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Sample records for yeast identification system

  1. Evaluation of Automated Yeast Identification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred and nine teleomorphic and anamorphic yeast isolates representing approximately 30 taxa were used to evaluate the accuracy of the Biolog yeast identification system. Isolates derived from nomenclatural types, environmental, and clinica isolates of known identity were tested in the Biolog system. Of the isolates tested, 81 were in the Biolog database. The system correctly identified 40, incorrectly identified 29, and was unable to identify 12. Of the 28 isolates not in the database, 18 were given names, whereas 10 were not. The Biolog yeast identification system is inadequate for the identification of yeasts originating from the environment during space program activities.

  2. Yeast-Plant Coupled Vector System for Identification of Nuclear Proteins1[OA

    E-print Network

    Citovsky, Vitaly

    Yeast-Plant Coupled Vector System for Identification of Nuclear Proteins1[OA] Adi Zaltsman, Bu and visualization of their nuclear accumulation in vivo. To this end, we developed a system of vectors that allows characterization would be facilitated by a convenient experimental system that allows identification of nuclear

  3. Evaluation of the Biolog MicroStation system for yeast identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, M. R.; Molina, T. C.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred and fifty-nine isolates representing 16 genera and 53 species of yeasts were processed with the Biolog MicroStation System for yeast identification. Thirteen genera and 38 species were included in the Biolog database. For these 129 isolates, correct identifications to the species level were 13.2, 39.5 and 48.8% after 24, 48 and 72 hours incubation at 30 degrees C, respectively. Three genera and 15 species which were not included in the Biolog database were also tested. Of the 30 isolates studied, 16.7, 53.3 and 56.7% of the isolates were given incorrect names from the system's database after 24,48 and 72 h incubation at 30 degrees C, respectively. The remaining isolates of this group were not identified.

  4. Yeast killer systems.

    PubMed Central

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Gerloni, M; Bertolotti, D; Polonelli, L

    1997-01-01

    The killer phenomenon in yeasts has been revealed to be a multicentric model for molecular biologists, virologists, phytopathologists, epidemiologists, industrial and medical microbiologists, mycologists, and pharmacologists. The surprisingly widespread occurrence of the killer phenomenon among taxonomically unrelated microorganisms, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, has engendered a new interest in its biological significance as well as its theoretical and practical applications. The search for therapeutic opportunities by using yeast killer systems has conceptually opened new avenues for the prevention and control of life-threatening fungal diseases through the idiotypic network that is apparently exploited by the immune system in the course of natural infections. In this review, the biology, ecology, epidemiology, therapeutics, serology, and idiotypy of yeast killer systems are discussed. PMID:9227858

  5. Yeast Functional Genomic Screens Lead to Identification of a Role for a Bacterial

    E-print Network

    Starnbach, Michael

    Yeast Functional Genomic Screens Lead to Identification of a Role for a Bacterial Effector developed a systems biological approach using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that can expedite the viable yeast haploid deletion strain collection for mutants hypersensitive to expression of the Shigella

  6. Systematic identification of cell size regulators in budding yeast

    E-print Network

    Barkai, Naama

    Article Systematic identification of cell size regulators in budding yeast Ilya Soifer & Naama yeast, we imaged and analyzed the cell cycle of millions of individual cells representing 591 mutants control mechanisms in budding yeast. Keywords cell growth; size control; START; yeast genetics Subject

  7. Yeast metabolic state identification using micro-fiber optics spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. S.; Castro, C. C.; Vicente, A. A.; Tafulo, P.; Jorge, P. A. S.; Martins, R. C.

    2011-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae morphology is known to be dependent on the cell physiological state and environmental conditions. On their environment, wild yeasts tend to form complex colonies architectures, such as stress response and pseudohyphal filaments morphologies, far away from the ones found inside bioreactors, where the regular cell cycle is observed under controlled conditions (e.g. budding and flocculating colonies). In this work we explore the feasibility of using micro-fiber optics spectroscopy to classify Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288C colony structures in YPD media, under different growth conditions, such as: i) no alcohol; ii) 1 % (v/v) Ethanol; iii) 1 % (v/v) 1-butanol; iv) 1 % (v/v) Isopropanol; v) 1 % (v/v) Tert-Amyl alcohol (2 Methyl-2-butanol); vi) 0,2 % (v/v) 2-Furaldehyde; vii) 5 % (w/v) 5 (Hydroxymethyl)-furfural; and viii) 1 % (w/v) (-)-Adenosine3', 5'cyclic monophosphate. The microscopy system includes a hyperspectral camera apparatus and a micro fiber (sustained by micro manipulator) optics system for spectroscopy. Results show that micro fiber optics system spectroscopy has the potential for yeasts metabolic state identification once the spectral signatures of colonies differs from each others. This technique associated with others physico-chemical information can benefit the creation of an information system capable of providing extremely detailed information about yeast metabolic state that will aid both scientists and engineers to study and develop new biotechnological products.

  8. Yeast Sequencing Report Identification of a Candida glabrata homologue of

    E-print Network

    Dean, Neta

    Yeast Sequencing Report Identification of a Candida glabrata homologue of the S. cerevisiae VRG4 from the pathogenic yeast, Candida glabrata, by functional complementation of an S. cerevisiae vrg4 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Keywords: glycosylation; Candida glabrata; nucleotide sugar transporter; GDP

  9. Molecular identification of yeasts associated with traditional Egyptian dairy products.

    PubMed

    El-Sharoud, W M; Belloch, C; Peris, D; Querol, A

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the diversity and ecology of yeasts associated with traditional Egyptian dairy products employing molecular techniques in yeast identification. A total of 120 samples of fresh and stored Domiati cheese, kariesh cheese, and "Matared" cream were collected from local markets and examined. Forty yeast isolates were cultured from these samples and identified using the restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLPs) of 5.8S-ITS rDNA region and sequencing of the domains D1 and D2 of the 26S rRNA gene. Yeasts were identified as Issatchenkia orientalis (13 isolates), Candida albicans (4 isolates), Clavispora lusitaniae (Candida lusitaniae) (9 isolates), Kodamaea ohmeri (Pichia ohmeri) (1 isolate), Kluyveromyces marxianus (6 isolates), and Candida catenulata (7 isolates). With the exception of C. lusitaniae, the D1/D2 26S rRNA gene sequences were 100% identical for the yeast isolates within the same species. Phylogenetic reconstruction of C. lusitaniae isolates grouped them into 3 distinguished clusters. Kariesh cheese was found to be the most diverse in its yeast floras and contained the highest total yeast count compared with other examined dairy products. This was linked to the acidic pH and lower salt content of this cheese, which favor the growth and survival of yeasts in foodstuffs. Stored Domiati cheese also contained diverse yeast species involving isolates of the pathogenic yeast C. albicans. This raises the possibility of dairy products being vehicles of transmission of pathogenic yeasts. PMID:19895478

  10. Research paper Rapid identification of CD4+ T-cell epitopes using yeast displaying

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Huimin

    Research paper Rapid identification of CD4+ T-cell epitopes using yeast displaying pathogen identification using yeast displaying pathogen-derived peptide library. A library of DNA fragments that encode in a yeast display vector. The resultant library of recombinant yeast cells are analyzed by FACS to identify

  11. Microfermentation Test For Identification Of Yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Molina, Thomas C.

    1995-01-01

    Microfermentation test developed as supplementary method for use in identifying yeasts, especially in clinical and environmental studies. In comparison with traditional fermentation tests, simpler and easier, and requiries less equipment, material, and laboratory space. Results obtained in days instead of weeks.

  12. YEASTS OF THE WORLD - MORPHOLOGY, PHYSIOLOGY, SEQUENCES AND IDENTIFICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication is a CD-ROM prepared by an international team of 12 scientists for the purpose of rapid identification of yeasts. Strains may be characterized from conventional growth tests or from sequences of selected genes. Test results are entered into the computer program where they are comp...

  13. Identification of a Novel System for Boron Transport: Atr1 Is a Main Boron Exporter in Yeast? †

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Alaattin; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Boron is a micronutrient in plants and animals, but its specific roles in cellular processes are not known. To understand boron transport and functions, we screened a yeast genomic DNA library for genes that confer resistance to the element in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thirty boron-resistant transformants were isolated, and they all contained the ATR1 (YML116w) gene. Atr1 is a multidrug resistance transport protein belonging to the major facilitator superfamily. C-terminal green fluorescent protein-tagged Atr1 localized to the cell membrane and vacuole, and ATR1 gene expression was upregulated by boron and several stress conditions. We found that atr1? mutants were highly sensitive to boron treatment, whereas cells overexpressing ATR1 were boron resistant. In addition, atr1? cells accumulated boron, whereas ATR1-overexpressing cells had low intracellular levels of the element. Furthermore, atr1? cells showed stronger boron-dependent phenotypes than mutants deficient in genes previously reported to be implicated in boron metabolism. ATR1 is widely distributed in bacteria, archaea, and lower eukaryotes. Our data suggest that Atr1 functions as a boron efflux pump and is required for boron tolerance. PMID:19414602

  14. Identification of a novel system for boron transport: Atr1 is a main boron exporter in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Alaattin; Karakaya, Huseyin C; Fomenko, Dmitri E; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Koc, Ahmet

    2009-07-01

    Boron is a micronutrient in plants and animals, but its specific roles in cellular processes are not known. To understand boron transport and functions, we screened a yeast genomic DNA library for genes that confer resistance to the element in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thirty boron-resistant transformants were isolated, and they all contained the ATR1 (YML116w) gene. Atr1 is a multidrug resistance transport protein belonging to the major facilitator superfamily. C-terminal green fluorescent protein-tagged Atr1 localized to the cell membrane and vacuole, and ATR1 gene expression was upregulated by boron and several stress conditions. We found that atr1Delta mutants were highly sensitive to boron treatment, whereas cells overexpressing ATR1 were boron resistant. In addition, atr1Delta cells accumulated boron, whereas ATR1-overexpressing cells had low intracellular levels of the element. Furthermore, atr1Delta cells showed stronger boron-dependent phenotypes than mutants deficient in genes previously reported to be implicated in boron metabolism. ATR1 is widely distributed in bacteria, archaea, and lower eukaryotes. Our data suggest that Atr1 functions as a boron efflux pump and is required for boron tolerance. PMID:19414602

  15. Differential identification of Candida species and other yeasts by analysis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled polypeptide profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.D.; Choo, K.B.; Tsai, W.C.; Jen, T.M.; Yeh, J.Y.; Han, S.H.

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes a scheme for differential identification of Candida species and other yeasts based on autoradiographic analysis of protein profiles of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled cellular proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Using ATCC strains as references, protein profile analysis showed that different Candida and other yeast species produced distinctively different patterns. Good agreement in results obtained with this approach and with other conventional systems was observed. Being accurate and reproducible, this approach provides a basis for the development of an alternative method for the identification of yeasts isolated from clinical specimens.

  16. Comparison between the Biflex III-Biotyper and the Axima-SARAMIS Systems for Yeast Identification by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Caroline; Sabou, Marcela; Moussaoui, Wardi; Prévost, Gilles; Delarbre, Jean-Marie; Candolfi, Ermanno; Gravet, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is emerging in laboratories as a new diagnostic tool for microorganism identification. We prospectively compared the performances of the Biflex III-Biotyper (Bruker Daltonics) and the Axima (Shimadzu)-SARAMIS (AnagnosTec) systems for the identification of 312 yeasts isolated from clinical specimens (249 Candida spp., including 19 C. albicans and 230 non-albicans species and 63 isolates belonging to different species of the genera Saccharomyces [20 isolates], Rhodotorula [8 isolates], Cryptococcus [8 isolates], Trichosporon [7 isolates], Pichia [7 isolates], Geotrichum [12 isolates], and Sporopachydermia cereana [1 isolate]). Species were identified by using routine conventional phenotypical methods and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing in case of discrepancy. We used expanded thresholds for species identification (log score of ?1.7 with 3 identical consecutive propositions and no discrepancy between the duplicates for the Bruker Daltonics system and similitude of ?40% with 5 successive identical propositions and no discrepancy between the duplicates for the Shimadzu system). Of the 312 isolates, 272 (87.2%) and 258 (82.7%) were successfully identified by the Bruker Daltonics and Shimadzu systems, respectively. All isolates were successfully identified within the most frequent and clinically relevant Candida species by the two systems. Nonvalid results corresponded mainly to species not or poorly represented in the databases. Major misidentifications were observed for 2 isolates (0.6%) by the Bruker Daltonics system and 4 isolates (1.3%) by the Shimadzu system. In conclusion, the performances of the Bruker Daltonics and the Shimadzu systems for yeast identification were good and comparable under routine clinical conditions, despite their differences in sample preparation, database content, and spectrum analysis. PMID:23390281

  17. Yeast identification in floral nectar of Mimulus aurantiacus (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyauk, C.; Belisle, M.; Fukami, T.

    2009-12-01

    Nectar is such a sugar-rich resource that serves as a natural habitat in which microbes thrive. As a result, yeasts arrive to nectar on the bodies of pollinators such as hummingbirds and bees. Yeasts use the sugar in nectar for their own needs when introduced. This research focuses on the identification of different types of yeast that are found in the nectar of Mimulus aurantiacus (commonly known as sticky monkey-flower). Unopened Mimulus aurantiacus flower buds were tagged at Jasper Ridge and bagged three days later. Floral nectar was then extracted and plated on potato dextrose agar. Colonies on the plates were isolated and DNA was extracted from each sample using QIAGEN DNeasy Plant Mini Kit. The DNA was amplified through PCR and ran through gel electrophoresis. The PCR product was used to clone the nectar samples into an E.coli vector. Finally, a phylogenetic tree was created by BLAST searching sequences in GenBank using the Internal Transcribed Space (ITS) locus. It was found that 18 of the 50 identified species were Candida magnifica, 14 was Candida rancensis, 6 were Crytococcus albidus and there were 3 or less of the following: Starmella bombicola, Candida floricola, Aureobasidium pullulans, Pichia kluyvera, Metschnikowa cibodaserisis, Rhodotorua colostri, and Malassezia globosa. The low diversity of the yeast could have been due to several factors: time of collection, demographics of Jasper Ridge, low variety of pollinators, and sugar concentration of the nectar. The results of this study serve as a necessary first step for a recently started research project on ecological interactions between plants, pollinators, and nectar-living yeast. More generally, this research studies the use of the nectar-living yeast community as a natural microcosm for addressing basic questions about the role of dispersal and competitive and facilitative interactions in ecological succession.

  18. Identification of Critical Amino Acids Conferring Lethality in VopK, a Type III Effector Protein of Vibrio cholerae: Lessons from Yeast Model System

    PubMed Central

    Bankapalli, Leela Krishna; Mishra, Rahul Chandra; Singh, Balvinder; Raychaudhuri, Saumya

    2015-01-01

    VopK, a type III effector protein, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Vibrio cholerae strains belonging to diverse serogroups. Ectopic expression of this protein exhibits strong toxicity in yeast model system. In order to map critical residues in VopK, we scanned the primary sequence guided by available data on various toxins and effector proteins. Our in silico analysis of VopK indicated the presence of predicted MCF1-SHE (SHxxxE) serine peptidase domain at the C-terminus region of the protein. Substitution of each of the predicted catalytic triad residues namely Ser314, His353 and Glu357 with alanine resulted in recombinant VopK proteins varying in lethality as evaluated in yeast model system. We observed that replacement of glutamate357 to alanine causes complete loss in toxicity while substitutions of serine314 and histidine353 with alanine exhibited partial loss in toxicity without affecting the stability of variants. In addition, replacement of another conserved serine residue at position 354 (S354) within predicted S314H353E357 did not affect toxicity of VopK. In essence, combined in silico and site directed mutagenesis, we have identified critical amino acids contributing to the lethal activity of VopK in yeast model system. PMID:26488395

  19. Yeast On-Target Lysis (YOTL), a Procedure for Making Auxiliary Mass Spectrum Data Sets for Clinical Routine Identification of Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Mareike; Weig, Michael; Zautner, Andreas E.; Groß, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based species identification has become a reliable and fast tool for use in clinical diagnostics, including in mycology. To identify yeasts in the MALDI Biotyper system, a multistep extraction protocol, which is also used to generate the reference spectra, is recommended. Sample preparation by on-target lysis (OTL) requires significantly less hands-on time and is therefore highly desirable, but it results in too-low MALDI Biotyper log score values to allow automated species identification. To overcome this problem, we developed a procedure for generating and validating an OTL spectrum data set for the most relevant and frequently occurring yeast species in clinical specimens. The performance was evaluated against a set of OTL spectra derived during clinical routine procedures and from a set of closely related yeasts. In the diagnostic setting, the OTL procedure significantly decreased the workload but allowed species identification with high specificity and sensitivity. False identifications were not observed. The use of in-house-generated OTL reference spectra can highly accelerate MALDI-TOF MS-based yeast species identification using the MALDI Biotyper. PMID:25232169

  20. Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequencing versus Biochemical Profiling for Identification of Medically Important Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Ciardo, D. E.; Schär, G.; Böttger, E. C.; Altwegg, M.; Bosshard, P. P.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we established an in-house database of yeast internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. This database includes medically important as well as colonizing yeasts that frequently occur in the diagnostic laboratory. In a prospective study, we compared molecular identification with phenotypic identification by using the ID32C system (bioMérieux) for yeast strains that could not be identified by a combination of CHROMagar Candida and morphology on rice agar. In total, 113 yeast strains were included in the study. By sequence analysis, 98% of all strains were identified correctly to the species level. With the ID32C, 87% of all strains were identified correctly to the species or genus level, 7% of the isolates could not be identified, and 6% of the isolates were misidentified, most of them as Candida rugosa or Candida utilis. For a diagnostic algorithm, we suggest a three-step procedure which integrates morphological criteria, biochemical investigation, and sequence analysis of the ITS region. PMID:16390952

  1. Locally isolated yeasts from Malaysia: identification, phylogenetic study and characterization.

    PubMed

    Oslan, Siti Nurbaya; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Basri, Mahiran; Chor, Adam Leow Thean

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts are a convenient platform for many applications. They have been widely used as the expression hosts. There is a need to have a new yeast expression system to contribute the molecular cloning demands. Eight yeast isolates were screened from various environment sources and identified through ribosomal DNA (rDNA) Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS). Full sequence of the rDNA ITS region for each isolate was BLASTed and phylogenetic study was constructed by using MEGA4. Among the isolates, isolate WB from 'ragi' (used to ferment carbohydrates) could be identified as a new species in order Saccharomycetales according to rDNA ITS region, morphology and biochemical tests. Isolate SO (from spoiled orange), RT (rotten tomato) and RG (different type of 'ragi') were identified as Pichia sp. Isolates R1 and R2, S4 and S5 (from the surrounding of a guava tree) were identified as Issatchenkia sp. and Hanseniaspora sp., respectively. Geneticin, 50 µg/mL, was determined to be the antibiotic marker for all isolates excepted for isolates RT and SO which used 500 µg/mL and 100 µg/mL Zeocin, respectively. Intra-extracellular proteins were screened for lipolytic activity at 30°C and 70°C. Thermostable lipase activity was detected in isolates RT and R1 with 0.6 U/mg and 0.1 U/mg, respectively. In conclusion, a new yeast-vector system for isolate WB can be developed by using phleomycin or geneticin as the drugs resistance marker. Moreover, strains RT and R1 can be investigated as a novel source of a thermostable lipase. PMID:22577620

  2. Identification and antifungal susceptibility of a large collection of yeast strains isolated in Tunisian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Eddouzi, Jamel; Lohberger, Andrea; Vogne, Christelle; Manai, Mohamed; Sanglard, Dominique

