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Sample records for yeast extract sucrose

  1. Purification and full characterisation of citreoviridin produced by Penicillium citreonigrum in yeast extract sucrose (YES) medium.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Mariana Wagner; Resck, Inês Sabioni; Caldas, Eloisa Dutra

    2015-01-01

    The mycotoxin citreoviridin has been associated with the 'yellow rice' disease, which caused cardiac beriberi in Japan. In Brazil, the consumption of contaminated rice was suspected to be involved in a recent beriberi outbreak. In this work, citreoviridin was produced by Penicillium citreonigrum, cultivated in 500 ml yeast extract sucrose (YES) liquid medium for 8 days at 25ºC, and the toxin extracted with chloroform from the liquid medium and the mycelium. A total of 15.3 g of crude extract was obtained from 48 culture flasks, with an estimated citreoviridin contend of 5.54 g, 74.3% being present in the mycelia. Semi-preparative HPLC of the crude extract yielded 27.1% citreoviridin. The HPLC-purified citreoviridin fraction was fully characterised by UV/VIS, FT-IR, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR, LC-MS/MS and LC-MSD TOF, and purity confirmed by gravimetric analysis. Isocitreoviridin was also produced by P. citreonigrum, accounting for about 10% of the citreoviridin present in the crude extract, most transformed into citreoviridin after 10 months under freezing conditions protected from light. Citreoviridin was shown to be stable under the same conditions, although it can suffer isomerisation after a longer storage period. Isomerisation is a potential source of variability in toxicological studies and purity of the material should be checked before study initiation. PMID:25190053

  2. Malt-yeast extract-sucrose agar, a suitable medium for enumeration and isolation of fungi from silage.

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, I; Stenwig, H

    1996-01-01

    A general medium named malt-yeast extract-sucrose agar (MYSA) containing oxgall was designed. The medium was intended for the enumeration and isolation of molds and yeasts in routine examinations of animal feed stuffs. In this study MYSA was tested as a general medium for mycological examination of silage. The medium was compared with dichloran-rose bengal medium (DRBC) in an examination of more than 500 specimens of big bale grass silage. Selected characteristics of known fungal species commonly isolated from feeds were examined after growth on MYSA and DRBC and on malt extract agar, used as a noninhibitory control medium. MYSA suppressed bacterial growth, without affecting the growth of fungi common in feeds. The fungi growing on MYSA were easily recognized, and the medium seemed to slow radial growth of fungal colonies, which permitted, easy counting. The number of species found was higher on MYSA than on DRBC. When we compared MYSA with DRBC for mycological examination of grass silage samples, MYSA was found to be the medium of choice. PMID:8837416

  3. Yeast Extract: Sucrose Ratio Effects on Egg Load, Survival, and Mortality Caused by GF-120 in Western Cherry Fruit Fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrinsic sources of nitrogen are needed by tephritid fruit flies for optimal nutrition. In this study, relationships between yeast extract diets containing 0, 0.109, 0.545, 1.09, 2.18, 3.27, and 5.45% nitrogen (N) and diet intake, survival, egg production, and responses to spinosad bait in western...

  4. Sucrose-fueled, energy dissipative, transient formation of molecular hydrogels mediated by yeast activity.

    PubMed

    Angulo-Pachón, César A; Miravet, Juan F

    2016-04-01

    A biologically mediated, energy dissipative, reversible formation of fibrillar networks is reported. The process of gelation is linked to sucrose-fueled production of CO2 by baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Continuous fueling of the system is required to maintain the self-assembled fibrillar network. PMID:27009800

  5. Proline accumulation in baker's yeast enhances high-sucrose stress tolerance and fermentation ability in sweet dough.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Ohtsu, Iwao; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    During bread-making processes, yeast cells are exposed to various baking-associated stresses. High-sucrose concentrations exert severe osmotic stress that seriously damages cellular components by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previously, we found that the accumulation of proline conferred freeze-thaw stress tolerance and the baker's yeast strain that accumulated proline retained higher-level fermentation abilities in frozen doughs than the wild-type strain. In this study, we constructed self-cloning diploid baker's yeast strains that accumulate proline. These resultant strains showed higher cell viability and lower intracellular oxidation levels than that observed in the wild-type strain under high-sucrose stress condition. Proline accumulation also enhanced the fermentation ability in high-sucrose-containing dough. These results demonstrate the usefulness of proline-accumulating baker's yeast for sweet dough baking. PMID:22041027

  6. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout extract, as described in this section, may... produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived from Saccharomyces cereviseae,...

  7. Sucrose Utilization in Budding Yeast as a Model for the Origin of Undifferentiated Multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    H. Koschwanez, John; R. Foster, Kevin; W. Murray, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    We use the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to investigate one model for the initial emergence of multicellularity: the formation of multicellular aggregates as a result of incomplete cell separation. We combine simulations with experiments to show how the use of secreted public goods favors the formation of multicellular aggregates. Yeast cells can cooperate by secreting invertase, an enzyme that digests sucrose into monosaccharides, and many wild isolates are multicellular because cell walls remain attached to each other after the cells divide. We manipulate invertase secretion and cell attachment, and show that multicellular clumps have two advantages over single cells: they grow under conditions where single cells cannot and they compete better against cheaters, cells that do not make invertase. We propose that the prior use of public goods led to selection for the incomplete cell separation that first produced multicellularity. PMID:21857801

  8. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  9. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout... prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract is the food ingredient resulting from concentration of the solubles of mechanically ruptured cells of a selected strain of yeast,...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  12. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout... prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  14. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout... prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  16. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout... prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived...

  17. Supplemental diets containing yeast, sucrose, and soy powder enhance the survivorship, growth, and development of prey-limited cursorial spiders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the effects of a food spray mixture (‘wheast’) and its individual ingredients (sucrose, yeast, and toasted soy flour) on the survivorship, growth, and development of a cursorial spider, Hibana futilis Banks (Anyphaenidae). Some treatments included eggs of Helicoverpa zea, a favored prey...

  18. Games microbes play: The game theory behind cooperative sucrose metabolism in yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, Jeff

    2010-03-01

    The origin of cooperation is a central challenge to our understanding of evolution. Microbial interactions can be manipulated in ways that animal interactions cannot, thus leading to growing interest in microbial models of cooperation and competition. In order for the budding yeast S. cerevisiae to grow on sucrose, the disaccharide must first be hydrolyzed by the enzyme invertase. This hydrolysis reaction is performed outside of the cytoplasm in the periplasmic space between the plasma membrane and the cell wall. Here we demonstrate that the vast majority (˜99%) of the monosaccharides created by sucrose hydrolysis diffuse away before they can be imported into the cell, thus making invertase production and secretion a cooperative behavior [1]. A mutant cheater strain that does not produce invertase is able to take advantage of and invade a population of wildtype cooperator cells. However, over a wide range of conditions, the wildtype cooperator can also invade a population of cheater cells. Therefore, we observe coexistence between the two strains in well-mixed culture at steady state resulting from the fact that rare strategies outperform common strategies---the defining features of what game theorists call the snowdrift game. A simple model of the cooperative interaction incorporating nonlinear benefits explains the origin of this coexistence. Glucose repression of invertase expression in wildtype cells produces a strategy which is optimal for the snowdrift game---wildtype cells cooperate only when competing against cheater cells. In disagreement with recent theory [2], we find that spatial structure always aids the evolution of cooperation in our experimental snowdrift game. [4pt] [1] Gore, J., Youk, H. & van Oudenaarden, A., Nature 459, 253 -- 256 (2009) [0pt] [2] Hauert, C. & Doebeli, M., Nature 428, 643 -- 646 (2004)

  19. Functional genomics of commercial baker's yeasts that have different abilities for sugar utilization and high-sucrose tolerance under different sugar conditions.

    PubMed

    Tanaka-Tsuno, Fumiko; Mizukami-Murata, Satomi; Murata, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Toshihide; Ando, Akira; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shima, Jun

    2007-10-01

    In the modern baking industry, high-sucrose-tolerant (HS) and maltose-utilizing (LS) yeast were developed using breeding techniques and are now used commercially. Sugar utilization and high-sucrose tolerance differ significantly between HS and LS yeasts. We analysed the gene expression profiles of HS and LS yeasts under different sucrose conditions in order to determine their basic physiology. Two-way hierarchical clustering was performed to obtain the overall patterns of gene expression. The clustering clearly showed that the gene expression patterns of LS yeast differed from those of HS yeast. Quality threshold clustering was used to identify the gene clusters containing upregulated genes (cluster 1) and downregulated genes (cluster 2) under high-sucrose conditions. Clusters 1 and 2 contained numerous genes involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, respectively. The expression level of the genes involved in the metabolism of glycerol and trehalose, which are known to be osmoprotectants, in LS yeast was higher than that in HS yeast under sucrose concentrations of 5-40%. No clear correlation was found between the expression level of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of the osmoprotectants and the intracellular contents of the osmoprotectants. The present gene expression data were compared with data previously reported in a comprehensive analysis of a gene deletion strain collection. Welch's t-test for this comparison showed that the relative growth rates of the deletion strains whose deletion occurred in genes belonging to cluster 1 were significantly higher than the average growth rates of all deletion strains. PMID:17724779

  20. Tris-sucrose buffer system: a new specially designed medium for extracellular invertase production by immobilized cells of isolated yeast Cryptococcus laurentii MT-61.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Mehmet Nuri; Taskin, Mesut; Canli, Ozden; Arslan, Nazli Pinar; Ortucu, Serkan

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to isolate new yeasts with high extracellular (exo) invertase activity and to investigate the usability of buffer systems as invertase production media by immobilized yeast cells. Among 70 yeast isolates, Cryptococcus laurentii MT-61 had the highest exo-invertase activity. Immobilization of yeast cells was performed using sodium alginate. Higher exo-invertase activity for immobilized cells was achieved in tris-sucrose buffer system (TSBS) compared to sodium acetate buffer system and potassium phosphate buffer system. TSBS was prepared by dissolving 30 g of sucrose in 1 L of tris buffer solution. The optimum pH, temperature, and incubation time for invertase production with immobilized cells were determined as 8.0, 35 °C and 36 h in TSBS, respectively. Under optimized conditions, maximum exo-invertase activity was found to be 28.4 U/mL in sterile and nonsterile TSBS. Immobilized cells could be reused in 14 and 12 successive cycles in sterile and nonsterile TSBS without any loss in the maximum invertase activity, respectively. This is the first report which showed that immobilized microbial cells could be used as a biocatalyst for exo-invertase production in buffer system. As an additional contribution, a new yeast strain with high invertase activity was isolated. PMID:23722276

  1. Ameliorative Effect of Hydroethanolic Leaf Extract of Byrsocarpus coccineus in Alcohol- and Sucrose-Induced Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Akindele, Abidemi J.; Iyamu, Endurance A.; Dutt, Prabhu; Satti, Naresh K.; Adeyemi, Olufunmilayo O.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension remains a major health problem worldwide considering the prevalence of morbidity and mortality. Plants remain a reliable source of efficacious and better tolerated drugs and botanicals. This study was designed to investigate the effect of the chemo-profiled hydroethanolic leaf extract of Byrsocarpus coccineus in ethanol- and sucrose-induced hypertension. Groups of rats were treated orally (p.o.) with distilled water (10 ml/kg), ethanol (35%; 3 g/kg), sucrose (5-7%), and B. coccineus (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg), and nifedipine together with ethanol and sucrose separately for 8 weeks. At the end of the treatment period, blood pressure and heart rate of rats were determined. Blood was collected for serum biochemical parameters and lipid profile assessment, and the liver, aorta, kidney, and heart were harvested for estimation of in vivo antioxidants and malondialdehyde (MDA). Results obtained in this study showed that B. coccineus at the various doses administered reduced the systolic, diastolic, and arterial blood pressure elevated by ethanol and sucrose. Also, the extract reversed the reduction in catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) induced by ethanol and sucrose. The level of MDA was reduced compared to the ethanol- and sucrose-induced hypertensive group. With respect to lipid profile, administration of B. coccineus at the various doses reduced the levels of triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), cholesterol, and atherogenic indices, compared to the ethanol and sucrose groups. In conclusion the hydroethanolic leaf extract of B. coccineus exerted significant antihypertensive effect and this is probably related to the antioxidant property and improvement of lipid profile observed in this study. PMID:25161923

  2. Mild water stress of Phaseolus vulgaris plants leads to reduced starch synthesis and extractable sucrose phosphate synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Vassey, T.L.; Sharkey, T.D. )

    1989-04-01

    Mild water stress, on the order of {minus}1.0 megapascals xylem water potential, can reduce the rate of photosynthesis and eliminate the inhibition of photosynthesis caused by O{sub 2} in water-stress-sensitive plants such as Phaseolus vulgaris. To investigate the lack of O{sub 2} inhibition of photosynthesis, we measured stromal and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, sucrose phosphate synthase, and partitioning of newly fixed carbon between starch and sucrose before, during, and after mild water stress. The extractable activity of the fructose bisphosphatases was unaffected by mild water stress. The extractable activity of SPS was inhibited by more than 60% in plants stressed to water potentials of {minus}0.9 megapascals. Water stress caused a decline in the starch/sucrose partitioning ratio indicating that starch synthesis was inhibited more than sucrose synthesis. We conclude that the reduced rate of photosynthesis during water stress is caused by stomatal closure, and that the restriction of CO{sub 2} supply caused by stomatal closure leads to a reduction in the capacity for both starch and sucrose synthesis. This causes the reduced O{sub 2} inhibition and abrupt CO{sub 2} saturation of photosynthesis.

  3. Inhibition of spoiling yeasts of fruit juices through citrus extracts.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Antonio; Speranza, Barbara; Campaniello, Daniela; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2013-10-01

    This article reports on the bioactivities of citrus extracts (citrus extract, lemon extract, and neroli) toward Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Pichia membranifaciens, and Rhodotorula bacarum. The bioactivities of the extracts (from 10 to 100 ppm) were evaluated through a microdilution method; thereafter, citrus extracts (0 to 80 ppm) were tested in combination with either pH (3.0 to 5.0) or temperature (5 to 25°C). Finally, a confirmatory experiment was run in a commercial drink (referred to as red fruit juice) containing citrus extract (40 ppm) that was inoculated with either S. cerevisiae or Z. bailii (5 log CFU/ml) and stored at 4 and 25°C. Yeasts increased to 7 log CFU/ml (Z. bailii) or 8 log CFU/ml (S. cerevisiae) in the control at 25°C, but the citrus extract addition controlled yeast growth for at least 3 days; under refrigeration, the effect was significant for 10 days. PMID:24112576

  4. Production of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, using sucrose by fungal and yeast strains, and their interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Ishibashi, Yuko; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-10-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), were produced from glucose and sucrose without vegetable oils. Pseudozyma antarctica JCM 10317, Ustilago maydis NBRC 5346, U. scitaminea NBRC 32730, and P. siamensis CBS 9960 produced mainly MEL-A, MEL-A, MEL-B, and MEL-C respectively. The sucrose-derived MELs showed excellent interfacial properties: low critical micelle concentration as well as that of oil-derived MELs. PMID:19809166

  5. Systematic identification of yeast proteins extracted into model wine during aging on the yeast lees.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jeffrey D; Harbertson, James F; Osborne, James P; Freitag, Michael; Lim, Juyun; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2010-02-24

    Total protein and protein-associated mannan concentrations were measured, and individual proteins were identified during extraction into model wines over 9 months of aging on the yeast lees following completion of fermentations by seven wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In aged wines, protein-associated mannan increased about 6-fold (+/-66%), while total protein only increased 2-fold (+/-20%), which resulted in a significantly greater protein-associated mannan/total protein ratio for three strains. A total of 219 proteins were identified among all wine samples taken over the entire time course. Of the 17 "long-lived" proteins detected in all 9 month samples, 13 were cell wall mannoproteins, and four were glycolytic enzymes. Most cytosolic proteins were not detected after 6 months. Native mannosylated yeast invertase was assayed for binding to wine tannin and was found to have a 10-fold lower affinity than nonglycosylated bovine serum albumin. Enrichment of mannoproteins in the aged model wines implies greater solution stability than other yeast proteins and the possibility that their contributions to wine quality may persist long after bottling. PMID:20108898

  6. Quantitative evaluation of intracellular metabolite extraction techniques for yeast metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Canelas, André B; ten Pierick, Angela; Ras, Cor; Seifar, Reza M; van Dam, Jan C; van Gulik, Walter M; Heijnen, Joseph J

    2009-09-01

    Accurate determination of intracellular metabolite levels requires well-validated procedures for sampling and sample treatment. Several methods exist for metabolite extraction, but the literature is contradictory regarding the adequacy and performance of each technique. Using a strictly quantitative approach, we have re-evaluated five methods (hot water, HW; boiling ethanol, BE; chloroform-methanol, CM; freezing-thawing in methanol, FTM; acidic acetonitrile-methanol, AANM) for the extraction of 44 intracellular metabolites (phosphorylated intermediates, amino acids, organic acids, nucleotides) from S. cerevisiae cells. Two culture modes were investigated (batch and chemostat) to check for growth condition dependency, and three targeted platforms were employed (two LC-MS and one GC/MS) to exclude analytical bias. Additionally, for the determination of metabolite recoveries, we applied a novel approach based on addition of (13)C-labeled internal standards at different stages of sample processing. We found that the choice of extraction method can drastically affect measured metabolite levels, to an extent that for some metabolites even the direction of changes between growth conditions can be inverted. The best performances, in terms of efficacy and metabolite recoveries, were achieved with BE and CM, which yielded nearly identical levels for the metabolites analyzed. According to our results, AANM performs poorly in yeast and FTM cannot be considered adequate as an extraction method, as it does not ensure inactivation of enzymatic activity. PMID:19653633

  7. Yeast extract stimulates production of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, by Pseudozyma hubeiensis SY62.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masaaki; Nagahama, Takahiko; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Morita, Tomotake; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai; Hatada, Yuji

    2011-06-01

    We improved the culture conditions for a biosurfactant producing yeast, Pseudozyma hubeiensis SY62. We found that yeast extract greatly stimulates MEL production. Furthermore, we demonstrated a highly efficient production of MELs in the improved medium by fed-batch cultivation. The final concentration of MELs reached 129 ± 8.2g/l for one week. PMID:21393057

  8. Enumeration and rapid identification of yeasts during extraction processes of extra virgin olive oil in Tuscany.

    PubMed

    Mari, Eleonora; Guerrini, Simona; Granchi, Lisa; Vincenzini, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of yeast populations during different olive oil extraction processes, carried out in three consecutive years in Tuscany (Italy), by analysing crushed pastes, kneaded pastes, oil from decanter and pomaces. The results showed yeast concentrations ranging between 10(3) and 10(5) CFU/g or per mL. Seventeen dominant yeast species were identified by random amplified polymorphic DNA with primer M13 and their identification was confirmed by restriction fragments length polymorphism of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer and sequencing rRNA genes. The isolation frequencies of each species in the collected samples pointed out that the occurrence of the various yeast species in olive oil extraction process was dependent not only on the yeasts contaminating the olives but also on the yeasts colonizing the plant for oil extraction. In fact, eleven dominant yeast species were detected from the washed olives, but only three of them were also found in oil samples at significant isolation frequency. On the contrary, the most abundant species in oil samples, Yamadazyma terventina, did not occur in washed olive samples. These findings suggest a phenomenon of contamination of the plant for oil extraction that selects some yeast species that could affect the quality of olive oil. PMID:27116959

  9. Acidifying and yeast extract in diets for adults cats.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Rosana C S; Zangeronimo, Márcio G; Dos Reis, Jéssica S; França, Janine; Santos, João P F; Pires, Carolina P; Chizzotti, Ana F; Costa, Adriano C; Ferreira, Lívia G; Saad, Flávia M O B

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of adding an acidifying agent based on phosphoric acid (A), a yeast extract from a specific strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (Y) and the combination of these two additives in food for adult cats. A test was conducted with 24 animals (mean 3.5 years old), mixed breed, weighing 3.72 ± 0.74 kg, kept in individual metabolic cages and distributed in a completely randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial design (with or without A 0.6% of dry matter, with or without Y 1.5% of dry matter) totalling four treatments and six replicates of each condition. The experimental period was 15 days. The A or the Y reduced (P< 0.01) the dry matter intake, but the effect was not observed when they were associated. The association improved (P<0.05) the digestibility of dry matter and ashes. The A reduced urine pH (P=0.05) regardless of the presence of the Y. There was no effect (P>0.09) on other parameters evaluated. Results of this study show that the isolated use of 0.6% A or 1.5% Y in diets for cats is not recommended. However, the association of these two additives was beneficial in increasing nutrient digestibility. PMID:24450338

  10. 40 CFR 180.1246 - Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1246 Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the biochemical pesticide Yeast...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1246 - Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1246 Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the biochemical pesticide Yeast...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1246 - Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1246 Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the biochemical pesticide Yeast...

  13. Polypeptide nature of growth requirement in yeast extract for Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P F; Langworthy, T A; Smith, M R

    1975-01-01

    The active component(s) in yeast extract required by Thermoplasma acidophilum for growth is polypeptide in nature. A fraction from yeast extract was isolated and partially characterized as one or more peptides of molecular weight about 1,000 containing 8 to 10 amino acids. Although it was composed largely of basic and dicarboxylic amino acids, only one amino group per molecule was free. The polypeptide(s) appeared to bind avidly to cations. No other organic compounds except glucose were needed by Thermoplasma. Among several hundred known compounds tested, only glutathione plus Fe2+ or Fe3+, clostridial ferredoxin, and spinach ferredoxin elicited any growth response. PMID:1102535

  14. Use of Non-Conventional Cell Disruption Method for Extraction of Proteins from Black Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Čolnik, Maja; Primožič, Mateja; Knez, Željko; Leitgeb, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The influence of pressure and treatment time on cells disruption of different black yeasts and on activities of extracted proteins using supercritical carbon dioxide process was studied. The cells of three different black yeasts Phaeotheca triangularis, Trimatostroma salinum, and Wallemia ichthyophaga were exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2) by varying pressure at fixed temperature (35°C). The black yeasts cell walls were disrupted, and the content of the cells was spilled into the liquid medium. The impact of SC CO2 conditions on secretion of enzymes and proteins from black yeast cells suspension was studied. The residual activity of the enzymes cellulase, β-glucosidase, α-amylase, and protease was studied by enzymatic assay. The viability of black yeast cells was determined by measuring the optical density of the cell suspension at 600 nm. The total protein concentration in the suspension was determined on UV–Vis spectrophotometer at 595 nm. The release of intracellular and extracellular products from black yeast cells was achieved. Also, the observation by an environmental scanning electron microscopy shows major morphological changes with SC CO2-treated cells. The advantages of the proposed method are in a simple use, which is also possible for heat-sensitive materials on one hand and on the other hand integration of the extraction of enzymes and their use in biocatalytical reactions. PMID:27148527

  15. Yeast, beef and pork extracts counteract Clostridium difficile toxin A enterotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Peter I; Fotopoulos, Grigorios; Pasche, Elisabeth; Porta, Nadine; Masserey Elmelegy, Isabelle; Sanchez-Garcia, Jose-Luis; Bergonzelli, Gabriela E; Corthésy-Theulaz, Irène

    2009-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is responsible for a large proportion of nosocomial cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. The present study provides evidence that yeast, beef and pork extracts, ingredients commonly used to grow bacteria, can counteract C. difficile toxin A enterotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. In model intestinal epithelial cells the individual extracts could prevent the toxin A-induced decrease in epithelial barrier function and partially prevented actin disaggregation and cell rounding. Mice with ad libitum access to individual extracts for 1 week had almost complete reduction in toxin A-induced fluid secretion in intestinal loops. Concomitantly, the toxin A-induced expression of the essential proinflammatory mediator Cox-2 was normalized. Moreover this protective effect was also seen when mice received only two doses of extract by intragastric gavage within 1 week. These results show that yeast, beef and pork extracts have the potential to counteract the intestinal pathogenesis triggered by C. difficile toxin A. PMID:19416358

  16. Bacterial clearance, heterophil function, and hematological parameters of transport stressed turkey poults supplemented with dietary yeast extract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeast extracts contain biological response modifiers that may be useful as alternatives to antibiotics for controlling pathogens in poultry production and mitigating the deleterious effects of production stressors. A standardized yeast extract feed supplement, Alphamune (YE), was added to turkey po...

  17. GMAX Yeast Background Strain Made from Industrial Tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Engineered to Convert Sucrose, Starch and Cellulosic Sugars Universally to Ethanol Anaerobically with Concurrent Coproduct Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tailored GMAX yeast background strain technology for universal ethanol production industrially. Production of the stable baseline glucose, mannose, arabinose, xylose-utilizing (GMAX) yeast will be evaluated by taking the genes identified in high-throughput screening for a plasmid-based yeast to uti...

  18. Gastrointestinal Maturation is Accelerated in Turkey Poults Supplemented with a Mannan-Oligosaccharide Yeast Extract (Alphamune)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alphamune™, a yeast extract antibiotic alternative, has been shown to stimulate the immune system, increase body weight in pigs, and reduce Salmonella colonization in chickens. The influence of Alphamune™ on gastrointestinal tract development has not been reported. Two trials were conducted to evalu...

  19. Effects of dietary yeast extract on turkey stress response and heterophil oxidative burst activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective nutritional approaches to counteract the negative effects of stress would both improve human health and provide food animal producers with useful alternatives to antibiotics. In this study, turkeys were fed a standard diet or the same diet supplemented with yeast extract (Alphamune™, YE), ...

  20. GASTROINTESTINAL MATURATION IS ACCELERATED IN TURKEY POULTS SUPPLEMENTED WITH A MANNAN-OLIGOSACCHARIDE YEAST EXTRACT (ALPHAMUNE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alphamune is a yeast extract antibiotic alternative that has been shown to stimulate the immune system and increase BW in pigs. The influence of Alphamune on gastrointestinal tract (GIT) development of turkey poults has not been reported. Two trials were conducted to evaluate the effects of Alphamun...

  1. Growth Characteristics and Physiological Functionality of Yeasts in Pear Marc Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Jang, In-Taek; Kang, Min-Gu; Na, Kwang-Chul

    2011-01-01

    Kluyveromyces fragilis KCTC 7260 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae KCTC 7904, which both grew well in pear marc extract, were selected and their growth profiles and physiological functionalities were determined. Both of the selected yeasts established maximal growth by 20 hr of cultivation at 30℃ in pear marc extract. The cell-free extracts showed high antihypertensive angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of 68.9% and 52.1%, respectively. The extracts also displayed 9.2 U/mL and 12.0 U/mL of protease activity, respectively. PMID:22783099

  2. A single protocol for extraction of gDNA from bacteria and yeast.

    PubMed

    Vingataramin, Laurie; Frost, Eric H

    2015-03-01

    Guanidine thiocyanate breakage of microorganisms has been the standard initial step in genomic DNA (gDNA) extraction of microbial DNA for two decades, despite the requirement for pretreatments to extract DNA from microorganisms other than Gram-negative bacteria. We report a quick and low-cost gDNA extraction protocol called EtNa that is efficient for bacteria and yeast over a broad range of concentrations. EtNa is based on a hot alkaline ethanol lysis. The solution can be immediately centrifuged to yield a crude gDNA extract suitable for PCR, or it can be directly applied to a silica column for purification. PMID:25757544

  3. Evidence for channeling of intermediates in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway by soybean and pea nodule extracts, yeast extracts, and purified yeast enzymes.

    PubMed

    Debnam, P M; Shearer, G; Blackwood, L; Kohl, D H

    1997-06-01

    Evidence is presented that intermediates of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) are channeled from one pathway enzyme to the next. CO2 produced from [1-14C]glucose in the presence of unlabelled pathway intermediates contained much more radioactivity than predicted by a model in which pathway-produced intermediates are in equilibrium with identical molecules in the bulk phase. This was the case whether glucose 6-phosphate (Glc6P), 6-phosphogluconolactone, or 6-phosphogluconate was added. Assumptions involved in calculating the amount of 14CO2 predicted for free mixing of 14C-labelled and unlabelled intermediates are discussed, together with the following results. (a) 14CO2 production by pea nodules in the presence of 3 mM 6-phosphogluconate was higher than in its absence. (b) Apparent channeling of intermediates was much higher for purified yeast enzymes than for yeast extract. (c) 6-Phosphogluconate and 6-phosphogluconolactone were channeled between yeast Glc6P dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase despite the absence of 6-phosphogluconolactonase in the purified yeast enzyme mixture. (d) When purified yeast hexokinase was physically separated from Glc6P dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase by a dialysis membrane, there was no apparent channeling. (e) Poly(ethylene glycol), high salt and detergents had little effect on apparent channeling of OPPP intermediates, which is consistent with a stable complex of enzymes. On the other hand, density gradient centrifugation experiments suggested a more transient interaction between the enzymes. Taken together, the results support channeling of OPPP pathway intermediates. PMID:9208916

  4. A rapid and simple method for DNA extraction from yeasts and fungi isolated from Agave fourcroydes.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Tussell, Raul; Lappe, Patricia; Ulloa, Miguel; Quijano-Ramayo, Andrés; Cáceres-Farfán, Mirbella; Larqué-Saavedra, Alfonso; Perez-Brito, Daisy

    2006-05-01

    A simple and easy protocol for extracting high-quality DNA from different yeast and filamentous fungal species is described. This method involves two important steps: first, the disruption of cell walls by mechanical means and freezing; and second, the extraction, isolation, and precipitation of genomic DNA. The absorbance ratios (A(260)/A(280)) obtained ranged from 1.6 to 2.0. The main objective of this procedure is to extract pure DNA from yeast and filamentous fungi, including those with high contents of proteins, polysaccharides, and other complex compounds in their cell walls. The yield and quality of the DNAs obtained were suitable for micro/minisatellite primer-polymerase chain reaction (MSP-PCR) fingerprinting as well as for the sequence of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA. PMID:16691008

  5. Phenolics-rich extracts from Silybum marianum and Prunella vulgaris reduce a high-sucrose diet induced oxidative stress in hereditary hypertriglyceridemic rats.

    PubMed

    Skottová, Nina; Kazdová, Ludmila; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Vecera, Rostislav; Sobolová, Lucie; Ulrichová, Jitka

    2004-08-01

    The study tested the effects of phenolics-rich extracts from the plants Silybum marianum (silymarin) and Prunella vulgaris (PVE) on blood and liver antioxidant status and lipoprotein metabolism. Hereditary hypertriglyceridemic rats fed on standard diet (STD) or high-sucrose diet (HSD, 70cal% of sucrose) for two weeks were used. HSD doubled plasma and liver triacylglycerol (TAG) and increased plasma VLDL-TAG and VLDL-cholesterol compared to STD. Administration of silymarin or PVE as 1% dietary supplements in HSD did not influence lipid levels in plasma or liver, but both extracts caused decrease in plasma VLDL-cholesterol levels. HSD-induced oxidative stress was manifested in increased TBARS and conjugated dienes (CD) content, decreased GSH levels and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in blood and liver. In blood the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased, whereas in liver the activity of catalase increased after HSD. Feeding on HSD containing phenolics-rich extracts resulted in reduction of TBARS and CD content and in increase of blood GPX activity and elevated GSH content in liver. Besides, silymarin increased the activity of SOD and level of GSH in blood. Catalase activity in blood or liver was not influenced by the presence of plant extracts in the diet. These results indicate that silymarin and PVE improve antioxidant status in blood and liver and positively affect plasma lipoprotein profile in an experimental model of dietary induced hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:15177299

  6. 21 CFR 184.1854 - Sucrose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1854 Sucrose. (a) Sucrose (C12H22O11, CAS Reg. No. 57-50-11-1) sugar, cane sugar, or beet sugar is the chemical β-D-fructofuranosyl-α-D-glucopyranoside. Sucrose is obtained by crystallization from sugar cane or sugar beet juice that has been extracted by pressing or diffusion,...

  7. Unveiling the potential of novel yeast protein extracts in white wines clarification and stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Joana P.; Neto, Rodrigo; Centeno, Filipe; De Fátima Teixeira, Maria; Gomes, Ana Catarina

    2015-01-01

    Fining agents derived from animal and mineral sources are widely used to clarify and stabilize white wines. Nevertheless, health and environmental problems are being raised, concerning the allergenic and environmental impact of some of those fining products. In this study, our aim is to validate the potential of yeast protein extracts, obtained from an alternative and safe source, naturally present in wine: oenological yeasts. Three untreated white wines were used in this work in order to evaluate the impact of these novel yeast protein extracts (YPE) in terms of the wine clarification and stabilization improvement. Two separated fining trials were thus conducted at laboratory scale and the yeast alternatives were compared with reference fining agents, obtained from mineral, animal and vegetable origins. Our results indicate that YPE were capable to promote (i) brilliance/color improvement, (ii) turbidity reduction (76–89% comparing with the untreated wines), and (iii) production of compact and homogeneous lees (44% smaller volume than obtained with bentonite). Additionally, after submitting wines to natural and forced oxidations, YPE treatments revealed (iv) different forms of colloidal stabilization, by presenting comparable or superior effects when particularly compared to casein. Altogether, this study reveals that YPE represent a promising alternative for white wine fining, since they are resultant from a natural and more sustainable origin, at present not regarded as potential allergenic according to Regulation (EC) No. 1169/2011. PMID:25853122

  8. Acceleration of yoghurt fermentation time by yeast extract and partial characterisation of the active components.

    PubMed

    Smith, Esti-Andrine; Myburgh, Jacobus; Osthoff, Gernot; de Wit, Maryna

    2014-11-01

    Water soluble autolysate of yeast, usually utilised for microbial growth support, was used as additive in yoghurt fermentation. The yeast extract (YE) resulted in a decrease of fermentation time by 21% to reach a pH of 4·6. However, the YE resulted in unacceptable flavour and taste. By size exclusion chromatography, a fraction of the YE was obtained that could account for the observed 21% decrease in fermentation time. The fraction contained molecules of low molecular weight, consisting of minerals, free amino acids and peptides. The acceleration of the yoghurt fermentation was ascribed to the short peptides in the fraction. It is proposed that the application of this extract in industrial yoghurt manufacture would result in savings for both the industry and the consumer. PMID:25353311

  9. Aniline blue-containing buffered charcoal-yeast extract medium for presumptive identification of Legionella species

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, R.L.

    1982-04-01

    By utilizing buffered charcoal-yeast extract medium containing 0.01% aniline blue in conjunction with a long-wave UV light, the differentiation of five species of Legionella was facilitated. L. pneumophila, when grown on this medium, did not absorb the aniline blue dye; however, L. micdadei, L. dumoffii, L. bozemanii, and L. gormanii absorbed the dye in varying amounts and produced colonies of various shades of blue.

  10. Methyl jasmonate and yeast extract stimulate mitragynine production in Mitragyna speciosa (Roxb.) Korth. shoot culture.

    PubMed

    Wungsintaweekul, Juraithip; Choo-Malee, Jutarat; Charoonratana, Tossaton; Keawpradub, Niwat

    2012-10-01

    Mitragynine is a pharmacologically-active terpenoid indole alkaloid found in Mitragyna speciosa leaves. Treatment with methyl jasmonate (10 μM) for 24 h and yeast extract (0.1 mg/ml) for 12 h were the optimum conditions of elicitation of mitragynine accumulation in a M. speciosa shoot culture. The former elicitor gave 0.11 mg mitragynine/g dry wt. Tryptophan decarboxylase and strictosidine synthase mRNA levels were enhanced in accordance with mitragynine accumulation. PMID:22714271

  11. Contributions of Sucrose Synthase and Invertase to the Metabolism of Sucrose in Developing Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Schmalstig, J. Gougler; Hitz, William D.

    1987-01-01

    The relative contributions of invertase and sucrose synthase to initial cleavage of phloem-imported sucrose was calculated for sink leaves of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr cv Wye) and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. monohybrid). Invertase from yeast hydrolyzed sucrose 4200 times faster than 1′-deoxy-1′-fluorosucrose (FS) while sucrose cleavage by sucrose synthase from developing soybean leaves proceeded only 3.6 times faster than cleavage of FS. [14C]Sucrose and [14C]FS, used as tracers of sucrose, were transported at identical rates to developing leaves through the phloem. The rate of label incorporation into insoluble products varied with leaf age from 3.4 to 8.0 times faster when [14C]sucrose was supplied than when [14C]FS was supplied. The discrimination in metabolism was related to enzymatic discriminations against FS to calculate the relative contributions of invertase and sucrose synthase to sucrose cleavage. In the youngest soybean leaves measured, 4% of final laminar length (FLL), all cleavage was by sucrose synthase. Invertase contribution to sucrose metabolism was 47% by 7.6% FLL, increased to 54% by 11% FLL, then declined to 42% for the remainder of the import phase. In sugar beet sink leaves at 30% FLL invertase contribution to sucrose metabolism was 58%. PMID:16665711

  12. Chlorhexidine: beta-cyclodextrin inhibits yeast growth by extraction of ergosterol

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, K. I. R.; Araújo, P. V.; Sinisterra, R. D.; Cortés, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Chlorhexidine (Cx) augmented with beta-cyclodextrin (β-cd) inclusion compounds, termed Cx:β-cd complexes, have been developed for use as antiseptic agents. The aim of this study was to examine the interactions of Cx:β-cd complexes, prepared at different molecular ratios, with sterol and yeast membranes. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) against the yeast Candida albicans (C.a.) was determined for each complex; the MICs were found to range from 0.5 to 2 μg/mL. To confirm the MIC data, quantitative analysis of viable cells was performed using trypan blue staining. Mechanistic characterization of the interactions that the Cx:β-cd complexes have with the yeast membrane and assessment of membrane morphology following exposure to Cx:β-cd complexes were performed using Sterol Quantification Method analysis (SQM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SQM revealed that sterol extraction increased with increasing β-cd concentrations (1.71 ×103; 1.4 ×103; 3.45 ×103, and 3.74 ×103 CFU for 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 1:4, respectively), likely as a consequence of membrane ergosterol solubilization. SEM images demonstrated that cell membrane damage is a visible and significant mechanism that contributes to the antimicrobial effects of Cx:β-cd complexes. Cell disorganization increased significantly as the proportion of β-cyclodextrin present in the complex increased. Morphology of cells exposed to complexes with 1:3 and 1:4 molar ratios of Cx:β-cd were observed to have large aggregates mixed with yeast remains, representing more membrane disruption than that observed in cells treated with Cx alone. In conclusion, nanoaggregates of Cx:β-cd complexes block yeast growth via ergosterol extraction, permeabilizing the membrane by creating cluster-like structures within the cell membrane, possibly due to high amounts of hydrogen bonding. PMID:24031894

  13. Extraction of brewer's yeasts using different methods of cell disruption for practical biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Matoulková, Dagmar; Kolouchová, Irena; Masák, Jan; Viden, Ivan; Sigler, Karel

    2015-05-01

    The methods of preparation of fatty acids from brewer's yeast and its use in production of biofuels and in different branches of industry are described. Isolation of fatty acids from cell lipids includes cell disintegration (e.g., with liquid nitrogen, KOH, NaOH, petroleum ether, nitrogenous basic compounds, etc.) and subsequent processing of extracted lipids, including analysis of fatty acid and computing of biodiesel properties such as viscosity, density, cloud point, and cetane number. Methyl esters obtained from brewer's waste yeast are well suited for the production of biodiesel. All 49 samples (7 breweries and 7 methods) meet the requirements for biodiesel quality in both the composition of fatty acids and the properties of the biofuel required by the US and EU standards. PMID:25394535

  14. A Yeast Metabolite Extraction Protocol Optimised for Time-Series Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Kalesh; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Murray, Douglas B.

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing call for the absolute quantification of time-resolved metabolite data. However, a number of technical issues exist, such as metabolites being modified/degraded either chemically or enzymatically during the extraction process. Additionally, capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) is incompatible with high salt concentrations often used in extraction protocols. In microbial systems, metabolite yield is influenced by the extraction protocol used and the cell disruption rate. Here we present a method that rapidly quenches metabolism using dry-ice ethanol bath and methanol N-ethylmaleimide solution (thus stabilising thiols), disrupts cells efficiently using bead-beating and avoids artefacts created by live-cell pelleting. Rapid sample processing minimised metabolite leaching. Cell weight, number and size distribution was used to calculate metabolites to an attomol/cell level. We apply this method to samples obtained from the respiratory oscillation that occurs when yeast are grown continuously. PMID:22952947

  15. Effect of scenedesmus acuminatus green algae extracts on the development of Candida lipolytic yeast in gas condensate-containing media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilmes, B. I.; Kasymova, G. A.; Runov, V. I.; Karavayeva, N. N.

    1980-01-01

    Data are given of a comparative study of the growth and development as well as the characteristics of the biomass of the C. Lipolytica yeast according to the content of raw protein, protein, lipids, vitamins in the B group, and residual hydrocarbons during growth in media with de-aromatized gas-condensate FNZ as the carbon source with aqueous and alcohol extracts of S. acuminatus as the biostimulants. It is shown that the decoction and aqueous extract of green algae has the most intensive stimulating effect on the yeast growth. When a decoction of algae is added to the medium, the content of residual hydrocarbons in the biomass of C. lipolytica yeast is reduced by 4%; the quantity of protein, lipids, thamine and inositol with replacement of the yeast autolysate by the decoction of algae is altered little.

  16. [Effects of 33% grapefruit extract on the growth of the yeast--like fungi, dermatopytes and moulds].

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Kułak, E; Lukaszuk, C; Niczyporuk, W

    2001-01-01

    Grapefruit seed extract was discovered by Jacob Harich an american immunologist in 1980. Assessment of the influence of grapefruit extract on the yeast-like fungi strains--Candida albicans growth. Material used in this investigation was ATCC test Candida albicans strains no 10231, 200 of Candida albicans strains, 5 of Candida sp. strains isolated from patients with candidiasis symptoms from different ontocenosis and 12 of dermatophytes and moulds isolated from patients. The susceptibility of the Candida was determined by serial dilution method. It seems that 33% grapefruit extract exert a potent antifungal activity against the yeast like fungi strains and had low activity against dermatophytes and moulds. Further studies in vitro and in vivo on greater number of the yeast-like fungi strains and other fungi species are needed. PMID:16886437

  17. Sucrose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking hexose transport.

    PubMed

    Batista, Anderson S; Miletti, Luiz C; Stambuk, Boris U

    2004-01-01

    Sucrose is the major carbon source used by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during production of baker's yeast, fuel ethanol and several distilled beverages. It is generally accepted that sucrose fermentation proceeds through extracellular hydrolysis of the sugar, mediated by the periplasmic invertase, producing glucose and fructose that are transported into the cells and metabolized. In the present work we analyzed the contribution to sucrose fermentation of a poorly characterized pathway of sucrose utilization by S. cerevisiae cells, the active transport of the sugar through the plasma membrane and its intracellular hydrolysis. A yeast strain that lacks the major hexose transporters (hxt1-hxt7 and gal2) is incapable of growing on or fermenting glucose or fructose. Our results show that this hxt-null strain is still able to ferment sucrose due to direct uptake of the sugar into the cells. Deletion of the AGT1 gene, which encodes a high-affinity sucrose-H(+) symporter, rendered cells incapable of sucrose fermentation. Since sucrose is not an inducer of the permease, expression of the AGT1 must be constitutive in order to allow growth of the hxt-null strain on sucrose. The molecular characterization of active sucrose transport and fermentation by S. cerevisiae cells opens new opportunities to optimize yeasts for sugarcane-based industrial processes. PMID:15741738

  18. Effect of sucrose in culture media on the location of glucosyltransferase of Streptococcus mutans and cell adherence to glass surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, S; Torii, M

    1978-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans strain B13 (serotype D) almost exclusively produced free glucosyltransferase (GTase) in the culture supernatant when grown in sucrose-free TTY broth medium, which was composed of Trypticase (Baltimore Biological Laboratory [BBL] Cockeysville, Md.), tryptose (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, Mich.), yeast extract (BBL), salts, and 1% glucose. Organisms grown in sucrose-free TTY broth retained very weak cell-associated GTase activity and did not adhere significantly to glass surfaces in the presence of exogenous sucrose. If sucrose was added to TTY broth, however, GTase was found on the cell surface where cell-bound, water-insoluble glucans were synthesized. Most commercially available products of Todd-Hewitt broth were found to contain trace amounts of sucrose, as did Trypticase soy broth (BBL), whereas brain heart infusion broth (Difco and BBL) was found to be essentially free of sucrose. Almost all detectable GTase activity was cell associated when S. mutans B13 was grown in Todd-Hewitt or trypticase soy broth. Heat-treated B13 cells grown in Todd-Hewitt broth and cell-free, water-insoluble glucans bound free GTase and produced marked adherence in the presence of sucrose. Experiments strongly suggest that the binding sites for free GTase are the surface glucans, and cell-associated and extracellular GTases are most likely alternate states of the same enzyme protein. PMID:669814

  19. Photocatalytic activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles synthesized using yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kaushik; Sarkar, C. K.; Ghosh, C. K.

    2015-11-01

    Synthesis of metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles through physical and chemical route is quiet common but biological synthesis procedures are gaining momentum due to their simplicity, cost-effectivity and eco-friendliness. Here, we report green synthesis of silver nanoparticles from aqueous solution of silver salts using yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) extract. The nanoparticles formation was gradually investigated by UV-Vis spectrometer. X-ray diffraction analysis was done to identify different phases of biosynthesized Ag nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy was performed to study the particle size and morphology of silver nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the nanoparticles was performed to study the role of biomolecules capped on the surface of Ag nanoparticles during interaction. Photocatalytic activity of these biosynthesized nanoparticles was studied using an organic dye, methylene blue under solar irradiation and these nanoparticles showed efficacy in degrading the dye within a few hours of exposure.

  20. 21 CFR 184.1854 - Sucrose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....1854 Sucrose. (a) Sucrose (C12H22O11, CAS Reg. No. 57-50-11-1) sugar, cane sugar, or beet sugar is the... sugar beet juice that has been extracted by pressing or diffusion, then clarified and evaporated....

  1. Effect of Yeast Extract and Vitamin B(12) on Ethanol Production from Cellulose by Clostridium thermocellum I-1-B.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Goto, S; Yonemura, S; Sekine, K; Okuma, E; Takagi, Y; Hon-Nami, K; Saiki, T

    1992-02-01

    Addition to media of yeast extract, a vitamin mixture containing vitamin B(12), biotin, pyridoxamine, and p-aminobenzoic acid, or vitamin B(12) alone enhanced formation of ethanol but decreased lactate production in the fermentation of cellulose by Clostridium thermocellum I-1-B. A similar effect was not observed with C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 and JW20. PMID:16348657

  2. Effects of yeast extract and vitamin D on turkey mortality and cellulitis incidence in a transport stress model.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated yeast extract (YE) and vitamin D (VD) in turkeys treated with dexamethasone (Dex) at intervals designed to simulate transport stress during a 3 stage growout. YE but not VD decreased early mortality (P = 0.001) and mortality at wk 7 (P= 0.02) and wk 12 (P = 0.002) but not wk 16. Celluli...

  3. Contributions of sucrose synthase and invertase to the metabolism of sucrose in developing leaves: estimation by alternate substrate utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalstig, J.G.; Hitz, W.D.

    1987-10-01

    The relative contributions of invertase and sucrose synthase to initial cleavage of phloem-imported sucrose was calculated for sink leaves of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr cv Wye) and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. monohybrid). Invertase from yeast hydrolyzed sucrose 4200 times faster than 1'-deoxy-1'-fluorosucrose (FS) while sucrose cleavage by sucrose synthase from developing soybean leaves proceeded only 3.6 times faster than cleavage of FS.(/sup 14/C)Sucrose and (/sup 14/C)FS, used as tracers of sucrose, were transported at identical rates to developing leaves through the phloem. The rate of label incorporation into insoluble products varied with leaf age from 3.4 to 8.0 times faster when (/sup 14/C)sucrose was supplied than when (/sup 14/C)FS was supplied. The discrimination in metabolism was related to enzymatic discriminations against FS to calculate the relative contributions of invertase and sucrose synthase to sucrose cleavage. In the youngest soybean leaves measured, 4% of final laminar length (FLL), all cleavage was by sucrose synthase. Invertase contribution to sucrose metabolism was 47% by 7.6% FLL, increased to 54% by 11% FLL, then declined to 42% for the remainder of the import phase. In sugar beet sink leaves at 30% FLL invertase contribution to sucrose metabolism was 58%.

  4. Contributions of sucrose synthase and invertase to the metabolism of sucrose in developing leaves : estimation by alternate substrate utilization.

    PubMed

    Schmalstig, J G; Hitz, W D

    1987-10-01

    The relative contributions of invertase and sucrose synthase to initial cleavage of phloem-imported sucrose was calculated for sink leaves of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr cv Wye) and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. monohybrid). Invertase from yeast hydrolyzed sucrose 4200 times faster than 1'-deoxy-1'-fluorosucrose (FS) while sucrose cleavage by sucrose synthase from developing soybean leaves proceeded only 3.6 times faster than cleavage of FS. [(14)C]Sucrose and [(14)C]FS, used as tracers of sucrose, were transported at identical rates to developing leaves through the phloem. The rate of label incorporation into insoluble products varied with leaf age from 3.4 to 8.0 times faster when [(14)C]sucrose was supplied than when [(14)C]FS was supplied. The discrimination in metabolism was related to enzymatic discriminations against FS to calculate the relative contributions of invertase and sucrose synthase to sucrose cleavage. In the youngest soybean leaves measured, 4% of final laminar length (FLL), all cleavage was by sucrose synthase. Invertase contribution to sucrose metabolism was 47% by 7.6% FLL, increased to 54% by 11% FLL, then declined to 42% for the remainder of the import phase. In sugar beet sink leaves at 30% FLL invertase contribution to sucrose metabolism was 58%. PMID:16665711

  5. Use of yeast cell wall extract as a tool to reduce the impact of necrotic enteritis in broilers.

    PubMed

    M'Sadeq, Shawkat A; Wu, Shu-Biao; Choct, Mingan; Forder, Rebecca; Swick, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    The use of a yeast cell wall extract derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Actigen(®)) has been proposed as an alternative to in-feed antibiotics. This experiment was conducted to investigate the efficacy of yeast cell extract as an alternative to zinc bacitracin or salinomycin using a necrotic enteritis challenge model. A feeding study was conducted using 480-day-old male Ross 308 chicks assigned to 48 floor pens. A 2 × 4 factorial arrangement of treatments was employed. The factors were: challenge (- or +) and feed additive (control, zinc bacitracin at 100/50 mg/kg, yeast cell wall extract at 400/800/200 mg/kg, or salinomycin at 60 mg/kg in starter, grower, and finisher, respectively). Diets based on wheat, sorghum, soybean meal, meat and bone meal, and canola meal were formulated according to the Ross 308 nutrient specifications. Birds were challenged using a previously established protocol (attenuated Eimeria spp oocysts) on d 9 and 10(8) to 10(9) Clostridium perfringens (type A strain EHE-NE18) on d 14 and 15). Challenged and unchallenged birds were partitioned to avoid cross contamination. Challenged birds had lower weight gain, feed intake and livability compared to unchallenged birds on d 24 and d 35 (P < 0.05). Birds given zinc bacitracin, yeast cell wall extract, or salinomycin had improved weight gain and livability when compared to control birds given no additives. Challenge × additive interactions were observed for feed intake and weight gain on d 24 and d 35 (P < 0.01). The additives all had a greater positive impact on feed intake, weight gain, and livability in challenged than unchallenged birds. All challenged birds showed higher necrotic enteritis lesion scores in the small intestine sections when compared to unchallenged birds (P < 0.01). Birds fed yeast cell wall extract exhibited increased villus height, decreased crypt depth, and increased villus:crypt ratio when challenged. Yeast cell wall extract, zinc bacitracin, and salinomycin were effective in preventing performance decline from necrotic enteritis in the current study. This study indicates that yeast cell wall extract has promise as a tool for controlling necrotic enteritis. PMID:25762162

  6. In Vivo Hypocholesterolemic Effect of MARDI Fermented Red Yeast Rice Water Extract in High Cholesterol Diet Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Beh, Boon Kee; Kong, Joan; Ho, Wan Yong; Mohd Yusof, Hamidah; Hussin, Aminuddin bin; Jaganath, Indu Bala; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Jamaluddin, Anisah

    2014-01-01

    Fermented red yeast rice has been traditionally consumed as medication in Asian cuisine. This study aimed to determine the in vivo hypocholesterolemic and antioxidant effects of fermented red yeast rice water extract produced using Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI) Monascus purpureus strains in mice fed with high cholesterol diet. Absence of monacolin-k, lower level of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), higher content of total amino acids, and antioxidant activities were detected in MARDI fermented red yeast rice water extract (MFRYR). In vivo MFRYR treatment on hypercholesterolemic mice recorded similar lipid lowering effect as commercial red yeast rice extract (CRYR) as it helps to reduce the elevated serum liver enzyme and increased the antioxidant levels in liver. This effect was also associated with the upregulation of apolipoproteins-E and inhibition of Von Willebrand factor expression. In summary, MFRYR enriched in antioxidant and amino acid without monacolin-k showed similar hypocholesterolemic effect as CRYR that was rich in monacolin-k and GABA. PMID:25031606

  7. In Vivo Hypocholesterolemic Effect of MARDI Fermented Red Yeast Rice Water Extract in High Cholesterol Diet Fed Mice.

    PubMed

    Yeap, Swee Keong; Beh, Boon Kee; Kong, Joan; Ho, Wan Yong; Mohd Yusof, Hamidah; Mohamad, Nurul Elyani; Hussin, Aminuddin Bin; Jaganath, Indu Bala; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Jamaluddin, Anisah; Long, Kamariah

    2014-01-01

    Fermented red yeast rice has been traditionally consumed as medication in Asian cuisine. This study aimed to determine the in vivo hypocholesterolemic and antioxidant effects of fermented red yeast rice water extract produced using Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI) Monascus purpureus strains in mice fed with high cholesterol diet. Absence of monacolin-k, lower level of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), higher content of total amino acids, and antioxidant activities were detected in MARDI fermented red yeast rice water extract (MFRYR). In vivo MFRYR treatment on hypercholesterolemic mice recorded similar lipid lowering effect as commercial red yeast rice extract (CRYR) as it helps to reduce the elevated serum liver enzyme and increased the antioxidant levels in liver. This effect was also associated with the upregulation of apolipoproteins-E and inhibition of Von Willebrand factor expression. In summary, MFRYR enriched in antioxidant and amino acid without monacolin-k showed similar hypocholesterolemic effect as CRYR that was rich in monacolin-k and GABA. PMID:25031606

  8. Zinc-containing yeast extract promotes nonrapid eye movement sleep in mice.

    PubMed

    Cherasse, Yoan; Saito, Hitomi; Nagata, Nanae; Aritake, Kosuke; Lazarus, Michael; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2015-10-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element for humans and animals, being located, among other places, in the synaptic vesicles of cortical glutamatergic neurons and hippocampal mossy fibers in the brain. Extracellular zinc has the potential to interact with and modulate many different synaptic targets, including glutamate and GABA receptors. Because of the central role of these neurotransmitters in brain activity, we examined in this study the sleep-promoting activity of zinc by monitoring locomotor activity and electroencephalogram after its administration to mice. Zinc-containing yeast extract (40 and 80 mg/kg) dose dependently increased the total amount of nonrapid eye movement sleep and decreased the locomotor activity. However, this preparation did not change the amount of rapid eye movement sleep or show any adverse effects such as rebound of insomnia during a period of 24 h following the induction of sleep; whereas the extracts containing other divalent cations (manganese, iron, and copper) did not decrease the locomotor activity. This is the first evidence that zinc can induce sleep. Our data open the way to new types of food supplements designed to improve sleep. PMID:26105624

  9. 21 CFR 184.1854 - Sucrose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sugar, or beet sugar is the chemical β-D-fructofuranosyl-α-D-glucopyranoside. Sucrose is obtained by crystallization from sugar cane or sugar beet juice that has been extracted by pressing or diffusion,...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1854 - Sucrose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sugar, or beet sugar is the chemical β-D-fructofuranosyl-α-D-glucopyranoside. Sucrose is obtained by crystallization from sugar cane or sugar beet juice that has been extracted by pressing or diffusion,...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1854 - Sucrose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sugar, or beet sugar is the chemical β-D-fructofuranosyl-α-D-glucopyranoside. Sucrose is obtained by crystallization from sugar cane or sugar beet juice that has been extracted by pressing or diffusion,...

  12. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called ...

  13. Investigations on hydrolytic activities from Stachybotrys microspora and their use as an alternative in yeast DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Abdeljalil, Salma; Ben Hmad, Ines; Saibi, Walid; Amouri, Bahia; Maalej, Wiem; Kaaniche, Marwa; Koubaa, Aida; Gargouri, Ali

    2014-02-01

    Stachybotrys microspora is a filamentous fungus characterized by the secretion of multiple hydrolytic activities (cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic enzymes). The production of these biocatalysts was studied under submerged culture using glucose, cellulose, and wheat bran as carbon sources. Endoglucanases, pectinases, xylanases, β-glucanases, chitinases, and proteases were induced on cellulose-based medium and repressed on glucose in both strains with higher amounts produced by the mutant. β-glucosidases were roughly equally produced by both strains under glucose and cellulose conditions. The yield of chitinases, β-glucanases, and proteases produced by Stachybotrys strains was as much higher than the commercialized lysing enzyme called "zymolyase," currently used in yeast DNA extraction. In this context, we showed that S. microspora hydrolases can be successfully applied in the extraction of yeast DNA. PMID:24241970

  14. Preparation and characterization of yeast nuclear extracts for efficient RNA polymerase B (II)-dependent transcription in vitro.

    PubMed

    Verdier, J M; Stalder, R; Roberge, M; Amati, B; Sentenac, A; Gasser, S M

    1990-12-11

    We present a reproducible method for the preparation of nuclear extracts from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that support efficient RNA polymerase B (II)-dependent transcription. Extracts from both a crude nuclear fraction and Percoll-purified nuclei are highly active for site-specific initiation and transcription of a G-free cassette under the Adenovirus major late promoter. At optimal extract concentrations transcription is at least 5 times more efficient with the yeast extracts than with HeLa whole cell extracts. We show that the transcriptional activity is sensitive to alpha-amanitin and to depletion of factor(s) recognizing the TATA-box of the promoter. The in vitro reaction showed maximal activity after 45 min, was very sensitive to Cl-, but was not affected by high concentrations of potassium. We find that the efficiency of in vitro transcription in nuclear extracts is reproducibly high when spheroplasting is performed with a partially purified beta 1,3-glucanase (lyticase). Therefore a simplified method to isolate the lyticase from the supernatant of Oerskovia xanthineolytica is also presented. PMID:2263463

  15. Homogeneous pyruvate kinase isolated from yeast by two different methods is indistinguishable from pyruvate kinase in cell-free extract.

    PubMed

    Aust, A E; Suelter, C H

    1978-10-25

    In this report, we have compared homogeneous yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) pyruvate kinase to enzyme from cell-free extracts in several different ways: 1) isoelectric focusing of cell-free extracts indicates one peak of pyruvate kinase activity whose isoelectric point is the same as that of the pure enzyme; 2) antibody prepared to the pure enzyme produces a single, fused precipitin line against enzyme in the cell-free extract and pure enzyme; 3) immunoelectrophoresis of cell-free extract produces one precipitin arc which has the same mobility as that of the pure enzyme; and 4) immunoprecipitation of the pure enzyme from cell-free extract with subsequent solubilization in 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate and electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels produces a single protein band attributable to pyruvate kinase which co-migrates with the purified enzyme. Within the limits of the sensitivity of the methods employed, we conclude that the homogeneous pyruvate kinase prepared from yeast lysed either by Manton-Gaulin homogenization (Aust, A., Yun, S.-L., and Suelter, C. (1975) Methods Enzymol. 42, 176-182) or by toluolysis (Yun, S.-L., Aust, A.E., and Suelter, C.H. (1977) J. Biol. Chem. 251, 124-128) is identical with pyruvate kinase in cell-free extract. PMID:100495

  16. Sucrose and Related Oligosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, Gillian

    Sucrose (α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1↔2)-β-D-fructofuranoside) is the most common low-molecular-weight sugar found in the plant kingdom. It is ubiquitously known as common table sugar and primarily produced industrially from sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris); the basics of the industrial manufacture of sucrose are outlined in this chapter. Commercial sucrose has a very high purity (> 99.9%) making it one of the purest organic substances produced on an industrial scale. Value-addition to sucrose via chemical and biotechnological reactions is becoming more important for the diversification of the sugar industry to maintain the industries' competitiveness in a world increasingly turning to a bio-based economy. The basis for the chemical reactivity of sucrose is the eight hydroxyl groups present on the molecule, although, sucrose chemical reactivity is regarded as difficult. Increasing use of enzymatic biotechnological techniques to derivatize sucrose is expected, to add special functionalities to sucrose products like biodegradability, biocompatibility, and non-toxicity. Analysis of sucrose by colorimetric, enzymatic, oxidation-reduction and chromatography methods are discussed. Oligosaccharides related to sucrose are outlined in detail and include sucrose-based plant, honey and in vitro oligosaccharides.

