribed Igh RNAs, suggesting a slower Pol II progression at Igh-V that could result in some early/premature transcription termination after prolonged pausing/stalling of Pol II. Knocking down RNA exosome complexes, which could decrease premature transcription termination, leads to decreased SHM. Knocking down Spt5, which can augment premature transcription termination, leads to increases in both SHM and the abundance of ssDNA substrates. Collectively, our data support the model that, following the reduction of Pol II progression (pausing or stalling) at the Igh-V, additional steps such as premature transcription termination are involved in providing ssDNA substrates for AID during SHM. PMID:24923561

  19. Modulatory effect of iron chelators on adenosine deaminase activity and gene expression in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Primon-Barros, Muriel; Rigo, Graziela Vargas; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; dos Santos, Odelta; Smiderle, Lisiane; Almeida, Silvana; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan that parasitises the urogenital human tract and causes trichomoniasis. During the infection, the acquisition of nutrients, such as iron and purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, is essential for the survival of the parasite. The enzymes for purinergic signalling, including adenosine deaminase (ADA), which degrades adenosine to inosine, have been characterised in T. vaginalis. In the evaluation of the ADA profile in different T. vaginalis isolates treated with different iron sources or with limited iron availability, a decrease in activity and an increase in ADA gene expression after iron limitation by 2,2-bipyridyl and ferrozine chelators were observed. This supported the hypothesis that iron can modulate the activity of the enzymes involved in purinergic signalling. Under bovine serum limitation conditions, no significant differences were observed. The results obtained in this study allow for the assessment of important aspects of ADA and contribute to a better understanding of the purinergic system in T. vaginalis and the role of iron in establishing infection and parasite survival. PMID:26517498

  20. PORPHOBILINOGEN DEAMINASE Deficiency Alters Vegetative and Reproductive Development and Causes Lesions in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, Víctor; Hricová, Andrea; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis rugosa1 (rug1) mutant has irregularly shaped leaves and reduced growth. In the absence of pathogens, leaves of rug1 plants have spontaneous lesions reminiscent of those seen in lesion-mimic mutants; rug1 plants also express cytological and molecular markers associated with defence against pathogens. These rug1 phenotypes are made stronger by dark/light transitions. The rug1 mutant also has delayed flowering time, upregulation of the floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and downregulation of the flowering promoters FT and SOC1/AGL20. Vernalization suppresses the late flowering phenotype of rug1 by repressing FLC. Microarray analysis revealed that 280 nuclear genes are differentially expressed between rug1 and wild type; almost a quarter of these genes are involved in plant defence. In rug1, the auxin response is also affected and several auxin-responsive genes are downregulated. We identified the RUG1 gene by map-based cloning and found that it encodes porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD), also known as hydroxymethylbilane synthase, an enzyme of the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis pathway, which produces chlorophyll, heme, siroheme and phytochromobilin in plants. PBGD activity is reduced in rug1 plants, which accumulate porphobilinogen. Our results indicate that Arabidopsis PBGD deficiency impairs the porphyrin pathway and triggers constitutive activation of plant defence mechanisms leading to leaf lesions and affecting vegetative and reproductive development. PMID:23308205

  1. Restricting activation-induced cytidine deaminase tumorigenic activity in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Casellas, Rafael; Yamane, Arito; Kovalchuk, Alexander L; Potter, Michael

    2009-03-01

    DNA breaks play an essential role in germinal centre B cells as intermediates to immunoglobulin class switching, a recombination process initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Immunoglobulin gene hypermutation is likewise catalysed by AID but is believed to occur via single-strand DNA breaks. When improperly repaired, AID-mediated lesions can promote chromosomal translocations (CTs) that juxtapose the immunoglobulin loci to heterologous genomic sites, including oncogenes. Two of the most studied translocations are the t(8;14) and T(12;15), which deregulate cMyc in human Burkitt's lymphomas and mouse plasmacytomas, respectively. While a complete understanding of the aetiology of such translocations is lacking, recent studies using diverse mouse models have shed light on two important issues: (1) the extent to which non-specific or AID-mediated DNA lesions promote CTs, and (2) the safeguard mechanisms that B cells employ to prevent AID tumorigenic activity. Here we review these advances and discuss the usage of pristane-induced mouse plasmacytomas as a tool to investigate the origin of Igh-cMyc translocations and B-cell tumorigenesis. PMID:19302140

  2. Adenosine deaminase is a useful biomarker to diagnose pleural tuberculosis in low to medium prevalence settings.

    PubMed

    Michot, Jean-Marie; Madec, Yoann; Bulifon, Sophie; Thorette-Tcherniak, Cécile; Fortineau, Nicolas; Noël, Nicolas; Lambotte, Olivier; El Jahiri, Younes; Delacour, Hervé; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Blanc, François-Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity measurement in pleural fluid is a relevant test to diagnose pleural tuberculosis (pTB) in high tuberculosis prevalence settings. We investigated the diagnostic utility of pleural ADA using a retrospective analysis of patients admitted with newly diagnosed pleural effusion without identified etiology between 2001 and 2008 in Paris suburb, a low to medium tuberculosis prevalence area. 104 adults (mean age 55 years; 34 with pTB, 70 with other diagnoses) were analyzed. Median follow-up was 15.6 months. Mean [interquartile range] pleural ADA was 119 U/L [IQR: 83-143] in pTB and 24 U/L [IQR: 15-31] in non-tuberculous effusions (P<0.001). With an optimal pleural ADA cut-off value of 41.5 U/L for pTB diagnosis, sensitivity and specificity were 97.1% and 92.9%, while positive and negative predictive values were 86.8% and 98.5%, respectively. We conclude that pleural ADA activity could be integrated in the diagnostic procedures of pTB in low to medium tuberculosis prevalence settings. PMID:26707067

  3. Modulatory effect of iron chelators on adenosine deaminase activity and gene expression in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Primon-Barros, Muriel; Rigo, Graziela Vargas; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Santos, Odelta dos; Smiderle, Lisiane; Almeida, Silvana; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-11-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan that parasitises the urogenital human tract and causes trichomoniasis. During the infection, the acquisition of nutrients, such as iron and purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, is essential for the survival of the parasite. The enzymes for purinergic signalling, including adenosine deaminase (ADA), which degrades adenosine to inosine, have been characterised in T. vaginalis. In the evaluation of the ADA profile in different T. vaginalis isolates treated with different iron sources or with limited iron availability, a decrease in activity and an increase in ADA gene expression after iron limitation by 2,2-bipyridyl and ferrozine chelators were observed. This supported the hypothesis that iron can modulate the activity of the enzymes involved in purinergic signalling. Under bovine serum limitation conditions, no significant differences were observed. The results obtained in this study allow for the assessment of important aspects of ADA and contribute to a better understanding of the purinergic system in T. vaginalis and the role of iron in establishing infection and parasite survival. PMID:26517498

  4. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ∼5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer. PMID:26681117

  5. Glucose metabolism during fasting is altered in experimental porphobilinogen deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Collantes, María; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Benito, Marina; Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Delgado, Mercedes; Vinaixa, María; Sampedro, Ana; Enríquez de Salamanca, Rafael; Prieto, Elena; Pozo, Miguel A; Peñuelas, Iván; Corrales, Fernando J; Barajas, Miguel; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) haploinsufficiency (acute intermittent porphyria, AIP) is characterized by neurovisceral attacks when hepatic heme synthesis is activated by endogenous or environmental factors including fasting. While the molecular mechanisms underlying the nutritional regulation of hepatic heme synthesis have been described, glucose homeostasis during fasting is poorly understood in porphyria. Our study aimed to analyse glucose homeostasis and hepatic carbohydrate metabolism during fasting in PBGD-deficient mice. To determine the contribution of hepatic PBGD deficiency to carbohydrate metabolism, AIP mice injected with a PBGD-liver gene delivery vector were included. After a 14 h fasting period, serum and liver metabolomics analyses showed that wild-type mice stimulated hepatic glycogen degradation to maintain glucose homeostasis while AIP livers activated gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis due to their inability to use stored glycogen. The serum of fasted AIP mice showed increased concentrations of insulin and reduced glucagon levels. Specific over-expression of the PBGD protein in the liver tended to normalize circulating insulin and glucagon levels, stimulated hepatic glycogen catabolism and blocked ketone body production. Reduced glucose uptake was observed in the primary somatosensorial brain cortex of fasted AIP mice, which could be reversed by PBGD-liver gene delivery. In conclusion, AIP mice showed a different response to fasting as measured by altered carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and modified glucose consumption in the brain cortex. Glucose homeostasis in fasted AIP mice was efficiently normalized after restoration of PBGD gene expression in the liver. PMID:26908609

  6. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  7. Heme-Biosynthetic Porphobilinogen Deaminase Protects Aspergillus nidulans from Nitrosative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shengmin; Narukami, Toshiaki; Nameki, Misuzu; Ozawa, Tomoko; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms have developed mechanisms to combat reactive nitrogen species (RNS); however, only a few of the fungal genes involved have been characterized. Here we screened RNS-resistant Aspergillus nidulans strains from fungal transformants obtained by introducing a genomic DNA library constructed in a multicopy vector. We found that the AN0121.3 gene (hemC) encodes a protein similar to the heme biosynthesis enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) and facilitates RNS-tolerant fungal growth. The overproduction of PBG-D in A. nidulans promoted RNS tolerance, whereas PBG-D repression caused growth that was hypersensitive to RNS. PBG-D levels were comparable to those of cellular protoheme synthesis as well as flavohemoglobin (FHb; encoded by fhbA and fhbB) and nitrite reductase (NiR; encoded by niiA) activities. Both FHb and NiR are hemoproteins that consume nitric oxide and nitrite, respectively, and we found that they are required for maximal growth in the presence of RNS. The transcription of hemC was upregulated by RNS. These results demonstrated that PBG-D is a novel NO-tolerant protein that modulates the reduction of environmental NO and nitrite levels by FHb and NiR. PMID:22038601

  8. Site-directed mutagenesis and bacterial expression of human adenosine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Danton, M.J.; Leonardo, J.; Riley, L.; Coleman, M.S.

    1987-05-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a purine salvage pathway enzyme, the absence of which is associated with severe combined immunodeficiency disease. Time-resolved fluorescence studies, in the presence of enzyme inhibitors, indicate that at least one of the four tryptophans present in the protein molecule is close to (or in) the active site. To investigate the role of these tryptophan residues in enzyme function, they have cloned ADA cDNA into a vector in which expression is directed by the lambda P/sub R/ promoter. E. coli cells deficient in ADA were transformed with the vector construct and were shown to synthesize catalytically active human ADA. Site directed mutagenesis, coupled with a uracil selection technique for generating mutants with high efficiency, was used to construct mutant alleles of the cloned ADA. Eight mutants were obtained with base substitutions converting each of the four tryptophans to arginine or glycine. The correlation between these specific mutations and the functional expression of ADA has been examined in the ADA deficient bacterial host.

  9. MicroRNA-155 suppresses activation-induced cytidine deaminase-mediated Myc-Igh translocation.

    PubMed

    Dorsett, Yair; McBride, Kevin M; Jankovic, Mila; Gazumyan, Anna; Thai, To-Ha; Robbiani, Davide F; Di Virgilio, Michela; Reina San-Martin, Bernardo; Heidkamp, Gordon; Schwickert, Tanja A; Eisenreich, Thomas; Rajewsky, Klaus; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2008-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate vast networks of genes that share miRNA target sequences. To examine the physiologic effects of an individual miRNA-mRNA interaction in vivo, we generated mice that carry a mutation in the putative microRNA-155 (miR-155) binding site in the 3'-untranslated region of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), designated Aicda(155) mice. AID is required for immunoglobulin gene diversification in B lymphocytes, but it also promotes chromosomal translocations. Aicda(155) caused an increase in steady-state Aicda mRNA and protein amounts by increasing the half-life of the mRNA, resulting in a high degree of Myc-Igh translocations. A similar but more pronounced translocation phenotype was also found in miR-155-deficient mice. Our experiments indicate that miR-155 can act as a tumor suppressor by reducing potentially oncogenic translocations generated by AID. PMID:18455451

  10. Activation-induced Cytidine Deaminase in B Cell Immunity and Cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is an enzyme that is predominantly expressed in germinal center B cells and plays a pivotal role in immunoglobulin class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation for antibody (Ab) maturation. These two genetic processes endow Abs with protective functions against a multitude of antigens (pathogens) during humoral immune responses. In B cells, AID expression is regulated at the level of either transcriptional activation on AID gene loci or post-transcriptional suppression of AID mRNA. Furthermore, AID stabilization and targeting are determined by post-translational modifications and interactions with other cellular/nuclear factors. On the other hand, aberrant expression of AID causes B cell leukemias and lymphomas, including Burkitt's lymphoma caused by c-myc/IgH translocation. AID is also ectopically expressed in T cells and non-immune cells, and triggers point mutations in relevant DNA loci, resulting in tumorigenesis. Here, I review the recent literatures on the function of AID, regulation of AID expression, stability and targeting in B cells, and AID-related tumor formation. PMID:23396757

  11. Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David N.; Li, Yonghua; Kumar, Rajnish; Burke, Sean A.; Dawson, Rodney; Hioe, Catarina E.; Borkowsky, William; Rom, William N.; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    While exploring the effects of aerosol IFN-γ treatment in HIV-1/tuberculosis co-infected patients, we observed A to G mutations in HIV-1 envelope sequences derived from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of aerosol IFN-γ-treated patients and induction of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) in the BAL cells. IFN-γ induced ADAR1 expression in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) but not T cells. ADAR1 siRNA knockdown induced HIV-1 expression in BAL cells of four HIV-1 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. Similar results were obtained in MDM that were HIV-1 infected in vitro. Over-expression of ADAR1 in transformed macrophages inhibited HIV-1 viral replication but not viral transcription measured by nuclear run-on, suggesting that ADAR1 acts post-transcriptionally. The A to G hyper-mutation pattern observed in ADAR1 over-expressing cells in vitro was similar to that found in the lungs of HIV-1 infected patients treated with aerosol IFN-γ suggesting the model accurately represented alveolar macrophages. Together, these results indicate that ADAR1 restricts HIV-1 replication post-transcriptionally in macrophages harboring HIV-1 provirus. ADAR1 may therefore contribute to viral latency in macrophages. PMID:25272020

  12. Double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase 1 (ADAR1) promotes EIAV replication and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Na, Lei; Fu, Li-Hua; Yang, Fei; Zhu, Chun-Hui; Tang, Li; Li, Qiang; Wang, Jia-Yi; Li, Zhan; Wang, Xue-Feng; Li, Cheng-Yao; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) have been reported to be functional on various viruses. ADAR1 may exhibit antiviral or proviral activity depending on the type of virus. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is the most well-studied lentivirus with respect to its interaction with ADAR1, and variable results have been reported. In this study, we demonstrated that equine ADAR1 (eADAR1) was a positive regulator of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), another lentivirus of the Retroviridae family. First, eADAR1 significantly promoted EIAV replication, and the enhancement of viral protein expression was associated with the long terminal repeat (LTR) and Rev response element (RRE) regions. Second, the RNA binding domain 1 of eADAR1 was essential only for enhancing LTR-mediated gene expression. Third, in contrast with APOBEC proteins, which have been shown to reduce lentiviral infectivity, eADAR1 increased the EIAV infectivity. This study indicated that eADAR1 was proviral rather than antiviral for EIAV. PMID:25589239

  13. Myoadenylate deaminase deficiency does not affect muscle anaplerosis during exhaustive exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Parise, Gianni; Gibala, Martin J; Graham, Terry E; Rush, James W E

    2001-01-01

    Myoadenylate deaminase (AMPD) deficiency is present in 1–2 % of the population. In theory, this deficiency may alter exercise energy metabolism by impairing the purine nucleotide cycle (PNC) and reducing tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle anaplerosis. The role of the PNC in TCA cycle anaplerosis is still a debated issue in physiology. Using patients with the AMPD1 mutation will allow a human ‘knockout’ approach to answering this question. Muscle AMPD activity and genotype (whole blood AMPD1 analysis) was used to classify participants into three groups: n = 3 with absence of AMPD activity and -/- AMPD1 genotype (homozygous); n = 4 with less than 50 % normal AMPD activity and +/- genotype (heterozygous) and n = 12 with normal AMPD activity and +/+ genotype (control). Biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis muscle before and after incremental cycle ergometry exercise to exhaustion. The muscle biopsies were analysed for AMPD activity, purine nucleotides/nucleosides and bases, creatine, phosphocreatine, amino acids, and the TCA cycle intermediates malate, citrate and fumarate. Time to exhaustion on the cycle ergometer was not different between groups. Muscle adenosine monophosphate increased significantly with exercise for homozygous subjects as compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). Inosine monophosphate increased significantly after exercise for control (P < 0.05) but not for the homozygous subjects. There were no other between-group differences for any other measured variables. In summary, complete and partial muscle AMPD deficiency did not affect TCA cycle anaplerosis, phosphocreatine hydrolysis, energy charge or exercise performance. PMID:11410643

  14. PMMA/polysaccharides nanofilm loaded with adenosine deaminase inhibitor for targeted anti-inflammatory drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Redolfi Riva, Eugenio; Desii, Andrea; Sartini, Stefania; La Motta, Concettina; Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-10-29

    A novel drug delivery vector, a free-standing polymeric ultrathin film (nanofilm) composed of PMMA and a polysaccharides multilayer, is presented. Chitosan and sodium alginate are alternatively deposited by spin-assisted LbL assembly onto a plasma-treated PMMA thin film. Hydrophobic anti-inflammatory drugs, an adenosine deaminase inhibitor (APP) and its fluorescent dansyl derivate (APP-Dns), are encapsulated inside the LbL multilayer using a simple casting deposition procedure. The resulting drug loaded nanofilm can be suspended in water upon dissolution of a PVA sacrificial layer. Morphological characterization of the nanofilm shows that PMMA/LbL nanofilms possess nanometric thickness (<200 nm) and very low surface roughness (1-2 nm for drug loaded nanofilms and <1 nm for blank nanofilm). Drug loaded films exhibit a diffusion controlled release mechanism following the Korsmayer-Peppas release model, confirmed by the fit of release data with a characteristic power law. Drug release is impaired through the PMMA layer, which acts effectively as a barrier for drug transport. This ultrathin polymer film can find application as a nanopatch for targeted inflammatory drug delivery to treat localized pathologies as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24073802

  15. Defective B cell tolerance in adenosine deaminase deficiency is corrected by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha V; Morbach, Henner; Brigida, Immacolata; Ng, Yen-Shing; Aiuti, Alessandro; Meffre, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene defects are among the most common causes of SCID. Restoration of purine metabolism and immune functions can be achieved by enzyme replacement therapy, or more effectively by bone marrow transplant or HSC gene therapy (HSC-GT). However, autoimmune complications and autoantibody production, including anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs), frequently occur in ADA-SCID patients after treatment. To assess whether ADA deficiency affects the establishment of B cell tolerance, we tested the reactivity of recombinant antibodies isolated from single B cells of ADA-SCID patients before and after HSC-GT. We found that before HSC-GT, new emigrant/transitional and mature naive B cells from ADA-SCID patients contained more autoreactive and ANA-expressing clones, indicative of defective central and peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoints. We further observed impaired B cell receptor (BCR) and TLR functions in B cells after ADA inhibition, which may underlie the defects in B cell tolerance. Strikingly, after HSC-GT, ADA-SCID patients displayed quasi-normal early B cell tolerance checkpoints, as evidenced by restored removal of developing autoreactive and ANA-expressing B cells. Hence, ADA plays an essential role in controlling autoreactive B cell counterselection by regulating BCR and TLR functions. PMID:22622038

  16. Defective B cell tolerance in adenosine deaminase deficiency is corrected by gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Aisha V.; Morbach, Henner; Brigida, Immacolata; Ng, Yen-Shing; Aiuti, Alessandro; Meffre, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene defects are among the most common causes of SCID. Restoration of purine metabolism and immune functions can be achieved by enzyme replacement therapy, or more effectively by bone marrow transplant or HSC gene therapy (HSC-GT). However, autoimmune complications and autoantibody production, including anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs), frequently occur in ADA-SCID patients after treatment. To assess whether ADA deficiency affects the establishment of B cell tolerance, we tested the reactivity of recombinant antibodies isolated from single B cells of ADA-SCID patients before and after HSC-GT. We found that before HSC-GT, new emigrant/transitional and mature naive B cells from ADA-SCID patients contained more autoreactive and ANA-expressing clones, indicative of defective central and peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoints. We further observed impaired B cell receptor (BCR) and TLR functions in B cells after ADA inhibition, which may underlie the defects in B cell tolerance. Strikingly, after HSC-GT, ADA-SCID patients displayed quasi-normal early B cell tolerance checkpoints, as evidenced by restored removal of developing autoreactive and ANA-expressing B cells. Hence, ADA plays an essential role in controlling autoreactive B cell counterselection by regulating BCR and TLR functions. PMID:22622038

  17. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H; Goodman, Myron F; Rueda, David

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ∼ 5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer. PMID:26681117

  18. Involvement of activation-induced cytidine deaminase in skin cancer development.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Taichiro; Toda, Yoshinobu; Hiai, Hiroshi; Uemura, Munehiro; Nakamura, Motonobu; Yamamoto, Norio; Asato, Ryo; Hattori, Yukari; Bessho, Kazuhisa; Minato, Nagahiro; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    Most skin cancers develop as the result of UV light-induced DNA damage; however, a substantial number of cases appear to occur independently of UV damage. A causal link between UV-independent skin cancers and chronic inflammation has been suspected, although the precise mechanism underlying this association is unclear. Here, we have proposed that activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, encoded by AICDA) links chronic inflammation and skin cancer. We demonstrated that Tg mice expressing AID in the skin spontaneously developed skin squamous cell carcinoma with Hras and Trp53 mutations. Furthermore, genetic deletion of Aicda reduced tumor incidence in a murine model of chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis. AID was expressed in human primary keratinocytes in an inflammatory stimulus-dependent manner and was detectable in human skin cancers. Together, the results of this study indicate that inflammation-induced AID expression promotes skin cancer development independently of UV damage and suggest AID as a potential target for skin cancer therapeutics. PMID:26974156

  19. Characterization of immunoglobulin gene somatic hypermutation in the absence of activation-induced cytidine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Nancy S.; Satorius, Colleen L.; Plebani, Alessandro; Durandy, Anne; Lipsky, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) of Ig genes depends upon the deamination of C nucleotides in WRCY (W=A/T, R=A/G, Y=C/T) motifs by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AICDA). Despite this, a large number of mutations occur in WA motifs that can be accounted for by the activity of polymerase eta (POL η). To determine whether there are AICDA-independent mutations and to characterize the relationship between AICDA- and POL η-mediated mutations, 1,470 H chain and 1,313 kappa and lambda chain rearrangements from three AICDA−/− patients were analyzed. The Ig mutation frequency of all VH genes from AICDA−/− patients was 40-fold less than that of normal donors whereas the mutation frequency of mutated VH sequences from AICDA−/− patients was 6.8-fold less than normal donors. AICDA−/− B cells lack mutations in WRCY/RGYW motifs as well as replacement mutations and mutational targeting in complementarity determining regions. A significantly reduced mutation frequency in WA motifs compared to normal donors and an increased percentage of transitions, which may relate to reduced uracil DNA-glycosylase (UNG) activity, suggest a role for AICDA in regulating POL η and UNG activity. Similar results were observed in VL rearrangements. The residual mutations were predominantly G:C substitutions, indicating that AICDA-independent cytidine deamination was a likely, yet inefficient, mechanism for mutating Ig genes. PMID:18606684

  20. Restricting activation-induced cytidine deaminase tumorigenic activity in B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, Rafael; Yamane, Arito; Kovalchuk, Alexander L; Potter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    DNA breaks play an essential role in germinal centre B cells as intermediates to immunoglobulin class switching, a recombination process initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Immunoglobulin gene hypermutation is likewise catalysed by AID but is believed to occur via single-strand DNA breaks. When improperly repaired, AID-mediated lesions can promote chromosomal translocations (CTs) that juxtapose the immunoglobulin loci to heterologous genomic sites, including oncogenes. Two of the most studied translocations are the t(8;14) and T(12;15), which deregulate cMyc in human Burkitt’s lymphomas and mouse plasmacytomas, respectively. While a complete understanding of the aetiology of such translocations is lacking, recent studies using diverse mouse models have shed light on two important issues: (1) the extent to which non-specific or AID-mediated DNA lesions promote CTs, and (2) the safeguard mechanisms that B cells employ to prevent AID tumorigenic activity. Here we review these advances and discuss the usage of pristane-induced mouse plasmacytomas as a tool to investigate the origin of Igh–cMyc translocations and B-cell tumorigenesis. PMID:19302140

  1. The Role of Histidine-Proline-Rich Glycoprotein as Zinc Chaperone for Skeletal Muscle AMP Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri-Raggi, Maria; Moir, Arthur J. G.; Raggi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Metallochaperones function as intracellular shuttles for metal ions. At present, no evidence for the existence of any eukaryotic zinc-chaperone has been provided although metallochaperones could be critical for the physiological functions of Zn2+ metalloenzymes. We propose that the complex formed in skeletal muscle by the Zn2+ metalloenzyme AMP deaminase (AMPD) and the metal binding protein histidine-proline-rich glycoprotein (HPRG) acts in this manner. HPRG is a major plasma protein. Recent investigations have reported that skeletal muscle cells do not synthesize HPRG but instead actively internalize plasma HPRG. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) performed on fresh preparations of rabbit skeletal muscle AMPD provided evidence for a dinuclear zinc site in the enzyme compatible with a (μ-aqua)(μ-carboxylato)dizinc(II) core with two histidine residues at each metal site. XAS on HPRG isolated from the AMPD complex showed that zinc is bound to the protein in a dinuclear cluster where each Zn2+ ion is coordinated by three histidine and one heavier ligand, likely sulfur from cysteine. We describe the existence in mammalian HPRG of a specific zinc binding site distinct from the His-Pro-rich region. The participation of HPRG in the assembly and maintenance of skeletal muscle AMPD by acting as a zinc chaperone is also demonstrated. PMID:24970226

  2. Endothelial catabolism of extracellular adenosine during hypoxia: the role of surface adenosine deaminase and CD26

    PubMed Central

    Eltzschig, Holger K.; Faigle, Marion; Knapp, Simone; Karhausen, Jorn; Ibla, Juan; Rosenberger, Peter; Odegard, Kirsten C.; Laussen, Peter C.; Thompson, Linda F.; Colgan, Sean P.

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular levels of adenosine increase during hypoxia. While acute increases in adenosine are important to counterbalance excessive inflammation or vascular leakage, chronically elevated adenosine levels may be toxic. Thus, we reasoned that clearance mechanisms might exist to offset deleterious influences of chronically elevated adenosine. Guided by microarray results revealing induction of endothelial adenosine deaminase (ADA) mRNA in hypoxia, we used in vitro and in vivo models of adenosine signaling, confirming induction of ADA protein and activity. Further studies in human endothelia revealed that ADA-complexing protein CD26 is coordinately induced by hypoxia, effectively localizing ADA activity at the endothelial cell surface. Moreover, ADA surface binding was effectively blocked with glycoprotein 120 (gp120) treatment, a protein known to specifically compete for ADA-CD26 binding. Functional studies of murine hypoxia revealed inhibition of ADA with deoxycoformycin (dCF) enhances protective responses mediated by adenosine (vascular leak and neutrophil accumulation). Analysis of plasma ADA activity in pediatric patients with chronic hypoxia undergoing cardiac surgery demonstrated a 4.1 ± 0.6-fold increase in plasma ADA activity compared with controls. Taken together, these results reveal induction of ADA as innate metabolic adaptation to chronically elevated adenosine levels during hypoxia. In contrast, during acute hypoxia associated with vascular leakage and excessive inflammation, ADA inhibition may serve as therapeutic strategy. PMID:16670267

  3. Mitochondrial Damage and Apoptosis Induced by Adenosine Deaminase Inhibition and Deoxyadenosine in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gil, Mercedes; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Balestri, Francesco; Colombaioni, Laura; Camici, Marcella

    2016-07-01

    The treatment with deoxycoformycin, a strong adenosine deaminase inhibitor, in combination with deoxyadenosine, causes apoptotic cell death of two human neuroblastoma cell lines, SH-SY5Y and LAN5. Herein we demonstrate that, in SH-SY5Y cells, this combination rapidly decreases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and, in parallel, increases mitochondrial mass, while, later, induces nuclear fragmentation, and activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3. In previous papers we have shown that a human astrocytoma cell line, subjected to the same treatment, undergoes apoptotic death as well. Therefore, both astrocytoma and neuroblastoma cell lines undergo apoptotic death following the combined treatment with deoxycoformycin and deoxyadenosine, but several differences have been found in the mode of action, possibly reflecting a different functional and metabolic profile of the two cell lines. Overall this work indicates that the neuroblastoma cell lines, like the line of astrocytic origin, are very sensitive to purine metabolism perturbation thus suggesting new therapeutic approaches to nervous system tumors. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1671-1679, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26659614

  4. AMP deaminase histochemical activity and immunofluorescent isozyme localization in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. L.; Sabina, R. L.; Ogasawara, N.; Riley, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The cellular distribution of AMP deaminase (AMPda) isozymes was documented for rat soleus and plantaris muscles, utilizing immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoprecipitation methods. AMPda is a ubiquitous enzyme existing as three distinct isozymes, A, B and C, which were initially purified from skeletal muscle, liver (and kidney), and heart, respectively. AMPda-A is primarily concentrated subsarcolemmally and intermyofibrillarly within muscle cells, while isozymes B and C are concentrated within non-myofiber elements of muscle tissue. AMPda-B is principally associated with connective tissues surrounding neural elements and the muscle spindle capsule, and AMPda-C is predominantly associated with circulatory elements, such as arterial and venous walls, capillary endothelium, and red blood cells. These specific localizations, combined with documented differences in kinetic properties, suggest multiple functional roles for the AMPda isozymes or temporal segregation of similar AMPda functions. Linkage of the AMPda substrate with adenosine production pathways at the AMP level and the localization of isozyme-C in vascular tissue suggest a regulatory role in the microcirculation.

  5. Regulation of activation-induced deaminase stability and antibody gene diversification by Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Orthwein, Alexandre; Patenaude, Anne-Marie; Affar, El Bachir; Lamarre, Alain; Young, Jason C.