    2013-10-01

    In this study, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used as a rapid method to identify yeasts isolated from patients in Tunisian hospitals. When identification could not be exstablished with this procedure, sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer with 5.8S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) and D1/D2 domain of large-subunit (LSU rDNA) were employed as a molecular approach for species differentiation. Candida albicans was the dominant species (43.37% of all cases), followed by C. glabrata (16.55%), C. parapsilosis (13.23%), C. tropicalis (11.34%), C. dubliniensis (4.96%), and other species more rarely encountered in human diseases such as C. krusei, C. metapsilosis, C. lusitaniae, C. kefyr, C. palmioleophila, C. guilliermondii, C. intermedia, C. orthopsilosis, and C. utilis. In addition, other yeast species were obtained including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Debaryomyces hansenii (anamorph known as C. famata), Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Kodamaea ohmeri, Pichia caribbica (anamorph known as C. fermentati), Trichosporon spp. and finally a novel yeast species, C. tunisiensis. The in vitro antifungal activities of fluconazole and voriconazole were determined by the agar disk diffusion test and Etest, while the susceptibility to additional antifungal agents was determined with the Sensititre YeastOne system. Our results showed low incidence of azole resistance in C. albicans (0.54%), C. tropicalis (2.08%) and C. glabrata (4.28%). In addition, caspofungin was active against most isolates of the collection with the exception of two K. ohmeri isolates. This is the first report to describe caspofungin resistant isolates of this yeast. PMID:23768242

  3. Yeast as a model system for identification of metabolic targets of a 'glucosamine complex' used as a therapeutic agent of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dillemans, Monique; Appelboom, Thierry; Van Nedervelde, Laurence

    2008-11-01

    This manuscript describes the effect of a glucosamine complex and its different constituents on the metabolism of yeast cells. Indeed, the yeast model biosystem offers important advantages in the understanding of basic cellular and molecular processes. For example, the possibility to differentiate aerobic and anaerobic metabolism allows the measurement of glycolysis and mitochondria importance in the control of energetic metabolism and stress-responsive. Yeast growth and division can be controlled efficiently and effectively by adjusting environmental conditions that mimic some aspect of those experienced by chondrocytes in an osteoarthritic milieu, such as low oxygen and nutriment availabilities, high oxidative stress, etc. The glucosamine complex or some of its components (glucosamine sulphate, MSM, Ribes nigrum and silicon) enhanced cellular proliferation and CO(2) production of yeast cells cultured under severe conditions. In addition, it allows a larger output of protons from the cells into the medium. Glucosamine complex supplementation also boosted cellular resistance to stresses such as heat shock, H(2)O(2)-induced peroxidation and ethanol. The beneficial effects of the complex were primarily due to R. nigrum and to glucosamine sulphate components. The protective effect of the glucosamine complex can be explained by an increase of cellular energy level through intensification of mitochondrial functionality and intracellular machinery (anaerobic glycolysis). An additional effect on protein kinase activation is not unlikely. PMID:18662850

  4. Detection and identification of wild yeast in Koumiss.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhishen; Yang, XuJin; Yuan, Hongli

    2012-09-01

    Koumiss is a slightly alcoholic fermented mare's milk beverage, originally obtained by using a natural mixed starter of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts. Yeast is an important component of Koumiss processing which can affect the aroma, texture, as well as the nutrients beneficial to human health, but few reports have examined the yeast ecology of local ecosystems. The purpose of this study was to isolate and identify the yeast present in Koumiss from three representative regions of China using a polyphasic method. A total of 655 yeast isolates were obtained from 96 Koumiss samples collected from three regions in China. Koumiss harbored yeast populations at 5-7 log CFU/ml. Twelve different yeast species belonging to nine genera were detected in the Koumiss samples tested, including Candida pararugosa, Dekkera anomala, Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia orientalis, Kazachstania unispora, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Pichia deserticola, Pichia fermentans, Pichia manshurica, Pichia membranaefaciens, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii. Kluyveromyces marxianus, Kazachstania unispora and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were the dominant species present in this traditional fermented dairy product. This study is the first to identify the yeast communities associated with Koumiss in China. The results enrich our knowledge of yeast in Koumiss, give us a more complete picture of the microbial diversity in Koumiss and can be used to promote the development of the local dairy industry. PMID:22608237

  5. Yeasts and yeast-like fungi associated with tree bark: diversity and identification of yeasts producing extracellular endoxylanases.

    PubMed

    Bhadra, Bhaskar; Rao, R Sreenivas; Singh, Pavan K; Sarkar, Partha K; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2008-05-01

    A total of 239 yeast strains was isolated from 52 tree bark samples of the Medaram and Srisailam forest areas of Andhra Pradesh, India. Based on analysis of D1/D2 domain sequence of 26S rRNA gene, 114 strains were identified as ascomycetous; 107 strains were identified as basidiomycetous yeasts; and 18 strains were identified as yeast-like fungi. Among the ascomycetous yeasts, 51% were identified as members of the genus Pichia, and the remaining 49% included species belonging to the genera Clavispora, Debaryomyces, Kluyveromyces, Hanseniaspora, Issatchenkia, Lodderomyces, Kodamaea, Metschnikowia, and Torulaspora. The predominant genera in the basidiomycetous yeasts were Cryptococcus (48.6%), Rhodotorula (29%), and Rhodosporidium (12.1%). The yeast-like fungi were represented by Aureobasidium pullulans (6.7%) and Lecythophora hoffmanii (0.8%). Of the 239 yeast strains tested for Xylanase, only five strains of Aureobasidium sp. produced xylanase on xylan-agar medium. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis and N-terminal amino-acid sequence of the xylanase of isolate YS67 showed high similarity with endo-1-4-beta-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) of Aureobasidium pullulans var. melanigenum. PMID:18219522

  6. Genetic Algorithms based Parameter Identification of Yeast Fed-Batch Cultivation

    E-print Network

    Borissova, Daniela

    variations of the SGA and MpGA have been developed [1, 4, 6, 9] . Among them are the modified geneticGenetic Algorithms based Parameter Identification of Yeast Fed-Batch Cultivation Maria Angelova.pencheva@clbme.bas.bg Abstract. Different kinds of genetic algorithms have been investigated for a parameter identification

  7. Advantages of Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry as a Rapid Diagnostic Tool for Identification of Yeasts and Mycobacteria in the Clinical Microbiological Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jonathan H. K.; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Ngan, Antonio H. Y.; Fung, Ami M. Y.; Woo, Wai-Lan; Yan, Mei-Kum; Choi, Garnet K. Y.; Ho, Pak-Leung; Cheng, Vincent C. C.

    2013-01-01

    Yeast and mycobacteria can cause infections in immunocompromised patients and normal hosts. The rapid identification of these organisms can significantly improve patient care. There has been an increasing number of studies on using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for rapid yeast and mycobacterial identifications. However, studies on direct comparisons between the Bruker Biotyper and bioMérieux Vitek MS systems for the identification of yeast and mycobacteria have been limited. This study compared the performance of the two systems in their identification of 98 yeast and 102 mycobacteria isolates. Among the 98 yeast isolates, both systems generated species-level identifications in >70% of the specimens, of which Candida albicans was the most commonly cultured species. At a genus-level identification, the Biotyper system identified more isolates than the Vitek MS system for Candida (75/78 [96.2%]versus 68/78 [87.2%], respectively; P = 0.0426) and non-Candida yeasts (18/20 [90.0%]versus 7/20 [35.0%], respectively; P = 0.0008). For mycobacterial identification, the Biotyper system generated reliable identifications for 89 (87.3%) and 64 (62.8%) clinical isolates at the genus and species levels, respectively, from solid culture media, whereas the Vitek MS system did not generate any reliable identification. The MS method differentiated 12/21 clinical species, despite the fact that no differentiation between Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium chelonae was found by using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In summary, the MALDI-TOF MS method provides short turnaround times and a standardized working protocol for the identification of yeast and mycobacteria. Our study demonstrates that MALDI-TOF MS is suitable as a first-line test for the identification of yeast and mycobacteria in clinical laboratories. PMID:24048537

  8. Identification of Sc-type ILV6 as a target to reduce diacetyl formation in lager brewers' yeast

    E-print Network

    Futschik, Matthias E.

    Identification of Sc-type ILV6 as a target to reduce diacetyl formation in lager brewers' yeast C Accepted 22 July 2011 Available online 3 August 2011 Keywords: Lager brewers' yeast Saccharomyces Diacetyl-flavor in lager beer. It is spontaneously generated from a-acetolactate, an intermediate of yeast's valine

  9. Identification of CCR4 and other essential thyroid hormone receptor co-activators by modified yeast synthetic genetic array analysis

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, Manjapra; Meng, Xianwang; Denis, Clyde L.; Webb, Paul; Baxter, John D.; Walfish, Paul G.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) co-regulators has enhanced our understanding of thyroid hormone (TH) action. However, it is likely that many other co-regulators remained unidentified, and unbiased methods are required to discover these proteins. We have previously demonstrated that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent system in which to study TR action, and that defined TR signaling complexes in a eukaryotic background devoid of complicating influences of mammalian cell co-regulators can be constructed and analyzed for endogenous yeast genes, many of which are conserved in mammals. Here, a modified synthetic genetic array analysis was performed by crossing a yeast strain that expressed TR?1 and the co-activator GRIP1/SRC2 with 384 yeast strains bearing deletions of known genes. Eight genes essential for TH action were isolated, of which 4 are conserved in mammals. Examination of one, the yeast CCR4 and its human homolog CCR4/NOT6 (hCCR4), confirmed that (i) transfected CCR4 potentiates a TH response in cultured cells more efficiently than established TR co-activators and (ii) knockdown of CCR4 expression strongly inhibited a TH response (>80%). TH treatment promoted rapid and sustained hCCR4 recruitment to the TH-responsive deiodinase 1 promoter and TR co-localizes with hCCR4 in the nucleus and interacts with hCCR4 in 2-hybrid and pull-down assays. These findings indicate that a modified yeast synthetic genetic array strategy is a feasible method for unbiased identification of conserved genes essential for TR and other nuclear receptor hormone functions in mammals. PMID:19903885

  10. Assessment of Accuracy of Identification of Pathogenic Yeasts in Microbiology Laboratories in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Szekely, Adrien; Palmer, Michael D.; Johnson, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid, accurate identification of yeast isolates from clinical samples has always been important given their innately variable antifungal susceptibility profiles. Recently, this has become paramount with the proposed introduction of species-specific interpretive breakpoints for MICs obtained in yeast antifungal susceptibility tests (M. A. Pfaller, D. Andes, D. J. Diekema, A. Espinel–Ingroff, D. Sheehan, and CLSI Subcommittee for Antifungal Susceptibility Testing, Drug Resist. Updat. 13:180–195, 2010). Here, we present the results of a 12-month evaluation of the accuracy of identifications that accompany yeast isolates submitted to the Mycology Reference Laboratory (United Kingdom) for either confirmation of identity or susceptibility testing. In total, 1,781 yeast isolates were analyzed, and the robustness of prior identifications obtained in microbiology laboratories throughout the United Kingdom was assessed using a combination of culture on chromogenic agar, morphology on cornmeal agar, and molecular identification by pyrosequencing. Over 40% of isolates (755) were submitted without any suggested identification. Of those isolates with a prior identification, 100 (9.7%) were incorrectly identified. Error rates ranged from 5.2% (for organisms submitted for antifungal susceptibility testing) to 18.2% (for organisms requiring confirmation of identity) and varied in a strictly species-specific manner. At least 50% of identification errors would be likely to affect interpretation of MIC data, with a possible impact on patient management. In addition, 2.3% of submitted cultures were found to contain mixtures of at least two yeast species. The vast majority of mixtures had gone undetected in the referring laboratory and would have impacted the interpretation of antifungal susceptibility profiles and patient management. Some of the more common misidentifications are discussed according to the identification method employed, with suggestions for avoiding such misinterpretations. PMID:22649009

  11. Identification of Protein Complexes by Comparative Analysis of Yeast and Bacterial Protein Interaction Data

    E-print Network

    Shamir, Ron

    Identification of Protein Complexes by Comparative Analysis of Yeast and Bacterial Protein Abstract Mounting evidence shows that many protein complexes are conserved in evolution. Here we use combines protein interaction data, that are available for each of the two species, and orthology

  12. Identification of food and beverage spoilage yeasts from DNA sequence analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection, identification, and classification of yeasts has undergone a major transformation in the last decade and a half following application of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons. Development of a database (barcode) of easily determined DNA sequences from domains 1 and 2 (D1/D2) of th...

  13. Yeasts from kefir grains: isolation, identification, and probiotic characterization.

    PubMed

    Diosma, Gabriela; Romanin, David E; Rey-Burusco, María F; Londero, Alejandra; Garrote, Graciela L

    2014-01-01

    Kefir-a traditional beverage whose consumption has been associated with health benefits-is a logical natural product to investigate for new probiotic strains. The aim of the present work was to isolate and identify kefir yeasts and select those with acid and bile tolerance to study their adhesion to epithelial cells and their transit through mouse gut. From 4 milky and 3 sugary kefir grains, 34 yeast strains were isolated and identified by means of classical microbiological and molecular-genetic methods (whole-cell protein pattern, internal-transcribed-spacer amplification, and analysis of restriction-fragment-length polymorphisms). We identified 4 species belonging to 3 genera-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (15 strains), Saccharomyces unisporus (6 strains), Issatchenkia occidentalis (4 strains), and Kluyveromyces marxianus (9 strains)-and selected 13 strains on the basis of resistance to low pH and bile salts. Among the strains selected, Kluyveromyces marxianus CIDCA 8154 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae CIDCA 8112 were further studied. Both strains evidenced the capacity to adhere to epithelial intestine-derived cells in vitro and to survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract of BALB/c mice. The investigation of the potential probiotic features of these kefir-yeast strains should be useful for the development of novel functional foods. PMID:23824665

  14. Identification of cell cycle-regulated genes in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xu; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy; Miller, Lance D; Lin, Kui; Jia, Yonghui; Kondu, Pinar; Wang, Long; Wong, Lim-Soon; Liu, Edison T; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Liu, Jianhua

    2005-03-01

    Cell cycle progression is both regulated and accompanied by periodic changes in the expression levels of a large number of genes. To investigate cell cycle-regulated transcriptional programs in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we developed a whole-genome oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray. Microarray analysis of both wild-type and cdc25 mutant cell cultures was performed to identify transcripts whose levels oscillated during the cell cycle. Using an unsupervised algorithm, we identified 747 genes that met the criteria for cell cycle-regulated expression. Peaks of gene expression were found to be distributed throughout the entire cell cycle. Furthermore, we found that four promoter motifs exhibited strong association with cell cycle phase-specific expression. Examination of the regulation of MCB motif-containing genes through the perturbation of DNA synthesis control/MCB-binding factor (DSC/MBF)-mediated transcription in arrested synchronous cdc10 mutant cell cultures revealed a subset of functional targets of the DSC/MBF transcription factor complex, as well as certain gene promoter requirements. Finally, we compared our data with those for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found approximately 140 genes that are cell cycle regulated in both yeasts, suggesting that these genes may play an evolutionarily conserved role in regulation of cell cycle-specific processes. Our complete data sets are available at http://giscompute.gis.a-star.edu.sg/~gisljh/CDC. PMID:15616197

  15. Author Identification Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, A. Ben

    2009-01-01

    Many efforts are currently underway to disambiguate author names and assign unique identification numbers so that publications by a given scholar can be reliably grouped together. This paper reviews a number of operational and in-development services. Some systems like ResearcherId.Com depend on self-registration and self-identification of a…

  16. Identification of indigenous yeast flora isolated from the five winegrape varieties harvested in Xiangning, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Guo, Jingjing; Liu, Fubing; Liu, Yanlin

    2014-03-01

    Inoculated fermentation by selected indigenous yeast strains from a specific location could provide the wine with unique regional sensory characteristics. The identification and differentiation of local yeasts are the first step to understand the function of yeasts and develop a better strain-selection program for winemaking. The indigenous yeasts in five grape varieties, Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Marselan, and Merlot cultivated in Xiangning, Shanxi, China were investigated. Eight species of seven genera including Aureobasidium pullulans, Candida zemplinina, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora occidentalis, Issatchenkia terricola, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia kluyveri, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified using Wallerstein Laboratory Nutrient medium with sequencing of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain. H. uvarum and S. cerevisiae were the predominant species, while most non-Saccharomyces species were present in the whole fermentation process at different levels among the grape varieties. The genotypes of S. cerevisiae from each microvinification were determined by using interdelta sequence analysis. The 102 isolates showed eight different genotypes, and genotype III was the predominant genotype found. The distribution of S. cerevisiae strains during the fermentation of Marselan was also studied. Six genotypes were observed among the 92 strains with different genotypes of competitiveness at different sampling stages. Genotype V demonstrated the potential for organizing starter strains and avoiding inefficient fermentation. In general, this study explored the yeast species in the grapes grown in Xiangning County and provided important information of relationship of local yeast diversity and its regional wine sensory characteristics. PMID:24395034

  17. Performance of mass spectrometric identification of bacteria and yeasts routinely isolated in a clinical microbiology laboratory using MALDI-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiping; Xi, Haiyan; Huang, Mei; Wang, Jie; Fan, Ming; Chen, Yong; Shao, Haifeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an emerging technology newly applied to identifying bacterial and yeast strains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of the VITEK® MS system in the identification of bacteria and yeast strains routinely isolated from clinical samples. Methods We prospectively analyzed routine MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification in parallel with conventional phenotypic identification of bacteria and yeasts regardless of phylum or source of isolation. Discordant results were resolved with 16S rDNA or internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene sequencing. Colonies (a single deposit on a MALDI disposable target without any prior extraction step) were analyzed using the VITEK® MS system. Peptide spectra acquired by the system were compared with the VITEK® MS IVD database Version 2.0, and the identification scores were recorded. Results Of the 1,181 isolates (1,061 bacterial isolates and 120 yeast isolates) analyzed, 99.5% were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry; 95.7% identified to the species level, 3.6% identified to the genus level, and 0.3% identified within a range of species belonging to different genera. Conversely, 0.1% of isolates were misidentified and 0.4% were unidentified, partly because the species were not included in the database. Re-testing using a second deposit provided a successful identification for 0.5% of isolates unidentified with the first deposit. Our results show that the VITEK® MS system has exceptional performance in identifying bacteria and yeast by comparing acquired peptide spectra to those contained in its database. Conclusions MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is a rapid, accurate, and relatively inexpensive method for bacterial and yeast identification. Our results demonstrate that the VITEK® MS system is a fast and reliable technique, and has the potential to replace conventional phenotypic identification for most bacterial and yeast strains routinely isolated in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:24822114

  18. Systematic identification of cell size regulators in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Soifer, Ilya; Barkai, Naama

    2014-01-01

    Cell size is determined by a complex interplay between growth and division, involving multiple cellular pathways. To identify systematically processes affecting size control in G1 in budding yeast, we imaged and analyzed the cell cycle of millions of individual cells representing 591 mutants implicated in size control. Quantitative metric distinguished mutants affecting the mechanism of size control from the majority of mutants that have a perturbed size due to indirect effects modulating cell growth. Overall, we identified 17 negative and dozens positive size control regulators, with the negative regulators forming a small network centered on elements of mitotic exit network. Some elements of the translation machinery affected size control with a notable distinction between the deletions of parts of small and large ribosomal subunit: parts of small ribosomal subunit tended to regulate size control, while parts of the large subunit affected cell growth. Analysis of small cells revealed additional size control mechanism that functions in G2/M, complementing the primary size control in G1. Our study provides new insights about size control mechanisms in budding yeast. PMID:25411401

  19. Identification of Yeast and Human 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-?-d-ribofuranoside (AICAr) Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Ceschin, Johanna; Saint-Marc, Christelle; Laporte, Jean; Labriet, Adrien; Philippe, Chloé; Moenner, Michel; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Pinson, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-?-d-ribofuranoside (AICAr) is the precursor of the active monophosphate form (AICAR), a small molecule with potent anti-proliferative and low energy mimetic properties. The molecular bases for AICAR toxicity at the cellular level are poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of several yeast AICAr-hypersensitive mutants. Identification of the cognate genes allowed us to establish that thiamine transporters Thi7 and Thi72 can efficiently take up AICAr under conditions where they are overexpressed. We establish that, under standard growth conditions, Nrt1, the nicotinamide riboside carrier, is the major AICAr transporter in yeast. A study of AICAR accumulation in human cells revealed substantial disparities among cell lines and confirmed that AICAr enters cells via purine nucleoside transporters. Together, our results point to significant differences between yeast and human cells for both AICAr uptake and AICAR accumulation. PMID:24778186

  20. Molecular-based identification of yeasts isolated from bovine clinical mastitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomohito; Sugita, Takashi; Hata, Eiji; Katsuda, Ken; Zhang, Enshi; Kiku, Yoshio; Sugawara, Kazue; Ozawa, Tomomi; Matsubara, Tomoko; Ando, Takaaki; Obayashi, Tetsu; Ito, Takaaki; Yabusaki, Takahiro; Kudo, Katsunori; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Koiwa, Masateru; Oshida, Toshio; Tagawa, Yuichi; Kawai, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed molecular-based identification of yeasts that associated with bovine clinical mastitis in Japan. Over 3,200 quarter milk samples from Holstein dairy cows collected in 2011 on Hokkaido and Honshu islands were examined. Yeast isolates were characterized by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of the D1/D2 region of the 26S rDNA. Molecular characterization confirmed that Candida spp. and Pichia spp. were most frequently isolated species. Our molecular analysis of mastitic milk samples demonstrated the prevalence of Pichia kudriavzevii(22/58) and Candida tropicalis(14/58). In addition, we demonstrated that molecular analysis of the D1/D2 region of the 26S rDNA is a rapid and reliable method for identifying clinically significant yeasts in dairy hygiene, including potentially new or emerging pathogenic species. PMID:23100116

  1. Identification of yeast and human 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-?-d-ribofuranoside (AICAr) transporters.