  17. Yeast Extract and Silver Nitrate Induce the Expression of Phenylpropanoid Biosynthetic Genes and Induce the Accumulation of Rosmarinic Acid in Agastache rugosa Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo Tae; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Yeo, Sun Kyung; Jeon, Jin; Park, Jong Seok; Lee, Sook Young; Park, Sang Un

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of yeast extract and silver nitrate on the enhancement of phenylpropanoid pathway genes and accumulation of rosmarinic acid in Agastache rugosa cell cultures. The treatment of cell cultures with yeast extract (500 mg/L) and silver nitrate (30 mg/L) for varying times enhanced the expression of genes in the phenylpropanoid pathway and the production of rosmarinic acid. The results indicated that the expression of RAS and HPPR was proportional to the amount of yeast extract and silver nitrate. The transcript levels of HPPR under yeast extract treatment were 1.84-, 1.97-, and 2.86-fold higher than the control treatments after 3, 6, and 12 h, respectively, whereas PAL expression under silver nitrate treatment was 52.31-fold higher than in the non-treated controls after 24 h of elicitation. The concentration of rosmarinic acid was directly proportional to the concentration of the applied elicitors. Yeast extract supplementation documented the highest amount of rosmarinic acid at 4.98 mg/g, whereas silver nitrate addition resulted in a comparatively lower amount of rosmarinic acid at 0.65 mg/g. In conclusion, addition of yeast extract to the cell cultures enhanced the accumulation of rosmarinic acid, which was evidenced by the expression levels of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway genes in A. rugosa. PMID:27043507

  18. Glucosyltransferase production by Klebsiella sp. K18 and conversion of sucrose to palatinose using immobilized cells

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, Daniela C.; Kawaguti, Haroldo Y.; Sato, Hlia H.

    2009-01-01

    The strain Klebsiella sp. K18 produces the enzyme glucosyltransferase and catalyses the conversion of sucrose to palatinose, an alternative sugar that presents low cariogenicity. Response Surface Methodology was successfully employed to determine the optimal concentration of culture medium components. Maximum glucosyltransferase production (21.78 U mL-1) was achieved using the optimized medium composed by sugar cane molasses (80 g L-1), bacteriological peptone (7 g L-1) and yeast extract (20 g L-1), after 8 hours of fermentation at 28C. The conversion of sucrose to palatinose was studied utilizing immobilized cells in calcium alginate. The effects of the alginate concentration (2-4%), cell mass concentration (20-40%) and substrate concentration (25-45%) were evaluated and the yield of palatinose was approximately 62.5%. PMID:24031319

  19. Sucrose and Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a relationship most sweet.

    PubMed

    Marques, Wesley Leoricy; Raghavendran, Vijayendran; Stambuk, Boris Ugarte; Gombert, Andreas Karoly

    2016-02-01

    Sucrose is an abundant, readily available and inexpensive substrate for industrial biotechnology processes and its use is demonstrated with much success in the production of fuel ethanol in Brazil. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which naturally evolved to efficiently consume sugars such as sucrose, is one of the most important cell factories due to its robustness, stress tolerance, genetic accessibility, simple nutrient requirements and long history as an industrial workhorse. This minireview is focused on sucrose metabolism in S. cerevisiae, a rather unexplored subject in the scientific literature. An analysis of sucrose availability in nature and yeast sugar metabolism was performed, in order to understand the molecular background that makes S. cerevisiae consume this sugar efficiently. A historical overview on the use of sucrose and S. cerevisiae by humans is also presented considering sugarcane and sugarbeet as the main sources of this carbohydrate. Physiological aspects of sucrose consumption are compared with those concerning other economically relevant sugars. Also, metabolic engineering efforts to alter sucrose catabolism are presented in a chronological manner. In spite of its extensive use in yeast-based industries, a lot of basic and applied research on sucrose metabolism is imperative, mainly in fields such as genetics, physiology and metabolic engineering. PMID:26658003

  20. Interactions of grape tannins and wine polyphenols with a yeast protein extract, mannoproteins and β-glucan.

    PubMed

    Mekoue Nguela, J; Poncet-Legrand, C; Sieczkowski, N; Vernhet, A

    2016-11-01

    At present, there is a great interest in enology for yeast derived products to replace aging on lees in winemaking or as an alternative for wine fining. These are yeast protein extracts (YPE), cell walls and mannoproteins. Our aim was to further understand the mechanisms that drive interactions between these components and red wine polyphenols. To this end, interactions between grape skin tannins or wine polyphenols or tannins and a YPE, a mannoprotein fraction and a β-glucan were monitored by binding experiments, ITC and DLS. Depending on the tannin structure, a different affinity between the polyphenols and the YPE was observed, as well as differences in the stability of the aggregates. This was attributed to the mean degree of polymerization of tannins in the polyphenol fractions and to chemical changes that occur during winemaking. Much lower affinities were found between polyphenols and polysaccharides, with different behaviors between mannoproteins and β-glucans. PMID:27211695

  1. High sucrose consumption promotes obesity whereas its low consumption induces oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rovenko, Bohdana M; Kubrak, Olga I; Gospodaryov, Dmytro V; Perkhulyn, Natalia V; Yurkevych, Ihor S; Sanz, Alberto; Lushchak, Oleh V; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2015-08-01

    The effects of sucrose in varied concentrations (0.25-20%) with constant amount of yeasts in larval diet on development and metabolic parameters of adult fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster were studied. Larvae consumed more food at low sucrose diet, overeating with yeast. On high sucrose diet, larvae ingested more carbohydrates, despite consuming less food and obtaining less protein derived from yeast. High sucrose diet slowed down pupation and increased pupa mortality, enhanced levels of lipids and glycogen, increased dry body mass, decreased water content, i.e. resulted in obese phenotype. Furthermore, it suppressed reactive oxygen species-induced oxidation of lipids and proteins as well as the activity of superoxide dismutase. The activity of catalase was gender-related. In males, at all sucrose concentrations used catalase activity was higher than at its concentration of 0.25%, whereas in females sucrose concentration virtually did not influence the activity. High sucrose diet increased content of protein thiols and the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The increase in sucrose concentration also enhanced uric acid level in females, but caused opposite effects in males. Development on high sucrose diets was accompanied by elevated steady-state insulin-like peptide 3 mRNA level. Finally, carbohydrate starvation at yeast overfeeding on low sucrose diets resulted in oxidative stress reflected by higher levels of oxidized lipids and proteins accompanied by increased superoxide dismutase activity. Potential mechanisms involved in regulation of redox processes by carbohydrates are discussed. PMID:26050918

  2. Phloem Loading of Sucrose

    PubMed Central

    Giaquinta, Robert

    1977-01-01

    Autoradiographic, plasmolysis, and 14C-metabolite distribution studies indicate that the majority of exogenously supplied 14C-sucrose enters the phloem directly from the apoplast in source leaf discs of Beta vulgaris. Phloem loading of sucrose is pH-dependent, being markedly inhibited at an apoplast pH of 8 compared to pH 5. Kinetic analyses indicate that the apparent Km of the loading process increases at the alkaline pH while the maximum velocity, Vmax, is pH-independent. The pH dependence of sucrose loading into source leaf discs translates to phloem loading in and translocation of sucrose from intact source leaves. Studies using asymmetrically labeled sucrose 14C-fructosyl-sucrose, show that sucrose is accumulated intact from the apoplast and not hydrolyzed to its hexose moieties by invertase prior to uptake. The results are discussed in terms of sucrose loading being coupled to the co-transport of protons (and membrane potential) in a manner consistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis of nonelectrolyte transport. Images PMID:16659931

  3. [Intensification of extraction by yeast Saccharamyces cerevisiae 1968 of copper ions from a solution in magnetic field].

    PubMed

    Gorobets, S V; Gorobets, O Iu; Goĭko, I Iu; Kasatkina, T P

    2006-01-01

    It was determined whether it is possible to intensify the biosorption of copper ions from a copper sulfate solution with yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1968 by introducing a metal headpiece into the solution and by applying an external magnetic field. The study was carried out in a magnetic field oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the axes of the rods (with parallel and perpendicular geometry of the system) that make up the headpiece. It was shown that the extent of intensification of the extraction of copper ions at different geometries of the system differs insignificantly and that the extraction of copper ions from the solution occurs by biosorption and cementation onto the metal headpiece. PMID:16808351

  4. Disruption of lipid domain organization in monolayers of complex yeast lipid extracts induced by the lysophosphatidylcholine analogue edelfosine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mahadeo, Mark; Nathoo, Safia; Ganesan, Suriakarthiga; Driedger, Michael; Zaremberg, Vanina; Prenner, Elmar J

    2015-10-01

    The lysophosphatidylcholine analogue edelfosine is a potent antitumor and antiparasitic drug that targets cell membranes. Previous studies have shown that edelfosine alters membrane domain organization inducing internalization of sterols and endocytosis of plasma membrane transporters. These early events affect signaling pathways that result in cell death. It has been shown that edelfosine preferentially partitions into more rigid lipid domains in mammalian as well as in yeast cells. In this work we aimed at investigating the effect of edelfosine on membrane domain organization using monolayers prepared from whole cell lipid extracts of cells treated with edelfosine compared to control conditions. In Langmuir monolayers we were able to detect important differences to the lipid packing of the membrane monofilm. Domain formation visualized by means of Brewster angle microscopy also showed major morphological changes between edelfosine treated versus control samples. Importantly, edelfosine resistant cells defective in drug uptake did not display the same differences. In addition, co-spread samples of control lipid extracts with edelfosine added post extraction did not fully mimic the results obtained with lipid extracts from treated cells. Altogether these results indicate that edelfosine induces changes in membrane domain organization and that these changes depend on drug uptake. Our work also validates the use of monolayers derived from complex cell lipid extracts combined with Brewster angle microscopy, as a sensitive approach to distinguish between conditions associated with susceptibility or resistance to lysophosphatidylcholine analogues. PMID:26386399

  5. A procedure for batch separation of sup 14 C-hexose from sup 14 C-sucrose

    SciTech Connect

    Tarpley, L.; Vietor, D.M. )

    1991-05-01

    This presentation describes a method for separating {sup 14}C-hexose from {sup 14}C-sucrose in extracts of plant tissue. Portions of ethanol extracts are treated with activated charcoal in microcentrifuge tubes. Aliquots are removed, ethanol evaporated and replaced with reaction mixture that phosphorylates hexose (HEPPS, K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}, Mg(C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O{sub 2}){sub 2}, ovalbumen, Na{sub 2}ATP, yeast hexokinase). After a time course, the hexokinase reaction is stopped (slowed considerably) to minimize effects of contamination enzyme activities. The stopping agent used is lyxose, a nonphosphorylable analogue of glucose. The strong anionic charge of phosphate introduced through the hexokinase action results in binding (> 95%) of hexose-phosphate to anion-exchange resin. Sucrose remains unbound (> 95%) in solution. This batch ion-exchange is performed in microcentrifuge tubes to allow many samples to be processed simultaneously. Recovery of radiolabel in extracts is complete (99%), and determinations are repeatable (cv = 23%). This method for routinely separating and quantifying {sup 14}C-hexose and {sup 14}C-sucrose in plant tissue extracts can contribute to the economy and feasibility of studies of {sup 14}C-photoassimilate partitioning to soluble sugars within and among plant tissues.

  6. Anti-osteoporosis activity of red yeast rice extract on ovariectomy-induced bone loss in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y F; Liu, W T; Chen, C Y; Ke, H P; Jiang, H L; Chen, X L; Shi, S Y; Wei, W; Zhang, X N

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common bone disease, affecting millions of people worldwide and leading to significant morbidity and high costs. Monacolin K, an extract of red yeast rice (RYR, Hongqu), plays important roles in the management of dyslipidemia, coronary heart disease, and diabetes. Our study aimed to investigate the protective effect of monacolin K on ovariectomy-induced bone loss in rats. Fifty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham-operated and five ovariectomized (OVX) groups: OVX with vehicle, OVX with fluvastatin, and OVX with RYR extract of three graded doses. Bone mineral density (BMD), biochemical markers, and cell viability were analyzed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Gene expression was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification and western blot. Our results showed that administration of RYR extract markedly increased the bone mineral density in OVX rats. Moreover, RYR extract decreased the levels of bone turnover markers, including osteocalcin and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase activity. The MMT assay revealed that RYR extract treatment significantly improved the osteoblast viabilities in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). At the molecular level, we further demonstrated that RYR extract enhanced the expression of Bmp2 and Bmp4 both at the mRNA and protein levels. Collectively, these data suggested RYR extract could protect against osteoporosis in ovariectomized rats, most likely through activation of BMP2/4 expression. PMID:26345740

  7. Bio-Based Solvents for Green Extraction of Lipids from Oleaginous Yeast Biomass for Sustainable Aviation Biofuel.

    PubMed

    Breil, Cassandra; Meullemiestre, Alice; Vian, Maryline; Chemat, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-based oleaginous microorganisms are potential candidates and resources for the sustainable production of biofuels. This study was designed to evaluate the performance of several alternative bio-based solvents for extracting lipids from yeasts. We used experimental design and simulation with Hansen solubility simulations and the conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation (COSMO-RS) to simulate the solubilization of lipids in each of these solvents. Lipid extracts were analyzed by high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) to obtain the distribution of lipids classes and gas chromatography coupled with a flame ionization detector (GC/FID) to obtain fatty acid profiles. Our aim was to correlate simulation with experimentation for extraction and solvation of lipids with bio-based solvents in order to make a preliminary evaluation for the replacement of hexane to extract lipids from microorganisms. Differences between theory and practice were noted for several solvents, such as CPME, MeTHF and ethyl acetate, which appeared to be good candidates to replace hexane. PMID:26861274

  8. Yeast Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a yeast infection and what causes it?  Yeast vaginitis is the second most common vaginal infection after ... risk for yeast Signs and symptoms of yeast vaginitis  Yeast infections may cause no symptoms  Sometimes yeast ...

  9. Selection and use of pectinolytic yeasts for improving clarification and phenolic extraction in winemaking.

    PubMed

    Belda, Ignacio; Conchillo, Lorena B; Ruiz, Javier; Navascués, Eva; Marquina, Domingo; Santos, Antonio

    2016-04-16

    Pectinase enzymes have shown a considerable influence in both, sensitive and technological properties of wines. They can help to improve clarification process, releasing more color and flavor compounds entrapped in grape skin, facilitating the liberation of phenolic compounds. This work aims to find yeasts that, because of their native pectinases, can be applied on combined fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae obtaining significant benefits over single-inoculated traditional fermentations. 462 yeast strains isolated from wineries were identified and tested for several enzymatic activities of recognized interest for enology industry. Considering the 7 identified species, only Aureobasidium pullulans, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Metschnikowia fructicola showed polygalacturonase activity. Because of its interest in winemaking, due to its reported incidence in wine flavor, the impact of M. pulcherrima as a source of pectinolytic enzymes was analyzed by measuring its influence in filterability, turbidity and the increase on color, anthocyanin and polyphenol content of wines fermented in combination with S. cerevisiae. Among the strains screened, M. pulcherrima NS-EM-34 was selected, due to its polygalacturonase activity, for further characterization in both, laboratory and semi-industrial scale assays. The kinetics concerning several metabolites of enological concern were followed during the entire fermentation process at microvinification scale. Improved results were obtained in the expected parameters when M. pulcherrima NS-EM-34 was used, in comparison to wines fermented with S. cerevisiae alone and combined with other pectinolytic and non-pectinolytic yeasts (A. pullulans and Lachancea thermotolerans, respectively), even working better than commercial enzymes preparations in most parameters. Additionally, M. pulcherrima NS-EM-34 was used at a semi-industrial scale combined with three different S. cerevisiae strains, confirming its potential application for red wine improvement on the mentioned sensorial and technological properties. PMID:26874860

  10. Effects of a dietary yeast extract on hematological parameters, heterophil function, and bacterial clearance in turkey poults challenged with Escherichia coli and subjected to transport stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to develop nutritional methods for controlling pathogens in poultry production. A standardized yeast extract supplement, Alphamune™ (YE), was added to turkey poult diets. Male poults were challenged by air sac injection with 60 cfu of E. coli at 1 week of age. At 3 weeks of age chal...

  11. Effects of a dietary yeast extract on hematological parameters, heterophil function, and bacterial clearance in turkey poults challenged with Escherichia coli and subjected to transport stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to develop nutritional methods for controlling pathogens in poultry production. A standardized yeast extract supplement, Alphamune (YE), was added to turkey poult diets. Male poults were challenged by air sac injection with 60 cfu of E. coli at 1 week of age. At 3 weeks of age chal...

  12. INFLUENCE OF HEN AGE ON THE RESPONSE OF TURKEY POULTS TO COLD STRESS, ESCHERICHIA COLI CHALLENGE, AND TREATMENT WITH A YEAST EXTRACT ANTIBIOTIC ALTERNATIVE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Two duplicated battery trials were conducted to evaluate a standardized Yeast Extract feed supplement, (Alphamune) in a cold stress-Escherichia coli challenge of one-week-old turkeys. Trial 1 used day-old male Hybrid Converter poults from 33-week-old hens in their 2nd week of lay. Trial 2 used ...

  13. The effect of a yeast extract feed additive on turkeys challenged with Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes and subjected to transport stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to develop nutritional methods for controlling pathogens in poultry production. A yeast extract supplement, Alphamune™ (YE) was added to the diet of turkeys which were exposed to E. coli and L. monocytogenes Scott A at 16 wks of age using coarse spray and feed inclusion. Positive c...

  14. Nucleotide-excision repair of DNA in cell-free extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Wu, X; Friedberg, E C

    1993-01-01

    A wide spectrum of DNA lesions are repaired by the nucleotide-excision repair (NER) pathway in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. We have developed a cell-free system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that supports NER. NER was monitored by measuring repair synthesis in DNA treated with cisplatin or with UV radiation. Repair synthesis in vitro was defective in extracts of rad1, rad2, and rad10 mutant cells, all of which have mutations in genes whose products are known to be required for NER in vivo. Additionally, repair synthesis was complemented by mixing different mutant extracts, or by adding purified Rad1 or Rad10 protein to rad1 or rad10 mutant extracts, respectively. The latter observation demonstrates that the Rad1 and Rad10 proteins directly participate in the biochemical pathway of NER. NER supported by nuclear extracts requires ATP and Mg2+ and is stimulated by polyethylene glycol and by small amounts of whole cell extract containing overexpressed Rad2 protein. The nuclear extracts also contain base-excision repair activity that is present at wild-type levels in rad mutant extracts. This cell-free system is expected to facilitate studies on the biochemical pathway of NER in S. cerevisiae. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:8506335

  15. Photodynamic inactivation of yeast and bacteria by extracts of Alternanthera brasiliana.

    PubMed

    Andreazza, Nathalia L; de Lourenco, Caroline C; Siqueira, Carlos A T; Sawaya, Alexandra C H F; Lapinski, Tadia F; Gasparetto, Adriana; Khouri, Sonia; Zamuner, Stella R; Munin, Egberto; Salvador, Marcos Jose

    2013-08-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of Alternathera brasiliana (Amaranthaceae) extracts as photosensitizing agents in photodynamic antimicrobial therapies (PACT) against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida dubliniensis. The crude hexane and ethanol extracts were obtained from A. brasiliana whole plant and showed absortion from 650 to 700 nm. Also, singlet molecular oxygen (1O2) production (type II photosensitization reaction) was examined, and the results show that 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran photodegradation was greatly enhanced in the presence of the A. brasiliana extracts. One plate in each assay was irradiated while the other was not irradiated, the number of colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) was obtained, and data analyzed by the Tukey test. The chemical composition of the extracts was determined by chromatographic and spectrometric techniques; steroids, triterpenes, and flavonoids were identified. Laser irradiation alone at 685 nm using diode laser, output power of 35 mW, and energy of 28 J/cm2, or non-irradiated crude extracts in sub-inhibitory concentration did not reduce the number of CFU/mL significantly, whereas irradiated hexane and ethanol extracts, in sub-inhibitory concentrations, inhibited the growth of these microorganisms. The photoactivation of hexane and ethanol extracts of A. brasiliana, in sub-inhibitory concentrations, using red laser radiation at 685 nm had an antimicrobial effect. PMID:23547779

  16. Optimizing conditions for poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate) production by Halomonas boliviensis LC1 in batch culture with sucrose as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Quillaguamán, Jorge; Muñoz, Marlene; Mattiasson, Bo; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2007-04-01

    Halomonas boliviensis LC1 is able to accumulate poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) under conditions of excess carbon source and depletion of essential nutrients. This study was aimed at an efficient production of PHB by growing H. boliviensis to high cell concentrations in batch cultures. The effect of ammonium, phosphate, and yeast extract concentrations on cell concentration [cell dry weight (CDW)] and PHB content of H. boliviensis cultured in shake flasks was assayed using a factorial design. High concentrations of these nutrients led to increments in cell growth but reduced the PHB content to some extent. Cultivations of H. boliviensis under controlled conditions in a fermentor using 1.5% (w/v) yeast extract as N source, and intermittent addition of sucrose to provide excess C source, resulted in a polymer accumulation of 44 wt.% and 12 g l(-1) CDW after 24 h of cultivation. Batch cultures in a fermentor with initial concentrations of 2.5% (w/v) sucrose and 1.5% (w/v) yeast extract, and with induced oxygen limitation, resulted in an optimum PHB accumulation, PHB concentration and CDW of 54 wt.%, 7.7 g l(-1) and 14 g l(-1), respectively, after 19 h of cultivation. The addition of casaminoacids in the medium increased the CDW to 14.4 g l(-1) in 17 h but reduced the PHB content in the cells to 52 wt.%. PMID:17160681

  17. Effects of bentonite and yeast extract as nutrient on decrease in hydraulic conductivity of porous media due to CaCO3 precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii.

    PubMed

    Eryrk, Ka?an; Yang, Suyin; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sakaguchi, Iwao; Katayama, Arata

    2015-10-01

    The reduction mechanism of hydraulic conductivity was investigated in porous media treated with bentonite and CaCO3 precipitates induced by growing cells of Sporosarcina pasteurii (ATCC 11859). Bentonite, the bacterial cells, and a precipitation solution, composing of 0.5M CaCl2 and 0.5M urea with or without 2% weight/volume yeast extract allowing the bacterial growth were sequentially introduced into the continuous-flow columns containing glass beads between 0.05 and 3mm in diameter. The treatments reduced the hydraulic conductivity of the columns from between 8.4נ10(-1) and 4.1נ10(-3)cm/s to between 9.9נ10(-4) and 2.1נ10(-6)cm/s as the lowest. With yeast extract, the conductivity continuously decreased during four days of the experiment, while became stable after two days without yeast extract. Introduction of the bacterial cells did not decrease the conductivity. The reduction in hydraulic conductivity was inversely correlated with the volume occupied by the depositions of bentonite and CaCO3 precipitates in column, showing the same efficiency but a larger effect of the CaCO3 precipitates with increasing volume by bacterial growth. The smaller glass beads resulted in larger volume of the depositions. Bentonite increased the deposition of CaCO3 precipitates. Analysis using the Kozeny-Carman equation suggested that without yeast extract, bentonite and the CaCO3 precipitates formed aggregates with glass beads, thus increasing their diameter and consequently decreasing the pore size in the column. With yeast extract, in addition to the aggregates, the individual CaCO3 precipitates formed separately from the aggregates reduced the hydraulic conductivity. PMID:25736267

  18. Improvement of grape and wine phenolic content by foliar application to grapevine of three different elicitors: Methyl jasmonate, chitosan, and yeast extract.

    PubMed

    Portu, Javier; López, Rosa; Baroja, Elisa; Santamaría, Pilar; Garde-Cerdán, Teresa

    2016-06-15

    Phenolic compounds play a key role in grape and wine organoleptic properties, being therefore a key parameter in wine quality. Elicitor application constitutes an interesting field of research since it is indirectly involved in the accumulation of phenolic compounds. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the application of three different elicitors on both grape and wine phenolic content. Methyl jasmonate, chitosan, and a commercial yeast extract were applied to the canopy at veraison and one week later. Results showed that foliar treatments carried out with methyl jasmonate and yeast extract achieved the best results, increasing grape and wine anthocyanin content when compared to the control. Moreover, the application of the yeast elicitor also enhanced grape stilbene content. In contrast, the chitosan treatment did not have a substantial impact on the phenolic compounds. The results of this study indicate that methyl jasmonate and yeast extract applications could be a simple practice to increase grape and wine phenolic content. PMID:26868568

  19. Application of supercritical CO(2) extraction for the elimination of odorant volatile compounds from winemaking inactive dry yeast preparation.

    PubMed

    Pozo-Bayn, Mara Angeles; Andjar-Ortiz, Inmaculada; Mendiola, Jose A; Ibez, Elena; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria

    2010-03-24

    A procedure based on the application of supercritical CO(2) extraction to reduce and/or to remove odorant volatile compounds from a winemaking inactive dry yeast (IDY) preparation has been set up. By applying a factorial design, a screening of different temperatures and pressure conditions was assayed in order to determine the optimal deodorization conditions, and afterward the effect of several sample pretreatments was investigated. The best extraction conditions were achieved at 200 atm and 60 degrees C, applying the cryogenic grinding of the sample and using 40% (w/w) ethanol as cosolvent. By using these conditions, it was possible to reduce to approximately 70% of the volatile compounds present in the samples that may be released into the wines and therefore affecting their sensory characteristics. Odorant volatile compounds such as 2-methylhydroxypyrrole, 2-ethyl-6-methylpyrazine, and 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine completely disappeared from the deodorized sample as verified by GC-O analysis. Additional experiments in model wines confirmed the low release of volatile compounds from the deodorized samples, without provoking any change to their nonvolatile composition (nitrogen compounds and neutral polysaccharides) that is related to the technological properties of these preparations. PMID:20170168

  20. Extraction of yeast mitochondrial membrane proteins by solubilization and detergent/polymer aqueous two-phase partitioning.

    PubMed

    Everberg, Henrik; Gustavsson, Niklas; Tjerneld, Folke

    2009-01-01

    Identification and characterization of membrane proteins is of increasing importance in modern proteomic studies. It is of central interest to have access to methods that combine efficient solubilization with enrichment of proteins and intact protein complexes. Separation methods have been developed based on nondenaturing detergent extraction of yeast mitochondrial membrane proteins followed by enrichment of hydrophobic proteins in aqueous two-phase system. Combining the zwitterionic detergent Zwittergent 3-10 and the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 results in a complementary solubilization of proteins, which is similar to that of the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) but with the important advantage of being nondenaturing. Detergent/polymer two-phase system partitioning offers removal of soluble proteins, which can be further improved by manipulation of the driving forces governing protein distribution between the phases. Integral and peripheral membrane protein subunits from intact membrane protein complexes partition to the detergent phase while soluble proteins are found in the polymer phase. A protocol is presented which combines nondenaturing solubilization of membrane proteins with extraction in detergent/polymer two-phase system for application in proteomic studies as a mild and efficient method for enrichment of membrane proteins and membrane protein complexes. PMID:19153685

  1. Extraction of ethanol with higher carboxylic acid solvents and their toxicity to yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a screening exercise for ethanol-selective extraction solvents, partitioning of ethanol and water from a 5 wt% aqueous solution into several C8 – C18 carboxylic acids was studied. Results for the acids are compared with those from alcohols of similar structure. In all cases studied, the acids exh...

  2. Sucrose Synthase: Expanding Protein Function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthase (SUS: EC 2.4.1.13), a key enzyme in plant sucrose catabolism, is uniquely able to mobilize sucrose into multiple pathways involved in metabolic, structural, and storage functions. Our research indicates that the biological function of SUS may extend beyond its catalytic activity. Th...

  3. A new β-glucosidase producing yeast for lower-cost cellulosic ethanol production from xylose-extracted corncob residues by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Lewis; Weber, Scott A; Cotta, Michael A; Li, Shi-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    This study reports a new yeast strain of Clavispora NRRL Y-50464 that is able to utilize cellobiose as sole source of carbon and produce sufficient native β-glucosidase enzyme activity for cellulosic ethanol production using SSF. In addition, this yeast is tolerant to the major inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass pre-treatment such as 2-furaldehyde (furfural) and 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde (HMF), and converted furfural into furan methanol in less than 12h and HMF into furan-2,5-dimethanol within 24h in the presence of 15 mM each of furfural and HMF. Using xylose-extracted corncob residue as cellulosic feedstock, an ethanol production of 23 g/l was obtained using 25% solids loading at 37 °C by SSF without addition of exogenous β-glucosidase. Development of this yeast aids renewable biofuels development efforts for economic consolidated SSF bio-processing. PMID:22133603

  4. Budding yeast protein extraction and purification for the study of function, interactions, and post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Eva Paige; Kerscher, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Homogenization by bead beating is a fast and efficient way to release DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites from budding yeast cells, which are notoriously hard to disrupt. Here we describe the use of a bead mill homogenizer for the extraction of proteins into buffers optimized to maintain the functions, interactions and post-translational modifications of proteins. Logarithmically growing cells expressing the protein of interest are grown in a liquid growth media of choice. The growth media may be supplemented with reagents to induce protein expression from inducible promoters (e.g. galactose), synchronize cell cycle stage (e.g. nocodazole), or inhibit proteasome function (e.g. MG132). Cells are then pelleted and resuspended in a suitable buffer containing protease and/or phosphatase inhibitors and are either processed immediately or frozen in liquid nitrogen for later use. Homogenization is accomplished by six cycles of 20 sec bead-beating (5.5 m/sec), each followed by one minute incubation on ice. The resulting homogenate is cleared by centrifugation and small particulates can be removed by filtration. The resulting cleared whole cell extract (WCE) is precipitated using 20% TCA for direct analysis of total proteins by SDS-PAGE followed by Western blotting. Extracts are also suitable for affinity purification of specific proteins, the detection of post-translational modifications, or the analysis of co-purifying proteins. As is the case for most protein purification protocols, some enzymes and proteins may require unique conditions or buffer compositions for their purification and others may be unstable or insoluble under the conditions stated. In the latter case, the protocol presented may provide a useful starting point to empirically determine the best bead-beating strategy for protein extraction and purification. We show the extraction and purification of an epitope-tagged SUMO E3 ligase, Siz1, a cell cycle regulated protein that becomes both sumoylated and phosphorylated, as well as a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase subunit, Slx5. PMID:24300101

  5. Oligosaccharides Derived from Sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsan, Pierre F.; Ouarné, Francois

    Sucrose is a non-reducing disaccharide, consisting of an α-D-glucopyranosyl residue and a β-D-fructofuranosyl residue linked covalently by their respective anomeric carbons (α-D-glucopyranosyl-1,2-β-D-fructofuranoside). It is not just a simple disaccharide, among others: in fact, the energy of its glycosidic bond is higher than that of a usual glycosidic bond. It is equal to 27.6 kJ/mol, which is similar to the energy of a nucleotide-sugar bond as in UDP-glucose or ADP-glucose. This means that sucrose is a protected and activated form of D-glucose (as well as of D-fructose), which plays a key role in the metabolism of plants, for a wide variety of synthesis reactions.

  6. Vacuolar Acid hydrolysis as a physiological mechanism for sucrose breakdown.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, E; Burns, J K

    1989-06-01

    Sucrose breakdown in mature acidic ;Persian' limes (Citrus aurantifolia [Christm.] Swing.) occurred at a rate of 30.6 picomoles per milliliter per day during 9 weeks storage at 15 degrees C. Neither enzyme of sucrose catabolism (sucrose synthase or acid/alkaline invertase) was present in extracts of mature storage tissue. The average vacuolar pH, estimated by direct measurement of sap from isolated vacuoles and by the methylamine method, was about 2.0 to 2.2. In vitro acid hydrolysis of sucrose at physiological concentrations in a buffered solution (pH 2.2) occurred at identical rates as in matured limes. The results indicate that sucrose breakdown in stored mature acidic limes occurs by acid hydrolysis. PMID:16666803

  7. Influence of agronomic factors and extraction rate on the acrylamide contents in yeast-leavened breads.

    PubMed

    Claus, Achim; Schreiter, Pat; Weber, Albrecht; Graeff, Simone; Herrmann, Wilfried; Claupein, Wilhelm; Schieber, Andreas; Carle, Reinhold

    2006-11-15

    Because the impact of agronomical factors on bakery products quality is still an insufficiently studied field, acrylamide contents of breads produced from flours of nine wheat, two rye, and two spelt varieties harvested in 2003 and 2004 were investigated. It could be demonstrated that acrylamide content in bread strongly depends on the cultivar, with extremes differing by a factor of 5.4 due to marked differences in free asparagine and crude protein contents. Nitrogen fertilization also resulted in elevated amino acid and protein contents, thus increasing acrylamide levels from 10.6 to 55.6 mug/kg. Independent of fertilization, harvest year turned out to be another factor influencing acrylamide formation. Breads produced from 2003 flours showed significantly higher acrylamide contents than those of 2004, which was ascribed to favorable light and temperature conditions during the cultivation period, thus enhancing amino acid and protein contents. Sprouting of the grain also resulted in significantly higher acrylamide levels, which was attributed to elevated enzyme activities and the formation of precursors from protein and starch. Furthermore, bakery products made from flours with higher extraction rates were shown to contain higher acrylamide levels resulting from extracted free asparagine and protein from the aleuron layers of the cereal grain. PMID:17090149

  8. Yeast extract promotes decolorization of azo dyes by stimulating azoreductase activity in Shewanella sp. strain IFN4.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad; Negm, Fayek; Khalid, Azeem; Shaharoona, Baby; Hussain, Sabir; Mahmood Nadeem, Sajid; Crowley, David E

    2016-02-01

    Biological treatment of azo dyes commonly requires a combined anaerobic-aerobic process in which initial decolorization is achieved by reductive cleavage of azo bonds on the parent molecule. The present study was conducted to examine the relative importance of co-substrates for driving reductive decolorization of azo dyes by Shewanella sp. strain IFN4 using whole cells and enzyme assays. Results showed that the dye decolorization by strain IFN4 was faster in medium containing 1gL(-1) yeast extract (YE) as compared to nine other co-substrates. Moreover, only YE stimulated azoreductase activity (increased from 1.32 to 4.19U/mg protein). Increasing the level of YE up to 8gL(-)(1) resulted into 81% decolorization of the dye in 1h along with an increase in azoreductase activity up to 6.16U/mg protein. Among the components of YE, only riboflavin stimulated the decolorization process as well as enzyme activity. Moreover, strain IFN4 demonstrated flavin reductase activity, and a significant correlation (r(2)=0.98) between flavin reduction and dye reduction by this strain emphasized the involvement of flavin compounds in the decolorization process. The results of this study show that YE serves both as a source of reducing equivalents and an electron shuttle for catalyzing dye reduction. PMID:26454074

  9. Synthesis of yeast extract-stabilized Cu nanoclusters for sensitive fluorescent detection of sulfide ions in water.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lihua; Zhang, Zaihua; Tang, Anwen; Li, Cong; Shen, Yehua

    2016-05-15

    In this work, we have presented a novel strategy to utilize as-synthesized yeast extract-stabilized Cu nanoclusters (Cu NCs) for sensitive and selective detection of S(2-). The fluorescence intensity of Cu NCs was enhanced significantly in the presence of both Na2S2O8 and S(2-). By virtue of this specific response, a Cu NC-based fluorescent turn-on sensor was developed, which allows the detection of S(2-) in the range of 0.02-0.8μM with a detection limit of 10nM. The enhancing mechanism was also discussed based on fluorescence decay, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies, indicating that S(2-) enhanced the Cu NCs emission mainly through sulfide-induced aggregation of Cu NCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated the usability of the present approach for the detection of S(2-) in water samples, which illustrates its great potential for the environmental monitoring and water quality inspection fields. PMID:26703988

  10. Utilization of waste products of dehydrated onion industry for production of fodder yeast by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ghonaim, S A; Abou-Zeid, A A; Abd El-Fattah, A F; Farid, M A

    1980-01-01

    One strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was selected from different yeasts, isolated from black strap molasses. This microorganism was cultivated on seven fermentation media for the production of protein. Medium I exhibited the highest potentiality for formation of protein. Therefore strain 1 of S. cerevisiae and medium I were used for further studies in the formation of protein. Factors controlling production of protein were explored. The required incubation period for the fermentation process was 72 hrs, while the initial pH value of the medium was 6.0. Sucrose supported the microorganism for higher production of protein (40.96%), while the best concentration of sucrose was shown to be 10.0 g/l. The best inorganic and organic nitrogen sources for protein formation were (NH4)2HPO4, (NH4)3PO4 and yeast extract, respectively. The best concentrations of (NH4)2HPO4 and yeast extract, supporting protein formation, were 5.0 g/l and 10.0 g/l, respectively. Addition of MgSO4, ZnSO4, ferrous ammonium sulphate, copper sulphate, biotin, Ca-pantothenate, thiamine, pyridoxine, and inositol to the synthetic medium did not markedly influence high level of protein formation. Glutamic acid was the best amino acid, supporting protein formation by S. cerevisiae. Onion juice was found to be a good medium, after deletion of inhibitory volatile sulphur organic compounds, for the production of protein by S. cerevisiae. Addition of (NH4)2HPO4 to the best concentration of onion juice assisted the onion medium in production of fodder yeast, containing high level of protein. Addition of MgSO4 to onion juice and (NH4)2HPO4 did not increase the total nitrogen of the biomass. Fodder yeast, produced by onion juice medium, contained more valuable ingredients than fodder yeast, produced by synthetic medium. PMID:6990654

  11. Microwave, ultrasound, thermal treatments, and bead milling as intensification techniques for extraction of lipids from oleaginous Yarrowia lipolytica yeast for a biojetfuel application.

    PubMed

    Meullemiestre, Alice; Breil, Cassandra; Abert-Vian, Maryline; Chemat, Farid

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, two different ways of lipids extraction from Yarrowia lipolytica yeast were investigated in order to maximize the extraction yield. Firstly, various modern techniques of extraction including ultrasound, microwave, and bead milling were tested to intensify the efficiency of lipid recovery. Secondly, several pretreatments such as freezing/defrosting, cold drying, bead milling, and microwave prior two washing of mixture solvent of chloroform:methanol (1:2, v/v) were study to evaluate the impact on lipid recovery. All these treatments were compared to conventional maceration, in terms of lipids extraction yield and lipid composition analysis. The main result of this study is the large difference of lipid recovery among treatments and the alteration of lipids profile after microwave and ultrasound techniques. PMID:27017129

  12. Combined extractives of red yeast rice, bitter gourd, chlorella, soy protein, and licorice improve total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Tsai, Ching-Min; Su, Ih-Jen; Yen, Hsien-Tung; Sheu, Wayne H-H

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of a plant-extractive compound on lipid profiles in subjects with metabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that extractives from red yeast rice, bitter gourd, chlorella, soy protein, and licorice have synergistic benefits on cholesterol and metabolic syndrome. In this double-blinded study, adult subjects with metabolic syndrome were randomized to receive a plant-extractive compound or a placebo treatment for 12 weeks. Both total cholesterol (5.4 ± 0.8 to 4.4 ± 0.6 mmol/L, P < .001) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (3.4 ± 0.7 to 2.7 ± 0.5 mmol/L, P < .001) were significantly reduced after treatment with the plant extractives, and the magnitudes of reduction were significantly greater than in the placebo group (-1.0 ± 0.6 vs 0.0 ± 0.6mmol/L, P < .001; -0.7 ± 0.6 vs 0.0 ± 0.6 mmol/L, P < .001). The reduction in the fasting triglycerides level was significantly greater in the plant-extractive group than in the placebo group (-0.5 ± 0.8 vs -0.2 ± 1.0 mmol/L, P = .039). There was also a significantly greater reduction in the proportion of subjects with hypertensive criteria in the plant-extractive group than in the placebo group (P = .040). In conclusion, the plant extractives from red yeast rice, bitter gourd, chlorella, soy protein, and licorice were effective in reducing total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The plant extractives also showed potential for reducing triglyceride and normalizing blood pressure. PMID:22348456

  13. Sucrose Phosphate Synthase and Sucrose Accumulation at Low Temperature 1

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Charles L.; Huber, Joan L. A.; Huber, Steven C.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of growth temperature on the free sugar and sucrose phosphate synthase content and activity of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf tissue was studied. When plants were grown at 25°C for 3 weeks and then transferred to a constant 5°C, sucrose, glucose, and fructose accumulated to high levels during a 14-d period. Predawn sugar levels increased from 14- to 20-fold over the levels present at the outset of the low-temperature treatment. Sucrose was the most abundant free sugar before, during, and after exposure to 5°C. Leaf sucrose phosphate synthase activity was significantly increased by the low-temperature treatment, whereas sucrose synthase and invertases were not. Synthesis of the sucrose phosphate synthase subunit was increased during and after low-temperature exposure and paralleled an increase in the steady-state level of the subunit. The increases in sucrose and its primary biosynthetic enzyme, sucrose phosphate synthase, are discussed in relation to adjustment of metabolism to low nonfreezing temperature and freezing stress tolerance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16652990

  14. Evolution of Plant Sucrose Uptake Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Anke; Sivitz, Alicia B.; Ward, John M.

    2012-01-01

    In angiosperms, sucrose uptake transporters (SUTs) have important functions especially in vascular tissue. Here we explore the evolutionary origins of SUTs by analysis of angiosperm SUTs and homologous transporters in a vascular early land plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and a non-vascular plant, the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens, the charophyte algae Chlorokybus atmosphyticus, several red algae and fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Plant SUTs cluster into three types by phylogenetic analysis. Previous studies using angiosperms had shown that types I and II are localized to the plasma membrane while type III SUTs are associated with vacuolar membrane. SUT homologs were not found in the chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean algae Chlorokybus atmosphyticus contains a SUT homolog (CaSUT1) and phylogenetic analysis indicated that it is basal to all other streptophyte SUTs analyzed. SUTs are present in both red algae and S. pombe but they are less related to plant SUTs than CaSUT1. Both Selaginella and Physcomitrella encode type II and III SUTs suggesting that both plasma membrane and vacuolar sucrose transporter activities were present in early land plants. It is likely that SUT transporters are important for scavenging sucrose from the environment and intracellular compartments in charophyte and non-vascular plants. Type I SUTs were only found in eudicots and we conclude that they evolved from type III SUTs, possibly through loss of a vacuolar targeting sequence. Eudicots utilize type I SUTs for phloem (vascular tissue) loading while monocots use type II SUTs for phloem loading. We show that HvSUT1 from barley, a type II SUT, reverted the growth defect of the Arabidopsis atsuc2 (type I) mutant. This indicates that type I and II SUTs evolved similar (and interchangeable) phloem loading transporter capabilities independently. PMID:22639641

  15. Inhibitory Properties of Aqueous Ethanol Extracts of Propolis on Alpha-Glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongcheng; Wang, Guangxin; Beta, Trust; Dong, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the inhibitory properties of various extracts of propolis on alpha-glucosidase from baker's yeast and mammalian intestine. Inhibitory activities of aqueous ethanol extracts of propolis were determined by using 4-nitrophenyl-D-glucopyranoside, sucrose and maltose as substrates, and acarbose as a positive reference. All extracts were significantly effective in inhibiting α-glucosidase from baker's yeast and rat intestinal sucrase in comparison with acarbose (P < 0.05). The 75% ethanol extracts of propolis (75% EEP) showed the highest inhibitory effect on α-glucosidase and sucrase and were a noncompetitive inhibition mode. 50% EEP, 95%, EEP and 100% EEP exhibited a mixed inhibition mode, while water extracts of propolis (WEP) and 25% EEP demonstrated a competitive inhibition mode. Furthermore, WEP presented the highest inhibitory activity against maltase. These results suggest that aqueous ethanol extracts of propolis may be used as nutraceuticals for the regulation of postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:25767553

  16. Effects of a preparation of combined glutathione-enriched yeast and rice embryo/soybean extracts on ethanol hangover.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heon-Sik; Song, Jugyeong; Kim, Tae Myoung; Joo, Seong Soo; Park, Dongsun; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Shin, Sunhee; Park, Hyoung Kook; Lee, Won Kyung; Ly, Sun Yung; Kim, Mee Ree; Lee, Do Ik; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2009-12-01

    The effects of a preparation of combined glutathione-enriched yeast (GEY) and rice embryo/soybean (RES) extracts (20:1), GEY/RES, on experimentally induced ethanol hangover were investigated in male Sprague-Dawley rats. To evaluate the preventive effects on hangover, rats were orally administered GEY/RES (50/2.5, 100/5, or 200/10 mg/kg) for 2 weeks. At 30 minutes after the final treatment, they were challenged with 3 mL/kg ethanol (15 mL of 20% in water/kg). The blood concentrations of alcohol and acetaldehyde were analyzed up to 7 hours postchallenge. Hepatic mRNA expression levels of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), cytochrome P450 type 2E1 (CYP2E1), and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Additional rats were challenged with ethanol and, 60 minutes later, administered GEY/RES to evaluate alcohol clearance. Pretreatment with GEY/RES for 2 weeks reduced the blood concentrations of alcohol and acetaldehyde in a dose-dependent manner, lowering by 29.5% and 54.6% at the highest dose (200/10 mg/kg), respectively. The expressions of mRNAs for ADH and ALDH, the major alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, were markedly increased in the livers of rats administered GEY/RES for 2 weeks, whereas CYP2E1 mRNA was suppressed. Postchallenge treatment with GEY/RES enhanced the alcohol clearance rate by lowering blood concentrations of alcohol and acetaldehyde by 24% and 26.6%, respectively, for the highest dose group. GEY/RES remarkably eliminated 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate radical and FeCl(3)-mediated lipid peroxidation in vitro and attenuated hepatic lipid accumulation following ethanol administration in vivo. Therefore, it is suggested that GEY/RES reduces the blood concentrations of alcohol and acetaldehyde not only by modulating alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, but also by exerting its antioxidant activity, and that GEY/RES could be a promising candidate for improvements of alcoholic hangover. PMID:20041794

  17. Establishment of Salvia castanea Diels f. tomentosa Stib. hairy root cultures and the promotion of tanshinone accumulation and gene expression with Ag(+), methyl jasmonate, and yeast extract elicitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Wang, Bangqing; Li, Hongyan; Peng, Liang; Ru, Mei; Liang, Zongsuo; Yan, Xijun; Zhu, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Salvia castanea Diels f. tomentosa Stib. is an endemic medicinal plant distributed in China, and the notably high content of tanshinone IIA in the root is proven effective for the therapy of heart diseases. Hairy root induction of this Salvia species was inoculated with Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain ATCC 15834. Transformed hairy root was cultured in 6,7-V liquid medium for growth kinetics assessment and elicitation. An S curve was present in the hairy root cultures based on the fresh and dry weights with an interval of 3 days. An optimum concentration of the applied elicitors (15 μM Ag(+), 200 μM methyl jasmonate, and 200 mg l(-1) yeast extract elicitor) benefitted both the growth status and tanshinone accumulation in the hairy root cultures. Tanshinone IIA contents were mostly stimulated 1.8-fold and 1.99-fold compared with the control by Ag(+) and methyl jasmonate elicitation, respectively. Yeast extract dramatically enhanced dry mass accumulation, while it promoted cryptotanshinone content of 2.84 ± 0.33 mg g(-1) dry weight at most in the hairy root cultures. Selected elicitors diversely influenced tanshinone accumulation in the time courses of hairy root cultures within 7 days. Furthermore, transcripts of selected genes in the tanshinone biosynthetic pathway were remarkably upregulated with elicitation. Yeast extract elicitor heightened 13.9-fold of isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase expression level at 12 h, while it increased 16.7-fold of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase transcript at 24 h compared with that of the control, which was more effective than Ag(+) and methyl jasmonate. This study provided a convenient hairy root culture system of S. castanea Diels f. tomentosa Stib. for tanshinone production for the first time. PMID:25783026

  18. Cyclin B-Cdk1 Kinase Stimulates ORC- and Cdc6-Independent Steps of Semiconservative Plasmid Replication in Yeast Nuclear Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Duncker, Bernard P.; Pasero, Philippe; Braguglia, Diego; Heun, Patrick; Weinreich, Michael; Gasser, Susan M.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear extracts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells synchronized in S phase support the semiconservative replication of supercoiled plasmids in vitro. We examined the dependence of this reaction on the prereplicative complex that assembles at yeast origins and on S-phase kinases that trigger initiation in vivo. We found that replication in nuclear extracts initiates independently of the origin recognition complex (ORC), Cdc6p, and an autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) consensus. Nonetheless, quantitative density gradient analysis showed that S- and M-phase nuclear extracts consistently promote semiconservative DNA replication more efficiently than G1-phase extracts. The observed semiconservative replication is compromised in S-phase nuclear extracts deficient for the Cdk1 kinase (Cdc28p) but not in extracts deficient for the Cdc7p kinase. In a cdc4-1 G1-phase extract, which accumulates high levels of the specific Clb-Cdk1 inhibitor p40SIC1, very low levels of semiconservative DNA replication were detected. Recombinant Clb5-Cdc28 restores replication in a cdc28-4 S-phase extract yet fails to do so in the cdc4-1 G1-phase extract. In contrast, the addition of recombinant Xenopus CycB-Cdc2, which is not sensitive to inhibition by p40SIC1, restores efficient replication to both extracts. Our results suggest that in addition to its well-characterized role in regulating the origin-specific prereplication complex, the Clb-Cdk1 complex modulates the efficiency of the replication machinery itself. PMID:9891057

  19. Analysis of sucrose from sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose is a disaccharide composed of the monosaccharides glucose and fructose. Sucrose is a product of photosynthesis and is a key carbohydrate resource for growth and metabolism in many organisms. Economic sources of sucrose include sugar cane and sugar beet, where fresh weight sucrose concentrati...

  20. Expression of peach sucrose transporters in heterologous systems points out their different physiological role.

    PubMed

    Zanon, Laura; Falchi, Rachele; Hackel, Aleksandra; Kühn, Christina; Vizzotto, Giannina

    2015-09-01

    Sucrose is the major phloem-translocated component in a number of economically important plant species. The comprehension of the mechanisms involved in sucrose transport in peach fruit appears particularly relevant, since the accumulation of this sugar, during ripening, is crucial for the growth and quality of the fruit. Here, we report the functional characterisation and subcellular localisation of three sucrose transporters (PpSUT1, PpSUT2, PpSUT4) in peach, and we formulate novel hypotheses about their role in accumulation of sugar. We provide evidence, about the capability of both PpSUT1 and PpSUT4, expressed in mutant yeast strains to transport sucrose. The functionality of PpSUT1 at the plasma membrane, and of PpSUT4 at the tonoplast, has been demonstrated. On the other hand, the functionality of PpSUT2 was not confirmed: this protein is unable to complement two sucrose uptake-deficient mutant yeast strains. Our results corroborate the hypotheses that PpSUT1 partakes in phloem loading in leaves, and PpSUT4 sustains cell metabolism by regulating sucrose efflux from the vacuole. PMID:26259193

  1. Sucrose phosphate synthase and sucrose phosphate phosphatase interact in planta and promote plant growth and biomass accumulation.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Victoria J; Park, Ji-Young; Unda, Faride; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2015-07-01

    Bioinformatic analysis indicates that sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) contains a putative C-terminal sucrose phosphate phosphatase (SPP)-like domain that may facilitates the binding of SPP. If an SPS-SPP enzyme complex exists, it may provide sucrose biosynthesis with an additional level of regulation, forming a direct metabolic channel for sucrose-6-phosphate between these two enzymes. Herein, the formation of an enzyme complex between SPS and SPP was examined, and the results from yeast two-hybrid experiments suggest that there is indeed an association between these proteins. In addition, in planta bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) was observed in Arabidopsis seedlings, providing physical evidence for a protein interaction in live cells and in real time. Finally, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) was employed in an attempt to detect SPS-SPP interactions visually. The findings clearly demonstrated that SPS interacts with SPP and that this interaction impacts soluble carbohydrate pools and affects carbon partitioning to starch. Moreover, a fusion construct between the two genes promotes plant growth in both transgenic Arabidopsis and hybrid poplar. PMID:25873678

  2. Sucrose phosphate synthase and sucrose phosphate phosphatase interact in planta and promote plant growth and biomass accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Victoria J.; Park, Ji-Young; Unda, Faride; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2015-01-01

    Bioinformatic analysis indicates that sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) contains a putative C-terminal sucrose phosphate phosphatase (SPP)-like domain that may facilitates the binding of SPP. If an SPS–SPP enzyme complex exists, it may provide sucrose biosynthesis with an additional level of regulation, forming a direct metabolic channel for sucrose-6-phosphate between these two enzymes. Herein, the formation of an enzyme complex between SPS and SPP was examined, and the results from yeast two-hybrid experiments suggest that there is indeed an association between these proteins. In addition, in planta bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) was observed in Arabidopsis seedlings, providing physical evidence for a protein interaction in live cells and in real time. Finally, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) was employed in an attempt to detect SPS–SPP interactions visually. The findings clearly demonstrated that SPS interacts with SPP and that this interaction impacts soluble carbohydrate pools and affects carbon partitioning to starch. Moreover, a fusion construct between the two genes promotes plant growth in both transgenic Arabidopsis and hybrid poplar. PMID:25873678

  3. Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels.

    PubMed

    Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Fang, Yapeng

    2016-05-18

    Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels has been studied extensively because it is expected to be useful in understanding flavour release from solid foods and to find a new processing method which produces more palatable and healthier foods. We provide an overview of the release of sucrose and other sugars from gels of agar and related polysaccharides. The addition of sucrose to agar solutions leads to the increase in transparency of the resulting gels and the decrease in syneresis, which is attributed to the decrease in mesh size in gels. The syneresis occurring in the quiescent condition and fluid release induced by compression is discussed. The relationship between the sugar release and the structural, rheological and thermal properties of gels is also discussed. Finally, the future research direction is proposed. PMID:26952168

  4. Could yeast infections impair recovery from mental illness? A case study using micronutrients and olive leaf extract for the treatment of ADHD and depression.

    PubMed

    Rucklidge, Julia J

    2013-01-01

    Micronutrients are increasingly used to treat psychiatric disorders including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), mood disorders, stress, and anxiety. However, a number of factors influence optimal response and absorption of nutrients, including the health of the gut, particularly the presence of yeast infections, such as Candida. As part of a wider investigation into the impact of micronutrients on psychiatric symptoms, many participants who experienced a yeast infection during their treatment showed a diminished response to the micronutrients. One case was followed systematically over a period of 3 y with documentation of deterioration in psychiatric symptoms (ADHD and mood) when infected with Candida and then symptom improvement following successful treatment of the infection with olive leaf extract (OLE) and probiotics. This case outlines that micronutrient treatment might be severely compromised by infections such as Candida and may highlight the importance of gut health when treating psychiatric disorders with nutrients. Given the role that inflammation can play in absorption of nutrients, it was hypothesized that the infection was impairing absorption of the micronutrients. PMID:23784606

  5. Sucrose partitioning between vascular bundles and storage parenchyma in the sugarcane stem: a potential role for the ShSUT1 sucrose transporter.

    PubMed

    Rae, Anne L; Perroux, Jai M; Grof, Christopher P L

    2005-04-01

    A transporter with homology to the SUT/SUC family of plant sucrose transporters was isolated from a sugarcane (Saccharum hybrid) stem cDNA library. The gene, designated ShSUT1, encodes a protein of 517 amino acids, including 12 predicted membrane-spanning domains and a large central cytoplasmic loop. ShSUT1 was demonstrated to be a functional sucrose transporter by expression in yeast. The estimated K(m) for sucrose of the ShSUT1 transporter was 2 mM at pH 5.5. ShSUT1 was expressed predominantly in mature leaves of sugarcane that were exporting sucrose and in stem internodes that were actively accumulating sucrose. Immunolocalization with a ShSUT1-specific antiserum identified the protein in cells at the periphery of the vascular bundles in the stem. These cells became lignified and suberized as stem development proceeded, forming a barrier to apoplasmic solute movement. However, the movement of the tracer dye, carboxyfluorescein from phloem to storage parenchyma cells suggested that symplasmic connections are present. ShSUT1 may have a role in partitioning of sucrose between the vascular tissue and sites of storage in the parenchyma cells of sugarcane stem internodes. PMID:15517352

  6. Featured Molecules: Sucrose and Vanillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-04-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for April relate to the sense of taste. Apple Fool, the JCE Classroom Activity, mentions sucrose and vanillin and their use as flavorings. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  7. Oligosaccharides from Sucrose via Glycansucrases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycansucrases are a class of microbial enzymes that polymerize either the fructosyl or the glucosyl moiety of sucrose to give beta-D-fructans or alpha-D-glucans. They are also capable of transferring fructosyl or glucosyl units to acceptor molecules to yield oligosaccharides. Although the glycosy...

  8. A yeast bioassay for direct measurement of thyroid hormone disrupting effects in water without sample extraction, concentration, or sterilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Ren, Shujuan; Han, Shaolun; Li, Na

    2014-04-01

    The present study introduces an improved yeast bioassay for rapid yet sensitive evaluation of thyroid hormone disruption at the level of thyroid receptor (TR) in environmental water samples. This assay does not require water sample preparation and thus requires very little hands-on time. Based on different β-galactosidase substrates, two modified bioassays, a colorimetric bioassay and a chemiluminescent bioassay, were developed. The compounds tested included the known thyroid hormone 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3), the specific TR antagonist amiodarone hydrochloride (AH) and phthalate esters (PAEs), which potentially disrupt thyroid hormone signaling. The EC50 values for T3 were similar to those previously obtained using a 96-well plate bioassay. TR antagonism by AH was studied in the presence of 2.5 × 10(-7)M T3, and the concentration producing 20% of the maximum effect (RIC20) for AH was 3.1 × 10(-7)M and 7.8 × 10(-9)M for the colorimetric bioassay and chemiluminescent bioassay, respectively. None of the tested PAEs induced β-galactosidase expression, but diethylhexyl phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate and dibutyl phthalate demonstrated TR antagonism. Furthermore, water samples collected from Guanting reservoir in Beijing were evaluated. Although TR agonism was not observed, antagonism was detected in all water samples and is expressed as AH equivalents. The toxicology equivalent quantity values obtained by the chemiluminescent bioassay ranged from 21.2 ± 1.6 to 313.9 ± 28.8 μg L(-1) AH, and similar values were obtained for the colorimetric bioassay. The present study shows that the modified yeast bioassay can be used as a valuable tool for quantification of thyroid hormone disrupting effects in environmental water samples. PMID:24355165

  9. Effects of Sugar (Sucrose) on Children's Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Lee A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined effects of sugar on behavior of 45 preschool and elementary school children. Provided all children with basic breakfast that included drink containing either 50 g of sucrose, a comparably sweet placebo, or very little sucrose. Found some small behavior changes in high-sucrose group. All effects were small in magnitude and not considered…

  10. Influence of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria and enzymatic yeast extracts on the microbiological, biochemical and sensorial properties of Lben generic products.