    2010-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) is the mutator enzyme that initiates somatic hypermutation and isotype switching of the antibody genes in B lymphocytes. Undesired byproducts of AID function are oncogenic mutations. AID expression levels seem to correlate with the extent of its physiological and pathological functions. In this study, we identify AID as a novel Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90 kD) client. We find that cytoplasmic AID is in a dynamic equilibrium regulated by Hsp90. Hsp90 stabilizes cytoplasmic AID, as specific Hsp90 inhibition leads to cytoplasmic polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of AID. Consequently, Hsp90 inhibition results in a proportional reduction in antibody gene diversification and off-target mutation. This evolutionarily conserved regulatory mechanism determines the functional steady-state levels of AID in normal B cells and B cell lymphoma lines. Thus, Hsp90 assists AID-mediated antibody diversification by stabilizing AID. Hsp90 inhibition provides the first pharmacological means to down-regulate AID expression and activity, which could be relevant for therapy of some lymphomas and leukemias. PMID:21041454

  6. Integrase-defective Lentiviral Vectors as a Delivery Platform for Targeted Modification of Adenosine Deaminase Locus

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, Alok V; Hollis, Roger P; Kuftinec, Gabriela; Senadheera, Shantha; Chan, Rebecca; Kohn, Donald B

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the use of integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) for transient delivery of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and donor templates for site-specific modification of the human adenosine deaminase (hADA) gene. Initially, we constructed IDLVs carrying ZFN monomers (Single-IDLVs) and found them to be able to deliver their gene-editing payload to K562 cells successfully upon cotransduction, with minimal cytotoxicity. To simplify delivery, we designed an IDLV construct to deliver both ZFN monomers from the same vector (Double-IDLV). However, this construct in its original state was prone to rearrangements of the vector genome, resulting in greatly reduced functionality; this was due to recombination between highly similar ZFN monomers arranged in tandem. We modified the Double-IDLV constructs to reduce recombination and restored simultaneous delivery of both ZFNs. We also tested an IDLV construct for delivery of donor templates and demonstrated its efficacy for gene modification. In summary, we highlighted the importance of modifying vector design for co-delivery of highly similar sequences inherent to genome-editing nucleases, and demonstrated significant improvement in the use of IDLVs for delivery of ZFNs and donor templates for genome modification. PMID:23857176

  7. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces ...

  8. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitations of cytosine by low energy electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, M.; Michaud, M.; Sanche, L.

    2010-10-01

    The absolute cross sections (CSs) for electronic excitations of cytosine by electron impact between 5 and 18 eV were measured by electron-energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy of the molecule deposited at low coverage on an inert Ar substrate. The lowest EEL features found at 3.55 and 4.02 eV are ascribed to transitions from the ground state to the two lowest triplet 1 A3'(π →π∗) and 2 A3'(π →π∗) valence states of the molecule. Their energy dependent CSs exhibit essentially a common maximum at about 6 eV with a value of 1.84×10-17 cm2 for the former and 4.94×10-17 cm2 for the latter. In contrast, the CS for the next EEL feature at 4.65 eV, which is ascribed to the optically allowed transition to the 2 A1'(π →π∗) valence state, shows only a steep rise to about 1.04×10-16 cm2 followed by a monotonous decrease with the incident electron energy. The higher EEL features at 5.39, 6.18, 6.83, and 7.55 eV are assigned to the excitations of the 3 A3,1'(π →π∗), 4 A1'(π →π∗), 5 A1'(π →π∗), and 6 A1'(π →π∗) valence states, respectively. The CSs for the 3 A3,1' and 4 A1' states exhibit a common enhancement at about 10 eV superimposed on a more or less a steep rise, reaching, respectively, a maximum of 1.27 and 1.79×10-16 cm2, followed by a monotonous decrease. This latter enhancement and the maximum seen at about 6 eV in the lowest triplet states correspond to the core-excited electron resonances that have been found by dissociative electron attachment experiments with cytosine in the gas phase. The weak EEL feature found at 5.01 eV with a maximum CS of 3.8×10-18 cm2 near its excitation threshold is attributed to transitions from the ground state to the 1 A3,1″(n →π∗) states. The monotonous rise of the EEL signal above 8 eV is attributed to the ionization of the molecule. It is partitioned into four excitation energy regions at about 8.55, 9.21, 9.83, and 11.53 eV, which correspond closely to the ionization energies of the four highest occupied molecular orbitals of cytosine. The sum of the ionization CS for these four excitation regions reaches a maximum of 8.1×10-16 cm2 at the incident energy of 13 eV.

  9. Modelling the Yeast Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Janjić, Vuk; Sharan, Roded; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    The topology behind biological interaction networks has been studied for over a decade. Yet, there is no definite agreement on the theoretical models which best describe protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Such models are critical to quantifying the significance of any empirical observation regarding those networks. Here, we perform a comprehensive analysis of yeast PPI networks in order to gain insights into their topology and its dependency on interaction-screening technology. We find that: (1) interaction-detection technology has little effect on the topology of PPI networks; (2) topology of these interaction networks differs in organisms with different cellular complexity (human and yeast); (3) clear topological difference is present between PPI networks, their functional sub-modules, and their inter-functional “linkers”; (4) high confidence PPI networks have more “geometrical” topology compared to predicted, incomplete, or noisy PPI networks; and (5) inter-functional “linker” proteins serve as mediators in signal transduction, transport, regulation and organisational cellular processes. PMID:24589662

  10. From yeast genetics to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Maráz, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Roots of classical yeast genetics go back to the early work of Lindegreen in the 1930s, who studied thallism, sporulation and inheritance of wine yeast strains belonging to S. cerevisiae. Consequent mutation and hybridization of heterothallic S. cerevisae strains resulted in the discovery of life cycle and mating type system, as well as construction of the genetic map. Elaboration of induced mutation and controlled hybridization of yeast strains opened up new possibilities for the genetic analysis of technologically important properties and for the production of improved industrial strains, but a big drawback was the widely different genetic properties of laboratory and industrial yeast strains. Genetic analysis and mapping of industrial strains were generally hindered because of homothallism, poor sporulation and/or low spore viability of brewing and wine yeast strains [1, 2]. In spite of this, there are a few examples of the application of sexual hybridization in the study of genetic control of important technological properties, e.g. sugar utilization, flocculation and flavor production in brewing yeast strains [3] or in the improvement of ethanol producing S. cerevisiae strains [4]. Rare mating and application of karyogamy deficient (kar-) mutants also proved useful in strain improvement [5]. Importance of yeasts in biotechnology is enormous. This includes food and beverage fermentation processes where a wide range of yeast species are playing role, but S. cerevisiae is undoubtedly the most important species among them. New biotechnology is aiming to improve these technologies, but besides this, a completely new area of yeast utilization has been emerged, especially in the pharmaceutical and medical areas. Without decreasing the importance of S. cerevisiae, numerous other yeast species, e.g. Kluyveromyces lactis, Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia pastoris, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Yarrowia lipolytica have gained increasing potentialities in the modern fermentation biotechnology [6]. Developments in yeast genetics, biochemistry, physiology and process engineering provided bases of rapid development in modern biotechnology, but elaboration of the recombinant DNA technique is far the most important milestone in this field. Other molecular genetic techniques, as molecular genotyping of yeast strains proved also very beneficial in yeast fermentation technologies, because dynamics of both the natural and inoculated yeast biota could be followed by these versatile DNA-based techniques. PMID:12512257

  11. Synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogen organic compounds by a Fischer-Tropsch-like process.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. C.; Oro, J.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the formation of purines, pyrimidines, and other bases from CO, H2, and NH3 under conditions similar to those used in the Fischer-Tropsch process. It is found that industrial nickel/iron alloy catalyzes the synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogenous compounds from mixtures of CO, H2, and NH3 at temperatures of about 600 C. Sufficient sample was accumulated to isolate as solid products adenine, guanine, and cytosine, which were identified by infrared spectrophotometry. In the absence of nickel/iron catalyst, at 650 C, or in the presence of this catalyst, at 450 C, no purines or pyrimidines were synthesized. These results confirm and extend some of the work reported by Kayatsu et al. (1968).

  12. Red yeast rice for dysipidemia.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Shariq; Al Badarin, Firas J; DiNicolantonio, James J; Lavie, Carl J; O'Keefe, James H

    2013-01-01

    Red yeast rice is an ancient Chinese food product that contains monacolins, chemical substances that are similar to statins in their mechanisms of action and lipid lowering properties. Several studies have found red yeast rice to be moderately effective at improving the lipid profile, particularly for lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. One large randomized controlled study from China found that red yeast rice significantly improved risk of major adverse cardiovascular events and overall survival in patients following myocardial infarction. Thus, red yeast rice is a potentially useful over-the-counter cholesterol-lowering agent. However, many red yeast rice formulations are non-standardized and unregulated food supplements, and there is a need for further research and regulation of production. PMID:24003656

  13. Genome-Wide Identification and Comparative Analysis of Cytosine-5 DNA Methyltransferase and Demethylase Families in Wild and Cultivated Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Gao, Chao; Bian, Xiaotong; Zhao, Shuzhen; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Xia, Han; Song, Hui; Hou, Lei; Wan, Shubo; Wang, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in genome protection, regulation of gene expression and is associated with plants development. Plant DNA methylation pattern was mediated by cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase. Although the genomes of AA and BB wild peanuts have been fully sequenced, these two gene families have not been studied. In this study we report the identification and analysis of putative cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases (C5-MTases) and demethylases in AA and BB wild peanuts. Cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases in AA and BB wild peanuts could be classified in MET, CMT, and DRM2 groups based on their domain organization. This result was supported by the gene and protein structural characteristics and phylogenetic analysis. We found that some wild peanut DRM2 members didn't contain UBA domain which was different from other plants such as Arabidopsis, maize and soybean. Five DNA demethylase encoding genes were found in AA genome and five in BB genome. The selective pressure analysis showed that wild peanut C5-MTase genes mainly underwent purifying selection but many positive selection sites can be detected. Conversely, DNA demethylase genes mainly underwent positive selection during evolution. Additionally, the expression dynamic of cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase genes in different cultivated peanut tissues were analyzed. Expression result showed that cold, heat or PEG stress could influence the expression level of C5-MTase and DNA demethylase genes in cultivated peanut. These results are useful for better understanding the complexity of these two gene families, and will facilitate epigenetic studies in peanut in the future. PMID:26870046

  14. Single Site Discrimination of Cytosine, 5-Methylcytosine, and 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine in Target DNA Using Anthracene-Tagged Fluorescent Probes.

    PubMed

    Duprey, Jean-Louis H A; Bullen, Gemma A; Zhao, Zheng-Yun; Bassani, Dario M; Peacock, Anna F A; Wilkie, John; Tucker, James H R

    2016-03-18

    The ability to discriminate between epigenetic variants in DNA is a necessary tool if we are to increase our understanding of the roles that they play in various biological processes and medical conditions. Herein, it is demonstrated how a simple two-step fluorescent probe assay can be used to differentiate all three major epigenetic variants of cytosine at a single locus site in a target strand of DNA. PMID:26580817

  15. Genome-Wide Identification and Comparative Analysis of Cytosine-5 DNA Methyltransferase and Demethylase Families in Wild and Cultivated Peanut.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Gao, Chao; Bian, Xiaotong; Zhao, Shuzhen; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Xia, Han; Song, Hui; Hou, Lei; Wan, Shubo; Wang, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in genome protection, regulation of gene expression and is associated with plants development. Plant DNA methylation pattern was mediated by cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase. Although the genomes of AA and BB wild peanuts have been fully sequenced, these two gene families have not been studied. In this study we report the identification and analysis of putative cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases (C5-MTases) and demethylases in AA and BB wild peanuts. Cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases in AA and BB wild peanuts could be classified in MET, CMT, and DRM2 groups based on their domain organization. This result was supported by the gene and protein structural characteristics and phylogenetic analysis. We found that some wild peanut DRM2 members didn't contain UBA domain which was different from other plants such as Arabidopsis, maize and soybean. Five DNA demethylase encoding genes were found in AA genome and five in BB genome. The selective pressure analysis showed that wild peanut C5-MTase genes mainly underwent purifying selection but many positive selection sites can be detected. Conversely, DNA demethylase genes mainly underwent positive selection during evolution. Additionally, the expression dynamic of cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase genes in different cultivated peanut tissues were analyzed. Expression result showed that cold, heat or PEG stress could influence the expression level of C5-MTase and DNA demethylase genes in cultivated peanut. These results are useful for better understanding the complexity of these two gene families, and will facilitate epigenetic studies in peanut in the future. PMID:26870046

  16. A study of the excited states in cytosine and guanine stacks in the Hartree-Fock and exciton approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Grobelsek-Vracko, M.; Zaider, M. )

    1994-04-01

    We report calculated exciton energies for the cytosine and guanine stacks obtained in the ab initio Hartree-Fock crystal orbital and exciton approximation, which includes the excited electron-hole interaction. This interaction plays an important role in the description of excited electron spectra in the low-energy region. The stacks were chosen as examples of polymers with helical symmetry. 21 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Epimer interconversion, isomerization, and hydrolysis of tetrahydrouridine: implications for cytidine deaminase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Niemi, Riku; Bummer, Paul; Anderson, Bradley D

    2003-10-01

    Tetrahydrouridine (THU) is an inhibitor of cytidine deaminase (CDA), the enzyme responsible for the deactivation of ara-C and other cytidine analogues in vivo, and therefore is capable of improving the therapeutic efficacy of these antitumor agents. In aqueous solution formulations, THU exists as a mixture of epimers differing in stereochemistry of the 4-OH substituent. The aims of this study were to investigate the interconversion kinetics of the epimers of THU, the CDA inhibitory effects of these epimers, and the stability and degradation mechanisms of THU epimer mixtures in aqueous solution with the ultimate goal of developing optimal conditions for a parenteral formulation of THU. A stability indicating HPLC assay utilizing a derivatized beta-cyclodextrin column was developed to separate the two epimers of THU and to monitor their reversible isomerization to their beta-ribopyranosyl counterparts and their hydrolysis to form N-glycosidic bond cleavage products. MS and one- and two-dimensional (1)H- and (13)C-NMR measurements were conducted to identify THU epimers and degradation products and to quantitatively model the degradation kinetics. The interconversion reaction between the two THU epimers is acid catalyzed with a first-order rate constant for conversion of epimer 1(1) to epimer 1(2) of (7.4 +/- 0.3) x 10(-3) h(-1) and an equilibrium constant ([1(2)]/[1(1)] of 1.7 +/- 0.1 at pH 7.4 and 25 degrees C. Epimer interconversion was therefore sufficiently slow at pH 7.4 to allow the isolation of each and evaluation of their CDA inhibitory activities utilizing 1% (w/v) mouse kidney homogenates as a source for cytidine deaminase and cytidine as a substrate. Inhibition constants for the two THU epimers (1(1) and 1(2)) were determined to be 8 +/- 1 x 10(-7) M and 6.2 +/- 0.2 x 10(-8) M, respectively. Studies at elevated temperature suggested that THU degradation from epimer mixtures is biphasic with the initial rate of disappearance being acid catalyzed and first order in initial THU concentration, thus ruling out dimerization as a potential reaction mechanism. NMR/MS analyses revealed that the major degradation products included the beta-ribopyranosyl THU isomers (two epimers), the reduced pyrimidinone base (tetrahydrouracil), and various anomers of D-ribose formed through N-glycosidic bond cleavage, and the products of subsequent reactions of the base. Kinetic modeling of the data obtained from both HPLC and NMR measurements indicated that in an acidic solution THU beta-ribofuranosyl --> beta-ribopyranosyl isomerization is a rapid equilibrium reaction, which proceeds through an intermediate observable in 1H-NMR, and is followed by slower N-glycosidic bond hydrolysis. All the reactions between THU, its ribopyranosyl isomers, the intermediate, and the base are acid catalyzed and appear to proceed through the same sugar ring-opened intermediate (carbinolamine), consistent with previous literature. PMID:14502542

  18. Southern blight disease of tomato control by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase producing Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Ritu; Agrawal, Lalit; Gupta, Swati; Kumar, Manoj; Yadav, Sumit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-02-01

    Tomato cultivation is highly susceptible for soil born diseases and among them southern blight disease caused by Scelerotium rolfsii is very common. For its management use of chemical fungicides is not very successful as their spores are able to survive for many years in the soil. As an alternative eco-friendly approach to control the disease antagonistic microbes are being characterized.Among them plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488 (B-30488) with antagonistic properties, multiple PGP attributes stress tolerance and ACC deaminase enzyme activity is characterized to decipher its mode of action against S. rolfsii under in vitro and in vivo conditions. In vitro results obtained from this study clearly demonstrate that B-30488 has ability to show antagonistic properties under different abiotic stresses against S. rolfsii. Similar results were also obtained from in vivo experiments where B-30488 inoculation has efficiently controlled the disease caused by S. rolfsii and improve the plant growth. Deleterious enhanced ethylene level in S. rolfsii infected plants was also ameliorated by inoculation of ACC deaminase producing B-30488. The ACC accumulation, ACO and ACS activities were also modulated in S. rolfsii infected plants. Results from defense enzymes and other biochemical attributes were also support the role of B-30488 inoculation in ameliorating the biotic stress caused by S. rolfsii in tomato plants. These results were further validated by pathogen related gene expression analysis by real time PCR. Overall results from the present study may be concluded that ACC deaminase producing B-30488 has ability to control the southern blight disease caused by S. rolfsii and commercial bioinoculant package may be developed. PMID:26825539

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of biodegradative threonine deaminase (TdcB) from Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Simanshu, Dhirendra K.; Chittori, Sagar; Savithri, H. S.; Murthy, M. R. N.

    2006-03-01

    S. typhimurium biodegradative threonine deaminase (TdcB), a member of the β-family of PLP-dependent enzymes, has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in three different crystal forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Biodegradative threonine deaminase (TdcB) catalyzes the deamination of l-threonine to α-ketobutyrate, the first reaction in the anaerobic breakdown of l-threonine to propionate. Unlike the biosynthetic threonine deaminase, TdcB is insensitive to l-isoleucine and is activated by AMP. Here, the cloning of TdcB (molecular weight 36 kDa) from Salmonella typhimurium with an N-terminal hexahistidine affinity tag and its overexpression in Escherichia coli is reported. TdcB was purified to homogeneity using Ni–NTA affinity column chromatography and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique in three different crystal forms. Crystal forms I (unit-cell parameters a = 46.32, b = 55.30, c = 67.24 Å, α = 103.09, β = 94.70, γ = 112.94°) and II (a = 56.68, b = 76.83, c = 78.50 Å, α = 66.12, β = 89.16, γ = 77.08°) belong to space group P1 and contain two and four molecules of TdcB, respectively, in the asymmetric unit. Poorly diffracting form III crystals were obtained in space group C2 and based on the unit-cell volume are most likely to contain one molecule per asymmetric unit. Two complete data sets of resolutions 2.2 Å (crystal form I) and 1.7 Å (crystal form II) were collected at 100 K using an in-house X-ray source.

  20. Role of the A2B receptor–adenosine deaminase complex in colonic dysmotility associated with bowel inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Antonioli, L; Fornai, M; Awwad, O; Giustarini, G; Pellegrini, C; Tuccori, M; Caputi, V; Qesari, M; Castagliuolo, I; Brun, P; Giron, M C; Scarpignato, C; Blandizzi, C; Colucci, R

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Adenosine A2B receptors regulate several physiological enteric functions. However, their role in the pathophysiology of intestinal dysmotility associated with inflammation has not been elucidated. Hence, we investigated the expression of A2B receptors in rat colon and their role in the control of cholinergic motility in the presence of bowel inflammation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Colitis was induced by 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS). Colonic A2B receptor expression and localization were examined by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The interaction between A2B receptors and adenosine deaminase was assayed by immunoprecipitation. The role of A2B receptors in the control of colonic motility was examined in functional experiments on longitudinal muscle preparations (LMPs). KEY RESULTS A2B receptor mRNA was present in colon from both normal and DNBS-treated rats but levels were increased in the latter. A2B receptors were predominantly located in the neuromuscular layer, but, in the presence of colitis, were increased mainly in longitudinal muscle. Functionally, the A2B receptor antagonist MRS 1754 enhanced both electrically-evoked and carbachol-induced cholinergic contractions in normal LMPs, but was less effective in inflamed tissues. The A2B receptor agonist NECA decreased colonic cholinergic motility, with increased efficacy in inflamed LMP. Immunoprecipitation and functional tests revealed a link between A2B receptors and adenosine deaminase, which colocalize in the neuromuscular compartment. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Under normal conditions, endogenous adenosine modulates colonic motility via A2B receptors located in the neuromuscular compartment. In the presence of colitis, this inhibitory control is impaired due to a link between A2B receptors and adenosine deaminase, which catabolizes adenosine, thus preventing A2B receptor activation. PMID:24286264

  1. Studies on Plant Growth Promoting Properties of Fruit-Associated Bacteria from Elettaria cardamomum and Molecular Analysis of ACC Deaminase Gene.

    PubMed

    Jasim, B; Anish, Mathew Chacko; Shimil, Vellakudiyan; Jyothis, Mathew; Radhakrishnan, E K

    2015-09-01

    Endophytic microorganisms have been reported to have diverse plant growth promoting mechanisms including phosphate solubilization, N2 fixation, production of phyto-hormones and ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate) deaminase and antiphyto-pathogenic properties. Among these, ACC deaminase production is very important because of its regulatory effect on ethylene which is a stress hormone with precise role in the control of fruit development and ripening. However, distribution of these properties among various endophytic bacteria associated with fruit tissue and its genetic basis is least investigated. In the current study, 11 endophytic bacteria were isolated and identified from the fruit tissue of Elettaria cardamomum and were studied in detail for various plant growth promoting properties especially ACC deaminase activity using both culture-based and PCR-based methods. PCR-based screening identified the isolates EcB 2 (Pantoea sp.), EcB 7 (Polaromonas sp.), EcB 9 (Pseudomonas sp.), EcB 10 (Pseudomonas sp.) and EcB 11 (Ralstonia sp.) as positive for ACC deaminase. The PCR products were further subjected to sequence analysis which proved the similarity of the sequences identified in the study with ACC deaminase sequences reported from other sources. The detailed bioinformatic analysis of the sequence including homology-based modelling and molecular docking confirmed the sequences to have ACC deaminase activity. The docking of the modelled proteins was done using patch dock, and the detailed scrutiny of the protein ligand interaction revealed conservation of key amino acids like Lys51, Ser78, Tyr268 and Tyr294 which play important role in the enzyme activity. These suggest the possible regulatory effect of these isolates on fruit physiology. PMID:26164855

  2. Purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: Elucidating the role of a conserved cysteine in adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Miller, Danielle V; Brown, Anne M; Xu, Huimin; Bevan, David R; White, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Adenine deaminases (Ade) and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferases (Hpt) are widely distributed enzymes involved in purine salvage. Characterization of the previously uncharacterized Ade (MJ1459 gene product) and Hpt (MJ1655 gene product) are discussed here and provide insight into purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Ade was demonstrated to use either Fe(II) and/or Mn(II) as the catalytic metal. Hpt demonstrated no detectable activity with adenine, but was equally specific for hypoxanthine and guanine with a kcat /KM of 3.2 × 10(7) and 3.0 × 10(7) s(- 1) M(- 1) , respectively. These results demonstrate that hypoxanthine and IMP are the central metabolites in purine salvage in M. jannaschii for AMP and GMP production. A conserved cysteine (C127, M. jannaschii numbering) was examined due to its high conservation in bacterial and archaeal homologues. To assess the role of this highly conserved cysteine in M. jannaschii Ade, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. It was determined that mutation to serine (C127S) completely abolished Ade activity and mutation to alanine (C127A) exhibited 10-fold decrease in kcat over the wild type Ade. To further investigate the role of C127, detailed molecular docking and dynamics studies were performed and revealed adenine was unable to properly orient in the active site in the C127A and C127S Ade model structures due to distinct differences in active site conformation and rotation of D261. Together this work illuminates purine salvage in M. jannaschii and the critical role of a cysteine residue in maintaining active site conformation of Ade. Proteins 2016; 84:828-840. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990095

  3. Diagnostic Algorithm for Glycogenoses and Myoadenylate Deaminase Deficiency Based on Exercise Testing Parameters: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, Fabrice; Uguen, Arnaud; Scotet, Virginie; Le Maréchal, Cédric; Rigal, Odile; Marcorelles, Pascale; Gobin, Eric; Carré, Jean-Luc; Zagnoli, Fabien; Giroux-Metges, Marie-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Aim Our aim was to evaluate the accuracy of aerobic exercise testing to diagnose metabolic myopathies. Methods From December 2008 to September 2012, all the consecutive patients that underwent both metabolic exercise testing and a muscle biopsy were prospectively enrolled. Subjects performed an incremental and maximal exercise testing on a cycle ergometer. Lactate, pyruvate, and ammonia concentrations were determined from venous blood samples drawn at rest, during exercise (50% predicted maximal power, peak exercise), and recovery (2, 5, 10, and 15 min). Biopsies from vastus lateralis or deltoid muscles were analysed using standard techniques (reference test). Myoadenylate deaminase (MAD) activity was determined using p-nitro blue tetrazolium staining in muscle cryostat sections. Glycogen storage was assessed using periodic acid-Schiff staining. The diagnostic accuracy of plasma metabolite levels to identify absent and decreased MAD activity was assessed using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results The study involved 51 patients. Omitting patients with glycogenoses (n = 3), MAD staining was absent in 5, decreased in 6, and normal in 37 subjects. Lactate/pyruvate at the 10th minute of recovery provided the greatest area under the ROC curves (AUC, 0.893 ± 0.067) to differentiate Abnormal from Normal MAD activity. The lactate/rest ratio at the 10th minute of recovery from exercise displayed the best AUC (1.0) for discriminating between Decreased and Absent MAD activities. The resulting decision tree achieved a diagnostic accuracy of 86.3%. Conclusion The present algorithm provides a non-invasive test to accurately predict absent and decreased MAD activity, facilitating the selection of patients for muscle biopsy and target appropriate histochemical analysis. PMID:26207760

  4. Editing of Cellular Self-RNAs by Adenosine Deaminase ADAR1 Suppresses Innate Immune Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    George, Cyril X; Ramaswami, Gokul; Li, Jin Billy; Samuel, Charles E

    2016-03-18

    Adenosine deaminases acting on double-stranded RNA (ADARs) catalyze the deamination of adenosine (A) to produce inosine (I) in double-stranded (ds) RNA structures, a process known as A-to-I RNA editing. dsRNA is an important trigger of innate immune responses, including interferon (IFN) production and action. We examined the role of A-to-I RNA editing by two ADARs, ADAR1 and ADAR2, in the sensing of self-RNA in the absence of pathogen infection, leading to activation of IFN-induced, RNA-mediated responses in mouse embryo fibroblasts. IFN treatment of Adar1(-/-) cells lacking both the p110 constitutive and p150 IFN-inducible ADAR1 proteins induced formation of stress granules, whereas neither wild-type (WT) nor Adar2(-/-) cells displayed a comparable stress granule response following IFN treatment. Phosphorylation of protein synthesis initiation factor eIF2α at serine 51 was increased in IFN-treated Adar1(-/-) cells but not in either WT or Adar2(-/-) cells following IFN treatment. Analysis by deep sequencing of mouse exonic loci containing A-to-I-editing sites revealed that the majority of editing in mouse embryo fibroblasts was carried out by ADAR1. IFN treatment increased editing in both WT and Adar2(-/-) cells but not in either Adar1(-/-) or Adar1(-/-) (p150) cells or Stat1(-/-) or Stat2(-/-) cells. Hyper-edited sites found in predicted duplex structures showed strand bias of editing for some RNAs. These results implicate ADAR1 p150 as the major A-to-I editor in mouse embryo fibroblasts, acting as a feedback suppressor of innate immune responses otherwise triggered by self-RNAs possessing regions of double-stranded character. PMID:26817845

  5. Macrophages mediate gemcitabine resistance of pancreatic adenocarcinoma by upregulating cytidine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Weizman, N; Krelin, Y; Shabtay-Orbach, A; Amit, M; Binenbaum, Y; Wong, R J; Gil, Z

    2014-07-17

    Resistance to pharmacologic agents used in chemotherapy is common in most human carcinomas, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), which is resistant to almost all drugs, including gemcitabine, a nucleoside analog used as a first-line treatment. Poor survival rates of PDA patients have, therefore, not changed much over 4 decades. Recent data indicated that tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which are abundant in the microenvironment of several tumors, including PDA, secrete pro-tumorigenic factors that contribute to cancer progression and dissemination. In this study, we show for the first time that TAMs can also induce chemoresistance of PDA by reducing gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Macrophages co-cultured with cancer cells or TAM-conditioned medium significantly reduced apoptosis and activation of the caspase-3 pathway during gemcitabine treatment. In vivo PDA models of mice, which have reduced macrophage recruitment and activation, demonstrated improved response to gemcitabine compared with controls. Similarly, inhibition of monocytes/macrophages trafficking by a CSF1-receptor antagonist GW2580 augmented the effect of gemcitabine in a transgenic mouse PDA model that was resistant to gemcitabine alone. Analysis of multiple proteins involved in gemcitabine delivery and metabolism revealed that TAMs induced upregulation of cytidine deaminase (CDA), the enzyme that metabolizes the drug following its transport into the cell. Decreasing CDA expression by PDA cells blocked the protective effect of TAMs against gemcitabine. These results provide the first evidence of a paracrine effect of TAMs, which mediates acquired resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. Modulation of macrophage trafficking or inhibition of CDA may offer a new strategy for augmenting the response of PDA to chemotherapy. PMID:23995783

  6. Investigation into effects of antipsychotics on ectonucleotidase and adenosine deaminase in zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Seibt, Kelly Juliana; Oliveira, Renata da Luz; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Senger, Mario Roberto; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-12-01

    Antipsychotic agents are used for the treatment of psychotic symptoms in patients with several brain disorders, such as schizophrenia. Atypical and typical antipsychotics differ regarding their clinical and side-effects profile. Haloperidol is a representative typical antipsychotic drug and has potent dopamine receptor antagonistic functions; however, atypical antipsychotics have been developed and characterized an important advance in the treatment of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. Purine nucleotides and nucleosides, such as ATP and adenosine, constitute a ubiquitous class of extracellular signaling molecules crucial for normal functioning of the nervous system. Indirect findings suggest that changes in the purinergic system, more specifically in adenosinergic activity, could be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We investigated the effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics on ectonucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities, followed by an analysis of gene expression patterns in zebrafish brain. Haloperidol treatment (9 µM) was able to decrease ATP hydrolysis (35%), whereas there were no changes in hydrolysis of ADP and AMP in brain membranes after antipsychotic exposure. Adenosine deamination in membrane fractions was inhibited (38%) after haloperidol treatment when compared to the control; however, no changes were observed in ADA soluble fractions after haloperidol exposure. Sulpiride (250 µM) and olanzapine (100 µM) did not alter ectonucleotidase and ADA activities. Haloperidol also led to a decrease in entpd2_mq, entpd3 and adal mRNA transcripts. These findings demonstrate that haloperidol is an inhibitor of NTPDase and ADA activities in zebrafish brain, suggesting that purinergic signaling may also be a target of pharmacological effects promoted by this drug. PMID:26156500

  7. Restriction of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus by Porcine APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases

    PubMed Central

    Dörrschuck, Eva; Fischer, Nicole; Bravo, Ignacio G.; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Kuiper, Heidi; Spötter, Andreas; Möller, Ronny; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten; Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2011-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine cells, tissues, and organs shows promise to surmount the shortage of human donor materials. Among the barriers to pig-to-human xenotransplantation are porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) since functional representatives of the two polytropic classes, PERV-A and PERV-B, are able to infect human embryonic kidney cells in vitro, suggesting that a xenozoonosis in vivo could occur. To assess the capacity of human and porcine cells to counteract PERV infections, we analyzed human and porcine APOBEC3 (A3) proteins. This multigene family of cytidine deaminases contributes to the cellular intrinsic immunity and act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. Our data show that the porcine A3 gene locus on chromosome 5 consists of the two single-domain genes A3Z2 and A3Z3. The evolutionary relationships of the A3Z3 genes reflect the evolutionary history of mammals. The two A3 genes encode at least four different mRNAs: A3Z2, A3Z3, A3Z2-Z3, and A3Z2-Z3 splice variant A (SVA). Porcine and human A3s have been tested toward their antiretroviral activity against PERV and murine leukemia virus (MuLV) using novel single-round reporter viruses. The porcine A3Z2, A3Z3 and A3Z2-Z3 were packaged into PERV particles and inhibited PERV replication in a dose-dependent manner. The antiretroviral effect correlated with editing by the porcine A3s with a trinucleotide preference for 5′ TGC for A3Z2 and A3Z2-Z3 and 5′ CAC for A3Z3. These results strongly imply that human and porcine A3s could inhibit PERV replication in vivo, thereby reducing the risk of infection of human cells by PERV in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:21307203

  8. Mutations in the human adenosine deaminase gene that affect protein structure and RNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Akeson, A.L.; Wiginton, D.A.; States, C.J.; Perme, C.M.; Dusing, M.R.; Hutton, J.J.