    PubMed

    Ceschin, Johanna; Saint-Marc, Christelle; Laporte, Jean; Labriet, Adrien; Philippe, Chloé; Moenner, Michel; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Pinson, Benoît

    2014-06-13

    5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-?-d-ribofuranoside (AICAr) is the precursor of the active monophosphate form (AICAR), a small molecule with potent anti-proliferative and low energy mimetic properties. The molecular bases for AICAR toxicity at the cellular level are poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of several yeast AICAr-hypersensitive mutants. Identification of the cognate genes allowed us to establish that thiamine transporters Thi7 and Thi72 can efficiently take up AICAr under conditions where they are overexpressed. We establish that, under standard growth conditions, Nrt1, the nicotinamide riboside carrier, is the major AICAr transporter in yeast. A study of AICAR accumulation in human cells revealed substantial disparities among cell lines and confirmed that AICAr enters cells via purine nucleoside transporters. Together, our results point to significant differences between yeast and human cells for both AICAr uptake and AICAR accumulation. PMID:24778186

  2. Identification of rose phenylacetaldehyde synthase by functional complementation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Farhi, Moran; Lavie, Orly; Masci, Tania; Hendel-Rahmanim, Keren; Weiss, David; Abeliovich, Hagai; Vainstein, Alexander

    2010-02-01

    Rose flowers, like flowers and fruits of many other plants, produce and emit the aromatic volatiles 2-phenylacetaldehyde (PAA) and 2-phenylethylalchohol (PEA) which have a distinctive flowery/rose-like scent. Previous studies in rose have shown that, similar to petunia flowers, PAA is formed from L: -phenylalanine via pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent L: -aromatic amino acid decarboxylase. Here we demonstrate the use of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae aro10 mutant to functionally characterize a Rosa hybrida cv. Fragrance Cloud sequence (RhPAAS) homologous to petunia phenylacetaldehyde synthase (PhPAAS). Volatile headspace analysis of the aro10 knockout strain showed that it produces up to eight times less PAA and PEA than the WT. Expression of RhPAAS in aro10 complemented the yeast's mutant phenotype and elevated PAA levels, similar to petunia PhPAAS. PEA production levels were also enhanced in both aro10 and WT strains transformed with RhPAAS, implying an application for metabolic engineering of PEA biosynthesis in yeast. Characterization of spatial and temporal RhPAAS transcript accumulation in rose revealed it to be specific to floral tissues, peaking in mature flowers, i.e., coinciding with floral scent production and essentially identical to other rose scent-related genes. RhPAAS transcript, as well as PAA and PEA production in flowers, displayed a daily rhythmic behavior, reaching peak levels during the late afternoon hours. Examination of oscillation of RhPAAS transcript levels under free-running conditions suggested involvement of the endogenous clock in the regulation of RhPAAS expression in rose flowers. PMID:19882107

  3. Identification of food and beverage spoilage yeasts from DNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-11-20

    Detection, identification and classification of yeasts have undergone major changes in the last decade and a half following application of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons. Development of a database (barcode) of easily determined DNA sequences from domains 1 and 2 (D1/D2) of the nuclear large subunit rRNA gene and from ITS now permits many laboratories to identify species quickly and accurately, thus replacing the laborious and often inaccurate phenotypic tests previously used. Phylogenetic analysis of gene sequences has resulted in a major revision of yeast systematics resulting in redefinition of nearly all genera. This new understanding of species relationships has prompted a change of rules for naming and classifying yeasts and other fungi, and these new rules are presented in the recently implemented International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (Melbourne Code). The use of molecular methods for species identification and the impact of Code changes on classification will be discussed, especially in the context of food and beverage spoilage yeasts. PMID:26051959

  4. YeastMed: an XML-Based System for Biological Data Integration of Yeast

    E-print Network

    Briache, Abdelaali; Kerzazi, Amine; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Montes, Jose F Aldana; Hassani, Badr D Rossi; Lairini, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    A key goal of bioinformatics is to create database systems and software platforms capable of storing and analysing large sets of biological data. Hundreds of biological databases are now available and provide access to huge amount of biological data. SGD, Yeastract, CYGD-MIPS, BioGrid and PhosphoGrid are five of the most visited databases by the yeast community. These sources provide complementary data on biological entities. Biologists are brought systematically to query these data sources in order to analyse the results of their experiments. Because of the heterogeneity of these sources, querying them separately and then manually combining the returned result is a complex and laborious task. To provide transparent and simultaneous access to these sources, we have developed a mediator-based system called YeastMed. In this paper, we present YeastMed focusing on its architecture.

  5. Accurate identification of centromere locations in yeast genomes using Hi-C

    PubMed Central

    Varoquaux, Nelle; Liachko, Ivan; Ay, Ferhat; Burton, Joshua N.; Shendure, Jay; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Noble, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Centromeres are essential for proper chromosome segregation. Despite extensive research, centromere locations in yeast genomes remain difficult to infer, and in most species they are still unknown. Recently, the chromatin conformation capture assay, Hi-C, has been re-purposed for diverse applications, including de novo genome assembly, deconvolution of metagenomic samples and inference of centromere locations. We describe a method, Centurion, that jointly infers the locations of all centromeres in a single genome from Hi-C data by exploiting the centromeres’ tendency to cluster in three-dimensional space. We first demonstrate the accuracy of Centurion in identifying known centromere locations from high coverage Hi-C data of budding yeast and a human malaria parasite. We then use Centurion to infer centromere locations in 14 yeast species. Across all microbes that we consider, Centurion predicts 89% of centromeres within 5 kb of their known locations. We also demonstrate the robustness of the approach in datasets with low sequencing depth. Finally, we predict centromere coordinates for six yeast species that currently lack centromere annotations. These results show that Centurion can be used for centromere identification for diverse species of yeast and possibly other microorganisms. PMID:25940625

  6. Optimized System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Longman, Richard W.

    1999-01-01

    In system identification, one usually cares most about finding a model whose outputs are as close as possible to the true system outputs when the same input is applied to both. However, most system identification algorithms do not minimize this output error. Often they minimize model equation error instead, as in typical least-squares fits using a finite-difference model, and it is seen here that this distinction is significant. Here, we develop a set of system identification algorithms that minimize output error for multi-input/multi-output and multi-input/single-output systems. This is done with sequential quadratic programming iterations on the nonlinear least-squares problems, with an eigendecomposition to handle indefinite second partials. This optimization minimizes a nonlinear function of many variables, and hence can converge to local minima. To handle this problem, we start the iterations from the OKID (Observer/Kalman Identification) algorithm result. Not only has OKID proved very effective in practice, it minimizes an output error of an observer which has the property that as the data set gets large, it converges to minimizing the criterion of interest here. Hence, it is a particularly good starting point for the nonlinear iterations here. Examples show that the methods developed here eliminate the bias that is often observed using any system identification methods of either over-estimating or under-estimating the damping of vibration modes in lightly damped structures.

  7. Deterministic Bilinear System Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheh-Han; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2015-08-01

    A unified identification method is proposed for system realization of a deterministic continuous-time/discrete-time bilinear models from input and output measurement data. A generalized Hankel matrix is formed with the output measurements obtained by applying a set of repeated input sequences to a bilinear system. A computational procedure is developed to extract a time varying discrete-time state-space model from the generalized Hankel matrix. The bilinear system models are realized by transforming the identified time varying discrete-time model to the bilinear models. Numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed identification method.

  8. Toward genome-wide identification of Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities in yeast: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2013-01-01

    The Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller (BDM) model of reproductive isolation by genetic incompatibility is a widely accepted model of speciation. Because of the exceptionally rich biological information about the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the identification of BDM incompatibilities in yeast would greatly deepen our understanding of the molecular genetic basis of reproductive isolation and speciation. However, despite repeated efforts, BDM incompatibilities between nuclear genes have never been identified between S. cerevisiae and its sister species S. paradoxus. Such negative results have led to the belief that simple nuclear BDM incompatibilities do not exist between the two yeast species. Here, we explore an alternative explanation that such incompatibilities exist but were undetectable due to limited statistical power. We discover that previously employed statistical methods were not ideal and that a redesigned method improves the statistical power. We determine, under various sample sizes, the probabilities of identifying BDM incompatibilities that cause F1 spore inviability with incomplete penetrance, and confirm that the previously used samples were too small to detect such incompatibilities. Our findings call for an expanded experimental search for yeast BDM incompatibilities, which has become possible with the decreasing cost of genome sequencing. The improved methodology developed here is, in principle, applicable to other organisms and can help detect epistasis in general. PMID:23742870

  9. Fourier transform infrared as a powerful technique for the identification and characterization of filamentous fungi and yeasts.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cledir; Fraga, Marcelo E; Kozakiewicz, Zofia; Lima, Nelson

    2010-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared is considered a powerful technique for characterizing chemical compositions of complex probes such as microorganisms. It has successfully been applied to fungal identification. In this paper, the current state of identification and characterization of filamentous fungi and yeasts by Fourier transform infrared is reviewed. PMID:20079832

  10. Volume 14 Number 17 1986 Nucleic Acids Research Analysis of the yeast SPT3 gene and Identification of its product, a positive regulator of Ty

    E-print Network

    Winston, Fred

    ; Accepted 14 August 1986 ABSTRACT Previous work has deaonstrated that the yeast SPT3 gene is requiredVolume 14 Number 17 1986 Nucleic Acids Research Analysis of the yeast SPT3 gene and Identification for transcription from S sequences, the long terminal repeats that flank yeast Ty elements. In spt3 null mutants

  11. Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA): a new systems approach to identify therapeutic targets for human genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, David J.; Juan, Ilona; Le, Hao; Cai, Xiaodong; Baumbach, Lisa; Beattie, Christine; D'Urso, Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    Genetic interaction networks that underlie most human diseases are highly complex and poorly defined. Better-defined networks will allow identification of a greater number of therapeutic targets. Here we introduce our Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA) approach and test it with the X-linked spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) disease gene UBA1. First, we express UBA1 and a mutant variant in fission yeast and use high-throughput methods to identify fission yeast genetic modifiers of UBA1. Second, we analyze available protein-protein interaction network databases in both fission yeast and human to construct UBA1 genetic networks. Third, from these networks we identified potential therapeutic targets for SMA. Finally, we validate one of these targets in a vertebrate (zebrafish) SMA model. This study demonstrates the power of combining synthetic and chemical genetics with a simple model system to identify human disease gene networks that can be exploited for treating human diseases. PMID:25075304

  12. Identification of predominant yeasts associated with artisan Mexican cocoa fermentations using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches.

    PubMed

    Arana-Sánchez, A; Segura-García, L E; Kirchmayr, M; Orozco-Ávila, I; Lugo-Cervantes, E; Gschaedler-Mathis, A

    2015-02-01

    The process of cocoa fermentation is a very important step for the generation or aromatic compounds, which are attributable to the metabolism of the microorganisms involved. There are some reports about this process and the identification of microorganisms; however, there are no reports identifying the yeasts involved in a Mexican cocoa fermentation process using molecular biology techniques, including restricted fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The aim of this study was to identify the main yeast species associated with Mexican cocoa fermentations employing culture-dependent and -independent techniques achieving two samplings with a 1 year time difference at the same site. Isolation of the microorganisms was performed in situ. Molecular identification of yeast isolates was achieved by RFLP analysis and rDNA sequencing. Total DNA from the microorganisms on the cocoa beans was utilized for the DGGE analysis. Bands from the DGGE gels were excised and sequenced. Nineteen isolated yeasts were identified (al specie level), three of which had never before been associated with cocoa fermentations worldwide. The detected predominant yeast varied from one technique to another. Hanseniaspora sp. resulted dominant in DGGE however Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the principal isolated species. In conclusion, the culture-dependent and -independent techniques complement each other showing differences in the main yeasts involved in spontaneous cocoa fermentation, probably due to the physiological states of the viable but non culturable yeasts. Furthermore important differences between the species detected in the two samplings were detected. PMID:25566818

  13. Microfluidic Acoustic System to Generate Aged Yeast for Cell Aging Studies 

    E-print Network

    Krenek, Keith

    2015-05-07

    understanding cell aging; therefore, to improve aging studies utilizing yeast as a model organism, a high-throughput microfluidic system has been developed to generate aged yeast for subsequent biochemical analyses. The microfluidic system starts with a mixed...

  14. Yeast prions: structure, biology, and prion-handling systems.

    PubMed

    Wickner, Reed B; Shewmaker, Frank P; Bateman, David A; Edskes, Herman K; Gorkovskiy, Anton; Dayani, Yaron; Bezsonov, Evgeny E

    2015-03-01

    A prion is an infectious protein horizontally transmitting a disease or trait without a required nucleic acid. Yeast and fungal prions are nonchromosomal genes composed of protein, generally an altered form of a protein that catalyzes the same alteration of the protein. Yeast prions are thus transmitted both vertically (as genes composed of protein) and horizontally (as infectious proteins, or prions). Formation of amyloids (linear ordered ?-sheet-rich protein aggregates with ?-strands perpendicular to the long axis of the filament) underlies most yeast and fungal prions, and a single prion protein can have any of several distinct self-propagating amyloid forms with different biological properties (prion variants). Here we review the mechanism of faithful templating of protein conformation, the biological roles of these prions, and their interactions with cellular chaperones, the Btn2 and Cur1 aggregate-handling systems, and other cellular factors governing prion generation and propagation. Human amyloidoses include the PrP-based prion conditions and many other, more common amyloid-based diseases, several of which show prion-like features. Yeast prions increasingly are serving as models for the understanding and treatment of many mammalian amyloidoses. Patients with different clinical pictures of the same amyloidosis may be the equivalent of yeasts with different prion variants. PMID:25631286

  15. Detection and identification of wild yeasts in Champús, a fermented Colombian maize beverage.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Cadavid, Esteban; Chaves-López, Clemencia; Tofalo, Rosanna; Paparella, Antonello; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the predominant yeasts in Champús, a traditional Colombian cereal-based beverage with a low alcoholic content. Samples of Champús from 20 production sites in the Cauca Valley region were analysed. A total of 235 yeast isolates were identified by conventional microbiological analyses and by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2. The dominant species were: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Issatchenkia orientalis, Pichia fermentans, Pichia kluyveri var. kluyveri, Zygosaccharomyces fermentati, Torulospora delbruekii, Galactomyces geotrichum and Hanseniaspora spp. Model Champús systems were inoculated with single strains of some isolated sporogenus species and the aromatic profiles were analysed by SPME. Analysis of data showed that Champús strains produced high amounts of esters. The aromatic compounds produced by Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts from Champús can exert a relevant influence on the sensory characteristics of the fermented beverage. The Champús strains could thus represent an important source for new yeast biotypes with potential industrial applications. PMID:18620968

  16. An autonomous system for identifying and governing a cell's state in yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissim, Lior; Beatus, Tsevi; Bar-Ziv, Roy

    2007-09-01

    We present an approach for an autonomous system that detects a particular state of interest in a living cell and can govern cell fate accordingly. Cell states could be better identified by the expression pattern of several genes than of a single one. Therefore, autonomous identification can be achieved by a system that measures the expression of these several genes and integrates their activities into a single output. We have constructed a system that diagnoses a unique state in yeast, in which two independent pathways, methionine anabolism and galactose catabolism, are active. Our design is based on modifications of the yeast two-hybrid system. We show that cells could autonomously report on their state, identify the state of interest, and inhibit their growth accordingly. The system's sensitivity is adjustable to detect states with limited dynamic range of inputs. The system's output depends only on the activity of input pathways, not on their identity; hence it is straightforward to diagnose any pair of inputs. A simple model is presented that accounts for the data and provides predictive power. We propose that such systems could handle real-life states-of-interest such as identification of aberrant versus normal growth.

  17. Identification of Protein Complexes by Comparative Analysis of Yeast and Bacterial Protein Interaction Data

    E-print Network

    Sharan, Roded

    available for yeast and bacteria and detected 11 significantly conserved complexes. Several- teins. By identifying a conserved complex whose yeast pro- teins function predominantly in the nuclear Algorithms, experimentation. Keywords Protein interaction network, comparative analysis, yeast, bacteria

  18. Isolation and identification of L-dopa decarboxylase as a protein that binds to and enhances transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor using the repressed transactivator yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed Central

    Wafa, Latif A; Cheng, Helen; Rao, Mira A; Nelson, Colleen C; Cox, Michael; Hirst, Martin; Sadowski, Ivan; Rennie, Paul S

    2003-01-01

    The AR (androgen receptor) is a ligand-regulated transcription factor, which belongs to the steroid receptor family and plays an essential role in growth and development of the prostate. Transcriptional activity of steroid receptors is modulated by interaction with co-regulator proteins and yeast two-hybrid analysis is commonly used to identify these steroid receptor-interacting proteins. However, a limitation of conventional two-hybrid systems for detecting AR protein partners has been that they only allow for analysis of the ligand- and DNA-binding domains of the receptor, as its NTD (N-terminal domain) possesses intrinsic transactivation activity. To identify AR N-terminus-interacting proteins, its NTD was used in the RTA (repressed transactivator) system, which is specifically designed for transactivator bait proteins and was shown to be suitable for two-hybrid analysis with the AR NTD. DDC (L-dopa decarboxylase) was detected multiple times as a novel AR-interacting protein, which was subsequently confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, transient transfection of DDC in prostate cancer cells strongly enhanced ligand-dependent AR transcriptional activity, an effect that was antagonized using high concentrations of the anti-androgen bicalutamide. Glucocorticoid receptor activity was also strongly enhanced with DDC co-transfection, while oestrogen receptor activity was only mildly affected. Together, our data demonstrate that DDC interacts with AR to enhance steroid receptor transactivation, which may have important implications in prostate cancer progression. PMID:12864730

  19. RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDA ALBICANS DIRECTLY FROM YEAST POSITIVE BLOOD CULTURE BOTTLES BY FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION USING PNA PROBES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles is described. The test (C. albicans PNA FISH) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe targeting C. albicans 26...