    PubMed

    Mangia, Nicoletta P; Garau, Giovanni; Murgia, Marco A; Bennani, Abdelmajid; Deiana, Pietrino

    2014-05-01

    In this study we identified Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lc. lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis, Kluyveromices lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the dominant microorganisms of traditional Moroccan acid-alcoholic fermented milk named Lben. The low pH (3·8±0·3), lactose (16·8±3·4 mg/l) and lactic acid (8·16±0·6 mg/l) content indicated that a strong fermentation occurred in the traditional product which was also characterised by the substantial presence of ethanol and typical volatile carbonyl compounds (i.e., acetoin, diacetyl and acetaldehyde). Microbiological analyses of experimental Lben manufactured with selected strains (isolated from the traditional product) of Lc. lactis subsp. lactis and Lc. lactis subsp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis alone (batch A) and in combination with enzymatic extract of a K. lactis strain (batch B) indicated a good effectiveness of the starters employed (∼1010 CFU/g of lactococci after 8 h of incubation) and a significant effect of the yeast enzyme extract on lactococci viability. Despite slight changes in the physicochemical characteristics of the two Lben during the 15 d storage period, volatile compounds (i.e. ethanol, acetaldehyde, diacetyl and acetoin) were consistently higher in batch B. Moreover, sensorial analysis performed after 15 d of storage, highlighted higher odour and flavour intensity, vegetable odour and viscosity in batch B while batch A displayed higher astringency. PMID:24642233

  11. Cloning of Sucrose:Sucrose 1-Fructosyltransferase from Onion and Synthesis of Structurally Defined Fructan Molecules from Sucrose1

    PubMed Central

    Vijn, Irma; van Dijken, Anja; Lscher, Marcel; Bos, Antoine; Smeets, Edward; Weisbeek, Peter; Wiemken, Andres; Smeekens, Sjef

    1998-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc):Suc 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST) is the key enzyme in plant fructan biosynthesis, since it catalyzes de novo fructan synthesis from Suc. We have cloned 1-SST from onion (Allium cepa) by screening a cDNA library using acid invertase from tulip (Tulipa gesneriana) as a probe. Expression assays in tobacco (Nicotiana plumbaginifolia) protoplasts showed the formation of 1-kestose from Suc. In addition, an onion acid invertase clone was isolated from the same cDNA library. Protein extracts of tobacco protoplasts transformed with this clone showed extensive Suc-hydrolyzing activity. Conditions that induced fructan accumulation in onion leaves also induced 1-SST mRNA accumulation, whereas the acid invertase mRNA level decreased. Structurally different fructan molecules could be produced from Suc by a combined incubation of protein extract of protoplasts transformed with 1-SST and protein extract of protoplasts transformed with either the onion fructan:fructan 6G-fructosyltransferase or the barley Suc:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase. PMID:9701606

  12. Sucrose-metabolizing enzymes in transport tissues and adjacent sink structures in developing citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Lowell, C A; Tomlinson, P T; Koch, K E

    1989-08-01

    Juice tissues of citrus lack phloem; therefore, photosynthates enroute to juice sacs exit the vascular system on the surface of each segment. Areas of extensive phloem unloading and transport (vascular bundles + segment epidermis) can thus be separated from those of assimilate storage (juice sacs) and adjacent tissues where both processes occur (peel). Sugar composition, dry weight accumulation, and activities of four sucrose-metabolizing enzymes (soluble and cell-wall-bound acid invertase, alkaline invertase, sucrose synthase, and sucrose phosphate synthase) were measured in these transport and sink tissues of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) to determine more clearly whether a given enzyme appeared to be more directly associated with assimilate transport versus deposition or utilization. Results were compared at three developmental stages. Activity of sucrose (per gram fresh weight and per milligram protein) extracted from zones of extensive phloem unloading and transport was significantly greater than from adjacent sink tissues during the stages (II and III) when juice sacs grow most rapidly. In stage II fruit, activity of sucrose synthase also significantly surpassed that of all other sucrose-metabolizing enzymes in extracts from the transport tissues (vascular bundles + segment epidermis). In contrast, sucrose phosphate synthase and alkaline invertase at this stage of growth were the most active enzymes from adjacent, rapidly growing, phloem-free sink tissues (juice sacs). Activity of these two enzymes in extracts from juice sacs was significantly greater than that form the transport tissues (vascular bundles + segment epidermis). Soluble acid invertase was the most active enzyme in extracts from all tissues of very young fruit (stage I), including nonvascular regions, but nearly disappeared prior to the onset of juice sac sugar accumulation. The physiological function of high sucrose synthase activity in the transport tissues during rapid sucrose import remains to be determined. PMID:16666942

  13. Magnetostructural study of iron sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Lucía; del Puerto Morales, María; José Lázaro, Francisco

    2005-05-01

    Magnetic and structural analyses have been performed on an iron sucrose complex used as a haematinic agent. The system contains two-line ferrihydrite particles of about 5 nm that are superparamagnetic above approximately 50 K. The observed low-temperature magnetic dynamics of this compound is closer to simple models than in the case of other iron-containing drugs for intravenous use like iron dextran.

  14. Sucrose as a sweetener for activated charcoal.

    PubMed

    Cooney, D O; Roach, M

    1979-06-01

    The efficacy of sucrose as a flavor for activated charcoal was studied. In vitro adsorption of sucrose (in Simulated Gastric Fluid, USP, without pepsin) to activated charcoal, and of a 1-g/liter sodium salicylate solution to a 1:1 mixture of sucrose and activated charcoal and to plain activated charcoal, was measured spectrophotometrically. In vitro adsorption of sucroses to activated charcoal was minimal. Sucrose reduced in vitro adsorption of sodium salicylate to activated charcoal by only small amounts. For example, at a ratio of 4 g activated charcoal to 1 g sodium salicylate, sucrose reduced salicylate adsorption to activated charcoal from 99% to 95%. A 1:1 sucrose-activated charcoal preparation provides sufficient flavor without substantial loss of adsorbance. PMID:463898

  15. Fit-for-purpose quenching and extraction protocols for metabolic profiling of yeast using chromatography-mass spectrometry platforms.

    PubMed

    Winder, Catherine L; Dunn, Warwick B

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomics involves the investigation of the intracellular (endometabolome) and extracellular (exometabolome) pools of metabolites in biological systems. Methods to sample the exometabolome and to quench metabolism and extract intracellular metabolites for the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae are presented here. These methods have been developed and validated to provide a fit-for-purpose protocol for global analyses of the S. cerevisiae metabolome. The protocol allows the extraction of a wide variety of metabolite classes and provides reproducible results to allow relative and semi-quantitative comparisons between samples of different origin. For exometabolome studies, fast sampling and separation of cells by syringe filtration is recommended. For endometabolome studies, fast quenching of intracellular metabolism is performed using a 60:40 (v/v) methanol:aqueous ammonium hydrogen carbonate solution at -48 °C. Extraction of intracellular metabolites is performed using multiple freeze/thaw cycles in a 60:40 (v/v) methanol:water solution at temperatures lower than 0 °C. PMID:21863491

  16. Sucrose transport into stalk tissue of sugarcane

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, M.; Maretzki, A. )

    1990-05-01

    The productivity of higher plants is, in part, dependent on transport of photosynthate from source to sink (in sugarcane, stalk) and upon its assimilation in cells of the sink tissue. In sugarcane, sucrose has been reported to undergo hydrolysis in the apoplast before uptake into the storage parenchyma, whereas recently, sucrose was reported to be taken up intact. This work was based on lack of randomization of ({sup 14}C)fructosyl sucrose accumulated after feeding tissue slices with this sugar. In this report, we present evidence from slices of stalk tissue that sucrose is taken up intact via a carrier-mediated, energy-dependent process. The evidence includes: (1) uptake of fluorosucrose, an analog of sucrose not subject to hydrolysis by invertase; (2) little or no randomization of ({sup 14}C) fructosyl sucrose taken up; (3) the presence of a saturable as well as a linear component of sucrose uptake; and (4) inhibition of both the saturable and linear components of sucrose uptake by protonophore and sulhydryl agents. Hexoses can also be taken up, and at a greater efficiency than sucrose. It is probable that both hexose and sucrose can be transported across the plasma membrane, depending on the physiological status of the plant.

  17. A suite of sucrose transporters expressed in coats of developing legume seeds includes novel pH-independent facilitators.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuchan; Qu, Hongxia; Dibley, Katherine E; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W

    2007-02-01

    A suite of newly discovered sucrose transporter genes, PsSUF1, PsSUF4, PvSUT1 and PvSUF1, were isolated from the coats of developing pea (Pisum sativum L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds. Sequence analysis indicated that deduced proteins encoded by PsSUF1, PvSUT1 and PvSUF1 clustered in a separate sub-group under sucrose transporter Clade I, whereas the deduced protein encoded by PsSUF4 clustered in Clade II. When expressed in yeast, these genes were shown to encode sucrose transporters with apparent Michaelis Menten constant (Km) values ranging from 8.9 to 99.8 mm. PvSUT1 exhibited functional characteristics of a sucrose/H+ symporter. In contrast, PsSUF1, PvSUF1 and PsSUF4 supported the pH- and energy independent transport of sucrose that was shown to be bi-directional. These transport properties, together with that of counter transport, indicated that PsSUF1, PvSUF1 and PsSUF4 function as carriers that support the facilitated diffusion of sucrose. Carrier function was unaffected by diethylpyrocarbonate and by maltose competition, suggesting that the sucrose binding sites of these transporters differed from those of known sucrose/H+ symporters. All sucrose transporters were expressed throughout the plant and, of greatest interest, were co-expressed in cells considered responsible for sucrose efflux from seed coats. The possible roles played by the novel facilitators in sucrose efflux from seed coats are discussed. PMID:17253986

  18. Isotopologue analysis of sugar phosphates in yeast cell extracts by gas chromatography chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chu, Dinh Binh; Troyer, Christina; Mairinger, Teresa; Ortmayr, Karin; Neubauer, Stefan; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic flux analysis is based on the measurement of isotopologue ratios. In this work, a new GC-MS-based method was introduced enabling accurate determination of isotopologue distributions of sugar phosphates in cell extracts. A GC-TOFMS procedure was developed involving a two-step online derivatization (ethoximation followed by trimethylsilylation) offering high mass resolution, high mass accuracy and the potential of retrospective data analysis typical for TOFMS. The information loss due to fragmentation intrinsic for isotopologue analysis by electron ionization could be overcome by chemical ionization with methane. A thorough optimization regarding pressure of the reaction gas, emission current, electron energy and temperature of the ion source was carried out. For a substantial panel of sugar phosphates both of the glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway, sensitive determination of the protonated intact molecular ions together with low abundance fragment ions was successfully achieved. The developed method was evaluated for analysis of Pichia pastoris cell extracts. The measured isotopologue ratios were in the range of 55:1-2:1. The comparison of the experimental isotopologue fractions with the theoretical fractions was excellent, revealing a maximum bias of 4.6% and an average bias of 1.4%. PMID:25673246

  19. Comparing the sugar profiles and primary structures of alkali-extracted water-soluble polysaccharides in cell wall between the yeast and mycelial phases from Tremella fuciformis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hanyu; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Juan; Zheng, Liesheng; Chen, Liguo; Ma, Aimin

    2016-05-01

    To gain insights into dimorphism, cell wall polysaccharides from Tremella fuciformis strains were obtained from alkali-extracted water-soluble fractions PTF-M38 (from the mycelial form), PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 (from the yeast form) of T. fuciformis strains were used to gain some insights into dimorphism study. Their chemical properties and structural features were investigated using gel permeation chromatography, gas chromatography, UV and IR spectrophotometry and Congo red binding reactions. The results indicated that the backbones of PTF-M38, PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 were configured with α-linkages with average molecular weights of 1.24, 1.08, and 1.19 kDa, respectively. PTF-M38 was mainly composed of xylose, mannose, glucose, and galactose in a ratio of 1:1.47:0.48:0.34, while PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 were mainly composed of xylose, mannose and glucose in a ratio of 1:1.65:4.06 and 1:1.21:0.44, respectively. The sugar profiles of PTF-M38, PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 were also established for further comparison. These profiles showed that all three polysaccharides contained the same sugars but in different ratios, and the carbon sources (xylose, mannose, glucose, and galactose) affected the sugar ratios within the polysaccharides. PMID:27095457

  20. An economic approach to efficient isotope labeling in insect cells using homemade 15N-, 13C- and 2H-labeled yeast extracts.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Christian; Isogai, Shin; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Heterologous expression of proteins in insect cells is frequently used for crystallographic structural studies due to the high yields even for challenging proteins requiring the eukaryotic protein processing capabilities of the host. However for NMR studies, the need for isotope labeling poses extreme challenges in eukaryotic hosts. Here, we describe a robust method to achieve uniform protein (15)N and (13)C labeling of up to 90 % in baculovirus-infected insect cells. The approach is based on the production of labeled yeast extract, which is subsequently supplemented to insect cell growth media. The method also allows deuteration at levels of >60 % without decrease in expression yield. The economic implementation of the labeling procedures into a standard structural biology laboratory environment is described in a step-by-step protocol. Applications are demonstrated for a variety of NMR experiments using the Abelson kinase domain, GFP, and the beta-1 adrenergic receptor as examples. Deuterated expression of the latter provides spectra of very high quality of a eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptor. PMID:26070442

  1. Mild alkali-pretreatment effectively extracts guaiacyl-rich lignin for high lignocellulose digestibility coupled with largely diminishing yeast fermentation inhibitors in Miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Si, Shengli; Hao, Bo; Zha, Yi; Wan, Can; Hong, Shufen; Kang, Yongbo; Jia, Jun; Zhang, Jing; Li, Meng; Zhao, Chunqiao; Tu, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Shiguang; Peng, Liangcai

    2014-10-01

    In this study, various alkali-pretreated lignocellulose enzymatic hydrolyses were evaluated by using three standard pairs of Miscanthus accessions that showed three distinct monolignol (G, S, H) compositions. Mfl26 samples with elevated G-levels exhibited significantly increased hexose yields of up to 1.61-fold compared to paired samples derived from enzymatic hydrolysis, whereas Msa29 samples with high H-levels displayed increased hexose yields of only up to 1.32-fold. In contrast, Mfl30 samples with elevated S-levels showed reduced hexose yields compared to the paired sample of 0.89-0.98 folds at p<0.01. Notably, only the G-rich biomass samples exhibited complete enzymatic hydrolysis under 4% NaOH pretreatment. Furthermore, the G-rich samples showed more effective extraction of lignin-hemicellulose complexes than the S- and H-rich samples upon NaOH pretreatment, resulting in large removal of lignin inhibitors to yeast fermentation. Therefore, this study proposes an optimal approach for minor genetic lignin modification towards cost-effective biomass process in Miscanthus. PMID:25079210

  2. p33-Independent Activation of a Truncated p92 RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase of Tomato Bushy Stunt Virus in Yeast Cell-Free Extract

    PubMed Central

    Pogany, Judit

    2012-01-01

    Plus-stranded RNA viruses replicate in membrane-bound structures containing the viral replicase complex (VRC). A key component of the VRC is the virally encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), which should be activated and incorporated into the VRC after its translation. To study the activation of the RdRp of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), a small tombusvirus of plants, we used N-terminal truncated recombinant RdRp, which supported RNA synthesis in a cell-free yeast extract-based assay. The truncated RdRp required a cis-acting RNA replication element and soluble host factors, while unlike the full-length TBSV RdRp, the truncated RdRp did not need the viral p33 replication cofactor or cellular membranes for RNA synthesis. Interestingly, the truncated RdRp used 3?-terminal extension for initiation and terminated prematurely at an internal cis-acting element. However, the truncated RdRp could perform de novo initiation on a TBSV plus-strand RNA template in the presence of the p33 replication cofactor, cellular membranes, and soluble host proteins. Altogether, the data obtained with the truncated RdRp indicate that this RdRp still requires activation, but with the participation of fewer components than with the full-length RdRp, making it suitable for future studies on dissection of the RdRp activation mechanism. PMID:22933278

  3. Comparison of the sequestering properties of yeast cell wall extract and hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate in three in vitro models accounting for the animal physiological bioavailability of zearalenone.

    PubMed

    Yiannikouris, A; Kettunen, H; Apajalahti, J; Pennala, E; Moran, C A

    2013-01-01

    The sequestration/inactivation of the oestrogenic mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA) by two adsorbents--yeast cell wall extract (YCW) and hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS)--was studied in three laboratory models: (1) an in vitro model was adapted from referenced methods to test for the sequestrant sorption capabilities under buffer conditions at two pH values using liquid chromatography coupled to a fluorescence detector for toxin quantification; (2) a second in vitro model was used to evaluate the sequestrant sorption stability according to pH variations and using ³H-labelled ZEA at low toxin concentration; and (3) an original, ex vivo Ussing chamber model was developed to further understand the transfer of ZEA through intestinal tissue and the impact of each sequestrant on the mycotoxin bioavailability of ³H-labelled ZEA. YCW was a more efficient ZEA adsorbent than HSCAS in all three models, except under very acidic conditions (pH 2.5 or 3.0). The Ussing chamber model offered a novel, ex vivo, alternative method for understanding the effect of sequestrant on the bioavailability of ZEA. The results showed that compared with HSCAS, YCW was more efficient in sequestering ZEA and that it reduced the accumulation of ZEA in the intestinal tissue by 40% (p < 0.001). PMID:23844575

  4. Comparison of a novel MPN method against the yeast extract agar (YEA) pour plate method for the enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sartory, David P; Gu, Haoyi; Chen, Chun-Ming

    2008-07-01

    This study compared the Quanti-Disc most probable number (MPN) test for heterotrophic bacteria from drinking water with the widely used yeast extract agar (YEA) pour plate method. The Quanti-Disc test module contains 50 reaction wells in which a medium has been pre-deposited. The medium contains a suite of three fluorogenic enzyme substrates selected for the detection of enzymes expressed widely by heterotrophic bacteria. The MPN of heterotrophic bacteria is calculated from the number of fluorescing reaction wells after incubation of a sample. Quanti-Disc and the YEA pour plate method were compared according to guidance on comparing methods given in United Kingdom national guidance and ISO 17994:2004. The two methods were also challenged with reference strains and isolates of heterotrophic bacteria from drinking water. This indicated that heterotrophic bacteria commonly encountered in drinking water are detected by both the YEA pour plate method and Quanti-Disc. Analysis of data from split water samples (723 for 37 degrees C tests and 872 for 22 degrees C tests) from nine geographically diverse laboratories in England and Wales demonstrated that the Quanti-Disc method is equivalent to the YEA pour plate method for the analysis of heterotrophic bacteria from drinking and similar waters at 37 degrees C, and superior to YEA for the analysis at 22 degrees C. The Quanti-Disc method is a simple and efficient alternative method for the enumeration of heterotrophic bacteria from drinking water. PMID:18534656

  5. Long-Term n-Caproic Acid Production from Yeast-Fermentation Beer in an Anaerobic Bioreactor with Continuous Product Extraction.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shijian; Usack, Joseph G; Spirito, Catherine M; Angenent, Largus T

    2015-07-01

    Multifunctional reactor microbiomes can elongate short-chain carboxylic acids (SCCAs) to medium-chain carboxylic acids (MCCAs), such as n-caproic acid. However, it is unclear whether this microbiome biotechnology platform is stable enough during long operating periods to consistently produce MCCAs. During a period of 550 days, we improved the operating conditions of an anaerobic bioreactor for the conversion of complex yeast-fermentation beer from the corn kernel-to-ethanol industry into primarily n-caproic acid. We incorporated and improved in-line, membrane liquid-liquid extraction to prevent inhibition due to undissociated MCCAs at a pH of 5.5 and circumvented the addition of methanogenic inhibitors. The microbiome accomplished several functions, including hydrolysis and acidogenesis of complex organic compounds and sugars into SCCAs, subsequent chain elongation with undistilled ethanol in beer, and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. The methane yield was 2.40 ± 0.52% based on COD and was limited by the availability of carbon dioxide. We achieved an average n-caproate production rate of 3.38 ± 0.42 g L(-1) d(-1) (7.52 ± 0.94 g COD L(-1) d(-1)) with an n-caproate yield of 70.3 ± 8.81% and an n-caproate/ethanol ratio of 1.19 ± 0.15 based on COD for a period of ∼55 days. The maximum production rate was achieved by increasing the organic loading rates in tandem with elevating the capacity of the extraction system and a change in the complex feedstock batch. PMID:25941741

  6. Fecal microbial communities of healthy adult dogs fed raw meat-based diets with or without inulin or yeast cell wall extracts as assessed by 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Beloshapka, Alison N; Dowd, Scot E; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M; Duclos, Laura; Swanson, Kelly S

    2013-06-01

    Our objective was to determine the effects of feeding raw meat-based diets with or without inulin or yeast cell wall extract (YCW) on fecal microbial communities of dogs using 454 pyrosequencing. Six healthy female adult beagles (5.5 ± 0.5 years; 8.5 ± 0.5 kg) were randomly assigned to six test diets using a Latin square design: (1) beef control; (2) beef + 1.4% inulin; (3) beef + 1.4% YCW; (4) chicken control; (5) chicken + 1.4% inulin; and (6) chicken + 1.4% YCW. Following 14 days of adaptation, fresh fecal samples were collected on day 15 or day 16 of each period. Fecal genomic DNA was extracted and used to create 16S rRNA gene amplicons, which were subjected to 454 pyrosequencing and qPCR. Predominant fecal bacterial phyla included Fusobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. Beef-based diets increased (P < 0.05) Escherichia, but decreased (P < 0.05) Anaerobiospirillum vs. chicken-based diets. Inulin decreased (P < 0.05) Enterobacteriaceae. Inulin increased (P < 0.05) Megamonas vs. control. Inulin also decreased (P < 0.05) Escherichia vs. YCW. qPCR data showed that YCW increased (P < 0.05) Bifidobacterium vs. inulin and control and inulin increased (P < 0.05) Lactobacillus vs. YCW. Although a few changes in fecal microbiota were observed with inulin or YCW consumption, a strong prebiotic effect was not observed. PMID:23360519

  7. Incubation of sucrose craving: effects of reduced training and sucrose pre-loading

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Jeffrey W.; Fyall, Amber M.; Osincup, Dan P.

    2010-01-01

    Time-dependent increases in cue-induced reward seeking after forced abstinence were described in rats with a history of cocaine or sucrose self-administration, suggesting reward craving incubates over time. In the present study, we examined the effects of reduced training experience, or sucrose pre-loading just prior to testing, on the incubation of sucrose craving. Sucrose seeking (responding in extinction and then for a sucrose-paired cue) increased over time in groups of rats that self-administered sucrose 6 h/day for 10 days and were tested at 1, 7, or 30 days of forced abstinence. We found that groups of rats that had self-administered 2 instead of 6 h/day showed a similar profile of responding. Incubation of sucrose craving was attenuated by free access to sucrose in home cages for 17 h immediately prior to testing assessed as extinction responding on days 1 and 30. However, this sucrose pre-loading had no effect on the time-dependent increase in responding for the sucrose-paired cue. In summary, reducing the training experience had no effect on the incubation of sucrose craving and free access to sucrose had only a limited effect–attenuating extinction responding. These results illustrate the strength of the incubation of craving and further suggest long-term changes in brain motivational circuitry following sucrose self-administration. PMID:15642609

  8. Sucrose synthesis in gamma irradiated sweet potato

    SciTech Connect

    Ailouni, S.; Hamdy, M.K.; Toledo, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of ..cap alpha..-irradiation carbohydrate metabolism was examined to elucidate mechanism of sucrose accumulation in sweet potato (SP). Enzymes examined were: ..beta..-amylase, phosphorylase, phosphoglucomutase, phosphoglucose isomerase, sucrose phosphate synthetase and sucrose synthetase. Irradiated SP (Red Jewell) sucrose was synthesized to yield 10.7% after 4 d PI. Activities of sugar synthesizing enzymes in irradiated SP were enhanced to different degrees using 100-200 Krad and 3 d PI at 24/sup 0/C. Phosphorylase and phosphoglucomutases specific activities reached 2.4 and 1.8 folds, respectively compared to control SP. ..beta..-amylase, phosphoglucose isomerase, sucrose synthetase and sucrose phosphate synthetase were also affected to yield 1.2, 1.3, 1.3 and 1.2 folds, respectively compared to controls. It is believed that amylase hydrolyzed starch to glucose which is converted to fructose by phosphoglucose isomerase. Sucrose is then formed by sucrose phosphate synthetase and/or sucrose synthetase leading to its accumulation. The irradiated SP was used for alcohol fermentation leading to 500 gal. of 200 proof ethanol/acre (from 500-600 bushels tuber/acre).

  9. Beta-glucan-depleted, glycopeptide-rich extracts from Brewer's and Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) lower interferon-gamma production by stimulated human blood cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, Roderick; Dias, Daniel A; Jayasinghe, Nirupama; Roessner, Ute; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-04-15

    Regulation of the human immune system requires controlled pro- and anti-inflammatory responses for host defence against infection and disease states. Yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), as used in brewing and baking, are mostly known for ability to stimulate the human immune-system predominantly reflecting the pro-inflammatory cell wall β-glucans. However, in this study, using food-compatible processing methods, glycopeptide-enriched and β-glucan-depleted products were each prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeasts, which suppressed production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in human whole blood cell assay, signifying that anti-inflammatory factors are also present in yeast. Anti-inflammatory bioactivities of products prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeast were compared with the commercial yeast product, Epicor®. While unfractionated Epicor was inactive, the C18 resin-binding fractions of Brewer's and Baker's yeast products and Epicor dose-dependently lowered IFN-γ, demonstrating that Epicor also contained both pro-inflammatory (β-glucans) and anti-inflammatory components. Anti-inflammatory activity was attributed to C18 resin-binding species glyco-peptides in Epicor and experimental yeast products. This study demonstrated that pro- and anti-inflammatory factors could be resolved and enriched in yeasts by suitable processing, with potential to improve specific activities. PMID:26617014

  10. A new beta-glucosidase producing yeast for lower-cost cellulosic ethanol production from xylose-extracted corncob residues by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional cellulose-to-ethanol conversion by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF)requires enzymatic saccharification using both cellulase and ß-glucosidase allowing cellulose utilization by common ethanologenic yeast. Here we report a new yeast strain of Clavispora NRRL Y-50464 th...

  11. A systematic review of xuezhikang, an extract from red yeast rice, for coronary heart disease complicated by dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Shang, Qinghua; Liu, Zhaolan; Chen, Keji; Xu, Hao; Liu, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This systematic review aims to evaluate the benefit and side effect of Xuezhikang for coronary heart disease (CHD) complicated by dyslipidemia. Methods. All randomized clinical trials (RCTs) with Xuezhikang as a treatment for CHD combined with dyslipidemia were considered for inclusion. Data extraction and analyses and quality assessment were conducted according to the Cochrane standards. Results. We included 22 randomized trials. Xuezhikang showed significant benefit on the incidence of all-cause deaths, CHD deaths, myocardial infarction, and revascularization as compared with placebo based on conventional treatment for CHD. It remarkably lowered total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) as compared with the placebo or inositol nicotinate group, which was similar to statins group. Xuezhikang also raised high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) compared to placebo or no intervention, which was similar to Inositol nicotinate and slightly inferior to statins. The incidence of adverse events did not differ between the Xuezhikang and control group. Conclusions. Xuezhikang showed a comprehensive lipid-regulating effect and was safe and effective in reducing cardiovascular events in CHD patients complicated by dyslipidemia. However, more rigorous trials with high quality are needed to give high level of evidence. PMID:22567033

  12. Effect of carbohydrate substrate on fermentation by kefir yeast supported on delignified cellulosic materials.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, I; Boskou, D; Kanellaki, M; Koutinas, A A

    2001-02-01

    The suitability of delignified cellulosic (DC) material supported kefir yeast to ferment raw materials that contain various single carbohydrates, for the production of potable alcohol and alcoholic drinks, is examined in this investigation. Results are reported of fermentations carried out with sucrose, fructose, and glucose in synthetic media. Repeated batch fermentations at various initial sugar concentrations of sucrose, fructose, and glucose were performed at 30 degrees C in the presence of the aforementioned biocatalyst. The results clearly show feasible yields in the range of 0.38-0.41 g/g, alcohol concentrations of 7.6-8.2% v/v, fermentation time of 90-115 h, and conversion of 92-96%. DC material supported kefir fermented 11-fold more rapidly than free cells and 9-fold more rapidly in comparison to kissiris supported kefir. The main volatile byproducts such as amyl alcohols (mixture of 2-methyl-1-butanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol), ethanal, and ethyl acetate were formed in all sugar fermentation products. The formation of 65-110 ppm of ethyl acetate is as high and even higher than that obtained with traditional wine yeasts. The increase of the initial concentration of sugar in the fermentation media resulted in an increase in contents of volatiles. The fine aroma that was obtained in the product of fructose could be attributed to the high percentage of ethyl acetate on total volatiles. The efficiency of DC material supported kefir was the same for the fermentations of individual sugars or a mixture of fructose, sucrose, and glucose. When whey with raisin extracts was fermented, lower yields were obtained but the aroma of the product was even better. PMID:11262008

  13. Cloning and Functional Analysis of Sucrose:Sucrose 1-Fructosyltransferase from Tall Fescue1

    PubMed Central

    Lscher, Marcel; Hochstrasser, Urs; Vogel, Guido; Aeschbacher, Roger; Galati, Virginie; Nelson, Curtis J.; Boller, Thomas; Wiemken, Andres

    2000-01-01

    Enzymes of grasses involved in fructan synthesis are of interest since they play a major role in assimilate partitioning and allocation, for instance in the leaf growth zone. Several fructosyltransferases from tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) have previously been purified (Lscher and Nelson, 1995). It is surprising that all of these enzyme preparations appeared to act both as sucrose (Suc):Suc 1-fructosyl transferases (1-SST) and as fructan:fructan 6G-fructosyl transferases. Here we report the cloning of a cDNA corresponding to the predominant protein in one of the fructosyl transferase preparations, its transient expression in tobacco protoplasts, and its functional analysis in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris. When the cDNA was transiently expressed in tobacco protoplasts, the corresponding enzyme preparations produced 1-kestose from Suc, showing that the cDNA encodes a 1-SST. When the cDNA was expressed in P. pastoris, the recombinant protein had all the properties of known 1-SSTs, namely 1-kestose production, moderate nystose production, lack of 6-kestose production, and fructan exohydrolase activity with 1-kestose as the substrate. The physical properties were similar to those of the previously purified enzyme, except for its apparent lack of fructan:fructan? 6G-fructosyl transferase activity. The expression pattern of the corresponding mRNA was studied in different zones of the growing leaves, and it was shown that transcript levels matched the 1-SST activity and fructan content. PMID:11080298

  14. Sucrose accumulation in mature sweet melon fruits. [Cucumis melo

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, A.A.; Aloni, B.

    1987-04-01

    Mesocarp tissue from sucrose-accumulating sweet melon (Cucumis melo cv. Galia) showed sucrose synthase activity (ca 1 nkat/gfw) while soluble acid invertase and sucrose phosphate synthase activities were not observed. Sucrose uptake into mesocarp discs was linear with sucrose concentration (1-500 mM) and unaffected by PCMBS and CCCP. Sucrose compartmentation into the vacuole also increased linearly with sucrose concentration as indicated by compartmental efflux kinetics. Mesocarp discs incubated in /sup 14/C-fructose + UDP-glu synthesized /sup 14/C-sucrose and efflux kinetics indicated that the /sup 14/C-sucrose was compartmentalized. These data support the hypothesis that two mechanisms are involved in sucrose accumulation in sweet melon: (1) compartmentation of intact sucrose and (2) synthesis of sucrose via sucrose synthase and subsequent compartmentation in the vacuole.

  15. Sugarcane genes associated with sucrose content

    PubMed Central

    Papini-Terzi, Flávia S; Rocha, Flávia R; Vêncio, Ricardo ZN; Felix, Juliana M; Branco, Diana S; Waclawovsky, Alessandro J; Del Bem, Luiz EV; Lembke, Carolina G; Costa, Maximiller DL; Nishiyama, Milton Y; Vicentini, Renato; Vincentz, Michel GA; Ulian, Eugênio C; Menossi, Marcelo; Souza, Glaucia M

    2009-01-01

    Background - Sucrose content is a highly desirable trait in sugarcane as the worldwide demand for cost-effective biofuels surges. Sugarcane cultivars differ in their capacity to accumulate sucrose and breeding programs routinely perform crosses to identify genotypes able to produce more sucrose. Sucrose content in the mature internodes reach around 20% of the culms dry weight. Genotypes in the populations reflect their genetic program and may display contrasting growth, development, and physiology, all of which affect carbohydrate metabolism. Few studies have profiled gene expression related to sugarcane's sugar content. The identification of signal transduction components and transcription factors that might regulate sugar accumulation is highly desirable if we are to improve this characteristic of sugarcane plants. Results - We have evaluated thirty genotypes that have different Brix (sugar) levels and identified genes differentially expressed in internodes using cDNA microarrays. These genes were compared to existing gene expression data for sugarcane plants subjected to diverse stress and hormone treatments. The comparisons revealed a strong overlap between the drought and sucrose-content datasets and a limited overlap with ABA signaling. Genes associated with sucrose content were extensively validated by qRT-PCR, which highlighted several protein kinases and transcription factors that are likely to be regulators of sucrose accumulation. The data also indicate that aquaporins, as well as lignin biosynthesis and cell wall metabolism genes, are strongly related to sucrose accumulation. Moreover, sucrose-associated genes were shown to be directly responsive to short term sucrose stimuli, confirming their role in sugar-related pathways. Conclusion - Gene expression analysis of sugarcane populations contrasting for sucrose content indicated a possible overlap with drought and cell wall metabolism processes and suggested signaling and transcriptional regulators to be used as molecular markers in breeding programs. Transgenic research is necessary to further clarify the role of the genes and define targets useful for sugarcane improvement programs based on transgenic plants. PMID:19302712

  16. Characterization, localization, and seasonal changes of the sucrose transporter FeSUT1 in the phloem of Fraxinus excelsior

    PubMed Central

    Öner-Sieben, Soner; Rappl, Christine; Sauer, Norbert; Stadler, Ruth; Lohaus, Gertrud

    2015-01-01

    Trees are generally assumed to be symplastic phloem loaders. A typical feature for most wooden species is an open minor vein structure with symplastic connections between mesophyll cells and phloem cells, which allow sucrose to move cell-to-cell through the plasmodesmata into the phloem. Fraxinus excelsior (Oleaceae) also translocates raffinose family oligosaccharides in addition to sucrose. Sucrose concentration was recently shown to be higher in the phloem sap than in the mesophyll cells. This suggests the involvement of apoplastic steps and the activity of sucrose transporters in addition to symplastic phloem-loading processes. In this study, the sucrose transporter FeSUT1 from F. excelsior was analysed. Heterologous expression in baker’s yeast showed that FeSUT1 mediates the uptake of sucrose. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that FeSUT1 was exclusively located in phloem cells of minor veins and in the transport phloem of F. excelsior. Further characterization identified these cells as sieve elements and possibly ordinary companion cells but not as intermediary cells. The localization and expression pattern point towards functions of FeSUT1 in phloem loading of sucrose as well as in sucrose retrieval. FeSUT1 is most likely responsible for the observed sucrose gradient between mesophyll and phloem. The elevated expression level of FeSUT1 indicated an increased apoplastic carbon export activity from the leaves during spring and late autumn. It is hypothesized that the importance of apoplastic loading is high under low-sucrose conditions and that the availability of two different phloem-loading mechanisms confers advantages for temperate woody species like F. excelsior. PMID:26022258

  17. Characterization, localization, and seasonal changes of the sucrose transporter FeSUT1 in the phloem of Fraxinus excelsior.

    PubMed

    ner-Sieben, Soner; Rappl, Christine; Sauer, Norbert; Stadler, Ruth; Lohaus, Gertrud

    2015-08-01

    Trees are generally assumed to be symplastic phloem loaders. A typical feature for most wooden species is an open minor vein structure with symplastic connections between mesophyll cells and phloem cells, which allow sucrose to move cell-to-cell through the plasmodesmata into the phloem. Fraxinus excelsior (Oleaceae) also translocates raffinose family oligosaccharides in addition to sucrose. Sucrose concentration was recently shown to be higher in the phloem sap than in the mesophyll cells. This suggests the involvement of apoplastic steps and the activity of sucrose transporters in addition to symplastic phloem-loading processes. In this study, the sucrose transporter FeSUT1 from F. excelsior was analysed. Heterologous expression in baker's yeast showed that FeSUT1 mediates the uptake of sucrose. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that FeSUT1 was exclusively located in phloem cells of minor veins and in the transport phloem of F. excelsior. Further characterization identified these cells as sieve elements and possibly ordinary companion cells but not as intermediary cells. The localization and expression pattern point towards functions of FeSUT1 in phloem loading of sucrose as well as in sucrose retrieval. FeSUT1 is most likely responsible for the observed sucrose gradient between mesophyll and phloem. The elevated expression level of FeSUT1 indicated an increased apoplastic carbon export activity from the leaves during spring and late autumn. It is hypothesized that the importance of apoplastic loading is high under low-sucrose conditions and that the availability of two different phloem-loading mechanisms confers advantages for temperate woody species like F. excelsior. PMID:26022258

  18. Counting Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, Jonathan; Welton, Briana

    1998-01-01

    Describes changes to a traditional study of population in yeast colonies. Changes to the procedures include: (1) only one culture per student team; (2) cultures are inoculated only once; and (3) the same tube is sampled daily. (DDR)

  19. Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Candida is the scientific name for yeast. It is a fungus that lives almost everywhere, including in ... infection that causes white patches in your mouth Candida esophagitis is thrush that spreads to your esophagus, ...

  20. Reducing sucrose loss in sugarbeet storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose loss in sugarbeet storage is a considerable problem which is negatively influenced by environmental conditions, stress on roots from disease problems in the field, rough handling during harvest and transport, and microbial growth. To reduce sucrose loss in sugarbeet storage, studies were in...

  1. GROWING SUGARBEET TO MAXIMIZE SUCROSE YIELD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Often it is said that sugarbeet growers are actually aiming to grow sugar (sucrose). Although that is true, it is not possible to grow maximum sugar per acre without careful consideration of what conditions enable sugarbeet to produce maximum sucrose yield. This section includes information on how...

  2. SUCROSE ACCUMULATION DURING EARLY SUGAR BEET DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined sucrose accumulation in different breeding lines during the first weeks after emergence in order to identify early morphological and physiological differences correlated with final root sucrose content. Six germplasm lines (US H20, SR87, SR95, SR96, SR97, and Syngenta-Hille...

  3. 27 CFR 21.131 - Sucrose octaacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sucrose octaacetate. 21.131 Section 21.131 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.131 Sucrose octaacetate. (a)...

  4. 27 CFR 21.131 - Sucrose octaacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sucrose octaacetate. 21.131 Section 21.131 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.131 Sucrose octaacetate. (a)...

  5. Characterization of Saccharomyces strains with respect to their ability to grow and ferment in the presence of ethanol and sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez, T.; Delcastillo, L.; Aguilera, A.; Conde, J.; Cerda-Olmedo, E.

    1982-12-01

    To optimize the conversion of carbohydrates to ethanol strains of several Saccharomyces species were examined for their ability to grow and ferment in a range of sucrose and ethanol concentrations. Isolated wine yeasts grew in the presence of 10% ethanol to the same final cell density as control cultures without ethanol. The best of these yeast strains grew in the presence of 15% ethanol and fermented in 18%. Ethanol accumulated, although at a reduced rate, after the cells stopped growing. Most yeast strains were highly fermentative in 50% sucrose. Some of them effectively utilized the carbohydrates of the culture, yielding final ethanol concentrations over 14%. Sixteen of the 35 strains were chosen for genetic analysis and breeding because of their capacity to sporulate. These strains are homothallic and their spores are viable.

  6. In vitro exposure of Penicillium mycotoxins with or without a modified yeast cell wall extract (mYCW) on bovine macrophages (BoMacs).

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Young; Quinton, V Margaret; Boermans, Herman J; Swamy, H V L N; Karrow, Niel A

    2015-11-01

    Penicillium mycotoxins (PMs) are contaminants that are frequently found in grain or crop-based silage for animal feed. Previously, we have characterized the potential immunotoxicity of the following PMs: citrinin (CIT), ochratoxin A (OTA), patulin (PAT), mycophenolic acid (MPA), and penicillic acid (PA) by using a bovine macrophage cell line (BoMacs). In the present study, cell proliferation was used as a bioassay endpoint to evaluate the efficacy of a modified yeast cell wall extract (mYCW), for preventing PM toxicity under various in vitro conditions such as the following: pH (3, 5, 7), incubation time (1, 2, 4, 6 h), percentage of mYCW (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0 %), and PM concentration. mYCW was most effective in preventing the toxicity of 12.88 and 25.8 μM OTA at pH 3.0 (p < 0.0001), regardless of incubation time (p < 0.0001) and the percentage of mYCW (p < 0.0001). An incubation time of 6 h (p < 0.05) or 0.5 and 1.0 % mYCW (p < 0.0001) significantly improved the efficacy of mYCW for preventing CIT toxicity. In contrast, 0.5 and 1.0 % of mYCW appeared to exacerbate the PAT toxicity (p < 0. 0001). This effect on PAT toxicity was constantly observed with higher PAT concentrations, and it reached significance at a concentration of 0.70 μM (p < 0.0001). mYCW had no effect on PA toxicity. These results suggest that mYCW may reduce OTA toxicity and, to some extent, CIT toxicity at pH 3.0. Although PAT toxicity was increased by mYCW treatment, PAT is readily degraded during heat treatment and may therefore be dealt with using other preventative measures. PMID:26358170

  7. Sucrose-mediated transcriptional regulation of sucrose symporter activity in the phloem.

    SciTech Connect

    Matt Vaughn Greg Harrington Daniel R Bush

    2002-08-06

    This project was based on our discovery that sucrose acts as a signaling molecule that regulates the activity of a proton-sucrose symporter in sugar beet leaf tissue. A major objective here was determining how sucrose transporter activity is being regulated. When sucrose accumulates in the phloem sucrose transport activity drops dramatically. Western blots of plasma membrane proteins isolated from sucrose treated leaves showed that the loss of sucrose transport activity was proportional to a decline in symporter abundance, demonstrating that sucrose transport is regulated by changes in the amount of BvSUT1 protein. BvSUT1 transcript levels decreased in parallel with the loss of sucrose transport activity. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that BvSUT1 gene transcription was repressed significantly in nuclei from leaves fed 100 mM exogenous sucrose, showing that sucrose-dependent modulation of BvSUT1 mRNA levels is mediated by changes in transcription. To identify which secondary messenger systems might be involved in regulating symporter activity, we used a variety of pharmacological agents to probe for a role of calcium or protein phosphorylation in sucrose signaling. In a detailed analysis, only okadaic acid altered sucrose transport activity. These results suggest a protein phosphatase is involved. We hypothesized that protein kinase inhibitors would have a neutral affect or increase symporter transcription. Transpirational feeding of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine had no impact on sucrose transport while calphostin C, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, caused a 60% increase. These data provided good evidence that protein phosphorylation plays a central role in regulating sucrose symporter expression and sucrose transport activity. To determine whether protein phosphorylation is involved in sucrose regulation of proton-sucrose symporter activity, we pre-fed leaves with staurosporine for 4 h and then fed the treated leaves water or 100 mM sucrose for an additional 20 h. Sucrose transport activity was higher than the water control in both staurosporine/water- and staurosporine/sucrose-fed leaves. In contrast, sucrose transport activity was only 40% of the water control in sucrose-fed leaves. Taken together, these results showed that a phosphorylation-dependent signal transduction pathway is involved in sucrose-mediated regulation of BvSUT1 gene expression, sucrose transport activity, and ultimately phloem loading. Publications originating from this work: Vaughn MW, GN. Harrington, and DR Bush 2002. Sucrose-mediated transcriptional regulation of sucrose symporter activity in the phloem. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:10876-10880 Ransom-Hodgkins W, MW Vaughn, and DR Bush 2003. Protein phosphorylation mediates a key step in sucrose-regulation of the expression and transport activity of a beet proton-sucrose symporter. Planta 217:483-489 Harrington GN and Bush DR 2003. The bifunctional role of hexokinase in metabolism and glucose signaling. Plant Cell 15: 2493-2496

  8. Diverse Exopolysaccharide Producing Bacteria Isolated from Milled Sugarcane: Implications for Cane Spoilage and Sucrose Yield

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Rolene; Mulako, Inonge; Slabbert, Etienne; Kossmann, Jens; George, Gavin M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial deterioration of sugarcane during harvesting and processing is correlated with significant loss of sucrose yield and the accumulation of bacterial polysaccharides. Dextran, a homoglucan produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides, has been cited as the primary polysaccharide associated with sugarcane deterioration. A culture-based approach was used to isolate extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) producing bacterial strains from milled sugarcane stalks. Ribosomal RNA sequencing analysis grouped 25 isolates into 4 genera. This study identified 2 bacterial genera not previously associated with EPS production or sucrose degradation. All isolates produced polysaccharide when grown in the presence of sucrose. Monosaccharide analysis of purified polymers by Gas Chromatography revealed 17 EPSs consisting solely of glucose (homoglucans), while the remainder contained traces of mannose or fructose. Dextranase treatment of polysaccharides yielded full digestion profiles for only 11 extracts. Incomplete hydrolysis profiles of the remaining polysaccharides suggest the release of longer oligosaccharides which may interfere with sucrose crystal formation. PMID:26710215

  9. Identification and Characterization of the Sucrose Synthase 2 Gene (Sus2) in Durum Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Volpicella, Mariateresa; Fanizza, Immacolata; Leoni, Claudia; Gadaleta, Agata; Nigro, Domenica; Gattulli, Bruno; Mangini, Giacomo; Blanco, Antonio; Ceci, Luigi R.

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose transport is the central system for the allocation of carbon resources in vascular plants. Sucrose synthase (SUS), which reversibly catalyzes sucrose synthesis and cleavage, represents a key enzyme in the control of the flow of carbon into starch biosynthesis. In the present study the genomic identification and characterization of the Sus2-2A and Sus2-2B genes coding for SUS in durum wheat (cultivars Ciccio and Svevo) is reported. The genes were analyzed for their expression in different tissues and at different seed maturation stages, in four tetraploid wheat genotypes (Svevo, Ciccio, Primadur, and 5-BIL42). The activity of the encoded proteins was evaluated by specific activity assays on endosperm extracts and their structure established by modeling approaches. The combined results of sucrose synthase 2 expression and activity levels were then considered in the light of their possible involvement in starch yield. PMID:27014292

  10. Functional Analysis of Arabidopsis Sucrose Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Ward

    2009-03-31

    Sucrose is the main photosynthetic product that is transported in the vasculature of plants. The long-distance transport of carbohydrates is required to support the growth and development of net-importing (sink) tissues such as fruit, seeds and roots. This project is focused on understanding the transport mechanism sucrose transporters (SUTs). These are proton-coupled sucrose uptake transporters (membrane proteins) that are required for transport of sucrose in the vasculature and uptake into sink tissues. The accomplishments of this project included: 1) the first analysis of substrate specificity for any SUT. This was accomplished using electrophysiology to analyze AtSUC2, a sucrose transporter from companion cells in Arabidopsis. 2) the first analysis of the transport activity for a monocot SUT. The transport kinetics and substrate specificity of HvSUT1 from barley were studied. 3) the first analysis of a sucrose transporter from sugarcane. and 4) the first analysis of transport activity of a sugar alcohol transporter homolog from plants, AtPLT5. During this period four primary research papers, funded directly by the project, were published in refereed journals. The characterization of several sucrose transporters was essential for the current effort in the analysis of structure/function for this gene family. In particular, the demonstration of strong differences in substrate specificity between type I and II SUTs was important to identify targets for site-directed mutagenesis.

  11. Sucrose metabolism in lima bean seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Dianpeng; Sung, Shijean, S.; Black, C.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Developing and germinating lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus var Cangreen) seeds were used for testing the sucrose synthase pathway, to examine the competition for uridine diphosphate (UDP) and pyrophosphate (PPi), and to identify adaptive and maintenance-type enzymes in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. In developing seeds, sucrose breakdown was dominated by the sucrose synthase pathway; but in the seedling embryos, both the sucrose synthase pathway and acid invertase were active. UDPase activity was low and seemingly insufficient to compete for UDP during sucrose metabolism in seed development or germination. In contrast, both an acid and alkaline pyrophosphatase were active in seed development and germination. The set of adaptive enzymes identified in developing seeds were sucrose synthase, PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase, plus acid and alkaline pyrophosphatase; and, the adaptive enzymes identified in germinating seeds included the same set of enzymes plus acid invertase. The set of maintenance enzymes identified during development, in the dry seed, and during germination were UDP-glucopyrophosphorylase, neutral invertase, ATP and UTP-dependent fructokinase, glucokinase, phosphoglucomutase, ATP and UTP-dependent phosphofructokinase and sucrose-P synthase.

  12. Enzymatic conversion of sucrose to hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Orr, M.

    1998-11-01

    The enzymatic conversion of sugars to hydrogen could be a promising method for alternative fuel production. Maple tree sap is a source of environmental sugar (e.g., sucrose) that has the potential to be converted into hydrogen using the enzymes invertase, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH), hydrogenase, and glucose isomerase (GI) and the cofactor NADP{sup +}/NADPH. The kinetics of hydrogen production have been studied, and optimal conditions for hydrogen production are described. At low initial sucrose concentrations, in the absence of glucose isomerase, stoichiometric yields of mol of H{sub 2}/mol of sucrose were achieved. At higher sucrose concentrations, the yield of hydrogen declined so that at an initial sucrose concentration of 292 mM only 7% yield of hydrogen was obtained. The reason for this low yield was studied and shown not to be caused by enzyme inactivation or a pH drop during the reaction but due to an instability of the cofactor NADP{sup +}. Although gluconic and inhibited both NADPH production and oxidation of GDH and hydrogenase, respectively, it was not the major cause of NADP{sup +} instability. Fructose was also shown to be converted to hydrogen if GI was present in the reaction mixture. Also, by starting with sucrose, 1.34 mol of H{sub 2}/mol of sucrose was obtained if GI was present in the reaction mixture.

  13. [Selection and study of potent lactose-fermenting yeasts].

    PubMed

    Golubev, V I; Golubev, N V

    2004-01-01

    Whey-fermenting Kluyveromyces cultures were revealed among 105 yeast strains assimilating lactose. Eighteen most potent strains isolated from milk products fermented galactose, sucrose, and raffinose, in addition to lactose. Many yeast strains fermented inulin. Most strains were resistant to cycloheximide and grew in medium containing glucose, NaCl, and ethanol at concentrations of up to 50, 11-12, and 10-12%, respectively (4 degrees C). Three strains had mycocinogenic activity. After fermentation of whey with selected yeast strains at 30 degrees C for 2-3 days, ethanol concentration was 4-5%. PMID:15283337

  14. Transport of sucrose, not hexose, in the phloem

    PubMed Central

    Liu, David D.; Chao, Wesley M.; Turgeon, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that glucose and fructose are essentially absent in mobile phloem sap. However, this paradigm has been called into question, especially but not entirely, with respect to species in the Ranunculaceae and Papaveraceae. In the experiments in question, phloem sap was obtained by detaching leaves and placing the cut ends of the petioles in an EDTA solution. More hexose than sucrose was detected. In the present study, these results were confirmed for four species. However, almost identical results were obtained when the leaf blades were removed and only petiole stubs were immersed. This suggests that the sugars in the EDTA solution represent compounds extracted from the petioles, rather than sugars in transit in the phloem. In further experiments, the leaf blades were exposed to 14CO2 and, following a chase period, radiolabelled sugars in the petioles and EDTA exudate were identified. Almost all the radiolabel was in the form of [14C]sucrose, with little radiolabelled hexose. The data support the long-held contention that sucrose is a ubiquitous transport sugar, but hexoses are essentially absent in the phloem stream. PMID:22553289

  15. Complete sucrose hydrolysis by heat-killed recombinant Pichia pastoris cells entrapped in calcium alginate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An ideal immobilized biocatalyst for the industrial-scale production of invert sugar should stably operate at elevated temperatures (60-70°C) and high sucrose concentrations (above 60%, w/v). Commercial invertase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is thermolabile and suffers from substrate inhibition. Thermotoga maritima β-fructosidase (BfrA) is the most thermoactive and thermostable sucrose-hydrolysing enzyme so far identified and allows complete inversion of the substrate in highly concentrated solutions. Results In this study, heat-killed Pichia pastoris cells bearing N-glycosylated BfrA in the periplasmic space were entrapped in calcium alginate beads. The immobilized recombinant yeast showed maximal sucrose hydrolysis at pH 5–7 and 90°C. BfrA was 65% active at 60°C and had no activity loss after incubation without the substrate at this temperature for 15 h. Complete inversion of cane sugar (2.04 M) at 60°C was achieved in batchwise and continuous operation with respective productivities of 4.37 and 0.88 gram of substrate hydrolysed per gram of dry beads per hour. The half-life values of the biocatalyst were 14 and 20 days when operated at 60°C in the stirred tank and the fixed-bed column, respectively. The reaction with non-viable cells prevented the occurrence of sucrose fermentation and the formation of by-products. Six-month storage of the biocatalyst in 1.46 M sucrose (pH 5.5) at 4°C caused no reduction of the invertase activity. Conclusions The features of the novel thermostable biocatalyst developed in this study are more attractive than those of immobilized S. cerevisiae cells for application in the enzymatic manufacture of inverted sugar syrup in batch and fixed-bed reactors. PMID:24943124

  16. Sucrose/Glucose molecular alloys by cryomilling.

    PubMed

    Megarry, Andrew J; Booth, Jonathan; Burley, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    We report here for the first time a series of amorphous sucrose/glucose molecular alloys prepared by cryomilling. Differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction and solution proton nuclear magnetic resonance showed that cryomilling drives a direct transformation from a two-phase mixture of crystalline sucrose and glucose, to a single-phase amorphous sucrose/glucose molecular alloy. The molecular alloys displayed a single Tg which varied linearly with composition. The effect of atmospheric moisture and the possibility of localised melting of the material because of milling-related friction were also discussed. PMID:24867316

  17. Genetic Analysis of Haploids from Industrial Strains of Baker's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yuji; Ouchi, Kozo

    1989-01-01

    Strains of baker's yeast conventionally used by the baking industry in Japan were tested for the ability to sporulate and produce viable haploid spores. Three isolates which possessed the properties of baker's yeasts were obtained from single spores. Each strain was a haploid, and one of these strains, YOY34, was characterized. YOY34 fermented maltose and sucrose, but did not utilize galactose, unlike its parental strain. Genetic analysis showed that YOY34 carried two MAL genes, one functional and one cryptic; two SUC genes; and one defective gal gene. The genotype of YOY34 was identified as MATα MAL1 MAL3g SUC2 SUC4 gall. The MAL1 gene from this haploid was constitutively expressed, was dominant over other wild-type MAL tester genes, and gave a weak sucrose fermentation. YOY34 was suitable for both bakery products, like conventional baker's yeasts, and for genetic analysis, like laboratory strains. PMID:16347967

  18. Mediated amperometry reveals different modes of yeast responses to sugars.

    PubMed

    Garjonyte, Rasa; Melvydas, Vytautas; Malinauskas, Albertas

    2016-02-01

    Menadione-mediated amperometry at carbon paste electrodes modified with various yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida pulcherrima, Pichia guilliermondii and Debaryomyces hansenii) was employed to monitor redox activity inside the yeast cells induced by glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose or galactose. Continuous measurements revealed distinct modes (transient or gradually increasing) of the current development during the first 2 to 3 min after subjection to glucose, fructose and sucrose at electrodes containing S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces strains. Different modes (increasing or decreasing) of the current development after yeast subjection to galactose at electrodes with S. cerevisiae or D. hansenii and at electrodes with C. pulcherrima and P. guilliermondii suggested different mechanisms of galactose assimilation. PMID:26523505

  19. Intracellular sucrose communicates metabolic demand to sucrose transporters in developing pea cotyledons

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuchan; Chan, Katie; Wang, Trevor L.; Hedley, Cliff L.; Offler, Christina E.; Patrick, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanistic inter-relationships in sinks between sucrose compartmentation/metabolism and phloem unloading/translocation are poorly understood. Developing grain legume seeds provide tractable experimental systems to explore this question. Metabolic demand by cotyledons is communicated to phloem unloading and ultimately import by sucrose withdrawal from the seed apoplasmic space via a turgor-homeostat mechanism. What is unknown is how metabolic demand is communicated to cotyledon sucrose transporters responsible for withdrawing sucrose from the apoplasmic space. This question was explored here using a pea rugosus mutant (rrRbRb) compromised in starch biosynthesis compared with its wild-type counterpart (RRRbRb). Sucrose influx into cotyledons was found to account for 90% of developmental variations in their absolute growth and hence starch biosynthetic rates. Furthermore, rr and RR cotyledons shared identical response surfaces, indicating that control of transporter activity was likely to be similar for both lines. In this context, sucrose influx was correlated positively with expression of a sucrose/H+ symporter (PsSUT1) and negatively with two sucrose facilitators (PsSUF1 and PsSUF4). Sucrose influx exhibited a negative curvilinear relationship with cotyledon concentrations of sucrose and hexoses. In contrast, the impact of intracellular sugars on transporter expression was transporter dependent, with expression of PsSUT1 inhibited, PsSUF1 unaffected, and PsSUF4 enhanced by sugars. Sugar supply to, and sugar concentrations of, RR cotyledons were manipulated using in vitro pod and cotyledon culture. Collectively the results obtained showed that intracellular sucrose was the physiologically active sugar signal that communicated metabolic demand to sucrose influx and this transport function was primarily determined by PsSUT1 regulated at the transcriptional level. PMID:18931350

  20. Identification of sucrose binding, membrane proteins using a photolyzable sucrose analog. [P. saccharophila

    SciTech Connect

    Ripp, K.G.; Liu, D.F.; Viitanen, P.; Hitz, W.D.

    1986-04-01

    The sucrose derivative 6'-deoxy-6'-(2-hydroxy-4-azido)benzamidosucrose (6'-HABS) was prepared from sucrose (via 6'-deoxy-6'-aminosucrose) and 4-amino-salicylic acid. 6'-HABS is a competitive inhibitor of sucrose influx into protoplasts from developing soybean cotyledons and of sucrose binding to membranes from the bacteria P. saccharophila. The Ki for inhibition in the soybean protoplasts was 75..mu..M. 6'-Deoxy-6'-(2-hydroxy-3-/sup 125/Iodo-4-azido)benzamidosucrose was prepared by lactoperoxidase iodination of 6'-HABS. Upon photolysis in the presence of membranes from P saccharophila, label from the photoprobe is incorporated into a sucrose inducible polypeptide of mass 84 KD in SDS-PAGE. The polypeptide is protected from labeling by the inclusion of sucrose in the photolysis mixture. Photolysis conditions which lead to specific labeling of the sucrose protectable polypeptide in bacterial membranes also give sucrose protectable labeling of a 66 KD polypeptide in microsomal preparations made from developing soybeans. The possibility that this is a sucrose transporting protein is being tested.

  1. Mannheimia succiniciproducens Phosphotransferase System for Sucrose Utilization▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Wook; Choi, Sol; Kim, Ji Mahn; Lee, Sang Yup

    2010-01-01

    The succinic acid producer Mannheimia succiniciproducens can efficiently utilize sucrose as a carbon source, but its metabolism has not been understood. This study revealed that M. succiniciproducens uses a sucrose phosphotransferase system (PTS), sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase, and a fructose PTS for the transport and utilization of sucrose. PMID:20081002

  2. Construction of killer wine yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Seki, T; Choi, E H; Ryu, D

    1985-05-01

    A double-stranded RNA plasmid which confers the superkiller phenotype was transferred into a wine yeast (Montrachet strain 522) and its leucine-requiring derivative (strain 694) by cytoduction, using the protoplast fusion technique. The killer wine yeast constructed completely suppressed the growth of killer-sensitive strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in yeast extract-peptone-glucose medium at pH 4.5, whereas the killer effect was somewhat decreased at pH 3.5. The wine yeast harboring the killer factor also inhibited the growth of killer-sensitive cells satisfactorily when it was grown in grape juice. PMID:16346794

  3. Role of glucose signaling in yeast metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dam, K. van

    1996-10-05

    The conversion of glucose to ethanol and carbon dioxide by yeast was the first biochemical pathway to be studied in detail. The initial observation that this process is catalyzed by an extract of yeast led to the discovery of enzymes and coenzymes and laid the foundation for modern biochemistry. In this article, knowledge concerning the relation between uptake of and signaling by glucose in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed and compared to the analogous process in prokaryotes. It is concluded that (much) more fundamental knowledge concerning these processes is required before rational redesign of metabolic fluxes from glucose in yeast can be achieved.

  4. Sucrose ingestion induces rapid AMPA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Tukey, David S; Ferreira, Jainne M; Antoine, Shannon O; D'amour, James A; Ninan, Ipe; Cabeza de Vaca, Soledad; Incontro, Salvatore; Wincott, Charlotte; Horwitz, Julian K; Hartner, Diana T; Guarini, Carlo B; Khatri, Latika; Goffer, Yossef; Xu, Duo; Titcombe, Roseann F; Khatri, Megna; Marzan, Dave S; Mahajan, Shahana S; Wang, Jing; Froemke, Robert C; Carr, Kenneth D; Aoki, Chiye; Ziff, Edward B

    2013-04-01

    The mechanisms by which natural rewards such as sugar affect synaptic transmission and behavior are largely unexplored. Here, we investigate regulation of nucleus accumbens synapses by sucrose intake. Previous studies have shown that AMPA receptor (AMPAR) trafficking is a major mechanism for regulating synaptic strength, and that in vitro, trafficking of AMPARs containing the GluA1 subunit takes place by a two-step mechanism involving extrasynaptic and then synaptic receptor transport. We report that in rat, repeated daily ingestion of a 25% sucrose solution transiently elevated spontaneous locomotion and potentiated accumbens core synapses through incorporation of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors (CPARs), which are GluA1-containing, GluA2-lacking AMPARs. Electrophysiological, biochemical, and quantitative electron microscopy studies revealed that sucrose training (7 d) induced a stable (>24 h) intraspinous GluA1 population, and that in these rats a single sucrose stimulus rapidly (5 min) but transiently (<24 h) elevated GluA1 at extrasynaptic sites. CPARs and dopamine D1 receptors were required in vivo for elevated locomotion after sucrose ingestion. Significantly, a 7 d protocol of daily ingestion of a 3% solution of saccharin, a noncaloric sweetener, induced synaptic GluA1 similarly to 25% sucrose ingestion. These findings identify multistep GluA1 trafficking, previously described in vitro, as a mechanism for acute regulation of synaptic transmission in vivo by a natural orosensory reward. Trafficking is stimulated by a chemosensory pathway that is not dependent on the caloric value of sucrose. PMID:23554493

  5. Sucrose Ingestion Induces Rapid AMPA Receptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Tukey, David S.; Ferreira, Jainne M.; Antoine, Shannon O.; Damour, James A.; Ninan, Ipe; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Incontro, Salvatore; Wincott, Charlotte; Horwitz, Julian K.; Hartner, Diana T.; Guarini, Carlo B.; Khatri, Latika; Goffer, Yossef; Xu, Duo; Titcombe, Roseann F.; Khatri, Megna; Marzan, Dave S.; Mahajan, Shahana S.; Wang, Jing; Froemke, Robert C.; Carr, Kenneth D.; Aoki, Chiye; Ziff, Edward B.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which natural rewards such as sugar affect synaptic transmission and behavior are largely unexplored. Here, we investigate regulation of nucleus accumbens synapses by sucrose intake. Previous studies have shown that AMPA receptor trafficking is a major mechanism for regulating synaptic strength, and that in vitro, trafficking of AMPA receptors containing the GluA1 subunit takes place by a two-step mechanism involving extrasynaptic and then synaptic receptor transport. We report that in rat, repeated daily ingestion of a 25% sucrose solution transiently elevated spontaneous locomotion and potentiated accumbens core synapses through incorporation of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CPARs), which are GluA1-containing, GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Electrophysiological, biochemical and quantitative electron microscopy studies revealed that sucrose training (7 days) induced a stable (>24 hr) intraspinous GluA1 population, and that in these rats a single sucrose stimulus rapidly (5 min) but transiently (<24 hr) elevated GluA1 at extrasynaptic sites. CPARs and dopamine D1 receptors were required in vivo for elevated locomotion after sucrose ingestion. Significantly, a 7-day protocol of daily ingestion of a 3% solution of saccharin, a non-caloric sweetener, induced synaptic GluA1 similarly to 25% sucrose ingestion. These findings identify multi-step GluA1 trafficking, previously described in vitro, as a mechanism for acute regulation of synaptic transmission in vivo by a natural orosensory reward. Trafficking is stimulated by a chemosensory pathway that is not dependent on the caloric value of sucrose. PMID:23554493

  6. Sucrose synthase oligomerization and F-actin association are regulated by sucrose concentration and phosphorylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthase (SUS) is a key enzyme in plant metabolism, as it serves to cleave the photosynthetic end product sucrose into UDP-glucose and fructose. SUS is generally assumed to be a tetrameric protein, but results in the present study suggest that SUS can form dimers as well as tetramers and th...