    1987-08-01

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency is one cause of the genetic disease severe combined immunodeficiency. To identify mutations responsible for ADA deficiency, the authors synthesized cDNAs to ADA mRNAs from two cell lines, GM2756 and GM2825A, derived from ADA-deficient immunodeficient patients. Sequence analysis of GM2756 cDNA clones revealed a different point mutation in each allele that causes amino acid changes of alanine to valine and arginine to histidine. One allele of GM2825A also has a point mutation that causes an alanine to valine substitution. The other allele of GM2825A was found to produce an mRNA in which exon 4 had been spliced out but had no other detrimental mutations. S1 nuclease mapping of GM2825A mRNA showed equal abundance of the full-length ADA mRNA and the ADA mRNA that was missing exon 4. Several of the ADA cDNA clones extended 5' of the major initiation start site, indicating multiple start sites for ADA transcription. The point mutations in GM2756 and GM2825A and the absence of exon 4 in GM2825A appear to be directly responsible for the ADA deficiency. Comparison of a number of normal and mutant ADA cDNA sequences showed a number of changes in the third base of codons. These change do not affect the amino acid sequence. Analyses of ADA cDNAs from different cell lines detected aberrant RNA species that either included intron 7 or excluded exon 7. Their presence is a result of aberrant splicing of pre-mRNAs and is not related to mutations that cause ADA deficiency.

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of the Gene Cluster Encoding Allantoinase and Guanine Deaminase in Klebsiella pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Karla; Badia, Josefa; Giménez, Rosa; Aguilar, Juan; Baldoma, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Purines can be used as the sole source of nitrogen by several strains of K. pneumoniae under aerobic conditions. The genes responsible for the assimilation of purine nitrogens are distributed in three separated clusters in the K. pneumoniae genome. Here, we characterize the cluster encompassing genes KPN_01787 to KPN_01791, which is involved in the conversion of allantoin into allantoate and in the deamination of guanine to xanthine. These genes are organized in three transcriptional units, hpxSAB, hpxC, and guaD. Gene hpxS encodes a regulatory protein of the GntR family that mediates regulation of this system by growth on allantoin. Proteins encoded by hpxB and guaD display allantoinase and guanine deaminase activity, respectively. In this cluster, hpxSAB is the most tightly regulated unit. This operon was activated by growth on allantoin as a nitrogen source; however, addition of allantoin to nitrogen excess cultures did not result in hpxSAB induction. Neither guaD nor hpxC was induced by allantoin. Expression of guaD is mainly regulated by nitrogen availability through the action of NtrC. Full induction of hpxSAB by allantoin requires both HpxS and NAC. HpxS may have a dual role, acting as a repressor in the absence of allantoin and as an activator in its presence. HpxS binds to tandem sites, S1 and S2, overlapping the −10 and −35 sequences of the hpxSAB promoter, respectively. The NAC binding site is located between S1 and S2 and partially overlaps S2. In the presence of allantoin, interplay between NAC and HpxS is proposed. PMID:21357483

  10. Preliminary investigations on inducing salt tolerance in maize through inoculation with rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Sajid Mahmood; Zahir, Zahir Ahmad; Naveed, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad

    2007-10-01

    Twenty rhizobacterial strains containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase were isolated from the rhizosphere of salt-affected maize fields. They were screened for their growth-promoting activities under axenic conditions at 1, 4, 8, and 12 dS x m-1 salinity levels. Based upon the data of the axenic study, the 6 most effective strains were selected to conduct pot trials in the wire house. Besides one original salinity level (1.6 dS x m-1), 3 other salinity levels (4, 8, and 12 dS x m-1) were maintained in pots and maize seeds inoculated with selected strains of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, as well as uninoculated controls were sown. Results showed that the increase in salinity level decreased the growth of maize seedlings. However, inoculation with rhizobacterial strains reduced this depression effect and improved the growth and yield at all the salinity levels tested. Selected strains significantly increased plant height, root length, total biomass, cob mass, and grain yield up to 82%, 93%, 51%, 40%, and 50%, respectively, over respective uninoculated controls at the electrical conductivity of 12 dS x m-1. Among various plant growth-promoting rhizobacterial strains, S5 (Pseudomonas syringae), S14 (Enterobacter aerogenes), and S20 (Pseudomonas fluorescens) were the most effective strains for promoting the growth and yield of maize, even at high salt stress. The relatively better salt tolerance of inoculated plants was associated with a high K+/Na+ ratio as well as high relative water and chlorophyll and low proline contents. PMID:18026206

  11. Activation-Induced Deaminase, AID, is catalytically active as a monomer on single-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Brar, Sukhdev S.; Sacho, Elizabeth J.; Tessmer, Ingrid; Croteau, Deborah L.; Erie, Dorothy A.; Diaz, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    Hypermutation and class switch recombination of immunoglobulin genes are antigen-activated mechanisms triggered by AID, a cytidine deaminase. AID deaminates cytidine residues in the DNA of the variable and the switch regions of the immunoglobulin locus. The resulting uracil induces error-prone DNA synthesis in the case of hypermutation or DNA breaks that activate non-homologous recombination in the case of class-switch recombination. In vitro studies have demonstrated that AID deaminates single-stranded but not double-stranded substrates unless AID is in a complex with RPA and the substrate is actively undergoing transcription. However, it is not clear whether AID deaminates its substrates primarily as a monomer or as a higher order oligomer. To examine the oligomerization state of AID alone and in the presence of single stranded DNA substrates of various structures, including loops embedded in double-stranded DNA, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize AID protein alone or in complex with DNA. Surprisingly, AFM results indicate that most AID molecules exist as a monomer and that it binds single-stranded DNA substrates as a monomer at concentrations where efficient deamination of single-stranded DNA substrates occur. The rate of deamination, under conditions of excess and limiting protein, also imply that AID can deaminate single-stranded substrates as a monomer. These results imply that non-phosphorylated AID is catalytically active as a monomer on single stranded DNA in vitro, including single-stranded DNA found in loops similar to those transiently formed in the immunoglobulin switch regions during transcription. PMID:17889624

  12. Ectopic expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase caused by epigenetics modification.

    PubMed

    Tatemichi, Masayuki; Hata, Harumi; Nakadate, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Recently studies have shown that ectopic expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) plays an important role in carcinognesis and cancer progression of inflammatory-associated cancers. Here, we examined the molecular mechanism of ectopic expression of AID in cancer cells, and whether or not nitric oxide (NO) modulates this expression, as NO is known to cause chemical deamination of the cytidine. In several cancer cell lines, treatment with the DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt) inhibitor 5-Aza-dC effected expression of AID by TNF-α, and expression was further induced by additional treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors with no stimulation. The CpG sites located in the promoter and exon 1 region of the AID gene in cancer cells were found to be hypomethylated in correlation with AID expression levels. Further, administration of HDAC inhibitors also induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in cancer cells treated with 5-Aza-dC. Interestingly, administration of S-nitroso-L-glutathione (GSNO) a nitric oxide (NO) donor, was found to enhance AID and iNOS expression in LoVo cells treated with 5-Aza-dC. Our findings suggest that AID and iNOS expression in cancer cells may be modified by epigenetic mechanisms, and that NO may further enhance AID and iNOS expression. Given recent plans to introduce Dnmt and HDAC inhibitors as novel cancer treatments, these findings regarding the potential for Dnmt and HDAC inhibitors to enhance expression of AID and iNOS, resulting in further cancer progression, might be taken into consideration. PMID:21109971

  13. New roles for DNA cytosine modification, eRNA, anchors, and superanchors in developing B cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Benner, Christopher; Isoda, Takeshi; Murre, Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    B-cell fate is orchestrated by a series of well-characterized developmental regulators. Here, we found that the onset of B-cell development was accompanied by large-scale changes in DNA cytosine modifications associated with promoters, enhancers, and anchors. These changes were tightly linked to alterations in transcription factor occupancy and nascent RNA (eRNA) transcription. We found that the prepro-B to the pro–B-cell transition was associated with a global exchange of DNA cytosine modifications for polycomb-mediated repression at CpG islands. Hypomethylated regions were found exclusively in the active/permissive compartment of the nucleus and were predominantly associated with regulatory elements or anchors that orchestrate the folding patterns of the genome. We identified superanchors, characterized by clusters of hypomethylated CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-bound elements, which were predominantly located at boundaries that define topological associated domains. A particularly prominent hypomethylated superanchor was positioned down-stream of the Ig heavy chain (Igh) locus. Analysis of global formaldehyde–cross-linking studies indicated that the Igh locus superanchor interacts with the VH region repertoire across vast genomic distances. We propose that the Igh locus superanchor sequesters the VH and DHJH regions into a spatial confined geometric environment to promote rapid first-passage times. Collectively, these studies demonstrate how, in developing B cells, DNA cytosine modifications associated with regulatory and architectural elements affect patterns of gene expression, folding patterns of the genome, and antigen receptor assembly. PMID:26417104

  14. Intramolecular folding of a fragment of the cytosine-rich strand of telomeric DNA into an i-motif.

    PubMed

    Leroy, J L; Guéron, M; Mergny, J L; Hélène, C

    1994-05-11

    In the recently discovered i-motif, four stretches of cytosine form two parallel-stranded duplexes whose C.C+ base pairs are fully intercalated. The i-motif may be recognized by characteristic Overhauser cross-peaks of the proton NMR spectrum, reflecting short H1'-H1' distances across the minor groove, and short internucleotide amino-proton-H2'/H2" across the major groove. We report the observation of such cross-peaks in the spectra of a fragment of the C-rich telomeric strand of vertebrates, d[CCCTAA]3CCC. The spectra also demonstrate that the cytosines are base-paired and that proton exchange is very slow, as reported previously for the i-motif. From UV absorbance and gel chromatography measurements, we assign these properties to an i-motif which includes all or nearly all the cytosines, and which is formed by intramolecular folding at slightly acid or neutral pH. A fragment of telomeric DNA of Tetrahymena, d[CCCCAA]3CCCC, has the same properties. Hence four consecutive C stretches of a C-rich telomeric strand can fold into an i-motif. Hypothetically, this could occur in vivo. PMID:8202359

  15. In vivo cleavage of cytosine-containing bacteriophage T4 DNA to genetically distinct, discretely sized fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.; Wiberg, J.S.

    1983-10-01

    Mutants of bacteriophage T4D that are defective in genes 42 (dCMP hydroxymethylase), 46 (DNA exonuclease), and 56 (dCTPase) produce limited amounts of phage DNA in Escherichia coli B. In this DNA, glucosylated 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is completely replaced by cytosine. It is found that this DNA rapidly becomes fragmented in vivo to at least 16 discrete bands as visualized on agarose gels subjected to electrophoresis. The sizes of the fragments ranged from more than 20 to less than 2 kilobase pairs. When DNAs from two of these bands were radioactively labeled in vitro by nick translation and hybridized to XbaI restiction fragments of cytosine-containing T4 DNA, evidence was obtained that the two bands are genetically distinct, i.e., they contain DNA from different parts of the T4 genome. Mutational inactivation of T4 endonuclease II (gene denA) prevented the fragmentation. Three different mutations in T4 endonuclease IV (gene denB) caused the same minor changes in the pattern of fragments. It is concluded that T4 endonuclease II is required, and endonuclease IV is involved to a minor extent, in the in vivo production of these cytosine-containing T4 DNA fragments. These DNA fragments are viewed as ''restriction fragments'' since they represent degradation products of DNA ''foreign'' to T4, they are of discrete size, and they are genetically distinct.

  16. Discovery of bisulfite-mediated cytosine conversion to uracil, the key reaction for DNA methylation analysis — A personal account

    PubMed Central

    Hayatsu, Hikoya

    2008-01-01

    Methylation at position 5 of cytosine in DNA is being intensively studied in many areas of biological sciences, as the methylation is intimately associated with the control of gene functions. The principal analytical method for determining the sites of 5-methylcytosine in genome at the sequence level involves bisulfite modification of DNA. The utility of this chemical treatment is based on the property of bisulfite to selectively deaminate cytosine residues. The bisulfite-mediated cytosine deamination was discovered in 1970 by us in the University of Tokyo. At the same time, Shapiro and his coworkers in New York University found the same reaction independently. We also reported that 5-methylcytosine was deaminated by bisulfite only very slowly. These findings were later utilized by a group of Australian scientists to devise a means to analyze 5-methylcytosine in DNA; thus, a method called ‘bisulfite genomic sequencing’ was invented by these researchers in 1992. This review describes the author’s reflection of the discovery of bisulfite reactions with pyrimidine bases. The author’s recent work that has resulted in an improvement of the procedure of analysis by use of a newly devised high concentration bisulfite solution is also described. PMID:18941305

  17. Reduced Genomic Cytosine Methylation and Defective Cellular Differentiation in Embryonic Stem Cells Lacking CpG Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Carlone, Diana L.; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Young, Suzanne R. L.; Dobrota, Erika; Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Ruiz, Joseph; Skalnik, David G.

    2005-01-01

    Cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides is a critical epigenetic modification of mammalian genomes. CpG binding protein (CGBP) exhibits a unique DNA-binding specificity for unmethylated CpG motifs and is essential for early murine development. Embryonic stem cell lines deficient for CGBP were generated to further examine CGBP function. CGBP−/− cells are viable but show an increased rate of apoptosis and are unable to achieve in vitro differentiation following removal of leukemia inhibitory factor from the growth media. Instead, CGBP−/− embryonic stem cells remain undifferentiated as revealed by persistent expression of the pluripotent markers Oct4 and alkaline phosphatase. CGBP−/− cells exhibit a 60 to 80% decrease in global cytosine methylation, including hypo-methylation of repetitive elements, single-copy genes, and imprinted genes. Total DNA methyltransferase activity is reduced by 30 to 60% in CGBP−/− cells, and expression of the maintenance DNA methyltransferase 1 protein is similarly reduced. However, de novo DNA methyltransferase activity is normal. Nearly all aspects of the pleiotropic CGBP−/− phenotype are rescued by introduction of a CGBP expression vector. Hence, CGBP is essential for normal epigenetic modification of the genome by cytosine methylation and for cellular differentiation, consistent with the requirement for CGBP during early mammalian development. PMID:15923607

  18. Reduced genomic cytosine methylation and defective cellular differentiation in embryonic stem cells lacking CpG binding protein.

    PubMed

    Carlone, Diana L; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Young, Suzanne R L; Dobrota, Erika; Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Ruiz, Joseph; Skalnik, David G

    2005-06-01

    Cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides is a critical epigenetic modification of mammalian genomes. CpG binding protein (CGBP) exhibits a unique DNA-binding specificity for unmethylated CpG motifs and is essential for early murine development. Embryonic stem cell lines deficient for CGBP were generated to further examine CGBP function. CGBP(-)(/)(-) cells are viable but show an increased rate of apoptosis and are unable to achieve in vitro differentiation following removal of leukemia inhibitory factor from the growth media. Instead, CGBP(-)(/)(-) embryonic stem cells remain undifferentiated as revealed by persistent expression of the pluripotent markers Oct4 and alkaline phosphatase. CGBP(-)(/)(-) cells exhibit a 60 to 80% decrease in global cytosine methylation, including hypo-methylation of repetitive elements, single-copy genes, and imprinted genes. Total DNA methyltransferase activity is reduced by 30 to 60% in CGBP(-)(/)(-) cells, and expression of the maintenance DNA methyltransferase 1 protein is similarly reduced. However, de novo DNA methyltransferase activity is normal. Nearly all aspects of the pleiotropic CGBP(-)(/)(-) phenotype are rescued by introduction of a CGBP expression vector. Hence, CGBP is essential for normal epigenetic modification of the genome by cytosine methylation and for cellular differentiation, consistent with the requirement for CGBP during early mammalian development. PMID:15923607

  19. New roles for DNA cytosine modification, eRNA, anchors, and superanchors in developing B cell progenitors.

    PubMed

    Benner, Christopher; Isoda, Takeshi; Murre, Cornelis

    2015-10-13

    B-cell fate is orchestrated by a series of well-characterized developmental regulators. Here, we found that the onset of B-cell development was accompanied by large-scale changes in DNA cytosine modifications associated with promoters, enhancers, and anchors. These changes were tightly linked to alterations in transcription factor occupancy and nascent RNA (eRNA) transcription. We found that the prepro-B to the pro-B-cell transition was associated with a global exchange of DNA cytosine modifications for polycomb-mediated repression at CpG islands. Hypomethylated regions were found exclusively in the active/permissive compartment of the nucleus and were predominantly associated with regulatory elements or anchors that orchestrate the folding patterns of the genome. We identified superanchors, characterized by clusters of hypomethylated CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-bound elements, which were predominantly located at boundaries that define topological associated domains. A particularly prominent hypomethylated superanchor was positioned down-stream of the Ig heavy chain (Igh) locus. Analysis of global formaldehyde-cross-linking studies indicated that the Igh locus superanchor interacts with the VH region repertoire across vast genomic distances. We propose that the Igh locus superanchor sequesters the VH and DHJH regions into a spatial confined geometric environment to promote rapid first-passage times. Collectively, these studies demonstrate how, in developing B cells, DNA cytosine modifications associated with regulatory and architectural elements affect patterns of gene expression, folding patterns of the genome, and antigen receptor assembly. PMID:26417104

  20. A novel mutation in the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in an extended Chinese family with acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Honglian; Yin, Kunlun; Hua, Baolai; Zhu, Tienan; Zhao, Yongqiang; Guo, Shubin; Yu, Xuezhong; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Zhou

    2015-07-10

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD), the third enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Establishing accurate diagnoses of the patient and asymptomatic family members with AIP involves identifying the PBGD enzyme mutations directly. Genetic testing provides a precise diagnosis for the patient and other asymptomatic family members, and thereby proper treatments can be initiated to prevent the disease from progressing. In this study, we report a novel PBGD missense mutation, A G-to-C, at the position 988 resulting in Alanine to Proline (Ala330Pro), in a Chinese family. PMID:25870942

  1. Adenosine Deaminase Acts as a Natural Antagonist for Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4-Mediated Entry of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Raj, V. Stalin; Smits, Saskia L.; Provacia, Lisette B.; van den Brand, Judith M. A.; Wiersma, Lidewij; Ouwendijk, Werner J. D.; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Spronken, Monique I.; van Amerongen, Geert; Rottier, Peter J. M.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Bosch, Berend Jan; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) replicates in cells of different species using dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) as a functional receptor. Here we show the resistance of ferrets to MERS-CoV infection and inability of ferret DDP4 to bind MERS-CoV. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids variable in ferret DPP4 thus revealed the functional human DPP4 virus binding site. Adenosine deaminase (ADA), a DPP4 binding protein, competed for virus binding, acting as a natural antagonist for MERS-CoV infection. PMID:24257613

  2. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed M Vargas; Parker, Brian J; Rasmussen, Morten; Lindgreen, Stinus; Lilje, Berit; Tobin, Desmond J; Kelly, Theresa K; Vang, Søren; Andersson, Robin; Jones, Peter A; Hoover, Cindi A; Tikhonov, Alexei; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Rubin, Edward M; Sandelin, Albin; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Krogh, Anders; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2014-03-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence data generated from hair shafts of a 4000-yr-old Paleo-Eskimo belonging to the Saqqaq culture, we generate the first ancient nucleosome map coupled with a genome-wide survey of cytosine methylation levels. The validity of both nucleosome map and methylation levels were confirmed by the recovery of the expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues. Using ancient methylation information, we estimated the age at death of the Saqqaq individual and illustrate how epigenetic information can be used to infer ancient gene expression. Similar epigenetic signatures were found in other fossil material, such as 110,000- to 130,000-yr-old bones, supporting the contention that ancient epigenomic information can be reconstructed from a deep past. Our findings lay the foundation for extracting epigenomic information from ancient samples, allowing shifts in epialleles to be tracked through evolutionary time, as well as providing an original window into modern epigenomics. PMID:24299735

  3. A cytosine methyltransferase homologue is essential for repeat-induced point mutation in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Michael; Williams, Rebecca L.; Kothe, Gregory O.; Selker, Eric U.

    2002-01-01

    During sexual development, Neurospora crassa inactivates genes in duplicated DNA segments by a hypermutation process, repeat-induced point mutation (RIP). RIP introduces C:G to T:A transition mutations and creates targets for subsequent DNA methylation in vegetative tissue. The mechanism of RIP and its relationship to DNA methylation are not fully understood. Mutations in DIM-2, a DNA methyltransferase (DMT) responsible for all known cytosine methylation in Neurospora, does not prevent RIP. We used RIP to disrupt a second putative DMT gene in the Neurospora genome and tested mutants for defects in DNA methylation and RIP. No effect on DNA methylation was detected in the tissues that could be assayed, but the mutants showed recessive defects in RIP. Duplications of the am and mtr genes were completely stable in crosses homozygous for the mutated potential DMT gene, which we call rid (RIP defective). The same duplications were inactivated normally in heterozygous crosses. Disruption of the rid gene did not noticeably affect fertility, growth, or development. In contrast, crosses homozygous for a mutation in a related gene in Ascobolus immersus, masc1, reportedly fail to develop and heterozygous crosses reduce methylation induced premeiotically [Malagnac, F., Wendel, B., Goyon, C., Faugeron, G., Zickler, D., et al. (1997) Cell 91, 281290]. We isolated homologues of rid from Neurospora tetrasperma and Neurospora intermedia to identify conserved regions. Homologues possess all motifs characteristic of eukaryotic DMTs and have large distinctive C- and N-terminal domains. PMID:12072568

  4. Photosensitized [2 + 2] cycloaddition of N-acetylated cytosine affords stereoselective formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Junpei; Nishiguchi, Kosuke; Manabe, Koichiro; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Iwai, Shigenori

    2011-01-01

    Photocycloaddition between two adjacent bases in DNA produces a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), which is one of the major UV-induced DNA lesions, with either the cis-syn or trans-syn structure. In this study, we investigated the photosensitized intramolecular cycloaddition of partially-protected thymidylyl-(3??5?)-N4-acetyl-2?-deoxy-5-methylcytidine, to clarify the effect of the base modification on the cycloaddition reaction. The reaction resulted in the stereoselective formation of the trans-syn CPD, followed by hydrolysis of the acetylamino group. The same result was obtained for the photocycloaddition of thymidylyl-(3??5?)-N4-acetyl-2?-deoxycytidine, whereas both the cis-syn and trans-syn CPDs were formed from thymidylyl-(3??5?)-thymidine. Kinetic analyses revealed that the activation energy of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis is comparable to that reported for the thymine-cytosine CPD. These findings provided a new strategy for the synthesis of oligonucleotides containing the trans-syn CPD. Using the synthesized oligonucleotide, translesion synthesis by human DNA polymerase ? was analyzed. PMID:20880992

  5. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed M. Vargas; Parker, Brian J.; Rasmussen, Morten; Lindgreen, Stinus; Lilje, Berit; Tobin, Desmond J.; Kelly, Theresa K.; Vang, Søren; Andersson, Robin; Jones, Peter A.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Tikhonov, Alexei; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Rubin, Edward M.; Sandelin, Albin; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Krogh, Anders; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence data generated from hair shafts of a 4000-yr-old Paleo-Eskimo belonging to the Saqqaq culture, we generate the first ancient nucleosome map coupled with a genome-wide survey of cytosine methylation levels. The validity of both nucleosome map and methylation levels were confirmed by the recovery of the expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues. Using ancient methylation information, we estimated the age at death of the Saqqaq individual and illustrate how epigenetic information can be used to infer ancient gene expression. Similar epigenetic signatures were found in other fossil material, such as 110,000- to 130,000-yr-old bones, supporting the contention that ancient epigenomic information can be reconstructed from a deep past. Our findings lay the foundation for extracting epigenomic information from ancient samples, allowing shifts in epialleles to be tracked through evolutionary time, as well as providing an original window into modern epigenomics. PMID:24299735

  6. Hydroxymethyl cytosine marks in the human mitochondrial genome are dynamic in nature.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sourav; Sengupta, Shantanu; Scaria, Vinod

    2016-03-01

    Apart from DNA methylation, hydroxymethylation has increasingly been studied as an important epigenetic mark. 5- hydroxymethylcytosines, though initially were thought to be an intermediary product of demethylation, recent studies suggest this to be a highly regulated process and modulated by the TET family of enzymes. Recent genome wide studies have shown that hydroxymethylcytosine marks are closely associated with the regulation of important biological processes like transcription and embryonic development. It is also known that aberrant hydroxymethylation marks have been associated with diseases like cancer. The presence of hydroxymethylcytosines in the mitochondrial genome has been earlier suggested, though the genome-scale map has not been laid out. In this present study, we have mapped and analyzed the hydroxymethylcytosine marks in the mitochondrial genome using 23 different publicly available datasets. We cross validated our data by checking for consistency across a subset of genomic regions previously annotated to hydroxymethylcytosines and show good consistency. We observe a dynamic distribution of hydroxymethylation marks in the mitochondrial genome. Unlike the methylcytosine marks, hydroxymethylcytosine marks are characterized by the lack of conservation across the samples considered, though similar cell types shared the pattern. We additionally observed that the hydroxymethylation marks are enriched in the upstream of GSS (gene start site) regions and in gene body as similar as nuclear genes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genome-scale map of hydroxymethyl cytosines in the human mitochondrial genome. PMID:26826294

  7. High Guanine and Cytosine Content Increases mRNA Levels in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Caffin, Fanny; Helwak, Aleksandra; Zylicz, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian genes are highly heterogeneous with respect to their nucleotide composition, but the functional consequences of this heterogeneity are not clear. In the previous studies, weak positive or negative correlations have been found between the silent-site guanine and cytosine (GC) content and expression of mammalian genes. However, previous studies disregarded differences in the genomic context of genes, which could potentially obscure any correlation between GC content and expression. In the present work, we directly compared the expression of GC-rich and GC-poor genes placed in the context of identical promoters and UTR sequences. We performed transient and stable transfections of mammalian cells with GC-rich and GC-poor versions of Hsp70, green fluorescent protein, and IL2 genes. The GC-rich genes were expressed several-fold to over a 100-fold more efficiently than their GC-poor counterparts. This effect was not due to different translation rates of GC-rich and GC-poor mRNA. On the contrary, the efficient expression of GC-rich genes resulted from their increased steady-state mRNA levels. mRNA degradation rates were not correlated with GC content, suggesting that efficient transcription or mRNA processing is responsible for the high expression of GC-rich genes. We conclude that silent-site GC content correlates with gene expression efficiency in mammalian cells. PMID:16700628

  8. Effective, homogeneous and transient interference with cytosine methylation in plant genomic DNA by zebularine

    PubMed Central

    Baubec, Tuncay; Pecinka, Ales; Rozhon, Wilfried; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2009-01-01

    Covalent modification by methylation of cytosine residues represents an important epigenetic hallmark. While sequence analysis after bisulphite conversion allows correlative analyses with single-base resolution, functional analysis by interference with DNA methylation is less precise, due to the complexity of methylation enzymes and their targets. A cytidine analogue, 5-azacytidine, is frequently used as an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferases, but its rapid degradation in aqueous solution is problematic for culture periods of longer than a few hours. Application of zebularine, a more stable cytidine analogue with a similar mode of action that is successfully used as a methylation inhibitor in Neurospora and mammalian tumour cell lines, can significantly reduce DNA methylation in plants in a dose-dependent and transient manner independent of sequence context. Demethylation is connected with transcriptional reactivation and partial decondensation of heterochromatin. Zebularine represents a promising new and versatile tool for investigating the role of DNA methylation in plants with regard to transcriptional control, maintenance and formation of (hetero-) chromatin. PMID:18826433

  9. Electronic excited states of guanine-cytosine hairpins and duplexes studied by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brazard, Johanna; Thazhathveetil, Arun K; Vayá, Ignacio; Lewis, Frederick D; Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2013-08-01

    Guanine-cytosine hairpins, containing a hexaethylene glycol bridge, are studied by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy and time-correlated single photon counting; their properties are compared to those of duplexes with the same sequence. It is shown that, both in hairpins and in duplexes, base pairing induces quenching of the ππ* fluorescence, the quantum yield decreasing by at least two orders of magnitude. When the size of the systems increases from two to ten base pairs, a fluorescent component decaying on the nanosecond time-scale appears at energy higher than that stemming from the bright states of non-interacting mono-nucleotides (ca. 330 nm). For ten base pairs, this new fluorescence forms a well-defined band peaking at 305 nm. Its intensity is about 20% higher for the hairpin compared to the duplex. Its position (red-shifted by 1600 cm(-1)) and width (broader by 1800 cm(-1) FWHM) differ from those observed for large duplexes containing 1000 base pairs, suggesting the involvement of electronic coupling. Fluorescence anisotropy reveals that the excited states responsible for high energy emission are not populated directly upon photon absorption but are reached during a relaxation process. They are assigned to charge transfer states. According to the emerging picture, the amplitude of conformational motions determines whether instantaneous deactivation to the ground state or emission from charge transfer states will take place, while ππ* fluorescence is associated to imperfect base-pairing. PMID:23736116

  10. Epigenetic memory of DNAi associated with cytosine methylation and histone modification in fern.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Hidenori; Sutoh, Keita; Wada, Masamitsu

    2012-11-01

    Gene silencing technology, such as RNA interference (RNAi), is commonly used to reduce gene expression in plant cells, and exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) can induce gene silencing in higher plants. Previously, we showed that the delivery of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) fragments, such as PCR products of an endogenous gene sequence, into fern (Adiantum capillus-veneris) gametophytic cells induces a sequence-specific gene silencing that we termed DNAi. In this study, we used a neochrome 1 gene (NEO1) that mediates both red light-induced chloroplast movement and phototropism as a model of DNAi and confirmed that the NEO1 function was suppressed by the repression of the NEO1 gene. Interestingly, the gene silencing effect by DNAi was found in the progeny. Cytosine methylation was detected in the NEO1-silenced lines. The DNA modifications was present in the transcriptional region of NEO1, but no differences between wild type and the silenced lines were found in the downstream region of NEO1. Our data suggest that the DNAi gene silencing effect that was inherited throughout the next generation is regulated by epigenetic modification. Furthermore, the histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), recovered the expression and function of NEO1 in the silenced lines, suggesting that histone deacetylation is essential for the direct suppression of target genes by DNAi. PMID:22990449

  11. SCAN database: facilitating integrative analyses of cytosine modification and expression QTL.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gamazon, Eric R; Zhang, Xu; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Liu, Cong; Szilágyi, Keely L; Dolan, M Eileen; Cox, Nancy J

    2015-01-01

    Functional annotation of genetic variants including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variations (CNV) promises to greatly improve our understanding of human complex traits. Previous transcriptomic studies involving individuals from different global populations have investigated the genetic architecture of gene expression variation by mapping expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Functional interpretation of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has identified enrichment of eQTL in top signals from GWAS of human complex traits. The SCAN (SNP and CNV Annotation) database was developed as a web-based resource of genetical genomic studies including eQTL detected in the HapMap lymphoblastoid cell line samples derived from apparently healthy individuals of European and African ancestry. Considering the critical roles of epigenetic gene regulation, cytosine modification quantitative trait loci (mQTL) are expected to add a crucial layer of annotation to existing functional genomic information. Here, we describe the new features of the SCAN database that integrate comprehensive mQTL mapping results generated in the HapMap CEU (Caucasian residents from Utah, USA) and YRI (Yoruba people from Ibadan, Nigeria) LCL samples and demonstrate the utility of the enhanced functional annotation system. PMID:25818895

  12. Effects of cytosine methylation on DNA morphology: An atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Cassina, V; Manghi, M; Salerno, D; Tempestini, A; Iadarola, V; Nardo, L; Brioschi, S; Mantegazza, F

    2016-01-01

    Methylation is one of the most important epigenetic mechanisms in eukaryotes. As a consequence of cytosine methylation, the binding of proteins that are implicated in transcription to gene promoters is severely hindered, which results in gene regulation and, eventually, gene silencing. To date, the mechanisms by which methylation biases the binding affinities of proteins to DNA are not fully understood; however, it has been proposed that changes in double-strand conformations, such as stretching, bending, and over-twisting, as well as local variations in DNA stiffness/flexibility may play a role. The present work investigates, at the single molecule level, the morphological consequences of DNA methylation in vitro. By tracking the atomic force microscopy images of single DNA molecules, we characterize DNA conformations pertaining to two different degrees of methylation. In particular, we observe that methylation induces no relevant variations in DNA contour lengths, but produces measurable incremental changes in persistence lengths. Furthermore, we observe that for the methylated chains, the statistical distribution of angles along the DNA coordinate length is characterized by a double exponential decay, in agreement with what is predicted for polyelectrolytes. The results reported herein support the claim that the biological consequences of the methylation process, specifically difficulties in protein-DNA binding, are at least partially due to DNA conformation modifications. PMID:26475643

  13. Aplidin synergizes with cytosine arabinoside: functional relevance of mitochondria in Aplidin-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Humeniuk, R; Menon, L G; Mishra, P J; Saydam, G; Longo-Sorbello, G S A; Elisseyeff, Y; Lewis, L D; Aracil, M; Jimeno, J; Bertino, J R; Banerjee, D

    2007-12-01

    Aplidin (plitidepsin) is a novel marine-derived antitumor agent presently undergoing phase II clinical trials in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Lack of bone marrow toxicity has encouraged further development of this drug for treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. Multiple signaling pathways have been shown to be involved in Aplidin-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2 phase. However, the exact mechanism(s) of Aplidin action remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that mitochondria-associated or -localized processes are the potential cellular targets of Aplidin. Whole genome gene-expression profiling (GEP) revealed that fatty acid metabolism, sterol biosynthesis and energy metabolism, including the tricarboxylic acid cycle and ATP synthesis are affected by Aplidin treatment. Moreover, mutant MOLT-4, human leukemia cells lacking functional mitochondria, were found to be resistant to Aplidin. Cytosine arabinoside (araC), which also generates oxidative stress but does not affect the ATP pool, showed synergism with Aplidin in our leukemia and lymphoma models in vitro and in vivo. These studies provide new insights into the mechanism of action of Aplidin. The efficacy of the combination of Aplidin and araC is currently being evaluated in clinical phase I/II program for the treatment of patients with relapsed leukemia and high-grade lymphoma. PMID:17713546

  14. Agriculturally important yeasts: Biological control of field and postharvest diseases using yeast antagonists, and yeasts as pathogens of plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two important agricultural aspects of yeasts, control of plant diseases through application of yeasts as the control agent, and yeasts that are plant pathogens are reviewed. Yeasts as biocontrol organisms are presented first, followed by a discussion of some of the more common plant pathogenic yeas...