  20. Identification of Gene Encoding Plasmodium knowlesi Phosphatidylserine Decarboxylase by Genetic Complementation in Yeast and Characterization of in Vitro Maturation of Encoded Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Augagneur, Yoann; Mamoun, Choukri Ben; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    The 23-megabase genome of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of severe human malaria, contains ?5300 genes, most of unknown function or lacking homologs in other organisms. Identification of these gene functions will help in the discovery of novel targets for the development of antimalarial drugs and vaccines. The P. falciparum genome is unusually A + T-rich, which hampers cloning and expressing these genes in heterologous systems for functional analysis. The large repertoire of genetic tools available for Saccharomyces cerevisiae makes this yeast an ideal system for large scale functional complementation analyses of parasite genes. Here, we report the construction of a cDNA library from P. knowlesi, which has a lower A + T content compared with P. falciparum. This library was applied in a yeast complementation assay to identify malaria genes involved in the decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine. Transformation of a psd1?psd2?dpl1? yeast strain, defective in phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis, with the P. knowlesi library led to identification of a new parasite phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (PkPSD). Unlike phosphatidylserine decarboxylase enzymes from other eukaryotes that are tightly associated with membranes, the PkPSD enzyme expressed in yeast was equally distributed between membrane and soluble fractions. In vitro studies reveal that truncated forms of PkPSD are soluble and undergo auto-endoproteolytic maturation in a phosphatidylserine-dependent reaction that is inhibited by other anionic phospholipids. This study defines a new system for probing the function of Plasmodium genes by library-based genetic complementation and its usefulness in revealing new biochemical properties of encoded proteins. PMID:22057268

  1. Running title: Yeasts from refrigerated commercial shell eggs Identification of yeasts isolated from commercial shell eggs stored at refrigerated temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts and molds can grow on or in eggs, causing spoilage. Washed and unwashed eggs (treatments) were collected aseptically on three separate days (replications) from a commercial processing facility and stored for 10 weeks at 4ºC. Ten eggs from each treatment were sampled weekly (110 eggs/treatme...

  2. Identification and Biological Characterization of Ribosomal Protein Methyltransferases in Yeast and Humans

    E-print Network

    Al-Hadid, Qais K.

    2015-01-01

    work on characterizing ribosomal protein methyltransferases, using the yeastthe yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Prior to this work, verywork on protein methylation reactions that affect the translational machinery decoding messenger RNA sequences to protein sequences in the yeast

  3. Identification of benzoquinones in pretreated lignocellulosic feedstocks and inhibitory effects on yeast.

    PubMed

    Stagge, Stefan; Cavka, Adnan; Jönsson, Leif J

    2015-12-01

    Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass under acidic conditions gives rise to by-products that inhibit fermenting microorganisms. An analytical procedure for identification of p-benzoquinone (BQ) and 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone (DMBQ) in pretreated biomass was developed, and the inhibitory effects of BQ and DMBQ on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were assessed. The benzoquinones were analyzed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole-mass spectrometry after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Pretreatment liquids examined with regard to the presence of BQ and DMBQ originated from six different lignocellulosic feedstocks covering agricultural residues, hardwood, and softwood, and were produced through impregnation with sulfuric acid or sulfur dioxide at varying pretreatment temperature (165-204 °C) and residence time (6-20 min). BQ was detected in all six pretreatment liquids in concentrations ranging up to 6 mg/l, while DMBQ was detected in four pretreatment liquids in concentrations ranging up to 0.5 mg/l. The result indicates that benzoquinones are ubiquitous as by-products of acid pretreatment of lignocellulose, regardless of feedstock and pretreatment conditions. Fermentation experiments with BQ and DMBQ covered the concentration ranges 2 mg/l to 1 g/l and 20 mg/l to 1 g/l, respectively. Even the lowest BQ concentration tested (2 mg/l) was strongly inhibitory to yeast, while 20 mg/l DMBQ gave a slight negative effect on ethanol formation. This work shows that benzoquinones should be regarded as potent and widespread inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, and that they warrant attention besides more well-studied inhibitory substances, such as aliphatic carboxylic acids, phenols, and furan aldehydes. PMID:26384342

  4. Killer systems of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    The killer systems of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are an unusual class of cytoplasmic symbionts of primitive eukaryotes. The genetic material of these symbionts is double-stranded RNA. They are characterized by the linearity of the genome, its fragmentation into a major and a minor fraction, which replicate separately, and their ability to control the synthesis of secretory mycocin proteins possessing a toxic action on closely related strains. The secretion of mycocins at the same time ensures acquiring of resistance to them. Strains containing killer symbionts are toxigenic and resistant to the action of their own toxin, but strains that are free of killer double-stranded RNAs are sensitive to the action of mycocins. The killer systems of S. cerevisiae have retained features relating them to viruses and are apparently the result of evolution of infectious viruses. The occurrences of such systems among monocellular eukaryotic organisms is an example of complication of the genome by means of its assembly from virus-like components. We discuss the unusual features of replication and the expression of killer systems and their utilization in the construction of vector molecules.

  5. Multisensor fusion for system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Sung-Han; Cho, Soojin; Park, Jong-Woong; Kim, Hyunjun

    2014-04-01

    System identification is a fundamental process for developing a numerical model of a physical structure. The system identification process typically involves in data acquisition; particularly in civil engineering applications accelerometers are preferred due to its cost-effectiveness, low noise, and installation convenience. Because the measured acceleration responses result in translational degrees of freedom (DOF) in the numerical model, moment-resisting structures such as beam and plate are not appropriately represented by the models. This study suggests a system identification process that considers both translational and rotational DOFs by using accelerometers and gyroscopes. The proposed approach suggests a systematic way of obtaining dynamic characteristics as well as flexibility matrix from two different measurements of acceleration and angular velocity. Numerical simulation and laboratory experiment are conducted to validate the efficacy of the proposed system identification process.

  6. NADP Regulates the Yeast GAL Induction System

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar,P.; Yao, Y.; Sternglanz, R.; Johnston, S.; Joshua-Tor, L.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the galactose-metabolizing genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on three core proteins: Gal4p, the transcriptional activator that binds to upstream activating DNA sequences (UASGAL); Gal80p, a repressor that binds to the carboxyl terminus of Gal4p and inhibits transcription; and Gal3p, a cytoplasmic transducer that, upon binding galactose and adenosine 5'-triphosphate, relieves Gal80p repression. The current model of induction relies on Gal3p sequestering Gal80p in the cytoplasm. However, the rapid induction of this system implies that there is a missing factor. Our structure of Gal80p in complex with a peptide from the carboxyl-terminal activation domain of Gal4p reveals the existence of a dinucleotide that mediates the interaction between the two. Biochemical and in vivo experiments suggests that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) plays a key role in the initial induction event.

  7. Identification of yeast proteins necessary for cell-surface function of a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Haass, Friederike A; Jonikas, Martin; Walter, Peter; Weissman, Jonathan S; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Jan, Lily Y; Schuldiner, Maya

    2007-11-13

    Inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels form gates in the cell membrane that regulate the flow of K(+) ions into and out of the cell, thereby influencing the membrane potential and electrical signaling of many cell types, including neurons and cardiomyocytes. Kir-channel function depends on other cellular proteins that aid in the folding of channel subunits, assembly into tetrameric complexes, trafficking of quality-controlled channels to the plasma membrane, and regulation of channel activity at the cell surface. We used the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to identify proteins necessary for the functional expression of a mammalian Kir channel at the cell surface. A screen of 376 yeast strains, each lacking one nonessential protein localized to the early secretory pathway, identified seven deletion strains in which functional expression of the Kir channel at the plasma membrane was impaired. Six deletions were of genes with known functions in trafficking and lipid biosynthesis (sur4Delta, csg2Delta, erv14Delta, emp24Delta, erv25Delta, and bst1Delta), and one deletion was of an uncharacterized gene (yil039wDelta). We provide genetic and functional evidence that Yil039wp, a conserved, phosphoesterase domain-containing protein, which we named "trafficking of Emp24p/Erv25p-dependent cargo disrupted 1" (Ted1p), acts together with Emp24p/Erv25p in cargo exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The seven yeast proteins identified in our screen likely impact Kir-channel functional expression at the level of vesicle budding from the ER and/or the local lipid environment at the plasma membrane. PMID:17989219

  8. New and emerging yeast pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, K C

    1995-01-01

    The most common yeast species that act as agents of human disease are Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The incidence of infections by other yeasts has increased during the past decade. The most evident emerging pathogens are Malassezia furfur, Trichosporon beigelii, Rhodotorula species, Hansenula anomala, Candida lusitaniae, and Candida krusei. Organisms once considered environmental contaminants or only industrially important, such as Candida utilis and Candida lipolytica, have now been implicated as agents of fungemia, onychomycosis, and systemic disease. The unusual yeasts primarily infect immunocompromised patients, newborns, and the elderly. The role of central venous catheter removal and antifungal therapy in patient management is controversial. The antibiograms of the unusual yeasts range from resistant to the most recent azoles and amphotericin B to highly susceptible to all antifungal agents. Current routine methods for yeast identification may be insufficient to identify the unusual yeasts within 2 days after isolation. The recognition of unusual yeasts as agents of sometimes life-threatening infection and their unpredictable antifungal susceptibilities increase the burden on the clinical mycology laboratory to pursue complete species identification and MIC determinations. Given the current and evolving medical practices for management of seriously ill patients, further evaluations of the clinically important data about these yeasts are needed. PMID:8665465

  9. Raman Spectroscopy and Chemometrics for Identification and Strain Discrimination of the Wine Spoilage Yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Brettanomyces bruxellensis

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Mark A.; Thornton, Roy J.

    2013-01-01

    The yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Dekkera bruxellensis (anamorph, Brettanomyces bruxellensis), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the major spoilage agents of finished wine. A novel method using Raman spectroscopy in combination with a chemometric classification tool has been developed for the identification of these yeast species and for strain discrimination of these yeasts. Raman spectra were collected for six strains of each of the yeasts Z. bailii, B. bruxellensis, and S. cerevisiae. The yeasts were classified with high sensitivity at the species level: 93.8% for Z. bailii, 92.3% for B. bruxellensis, and 98.6% for S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between strains of these species. These yeasts were classified at the strain level with an overall accuracy of 81.8%. PMID:23913433

  10. Systems identification - reprise and projections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A state-of-the-arts review is given for the field of system identification. Progress in the field is traced from the early models of dynamic systems by Sir Isaac Newton up to the present day use of advanced techniques for numerous applications.

  11. Identification of C(2)M interacting proteins by yeast two-hybrid screening.

    PubMed

    Shanshan, Yue; Laixin, Xia

    2015-11-20

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a huge structure which assembles between the homologous chromosomes during meiotic prophase I. Drosophila germ cell-specific nucleoprotein C(2)M clustering at chromosomes can induce SC formation. To further study the molecular function and mechanism of C(2)M in meiosis, we constructed a bait vector for C(2)M and used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify C(2)M interacting proteins. Forty interacting proteins were obtained, including many DNA and histone binding proteins, ATP synthases and transcription factors. Gene silencing assays in Drosophila showed that two genes, wech and Psf1, may delay the disappearance of SC. These results indicate that Wech and Psf1 may form a complex with C(2)M to participate in the formation or stabilization of the SC complex. PMID:26582530

  12. 1997 Oxford University Press 46194625Nucleic Acids Research, 1997, Vol. 25, No. 22 Analysis of the yeast genome: identification of new

    E-print Network

    Olivas, Wendy M.

    untranslated region (UTR) (18,19). The 10Sa RNA of Escherichia coli contains both transfer and messenger of the yeast genome: identification of new non-coding and small ORF-containing RNAs Wendy M. Olivas, Denise the expression of an RNA polymerase III transcript. This approach led to the identification of a new, non

  13. RAPID IDENTFICATION OF ASCOMYCETOUS YEASTS FROM CLINICAL SPECIMENS BY A MOLECULAR-BASED FLOW CYTOMETRY METHOD AND COMPARISION WITH IDENTIFICATIONS FROM PHENOTYPIC ASSAYS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to compare the identification of ascomycetous yeasts recovered from clinical specimens by using phenotypic assays (PA) and a molecular flow cytometric (FC) method. LSU rRNA D1/D2 gene sequence analysis was also performed and served as the reference for correct strain identif...

  14. Improving the Yeast Three-Hybrid System for High-Throughput Target Discovery

    E-print Network

    Bailey, Kyle

    2011-05-27

    -protein interactions. The yeast three-hybrid system is an attractive alternative that uses genetic tools to screen for protein-small molecule interactions in cellulo. This thesis describes efforts to improve the utility of the yeast three-hybrid system to screen...

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF YEASTS ISOLATED FROM COMMERCIAL SHELL EGGS STORED AT REFRIGERATED TEMPERATURES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts and molds, which are able to withstand harsh environmental stresses, can grow on or in eggs and cause spoilage. Egg meats readily absorb off odors, including those caused by yeast or mold growth, so their presence on eggs may constitute a quality concern. Washed and unwashed eggs (treatment...

  16. Alkali-metal-cation influx and efflux systems in nonconventional yeast species.

    PubMed

    Ramos, José; Ariño, Joaquín; Sychrová, Hana

    2011-04-01

    To maintain optimal intracellular concentrations of alkali-metal-cations, yeast cells use a series of influx and efflux systems. Nonconventional yeast species have at least three different types of efficient transporters that ensure potassium uptake and accumulation in cells. Most of them have Trk uniporters and Hak K(+)-H(+) symporters and a few yeast species also have the rare K(+) (Na(+))-uptake ATPase Acu. To eliminate surplus potassium or toxic sodium cations, various yeast species use highly conserved Nha Na(+) (K(+))/H(+) antiporters and Na(+) (K(+))-efflux Ena ATPases. The potassium-specific yeast Tok1 channel is also highly conserved among various yeast species and its activity is important for the regulation of plasma membrane potential. PMID:21241357

  17. Identification of yeasts during alcoholic fermentation of tchapalo, a traditional sorghum beer from Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    N'guessan, Kouadio Florent; Brou, Kouakou; Jacques, Noémie; Casaregola, Serge; Dje, Koffi Marcellin

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the diversity and dynamics of yeasts involved in alcoholic fermentation of a traditional sorghum beer from Côte d'Ivoire, tchapalo. A total of 240 yeast strains were isolated from fermenting sorghum wort inoculated with dry yeast from two geographic regions of Côte d'Ivoire (Abidjan and Bondoukou). Initial molecular identification to the species level was carried out using RFLP of PCR-amplified internal transcribed spacers of rDNA (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2). Ten different profiles were obtained from the restriction of PCR products with the three endonucleases HaeIII, CfoI and HinfI. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA and the ACT1 gene allowed us to assign these groups to six different species: Saccharomyces cerevisiae-like, Candida tropicalis, Pichia kudriavzevii, Pichia kluyveri, Kodamaea ohmeri and Meyerozyma caribbica. The most frequent species associated with tchapalo fermentation was S. cerevisiae-like (87.36%), followed by C. tropicalis (5.45%) and M. caribbica (2.71%). S. cerevisiae-like strains were diploid heterozygotes and exhibited three to four nucleotides divergence from the type strain in the D1/D2 domain and several indels in the more discriminant sequence of the intron of the ACT1 gene. During the process, the yeast species isolated and their frequencies varied according to the geographic origin of the dry yeast. The occurrence of some species was sporadic and only two non-Saccharomyces species were found in the final product. PMID:21318423

  18. Automated drug identification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campen, C. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    System speeds up analysis of blood and urine and is capable of identifying 100 commonly abused drugs. System includes computer that controls entire analytical process by ordering various steps in specific sequences. Computer processes data output and has readout of identified drugs.

  19. Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-print Network

    Valasek, John

    Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks Kenton Kirkpatrick Jim May Jr. John Meeting January 9, 2013 Compos Volatus #12;Overview Motivation System Identification Artificial Neural Networks 2 Artificial Neural Networks ANNSID Conclusions and Open Challenges #12;Motivation 3 #12

  20. Identification of respiratory chain gene mutations that shorten replicative life span in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hacioglu, Elise; Demir, Ayse Banu; Koc, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    Aging is the progressive accumulation of alterations in cells that elevates the risk of death. The mitochondrial theory of aging postulates that free radicals produced by the mitochondrial respiratory system contribute to the aging process. However, the roles of individual electron transfer chain (ETC) components in cellular aging have not been elucidated. In this study, we analyzed the replicative life span of 73 yeast deletion mutants lacking the genes of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain system, and found that nine of these mutants (?nde1, ?tcm62, ?rip1, ?cyt1, ?qrc8, ?pet117, ?cox11, ?atp11, ?fmc1) had significantly shorter life spans. These mutants had lower rates of respiration and were slightly sensitive to exogenous administration of hydrogen peroxide. However, only two of them, ?nde1 and ?fmc1, produced higher amounts of intrinsic superoxide radicals in the presence of glucose compared to that of wild type cells. Interestingly, there were no significant alterations in the mitochondrial membrane potentials of these mutants. We speculate that the shorter life spans of ETC mutants result from multiple mechanisms including the low respiration rate and low energy production rather than just a ROS-dependent path. PMID:22137892

  1. A bimodal biometric identification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghari, Mohammad S.; Khuwaja, Gulzar A.

    2013-03-01

    Biometrics consists of methods for uniquely recognizing humans based upon one or more intrinsic physical or behavioral traits. Physicals are related to the shape of the body. Behavioral are related to the behavior of a person. However, biometric authentication systems suffer from imprecision and difficulty in person recognition due to a number of reasons and no single biometrics is expected to effectively satisfy the requirements of all verification and/or identification applications. Bimodal biometric systems are expected to be more reliable due to the presence of two pieces of evidence and also be able to meet the severe performance requirements imposed by various applications. This paper presents a neural network based bimodal biometric identification system by using human face and handwritten signature features.

  2. Budding Yeast for Budding Geneticists: A Primer on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model System

    PubMed Central

    Duina, Andrea A.; Miller, Mary E.; Keeney, Jill B.

    2014-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a powerful model organism for studying fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. This Primer article presents a brief historical perspective on the emergence of this organism as a premier experimental system over the course of the past century. An overview of the central features of the S. cerevisiae genome, including the nature of its genetic elements and general organization, is also provided. Some of the most common experimental tools and resources available to yeast geneticists are presented in a way designed to engage and challenge undergraduate and graduate students eager to learn more about the experimental amenability of budding yeast. Finally, a discussion of several major discoveries derived from yeast studies highlights the far-reaching impact that the yeast system has had and will continue to have on our understanding of a variety of cellular processes relevant to all eukaryotes, including humans. PMID:24807111

  3. Structural Aspects of System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, Keith

    1973-01-01

    The problem of identifying linear dynamical systems is studied by considering structural and deterministic properties of linear systems that have an impact on stochastic identification algorithms. In particular considered is parametrization of linear systems so that there is a unique solution and all systems in appropriate class can be represented. It is assumed that a parametrization of system matrices has been established from a priori knowledge of the system, and the question is considered of when the unknown parameters of this system can be identified from input/output observations. It is assumed that the transfer function can be asymptotically identified, and the conditions are derived for the local, global and partial identifiability of the parametrization. Then it is shown that, with the right formulation, identifiability in the presence of feedback can be treated in the same way. Similarly the identifiability of parametrizations of systems driven by unobserved white noise is considered using the results from the theory of spectral factorization.

  4. Automated systems for identification of microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Stager, C E; Davis, J R

    1992-01-01

    Automated instruments for the identification of microorganisms were introduced into clinical microbiology laboratories in the 1970s. During the past two decades, the capabilities and performance characteristics of automated identification systems have steadily progressed and improved. This article explores the development of the various automated identification systems available in the United States and reviews their performance for identification of microorganisms. Observations regarding deficiencies and suggested improvements for these systems are provided. PMID:1498768

  5. System identification of jet engines

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, N.