  7. Extended exposure to environmental cues, but not to sucrose, reduces sucrose cue reactivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Harkness, John H; Wells, Jason; Webb, Sierra; Grimm, Jeffrey W

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we examined the effects of extinction of sucrose-predictive contextual cues and/or sucrose satiation on the expression of sucrose cue reactivity in a rat model of relapse. Context extinction was imposed by housing rats in their home cage or in the operant conditioning chamber for 17 h prior to testing. For sucrose satiation, rats were allowed unlimited access to water or sucrose for 17 h prior to testing. Cue reactivity was assessed after either one (Day 1) or 30 (Day 30) days of forced abstinence from sucrose self-administration. An abstinence-dependent increase in sucrose cue reactivity was observed in all conditions ("incubation of craving"). Context extinction dramatically reduced lever responding on both Day 1 and Day 30. Sucrose satiation had no significant effect on cue reactivity in any condition. These results demonstrate that the context in which self-administration occurs maintains a powerful influence over cue reactivity, even after extended forced abstinence. In contrast, the primary reinforcer has little control over cue reactivity. These findings highlight the important role of conditioned contextual cues in driving relapse behavior. PMID:26169836

  8. SUCROSE SYNTHASE (SUS) OLIGOMERIZATION IS REGULATED BY SUCROSE LEVELS WITHIN PLANT CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthase (SUS) is an important plant metabolic enzyme as it cleaves sucrose in the cytoplasm of plant cells. There are three known isoforms of SUS within Zea mays: SUS1, SUS-SH1, and SUS2 (formerly SUS3). It is thought that SUS is predominantly a hetero-tetramer composed of the three isoform...

  9. Structural, thermal, functional, antioxidant & antimicrobial properties of β-d-glucan extracted from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cereviseae)-Effect of γ-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asma Ashraf; Gani, Adil; Masoodi, F A; Amin, Furheen; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad; Gani, Asir

    2016-04-20

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of γ-irradiation (0, 5, 10, 20, 30 & 50kGy) on the structural, functional, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of yeast β-d-glucan. The samples were characterized by ATR-FTIR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and the thermal properties were studied using DSC. There was a decrease in the average molecular weight of β-d-glucan as the irradiation dose increased. The functional properties of irradiated yeast β-d-glucan were largely influenced by the action of gamma radiation like swelling power and viscosity decreases with increase in the irradiation dose while as fat binding capacity, emulsifying properties, foaming properties and bile acid binding capacity shows an increasing trend. All the antioxidant properties carried out using six different assays increased significantly (p≤0.05) in a dose dependent manner. The antibacterial activity of yeast β-d-glucan also showed an increasing trend with increase in the irradiation dose from 5 to 50kDa. PMID:26876872

  10. Enhanced production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using rice bran extracts by Lactobacillus sakei B2-16.

    PubMed

    Kook, Moo-Chang; Seo, Myung-Ji; Cheigh, Chan-Ick; Pyun, Yu-Ryang; Cho, Seok-Cheol; Park, Hoon

    2010-04-01

    An efficient and simple fermentation process was developed for the production of gamma-amminobutyric acid (GABA) by Lactobacillus sakei B2-16. When the L. sakei B2-16 was cultivated in the rice bran extracts medium containing 4% sucrose, 1% yeast extract and 12% monosodium glutamate, the maximum GABA concentration reached 660.0 mM with 100% conversion yield, showing the 2.4-fold higher GABA concentration compared to the modified MRS medium without the rice bran extracts. The GABA production was scaled-up from a laboratory scale (5 L) to a pilot (300 L) and a plant scales (5,000 L) to investigate the application possibility of GABA production to industrial fields. The GABA production at the pilot and plant scales was similar to the laboratory scale using rice bran extracts medium which could be effective for the low-cost production of GABA. PMID:20467250

  11. Optimisation of ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions for maximal recovery of active monacolins and removal of toxic citrinin from red yeast rice by a full factorial design coupled with response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guisheng; Fu, Lei; Li, Xiaobo

    2015-03-01

    This study optimised the ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) conditions to achieve maximal recovery of active monacolins with minimal contents of citrinin from red yeast rice (RYR). A central composite design after a full factorial design was utilised to examine the different UAE parameters. The studies revealed that HAc%, extraction time and EtOH% had significant influences on the recovery yield of monacolins, while HAc% and EtOH% were key factors for the elimination of citrinin. The resulting optimal conditions were as follows: ultrasound power of 250 W, HAc% of 7.7%, RYR amount of 0.2 g (solvent-to-solid ratio 40 mL/g), extraction time of 50.7 min, EtOH% of 57.2% and extraction temperature of 20 °C. Under these conditions, at least 94.7% of monacolins was recovered and 87.7% of citrinin was removed from RYR. This optimised UAE condition was further evaluated for potential industrial application in manufacturing of RYR as pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals. PMID:25306334

  12. Plant sucrose transporters from a biophysical point of view.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Dietmar

    2011-05-01

    The majority of higher plants use sucrose as their main mobile carbohydrate. Proton-driven sucrose transporters play a crucial role in cell-to-cell and long-distance distribution of sucrose throughout the plant. A very negative plant membrane potential and the ability of sucrose transporters to accumulate sucrose concentrations of more than 1 M indicate that plants evolved transporters with unique structural and functional features. The knowledge about the transport mechanism and structural/functional domains of these nano-machines is, however, still fragmentary. In this review, the current knowledge about the biophysical properties of plant sucrose transporters is summarized and discussed. PMID:21502662

  13. Fermentation pattern of sucrose to ethanol conversions by Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Lyness, Ed.; Doelle, H.W.

    1981-07-01

    General patterns of sucrose fermentation by two strains of Zymomonas mobilis, designated Z7 and Z10, were established using sucrose concentrations from 50 to 200 g/liter. Strain Z7 showed a higher invertase activity than Z10. Strain Z10 showed a reduced specific growth rate a high sucrose concentrations while Z7 was unaffected. High sucrose hydrolyzing activity in strain Z7 lead to glucose accumulation in the medium at high sucrose concentrations. Ethanol production and fermentation time depend on the rate of catabolism of the products of sucrose hydrolysis, glucose and fructose. 10 refs.

  14. Screening of novel yeast inulinases and further application to bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Susana M; Teixeira, Pedro D; Silva, Tiago P; Teixeira, Alexandra V; Alves, Luís

    2013-09-25

    Inulin is a carbohydrate composed of linear chains of β-2,1-linked D-fructofuranose molecules terminated by a glucose residue through a sucrose-type linkage at the reducing end. Jerusalem artichoke (JA) is one of the most interesting materials among unconventional and renewable raw materials, with levels of inulin reaching 50-80% of dry matter. Inulin or inulin-rich materials can be actively hydrolyzed by microbial inulinases to produce glucose and fructose syrups that can be used in bioprocesses. In this study, several microbial strains were isolated and their ability to inulinase biosynthesis was evaluated. The novel yeast strain Talf1, identified as Zygosaccharomyces bailii, was the best inulinase producer, attaining 8.67 U/ml of inulinase activity when JA juice was used as the inducer substrate. Z. bailii strain Talf1 and/or its enzymatic crude extract were further applied for bioethanol production and biodesulfurization (BDS) processes, using inulin and JA juice as carbon source. In a consolidated bioprocessing for ethanol production from 200 g/l inulin, Z. bailii strain Talf1 was able to produce 67 g/l of ethanol. This ethanol yield was improved in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process, with the ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMI 885 and the Talf1 inulinases, achieving a production of 78 g/l ethanol. However, the highest ethanol yield (∼48%) was obtained in a SSF process from JA juice (∼130 g/l fermentable sugars), where the S. cerevisiae produced 63 g/l ethanol. Relatively to the dibenzothiophene BDS tests, the Gordonia alkanivorans strain 1B achieved a desulfurization rate of 4.8 μM/h within a SSF process using Talf1 inulinases and JA juice, highlighting the potential of JA as a less expensive alternative carbon source. These results showed the high potential of Z. bailii strain Talf1 inulinases as a versatile tool for bioprocesses using inulin-rich materials. PMID:23419675

  15. Purification and Characterization of Sucrose Synthetase from the Shoot of Bamboo Leleba oldhami.

    PubMed

    Su, J C

    1977-07-01

    A 108-fold purification of the sucrose synthetase from the extract of the shoot of bamboo Lelaba oldhami was achieved by ammonium sulfate fractionation, calcium phosphate gel adsorption, and chromatographic separations on Sephadex G-100 and diethylaminoethyl-cellulose columns. Some properties of this enzyme, namely thermal and pH stabilities, stabilization by aqueous glycerol, pH optimum, substrate specificities, effects of metallic ions, effects of sulfhydryl reagents, molecular weight, sedimentation constants, isoelectric point, and substrate saturation kinetics had been investigated.The substrate saturation kinetics indicated that the enzyme could be an allosteric enzyme with the saccharide substrates (sucrose and fructose) serving as the homotropic allosteric effectors in regulating the biosynthesis and degradation of sucrose. PMID:16660030

  16. The sim Operon Facilitates the Transport and Metabolism of Sucrose Isomers in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334?

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, John; Jakubovics, Nicholas; Abraham, Bindu; Hess, Sonja; Pikis, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Inspection of the genome sequence of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 revealed two operons that might dissimilate the five isomers of sucrose. To test this hypothesis, cells of L. casei ATCC 334 were grown in a defined medium supplemented with various sugars, including each of the five isomeric disaccharides. Extracts prepared from cells grown on the sucrose isomers contained high levels of two polypeptides with Mrs of ?50,000 and ?17,500. Neither protein was present in cells grown on glucose, maltose or sucrose. Proteomic, enzymatic, and Western blot analyses identified the ?50-kDa protein as an NAD+- and metal ion-dependent phospho-?-glucosidase. The oligomeric enzyme was purified, and a catalytic mechanism is proposed. The smaller polypeptide represented an EIIA component of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system. Phospho-?-glucosidase and EIIA are encoded by genes at the LSEI_0369 (simA) and LSEI_0374 (simF) loci, respectively, in a block of seven genes comprising the sucrose isomer metabolism (sim) operon. Northern blot analyses provided evidence that three mRNA transcripts were up-regulated during logarithmic growth of L. casei ATCC 334 on sucrose isomers. Internal simA and simF gene probes hybridized to ?1.5- and ?1.3-kb transcripts, respectively. A 6.8-kb mRNA transcript was detected by both probes, which was indicative of cotranscription of the entire sim operon. PMID:18310337

  17. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    Microbial fuel cells leverage whole cell biocatalysis to convert the energy stored in energy-rich renewable biomolecules such as sugar, directly to electrical energy at high efficiencies. Advantages of the process include ambient temperature operation, operation in natural streams such as wastewater without the need to clean electrodes, minimal balance-of-plant requirements compared to conventional fuel cells, and environmentally friendly operation. These make the technology very attractive as portable power sources and waste-to-energy converters. The principal problem facing the technology is the low power densities compared to other conventional portable power sources such as batteries and traditional fuel cells. In this work we examined the yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cell and developed methods to increase the power density from such fuel cells. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and optical absorption measurements were used to establish significant adsorption of electron mediators by the microbes. Mediator adsorption was demonstrated to be an important limitation in achieving high power densities in yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cells. Specifically, the power densities are low for the length of time mediator adsorption continues to occur. Once the mediator adsorption stops, the power densities increase. Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used to extract reaction rate information, and a simple kinetic expression was developed for the current observed in the anodic half-cell. Since the rate expression showed that the current was directly related to microbe concentration close to the electrode, methods to increase cell mass attached to the anode was investigated. Electrically biased electrodes were demonstrated to develop biofilm-like layers of the Baker's yeast with a high concentration of cells directly connected to the electrode. The increased cell mass did increase the power density 2 times compared to a non biofilm fuel cell, but the power density increase was shown to quickly saturate with cell mass attached on the electrode. Based on recent modelling data that suggested that the electrode currents might be limited by the poor electrical conductivity of the anode, the power density versus electrical conductivity of a yeast-immobilized anode was investigated. Introduction of high aspect ratio carbon fiber filaments to the immobilization matrix increased the electrical conductivity of the anode. Although a higher electrical conductivity clearly led to an increase in power densities, it was shown that the principal limitation to power density increase was coming from proton transfer limitations in the immobilized anode. Partial overcoming of the gradients lead a power density of ca. 250 microW cm-2, which is the highest reported for yeast powered MFCs. A yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cell was investigated as a power source for low power sensors using raw tree sap. It was shown that yeast can efficiently utilize the sucrose present in the raw tree sap to produce electricity when excess salt is added to the medium. Therefore the salinity of a potential energy source is an important consideration when MFCs are being considered for energy harvesting from natural sources.

  18. 27 CFR 21.131 - Sucrose octaacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... using phenolphthalein indicator. Percent acid as acetic acid=ml NaOH used×0.6/ weight of sample (c... phenolphthalein indicator. Percent sucrose octaacetate=(ml NaOH−ml H2SO4)×4.2412/weight of sample...

  19. 27 CFR 21.131 - Sucrose octaacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... using phenolphthalein indicator. Percent acid as acetic acid=ml NaOH used×0.6/ weight of sample (c... phenolphthalein indicator. Percent sucrose octaacetate=(ml NaOH−ml H2SO4)×4.2412/weight of sample...

  20. 21 CFR 172.869 - Sucrose oligoesters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... preparation of sucrose oligoesters are dimethyl sulfoxide, isobutyl alcohol, and those solvents generally... incorporated by reference, in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of the methods may be... sample). Do. (8) Residual Methanol Not more than 10 milligrams/kilogram Method listed in the...

  1. 21 CFR 172.869 - Sucrose oligoesters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... preparation of sucrose oligoesters are dimethyl sulfoxide, isobutyl alcohol, and those solvents generally... incorporated by reference, in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of the methods may be... sample). Do. (8) Residual Methanol Not more than 10 milligrams/kilogram Method listed in the...

  2. 21 CFR 172.869 - Sucrose oligoesters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... preparation of sucrose oligoesters are dimethyl sulfoxide, isobutyl alcohol, and those solvents generally... incorporated by reference, in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of the methods may be... sample). Do. (8) Residual Methanol Not more than 10 milligrams/kilogram Method listed in the...

  3. 21 CFR 172.869 - Sucrose oligoesters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies may be examined at the Food and Drug Administration's Main Library, 10903 New... hydrogenated fats and oils). The only solvents which may be used in the preparation of sucrose oligoesters are...-6030 or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html. Copies of the...

  4. 21 CFR 172.869 - Sucrose oligoesters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... preparation of sucrose oligoesters are dimethyl sulfoxide, isobutyl alcohol, and those solvents generally... incorporated by reference, in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of the methods may be... sample). Do. (8) Residual Methanol Not more than 10 milligrams/kilogram Method listed in the...

  5. Fermentation pattern of sucrose to ethanol conversions by Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Lyness, E.; Doelle, H.W.

    1981-07-01

    General patterns of sucrose fermentation by two strains of Zymomonas mobilis, designated Z7 and Z10, were established using sucrose concentrations from 50 to 200 g/liter. Strain Z7 showed a higher invertase activity than Z10. Strain Z10 showed a reduced specific growth rate at high sucrose concentrations while Z7 was unaffected. High sucrose hydrolyzing activity in strain Z7 lead to glucose accumulation in the medium at high sucrose concentrations. Ethanol production and fermentation time depend on the rate of catabolism of the products of sucrose hydrolysis, glucose and fructose. The metabolic quotients for sucrose utilization, qs, and ethanol production, qp (g/g.hr), are unsuitable for describing sucrose utilization by Zymomonas mobilis as the logarithmic phase of growth precedes the phase of highest substrate utilization (g/liter.hr) and ethanol production (g/liter.hr) in batch culture. (Refs. 10).

  6. Assessment of extracts from red yeast rice for herb-drug interaction by in-vitro and in-vivo assays.

    PubMed

    Fung, Wai To; Subramaniam, G; Lee, Joel; Loh, Heng Meng; Leung, Pak Ho Henry

    2012-01-01

    Red yeast rice (RYR) is made by fermenting the yeast Monascus purpureus over rice. It is a source of natural red food colorants, a food garnish and a traditional medication. Results of the current study demonstrated that polar fractions of the RYR preparations contained herbal-drug interaction activity, which if left unremoved, enhanced P-glycoprotein activity and inhibited the major drug metabolizing cytochromes P450, i,e, CYP 1A2, 2C9 and 3A4. The data from Caco-2 cell absorption and animal model studies further demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic modulation effect by RYR preparations containing the polar fractions ("untreated" preparation) was greater than that from RYR preparations with the polar fractions removed ("treated" preparation). The data indicates a potential for herb-drug interactions to be present in RYR commonly sold as nutritional supplements when the polar fractions are not removed and this should be taken into consideration when RYR is consumed with medications, including verapamil. PMID:22389767

  7. Induction of Sucrose Utilization Genes from Bifidobacterium lactis by Sucrose and Raffinose

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Marla I.; Abratt, Valerie R.; Reid, Sharon J.

    2003-01-01

    The probiotic organism Bifidobacterium lactis was isolated from a yoghurt starter culture with the aim of analyzing its use of carbohydrates for the development of prebiotics. A sucrose utilization gene cluster of B. lactis was identified by complementation of a gene library in Escherichia coli. Three genes, encoding a sucrose phosphorylase (ScrP), a GalR-LacI-type transcriptional regulator (ScrR), and a sucrose transporter (ScrT), were identified by sequence analysis. The scrP gene was expressed constitutively from its own promoter in E. coli grown in complete medium, and the strain hydrolyzed sucrose in a reaction that was dependent on the presence of phosphates. Primer extension experiments with scrP performed by using RNA isolated from B. lactis identified the transcriptional start site 102 bp upstream of the ATG start codon, immediately adjacent to a palindromic sequence resembling a regulator binding site. In B. lactis, total sucrase activity was induced by the presence of sucrose, raffinose, or oligofructose in the culture medium and was repressed by glucose. RNA analysis of the scrP, scrR, and scrT genes in B. lactis indicated that expression of these genes was influenced by transcriptional regulation and that all three genes were similarly induced by sucrose and raffinose and repressed by glucose. Analysis of the sucrase activities of deletion constructs in heterologous E. coli indicated that ScrR functions as a positive regulator. PMID:12513973

  8. Sucrose Synthase, Starch Accumulation, and Tomato Fruit Sink Strength.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, F.; Sanz, A.; Brenner, M. L.; Smith, A.

    1993-01-01

    Contrasting evidence has accumulated regarding the role of acid invertase and sucrose synthase in tomato fruit sink establishment and maintenance. In this work the relationships among the activities of sucrose synthase and acid invertase, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill cv UC-82B fruit growth, and starch accumulation were analyzed in fruit at 0 to 39 d after anthesis. Sucrose synthase, but not acid invertase, was found to be positively correlated with tomato fruit relative growth rate and with starch content in the pericarp tissue. A similar association between sucrose synthase activity and starch accumulation was also evident in the basal portion of the stem. Heat-shock treatments, which inhibited the increase in sucrose synthase activity at the beginning of the light period and had no effect on acid invertase activity, were used to examine the importance of sucrose synthase in relation to sucrose metabolism and starch synthesis. After the heat-shock treatment, concomitantly with the suppressed sucrose synthase activity relative to the controls, there was a reduction in sucrose cleavage and starch accumulation. These data substantiate the conclusion that, during the early phases of tomato fruit development, sucrose synthase rather than acid invertase is the dominant enzyme in metabolizing imported sucrose, which in turn plays a part in regulating the import of sucrose into the fruit. PMID:12231688

  9. Synthesis & Biological, Physical, & Adhesive Properties of Epoxy Sucroses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raw sugar was converted in two steps to epoxy allyl sucroses (EAS), epoxy crotyl sucroses (ECS), and epoxy methallyl sucroses (EMS) respectively, in 82, 91, and 91.5 % overall yields. EAS, ECS, and EMS are regio and diastereo isomeric epoxy monomers that are liquids at room temperature. The averag...

  10. Probing Osmotic Effects on Invertase with l-(?)-Sucrose

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seung-kee; Wei, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    l-(?)-Sucrose was efficiently synthesized using intramolecular aglycon delivery and used to elucidate osmotic effects on the activity of invertase, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of d-(+)-sucrose. The osmotic effect imposed by l-sucrose was responsible for more than 30% of the activity loss ascribed otherwise to substrate inhibition. PMID:18802643

  11. COMPARISON OF SUCROSE CATABOLISM IN ROOTS OF THREE BETA VULGARIS L. GENOTYPES WITH DIFFERENT YIELD AND SUCROSE ACCUMULATING CAPACITIES.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose catabolism is a major determinant of sink strength in nearly all plants and affects sucrose partitioning to growing sinks as well as sink size and carbohydrate content. Three enzyme families are responsible for nearly all sucrose catabolism in sugarbeet roots: acid invertase, alkaline inve...

  12. Production and application of a rare disaccharide using sucrose phosphorylase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kenji; Yoshihara, Akihide; Furumoto, Toshio; Takata, Goro

    2015-06-01

    Sucrose phosphorylase (SPase) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides exhibited activity towards eight ketohexoses, which behaved as D-glucosyl acceptors, and α-D-glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), which behaved as a donor. All eight of these ketohexoses were subsequently transformed into the corresponding d-glucosyl-ketohexoses. Of the eight ketohexoses evaluated in the current study, d-allulose behaved as the best substrate for SPase, and the resulting d-glucosyl-d-alluloside product was found to be a non-reducing sugar with a specific optical rotation of [α]D(20) + 74.36°. D-Glucosyl-D-alluloside was identified as α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-allulofuranoside by NMR analysis. D-Glucosyl-D-alluloside exhibited an inhibitory activity towards an invertase from yeast with a Km value of 50 mM, where it behaved as a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 9.2 mM. D-Glucosyl-D-alluloside was also successfully produced from sucrose using SPase and D-tagatose 3-epimerase. This process also allowed for the production of G1P from sucrose and d-allulose from D-fructose, which suggested that this method could be used to prepare d-glucosyl-d-alluloside without the need for expensive reagents such as G1P and d-allulose. PMID:25499751

  13. Prenatal ethanol increases sucrose reinforcement, an effect strengthened by postnatal association of ethanol and sucrose.

    PubMed

    Culleré, Marcela Elena; Spear, Norman E; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Late prenatal exposure to ethanol recruits sensory processing of the drug and of its motivational properties, an experience that leads to heightened ethanol affinity. Recent studies indicate common sensory and neurobiological substrates between this drug and sweet tastants. Using a recently developed operant conditioning technique for infant rats, we examined the effects of prenatal ethanol history upon sucrose self-administration (postnatal days, PDs 14-17). Prior to the last conditioning session, a low (0.5 g/kg) or a high (2.5 g/kg) ethanol dose were paired with sucrose. The intention was to determine if ethanol would inflate or devalue the reinforcing capability of the tastant and if these effects are dependent upon prenatal ethanol history. Male and female pups prenatally exposed to ethanol (2.0 g/kg) responded more when reinforced with sucrose than pups lacking this antenatal experience. Independently of prenatal status, a low ethanol dose (0.5 g/kg) enhanced the reinforcing capability of sucrose while the highest dose (2.5 g/kg) seemed to ameliorate the motivational properties of the tastant. During extinction (PD 18), two factors were critical in determining persistence of responding despite reinforcement omission. Pups prenatally exposed to ethanol that subsequently experienced the low ethanol dose paired with sucrose, showed higher resistance to extinction. The effects here reported were not associated with differential blood alcohol levels across prenatal treatments. These results indicate that fetal ethanol experience promotes affinity for a natural sweet reinforcer and that low doses of ethanol are also capable of enhancing the positive motivational consequences of sucrose when ethanol and sucrose are paired during infancy. PMID:24398347

  14. Translocation of labelled sucrose: A student exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Photosynthetic carbohydrates from the leaves are exported through the phloem to growing tips, roots, flowers and fruits. If sucrose labelled with {sup 14}C is applied to the leaves of bean plants, the pathway for sugar movement may be readily observed by autoradiography. Students apply the labelled sucrose during class time and return the next day to press their plants. During the next class, the pressed and dried plants are placed against X-ray film and left in the dark for four weeks. the film is then developed, examined for presence of label and compared to the pressed plants. Source to sink movement is clearly illustrated and information about the mechanism of phloem transport and loading is gained through experimental treatments, which include blocking the phloem pathway and inhibiting energy production.

  15. Withanolides and Sucrose Esters from Physalis neomexicana.

    PubMed

    Cao, Cong-Mei; Wu, Xiaoqing; Kindscher, Kelly; Xu, Liang; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2015-10-23

    Four withanolides (1-4) and two sucrose esters (5, 6) were isolated from the aerial parts of Physalis neomexicana. The structures of 1-6 were elucidated through a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Cytotoxicity studies of the isolates revealed that 2 inhibited human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) with IC50 values of 1.7 and 6.3 μM, respectively. PMID:26492982

  16. Methanogenesis from Sucrose by Defined Immobilized Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, W. Jack; Guyot, Jean-Pierre; Wolfe, Ralph S.

    1984-01-01

    A bacterial consortium capable of sucrose degradation primarily to CH4 and CO2 was constructed, with acetate as the key methanogenic precursor. In addition, the effect of agar immobilization on the activity of the consortium was determined. The primary fermentative organism, Escherichia coli, produced acetate, formate, H2, and CO2 (known substrates for methanogens), as well as ethanol and lactate, compounds that are not substrates for methanogens. Oxidation of the nonmethanogenic substrates, lactate and ethanol, to acetate was mediated by the addition of Acetobacterium woodii and Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The methanogenic stage was accomplished by the addition of the acetophilic methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri and the hydrogenophilic methanogen Methanobacterium formicicum. Results of studies with low substrate concentrations (0.05 to 0.2% [wt/vol]), a growth-limiting medium, and the five-component consortium indicated efficient conversion (40%) of sucrose carbon to CH4. Significant decreases in yields of CH4 and rates of CH4 production were observed if any component of the consortium was omitted. Approximately 70% of the CH4 generated occurred via acetate. Agar-immobilized cells of the consortium exhibited yields of CH4 and rates of CH4 production from sucrose similar to those of nonimmobilized cells. The rate of CH4 production decreased by 25% when cysteine was omitted from reaction conditions and by 40% when the immobilized consortium was stored for 1 week at 4°C. PMID:16346452

  17. Does sucrose influence the properties of DMPC vesicles?

    PubMed

    Kiselev, M A; Wartewig, S; Janich, M; Lesieur, P; Kiselev, A M; Ollivon, M; Neubert, R

    2003-03-01

    Small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction coupled with differential scanning calorimetry, and Raman spectroscopy were applied to investigate unilamellar (ULVs) and multilamellar (MLVs) dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) vesicles in aqueous sucrose solutions with sucrose concentrations from 0 to 60% w/w. In case of ULVs, the addition of sucrose decreases the polydispersity of vesicle population. A minimum value of polydispersity was found at 20% sucrose. For sucrose concentration from 0 to 35% oligolamellar vesicles in the ULV population have a minimum presence. Vesicles with 5-10% sucrose exhibit the best stability in time. For the case of MLVs, sucrose influences the temperature of the phase transitions, but the internal membrane structure remains unchanged. PMID:12637163

  18. Single cell protein production from yacon extract using a highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant of the marine yeast Cryptococcus aureus G7a and its nutritive analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Hai; Zhang, Tong; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Chi, Zhe; Li, Jing; Wang, Xiang-Hong

    2010-06-01

    The intracellular protein in the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant can be easily released when they are incubated both in the low-osmolarity water and at the non-permissive temperature (usually 37 degrees C). After the mutant was grown in the yacon extract for 45 h, the crude protein content in the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant Z114 was 59.1% and over 61% of the total protein could be released from the cells treated at 37 degrees C. The mutant cells grown in the yacon extract still contained high level of essential amino acids and other nutrients. This means that the yacon extract could be used as the medium for growth of the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant which contained high content of crude protein. PMID:19727833

  19. Aerobic decolorization, degradation and detoxification of azo dyes by a newly isolated salt-tolerant yeast Scheffersomyces spartinae TLHS-SF1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liang; He, Muyang; Song, Li; Fu, Xinmei; Shi, Shengnan

    2016-03-01

    Isolation, identification and characterization of a salt-tolerant yeast capable of degrading and detoxifying azo dyes were investigated in this study. Possible degradation pathway of Acid Scarlet 3R was proposed through analyzing metabolic intermediates using UV-Vis and HPLC-MS methods. Furthermore, the Microtox test was performed to evaluate the acute toxicity of the dye before and after biodegradation. The results showed that a salt-tolerant yeast named TLHS-SF1 was isolated and identified as Scheffersomyces spartinae basing on 26S rDNA analysis. The optimal decolorization and growth parameters were: sucrose 2gL(-1), (NH4)2SO4 0.6gL(-1), yeast extract 0.08gL(-1), NaCl⩽30gL(-1), 160rmin(-1), 30°C and pH 5.0-6.0. More than 90% of 80mg L(-1) 3R could be decolorized within 16h under the optimal conditions. 3R was possibly degraded successively through azo-reduction, deamination and desulfonation pathways, and its acute toxicity obviously decreased by strain TLHS-SF1. PMID:26744802

  20. Seed-specific overexpression of a potato sucrose transporter increases sucrose uptake and growth rates of developing pea cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Rosche, Elke; Blackmore, Daniel; Tegeder, Mechthild; Richardson, Terese; Schroeder, Hart; Higgins, Thomas J V; Frommer, Wolf B; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W

    2002-04-01

    During the storage phase, cotyledons of developing pea seeds are nourished by nutrients released to the seed apoplasm by their maternal seed coats. Sucrose is transported into pea cotyledons by sucrose/H+ symport mediated by PsSUT1 and possibly other sucrose symporters. PsSUT1 is principally localised to plasma membranes of cotyledon epidermal and subepidermal transfer cells abutting the seed coat. We tested the hypothesis that endogenous sucrose/H+ symporter(s) regulate sucrose import into developing pea cotyledons. This was done by supplementing their transport activity with a potato sucrose symporter (StSUT1), selectively expressed in cotyledon storage parenchyma cells under control of a vicilin promoter. In segregating transgenic lines, enhanced [(14)C]sucrose influx into cotyledons above wild-type levels was found to be dependent on StSUT1 expression. The transgene significantly increased (approximately 2-fold) transport activity of cotyledon storage parenchyma tissues where it was selectively expressed. In contrast, sucrose influx into whole cotyledons through the endogenous epidermal transfer cell pathway was increased by only 23% in cotyledons expressing the transgene. A similar response was found for rates of biomass gain by intact cotyledons and by excised cotyledons cultured on a sucrose medium. These observations demonstrate that transport activities of sucrose symporters influence cotyledon growth rates. The attenuated effect of StSUT1 overexpression on sucrose and dry matter fluxes by whole cotyledons is consistent with a large proportion of sucrose being taken up at the cotyledonary surface. This indicates that the cellular location of sucrose transporter activity plays a key role in determining rates of sucrose import into cotyledons. PMID:12000453

  1. Behavioral economics of concurrent ethanol-sucrose and sucrose reinforcement in the rat: effects of altering variable-ratio requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Petry, N M; Heyman, G M

    1995-01-01

    These experiments examined the own-price and cross-price elasticities of a drug (ethanol mixed with 10% sucrose) and a nondrug (10% sucrose) reinforcer. Rats were presented with ethanol-sucrose and sucrose, both available on concurrent independent variable-ratio (VR) 8 schedules of reinforcement. In Experiment 1, the variable ratio for the ethanol mix was systematically raised to 10, 12, 14, 16, 20, and 30, while the variable ratio for sucrose remained at 8. Five of the 6 rats increased ethanol-reinforced responding at some of the increments and defended baseline levels of ethanol intake. However, the rats eventually ceased ethanol-reinforced responding at the highest variable ratios. Sucrose-reinforced responding was not systematically affected by the changes in variable ratio for ethanol mix. In Experiment 2, the variable ratio for sucrose was systematically increased while the ethanol-sucrose response requirement remained constant. The rats decreased sucrose-reinforced responding and increased ethanol-sucrose-reinforced responding, resulting in a two- to 10-fold increase in ethanol intake. Experiment 3 examined the substitutability of qualitatively identical reinforcers: 10% sucrose versus 10% sucrose. Increases in variable-ratio requirements at the preferred lever resulted in a switch in lever preference. Experiment 4 examined whether 10% ethanol mix substituted for 5% ethanol mix, with increasing variable-ratio requirements of the 5% ethanol. All rats eventually responded predominantly for the 10% ethanol mix, but total amount of ethanol consumed per session did not systematically change. In Experiment 5, the variable-ratio requirements for both ethanol and sucrose were simultaneously raised to VR 120; 7 of 8 rats increased ethanol-reinforced responding while decreasing sucrose-reinforced responding. These data suggest that, within this ethanol-induction procedure and within certain parameters, demand for ethanol-sucrose was relatively inelastic, and sucrose consumption was independent of ethanol-sucrose consumption. Demand for sucrose, on the other hand, was relatively elastic, and ethanol-sucrose readily substituted for it. The results are discussed in terms of applying a behavioral economic approach to relationships between drug and nondrug reinforcers. PMID:8551192

  2. Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Xylose-extracted Corncob Residue by SSF Using Inhibitor- and Thermal-tolerant Yeast Clavispora NRRL Y-50339

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xylose-extracted corncob residue, a byproduct of the xylose-producing industry using corncobs, is an abundant potential energy resource for cellulosic ethanol production. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) is considered an ideal one-step process for conversion of lignocellulosic b...

  3. Transcription factors, sucrose, and sucrose metabolic genes interact to regulate potato phenylpropanoid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Payyavula, Raja S.; Navarre, Duroy A.

    2013-01-01

    Much remains unknown about how transcription factors and sugars regulate phenylpropanoid metabolism in tuber crops like potato (Solanum tuberosum). Based on phylogeny and protein similarity to known regulators of phenylpropanoid metabolism, 15 transcription factors were selected and their expression was compared in white, yellow, red, and purple genotypes with contrasting phenolic and anthocyanin profiles. Red and purple genotypes had increased phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) enzyme activity, markedly higher levels of phenylpropanoids, and elevated expression of most phenylpropanoid structural genes, including a novel anthocyanin O-methyltransferase. The transcription factors Anthocyanin1 (StAN1), basic Helix Loop Helix1 (StbHLH1), and StWD40 were more strongly expressed in red and purple potatoes. Expression of 12 other transcription factors was not associated with phenylpropanoid content, except for StMYB12B, which showed a negative relationship. Increased expression of AN1, bHLH1, and WD40 was also associated with environmentally mediated increases in tuber phenylpropanoids. Treatment of potato plantlets with sucrose induced hydroxycinnamic acids, flavonols, anthocyanins, structural genes, AN1, bHLH1, WD40, and genes encoding the sucrose-hydrolysing enzymes SUSY1, SUSY4, and INV2. Transient expression of StAN1 in tobacco leaves induced bHLH1, structural genes, SUSY1, SUSY4, and INV1, and increased phenylpropanoid amounts. StAN1 infiltration into tobacco leaves decreased sucrose and glucose concentrations. In silico promoter analysis revealed the presence of MYB and bHLH regulatory elements on sucrolytic gene promoters and sucrose-responsive elements on the AN1 promoter. These findings reveal an interesting dynamic between AN1, sucrose, and sucrose metabolic genes in modulating potato phenylpropanoids. PMID:24098049

  4. Sucrose and Warmth for Analgesia in Healthy Newborns: An RCT

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Elizabeth; Zageris, Danielle; Heilman, Keri J.; Porges, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Increasing data suggest that neonatal pain has long-term consequences. Nonpharmacologic techniques (sucrose taste, pacifier suckling, breastfeeding) are effective and now widely used to combat minor neonatal pain. This study examined the analgesic effect of sucrose combined with radiant warmth compared with the taste of sucrose alone during a painful procedure in healthy full-term newborns. METHODS: A randomized, controlled trial included 29 healthy, full-term newborns born at the University of Chicago Hospital. Both groups of infants were given 1.0 mL of 25% sucrose solution 2 minutes before the vaccination, and 1 group additionally was given radiant warmth from an infant warmer before the vaccination. We assessed pain by comparing differences in cry, grimace, heart rate variability (ie, respiratory sinus arrhythmia), and heart rate between the groups. RESULTS: The sucrose plus warmer group cried and grimaced for 50% less time after the vaccination than the sucrose alone group (P < .05, respectively). The sucrose plus warmer group had lower heart rate and heart rate variability (ie, respiratory sinus arrhythmia) responses compared with the sucrose alone group (P < .01), reflecting a greater ability to physiologically regulate in response to the painful vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of sucrose and radiant warmth is an effective analgesic in newborns and reduces pain better than sucrose alone. The ready availability of this practical nonpharmacologic technique has the potential to reduce the burden of newborn pain. PMID:25687147

  5. Vaginal Yeast Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Vaginal Yeast Infections Print ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  6. Kinetic model of sucrose accumulation in maturing sugarcane culm tissue.

    PubMed

    Uys, Lafras; Botha, Frederik C; Hofmeyr, Jan-Hendrik S; Rohwer, Johann M

    2007-01-01

    Biochemically, it is not completely understood why or how commercial varieties of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) are able to accumulate sucrose in high concentrations. Such concentrations are obtained despite the presence of sucrose synthesis/breakdown cycles (futile cycling) in the culm of the storage parenchyma. Given the complexity of the process, kinetic modelling may help to elucidate the factors governing sucrose accumulation or direct the design of experimental optimisation strategies. This paper describes the extension of an existing model of sucrose accumulation (Rohwer, J.M., Botha, F.C., 2001. Analysis of sucrose accumulation in the sugar cane culm on the basis of in vitro kinetic data. Biochem. J. 358, 437-445) to account for isoforms of sucrose synthase and fructokinase, carbon partitioning towards fibre formation, and the glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase (PFK), pyrophosphate-dependent PFK and aldolase. Moreover, by including data on the maximal activity of the enzymes as measured in different internodes, a growth model was constructed that describes the metabolic behaviour as sugarcane parenchymal tissue matures from internodes 3-10. While there was some discrepancy between modelled and experimentally determined steady-state sucrose concentrations in the cytoplasm, steady-state fluxes showed a better fit. The model supports a hypothesis of vacuolar sucrose accumulation against a concentration gradient. A detailed metabolic control analysis of sucrose synthase showed that each isoform has a unique control profile. Fructose uptake by the cell and sucrose uptake by the vacuole had a negative control on the futile cycling of sucrose and a positive control on sucrose accumulation, while the control profile for neutral invertase was reversed. When the activities of these three enzymes were changed from their reference values, the effects on futile cycling and sucrose accumulation were amplified. The model can be run online at the JWS Online database (http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za/database/uys). PMID:17555779

  7. Yeast based sensors.

    PubMed

    Shimomura-Shimizu, Mifumi; Karube, Isao

    2010-01-01

    Since the first microbial cell sensor was studied by Karube et al. in 1977, many types of yeast based sensors have been developed as analytical tools. Yeasts are known as facultative anaerobes. Facultative anaerobes can survive in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The yeast based sensor consisted of a DO electrode and an immobilized omnivorous yeast. In yeast based sensor development, many kinds of yeast have been employed by applying their characteristics to adapt to the analyte. For example, Trichosporon cutaneum was used to estimate organic pollution in industrial wastewater. Yeast based sensors are suitable for online control of biochemical processes and for environmental monitoring. In this review, principles and applications of yeast based sensors are summarized. PMID:20087724

  8. Membrane perturbing properties of sucrose polyesters.

    PubMed

    McManus, G G; Buchanan, G W; Jarrell, H C; Epand, R M; Epand, R F; Cheetham, J J

    2001-02-01

    Sucrose polyester (SPE), in the form of sucrose octaesters and sucrose hexaesters of palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), oleic (18:1cis), and linoleic (18:2cis) acids, have many uses. Applications include: a non-caloric fat substitute, detoxification agent, and oral contrast agent for human abdominal (MRI) magnetic resonance imaging. However, it has been shown that the ingestion of SPE was shown to generate a depletion of physiologically important lipidic vitamins and other lipophilic molecules. In order to better understand, at the molecular level, the type of interaction between SPE and lipid membrane, we have, first synthesized different type of labelled and non-labelled SPEs. Secondly, we have studied the effect of SPEs on multilamellar dispersions of dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DEPE) and dipalmitoylphosphocholine (DPPC) as a function of temperature, SPE composition and concentration. The effects of SPEs were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction, 2H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. At low concentration (< 1 mol%) all of the SPEs lowered the bilayer to the inverted hexagonal phase transition temperature of DEPE and induced the formation of a cubic phase in a composition dependent manner. At the same low concentration, SPEs in DPPC induce the formation of a non-bilayer phase as seen by 31P NMR. Order parameter measurements of DPPC-d62/SPE mixtures show that the SPE effect on the DPPC monolayer thickness is dependent on the SPE, concentration, chains length and saturation level. At higher concentration (> or = 10 mol%) SPE are very potent DEPE bilayer to HII phase transition promoters, although at that concentration the SPE have lost the ability to form cubic phases. SPEs have profound effects on the phase behaviour of model membrane systems, and may be important to consider when developing current and potential industrial and medical applications. PMID:11269937

  9. Role of sucrose phosphate synthase in sucrose biosynthesis in ripening bananas and its relationship to the respiratory climacteric.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, N L; Pharr, D M; Huber, S C

    1990-09-01

    During ripening of bananas (Musa spp. [AAA group, Cavendish subgroup]), there is a massive conversion of starch to sucrose. Also during ripening there is a rise in respiration known as the respiratory climacteric. In this study changes in carbohydrate content, activities of starch and sucrose metabolizing enzymes, and respiration were measured to assess their potential interrelationships. Sucrose phosphate synthase activity increased dramatically during the first 4 days after initiation of ripening by ethylene treatment. Starch concentration decreased and sucrose concentration increased during this time period. Developmental changes in sucrose phosphate synthase activity were measured with limiting substrate (plus Pi) and saturating substrate concentrations. Activities were not parallel under the two assay conditions, providing tentative evidence that kinetically different forms of the enzyme may exist at different stages of ripening. Sucrose accumulation rate was most highly correlated with sucrose phosphate synthase activity assayed with limiting substrate concentrations (plus Pi). The cumulative amount of CO(2) respired during ripening was positively correlated with sugar accumulation (R(2) = 0.97). From this linear regression it was calculated that a constant 0.605 millimoles of CO(2) was evolved per mole of sucrose formed throughout ripening. Using this quantity, the percentage of the total respiratory ATP produced which was required for the conversion of starch to sucrose was calculated assuming different models for carbon export from the amyloplast. The results suggest that sucrose biosynthesis during ripening constitutes a significant sink for respiratory ATP. PMID:16667688

  10. Sucrose activates human taste pathways differently from artificial sweetener.

    PubMed

    Frank, Guido K W; Oberndorfer, Tyson A; Simmons, Alan N; Paulus, Martin P; Fudge, Julie L; Yang, Tony T; Kaye, Walter H

    2008-02-15

    Animal models suggest that sucrose activates taste afferents differently than non-caloric sweeteners. Little information exists how artificial sweeteners engage central taste pathways in the human brain. We assessed sucrose and sucralose taste pleasantness across a concentration gradient in 12 healthy control women and applied 10% sucrose and matched sucralose during functional magnet resonance imaging. The results indicate that (1) both sucrose and sucralose activate functionally connected primary taste pathways; (2) taste pleasantness predicts left insula response; (3) sucrose elicits a stronger brain response in the anterior insula, frontal operculum, striatum and anterior cingulate, compared to sucralose; (4) only sucrose, but not sucralose, stimulation engages dopaminergic midbrain areas in relation to the behavioral pleasantness response. Thus, brain response distinguishes the caloric from the non-caloric sweetener, although the conscious mind could not. This could have important implications on how effective artificial sweeteners are in their ability to substitute sugar intake. PMID:18096409

  11. Yeast communities associated with sugarcane in Campos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Azeredo, L A; Gomes, E A; Mendonça-Hagler, L C; Hagler, A N

    1998-09-01

    Yeast communities associated with sugarcane leaves, stems and rhizosphere during different phases of plant development were studied near Campos, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Atmospheric temperature, soil granulometry and pH, and sugar cane juice degree Brix and pH were determined. Yeast communities associated with sugarcane were obtained after cellular extraction by shaking, blending and shaking plus sonication, and cultured on Yeast Nitrogen Base Agar plus glucose (0.5%) and Yeast Extract-Malt Extract Agar. No significant differences in yeast counts were found among the cellular extraction treatments and culture media. 230 yeast cultures were identified according to standard methods, and distinct yeast communities were found for each substrate studied. The prevalent species isolated from sugarcane were Cryptococcus laurentii, Cryptococcus albidus, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Debaryomyces hansenii. PMID:10943361

  12. Effect of salt on the response of birds to sucrose

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, J.G., Jr.; Maller, O.

    1973-01-01

    The preference of male red-winged blackbirds for solutions of sucrose and sucrose with 0.03 M sodium chloride was tested, using a two-bottle choice test. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that the birds were indifferent to 0.03 M NaCl in water. Both control and experimental animals exhibited indifference to the solutions at the lowest concentration and aversion at the highest. The data suggest that the added sodium chloride makes the sucrose stimulus more discriminable.

  13. Interference of humic acids and DNA extracted directly from soil in detection and transformation of recombinant DNA from bacteria and a yeast.

    PubMed

    Tebbe, C C; Vahjen, W

    1993-08-01

    A two-step protocol for the extraction and purification of total DNA from soil samples was developed. Crude DNA extracts (100 microliters from 5 g of soil) were contaminated with humic acids at concentrations of 0.7 to 3.3 micrograms/microliters, depending on the type of soil extracted. The coextracted humic acid fraction of a clay silt was similar to a commercially available standard humic acid mixture, as determined by electrophoretic mobility in agarose gels, UV fluorescence, and inhibition assays with DNA-transforming enzymes. Restriction endonucleases were inhibited at humic acid concentrations of 0.5 to 17.2 micrograms/ml for the commercial product and 0.8 to 51.7 micrograms/ml for the coextracted humic acids. DNase I was less susceptible (MIC of standard humic acids, 912 micrograms/ml), and RNase could not be inhibited at all (MIC, > 7.6 mg/ml). High inhibitory susceptibilities for humic acids were observed with Taq polymerase. For three Taq polymerases from different commercial sources, MICs were 0.08 to 0.64 micrograms of the standard humic acids per ml and 0.24 to 0.48 micrograms of the coextracted humic acids per ml. The addition of T4 gene 32 protein increased the MIC for one Taq polymerase to 5.12 micrograms/ml. Humic acids decreased nonradioactive detection in DNA-DNA slot blot hybridizations at amounts of 0.1 micrograms and inhibited transformation of competent Escherichia coli HB101 with a broad-host-range plasmid, pUN1, at concentrations of 100 micrograms/ml. Purification of crude DNA with ion-exchange chromatography resulted in removal of 97% of the initially coextracted humic acids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7690221

  14. Alcohol production from Jerusalem artichoke using yeasts with inulinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Guiraud, J.P.; Daurelles, J.; Galzy, P.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to show that yeasts with inulinase activity can be used to produce ethanol from the Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.). The results show that a fermentable extract can be easily obtained from the Jerusalem artichoke even under cold conditions. Yeasts with inulinase activity can be used to produce ethanol with good profitability. 19 refs.

  15. Sucrose-mediated giant cell formation in the genus Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K G; McDonald, I J

    1976-03-01

    Growth of Neisseria perflava, Neisseria cinerea, and Neisseria sicca strain Kirkland in media supplemented with sucrose (0.5 to 5.0% w/v) resulted in the formation of giant cells. Response to sucrose was specific in that a variety of other carbohydrates did not mediate giant cell formation. Giant cells appeared only under growth conditions and did not lyse upon transfer to medium lacking sucrose or upon resuspension in hypotonic media. Reversion of giant to normal cells occurred when giant cells were used as inocula and allowed to multiply in media lacking sucrose. PMID:1253000

  16. Transport and Sorting of the Solanum tuberosum Sucrose Transporter SUT1 Is Affected by Posttranslational Modification[W

    PubMed Central

    Krügel, Undine; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Langbein, Jennifer; Wiederhold, Elena; Liesche, Johannes; Friedrich, Thomas; Grimm, Bernhard; Martinoia, Enrico; Poolman, Bert; Kühn, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The plant sucrose transporter SUT1 from Solanum tuberosum revealed a dramatic redox-dependent increase in sucrose transport activity when heterologously expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Plant plasma membrane vesicles do not show any change in proton flux across the plasma membrane in the presence of redox reagents, indicating a SUT1-specific effect of redox reagents. Redox-dependent sucrose transport activity was confirmed electrophysiologically in Xenopus laevis oocytes with SUT1 from maize (Zea mays). Localization studies of green fluorescent protein fusion constructs showed that an oxidative environment increased the targeting of SUT1 to the plasma membrane where the protein concentrates in 200- to 300-nm raft-like microdomains. Using plant plasma membranes, St SUT1 can be detected in the detergent-resistant membrane fraction. Importantly, in yeast and in plants, oxidative reagents induced a shift in the monomer to dimer equilibrium of the St SUT1 protein and increased the fraction of dimer. Biochemical methods confirmed the capacity of SUT1 to form a dimer in plants and yeast cells in a redox-dependent manner. Blue native PAGE, chemical cross-linking, and immunoprecipitation, as well as the analysis of transgenic plants with reduced expression of St SUT1, confirmed the dimerization of St SUT1 and Sl SUT1 (from Solanum lycopersicum) in planta. The ability to form homodimers in plant cells was analyzed by the split yellow fluorescent protein technique in transiently transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves and protoplasts. Oligomerization seems to be cell type specific since under native-like conditions, a phloem-specific reduction of the dimeric form of the St SUT1 protein was detectable in SUT1 antisense plants, whereas constitutively inhibited antisense plants showed reduction only of the monomeric form. The role of redox control of sucrose transport in plants is discussed. PMID:18790827

  17. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis IV. The Identity and Sequence of the Intermediates in Sucrose Synthesis

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Calvin, M.; Benson, A.

    1948-12-14

    The synthesis of sucrose from C{sup 14}0{sub 2} by green algae has been investigated and the intermediates separated by the method of paper chromatography. It is shown that sucrose is the first free sugar appearing during photosynthesis. It is apparently formed by condensation of the glucose-I-phosphate and a fructose phosphate. A series of radioautographs of paper chromatograms of extracts from plants which have photosynthesized for different periods of time has been prepared. The results indicate that 2-phosphoglyceric acid is the first product synthesized from C0{sub 2} during photosynthesis.

  18. Functional characterization of sucrose phosphorylase and scrR, a regulator of sucrose metabolism in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Januana S; Abdi, Reihaneh; Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Schwab, Clarissa; Gänzle, Michael G

    2013-12-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri harbours alternative enzymes for sucrose metabolism, sucrose phosphorylase, fructansucrases, and glucansucrases. Sucrose phosphorylase and fructansucrases additionally contribute to raffinose metabolism. Glucansucrases and fructansucrases produce exopolysaccharides as alternative to sucrose hydrolysis. L. reuteri LTH5448 expresses a levansucrase (ftfA) and sucrose phosphorylase (scrP), both are inducible by sucrose. This study determined the contribution of scrP to sucrose and raffinose metabolism in L. reuteri LTH5448, and elucidated the role of scrR in regulation sucrose metabolism. Disruption of scrP and scrR was achieved by double crossover mutagenesis. L. reuteri LTH5448, LTH5448ΔscrP and LTH5448ΔscrR were characterized with respect to growth and metabolite formation with glucose, sucrose, or raffinose as sole carbon source. Inactivation of scrR led to constitutive transcription of scrP and ftfA, demonstrating that scrR is negative regulator. L. reuteri LTH5448 and the LTH5448ΔscrP or LTH5448ΔscrR mutant strains did not differ with respect to glucose, sucrose or raffinose utilization. However, L. reuteri LTH5448ΔscrP produced more levan, indicating that the lack of sucrose phosphorylase is compensated by an increased metabolic flux through levansucrase. In conclusion, the presence of alternate pathways for sucrose and raffinose metabolism and their regulation indicate that these substrates, which are abundant in plants, are preferred carbohydrate sources for L. reuteri. PMID:24010626

  19. Inhibition by Natural Dietary Substances of Gastrointestinal Absorption of Starch and Sucrose in Rats and Pigs: 1. Acute Studies

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Harry G.; Echard, Bobby; Bagchi, Debasis; Stohs, Sidney

    2007-01-01

    Rapid gastrointestinal absorption of refined carbohydrates (CHO) is linked to perturbed glucose-insulin metabolism that is, in turn, associated with many chronic health disorders. We assessed the ability of various natural substances, commonly referred to as “CHO blockers,” to influence starch and sucrose absorption in vivo in ninety-six rats and two pigs. These natural enzyme inhibitors of amylase/sucrase reportedly lessen breakdown of starches and sucrose in the gastrointestinal tract, limiting their absorption. To estimate absorption, groups of nine SD rats were gavaged with water or water plus rice starch and/or sucrose; and circulating glucose was measured at timed intervals thereafter. For each variation in the protocol a total of at least nine different rats were studied with an equal number of internal controls on three different occasions. The pigs rapidly drank CHO and inhibitors in their drinking water. In rats, glucose elevations above baseline over four hours following rice starch challenge as estimated by area-under-curve (AUC) were 40%, 27%, and 85% of their internal control after ingesting bean extract, hibiscus extract, and l-arabinose respectively in addition to the rice starch. The former two were significantly different from control. L-Arabinose virtually eliminated the rising circulating glucose levels after sucrose challenge, whereas hibiscus and bean extracts were associated with lesser decreases than l-arabinose that were still significantly lower than control. The glucose elevations above baseline over four hours in rats receiving sucrose (AUC) were 51%, 43% and 2% of control for bean extract, hibiscus extract, and L-arabinose, respectively. Evidence for dose-response of bean and hibiscus extracts is reported. Giving the natural substances minus CHO challenge caused no significant changes in circulating glucose concentrations, indicating no major effects on overall metabolism. A formula combining these natural products significantly decreased both starch and sucrose absorption, even when the CHO were given simultaneously. These results support the hypothesis that the enzyme inhibitors examined here at reasonable doses can safely lower the glycemic loads starch and sucrose. PMID:17713600

  20. Sucrose transport and phloem unloading in stem of Vicia faba: possible involvement of a sucrose carrier and osmotic regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Aloni, B.; Wyse, R.E.; Griffith, S.

    1986-06-01

    After pulse labeling of a source leaf with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, stem sections of Vicia faba plants were cut and the efflux characteristics of /sup 14/C-labeled sugars into various buffered solutions were determined. Radiolabeled sucrose was shown to remain localized in the phloem and adjacent phloem parenchyma tissues after a 2-hour chase. Therefore, sucrose leakage from stem segments prepared following a 75-minute chase period was assumed to be characteristic of phloem unloading. The efflux of /sup 14/C assimilates from the phloem was enhanced by 1 millimolar p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonic acid (PCMBS) and by 5 micromolar carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenly hydrazone (CCCP). However, PCMBS inhibited and CCCP enhanced general leakage of nonradioactive sugars from the stem segments. Sucrose at concentrations of 50 millimolar in the free space increased efflux of (/sup 14/C)sucrose, presumably through an exchange mechanism. This exchange was inhibited by PCMBS and abolished by 0.2 molar mannitol. Increasing the osmotic concentration of the efflux medium with mannitol reduced (/sup 14/C)sucrose efflux. However, this inhibition seems not to be specific to sucrose unloading since leakage of total sugars, nonlabeled sucrose, glucose, and amino acids from the bulk of the tissue was reduced in a similar manner. The data suggest that phloem unloading in cut stem segments is consistent with passive efflux of sucrose from the phloem to the apoplast and that sucrose exchange via a membrane carrier may be involved.

  1. Improvement of stress tolerance and leavening ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions by overexpression of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Feng, Bing; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-03-16

    During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast cells are exposed to multiple baking-associated stresses, such as elevated high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. There is a high demand for baker's yeast strains that could withstand these stresses with high leavening ability. The SNR84 gene encodes H/ACA snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA), which is known to be involved in pseudouridylation of the large subunit rRNA. However, the function of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast coping with baking-associated stresses remains unclear. In this study, we explored the effect of SNR84 overexpression on baker's yeast which was exposed to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. These results suggest that overexpression of the SNR84 gene conferred tolerance of baker's yeast cells to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses and enhanced their leavening ability in high-sucrose and freeze-thaw dough. These findings could provide a valuable insight for breeding of novel stress-resistant baker's yeast strains that are useful for baking. PMID:25555226

  2. Interspecific Variation in the Promoter Region of A Sucrose Synthase Gene in the Genus Saccharum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthase is an important enzyme of sucrose metabolism in sugarcane, a polyploid interspecific hybrid of the genus Saccharum. One of the genes for sucrose synthase (Sus2, homologous to maize Sh1) is more highly expressed in sucrose-storing hybrids than in low sucrose S. spontaneum. We amplifi...

  3. Aqueous Extract of Annona macroprophyllata: A Potential α-Glucosidase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Brindis, F.; González-Trujano, M. E.; González-Andrade, M.; Aguirre-Hernández, E.; Villalobos-Molina, R.