  15. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  16. Lager yeast comes of age.

    PubMed

    Wendland, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This "web of life" recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  17. Yeasts: From genetics to biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, S.; Poli, G.; Siman-Tov, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    Yeasts have been known and used in food and alcoholic fermentations ever since the Neolithic Age. In more recent times, on the basis of their peculiar features and history, yeasts have become very important experimental models in both microbiological and genetic research, as well as the main characters in many fermentative production processes. In the last 40 years, advances in molecular biology and genetic engineering have made possible not only the genetic selection of organisms, but also the genetic modification of some of them, especially the simplest of them, such as bacteria and yeasts. These discoveries have led to the availability of new yeast strains fit to fulfill requests of industrial production and fermentation. Moreover, genetically modified and transformed yeasts have been constructed that are able to produce large amounts of biologically active proteins and enzymes. Thus, recombinant yeasts make it easier to produce drugs, biologically active products, diagnostics, and vaccines, by inexpensive and relatively simple techniques. Yeasts are going to become more and more important in the {open_quotes}biotechnological revolution{close_quotes} by virtue of both their features and their very long and safe use in human nutrition and industry. 175 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Lager Yeast Comes of Age

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This “web of life” recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  19. Yeasts: from genetics to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Russo, S; Berkovitz Siman-Tov, R; Poli, G

    1995-01-01

    Yeasts have been known and used in food and alcoholic fermentations ever since the Neolithic Age. In more recent times, on the basis of their peculiar features and history, yeasts have become very important experimental models in both microbiological and genetic research, as well as the main characters in many fermentative production processes. In the last 40 years, advances in molecular biology and genetic engineering have made possible not only the genetic selection of organisms, but also the genetic modification of some of them, especially the simplest of them, such as bacteria and yeasts. These discoveries have led to the availability of new yeast strains fit to fulfill requests of industrial production and fermentation. Moreover, genetically modified and transformed yeasts have been constructed that are able to produce large amounts of biologically active proteins and enzymes. Thus, recombinant yeasts make it easier to produce drugs, biologically active products, diagnostics, and vaccines, by inexpensive and relatively simple techniques. Yeasts are going to become more and more important in the "biotechnological revolution" by virtue of both their features and their very long and safe use in human nutrition and industry. PMID:9003692

  20. A quantum chemical insight to intermolecular hydrogen bonding interaction between cytosine and nitrosamine: Structural and energetic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, Behzad

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen bond interactions which are formed during complex formation between cytosine and nitrosamine have been fully investigated using B3LYP, B3PW91 and MP2 methods in conjunction with various basis sets including 6-311++G (d,p), 6-311++G (2d,2p), 6-311++G (df,pd) and AUG-cc-pVDZ. Three regions around the most stable conformer of cytosine in the gas phase with six possible double H-bonded interactions were considered. Two intermolecular hydrogen bonds of type NC-N-HNA and O-H(N-H)C-ONA were found on the potential energy surface in a cyclic system with 8-member in CN1, CN3, CN5 and 7-member in CN2, CN4, CN6 systems. Results of binding energy calculation at all applied methods reveal that the CN1 structure is the most stable one which is formed by interaction of nitrosamine with cytosine in S1 region. The BSSE-corrected binding energy for six complex system is ranging from -23.8 to -43.6 kJ/mol at MP2/6-311++G (df,pd) level and the stability order is as CN1 > CN2 > CN3 > CN4 > CN5 > CN6 in all studied levels of theories. The NBO results reveal that the charge transfer occurred from cytosine to nitrosamine in CN1, CN3, CN5 and CN6 whereas this matter in the case of CN2 and CN4 was reversed. The relationship between BEs with red shift of H-bond involved bonds vibrational frequencies, charge transfer energies during complex formation and electron densities at H-bond BCPs were discussed. In addition activation energetic properties related to the proton transfer process between cytosine and nitrosamine have been calculated at MP2/6-311++G (df,pd) level. AIM results imply that H-bond interactions are electrostatic with partially covalent characteristic in nature.

  1. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  2. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  3. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida...

  4. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  5. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  6. Molybdate induces thermotolerance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Tiligada, E; Miligkos, V; Ypsilantis, E; Papamichael, K; Delitheos, A

    1999-08-01

    Application of a mild heat pretreatment, performed by shifting cells from 27 degrees C to 37 degrees C led to the protection of yeast cells from death due to a subsequent extreme heat shock at 53 degrees C. The presence of cycloheximide inhibited this induction of thermotolerance, indicating the involvement of de novo protein. The phosphatase inhibitor sodium molybdate induced thermotolerance to the non-pretreated yeast cells. This induction of thermotolerance did not seem to depend upon de novo protein synthesis. Thus, acquisition of thermotolerance in yeast may involve a number of cellular mechanisms depending on the conditions the organism encounters at any particular time. PMID:10499293

  7. Triacylglycerol Homeostasis: Insights from Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Kohlwein, Sepp D.

    2010-01-01

    The endemic increase in lipid-associated disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus has placed triacylglycerol metabolism and its associated organelle, lipid droplets, in the spotlight of biomedical research. Key enzymes of triacylglycerol metabolism are structurally and functionally conserved between yeast and mammalian cells, and studies in yeast have contributed significantly to the understanding of their biological function(s). Based on these similarities, studies performed in yeast may provide further significant mechanistic insight into the molecular basis of triacylglycerol homeostasis and its important physiological roles in healthy and diseased cells. PMID:20231294

  8. Marine yeast isolation and industrial application

    PubMed Central

    Zaky, Abdelrahman Saleh; Tucker, Gregory A; Daw, Zakaria Yehia; Du, Chenyu

    2014-01-01

    Over the last century, terrestrial yeasts have been widely used in various industries, such as baking, brewing, wine, bioethanol and pharmaceutical protein production. However, only little attention has been given to marine yeasts. Recent research showed that marine yeasts have several unique and promising features over the terrestrial yeasts, for example higher osmosis tolerance, higher special chemical productivity and production of industrial enzymes. These indicate that marine yeasts have great potential to be applied in various industries. This review gathers the most recent techniques used for marine yeast isolation as well as the latest applications of marine yeast in bioethanol, pharmaceutical and enzyme production fields. PMID:24738708

  9. Marine yeast isolation and industrial application.

    PubMed

    Zaky, Abdelrahman Saleh; Tucker, Gregory A; Daw, Zakaria Yehia; Du, Chenyu

    2014-09-01

    Over the last century, terrestrial yeasts have been widely used in various industries, such as baking, brewing, wine, bioethanol and pharmaceutical protein production. However, only little attention has been given to marine yeasts. Recent research showed that marine yeasts have several unique and promising features over the terrestrial yeasts, for example higher osmosis tolerance, higher special chemical productivity and production of industrial enzymes. These indicate that marine yeasts have great potential to be applied in various industries. This review gathers the most recent techniques used for marine yeast isolation as well as the latest applications of marine yeast in bioethanol, pharmaceutical and enzyme production fields. PMID:24738708

  10. Effect of a nickel-tolerant ACC deaminase-producing Pseudomonas strain on growth of nontransformed and transgenic canola plants.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Hilda; Vessely, Susanne; Shah, Saleh; Glick, Bernard R

    2008-08-01

    Four bacterial strains were isolated from soils at nickel-contaminated sites based on their ability to utilize 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) as a sole source of nitrogen. The four isolates were all identified as Pseudomonas putida Biovar B, and subsequent testing revealed that they all exhibited traits previously associated with plant growth promotion (i.e., indoleacetic acid and siderophore production and ACC deaminase activity). These four strains were also tolerant of nickel concentrations of up to 13.2 mM in the culture medium. The strain, HS-2, selected for further characterization, was used in pot experiments to inoculate both nontransformed and transgenic canola plants (expressing a bacterial ACC deaminase gene in its roots). Plants inoculated with the HS-2 strain produced an increase in plant biomass as well as in nickel (Ni) uptake by shoots and roots. The results suggest that this strain is a potential candidate to be used as an inoculant in both phytoremediation protocols and in plant growth promotion. PMID:18560939

  11. APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytidine deaminase and functions independently of HIV reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Suspène, Rodolphe; Sommer, Peter; Henry, Michel; Ferris, Stéphane; Guétard, Denise; Pochet, Sylvie; Chester, Ann; Navaratnam, Naveenan; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    In the absence of the viral vif gene, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be restricted by the APOBEC3G gene on chromosome 22. The role of the HIV Vif protein is to exclude host cell APOBEC3G from the budding virion. As APOBEC3G shows sequence homology to cytidine deaminases, it is presumed that in the absence of Vif, cytidine residues in the cDNA are deaminated yielding uracil. It is not known if additional proteins mediate APOBEC3G function or if deamination occurs in concert with reverse transcription. This report describes an in vitro assay showing that Baculovirus derived APOBEC3G alone extensively deaminates cDNA independently of reverse transcriptase. It reproduces the dinucleotide context typical of G → A hypermutants derived from a Δvif virus. By using an RNaseH– form of reverse transcriptase, it was shown that the cDNA has to be free of its RNA template to allow deamination. APOBEC3G deamination of dC or dCTP was not detected. In short, APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytidine deaminase capable of restricting retroviral replication. PMID:15121899

  12. Two Arabidopsis Threonine Aldolases Are Nonredundant and Compete with Threonine Deaminase for a Common Substrate Pool[W

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vijay; Laubengayer, Karen M.; Schauer, Nicolas; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Jander, Georg

    2006-01-01

    Amino acids are not only fundamental protein constituents but also serve as precursors for many essential plant metabolites. Although amino acid biosynthetic pathways in plants have been identified, pathway regulation, catabolism, and downstream metabolite partitioning remain relatively uninvestigated. Conversion of Thr to Gly and acetaldehyde by Thr aldolase (EC 4.1.2.5) was only recently shown to play a role in plant amino acid metabolism. Whereas one Arabidopsis thaliana Thr aldolase (THA1) is expressed primarily in seeds and seedlings, the other (THA2) is expressed in vascular tissue throughout the plant. Metabolite profiling of tha1 mutants identified a >50-fold increase in the seed Thr content, a 50% decrease in seedling Gly content, and few other significant metabolic changes. By contrast, homozygous tha2 mutations cause a lethal albino phenotype. Rescue of tha2 mutants and tha1 tha2 double mutants by overproduction of feedback-insensitive Thr deaminase (OMR1) shows that Gly formation by THA1 and THA2 is not essential in Arabidopsis. Seed-specific expression of feedback-insensitive Thr deaminase in both tha1 and tha2 Thr aldolase mutants greatly increases seed Ile content, suggesting that these two Thr catabolic enzymes compete for a common substrate pool. PMID:17172352

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from Streptococcus pyogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Min-Je; Lee, Won-Ho; Nam, Ki-hyun; Rhee, Kyeong-hee; Lee, Ki-Seog; Kim, Eunice EunKyung; Yu, Myung-Hee; Hwang, Kwang Yeon

    2005-04-01

    The tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from the pathogenic bacteria S. pyogenes has been overexpressed and crystallized. The tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from the pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes (spTAD) has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized in the presence of Zn{sup 2+} ion at 295 K using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Flash-cooled crystals of spTAD diffracted to 2.0 Å using 30%(v/v) glycerol as a cryoprotectant. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.0 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 81.042, c = 81.270 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one subunit of spTAD, with a corresponding crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 3.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 62.7%.

  14. Characterization of ACC deaminase gene in Pseudomonas entomophila strain PS-PJH isolated from the rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan; Lee, Kui-Jae; Park, Seung-Moon; Chae, Jong-Chan; Yun, Bong-Sik; Lee, Yong Hoon; Park, Yool-Jin; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2010-04-01

    The enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase cleaves the ethylene precursor ACC into alpha-ketobutyrate and ammonia. The decreased level of ethylene allows the plant to be more resistant to a wide environmental stress including plant pathogens. In the present study, we characterized the ACC deaminase activity of a Pseudomonas entomophila strain PS-PJH isolated from the red pepper rhizosphere region of red pepper grown at Jinan, Korea. The isolate produced 23.8 +/- 0.4 micromol of alpha-ketobutyrate/mg of protein/h during ACC deamination under in vitro conditions. Polymerase chain reaction for acdS gene showed that the isolated P. entomophila strain PS-PJH carry sequences similar to the known acdS genes. Results of the multiple sequence alignment revealed >99% identity (nucleotide and amino acid) with acdS gene of Pseudomonas putida strains AM15 and UW4. The isolated bacteria promoted 43.3 and 34.1% of growth in Raphanus sativus and Lactuca sativa plants, respectively. Based on the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region sequences, the isolate was identified as P. entomophila. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study to report the acdS gene in P. entomophila. PMID:20082369

  15. Assimilation of nitrate by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Siverio, José M

    2002-08-01

    Nitrate assimilation has received much attention in filamentous fungi and plants but not so much in yeasts. Recently the availability of classical genetic and molecular biology tools for the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has allowed the advance of the study of this metabolic pathway in yeasts. The genes YNT1, YNR1 and YNI1, encoding respectively nitrate transport, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, have been cloned, as well as two other genes encoding transcriptional regulatory factors. All these genes lie closely together in a cluster. Transcriptional regulation is the main regulatory mechanism that controls the levels of the enzymes involved in nitrate metabolism although other mechanisms may also be operative. The process involved in the sensing and signalling of the presence of nitrate in the medium is not well understood. In this article the current state of the studies of nitrate assimilation in yeasts as well as possible venues for future research are reviewed. PMID:12165428

  16. The Yeast Sphingolipid Signaling Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Montefusco, David J.; Matmati, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are recognized as signaling mediators in a growing number of pathways, and represent potential targets to address many diseases. The study of sphingolipid signaling in yeast has created a number of breakthroughs in the field, and has the potential to lead future advances. The aim of this article is to provide an inclusive view of two major frontiers in yeast sphingolipid signaling. In the first section, several key studies in the field of sphingolipidomics are consolidated to create a yeast sphingolipidome that ranks nearly all known sphingolipid species by their level in a resting yeast cell. The second section presents an overview of most known phenotypes identified for sphingolipid gene mutants, presented with the intention of illuminating not yet discovered connections outside and inside of the field. PMID:24220500

  17. Regulation of epithelial and lymphocyte cell adhesion by adenosine deaminase-CD26 interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Ginés, Silvia; Mariño, Marta; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Morimoto, Chikao; Callebaut, Christian; Hovanessian, Ara; Casadó, Vicent; Lluis, Carmen; Franco, Rafael

    2002-01-01

    The extra-enzymic function of cell-surface adenosine deaminase (ADA), an enzyme mainly localized in the cytosol but also found on the cell surface of monocytes, B cells and T cells, has lately been the subject of numerous studies. Cell-surface ADA is able to transduce co-stimulatory signals in T cells via its interaction with CD26, an integral membrane protein that acts as ADA-binding protein. The aim of the present study was to explore whether ADA-CD26 interaction plays a role in the adhesion of lymphocyte cells to human epithelial cells. To meet this aim, different lymphocyte cell lines (Jurkat and CEM T) expressing endogenous, or overexpressing human, CD26 protein were tested in adhesion assays to monolayers of colon adenocarcinoma human epithelial cells, Caco-2, which express high levels of cell-surface ADA. Interestingly, the adhesion of Jurkat and CEM T cells to a monolayer of Caco-2 cells was greatly dependent on CD26. An increase by 50% in the cell-to-cell adhesion was found in cells containing higher levels of CD26. Incubation with an anti-CD26 antibody raised against the ADA-binding site or with exogenous ADA resulted in a significant reduction (50-70%) of T-cell adhesion to monolayers of epithelial cells. The role of ADA-CD26 interaction in the lymphocyte-epithelial cell adhesion appears to be mediated by CD26 molecules that are not interacting with endogenous ADA (ADA-free CD26), since SKW6.4 (B cells) that express more cell-surface ADA showed lower adhesion than T cells. Adhesion stimulated by CD26 and ADA is mediated by T cell lymphocyte function-associated antigen. A role for ADA-CD26 interaction in cell-to-cell adhesion was confirmed further in integrin activation assays. FACS analysis revealed a higher expression of activated integrins on T cell lines in the presence of increasing amounts of exogenous ADA. Taken together, these results suggest that the ADA-CD26 interaction on the cell surface has a role in lymphocyte-epithelial cell adhesion. PMID:11772392

  18. Restriction of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus by Equine APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zielonka, Jörg; Bravo, Ignacio G.; Marino, Daniela; Conrad, Elea; Perković, Mario; Battenberg, Marion; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian APOBEC3 (A3) proteins comprise a multigene family of cytidine deaminases that act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. The A3 locus on the chromosome 28 of the horse genome contains multiple A3 genes: two copies of A3Z1, five copies of A3Z2, and a single copy of A3Z3, indicating a complex evolution of multiple gene duplications. We have cloned and analyzed for expression the different equine A3 genes and examined as well the subcellular distribution of the corresponding proteins. Additionally, we have tested the functional antiretroviral activity of the equine and of several of the human and nonprimate A3 proteins against the Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), the Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and the Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2). Hematopoietic cells of horses express at least five different A3s: A3Z1b, A3Z2a-Z2b, A3Z2c-Z2d, A3Z2e, and A3Z3, whereas circulating macrophages, the natural target of EIAV, express only part of the A3 repertoire. The five A3Z2 tandem copies arose after three consecutive, recent duplication events in the horse lineage, after the split between Equidae and Carnivora. The duplicated genes show different antiviral activities against different viruses: equine A3Z3 and A3Z2c-Z2d are potent inhibitors of EIAV while equine A3Z1b, A3Z2a-Z2b, A3Z2e showed only weak anti-EIAV activity. Equine A3Z1b and A3Z3 restricted AAV and all equine A3s, except A3Z1b, inhibited SIV. We hypothesize that the horse A3 genes are undergoing a process of subfunctionalization in their respective viral specificities, which might provide the evolutionary advantage for keeping five copies of the original gene. PMID:19458006

  19. Regulation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate deaminase in the freeze tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica

    PubMed Central

    Dieni, Christopher A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2008-01-01

    Background The wood frog, Rana sylvatica, is one of a few vertebrate species that have developed natural freeze tolerance, surviving days or weeks with 6570% of its total body water frozen in extracellular ice masses. Frozen frogs exhibit no vital signs and their organs must endure multiple stresses, particularly long term anoxia and ischemia. Maintenance of cellular energy supply is critical to viability in the frozen state and in skeletal muscle, AMP deaminase (AMPD) plays a key role in stabilizing cellular energetics. The present study investigated AMPD control in wood frog muscle. Results Wood frog AMPD was subject to multiple regulatory controls: binding to subcellular structures, protein phosphorylation, and effects of allosteric effectors, cryoprotectants and temperature. The percentage of bound AMPD activity increased from 20 to 35% with the transition to the frozen state. Bound AMPD showed altered kinetic parameters compared with the free enzyme (S0.5 AMP was reduced, Hill coefficient fell to ~1.0) and the transition to the frozen state led to a 3-fold increase in S0.5 AMP of the bound enzyme. AMPD was a target of protein phosphorylation. Bound AMPD from control frogs proved to be a low phosphate form with a low S0.5 AMP and was phosphorylated in incubations that stimulated PKA, PKC, CaMK, or AMPK. Bound AMPD from frozen frogs was a high phosphate form with a high S0.5 AMP that was reduced under incubation conditions that stimulated protein phosphatases. Frog muscle AMPD was activated by MgATP and MgADP and inhibited by MgGTP, KCl, NaCl and NH4Cl. The enzyme product, IMP, uniquely inhibited only the bound (phosphorylated) enzyme from muscle of frozen frogs. Activators and inhibitors differentially affected the free versus bound enzyme. S0.5 AMP of bound AMPD was also differentially affected by high versus low assay temperature (25 vs 5C) and by the presence/absence of the natural cryoprotectant (250 mM glucose) that accumulates during freezing. Conclusion Maintenance of long term viability under the ischemic conditions in frozen muscle requires attention to the control of cellular energetics. Differential regulatory controls on AMPD by mechanisms including binding to muscle proteins, actions allosteric effectors, glucose and temperature effects and reversible phosphorylation adjust enzyme function for an optimal role in controlling cellular adenylate levels in ischemic frozen muscle. Stable modification of AMPD properties via freeze-responsive phosphorylation may contribute both to AMPD control and to coordinating AMPD function with other enzymes of energy metabolism in cold ischemic muscle. PMID:18430211

  20. Restriction of equine infectious anemia virus by equine APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Jörg; Bravo, Ignacio G; Marino, Daniela; Conrad, Elea; Perković, Mario; Battenberg, Marion; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten

    2009-08-01

    The mammalian APOBEC3 (A3) proteins comprise a multigene family of cytidine deaminases that act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. The A3 locus on the chromosome 28 of the horse genome contains multiple A3 genes: two copies of A3Z1, five copies of A3Z2, and a single copy of A3Z3, indicating a complex evolution of multiple gene duplications. We have cloned and analyzed for expression the different equine A3 genes and examined as well the subcellular distribution of the corresponding proteins. Additionally, we have tested the functional antiretroviral activity of the equine and of several of the human and nonprimate A3 proteins against the Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), the Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and the Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2). Hematopoietic cells of horses express at least five different A3s: A3Z1b, A3Z2a-Z2b, A3Z2c-Z2d, A3Z2e, and A3Z3, whereas circulating macrophages, the natural target of EIAV, express only part of the A3 repertoire. The five A3Z2 tandem copies arose after three consecutive, recent duplication events in the horse lineage, after the split between Equidae and Carnivora. The duplicated genes show different antiviral activities against different viruses: equine A3Z3 and A3Z2c-Z2d are potent inhibitors of EIAV while equine A3Z1b, A3Z2a-Z2b, A3Z2e showed only weak anti-EIAV activity. Equine A3Z1b and A3Z3 restricted AAV and all equine A3s, except A3Z1b, inhibited SIV. We hypothesize that the horse A3 genes are undergoing a process of subfunctionalization in their respective viral specificities, which might provide the evolutionary advantage for keeping five copies of the original gene. PMID:19458006

  1. Effect of high dose cytosine arabinoside on quantitative EEG in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Marta; Marchesi, Francesco; Dispenza, Sabrina; Dinapoli, Loredana; Sperati, Francesca; Petreri, Gianluca; Gumenyuk, Svitlana; Dessanti, Maria Laura; Zarabla, Alessia; Cantelmi, Tonino; Mengarelli, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Background EEG activity is considered an index of functional state of brain. Chemotherapy (CT), used for non-central nervous system (CNS) cancer, can cross the blood brain barrier and contribute to changes in the functional state of brain that can alter background EEG activity. Quantitative EEG (qEEG) is superior to conventional EEG in the detection of subtle alterations of EEG background activity and for this reason, the use of qEEG might assist the clinician in evaluating the possible effect of CT on the CNS. The nucleoside analog cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) is one of the milestone chemotherapeutic agents used for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our observational study evaluates the possible effect of Ara-C on the qEEG of patients with AML, without CNS involvement. We conducted an observational study on newly diagnosed AML patients without CNS involvement, undergoing treatment with Ara-C to analyze the possible effect of Ara-C high doses on EEG background activity using qEEG analyses. A total of nine AML patients, 5 with Ara-C i.v. high dose (≥3 g/m(2) die), 4 with standard dose (100 mg/m(2) die) underwent qEEG (at rest, during hyperpnoea, mental arithmetic task and blocking reaction). We compared the EEG background activity of the two groups at baseline and after 6 months. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences between the two groups in mean relative power for all frequency bands, at rest and during hyperpnoea, mental arithmetic task and blocking reaction. Our data indicate that high dose Ara-C i.v. did not induce significant changes on EEG background activity in our patients. Future research in this area could include prospective studies that would combine qEEG and neuropsychological testing to assess the impact of CT on brain functions. PMID:27066155

  2. Evolution of complete proteomes: guanine-cytosine pressure, phylogeny and environmental influences blend the proteomic architecture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Guanine-cytosine (GC) composition is an important feature of genomes. Likewise, amino acid composition is a distinct, but less valued, feature of proteomes. A major concern is that it is not clear what valuable information can be acquired from amino acid composition data. To address this concern, in-depth analyses of the amino acid composition of the complete proteomes from 63 archaea, 270 bacteria, and 128 eukaryotes were performed. Results Principal component analysis of the amino acid matrices showed that the main contributors to proteomic architecture were genomic GC variation, phylogeny, and environmental influences. GC pressure drove positive selection on Ala, Arg, Gly, Pro, Trp, and Val, and adverse selection on Asn, Lys, Ile, Phe, and Tyr. The physico-chemical framework of the complete proteomes withstood GC pressure by frequency complementation of GC-dependent amino acid pairs with similar physico-chemical properties. Gln, His, Ser, and Val were responsible for phylogeny and their constituted components could differentiate archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes. Environmental niche was also a significant factor in determining proteomic architecture, especially for archaea for which the main amino acids were Cys, Leu, and Thr. In archaea, hyperthermophiles, acidophiles, mesophiles, psychrophiles, and halophiles gathered successively along the environment-based principal component. Concordance between proteomic architecture and the genetic code was also related closely to genomic GC content, phylogeny, and lifestyles. Conclusions Large-scale analyses of the complete proteomes of a wide range of organisms suggested that amino acid composition retained the trace of GC variation, phylogeny, and environmental influences during evolution. The findings from this study will help in the development of a global understanding of proteome evolution, and even biological evolution. PMID:24088322

  3. McrB: a prokaryotic protein specifically recognizing DNA containing modified cytosine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Krger, T; Wild, C; Noyer-Weidner, M

    1995-01-01

    Restriction of DNA by the Escherichia coli K-12 McrBC restriction endonuclease, which consists of the two subunits McrB and McrC, depends on the presence of modified cytosine residues in a special constellation. From previous work by others it was known that restriction of 5-methylcytosine-containing DNA requires two methylated 5'-PuC sites separated by approximately 40-80 non-defined base pairs. Here we show that binding of the McrBC nuclease is mediated exclusively by the McrB subunit. McrB has a low affinity for non-methylated DNA, with which it forms low molecular weight complexes. The affinity for DNA is significantly increased, with variations depending on the sequence context, by hemi- or fully methylated 5'-PuC sites. Binding to such substrates yields high molecular weight complexes, presumably involving several McrB molecules. Methylation at unique 5'-PuC sites can be sufficient to stimulate DNA binding by McrB. As such substrates are not cleaved by the nuclease, restriction apparently requires the coordinated interaction of molecules bound to neighbouring 5'-PumC sites. The binding properties of McrB exhibit some similarities to recently identified eukaryotic proteins interacting in a non-sequence-specific manner with DNA containing methylated 5'-CpG sequences and might point to a common molecular origin of these proteins. In addition to DNA, McrB also binds GTP, an essential cofactor in DNA restriction by McrBC. McrC neither binds to DNA nor modulates the DNA binding potential of McrB. As McrC is essential for restriction it appears to predominantly function in catalysis. Images PMID:7781618

  4. Vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization studies of the microhydration of DNA bases (guanine, cytosine, adenine, and thymine).