    2000-01-01

    System identification plays an important role in advanced control systems for jet engines, in which controls are performed adaptively using data from the actual engine and the identified engine. An identification technique for jet engine using the Constant Gain Extended Kalman Filter (CGEKF) is described. The filter is constructed for a two-spool turbofan engine. The CGEKF filter developed here can recognize parameter change in engine components and estimate unmeasurable variables over whole flight conditions. These capabilities are useful for an advanced Full Authority Digital Electric Control (FADEC). Effects of measurement noise and bias, effects of operating point and unpredicted performance change are discussed. Some experimental results using the actual engine are shown to evaluate the effectiveness of CGEKF filter.

  6. On-Orbit System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.; Bayard, D.; Eldred, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    Information derived from accelerometer readings benefits important engineering and control functions. Report discusses methodology for detection, identification, and analysis of motions within space station. Techniques of vibration and rotation analyses, control theory, statistics, filter theory, and transform methods integrated to form system for generating models and model parameters that characterize total motion of complicated space station, with respect to both control-induced and random mechanical disturbances.

  7. Isolation, identification, and activity in vitro of killer yeasts against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolated from tropical fruits.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Jaqueline Rabelo; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros; Brandão, Luciana Rocha; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Viana, Francisco Marto Pinto

    2013-07-01

    A total of 580 yeasts strains, isolated from Ceara State of Brasil, were evaluated for their ability to produce killer toxin. Of these strains, 29 tested positive for the killer phenotype and were further evaluated for their ability to control Colletotrichum gloeosporioides germination in vitro. All yeast strains that expressed the killer phenotype were characterized by sequencing the D1/D2 regions of the large subunit of the rRNA gene. Five yeast strains provided a significant reduction in mycelial growth and conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides in vitro, especially Meyerozyma guilliermondii, which was able to reduce the fungal mycelial growth on solid medium (potato dextrose agar (PDA)) by 60% and block 100% of conidia germination in liquid media (potato dextrose broth (PDB)). Filtering and autoclaving the liquid cultures had no effect on the growth of the pathogen. These results indicate the potential use of antagonist yeasts isolated from tropical fruits in the control of anthracnose caused by C. gloeosporioides in papaya. Further elucidation of main mechanisms involved on anthracnose control by these yeasts could be helpful for the development of biocontrol techniques related to the management of this disease in tropical fruits. PMID:22915228

  8. Yeast Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in women who have taken antibiotics, are on hormonal contraception, have diabetes and or are pregnant. ? Women who have medical conditions or take medicines which weaken the immune system are at greater risk for yeast Signs and symptoms of yeast vaginitis ? ...

  9. Practical Attacks on Proximity Identification Systems

    E-print Network

    Hancke, Gerhard

    Attacks on Proximity Identification Systems ­ p. #12;RFID Devices Applications Logistics Access control" Identification Power Clock Token RFID RFID Reader Data ISO 14443 A (and B) 13.56 MHz Reader Token Modified Practical Attacks on Proximity Identification Systems ­ p. #12;Passive Eavesdropping RFID 10 cm Legitimate

  10. Identification of enzyme responsible for erythritol utilization and reaction product in yeast Lipomyces starkeyi.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Katsushi; Harada, Teiko; Arita, Yasukazu; Watanabe, Hisayuki; Iwabuki, Hidehiko; Terada, Asako; Naganuma, Takafumi; Uzuka, Yasuyuki

    2006-04-01

    We have identified the enzyme responsible for erythritol utilization and its reaction product in the yeast Lipomyces starkeyi CBS 1807. The enzyme, a polyol dehydrogenase requiring NAD+ as a coenzyme, was induced by erythritol in this yeast. We confirmed that the enzyme product was L-erythrulose by MS, NMR, and polarimeter analyses, meaning that we clarified the first step of erythritol utilization in yeasts for the first time. In the case of the oxidative reaction, D-threitol, (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol, and erythritol were much better substrates than 21 other polyols tested. These three substrates are tetroses and have an R configuration at C-3, and whose third carbon results in easiest oxidation in this enzyme. The research of the substrate specificity in the reductive reaction demonstrated that L-erythrulose and dihydroxyacetone were better substrates, that D-acetoin was inactive and L-erythrose (aldose) was slightly active. PMID:16716937

  11. Discrete dynamical system modelling for gene regulatory networks of 5-hydroxymethylfural tolerance for ethanologenic yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Composed of linear difference equations, a discrete dynamic system model was designed to reconstruct transcriptional regulations in gene regulatory networks in response to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, a bioethanol conversion inhibitor for ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The modeling aims ...

  12. Identification of the Zeo1 Protein as a Candidate Structural Homolog of ?-Synuclein in Budding Yeast

    E-print Network

    Sepehr Ehsani

    2015-05-23

    Human {\\alpha}-synuclein (SNCA) is a 140-amino-acid protein belonging to the three-member synuclein family. It has been extensively studied due to its misfolding/aggregation in and genetic linkage to neurodegenerative diseases, especially Parkinson's disease (PD). To better understand its biology, models of SNCA toxicity have been developed in budding yeast over the past decade, which have yielded insights into the protein's modes of action in specific pathways and potential therapeutic targets. Given that the synuclein gene family is not present in yeast, an extensive homology search was undertaken to determine if any yeast protein may possess structural homology to SNCA and whose native biology may shed more light on SNCA's pathomechanism in eukaryotes. We identified Zeo1, a membrane-associated protein involved in the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway, as a candidate structural homolog. We show that Zeo1 overexpression is toxic in yeast and, similar to SNCA, localizes to lipid membranes. A number of biochemical similarities between Zeo1 and SNCA also become apparent in light of this potential structural connection. Moreover, the yeast PKC1 gene, a kinase acting as a downstream signaling hub in the CWI pathway, rescues both SNCA- and Zeo1-induced toxicities. Using the same homology search methods that identified Zeo1, we show that Pkc1 has a hybrid structural similarity to PINK1 and PARIS, two mitochondrial PD-implicated proteins not generally linked directly to synuclein-specific pathobiology. Overall, this proof-of-concept study shows the potential utility of hitherto uncharacterized cross-species structural homologs, identified using comparative proteome-wide structure prediction algorithms, in shedding light on abstruse connections among disease-relevant proteins.

  13. System/observer/controller identification toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Horta, Lucas G.; Phan, Minh

    1992-01-01

    System Identification is the process of constructing a mathematical model from input and output data for a system under testing, and characterizing the system uncertainties and measurement noises. The mathematical model structure can take various forms depending upon the intended use. The SYSTEM/OBSERVER/CONTROLLER IDENTIFICATION TOOLBOX (SOCIT) is a collection of functions, written in MATLAB language and expressed in M-files, that implements a variety of modern system identification techniques. For an open loop system, the central features of the SOCIT are functions for identification of a system model and its corresponding forward and backward observers directly from input and output data. The system and observers are represented by a discrete model. The identified model and observers may be used for controller design of linear systems as well as identification of modal parameters such as dampings, frequencies, and mode shapes. For a closed-loop system, an observer and its corresponding controller gain directly from input and output data.

  14. Direct identification of clinically relevant bacterial and yeast microcolonies and macrocolonies on solid culture media by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Espagnon, Isabelle; Ostrovskii, Denis; Mathey, Raphaël; Dupoy, Mathieu; Joly, Pierre L; Novelli-Rousseau, Armelle; Pinston, Frédéric; Gal, Olivier; Mallard, Frédéric; Leroux, Denis F

    2014-02-01

    Decreasing turnaround time is a paramount objective in clinical diagnosis. We evaluated the discrimination power of Raman spectroscopy when analyzing colonies from 80 strains belonging to nine bacterial and one yeast species directly on solid culture medium after 24-h (macrocolonies) and 6-h (microcolonies) incubation. This approach, that minimizes sample preparation and culture time, would allow resuming culture after identification to perform downstream antibiotic susceptibility testing. Correct identification rates measured for macrocolonies and microcolonies reached 94.1% and 91.5%, respectively, in a leave-one-strain-out cross-validation mode without any correction for possible medium interference. Large spectral differences were observed between macrocolonies and microcolonies, that were attributed to true biological differences. Our results, conducted on a very diversified panel of species and strains, were obtained by using simple and robust sample preparation and preprocessing procedures, while still confirming published results obtained by using more complex elaborated protocols. Instrumentation is simplified by the use of 532-nm laser excitation yielding a Raman signal in the visible range. It is, to our knowledge, the first side-by-side full classification study of microorganisms in the exponential and stationary phases confirming the excellent performance of Raman spectroscopy for early species-level identification of microorganisms directly from an agar culture. PMID:24522809

  15. Yeast mitochondrial F1F0-ATP synthase exists as a dimer: identification of three dimer-specific subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, I; Pfeiffer, K; Neupert, W; Stuart, R A; Schägger, H

    1998-01-01

    Using the technique of blue native gel electrophoresis, the oligomeric state of the yeast mitochondrial F1F0-ATP synthase was analysed. Solubilization of mitochondrial membranes with low detergent to protein ratios led to the identification of the dimeric state of the ATP synthase. Analysis of the subunit composition of the dimer, in comparison with the monomer, revealed the presence of three additional small proteins. These dimer-specific subunits of the ATP synthase were identified as the recently described subunit e/Tim11 (Su e/Tim11), the putative subunit g homolog (Su g) and a new component termed subunit k (Su k). Although, as shown here, these three proteins are not required for the formation of enzymatically active ATP synthase, Su e/Tim11 and Su g are essential for the formation of the dimeric state. Su e/Tim11 appears to play a central role in this dimerization process. The dimer-specific subunits are associated with the membrane bound F0-sector. The F0-sector may thereby be involved in the dimerization of two monomeric F1F0-ATP synthase complexes. We speculate that the F1F0-ATP synthase of yeast, like the other complexes of oxidative phosphorylation, form supracomplexes to optimize transduction of energy and to enhance the stability of the complex in the membrane. PMID:9857174

  16. Personal identification credential system (PICS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressley, Jackson R.; Cantrell, Thomas; Page, Lochlin; Cudlitz, Stephen; Higgins, Roy

    2005-03-01

    A pilot Personal Identification Credential System (PICS) has been developed and fielded. The PICS is a wireless biometric credential that interfaces with access control systems. The PICS consists of individual handheld Personal Identification Credentials (PIC), a PICS Reader located at a facility entry control point that interfaces with the facility entry control system, and a PICS Enrollment Station. In operation, an individual approaching a facility entry point in a vehicle picks up the PIC handheld unit and places a finger on its sensor. The PIC then authenticates the user and from within the vehicle initiates two-way, secure RF communication with the PICS Reader as the vehicle approaches the gate. The PICS Reader then verifies that the individual is authorized for admittance and notifies the facility gate entry control system, which informs the sentry that the request for access was successful or unsuccessful. If the request for access is unsuccessful, the gate entry control system automatically will close the gate. This sequence of events takes place while the car is moving through a normally open entry lane. The PIC is a small, handheld device which contains the biometric sensor (fingerprint sensor), wireless RF transceiver, processor, encryption and battery. The PIC may be used while traveling in a vehicle or may be used while on foot for access to a PICS controlled man gate or secure area access portal. The PIC is small enough to be carried in a shirt pocket, or it can be left in the user's vehicle. The PIC battery will power the PIC for months and is rechargeable. Up to 10 fingers may be stored in the PIC.

  17. Optimization of the Preanalytical Steps of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Identification Provides a Flexible and Efficient Tool for Identification of Clinical Yeast Isolates in Medical Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Goyer, Marianne; Lucchi, Geraldine; Ducoroy, Patrick; Vagner, Odile; Bonnin, Alain

    2012-01-01

    We report here that modifications of the preanalytical steps of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification of yeasts, with regard to the original protocol provided by the manufacturers, appear to be efficient for the reliable routine identification of clinical yeast isolates in medical laboratories. Indeed, when one colony was sampled instead of five and the protein extraction protocol was modified, the performance of MALDI-TOF MS was superior to that of the API ID 32C method (discrepancies were confirmed by using molecular identification), allowing the correct identification of 94% of the 335 clinical isolates prospectively tested. We then demonstrated that the time for which the primary cultures were preincubated on CHROMagar did not impact the identification of yeasts by MALDI-TOF MS, since 95.1 and 96.2% of the 183 clinical yeast isolates prospectively tested were correctly identified after 48 and 72 h of preincubation, respectively. PMID:22718939

  18. Identification of a functional homolog of the yeast copper homeostasis gene ATX1 from Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Himelblau, E.; Amasino, R.M.; Mira, H.; Penarrubia, L.; Lin, S.J.; Culotta, V.C.

    1998-08-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a homolog of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) gene Anti-oxidant 1 (ATX1) has been identified from Arabidopsis. This gene, referred to as Copper CHaperone (CCH), encodes a protein that is 36% identical to the amino acid sequence of ATX1 and has a 48-amino acid extension at the C-terminal end, which is absent from ATX1 homologs identified in animals. ATX1-deficient yeast (atx1) displayed a loss of high-affinity iron uptake. Expression of CCH in the atx1 strain restored high-affinity iron uptake, demonstrating that CCH is a functional homolog of ATX1. When overexpressed in yeast lacking the superoxide dismutase gene SOD1, both ATX1 and CCH protected the cell from the reactive oxygen toxicity that results from superoxide dismutase deficiency. CCH was unable to rescue the sod1 phenotype in the absence of copper, indicating that CCH function is copper dependent. In Arabidopsis CCH mRNA is present in the root, leaf, and in fluorescence and is up-regulated 7-fold in leaves undergoing senescence. In plants treated with 800 nL/L ozone for 30 min, CCH mRNA levels increased by 30%. In excised leaves and whole plants treated with high levels of exogenous CuSO{sub 4}, CCH mRNA levels decreased, indicating that CCH is regulated differently than characterized metallothionein proteins in Arabidopsis.

  19. Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-print Network

    Valasek, John

    Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks Kenton Kirkpatrick , Jim May Jr linear system identification for aircraft using artificial neural net- works. The output of a linear aircraft system consists of linear combinations of state and control inputs. Determining linear models

  20. Stochastic system identification in structural dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal

    1988-01-01

    Recently, new identification methods have been developed by using the concept of optimal-recursive filtering and stochastic approximation. These methods, known as stochastic identification, are based on the statistical properties of the signal and noise, and do not require the assumptions of current methods. The criterion for stochastic system identification is that the difference between the recorded output and the output from the identified system (i.e., the residual of the identification) should be equal to white noise. In this paper, first a brief review of the theory is given. Then, an application of the method is presented by using ambient vibration data from a nine-story building.

  1. Isolation and Identification of Yeasts from Wild Flowers Collected around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea, and Characterization of the Unrecorded Yeast Bullera coprosmaensis.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Min; Hyun, Se-Hee; Lee, Hyang Burm; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Ha-Kun; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-09-01

    Several types of yeasts were isolated from wild flowers around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea and identified by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the PCR amplicons for the D1/D2 variable domain of the 26S ribosomal DNA using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis. In total, 60 strains from 18 species were isolated, and Pseudozyma spp. (27 strains), which included Pseudozyma rugulosa (7 strains) and Pseudozyma aphidis (6 strains), was dominant species. Among the 60 strains, Bullera coprosmaensis JS00600 represented a newly recorded yeast strain in Korea, and its microbiological characteristics were investigated. The yeast cell has an oval-shaped morphology measuring 1.4 × 1.7 µm in size. Bullera coprosmaensis JS00600 is an asporous yeast that exhibits no pseudomycelium formation. It grew well in vitamin-free medium as well as in yeast extract-malt extract broth and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) broth, and it is halotolerant growing in 10% NaCl-containing YPD broth. PMID:26539042

  2. Isolation and Identification of Yeasts from Wild Flowers Collected around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea, and Characterization of the Unrecorded Yeast Bullera coprosmaensis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Min; Hyun, Se-Hee; Lee, Hyang Burm; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Ha-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Several types of yeasts were isolated from wild flowers around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea and identified by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the PCR amplicons for the D1/D2 variable domain of the 26S ribosomal DNA using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis. In total, 60 strains from 18 species were isolated, and Pseudozyma spp. (27 strains), which included Pseudozyma rugulosa (7 strains) and Pseudozyma aphidis (6 strains), was dominant species. Among the 60 strains, Bullera coprosmaensis JS00600 represented a newly recorded yeast strain in Korea, and its microbiological characteristics were investigated. The yeast cell has an oval-shaped morphology measuring 1.4 × 1.7 µm in size. Bullera coprosmaensis JS00600 is an asporous yeast that exhibits no pseudomycelium formation. It grew well in vitamin-free medium as well as in yeast extract-malt extract broth and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) broth, and it is halotolerant growing in 10% NaCl-containing YPD broth. PMID:26539042

  3. Routine identification of medical fungi by the new Vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight system with a new time-effective strategy.

    PubMed

    Iriart, Xavier; Lavergne, Rose-Anne; Fillaux, Judith; Valentin, Alexis; Magnaval, Jean-François; Berry, Antoine; Cassaing, Sophie

    2012-06-01

    We report here a clinical evaluation of the Vitek MS system for rapid fungal identification. A strategy that uses a single deposit without prior protein extraction was utilized to save time and money. Clinical isolates from the Toulouse University hospital were used to evaluate the performance of the Vitek MS compared to that of both routine laboratory techniques and Vitek2. The Vitek MS performed well in the identification of yeasts and Aspergillus fungi (93.2% of correct identifications). PMID:22495559

  4. Identification of proteins associated with the yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase by tandem affinity purification

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Dmitriy A; Savkina, Maria; Anikin, Michael; Del Campo, Mark; Ecker, Karen; Lambowitz, Alan M; De Gnore, Jon P; McAllister, William T

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of mitochondrial (mt) transcripts varies under different conditions, and is thought to depend upon rates of transcription initiation, transcription termination/attenuation and RNA processing/degradation. The requirement to maintain the balance between RNA synthesis and processing may involve coordination between these processes; however, little is known about factors that regulate the activity of mtRNA polymerase (mtRNAP). Recent attempts to identify mtRNAP–protein interactions in yeast by means of a generalized tandem affinity purification (TAP) protocol were not successful, most likely because they involved a C-terminal mtRNAP–TAP fusion (which is incompatible with mtRNAP function) and because of the use of whole-cell solubilization protocols that did not preserve the integrity of mt protein complexes. Based upon the structure of T7 RNAP (to which mtRNAPs show high sequence similarity), we identified positions in yeast mtRNAP that allow insertion of a small affinity tag, confirmed the mature N-terminus, constructed a functional N-terminal TAP–mtRNAP fusion, pulled down associated proteins, and identified them by LC–MS–MS. Among the proteins found in the pull-down were a DEAD-box protein (Mss116p) and an RNA-binding protein (Pet127p). Previous genetic experiments suggested a role for these proteins in linking transcription and RNA degradation, in that a defect in the mt degradadosome could be suppressed by overexpression of either of these proteins or, independently, by mutations in either mtRNAP or its initiation factor Mtf1p. Further, we found that Mss116p inhibits transcription by mtRNAP in vitro in a steady-state reaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Mss116p and Pet127p are involved in modulation of mtRNAP activity. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:19536766

  5. Identification of a non-mitochondrial phosphatidylserine decarboxylase activity (PSD2) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Trotter, P J; Voelker, D R

    1995-03-17

    Phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (PSD1) plays a central role in the biosynthesis of aminophospholipids in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes by catalyzing the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine. Recent reports (Trotter, P. J., Pedretti, J., and Voelker, D. R. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 21416-21424; Clancey, C. J., Chang, S.-C., and Dowhan, W. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 24580-24590) described the cloning of a yeast structural gene for this enzyme (PSD1) and the creation of the null allele. Based on the phenotype of strains containing a null allele for PSD1 (psd1-delta 1::TRP1) it was hypothesized that yeast have a second phosphatidylserine decarboxylase. The present studies demonstrate the presence of a second enzyme activity (denoted PSD2), which, depending on the method of evaluation, accounts for 4-12% of the total cellular phosphatidylserine decarboxylase activity found in wild type. Recessive mutations resulting in loss of this enzyme activity (denoted psd2) in cells containing the psd1-delta 1::TRP1 null allele also result in ethanolamine auxotrophy. When incubated with [3H]serine these double mutants accumulate label in phosphatidylserine, while very little (< 5%) is converted to phosphatidylethanolamine. In addition, these mutants have a approximately 70% decrease in the amount of total phosphatidylethanolamine even when grown in the presence of exogenous ethanolamine. Strains containing psd1 or psd2 mutations were utilized for the subcellular localization of the PSD2 enzyme activity. Unlike the PSD1 activity, the PSD2 enzyme activity does not localize to the mitochondria, but to a low density subcellular compartment with fractionation properties similar to both vacuoles and Golgi. PMID:7890739