    2013-01-01

    Annona genus contains plants used in folk medicine for the treatment of diabetes. In the present study, an aqueous extract prepared from Annona macroprophyllata (Annonaceae, also known as A. diversifolia) leaves was evaluated on both the activity of yeast α-glucosidase (an in vitro assay) and sucrose tolerance in Wistar rats. The results have shown that the aqueous extract from A. macroprophyllata inhibits the yeast α-glucosidase with an IC50 = 1.18 mg/mL, in a competitive manner with a Ki = 0.97 mg/mL, a similar value to that of acarbose (Ki = 0.79 mg/mL). The inhibitory activity of A. macroprophyllata was reinforced by its antihyperglycemic effect, at doses of 100, 300, and 500 mg/kg in rats. Chromatographic analysis identified the flavonoids rutin and isoquercitrin in the most polar fractions of A. macroprophyllata crude extract, suggesting that these flavonoids are part of the active constituents in the plant. Our results support the use of A. macroprophyllata in Mexican folk medicine to control postprandial glycemia in people with diabetes mellitus, involving active constituents of flavonoid nature. PMID:24298552

  4. Quillajasides A and B: New Phenylpropanoid Sucrose Esters from the Inner Bark of Quillaja saponaria Molina.

    PubMed

    Maier, Christiane; Conrad, Jürgen; Steingass, Christof B; Beifuss, Uwe; Carle, Reinhold; Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2015-10-14

    The phenolic composition of freshly prepared aqueous extracts of the inner bark of Quillaja saponaria Molina was compared to that of commercially available Quillaja extracts, which are currently used as emulsifiers in foods and cosmetics. Major phenolics in both extracts were (+)-piscidic acid and several p-coumaroyl sucrose esters. Among the latter, two new compounds were isolated and characterized: α-l-rhap-(1→4)-α-l-rhap-(1→3)-(4-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl)-α-d-glup-(1→2)-(3-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl)-β-d-fruf (quillajaside A) and β-d-apif-(1→4)-α-l-rhap-(1→4)-α-l-rhap-(1→3)-(4-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl)-α-d-glup-(1→2)-(3-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl)-β-d-fruf (quillajaside B). In addition, a putative biosynthetic pathway of at least 20 structurally related p-coumaroyl sucrose esters was tentatively identified. Besides their antioxidant activity and their potential function as substrate for enzymatic browning reactions, the new compounds are highly characteristic for both the inner bark of Q. saponaria and commercial extracts derived therefrom. Consequently, they might serve as authenticity markers for the detection of Quillaja extracts in food and cosmetic formulations. PMID:26375986

  5. Highly Efficient Fructooligosaccharides Production by an Erythritol-Producing Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Displaying Fructosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lebin; An, Jin; Li, Lijuan; Wang, Hengwei; Liu, Dawen; Li, Ning; Cheng, Hairong; Deng, Zixin

    2016-05-18

    Currently, fructooligosaccharides (FOS) are industrially transformed from sucrose by purified enzymes or fungi cells. However, these methods are expensive and time-consuming. An economical approach to producing FOS using erythritol-producing yeast cells was described in this study. Fructosyltransferase from Aspergillus oryzae was displayed on the cell surface of Yarrowia lipolytica, resulting in an engineered strain capable of transforming sucrose to FOS. An amount of 480 g/L FOS was produced within 3 h in a solution of 800 g/L sucrose and 5 g/L cells (dry cell weight, DCW) at pH 6.0 and 60 °C, with a yield of 60% of total sucrose and a productivity of 160 g/(L·h). The yeast pastes from the erythritol industry can be repeatedly used as the whole-cell catalysts at least 10 times by this newly developed approach. This efficient method is attractive for the large-scale production of FOS from sucrose. PMID:27124471

  6. Media for preservative resistant yeasts: a collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Hocking, A D

    1996-04-01

    An international collaborative study was carried out to determine the most effective medium for selective isolation and enumeration of preservative resistant yeasts. Such a medium should prevent the growth of other yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are tolerant to lower levels of commonly used food preservatives, and sensitive yeasts such as Rhodotorula species. The study compared two non-selective media that are in common use for cultivation of yeasts from foods, Malt Extract agar (MEA) and Tryptone Glucose Yeast extract agar (TGY) with media made selective for preservative resistant yeasts by addition of 0.5% acetic acid to these two basal media (MEAA and TGYA). A fifth medium, Zygosaccharomyces bailii medium (ZBM) was also included in the study. These media were compared for their efficacy in selective isolation and enumeration of the preservative resistant yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Pichia membranaefaciens. MEA and TGY without acetic acid were used as control, non-selective media, and Rhodotorula glutinis was the preservative sensitive control culture. Seven laboratories in six countries took part in the study. Of the non-selective media, TGY generally gave the highest counts, and TGY amended with 0.5% acetic acid (TGYA) was the best medium for recovery of all three preservative-resistant yeasts. ZBM was found to be selective for Z. bailii, but counts of this yeast on ZBM were significantly lower than on TGYA. R. glutinis did not grow on any of the selective media. PMID:8796419

  7. Oral sucrose and pain relief for preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Anita; Waltman, Patricia A

    2003-06-01

    The frequency of painful procedures performed on preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) presents a challenge to nurses who are attempting to provide effective pain relief, and to the infants themselves who may suffer adverse consequences in response to repeated painful procedures. One new pain relief intervention under study is the administration of oral sucrose, which may activate endogenous opioid systems within the body. Studies with preterm infants that have examined the use of oral sucrose as an analgesic during heelsticks and venipunctures have shown that sucrose is effective in reducing pain. Sucrose may also be combined with nonnutritive sucking to provide significant pain relief. The use of oral sucrose is now recommended with a wide range of painful procedures in the NICU. Promising results have been observed in studies with both term and preterm infants, but less research has occurred with preterm infants. Additional research is warranted to determine the most effective approaches for the administration of sucrose, to examine the effectiveness of sucrose with additional types of painful procedures, and to examine the effects of long-term repeated use of sucrose. PMID:12836150

  8. Functionality of Inulin as a Sucrose Replacer in Cookie Baking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inulin was evaluated as a sucrose replacer for healthy cookie production with benefits of low glycemic impact and prebiotic soluble fiber. Sucrose (as a reference) and three inulin products of different concentrations (as soluble fibers) were used to explore the effects of sugar-replacer type on so...

  9. Estimation of sugarcane sucrose and biomass with remote sensing techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing techniques were used to predict sucrose levels (TRS) and gross cane yield in field-grown sugarcane. To estimate sucrose levels, leaves were collected from plant-cane and first-ratoon sugarcane plants from the variety maturity studies conducted at the USDA-ARS-SRRC, Sugarcane Research...

  10. The Crystal Structure of Nitrosomonas europaea Sucrose Synthase Reveals Critical Conformational Changes and Insights into Sucrose Metabolism in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rui; Asención Diez, Matías D.; Figueroa, Carlos M.; Machtey, Matías; Iglesias, Alberto A.; Ballicora, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this paper we report the first crystal structure of a prokaryotic sucrose synthase from the nonphotosynthetic bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea. The obtained structure was in an open form, whereas the only other available structure, from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, was in a closed conformation. Comparative structural analysis revealed a “hinge-latch” combination, which is critical to transition between the open and closed forms of the enzyme. The N. europaea sucrose synthase shares the same fold as the GT-B family of the retaining glycosyltransferases. In addition, a triad of conserved homologous catalytic residues in the family was shown to be functionally critical in the N. europaea sucrose synthase (Arg567, Lys572, and Glu663). This implies that sucrose synthase shares not only a common origin with the GT-B family but also a similar catalytic mechanism. The enzyme preferred transferring glucose from ADP-glucose rather than UDP-glucose like the eukaryotic counterparts. This predicts that these prokaryotic organisms have a different sucrose metabolic scenario from plants. Nucleotide preference determines where the glucose moiety is targeted after sucrose is degraded. IMPORTANCE We obtained biochemical and structural evidence of sucrose metabolism in nonphotosynthetic bacteria. Until now, only sucrose synthases from photosynthetic organisms have been characterized. Here, we provide the crystal structure of the sucrose synthase from the chemolithoautotroph N. europaea. The structure supported that the enzyme functions with an open/close induced fit mechanism. The enzyme prefers as the substrate adenine-based nucleotides rather than uridine-based like the eukaryotic counterparts, implying a strong connection between sucrose and glycogen metabolism in these bacteria. Mutagenesis data showed that the catalytic mechanism must be conserved not only in sucrose synthases but also in all other retaining GT-B glycosyltransferases. PMID:26013491

  11. Optimisation of methodology for enumeration of xerophilic yeasts from foods.

    PubMed

    Andrews, S; de Graaf, H; Stamation, H

    1997-04-01

    Xerophilic yeasts grow in intermediate moisture foods (aw, 0.65-0.85) such as sugar syrups, fruit concentrates, jams and brines. Non-osmophilic yeasts are enumerated by diluting in 0.1% peptone and then plated onto media such as malt extract or glucose yeast extract agar. In the presence of moulds the yeasts are enumerated in dichloran rose bengal chloramphenicol agar (DRBC). These procedures were demonstrated to be unsatisfactory for the enumeration of xerophilic yeasts in low aw foods. Investigations using pure cultures of xerophilic yeasts as well as naturally contaminated apple juice concentrates and glacé cherries have shown that a reduced aw diluent, in particular 30% w/w glycerol in combination with tryptone 10% glucose yeast extract agar (TGY) optimises the recovery of the yeasts, especially sublethally injured cells. The inclusion of sodium chloride in either the diluents or the culture media was not necessary to optimise the recovery of D. hansenii growing in 20% sodium chloride broths. PMID:9105918

  12. Yeast improves resistance to environmental challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alphamune™, a yeast extract antibiotic alternative, was added at either 1 lb/ton or 2 lb/ton to a turkey starter diet. Two trials were conducted to evaluate the effects of Alphamune™ on gut maturation of 7 and 21 day old poults. Sections from the mid-point of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum of each ...

  13. A Novel Production Method for High-Fructose Glucose Syrup from Sucrose-Containing Biomass by a Newly Isolated Strain of Osmotolerant Meyerozyma guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Sadat Mohammad Rezq; Kodaki, Tsutomu

    2016-04-28

    One osmotolerant strain from among 44 yeast isolates was selected based on its growth abilities in media containing high concentrations of sucrose. This selected strain, named SKENNY, was identified as Meyerozyma guilliermondii by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer regions and partial D1/D2 large-subunit domains of the 26S ribosomal RNA. SK-ENNY was utilized to produce high-fructose glucose syrup (HFGS) from sucrose-containing biomass. Conversion rates to HFGS from 310-610 g/l of pure sucrose and from 75-310 g/l of sugar beet molasses were 73.5-94.1% and 76.2-91.1%, respectively. In the syrups produced, fructose yields were 89.4-100% and 96.5-100% and glucose yields were 57.6-82.5% and 55.3-79.5% of the theoretical values for pure sucrose and molasses sugars, respectively. This is the first report of employing M. guilliermondii for production of HFGS from sucrose-containing biomass. PMID:26718465

  14. Use of glutaraldehyde and benzalkonium chloride for minimizing post-harvest physio-chemical and microbial changes responsible for sucrose losses in sugar cane.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pushpa; Arya, Namita; Tiwari, Priyanka; Suman, Archna; Rai, R K; Shrivastava, A K; Solomon, S

    2008-08-27

    Sugar cane is sensitive to enormous sucrose losses induced by physio-chemical and microbial changes, the severity being increased during the time lag between harvest and crushing in the mills. Minimization of the sucrose losses in the field is essential for better sugar recovery and prevention of sucrose losses. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of glutaraldehyde and benzalkonium chloride for their effects on the microbial counts and physio-chemical changes responsible for sucrose losses. Glutaraldehyde and benzalkonium chloride (1000 + 250 ppm) reduced the losses in sucrose content to 7.1% as compared to the 30.8% loss in the control, thus improving the performance by 76.9%. The application of chemicals reduced the acid invertase activity (by 60%), lowered weight loss, titrable acidity, reducing sugars content, dextran, ethanol, and ethylene production and respiration rates. The application led to the reduction in the total bacterial, fungal, Leuconostoc, and yeast counts by 67.92, 51.3%, 26.08, and 51.2%, respectively. PMID:18662009

  15. Sucrose behenate as a crystallization enhancer for soft fats.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Maria Aliciane Fontenele; da Silva, Thaís Lomonaco Teodoro; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Badan; Chiu, Ming Chih; Gonçalves, Lireny Aparecida Guaraldo

    2016-02-01

    The addition of sucrose behenate for the modification of the physical properties of soft fats, such as soybean oil-based interesterified fat, refined palm oil, and palm mid fraction was studied. The addition of sucrose behenate was verified to affect the crystalline network of fats, changing the hardness and solids profile. The isothermal crystallization behaviors of the fat blends with 1% sucrose behenate were analyzed at 20 and 25 °C. Temperature had a greater effect on the speed of crystallization (k) than the presence of the emulsifier. Sucrose behenate did, however, influence the crystallization mechanism, with changes observed in the Avrami exponent (n). These changes were also observed in the microstructure of the fats. Changes in the polymorphic behavior were observed with the addition of sucrose behenate, such as a possible delay in the α → β transition for interesterified fat, and the initial formation of the β polymorph in palm oil. PMID:26304437

  16. Sucrose:Fructan 6-Fructosyltransferase, a Key Enzyme for Diverting Carbon from Sucrose to Fructan in Barley Leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Duchateau, N.; Bortlik, K.; Simmen, U.; Wiemken, A.; Bancal, P.

    1995-01-01

    Sucrose:sucrose 6-fructosyltransferase, an enzyme activity recently identified in fructan-accumulating barley (Hordeum vulgare) leaves, was further characterized. The purified enzyme catalyzed the transfer of a fructosyl group from sucrose to various acceptors. It displayed some [beta]-fructosidase (invertase) activity, indicating that water could act as fructosyl acceptor. Moreover, it transferred the fructosyl residue of unlabeled sucrose to [U-14C]Glc, producing [U-14C]sucrose and unlabeled glucose. Most significantly for fructan synthesis, the enzyme used as acceptors but not as donors a variety of oligofructans containing [beta](2->1)- and [beta](2->6)-linked fructosyl moieties. Thus, it acted as a general sucrose:fructan fructosyltransferase. The products formed by the enzyme from sucrose and various purified, structurally characterized oligofructans were analyzed by liquid chromatography and identified by comparison with structurally characterized standards. The results showed that the enzyme formed exclusively [beta](2->6) fructosyl-fructose linkages, either initiating or elongating a fructan chain of the phlein type. We propose, therefore, to rename the purified enzyme sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase. PMID:12228431

  17. Regulation and function of sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    St Martin, E J; Wittenberger, C L

    1979-01-01

    Sucrose catabolism by Streptococcus mutans is initiated by a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sucrose phosphotransferase reaction that produces sucrose 6-phosphate the latter is then cleaved by a sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase reaction that yields glucose 6-phosphate and fructose. We have examined the regulation of the sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase and found that it was synthesized constitutively whereas sucrose phosphotransferase activity was inducible. However, the levels of both sucrose phosphotransferase and sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase were repressed when fructose was used as a growth substrate. The specific activity of sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase in permeabilized cells was approximately 30 mmol/min per mg (dry weight of cells), and it had an apparent Km for sucrose 6-phosphate of 0.3 mM. analysis of a mutant that was missing sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase activity revealed that its ability to hydrolyze sucrose was reduced. PMID:94907

  18. Production of freeze-dried yeast culture for the brewing of traditional sorghum beer, tchapalo.

    PubMed

    N'Guessan, Florent K; Coulibaly, Hermann W; Alloue-Boraud, Mireille W A; Cot, Marlène; Djè, Koffi Marcellin

    2016-01-01

    Freeze-drying is a well-known dehydration method widely used to preserve microorganisms. In order to produce freeze-dried yeast starter culture for the brewing purpose of African sorghum beer, we tested protective agents (sucrose, glucose, glycerol) in combination with support materials (millet, maize, sorghum, and cassava flours) at 1:1 ratio (v/v). The yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae F 12-7 and Candida tropicalis C 0-7 previously isolated from sorghum beer were used in a mixed culture at a ratio of 2:1 (C. tropicalis/S. cerevisiae). After the freeze-drying, the residual water contents were between 0.78 -2.27%, 0.55 -4.09%, and 0.40-2.61%, respectively, with sucrose, glucose and glycerol. The dried yeasts viabilities were between 4.0% and 10.6%. Among the protective agents used, sucrose was found to be the best protectant giving cell viabilities of 8.4-10.6%. Considering the support materials, millet flour was the best support after drying. When the freeze-dried yeast powders were stored at 4°C and room temperature (25-28°C) for up to 3 months, the survival rates were the highest with cassava flour as the support material. PMID:26788308

  19. Multisite phosphorylation of spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L.; Huber, S.C. )

    1990-05-01

    Spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase is phosphorylated both in vivo and in vitro on serine residues. Phosphorylation of SPS in vivo yields twelve major phosphopeptides after a tryptic digest and two dimensional mapping. The in vivo labeling of three of these SPS P-peptides is reduced in illuminated leaves where the extracted enzyme is activated relative to that of dark leaves. Two of these inhibitory sites are phosphorylated as well when SPS is inactivated in vitro using ({sup 32}P)ATP. In vivo phosphorylation of two other sites is enhanced during mannose feeding of the leaves (in light or dark) which produces the highest activation state of SPS. Overall, the results confirm that light-dark regulation of SPS activity occurs as a result of regulatory seryl-phosphorylation and involves a balance between phosphorylation of sites which inhibit or stimulate activity. Regulation of the SPS protein kinase that inhibits activity is relatively unaffected by phosphate but inhibited by G1c 6-P (IC{sub 50}{approx}5 mM), which may explain the control of SPS activation state by light-dark signals.

  20. Pexophagy in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Oku, Masahide; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Pexophagy, selective degradation of peroxisomes via autophagy, is the main system for reducing organelle abundance. Elucidation of the molecular machinery of pexophagy has been pioneered in studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the methylotrophic yeasts Pichia pastoris and Hansenula polymorpha. Recent analyses using these yeasts have elucidated the molecular machineries of pexophagy, especially in terms of the interactions and modifications of the so-called adaptor proteins required for guiding autophagic membrane biogenesis on the organelle surface. Based on the recent findings, functional relevance of pexophagy and another autophagic pathway, mitophagy (selective autophagy of mitochondria), is discussed. We also discuss the physiological importance of pexophagy in these yeast systems. PMID:26409485

  1. Production of 1-Kestose in Transgenic Yeast Expressing a Fructosyltransferase from Aspergillus foetidus

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Jochen; Willmitzer, Lothar; Heyer, Arnd G.

    1998-01-01

    Sucrose-inducible secretory sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST) from Aspergillus foetidus has been purified and subjected to N-terminal amino acid sequence determination. The enzyme is extensively glycosylated, and the active form is probably represented by a dimer of identical subunits with an apparent molecular mass of 180 kDa as judged from mobility in seminative acrylamide gels. The enzyme catalyzes fructosyl transfer from sucrose to sucrose producing glucose and 1-kestose. Oligosaccharides with a higher degree of polymerization are not obtained with sucrose as the substrate. The cDNA encoding the A. foetidus 1-SST has been cloned and sequenced. Sequence homology was found to be highest to levanases, but no hydrolytic activity was observed when levan was incubated with the enzyme. Expression of the cloned gene in an invertase-deficient mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in 1-kestose production, with 6-kestose and neokestose being side products of the reaction. Products were well distinguishable from those formed by yeast transformants expressing a cytosolic invertase. PMID:9495772

  2. GC-MS and MALDI-TOF MS profiling of sucrose esters from Nicotiana tabacum and N. rustica.

    PubMed

    Haliński, Łukasz P; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been applied for the first time to the analysis of the sucrose esters from the surface of Nicotiana L. leaves. The profiles obtained for the model plant N. tabacum were similar to those from the gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) analysis. The most reproducible results were obtained using a dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) matrix. The main advantage of this method is that crude plant extracts can be analysed without sample clean-up. GC-MS analysis of Aztec tobacco (N. rustica) extracts revealed the presence of three types of sucrose esters. All identified compounds had three C4-C8 acyl chains substituting the glucose moiety, while the fructose part of the molecule was substituted with 0, 1, or 2 acetyl groups. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of the sucrose ester fraction revealed the presence of compounds not eluting from a GC column. Combining the data from both GC-MS and MALDI-TOF MS experiments, we obtained a full sucrose ester profile, which is based on the molecular weight of the compounds and on the number of acyl chains in the molecule. PMID:23923618

  3. Acceptance and intake of gel and liquid sucrose compositions by the Argentine ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Silverman, J; Roulston, T H

    2001-04-01

    Liquids and gels are common delivery forms used in commercial ant baits, but the relative effectiveness of each is unknown. We compared the feeding responses of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), to liquid and gel compositions of sucrose. In choice assays, more workers were counted on gel than liquid; however, substantially more liquid was consumed. Because workers could stand on the gel, more workers could feed simultaneously on the gel. The feeding bouts of individual workers, however, were much less efficient at extracting sucrose in gel form. Workers fed eightfold longer on the gel, yet removed fivefold less sucrose than workers feeding on liquid. This potential bias should be considered during attraction and palatability studies that use physically different bait compositions. When the toxicant fipronil was added to the compositions, a greater proportion of the colony died after workers had fed on liquid than gel baits. This finding suggests that liquid formulations may provide more effective control of Argentine ants due to the greater speed and abundance in which it is ingested. PMID:11332847

  4. Enzymatic-spectrophotometric determination of sucrose in coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Alcázar, Angela; Jurado, J Marcos; Martín, M Jesús; Pablos, Fernando; González, A Gustavo

    2005-10-15

    A spectrophotometric method for determining sucrose is proposed. Sucrose is hydrolyzed by invertase into glucose and fructose. Then, glucose is oxidized in presence of glucose oxidase and the produced hydrogen peroxide reacts with phenol-4-sulfonic acid sodium salt and 4-aminoantipyrine in presence of peroxidase, yielding a pink dye with an absorption maximum at 505 nm. This method was validated following the EURACHEM and VAM project guidelines for method validation. Trueness, precision, robustness, sensitivity and linearity were considered. The method was applied to the determination of sucrose in green and roasted coffee beans. A comparison with the HPLC method with pulsed amperometric detection was carried out. PMID:18970237

  5. Sucrose regulates plant responses to deficiencies in multiple nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Mingguang

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis mutant hps1 that over-accumulates sucrose has enhanced sensitivity in almost all the aspects of plant responses to phosphate starvation. The detailed characterization of hps1 has led to the conclusion that sucrose is a global regulator of plant phosphate responses. Here, we show that hps1 is also hypersensitive to nitrogen and potassium deprivation, as well as to decreased levels of overall macronutrients. These results suggest that sucrose regulates plant deficiency responses to multiple nutrients and is part of a general response to nutrient deprivation. PMID:21701258

  6. Characteristics of Sucrose Transport through the Sucrose-Specific Porin ScrY Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liping; Bertelshofer, Franziska; Greiner, Günther; Böckmann, Rainer A.

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose-specific porin (ScrY) is a transmembrane protein that allows for the uptake of sucrose under growth-limiting conditions. The crystal structure of ScrY was resolved before by X-ray crystallography, both in its uncomplexed form and with bound sucrose. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of the transport mechanism of ScrY. To date, there has not yet been any clear demonstration for sucrose transport through the ScrY. Here, the dynamics of the ScrY trimer embedded in a phospholipid bilayer as well as the characteristics of sucrose translocation were investigated by means of atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The potential of mean force (PMF) for sucrose translocation through the pore showed two main energy barriers within the constriction region of ScrY. Energy decomposition allowed to pinpoint three aspartic acids as key residues opposing the passage of sucrose, all located within the L3 loop. Mutation of two aspartic acids to uncharged residues resulted in an accordingly modified electrostatics and decreased PMF barrier. The chosen methodology and results will aid in the design of porins with modified transport specificities. PMID:26913282

  7. Characteristics of Sucrose Transport through the Sucrose-Specific Porin ScrY Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liping; Bertelshofer, Franziska; Greiner, Günther; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose-specific porin (ScrY) is a transmembrane protein that allows for the uptake of sucrose under growth-limiting conditions. The crystal structure of ScrY was resolved before by X-ray crystallography, both in its uncomplexed form and with bound sucrose. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of the transport mechanism of ScrY. To date, there has not yet been any clear demonstration for sucrose transport through the ScrY. Here, the dynamics of the ScrY trimer embedded in a phospholipid bilayer as well as the characteristics of sucrose translocation were investigated by means of atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The potential of mean force (PMF) for sucrose translocation through the pore showed two main energy barriers within the constriction region of ScrY. Energy decomposition allowed to pinpoint three aspartic acids as key residues opposing the passage of sucrose, all located within the L3 loop. Mutation of two aspartic acids to uncharged residues resulted in an accordingly modified electrostatics and decreased PMF barrier. The chosen methodology and results will aid in the design of porins with modified transport specificities. PMID:26913282

  8. A reassessment of the role of sucrose synthase in the hypoxic sucrose-ethanol transition in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Santaniello, Antonietta; Loreti, Elena; Gonzali, Silvia; Novi, Giacomo; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-10-01

    Plants under low-oxygen availability adapt their metabolism to compensate for the lower ATP production that arises from the limited respiratory activity in mitochondria. Anaerobic glycolysis requires continuous fuelling of carbon units, also provided from sucrose. The anaerobic catabolism of sucrose is thought to require the activity of sucrose synthase, being this enzymatic reaction more energetically favourable than that of invertase. The role of sucrose synthases (SUS) for aerobic sucrose catabolism in Arabidopsis has been recently questioned since SUS mutants fail to show altered phenotype or metabolic profile. In the present paper, we analysed the role of SUS1 and SUS4, both induced by low oxygen, in plant survival and ethanol production. The results showed that mutants lacking both SUS were as tolerant to low oxygen as the wild type in most of the experimental conditions tested. Only under conditions of limiting sugar availability the requirement of SUS1 and SUS4 for ethanol production was evident, although partly compensated by invertase activities, as revealed by the use of a double mutant lacking the two major cytosolic invertases. We conclude that, contrary to general belief, the sucrose synthase pathway is not the preferential route for sucrose metabolism under hypoxia. PMID:24810896

  9. Cryptococcus friedmannii, a new species of yeast from the Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Cryptococcus friedmannii Vishniac sp. nov. from an Antarctic cryptoendolithic community is a psychrophilic basidioblastomycete characterized by cream-colored colonies of cells with smooth, layered walls, budding monopolarly, producing amylose and extracellular proteinase, utilizing nitrate and D-alanine (inter alia) as nitrogen sources and L-arabinose, arbutin, cellobiose, D-glucuronate, maltose, melezitose, salicin, soluble starch, trehalose, and D-xylose as carbon sources. This species differs from all other basidiomycetous yeasts in possessing the following combination of characters: amylose production (positive), assimilation of cellobiose (positive), D-galactose (negative), myo-inositol (negative), D-mannitol (negative), and sucrose (negative).

  10. Effect of vanadate on proton-sucrose cotransport in Ricinus cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Vreugdenhil, D.; Spanswick, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    The effects of orthovanadate on the uptake of sucrose by Ricinus cotyledons and on sucrose-coupled proton influx were measured in order to gain insight into the relationship to the plasma membrane proton pump. Vanadate had no effect on short-term sucrose uptake. In long-term experiments (> 30 min) sucrose uptake was progressively inhibited, but only at high external sucrose concentrations. Vanadate did not affect proton efflux pumping in the absence of sucrose and neither did it change the initial rate of sucrose-coupled proton influx. However, it enhanced the maximal level of sucrose-induced alkalization of the medium at all sucrose concentrations tested. This is interpreted as an inhibiting effect of vanadate on the proton pump that recycles protons during sucrose-proton cotransport. The sensitivity towards vanadate indicates that this proton pump is an ATPase. A second proton-translocating system, that is insensitive to vanadate, is postulated to function in the absence of sucrose.

  11. Effect of Yeast Hulls on Stuck and Sluggish Wine Fermentations: Importance of the Lipid Component

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Eeva; Ingledew, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of yeast hulls (yeast ghosts) on sluggish or stuck white wine fermentations was studied. The enhancing effect on yeast growth and fermentation rate displayed by the hulls was shown to be similar to the effect provided by lipid extract from the same hulls. Unsaturated fatty acids and sterols were incorporated into the yeast from lipid extracts during fermentation carried out under oxygen-limited conditions. Adsorption of toxic medium-chain fatty acid (decanoic acid) onto the yeast hulls took place through a dialysis membrane. However, when the hulls were placed inside a dialysis bag, the increase in yeast growth and fermentation rate seen when freely suspended hulls were used did not occur. Accordingly, the effect of yeast hulls in preventing stuck fermentations cannot be attributed only to the adsorption and consequent removal of medium-chain fatty acids from the juice. PMID:16347950

  12. Sucrose metabolism: gateway to diverse carbon use and sugar signaling.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose metabolism plays pivotal roles in development, stress response, and yield formation, mainly by generating a range of sugars as metabolites to fuel growth and synthesize essential compounds (including protein, cellulose, and starch) and as signals to regulate expression of microRNAs, transcription factors, and other genes and for crosstalk with hormonal, oxidative, and defense signaling. This review aims to capture the most exciting developments in this area by evaluating (a) the roles of key sucrose metabolic enzymes in development, abiotic stress responses, and plant-microbe interactions; (b) the coupling between sucrose metabolism and sugar signaling from extra- to intracellular spaces; (c) the different mechanisms by which sucrose metabolic enzymes could perform their signaling roles; and (d) progress on engineering sugar metabolism and transport for high yield and disease resistance. Finally, the review outlines future directions for research on sugar metabolism and signaling to better understand and improve plant performance. PMID:24579990

  13. Sucrose Improves Insecticide Activity Against Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Cowles, Richard S; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Holdcraft, Robert; Loeb, Gregory M; Elsensohn, Johanna E; Hesler, Steven P

    2015-04-01

    The addition of sucrose to insecticides targeting spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), enhanced lethality in laboratory, semifield, and field tests. In the laboratory, 0.1% sucrose added to a spray solution enhanced spotted wing drosophila feeding. Flies died 120 min earlier when exposed to spinosad residues at label rates enhanced with sucrose. Added sucrose reduced the LC50 for dried acetamiprid residues from 82 to 41 ppm in the spray solution. Laboratory bioassays of spotted wing drosophila mortality followed exposure to grape and blueberry foliage and/or fruit sprayed and aged in the field. On grape foliage, the addition of 2.4 g/liter of sugar with insecticide sprays resulted in an 11 and 6% increase of spotted wing drosophila mortality at 1 and 2 d exposures to residues, respectively, averaged over seven insecticides with three concentrations. In a separate experiment, spinetoram and cyantraniliprole reduced by 95-100% the larval infestation of blueberries, relative to the untreated control, 7 d after application at labeled rates when applied with 1.2 g/liter sucrose in a spray mixture, irrespective of rainfall; without sucrose infestation was reduced by 46-91%. Adding sugar to the organically acceptable spinosyn, Entrust, reduced larval infestation of strawberries by >50% relative to without sugar for five of the six sample dates during a season-long field trial. In a small-plot field test with blueberries, weekly applications in alternating sprays of sucrose plus reduced-risk insecticides, spinetoram or acetamiprid, reduced larval infestation relative to the untreated control by 76%; alternating bifenthrin and phosmet (without sucrose) reduced infestation by 65%. PMID:26470175

  14. Sucrose transport into developing seeds of Pisum sativum L.

    PubMed

    Tegeder, M; Wang, X D; Frommer, W B; Offler, C E; Patrick, J W

    1999-04-01

    The anatomy of developing pea seeds is characterized by transfer cells present in both coats and cotyledons at the maternal/filial interface. To determine the nature and cellular localization of sucrose transporters in pea seeds, a full-length clone of a sucrose/H+ symporter (PsSUT1) was isolated from a cotyledon cDNA library. Northern blot analyses of different organs showed that PsSUT1 is expressed in non-seed tissues, including sucrose sinks and sources. Within developing seeds, transcripts of PsSUT1 and PsAHA1 genes were detected in all tissues, while transcripts of a sucrose binding protein (GmSBP) were confined to cotyledon epidermal transfer cells. Signal intensities of PsSUT1 and PsAHA1 transcripts and protein products were most pronounced in the thin-walled parenchyma cells of seed coats and epidermal transfer cells of cotyledons. For cotyledons, the highest transporter densities were localized to those portions of plasma membranes lining the wall ingrowth regions of epidermal transfer cells. Responses of [14C]sucrose influx to metabolic inhibitors indicated that proton-coupled sucrose transport was operative in both seed coats and cotyledons. Cotyledon epidermal transfer cells were shown to support the highest sucrose flux. Maximal transport activity was found to account for the sucrose flux differences between seed tissues. Intercellular movement of the symplasmic tracer, 5-(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF), demonstrated that symplasmic pathways interconnect the vascular tissues to thin-walled parenchyma transfer cells of seed coats and, for cotyledons, epidermal transfer cells to storage parenchyma cells. PMID:10363367

  15. Parabrachial coding of sapid sucrose: Relevance to reward and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hajnal, Andras; Norgren, Ralph; Kovacs, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Cumulative evidence in rats suggests that the pontine parabrachial nucleus (PBN) is necessary for assigning hedonic value to taste stimuli. In a series of studies, our laboratory has investigated the parabrachial coding of sapid sucrose in normal and obese rats. First, using chronic microdialysis, we demonstrated that sucrose intake increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, an effect that is dependent on oral stimulation and on concentration. The dopamine response was independent of the thalamocortical gustatory system, but was blunted substantially by lesions of the PBN. Similar lesions of the PBN but not the thalamic taste relay diminished cFos activation by sucrose ingestion in the nucleus accumbens. Recent single neuron recording studies demonstrated that processing of sucrose-evoked activity in the PBN is altered in the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats that develop obesity due to chronic overeating and express increased avidity to sweet. Compared with lean controls, taste neurons in OLETF rats had reduced overall sensitivity to sucrose and altered concentration responses: decreased responses to lower and augmented responses to higher concentrations. The decreased sensitivity to sucrose was specific to NaCl-best neurons that also responded to sucrose, but the concentration effects were carried by the sucrose-specific neurons. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that the PBN enables taste stimuli to engage the reward system and, in doing so, influences food intake and body weight regulation. Obesity, in turn, may further alter the gustatory code via forebrain connections to the taste relays or hormonal changes consequent to weight gain. PMID:19686159

  16. Sucrose polyester and covert caloric dilution.

    PubMed

    Glueck, C J; Hastings, M M; Allen, C; Hogg, E; Baehler, L; Gartside, P S; Phillips, D; Jones, M; Hollenbach, E J; Braun, B; Anastasia, J V

    1982-06-01

    Total daily caloric intake was measured in 10 obese subjects when sucrose polyester (SPE), a nonabsorbable synthetic fat, covertly replaced conventional fats in a single crossover study consisting of three periods: a period of 7 to 14 days to determine baseline caloric intake and two 20-day study periods. An average of 60 g SPE/day replaced conventional fat in one of the two study periods. During both study periods, 60% of the base line caloric intake was "required intake" at mealtime; an additional 60% of base line caloric intake was allowed as "free choice" foods at a specified snacktime. It was thus possible during both study periods to consume more than 100% of the base line caloric intake. In the SPE study period, 40 g SPE replaced 40 g conventional fat for every 1200 kcal of required intake, resulting in a 30% reduction in mealtime caloric intake. Mean total caloric intake (meal and snack) fell 23% during the SPE period (p less than 0.05), despite an average daily weight loss of 0.18 kg. Snack caloric intake did not increase significantly to compensate for caloric dilution of the meals during the SPE period. These results indicate that the obese may not detect or may not compensate for covert dilution of fat calories with SPE. In addition, during the SPE period, there was a 10% reduction in total plasma cholesterol, a 14% reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and a 10% reduction in triglyceride concentration. Thus, fat replacement with SPE may benefit weight reduction regimens in obese subjects by facilitating decreased caloric intake and by improving the circulating lipoprotein profile as well. PMID:7081117

  17. Evolution of Sucrose Synthesis[w

    PubMed Central

    Lunn, John Edward

    2002-01-01

    Cyanobacteria and proteobacteria (purple bacteria) are the only prokaryotes known to synthesize sucrose (Suc). Suc-P synthase, Suc-phosphatase (SPP), and Suc synthase activities have previously been detected in several cyanobacteria, and genes coding for Suc-P synthase (sps) and Suc synthase (sus) have been cloned from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena (Nostoc) spp., respectively. An open reading frame in the Synechocystis genome encodes a predicted 27-kD polypeptide that shows homology to the maize (Zea mays) SPP. Heterologous expression of this putative spp gene in Escherichia coli, reported here, confirmed that this open reading frame encodes a functional SPP enzyme. The Synechocystis SPP is highly specific for Suc-6F-P (Km = 7.5 μm) and is Mg2+ dependent (Ka = 70 μm), with a specific activity of 46 μmol min−1 mg−1 protein. Like the maize SPP, the Synechocystis SPP belongs to the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily of phosphatases/hydrolases. Searches of sequenced microbial genomes revealed homologs of the Synechocystis sps gene in several other cyanobacteria (Nostoc punctiforme, Prochlorococcus marinus strains MED4 and MIT9313, and Synechococcus sp. WH8012), and in three proteobacteria (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Magnetococcus sp. MC1, and Nitrosomonas europaea). Homologs of the Synechocystis spp gene were found in Magnetococcus sp. MC1 and N. punctiforme, and of the Anabaena sus gene in N. punctiforme and N. europaea. From analysis of these sequences, it is suggested that Suc synthesis originated in the proteobacteria or a common ancestor of the proteobacteria and cyanobacteria. PMID:11950997

  18. ESR investigation of sucrose radicals produced by particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Sato, Yukio

    2004-05-01

    We investigated sucrose radicals produced by heavy-ion irradiation with various linear energy transfer (LETs) and the possibility for a sucrose electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimeter. The impact of heavy ions on sucrose produced sucrose radicals, which were measured by ESR. The obtained spectral pattern was the same as that for helium (He) ions, carbon (C) ions, neon (Ne) ions, iron (Fe) ions, and γ-ray irradiation. Identical spectra were measured after 1 year, but the initial intensities decreased by a few percent when the samples were kept in ESR tubes with the caps at ambient temperature. The total spin concentration obtained by heavy-ion irradiation had a linear relation with the absorbed dose, and correlated logarithmically with the LET. Qualitative ESR analyses showed that the production of sucrose radicals depended on both the particle identity and the LET at the same dose. The production of spin concentration by He ions was the most sensitive to LET. Empirical relations between the LET and the spin yield for various particles imply that the LET at a certain dose can be estimated by the spin concentration. Therefore, the present ESR results imply that sucrose can be used to monitor the absorbed dose and the LET of particle irradiation.

  19. New antiinflammatory sucrose esters in the natural sticky coating of tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica), an important culinary fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan-Rui; Khan, Wajid; Bakht, Jehan; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2016-04-01

    Tomatillo is a popular culinary fruit. The sticky material on its surface, consumed as part of the fruit, has never been investigated. Chemical characterization of sticky material on tomatillo fruits yielded five new sucrose esters, as confirmed by spectroscopic methods. The solvent extract of the sticky material from the whole fresh fruit and pure isolates showed antiinflammatory activity as confirmed by in vitro cyclooxygenase enzymes inhibitory assays. Five sucrose esters isolated at 100 μg/mL (153.8, 138.8, 136.2, 141.6 and 138.8 μM, respectively) inhibited cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 enzymes by 50%. The cyclooxygenase enzyme inhibitory activity of extract and isolates at 100 μg/mL was similar to non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen, used as positive controls in the assay at 108, 12 and 15 μg/mL (600, 60 and 60 μM), respectively. PMID:26593547

  20. Inhibition by Natural Dietary Substances of Gastrointestinal Absorption of Starch and Sucrose in Rats 2. Subchronic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Harry G.; Echard, Bobby; Bagchi, Debasis; Stohs, Sidney

    2007-01-01

    Acute oral consumption of various natural inhibitors of amylase (bean and hibiscus extracts) and sucrase (L-arabinose) reduce absorption of starch and sucrose respectively in rats and pigs measured by lessened appearance of circulating glucose levels. The present subchronic study was designed to determine whether these selected inhibitors of gastrointestinal starch and sucrose absorption (so-called “carb blockers”) remain effective with continued use and to assess their metabolic influences after prolonged intake. Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged twice daily over nine weeks with either water or an equal volume of water containing a formula that included bean and hibiscus extracts and L-arabinose. To estimate CHO absorption, control and treated Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with either water alone or an equal volume of water containing glucose, rice starch, sucrose, or combined rice starch and sucrose. Circulating glucose was measured at timed intervals over four hours. The ability to decrease starch and sucrose absorption use. No toxic effects (hepatic, renal, hematologic) were evident. Blood chemistries revealed significantly lower circulating glucose levels and a trend toward decreased HbA1C in the nondiabetic rats receiving the natural formulation compared to control. Subchronic administration of enzyme inhibitors was also associated with many metabolic changes including lowered systolic blood pressure and altered fluid-electrolyte balance. We postulate that proper intake of natural amylase and sucrase inhibitors may be useful in the prevention and treatment of many chronic disorders associated with perturbations in glucose-insulin homeostasis secondary to the rapid absorption of refined CHO. PMID:17713601

  1. Identification and characterization of the three homeologues of a new sucrose transporter in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sucrose transporters (SUTs) play important roles in regulating the translocation of assimilates from source to sink tissues. Identification and characterization of new SUTs in economically important crops such as wheat provide insights into their role in determining seed yield. To date, however, only one SUT of wheat has been reported and functionally characterized. The present study reports the isolation and characterization of a new SUT, designated as TaSUT2, and its homeologues (TaSUT2A, TaSUT2B and TaSUT2D) in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Results TaSUT2A and TaSUT2B genes each encode a protein with 506 amino acids, whereas TaSUT2D encodes a protein of 508 amino acids. The molecular mass of these proteins is predicted to be ~ 54 kDA. Topological analysis of the amino acid sequences of the three homeologues revealed that they contain 12 transmembrane spanning helices, which are described as distinct characteristic features of glycoside-pentoside-hexuronide cation symporter family that includes all known plant SUTs, and a histidine residue that appears to be localized at and associated conformationally with the sucrose binding site. Yeast SUSY7/ura3 strain cells transformed with TaSUT2A, TaSUT2B and TaSUT2D were able to uptake sucrose and grow on a medium containing sucrose as a sole source of carbon; however, our subcellular localization study with plant cells revealed that TaSUT2 is localized to the tonoplast. The expression of TaSUT2 was detected in the source, including flag leaf blade, flag leaf sheath, peduncle, glumes, palea and lemma, and sink (seed) tissues. The relative contributions of the three genomes of wheat to the total expression of TaSUT2 appear to differ with tissues and developmental stages. At the cellular level, TaSUT2 is expressed mainly in the vein of developing seeds and subepidermal mesophyll cells of the leaf blade. Conclusion This study demonstrated that TaSUT2 is a new wheat SUT protein. Given that TaSUT2 is localized to the tonoplast and sucrose is temporarily stored in the vacuoles of both source and sink tissues, our data imply that TaSUT2 is involved in the intracellular partitioning of sucrose, particularly between the vacuole and cytoplasm. PMID:24237613

  2. In situ hybridization of riboprobes for two sucrose synthase transcripts in sugarbeet root tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthase is an important enzyme for sucrose metabolism in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots. Its activity rises during root development and it is correlated with sucrose accumulation. Sucrose synthase has two active isoforms in sugarbeet roots. The goals of this work were to study spatial d...

  3. Analysis of sucrose acetates in a crude 6-O-acetyl sucrose product by on-line hydrolysis-high-performance liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenwu; Wang, Nani; Zhang, Peimin; Zhang, Jiajie; Wu, Shuchao; Zhu, Yan

    2016-06-01

    A standard-free and sensitive method was developed for analysis of sucrose acetates in a crude 6-O-acetyl sucrose (S-6-a) product by on-line hydrolysis-high-performance liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (PAD). Sucrose, three regio-isomers of acetyl sucrose and five regio-isomers of diacetyl sucrose were separated on a C18 column using 3% (v/v) acetonitrile in water as eluent within 25min. After purification with LC followed by semi-preparative HPLC, their chemical structures were identified by 1D, 2D NMR and LC-MS. Moreover, quantification of those regio-isomers was achieved by on-line alkaline hydrolysis to liberate sucrose using a post-column delivery system, and then detected by PAD for indirect estimation of the sucrose acetate content. Under optimal conditions, the linear ranges were from 0.03 to 150μmolL(-1) for sucrose corresponding to sucrose acetates with coefficient of determination as 0.9997 and detection limit as 0.01μmolL(-1) (S/N=3). Good repeatability was obtained (RSD<3%, n=6). Furthermore, this method has been successfully applied to the analysis of sucrose and sucrose acetates in a crude S-6-a product during synthesis, purification and structure elucidation studies. The recoveries were from 94.89% to 102.31% for sucrose and sucrose acetates. PMID:27139218

  4. Microwave-synthesized magnetic chitosan microparticles for the immobilization of yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Safarik, Ivo; Pospiskova, Kristyna; Maderova, Zdenka; Baldikova, Eva; Horska, Katerina; Safarikova, Mirka

    2015-01-01

    An extremely simple procedure has been developed for the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells on magnetic chitosan microparticles. The magnetic carrier was prepared using an inexpensive, simple, rapid, one-pot process, based on the microwave irradiation of chitosan and ferrous sulphate at high pH. Immobilized yeast cells have been used for sucrose hydrolysis, hydrogen peroxide decomposition and the adsorption of selected dyes. PMID:24753015

  5. A Preliminary Study of the Human Brain Response to Oral Sucrose and its Association with Recent Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Kareken, David A.; Dzemidzic, Mario; Oberlin, Brandon G.; Eiler, William J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background A preference for sweet tastes has been repeatedly shown to be associated with alcohol preference in both animals and humans. In this study, we tested the extent to which recent drinking is related to blood oxygen dependent (BOLD) activation from an intensely sweet solution in orbitofrontal areas known to respond to primary rewards. Methods Sixteen right-handed, non-treatment seeking, healthy volunteers (mean age 26 years; 75% male) were recruited from the community. All underwent a taste test using a range of sucrose concentrations, as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during pseudorandom, event-driven stimulation with water and a 0.83M concentration of sucrose in water. Results [Sucrose > Water] provoked significant BOLD activation in primary gustatory cortex and amygdala, as well as in the right ventral striatum and in bilateral orbitofrontal cortex. Drinks/drinking day correlated significantly with the activation as extracted from the left orbital area (r = 0.52, p = 0.04 after correcting for a bilateral comparison). Using stepwise multiple regression, the addition of rated sucrose-liking accounted for significantly more variance in drinks/drinking day than did left orbital activation alone (multiple R= 0.79, p = 0.002). Conclusions Both the orbitofrontal response to an intensely sweet taste, as well as rated liking of that taste, accounted for significant variance in drinking behavior. The brain response to sweet tastes may be an important phenotype of alcoholism risk. PMID:23841808

  6. Vaginal Yeast Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to thick. Most male partners of women with yeast infections do not have any symptoms of the infection. Some men, however, have reported temporary rashes and burning sensations of the penis after intercourse if they did not use condoms. ...

  7. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnant You are obese You have diabetes A yeast infection is not spread through sexual contact. However, some men will develop symptoms such as itching and a rash on the penis after having sexual contact with an infected partner. ...

  8. Replicative Aging in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Steinkraus, K.A.; Kaeberlein, M.; Kennedy, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    Progress in aging research is now rapid, and surprisingly, studies in a single-celled eukaryote are a driving force. The genetic modulators of replicative life span in yeast are being identified, the molecular events that accompany aging are being discovered, and the extent to which longevity pathways are conserved between yeast and multicellular eukaryotes is being tested. In this review, we provide a brief retrospective view on the development of yeast as a model for aging and then turn to recent discoveries that have pushed aging research into novel directions and also linked aging in yeast to well-developed hypotheses in mammals. Although the question of what causes aging still cannot be answered definitively, that day may be rapidly approaching. PMID:18616424

  9. RNAi in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mower, Jeffrey P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Fink, Gerald R.; Bartel, David P.

    2013-01-01

    RNAi, a gene-silencing pathway triggered by double-stranded RNA, is conserved in diverse eukaryotic species but has been lost in the model budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we show that RNAi is present in other budding-yeast species, including Saccharomyces castellii and Candida albicans. These species use noncanonical Dicer proteins to generate siRNAs, which mostly correspond to transposable elements and Y’ subtelomeric repeats. In S. castellii, RNAi mutants are viable but have excess Y’ mRNA levels. In S. cerevisiae, introducing Dicer and Argonaute of S. castellii restores RNAi, and the reconstituted pathway silences endogenous retrotransposons. These results identify a novel class of Dicer proteins, bring the tool of RNAi to the study of budding yeasts, and bring the tools of budding yeast to the study of RNAi. PMID:19745116

  10. Yeast Biomass Production in Brewery's Spent Grains Hemicellulosic Hydrolyzate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Luís C.; Carvalheiro, Florbela; Lopes, Sónia; Neves, Ines; Gírio, Francisco M.

    Yeast single-cell protein and yeast extract, in particular, are two products which have many feed, food, pharmaceutical, and biotechnological applications. However, many of these applications are limited by their market price. Specifically, the yeast extract requirements for culture media are one of the major technical hurdles to be overcome for the development of low-cost fermentation routes for several top value chemicals in a biorefinery framework. A potential biotechnical solution is the production of yeast biomass from the hemicellulosic fraction stream. The growth of three pentose-assimilating yeast cell factories, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Pichia stipitis was compared using non-detoxified brewery's spent grains hemicellulosic hydrolyzate supplemented with mineral nutrients. The yeasts exhibited different specific growth rates, biomass productivities, and yields being D. hansenii as the yeast species that presented the best performance, assimilating all sugars and noteworthy consuming most of the hydrolyzate inhibitors. Under optimized conditions, D. hansenii displayed a maximum specific growth rate, biomass yield, and productivity of 0.34 h-1, 0.61 g g-1, and 0.56 g 1-1 h-1, respectively. The nutritional profile of D. hansenii was thoroughly evaluated, and it compares favorably to others reported in literature. It contains considerable amounts of some essential amino acids and a high ratio of unsaturated over saturated fatty acids.

  11. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing enzymes of yeasts.

  12. Modeling brewers' yeast flocculation

    PubMed

    van Hamersveld EH; van der Lans RG; Caulet; Luyben

    1998-02-01

    Flocculation of yeast cells occurs during the fermentation of beer. Partway through the fermentation the cells become flocculent and start to form flocs. If the environmental conditions, such as medium composition and fluid velocities in the tank, are optimal, the flocs will grow in size large enough to settle. After settling of the main part of the yeast the green beer is left, containing only a small amount of yeast necessary for rest conversions during the next process step, the lagering. The physical process of flocculation is a dynamic equilibrium of floc formation and floc breakup resulting in a bimodal size distribution containing single cells and flocs. The floc size distribution and the single cell amount were measured under the different conditions that occur during full scale fermentation. Influences on flocculation such as floc strength, specific power input, and total number of yeast cells in suspension were studied. A flocculation model was developed, and the measured data used for validation. Yeast floc formation can be described with the collision theory assuming a constant collision efficiency. The breakup of flocs appears to occur mainly via two mechanisms, the splitting of flocs and the erosion of yeast cells from the floc surface. The splitting rate determines the average floc size and the erosion rate determines the number of single cells. Regarding the size of the flocs with respect to the scale of turbulence, only the viscous subrange needs to be considered. With the model, the floc size distribution and the number of single cells can be predicted at a certain point during the fermentation. For this, the bond strength between the cells, the fractal dimension of the yeast, the specific power input in the tank and the number of yeast cells that are in suspension in the tank have to be known. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10099210

  13. Impaired Function of the Tonoplast-Localized Sucrose Transporter in Rice, OsSUT2, Limits the Transport of Vacuolar Reserve Sucrose and Affects Plant Growth1[W

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Joon-Seob; Cho, Jung-Il; Reinders, Anke; Lee, Sang-Won; Yoo, Youngchul; Tuan, Pham Quoc; Choi, Sang-Bong; Bang, Geul; Park, Youn-Il; Cho, Man-Ho; Bhoo, Seong Hee; An, Gynheung; Hahn, Tae-Ryong; Ward, John M.; Jeon, Jong-Seong

    2011-01-01

    Physiological functions of sucrose (Suc) transporters (SUTs) localized to the tonoplast in higher plants are poorly understood. We here report the isolation and characterization of a mutation in the rice (Oryza sativa) OsSUT2 gene. Expression of OsSUT2-green fluorescent protein in rice revealed that OsSUT2 localizes to the tonoplast. Analysis of the OsSUT2 promoter::β-glucuronidase transgenic rice indicated that this gene is highly expressed in leaf mesophyll cells, emerging lateral roots, pedicels of fertilized spikelets, and cross cell layers of seed coats. Results of Suc transport assays in yeast were consistent with a H+-Suc symport mechanism, suggesting that OsSUT2 functions in Suc uptake from the vacuole. The ossut2 mutant exhibited a growth retardation phenotype with a significant reduction in tiller number, plant height, 1,000-grain weight, and root dry weight compared with the controls, the wild type, and complemented transgenic lines. Analysis of primary carbon metabolites revealed that ossut2 accumulated more Suc, glucose, and fructose in the leaves than the controls. Further sugar export analysis of detached leaves indicated that ossut2 had a significantly decreased sugar export ability compared with the controls. These results suggest that OsSUT2 is involved in Suc transport across the tonoplast from the vacuole lumen to the cytosol in rice, playing an essential role in sugar export from the source leaves to sink organs. PMID:21771914

  14. Bacteria and yeast cell disruption using lytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Oriana

    2008-01-01

    Enzymatic methods provide a convenient alternative for overcoming technical disadvantages of mechanical disruption. Protocols for protein extraction from bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae using lytic enzymes are presented in this chapter. Adaptation of the yeast protocol to a microtiter plate format makes this protocol amenable for proteomic applications and high-throughput screening of libraries expressing genetic variants in yeast. This methodology can also be applied to bacteria. PMID:18369849

  15. Forces in yeast flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  16. Using Microsatellites to Identify Yeast Strains in Beer

    PubMed Central

    Bruke, Alexandria; Van Brocklin, Jennifer; Rivest, Jason; Prenni, Jessica E.; Ibrahim, Hend

    2012-01-01

    Yeast is an integral part of the brewing process and is responsible for much of the taste and characteristics of beer. During the brewing process, yeast is subject to ageing and stress factors that can result in growth inhibition, decreased genetic stability, and changes in cell membrane stability. Characterization of yeast species used in industrial fermentation (e.g. S. cerevisiae) is of great importance to the brewing industry. The objective of this study was to develop an assay to identify yeast strains commonly used in the production of beer. Six microsatellite regions of DNA (comprised of AAT) were used as sequence tagged site markers (STR) to identify and compare yeast samples and to determine strain within a species. Labeled primers ScATT (1-6) targeting these six microsatellite regions were designed using 6-FAM, VIC, NED and PET 5′-fluorescent labels. The six regions were amplified, in a single reaction, from extracted yeast genomic DNA using a modified multiplex-PCR protocol and the labeled PCR products were analyzed on an ABI 3130xl Genetic Analyzer. Using this approach 6 STR markers were amplified in a single multiplex reaction from a commercially utilized yeast strain provided by Odell Brewing. Different alleles were distinguished based on the size of each STR and the labeling fluorophore. The procedures developed in this study will provide an invaluable tool for the quality control of yeast strains in the brewing industry.

  17. Expression analysis of genes associated with sucrose accumulation in sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) varieties differing in content and time of peak sucrose storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthesis/accumulation in sugarcane is a complex process involving many genes and regulatory sequences that control biochemical events in source-sink tissues. Among these, sucrose synthase (SuSy), sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), soluble acid (SAI) and cell-wall invertase (CWI) are importan...

  18. Astaxanthinogenesis in the yeast Phaffia rhodozyma - optimization of low-cost culture media and yeast cell-wall lysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, J.D.; Baron, M.; Guimaraes, M.F.

    1997-12-31

    Astaxanthin is a diketo-dihydroxy-carotenoid produced by Phaffia rhodozyma, a basidiomicetous yeast. A low-cost fermentation medium consisting of raw sugarcane juice and urea was developed to exploit the active sucrolytic/urelolytic enzyme apparatus inherent to the yeast. As compared to the beneficial effect of 0.1 g% urea, a ready nitrogen source, mild phosphoric pre inversion of juice sucrose to glucose and fructose, promptly fermentable carbon sources, resulted in smaller benefits. Corn steep liquor (CSL) was found to be a valuable supplement for both yeast biomass yield (9.2 g dry cells/L) and astaxanthin production (1.3 mg/g cells). Distillery effluent (vinace), despite only a slightly positive effect on yeast growth, allowed for the highest pigment productivity (1.9 mg/g cells). Trace amounts of Ni{sup 2} (1 mg/L, as a cofactor for urease) resulted in controversial effects, namely, biomass decrease and astaxanthin increase, with no effect on the release (and uptake) of ammonium ion from urea. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions. PMID:26616172

  20. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions. PMID:26616172

  1. SUCROSE SYNTHASE: ELUCIDATION OF COMPLEX POST-TRANSLATIONAL REGULATORY MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Steven C. Huber

    2009-05-12

    Studies have focused on the enzyme sucrose synthase, which plays an important role in the metabolism of sucrose in seeds and tubers. There are three isoforms of SUS in maize, referred to as SUS1, SUS-SH1, and SUS2. SUS is generally considered to be tetrameric protein but recent evidence suggests that SUS can also occur as a dimeric protein. The formation of tetrameric SUS is regulated by sucrose concentration in vitro and this could also be an important factor in the cellular localization of the protein. We found that high sucrose concentrations, which promote tetramer formation, also inhibit the binding of SUS1 to actin filaments in vitro. Previously, high sucrose concentrations were shown to promote SUS association with the plasma membrane. The specific regions of the SUS molecule involved in oligomerization are not known, but we identified a region of the SUS1 moelcule by bioinformatic analysis that was predicted to form a coiled coil. We demonstrated that this sequence could, in fact, self-associate as predicted for a coiled coil, but truncation analysis with the full-length recombinant protein suggested that it was not responsible for formation of dimers or tetramers. However, the coiled coil may function in binding of other proteins to SUS1. Overall, sugar availability may differentially influence the binding of SUS to cellular structures, and these effects may be mediated by changes in the oligomeric nature of the enzyme.

  2. The Structure of Sucrose Synthase-1 from Arabidopsis thaliana and Its Functional Implications*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi; Anderson, Spencer; Zhang, Yanfeng; Garavito, R. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Sucrose transport is the central system for the allocation of carbon resources in vascular plants. During growth and development, plants control carbon distribution by coordinating sites of sucrose synthesis and cleavage in different plant organs and different cellular locations. Sucrose synthase, which reversibly catalyzes sucrose synthesis and cleavage, provides a direct and reversible means to regulate sucrose flux. Depending on the metabolic environment, sucrose synthase alters its cellular location to participate in cellulose, callose, and starch biosynthesis through its interactions with membranes, organelles, and cytoskeletal actin. The x-ray crystal structure of sucrose synthase isoform 1 from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSus1) has been determined as a complex with UDP-glucose and as a complex with UDP and fructose, at 2.8- and 2.85-Å resolutions, respectively. The AtSus1 structure provides insights into sucrose catalysis and cleavage, as well as the regulation of sucrose synthase and its interactions with cellular targets. PMID:21865170

  3. The Structure of Sucrose Synthase-1 from Arabidopsis thaliana and Its Functional Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yi; Anderson, Spencer; Zhang, Yanfeng; Garavito, R. Michael

    2014-10-02

    Sucrose transport is the central system for the allocation of carbon resources in vascular plants. During growth and development, plants control carbon distribution by coordinating sites of sucrose synthesis and cleavage in different plant organs and different cellular locations. Sucrose synthase, which reversibly catalyzes sucrose synthesis and cleavage, provides a direct and reversible means to regulate sucrose flux. Depending on the metabolic environment, sucrose synthase alters its cellular location to participate in cellulose, callose, and starch biosynthesis through its interactions with membranes, organelles, and cytoskeletal actin. The x-ray crystal structure of sucrose synthase isoform 1 from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSus1) has been determined as a complex with UDP-glucose and as a complex with UDP and fructose, at 2.8- and 2.85-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively. The AtSus1 structure provides insights into sucrose catalysis and cleavage, as well as the regulation of sucrose synthase and its interactions with cellular targets.

  4. Difructosan anhydrides III preparation from sucrose by coupled enzyme reaction.

    PubMed

    Hang, Hua; Miao, Ming; Li, Yungao; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng; Zhang, Tao

    2013-02-15

    Difructosan anhydrides III (DFA III) preparation was usually obtained by inulin hydrolysis with inulin fructotransferase (IFTase). The fructofuranosidic linkages of inulin were the same as fructooligosaccharides (FOS), which was synthesized by sucrose with fructosyltransferase (FTase). FOS was mainly composed of 1-kestose (GF(2)), nystose (GF(3)) and fructofuranosylnystose (GF(4)), and nystose was observed to be the smallest substrate for IFTase to synthesize DFA III. So sucrose, much cheaper than inulin, was considered to produce DFA III by coupled FTase and IFTase reaction. DFA III yield was obtained about 100mg/g (DFA III weight/sucrose weight) through this method. The results demonstrated the high potential of the coupled enzyme reaction as a novel DFA III producing method. PMID:23399196

  5. Sucrose metabolism contributes to in vivo fitness of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Camilli, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Summary We characterized two sucrose-metabolizing systems – sus and scr – and describe their roles in the physiology and virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in murine models of carriage and pneumonia. The sus and scr systems are regulated by LacI family repressors SusR and ScrR respectively. SusR regulates an adjacent ABC transporter (susT1/susT2/susX) and sucrose-6-phosphate (S-6-P) hydrolase (susH). ScrR controls an adjacent PTS transporter (scrT), fructokinase (scrK) and second S-6-P hydrolase (scrH). sus and scr play niche-specific roles in virulence. The susH and sus locus mutants are attenuated in the lung, but dispensable in nasopharyngeal carriage. Conversely, the scrH and scr locus mutants, while dispensable in the lung, are attenuated for nasopharyngeal colonization. The scrH/susH double mutant is more attenuated than scrH in the nasopharynx, indicating SusH can substitute in this niche. Both systems are sucrose-inducible, with ScrH being the major in vitro hydrolase. The scrH/susH mutant does not grow on sucrose indicating that sus and scr are the only sucrose-metabolizing systems in S. pneumoniae. We propose a model describing hierarchical regulation of the scr and sus systems by the putative inducer, S-6-P. The transport and metabolism of sucrose or a related disaccharide thus contributes to S. pneumoniae colonization and disease. PMID:17880421

  6. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy R.; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term transcriptional network refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24018767

  7. Oxygen requirements of yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Visser, W; Scheffers, W A; Batenburg-van der Vegte, W H; van Dijken, J P

    1990-01-01

    Type species of 75 yeast genera were examined for their ability to grow anaerobically in complex and mineral media. To define anaerobic conditions, we added a redox indicator, resazurin, to the media to determine low redox potentials. All strains tested were capable of fermenting glucose to ethanol in oxygen-limited shake-flask cultures, even those of species generally regarded as nonfermentative. However, only 23% of the yeast species tested grew under anaerobic conditions. A comparative study with a number of selected strains revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae stands out as a yeast capable of rapid growth at low redox potentials. Other yeasts, such as Torulaspora delbrueckii and Candida tropicalis, grew poorly mu max, 0.03 and 0.05 h-1, respectively) under anaerobic conditions in mineral medium supplemented with Tween 80 and ergosterol. The latter organisms grew rapidly under oxygen limitation and then displayed a high rate of alcoholic fermentation. It can be concluded that these yeasts have hitherto-unidentified oxygen requirements for growth. Images PMID:2082825

  8. Method for converting sucrose to .beta.-D-glucose

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Blake A.; Volponi, Joanne V.; Ingersoll, David; Walker, Andrew

    2009-07-07

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for continuously converting sucrose to .beta.-D-glucose. The method comprises a three-stage enzymatic reactor in which an aqueous solution of sucrose is first converted into a solution of fructose and .alpha.-D-glucose by passing it through a porous, packed column containing an inert media on which invertase is immobilized. This solution is then sent through a second packed column containing glucose isomerase and finally a third packed column containing mutarotase. Solution temperature and pH are adjusted to maximize glucose output.