    PubMed

    Belau, Leonid; Wilson, Kevin R; Leone, Stephen R; Ahmed, Musahid

    2007-08-01

    In this work, we report on a photoionization study of the microhydration of the four DNA bases. Gas-phase clusters of water with DNA bases [guanine (G), cytosine (C), adenine (A), and thymine (T)] are generated via thermal vaporization of the bases and expansion of the resultant vapor in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single-photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are recorded for the DNA bases and the following water (W) clusters: G, GWn (n = 1-3); C, CWn (n = 1-3); A, AWn (n = 1,2); and T, TWn (n = 1-3). Appearance energies (AE) are derived from the onset of these PIE curves (all energies in eV): G (8.1 +/- 0.1), GW (8.0 +/- 0.1), GW2 (8.0 +/- 0.1), and GW3 (8.0); C (8.65 +/- 0.05), CW (8.45 +/- 0.05), CW2 (8.4 +/- 0.1), and CW3 (8.3 +/- 0.1); A (8.30 +/- 0.05), AW (8.20 +/- 0.05), and AW2 (8.1 +/- 0.1); T (8.90 +/- 0.05); and TW (8.75 +/- 0.05), TW2 (8.6 +/- 0.1), and TW3 (8.6 +/- 0.1). The AEs of the DNA bases decrease slightly with the addition of water molecules (up to three) but do not converge to values found for photoinduced electron removal from DNA bases in solution. PMID:17419600

  5. Vacuum-Ultraviolet photoionization studies of the microhydrationof DNA bases (Guanine, Cytosine, Adenine and Thymine)

    SciTech Connect

    Belau, L.; Wilson, K.R.; Leone, S.R.; Musahid, Ahmed

    2007-01-22

    In this work, we report on a photoionization study of the microhydration of the four DNA bases. Gas-phase clusters of water with DNA bases [guanine (G), cytosine (C), adenine (A), and thymine (T)] are generated via thermal vaporization of the bases and expansion of the resultant vapor in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single-photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are recorded for the DNA bases and the following water (W) clusters: G, GW{sub n} (n = 1-3); C, CW{sub n} (n = 1-3); A, AW{sub n} (n = 1,2); and T, TW{sub n} (n = 1-3). Appearance energies (AE) are derived from the onset of these PIE curves (all energies in eV): G (8.1 {+-} 0.1), GW (8.0 {+-} 0.1), GW{sub 2} (8.0 {+-} 0.1), and GW{sub 3} (8.0); C (8.65 {+-} 0.05), CW (8.45 {+-} 0.05), CW{sub 2} (8.4 {+-} 0.1), and CW{sub 3} (8.3 {+-} 0.1); A (8.30 {+-} 0.05), AW (8.20 {+-} 0.05), and AW{sub 2} (8.1 {+-} 0.1); T (8.90 {+-} 0.05); and TW (8.75 {+-} 0.05), TW{sub 2} (8.6 {+-} 0.1), and TW{sub 3} (8.6 {+-} 0.1). The AEs of the DNA bases decrease slightly with the addition of water molecules (up to three) but do not converge to values found for photoinduced electron removal from DNA bases in solution.

  6. The cloned 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase gene from Sinorhizobium sp. strain BL3 in Rhizobium sp. strain TAL1145 promotes nodulation and growth of Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Awaya, Jonathan D; Li, Qing X; Borthakur, Dulal

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase of symbionts in nodulation and growth of Leucaena leucocephala. The acdS genes encoding ACC deaminase were cloned from Rhizobium sp. strain TAL1145 and Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 in multicopy plasmids, and transferred to TAL1145. The BL3-acdS gene greatly enhanced ACC deaminase activity in TAL1145 compared to the native acdS gene. The transconjugants of TAL1145 containing the native or BL3 acdS gene could grow in minimal media containing 1.5mM ACC, whereas BL3 could tolerate up to 3mM ACC. The TAL1145 acdS gene was inducible by mimosine and not by ACC, while the BL3 acdS gene was highly inducible by ACC and not by mimosine. The transconjugants of TAL1145 containing the native- and BL3-acdS genes formed nodules with greater number and sizes, and produced higher root mass on L. leucocephala than by TAL1145. This study shows that the introduction of multiple copies of the acdS gene increased ACC deaminase activities of TAL1145 and enhanced its symbiotic efficiency on L. leucocephala. PMID:18406559

  7. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-containing rhizobacteria protect Ocimum sanctum plants during waterlogging stress via reduced ethylene generation.

    PubMed

    Barnawal, Deepti; Bharti, Nidhi; Maji, Deepamala; Chanotiya, Chandan Singh; Kalra, Alok

    2012-09-01

    Ocimum sanctum grown as rain-fed crop, is known to be poorly adapted to waterlogged conditions. Many a times the crop suffers extreme damages because of anoxia and excessive ethylene generation due to waterlogging conditions present under heavy rain. The usefulness of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-containing plant growth promoting rhizobacteria was investigated under waterlogging stress. The comparison of herb yield and stress induced biochemical changes of waterlogged and non-waterlogged plants with and without ACC deaminase-containing microbiological treatments were monitored in this study. Ten plant growth promoting rhizobacteria strains containing ACC-deaminase were isolated and characterized. Four selected isolates Fd2 (Achromobacter xylosoxidans), Bac5 (Serratia ureilytica), Oci9 (Herbaspirillum seropedicae) and Oci13 (Ochrobactrum rhizosphaerae) had the potential to protect Ocimum plants from flood induced damage under waterlogged glass house conditions. Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential of these ACC deaminase-containing selected strains for reducing the yield losses caused by waterlogging conditions. Bacterial treatments protected plants from waterlogging induced detrimental changes like stress ethylene production, reduced chlorophyll concentration, higher lipid peroxidation, proline concentration and reduced foliar nutrient uptake. Fd2 (A. xylosoxidans) induced maximum waterlogging tolerance as treated waterlogged plants recorded maximum growth and herb yield (46.5% higher than uninoculated waterlogged plants) with minimum stress ethylene levels (53% lower ACC concentration as compared to waterlogged plants without bacterial inoculation) whereas under normal non-waterlogged conditions O. rhizosphaerae was most effective in plant growth promotion. PMID:22846334

  8. Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

    The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

  9. Study of amyloids using yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wickner, Reed B.; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Shewmaker, Frank; McGlinchey, Ryan; Edskes, Herman K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism in such fields as the cell cycle, regulation of transcription, protein trafficking and cell biology, primarily because of its ease of genetic manipulation. This is no less so in the area of amyloid studies. The endogenous yeast amyloids described to date include prions, infectious proteins (Table 1), and some cell wall proteins (1). and amyloids of humans and a fungal prion have also been studied using the yeast system. Accordingly, the emphasis of this chapter will be on genetic, biochemical, cell biological and physical methods particularly useful in the study of yeast prions and other amyloids studied in yeast. We limit our description of these methods to those aspects which have been most useful in studying yeast prions, citing more detailed expositions in the literature. Volumes on yeast genetics methods (2–4), and on amyloids and prions (5, 6) are useful, and Masison has edited a volume of Methods on “Identification, analysis and characterization of fungal prions” which covers some of this territory (7). We also outline some useful physical methods, pointing the reader to more extensive and authoratative descriptions. PMID:22528100

  10. Yeast mitochondrial transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mathilde; Darzacq, Xavier; Devaux, Frederic; Singer, Robert H; Jacq, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Although 30 years ago it was strongly suggested that some cytoplasmic ribosomes are bound to the surface of yeast mitochondria, the mechanisms and the raison d'être of this process are not understood. For instance, it is not perfectly known which of the several hundred nuclearly encoded genes have to be translated to the mitochondrial vicinity to guide the import of the corresponding proteins. One can take advantage of several modern methods to address a number of aspects of the site-specific translation process of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) coding for proteins imported into mitochondria. Three complementary approaches are presented to analyze the spatial distribution of mRNAs coding for proteins imported into mitochondria. Starting from biochemical purifications of mitochondria-bound polysomes, we describe a genomewide approach to classify all the cellular mRNAs according to their physical proximity with mitochondria; we also present real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction monitoring of mRNA distribution to provide a quantified description of this localization. Finally, a fluorescence microscopy approach on a single living cell is described to visualize the in vivo localization of mRNAs involved in mitochondria biogenesis. PMID:18314748

  11. Synthetic Yeast Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Wenying; Burton, Justin

    2010-03-01

    Cooperation is wide-spread and has been postulated to drive major transitions in evolution. However, Darwinian selection favors ``cheaters'' that consume benefits without paying a fair cost. How did cooperation evolve against the threat of cheaters? To investigate the evolutionary trajectories of cooperation, we created a genetically tractable system that can be observed as it evolves from inception. The system consists of two engineered yeast strains -- a red-fluorescent strain that requires adenine and releases lysine and a yellow-fluorescent strain that requires lysine and releases adenine. Cells that consume but not supply metabolites would be cheaters. From the properties of two cooperating strains, we calculated and experimentally verified the minimal initial cell densities required for the viability of the cooperative system in the absence of exogenously added adenine and lysine. Strikingly, evolved cooperative systems were viable at 100-fold lower initial cell densities than their ancestors. We are investigating the nature and diversity of pro-cooperation changes, the dynamics of cooperator-cheater cocultures, and the effects of spatial environment on cooperation and cheating.

  12. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  13. Characterization of ACC deaminase-producing endophytic bacteria isolated from copper-tolerant plants and their potential in promoting the growth and copper accumulation of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Feng; He, Lin-Yan; Chen, Zhao-Jin; Wang, Qing-Ya; Qian, Meng; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2011-03-01

    One hundred Cu-resistant-endophytic bacteria were isolated from Cu-tolerant plants grown on Cu mine wasteland, of which, eight Cu-resistant and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase-producing endophytic bacteria were obtained based on the ACC deaminase activity of the bacteria and characterized with respect to metal resistance, production of ACC deaminase, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) as well as siderophores and mineral phosphate solubilization. Ralstonia sp. J1-22-2, Pantoea agglomerans Jp3-3, and Pseudomonas thivervalensis Y1-3-9 with higher ACC deaminase activity (ranging from 213 to 370 ?M ?-ketobutyrate mg(-1)h(-1)) were evaluated for promoting plant growth and Cu uptake of rape grown in quartz sand containing 0, 2.5, and 5 mg kg(-1) of Cu in pot experiments. The eight bacteria were found to exhibit different multiple heavy metal resistance characteristics, to show different levels of ACC deaminase activity and to produce indole acetic acid. Seven bacteria produced siderophores and solubilized inorganic phosphate. Pot experiments showed that inoculation with the strains (J1-22-2, Jp3-3, and Y1-3-9) was found to increase the biomass of rape. Increases in above-ground tissue Cu contents of rape cultivated in 2.5 and 5 mg kg(-1) of Cu-contaminated substrates varied from 9% to 31% and from 3 to 4-fold respectively in inoculated-rape plants compared to the uninoculated control. The maximum Cu uptake of rape was observed after inoculation with P. agglomerans Jp3-3. The results show that metal-resistant and plant growth promoting endophytic bacteria play an important role in plant growth and Cu uptake which may provide a new endophytic bacterial-assisted phytoremediation of Cu-contaminated environment. PMID:21315404

  14. An efficient approach to identify ilvA mutations reveals an amino-terminal catalytic domain in biosynthetic threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, K E; Eisenstein, E

    1993-01-01

    High-level expression of the regulatory enzyme threonine deaminase in Escherichia coli strains grown on minimal medium that are deficient in the activities of enzymes needed for branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis result in growth inhibition, possibly because of the accumulation of toxic levels of alpha-ketobutyrate, the product of the committed step in isoleucine biosynthesis. This condition affords a means for selecting genetic variants of threonine deaminase that are deficient in catalysis by suppression of growth inhibition. Strains harboring mutations in ilvA that decreased the catalytic activity of threonine deaminase were found to grow more rapidly than isogenic strains containing wild-type ilvA. Modification of the ilvA gene to introduce additional unique, evenly spaced restriction enzyme sites facilitated the identification of suppressor mutations by enabling small DNA fragments to be subcloned for sequencing. The 10 mutations identified in ilvA code for enzymes with significantly reduced activity relative to that of wild-type threonine deaminase. Values for their specific activities range from 40% of that displayed by wild-type enzyme to complete inactivation as evidenced by failure to complement an ilvA deletion strain to isoleucine prototrophy. Moreover, some mutant enzymes showed altered allosteric properties with respect to valine activation and isoleucine inhibition. The location of the 10 mutations in the 5' two-thirds of the ilvA gene is consistent with suggestions that threonine deaminase is organized functionally with an amino-terminal domain that is involved in catalysis and a carboxy-terminal domain that is important for regulation. Images PMID:8407838

  15. Spatial and Functional Relationships Among Pol V-Associated loci, Pol IV-Dependent siRNAs, and Cytosine Methylation in the Arabidopsis Epigenome

    SciTech Connect

    Wierzbicki, A. T.; Cocklin, Ross; Mayampurath, Anoop; Lister, Ryan; Rowley, M. J.; Gregory, Brian D.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Tang, Haixu; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2012-08-15

    Multisubunit RNA polymerases IV and V (Pols IV and V) mediate RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing of retrotransposons and heterochromatic repeats in plants. We identified genomic sites of Pol V occupancy in parallel with siRNA deep sequencing and methylcytosine mapping, comparing wild-type plants with mutants defective for Pol IV, Pol V, or both Pols IV and V. Approximately 60% of Pol V-associated regions encompass regions of 24-nucleotide (nt) siRNA complementarity and cytosine methylation, consistent with cytosine methylation being guided by base-pairing of Pol IV-dependent siRNAs with Pol V transcripts. However, 27% of Pol V peaks do not overlap sites of 24-nt siRNA biogenesis or cytosine methylation, indicating that Pol V alone does not specify sites of cytosine methylation. Surprisingly, the number of methylated CHH motifs, a hallmark of RNA-directed de novo methylation, is similar in wild-type plants and Pol IV or Pol V mutants. In the mutants, methylation is lost at 50%-60% of the CHH sites that are methylated in the wild type but is gained at new CHH positions, primarily in pericentromeric regions. These results indicate that Pol IV and Pol V are not required for cytosine methyltransferase activity but shape the epigenome by guiding CHH methylation to specific genomic sites.

  16. DNA strand breaks induced by concerted interaction of H radicals and low-energy electrons. A computational study of the nucleotide of cytosine

    SciTech Connect

    Dabkowska, Iwona; Rak, Janusz; Gutowski, Maciej S.

    2005-08-01

    We propose a mechanism of DNA single strand breaks induced by low-energy electrons. Density functional theory calculations have been performed on a nucleotide of cytosine to identify barriers for the phosphate-sugar O-C bond cleavage. Attachment of the first excess electron induces intermolecular proton transfer to cytosine. The resulting neutral radical of hydrogenated cytosine binds another excess electron, and the excess charge is localized primarily on the C6 atom. A barrier based of free enthalpies of 4.2 kcal/mol is encountered for proton transfer from the C2’ atom of the adjacent sugar unit to the C6 atom of cytosine. The proton transfer is followed by a barrier-free sugar-phosphate C-O bond cleavage. The rate of the C-O bond cleavage in the anion of hydrogenated nucleotide of cytosine is estimated to be in a range 5x108 to 2x1010 s-1, which makes the proposed mechanism probable to take place in DNA. The process proceeds through bound anionic states, not through metastable states with finite lifetimes and discrete energy positions with respect to the neutral target. The results suggest that even very low-energy electrons may cleave the DNA backbon

  17. Effect of C5-Methylation of Cytosine on the UV-Induced Reactivity of Duplex DNA: Conformational and Electronic Factors.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Esposito, Luciana; Douki, Thierry; Perron, Marion; Lepori, Clément; Improta, Roberto; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2016-05-12

    C5-methylation of cytosines is strongly correlated with UV-induced mutations detected in skin cancers. Mutational hot-spots appearing at TCG sites are due to the formation of pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers (CPDs). The present study, performed for the model DNA duplex (TCGTA)3·(TACGA)3 and the constitutive single strands, examines the factors underlying the effect of C5-methylation on pyrimidine dimerization at TCG sites. This effect is quantified for the first time by quantum yields ϕ. They were determined following irradiation at 255, 267, and 282 nm and subsequent photoproduct analysis using HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry. C5-methylation leads to an increase of the CPD quantum yield up to 80% with concomitant decrease of that of pyrimidine(6-4) pyrimidone adducts (64PPs) by at least a factor of 3. The obtained ϕ values cannot be explained only by the change of the cytosine absorption spectrum upon C5-methylation. The conformational and electronic factors that may affect the dimerization reaction are discussed in light of results obtained by fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and quantum mechanical calculations. Thus, it appears that the presence of an extra methyl on cytosine affects the sugar puckering, thereby enhancing conformations of the TC step that are prone to CPD formation but less favorable to 64PPs. In addition, C5-methylation diminishes the amplitude of conformational motions in duplexes; in the resulting stiffer structure, ππ* excitations may be transferred from initially populated exciton states to reactive pyrimidines giving rise to CPDs. PMID:27075054

  18. Two crystal forms of helix II of Xenopus laevis 5S rRNA with a cytosine bulge.

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Y; Sundaralingam, M

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of r(GCCACCCUG).r(CAGGGUCGGC), helix II of the Xenopus laevis 5S rRNA with a cytosine bulge (underlined), has been determined in two forms at 2.2 A (Form I, space group P4(2)2(1)2, a = b = 57.15 A and c = 43.54 A) and 1.7 A (Form II, space group P4(3)2(1)2, a = b = 32.78 A and c = 102.5 A). The helical regions of the nonamers are found in the standard A-RNA conformations and the two forms have an RMS deviation of 0.75 A. However, the cytosine bulge adopts two significantly different conformations with an RMS deviation of 3.9 A. In Form I, the cytosine bulge forms an intermolecular C+*G.C triple in the major groove of a symmetry-related duplex with intermolecular hydrogen bonds between N4C and O6G, and between protonated N3+C and N7G. In contrast, a minor groove C*G.C triple is formed in Form II with intermolecular hydrogen bonds between O2C and N2G, and between N3C and N3G with a water bridge. A partial major groove opening was observed in Form I structure at the bulge site. Two Ca2+ ions were found in Form I helix whereas there were none in Form II. The structural comparison of these two forms indicates that bulged residues can adopt a variety of conformations with little perturbation to the global helix structure. This suggests that bulged residues could function as flexible latches in bridging double helical motifs and facilitate the folding of large RNA molecules. PMID:10999608

  19. Decreased expression of manganese superoxide dismutase in transformed cells is associated with increased cytosine methylation of the SOD2 gene.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; He, T; Domann, F E

    1999-08-01

    Tumor cells express lower levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) than their normal counterparts. Enforced expression of MnSOD reverses the malignant phenotype of many transformed cells, suggesting that SOD2 is a tumor suppressor. The SOD2 gene contains a large CpG island spanning > 3.5 kb that starts near the 5' edge of the promoter and extends into intron 2. We hypothesized that the difference in SOD2 expression between tumor cells and their normal cell counterparts might be secondary to differences in their cytosine methylation patterns in this CpG island. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the methylation status of the SOD2 gene in two cell line models that show differential MnSOD expression between normal and SV40-transformed cells: WI38 and MRC5 and their SV40-transformed variants, WI38-VA and MRC5-VA. We subdivided the SOD2 gene CpG island into 10 individual regions for analysis by bisulfite genomic sequencing. A region located in intron 2 displayed a significant increase in cytosine methylation in both transformed cell lines that expressed low levels of MnSOD mRNA compared with their normal cell counterparts. Recent studies by others have shown that SOD2 intron 2 is a potent transcriptional enhancer. The association between increased cytosine methylation of the SOD2 intron 2 region and decreased MnSOD expression in transformed cells compared with their normal counterparts suggests that an epigenetic mechanism contributes to the differential SOD2 gene expression between these normal and SV40-transformed cells. PMID:10463060

  20. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-01-01

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides. PMID:7177848

  1. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-10-25

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides. PMID:7177848

  2. The effect of breathing vibration on the charge carrier mobility of a guanine cytosine base pair stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beleznay, F. B.; Szekeres, Zs.; Bogr, F.; Ladik, J.

    2006-06-01

    Ab initio HF crystal orbital calculations were performed for a guanine-cytosine base pair stack at its equilibrium position and at 0.05 dilatation and compression, respectively. The shifts of the conduction and valence band edges were used to determine the deformation potentials of the electrons and the holes. After performing an approximate calculation for the elastic constant, the mobilities of the electrons and holes were determined. They were combined with the mobilities belonging to the longitudinal and torsional motions at a stack in DNA.

  3. Ultrafast IR spectroscopy of polymeric cytosine nucleic acids reveal the long-lived species is due to a localised state.

    PubMed

    Keane, Praic M; Wojdyla, Michal; Doorley, Gerard W; Kelly, John M; Clark, Ian P; Parker, Anthony W; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Magno, Lus M; Quinn, Susan J

    2012-05-14

    The decay pathways of UV-excited cytosine polymers are investigated using picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. Similar yields of a non-emissive (1)n?* state are found in the single-stranded dC(30) polymer as in the dCMP monomer, but with a longer lifetime in the polymer (80 ps vs. 39 ps). A longer lifetime is also found in the d(CpC) dinucleotide. No evidence of excimer states is observed, suggesting that localised (1)n?* excited states are the most significant intermediates present on the picosecond timescale. PMID:22358255

  4. Intersystem crossing rates of S1 state keto-amino cytosine at low excess energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobsiger, Simon; Etinski, Mihajlo; Blaser, Susan; Frey, Hans-Martin; Marian, Christel; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    The amino-keto tautomer of supersonic jet-cooled cytosine undergoes intersystem crossing (ISC) from the v = 0 and low-lying vibronic levels of its S1(1ππ∗) state. We investigate these ISC rates experimentally and theoretically as a function of S1 state vibrational excess energy Eexc. The S1 vibronic levels are pumped with a ˜5 ns UV laser, the S1 and triplet state ion signals are separated by prompt or delayed ionization with a second UV laser pulse. After correcting the raw ISC yields for the relative S1 and T1 ionization cross sections, we obtain energy dependent ISC quantum yields QISC corr = 1 % -5%. These are combined with previously measured vibronic state-specific decay rates, giving ISC rates kISC = 0.4-1.5 ṡ 109 s-1, the corresponding S1⇝S0 internal conversion (IC) rates are 30-100 times larger. Theoretical ISC rates are computed using SCS-CC2 methods, which predict rapid ISC from the S1; v = 0 state with kISC = 3 ṡ 109 s-1 to the T1(3ππ∗) triplet state. The surprisingly high rate of this El Sayed-forbidden transition is caused by a substantial admixture of 1nOπ∗ character into the S1(1ππ∗) wave function at its non-planar minimum geometry. The combination of experiment and theory implies that (1) below Eexc = 550 cm-1 in the S1 state, S1⇝S0 internal conversion dominates the nonradiative decay with kIC ≥ 2 ṡ 1010 s-1, (2) the calculated S1⇝T1 (1ππ∗⇝3ππ∗) ISC rate is in good agreement with experiment, (3) being El-Sayed forbidden, the S1⇝T1 ISC is moderately fast (kISC = 3 ṡ 109 s-1), and not ultrafast, as claimed by other calculations, and (4) at Eexc ˜ 550 cm-1 the IC rate increases by ˜50 times, probably by accessing the lowest conical intersection (the C5-twist CI) and thereby effectively switching off the ISC decay channels.

  5. Intersystem crossing rates of S1 state keto-amino cytosine at low excess energy.

    PubMed

    Lobsiger, Simon; Etinski, Mihajlo; Blaser, Susan; Frey, Hans-Martin; Marian, Christel; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-12-21

    The amino-keto tautomer of supersonic jet-cooled cytosine undergoes intersystem crossing (ISC) from the v = 0 and low-lying vibronic levels of its S1((1)ππ(∗)) state. We investigate these ISC rates experimentally and theoretically as a function of S1 state vibrational excess energy Eexc. The S1 vibronic levels are pumped with a ∼5 ns UV laser, the S1 and triplet state ion signals are separated by prompt or delayed ionization with a second UV laser pulse. After correcting the raw ISC yields for the relative S1 and T1 ionization cross sections, we obtain energy dependent ISC quantum yields QISC (corr)=1%-5%. These are combined with previously measured vibronic state-specific decay rates, giving ISC rates kISC = 0.4-1.5 ⋅ 10(9) s(-1), the corresponding S1⇝S0 internal conversion (IC) rates are 30-100 times larger. Theoretical ISC rates are computed using SCS-CC2 methods, which predict rapid ISC from the S1; v = 0 state with kISC = 3 ⋅ 10(9) s(-1) to the T1((3)ππ(∗)) triplet state. The surprisingly high rate of this El Sayed-forbidden transition is caused by a substantial admixture of (1)nOπ(∗) character into the S1((1)ππ(∗)) wave function at its non-planar minimum geometry. The combination of experiment and theory implies that (1) below Eexc = 550 cm(-1) in the S1 state, S1⇝S0 internal conversion dominates the nonradiative decay with kIC ≥ 2 ⋅ 10(10) s(-1), (2) the calculated S1⇝T1 ((1)ππ(∗)⇝(3)ππ(∗)) ISC rate is in good agreement with experiment, (3) being El-Sayed forbidden, the S1⇝T1 ISC is moderately fast (kISC = 3 ⋅ 10(9) s(-1)), and not ultrafast, as claimed by other calculations, and (4) at Eexc ∼ 550 cm(-1) the IC rate increases by ∼50 times, probably by accessing the lowest conical intersection (the C5-twist CI) and thereby effectively switching off the ISC decay channels. PMID:26696056

  6. Pulsed magnetic field from video display terminals enhances teratogenic effects of cytosine arabinoside in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, H.; Wu, R.Y.; Shao, B.J.; Fu, Y.D.; Yao, G.D.; Lu, D.J.

    1995-05-01

    Eighty-nine Swiss Webster mice were randomly divided into four groups: a control group, a pulsed magnetic field (PMF) group, a cytosine arabinoside (ara-C, a teratogen) group, and a combined PMF + ara-C group. Mice in the PMF and PMF + ara-C groups were irradiated with a PMF (a sawtooth waveform with 52 {mu}s rise time, 12{mu}s decay time, and 15.6 kHz frequency) at a peak magnetic flux density of 40 {mu}T for 4 hours daily on days 6-17 of gestation. The mice in the ara-C and the PMF + ara-C groups were injected intraperitoneally on day 9 of gestation with 10 mg/kg of ara-C. The incidence of resorption and dead fetuses was not affected by PMF but was increased by ara-C injection. The malformation incidence of cleft palate (CP) and/or cleft lip (CL) was significantly higher in all three of the treated groups than in the control group (P < 0.05). If, however, statistical analyses had been done on litters rather than on individual fetuses, they would show that the incidence of CP and/or CL in the PMF group is not significantly greater than that in the control group. A significantly higher incidence of CP and/or CL was found in the PMF + ara-C group (49%) than the ara-C alone group (26.1%). These data suggest that PMF might enhance the development of ara-C-induced CP and/or CL. The incidence of minor variations in skeletal development, including reduction of skeletal calcification and loss of skeleton, was not statistically significant in the PMF group. However, it was higher in the two ara-C-treated groups, and there was no significant difference between the ara-C alone group and the ara-C + PMF group. From these results it is concluded that the very weak embryotoxic effects of PMF exposure may be revealed and enhanced in combination with a teratogenic agent.

  7. Yeast Genetics and Biotechnological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Saroj; Baranwal, Richa

    Yeast can be recognized as one of the very important groups of microorganisms on account of its extensive use in the fermentation industry and as a basic eukaryotic model cellular system. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively used to elucidate the genetics and regulation of several key functions in the cell such as cell mating, electron transport chain, protein trafficking, cell cycle events and others. Even before the genome sequence of the yeast was out, the structural organization and function of several of its genes was known. With the availability of the origin of replication from the 2 μm plasmid and the development of transformation system, it became the host of choice for expression of a number of important proteins. A large number of episomal and integrative shuttle vectors are available for expression of mammalian proteins. The latest developments in genomics and micro-array technology have allowed investigations of individual gene function by site-specific deletion method. The application of metabolic profiling has also assisted in understanding the cellular network operating in this yeast. This chapter is aimed at reviewing the use of this system as an experimental tool for conducting classical genetics. Various vector systems available, foreign genes expressed and the limitations as a host will be discussed. Finally, the use of various yeast enzymes in biotechnology sector will be reviewed.

  8. Progress in Yeast Glycosylation Engineering.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Stephen R; Zha, Dongxing

    2015-01-01

    While yeast are lower eukaryotic organisms, they share many common features and biological processes with higher eukaryotes. As such, yeasts have been used as model organisms to facilitate our understanding of such features and processes. To this end, a large number of powerful genetic tools have been developed to investigate and manipulate these organisms. Going hand-in-hand with these genetic tools is the ability to efficiently scale up the fermentation of these organisms, thus making them attractive hosts for the production of recombinant proteins. A key feature of producing recombinant proteins in yeast is that these proteins can be readily secreted into the culture supernatant, simplifying any downstream processing. A consequence of this secretion is that the proteins typically pass through the secretory pathway, during which they may be exposed to various posttranslational modifications. The addition of glycans is one such modification. Unfortunately, while certain aspects of glycosylation are shared between lower and higher eukaryotes, significant differences exist. Over the last two decades much research has focused on engineering the glycosylation pathways of yeast to more closely resemble those of higher eukaryotes, particularly those of humans for the production of therapeutic proteins. In the current review we shall highlight some of the key achievements in yeast glyco-engineering which have led to humanization of both the N- and O-linked glycosylation pathways. PMID:26082216

  9. Targeted mutation at cytosine-containing pyrimidine dimers: studies of Escherichia coli B/r with acetophenone and 313-nm light.

    PubMed Central

    Fix, D; Bockrath, R

    1983-01-01

    We have tested the two-event model for UV mutagenesis producing class 2 suppressor mutations at glutamine tRNA genes in Escherichia coli. In the model used, the induction/indexing lesion is any type of pyrimidine dimer and the premutational photoproduct at the target site is a cytosine-containing dimer. Specific mutation-frequency responses were analyzed under conditions in which the ratio of thymine-thymine dimers to cytosine-containing dimers was modified by using 313-nm light and 0.0%, 0.1%, or 0.2% acetophenone. Changes observed in the production of class 2 suppressor mutations were consistent with the model and suggested that the G X C leads to A X T transitions responsible for class 2 suppressor mutations are targeted by cytosine-containing pyrimidine dimers at the mutational sites. PMID:6348769

  10. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression in Human B Cell Precursors Is Essential for Central B Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-11-17

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme-mediating class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells. PMID:26546282

  11. Somatic hypermutation: activation-induced deaminase for C/G followed by polymerase η for A/T

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, Michael S.; Rada, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) introduces nucleotide substitutions into immunoglobulin variable (Ig V) region genes at all four bases, but the mutations at C/G and A/T pairs are achieved by distinct mechanisms. Mutations at C/G pairs are a direct consequence of the C→U deamination catalyzed by activation-induced deaminase (AID). Mutations at A/T pairs, however, require a second mutagenic process that occurs during patch repair of the AID-generated U/G mismatch. Several DNA polymerases have been proposed to play a role in SHM, but accumulating evidence indicates that the mutations at A/T are overwhelmingly achieved by recruitment of DNA polymerase η. PMID:17190841

  12. Inhibition of AMP deaminase activity does not improve glucose control in rodent models of insulin resistance or diabetes.