  6. Identification of Medically Relevant Species of Arthroconidial Yeasts by Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kolecka, Anna; Khayhan, Kantarawee; Groenewald, Marizeth; Theelen, Bart; Arabatzis, Michael; Velegraki, Aristea; Kostrzewa, Markus; Mares, Mihai; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used for an extensive identification study of arthroconidial yeasts, using 85 reference strains from the CBS-KNAW yeast collection and 134 clinical isolates collected from medical centers in Qatar, Greece, and Romania. The test set included 72 strains of ascomycetous yeasts (Galactomyces, Geotrichum, Saprochaete, and Magnusiomyces spp.) and 147 strains of basidiomycetous yeasts (Trichosporon and Guehomyces spp.). With minimal preparation time, MALDI-TOF MS proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool that provided reliable identification of most (98%) of the tested strains to the species level, with good discriminatory power. The majority of strains were correctly identified at the species level with good scores (>2.0) and seven of the tested strains with log score values between 1.7 and 2.0. The MALDI-TOF MS results obtained were consistent with validated internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA sequencing results. Expanding the mass spectrum database by increasing the number of reference strains for closely related species, including those of nonclinical origin, should enhance the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS-based diagnostic analysis of these arthroconidial fungi in medical and other laboratories. PMID:23678074

  7. IONS: Identification of Orthologs by Neighborhood and Similarity—an Automated Method to Identify Orthologs in Chromosomal Regions of Common Evolutionary Ancestry and its Application to Hemiascomycetous Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Seret, Marie-Line; Baret, Philippe V.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis is widely used to infer gene function and study genome evolution and requires proper ortholog identification across different genomes. We have developed a program for the Identification of Orthologs in one-to-one relationship by Neighborhood and Similarity (IONS) between closely related species. The algorithm combines two levels of evidence to determine co-ancestrality at the genome scale: sequence similarity and shared neighborhood. The method was initially designed to provide anchor points for syntenic blocks within the Génolevures project concerning nine hemiascomycetous yeasts (about 50,000 genes) and is applicable to different input databases. Comparison based on use of a Rand index shows that the results are highly consistent with the pillars of the Yeast Gene Order Browser, a manually curated database. Compared with SYNERGY, another algorithm reporting homology relationships, our method’s main advantages are its automation and the absence of dataset-dependent parameters, facilitating consistent integration of newly released genomes. PMID:21918595

  8. IONS: Identification of Orthologs by Neighborhood and Similarity-an Automated Method to Identify Orthologs in Chromosomal Regions of Common Evolutionary Ancestry and its Application to Hemiascomycetous Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Seret, Marie-Line; Baret, Philippe V

    2011-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis is widely used to infer gene function and study genome evolution and requires proper ortholog identification across different genomes. We have developed a program for the Identification of Orthologs in one-to-one relationship by Neighborhood and Similarity (IONS) between closely related species. The algorithm combines two levels of evidence to determine co-ancestrality at the genome scale: sequence similarity and shared neighborhood. The method was initially designed to provide anchor points for syntenic blocks within the Génolevures project concerning nine hemiascomycetous yeasts (about 50,000 genes) and is applicable to different input databases. Comparison based on use of a Rand index shows that the results are highly consistent with the pillars of the Yeast Gene Order Browser, a manually curated database. Compared with SYNERGY, another algorithm reporting homology relationships, our method's main advantages are its automation and the absence of dataset-dependent parameters, facilitating consistent integration of newly released genomes. PMID:21918595

  9. Identification and Cloning of the Chl4 Gene Controlling Chromosome Segregation in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kouprina, N.; Kirillov, A.; Kroll, E.; Koryabin, M.; Shestopalov, B.; Bannikov, V.; Zakharyev, V.; Larionov, V.

    1993-01-01

    A collection of chl mutants characterized by decreased fidelity of chromosome transmission and by minichromosome nondisjunction in mitosis was examined for the ability to maintain nonessential dicentric plasmids. In one of the seven mutants analyzed, chl4, dicentric plasmids did not depress cell division. Moreover, nonessential dicentric plasmids were maintained stably without any rearrangements during many generations in the chl4 mutant. The rate of mitotic heteroallelic recombination in the chl4 mutant was not increased compared to that in an isogenic wild-type strain. Analysis of the segregation of a marked chromosome indicated that sister chromatid nondisjunction and sister chromatid loss contributed equally to chromosome malsegregation in the chl4 mutant. A genomic clone of CHL4 was isolated by complementation of the chl4-1 mutation and was physically mapped to the right arm of chromosome IV near the SUP2 gene. Nucleotide sequence analysis of CHL4 clone revealed a 1.4-kb open reading frame coding for a 53-kD predicted protein which does not have homology to published proteins. A strain containing a null allele of CHL4 is viable under standard growth conditions but has a temperature-sensitive phenotype (conditional lethality at 36°). We suggest that the CHL4 gene is required for kinetochore function in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:8243998

  10. Identification and Dissection of a Complex DNA Repair Sensitivity Phenotype in Baker's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Demogines, Ann; Smith, Erin; Kruglyak, Leonid; Alani, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Complex traits typically involve the contribution of multiple gene variants. In this study, we took advantage of a high-density genotyping analysis of the BY (S288c) and RM strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of 123 derived spore progeny to identify the genetic loci that underlie a complex DNA repair sensitivity phenotype. This was accomplished by screening hybrid yeast progeny for sensitivity to a variety of DNA damaging agents. Both the BY and RM strains are resistant to the ultraviolet light–mimetic agent 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO); however, hybrid progeny from a BY×RM cross displayed varying sensitivities to the drug. We mapped a major quantitative trait locus (QTL), RAD5, and identified the exact polymorphism within this locus responsible for 4-NQO sensitivity. By using a backcrossing strategy along with array-assisted bulk segregant analysis, we identified one other locus, MKT1, and a QTL on Chromosome VII that also link to the hybrid 4-NQO–sensitive phenotype but confer more minor effects. This work suggests an additive model for sensitivity to 4-NQO and provides a strategy for mapping both major and minor QTL that confer background-specific phenotypes. It also provides tools for understanding the effect of genetic background on sensitivity to genotoxic agents. PMID:18617998

  11. Identification of Information in Decision Systems

    E-print Network

    Datta, Shoumen

    2007-01-01

    Extending unique identification to non-physical objects (data, information, decisions, knowledge) is a challenging problem in systems engineering. The tools and technologies available for naming physical objects may soon ...

  12. Security approaches for Radio Frequency Identification systems

    E-print Network

    Foley, Joseph Timothy, 1976-

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, I explore the challenges related to the security of the Electronic Product Code (EPC) class of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags and associated data. RFID systems can be used to improve supply chain ...

  13. High-Throughput Identification of Cis-Regulatory Rewiring Events in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Sarda, Shrutii; Hannenhalli, Sridhar

    2015-12-01

    A coregulated module of genes ("regulon") can have evolutionarily conserved expression patterns and yet have diverged upstream regulators across species. For instance, the ribosomal genes regulon is regulated by the transcription factor (TF) TBF1 in Candida albicans, while in Saccharomyces cerevisiae it is regulated by RAP1. Only a handful of such rewiring events have been established, and the prevalence or conditions conducive to such events are not well known. Here, we develop a novel probabilistic scoring method to comprehensively screen for regulatory rewiring within regulons across 23 yeast species. Investigation of 1,713 regulons and 176 TFs yielded 5,353 significant rewiring events at 5% false discovery rate (FDR). Besides successfully recapitulating known rewiring events, our analyses also suggest TF candidates for certain processes reported to be under distinct regulatory controls in S. cerevisiae and C. albicans, for which the implied regulators are not known: 1) Oxidative stress response (Sc-MSN2 to Ca-FKH2) and 2) nutrient modulation (Sc-RTG1 to Ca-GCN4/Ca-UME6). Furthermore, a stringent screen to detect TF rewiring at individual genes identified 1,446 events at 10% FDR. Overall, these events are supported by strong coexpression between the predicted regulator and its target gene(s) in a species-specific fashion (>50-fold). Independent functional analyses of rewiring TF pairs revealed greater functional interactions and shared biological processes between them (P = 1 × 10(-3)).Our study represents the first comprehensive assessment of regulatory rewiring; with a novel approach that has generated a unique high-confidence resource of several specific events, suggesting that evolutionary rewiring is relatively frequent and may be a significant mechanism of regulatory innovation. PMID:26399482

  14. Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for improved xylose utilization with a three-plasmid SUMO yeast expression system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-plasmid yeast expression system utilizing the portable small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) vector set combined with the efficient endogenous yeast protease Ulp1 was developed for production of large amounts of soluble functional protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each vector has a differ...

  15. Modeling, system identification, and control of ASTREX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abhyankar, Nandu S.; Ramakrishnan, J.; Byun, K. W.; Das, A.; Cossey, Derek F.; Berg, J.

    1993-01-01

    The modeling, system identification and controller design aspects of the ASTREX precision space structure are presented in this work. Modeling of ASTREX is performed using NASTRAN, TREETOPS and I-DEAS. The models generated range from simple linear time-invariant models to nonlinear models used for large angle simulations. Identification in both the time and frequency domains are presented. The experimental set up and the results from the identification experiments are included. Finally, controller design for ASTREX is presented. Simulation results using this optimal controller demonstrate the controller performance. Finally the future directions and plans for the facility are addressed.

  16. Multi-level RF identification system

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-07-20

    A radio frequency identification system having a radio frequency transceiver for generating a continuous wave RF interrogation signal that impinges upon an RF identification tag. An oscillation circuit in the RF identification tag modulates the interrogation signal with a subcarrier of a predetermined frequency and modulates the frequency-modulated signal back to the transmitting interrogator. The interrogator recovers and analyzes the subcarrier signal and determines its frequency. The interrogator generates an output indicative of the frequency of the subcarrier frequency, thereby identifying the responding RFID tag as one of a "class" of RFID tags configured to respond with a subcarrier signal of a predetermined frequency.

  17. Nuclear Materials Identification System Operational Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, L.G.

    2001-04-10

    This report describes the operation and setup of the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) with a {sup 252}Cf neutron source at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The components of the system are described with a description of the setup of the system along with an overview of the NMIS measurements for scanning, calibration, and confirmation of inventory items.

  18. On Markov parameters in system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh; Juang, Jer-Nan; Longman, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed discussion of Markov parameters in system identification is given. Different forms of input-output representation of linear discrete-time systems are reviewed and discussed. Interpretation of sampled response data as Markov parameters is presented. Relations between the state-space model and particular linear difference models via the Markov parameters are formulated. A generalization of Markov parameters to observer and Kalman filter Markov parameters for system identification is explained. These extended Markov parameters play an important role in providing not only a state-space realization, but also an observer/Kalman filter for the system of interest.

  19. Yeast as a system for modeling mitochondrial disease mechanisms and discovering therapies.

    PubMed

    Lasserre, Jean-Paul; Dautant, Alain; Aiyar, Raeka S; Kucharczyk, Roza; Glatigny, Annie; Tribouillard-Tanvier, Déborah; Rytka, Joanna; Blondel, Marc; Skoczen, Natalia; Reynier, Pascal; Pitayu, Laras; Rötig, Agnès; Delahodde, Agnès; Steinmetz, Lars M; Dujardin, Geneviève; Procaccio, Vincent; di Rago, Jean-Paul

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are severe and largely untreatable. Owing to the many essential processes carried out by mitochondria and the complex cellular systems that support these processes, these diseases are diverse, pleiotropic, and challenging to study. Much of our current understanding of mitochondrial function and dysfunction comes from studies in the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because of its good fermenting capacity, S. cerevisiae can survive mutations that inactivate oxidative phosphorylation, has the ability to tolerate the complete loss of mitochondrial DNA (a property referred to as 'petite-positivity'), and is amenable to mitochondrial and nuclear genome manipulation. These attributes make it an excellent model system for studying and resolving the molecular basis of numerous mitochondrial diseases. Here, we review the invaluable insights this model organism has yielded about diseases caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, which ranges from primary defects in oxidative phosphorylation to metabolic disorders, as well as dysfunctions in maintaining the genome or in the dynamics of mitochondria. Owing to the high level of functional conservation between yeast and human mitochondrial genes, several yeast species have been instrumental in revealing the molecular mechanisms of pathogenic human mitochondrial gene mutations. Importantly, such insights have pointed to potential therapeutic targets, as have genetic and chemical screens using yeast. PMID:26035862

  20. Yeast as a system for modeling mitochondrial disease mechanisms and discovering therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lasserre, Jean-Paul; Dautant, Alain; Aiyar, Raeka S.; Kucharczyk, Roza; Glatigny, Annie; Tribouillard-Tanvier, Déborah; Rytka, Joanna; Blondel, Marc; Skoczen, Natalia; Reynier, Pascal; Pitayu, Laras; Rötig, Agnès; Delahodde, Agnès; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Dujardin, Geneviève; Procaccio, Vincent; di Rago, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial diseases are severe and largely untreatable. Owing to the many essential processes carried out by mitochondria and the complex cellular systems that support these processes, these diseases are diverse, pleiotropic, and challenging to study. Much of our current understanding of mitochondrial function and dysfunction comes from studies in the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because of its good fermenting capacity, S. cerevisiae can survive mutations that inactivate oxidative phosphorylation, has the ability to tolerate the complete loss of mitochondrial DNA (a property referred to as ‘petite-positivity’), and is amenable to mitochondrial and nuclear genome manipulation. These attributes make it an excellent model system for studying and resolving the molecular basis of numerous mitochondrial diseases. Here, we review the invaluable insights this model organism has yielded about diseases caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, which ranges from primary defects in oxidative phosphorylation to metabolic disorders, as well as dysfunctions in maintaining the genome or in the dynamics of mitochondria. Owing to the high level of functional conservation between yeast and human mitochondrial genes, several yeast species have been instrumental in revealing the molecular mechanisms of pathogenic human mitochondrial gene mutations. Importantly, such insights have pointed to potential therapeutic targets, as have genetic and chemical screens using yeast. PMID:26035862

  1. GENE ENGINEERING IN YEAST FOR BIODEGRADATION: IMMUNOLOGICAL CROSS-REACTIVITY AMONG CYTOCHROME P-450 SYSTEM PROTEINS OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND CANDIDA TROPICALIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Yeasts are eukaryotic microorganisms whose cytochrome P-450 monoxygenase systems may be amenable to genetic engineering for the hydroxylation and detoxication of polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. e are examining the molecular genetic properties of strains of bakers yeast, Sa...

  2. Choosing Between Yeast and Bacterial Expression Systems: Yield Dependent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Rebecca S.; Malone, Christine C.; Moore, Blake P.; Burk, Melissa; Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a naturally occurring fluorescent protein isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. The intrinsic fluorescence of the protein is due to a chromophore located in the center of the molecule. Its usefulness has been established as a marker for gene expression and localization of gene products. GFP has recently been utilized as a model protein for crystallization studies at NASA/MSFC, both in earth-based and in microgravity experiments. Because large quantities of purified protein were needed, the cDNA of GFP was cloned into the Pichia pastoris pPICZ(alpha) C strain, with very little protein secreted into the media. Microscopic analysis prior to harvest showed gigantic green fluorescent yeast, but upon harvesting most protein was degraded. Trial fermentations of GFP cloned into pPICZ A for intracellular expression provided unsatisfactory yield. GFP cloned into E, coli was overexpressed at greater than 150 mg/liter, with purification yields at greater than 100mg/liter.

  3. Identification of a Small Molecule Yeast TORC1 Inhibitor with a Multiplex Screen Based on Flow Cytometry

    E-print Network

    Halazonetis, Thanos

    States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: TOR (target of rapamycin) is a serine/threonine kinase, evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human, which functions as a fundamental controller of cell growth-tagged yeast clones that represent the readouts of four branches of the TORC1 signaling pathway in budding

  4. Yeast osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Stefan; Krantz, Marcus; Nordlander, Bodil

    2007-01-01

    Osmoregulation is the active control of the cellular water balance and encompasses homeostatic mechanisms crucial for life. The osmoregulatory system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is particularly well understood. Key to yeast osmoregulation is the production and accumulation of the compatible solute glycerol, which is partly controlled by the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) signaling system. Genetic analyses combined with studies on protein-protein interactions have revealed the wiring scheme of the HOG signaling network, a branched mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (MAPK) pathway that eventually converges on the MAPK Hog1. Hog1 is activated following cell shrinking and controls posttranscriptional processes in the cytosol as well as gene expression in the nucleus. HOG pathway activity can easily and rapidly be controlled experimentally by extracellular stimuli, and signaling and adaptation can be separated by a system of forced adaptation. This makes yeast osmoregulation suitable for studies on system properties of signaling and cellular adaptation via mathematical modeling. Computational simulations and parallel quantitative time course experimentation on different levels of the regulatory system have provided a stepping stone toward a holistic understanding, revealing how the HOG pathway can combine rigorous feedback control with maintenance of signaling competence. The abundant tools make yeast a suitable model for an integrated analysis of cellular osmoregulation. Maintenance of the cellular water balance is fundamental for life. All cells, even those in multicellular organisms with an organism-wide osmoregulation, have the ability to actively control their water balance. Osmoregulation encompasses homeostatic processes that maintain an appropriate intracellular environment for biochemical processes as well as turgor of cells and organism. In the laboratory, the osmoregulatory system is studied most conveniently as a response to osmotic shock, causing rapid and dramatic changes in the extracellular water activity. Those rapid changes mediate either water efflux (hyperosmotic shock), and hence cell shrinkage, or influx (hypoosmotic shock), causing cell swelling. The yeast S. cerevisiae, as a free-living organism experiencing both slow and rapid changes in extracellular water activity, has proven a suitable and genetically tractable experimental system in studying the underlying signaling pathways and regulatory processes governing osmoregulation. Although far from complete, the present picture of yeast osmoregulation is both extensive and detailed (de Nadal et al., 2002; Hohmann, 2002; Klipp et al., 2005). Simulations using mathematical models combined with time course measurements of different molecular processes in signaling and adaptation have allowed elucidation of the first system properties on the yeast osmoregulatory network. PMID:17875410

  5. 78 FR 58785 - Unique Device Identification System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... example, the use of UDIs in computerized physician order entry systems will help ensure that the intended... device identification system, as required by section 519(f) of the FD&C Act (see 77 FR 40736). On July 9...(f) of the FD&C Act (see 77 FR 69393). The preamble to the July 2012 proposal describes...

  6. A practical approach to rotorcraft systems identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Val, R. W.; Wang, J. C.; Demiroz, M. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A standard for rotorcraft system identification is proposed to facilitate the exchange of data and technology within the industry. This integrated approach utilizes simulations to validate methodology and flight data to validate simulations. A new technique allowing results obtained from separate maneuvers to be systematically combined is also presented and shown to be a fundamental tool in providing a practical approach to rotorcraft identification. The proposed methodology is evaluated using data generated by nonlinear blade-element simulation of the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft.