  9. Anharmonicity and hydrogen bonding in electrooptic sucrose crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, M. M.; Giermańska, J.

    1990-03-01

    The polarized absorption spectra of the sucrose crystal in the 5300 - 7300 cm -1 region have been measured. The assignments of all the eight OH stretching overtones are proposed and their mechanical anharmonicities are estimated. The discrepancies from the oriented gas model (OGM) in the observed relative band intensities, especially of the -CH vibrations, are assumed to be connected with vibronic couplings enhanced by the helical arrangement of molecules joined by hydrogen bondings. It seems that this kind of interactions might be important for the second harmonic generation (SHG) by the sucrose crystal.

  10. Sucrose: A Prospering and Sustainable Organic Raw Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Siegfried; Rose, Thomas; Moser, Matthias

    Sucrose (α-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-fructofuranoside) is an inexpensive chemical produced by sugar cane and sugar beet cultivation. Chemical and/or biochemical transformations convert it into highly valuable synthetic intermediates such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), bioethylene, 1,2-propylene glycol and levulinic acid. Sucrose can also be converted into biodegradable polymers such as polyesters and polyurethanes, as well as into novel carbohydrates such as isomaltulose, trehalulose, inulin, levan, Neo-amylose, and dextran, highly valuable additives for food and cosmetics and materials for separation and purification technologies.

  11. Avocado Oil Supplementation Modifies Cardiovascular Risk Profile Markers in a Rat Model of Sucrose-Induced Metabolic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Zarrabal, Octavio; Nolasco-Hipolito, Cirilo; Aguilar-Uscanga, M. Guadalupe; Melo-Santiesteban, Guadalupe; Hayward-Jones, Patricia M.; Barradas-Dermitz, Dulce M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of avocado oil administration on biochemical markers of cardiovascular risk profile in rats with metabolic changes induced by sucrose ingestion. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: a control group (CG; basic diet), a sick group (MC; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution), and three other groups (MCao, MCac, and MCas; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution plus olive oil and avocado oil extracted by centrifugation or using solvent, resp.). Glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, low- and high-density lipoproteins (LDL, HDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), lactic dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration were analyzed. Avocado oil reduces TG, VLDL, and LDL levels, in the LDL case significantly so, without affecting HDL levels. An effect was exhibited by avocado oil similar to olive oil, with no significant difference between avocado oil extracted either by centrifugation or solvent in myocardial injury biochemical indicators. Avocado oil decreased hs-CRP levels, indicating that inflammatory processes were partially reversed. These findings suggested that avocado oil supplementation has a positive health outcome because it reduces inflammatory events and produces positive changes in the biochemical indicators studied, related to the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:24719499

  12. Avocado oil supplementation modifies cardiovascular risk profile markers in a rat model of sucrose-induced metabolic changes.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Zarrabal, Octavio; Nolasco-Hipolito, Cirilo; Aguilar-Uscanga, M Guadalupe; Melo-Santiesteban, Guadalupe; Hayward-Jones, Patricia M; Barradas-Dermitz, Dulce M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of avocado oil administration on biochemical markers of cardiovascular risk profile in rats with metabolic changes induced by sucrose ingestion. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: a control group (CG; basic diet), a sick group (MC; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution), and three other groups (MCao, MCac, and MCas; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution plus olive oil and avocado oil extracted by centrifugation or using solvent, resp.). Glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, low- and high-density lipoproteins (LDL, HDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), lactic dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration were analyzed. Avocado oil reduces TG, VLDL, and LDL levels, in the LDL case significantly so, without affecting HDL levels. An effect was exhibited by avocado oil similar to olive oil, with no significant difference between avocado oil extracted either by centrifugation or solvent in myocardial injury biochemical indicators. Avocado oil decreased hs-CRP levels, indicating that inflammatory processes were partially reversed. These findings suggested that avocado oil supplementation has a positive health outcome because it reduces inflammatory events and produces positive changes in the biochemical indicators studied, related to the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:24719499

  13. The effect of sucrose on unfrozen water and syneresis of acidified sodium caseinate-xanthan gels.

    PubMed

    Braga, A L M; Cunha, R L

    2005-07-01

    The influence of the ingredients of acidified Na caseinate-xanthan-sucrose gels on thermophysical properties and syneresis of the gels was studied. Sucrose concentration affected all of the gel equilibrium properties and the rate of syneresis. The positive effect of sucrose on syneresis and unfrozen water (UFW) values was attributed to different effects. The amount of UFW was governed mainly by the colligative properties of sucrose whereas the equilibrium syneresis behaviour was associated with the changes in network dynamics caused by the kosmotropic properties of sucrose. The latter could enhance xanthan-sucrose association or favour xanthan-protein interactions. PMID:15913757

  14. Distribution of sucrose around the mouth and its clearance after a sucrose mouthrinse or consumption of three different foods.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, L M; Dawes, C

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of sucrose in whole saliva and in saliva from seven different regions of the mouth was determined in 10 subjects over the 10-min period following the chewing of a doughnut, sucking on a mint candy, the drinking of orange juice, or use of a 10% sucrose mouthrinse. With all products, the sucrose was distributed non-uniformly, with particularly low concentrations on the lingual surfaces of the lower incisors and the facial surfaces of the upper molars. Clearance was also most rapid from these sites. Since the depth and duration of a Stephan curve in dental plaque is influenced by the sugar concentration to which the plaque is exposed, the results, together with previous results on salivary film velocity in different regions of the mouth, help to provide an explanation for the site-specificity of smooth-surface caries and of supragingival calculus deposition. PMID:8033187

  15. [Fructose transporter in yeasts].

    PubMed

    Lazar, Zbigniew; Dobrowolski, Adam; Robak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Study of hexoses transporter started with discovery of galactose permease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Glucose, fructose and mannose assimilation is assumed by numerous proteins encoded by different genes. To date over 20 hexoses transporters, belonging to Sugar Porter family and to Major Facilitator Superfamily, were known. Genome sequence analysis of Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, S. cerevisaie and Debaryomyces hansenii reveled potential presence of 17-48 sugar porter proteins. Glucose transporters in S. cerevisiae have been already characterized. In this paper, hexoses transporters, responsible for assimilation of fructose by cells, are presented and compared. Fructose specific transporter are described for yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Zygosaccharomyces bailli, K. lactis, Saccharomyces pastorianus, S. cerevisiae winemaking strain and for fungus Botritys cinerea and human (Glut5p). Among six yeasts transporters, five are fructose specific, acting by facilitated diffusion or proton symport. Yeasts monosaccharides transporter studies allow understanding of sugars uptake and metabolism important aspects, even in higher eukaryotes cells. PMID:25033548

  16. Strong nucleosomes of yeasts.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Edward N; Tripathi, Vijay

    2016-02-01

    Yeast genome lacks visibly periodic sequences characteristic of strong nucleosomes (SNs) originally discovered in A. thaliana, C. elegans, and H. sapiens. Yet, the sequences with good match to the (RRRRRYYYYY)n consensus of the SNs do show preference to centromere regions of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Cryptococcus neoformans - property characteristic of SNs of higher eukaryotes. Candida albicans is the first exception detected so far, where their SNs do not have any affinity to the centromeres, nor pericentromeric regions. Three of the four yeast genomes analyzed possess unique repeating centromere-specific SN sequences (C. albicans, again, is an exception). The results firmly indicate that centromeres of plants, animals, and yeasts in general have special chromatin structure, favoring SNs. PMID:25893982

  17. Yeast killer systems.

    PubMed Central

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Gerloni, M; Bertolotti, D; Polonelli, L

    1997-01-01

    The killer phenomenon in yeasts has been revealed to be a multicentric model for molecular biologists, virologists, phytopathologists, epidemiologists, industrial and medical microbiologists, mycologists, and pharmacologists. The surprisingly widespread occurrence of the killer phenomenon among taxonomically unrelated microorganisms, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, has engendered a new interest in its biological significance as well as its theoretical and practical applications. The search for therapeutic opportunities by using yeast killer systems has conceptually opened new avenues for the prevention and control of life-threatening fungal diseases through the idiotypic network that is apparently exploited by the immune system in the course of natural infections. In this review, the biology, ecology, epidemiology, therapeutics, serology, and idiotypy of yeast killer systems are discussed. PMID:9227858

  18. Antisense inhibition of tomato fruit sucrose synthase decreases fruit setting and the sucrose unloading capacity of young fruit.

    PubMed Central

    D'Aoust, M A; Yelle, S; Nguyen-Quoc, B

    1999-01-01

    The role of sucrose synthase (SuSy) in tomato fruit was studied in transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants expressing an antisense fragment of fruit-specific SuSy RNA (TOMSSF) under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Constitutive expression of the antisense RNA markedly inhibited SuSy activity in flowers and fruit pericarp tissues. However, inhibition was only slight in the endosperm and was undetectable in the embryo, shoot, petiole, and leaf tissues. The activity of sucrose phosphate synthase decreased in parallel with that of SuSy, but acid invertase activity did not increase in response to the reduced SuSy activity. The only effect on the carbohydrate content of young fruit was a slight reduction in starch accumulation. The in vitro sucrose import capacity of fruits was not reduced by SuSy inhibition at 23 days after anthesis, and the rate of starch synthesized from the imported sucrose was not lessened even when SuSy activity was decreased by 98%. However, the sucrose unloading capacity of 7-day-old fruit was substantially decreased in lines with low SuSy activity. In addition, the SuSy antisense fruit from the first week of flowering had a slower growth rate. A reduced fruit set, leading to markedly less fruit per plant at maturity, was observed for the plants with the least SuSy activity. These results suggest that SuSy participates in the control of sucrose import capacity of young tomato fruit, which is a determinant for fruit set and development. PMID:10590167

  19. Evolutionary history of Ascomyceteous Yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are important for many industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 20 ascomyceteous yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. A comp...

  20. Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction

    MedlinePlus

    ... preparations of red yeast rice are used in food products in Chinese cuisine, including Peking duck. Others have been sold as dietary supplements to lower blood levels of cholesterol and related lipids. Some red yeast rice products contain substances called ...

  1. Genetics of Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querol, Amparo; Fernández-Espinar, M. Teresa; Belloch, Carmela

    The use of yeasts in biotechnology processes dates back to ancient days. Before 7000 BC, beer was produced in Sumeria. Wine was made in Assyria in 3500 BC, and ancient Rome had over 250 bakeries, which were making leavened bread by 100 BC. And milk has been made into Kefyr and Koumiss in Asia for many centuries (Demain, Phaff, & Kurtzman, 1999). However, the importance of yeast in the food and beverage industries was only realized about 1860, when their role in food manufacturing became evident.

  2. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric; Suominen, Pirkko

    2010-12-07

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains. ##STR00001##

  3. Fast and sensitive detection of genetically modified yeasts in wine.

    PubMed

    León, Carlos; García-Cañas, Virginia; González, Ramón; Morales, Pilar; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2011-10-21

    In this work, a novel screening methodology based on the combined use of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and capillary gel electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence (CGE-LIF) is developed for the fast and sensitive detection of genetically modified yeasts in wine. As model, a recombinant EKD-13 Saccaromyces cerevisiae strain was selected and different wines were prepared using either recombinant or conventional yeasts. Special emphasis is put on the yeast DNA extraction step, exploring different commercial and non-commercial methods, in order to overcome the important difficulty of obtaining amplifiable DNA from wine samples. To unequivocally detect the transgenic yeast, two specific segments of the transgenic construction were amplified. In addition, a third primer pair was used as amplification control to confirm the quality of the yeast DNA obtained from the extraction step. CGE-LIF provides high sensitivity, good analysis speed and impressive resolution of DNA fragments, making this technique very convenient to optimize multiplex PCR parameters and to analyze the amplified DNA fragments. Thus, the CGE-LIF method provided %RSD values for DNA migration times lower than 0.82% (n=10) with the same capillary and lower than 1.92% (n=15) with three different capillaries, allowing the adequate size determination of the PCR products with an error lower than 4% compared to the theoretically expected. The whole method developed in this work requires less than one working day and grants the sensitive detection of transgenic yeasts in wine samples. PMID:21296357

  4. Synthesis of carbon-13 enriched disaccharides: lactose and sucrose

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.E.; Unkefer, P.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Ehler, D.S.

    1986-05-01

    Disaccharides can be prepared enzymatically and by chemical synthesis. Lactose enriched with carbon-13 at C-1 can be synthesized by reacting K/sup 13/CN with a sugar having a one fewer carbon than the desired product. Thus, a mixture of 4-O-..beta..-D-galactopyranosyl-D-(1-/sup 13/C)glucose ((1-/sup 13/C)lactose) and 4-O-..beta..-D-galactopyranosyl-D-(1-/sup 13/C)mannose can be synthesized from 3-O-..beta..-D-galactopyranosyl-D-arabinose and K/sup 13/CN. (/sup 13/C)Sucrose is conveniently prepared in gram quantities from D-(/sup 13/C)fructose and UDP-glucose in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme sucrose synthetase. This reaction proceeds smoothly at 25/sup 0/ over a period of hours to give an equilibrium mixture which can be separated chromatographically. The glucose portion of sucrose can be labeled using enzymatically-prepared UDP-(/sup 13/C)glucose. Labeled sucrose is important for the preparation of labeled starches to be used for structural and metabolic studies.

  5. Sucrose Responsiveness, Learning Success, and Task Specialization in Ants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Margot; Rolland, Uther; Giurfa,, Martin; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Social insects possess remarkable learning capabilities, which are crucial for their ecological success. They also exhibit interindividual differences in responsiveness to environmental stimuli, which underlie task specialization and division of labor. Here we investigated for the first time the relationships between sucrose responsiveness,…

  6. 21 CFR 172.859 - Sucrose fatty acid esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sucrose fatty acid esters. 172.859 Section 172.859 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives §...

  7. Sucrose Responsiveness, Learning Success, and Task Specialization in Ants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Margot; Rolland, Uther; Giurfa,, Martin; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Social insects possess remarkable learning capabilities, which are crucial for their ecological success. They also exhibit interindividual differences in responsiveness to environmental stimuli, which underlie task specialization and division of labor. Here we investigated for the first time the relationships between sucrose responsiveness,

  8. Regulation of sucrose synthesis in water stressed leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Daie, J.; Aloni, B. )

    1991-05-01

    Alteration in carbon metabolism and carbohydrate partitioning occur in drought stressed plants. Some species accumulate large quantities of starch in the chloroplast, which may be used to support sucrose synthesis under conditions of limited carbon supply. The authors monitored chemical partitioning of carbon between sugars and starch and the activity of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and fructose 1,6 bisphosphatase (FBPase) in the source leaves of water stressed tomatoes. Plants were stressed by withdrawing water for 10 days and rewatered for recovery. Water potential dropped from {minus}0.8 to {minus}2.2MPA in 10 days, but recovered to control level 2 days after rewatering. Photosynthetic rates as measured by the activity of Rubisco followed similar patterns to those of water potential. After 10 days, leaf starch levels decreased to less than 50% of control. Sucrose levels did not increase significantly, but hexose levels increased 3-4 fold during the stress period, and decreased to control levels 1 day after rewatering. FBPase activity decreased and SPS activity increased under stress conditions. Upon rewatering, the activity of FBPase and SPS returned to control levels. Presence of large quantities of hexose and activation of SPS in stressed leaves suggested that additional sucrose synthesized under stress was hydrolyzed to hexoses, presumably due to enhanced invertase activity.

  9. 21 CFR 172.859 - Sucrose fatty acid esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sucrose fatty acid esters. 172.859 Section 172.859 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives §...

  10. 21 CFR 172.859 - Sucrose fatty acid esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sucrose fatty acid esters. 172.859 Section 172.859 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR...

  11. Kinetic Characterization of Spinach Leaf Sucrose-Phosphate Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Jacob; Preiss, Jack

    1982-01-01

    The spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase was partially purified via DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and its kinetic properties were studied. Fructose-6-phosphate saturation curves were sigmoidal, while UDPglucose saturation curves were hyperbolic. At subsaturating concentrations of fructose-6-phosphate, 1,5 anhydroglucitol-6-phosphate had a stimulatory effect on enzyme activity, suggesting multiple and interacting fructose-6-phosphate sites on sucrose-phosphate synthase. The concentrations required for 50% of maximal activity were 3.0 millimolar and 1.3 millimolar, respectively, for fructose-6-phosphate and UDPglucose. The enzyme was not stimulated by divalent cations. Inorganic phosphate proved to be a potent inhibitor, particularly at low concentrations of substrate. Phosphate inhibition was competitive with UDPglucose, and its Ki was determined to be 1.75 millimolar. Sucrose phosphate, the product of the reaction, was also shown to be a competitive inhibitor towards UDPglucose concentration and had Ki of 0.4 millimolar. The kinetic results suggest that spinach leaf sucrose-phospahte synthase is a regulatory enzyme and that its activity is modulated by the concentrations of phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, and UDPglucose occurring in the cytoplasm of the leaf cell. PMID:16662338

  12. 21 CFR 172.859 - Sucrose fatty acid esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sucrose fatty acid esters. 172.859 Section 172.859 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives §...

  13. 21 CFR 172.859 - Sucrose fatty acid esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sucrose fatty acid esters. 172.859 Section 172.859 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives §...

  14. Sugarcane bagasse hydrolysis using yeast cellulolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Souza, Angelica Cristina de; Carvalho, Fernanda Paula; Silva e Batista, Cristina Ferreira; Schwan, Rosane Freitas; Dias, Disney Ribeiro

    2013-10-28

    Ethanol fuel production from lignocellulosic biomass is emerging as one of the most important technologies for sustainable development. To use this biomass, it is necessary to circumvent the physical and chemical barriers presented by the cohesive combination of the main biomass components, which hinders the hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose into fermentable sugars. This study evaluated the hydrolytic capacity of enzymes produced by yeasts, isolated from the soils of the Brazilian Cerrado biome (savannah) and the Amazon region, on sugarcane bagasse pre-treated with H2SO4. Among the 103 and 214 yeast isolates from the Minas Gerais Cerrado and the Amazon regions, 18 (17.47%) and 11 (5.14%) isolates, respectively, were cellulase-producing. Cryptococcus laurentii was prevalent and produced significant β- glucosidase levels, which were higher than the endo- and exoglucanase activities. In natura sugarcane bagasse was pre-treated with 2% H2SO4 for 30 min at 150oC. Subsequently, the obtained fibrous residue was subjected to hydrolysis using the Cryptococcus laurentii yeast enzyme extract for 72 h. This enzyme extract promoted the conversion of approximately 32% of the cellulose, of which 2.4% was glucose, after the enzymatic hydrolysis reaction, suggesting that C. laurentii is a good β-glucosidase producer. The results presented in this study highlight the importance of isolating microbial strains that produce enzymes of biotechnological interest, given their extensive application in biofuel production. PMID:23851270

  15. Nucleolar and nuclear envelope proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hurt, E C; McDowall, A; Schimmang, T

    1988-08-01

    We have developed a fast and reliable purification protocol to obtain yeast nuclei in intact and pure form and in a reasonable yield. The purified nuclei appear homogeneous at the light and electron microscopic level, are highly enriched in the nuclear marker histone H2B and devoid of mitochondrial, vacuolar and cytosolic marker proteins. On sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels, the nuclear fraction contains unique proteins which distinguishes them from the major yeast subcellular fractions. Yeast nuclei were separated by detergent/salt extraction into soluble, insoluble and membrane fractions. Antibodies raised against subnuclear fractions lead to the identification of an integral nuclear membrane protein and a high-abundance 38-kDa protein which is located in the yeast nucleolus. PMID:3053175

  16. Wheat cytosolic acetyl-CoA carboxylase complements an ACC1 null mutation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Joachimiak, M; Tevzadze, G; Podkowinski, J; Haselkorn, R; Gornicki, P

    1997-09-01

    Spores harboring an ACC1 deletion derived from a diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, in which one copy of the entire ACC1 gene is replaced with a LEU2 cassette, fail to grow. A chimeric gene consisting of the yeast GAL10 promoter, yeast ACC1 leader, wheat cytosolic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) cDNA, and yeast ACC1 3' tail was used to complement a yeast ACC1 mutation. The complementation demonstrates that active wheat ACCase can be produced in yeast. At low concentrations of galactose, the activity of the "wheat gene" driven by the GAL10 promoter is low and ACCase becomes limiting for growth, a condition expected to enhance transgenic yeast sensitivity to wheat ACCase-specific inhibitors. An aryloxyphenoxypropionate and two cyclohexanediones do not inhibit growth of haploid yeast strains containing the yeast ACC1 gene, but one cyclohexanedione inhibits growth of the gene-replacement strains at concentrations below 0.2 mM. In vitro, the activity of wheat cytosolic ACCase produced by the gene-replacement yeast strain is inhibited by haloxyfop and cethoxydim at concentrations above 0.02 mM. The activity of yeast ACCase is less affected. The wheat plastid ACCase in wheat germ extract is inhibited by all three herbicides at concentrations below 0.02 mM. Yeast gene-replacement strains will provide a convenient system for the study of plant ACCases. PMID:11038571

  17. Wheat cytosolic acetyl-CoA carboxylase complements an ACC1 null mutation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Joachimiak, M.; Tevzadze, G.; Podkowinski, J.; Haselkorn, R.; Gornicki, P.

    1997-01-01

    Spores harboring an ACC1 deletion derived from a diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, in which one copy of the entire ACC1 gene is replaced with a LEU2 cassette, fail to grow. A chimeric gene consisting of the yeast GAL10 promoter, yeast ACC1 leader, wheat cytosolic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) cDNA, and yeast ACC1 3′ tail was used to complement a yeast ACC1 mutation. The complementation demonstrates that active wheat ACCase can be produced in yeast. At low concentrations of galactose, the activity of the “wheat gene” driven by the GAL10 promoter is low and ACCase becomes limiting for growth, a condition expected to enhance transgenic yeast sensitivity to wheat ACCase-specific inhibitors. An aryloxyphenoxypropionate and two cyclohexanediones do not inhibit growth of haploid yeast strains containing the yeast ACC1 gene, but one cyclohexanedione inhibits growth of the gene-replacement strains at concentrations below 0.2 mM. In vitro, the activity of wheat cytosolic ACCase produced by the gene-replacement yeast strain is inhibited by haloxyfop and cethoxydim at concentrations above 0.02 mM. The activity of yeast ACCase is less affected. The wheat plastid ACCase in wheat germ extract is inhibited by all three herbicides at concentrations below 0.02 mM. Yeast gene-replacement strains will provide a convenient system for the study of plant ACCases. PMID:11038571

  18. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otabe, E. S.; Kuroki, S.; Nikawa, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ooba, T.; Kiso, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  19. The Trehalose Phosphotransferase System (PTS) in E. coli W Can Transport Low Levels of Sucrose that Are Sufficient to Facilitate Induction of the csc Sucrose Catabolism Operon

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Jennifer A.; Bohlke, Nina; Vickers, Claudia E.; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2014-01-01

    Plasticity in substrate acceptance is a well-characterised phenomenon for disaccharide transporters. Sucrose, a non-reducing disaccharide, is usually metabolised via either the permease-mediated chromosomally-encoded sucrose catabolism (csc) regulon or the sucrose phosphotransferase system (PTS). E. coli W is a fast-growing strain which efficiently utilises sucrose at concentrations above 1% via the csc regulon. To examine if sucrose could be metabolised via other routes, a library of transposon mutants was generated and screened on 0.2% sucrose. One mutant identified from this library had an insertion in the repressor for the regulon controlling catabolism of the disaccharide trehalose (treR). A series of mutants was constructed to elucidate the mechanism of sucrose utilization in the treR insertion strain. Analysis of these mutants provided evidence that deletion of TreR enables uptake of sucrose via TreB, an enzyme II protein required for PTS-mediated uptake of trehalose. Once inside the cell, this sucrose is not processed by the TreC hydrolase, nor is it sufficient for growth of the strain. QRT-PCR analysis showed that levels of cscA (invertase) transcript increased in the WΔtreR mutant relative to the wild-type strain when grown under low sucrose conditions. This result suggests that the intracellular sucrose provided by TreB can facilitate de-repression of the csc regulon, leading to increased gene expression, sucrose uptake and sucrose utilization in the treR mutant. PMID:24586369

  20. Investigating polymorphisms in membrane-associated transporter protein SLC45A2, using sucrose transporters as a model.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Anke; Ward, John M

    2015-07-01

    Solute carrier family 45 member 2 encodes the melanosomal membrane protein, membrane-associated transporter protein (MATP), of unknown function, that is required for normal melanin synthesis. The present study analyzed the effects of two human MATP mutations, D93N, which causes oculocutaneous albinism 4 (OCA4), and L374F, which is correlated with light pigmentation in European populations. Corresponding mutations were produced in the related and well-characterized sucrose transporter from rice, OsSUT1, and transport activity was measured by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, in addition to 14C-sucrose uptake in yeast. The mutation corresponding to D93N resulted in a complete loss of transport activity. The mutation corresponding to L374F resulted in a 90% decrease in transport activity, although the substrate affinity was unaffected. The results indicated that the D93N mutation causes OCA4 as a result of loss of MATP transport activity, and that the F374 allele confers significantly lower transport activity than L374. PMID:25760657

  1. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis XIX. The Identification of Sucrose Phosphate in Sugar Beet Leaves

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Buchanan, J. G.

    1952-09-01

    The recognition and characterization of a sucrose phosphate as an intermediate in sucrose by synthesis by green plants is described. A tentative structure for this phosphate is proposed and its mode of formation suggested.

  2. The opioid system majorly contributes to preference for fat emulsions but not sucrose solutions in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Okahashi, Tatsuya; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Okafuji, Yoko; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Rodents show a stronger preference for fat than sucrose, even if their diet is isocaloric. This implies that the preference mechanisms for fat and sucrose differ. To compare the contribution of the opioid system to the preference of fat and sucrose, we examined the effects of mu-, delta-, kappa-, and non-selective opioid receptor antagonists on the preference of sucrose and fat, assessed by a two-bottle choice test and a licking test, in mice naïve to sucrose and fat ingestion. Administration of non-selective and mu-selective opioid receptor antagonists more strongly inhibited the preference of fat than sucrose. While the preference of fat was reduced to the same level as water by the antagonist administration that of sucrose was still greater than water. Our results suggest that the preference of fat relies strongly on the opioid system, while that of sucrose is regulated by other mechanisms in addition to the opioid system. PMID:25516200

  3. Chemical genomics in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Many drugs have unknown, controversial or multiple mechanisms of action. Four recent 'chemical genomic' studies, using genome-scale collections of yeast gene deletions that were either arrayed or barcoded, have presented complementary approaches to identifying gene-drug and pathway-drug interactions. PMID:15345040

  4. Opportunistic Pathogenic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Uma

    Advances in medical research, made during the last few decades, have improved the prophylactic, diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for variety of infections/diseases. However, many of the prophylactic and therapeutic procedures have been seen in many instances to exact a price of host-vulnerability to an expanding group of opportunistic pathogens and yeasts are one of the important members in it. Fortunately amongst the vast majority of yeasts present in nature only few are considered to have the capability to cause infections when certain opportunities predisposes and these are termed as ‘opportunistic pathogenic yeasts.’ However, the term ‘pathogenic’ is quite tricky, as it depends of various factors of the host, the ‘bug’ and the environment to manifest the clinical infection. The borderline is expanding. In the present century with unprecedented increase in number of immune-compromised host in various disciplines of health care settings, where any yeast, which has the capability to grow at 37 ° C (normal body temperature of human), can be pathogenic and cause infection in particular situation

  5. Transgene silencing of sucrose synthase in alfalfa stem vascular tissue by a truncated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase: sucrose synthase construct

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important role of sucrose synthase (SUS, EC 2.4.1.13) in plants is to provide UDP-glucose needed for cellulose synthesis in cell walls. We examined if over-expressing SUS in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) would increase cellulose content of stem cell walls. Alfalfa plants were transformed with two ...

  6. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2013-02-12

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  7. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2014-09-23

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  8. Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Videlier, Mathieu; Camadro, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Label-free bottom-up shotgun MS-based proteomics is an extremely powerful and simple tool to provide high quality quantitative analyses of the yeast proteome with only microgram amounts of total protein. Although the experimental design of this approach is rather straightforward and does not require the modification of growth conditions, proteins or peptides, several factors must be taken into account to benefit fully from the power of this method. Key factors include the choice of an appropriate method for the preparation of protein extracts, careful evaluation of the instrument design and available analytical capabilities, the choice of the quantification method (intensity-based vs. spectral count), and the proper manipulation of the selected quantification algorithm. The elaboration of this robust workflow for data acquisition, processing, and analysis provides unprecedented insight into the dynamics of the yeast proteome. PMID:26483028

  9. Cellulose Deficiency Is Enhanced on Hyper Accumulation of Sucrose by a H+-Coupled Sucrose Symporter.

    PubMed

    Yeats, Trevor H; Sorek, Hagit; Wemmer, David E; Somerville, Chris R

    2016-05-01

    In order to understand factors controlling the synthesis and deposition of cellulose, we have studied the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) double mutant shaven3 shaven3-like1 (shv3svl1), which was shown previously to exhibit a marked cellulose deficiency. We discovered that exogenous sucrose (Suc) in growth medium greatly enhances the reduction in hypocotyl elongation and cellulose content of shv3svl1 This effect was specific to Suc and was not observed with other sugars or osmoticum. Live-cell imaging of fluorescently labeled cellulose synthase complexes revealed a slowing of cellulose synthase complexes in shv3svl1 compared with the wild type that is enhanced in a Suc-conditional manner. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance confirmed a cellulose deficiency of shv3svl1 but indicated that cellulose crystallinity was unaffected in the mutant. A genetic suppressor screen identified mutants of the plasma membrane Suc/H(+) symporter SUC1, indicating that the accumulation of Suc underlies the Suc-dependent enhancement of shv3svl1 phenotypes. While other cellulose-deficient mutants were not specifically sensitive to exogenous Suc, the feronia (fer) receptor kinase mutant partially phenocopied shv3svl1 and exhibited a similar Suc-conditional cellulose defect. We demonstrate that shv3svl1, like fer, exhibits a hyperpolarized plasma membrane H(+) gradient that likely underlies the enhanced accumulation of Suc via Suc/H(+) symporters. Enhanced intracellular Suc abundance appears to favor the partitioning of carbon to starch rather than cellulose in both mutants. We conclude that SHV3-like proteins may be involved in signaling during cell expansion that coordinates proton pumping and cellulose synthesis. PMID:27013021

  10. Yeast diversity of Ghanaian cocoa bean heap fermentations.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Heide-Marie; Vrancken, Gino; Takrama, Jemmy F; Camu, Nicholas; De Vos, Paul; De Vuyst, Luc

    2009-08-01

    The fermentation of the Theobroma cacao beans, involving yeasts, lactic acid bacteria, and acetic acid bacteria, has a major influence on the quality of the resulting cocoa. An assessment of the microbial community of cocoa bean heap fermentations in Ghana resulted in 91 yeast isolates. These were grouped by PCR-fingerprinting with the primer M13. Representative isolates were identified using the D1/D2 region of the large subunit rRNA gene, internal transcribed spacer sequences and partial actin gene sequences leading to the detection of 15 species. Properties of importance for cocoa bean fermentation, namely sucrose, glucose, and citrate assimilation capacity, pH-, ethanol-, and heat-tolerance, were examined for selected isolates. Pichia kudriavzevii (Issatchenkia orientalis), Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Hanseniaspora opuntiae formed the major components of the yeast community. Hanseniaspora opuntiae was identified conclusively for the first time from cocoa fermentations. Among the less frequently encountered species, Candida carpophila, Candida orthopsilosis, Kodamaea ohmeri, Meyerozyma (Pichia) caribbica, Pichia manshurica, Saccharomycodes ludwigii, and Yamadazyma (Pichia) mexicana were not yet documented from this substrate. Hanseniaspora opuntiae was preferably growing during the earlier phase of fermentation, reflecting its tolerance to low pH and its citrate-negative phenotype, while no specific temporal distribution was recognized for P. kudriavzevii and S. cerevisiae. PMID:19473277

  11. Reinforcement Value and Substitutability of Sucrose and Wheel Running: Implications for Activity Anorexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belke, Terry W.; Duncan, Ian D.; Pierce, W. David

    2006-01-01

    Choice between sucrose and wheel-running reinforcement was assessed in two experiments. In the first experiment, ten male Wistar rats were exposed to concurrent VI 30 s VI 30 s schedules of wheel-running and sucrose reinforcement. Sucrose concentration varied across concentrations of 2.5, 7.5, and 12.5%. As concentration increased, more behavior…

  12. Aspects of sucrose transport in stem parenchyma of sweet sorghum. [Sorghum bicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Lingle, S.E.

    1987-08-01

    Sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is a sucrose-storing crop with a storage tissue anatomically similar to that of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.). However, recent evidence suggests that sweet sorghum may be biochemically different from sugarcane. /sup 14/C-sucrose uptake was studied in excised tissue discs from fully-elongated internodes of Rio sweet sorghum. Washout studies gave results consistent with a 3 compartment system. After 3 hours of uptake, most of the /sup 14/C was found in the vacuole compartment, and was determined by HPLC to be sucrose. Total sucrose uptake consisted of a PCMBS-sensitive (active) and a PCMBS-insensitive (passive) component. Active sucrose uptake had a pH optimum of 4.5. Total sucrose uptake was negatively correlated with the internal sucrose content of the tissue. Fructosyl-labelled /sup 14/C-sucrose was not randomized during uptake, suggesting that sucrose cleavage is not a requirement for sucrose uptake in sweet sorghum. This data suggests that in sweet sorghum, sucrose is transported intact by a specific carrier, as opposed to the sucrose-cleavage-and-resynthesis transport system that apparently operates in sugarcane.

  13. SUGARBEET ROOT SUCROSE SYNTHASE ISOFORMS DIFFER IN DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION, SUBUNIT COMPOSITION AND RESPONSE TO PH.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two sucrose synthase isoforms have been identified by activity stained isoelectric focused polyacrylamide electrophoresis in developing sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) root. Sucrose synthase isoform I (SuSyI) was present from the early stages of development to maturity. Sucrose synthase isoform II (S...

  14. Reinforcement Value and Substitutability of Sucrose and Wheel Running: Implications for Activity Anorexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belke, Terry W.; Duncan, Ian D.; Pierce, W. David

    2006-01-01

    Choice between sucrose and wheel-running reinforcement was assessed in two experiments. In the first experiment, ten male Wistar rats were exposed to concurrent VI 30 s VI 30 s schedules of wheel-running and sucrose reinforcement. Sucrose concentration varied across concentrations of 2.5, 7.5, and 12.5%. As concentration increased, more behavior

  15. Effect of Dietary Intake of Avocado Oil and Olive Oil on Biochemical Markers of Liver Function in Sucrose-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Zarrabal, Octavio; Nolasco-Hipolito, Cirilo; Aguilar-Uscanga, Ma. Guadalupe; Melo Santiesteban, Guadalupe; Hayward-Jones, Patricia M.; Barradas-Dermitz, Dulce Ma.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic changes, along with cardiovascular and hepatic factors, are associated with the development of diseases such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obesity. We evaluated the effect of avocado oil supplementation (centrifuged and solvent extracted), compared with olive oil, upon the hepatic function in sucrose-fed rats. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: control (basal diet), a sucrose-fed group (basal diet plus 30% sucrose solution), and three other groups (S-OO, S-AOC, and S-AOS, indicating basal diet plus 30% sucrose solution plus olive oil OO, avocado oil extracted by centrifugation AOC or using solvent AOS, resp.). Glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein, albumin, globulin, direct bilirubin, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, cholinesterase, and α-amylase concentrations were determined and avocado oil effect on them was studied. In some cases the induced metabolic alteration significantly affected total protein and bilirubin levels and also had a highly significant effect on α-amylase levels. AOC and AOS exhibited effects similar to those of olive oil, according to the nonsignificant difference in fatty acid profile observed by other authors. Avocado oil consumption could be beneficial in the control of altered metabolic profile illnesses as it presents effects on hepatic function biochemical markers similar to olive oil. PMID:24860825

  16. Effect of dietary intake of avocado oil and olive oil on biochemical markers of liver function in sucrose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Zarrabal, Octavio; Nolasco-Hipolito, Cirilo; Aguilar-Uscanga, Ma Guadalupe; Melo Santiesteban, Guadalupe; Hayward-Jones, Patricia M; Barradas-Dermitz, Dulce Ma

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic changes, along with cardiovascular and hepatic factors, are associated with the development of diseases such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obesity. We evaluated the effect of avocado oil supplementation (centrifuged and solvent extracted), compared with olive oil, upon the hepatic function in sucrose-fed rats. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: control (basal diet), a sucrose-fed group (basal diet plus 30% sucrose solution), and three other groups (S-OO, S-AOC, and S-AOS, indicating basal diet plus 30% sucrose solution plus olive oil OO, avocado oil extracted by centrifugation AOC or using solvent AOS, resp.). Glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein, albumin, globulin, direct bilirubin, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, cholinesterase, and α -amylase concentrations were determined and avocado oil effect on them was studied. In some cases the induced metabolic alteration significantly affected total protein and bilirubin levels and also had a highly significant effect on α -amylase levels. AOC and AOS exhibited effects similar to those of olive oil, according to the nonsignificant difference in fatty acid profile observed by other authors. Avocado oil consumption could be beneficial in the control of altered metabolic profile illnesses as it presents effects on hepatic function biochemical markers similar to olive oil. PMID:24860825

  17. The Regulation of Filamentous Growth in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul J.; Sprague, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous growth is a nutrient-regulated growth response that occurs in many fungal species. In pathogens, filamentous growth is critical for host–cell attachment, invasion into tissues, and virulence. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes filamentous growth, which provides a genetically tractable system to study the molecular basis of the response. Filamentous growth is regulated by evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways. One of these pathways is a mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. A remarkable feature of the filamentous growth MAPK pathway is that it is composed of factors that also function in other pathways. An intriguing challenge therefore has been to understand how pathways that share components establish and maintain their identity. Other canonical signaling pathways—rat sarcoma/protein kinase A (RAS/PKA), sucrose nonfermentable (SNF), and target of rapamycin (TOR)—also regulate filamentous growth, which raises the question of how signals from multiple pathways become integrated into a coordinated response. Together, these pathways regulate cell differentiation to the filamentous type, which is characterized by changes in cell adhesion, cell polarity, and cell shape. How these changes are accomplished is also discussed. High-throughput genomics approaches have recently uncovered new connections to filamentous growth regulation. These connections suggest that filamentous growth is a more complex and globally regulated behavior than is currently appreciated, which may help to pave the way for future investigations into this eukaryotic cell differentiation behavior. PMID:22219507

  18. The genetics of a putative social trait in natural populations of yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bozdag, G O; Greig, D

    2014-01-01

    The sharing of secreted invertase by yeast cells is a well-established laboratory model for cooperation, but the only evidence that such cooperation occurs in nature is that the SUC loci, which encode invertase, vary in number and functionality. Genotypes that do not produce invertase can act as ‘cheats’ in laboratory experiments, growing on the glucose that is released when invertase producers, or ‘cooperators’, digest sucrose. However, genetic variation for invertase production might instead be explained by adaptation of different populations to different local availabilities of sucrose, the substrate for invertase. Here we find that 110 wild yeast strains isolated from natural habitats, and all contained a single SUC locus and produced invertase; none were ‘cheats’. The only genetic variants we found were three strains isolated instead from sucrose-rich nectar, which produced higher levels of invertase from three additional SUC loci at their subtelomeres. We argue that the pattern of SUC gene variation is better explained by local adaptation than by social conflict. PMID:25169714

  19. Individual Differences Among Children in Sucrose Detection Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Paule Valery; Reed, Danielle R.; Mennella, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little research has focused on whether there are individual differences among children in their sensitivity to sweet taste and, if so, the biological correlates of such differences. Objectives Our goal was to understand how variations in children’s sucrose detection thresholds relate to their age and gender, taste genotype, body composition, and dietary intake of added sugars. Methods Sucrose detection thresholds in 7- to 14-year-old children were tested individually using a validated, two-alternative, forced-choice, paired-comparison tracking method. Five genetic variants of taste genes were assayed: TAS1R3 and GNAT3 (sweet genes; one variant each) and the bitter receptor gene TAS2R38 (three variants). All children were measured for body weight and height. A subset of these children were measured for the percentage of body fat and waist circumference and provided added sugar intake by 24-hour dietary recall. Results Sucrose thresholds ranged from 0.23 to 153.8 mM with most of the children completing the threshold task (216/235; 92%). Some children were biologically related (i.e., siblings), and for the genetic analysis, one sibling from each family was studied. Variants in the bitter but not the sweet genes were related to sucrose threshold and sugar intake; children with two bitter-sensitive alleles could detect sucrose at lower concentrations (F(2,165) = 4.55, p = .01; rs1726866) and reported eating more added sugar (% kcal; F(2, 62) = 3.64, p = .03) than did children with less sensitive alleles. Age, gender, and indices of obesity also were related to child-to-child differences in sucrose threshold; girls were more sensitive than boys (t(214) = 2.0, p = .05), older children were more sensitive than younger children (r(214) = −.16, p = .02), and fatter (r(84) = −.22, p = .05) or more centrally obese children (r(84) = −.26, p = .02) were more sensitive relative to others. Discussion Inborn differences in bitter sensitivity may affect childhood dietary sugar intake with long-term health consequences. There may be a more complex interplay between the developing bitter and sweet taste systems than previously understood. PMID:26633761

  20. Protein phosphorylation as a mechanism for regulation of spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L.A.; Huber, S.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation has been identified as a mechanism for the light-dark regulation of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) activity, previously shown to involve some type of covalent modification of the enzyme. The 120 kD subunit of SPS in extracts of light-treated leaves was labeled with {sup 32}P in the presence of ({gamma}-{sup 32}P) ATP. In this in vitro system, {sup 32}P incorporation into light-activated SPS was dependent upon ATP and magnesium concentrations as well as time, and was closely paralleled by inactivation of the enzyme. The soluble protein kinase involved in the interconversion of SPS between activated and deactivated forms may be specific for SPS as it co-purifies with SPS during partial purification of the enzyme. The kinase appears not to be calcium activated and no evidence has been obtained for metabolite control of SPS phosphorylation/inactivation.

  1. A non-destructive method for quantification the irradiation doses of irradiated sucrose using Vis/NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gong, Aiping; Qiu, Zhengjun; He, Yong; Wang, Zhiping

    2012-12-01

    This article proposes a new method for fast discrimination of irradiation doses of sucrose based on visible-near infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy technology. 250 sucrose samples were categorized into five groups to be irradiated at 0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0 kGy respectively and prepared for the discrimination analysis. The 50 samples of each group were randomly divided into a calibration set containing 40 samples, and a validation set containing the remaining 10 samples. Principal component clustering analysis (PCCA) was applied for the extraction of principal components (PCs) and for clustering analysis. The first five PCs were regarded as the inputs to develop the back propagation neural network (BPNN) model. The performance of the model was validated by the 50 unknown samples and the BPNN achieved an excellent precision and recognition ration of 100%. The results indicated that Vis/NIR spectroscopy could be utilized as a rapid and non-destructive method for the classification of different irradiation doses of irradiated sucrose. PMID:23041915

  2. Genome-wide interacting effects of sucrose and herbicide-mediated stress in Arabidopsis thaliana: novel insights into atrazine toxicity and sucrose-induced tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ramel, Fanny; Sulmon, Cécile; Cabello-Hurtado, Francisco; Taconnat, Ludivine; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Renou, Jean-Pierre; El Amrani, Abdelhak; Couée, Ivan; Gouesbet, Gwenola

    2007-01-01

    Background Soluble sugars, which play a central role in plant structure and metabolism, are also involved in the responses to a number of stresses, and act as metabolite signalling molecules that activate specific or hormone-crosstalk transduction pathways. The different roles of exogenous sucrose in the tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana plantlets to the herbicide atrazine and oxidative stress were studied by a transcriptomic approach using CATMA arrays. Results Parallel situations of xenobiotic stress and sucrose-induced tolerance in the presence of atrazine, of sucrose, and of sucrose plus atrazine were compared. These approaches revealed that atrazine affected gene expression and therefore seedling physiology at a much larger scale than previously described, with potential impairment of protein translation and of reactive-oxygen-species (ROS) defence mechanisms. Correlatively, sucrose-induced protection against atrazine injury was associated with important modifications of gene expression related to ROS defence mechanisms and repair mechanisms. These protection-related changes of gene expression did not result only from the effects of sucrose itself, but from combined effects of sucrose and atrazine, thus strongly suggesting important interactions of sucrose and xenobiotic signalling or of sucrose and ROS signalling. Conclusion These interactions resulted in characteristic differential expression of gene families such as ascorbate peroxidases, glutathione-S-transferases and cytochrome P450s, and in the early induction of an original set of transcription factors. These genes used as molecular markers will eventually be of great importance in the context of xenobiotic tolerance and phytoremediation. PMID:18053238

  3. Water Transport in Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Farzana; Prista, Catarina; Madeira, Ana; Moura, Teresa; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C; Soveral, Graça

    2016-01-01

    Water moves across membranes through the lipid bilayer and through aquaporins, in this case in a regulated manner. Aquaporins belong to the MIP superfamily and two subfamilies are represented in yeasts: orthodox aquaporins considered to be specific water channels and aquaglyceroporins (heterodox aquaporins). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, four aquaporin isoforms were identified, two of which are genetically close to orthodox aquaporins (ScAqy1 and ScAqy2) and the other two are more closely related to the aquaglyceroporins (ScFps1 and ScAqy3). Advances in the establishment of water channels structure are reviewed in this chapter in relation with the mechanisms of selectivity, conductance and gating. Aquaporins are important for key aspects of yeast physiology. They have been shown to be involved in sporulation, rapid freeze-thaw tolerance, osmo-sensitivity, and modulation of cell surface properties and colony morphology, although the underlying exact mechanisms are still unknown. PMID:26721272

  4. Extracellular Polysaccharides Produced by Yeasts and Yeast-Like Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; de Maeseneire, Sofie L.; Vandamme, Erick J.

    Several yeasts and yeast-like fungi are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. Most of these contain D-mannose, either alone or in combination with other sugars or phosphate. A large chemical and structural variability is found between yeast species and even among different strains. The types of polymers that are synthesized can be chemically characterized as mannans, glucans, phosphoman-nans, galactomannans, glucomannans and glucuronoxylomannans. Despite these differences, almost all of the yeast exopolysaccharides display some sort of biological activity. Some of them have already applications in chemistry, pharmacy, cosmetics or as probiotic. Furthermore, some yeast exopolysaccharides, such as pullulan, exhibit specific physico-chemical and rheological properties, making them useful in a wide range of technical applications. A survey is given here of the production, the characteristics and the application potential of currently well studied yeast extracellular polysaccharides.

  5. Sucrose Monoester Micelles Size Determined by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS)

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Susana A.; Gratton, Enrico; Zanocco, Antonio L.; Lemp, Else; Gunther, German

    2011-01-01

    One of the several uses of sucrose detergents, as well as other micelle forming detergents, is the solubilization of different membrane proteins. Accurate knowledge of the micelle properties, including size and shape, are needed to optimize the surfactant conditions for protein purification and membrane characterization. We synthesized sucrose esters having different numbers of methylene subunits on the substituent to correlate the number of methylene groups with the size of the corresponding micelles. We used Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) and two photon excitation to determine the translational D of the micelles and calculate their corresponding hydrodynamic radius, Rh. As a fluorescent probe we used LAURDAN (6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene), a dye highly fluorescent when integrated in the micelle and non-fluorescent in aqueous media. We found a linear correlation between the size of the tail and the hydrodynamic radius of the micelle for the series of detergents measured. PMID:22216230

  6. Magnetic birefringence of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles stabilised by sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralewski, M.; Pochylski, M.; Gierszewski, J.

    2011-05-01

    Magnetically induced optical birefringence is used to investigate pharmaceutically important iron-sucrose aqueous suspensions. XRD and TEM measurements of the system of oxyhydroxide particles stabilised by sucrose have shown that this system contains iron oxyhydroxide in the form of 2-5 nm particles. The mineral form of the iron-core is suggested to be akaganeite. Anisotropy of the optical polarizability and magnetic susceptibility of akaganeite nanoparticles are calculated. The permanent dipole moment obtained for the nanoparticles studied was found to be negligible, in agreement with the characteristic superparamagnetic behaviour of the magnetic nanoparticles observed at room temperature. The Neel temperature of these nanoparticles is estimated as below 276 K. The results obtained are discussed against a background of the earlier studies of similar nanoscale systems.

  7. Cryoprotection by Glucose, Sucrose, and Raffinose to Chloroplast Thylakoids 1

    PubMed Central

    Lineberger, R. Daniel; Steponkus, Peter L.

    1980-01-01

    Differential cryoprotection is afforded to chloroplast thylakoids against freeze-induced uncoupling of cyclic photophosphorylation by equimolar concentrations of glucose, sucrose, and raffinose. This differential protective effect appears to be due to nonideal activity-concentration profiles exhibited by the sugars during freezing. When cryoprotection is analyzed as a function of the mole fraction of NaCl to which the membranes are exposed during freezing, the pattern of protection to cyclic photophosphorylation and its component reactions is not dependent upon the chemical identity of the protective solute. Cryoprotective efficiency of glucose, sucrose, and raffinose can be accounted for by proposing an activity dependent alteration in the freezing environment rather than specific solute-membrane interactions. PMID:16661177

  8. [Technology for the whole utilization of brewer's yeast in food industry].

    PubMed

    Otero, M A; Cabello, A; Vasallo, M C; García, L; López, J

    2000-12-01

    A flexible scheme for the fractionation of brewer's yeast was developed. The procedure allows the production of different products such as: dry yeast flakes, dry yeast pills, yeast-extract based table sauce, yeast protein concentrates and soy-like sauce. The investment required for the processing of one ton per day is below 2 million dollars with an overall profitability higher than 53%. Investment is recovered in 0.75 years. The production of food ingredients from yeast upgrades its biomass about 25 fold. Present procedure is compared with other biomass fractionation processes taking into account the utilization of all technological streams where the process becomes environmentally friendly since effluent production significantly lower than similar technologies. PMID:11464667

  9. Immunoprecipitation and Characterization of Membrane Protein Complexes from Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parra-Belky, Karlett; McCulloch, Kathryn; Wick, Nicole; Shircliff, Rebecca; Croft, Nicolas; Margalef, Katrina; Brown, Jamie; Crabill, Todd; Jankord, Ryan; Waldo, Eric

    2005-01-01

    In this undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment, the vacuolar ATPase protein complex is purified from yeast cell extracts by doing immunoprecipitations under nondenaturing conditions. Immunoprecipitations are performed using monoclonal antibodies to facilitate data interpretation, and subunits are separated on the basis of their molecular…

  10. Chronic mild stress affects sucrose intake and sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Grønli, Janne; Murison, Robert; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Sørensen, Eli; Portas, Chiara M; Ursin, Reidun

    2004-04-01

    Depression in humans is associated with sleep abnormalities of three types: altered rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, fragmented sleep, and reduced delta sleep. In an animal model of depression, chronic exposure to mild stressors (CMS, e.g. periods of soiled cage, reversed light/dark cycle, grouped housing, food and/or water deprivation) causes behavioral and hormonal changes which, in humans, often are associated with depression. In the CMS model, a reduced sucrose intake has been defined as one of the core symptoms of depression, anhedonia, although this finding is not consistent among various laboratories. In the present study, we investigated if the CMS procedure, in our laboratory, would cause decreased sucrose intake and, also, give sleep changes similar to what is found in depressed patients. Exposure to CMS decreased sucrose intake in our rats. The largest effect was obtained after 2 weeks of the stress protocol. CMS rats spent more time in REM sleep and showed more fragmented sleep compared to their baseline recording, while there were no changes in the control rats. Increased sleep fragmentation in CMS rats was particularly evident by increased number of arousals, and increased REM sleep and slow-wave-sleep-1 (SWS-1) episodes. The duration of sleep stage episodes was decreased. The amount of slow-wave-sleep-2 (SWS-2) was not decreased, however SWS-2 in percent of total SWS was reduced. Correlation analysis showed that animals that had less consumption of sucrose spent more time in REM sleep and had increased number of REM sleep episodes. In this study, CMS appears to be a model of depression. PMID:15033287

  11. Electrons trapped in single crystals of sucrose: Induced spin densities

    SciTech Connect

    Box, H.C.; Budzinski, E.E.; Freund, H.G. )

    1990-07-01

    Electrons are trapped at intermolecular sites in single crystals of sucrose {ital X} irradiated at 4.2 K. The coupling tensors for the hyperfine couplings between the electron and surrounding protons have been deduced from electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) data. Electron spin densities at nearby hydroxy protons are positive, whereas spin densities at the more remote protons of carbon-bound hydrogen atoms are negative. The origin of these negative spin densities is discussed.

  12. Sucrose synthase: A unique glycosyltransferase for biocatalytic glycosylation process development.

    PubMed

    Schmölzer, Katharina; Gutmann, Alexander; Diricks, Margo; Desmet, Tom; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy, EC 2.4.1.13) is a glycosyltransferase (GT) long known from plants and more recently discovered in bacteria. The enzyme catalyzes the reversible transfer of a glucosyl moiety between fructose and a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) (sucrose+NDP↔NDP-glucose+fructose). The equilibrium for sucrose conversion is pH dependent, and pH values between 5.5 and 7.5 promote NDP-glucose formation. The conversion of a bulk chemical to high-priced NDP-glucose in a one-step reaction provides the key aspect for industrial interest. NDP-sugars are important as such and as key intermediates for glycosylation reactions by highly selective Leloir GTs. SuSy has gained renewed interest as industrially attractive biocatalyst, due to substantial scientific progresses achieved in the last few years. These include biochemical characterization of bacterial SuSys, overproduction of recombinant SuSys, structural information useful for design of tailor-made catalysts, and development of one-pot SuSy-GT cascade reactions for production of several relevant glycosides. These advances could pave the way for the application of Leloir GTs to be used in cost-effective processes. This review provides a framework for application requirements, focusing on catalytic properties, heterologous enzyme production and reaction engineering. The potential of SuSy biocatalysis will be presented based on various biotechnological applications: NDP-sugar synthesis; sucrose analog synthesis; glycoside synthesis by SuSy-GT cascade reactions. PMID:26657050

  13. Steroid hormone excretion is enhanced by sucrose feeding to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, T.C.; Hsu, H.; Saunders, J.P.; Kim, S.S.; Given-Proctor, J.; Ahrens, R.A.

    1986-03-01

    The hypothesis tested was that feeding rats sucrose rather than invert sugar (50:50 mixture of glucose and fructose) or cornstarch would result in a more rapid excretion of intravenously injected 1,2-/sup 3/H aldosterone or 1,2,6,7-/sup 3/H cortisol. The three carbohydrate sources provided 45% of dietary energy when fed, respectively, to one of three groups of 10 male, Sprague Dawley rats. After 4 or 8 weeks of ad lib feeding of the three diets 5 ..mu..CI of /sup 3/H-labeled hormones were injected intravenously and % recovery in urine and feces was measured for 4 days by liquid scintillation counting. Nearly 90% of the /sup 3/H injected as 1,2-/sup 3/H aldosterone was recovered over 4 days in the excreta of the sucrose fed rats. This recovery of /sup 3/H from aldosterone was significantly greater (P < 0.01) than when invert sugar (65%) or cornstarch (60%) were fed. The recovery of /sup 3/H from intravenously injected 1,2,6,7-/sup 3/H cortisol followed a similar pattern. The authors anticipate that the excretion of all metabolic end products and xenobiotics excreted as glucuronides would be enhanced by sucrose feeding. Oxocarbonium ions from the glucose portion of sucrose digestion in the mammalian small intestine are thought to compete with oxocarbonium ions from the glucuronic acid portion of glucuronide hydrolysis. Such competition may slow glucuronide hydrolysis and promote glucuronide excretion, including the glucuronides derived from aldosterone and cortisol.

  14. Yeast Colony Embedding Method

    PubMed Central

    Piccirillo, Sarah; Honigberg, Saul M.

    2011-01-01

    Patterning of different cell types in embryos is a key mechanism in metazoan development. Communities of microorganisms, such as colonies and biofilms also display patterns of cell types. For example, in the yeast S. cerevisiae, sporulated cells and pseudohyphal cells are not uniformly distributed in colonies. The functional importance of patterning and the molecular mechanisms that underlie these patterns are still poorly understood. One challenge with respect to investigating patterns of cell types in fungal colonies is that unlike metazoan tissue, cells in colonies are relatively weakly attached to one another. In particular, fungal colonies do not contain the same extensive level of extracellular matrix found in most tissues . Here we report on a method for embedding and sectioning yeast colonies that reveals the interior patterns of cell types in these colonies. The method can be used to prepare thick sections (0.5 μ) useful for light microscopy and thin sections (0.1 μ) suitable for transmission electron microscopy. Asci and pseudohyphal cells can easily be distinguished from ovoid yeast cells by light microscopy , while the interior structure of these cells can be visualized by EM. The method is based on surrounding colonies with agar, infiltrating them with Spurr's medium, and then sectioning. Colonies with a diameter in the range of 1-2 mm are suitable for this protocol. In addition to visualizing the interior of colonies, the method allows visualization of the region of the colony that invades the underlying agar. PMID:21445054

  15. Models for yeast prions.

    PubMed

    Morgan, B J T; Ridout, M S; Ruddock, L W

    2003-09-01

    The cytoplasmic heritable determinant [PSI+] of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits prion-like properties. The properties of yeast prions are studied in the hope that this will enhance the understanding of mammalian prions, which cause mad-cow, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, and related neurodegenerative diseases. When host cells divide, the yeast prions distribute themselves without loss over the daughter cells. Experimental data provide information on how the proportion of cells with prions decreases over time when priori replication is inhibited. One feature of scientific interest is the unknown mean number, n0, of prions assumed to be present in the cells at the start of the experiment. We develop several stochastic models and by fitting them to the data, we obtain substantially larger estimates of n0 compared with a previous analysis. An interesting feature of a model with constant cell generation times is that the predicted proportion of cells with prions varies over time as a sequence of linked hyperbolic curves. Avenues for future research are outlined, which relax simplifying assumptions made in the models. We make several recommendations for the design of future experiments. PMID:14601757

  16. Diffusion of Trehalose and Sucrose in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feick, E.; von Meerwall, E.; Ekdawi, N.; de Pablo, J.

    2000-10-01

    Trehalose is emerging as superior substitute for sucrose in solution as a cryoprotectant, e. g., to preserve organs destined for transplantation. We have used the proton NMR pulsed-gradient spin-echo method between T = 30 and 85 deg. C to study the self-diffusion of solvent and solute in aqueous solutions of these molecules as function of their concentration, c. We find that both solute molecules diffuse substantially more slowly than water at corresponding c and T; that addition of water accelerates solute diffusion more rapidly than that of water; and that while at a given c and T water diffusion is insensitive to solute identity, trehalose diffusion is slower than sucrose diffusion. The latter effect increases with c, approaching a factor of two at the highest c. In these respects our results correspond closely to those of our extensive numerical simulations of these systems. Free-volume theory is employed to explore the cooperative kinetic interactions between solvent and solutes, and to account tentatively for part of the superiority of trehalose to sucrose as preservation agent. Differences in crystallization behavior also seem to be involved.

  17. Sucrose-replacement by rebaudioside a in a model beverage.

    PubMed

    Majchrzak, Dorota; Ipsen, Annika; Koenig, Juergen

    2015-09-01

    Rebaudioside A (RA), a component of Stevia rebaudiana, is a non-caloric sweetener of natural origin, suitable to meet consumers' demand for sweet taste, but undesirable flavors were reported at high concentrations. Aim of this study was to create a model beverage (ice-tea) in which sucrose was replaced increasingly by RA to identify optimal sensory profile for consumer acceptance. Samples with 20 % and 40 % sucrose replacement by RA, respectively, showed very similar sensory profiles but were significantly higher in some flavor attributes, such as artificial sweetness, licorice-like and metallic, as well as in sweet and bitter aftertaste (p < 0.05) compared to the reference ice-tea. In both hedonic tests, preference and acceptance samples with RA have been judged as comparable to the reference despite perception of some undesirable notes. In view of the results of our study it can be stated that a replacement of 20 % or 40 % sucrose by RA in an ice-tea is achievable. PMID:26345024

  18. Production of alcohol from Jerusalem artichokes by yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Duvnjak, Z.; Kosaric, N.; Kliza, S.; Hayes, D.