    PubMed

    Admyre, Therese; Amrot-Fors, Lena; Andersson, Maria; Bauer, Martin; Bjursell, Mikael; Drmota, Tomas; Hallen, Stefan; Hartleib-Geschwindner, Judith; Lindmark, Bo; Liu, Jianming; Löfgren, Lars; Rohman, Mattias; Selmi, Nidhal; Wallenius, Kristina

    2014-11-20

    Inhibition of AMP deaminase (AMPD) holds the potential to elevate intracellular adenosine and AMP levels and, therefore, to augment adenosine signaling and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). To test the latter hypothesis, novel AMPD pan inhibitors were synthesized and explored using a panel of in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models focusing on confirming AMPD inhibitory potency and the potential of AMPD inhibition to improve glucose control in vivo. Repeated dosing of selected inhibitors did not improve glucose control in insulin-resistant or diabetic rodent disease models. Mice with genetic deletion of the muscle-specific isoform Ampd1 did not showany favorable metabolic phenotype despite being challenged with high-fat diet feeding. Therefore, these results do not support the development of AMPD inhibitors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25459661

  13. The effects of tautomerization and protonation on the adenine-cytosine mismatches: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Hamid Reza; Bagheri, Sotoodeh; Abareghi, Mahsa

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate the results of a theoretical study concerned with the question how tautomerization and protonation of adenine affect the various properties of adenine-cytosine mismatches. The calculations, in gas phase and in water, are performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. In gas phase, it is observed that any tautomeric form of investigated mismatches is more stabilized when adenine is protonated. As for the neutral mismatches, the mismatches containing amino form of cytosine and imino form of protonated adenine are more stable. The role of aromaticity on the stability of tautomeric forms of mismatches is investigated by NICS(1)ZZ index. The stability of mispairs decreases by going from gas phase to water. It can be explained using dipole moment parameter. The influence of hydrogen bonds on the stability of mismatches is examined by atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. In addition to geometrical parameters and binding energies, the study of the topological properties of electron charge density aids in better understanding of these mispairs. PMID:26198186

  14. Mutagenic effects induced by the attack of NO2 radical to the guanine-cytosine base pair

    PubMed Central

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P.; Requena, Alberto; Zúñiga, José; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the attack of the nitrogen dioxide radical (NO•2) to the guanine—cytosine (GC) base pair and the subsequent tautomeric reactions able to induce mutations, by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The conducted simulations allow us to identify the most reactive sites of the GC base pair. Indeed, the computed relative energies demonstrate that the addition of the NO•2 radical to the C8 position of the guanine base forms to the most stable adduct. Although the initial adducts might evolve to non-canonical structures via inter-base hydrogen bonds rearrangements, the probability for the proton exchange to occur lies in the same range as that observed for undamaged DNA. As a result, tautomeric errors in NO2-attacked DNA arises at the same rate as in canonical DNA, with no macroscopic impact on the overall stability of DNA. The potential mutagenic effects of the GC–NO•2 radical adducts likely involve side reactions, e.g., the GC deprotonation to the solvent, rather than proton exchange between guanine and cytosine basis. PMID:25798437

  15. Cytosines, but not purines, determine recombination activating gene (RAG)-induced breaks on heteroduplex DNA structures: implications for genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Naik, Abani Kanta; Lieber, Michael R; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2010-03-01

    The sequence specificity of the recombination activating gene (RAG) complex during V(D)J recombination has been well studied. RAGs can also act as structure-specific nuclease; however, little is known about the mechanism of its action. Here, we show that in addition to DNA structure, sequence dictates the pattern and efficiency of RAG cleavage on altered DNA structures. Cytosine nucleotides are preferentially nicked by RAGs when present at single-stranded regions of heteroduplex DNA. Although unpaired thymine nucleotides are also nicked, the efficiency is many fold weaker. Induction of single- or double-strand breaks by RAGs depends on the position of cytosines and whether it is present on one or both of the strands. Interestingly, RAGs are unable to induce breaks when adenine or guanine nucleotides are present at single-strand regions. The nucleotide present immediately next to the bubble sequence could also affect RAG cleavage. Hence, we propose "C((d))C((S))C((S))" (d, double-stranded; s, single-stranded) as a consensus sequence for RAG-induced breaks at single-/double-strand DNA transitions. Such a consensus sequence motif is useful for explaining RAG cleavage on other types of DNA structures described in the literature. Therefore, the mechanism of RAG cleavage described here could explain facets of chromosomal rearrangements specific to lymphoid tissues leading to genomic instability. PMID:20051517

  16. Electronic properties of a cytosine decavanadate: toward a better understanding of chemical and biological properties of decavanadates.

    PubMed

    Bosnjaković-Pavlović, Nada; Spasojević-de Biré, Anne; Tomaz, Isabel; Bouhmaida, Nouzha; Avecilla, Fernando; Mioc, Ubavka B; Pessoa, João Costa; Ghermani, Nour Eddine

    2009-10-19

    We have synthesized and crystallized a cytosine-decavanadate compound, Na(3) [V(10)O(28)] (C(4)N(3)OH(5))(3)(C(4)N(3)OH(6))(3).10H(2)O, and its crystal structure has been determined from a single-crystal X-ray diffraction. A high resolution X-ray diffraction experiment at 210 K (in P1 space group phase) was carried out. The data were refined using a pseudo-atom multipole model to get the electron density and the electrostatic properties of the decavanadate-cytosine complex. Static deformation density maps and Atoms in Molecules (AIM) topological analysis were used for this purpose. To get insight into the reactivity of the decavanadate anion, we have determined the atomic net charges and the molecular electrostatic potential. Special attention was paid to the hydrogen bonding occurring in the solid state between the decavanadate anion and its environment. The comparison of the experimental electronic characteristics of the decavanadate anions to those found in literature reveals that this anion is a rigid entity conserving its intrinsic properties. This is of particular importance for the future investigations of the biological activities of the decavanadate anion. PMID:19764781

  17. Mutagenic Effects Induced by the Attack of NO2 Radical to the Guanine-Cytosine Base Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerón-Carrasco, José Pedro; Requena, Alberto; Zúñiga, José; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the attack of the nitrogen dioxide radical (NO2) to the guanine-cytosine (GC) base pair and the subsequent tautomeric reactions able to induce mutations, by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The conducted simulations allow us to identify the most reactive sites of the GC base pair. Indeed, the computed relative energies demonstrate that the addition of the NO2 radical to the C8 position of the guanine base forms to the most stable adduct. Although the initial adducts might evolve to non-canonical structures via inter-base hydrogen bonds rearrangements, the probability for the proton exchange to occur lies in the same range as that observed for undamaged DNA. As a result, tautomeric errors in NO2-attacked DNA arises at the same rate as in canonical DNA, with no macroscopic impact on the overall stability of DNA. The potential mutagenic effects of the GC-NO2 radical adducts likely involve side reactions, e.g., the GC deprotonation to the solvent, rather than proton exchange between guanine and cytosine basis.

  18. Adsorption of cytosine, thymine, guanine and adenine on Cu(1 1 0) studied by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Taro; Shirasaka, Kaoru; Takano, Akira; Kawai, Maki

    2004-07-01

    The molecular internal vibration modes and orientation of the DNA base molecules (cytosine, thymine, guanine and adenine) adsorbed on copper(1 1 0) clean single crystal surface were investigated by infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. The adsorption was performed by thermal evaporation of powder of each species onto Cu(1 1 0) at room temperature. The surface uptakes of the molecules were determined by Auger electron spectroscopy. Cytosine exhibited characteristic asymmetric and symmetric NH 2 stretching signal. The asymmetric stretching signal was missing in the submonolayer region, indicating that the whole molecule was standing upright, with the NH 2 group sticking out of the surface. Thymine was also proved to stand upright at surface. Guanine exhibited weakened infrared signals, indicating that the core purine ring was tilted on the surface, with an interaction of NH?C?O side of the molecule. Adenine at coverages below one monolayer gave no absorption signals, evidencing the molecules laid flat along the surface. The vibrational information obtained will be helpful in developing the future methods of surface DNA sequencing.

  19. CXXC Finger Protein 1 Contains Redundant Functional Domains That Support Embryonic Stem Cell Cytosine Methylation, Histone Methylation, and Differentiation▿

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Courtney M.; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Skalnik, David G.

    2009-01-01

    CXXC finger protein 1 (Cfp1) is a regulator of both cytosine methylation and histone methylation. Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells lacking Cfp1 exhibit a decreased plating efficiency, decreased cytosine methylation, elevated global levels of histone H3-Lys4 trimethylation, and a failure to differentiate in vitro. Remarkably, transfection studies reveal that expression of either the amino half of Cfp1 (amino acids 1 to 367 [Cfp11-367]) or the carboxyl half of Cfp1 (Cfp1361-656) is sufficient to correct all of the defects observed with ES cells that lack Cfp1. However, a point mutation (C169A) that abolishes DNA-binding activity of Cfp1 ablates the rescue activity of the Cfp11-367 fragment, and a point mutation (C375A) that abolishes the interaction of Cfp1 with the Setd1 histone H3-Lys4 methyltransferase complexes ablates the rescue activity of the Cfp1361-656 fragment. Introduction of both the C169A and C375A point mutations ablates the rescue activity of the full-length Cfp1 protein. These results indicate that retention of either the Cfp1 DNA-binding domain or Setd1 interaction domain is required for Cfp1 rescue activity, and they illustrate the functional complexity of this critical epigenetic regulator. A model is presented for how epigenetic cross talk may explain the finding of redundant functional domains within Cfp1. PMID:19433449

  20. CXXC finger protein 1 contains redundant functional domains that support embryonic stem cell cytosine methylation, histone methylation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tate, Courtney M; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Skalnik, David G

    2009-07-01

    CXXC finger protein 1 (Cfp1) is a regulator of both cytosine methylation and histone methylation. Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells lacking Cfp1 exhibit a decreased plating efficiency, decreased cytosine methylation, elevated global levels of histone H3-Lys4 trimethylation, and a failure to differentiate in vitro. Remarkably, transfection studies reveal that expression of either the amino half of Cfp1 (amino acids 1 to 367 [Cfp1(1-367)]) or the carboxyl half of Cfp1 (Cfp1(361-656)) is sufficient to correct all of the defects observed with ES cells that lack Cfp1. However, a point mutation (C169A) that abolishes DNA-binding activity of Cfp1 ablates the rescue activity of the Cfp1(1-367) fragment, and a point mutation (C375A) that abolishes the interaction of Cfp1 with the Setd1 histone H3-Lys4 methyltransferase complexes ablates the rescue activity of the Cfp1(361-656) fragment. Introduction of both the C169A and C375A point mutations ablates the rescue activity of the full-length Cfp1 protein. These results indicate that retention of either the Cfp1 DNA-binding domain or Setd1 interaction domain is required for Cfp1 rescue activity, and they illustrate the functional complexity of this critical epigenetic regulator. A model is presented for how epigenetic cross talk may explain the finding of redundant functional domains within Cfp1. PMID:19433449

  1. Medium-dependent interactions of quinones with cytosine and cytidine: a laser flash photolysis study with magnetic field effect.

    PubMed

    Bose, Adity; Basu, Samita

    2009-03-01

    Laser flash photolysis and an external magnetic field have been used for the study of the interaction of two quinone molecules, namely, 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) and 2-methyl 1,4-naphthoquinone (or menadione, MQ) with a DNA base, cytosine (C) and its nucleoside cytidine (dC) in two media, a homogeneous one composed of acetonitrile/water (ACN/H(2)O, 9:1, v/v) and a SDS micellar heterogeneous one. We have applied an external magnetic field for the proper identification of the transients formed during the interactions in micellar media. Cytosine exhibits electron transfer (ET) followed by hydrogen abstraction (HA) while dC reveals a reduced ET compared to C, with both quinones in organic homogeneous medium (ACN/H(2)O). Due to a higher electron affinity, AQ supports more faciler ET than MQ with dC in ACN/H(2)O but observations in SDS have been just the reverse. In SDS, ET from dC is completely quenched and a dominant HA is all that could be discerned. This work reveals two main findings: first, a drop in ET on addition of a ribose unit to C, which has been attributed to a role of keto-enol tautomerism in inducing ET from electron-rich nucleus and second, the effect of medium in controlling reaction mechanism by favoring HA with AQ although it is intrinsically more prone towards ET. PMID:19121557

  2. Yeast Can Affect Behavior and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, William G.

    1984-01-01

    A pediatrician recounts his experiences in diagnosing and treating allergies to common yeast germs that may result in behavior and learning problems. He lists characteristics that may predispose children to yeast-connected health problems. (CL)

  3. Genomic evolution of the ascomycetous yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are important for industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable metabolic and phylogenetic diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphr...

  4. PHYLOGENETICS OF SACCHAROMYCETALES, THE ASCOMYCETE YEASTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ascomycete yeasts (Phylum Ascomycota: Subphylum Saccharomycotina: Class Saccharomycetes: Order Saccharomycetales) comprise a monophyletic lineage with a single order of about 1000 known species. These yeasts live as saprobes, often in association with plants, animals, and their interfaces. A few s...

  5. Chromatin and Transcription in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Oliver J.; Winston, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which chromatin structure controls eukaryotic transcription has been an intense area of investigation for the past 25 years. Many of the key discoveries that created the foundation for this field came from studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including the discovery of the role of chromatin in transcriptional silencing, as well as the discovery of chromatin-remodeling factors and histone modification activities. Since that time, studies in yeast have continued to contribute in leading ways. This review article summarizes the large body of yeast studies in this field. PMID:22345607

  6. Combined nuclear measurements of yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, N. S.; Al-Saleh, K. A.; Arafah, D.-E.; Halim, N. A.

    1987-05-01

    Combined Rutherford backscattering (RBS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) techniques were used to determine the elemental composition of yeast. Results reveal no toxic elements (e.g. Ag, Pb, etc) in yeast. Yet results display some similarities in concentrations of some elements (e.g. Ti, Mn, Ni, Cu and Sr), large differences are observed for others (e.g. S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe and Zn). Variations are accounted due to different growing media or contamination during processing.

  7. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  8. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  9. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  10. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  11. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  12. Yeast: A Research Organism for Teaching Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manney, Thomas R.; Manney, Monta L.

    1992-01-01

    Explains why laboratory strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are particularly suited for classroom science activities. Describes the sexual life cycle of yeast and the genetic system with visible mutations. Presents an overview of activities that can be done with yeast and gives a source for teachers to obtain more information. (PR)

  13. Control of ATP homeostasis during the respiro-fermentative transition in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Thomas; Novo, Maite; Rössger, Katrin; Létisse, Fabien; Loret, Marie-Odile; Portais, Jean-Charles; François, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Respiring Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells respond to a sudden increase in glucose concentration by a pronounced drop of their adenine nucleotide content ([ATP]+[ADP]+[AMP]=[AXP]). The unknown fate of ‘lost' AXP nucleotides represented a long-standing problem for the understanding of the yeast's physiological response to changing growth conditions. Transient accumulation of the purine salvage pathway intermediate, inosine, accounted for the apparent loss of adenine nucleotides. Conversion of AXPs into inosine was facilitated by AMP deaminase, Amd1, and IMP-specific 5′-nucleotidase, Isn1. Inosine recycling into the AXP pool was facilitated by purine nucleoside phosphorylase, Pnp1, and joint action of the phosphoribosyltransferases, Hpt1 and Xpt1. Analysis of changes in 24 intracellular metabolite pools during the respiro-fermentative growth transition in wild-type, amd1, isn1, and pnp1 strains revealed that only the amd1 mutant exhibited significant deviations from the wild-type behavior. Moreover, mutants that were blocked in inosine production exhibited delayed growth acceleration after glucose addition. It is proposed that interconversion of adenine nucleotides and inosine facilitates rapid and energy-cost efficient adaptation of the AXP pool size to changing environmental conditions. PMID:20087341

  14. Yeast as factory and factotum.

    PubMed

    Dixon, B

    2000-02-01

    After centuries of vigorous activity in making fine wines, beers and breads, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is now acquiring a rich new portfolio of skills, bestowed by genetic manipulation. As shown in a recent shop-window of research supported by the European Commission, yeasts will soon be benefiting industries as diverse as fish farming, pharmaceuticals and laundering. PMID:11190211

  15. TDP-43 toxicity in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Armakola, Maria; Hart, Michael P.; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2010-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an emerging tool for investigating the molecular pathways that underpin several human neurodegenerative disorders associated with protein misfolding. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating adult onset neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting motor neurons. The protein TDP-43 has recently been demonstrated to play an important role in the disease, however the mechanisms by which TDP-43 contributes to pathogenesis are unclear. To explore the mechanistic details that result in aberrant accumulation of TDP-43 and to discover potential strategies for therapeutic intervention, we employed a yeast TDP-43 proteinopathy model system. These studies allowed us to determine the regions of TDP-43 required for aggregation and toxicity and to define the effects of ALS-linked mutant forms of TDP-43. We have also been able to harness the power of yeast genetics to identify potent modifiers of TDP-43 toxicity using high-throughput yeast genetic screens. Here, we describe the methods and approaches that we have used in order to gain insight into TDP-43 biology and its role in disease. These approaches are readily adaptable to other neurodegenerative disease proteins. PMID:21115123

  16. Yeast Proteomics and Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Snyder, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of biological processes as well as human diseases has improved greatly thanks to studies on model organisms such as yeast. The power of scientific approaches with yeast lies in its relatively simple genome, its facile classical and molecular genetics, as well as the evolutionary conservation of many basic biological mechanisms. However, even in this simple model organism, systems biology studies, especially proteomic studies had been an intimidating task. During the past decade, powerful high-throughput technologies in proteomic research have been developed for yeast including protein microarray technology. The protein microarray technology allows the interrogation of protein-protein, protein-DNA, protein-small molecule interaction networks as well as post-translational modification networks in a large-scale, high-throughput manner. With this technology, many groundbreaking findings have been established in studies with the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, most of which could have been unachievable with traditional approaches. Discovery of these networks has profound impact on explicating biological processes with a proteomic point of view, which may lead to a better understanding of normal biological phenomena as well as various human diseases. PMID:20728591

  17. Accelerated deamination of cytosine residues in UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers leads to CC-->TT transitions.

    PubMed

    Peng, W; Shaw, B R

    1996-08-01

    The rate of UV-induced deamination of cytosine to uracil at a specific site in double-stranded (ds) DNA was monitored using a genetic reversion assay. M13mp2C141 ds DNA was exposed to 160 J/m2 UV (254 nm), incubated at 37 degrees C, pH 7.4, for various time intervals to allow for deamination, and treated with Escherichia coli photolyase in the presence of 365 nm light to reverse cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimers. Upon transfection into uracil-glycosylase deficient (ung-) E. coli cells, the mutation (i.e., reversion) frequencies in the CCCC target sequence increased greatly with post-UV time of incubation at 37 degrees C, nearly doubling every day that the DNA had been held at 37 degrees C. After 8 days, the reversion frequencies had increased by two orders of magnitude upon transfection into ung- cells, relative to isogenic ung+ cells, indicating that most of the mutations arising in UV/photolyase-treated ds DNA were C-->T mutations mediated by a uracil intermediate. Sequencing of the revertants revealed that all mutations were single C-->T or tandem double CC-->TT mutations. An increasing percentage of tandem double CC-->TT mutations was found with longer post-UV incubation times, yet none occurred if the post-UV delay time step was omitted before photoreversal. After a 4-day delay between UV and photoreversal at 37 degrees C, greater than 84% of the total revertants had tandem double CC-->TT mutations. Thus, the generation of a tandem double mutation is a time-dependent process that arises in DNA after the initial UV exposure. The rate of appearance (with a pseudo-first-order rate constant ca. 10(-6) s-1) of tandem double mutations during incubation of UV-irradiated DNA is inconsistent with two random, independently occurring mutational events and suggests a concerted deamination of both residues in a tandem cytosine pyrimidine (C < > C) dimer. Considering that deamination in a C < > C dimer occurred here with a half-life of ca. 5 days, in contrast to the measured half-life of ca. 20,000 years for spontaneous (non-UV-treated) cytosine deamination for the same target, these studies show that the formation of pyrimidine dimers in DNA increases the rate of deamination by six orders of magnitude, leading to the accelerated formation of single C-->T and tandem double CC-->TT mutations. PMID:8756482

  18. Novel Rhizosphere Soil Alleles for the Enzyme 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase Queried for Function with an In Vivo Competition Assay.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhao; Di Rienzi, Sara C; Janzon, Anders; Werner, Jeff J; Angenent, Largus T; Dangl, Jeffrey L; Fowler, Douglas M; Ley, Ruth E

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomes derived from environmental microbiota encode a vast diversity of protein homologs. How this diversity impacts protein function can be explored through selection assays aimed to optimize function. While artificially generated gene sequence pools are typically used in selection assays, their usage may be limited because of technical or ethical reasons. Here, we investigate an alternative strategy, the use of soil microbial DNA as a starting point. We demonstrate this approach by optimizing the function of a widely occurring soil bacterial enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. We identified a specific ACC deaminase domain region (ACCD-DR) that, when PCR amplified from the soil, produced a variant pool that we could swap into functional plasmids carrying ACC deaminase-encoding genes. Functional clones of ACC deaminase were selected for in a competition assay based on their capacity to provide nitrogen to Escherichia coli in vitro. The most successful ACCD-DR variants were identified after multiple rounds of selection by sequence analysis. We observed that previously identified essential active-site residues were fixed in the original unselected library and that additional residues went to fixation after selection. We identified a divergent essential residue whose presence hints at the possible use of alternative substrates and a cluster of neutral residues that did not influence ACCD performance. Using an artificial ACCD-DR variant library generated by DNA oligomer synthesis, we validated the same fixation patterns. Our study demonstrates that soil metagenomes are useful starting pools of protein-coding-gene diversity that can be utilized for protein optimization and functional characterization when synthetic libraries are not appropriate. PMID:26637602

  19. Possible Role of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Activity of Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 on Symbiosis with Mung Bean and Determinate Nodule Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Sripakdi, Sudarat; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Teaumroong, Neung

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 forms symbiotic interactions with mung bean (Vigna radiata) and contains lrpL-acdS genes, which encode the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of plant ethylene synthesis. Since ethylene interferes with nodule formation in some legumes and plays a role in senescence in plant cells, BL3-enhancing ACC deaminase activity (BL3+) and defective mutant (BL3−) strains were constructed in order to investigate the effects of this enzyme on symbiosis and nodule senescence. Nodulation competitiveness was weaker in BL3− than in the wild-type, but was stronger in BL3+. The inoculation of BL3− into mung bean resulted in less plant growth, a lower nodule dry weight, and smaller nodule number than those in the wild-type, whereas the inoculation of BL3+ had no marked effects. However, similar nitrogenase activity was observed with all treatments; it was strongly detected 3 weeks after the inoculation and gradually declined with time, indicating senescence. The rate of plant nodulation by BL3+ increased in a time-dependent manner. Nodules occupied by BL3− formed smaller symbiosomes, and bacteroid degradation was more prominent than that in the wild-type 7 weeks after the inoculation. Changes in biochemical molecules during nodulation were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and the results obtained confirmed that aging processes differed in nodules occupied by BL3 and BL3−. This is the first study to show the possible role of ACC deaminase activity in senescence in determinate nodules. Our results suggest that an increase in ACC deaminase activity in this strain does not extend the lifespan of nodules, whereas the lack of this activity may accelerate nodule senescence. PMID:26657304

  20. Novel Rhizosphere Soil Alleles for the Enzyme 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase Queried for Function with an In Vivo Competition Assay

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhao; Di Rienzi, Sara C.; Janzon, Anders; Werner, Jeff J.; Angenent, Largus T.; Dangl, Jeffrey L.; Fowler, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomes derived from environmental microbiota encode a vast diversity of protein homologs. How this diversity impacts protein function can be explored through selection assays aimed to optimize function. While artificially generated gene sequence pools are typically used in selection assays, their usage may be limited because of technical or ethical reasons. Here, we investigate an alternative strategy, the use of soil microbial DNA as a starting point. We demonstrate this approach by optimizing the function of a widely occurring soil bacterial enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. We identified a specific ACC deaminase domain region (ACCD-DR) that, when PCR amplified from the soil, produced a variant pool that we could swap into functional plasmids carrying ACC deaminase-encoding genes. Functional clones of ACC deaminase were selected for in a competition assay based on their capacity to provide nitrogen to Escherichia coli in vitro. The most successful ACCD-DR variants were identified after multiple rounds of selection by sequence analysis. We observed that previously identified essential active-site residues were fixed in the original unselected library and that additional residues went to fixation after selection. We identified a divergent essential residue whose presence hints at the possible use of alternative substrates and a cluster of neutral residues that did not influence ACCD performance. Using an artificial ACCD-DR variant library generated by DNA oligomer synthesis, we validated the same fixation patterns. Our study demonstrates that soil metagenomes are useful starting pools of protein-coding-gene diversity that can be utilized for protein optimization and functional characterization when synthetic libraries are not appropriate. PMID:26637602

  1. Tyr254 hydroxyl group acts as a two-way switch mechanism in the coupling of heterotropic and homotropic effects in Escherichia coli glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Montero-Morán, G M; Horjales, E; Calcagno, M L; Altamirano, M M

    1998-05-26

    The involvement of tyrosine residues in the allosteric function of the enzyme glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli was first proposed on the basis of a theoretical analysis of the sequence and demonstrated by spectrophotometric experiments. Two tyrosine residues, Tyr121 and Tyr254, were indicated as involved in the mechanism of cooperativity and in the allosteric regulation of the enzyme [Altamirano et al. (1994) Eur. J. Biochem. 220, 409-413]. Tyr121 replacement by threonine or tryptophan altered the symmetric character of the T --> R transition [Altamirano et al. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 6074-6082]. From crystallographic data of the R allosteric conformer, Tyr254 has been shown to be part of the allosteric pocket [Oliva et al. (1995) Structure 3, 1323-1332]. Although it is not directly involved in binding the allosteric activator, N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate, Tyr 254 is hydrogen bonded through its phenolic hydroxyl to the backbone carbonyl from residue 161 in the neighboring polypeptide chain. Kinetic and binding experiments with the mutant form Tyr254-Phe of the enzyme reveal that this replacement caused an uncoupling of the homotropic and heterotropic effects. Homotropic cooperativity diminished and the allosteric activation pattern changed from one of the K-type in the wild-type deaminase to a mixed K-V pattern. On the other hand, Tyr254-Trp deaminase is kinetically closer to a K-type enzyme and it has a higher catalytic efficiency than the wild-type protein. These results show that the interactions of Tyr254 are fundamental in coupling binding in the active site to events occurring in the allosteric pocket of E. coli glucosamine 6-P deaminase. PMID:9601045

  2. New assignment of the adenosine deaminase gene locus to chromosome 20q13 X 11 by study of a patient with interstitial deletion 20q.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, M B; Tranebjaerg, L; Tommerup, N; Nygaard, P; Edwards, H

    1987-01-01

    A karyotype 46,XY,del(20)(q11 X 23q13 X 11) was found in a three year old boy with mental and growth retardation, low set ears, broad nasal bridge, and macrostomia. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was reduced by about 50%, assigning the gene locus to the deleted segment. A review of the previously reported regional assignments suggests that the ADA gene is in the region of band 20q13 X 11. Images PMID:3560174

  3. Partial resolution of bone lesions. A child with severe combined immunodeficiency disease and adenosine deaminase deficiency after enzyme-replacement therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yulish, B.S.; Stern, R.C.; Polmar, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    A child with severe combined immunodeficiency disease and adenosine deaminase deficiency, with characteristic bone dysplasia, was treated with transfusions of frozen irradiated RBCs as a means of enzyme replacement. This therapy resulted in restoration of immunologic competence and partial resolution of the bone lesions. Although the natural history of these lesions without therapy is not known, enzyme-replacement therapy may have played a role in the resolution of this patient's bone lesions.

  4. The first crystal structure of a dTTP-bound deoxycytidylate deaminase validates and details the allosteric-inhibitor binding site.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Deoxycytidylate deaminase is unique within the zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family as being allosterically regulated, activated by dCTP, and inhibited by dTTP. Here we present the first crystal structure of a dTTP-bound deoxycytidylate deaminase from the bacteriophage S-TIM5, confirming that this inhibitor binds to the same site as the dCTP activator. The molecular details of this structure, complemented by structures apo- and dCMP-bound, provide insights into the allosteric mechanism. Although the positioning of the nucleoside moiety of dTTP is almost identical to that previously described for dCTP, protonation of N3 in deoxythymidine and not deoxycytidine would facilitate hydrogen bonding of dTTP but not dCTP and may result in a higher affinity of dTTP to the allosteric site conferring its inhibitory activity. Further the functional group on C4 (O in dTTP and NH2 in dCTP) makes interactions with nonconserved protein residues preceding the allosteric motif, and the relative strength of binding to these residues appears to correspond to the potency of dTTP inhibition. The active sites of these structures are also uniquely occupied by dTMP and dCMP resolving aspects of substrate specificity. The methyl group of dTMP apparently clashes with a highly conserved tyrosine residue, preventing the formation of a correct base stacking shown to be imperative for deamination activity. The relevance of these findings to the wider zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family is also discussed. PMID:25404739

  5. The First Crystal Structure of a dTTP-bound Deoxycytidylate Deaminase Validates and Details the Allosteric-Inhibitor Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Ailie; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Deoxycytidylate deaminase is unique within the zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family as being allosterically regulated, activated by dCTP, and inhibited by dTTP. Here we present the first crystal structure of a dTTP-bound deoxycytidylate deaminase from the bacteriophage S-TIM5, confirming that this inhibitor binds to the same site as the dCTP activator. The molecular details of this structure, complemented by structures apo- and dCMP-bound, provide insights into the allosteric mechanism. Although the positioning of the nucleoside moiety of dTTP is almost identical to that previously described for dCTP, protonation of N3 in deoxythymidine and not deoxycytidine would facilitate hydrogen bonding of dTTP but not dCTP and may result in a higher affinity of dTTP to the allosteric site conferring its inhibitory activity. Further the functional group on C4 (O in dTTP and NH2 in dCTP) makes interactions with nonconserved protein residues preceding the allosteric motif, and the relative strength of binding to these residues appears to correspond to the potency of dTTP inhibition. The active sites of these structures are also uniquely occupied by dTMP and dCMP resolving aspects of substrate specificity. The methyl group of dTMP apparently clashes with a highly conserved tyrosine residue, preventing the formation of a correct base stacking shown to be imperative for deamination activity. The relevance of these findings to the wider zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family is also discussed. PMID:25404739

  6. Possible Role of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Activity of Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 on Symbiosis with Mung Bean and Determinate Nodule Senescence.