  7. Robust orthogonal recombination system for versatile genomic elements rearrangement in yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiuhui; Qi, Hao; Wu, Yi; Yuan, Yingjin

    2015-01-01

    Rearrangement of genomic DNA elements in a dynamic controlled fashion is a fundamental challenge. Site-specific DNA recombinases have been tamed as a powerful tool in genome editing. Here, we reported a DNA element rearrangement on the basis of a pairwise orthogonal recombination system which is comprised of two site-specific recombinases of Vika/vox and Cre/loxp in yeast Saccharomyces Creevisiae. Taking the advantage of the robust pairwise orthogonality, we showed that multi gene elements could be organized in a programmed way, in which rationally designed pattern of loxP and vox determined the final genotype after expressing corresponding recombinases. Finally, it was demonstrated that the pairwise orthogonal recombination system could be utilized to refine synthetic chromosome rearrangement and modification by loxP-mediated evolution, SCRaMbLE, in yeast cell carrying a completely synthesized chromosome III. PMID:26477943

  8. PICK1: a Perinuclear Binding Protein and Substrate for Protein Kinase C Isolated by the Yeast Two-hybrid System

    E-print Network

    Staudinger, Jeffrey Leonard; Zhou, Jumin; Burgess, Rob; Elledge, Stephen J.; Olson, Eric N.

    1995-02-01

    translocates to different subcellular sites where it phosphorylates numerous proteins, most of which are unidentified. We used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify proteins that interact with activated PKC alpha. Using the catalytic region of PKC fused...

  9. Continuous-Time Bilinear System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe a new method for identification of a continuous-time multi-input and multi-output bilinear system. The approach is to make judicious use of the linear-model properties of the bilinear system when subjected to a constant input. Two steps are required in the identification process. The first step is to use a set of pulse responses resulting from a constant input of one sample period to identify the state matrix, the output matrix, and the direct transmission matrix. The second step is to use another set of pulse responses with the same constant input over multiple sample periods to identify the input matrix and the coefficient matrices associated with the coupling terms between the state and the inputs. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the concept and the computational algorithm for the identification method.

  10. Stabilization of the yeast desaturase system by low levels of oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkmann, C. M.; Klein, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    The stability of particulate palmitoyl-CoA desaturase preparations from anaerobically grown yeast cells was increased by exposure to low levels of oxygen. The stabilizing effect of oxygen may be based upon the increased amounts of palmitoleic acid and ergosterol that become available to the cells. These results suggest the evolutinary appearance of this system at a time when atmospheric oxygen was at a low level.

  11. In vitro evaluation of atmospheric particulate matter and sedimentation particles using yeast bioassay system.

    PubMed

    Mori, Taiki; Inudo, Makiko; Takao, Yuji; Koga, Minoru; Takemasa, Takehiro; Shinohara, Ryota; Arizono, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Little information on the evaluation of airborne particulate matter (APM) and sedimentation particles from subway stations is available. The thermal metamorphism of train wheels generating toxic particles in subway stations is a possibility. In this study, the toxicity and physiological effects of particles from subway stations were evaluated using a yeast bioassay system. Estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of APM in APM extracts from subway stations were determined. No estrogenic activity was found in the APM fractions and their S9-activated APM samples. Sedimentation dust samples also showed no estrogen activity. In contrast, extracts from sedimentation dust samples showed antiestrogen activity. Marked yeast toxicity was observed in the samples extracted from sedimentation dust. Potent yeast toxicity was also found in the S9-activated extracts from sedimentation dust. The results suggest that sedimentation dust from a semiclosed area of a subway system has antiestrogen activity, although both the origin and generation system of this activity are uncertain. These pollutants in sedimentation dust may change to a more toxic form in vivo by S9 activation. PMID:17762843

  12. State Identification in Nonlinear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, James Paul

    2005-02-06

    A state estimation method based on finding a system state that causes a model to match a set of system measurements is regularized by requiring that sudden changes in system state be avoided. The required optimization is accomplished by a pattern search algorithm. The method does not require derivative information or linearization of the model. Is has been applied to a 10 dimensional model of a fast reactor system.

  13. Identification of oleaginous yeast strains able to accumulate high intracellular lipids when cultivated in alkaline pretreated corn stover

    PubMed Central

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Jin, Mingjie; Fernandez, J. Enrique; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Balan, Venkatesh; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial oil is a potential alternative to food/plant-derived biodiesel fuel. Our previous screening studies identified a wide range of oleaginous yeast species, using a defined laboratory medium known to stimulate lipid accumulation. In this study, the ability of these yeasts to grow and accumulate lipids was further investigated in synthetic hydrolysate (SynH) and authentic ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). Most yeast strains tested were able to accumulate lipids in SynH, but only a few were able to grow and accumulate lipids in ACSH medium. Cryptococcus humicola UCDFST 10-1004 was able to accumulate as high as 15.5 g/L lipids, out of a total of 36 g/L cellular biomass when grown in ACSH, with a cellular lipid content of 40% of cell dry weight. This lipid production is among the highest reported values for oleaginous yeasts grown in authentic hydrolysate. Pre-culturing in SynH media with xylose as sole carbon source enabled yeasts to assimilate both glucose and xylose more efficiently in the subsequent hydrolysate medium. This study demonstrates that ACSH is a suitable medium for certain oleaginous yeasts to convert lignocellullosic sugars to triacylglycerols for production of biodiesel and other valuable oleochemicals. PMID:25052467

  14. Optical disk uses in criminal identification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sypherd, Allen D.

    1990-08-01

    A significant advancement in law enforcement tools has been made possible by the rapid and innovative development of electronic imaging for criminal identification systems. In particular, development of optical disks capable of high-capacity and random-access storage has provided a unique marriage of application and technology. Fast random access to any record, non-destructive reading of stored images, electronic sorting and transmission of images and an accepted legal basis for evidence are a few of the advantages derived from optical disk technology. This paper discusses the application of optical disk technology to both Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) and Automated Mugshot Retrieval Systems (AMRS). The following topics are addressed in light of AFIS and AMRS user requirements and system capabilities: Write once vs. rewritable, gray level and storage requirements, multi-volume library systems, data organization and capacity trends.

  15. Bimodal Biometric Person Identification System Under Perturbations

    E-print Network

    Bimodal Biometric Person Identification System Under Perturbations Miguel Carrasco1 , Luis Pizarro2 inexpensive and widely accepted biometric traits, namely face and voice information. We use a probabilistic of the face and voice classifiers alone. Keywords: Biometrics, multimodal, identificacion, face, voice, proba

  16. 78 FR 58785 - Unique Device Identification System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... the device prior to submitting a report. It will allow FDA, health care providers, and industry to... device identification system, as required by section 519(f) of the FD&C Act (see 77 FR 40736). On July 9...(f) of the FD&C Act (see 77 FR 69393). The preamble to the July 2012 proposal describes...

  17. Music Emotion Identification from Lyrics Systems Science

    E-print Network

    Lee, WonSook

    Music Emotion Identification from Lyrics Dan Yang Systems Science University of Ottawa Ottawa that is extended to 23 specific emotion categories. Our results for mining the lyrical text of songs for specific that correspond to commonsense intuitions about specific emotions. Mining lyrics focused in this paper is one

  18. Identification and characterization of the mitochondrial RNA polymerase and transcription factor in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hengyi; Sun, Wenxia; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair I H

    2011-07-01

    We have characterized the mitochondrial transcription factor (Mtf1) and RNA polymerase (Rpo41) of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Deletion mutants show Mtf1 or Rpo41 to be essential for cell growth, cell morphology and mitochondrial membrane potential. Overexpression of Mtf1 and Rpo41 can induce mitochondrial transcription. Mtf1 and Rpo41 can bind and transcribe mitochondrial promoters in vitro and the initiating nucleotides were the same in vivo and in vitro. Mtf1 is required for efficient transcription. We discuss the functional differences between Mtf1 and Rpo41 of S. pombe with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher organisms. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, the established model for mitochondrial transcription, S. pombe, a petite-negative yeast, resembles higher organisms that cannot tolerate the loss of mitochondrial function. The S. pombe and human mitochondrial genomes are similar in size and much smaller than that of S. cerevisiae. This is an important first step in the development of S. pombe as an alternative and complementary model system for molecular genetic and biochemical studies of mitochondrial transcription and mitochondrial-nuclear interactions. This is the first systematic study of the cellular function and biochemistry of Rpo41 and Mtf1 in S. pombe. PMID:21357609

  19. An efficient automatic firearm identification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan, Zun Liang; Liong, Choong-Yeun; Jemain, Abdul Aziz; Ghani, Nor Azura Md.

    2014-06-01

    Automatic firearm identification system (AFIS) is highly demanded in forensic ballistics to replace the traditional approach which uses comparison microscope and is relatively complex and time consuming. Thus, several AFIS have been developed for commercial and testing purposes. However, those AFIS are still unable to overcome some of the drawbacks of the traditional firearm identification approach. The goal of this study is to introduce another efficient and effective AFIS. A total of 747 firing pin impression images captured from five different pistols of same make and model are used to evaluate the proposed AFIS. It was demonstrated that the proposed AFIS is capable of producing firearm identification accuracy rate of over 95.0% with an execution time of less than 0.35 seconds per image.

  20. High-Level System Support for Automatic-Identification Applications

    E-print Network

    Identification (RFID), RFID middleware, Smart Objects 1 Introduction Radio Frequency Identification (RFID range of industries. RFID systems have begun to find greater use in the consumer object identification RFID are often labeled automatic identification (Auto-ID) applications or smart object applications

  1. Isolation and identification of yeasts associated with vineyard and winery by RFLP analysis of ribosomal genes and mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Sabate, Josepa; Cano, Josep; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Guillamón, Josè M

    2002-01-01

    Yeast colonies isolated from vineyard and cellar substrates were analysed in the present study. Yeast species assessment was carried out by amplification and digestion of a region of the ribosomal RNA gene repeat unit. Saccharomyces strains were also characterised using mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis. Oxidative basidiomycetous yeasts without enological potential were predominant in the vineyard environment. Yeasts associated with grape skin depend on grape variety, vintage and degree of grape maturation. These species from grape surface constituted the predominant microbiota in must and they developed during the first stages of the process. Yeasts colonies were also isolated and identified from the walls of a fermentation vat some days before the harvest. Contray to what was expected, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was not the major species isolated as Candida sorbosa represented 76% of the species isolated. Saccharomyces strains isolated from the fermentation vat had been previously isolated in wine fermentations in this cellar. Therefore, these strains should be considered as constant residents of this winery. PMID:12501990

  2. Biodiversity of yeast mycobiota in "sucuk," a traditional Turkish fermented dry sausage: phenotypic and genotypic identification, functional and technological properties.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Ismet; Sagdic, Osman

    2014-11-01

    In this study, yeasts from Turkish fermented sucuks were identified and their functional and technological properties were evaluated. Two hundred fifty-five yeast isolates were obtained from 35 different sucuk samples from different regions of Turkey. The yeast isolates were determined as genotypic using 2 different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods (rep-PCR and RAPD-PCR). Functional and technological properties of including proteolytic, lipolytic, and catalase activities, tolerance to NaCl and bile, as well as growing rates at different temperature and pH conditions selected yeast strains were also evaluated. Candida zeylanoides and Debaryomyces hansenii were dominant strains in sucuk samples. All C. zeylanoides and D. hansenii tested could grow at the condition of 15% NaCl and 0.3% bile salt. However, none of the strains were able to grow at 37 °C, even though catalase activity, weak proteolytic and lipolytic activities was still observed. D. hansenii were able to grow only at pH 3, while some of C. zeylanoides could grow at lower pH levels (pH 2). Three and 4 strains of C. zeylanoides showed ?-hemolysis activity and nitrate reduction ability to nitrite, respectively. D. hansenii did not have properties, which are ?-hemolysis, nitrate reduction, or hydrogen sulfide production. Overall, diverse yeast mycobiota present in Turkish fermented sucuk and their functional and technological properties were revealed with this study. PMID:25273925

  3. Construction of a beta-glucosidase expression system using the multistress-tolerant yeast Issatchenkia orientalis.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Takao; Tokuhiro, Kenro; Sugiyama, Hidehiko; Kohda, Katsuhiro; Isono, Naoto; Hisamatsu, Makoto; Takahashi, Haruo; Imaeda, Takao

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate the value of the thermotolerant yeast Issatchenkia orientalis as a candidate microorganism for bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass with the goal of consolidated bioprocessing. The I. orientalis MF-121 strain is acid tolerant, ethanol tolerant, and thermotolerant, and is thus a multistress-tolerant yeast. To express heterologous proteins in I. orientalis, we constructed a transformation system for the MF-121 strain and then isolated the promoters of TDH1 and PGK1, two genes that were found to be strongly expressed during ethanol fermentation. As a result, expression of beta-glucosidase from Aspergillus aculeatus could be achieved with I. orientalis, demonstrating successful heterologous gene expression in I. orientalis for the first time. The transformant could convert cellobiose to ethanol under acidic conditions and at high temperature. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) was performed with the transformant, which produced 29 g l(-1) of ethanol in 72 h at 40 degrees C even without addition of beta-glucosidase when SSF was carried out in medium containing 100 g l(-1) of microcrystalline cellulose and a commercial cellulase preparation. These results suggest that using a genetically engineered thermotolerant yeast such as I. orientalis in SSF could lead to cost reduction because less saccharification enzymes are required. PMID:20467739

  4. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  5. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces ...

  6. Microbial identification system for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Harlan D.; Scarlett, Janie B.; Skweres, Joyce A.; Fortune, Russell L.; Staples, John L.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Health System (EHS) and Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station Freedom will require a comprehensive microbiology capability. This requirement entails the development of an automated system to perform microbial identifications on isolates from a variety of environmental and clinical sources and, when required, to perform antimicrobial sensitivity testing. The unit currently undergoing development and testing is the Automated Microbiology System II (AMS II) built by Vitek Systems, Inc. The AMS II has successfully completed 12 months of laboratory testing and evaluation for compatibility with microgravity operation. The AMS II is a promising technology for use on Space Station Freedom.

  7. Robust Subspace System Identification via Weighted Nuclear Norm Optimization

    E-print Network

    Seshia, Sanjit A.

    Robust Subspace System Identification via Weighted Nuclear Norm Optimization Dorsa Sadigh Henrik, outliers, nuclear norm, sparsity, robust PCA. 1. INTRODUCTION Subspace system identification is a well studied problem in system identification. The problem was recently posed as a convex optimization problem

  8. Reliability of the WIDERYST Susceptibility Testing System for Detection of In Vitro Antifungal Resistance in Yeasts?

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Gutierrez, M. Olga; Buitrago, M. Jose; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the WIDERYST system, a commercially available computer-assisted image-processing device for the antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts. A collection of 90 clinical isolates selected to represent ranges of susceptibilities in vitro as broad as possible was tested. An evaluation compared the results obtained by the new system with those achieved by both the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) microdilution reference procedure and the antifungal susceptibility standard of the European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Overall, the agreement and the correlation index between results obtained by the EUCAST method and the WIDERYST system were 89% and 0.84 (P < 0.01), respectively, and agreement and correlation index between data obtained by the CLSI procedure and the WIDERYST system were 90% and 0.86 (P < 0.01), respectively. The system was able to detect amphotericin B-resistant isolates. All Candida sp. isolates with resistance in vitro to azole agents were detected as well. The system misclassified some isolates belonging to the slowly growing genera Dipodascus and Pichia. A total of 2.7% very major errors were detected for fluconazole. The WIDERYST system is an alternative to reference procedures for antifungal susceptibility testing of clinical isolates of yeasts, particularly for Candida and Cryptococcus species. PMID:18195057

  9. System identification of the brompton bicycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladun, Monique Victoria Teresa

    The Brompton (a European folding design) bicycle was instrumented with a variety of sensors including acceleration, angular rate, speed, and steering sensors. A bicycle state estimator was designed to obtain additional information from this data including heading, turn rate, lean angle, steer rate, and positions of the wheels during a trajectory. The first part of the thesis describes the model setup for system identification including the Steer-to-Lean dynamics and Lean-to-Steer dynamics reduced models. CIFER software was used in the system identification process of these models. The second part describes the validation of the Empirical model by using the Rider Control model ([1]) and the Complete Rider/Vehicle model ([1]) to determine the feedback gains. The Theoretical model feedback gains were also determined by using the Rider Control model ([1]) and the Complete Rider/Vehicle model ([1]).

  10. Unique device identification system. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-09-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to establish a system to adequately identify devices through distribution and use. This rule requires the label of medical devices to include a unique device identifier (UDI), except where the rule provides for an exception or alternative placement. The labeler must submit product information concerning devices to FDA's Global Unique Device Identification Database (GUDID), unless subject to an exception or alternative. The system established by this rule requires the label and device package of each medical device to include a UDI and requires that each UDI be provided in a plain-text version and in a form that uses automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) technology. The UDI will be required to be directly marked on the device itself if the device is intended to be used more than once and intended to be reprocessed before each use. PMID:24066364

  11. Design and evaluation of a microfluidic system for inhibition studies of yeast cell signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamngren, Charlotte; Dinér, Peter; Grøtli, Morten; Goksör, Mattias; Adiels, Caroline B.

    2012-10-01

    In cell signaling, different perturbations lead to different responses and using traditional biological techniques that result in averaged data may obscure important cell-to-cell variations. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a four-inlet microfluidic system that enables single-cell analysis by investigating the effect on Hog1 localization post a selective Hog1 inhibitor treatment during osmotic stress. Optical tweezers was used to position yeast cells in an array of desired size and density inside the microfluidic system. By changing the flow rates through the inlet channels, controlled and rapid introduction of two different perturbations over the cell array was enabled. The placement of the cells was determined by diffusion rates flow simulations. The system was evaluated by monitoring the subcellular localization of a fluorescently tagged kinase of the yeast "High Osmolarity Glycerol" (HOG) pathway, Hog1-GFP. By sequential treatment of the yeast cells with a selective Hog1 kinase inhibitor and sorbitol, the subcellular localization of Hog1-GFP was analysed on a single-cell level. The results showed impaired Hog1-GFP nuclear localization, providing evidence of a congenial design. The setup made it possible to remove and add an agent within 2 seconds, which is valuable for investigating the dynamic signal transduction pathways and cannot be done using traditional methods. We are confident that the features of the four-inlet microfluidic system will be a valuable tool and hence contribute significantly to unravel the mechanisms of the HOG pathway and similar dynamic signal transduction pathways.

  12. Characterization of recombinant forms of the yeast Gas1 protein and identification of residues essential for glucanosyltransferase activity and folding.

    PubMed

    Carotti, Cristina; Ragni, Enrico; Palomares, Oscar; Fontaine, Thierry; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Latgé, Jean Paul; Vai, Marina; Popolo, Laura

    2004-09-01

    Gas1p is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored plasma membrane glycoprotein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is a representative of Family GH72 of glycosidases/transglycosidases, which also includes proteins from human fungal pathogens. Gas1p, Phr1-2p from Candida albicans and Gel1p from Aspergillus fumigatus have been shown to be beta-(1,3)-glucanosyltransferases required for proper cell wall assembly and morphogenesis. Gas1p is organized into three modules: a catalytic domain; a cys-rich domain; and a highly O-glycosylated serine-rich region. In order to provide an experimental system for the biochemical and structural analysis of Gas1p, we expressed soluble forms in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Here we report that 48 h after induction with methanol, soluble Gas1p was produced at a yield of approximately 10 mg x L(-1) of medium, and this value was unaffected by the further removal of the serine-rich region or by fusion to a 6 x His tag. Purified soluble Gas1 protein showed beta-(1,3)-glucanosyltransferase activity that was abolished by replacement of the putative catalytic residues, E161 and E262, with glutamine. Spectral studies confirmed that the recombinant soluble Gas1 protein assumed a stable conformation in P. pastoris. Interestingly, thermal denaturation studies demonstrated that Gas1p is highly resistant to heat denaturation, and a complete refolding of the protein following heat treatment was observed. We also showed that Gas1p contains five intrachain disulphide bonds. The effects of the C74S, C103S and C265S substitutions in the membrane-bound Gas1p were analyzed in S. cerevisiae. The Gas1-C74S protein was totally unable to complement the phenotype of the gas1 null mutant. We found that C74 is an essential residue for the proper folding and maturation of Gas1p. PMID:15355340

  13. 77 FR 40735 - Unique Device Identification System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to establish a unique device identification system to implement the requirement added to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) by section 226 of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA), Section 226 of FDAAA amended the FD&C Act to add new section 519(f), which directs FDA to promulgate regulations......