    1982-11-01

    Various yeasts such as several strains of Saccharomyces diastaticus, S. cerevisiae, and Kluyveromyces fragilis were investigated for their ability to ferment the carbohydrates from Jerusalem artichokes to alcohol. Juice extracted from the artichokes was used as the fermentation substrate with and without prior hydrolysis of the carbohydrates. Fermentation was also carried out with raw artichokes without prior juice extraction. Results indicate that this raw material has good potential for fuel alcohol production by fermentation. (Refs. 15).

  19. Yeast and Mammalian Metallothioneins Functionally Substitute for Yeast Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamai, Katherine T.; Gralla, Edith B.; Ellerby, Lisa M.; Valentine, Joan S.; Thiele, Dennis J.

    1993-09-01

    Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase catalyzes the disproportionation of superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide and dioxygen and is thought to play an important role in protecting cells from oxygen toxicity. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains lacking copper-zinc superoxide dismutase, which is encoded by the SOD1 gene, are sensitive to oxidative stress and exhibit a variety of growth defects including hypersensitivity to dioxygen and to superoxide-generating drugs such as paraquat. We have found that in addition to these known phenotypes, SOD1-deletion strains fail to grow on agar containing the respiratory carbon source lactate. We demonstrate here that expression of the yeast or monkey metallothionein proteins in the presence of copper suppresses the lactate growth defect and some other phenotypes associated with SOD1-deletion strains, indicating that copper metallothioneins substitute for copper-zinc superoxide dismutase in vivo to protect cells from oxygen toxicity. Consistent with these results, we show that yeast metallothionein mRNA levels are dramatically elevated under conditions of oxidative stress. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrate that yeast metallothionein, purified or from whole-cell extracts, exhibits copper-dependent antioxidant activity. Taken together, these data suggest that both yeast and mammalian metallothioneins may play a direct role in the cellular defense against oxidative stress by functioning as antioxidants.

  20. Improvement of fermentation ability under baking-associated stress conditions by altering the POG1 gene expression in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Hashida, Keisuke; Oshiro, Satoshi; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    During the bread-making process, yeast cells are exposed to many types of baking-associated stress. There is thus a demand within the baking industry for yeast strains with high fermentation abilities under these stress conditions. The POG1 gene, encoding a putative transcription factor involved in cell cycle regulation, is a multicopy suppressor of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae E3 ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 mutant. The pog1 mutant is sensitive to various stresses. Our results suggested that the POG1 gene is involved in stress tolerance in yeast cells. In this study, we showed that overexpression of the POG1 gene in baker's yeast conferred increased fermentation ability in high-sucrose-containing dough, which is used for sweet dough baking. Furthermore, deletion of the POG1 gene drastically increased the fermentation ability in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress, which would be a useful characteristic for frozen dough baking. Thus, the engineering of yeast strains to control the POG1 gene expression level would be a novel method for molecular breeding of baker's yeast. PMID:23800735

  1. Episodic sucrose intake during food restriction increases synaptic abundance of AMPA receptors in nucleus accumbens and augments intake of sucrose following restoration of ad libitum feeding.

    PubMed

    Peng, X-X; Lister, A; Rabinowitsch, A; Kolaric, R; Cabeza de Vaca, S; Ziff, E B; Carr, K D

    2015-06-01

    Weight-loss dieting often leads to loss of control, rebound weight gain, and is a risk factor for binge pathology. Based on findings that food restriction (FR) upregulates sucrose-induced trafficking of glutamatergic AMPA receptors to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) postsynaptic density (PSD), this study was an initial test of the hypothesis that episodic "breakthrough" intake of forbidden food during dieting interacts with upregulated mechanisms of synaptic plasticity to increase reward-driven feeding. Ad libitum (AL) fed and FR subjects consumed a limited amount of 10% sucrose, or had access to water, every other day for 10 occasions. Beginning three weeks after return of FR rats to AL feeding, when 24-h chow intake and rate of body weight gain had normalized, subjects with a history of sucrose intake during FR consumed more sucrose during a four week intermittent access protocol than the two AL groups and the group that had access to water during FR. In an experiment that substituted noncontingent administration of d-amphetamine for sucrose, FR subjects displayed an enhanced locomotor response during active FR but a blunted response, relative to AL subjects, during recovery from FR. This result suggests that the enduring increase in sucrose consumption is unlikely to be explained by residual enhancing effects of FR on dopamine signaling. In a biochemical experiment which paralleled the sucrose behavioral experiment, rats with a history of sucrose intake during FR displayed increased abundance of pSer845-GluA1, GluA2, and GluA3 in the NAc PSD relative to rats with a history of FR without sucrose access and rats that had been AL throughout, whether they had a history of episodic sucrose intake or not. A history of FR, with or without a history of sucrose intake, was associated with increased abundance of GluA1. A terminal 15-min bout of sucrose intake produced a further increase in pSer845-GluA1 and GluA2 in subjects with a history of sucrose intake during FR. Generally, neither a history of sucrose intake nor a terminal bout of sucrose intake affected AMPA receptor abundance in the NAc PSD of AL subjects. Together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis, but the functional contribution of increased synaptic incorporation of AMPA receptors remains to be established. PMID:25800309

  2. Wood impregnation of yeast lees for winemaking.

    PubMed

    Palomero, Felipe; Bertani, Paolo; Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Cadahía, Estrella; Benito, Santiago; Morata, Antonio; Suárez-Lepe, José A

    2015-03-15

    This study develops a new method to produce more complex wines by means of an indirect diffusion of wood aromas from yeast cell-walls. An exogenous lyophilized biomass was macerated with an ethanol wood extract solution and subsequently dried. Different times were used for the adsorption of polyphenols and volatile compounds to the yeast cell-walls. The analysis of polyphenols and volatile compounds (by HPLC/DAD and GC-MS, respectively) demonstrate that the adsorption/diffusion of these compounds from the wood to the yeast takes place. Red wines were also aged with Saccharomyces cerevisiae lees that had been impregnated with wood aromas and subsequently dried. Four different types of wood were used: chestnut, cherry, acacia and oak. Large differences were observed between the woods studied with regards to their volatile and polyphenolic profiles. Sensory evaluations confirmed large differences even with short-term contact between the wines and the lees, showing that the method could be of interest for red wine making. In addition, the results demonstrate the potential of using woods other than oak in cooperage. PMID:25308662

  3. Inactivation of highly activated spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase by dephosphorylation. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L. ); Huber, S.C. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh ); Hite, D.R.C.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) can be phosphorylated and inactivated in vitro with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. Thus, it was surprising to find that SPS, extracted from leaves fed mannose in the light to highly activate the enzyme, could be inactivated in an ATP-independent manner when desalted crude extracts were preincubated at 25{degrees}C before assay. The spontaneous inactivation involved a loss in activity measured with limiting substrate concentrations in the presence of the inhibitor, Pi, without affecting maximum catalytic activity. The spontaneous inactivation was unaffected by exogenous carrier proteins and protease inhibitors, but was inhibited by inorganic phosphate, fluoride, and molybdate, suggesting that a phosphatase may be involved. Okadaic acid, a potent inhibitor of mammalian type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases, had no effect up to 5 micromolar. Inactivation was stimulated about twofold by exogenous Mg{sup 2+} and was relatively insensitive to Ca{sup 2+} and to pH over the range pH 6.5 to 8.5. Radioactive phosphate incorporated into SPS during labeling of excised leaves with ({sup 32}P)Pi (initially in the dark and then in the light with mannose) was lost with time when desalted crude extracts were incubated at 25 C, and the loss in radiolabel was substantially reduced by fluoride. These results provide direct evidence for action of an endogenous phosphatase(s) using SPS as substrate.

  4. Nitrosative stress and apoptosis in non-anemic healthy rats induced by intravenous iron sucrose similars versus iron sucrose originator.

    PubMed

    Toblli, Jorge E; Cao, Gabriel; Angerosa, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Iron can both induce and inhibit nitrosative stress. Intracellular iron levels play an important role in nitric oxide (NO(•)) signaling mechanisms. Depending on various factors, such as the cell's redox state and transition metal levels, NO(•) generation may lead to lipid peroxidation and DNA damage as well as both anti- and pro-apoptotic effects. Administration of intravenous iron sucrose originator (IS(ORIG)) has been shown not to cause significant tyrosine nitration or significantly increased caspase 3 levels in non-anemic rats. In this study, the potential of several marketed iron sucrose similars (ISSs) to induce tyrosine nitration and caspase 3 expression in non-anemic rats was assessed. Although the physico-chemical properties of most of the analyzed ISSs complied with the United States Pharmacopeia for iron sucrose injection, all ISSs resulted in higher levels of tyrosine nitration and increased the expression of caspase 3 versus IS(ORIG). Moreover, significant differences were detected in tissue iron distribution between IS(ORIG)- and ISS-treated animals. In general, ISORIG resulted in higher levels of ferritin deposits versus ISSs whereas ISSs showed higher Prussian blue-stainable iron(III) deposits than IS(ORIG). This result suggests that some iron from ISSs bypassed the tightly regulated pathway through resident macrophages of the liver, spleen and bone marrow thus, ending up in the cellular compartment that favors oxidative and or nitrosative stress as well as apoptosis. The results also confirm that polynuclear iron(III)-oxyhydroxide carbohydrates, such as iron sucrose, cannot be fully characterized by physico-chemical methods alone. PMID:25609135

  5. A sucrose transporter-interacting protein disulphide isomerase affects redox homeostasis and links sucrose partitioning with abiotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Erik; Obata, Toshihiro; Gerstenberger, Anne; Gier, Konstanze; Brandt, Tobias; Fernie, Alisdair R; Schulze, Waltraud; Kühn, Christina

    2016-06-01

    Sucrose accumulation in leaves in response to various abiotic stresses suggests a specific role of this disaccharide for stress tolerance and adaptation. The high-affinity transporter StSUT1 undergoes substrate-induced endocytosis presenting the question as to whether altered sucrose accumulation in leaves in response to stresses is also related to enhanced endocytosis or altered activity of the sucrose transporter. StSUT1 is known to interact with several stress-inducible proteins; here we investigated whether one of the interacting candidates, StPDI1, affects its subcellular localization in response to stress: StPDI1 expression is induced by ER-stress and salt. Both proteins, StSUT1 and StPDI1, were found in the detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fraction, and this might affect internalization. Knockdown of StPDI1 expression severely affects abiotic stress tolerance of transgenic potato plants. Analysis of these plants does not reveal modified subcellular localization or endocytosis of StSUT1, but rather a disturbed redox homeostasis, reduced detoxification of reactive oxygen species and effects on primary metabolism. Parallel observations with other StSUT1-interacting proteins are discussed. The redox status in leaves seems to be linked to the sugar status in response to various stress stimuli and to play a role in stress tolerance. PMID:26670204

  6. Characteristics of Sucrose Transport and Sucrose-Induced H+ Transport on the Tonoplast of Red Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Storage Tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Getz, H. P.; Klein, M.

    1995-01-01

    Sucrose-induced changes of the energization state of the red beet root (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. conditiva) vacuolar membrane were observed with the fluorescent dyes 6-chloro-9-{[4-(diethylamino)- 1-methylbutyl]-amino}-2-methoxyacridine dihydrochloride, as a pH monitor, and 9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxyacridine (ACMA). Consequently, transient acidification of the surrounding suspension medium could be measured with a pH electrode. This signal was specific for Suc and was not seen for sorbitol, mannitol, or maltose. Sucrose-induced medium acidification was sensitive to the same inhibitors that were efficient in inhibiting sucrose transport, including the monoclonal antibodies TNP56-12 and C50-5-3. It was seen with vacuoles and vesicles energized with MgATP before sucrose was added but also with vacuoles not artificially energized previously. Using bafilomycin A1 for the inhibition of the vacuolar ATPase of vacuoles previously energized by MgATP, apparent Km values for H+ export from the vacuoles to the medium could be calculated taking into account the passive proton leak. Apparent Km values for H+ export determined from data obtained with pH measurements in the medium and with ACMA corresponded to those obtained previously for sucrose uptake. Comparing sucrose uptake rates with corresponding H+ export rates at the respective sucrose concentrations and at Km, a stoichiometry of approximately one proton per transported sucrose was estimated. PMID:12228372

  7. Evidence for the presence of a sucrose carrier in immature sugar beet tap roots. [Beta vulgaris L

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine, R.; Daie, J.; Wyse, R. )

    1988-02-01

    The objectives of this work were to determine the path of phloem unloading and if a sucrose carrier was present in young sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproots. The approach was to exploit the characteristics of the sucrose analog, 1{prime}-fluorosucrose (F-sucrose) which is a poor substrate for acid invertase but is a substrate for sucrose synthase. Ten millimolar each of ({sup 3}H) sucrose and ({sup 14}C)F-sucrose were applied in a 1:1 ratio to an abraded region of an attached leaf for 6 hours. ({sup 14}C)F-sucrose was translocated and accumulated in the roots at a higher rate than ({sup 3}H)sucrose. This was due to ({sup 3}H)sucrose hydrolysis along the translocation path. Presence of ({sup 3}H)hexose and ({sup 14}C)F-sucrose in the root apoplast suggested apoplastic sucrose unloading with its subsequent hydrolysis. Labeled F-sucrose uptake by root tissue discs exhibited biphasic kinetics and was inhibited by unlabeled sucrose, indicating that immature roots have the ability for carrier-mediated sucrose transport from the apoplast. Collectively, in vivo and in vitro data indicate that despite sucrose hydrolysis by the wall-bound invertase, sucrose hydrolysis is not entirely essential for sugar accumulation in this tissue.

  8. Isolation of marine yeasts collected from the Pacific Ocean showing a high production of gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Kazuaki; Guo, Xiao-feng; Uryu, Noboru; Hagiwara, Toshihiko; Watabe, Shugo

    2008-12-01

    Marine yeasts were collected from coastal and deep sea areas in the Pacific Ocean and the Sea of Japan around central and northern Japan to prepare a novel type of natural seasoning. It was found that one of the marine yeasts collected from the Pacific Ocean off Hachinohe showed a high concentration of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in its extract, about 7-10 times higher than those of commercially available bread yeast and other marine yeasts. The marine yeast isolated and named Hachinohe No. 6 catalyzed the reaction from monosodium glutamate to GABA only in the presence of glucose. Subsequently, several marine yeasts belonging to the genera Pichia and Candida were found to have such catalytic activities, but not those belonging to the genus Saccharomyces. Isolate Hachinohe No. 6 was found to have the highest catalytic activity among the yeasts examined in this study. PMID:19060402

  9. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces ...

  10. Plant RNA processing: soybean pre-mRNA in a pea cell-free extract

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, M.A.; Hanley, B.A.

    1987-05-01

    Using a pea cell-free extract they have demonstrated the splicing of an SP6 fusion transcript containing an intron derived from the soybean seed storage protein ..beta..-subunit gene. Intron 115 from the conglycinin gene was cloned into a SP6 vector and transcribed using standard recombinant DNA techniques. Incubation of radioactively labeled fusion transcripts in the cell-free system produced a number of products which were identified by primer extension and S1 nuclease analysis. All the products are linear RNA molecules. Lariat intermediates, similar to those found in the yeast and HeLa cell RNA processing systems, have not been detected. The linear RNA products detected in their plant in vitro processing system have various portions of the intron removed which suggests that alternative splice sites are used in processing of this plant intron due to activation of cryptic splice sites or creation of splice sites in the fusion construction. The kinetics of the reactions and parameters of the extract are similar to those determined for the HeLa cell system. Sucrose gradient analysis has demonstrated that the plant RNA products sedimented in a 30S particle, similar in size to that found for the spliceosome of the HeLa cell system.

  11. Biosurfactant-producing yeasts isolated from flowering plants and bees.

    PubMed

    Ianieva, O D

    2013-01-01

    The yeast strains (n=160) have been isolated from various flowering plants and bees Apis mellifera. Oil-spreading method was used to assay the ability of the isolated yeasts to produce biosurfactants. Five most active strains able to synthesize glycolipid biosurfactants produced the oil-spreading zone with diameter 3.66-50 cm The addition of oleic acid, sunflower oil and octadecane significantly increased biosurfactant activity of the studied strains. Crude biosurfactants produced by the strains Candida sp. 79a and 156a were isolated as ethyl acetate extract and proved to be a mixture of glycolipids by thin-layer chromatography. PMID:24006785

  12. Degradation of Sucrose by Whole Cells and Plaque of Actinomyces naeslundii

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chris H.

    1974-01-01

    Whole cells of Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 12104, either in a dispersed form or in the form of plaque, enzymatically degraded sucrose to glucose and fructose. Washed whole cells expressed β-fructofuranosidase specificity and hydrolyzed sucrose to essentially equimolar quantities of glucose and fructose. The cells readily hydrolyzed sucrose, raffinose, and Actinomyces viscosus or Aerobacter levanicum levan, but did not degrade melezitose, maltose, α-methyl-d-glucoside, melibiose, glucose-1-phosphate, or dextran T-500. Sucrose degradation occurred at a temperature optimum of 37 to 45 C and at a pH optimum of 5.7 to 6.0. The Km for sucrose was 0.05 M. Sucrose or raffinose in the growth medium resulted in cells with a specific activity that was fivefold greater than that of cells grown in medium supplemented with either glucose, fructose, maltose, lactose, or glucose and fructose, or grown in unsupplemented medium. Addition of sucrose to log-phase cells growing in glucose also increased the specific activity. Degradation of sucrose by whole cells in the form of plaque also occurred, but 6% less free fructose than free glucose was recovered. Sucrose-dependent synthesis of extracellular levan or glucan by whole cells or plaque could not be demonstrated. The ability of A. naeslundii to degrade sucrose and levan may be related to the pathogenic potential of this bacterium in plaque-associated oral diseases. Images PMID:4611924

  13. Automated motion estimation of root responses to sucrose in two Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wuyts, Nathalie; Bengough, A Glyn; Roberts, Timothy J; Du, Chengjin; Bransby, M Fraser; McKenna, Stephen J; Valentine, Tracy A

    2011-10-01

    Root growth is a highly dynamic process influenced by genetic background and environment. This paper reports the development of R scripts that enable root growth kinematic analysis that complements a new motion analysis tool: PlantVis. Root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana expressing a plasma membrane targeted GFP (C24 and Columbia 35S:LTI6b-EGFP) was imaged using time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy. Displacement of individual pixels in the time-lapse sequences was estimated automatically by PlantVis, producing dense motion vector fields. R scripts were developed to extract kinematic growth parameters and report displacement to ± 0.1 pixel. In contrast to other currently available tools, Plantvis-R delivered root velocity profiles without interpolation or averaging across the root surface and also estimated the uncertainty associated with tracking each pixel. The PlantVis-R analysis tool has a range of potential applications in root physiology and gene expression studies, including linking motion to specific cell boundaries and analysis of curvature. The potential for quantifying genotype × environment interactions was examined by applying PlantVis-R in a kinematic analysis of root growth of C24 and Columbia, under contrasting carbon supply. Large genotype-dependent effects of sucrose were recorded. C24 exhibited negligible differences in elongation zone length and elongation rate but doubled the density of lateral roots in the presence of sucrose. Columbia, in contrast, increased its elongation zone length and doubled its elongation rate and the density of lateral roots. PMID:21630041

  14. Modelling the Yeast Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Janjić, Vuk; Sharan, Roded; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    The topology behind biological interaction networks has been studied for over a decade. Yet, there is no definite agreement on the theoretical models which best describe protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Such models are critical to quantifying the significance of any empirical observation regarding those networks. Here, we perform a comprehensive analysis of yeast PPI networks in order to gain insights into their topology and its dependency on interaction-screening technology. We find that: (1) interaction-detection technology has little effect on the topology of PPI networks; (2) topology of these interaction networks differs in organisms with different cellular complexity (human and yeast); (3) clear topological difference is present between PPI networks, their functional sub-modules, and their inter-functional “linkers”; (4) high confidence PPI networks have more “geometrical” topology compared to predicted, incomplete, or noisy PPI networks; and (5) inter-functional “linker” proteins serve as mediators in signal transduction, transport, regulation and organisational cellular processes. PMID:24589662

  15. From yeast genetics to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Maráz, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Roots of classical yeast genetics go back to the early work of Lindegreen in the 1930s, who studied thallism, sporulation and inheritance of wine yeast strains belonging to S. cerevisiae. Consequent mutation and hybridization of heterothallic S. cerevisae strains resulted in the discovery of life cycle and mating type system, as well as construction of the genetic map. Elaboration of induced mutation and controlled hybridization of yeast strains opened up new possibilities for the genetic analysis of technologically important properties and for the production of improved industrial strains, but a big drawback was the widely different genetic properties of laboratory and industrial yeast strains. Genetic analysis and mapping of industrial strains were generally hindered because of homothallism, poor sporulation and/or low spore viability of brewing and wine yeast strains [1, 2]. In spite of this, there are a few examples of the application of sexual hybridization in the study of genetic control of important technological properties, e.g. sugar utilization, flocculation and flavor production in brewing yeast strains [3] or in the improvement of ethanol producing S. cerevisiae strains [4]. Rare mating and application of karyogamy deficient (kar-) mutants also proved useful in strain improvement [5]. Importance of yeasts in biotechnology is enormous. This includes food and beverage fermentation processes where a wide range of yeast species are playing role, but S. cerevisiae is undoubtedly the most important species among them. New biotechnology is aiming to improve these technologies, but besides this, a completely new area of yeast utilization has been emerged, especially in the pharmaceutical and medical areas. Without decreasing the importance of S. cerevisiae, numerous other yeast species, e.g. Kluyveromyces lactis, Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia pastoris, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Yarrowia lipolytica have gained increasing potentialities in the modern fermentation biotechnology [6]. Developments in yeast genetics, biochemistry, physiology and process engineering provided bases of rapid development in modern biotechnology, but elaboration of the recombinant DNA technique is far the most important milestone in this field. Other molecular genetic techniques, as molecular genotyping of yeast strains proved also very beneficial in yeast fermentation technologies, because dynamics of both the natural and inoculated yeast biota could be followed by these versatile DNA-based techniques. PMID:12512257

  16. Significant quantities of the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase are present in the cell wall of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Motshwene, Precious; Brandt, Wolf; Lindsey, George

    2003-01-01

    NaOH was used to extract proteins from the cell walls of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This treatment was shown not to disrupt yeast cells, as NaOH-extracted cells displayed a normal morphology upon electron microscopy. Moreover, extracted and untreated cells had qualitatively similar protein contents upon disruption. When yeast was grown in the presence of 1 M mannitol, two proteins were found to be present at an elevated concentration in the cell wall. These were found to be the late-embryogenic-abundant-like protein heat-shock protein 12 and the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase. The presence of phosphoglycerate mutase in the cell wall was confirmed by immunocytochemical analysis. Not only was the phosphoglycerate mutase in the yeast cell wall found to be active, but whole yeast cells were also able to convert 3-phosphoglycerate in the medium into ethanol, provided that the necessary cofactors were present. PMID:12238949

  17. Red yeast rice for dysipidemia.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Shariq; Al Badarin, Firas J; DiNicolantonio, James J; Lavie, Carl J; O'Keefe, James H

    2013-01-01

    Red yeast rice is an ancient Chinese food product that contains monacolins, chemical substances that are similar to statins in their mechanisms of action and lipid lowering properties. Several studies have found red yeast rice to be moderately effective at improving the lipid profile, particularly for lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. One large randomized controlled study from China found that red yeast rice significantly improved risk of major adverse cardiovascular events and overall survival in patients following myocardial infarction. Thus, red yeast rice is a potentially useful over-the-counter cholesterol-lowering agent. However, many red yeast rice formulations are non-standardized and unregulated food supplements, and there is a need for further research and regulation of production. PMID:24003656

  18. The effects of sympathectomy and dexamethasone in rats ingesting sucrose

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Coln, Margarita; Villanueva, Ivn; Pin, Manuel; Racotta, Radu

    2006-01-01

    Both high-sucrose diet and dexamethasone (D) treatment increase plasma insulin and glucose levels and induce insulin resistance. We showed in a previous work (Franco-Colin, et al. Metabolism 2000; 49:1289-1294) that combining both protocols for 7 weeks induced less body weight gain in treated rats without affecting mean daily food intake. Since such an effect may be explained by an increase in caloric expenditure, possibly due to activation of the sympathetic nervous system by sucrose ingestion, in this work, and using 10% sucrose in the drinking water, male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. Two groups were sympathectomized using guanethidine (Gu) treatment for 3 weeks. One of these groups of rats received D in the drinking water. Of the 2 groups not receiving Gu, one was the control (C) and the other received D. After 8 weeks a glucose tolerance test was done. The rats were sacrificed and liver triglyceride (TG), perifemoral muscle lipid, and norepinephrine (NE) levels in the liver spleen, pancreas, and heart were determined. Gu-treated rats (Gu and Gu+D groups) showed less than 10% NE concentration compared to C and D rats, less daily caloric intake and body-weight gain, more sucrose intake, and better glucose tolerance. The area under the curve after glucose administration correlated significantly with the mean body weight gain of the rats, except for D group. Groups D (D and Gu+D) also showed less caloric intake and body-weight gain but higher liver weight and TG concentration and lower peripheral muscle mass. The combination of Gu+D treatments showed some peculiar results: negative body weight gain, a fatty liver, and low muscle mass. Though the glucose tolerance test had the worst results for the D group, it showed the best results in the Gu+D group. There were significant interactions for Guan X Dex by two-way ANOVA test for the area under the curve in the glucose tolerance test, muscle mass, and muscle lipids. The results suggest that dexamethasone catabolic effect is not caused by sympathetic activation. PMID:16585949

  19. Tonoplast Sugar Transporters (SbTSTs) putatively control sucrose accumulation in sweet sorghum stems.

    PubMed

    Bihmidine, Saadia; Julius, Benjamin T; Dweikat, Ismail; Braun, David M

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates are differentially partitioned in sweet versus grain sorghums. While the latter preferentially accumulate starch in the grain, the former primarily store large amounts of sucrose in the stem. Previous work determined that neither sucrose metabolizing enzymes nor changes in Sucrose transporter (SUT) gene expression accounted for the carbohydrate partitioning differences. Recently, 2 additional classes of sucrose transport proteins, Tonoplast Sugar Transporters (TSTs) and SWEETs, were identified; thus, we examined whether their expression tracked sucrose accumulation in sweet sorghum stems. We determined 2 TSTs were differentially expressed in sweet vs. grain sorghum stems, likely underlying the massive difference in sucrose accumulation. A model illustrating potential roles for different classes of sugar transport proteins in sorghum sugar partitioning is discussed. PMID:26619184

  20. Effect of sucrose starvation on sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cell carbohydrate and Pi status.

    PubMed Central

    Rébeillé, F; Bligny, R; Martin, J B; Douce, R

    1985-01-01

    The mobilization of stored carbohydrates during sucrose starvation was studied with sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells. When sucrose was omitted from the nutrient medium, the intracellular sucrose pool decreased rapidly during the first hours of the experiment, whereas the starch content remained practically unchanged. After 10h of sucrose starvation, starch hydrolysis replaced sucrose breakdown. From this moment, the phosphate-ester pool and respiration rate decreased with time. Conversely, the intracellular Pi concentration increased. 31P n.m.r. of intact sycamore cells indicated that, under these conditions, most of the Pi accumulated in the vacuole. These results strongly suggest that starch breakdown, in contrast with sucrose hydrolysis, is not rapid enough to maintain a high cellular metabolism. PMID:3985940

  1. Developmental Transition from Enzymatic to Acid Hydrolysis of Sucrose in Acid Limes (Citrus aurantifolia).

    PubMed

    Echeverria, E

    1990-01-01

    The sucrose breakdown mechanisms in juice sacs of acid lime (Citrus aurantifolia [Christm.] Swing.) were investigated throughout fruit development. All three enzymes of sucrose catabolism (sucrose synthase, acid, and alkaline invertase) are present during the initial stages. The activities of these enzymes declined rapidly and disappeared by stage 5 (80% development) but not before vacuolar pH had decreased to approximately 2.5. At this stage, sucrose breakdown occurs by acid hydrolysis. By attaining a vacuolar pH of 2.5 prior to enzyme disappearance, the cell maintains a continuous ability to break down sucrose throughout ontogeny. Thus, acid limes possess a unique and coordinated system for sucrose breakdown that involves both enzymatic and nonenzymatic pathways. PMID:16667241

  2. Isolation and Identification of Yeasts from Wild Flowers Collected around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea, and Characterization of the Unrecorded Yeast Bullera coprosmaensis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Min; Hyun, Se-Hee; Lee, Hyang Burm; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Ha-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Several types of yeasts were isolated from wild flowers around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea and identified by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the PCR amplicons for the D1/D2 variable domain of the 26S ribosomal DNA using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis. In total, 60 strains from 18 species were isolated, and Pseudozyma spp. (27 strains), which included Pseudozyma rugulosa (7 strains) and Pseudozyma aphidis (6 strains), was dominant species. Among the 60 strains, Bullera coprosmaensis JS00600 represented a newly recorded yeast strain in Korea, and its microbiological characteristics were investigated. The yeast cell has an oval-shaped morphology measuring 1.4 × 1.7 µm in size. Bullera coprosmaensis JS00600 is an asporous yeast that exhibits no pseudomycelium formation. It grew well in vitamin-free medium as well as in yeast extract-malt extract broth and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) broth, and it is halotolerant growing in 10% NaCl-containing YPD broth. PMID:26539042

  3. Biochemical and genomic analysis of sucrose metabolism during coffee (Coffea arabica) fruit development.

    PubMed

    Geromel, Clara; Ferreira, Lúcia Pires; Guerreiro, Sandra Maria Carmelo; Cavalari, Aline Andréia; Pot, David; Pereira, Luiz Filipe Protásio; Leroy, Thierry; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Mazzafera, Paulo; Marraccini, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Sucrose metabolism and the role of sucrose synthase were investigated in the fruit tissues (pericarp, perisperm, and endosperm) of Coffea arabica during development. Acid invertase, sucrose phosphate synthase, and sucrose synthase activities were monitored and compared with the levels of sucrose and reducing sugars. Among these enzymes, sucrose synthase showed the highest activities during the last stage of endosperm and pericarp development and this activity paralleled closely the accumulation of sucrose in these tissues at this stage. Carbon partitioning in fruits was studied by pulse-chase experiments with (14)C-sugars and revealed high rates of sucrose turnover in perisperm and endosperm tissues. Additional feeding experiments with (14)CO(2) showed that leaf photosynthesis contributed more to seed development than the pericarp in terms of photosynthate supply to the endosperm. Sugar analysis, feeding experiments, and histological studies indicated that the perisperm plays an important role in this downloading process. It was observed that the perisperm presents a transient accumulation of starch which is degraded as the seed develops. Two full-length cDNAs (CaSUS1 and CaSUS2) and the complete gene sequence of the latter were also isolated. They encode sucrose synthase isoforms that are phylogenetically distinct, indicating their involvement in different physiological functions during cherry development. Contrasting expression patterns were observed for CaSUS1 and CaSUS2 in perisperm, endosperm, and pericarp tissues: CaSUS1 mRNAs accumulated mainly during the early development of perisperm and endosperm, as well as during pericarp growing phases, whereas those of CaSUS2 paralleled sucrose synthase activity in the last weeks of pericarp and endosperm development. Taken together, these results indicate that sucrose synthase plays an important role in sugar metabolism during sucrose accumulation in the coffee fruit. PMID:16926239

  4. Purification, characterization and physiological role of sucrose synthase in the pea seed coat (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Déjardin, A; Rochat, C; Maugenest, S; Boutin, J P

    1997-01-01

    The seed coat is a maternal organ which surrounds the embryo and is involved in the control of its nutrition. This study with pea (Pisum sativum L.) was conducted to understand more fully the sucrose/starch interconversions occurring in the seed coat. The concentrations of soluble sugars, the starch content, and the activities of the sucrose-metabolizing enzymes, sucrose synthase (Sus; EC 2.4.1.13), alkaline and soluble acid invertase (EC 3.2.1.26) and sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS; EC 2.4.1.14) were compared at four developmental stages during seed filling. Among the four enzymes, only Sus activity was very high and strongly correlated with the starch concentration in the seed coat. Sucrose synthase catalyses the cleavage of sucrose in the presence of UDP into UDP-glucose and fructose. Sucrose synthase was purified from pea seed coats in a three-step protocol, consisting of diethylaminoethyl-Sephacel chromatography, gel filtration and affinity chromatography. The enzyme was characterized at the biochemical and molecular levels. Sucrose synthase exhibits biochemical properties which allow it to function in the direction of both sucrose cleavage and synthesis. The mass-action ratio of its four substrate was close to the theoretical equilibrium constant at the four developmental stages we studied. A labelling experiment on seed coats has shown that Sus activity is reversible in vivo and can produce 37% of neo-synthesized sucrose in the seed coat cells (minimum value). It is concluded that Sus could play a central role in the control of sucrose concentration in the seed coat cells in response to the demand for sucrose in the embryo during the development of the seed. PMID:9084215

  5. A novel sucrose/H+ symport system and an intracellular sucrase in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arpita; Mandal, Debjani

    2011-07-01

    The flagellated form of pathogenic parasitic protozoa Leishmania, resides in the alimentary tract of its sandfly vector, where sucrose serves as a major nutrient source. In this study we report the presence of a sucrose transport system in Leishmania donovani promastigotes. The kinetics of sucrose uptake in promastigotes are biphasic in nature with both high affinity K(m) (K(m) of ∼ 75 μM) and low affinity K(m) (K(m)∼ 1.38 mM) components. By contrast the virulent amastigotes take up sucrose via a low affinity process with a K(m) of 2.5mM. The transport of sucrose into promastigotes leads to rapid intracellular acidification, as indicated by changes in the fluorescence of the pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(6) Carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). In experiments with right side-out plasma membrane vesicles derived from L. donovani promastigotes, an artificial pH gradient was able to drive the active accumulation of sucrose. These data are consistent with the operation of a H(+)-sucrose symporter. The symporter was shown to be independent of Na(+) and to be insensitive to cytochalasin B, to the flavonoid phloretin and to the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase inhibitor ouabain. However, the protonophore carbonylcyanide P- (trifluromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP) and a number of thiol reagents caused significant inhibition of sucrose uptake. Evidence was also obtained for the presence of a stable intracellular pool of the sucrose splitting enzyme, sucrase, in promastigote stage parasites. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that L. donovani promastigotes take up sucrose via a novel H(+)-sucrose symport system and that, on entering the cell, the sucrose is hydrolysed to its component monosaccharides by an intracellular sucrase, thereby providing an energy source for the parasites. PMID:21515279

  6. Dissecting ribosome assembly and transport in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Altvater, Martin; Schütz, Sabina; Chang, Yiming; Panse, Vikram Govind

    2014-01-01

    Construction of the eukaryotic ribosome begins in the nucleolus and requires >300 evolutionarily conserved nonribosomal trans-acting factors, which transiently associate with preribosomal subunits at distinct assembly stages. A subset of trans-acting and transport factors passage assembled preribosomal subunits in a functionally inactive state through the nuclear pore complexes (NPC) into the cytoplasm, where they undergo final maturation before initiating translation. Here, we summarize the repertoire of tools developed in the model organism budding yeast that are spearheading the functional analyses of trans-acting factors involved in the assembly and intracellular transport of preribosomal subunits. We elaborate on different GFP-tagged ribosomal protein reporters and a pre-rRNA reporter that reliably monitors the movement of preribosomal particles from the nucleolus to cytoplasm. We discuss the powerful yeast heterokaryon assay, which can be employed to uncover shuttling trans-acting factors that need to accompany preribosomal subunits to the cytoplasm to be released prior to initiating translation. Moreover, we present two biochemical approaches, namely sucrose gradient analyses and tandem affinity purification, that are rapidly facilitating the uncovering of regulatory processes that control the compositional dynamics of trans-acting factors on maturing preribosomal particles. Altogether, these approaches when combined with traditional analytical biochemistry, targeted proteomics and structural methodologies, will contribute to the dissection of the assembly and intracellular transport of preribosomal subunits, as well as other macromolecular assemblies that influence diverse biological pathways. PMID:24857742

  7. Yeast identification in floral nectar of Mimulus aurantiacus (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyauk, C.; Belisle, M.; Fukami, T.

    2009-12-01

    Nectar is such a sugar-rich resource that serves as a natural habitat in which microbes thrive. As a result, yeasts arrive to nectar on the bodies of pollinators such as hummingbirds and bees. Yeasts use the sugar in nectar for their own needs when introduced. This research focuses on the identification of different types of yeast that are found in the nectar of Mimulus aurantiacus (commonly known as sticky monkey-flower). Unopened Mimulus aurantiacus flower buds were tagged at Jasper Ridge and bagged three days later. Floral nectar was then extracted and plated on potato dextrose agar. Colonies on the plates were isolated and DNA was extracted from each sample using QIAGEN DNeasy Plant Mini Kit. The DNA was amplified through PCR and ran through gel electrophoresis. The PCR product was used to clone the nectar samples into an E.coli vector. Finally, a phylogenetic tree was created by BLAST searching sequences in GenBank using the Internal Transcribed Space (ITS) locus. It was found that 18 of the 50 identified species were Candida magnifica, 14 was Candida rancensis, 6 were Crytococcus albidus and there were 3 or less of the following: Starmella bombicola, Candida floricola, Aureobasidium pullulans, Pichia kluyvera, Metschnikowa cibodaserisis, Rhodotorua colostri, and Malassezia globosa. The low diversity of the yeast could have been due to several factors: time of collection, demographics of Jasper Ridge, low variety of pollinators, and sugar concentration of the nectar. The results of this study serve as a necessary first step for a recently started research project on ecological interactions between plants, pollinators, and nectar-living yeast. More generally, this research studies the use of the nectar-living yeast community as a natural microcosm for addressing basic questions about the role of dispersal and competitive and facilitative interactions in ecological succession.

  8. Agriculturally important yeasts: Biological control of field and postharvest diseases using yeast antagonists, and yeasts as pathogens of plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two important agricultural aspects of yeasts, control of plant diseases through application of yeasts as the control agent, and yeasts that are plant pathogens are reviewed. Yeasts as biocontrol organisms are presented first, followed by a discussion of some of the more common plant pathogenic yeas...

  9. Biosynthesis of sucrose and mannitol as a function of leaf age in celery (Apium graveolens L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.M.; Fellman, J.K.; Loescher, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    In celery (Apium graveolens L.), the two major translocated carbohydrates are sucrose and the acyclic polyol mannitol. Their metabolism, however, is different and their specific functions are uncertain. To compare their roles in carbon partitioning and sink-source transitions, developmental changes in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ labeling, pool sizes, and key enzyme activities in leaf tissues were examined. The proportion of label in mannitol increased dramatically with leaf maturation whereas that in sucrose remained fairly constant. Mannitol content, however, was high in all leaves and sucrose content increased as leaves developed. Activities of mannose-6-P reductase, cytoplasmic and chloroplastic fructose-1,6-bis-phosphatases, sucrose phosphate synthase, and sucrose synthase increased with leaf maturation and decreased as leaves senesced. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and nonreversible glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase activities rose as leaves developed but did not decrease. Thus, sucrose is produced in all photosynthetically active leaves whereas mannitol is synthesized primarily in mature leaves and stored in all leaves. Onset of sucrose export in celery may result from sucrose accumulation in expanding leaves, but mannitol export is clearly unrelated to mannitol concentration. Mannitol export, however, appears to coincide with increased mannitol biosynthesis. Although mannitol and sucrose arise from a common precursor in celery, subsequent metabolism and transport must be regulated separately.

  10. Sucrose in bloom-forming cyanobacteria: loss and gain of genes involved in its biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kolman, María A; Salerno, Graciela L

    2016-02-01

    Bloom-forming cyanobacteria are widely distributed in freshwater ecosystems. To cope with salinity fluctuations, cyanobacteria synthesize compatible solutes, such as sucrose, to maintain the intracellular osmotic balance. The screening of cyanobacterial genomes revealed that homologues to sucrose metabolism-related genes only occur in few bloom-forming strains, mostly belonging to Nostocales and Stigonematales orders. Remarkably, among Chroococcales and Oscillatoriales strains, homologues were only found in M. aeruginosa PCC 7806 and Leptolyngbya boryana PCC 6306, suggesting a massive loss of sucrose metabolism in bloom-forming strains of these orders. After a complete functional characterization of sucrose genes in M. aeruginosa PCC 7806, we showed that sucrose metabolism depends on the expression of a gene cluster that defines a transcriptional unit, unique among all sucrose-containing cyanobacteria. It was also demonstrated that the expression of the encoding genes of sucrose-related proteins is stimulated by salt. In view of its ancestral origin in cyanobacteria, the fact that most bloom-forming strains lack sucrose metabolism indicates that the genes involved might have been lost during evolution. However, in a particular strain, like M. aeruginosa PCC 7806, sucrose synthesis genes were probably regained by horizontal gene transfer, which could be hypothesized as a response to salinity fluctuations. PMID:26913819

  11. Sucrose produces withdrawal and dopamine-sensitive reinforcing effects in planarians.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Charlie; Tallarida, Christopher S; Raffa, Robert B; Rawls, Scott M

    2013-03-15

    Sucrose produces physical dependence and reinforcing effects in rats. We hypothesized that similar effects could be demonstrated in planarians, the earliest animal with a centralized nervous system. We used two assays, one that quantifies withdrawal responses during drug absence as a reduction in motility and another that quantifies reinforcing effects using a conditioned place preference (CPP) design. In withdrawal experiments, planarians exposed to sucrose (1%) for 60 min and then tested in water for 5 min displayed reduced motility compared to water controls. Acute or continuous sucrose (1%) exposure did not affect motility. CPP experiments used a biased design to capitalize upon planarians' natural preference for the dark (pretest, sucrose conditioning in the light, posttest). Planarians conditioned with sucrose (1%) displayed a greater preference shift than sucrose-naïve planarians. Glucose (0.1, 1%), but not the non-digestible disaccharide lactulose (0.1, 1%), also produced a greater preference shift than water-exposed planarians. Development of sucrose-induced CPP was inhibited when sucrose (1%) conditioning was conducted in combination with dopamine receptor antagonists SCH 23390 (1 μM) or sulpiride (1 μM). These results suggest that the rewarding and reinforcing effects of sugar are highly conserved across species and that planarians offer an invertebrate model to provide insight into the pharmacological effects of sucrose and related sweeteners. PMID:23415661

  12. Exposure to sucrose during periods of withdrawal does not reduce cocaine-seeking behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Céline; Lafay-Chebassier, Claire; Solinas, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant access to drugs of abuse and alternative rewards such as sucrose has been shown to decrease addiction-related behaviors in animals. Here we investigated whether access to sucrose during abstinence in contexts that are temporally and physically distinct from drug-related contexts could reduce subsequent drug seeking. In addition, we investigated whether a history of cocaine self-administration would alter the rewarding effects of sucrose. Rats self-administered cocaine for ten sessions, while yoked-saline rats received only saline injections, and then we subjected them to a 30-day withdrawal period during which they had access to water and sucrose continuously or intermittently according to a schedule that induces binge-drinking behavior. At the end of the withdrawal period, rats were tested for cocaine seeking behavior during a single 6 h session. We found that exposure to cocaine increased sucrose consumption only when rats had intermittent access to sucrose, but exposure to sucrose did not alter drug seeking regardless of the schedule of access. These results suggest that exposure to cocaine cross-sensitizes to the rewarding effects of sucrose, but exposure to sucrose during abstinence, temporally and physically distinct from drug-related environments, does not to reduce drug seeking. PMID:26997496

  13. Photocatalytic properties of hierarchical ZnO flowers synthesized by a sucrose-assisted hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wei; Wei, Bo; Xu, Lingling; Zhao, Yan; Gao, Hong; Liu, Jia

    2012-10-01

    In this work, hierarchical ZnO flowers were synthesized via a sucrose-assisted urea hydrothermal method. The thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA-DTA) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) showed that sucrose acted as a complexing agent in the synthesis process and assisted combustion during annealing. Photocatalytic activity was evaluated using the degradation of organic dye methyl orange. The sucrose added ZnO flowers showed improved activity, which was mainly attributed to the better crystallinity as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The effect of sucrose amount on photocatalytic activity was also studied.

  14. Water Restriction and Fluid Temperature Alter Preference for Water and Sucrose Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bales, Michelle B.; Breza, Joseph M.; Houpt, Thomas A.; Smith, James C.; Contreras, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The role of diet temperature in ingestive behavior is poorly understood. We examined the importance of stimulus temperature and water-restriction state on the preference for and intake of water and sucrose. Using custom-designed equipment that allows us to monitor and maintain solution temperatures during testing (±0.1 °C), we conducted a series of 2-bottle preference tests (10 °C water vs. sucrose 10–40 °C) and brief access tests (10–40 °C water and sucrose). Water-restricted rats preferred cold water over any sucrose concentration (0.0–1.0 M) if the sucrose was 30 or 40 °C, whereas the same rats preferred sucrose at all concentrations and temperatures when unrestricted suggesting that the water-restriction state interacts with temperature preference. In a series of brief-access tests using a Davis Rig (MS-180), rats reduced licking to cold sucrose compared with 20 °C sucrose, suggesting that unlike water, cold temperature reduced the palatability of sucrose. PMID:22109629

  15. Mechanistic investigation of domain specific unfolding of human serum albumin and the effect of sucrose

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rajeev; Sen, Pratik

    2013-01-01

    This study is devoted to understand the unfolding mechanism of a multidomain protein, human serum albumin (HSA), in absence and presence of the sucrose by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy with domain specific marker molecules and is further being substantiated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In water, the domain III of HSA found to unfold first followed by domains I and II as the concentration of GnHCl is increased in the medium. The sequential unfolding behavior of different domains of HSA remains same in presence of sucrose; however, a higher GnHCl concentration is required for unfolding, suggesting stabilizing effect of sucrose on HSA. Domain I is found to be most stabilized by sucrose. The stabilization of domain II is somewhat similar to domain I, but the effect of sucrose on domain III is found to be very small. MD simulation also predicted a similar behavior of sucrose on HSA. The stabilizing effect of sucrose is explained in terms of the entrapment of water molecules in between HSA surface and sucrose layer as well as direct interaction between HSA and sucrose. PMID:24038622

  16. Tissue-specific expression of two genes for sucrose synthase in carrot (Daucus carota L.).

    PubMed

    Sturm, A; Lienhard, S; Schatt, S; Hardegger, M

    1999-01-01

    Sucrose synthase, which cleaves sucrose in the presence of uridine diphosphate (UDP) into UDP-glucose and fructose, is thought to be a key determinant of sink strength of heterotrophic plant organs. To determine the roles of the enzyme in carrot, we characterized carrot sucrose synthase at the molecular level. Two genes (Susy*Dc1 and Susy*Dc2) were isolated. The deduced amino acid sequences are 87% identical. However, the sequences upstream of the translation initiation codons are markedly different, as are the expression patterns of the two genes. Susy*Dc2 was exclusively expressed in flowers. Transcripts for Susy*Dc1 were found in stems, in roots at different developmental stages, and in flower buds, flowers and maturing seeds, with the highest levels in strong utilization sinks for sucrose such as growing stems and tap root tips. Expression of Susy*Dc1 was regulated by anaerobiosis but not by sugars or acetate. The carrot sucrose synthase protein is partly membrane-associated and this insoluble form may be directly involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Tap roots of the carrot cultivar used accumulated starch in the vicinity of the vascular bundles, which correlated with high sucrose synthase transcript levels. This finding suggests that soluble sucrose synthase in tap roots channels sucrose towards starch biosynthesis. Starch accumulation appears to be transient and may be involved in sucrose partitioning to developing tap roots. PMID:10080700

  17. Exposure to sucrose during periods of withdrawal does not reduce cocaine-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Céline; Lafay-Chebassier, Claire; Solinas, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant access to drugs of abuse and alternative rewards such as sucrose has been shown to decrease addiction-related behaviors in animals. Here we investigated whether access to sucrose during abstinence in contexts that are temporally and physically distinct from drug-related contexts could reduce subsequent drug seeking. In addition, we investigated whether a history of cocaine self-administration would alter the rewarding effects of sucrose. Rats self-administered cocaine for ten sessions, while yoked-saline rats received only saline injections, and then we subjected them to a 30-day withdrawal period during which they had access to water and sucrose continuously or intermittently according to a schedule that induces binge-drinking behavior. At the end of the withdrawal period, rats were tested for cocaine seeking behavior during a single 6 h session. We found that exposure to cocaine increased sucrose consumption only when rats had intermittent access to sucrose, but exposure to sucrose did not alter drug seeking regardless of the schedule of access. These results suggest that exposure to cocaine cross-sensitizes to the rewarding effects of sucrose, but exposure to sucrose during abstinence, temporally and physically distinct from drug-related environments, does not to reduce drug seeking. PMID:26997496

  18. Combined compared to dissociated oral and intestinal sucrose stimuli induce different brain hedonic processes

    PubMed Central

    Clouard, Caroline; Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine; Meurice, Paul; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Val-Laillet, David

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of brain networks contributing to the processing of oral and/or intestinal sugar signals in a relevant animal model might help to understand the neural mechanisms related to the control of food intake in humans and suggest potential causes for impaired eating behaviors. This study aimed at comparing the brain responses triggered by oral and/or intestinal sucrose sensing in pigs. Seven animals underwent brain single photon emission computed tomography (99mTc-HMPAO) further to oral stimulation with neutral or sucrose artificial saliva paired with saline or sucrose infusion in the duodenum, the proximal part of the intestine. Oral and/or duodenal sucrose sensing induced differential cerebral blood flow changes in brain regions known to be involved in memory, reward processes and hedonic (i.e., pleasure) evaluation of sensory stimuli, including the dorsal striatum, prefrontal cortex, cingulate cortex, insular cortex, hippocampus, and parahippocampal cortex. Sucrose duodenal infusion only and combined sucrose stimulation induced similar activity patterns in the putamen, ventral anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus. Some brain deactivations in the prefrontal and insular cortices were only detected in the presence of oral sucrose stimulation. Finally, activation of the right insular cortex was only induced by combined oral and duodenal sucrose stimulation, while specific activity patterns were detected in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex with oral sucrose dissociated from caloric load. This study sheds new light on the brain hedonic responses to sugar and has potential implications to unravel the neuropsychological mechanisms underlying food pleasure and motivation. PMID:25147536

  19. [Succinic acid production from sucrose and sugarcane molasses by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Ma, Jiangfeng; Wu, Mingke; Ji, Yaliang; Chen, Wufang; Ren, Xinyi; Jiang, Min

    2015-04-01

    Sugarcane molasses containing large amounts of sucrose is an economical substrate for succinic acid production. However, Escherichia coli AFP111 cannot metabolize sucrose although it is a promising candidate for succinic acid production. To achieve sucrose utilizing ability, we cloned and expressed cscBKA genes encoding sucrose permease, fructokinase and invertase of non-PTS sucrose-utilization system from E. coli W in E. coli AFP111 to generate a recombinant strain AFP111/pMD19T-cscBKA. After 72 h of anaerobic fermentation of the recombinant in serum bottles, 20 g/L sucrose was consumed and 12 g/L succinic acid was produced. During dual-phase fermentation comprised of initial aerobic growth phase followed by anaerobic fermentation phase, the concentration of succinic acid from sucrose and sugarcane molasses was 34 g/L and 30 g/L, respectively, at 30 h of anaerobic phase in a 3 L fermentor. The results show that the introduction of non-PTS sucrose-utilization system has sucrose-metabolizing capability for cell growth and succinic acid production, and can use cheap sugarcane molasses to produce succinic acid. PMID:26380410

  20. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  1. Lager yeast comes of age.

    PubMed

    Wendland, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This "web of life" recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  2. Yeasts: From genetics to biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, S.; Poli, G.; Siman-Tov, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    Yeasts have been known and used in food and alcoholic fermentations ever since the Neolithic Age. In more recent times, on the basis of their peculiar features and history, yeasts have become very important experimental models in both microbiological and genetic research, as well as the main characters in many fermentative production processes. In the last 40 years, advances in molecular biology and genetic engineering have made possible not only the genetic selection of organisms, but also the genetic modification of some of them, especially the simplest of them, such as bacteria and yeasts. These discoveries have led to the availability of new yeast strains fit to fulfill requests of industrial production and fermentation. Moreover, genetically modified and transformed yeasts have been constructed that are able to produce large amounts of biologically active proteins and enzymes. Thus, recombinant yeasts make it easier to produce drugs, biologically active products, diagnostics, and vaccines, by inexpensive and relatively simple techniques. Yeasts are going to become more and more important in the {open_quotes}biotechnological revolution{close_quotes} by virtue of both their features and their very long and safe use in human nutrition and industry. 175 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Lager Yeast Comes of Age

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This “web of life” recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  4. Yeasts: from genetics to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Russo, S; Berkovitz Siman-Tov, R; Poli, G

    1995-01-01

    Yeasts have been known and used in food and alcoholic fermentations ever since the Neolithic Age. In more recent times, on the basis of their peculiar features and history, yeasts have become very important experimental models in both microbiological and genetic research, as well as the main characters in many fermentative production processes. In the last 40 years, advances in molecular biology and genetic engineering have made possible not only the genetic selection of organisms, but also the genetic modification of some of them, especially the simplest of them, such as bacteria and yeasts. These discoveries have led to the availability of new yeast strains fit to fulfill requests of industrial production and fermentation. Moreover, genetically modified and transformed yeasts have been constructed that are able to produce large amounts of biologically active proteins and enzymes. Thus, recombinant yeasts make it easier to produce drugs, biologically active products, diagnostics, and vaccines, by inexpensive and relatively simple techniques. Yeasts are going to become more and more important in the "biotechnological revolution" by virtue of both their features and their very long and safe use in human nutrition and industry. PMID:9003692

  5. Momordica charantia maintains normal glucose levels and lipid profiles and prevents oxidative stress in diabetic rats subjected to chronic sucrose load.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Padmaja; George, Saramma

    2010-06-01

    Momordica charantia L., commonly known as bitter gourd, is used as a vegetable by the Asian community in Africa. It is frequently used as an antidiabetic herb for the management of the disease in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of M. charantia on glucose level, lipid profiles, and oxidative stress in diabetic rats subjected to a sucrose load. Five normal rats and 20 diabetic rats (diabetes induced by injecting alloxan monohydrate) were used for the experiment. Diabetic rats were divided into four groups: three experimental groups that received sucrose (4 g/kg of body weight) plus graded doses of M. charantia extract and a diabetic control group that received only sucrose (4 g/kg of body weight). Normal rats were used as the normal control group and received only sucrose (4 kg/kg of body weight). The experiment was run for 30 days, after which rats were bled to assay blood glucose, lipid profiles, and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and reduced glutathione. After this, all treatments were terminated. Rats in the normal control group, diabetic control group, and experimental group 3 were subjected to observation for 30 days and were bled on day 31 to assay parameters as stated above. Results indicated that M. charantia maintained the normal glucose levels in all experimental groups, reduced triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein levels, and increased high-density lipoprotein levels. It also improved the antioxidant status, indicated by low levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and normal levels of reduced glutathione. Rats reverted to diabetic conditions and were found to be under oxidative stress after termination of treatment. This study concludes that M. charantia maintains the normal glucose level, lipid profiles, and antioxidant condition in diabetic rats against the sucrose load. PMID:20521977

  6. Mass spectrometry-based method to investigate the natural selectivity of sucrose as the sugar transport form for plants.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hang; Wu, Yile; Liu, Wu; Liu, Yan; Gao, Xiang; Lin, Jinming; Zhao, Yufen

    2015-04-30

    Sucrose is the carbon skeletons and energy vector for plants, which is important for plants growth. Among thousands of disaccharides in Nature, why chose sucrose for plants? In this paper, we analyzed the intrinsic structural characteristics of four sucrose isomers with different glycosidic linkage by mass spectrometry (MS) technique. Our results show that sucrose has the most labile glycosidic bond compared with other three isomers, which is helpful for releasing glucose and fructose unit. Besides, sucrose has the most stable integral structure, which is hard to dehydrate and degrade into fragments through losing one or three even four-carbon units, just as its three isomers. In other words, sucrose is more easily holds an integral structure during the transport process, whenever it is necessary, and sucrose can be cleaved into glucose and fructose easily. Besides, we also investigate the internal relationship of sucrose with K(+) by tandem mass spectrometry and viscosity measurement. The related results have shown that the K(+) can stabilize sucrose to a greater extent than the Na(+). Furthermore, under the same conditions, K(+) ions reduce the viscosity of sucrose-water system much more than Na(+). These results suggest that K(+) is a better co-transporter for sucrose. Of course, the transport of sucrose in plants is a very complicated process, which is involved in many proteins. This paper directly accounts for the basic structure feature of sucrose, and the results discovered could provide the novel insight for the answer why Nature chose sucrose for plants. PMID:25699973

  7. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  8. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  9. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida...