    PubMed

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Sripakdi, Sudarat; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Teaumroong, Neung

    2015-12-22

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 forms symbiotic interactions with mung bean (Vigna radiata) and contains lrpL-acdS genes, which encode the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of plant ethylene synthesis. Since ethylene interferes with nodule formation in some legumes and plays a role in senescence in plant cells, BL3-enhancing ACC deaminase activity (BL3(+)) and defective mutant (BL3(-)) strains were constructed in order to investigate the effects of this enzyme on symbiosis and nodule senescence. Nodulation competitiveness was weaker in BL3(-) than in the wild-type, but was stronger in BL3(+). The inoculation of BL3(-) into mung bean resulted in less plant growth, a lower nodule dry weight, and smaller nodule number than those in the wild-type, whereas the inoculation of BL3(+) had no marked effects. However, similar nitrogenase activity was observed with all treatments; it was strongly detected 3 weeks after the inoculation and gradually declined with time, indicating senescence. The rate of plant nodulation by BL3(+) increased in a time-dependent manner. Nodules occupied by BL3(-) formed smaller symbiosomes, and bacteroid degradation was more prominent than that in the wild-type 7 weeks after the inoculation. Changes in biochemical molecules during nodulation were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and the results obtained confirmed that aging processes differed in nodules occupied by BL3 and BL3(-). This is the first study to show the possible role of ACC deaminase activity in senescence in determinate nodules. Our results suggest that an increase in ACC deaminase activity in this strain does not extend the lifespan of nodules, whereas the lack of this activity may accelerate nodule senescence. PMID:26657304

  7. On-Chip Sequence-Specific Immunochemical Epigenomic Analysis Utilizing Outward-Turned Cytosine in a DNA Bulge with Handheld Surface Plasmon Resonance Equipment.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Ryoji; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Kyoko; Niwa, Osamu

    2015-11-17

    This paper reports a sequence-specific immunoassay chip for DNA methylation assessment by microfluidic-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection. This was achieved by utilizing an affinity measurement involving the target, (methyl)cytosine, in a single-base bulge region and an anti-methylcytosine antibody in a microchannel, following hybridization with a biotinylated bulge-inducing DNA probe. The probe alters the target cytosine in a looped-out state because of the π-π stacking between flanking bases of the target. The probe design is simple and consists of the elimination of guanine paired with the target cytosine from a fragmented full-match sequence. We obtained the single methylation status in 6 amol (48 fg) of synthesized oligo DNA in 45 min, which is the fastest DNA methylation assessment yet reported, without employing a conventional bisulfite reaction, PCR, or sequencing. We also succeeded in discrimination of the methylation status of single cytosine in genomic λ DNA and HCT116 human colon cancer cells. The advantages of the proposed method are its small equipment, simple microfluidics design, ease of handling (two injections of DNA and antibody), lack of need for a methylation-sensitive enzyme, and neutral buffer conditions. PMID:26482842

  8. Spectrochemical evidence for the presence of a tyrosine residue in the allosteric site of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Altamirano, M M; Hernandez-Arana, A; Tello-Solis, S; Calcagno, M L

    1994-03-01

    The interaction of the enzyme glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli with its allosteric activator, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 6-phosphate, was studied by different spectrophotometric methods. Analysis of the circular-dichroism differential spectra produced by the binding of the allosteric activator or the competitive inhibitor 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-glucitol 6-phosphate (a homotropic ligand displacing the allosteric equilibrium to the R conformer), strongly suggests the presence of tyrosine residues at or near the allosteric site, although a conformational effect cannot be ruled out. The involvement of a single tyrosine residue in the N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-6-phosphate binding site of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase was supported by spectrophotometric pH titrations performed in the presence or absence of the homotropic and heterotropic ligand. In these experiments, a single titrated tyrosine residue is completely protected by saturation with the allosteric activator; this group is considerably acidic (pK 8.75). The analysis of the amino acid sequence of the deaminase using a set of indices for the prediction of surface accessibility of amino acid residues, suggests that the involved residue may be Tyr121 or Tyr254. PMID:8125098

  9. Yeasts in an industrial malting ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Laitila, A; Wilhelmson, A; Kotaviita, E; Olkku, J; Home, S; Juvonen, R

    2006-11-01

    The malting ecosystem consists of two components: the germinating cereal grains and the complex microbial community. Yeasts and yeast-like fungi are an important part of this ecosystem, but the composition and the effects of this microbial group have been largely unknown. In this study we surveyed the development of yeasts and yeast-like fungi in four industrial scale malting processes. A total of 136 malting process samples were collected and examined for the presence of yeasts growing at 15, 25 and 37 degrees C. More than 700 colonies were isolated and characterized. The isolates were discriminated by PCR-fingerprinting with microsatellite primer (M13). Yeasts representing different fingerprint types were identified by sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. Furthermore, identified yeasts were screened for the production of alpha-amylase, beta-glucanase, cellulase and xylanase. A numerous and diverse yeast community consisting of both ascomycetous (25) and basidiomycetous (18) species was detected in the various stages of the malting process. The most frequently isolated ascomycetous yeasts belonged to the genera Candida, Clavispora, Galactomyces, Hanseniaspora, Issatchenkia, Pichia, Saccharomyces and Williopsis and the basidiomycetous yeasts to Bulleromyces, Filobasidium, Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Sporobolomyces and Trichosporon. In addition, two ascomycetous yeast-like fungi (black yeasts) belonging to the genera Aureobasidium and Exophiala were commonly detected. Yeasts and yeast-like fungi produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes with a potentially positive contribution to the malt enzyme spectrum. Knowledge of the microbial diversity provides a basis for microflora management and understanding of the role of microbes in the cereal germination process. PMID:16758169

  10. A 5? cytosine binding pocket in Puf3p specifies regulation of mitochondrial mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Deyu; Stumpf, Craig R.; Krahn, Joseph M.; Wickens, Marvin; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.

    2010-11-03

    A single regulatory protein can control the fate of many mRNAs with related functions. The Puf3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exemplary, as it binds and regulates more than 100 mRNAs that encode proteins with mitochondrial function. Here we elucidate the structural basis of that specificity. To do so, we explore the crystal structures of Puf3p complexes with 2 cognate RNAs. The key determinant of Puf3p specificity is an unusual interaction between a distinctive pocket of the protein with an RNA base outside the 'core' PUF-binding site. That interaction dramatically affects binding affinity in vitro and is required for regulation in vivo. The Puf3p structures, combined with those of Puf4p in the same organism, illuminate the structural basis of natural PUF-RNA networks. Yeast Puf3p binds its own RNAs because they possess a -2C and is excluded from those of Puf4p which contain an additional nucleotide in the core-binding site.

  11. The use of 2-hydroperoxytetrahydrofuran as a reagent to sequence cytosine and to probe non-Watson-Crick DNA structures.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, G; Gannett, P; Gold, B

    1995-01-01

    2-Hydroperoxytetrahydrofuran (THF-OOH) can be employed to sequence cytosine (C) and to probe for non-canonical DNA structures involving C. Using 32P-labeled oligomers and a DNA restriction fragment, it is demonstrated that THF-OOH has a strong preference for Cs in single-stranded (s-s) DNA regions, and in bulges, loops and mismatches. The reactivity of C is diminished below pH 6.0, but is not affected by substitution of 5-methylcytosine. To demonstrate the utility of the reagent, it is directly compared to methoxylamine and chloroacetaldehyde, two other reagents commonly used to chemically probe C residues in non-Watson-Crick DNA structures. Images PMID:7899093

  12. Spectroscopic (UV/VIS, Raman) and Electrophoresis Study of Cytosine-Guanine Oligonucleotide DNA Influenced by Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Banihashemian, Seyedeh Maryam; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Boon Tong, Goh; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effect of a magnetic field on oligonucleotide DNA can provide a novel DNA manipulation technique for potential application in bioengineering and medicine. In this work, the optical and electrochemical response of a 100 bases oligonucleotides DNA, cytosine-guanine (CG100), is investigated via exposure to different magnetic fields (250, 500, 750, and 1000 mT). As a result of the optical response of CG100 to the magnetic field, the ultra-violet-visible spectrum indicated a slight variation in the band gap of CG100 of about 0.3 eV. Raman spectroscopy showed a significant deviation in hydrogen and phosphate bonds’ vibration after exposure to the magnetic field. Oligonucleotide DNA mobility was investigated in the external electric field using the gel electrophoresis technique, which revealed a small decrease in the migration of CG100 after exposure to the magnetic field. PMID:26999445

  13. Spectroscopic (UV/VIS, Raman) and Electrophoresis Study of Cytosine-Guanine Oligonucleotide DNA Influenced by Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Banihashemian, Seyedeh Maryam; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Boon Tong, Goh; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effect of a magnetic field on oligonucleotide DNA can provide a novel DNA manipulation technique for potential application in bioengineering and medicine. In this work, the optical and electrochemical response of a 100 bases oligonucleotides DNA, cytosine-guanine (CG100), is investigated via exposure to different magnetic fields (250, 500, 750, and 1000 mT). As a result of the optical response of CG100 to the magnetic field, the ultra-violet-visible spectrum indicated a slight variation in the band gap of CG100 of about 0.3 eV. Raman spectroscopy showed a significant deviation in hydrogen and phosphate bonds' vibration after exposure to the magnetic field. Oligonucleotide DNA mobility was investigated in the external electric field using the gel electrophoresis technique, which revealed a small decrease in the migration of CG100 after exposure to the magnetic field. PMID:26999445

  14. CpG-binding protein (CXXC finger protein 1) is a component of the mammalian Set1 histone H3-Lys4 methyltransferase complex, the analogue of the yeast Set1/COMPASS complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Heon; Skalnik, David G

    2005-12-16

    CpG-binding protein (CXXC finger protein 1 (CFP1)) binds to DNA containing unmethylated CpG motifs and is required for mammalian embryogenesis, normal cytosine methylation, and cellular differentiation. Studies were performed to identify proteins that interact with CFP1 to gain insight into the molecular function of this protein. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry reveal that human CFP1 associates with a approximately 450-kDa complex that contains the mammalian homologues of six of the seven components of the Set1/COMPASS complex, the sole histone H3-Lys4 methyltransferase in yeast. In vitro assays demonstrate that the human Set1/CFP1 complex is a histone methyltransferase that produces mono-, di-, and trimethylated histone H3 at Lys4. Confocal microscopy reveals that CFP1 and Set1 co-localize to nuclear speckles associated with euchromatin. A Set1 complex of reduced mass persists in murine embryonic stem cells lacking CFP1. These cells carry elevated levels of methylated histone H3-Lys4 and reduced levels of methylated histone H3-Lys9. Together with the previous finding of reduced levels of cytosine methylation, these data indicate that cells lacking CFP1 contain reduced levels of heterochromatin. Furthermore, ES cells lacking CFP1 exhibit a 4-fold excess of histone H3-Lys4 methylation following induction of differentiation, indicating that CFP1 restricts the activity of the Set1 histone methyltransferase complex. These results reveal a mammalian counterpart to the yeast Set1/COMPASS complex. The presence of CFP1 in this complex implicates this protein as a critical epigenetic regulator of histone modification in addition to cytosine methylation and reveals one mechanism by which this protein intersects with the epigenetic machinery. PMID:16253997

  15. Stability of the valence anion of cytosine is governed by nucleobases sequence in the double stranded DNA π-stack: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobyłecka, Monika; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Rak, Janusz

    2009-08-01

    The stabilities of the valence anion of cytosine (C-) in model trimers of complementary base pairs that possess the B-DNA geometry but differ in base sequence are reported. In order to estimate the energetics of electron attachment to the middle cytosine incorporated in the trimer, a thermodynamic cycle employing all possible two-body interaction energies in the neutral and anionic duplex as well as the adiabatic electron affinity of isolated cytosine were developed. All calculations were carried out at the MP2 level of theory with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. We have demonstrated that contrary to the literature reports, concerning single stranded DNA, the sequence of nucleic bases has a profound effect on the stability of the cytosine valence anion. The anionic 3'-CCC-5' complex is the most stable configuration (EA=0.399 eV) and the 3'-GCG-5' trimer anion is the most unstable species (EA=-0.193 eV). Moreover, with the energetic correction for the presence of sugar-phosphate backbone all possible double stranded DNA sequences lead to the stable C-. The predicted electron affinities of the cytosine anion have been compared to the results of analogous studies on the thymine anion published recently [M. Kobyłecka et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 15683 (2008)]. The consequences of low-energy barrier proton transfer in the GC anion have been discussed in the context of induced by electrons DNA single strand breaks. The DNA sequences that should dramatically differ in their vulnerability to be damaged by low energy electrons have been proposed.

  16. Mycotoxins - prevention and decontamination by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Pfliegler, Walter P; Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Pócsi, István

    2015-07-01

    The application of yeasts has great potential in reducing the economic damage caused by toxigenic fungi in the agriculture. Some yeasts may act as biocontrol agents inhibiting the growth of filamentous fungi. These species may also gain importance in the preservation of agricultural products and in the reduction of their mycotoxin contamination, yet the extent of mycotoxin production in the presence of biocontrol agents is relatively less understood. The application of yeasts in various technological processes may have a direct inhibitory effect on the toxin production of certain molds, which is independent of their growth suppressing effect. Furthermore, several yeast species are capable of accumulating mycotoxins from agricultural products, thereby effectively decontaminating them. Probiotic yeasts or products containing yeast cell wall are also applied to counteract mycotoxicosis in livestock. Several yeast strains are also able to degrade toxins to less-toxic or even non-toxic substances. This intensively researched field would greatly benefit from a deeper knowledge on the genetic and molecular basis of toxin degradation. Moreover, yeasts and their biotechnologically important enzymes may exhibit sensitivity to certain mycotoxins, thereby mounting a considerable problem for the biotechnological industry. It is noted that yeasts are generally regarded as safe; however, there are reports of toxin degrading species that may cause human fungal infections. The aspects of yeast-mycotoxin relations with a brief consideration of strain improvement strategies and genetic modification for improved detoxifying properties and/or mycotoxin resistance are reviewed here. PMID:25682759

  17. Nuclear Import of Yeast Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Burcoglu, Julianne; Zhao, Liang; Enenkel, Cordula

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are highly conserved protease complexes responsible for the degradation of aberrant and short-lived proteins. In highly proliferating yeast and mammalian cells, proteasomes are predominantly nuclear. During quiescence and cell cycle arrest, proteasomes accumulate in granules in close proximity to the nuclear envelope/ER. With prolonged quiescence in yeast, these proteasome granules pinch off as membraneless organelles, and migrate as stable entities through the cytoplasm. Upon exit from quiescence, the proteasome granules clear and the proteasomes are rapidly transported into the nucleus, a process reflecting the dynamic nature of these multisubunit complexes. Due to the scarcity of studies on the nuclear transport of mammalian proteasomes, we summarised the current knowledge on the nuclear import of yeast proteasomes. This pathway uses canonical nuclear localisation signals within proteasomal subunits and Srp1/Kap95, and the canonical import receptor, named importin/karyopherin αβ. Blm10, a conserved 240 kDa protein, which is structurally related to Kap95, provides an alternative import pathway. Two models exist upon which either inactive precursor complexes or active holo-enzymes serve as the import cargo. Here, we reconcile both models and suggest that the import of inactive precursor complexes predominates in dividing cells, while the import of mature enzymes mainly occurs upon exit from quiescence. PMID:26262643

  18. Yeast diversity in hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Butinar, L; Santos, S; Spencer-Martins, I; Oren, A; Gunde-Cimerman, N

    2005-03-15

    Thus far it has been considered that hypersaline natural brines which are subjected to extreme solar heating, do not contain non-melanized yeast populations. Nevertheless we have isolated yeasts in eight different salterns worldwide, as well as from the Dead Sea, Enriquillo Lake (Dominican Republic) and the Great Salt Lake (Utah). Among the isolates obtained from hypersaline waters, Pichia guilliermondii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Yarrowia lipolytica and Candida parapsilosis are known contaminants of low water activity food, whereas Rhodosporidium sphaerocarpum, R. babjevae, Rhodotorula laryngis, Trichosporon mucoides, and a new species resembling C. glabrata were not known for their halotolerance and were identified for the first time in hypersaline habitats. Moreover, the ascomycetous yeast Metschnikowia bicuspidata, known to be a parasite of the brine shrimp, was isolated as a free-living form from the Great Salt Lake brine. In water rich in magnesium chloride (bitterns) from the La Trinitat salterns (Spain), two new species provisionally named C. atmosphaerica - like and P. philogaea - like were discovered. PMID:15766773

  19. The birth of yeast peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J

    2016-05-01

    This contribution describes the phenotypic differences of yeast peroxisome-deficient mutants (pex mutants). In some cases different phenotypes were reported for yeast mutants deleted in the same PEX gene. These differences are most likely related to the marker proteins and methods used to detect peroxisomal remnants. This is especially evident for pex3 and pex19 mutants, where the localization of receptor docking proteins (Pex13, Pex14) resulted in the identification of peroxisomal membrane remnants, which do not contain other peroxisomal membrane proteins, such as the ring proteins Pex2, Pex10 and Pex12. These structures in pex3 and pex19 cells are the template for peroxisome formation upon introduction of the missing gene. Taken together, these data suggest that in all yeast pex mutants analyzed so far peroxisomes are not formed de novo but use membrane remnant structures as a template for peroxisome formation upon reintroduction of the missing gene. The relevance of this model for peroxisomal membrane protein and lipid sorting to peroxisomes is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Peroxisomes edited by Ralf Erdmann. PMID:26367802

  20. A new strategy based on pharmacophore-based virtual screening in adenosine deaminase inhibitors detection and in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibition not only may be applied for the treatment of ischemic injury, hypertension, lymphomas and leukaemia, but also they have been considered as anti- inflammatory drugs. On the other hand according to literatures, ADA inhibitors without a nucleoside framework would improve pharmacokinetics and decrease toxicity. Hence we have carried out a rational pharmacophore design for non-nucleoside inhibitors filtration. Methods A merged pharmacophore model based on the most potent non-nucleoside inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA) and natural products were generated and applied for compounds filtration. The effects of filtrated compounds based on pharmacophore and docking studies investigated on ADA by UV and Fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. Results Extracted compounds were find efficiently inhibit ADA, and the most potent (2) shows an inhibition constant equal to 20 μM. Besides, Fluorescence spectroscopy studies revealed that enzyme 3D structure bear further change in lower concentrations of compound 2. Conclusion 3 non-nucleoside inhibitors for ADA are presented. According to obtained results from UV and fluorescence spectroscopy, such interesting pharmacophore template with multiple approaches will help us to extract or design compound with desired properties. PMID:23351306

  1. Variation in the gene for muscle-specific AMP deaminase is associated with insulin clearance, a highly heritable trait.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Mark O; Taylor, Kent D; Guo, Xiuqing; Quiñones, Manuel J; Cui, Jinrui; Li, Xiaohui; Hang, Tieu; Yang, Huiying; Holmes, Edward; Hsueh, Willa A; Olefsky, Jerrold; Rotter, Jerome I

    2005-04-01

    The rising prevalence of the insulin resistance syndrome in our society necessitates a better understanding of the genetic determinants of all aspects of insulin action and metabolism. We evaluated the heritability of insulin sensitivity and the metabolic clearance rate of insulin (MCRI) as quantified by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp in 403 Mexican Americans. We tested the candidate gene AMP deaminase 1 (AMPD1) for association with insulin-related traits because it codes for an enzyme that has the potential to influence multiple aspects of insulin pharmacodynamics. By converting AMP to inosine monophosphate, AMPD1 plays a major role in regulating cellular AMP levels; AMP activates AMP kinase, an enzyme that modulates cellular energy and insulin action. We determined that nine AMPD1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) defined two haplotype blocks. Insulin clearance was found to have a higher heritability (h(2) = 0.58) than fasting insulin (h(2) = 0.38) or insulin sensitivity (h(2) = 0.44). The MCRI was associated with AMPD1 SNPs and haplotypes. Insulin clearance is a highly heritable trait, and specific haplotypes within the AMPD1 gene, which encodes a skeletal muscle-specific protein, are associated with variation in insulin clearance. We postulated that the processes of insulin action and insulin clearance in skeletal muscle are highly regulated and that AMPD1 function may play an important role in these phenomena. PMID:15793265

  2. SU-C-303-01: Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Confers Cancer Resistance to Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S; La Count, S; Liu, J; Bai, X; Lu, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the role of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in malignant cell resistance to radiation therapy. Methods: We first developed several small devices that could be used to adopt radiation beams from clinical high dose rate brachy therapy (HDR) or linac-based megavoltage machines to perform pre-clinical cell and mouse experiments. Then we used these devices to deliver radiation to AID-positive and AID-silenced cancer cells or tumors formed by these cells in mice. Cells and mice bearing tumors received the same dose under the same experimental conditions. For cells, we observed the apoptosis and the cell survival rate over time. For mice bearing tumors, we measured and recorded the tumor sizes every other day for 4 weeks. Results: For cell experiments, we found that the AID-positive cells underwent much less apoptosis compared with AID-silenced cells upon radiation. And for mouse experiments, we found that AID-positive tumors grew significantly faster than the AID-silenced tumors despite of receiving the same doses of radiation. Conclusion: Our study suggests that AID may confer cancer resistance to radiation therapy, and AID may be a significant biomarker predicting cancer resistance to radiation therapy for certain cancer types.

  3. A Study on the Serum Adenosine Deaminase Activity in Patients with Typhoid Fever and Other Febrile Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Ketavarapu, Sameera; Ramani G., Uma; Modi, Prabhavathi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) has been suggested to be an important enzyme which is associated with the cell mediated immunity, but its clinical significance in typhoid fever has not yet been characterized. The present study was taken up to evaluate the serum ADA activity in patients of typhoid fever. The levels of ADA were also measured in the patients who were suffering from other febrile illnesses. Material and Method: This was a case control study. The subjects who were included in this study were divided into 3 groups. Group A consisted of 50 normal healthy individuals who served as the controls. Group B consisted of 50 patients, both males and females of all age groups, who were suffering from culture positive typhoid fever. Group C consisted of 50 patients who were suffering from febrile illnesses other than typhoid fever like viral fever, gastro enteritis, malaria, tonsillitis, upper respiratory tract infections, etc. The serum levels of ADA were estimated in all the subjects who were under study. Results: The serum ADA level was found to be increased in the patients of typhoid fever as compared to that in those with other febrile illnesses and in the controls. Conclusion: From the present study, it can be concluded that there was a statistically significant increase in the serum ADA levels in the patients with typhoid. PMID:23730630

  4. Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase Targets DNA at Sites of RNA Polymerase II Stalling by Interaction with Spt5

    PubMed Central

    Pavri, Rushad; Gazumyan, Anna; Jankovic, Mila; Di Virgilio, Michela; Klein, Isaac; Ansarah-Sobrinho, Camilo; Resch, Wolfgang; Yamane, Arito; San-Martin, Bernardo Reina; Barreto, Vasco; Nieland, Thomas J.; Root, David E.; Casellas, Rafael; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates antibody gene diversification by creating U:G mismatches. However, AID is not specific for antibody genes. Off-target lesions can activate oncogenes or cause chromosome translocations. Despite its importance in these transactions little is known about how AID finds its targets. To address this, we performed an shRNA screen. We found that Spt5, a factor associated with stalled RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and single stranded DNA (ssDNA), is required for class switch recombination (CSR). Spt5 interacts with AID, it is required for the association of AID and Pol II, and for AID recruitment to Ig switch regions and non-Ig targets. ChIP-seq experiments reveal that Spt5 co-localizes with AID and stalled Pol II. Further, Spt5 accumulation at sites of Pol II stalling is predictive of AID-induced mutation. We propose that AID is targeted to sites of Pol II stalling in part via its association with Spt5. PMID:20887897

  5. Regulation of pyrimidine deoxyribonucleotide metabolism by substrate cycles in dCMP deaminase-deficient V79 hamster cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, V; Pontis, E; Reichard, P

    1987-01-01

    A mutant V79 hamster fibroblast cell line lacking the enzyme dCMP deaminase was used to study the regulation of deoxynucleoside triphosphate pools by substrate cycles between pyrimidine deoxyribosides and their 5'-phosphates. Such cycles were suggested earlier to set the rates of cellular import and export of deoxyribosides, thereby influencing pool sizes (V. Bianchi, E. Pontis, and P. Reichard, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:986-990, 1986). While normal V79 cells derived more than 80% of their dTTP from CDP reduction via deamination of dCMP, the mutant cells had to rely completely on UDP reduction for de novo synthesis of dTTP, which became limiting for DNA synthesis. Because of the allosteric properties of ribonucleotide reductase, CDP reduction was not diminished, leading to a large expansion of the dCTP pool. The increase of this pool was kept in check by a shift in the balance of the deoxycytidine/dCMP cycle towards the deoxynucleoside, leading to massive excretion of deoxycytidine. In contrast, the balance of the deoxyuridine/dUMP cycle was shifted towards the nucleotide, facilitating import of extracellular deoxynucleosides. PMID:3437888

  6. Identification of DNA cleavage- and recombination-specific hnRNP cofactors for activation-induced cytidine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenjun; Begum, Nasim A; Mondal, Samiran; Stanlie, Andre; Honjo, Tasuku

    2015-05-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for antibody class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). AID originally was postulated to function as an RNA-editing enzyme, based on its strong homology with apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide 1 (APOBEC1), the enzyme that edits apolipoprotein B-100 mRNA in the presence of the APOBEC cofactor APOBEC1 complementation factor/APOBEC complementation factor (A1CF/ACF). Because A1CF is structurally similar to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), we investigated the involvement of several well-known hnRNPs in AID function by using siRNA knockdown and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9-mediated disruption. We found that hnRNP K deficiency inhibited DNA cleavage and thereby induced both CSR and SHM, whereas hnRNP L deficiency inhibited only CSR and somewhat enhanced SHM. Interestingly, both hnRNPs exhibited RNA-dependent interactions with AID, and mutant forms of these proteins containing deletions in the RNA-recognition motif failed to rescue CSR. Thus, our study suggests that hnRNP K and hnRNP L may serve as A1CF-like cofactors in AID-mediated CSR and SHM. PMID:25902538

  7. Identification of DNA cleavage- and recombination-specific hnRNP cofactors for activation-induced cytidine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenjun; Begum, Nasim A.; Mondal, Samiran; Stanlie, Andre; Honjo, Tasuku

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for antibody class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). AID originally was postulated to function as an RNA-editing enzyme, based on its strong homology with apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide 1 (APOBEC1), the enzyme that edits apolipoprotein B-100 mRNA in the presence of the APOBEC cofactor APOBEC1 complementation factor/APOBEC complementation factor (A1CF/ACF). Because A1CF is structurally similar to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), we investigated the involvement of several well-known hnRNPs in AID function by using siRNA knockdown and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9–mediated disruption. We found that hnRNP K deficiency inhibited DNA cleavage and thereby induced both CSR and SHM, whereas hnRNP L deficiency inhibited only CSR and somewhat enhanced SHM. Interestingly, both hnRNPs exhibited RNA-dependent interactions with AID, and mutant forms of these proteins containing deletions in the RNA-recognition motif failed to rescue CSR. Thus, our study suggests that hnRNP K and hnRNP L may serve as A1CF-like cofactors in AID-mediated CSR and SHM. PMID:25902538

  8. MicroRNA-146b-3p regulates retinal inflammation by suppressing adenosine deaminase-2 in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fulzele, Sadanand; El-Sherbini, Ahmed; Ahmad, Saif; Sangani, Rajnikumar; Matragoon, Suraporn; El-Remessy, Azza; Radhakrishnan, Reshmitha; Liou, Gregory I

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia- (HG-) Amadori-glycated albumin- (AGA-) induced activation of microglia and monocytes and their adherence to retinal vascular endothelial cells contribute to retinal inflammation leading to diabetic retinopathy (DR). There is a great need for early detection of DR before demonstrable tissue damages become irreversible. Extracellular adenosine, required for endogenous anti-inflammation, is regulated by the interplay of equilibrative nucleoside transporter with adenosine deaminase (ADA) and adenosine kinase. ADA, including ADA1 and ADA2, exists in all organisms. However, because ADA2 gene has not been identified in mouse genome, how diabetes alters adenosine-dependent anti-inflammation remains unclear. Studies of pig retinal microglia and human macrophages revealed a causal role of ADA2 in inflammation. Database search suggested miR-146b-3p recognition sites in the 3'-UTR of ADA2 mRNA. Coexpression of miR-146b-3p, but not miR-146-5p or nontargeting miRNA, with 3'-UTR of the ADA2 gene was necessary to suppress a linked reporter gene. In the vitreous of diabetic patients, decreased miR-146b-3p is associated with increased ADA2 activity. Ectopic expression of miR-146b-3p suppressed ADA2 expression, activity, and TNF-α release in the AGA-treated human macrophages. These results suggest a regulatory role of miR-146b-3p in diabetes related retinal inflammation by suppressing ADA2. PMID:25815338

  9. Whole-genome sequencing reveals activation-induced cytidine deaminase signatures during indolent chronic lymphocytic leukaemia evolution.

    PubMed

    Kasar, S; Kim, J; Improgo, R; Tiao, G; Polak, P; Haradhvala, N; Lawrence, M S; Kiezun, A; Fernandes, S M; Bahl, S; Sougnez, C; Gabriel, S; Lander, E S; Kim, H T; Getz, G; Brown, J R

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chromosome 13q deletion or normal cytogenetics represent the majority of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cases, yet have relatively few driver mutations. To better understand their genomic landscape, here we perform whole-genome sequencing on a cohort of patients enriched with these cytogenetic characteristics. Mutations in known CLL drivers are seen in only 33% of this cohort, and associated with normal cytogenetics and unmutated IGHV. The most commonly mutated gene in our cohort, IGLL5, shows a mutational pattern suggestive of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) activity. Unsupervised analysis of mutational signatures demonstrates the activities of canonical AID (c-AID), leading to clustered mutations near active transcriptional start sites; non-canonical AID (nc-AID), leading to genome-wide non-clustered mutations, and an ageing signature responsible for most mutations. Using mutation clonality to infer time of onset, we find that while ageing and c-AID activities are ongoing, nc-AID-associated mutations likely occur earlier in tumour evolution. PMID:26638776

  10. Opposing Activity Changes in AMP Deaminase and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in the Hibernating Ground Squirrel

    PubMed Central

    Cicerchi, Christina; Garcia, Gabriela E.; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A.; Trostel, Jessica; Jain, Swati; Mant, Colin T.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Ishimoto, Takuji; Shimada, Michiko; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jani, Alkesh; Stenvinkel, Peter; Martin, Sandra L.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating animals develop fatty liver when active in summertime and undergo a switch to a fat oxidation state in the winter. We hypothesized that this switch might be determined by AMP and the dominance of opposing effects: metabolism through AMP deaminase (AMPD2) (summer) and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (winter). Liver samples were obtained from 13-lined ground squirrels at different times during the year, including summer and multiples stages of winter hibernation, and fat synthesis and ?-fatty acid oxidation were evaluated. Changes in fat metabolism were correlated with changes in AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid (downstream product of AMPD2), as well as changes in AMPK and intrahepatic ?-hydroxybutyrate (a marker of fat oxidation). Hepatic fat accumulation occurred during the summer with relatively increased enzymes associated with fat synthesis (FAS, ACL and ACC) and decreased enoyl CoA hydratase (ECH1) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), rate limiting enzymes of fat oxidation. In summer, AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid levels were high and hepatic AMPK activity was low. In contrast, the active phosphorylated form of AMPK and ?-hydroxybutyrate both increased during winter hibernation. Therefore, changes in AMPD2 and AMPK activity were paralleled with changes in fat synthesis and fat oxidation rates during the summer-winter cycle. These data illuminate the opposing forces of metabolism of AMP by AMPD2 and its availability to activate AMPK as a switch that governs fat metabolism in the liver of hibernating ground squirrel. PMID:25856396

  11. Isotype-switched follicular lymphoma displays dissociation between activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Florian; Navarrete, Marcelo A; Bertinetti-Lapatki, Cristina; Boehm, Joachim; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Veelken, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    In B-cells, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of immunoglobulin genes. AID introduces mutations in immunoglobulin variable regions (IGV) during B-cell receptor affinity maturation, but may also introduce aberrant mutations into non-immunoglobulin genes, most commonly BCL6. Follicular lymphoma (FL) B-cells constitutively express AID and undergo CSR, SHM and aberrant SHM. We have studied AID expression, the presence of SHM mutations, CSR, and aberrant SHM in BCL6 in a cohort of 75 FL patients. Whereas IgM-expressing (non-switched) FL were characterized by an expected positive correlation between AID and IGV and BCL6 mutations, isotype-switched FL showed dissociation between AID expression and aberrant SHM, and inverse correlation between SHM and AID expression. Our results unveil two manifest biological subgroups of FL and indicate that the specific dissociation between AID and SHM after isotype switch may correlate with the clinical outcome of this heterogeneous disease. PMID:25860234

  12. Syzygium cumini extract decrease adenosine deaminase, 5'nucleotidase activities and oxidative damage in platelets of diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    De Bona, Karine S; Bell, Luziane P; Sari, Marcel H; Thom, Gustavo; Schetinger, Maria R C; Morsch, Vera M; Boligon, Aline; Athayde, Margareth L; Pigatto, Aline S; Moretto, Maria B

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a chronic metabolic disorder, has assumed epidemic proportions and its long-term complications can have devastating consequences. The oxidative stress in diabetes was greatly increased due to prolonged exposure to hyperglycemia and impairment of oxidant/antioxidant equilibrium. Syzygium cumini is being widely used to treat diabetes by the traditional practitioners over many centuries. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) and 5'-Nucleotidase (5'NT) are enzymes of purine nucleoside metabolism that play an important role in the regulation of adenosine (Ado) levels. In this study, we investigated the effect of Syzygium cumini aqueous leaves extract (ASc) on ADA and 5'NT activities and on parameters of oxidative stress under in vitro conditions, using platelets of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) was assayed by ADA, 5'NT, Catalase (CAT), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) activities and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels. We observed that ADA, 5'NT activities and TBARS levels were significantly higher when compared to the control group, and ASc (100 and 200 ?g/mL) prevented these effects. Our study demonstrates that ASc was able to remove oxidant species generated in diabetic conditions and modulates in the Ado levels. Then, ASc may promote a compensatory response in platelet function, improving the susceptibility-induced by the diabetes mellitus. PMID:21063110

  13. Cis- and trans-acting elements involved in the regulation of the erythroid promoter of the human porphobilinogen deaminase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Mignotte, V; Eleouet, J F; Raich, N; Romeo, P H

    1989-01-01

    Two cis-acting sequences, recognized by two erythroid-specific trans-acting factors, are involved in the regulation of the erythroid promoter of the human gene coding for porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). The first region, located at -70, binds the erythroid factor NF-E1, and point mutations within this region abolish the induction of transcription of this promoter during murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cell differentiation. The second region, located at -160, binds the erythroid-specific factor NF-E2 and the ubiquitous factor AP1. Using UV cross-linking, we show that NF-E2 has a higher molecular weight than AP1, demonstrating that NF-E2 is not an erythroid-specific degradation product of AP1. By point mutagenesis of the NF-E2/AP1 binding site, we define mutations that abolish binding of either NF-E2 alone or AP1 and NF-E2 together. Regulation of transcription of the PBGD erythroid promoter is abolished by those mutations, suggesting that NF-E2 but not AP1 is necessary for correct regulation of this promoter in erythroid cells. Images PMID:2771941

  14. Long-term expression of human adenosine deaminase in mice transplanted with retrovirus-infected hematopoietic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, B.; Apperley, J.F.; Orkin, S.H.; Williams, D.A. )

    1989-11-01

    Long-term stable expression of foreign genetic sequences transferred into hematopoietic stem cells by using retroviral vectors constitutes a relevant model for somatic gene therapy. Such stability of expression may depend on vector design, including the presence or absence of specific sequences within the vector, in combination with the nature and efficiency of infection of the hematopoietic target cells. The authors have previously reported successful transfer of human DNA encoding adenosine deaminase (ADA) into CFU-S (colony-forming unit-spleen) stem cells using simplified recombinant retroviral vectors. Human ADA was expressed in CFU-S-derived spleen colonies at levels near to endogenous enzyme. However, because of the lack of an efficient dominant selectable marker and low recombinant viral titers, stability of long-term expression of human ADA was not examined. They report here the development of an efficient method of infection of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) without reliance on in vitro selection. Peripheral blood samples of 100% of mice transplanted with HSC infected by this protocol exhibit expression of human ADA 30 days after transplantation. Some mice (6 of 13) continue to express human ADA in all lineages after complete hematopoietic reconstitution (4 months). The use of recombinant retroviral vectors that efficiently transfer human ADA cDNA into HSC leading to stable expression of functional ADA in reconstituted mice, provides an experimental framework for future development of approaches to somatic gene therapy.

  15. A source of the single-stranded DNA substrate for activation-induced deaminase during somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohua; Fan, Manxia; Kalis, Susan; Wei, Lirong; Scharff, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    During somatic hypermutation (SHM), activation-induced deaminase (AID) mutates deoxycytidine on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) generated by the transcription machinery, but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. Here we report a higher abundance of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) at the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable (Igh-V) region compared with the constant region and partially transcribed Igh RNAs, suggesting a slower Pol II progression at Igh-V that could result in some early/premature transcription termination after prolonged pausing/stalling of Pol II. Knocking down RNA-exosome complexes, which could decrease premature transcription termination, leads to decreased SHM. Knocking down Spt5, which can augment premature transcription termination, leads to increase in both, SHM and the abundance of ssDNA substrates. Collectively, our data support the model that, following the reduction of Pol II progression (pausing or stalling) at the Igh-V, additional steps such as premature transcription termination are involved in providing ssDNA substrates for AID during SHM. PMID:24923561

  16. Activation induced deaminase C-terminal domain links DNA breaks to end protection and repair during class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, Astrid; Eranki, Anil K.; Patenaude, Anne-Marie; Methot, Stephen P.; Fifield, Heather; Cortizas, Elena M.; Foster, Paul; Imai, Kohsuke; Durandy, Anne; Larijani, Mani; Verdun, Ramiro E.; Di Noia, Javier M.

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) triggers antibody class switch recombination (CSR) in B cells by initiating DNA double strand breaks that are repaired by nonhomologous end-joining pathways. A role for AID at the repair step is unclear. We show that specific inactivation of the C-terminal AID domain encoded by exon 5 (E5) allows very efficient deamination of the AID target regions but greatly impacts the efficiency and quality of subsequent DNA repair. Specifically eliminating E5 not only precludes CSR but also, causes an atypical, enzymatic activity-dependent dominant-negative effect on CSR. Moreover, the E5 domain is required for the formation of AID-dependent Igh-cMyc chromosomal translocations. DNA breaks at the Igh switch regions induced by AID lacking E5 display defective end joining, failing to recruit DNA damage response factors and undergoing extensive end resection. These defects lead to nonproductive resolutions, such as rearrangements and homologous recombination that can antagonize CSR. Our results can explain the autosomal dominant inheritance of AID variants with truncated E5 in patients with hyper-IgM syndrome 2 and establish that AID, through the E5 domain, provides a link between DNA damage and repair during CSR. PMID:24591601

  17. Whole-genome sequencing reveals activation-induced cytidine deaminase signatures during indolent chronic lymphocytic leukaemia evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kasar, S.; Kim, J.; Improgo, R.; Tiao, G.; Polak, P.; Haradhvala, N.; Lawrence, M. S.; Kiezun, A.; Fernandes, S. M.; Bahl, S.; Sougnez, C.; Gabriel, S.; Lander, E. S.; Kim, H. T.; Getz, G.; Brown, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chromosome 13q deletion or normal cytogenetics represent the majority of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cases, yet have relatively few driver mutations. To better understand their genomic landscape, here we perform whole-genome sequencing on a cohort of patients enriched with these cytogenetic characteristics. Mutations in known CLL drivers are seen in only 33% of this cohort, and associated with normal cytogenetics and unmutated IGHV. The most commonly mutated gene in our cohort, IGLL5, shows a mutational pattern suggestive of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) activity. Unsupervised analysis of mutational signatures demonstrates the activities of canonical AID (c-AID), leading to clustered mutations near active transcriptional start sites; non-canonical AID (nc-AID), leading to genome-wide non-clustered mutations, and an ageing signature responsible for most mutations. Using mutation clonality to infer time of onset, we find that while ageing and c-AID activities are ongoing, nc-AID-associated mutations likely occur earlier in tumour evolution. PMID:26638776

  18. Yeasts and circumcision in the male.

    PubMed

    Davidson, F

    1977-04-01

    Sixty-six circumcised men and 69 uncircumcised men, both heterosexual and homosexual, had specimens taken from the coronal sulcus and meatus of the penis. Yeasts were isolated at similar rates in both the circumcised (14%) and uncircumcised (17%) men. The circumcised men had significantly fewer symptoms (P = 0-0058). Therefore the female partners of both circumcised and uncircumcised men are exposed to similar rates of yeast infection despite the absence of symptoms in circumcised men. Eighty per cent of the female contacts of yeast-positive men had yeast infection while 32% of the contacts of yeast-negative men were affected. This difference was statistically significant (0-05 greater than P greater than 0-025). Men with non-specific genital infection seemed more likely to carry yeasts than men with gonorrhoea or normal men. PMID:322822

  19. Biopharmaceutical discovery and production in yeast.

    PubMed

    Meehl, Michael A; Stadheim, Terrance A

    2014-12-01

    The selection of an expression platform for recombinant biopharmaceuticals is often centered upon suitable product titers and critical quality attributes, including post-translational modifications. Although notable differences between microbial, yeast, plant, and mammalian host systems exist, recent advances have greatly mitigated any inherent liabilities of yeasts. Yeast expression platforms are important to both the supply of marketed biopharmaceuticals and the pipelines of novel therapeutics. In this review, recent advances in yeast-based expression of biopharmaceuticals will be discussed. The advantages of using glycoengineered yeast as a production host and in the discovery space will be illustrated. These advancements, in turn, are transforming yeast platforms from simple production systems to key technological assets in the discovery and selection of biopharmaceutical lead candidates. PMID:25014890

  20. Yeasts Diversity in Fermented Foods and Beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamang, Jyoti Prakash; Fleet, Graham H.

    People across the world have learnt to culture and use the essential microorganisms for production of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages. A fermented food is produced either spontaneously or by adding mixed/pure starter culture(s). Yeasts are among the essential functional microorganisms encountered in many fermented foods, and are commercially used in production of baker's yeast, breads, wine, beer, cheese, etc. In Asia, moulds are predominant followed by amylolytic and alcohol-producing yeasts in the fermentation processes, whereas in Africa, Europe, Australia and America, fermented products are prepared exclusively using bacteria or bacteria-yeasts mixed cultures. This chapter would focus on the varieties of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages produced by yeasts, their microbiology and role in food fermentation, widely used commercial starters (pilot production, molecular aspects), production technology of some common commercial fermented foods and alcoholic beverages, toxicity and food safety using yeasts cultures and socio-economy

  1. Plant growth-promoting traits of epiphytic and endophytic yeasts isolated from rice and sugar cane leaves in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nutaratat, Pumin; Srisuk, Nantana; Arunrattiyakorn, Panarat; Limtong, Savitree

    2014-08-01

    A total of 1035 yeast isolates, obtained from rice and sugar cane leaves, were screened primarily for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production. Thirteen isolates were selected, due to their IAA production ranging from 1.2 to 29.3 mg g(-)(1) DCW. These isolates were investigated for their capabilities of calcium phosphate and ZnO(3) solubilisation, and also for production of NH(3), polyamine, and siderophore. Their 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, catalase and fungal cell wall-degrading enzyme activities were assessed. Their antagonism against rice fungal pathogens was also evaluated. Strain identification, based on molecular taxonomy, of the thirteen yeast isolates revealed that four yeast species - i.e. Hannaella sinensis (DMKU-RP45), Cryptococcus flavus (DMKU-RE12, DMKU-RE19, DMKU-RE67, and DMKU-RP128), Rhodosporidium paludigenum (DMKU-RP301) and Torulaspora globosa (DMKU-RP31) - were capable of high IAA production. Catalase activity was detected in all yeast strains tested. The yeast R. paludigenum DMKU-RP301 was the best IAA producer, yielding 29.3 mg g(-)(1) DCW, and showed the ability to produce NH3 and siderophore. Different levels of IAA production (7.2-9.7 mg g(-)(1) DCW) were found in four strains of C. flavus DMKU-RE12, DMKU-RE19, and DMKU-RE67, which are rice leaf endophytes, and strain DMKU-RP128, which is a rice leaf epiphyte. NH(3) production and carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) activity was also detected in these four strains. Antagonism to fungal plant pathogens and production of antifungal volatile compounds were exhibited in T. globosa DMKU-RP31, as well as a moderate level of IAA production (4.9 mg g(-)(1) DCW). The overall results indicated that T. globosa DMKU-RP31 might be used in two ways: enhancing plant growth and acting as a biocontrol agent. In addition, four C. flavus were also found to be strains of interest for optimal IAA production. PMID:25110131

  2. [Yeast--the agent of weed diseases].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic yeast were isolated from infected weeds that occur in cereal crops. On the basis of morphological, physiological and biochemical properties the yeast isolated from sow thistle and dandelion have been identified as Rhodosporidium diobovatum Newell & Hunter and Rhodotorula sp. In the experiment the yeast caused pathological process on the weeds, from which they are isolated, on other types of weeds, but also on wheat, oat and soybean. PMID:25507810

  3. [Yeasts--the pathogen of weed diseases].

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, L M; Savenko, E A; Ianeva, O D; Pasichnik, L A

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic yeast were isolated from infected weeds that occur in cereal crops. On the basis of morphological, physiological and biochemical properties the yeast isolated from sow thistle and dandelion have been identified as Rhodosporidium diobovatum Newell & Hunter and Rhodotorula sp. In the experiment the yeast caused pathological process on the weeds, from which they are isolated, on other types of weeds, but also on wheat, oat and soybean. PMID:25434212

  4. Yeasts in floral nectar: a quantitative survey

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Carlos M.; de Vega, Clara; Canto, Azucena; Pozo, María I.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims One peculiarity of floral nectar that remains relatively unexplored from an ecological perspective is its role as a natural habitat for micro-organisms. This study assesses the frequency of occurrence and abundance of yeast cells in floral nectar of insect-pollinated plants from three contrasting plant communities on two continents. Possible correlations between interspecific differences in yeast incidence and pollinator composition are also explored. Methods The study was conducted at three widely separated areas, two in the Iberian Peninsula (Spain) and one in the Yucatán Peninsula (Mexico). Floral nectar samples from 130 species (37–63 species per region) in 44 families were examined microscopically for the presence of yeast cells. For one of the Spanish sites, the relationship across species between incidence of yeasts in nectar and the proportion of flowers visited by each of five major pollinator categories was also investigated. Key Results Yeasts occurred regularly in the floral nectar of many species, where they sometimes reached extraordinary densities (up to 4 × 105 cells mm−3). Depending on the region, between 32 and 44 % of all nectar samples contained yeasts. Yeast cell densities in the order of 104 cells mm−3 were commonplace, and densities >105 cells mm−3 were not rare. About one-fifth of species at each site had mean yeast cell densities >104 cells mm−3. Across species, yeast frequency and abundance were directly correlated with the proportion of floral visits by bumble-bees, and inversely with the proportion of visits by solitary bees. Conclusions Incorporating nectar yeasts into the scenario of plant–pollinator interactions opens up a number of intriguing avenues for research. In addition, with yeasts being as ubiquitous and abundant in floral nectars as revealed by this study, and given their astounding metabolic versatility, studies focusing on nectar chemical features should carefully control for the presence of yeasts in nectar samples. PMID:19208669

  5. Evaluation of Automated Yeast Identification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred and nine teleomorphic and anamorphic yeast isolates representing approximately 30 taxa were used to evaluate the accuracy of the Biolog yeast identification system. Isolates derived from nomenclatural types, environmental, and clinica isolates of known identity were tested in the Biolog system. Of the isolates tested, 81 were in the Biolog database. The system correctly identified 40, incorrectly identified 29, and was unable to identify 12. Of the 28 isolates not in the database, 18 were given names, whereas 10 were not. The Biolog yeast identification system is inadequate for the identification of yeasts originating from the environment during space program activities.

  6. Interactions between killer yeasts and pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Walker, G M; McLeod, A H; Hodgson, V J

    1995-04-01

    A total of 17 presumptive killer yeast strains were tested in vitro for growth inhibitory and killing activity against a range of fungal pathogens of agronomic, environmental and clinical significance. Several yeasts were identified which displayed significant activity against important pathogenic fungi. For example, isolates of the opportunistic human pathogen, Candida albicans, were generally very sensitive to Williopsis mrakii killer yeast activity, whilst killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia anomala markedly inhibited the growth of certain wood decay basidiomycetes and plant pathogenic fungi. Results indicate that such yeasts, together with their killer toxins, may have potential as novel antimycotic biocontrol agents. PMID:7758935

  7. Construction of killer wine yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Seki, T; Choi, E H; Ryu, D

    1985-05-01

    A double-stranded RNA plasmid which confers the superkiller phenotype was transferred into a wine yeast (Montrachet strain 522) and its leucine-requiring derivative (strain 694) by cytoduction, using the protoplast fusion technique. The killer wine yeast constructed completely suppressed the growth of killer-sensitive strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in yeast extract-peptone-glucose medium at pH 4.5, whereas the killer effect was somewhat decreased at pH 3.5. The wine yeast harboring the killer factor also inhibited the growth of killer-sensitive cells satisfactorily when it was grown in grape juice. PMID:16346794

  8. Role of glucose signaling in yeast metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dam, K. van

    1996-10-05

    The conversion of glucose to ethanol and carbon dioxide by yeast was the first biochemical pathway to be studied in detail. The initial observation that this process is catalyzed by an extract of yeast led to the discovery of enzymes and coenzymes and laid the foundation for modern biochemistry. In this article, knowledge concerning the relation between uptake of and signaling by glucose in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed and compared to the analogous process in prokaryotes. It is concluded that (much) more fundamental knowledge concerning these processes is required before rational redesign of metabolic fluxes from glucose in yeast can be achieved.

  9. In vivo targeting of de novo DNA methylation by histone modifications in yeast and mouse.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Marco; Pastor, William A; Montanini, Barbara; Nee, Kevin; Ferrari, Roberto; Fu, Kai; Bonora, Giancarlo; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Clark, Amander T; Ottonello, Simone; Jacobsen, Steven E; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of cytosines (5(me)C) is a widespread heritable DNA modification. During mammalian development, two global demethylation events are followed by waves of de novo DNA methylation. In vivo mechanisms of DNA methylation establishment are largely uncharacterized. Here, we use Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a system lacking DNA methylation to define the chromatin features influencing the activity of the murine DNMT3B. Our data demonstrate that DNMT3B and H3K4 methylation are mutually exclusive and that DNMT3B is co-localized with H3K36 methylated regions. In support of this observation, DNA methylation analysis in yeast strains without Set1 and Set2 shows an increase of relative 5(me)C levels at the transcription start site and a decrease in the gene-body, respectively. We extend our observation to the murine male germline, where H3K4me3 is strongly anti-correlated while H3K36me3 correlates with accelerated DNA methylation. These results show the importance of H3K36 methylation for gene-body DNA methylation in vivo. PMID:25848745

  10. Drosophila Regulate Yeast Density and Increase Yeast Community Similarity in a Natural Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Stamps, Judy A.; Yang, Louie H.; Morales, Vanessa M.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster adults and larvae, but especially larvae, had profound effects on the densities and community structure of yeasts that developed in banana fruits. Pieces of fruit exposed to adult female flies previously fed fly-conditioned bananas developed higher yeast densities than pieces of the same fruits that were not exposed to flies, supporting previous suggestions that adult Drosophila vector yeasts to new substrates. However, larvae alone had dramatic effects on yeast density and species composition. When yeast densities were compared in pieces of the same fruits assigned to different treatments, fruits that developed low yeast densities in the absence of flies developed significantly higher yeast densities when exposed to larvae. Across all of the fruits, larvae regulated yeast densities within narrow limits, as compared to a much wider range of yeast densities that developed in pieces of the same fruits not exposed to flies. Larvae also affected yeast species composition, dramatically reducing species diversity across fruits, reducing variation in yeast communities from one fruit to the next (beta diversity), and encouraging the consistent development of a yeast community composed of three species of yeast (Candida californica, C. zemplinina, and Pichia kluvyeri), all of which were palatable to larvae. Larvae excreted viable cells of these three yeast species in their fecal pools, and discouraged the growth of filamentous fungi, processes which may have contributed to their effects on the yeast communities in banana fruits. These and other findings suggest that D. melanogaster adults and their larval offspring together engage in ‘niche construction’, facilitating a predictable microbial environment in the fruit substrates in which the larvae live and develop. PMID:22860093

  11. Novel deletion and a new missense mutation (Glu 217 Lys) at the catalytic site in two adenosine deaminase alleles of a patient with neonatal onset adenosine deaminase severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, R.; Nicknam, M.N.; Eng, F.; Yang, D.R.; Borkowsky, W. )

    1992-11-01

    Mutations at the adenosine deaminase (ADA) locus result in a spectrum of disorders, encompassing a fulminant neonatal onset severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and childhood onset immunodeficiency, as well as apparently normal immune function. The extent of accumulation of the toxic metabolite, deoxyATP, correlates directly with severity of disease. The authors have now determined the mutations on both alleles of a child with fulminant, neonatal onset ADA SCID and accumulation of extremely high concentrations of deoxyATP. The genotype was consistent with the severely affected phenotype. One allele carried a large deletion that arose by non-homologous recombination and included the first five exons and promoter region. The second allele carried a missense mutation (G[sup 649]A) resulting in replacement of Glu[sup 217], an amino acid involved in the catalytic site, by Lys and predicting a major alteration in charge. Expression of the mutant cDNA on Cos cells confirmed that the mutation abolished enzyme activity. The authors have previously reported that a missense mutation at the preceding codon is similarly associated with neonatal onset ADA SCID and accumulation of extremely high deoxyATP. These findings suggest that genotype-phenotype correlations may be apparent for ADA SCID, despite the role that random variation in exposure to environmental pathogens may play in the initial phenotype. Such genotype-phenotype correlations may be important to consider in evaluating results of ongoing trials of [open quotes]gene[close quotes] and enzyme replacement therapy. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Phosphatidic acid synthesis in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, N. J.; Lynen, F.

    1965-01-01

    1. The presence of palmitoyl-CoA–l-glycerol 1-phosphate palmitoyltransferase (EC2.3.1.15) has been demonstrated in a particulate fraction of baker's yeast. 2. The enzyme has been characterized, and its activity studied as a function of pH and concentration of substrates. 3. Inhibition by thiol poisons and protection by acyl-CoA have been used to obtain information on the active site. 4. By various methods of supplying acyl radicals, the species `palmitoyl-CoA' has been shown to be the true acyl donor to the transferase. PMID:14342236

  13. Rapid determination of yeast viability

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.S.; Robinson, F.M.; Wang, H.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A modified simple staining method using Methylene blue to distinguish between live and dead cells has been developed. Methylene blue (0.025%, w/v) in full strength Ringer solution with 1% glucose (w/v) added is used as the standard staining solution. Satisfactory and reproducible results can be obtained through microscopic examination using this staining method. The ratio of viable cells to nonviable cells is constant for at least two days if the proper environmental conditions are provided. This method was used to demonstrate the effects of various factors that influence yeast viability.

  14. Combined matrix-isolation FT-IR and ab initio 6-31++G** study of H-bonded complexes between water and molecules modelling cytosine or isocytosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, Johan; Adamowicz, Ludwik; Maes, Guido

    1994-06-01

    A step-by-step experimental and ab initio SCF/6-31++G** procedure is described for the interpretation of the matrix FT-IR spectra of H-bonded complexes of cytosine or isocytosine with water. The method involves a detailed study of several compounds, each modelling one or a few cytosine sites and/or tautomers in order of increasing complexity. Results are presented for tautomerization processes in 2-OH-pyridine, 4-OH-pyrimidine and isocytosine, and for H-bonded complexes of water with pyrimidine, 4-OH-pyridine and 4-NH 2-pyridine. The whole series of obtained results has allowed the setting up of a large-scale vibration correlation diagram for water complexed with N- and O-bases. It also allows some new, important conclusions to be drawn about the major problem of scaling ab initio predicted frequencies for anharmonic proton-donor vibrational modes.

  15. Gas-phase interactions between lead(II) ions and cytosine: tandem mass spectrometry and infrared multiple-photon dissociation spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Salpin, Jean-Yves; Haldys, Violette; Guillaumont, Sébastien; Tortajada, Jeanine; Hurtado, Marcela; Lamsabhi, Al Mokhtar

    2014-10-01

    Gas-phase interactions between Pb(2+) ions and cytosine (C) were studied by combining tandem mass spectrometry, infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Both singly and doubly charged complexes were generated by electrospray. The [Pb(C)-H](+) complex was extensively studied, and this study shows that two structures, involving the interaction of the metal with the deprotonated canonical keto-amino tautomer of cytosine, are generated in the gas phase; the prominent structure is the bidentate form involving both the N1 and O2 electronegative centers. The DFT study also points out a significant charge transfer from the nucleobase to the low-lying p orbitals of the metal and a strong polarization of the base upon complexation. The various potential energy surfaces explored to account for the fragmentation observed are consistent with the high abundance of the [PbNH2](+) fragment ion. PMID:25044836

  16. Hydration properties of natural and synthetic DNA sequences with methylated adenine or cytosine bases in the R.DpnI target and BDNF promoter studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanak, Siba; Helms, Volkhard

    2014-12-01

    Adenine and cytosine methylation are two important epigenetic modifications of DNA sequences at the levels of the genome and transcriptome. To characterize the differential roles of methylating adenine or cytosine with respect to their hydration properties, we performed conventional MD simulations and free energy perturbation calculations for two particular DNA sequences, namely the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter and the R.DpnI-bound DNA that are known to undergo methylation of C5-methyl cytosine and N6-methyl adenine, respectively. We found that a single methylated cytosine has a clearly favorable hydration free energy over cytosine since the attached methyl group has a slightly polar character. In contrast, capping the strongly polar N6 of adenine with a methyl group gives a slightly unfavorable contribution to its free energy of solvation. Performing the same demethylation in the context of a DNA double-strand gave quite similar results for the more solvent-accessible cytosine but much more unfavorable results for the rather buried adenine. Interestingly, the same demethylation reactions are far more unfavorable when performed in the context of the opposite (BDNF or R.DpnI target) sequence. This suggests a natural preference for methylation in a specific sequence context. In addition, free energy calculations for demethylating adenine or cytosine in the context of B-DNA vs. Z-DNA suggest that the conformational B-Z transition of DNA transition is rather a property of cytosine methylated sequences but is not preferable for the adenine-methylated sequences investigated here.

  17. Accurate CpG and non-CpG cytosine methylation analysis by high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing in plants.

    PubMed

    How-Kit, Alexandre; Daunay, Antoine; Mazaleyrat, Nicolas; Busato, Florence; Daviaud, Christian; Teyssier, Emeline; Deleuze, Jean-François; Gallusci, Philippe; Tost, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    Pyrosequencing permits accurate quantification of DNA methylation of specific regions where the proportions of the C/T polymorphism induced by sodium bisulfite treatment of DNA reflects the DNA methylation level. The commercially available high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing instruments allow for the simultaneous analysis of 96 samples, but restrict the DNA methylation analysis to CpG dinucleotide sites, which can be limiting in many biological systems. In contrast to mammals where DNA methylation occurs nearly exclusively on CpG dinucleotides, plants genomes harbor DNA methylation also in other sequence contexts including CHG and CHH motives, which cannot be evaluated by these pyrosequencing instruments due to software limitations. Here, we present a complete pipeline for accurate CpG and non-CpG cytosine methylation analysis at single base-resolution using high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing. The devised approach includes the design and validation of PCR amplification on bisulfite-treated DNA and pyrosequencing assays as well as the quantification of the methylation level at every cytosine from the raw peak intensities of the Pyrograms by two newly developed Visual Basic Applications. Our method presents accurate and reproducible results as exemplified by the cytosine methylation analysis of the promoter regions of two Tomato genes (NOR and CNR) encoding transcription regulators of fruit ripening during different stages of fruit development. Our results confirmed a significant and temporally coordinated loss of DNA methylation on specific cytosines during the early stages of fruit development in both promoters as previously shown by WGBS. The manuscript describes thus the first high-throughput locus-specific DNA methylation analysis in plants using pyrosequencing. PMID:26072424

  18. [Multiple hybridization in genome analysis. 1. Reaction of diamine and bisulfite with cytosine for the introduction of nonradioactive markers into DNA].

    PubMed

    Turchinskiĭ, M F; Aĭnbinder, E I; Sverdlov, E D

    1988-01-01

    A two-step chemical method has been developed for the introduction of biotin and other low-molecular derivatives into DNA. The method is based on the interaction of aliphatic diamines with cytosine residues of the polynucleotide chain in the presence of sodium bisulfite with subsequent addition of biotin. DNA modified this way may be used as an effective probe for non-isotopic hybridization which can be used simultaneously with 32P-labelled probes. PMID:2855255

  19. Prevention of Yeast Spoilage in Feed and Food by the Yeast Mycocin HMK

    PubMed Central

    Lowes, K. F.; Shearman, C. A.; Payne, J.; MacKenzie, D.; Archer, D. B.; Merry, R. J.; Gasson, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The yeast Williopsis mrakii produces a mycocin or yeast killer toxin designated HMK; this toxin exhibits high thermal stability, high pH stability, and a broad spectrum of activity against other yeasts. We describe construction of a synthetic gene for mycocin HMK and heterologous expression of this toxin in Aspergillus niger. Mycocin HMK was fused to a glucoamylase protein carrier, which resulted in secretion of biologically active mycocin into the culture media. A partial purification protocol was developed, and a comparison with native W. mrakii mycocin showed that the heterologously expressed mycocin had similar physiological properties and an almost identical spectrum of biological activity against a number of yeasts isolated from silage and yoghurt. Two food and feed production systems prone to yeast spoilage were used as models to assess the ability of mycocin HMK to act as a biocontrol agent. The onset of aerobic spoilage in mature maize silage was delayed by application of A. niger mycocin HMK on opening because the toxin inhibited growth of the indigenous spoilage yeasts. This helped maintain both higher lactic acid levels and a lower pH. In yoghurt spiked with dairy spoilage yeasts, A. niger mycocin HMK was active at all of the storage temperatures tested at which yeast growth occurred, and there was no resurgence of resistant yeasts. The higher the yeast growth rate, the more effective the killing action of the mycocin. Thus, mycocin HMK has potential applications in controlling both silage spoilage and yoghurt spoilage caused by yeasts. PMID:10698773

  20. Fermentation studies using Saccharomyces diastaticus yeast strains

    SciTech Connect

    Erratt, J.A.; Stewart, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    The yeast species, Saccharomyces diastaticus, has the ability to ferment starch and dextrin, because of the extracellular enzyme, glucoamylase, which hydrolyzes the starch/dextrin to glucose. A number of nonallelic genes--DEX 1, DEX 2, and dextrinase B which is allelic to STA 3--have been isolated, which impart to the yeast the ability to ferment dextrin. Various diploid yeast strains were constructed, each being either heterozygous or homozygous for the individual dextrinase genes. Using 12 (sup 0) plato hopped wort (30% corn adjunct) under agitated conditions, the fermentation rates of the various diploid yeast strains were monitored. A gene-dosage effect was exhibited by yeast strains containing DEX 1 or DEX 2, however, not with yeast strains containing dextrinase B (STA 3). The fermentation and growth rates and extents were determined under static conditions at 14.4 C and 21 C. With all yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes, both fermentation and growth were increased at the higher incubation temperature. Using 30-liter fermentors, beer was produced with the various yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes and the physical and organoleptic characteristics of the products were determined. The concentration of glucose in the beer was found to increase during a 3-mo storage period at 21 C, indicating that the glucoamylase from Saccharomyces diastaticus is not inactivated by pasteurization. (Refs. 36).