  10. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  11. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  12. Molybdate induces thermotolerance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Tiligada, E; Miligkos, V; Ypsilantis, E; Papamichael, K; Delitheos, A

    1999-08-01

    Application of a mild heat pretreatment, performed by shifting cells from 27 degrees C to 37 degrees C led to the protection of yeast cells from death due to a subsequent extreme heat shock at 53 degrees C. The presence of cycloheximide inhibited this induction of thermotolerance, indicating the involvement of de novo protein. The phosphatase inhibitor sodium molybdate induced thermotolerance to the non-pretreated yeast cells. This induction of thermotolerance did not seem to depend upon de novo protein synthesis. Thus, acquisition of thermotolerance in yeast may involve a number of cellular mechanisms depending on the conditions the organism encounters at any particular time. PMID:10499293

  13. Triacylglycerol Homeostasis: Insights from Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Kohlwein, Sepp D.

    2010-01-01

    The endemic increase in lipid-associated disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus has placed triacylglycerol metabolism and its associated organelle, lipid droplets, in the spotlight of biomedical research. Key enzymes of triacylglycerol metabolism are structurally and functionally conserved between yeast and mammalian cells, and studies in yeast have contributed significantly to the understanding of their biological function(s). Based on these similarities, studies performed in yeast may provide further significant mechanistic insight into the molecular basis of triacylglycerol homeostasis and its important physiological roles in healthy and diseased cells. PMID:20231294

  14. Scanning Electron Microscopic study of Piper betle L. leaves extract effect against Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175

    PubMed Central

    RAHIM, Zubaidah Haji Abdul; THURAIRAJAH, Nalina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have shown that Piper betle L. leaves extract inhibits the adherence of Streptococcus mutans to glass surface, suggesting its potential role in controlling dental plaque development. Objectives: In this study, the effect of the Piper betle L. extract towards S. mutans (with/without sucrose) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and on partially purified cell-associated glucosyltransferase activity were determined. Material and Methods S. mutans were allowed to adhere to glass beads suspended in 6 different Brain Heart Infusion broths [without sucrose; with sucrose; without sucrose containing the extract (2 mg mL-1 and 4 mg mL-1); with sucrose containing the extract (2 mg mL-1 and 4 mg mL-1)]. Positive control was 0.12% chlorhexidine. The glass beads were later processed for SEM viewing. Cell surface area and appearance and, cell population of S. mutans adhering to the glass beads were determined upon viewing using the SEM. The glucosyltransferase activity (with/without extract) was also determined. One- and two-way ANOVA were used accordingly. Results It was found that sucrose increased adherence and cell surface area of S. mutans (p<0.001). S. mutans adhering to 100 µm2 glass surfaces (with/without sucrose) exhibited reduced cell surface area, fluffy extracellular appearance and cell population in the presence of the Piper betle L. leaves extract. It was also found that the extract inhibited glucosyltransferase activity and its inhibition at 2.5 mg mL-1 corresponded to that of 0.12% chlorhexidine. At 4 mg mL-1 of the extract, the glucosyltransferase activity was undetectable and despite that, bacterial cells still demonstrated adherence capacity. Conclusion The SEM analysis confirmed the inhibitory effects of the Piper betle L. leaves extract towards cell adherence, cell growth and extracellular polysaccharide formation of S. mutans visually. In bacterial cell adherence, other factors besides glucosyltransferase are involved. PMID:21552715

  15. Marine yeast isolation and industrial application

    PubMed Central

    Zaky, Abdelrahman Saleh; Tucker, Gregory A; Daw, Zakaria Yehia; Du, Chenyu

    2014-01-01

    Over the last century, terrestrial yeasts have been widely used in various industries, such as baking, brewing, wine, bioethanol and pharmaceutical protein production. However, only little attention has been given to marine yeasts. Recent research showed that marine yeasts have several unique and promising features over the terrestrial yeasts, for example higher osmosis tolerance, higher special chemical productivity and production of industrial enzymes. These indicate that marine yeasts have great potential to be applied in various industries. This review gathers the most recent techniques used for marine yeast isolation as well as the latest applications of marine yeast in bioethanol, pharmaceutical and enzyme production fields. PMID:24738708

  16. Marine yeast isolation and industrial application.

    PubMed

    Zaky, Abdelrahman Saleh; Tucker, Gregory A; Daw, Zakaria Yehia; Du, Chenyu

    2014-09-01

    Over the last century, terrestrial yeasts have been widely used in various industries, such as baking, brewing, wine, bioethanol and pharmaceutical protein production. However, only little attention has been given to marine yeasts. Recent research showed that marine yeasts have several unique and promising features over the terrestrial yeasts, for example higher osmosis tolerance, higher special chemical productivity and production of industrial enzymes. These indicate that marine yeasts have great potential to be applied in various industries. This review gathers the most recent techniques used for marine yeast isolation as well as the latest applications of marine yeast in bioethanol, pharmaceutical and enzyme production fields. PMID:24738708

  17. HPA axis dampening by limited sucrose intake: reward frequency vs. caloric consumption.

    PubMed

    Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Ostrander, Michelle M; Herman, James P

    2011-04-18

    Individuals often cope with stress by consuming calorically-dense, highly-palatable 'comfort' foods. The present work explores the stress-relieving properties of palatable foods in a rat model of limited sucrose intake. In this model, adult male rats with free access to chow and water are given additional access to a small amount of sucrose drink (or water as a control). A history of such limited sucrose intake reduces the collective (HPA axis, sympathetic, and behavioral-anxiety) stress response. Moreover, the stress-dampening by sucrose appears to be mediated primarily by its rewarding properties, since beneficial effects are reproduced by the noncaloric sweetener saccharin but not oral intragastric gavage of sucrose. The present work uses an alternate strategy to address the hypothesis that the rewarding properties of sucrose mediate its stress-dampening. This work varies the duration, frequency, and/or volume of sucrose and assesses the ability to attenuate HPA axis stress responses. The data indicate that HPA-dampening is optimal with a greater duration and/or frequency of sucrose, whereas increasing the volume of sucrose consumed is without effect. This finding suggests that the primary factor mediating stress-dampening is the number/rate of reward (i.e., sucrose) exposures, rather than the total sucrose calories consumed. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that stress relief by limited palatable food intake is mediated primarily by its hedonic/rewarding properties. Moreover, the results support the contention that naturally rewarding behaviors are a physiological means to produce stress relief. PMID:21168428

  18. The effects of nicotine and sucrose on spatial memory and attention.

    PubMed

    Harte, C B; Kanarek, R B

    2004-04-01

    Both nicotine and sucrose can enhance performance on cognitive tasks. However, little is known about whether nicotine and sucrose could act jointly to augment mental performance. To investigate if there is an interaction between nicotine and sucrose on cognitive behavior, performance on a continuous performance task (CPT) and a spatial memory task was examined in 14 healthy smokers after they had drunk 8 oz of either a sucrose- or aspartame-containing beverage, and then chewed a piece of gum containing either 2 mg nicotine or no nicotine. To assess changes in mood as a function of nicotine and sucrose intake, the profile of mood states (POMS) test was administered three times during each test session. Participants made significantly more correct responses and significantly fewer incorrect responses on the CPT when they received nicotine than when they received the placebo gum. Closer analysis of the data revealed that there was an interaction between sucrose consumption and nicotine intake. Nicotine increased hits and decreased misses when participants were given the sucrose-containing beverage, but not when they were given the aspartame-containing beverage. Neither nicotine nor sucrose affected spatial memory or mood across experimental sessions. However, when data were analyzed for just the first session, participants who drank the sucrose-containing beverage performed significantly better on the spatial memory task than those who drank the aspartame-containing beverage. No gender differences in the effects of nicotine or sucrose on cognitive performance were detected. The results provide support that both nicotine and sucrose have positive effects on cognitive behavior, and that under some conditions the two variables have additive effects on performance. PMID:15279498

  19. Assimilation of nitrate by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Siverio, José M

    2002-08-01

    Nitrate assimilation has received much attention in filamentous fungi and plants but not so much in yeasts. Recently the availability of classical genetic and molecular biology tools for the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has allowed the advance of the study of this metabolic pathway in yeasts. The genes YNT1, YNR1 and YNI1, encoding respectively nitrate transport, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, have been cloned, as well as two other genes encoding transcriptional regulatory factors. All these genes lie closely together in a cluster. Transcriptional regulation is the main regulatory mechanism that controls the levels of the enzymes involved in nitrate metabolism although other mechanisms may also be operative. The process involved in the sensing and signalling of the presence of nitrate in the medium is not well understood. In this article the current state of the studies of nitrate assimilation in yeasts as well as possible venues for future research are reviewed. PMID:12165428

  20. The Yeast Sphingolipid Signaling Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Montefusco, David J.; Matmati, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are recognized as signaling mediators in a growing number of pathways, and represent potential targets to address many diseases. The study of sphingolipid signaling in yeast has created a number of breakthroughs in the field, and has the potential to lead future advances. The aim of this article is to provide an inclusive view of two major frontiers in yeast sphingolipid signaling. In the first section, several key studies in the field of sphingolipidomics are consolidated to create a yeast sphingolipidome that ranks nearly all known sphingolipid species by their level in a resting yeast cell. The second section presents an overview of most known phenotypes identified for sphingolipid gene mutants, presented with the intention of illuminating not yet discovered connections outside and inside of the field. PMID:24220500

  1. Effect of Sucrose Concentration on Sucrose-Dependent Adhesion and Glucosyltransferase Expression of S. mutans in Children with Severe Early-Childhood Caries (S-ECC)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Wenqing; Lin, Jiacheng; Chen, Zhuoyu; Yu, Dongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose, extracellular polysaccharide, and glucosyltransferases (GTFs) are key factors in sucrose-dependent adhesion and play important roles in the process of severe early-childhood caries (S-ECC). However, whether sucrose concentration regulates gtf expression, extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, and sucrose-dependent adhesion is related to the different genotypes of S. mutans isolated from ECC in children and still needs to be investigated. In this study, 52 strains of S. mutans were isolated from children with S-ECC and caries-free (CF) children. Water-insoluble glucan (WIG) synthesis was detected by the anthrone method, adhesion capacity by the turbidimetric method, and expression of gtf by RT-PCR in an in vitro model containing 1%–20% sucrose. The genotypes of S. mutans were analyzed by AP-PCR. The results showed that WIG synthesis, adhesion capacity, and gtf expression increased significantly when the sucrose concentration was from 1% to 10%. WIG synthesis and gtfB as well as gtfC expression of the 1% and 5% groups were significantly lower than those of the 10% and 20% groups (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the 10% and 20% groups. The fingerprints of S. mutans detected from individuals in the S-ECC group exhibited a significant difference in diversity compared with those from CF individuals (p < 0.05). Further, the expression of gtfB and gtfC in the S-ECC group was significantly different among the 1- to 5-genotype groups (p < 0.05). It can be concluded that sucrose-dependent adhesion might be related to the diversity of genotypes of S. mutans, and the 10% sucrose level can be seen as a “turning point” and essential factor for the prevention of S-ECC. PMID:25207825

  2. Effect of sucrose concentration on sucrose-dependent adhesion and glucosyltransferase expression of S. mutans in children with severe early-childhood caries (S-ECC).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Wenqing; Lin, Jiacheng; Chen, Zhuoyu; Yu, Dongsheng

    2014-09-01

    Sucrose, extracellular polysaccharide, and glucosyltransferases (GTFs) are key factors in sucrose-dependent adhesion and play important roles in the process of severe early-childhood caries (S-ECC). However, whether sucrose concentration regulates gtf expression, extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, and sucrose-dependent adhesion is related to the different genotypes of S. mutans isolated from ECC in children and still needs to be investigated. In this study, 52 strains of S. mutans were isolated from children with S-ECC and caries-free (CF) children. Water-insoluble glucan (WIG) synthesis was detected by the anthrone method, adhesion capacity by the turbidimetric method, and expression of gtf by RT-PCR in an in vitro model containing 1%-20% sucrose. The genotypes of S. mutans were analyzed by AP-PCR. The results showed that WIG synthesis, adhesion capacity, and gtf expression increased significantly when the sucrose concentration was from 1% to 10%. WIG synthesis and gtfB as well as gtfC expression of the 1% and 5% groups were significantly lower than those of the 10% and 20% groups (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the 10% and 20% groups. The fingerprints of S. mutans detected from individuals in the S-ECC group exhibited a significant difference in diversity compared with those from CF individuals (p < 0.05). Further, the expression of gtfB and gtfC in the S-ECC group was significantly different among the 1- to 5-genotype groups (p < 0.05). It can be concluded that sucrose-dependent adhesion might be related to the diversity of genotypes of S. mutans, and the 10% sucrose level can be seen as a "turning point" and essential factor for the prevention of S-ECC. PMID:25207825

  3. Yeast Associated with the Ambrosia Beetle, Platypus koryoensis, the Pest of Oak Trees in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yeo Hong; Suh, Dong Yeon; Yoo, Hun Dal; Oh, Man Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Oak tree death caused by symbiosis of an ambrosia beetle, Platypus koryoensis, and an ophiostomatoid filamentous fungus, Raffaelea quercus-mongolicae, has been a nationwide problem in Korea since 2004. In this study, we surveyed the yeast species associated with P. koryoensis to better understand the diversity of fungal associates of the beetle pest. In 2009, a total of 195 yeast isolates were sampled from larvae and adult beetles (female and male) of P. koryoensis in Cheonan, Goyang, and Paju; 8 species were identified by based on their morphological, biochemical and molecular analyses. Meyerozyma guilliermondii and Candida kashinagacola were found to be the two dominant species. Among the 8 species, Candida homilentoma was a newly recorded yeast species in Korea, and thus, its mycological characteristics were described. The P. koryoensis symbiont R. quercusmongolicae did not show extracelluar CM-cellulase, xylanase and avicelase activity that are responsible for degradation of wood structure; however, C. kashinagacola and M. guilliermondii did show the three extracellular enzymatic activities. Extracelluar CM-cellulase activity was also found in Ambrosiozyma sp., C. homilentoma, C. kashinagacola, and Candida sp. Extracelluar pectinase activity was detected in Ambrosiozyma sp., C. homilentoma, Candida sp., and M. guilliermondii. All the 8 yeast species displayed compatible relationships with R. quercus-mongolicae when they were co-cultivated on yeast extract-malt extract plates. Overall, our results demonstrated that P. koryoensis carries the yeast species as a symbiotic fungal associate. This is first report of yeast diversity associated with P. koryoensis. PMID:26839506

  4. Yeast Associated with the Ambrosia Beetle, Platypus koryoensis, the Pest of Oak Trees in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yeo Hong; Suh, Dong Yeon; Yoo, Hun Dal; Oh, Man Hwan; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2015-12-01

    Oak tree death caused by symbiosis of an ambrosia beetle, Platypus koryoensis, and an ophiostomatoid filamentous fungus, Raffaelea quercus-mongolicae, has been a nationwide problem in Korea since 2004. In this study, we surveyed the yeast species associated with P. koryoensis to better understand the diversity of fungal associates of the beetle pest. In 2009, a total of 195 yeast isolates were sampled from larvae and adult beetles (female and male) of P. koryoensis in Cheonan, Goyang, and Paju; 8 species were identified by based on their morphological, biochemical and molecular analyses. Meyerozyma guilliermondii and Candida kashinagacola were found to be the two dominant species. Among the 8 species, Candida homilentoma was a newly recorded yeast species in Korea, and thus, its mycological characteristics were described. The P. koryoensis symbiont R. quercusmongolicae did not show extracelluar CM-cellulase, xylanase and avicelase activity that are responsible for degradation of wood structure; however, C. kashinagacola and M. guilliermondii did show the three extracellular enzymatic activities. Extracelluar CM-cellulase activity was also found in Ambrosiozyma sp., C. homilentoma, C. kashinagacola, and Candida sp. Extracelluar pectinase activity was detected in Ambrosiozyma sp., C. homilentoma, Candida sp., and M. guilliermondii. All the 8 yeast species displayed compatible relationships with R. quercus-mongolicae when they were co-cultivated on yeast extract-malt extract plates. Overall, our results demonstrated that P. koryoensis carries the yeast species as a symbiotic fungal associate. This is first report of yeast diversity associated with P. koryoensis. PMID:26839506

  5. Effects of Selenium on Morphological Changes in Candida utilis ATCC 9950 Yeast Cells.

    PubMed

    Kieliszek, Marek; Błażejak, Stanisław; Bzducha-Wróbel, Anna; Kurcz, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the results of microscopic examinations of the yeast cells cultured in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) media supplemented with sodium selenite(IV). The analysis of the morphological changes in yeast cells aimed to determine whether the selected selenium doses and culturing time may affect this element accumulation in yeast cell structures in a form of inorganic or organic compounds, as a result of detoxification processes. The range of characteristic morphological changes in yeasts cultivated in experimental media with sodium selenite(IV) was observed, including cell shrinkage and cytoplasm thickening of the changes within vacuole structure. The processes of vacuole disintegration were observed in aging yeast cells in culturing medium, which may indicate the presence of so-called ghost cells lacking intracellular organelles The changes occurring in the morphology of yeasts cultured in media supplemented with sodium selenite were typical for stationary phase of yeast growth. From detailed microscopic observations, larger surface area of the cell (6.03 μm(2)) and yeast vacuole (2.17 μm(2)) were noticed after 24-h culturing in the medium with selenium of 20 mg Se(4+)/L. The coefficient of shape of the yeast cells cultured in media enriched with sodium selenite as well as in the control YPD medium ranged from 1.02 to 1.22. Elongation of cultivation time (up to 48 and 72 h) in the media supplemented with sodium selenite caused a reduction in the surface area of the yeast cell and vacuole due to detoxification processes. PMID:26166197

  6. Vacuoles of Candida yeast as a specialized niche for Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Siavoshi, Farideh; Saniee, Parastoo

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are resistant to hostile gastric environments and antibiotic therapy, reflecting the possibility that they are protected by an ecological niche, such as inside the vacuoles of human epithelial and immune cells. Candida yeast may also provide such an alternative niche, as fluorescently labeled H. pylori were observed as fast-moving and viable bacterium-like bodies inside the vacuoles of gastric, oral, vaginal and foodborne Candida yeasts. In addition, H. pylori-specific genes and proteins were detected in samples extracted from these yeasts. The H. pylori present within these yeasts produce peroxiredoxin and thiol peroxidase, providing the ability to detoxify oxygen metabolites formed in immune cells. Furthermore, these bacteria produce urease and VacA, two virulence determinants of H. pylori that influence phago-lysosome fusion and bacterial survival in macrophages. Microscopic observations of H. pylori cells in new generations of yeasts along with amplification of H. pylori-specific genes from consecutive generations indicate that new yeasts can inherit the intracellular H. pylori as part of their vacuolar content. Accordingly, it is proposed that yeast vacuoles serve as a sophisticated niche that protects H. pylori against the environmental stresses and provides essential nutrients, including ergosterol, for its growth and multiplication. This intracellular establishment inside the yeast vacuole likely occurred long ago, leading to the adaptation of H. pylori to persist in phagocytic cells. The presence of these bacteria within yeasts, including foodborne yeasts, along with the vertical transmission of yeasts from mother to neonate, provide explanations for the persistence and propagation of H. pylori in the human population. This Topic Highlight reviews and discusses recent evidence regarding the evolutionary adaptation of H. pylori to thrive in host cell vacuoles. PMID:24833856

  7. Principal-Component Analysis of the Characteristics Desirable in Baker's Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yuji; Ouchi, Kozo

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-seven properties considered to be required for good bakery products were examined in 56 industrial and 2 laboratory yeast strains. The data obtained were applied to principal-component analysis, one of the multivariate statistical analyses. The first and second principal components together were extracted, and these accounted for 77.7% of the variance. The first principal component was interpreted as the glycolytic activity of yeast in dough, and the second one was interpreted as the balance of leavening abilities in sweet and flour doughs from the factor loadings. The scattergram on the two principal components was effective in grouping the 58 yeast strains used. PMID:16347943

  8. Suckling- and sucrose-induced analgesia in human newborns.

    PubMed

    Blass, E M; Watt, L B

    1999-12-01

    This experiment had three goals: 1. To identify the basis of sucking-induced analgesia in healthy, term, newborn humans undergoing the painful, routine, procedure of heel lance and blood collection. 2. To evaluate how taste-induced and sucking-induced analgesias combine to combat pain. 3. To determine whether facial grimacing was an accurate index of diminished pain, or whether it was linked to tissue trauma. We report that: 1. Sucking an unflavored pacifier was analgesic when and only when suck rate exceeded 30 sucks/min. 2. The combination of sucrose and nonnutritive sucking was remarkably analgesic; we saw no behavioral indication in nine of the ten infants that the heel lance had even occurred. 3. Grimacing was reduced to almost naught by procedures that essentially eliminated crying and markedly reduced heart rate during the blood harvesting procedure. PMID:10568870

  9. Identification of sucrose synthase as an actin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that sucrose synthase (SuSy) binds both G- and F-actin: (i) presence of SuSy in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of microsomal membranes (i.e. crude cytoskeleton fraction); (ii) co-immunoprecipitation of actin with anti-SuSy monoclonal antibodies; (iii) association of SuSy with in situ phalloidin-stabilized F-actin filaments; and (iv) direct binding to F-actin, polymerized in vitro. Aldolase, well known to interact with F-actin, interfered with binding of SuSy, suggesting that a common or overlapping binding site may be involved. We postulate that some of the soluble SuSy in the cytosol may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vivo.

  10. Dimerization effect of sucrose octasulfate on rat FGF1

    PubMed Central

    Kulahin, N.; Kiselyov, V.; Kochoyan, A.; Kristensen, O.; Kastrup, Jette S.; Berezin, V.; Bock, E.; Gajhede, M.

    2008-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) constitute a family of at least 23 structurally related heparin-binding proteins that are involved in regulation of cell growth, survival, differentiation and migration. Sucrose octasulfate (SOS), a chemical analogue of heparin, has been demonstrated to activate FGF signalling pathways. The structure of rat FGF1 crystallized in the presence of SOS has been determined at 2.2 Å resolution. SOS-mediated dimerization of FGF1 was observed, which was further supported by gel-filtration experiments. The major contributors to the sulfate-binding sites in rat FGF1 are Lys113, Lys118, Arg122 and Lys128. An arginine at position 116 is a consensus residue in mammalian FGF molecules; however, it is a serine in rat FGF1. This difference may be important for SOS-mediated FGF1 dimerization in rat. PMID:18540049

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Produces a Yeast Substance that Exhibits Estrogenic Activity in Mammalian Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, David; Stathis, Peter A.; Hirst, Margaret A.; Price Stover, E.; Do, Yung S.; Kurz, Walter

    1984-06-01

    Partially purified lipid extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contain a substance that displaces tritiated estradiol from rat uterine cytosol estrogen receptors. The yeast product induces estrogenic bioresponses in mammalian systems as measured by induction of progesterone receptors in cultured MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and by a uterotrophic response and progesterone receptor induction after administration to ovariectomized mice. The findings raise the possibility that bakers' yeast may be a source of environmental estrogens.

  12. Composition of the cell walls of several yeast species.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T H; Fleet, G H; Rogers, P L

    1998-08-01

    Cell walls, representing 26%-32% of the cell dry weight, were prepared from several strains of the yeasts Kloeckera apiculata, Debaryomyces hansenii, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Extraction of the walls with potassium hydroxide at 4 degrees C, followed by saturation of the alkali-soluble extract with ammonium sulphate gave fractions of mannoprotein, alkali-soluble glucan and alkali-insoluble glucan. Chitin was associated with the alkali-insoluble glucan. The proportions of the different fractions within the walls varied with the species and strain. Mannoprotein comprised between 25% and 34% of the walls, the content of alkali-insoluble glucan ranged from 15% to 48%, and the content of alkali-soluble glucan ranged from 10% to 48%. There was significant variation in the physical appearance of the alkali-soluble glucans and the relative viscosity of suspensions of these glucans. The yeasts could represent novel sources of polysaccharides with industrial and medical applications. PMID:9763691

  13. Sugaring the pill: ethics and uncertainties in the use of sucrose for newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dominic J C; Savulescu, Julian; Slater, Rebeccah

    2012-07-01

    Sucrose is widely used for the management of procedural pain in newborn infants, including capillary blood sampling, venepuncture, and vascular cannulation. Multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that sweet-tasting solutions reduce behavioral responses to acute painful stimuli. It has been claimed that sucrose should be a standard of care in neonatal units and that further placebo-controlled trials of sucrose are unnecessary and unethical. However, recently published data cast doubt on the analgesic properties of sucrose. We review this new evidence and analyze the philosophical and ethical questions that it raises, including the "problem of other minds." Sugar may be better understood not as an analgesic, removing or relieving pain, but as a compensating pleasure. There is a need for further research on the mechanism of sucrose's effect on pain behavior and on the long-term effects of sucrose treatment. Such trials will require comparison with placebo or with other interventions. Given uncertainty about the benefit of sucrose, it may be wise to use alternative analgesics or nonpharmacological interventions where these are available and appropriate. Sucrose may not be the answer to procedural pain in newborns. PMID:22751876

  14. Sucrose regulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase subunit genes transcript levels in leaves and fruits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiangyang; Xing, Jinpeng; Gianfagna, Thomas J.; Janes, Harry W.

    2002-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase, EC2.7.7.27) is a key regulatory enzyme in starch biosynthesis. The enzyme is a heterotetramer with two S and two B subunits. In tomato, there are three multiple forms of the S subunit gene. Agp S1, S2 and B are highly expressed in fruit from 10 to 25 days after anthesis. Agp S3 is only weakly expressed in fruit. Sucrose significantly elevates expression of Agp S1, S2 and B in both leaves and fruits. Agp S1 exhibits the highest degree of regulation by sucrose. In fact, sucrose may be required for Agp S1 expression. For excised leaves incubated in water, no transcripts for Agp S1 could be detected in the absence of sucrose, whereas it took up to 16 h in water before transcripts were no longer detectable for Agp S2 and B. Neither Agp S3 nor the tubulin gene is affected by sucrose, demonstrating that this response is specifically regulated by a carbohydrate metabolic signal, and is not due to a general increase in metabolism caused by sucrose treatment. Truncated versions of the promoter for Agp S1 indicate that a specific region 1.3-3.0 kb upstream from the transcription site is responsible for sucrose sensitivity. This region of the S1 promoter contains several cis-acting elements present in the promoters of other genes that are also regulated by sucrose. c2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sucrose and Starch Synthesis in Spinach Plants Grown under Long and Short Photosynthetic Periods

    PubMed Central

    Baysdorfer, Chris; Robinson, J. Michael

    1985-01-01

    The flow of carbon into sucrose and starch was investigated in fully expanded primary leaves of spinach using the long to short day transition and partial defoliation as tools to manipulate sucrose/starch synthesis. Transfer from 12 hour to 7 hour photosynthetic periods resulted in a 4-fold increase in the initial rate of starch synthesis, a 50% increase in the initial rate of sucrose synthesis, a 30% increase in leaf sucrose, and a 40% decrease in fructose, 2,6-biphosphate. In addition, sucrose synthesis rates in cells isolated from shortened daylength plants are 80% higher than in cells isolated from control plants. These results show that, in spinach, an increase in the rates of both sucrose and starch synthesis can occur under short day conditions. In contrast, when short day plants are partially defoliated, starch levels remain high, fructose 2,6-biphosphate levels remain low, but the level of leaf sucrose drops by 50%. Thus, when demand exceeds supply, starch synthesis has priority over filling of leaf sucrose pools in the short day plant. PMID:16664501

  16. Postharvest respiration rate and sucrose concentration of Rhizoctonia-infected sugar beet roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR), caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2, is a common root disease on sugar beet that reduces yield and sucrose during the growing season and causes further losses by increasing respiration and reducing sucrose content during storage. The industry needs to identify...

  17. Octopamine indirectly affects proboscis extension response habituation in Drosophila melanogaster by controlling sucrose responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Scheiner, Ricarda; Steinbach, Anne; Claßen, Gerbera; Strudthoff, Nicole; Scholz, Henrike

    2014-10-01

    Octopamine is an important neurotransmitter in insects with multiple functions. Here, we investigated the role of this amine in a simple form of learning (habituation) in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Specifically, we asked if octopamine is necessary for normal habituation of a proboscis extension response (PER) to different sucrose concentrations. In addition, we analyzed the relationship between responsiveness to sucrose solutions applied to the tarsus and habituation of the proboscis extension response in the same individual. The Tyramine-β-hydroxylase (Tβh) mutant lacks the enzyme catalyzing the final step of octopamine synthesis. This mutant was significantly less responsive to sucrose than controls. The reduced responsiveness directly led to faster habituation. Systemic application of octopamine or induction of octopamine synthesis by Tβh expression in a cluster of octopaminergic neurons within the suboesophageal ganglion restored sucrose responsiveness and habituation of octopamine mutants to control level. Further analyses imply that the reduced sucrose responsiveness of Tβh mutants is related to a lower sucrose preference, probably due to a changed carbohydrate metabolism, since Tβh mutants survived significantly longer under starved conditions. These findings suggest a pivotal role for octopamine in regulating sucrose responsiveness in fruit flies. Further, octopamine indirectly influences non-associative learning and possibly associative appetitive learning by regulating the evaluation of the sweet component of a sucrose reward. PMID:24819202

  18. Repeated Cocaine Experience Facilitates Sucrose-Reinforced Operant Responding in Enriched and Isolated Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Emily D.; Gehrke, Brenda J.; Green, Thomas A.; Zentall, Thomas R.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether repeated cocaine exposure differentially affects sucrose-reinforced operant responding in rats raised in an enriched condition (EC) or an isolated condition (IC). Specifically, the performance of EC and IC rats pressing a lever for sucrose under a high fixed-ratio schedule (FR 30)…

  19. Diminished Reactivity of Postmature Human Infants to Sucrose Compared with Term Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study of healthy 39-week-old infants, so-called term infants, and chronically stressed 42-week-old infants, so-called postmature infants, showed that sucrose was extremely effective in calming term infants but less effective in calming postmature infants. Results supported the hypothesis that sucrose engages an opioid system in infants. (BG)

  20. NUTRIENT YIELDS FROM IN VITRO FERMENTATIONS OF SUCROSE AND NEUTRAL DETERGENT FIBER BY MIXED RUMINAL MICROORGANISMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of level of sucrose on nutrient yield by mixed ruminal microbes was evaluated in vitro in two 24 h fermentations in sealed vials. Isolated bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) NDF (130 mg) was incubated with sucrose (Suc; 65, 130, or 195 mg) in Goering/Van Soest buffer with 15% ruminal fluid ...

  1. Detection of sucrose content of sugar beet by visible/near-infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose content is the most important quality parameter in the production and processing of sugar beet. This paper reports on the application of visible/near-infrared (Vis-NIR) spectroscopy for measurement of the sucrose content of sugar beet. Two portable spectrometers, covering the spectral region...

  2. DISTINCT SUCROSE ISOMERASES CATALYZE TREHALULOSE SYNTHESIS IN WHITEFLIES, BEMISIA ARGENTIFOLII, AND ERWINIA RHAPONTICI.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isomaltulose and trehalulose are commercially valuable sucrose-substitutes that are produced in several microorganisms by the palI gene product, a sucrose isomerase. Trehalulose also occurs in the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia argentifoli, as the major carbohydrate in the honeydew. To determine if ...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1222 - Sucrose octanoate esters; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sucrose octanoate esters; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1222 Sucrose octanoate esters; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1222 - Sucrose octanoate esters; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sucrose octanoate esters; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1222 Sucrose octanoate esters; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of...

  5. Pursuing the Pavlovian Contributions to Induction in Rats Responding for 1% Sucrose Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Huls, Amber; Kulland, Ashley

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated whether Pavlovian conditioning contributes, in the form of the response operandum serving as a conditioned stimulus, to the increase in the rate of response for 1% liquid-sucrose reinforcement when food-pellet reinforcement is upcoming. Rats were exposed to conditions in which sign tracking for 1% sucrose was…

  6. X-ray fluorescence and multivariate analysis for sucrose quantification in sugarcane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melquiades, Fábio L.; Bortoleto, Gisele G.; Neme, Fernanda F.; Ton, Ariel; Bueno, Maria I. M. S.

    2013-05-01

    Currently the methods used for determining the sucrose content in sugarcane are made in the clarified juice. In this study portable energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) together with chemometric tools was used to quantify sucrose through the stem, lief and juice. The best results were obtained for the stem, with means relative deviation of around 6%.

  7. Repeated Cocaine Experience Facilitates Sucrose-Reinforced Operant Responding in Enriched and Isolated Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Emily D.; Gehrke, Brenda J.; Green, Thomas A.; Zentall, Thomas R.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether repeated cocaine exposure differentially affects sucrose-reinforced operant responding in rats raised in an enriched condition (EC) or an isolated condition (IC). Specifically, the performance of EC and IC rats pressing a lever for sucrose under a high fixed-ratio schedule (FR 30)

  8. Oxytocin differentially affects sucrose taking and seeking in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Luyi; Ghee, Shannon M; See, Ronald E; Reichel, Carmela M

    2015-04-15

    Oxytocin has a modulatory role in natural and drug reward processes. While the role of oxytocin in pair bonding and reproduction has been extensively studied, sex differences in conditioned and unconditioned behavioral responses to oxytocin treatment have not been fully characterized. Here, we determined whether male and female rats would show similar dose response curves in response to acute oxytocin on measures of locomotor activity, sucrose seeking, and sucrose intake. Male and freely cycling female rats received vehicle or oxytocin (0.1, 0.3, 1, 3mg/kg, IP) injections before behavioral tests designed to assess general motor activity, as well as sucrose self-administration and seeking. Lower doses of oxytocin decreased motor activity in a novel environment in females relative to males. Likewise, lower doses of oxytocin in females decreased responding for sucrose during maintenance of sucrose self-administration and reinstatement to sucrose-conditioned cues. However, sucrose seeking in response to a sucrose prime was only decreased by the highest oxytocin dose in both sexes. In general, oxytocin had similar effects in both sexes. However, females were more sensitive to lower doses of oxytocin than males. These findings are consistent with the notion that oxytocin regulates many of the same behaviors in males and females, but that the effects are typically more profound in females. Therapeutic use of oxytocin should include sex as a factor in determining dose regimens. PMID:25647756

  9. Evidence for the presence of a sucrose carrier in immature sugar-beet roots

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine, R.; Daie, J.; Wyse, R.

    1987-04-01

    Unlike in mature sugar-beet roots, sucrose is assumed to be hydrolyzed by a wall-bound invertase prior to uptake by immature roots. To test this hypothesis, they used a sucrose analog, 1'fluorosucrose which is recognized by the carrier but is a poor substrate for invertases. Asymmetrically labeled sucrose (/sup 3/H-fructose) 1'fluorosucrose (/sup 14/C-glucose) were applied at 10 mM (/sup 3/H//sup 14/C=1) to an attached source leaf. After 6 h, sugars from plant parts in the translocation path were separated on HPLC. /sup 14/C-1'fluorosucrose was translocated and accumulated in the root at a higher rate than /sup 3/H-sucrose due to greater metabolism of /sup 3/H-sucrose in the shoot (indicated by the presence of /sup 3/H in hexose fractions and loss of asymmetry). In the root 25% of the /sup 3/H-sucrose was hydrolyzed to hexoses whereas no /sup 14/C was detected in hexose fractions. The data indicate that despite high cell-wall invertase and cytoplasmic sucrose synthase activities, young sugar-beet roots import and store sucrose without hydrolysis. Therefore, the function of a group translocator at the tonoplast is unclear.

  10. Determination of structural requirements and probable regulatory effectors for membrane association of maize sucrose synthase 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthase (SUS) cleaves sucrose to form UDP-glucose and fructose, and exists in soluble (s-SUS) and membrane-associated (m-SUS) forms, with the latter proposed to channel UDP-glucose to the cellulose synthase complex on the plasma membrane of plant cells during synthesis of cellulose. However...

  11. Recurrrent Selection for Sucrose Content has Altered Growth and Sugar Accumulation in Sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recurrent selection for sucrose content in sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) should result in a concentration of traits and genes that contribute to high sucrose. To determine if growth-related traits were altered by seven cycles of recurrent selection, five cultivars from the first cycle (released...

  12. Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

    The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

  13. Study of amyloids using yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wickner, Reed B.; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Shewmaker, Frank; McGlinchey, Ryan; Edskes, Herman K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism in such fields as the cell cycle, regulation of transcription, protein trafficking and cell biology, primarily because of its ease of genetic manipulation. This is no less so in the area of amyloid studies. The endogenous yeast amyloids described to date include prions, infectious proteins (Table 1), and some cell wall proteins (1). and amyloids of humans and a fungal prion have also been studied using the yeast system. Accordingly, the emphasis of this chapter will be on genetic, biochemical, cell biological and physical methods particularly useful in the study of yeast prions and other amyloids studied in yeast. We limit our description of these methods to those aspects which have been most useful in studying yeast prions, citing more detailed expositions in the literature. Volumes on yeast genetics methods (2–4), and on amyloids and prions (5, 6) are useful, and Masison has edited a volume of Methods on “Identification, analysis and characterization of fungal prions” which covers some of this territory (7). We also outline some useful physical methods, pointing the reader to more extensive and authoratative descriptions. PMID:22528100

  14. Bioactivity studies of extracts from Tridax procumbens.

    PubMed

    Taddei, A; Rosas-Romero, A J

    2000-06-01

    An updated review on the biological activity of Tridax procumbens is presented. A detailed biological screening comprised of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi using crude extracts of this plant was undertaken. The n-hexane extract of the flowers showed activity against Escherichia coli. The same extract of the whole aerial parts was active against Mycobacterium smegmatis, Escherichia coli, Salmonella group C and Salmonella paratyphi. The ethyl-acetate extract of the flowers was active against Bacillus cereus and Klebsiella sp. The aerial parts extract also showed activity only against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Staphylococcus aureus, while the aqueous extract showed no antimicrobial activity. None of the tested extracts was active against the yeasts, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Rhodotorula rubra; or the fungi: Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Mucor sp. and Trichophyton rubrum. PMID:11185735

  15. Pronounced Phenotypic Changes in Transgenic Tobacco Plants Overexpressing Sucrose Synthase May Reveal a Novel Sugar Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh Anh; Luan, Sheng; Wi, Seung G.; Bae, Hanhong; Lee, Dae-Seok; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Soluble sugars not only serve as nutrients, but also act as signals for plant growth and development, but how sugar signals are perceived and translated into physiological responses in plants remains unclear. We manipulated sugar levels in transgenic plants by overexpressing sucrose synthase (SuSy), which is a key enzyme believed to have reversible sucrose synthesis and sucrose degradation functions. The ectopically expressed SuSy protein exhibited sucrose-degrading activity, which may change the flux of sucrose demand from photosynthetic to non-photosynthetic cells, and trigger an unknown sucrose signaling pathway that lead to increased sucrose content in the transgenic plants. An experiment on the transition from heterotrophic to autotrophic growth demonstrated the existence of a novel sucrose signaling pathway, which stimulated photosynthesis, and enhanced photosynthetic synthesis of sucrose, which was the direct cause or the sucrose increase. In addition, a light/dark time treatment experiment, using different day length ranges for photosynthesis/respiration showed the carbohydrate pattern within a 24-h day and consolidated the role of sucrose signaling pathway as a way to maintain sucrose demand, and indicated the relationships between increased sucrose and upregulation of genes controlling development of the shoot apical meristem (SAM). As a result, transgenic plants featured a higher biomass and a shorter time required to switch to reproduction compared to those of control plants, indicating altered phylotaxis and more rapid advancement of developmental stages in the transgenic plants. PMID:26793204

  16. Pronounced Phenotypic Changes in Transgenic Tobacco Plants Overexpressing Sucrose Synthase May Reveal a Novel Sugar Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quynh Anh; Luan, Sheng; Wi, Seung G; Bae, Hanhong; Lee, Dae-Seok; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Soluble sugars not only serve as nutrients, but also act as signals for plant growth and development, but how sugar signals are perceived and translated into physiological responses in plants remains unclear. We manipulated sugar levels in transgenic plants by overexpressing sucrose synthase (SuSy), which is a key enzyme believed to have reversible sucrose synthesis and sucrose degradation functions. The ectopically expressed SuSy protein exhibited sucrose-degrading activity, which may change the flux of sucrose demand from photosynthetic to non-photosynthetic cells, and trigger an unknown sucrose signaling pathway that lead to increased sucrose content in the transgenic plants. An experiment on the transition from heterotrophic to autotrophic growth demonstrated the existence of a novel sucrose signaling pathway, which stimulated photosynthesis, and enhanced photosynthetic synthesis of sucrose, which was the direct cause or the sucrose increase. In addition, a light/dark time treatment experiment, using different day length ranges for photosynthesis/respiration showed the carbohydrate pattern within a 24-h day and consolidated the role of sucrose signaling pathway as a way to maintain sucrose demand, and indicated the relationships between increased sucrose and upregulation of genes controlling development of the shoot apical meristem (SAM). As a result, transgenic plants featured a higher biomass and a shorter time required to switch to reproduction compared to those of control plants, indicating altered phylotaxis and more rapid advancement of developmental stages in the transgenic plants. PMID:26793204

  17. Impact of melting conditions of sucrose on its glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Vanhal, I; Blond, G

    1999-10-01

    The impact of the melting conditions of sucrose crystals on the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the sucrose melt was studied. Final temperature, heating rate, and the residence time at the final temperature were the experimental conditions considered. The glass transition temperature of the different glasses was measured by differential scanning calorimetry, and the degradation of sucrose during the thermal treatments was studied by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that the T(g) is sensitive to the degradation of sucrose: T(g) decreases with the appearance of small molecules and then increases with the appearance of polymerization products. Thus, the choice of thermal treatment is of the utmost importance for the determination of the T(g) of pure sucrose. PMID:10552803

  18. Influence of sugars and hormones on the genes involved in sucrose metabolism in maize endosperms.

    PubMed

    Ren, X D; Liu, H M; Liu, Y H; Hu, Y F; Zhang, J J; Huang, Y B

    2015-01-01

    Starch is the major storage product in the endosperm of cereals. Its synthesis is closely related to sucrose metabolism. In our previous study, we found that the expression of most of the genes involved in starch synthesis might be regulated by sugars and hormones in the maize endosperm. However, little is known regarding the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in sucrose metabolism. Thus, in this study, maize endosperms were treated with different sugars and hormones and the expression of genes involved in sucrose metabolism (including synthesis, degradation, and transport) were evaluated using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We found that genes affected by different sugars and hormones were primarily regulated by abscisic acid. Sucrose and abscisic acid showed an additive effect on the expression of some genes. Differences in the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in sucrose metabolism and starch biosynthesis were observed. PMID:25867309

  19. ( sup 14 C)-Sucrose uptake by guard cell protoplasts of pisum sativum, argenteum mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrig, K.; Raschke, K. )

    1991-05-01

    Guard cells rely on import for their supply with reduced carbon. The authors tested by silicone oil centrifugation the ability of guard cell protoplasts to accumulated ({sup 14}C)-sucrose. Uptake rates were corrected after measurement of {sup 14}C-sorbitol and {sup 3}H{sub 2}O spaces. Sucrose uptake followed biphasic kinetics, with a high-affinity component below 1 mM external sucrose (apparent K{sub m} 0.8 mM at 25C) and a low-affinity nonsaturable component above. Uptake depended on pH (optimum at pH 5.0). Variations in the concentrations of external KCl, CCCP, and valinomycin indicated that about one-half of the sucrose uptake rate could be related to an electrochemical gradient across the plasmalemma. Total uptake rates measured at 5 mM external sucrose seem to be sufficient to replenish emptied plastids with starch within a few hours.

  20. Sucrose Hydrolysis in Relation to Phloem Translocation in Beta vulgaris1

    PubMed Central

    Giaquinta, Robert

    1977-01-01

    Asymmetrically labeled sucrose, 14C(fructosyl)sucrose, was used to determine whether sucrose undergoes extracellular hydrolysis during phloem translocation in the sugar beet, Beta vulgaris. In addition, the metabolism of various sugars accumulated and translocated was determined in various regious of the plant. These processes were studied in detached regions as well as in the intact, translocating plant in the source leaf, along the translocation path, and in a rapidly growing sink leaf and storage beet. The data show that, unlike sucrose accumulation into the sink tissue of sugarcane, sucrose is neither hydrolzyed prior to phloem loading or during transit, nor is it extracellularly hydrolyzed during accumulation into sink leaves or the storage beet. PMID:16660089

  1. Yeast mitochondrial transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mathilde; Darzacq, Xavier; Devaux, Frederic; Singer, Robert H; Jacq, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Although 30 years ago it was strongly suggested that some cytoplasmic ribosomes are bound to the surface of yeast mitochondria, the mechanisms and the raison d'être of this process are not understood. For instance, it is not perfectly known which of the several hundred nuclearly encoded genes have to be translated to the mitochondrial vicinity to guide the import of the corresponding proteins. One can take advantage of several modern methods to address a number of aspects of the site-specific translation process of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) coding for proteins imported into mitochondria. Three complementary approaches are presented to analyze the spatial distribution of mRNAs coding for proteins imported into mitochondria. Starting from biochemical purifications of mitochondria-bound polysomes, we describe a genomewide approach to classify all the cellular mRNAs according to their physical proximity with mitochondria; we also present real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction monitoring of mRNA distribution to provide a quantified description of this localization. Finally, a fluorescence microscopy approach on a single living cell is described to visualize the in vivo localization of mRNAs involved in mitochondria biogenesis. PMID:18314748

  2. Synthetic Yeast Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Wenying; Burton, Justin

    2010-03-01

    Cooperation is wide-spread and has been postulated to drive major transitions in evolution. However, Darwinian selection favors ``cheaters'' that consume benefits without paying a fair cost. How did cooperation evolve against the threat of cheaters? To investigate the evolutionary trajectories of cooperation, we created a genetically tractable system that can be observed as it evolves from inception. The system consists of two engineered yeast strains -- a red-fluorescent strain that requires adenine and releases lysine and a yellow-fluorescent strain that requires lysine and releases adenine. Cells that consume but not supply metabolites would be cheaters. From the properties of two cooperating strains, we calculated and experimentally verified the minimal initial cell densities required for the viability of the cooperative system in the absence of exogenously added adenine and lysine. Strikingly, evolved cooperative systems were viable at 100-fold lower initial cell densities than their ancestors. We are investigating the nature and diversity of pro-cooperation changes, the dynamics of cooperator-cheater cocultures, and the effects of spatial environment on cooperation and cheating.

  3. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  4. Sucrose transporters in two members of the Scrophulariaceae with different types of transport sugar.

    PubMed

    Knop, C; Voitsekhovskaja, O; Lohaus, G

    2001-05-01

    In order to study differences between sugar transport in oligosaccharide-translocating and sucrose-translocating species, two members of the Scrophulariaceae, Asarina barclaiana Pennell and Alonsoa meridionalis O. Kuntze, were analysed regarding minor-vein anatomy, sugar concentrations in leaves and phloem sap, and expression of sucrose transporters. The minor veins of Asarina barclaiana possess mainly transfer cells and modified intermediary cells and those of Alonsoa meridionalis have intermediary cells and ordinary companion cells. Phloem sap from these plants was collected by the laser-aphid-stylet technique. The main carbon transport forms in Asarina were sucrose and in Alonsoa raffinose and stachyose. The sum of the carbohydrate concentrations in the phloem sap of both species was as high as that in apoplastic phloem loaders. In Asarina the ratio of the sucrose concentration in the phloem to that in the cytosol of source cells was about 35 and the corresponding ratio in Alonsoa was about two. Sucrose transporter cDNAs were isolated from leaves of both species. By means of semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, sucrose transporter mRNA was detected in different organs and also in the phloem sap. This is the first time that sucrose transporters have been found in oligosaccharide-translocating species and that the mRNA of these sucrose transporters has been localized directly in the phloem sap. Taken together, our observations indicate that Asarina is an apoplastic phloem loader, while the results for Alonsoa are ambiguous: some properties are typical of the symplastic phloem-loading mechanism, but probably a sucrose transporter is involved in loading and/or retrieval of sucrose into the phloem. PMID:11523659

  5. Role of orexin/hypocretin in conditioned sucrose-seeking in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cason, Angie M.; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Rationale The orexin/hypocretin system has recently been implicated in reward-seeking, especially for highly salient food and drug rewards. We reasoned that this system may be strongly engaged during periods of reward restriction, including food restriction. Objectives This study examined the involvement of the orexin (Orx) system in responding for sucrose, and in cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished sucrose-seeking, in ad libitum fed vs. food-restricted male subjects. Methods Sprague Dawley rats (n=108) were trained to self-administer sucrose, and we determined the effects of pretreatment with the OxR1 receptor antagonist SB 334867 (SB; 10–30 mg/kg) on fixed ratio (FR) or progressive ratio (PR) sucrose self-administration, as well as on cue-induced reinstatement of sucrose-seeking. Finally, expression of the immediate early gene c-fos in Orx neurons was examined after self-administration, late extinction or cue-induced reinstatement of sucrose seeking. Results SB decreased lever responding (by about 1/3) and the number of reinforcers earned during FR, and less so during PR, schedules and decreased cue-induced reinstatement to sucrose-seeking to extinction levels, predominately in food-restricted rats. Additionally, Fos expression in Orx neurons in perifornical and dorsomedial hypothalamus was increased during extinction. Conclusions These results indicate that signaling at the OxR1 receptor is involved in pronounced sucrose reinforcement, and reinstatement of sucrose-seeking elicited by sucrose-paired cues, in food-restricted subjects. These findings lead us to conclude that conditioned activation of Orx neurons increases motivation for food reward during food restriction. PMID:23096770

  6. Interaction of Metabolic Stress with Chronic Mild Stress in Altering Brain Cytokines and Sucrose Preference

    PubMed Central

    Remus, Jennifer L.; Stewart, Luke T.; Camp, Robert M.; Novak, Colleen M.; Johnson, John D.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that metabolic stressors increase an organism’s risk of depression. Chronic mild stress is a popular animal model of depression and several serendipitous findings have suggested that food deprivation prior to sucrose testing in this model is necessary to observe anhedonic behaviors. Here, we directly tested this hypothesis by exposing animals to chronic mild stress and used an overnight two bottle sucrose test (food ad libitum) on day 5 and 10, then food and water deprive animals overnight and tested their sucrose consumption and preference in a 1h sucrose test the following morning. Approximately 65% of stressed animals consumed sucrose and showed a sucrose preference similar to non-stressed controls in an overnight sucrose test, while 35% showed a decrease in sucrose intake and preference. Following overnight food and water deprivation the previously ‘resilient’ animals showed a significant decrease in sucrose preference and greatly reduced sucrose intake. In addition, we evaluated whether the onset of anhedonia following food and water deprivation corresponds to alterations in corticosterone, epinephrine, circulating glucose, or interleukin-1 beta expression in limbic brain areas. While all stressed animals showed adrenal hypertrophy and elevated circulating epinephrine, only stressed animals that were food deprived were hypoglycemic compared to food deprived controls. Additionally, food and water deprivation significantly increased hippocampus IL-1β while food and water deprivation only increased hypothalamus IL-1β in stress susceptible animals. These data demonstrate that metabolic stress of food and water deprivation interacts with chronic stressor exposure to induce physiological and anhedonic responses. PMID:25914924

  7. Sucrose importation into laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis, in relation to ethylene stimulation of latex production

    PubMed Central

    Dusotoit-Coucaud, Anaïs; Brunel, Nicole; Kongsawadworakul, Panida; Viboonjun, Unchera; Lacointe, André; Julien, Jean-Louis; Chrestin, Hervé; Sakr, Soulaïman

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The major economic product of Hevea brasiliensis is a rubber-containing cytoplasm (latex), which flows out of laticifers (latex cells) when the bark is tapped. The latex yield is stimulated by ethylene. Sucrose, the unique precursor of rubber synthesis, must cross the plasma membrane through specific sucrose transporters before being metabolized in the laticifers. The relative importance of sucrose transporters in determining latex yield is unknown. Here, the effects of ethylene (by application of Ethrel®) on sucrose transporter gene expression in the inner bark tissues and latex cells of H. brasiliensis are described. Methods Experiments, including cloning sucrose transporters, real time RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, were carried out on virgin (untapped) trees, treated or untreated with the latex yield stimulant Ethrel. Key Results Seven putative full-length cDNAs of sucrose transporters were cloned from a latex-specific cDNA library. These transporters belong to all SUT (sucrose transporter) groups and differ by their basal gene expression in latex and inner soft bark, with a predominance of HbSUT1A and HbSUT1B. Of these sucrose transporters, only HbSUT1A and HbSUT2A were distinctly increased by ethylene. Moreover, this increase was shown to be specific to laticifers and to ethylene application. Conclusion The data and all previous information on sucrose transport show that HbSUT1A and HbSUT2A are related to the increase in sucrose import into laticifers, required for the stimulation of latex yield by ethylene in virgin trees. PMID:19567416

  8. Resinless section electron microscopy reveals the yeast cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Penman, J; Penman, S

    1997-04-15

    The cytoskeleton of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is essentially invisible using conventional microscopy techniques. A similar problem was solved for the mammalian cell cytoskeleton using resinless section electron microscopy, a technique applied here to yeast. In the resinless image, soluble proteins are no longer cloaked by embedding medium and must be removed by selective detergent extraction. In yeast, this requires breaching the cell wall by digesting with Zymolyase sufficiently to allow detergent extraction of the plasma membrane lipids. Gel electropherograms show that the extracted or "soluble" proteins are distinct from the retained or "structural" proteins that presumably comprise the cytoskeleton. These putative cytoskeleton proteins include the major portions of a 43-kDa protein, which is presumably actin, and of proteins in a band appearing at 55 kDa, as well as numerous less abundant, nonactin proteins. Resinless section electron micrographs show a dense, three-dimensional web of anastomosing, polymorphic filaments bounded by the remnant cell wall. Although the filament network is very heterogenous, there appear to be two principal classes of filament diameters-5 nm and 15-20 nm-which may correspond to actin and intermediate filaments, respectively. A large oval region of lower filament density probably corresponds to the vacuole, and an electron dense spheroidal body, 300-500 nm in diameter, is likely the nucleus. The techniques detailed in this report afford new approaches to the study of yeast cytoarchitecture. PMID:9108046

  9. Identification of actively filling sucrose sinks. [Solanum tuberosum; Phaseolus lunatus; Manihot esculenta; Liquidambar styraciflua L. ; Carya illinoinensis

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Shijean S.; Xu, Dianpeng; Black C.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Certain actively filling plant sucrose sinks such as a seed, a tuber, or a root can be identified by measuring the uridine diphosphate and pyrophosphate-dependent metabolism of sucrose. Sucrolysis in both active and quiescent sucrose sinks was tested and sucrose synthase was found to be the predominant sucrose breakdown activity. Sucrolysis via invertases was low and secondary in both types of sinks. Sucrose synthase activity dropped markedly, greater than fivefold, in quiescent sinks. The test are consistent with the hypothesis that the sucrose filling activity, i.e. the sink strength, of these plant sinks can be measured by testing the uridine diphosphate and pyrophosphate-dependent breakdown of sucrose. Measuring the initial reactions of sucrolysis shows much promise for use in agriculture crop and tree improvement research as a biochemical test for sink strength.

  10. Aphanomyces effects on carbohydrate impurities and sucrose extractability in postharvest sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet roots with rot caused by Aphanomyces cochlioides often are incorporated into storage piles even though effects of disease on processing properties are unknown. Roots with Aphanomyces root rot were harvested from six fields over 2 years. For each field, roots with similar disease symptom...

  11. Aspen SUCROSE TRANSPORTER3 Allocates Carbon into Wood Fibers1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Mahboubi, Amir; Ratke, Christine; Gorzsás, András; Kumar, Manoj; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.; Niittylä, Totte

    2013-01-01

    Wood formation in trees requires carbon import from the photosynthetic tissues. In several tree species, including Populus species, the majority of this carbon is derived from sucrose (Suc) transported in the phloem. The mechanism of radial Suc transport from phloem to developing wood is not well understood. We investigated the role of active Suc transport during secondary cell wall formation in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides). We show that RNA interference-mediated reduction of PttSUT3 (for Suc/H+ symporter) during secondary cell wall formation in developing wood caused thinner wood fiber walls accompanied by a reduction in cellulose and an increase in lignin. Suc content in the phloem and developing wood was not significantly changed. However, after 13CO2 assimilation, the SUT3RNAi lines contained more 13C than the wild type in the Suc-containing extract of developing wood. Hence, Suc was transported into developing wood, but the Suc-derived carbon was not efficiently incorporated to wood fiber walls. A yellow fluorescent protein:PttSUT3 fusion localized to plasma membrane, suggesting that reduced Suc import into developing wood fibers was the cause of the observed cell wall phenotype. The results show the importance of active Suc transport for wood formation in a symplasmically phloem-loading tree species and identify PttSUT3 as a principal transporter for carbon delivery into secondary cell wall-forming wood fibers. PMID:24170204

  12. High biobased content epoxy-anhydride thermosets from epoxidized sucrose esters of Fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiao; Sengupta, Partha; Webster, Dean C

    2011-06-13

    Novel highly functional biobased epoxy compounds, epoxidized sucrose esters of fatty acids (ESEFAs), were cross-linked with a liquid cycloaliphatic anhydride to prepare polyester thermosets. The degree of cure or conversion was studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and the sol content of the thermosets was determined using solvent extraction. The mechanical properties were studied using tensile testing to determine Young's modulus, tensile stress, and elongation at break. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was used to determine glass-transition temperature, storage modulus, and cross-link density. The nanomechanical properties of the surfaces were studied using nanoindentation to determine reduced modulus and indentation hardness. The properties of coatings on steel substrates were studied to determine coating hardness, adhesion, solvent resistance, and mechanical durability. Compared with the control, epoxidized soybean oil, the anhydride-cured ESEFAs have high modulus and are hard and ductile, high-performance thermoset materials while maintaining a high biobased content (71-77% in theory). The exceptional performance of the ESEFAs is attributed to the unique structure of these macromolecules: well-defined compact structures with high epoxide functionality. These biobased thermosets have potential uses in applications such as composites, adhesives, and coatings. PMID:21561167

  13. Immunosuppressive decalin derivatives from red yeast rice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Lu, Jing-Guang; Li, Ting; Zhu, Guo-Yuan; Han, Quan-Bin; Hsiao, Wen-Luan; Liu, Liang; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2012-04-27

    Five new decalin derivatives (1-5), together with two known compounds (6 and 7), were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of red yeast rice. Their structures were elucidated by means of NMR and mass spectroscopic analyses. Monascusic lactone A (1) is the first reported naturally occurring decalin derivative possessing a spiro lactone at the C-1 position. The immunosuppressive effects of all these isolates (1-7) on human T cell proliferation were investigated, and all, especially monascusic acids B (2), C (3), D (4), and A (6) and heptaketide (7), suppressed human T cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner from 10 to 100 μM. This is the first report on the immunosuppressive activity of decalin derivatives. PMID:22394155

  14. COMPARISON OF SCUROSE CATABOLISM IN ROOTS OF THREE BETA VULGAR L GENOTYPES WITH DIFFERENT YIELD AND SUCROSE ACCUMULATING CAPACITIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose catabolism is a major determinant of sink strength in nearly all plants and affects sucrose partitioning to growing sinks as well as sink size and carbohydrate content. Three major enzyme families are responsible for sucrose catabolism in sugarbeet roots: acid invertase, alkaline invertase ...

  15. CLONING OF ATSUT6/ATSUC6, A MEMBER OF A NEW SUB-CLASS OF SUCROSE TRANSPORTER FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon fixed in source tissues of higher plants by photosynthesis is generally partitioned to heterotrophic sink organs through the vascular tissue in the form of sucrose. Plasma membrane sucrose transporters play key roles in phloem-loading and post phloem uptake of sucrose. A new member of the Ara...

  16. Physical, functional and structural characterization of the cell wall fractions from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Borchani, Chema; Fonteyn, Fabienne; Jamin, Guilhem; Paquot, Michel; Thonart, Philippe; Blecker, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The yeast cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important source of β-d-glucan, a glucose homopolymer with many functional, nutritional and human health benefits. In the present study, the yeast cell wall fractionation process involving enzymatic treatments (savinase and lipolase enzymes) affected most of the physical and functional characteristics of extracted fractions. Thus, the fractionation process showed that β-d-glucan fraction F4 had significantly higher swelling power and fat binding capacity compared to other fractions (F1, F2 and F3). It also exhibited a viscosity of 652.12mPas and a high degree of brightness of extracted β-d-glucan fraction. Moreover, the fractionation process seemed to have an effect on structural and thermal properties of extracted fractions. Overall, results showed that yeast β-d-glucan had good potential for use as a prebiotic ingredient in food, as well as medicinal and pharmaceutical products. PMID:26471666

  17. Yeast protein synthesis. Preparation and analysis of a highly active cell-free system

    PubMed Central

    Sissons, Christopher H.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the techniques for preparing, handling and assaying a cell-free protein-synthesizing system from yeast, analogous to crude (S-30) Escherichia coli extracts. Its basic characteristics are described. The rate of poly(U)-directed polyphenylalanine synthesis was at least fivefold higher than in previously reported yeast cell-free systems, approaching that of crude mammalian cell-free systems. Fractionation of the S-30 extracts lowered activity. Organelles and their fragments present in the S-30 extract neither contributed to nor inhibited cytoplasmic protein synthesis. There was a component localized in the high-speed supernatant that caused an inhibition of polyphenylalanine synthesis. Poly(U) programmed the synthesis of long-chain polyphenylalanine, in contrast with the only other yeast system in which this has been examined (Bretthauer & Golichowski, 1968). Preincubation techniques inactivated the system and probably a small proportion only of the ribosomes was active. PMID:4618478

  18. Yeast Genetics and Biotechnological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Saroj; Baranwal, Richa

    Yeast can be recognized as one of the very important groups of microorganisms on account of its extensive use in the fermentation industry and as a basic eukaryotic model cellular system. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively used to elucidate the genetics and regulation of several key functions in the cell such as cell mating, electron transport chain, protein trafficking, cell cycle events and others. Even before the genome sequence of the yeast was out, the structural organization and function of several of its genes was known. With the availability of the origin of replication from the 2 μm plasmid and the development of transformation system, it became the host of choice for expression of a number of important proteins. A large number of episomal and integrative shuttle vectors are available for expression of mammalian proteins. The latest developments in genomics and micro-array technology have allowed investigations of individual gene function by site-specific deletion method. The application of metabolic profiling has also assisted in understanding the cellular network operating in this yeast. This chapter is aimed at reviewing the use of this system as an experimental tool for conducting classical genetics. Various vector systems available, foreign genes expressed and the limitations as a host will be discussed. Finally, the use of various yeast enzymes in biotechnology sector will be reviewed.

  19. Progress in Yeast Glycosylation Engineering.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Stephen R; Zha, Dongxing

    2015-01-01

    While yeast are lower eukaryotic organisms, they share many common features and biological processes with higher eukaryotes. As such, yeasts have been used as model organisms to facilitate our understanding of such features and processes. To this end, a large number of powerful genetic tools have been developed to investigate and manipulate these organisms. Going hand-in-hand with these genetic tools is the ability to efficiently scale up the fermentation of these organisms, thus making them attractive hosts for the production of recombinant proteins. A key feature of producing recombinant proteins in yeast is that these proteins can be readily secreted into the culture supernatant, simplifying any downstream processing. A consequence of this secretion is that the proteins typically pass through the secretory pathway, during which they may be exposed to various posttranslational modifications. The addition of glycans is one such modification. Unfortunately, while certain aspects of glycosylation are shared between lower and higher eukaryotes, significant differences exist. Over the last two decades much research has focused on engineering the glycosylation pathways of yeast to more closely resemble those of higher eukaryotes, particularly those of humans for the production of therapeutic proteins. In the current review we shall highlight some of the key achievements in yeast glyco-engineering which have led to humanization of both the N- and O-linked glycosylation pathways. PMID:26082216

  20. Sugaring the pill. Ethics and uncertainties in the use of sucrose for newborn infants

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Dominic JC; Savulescu, Julian; Slater, Rebeccah

    2012-01-01

    Sucrose is widely used for the management of procedural pain in newborn infants, including capillary blood sampling, venepuncture and vascular cannulation. Multiple randomised controlled trials have demonstrated that sweet-tasting solutions reduce behavioural responses to acute painful stimuli. It has been claimed that sucrose should be a standard of care in neonatal units, and that further placebo-controlled trials of sucrose are unnecessary and unethical. However, recently published neuroscientific studies cast doubt on the analgesic properties of sucrose. We review this new evidence and analyse the philosophical and ethical questions that it raises, including the “problem of other minds”. Sugar may be better understood not as an analgesic, removing or relieving pain, but as a compensating pleasure. There is a need for further research on the mechanism of sucrose’s effect on pain behaviour and on the long-term effects of sucrose treatment. Such trials will require comparison with placebo or with other interventions. Given uncertainty about the benefit of sucrose it may be wise to use alternative analgesics or non-pharmacological interventions where these are available and appropriate. Sucrose may not be the answer to procedural pain in newborns. PMID:22751876