  14. Identification of dynamic systems, theory and formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, R. E.; Iliff, K. W.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of estimating parameters of dynamic systems is addressed in order to present the theoretical basis of system identification and parameter estimation in a manner that is complete and rigorous, yet understandable with minimal prerequisites. Maximum likelihood and related estimators are highlighted. The approach used requires familiarity with calculus, linear algebra, and probability, but does not require knowledge of stochastic processes or functional analysis. The treatment emphasizes unification of the various areas in estimation in dynamic systems is treated as a direct outgrowth of the static system theory. Topics covered include basic concepts and definitions; numerical optimization methods; probability; statistical estimators; estimation in static systems; stochastic processes; state estimation in dynamic systems; output error, filter error, and equation error methods of parameter estimation in dynamic systems, and the accuracy of the estimates.

  15. Identification of a Conserved Motif in the Yeast Golgi GDP-mannose Transporter Required for Binding to Nucleotide Sugar*

    E-print Network

    Dean, Neta

    to Nucleotide Sugar* Received for publication, October 5, 2000, and in revised form, November 3, 2000 Published in the Golgi complex are modified by the addition of sugars. In the yeast Saccha- romyces cerevisiae of the Golgi is mediated by the VRG4 gene product, a nucleotide sugar transporter that is a member of a large

  16. An In-House Assay Is Superior to Sepsityper for Direct Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) Mass Spectrometry Identification of Yeast Species in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Bidart, Marie; Bonnet, Isabelle; Hennebique, Aurélie; Kherraf, Zine Eddine; Pelloux, Hervé; Berger, François; Cornet, Muriel; Bailly, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    We developed an in-house assay for the direct identification, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, of yeasts in blood culture. Sixty-one representative strains from 12 species were analyzed in spiked blood cultures. Our assay accurately identified 95 of 107 (88.8%) positive blood cultures and outperformed the commercial Sepsityper kit (81.7% identification). PMID:25762771

  17. System identification of structural acoustic system using the scale correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Woo Seok; Lee, Doo Ho

    2006-02-01

    System identification can be a nice tool to make an accurate model of structural acoustic system that can describe the structure-borne noise in a car or an airplane. However, the implementation of the system identification technique to the structural acoustic system is difficult since the system is made of different physical systems. The responses from one system of the hybrid system show different characteristics from those of the others. If we try to identify the system from the responses of different physical systems, we meet a very embarrassing situation. The scales of those signals are so different that the system identification will concentrate on the modelling of the signals with large magnitude. Scale correction process is introduced to adjust the relative magnitude of those signals. When the scale correction is applied, the responses regenerated from the identified system model are similar with the original ones, which means the identified system is correct. This method will be useful for the other hybrid systems such as the structure-control system, structure-soil system and structure-fluid system.

  18. Power system identification toolbox: Phase two progress

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes current progress on a project funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to develop a set of state-of-the-art analysis software (termed the Power System Identification [PSI] Toolbox) for fitting dynamic models to measured data. The project is being conducted as a three-phase effort. The first phase, completed in late 1992, involved investigating the characteristics of the analysis techniques by evaluating existing software and developing guidelines for best use. Phase Two includes extending current software, developing new analysis algorithms and software, and demonstrating and developing applications. The final phase will focus on reorganizing the software into a modular collection of documented computer programs and developing user manuals with instruction and application guidelines. Phase Two is approximately 50% complete; progress to date and a vision for the final product of the PSI Toolbox are described. The needs of the power industry for specialized system identification methods are particularly acute. The industry is currently pushing to operate transmission systems much closer to theoretical limits by using real-time, large-scale control systems to dictate power flows and maintain dynamic stability. Reliably maintaining stability requires extensive system-dynamic modeling and analysis capability, including measurement-based methods. To serve this need, the BPA has developed specialized system-identification computer codes through in-house efforts and university contract research over the last several years. To make full integrated use of the codes, as well as other techniques, the BPA has commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to further develop the codes and techniques into the PSI Toolbox.

  19. Injectable electronic identification, monitoring, and stimulation systems.

    PubMed

    Troyk, P R

    1999-01-01

    Historically, electronic devices such as pacemakers and neuromuscular stimulators have been surgically implanted into animals and humans. A new class of implants made possible by advances in monolithic electronic design and implant packaging is small enough to be implanted by percutaneous injection through large-gauge hypodermic needles and does not require surgical implantation. Among these, commercially available implants, known as radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, are used for livestock, pet, laboratory animal, and endangered-species identification. The RFID tag is a subminiature glass capsule containing a solenoidal coil and an integrated circuit. Acting as the implanted half of a transcutaneous magnetic link, the RFID tag is powered by and communicates with an extracorporeal magnetic reader. The tag transmits a unique identification code that serves the function of identifying the animal. Millions of RFID tags have been sold since the early 1980s. Based on the success of the RFID tags, research laboratories have developed injectable medical implants, known as micromodules. One type of micromodule, the microstimulator, is designed for use in functional-neuromuscular stimulation. Each microstimulator is uniquely addressable and could comprise one channel of a multichannel functional-neuromuscular stimulation system. Using bidirectional telemetry and commands, from a single extracorporeal transmitter, as many as 256 microstimulators could form the hardware basis for a complex functional-neuromuscular stimulation feedback-control system. Uses include stimulation of paralyzed muscle, therapeutic functional-neuromuscular stimulation, and neuromodulatory functions such as laryngeal stimulation and sleep apnea. PMID:11701487

  20. Assessment of uncoupling activity of uncoupling protein 3 using a yeast heterologous expression system

    E-print Network

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    , with uncoupling protein 3L having greater effects in whole yeast and a smaller effect on the state 4 respiration of effects of uncoupling protein 3L and uncoupling protein 1 in whole yeast versus isolated mitochondriaAssessment of uncoupling activity of uncoupling protein 3 using a yeast heterologous expression

  1. Identification of PLP2 and RAB5C as novel TPD52 binding partners through yeast two-hybrid screening.

    PubMed

    Shahheydari, Hamideh; Frost, Sarah; Smith, Brian J; Groblewski, Guy E; Chen, Yuyan; Byrne, Jennifer A

    2014-07-01

    Tumor protein D52 (TPD52) is overexpressed in different cancers, but its molecular functions are poorly defined. A large, low-stringency yeast two-hybrid screen using full-length TPD52 bait identified known partners (TPD52, TPD52L1, TPD52L2, MAL2) and four other preys that reproducibly bound TPD52 and TPD52L1 baits (PLP2, RAB5C, GOLGA5, YIF1A). PLP2 and RAB5 interactions with TPD52 were confirmed in pull down assays, with interaction domain mapping experiments indicating that both proteins interact with a novel binding region of TPD52. This study provides insights into TPD52 functions, and ways to maximise the efficiency of low-stringency yeast two-hybrid screens. PMID:24604726

  2. Identification of candidate substrates for the Golgi Tul1 E3 ligase using quantitative diGly proteomics in yeast.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zongtian; Kim, Min-Sik; Pandey, Akhilesh; Espenshade, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    Maintenance of protein homeostasis is essential for cellular survival. Central to this regulation are mechanisms of protein quality control in which misfolded proteins are recognized and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. One well-studied protein quality control pathway requires endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident, multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligases that function in ER-associated degradation. Using fission yeast, our lab identified the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase as required for proteolytic activation of fungal sterol regulatory element-binding protein transcription factors. The Dsc E3 ligase contains five integral membrane subunits and structurally resembles ER-associated degradation E3 ligases. Saccharomyces cerevisiae codes for homologs of Dsc E3 ligase subunits, including the Dsc1 E3 ligase homolog Tul1 that functions in Golgi protein quality control. Interestingly, S. cerevisiae lacks sterol regulatory element-binding protein homologs, indicating that novel Tul1 E3 ligase substrates exist. Here, we show that the S. cerevisiae Tul1 E3 ligase consists of Tul1, Dsc2, Dsc3, and Ubx3 and define Tul1 complex architecture. Tul1 E3 ligase function required each subunit as judged by vacuolar sorting of the artificial substrate Pep12D. Genetic studies demonstrated that Tul1 E3 ligase was required in cells lacking the multivesicular body pathway and under conditions of ubiquitin depletion. To identify candidate substrates, we performed quantitative diGly proteomics using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to survey ubiquitylation in wild-type and tul1? cells. We identified 3116 non-redundant ubiquitylation sites, including 10 sites in candidate substrates. Quantitative proteomics found 4.5% of quantified proteins (53/1172) to be differentially expressed in tul1? cells. Correcting the diGly dataset for these differences increased the number of Tul1-dependent ubiquitylation sites. Together, our data demonstrate that the Tul1 E3 ligase functions in protein homeostasis under non-stress conditions and support a role in protein quality control. This quantitative diGly proteomics methodology will serve as a robust platform for screening for stress conditions that require Tul1 E3 ligase activity. PMID:25078903

  3. Whole Pichia pastoris Yeast Expressing Measles Virus Nucleoprotein as a Production and Delivery System to Multimerize Plasmodium Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Daria; Ruffie, Claude; Dubois, Myriam; Combredet, Chantal; Amino, Rogerio; Formaglio, Pauline; Gorgette, Olivier; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Guery, Charline; Puijalon, Odile; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Ménard, Robert; Tangy, Frédéric; Sala, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are largely used as bioreactors for vaccine production. Usually, antigens are produced in yeast then purified and mixed with adjuvants before immunization. However, the purification costs and the safety concerns recently raised by the use of new adjuvants argue for alternative strategies. To this end, the use of whole yeast as both production and delivery system appears attractive. Here, we evaluated Pichia pastoris yeast as an alternative vaccine production and delivery system for the circumsporozoite protein (CS) of Plasmodium, the etiologic agent of malaria. The CS protein from Plasmodium berghei (Pb) was selected given the availability of the stringent C57Bl/6 mouse model of infection by Pb sporozoites, allowing the evaluation of vaccine efficacy in vivo. PbCS was multimerized by fusion to the measles virus (MV) nucleoprotein (N) known to auto-assemble in yeast in large-size ribonucleoprotein rods (RNPs). Expressed in P. pastoris, the N-PbCS protein generated highly multimeric and heterogenic RNPs bearing PbCS on their surface. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence analyses revealed the shape of these RNPs and their localization in peripheral cytoplasmic inclusions. Subcutaneous immunization of C57Bl/6 mice with heat-inactivated whole P. pastoris expressing N-PbCS RNPs provided significant reduction of parasitemia after intradermal challenge with a high dose of parasites. Thus, in the absence of accessory adjuvants, a very low amount of PbCS expressed in whole yeast significantly decreased clinical damages associated with Pb infection in a highly stringent challenge model, providing a proof of concept of the intrinsic adjuvancy of this vaccine strategy. In addition to PbCS multimerization, the N protein contributed by itself to parasitemia delay and long-term mice survival. In the future, mixtures of whole recombinant yeasts expressing relevant Plasmodium antigens would provide a multivalent formulation applicable for antigen combination screening and possibly for large-scale production, distribution and delivery of a malaria vaccine in developing countries. PMID:24475165

  4. Combinatorial Screening for Transgenic Yeasts with High Cellulase Activities in Combination with a Tunable Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoichiro; Yamanishi, Mamoru; Ikeuchi, Akinori; Imamura, Chie; Matsuyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Combinatorial screening used together with a broad library of gene expression cassettes is expected to produce a powerful tool for the optimization of the simultaneous expression of multiple enzymes. Recently, we proposed a highly tunable protein expression system that utilized multiple genome-integrated target genes to fine-tune enzyme expression in yeast cells. This tunable system included a library of expression cassettes each composed of three gene-expression control elements that in different combinations produced a wide range of protein expression levels. In this study, four gene expression cassettes with graded protein expression levels were applied to the expression of three cellulases: cellobiohydrolase 1, cellobiohydrolase 2, and endoglucanase 2. After combinatorial screening for transgenic yeasts simultaneously secreting these three cellulases, we obtained strains with higher cellulase expressions than a strain harboring three cellulase-expression constructs within one high-performance gene expression cassette. These results show that our method will be of broad use throughout the field of metabolic engineering. PMID:26692026

  5. An Efficient Genome-Wide Fusion Partner Screening System for Secretion of Recombinant Proteins in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung-Hoon; Hyun Sung, Bong; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Park, Soon-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Mook; Kim, Mi-Jin; Lee, Cho-Ryong; Sohn, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    To produce rarely secreted recombinant proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we developed a novel genome-wide optimal translational fusion partner (TFP) screening system that involves recruitment of an optimal secretion signal and fusion partner. A TFP library was constructed from a genomic and truncated cDNA library by using the invertase-based signal sequence trap technique. The efficiency of the system was demonstrated using two rarely secreted proteins, human interleukin (hIL)-2 and hIL-32. Optimal TFPs for secretion of hIL-2 and hIL-32 were easily selected, yielding secretion of these proteins up to hundreds of mg/L. Moreover, numerous uncovered yeast secretion signals and fusion partners were identified, leading to efficient secretion of various recombinant proteins. Selected TFPs were found to be useful for the hypersecretion of other recombinant proteins at yields of up to several g/L. This screening technique could provide new methods for the production of various types of difficult-to-express proteins. PMID:26195161

  6. Automated Firearms Identification System (AFIDS), phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, R. J.; Framan, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    Items critical to the future development of an automated firearms identification system (AFIDS) have been examined, with the following specific results: (1) Types of objective data, that can be utilized to help establish a more factual basis for determining identity and nonidentity between pairs of fired bullets, have been identified. (2) A simulation study has indicated that randomly produced lines, similar in nature to the individual striations on a fired bullet, can be modeled and that random sequences, when compared to each other, have predictable relationships. (3) A schematic diagram of the general concept for AFIDS has been developed and individual elements of this system have been briefly tested for feasibility. Future implementation of such a proposed system will depend on such factors as speed, utility, projected total cost and user requirements for growth. The success of the proposed system, when operational, would depend heavily on existing firearms examiners.

  7. Identification of mating type genes in the bipolar basidiomycetous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides: first insight into the MAT locus structure of the Sporidiobolales.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Marco A; Rosa, André; Rodrigues, Nádia; Fonseca, Alvaro; Gonçalves, Paula

    2008-06-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides is a heterothallic, bipolar, red yeast that belongs to the Sporidiobolales, an order within a major lineage of basidiomycetes, the Pucciniomycotina. In contrast to other basidiomycetes, considerably less is known about the nature of the mating type (MAT) loci that control sexual reproduction in this lineage. Three genes (RHA1, RHA2, and RHA3) encoding precursors of the MAT A1 pheromone (rhodotorucine A) were previously identified and formed the basis for a genome walking approach that led to the identification of additional MAT genes in complementary mating strains of R. toruloides. Two mating type-specific alleles encoding a p21-activated kinase (PAK; Ste20 homolog) were found between the RHA2 and RHA3 genes, and identification in MAT A2 strains of a gene encoding a presumptive pheromone precursor enabled prediction of the structure of rhodotorucine a. In addition, a putative pheromone receptor gene (STE3 homolog) was identified upstream of RHA1. Analyses of genomic data from two closely related species, Sporobolomyces roseus and Sporidiobolus salmonicolor, identified syntenic regions that contain homologs of all the above-mentioned genes. Notably, six novel pheromone precursor genes were uncovered, which encoded, similarly to the RHA genes, multiple tandem copies of the peptide moiety. This suggests that this structure, which is unique among fungal lipopeptide pheromones, seems to be prevalent in red yeasts. Species comparisons provided evidence for a large, multigenic MAT locus structure in the Sporidiobolales, but no putative homeodomain transcription factor genes (which are present in all basidiomycetous MAT loci characterized thus far) could be found in any of the three species in the vicinity of the MAT genes identified. PMID:18408057

  8. Identification of Mating Type Genes in the Bipolar Basidiomycetous Yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides: First Insight into the MAT Locus Structure of the Sporidiobolales? †

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Marco A.; Rosa, André; Rodrigues, Nádia; Fonseca, Álvaro; Gonçalves, Paula

    2008-01-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides is a heterothallic, bipolar, red yeast that belongs to the Sporidiobolales, an order within a major lineage of basidiomycetes, the Pucciniomycotina. In contrast to other basidiomycetes, considerably less is known about the nature of the mating type (MAT) loci that control sexual reproduction in this lineage. Three genes (RHA1, RHA2, and RHA3) encoding precursors of the MAT A1 pheromone (rhodotorucine A) were previously identified and formed the basis for a genome walking approach that led to the identification of additional MAT genes in complementary mating strains of R. toruloides. Two mating type-specific alleles encoding a p21-activated kinase (PAK; Ste20 homolog) were found between the RHA2 and RHA3 genes, and identification in MAT A2 strains of a gene encoding a presumptive pheromone precursor enabled prediction of the structure of rhodotorucine a. In addition, a putative pheromone receptor gene (STE3 homolog) was identified upstream of RHA1. Analyses of genomic data from two closely related species, Sporobolomyces roseus and Sporidiobolus salmonicolor, identified syntenic regions that contain homologs of all the above-mentioned genes. Notably, six novel pheromone precursor genes were uncovered, which encoded, similarly to the RHA genes, multiple tandem copies of the peptide moiety. This suggests that this structure, which is unique among fungal lipopeptide pheromones, seems to be prevalent in red yeasts. Species comparisons provided evidence for a large, multigenic MAT locus structure in the Sporidiobolales, but no putative homeodomain transcription factor genes (which are present in all basidiomycetous MAT loci characterized thus far) could be found in any of the three species in the vicinity of the MAT genes identified. PMID:18408057

  9. Autonomous Frequency-Domain System-Identification Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Mettler, Edward; Bayard, David S.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification (AU-FREDI) computer program implements system of methods, algorithms, and software developed for identification of parameters of mathematical models of dynamics of flexible structures and characterization, by use of system transfer functions, of such models, dynamics, and structures regarded as systems. Software considered collection of routines modified and reassembled to suit system-identification and control experiments on large flexible structures.

  10. Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Allan E.

    1993-01-01

    This final technical report covers a three and one-half year period preceding February 28, 1993 during which support was provided under NASA Grant NAG-1-1065. Following a general description of the system identification problem and a brief survey of methods to attack it, the basic ideas behind the approach taken in this research effort are presented. The results obtained are described with reference to the published work, including the five semiannual progress reports previously submitted and two interim technical reports.

  11. Red yeast

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cause kidney damage. Special precautions & warnings: Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Red yeast is LIKELY UNSAFE during pregnancy. It ... about the safety of using red yeast during breast-feeding. Don’t use during pregnancy or breast-feeding. ...

  12. System Identification of Civil Engineering Structures through Wireless Structural Monitoring and Subspace System Identification Methods

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    System Identification of Civil Engineering Structures through Wireless Structural Monitoring of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Civil Engineering) in The University of Michigan 2011 engineers; amazingly, there were many keys which unlocked many civil engineering problems. All achievements

  13. [Evaluation of endocrine disruptors in environmental water using yeast two-hybrid system].

    PubMed

    Nakamuro, K; Ueno, H; Okuno, T; Kawai, H

    2000-12-01

    Estrogenicity of concentrates from waters of lake, river, tap water and effluent of sewage treatment plant by XAD-2 resin column concentration method was detected by the yeast two-hybrid system. Estrogenicity was detected in all environmental waters. From dose-response curve on estrogenic activity of concentrates from the Yodo river water by the two-hybrid system with and without S9mix, 17 beta-estradiol equivalent values in the river water were very similar to analytical values of 17 beta-estradiol reported by the Ministry of Constraction's survey(1999). Estrogenic activities of these concentrates were enhanced by metabolic activation. On the other hand, the tests on effect of these concentrates against estrogenic activity of 17 beta-estradiol (6 x 10(-10) M) revealed that the river water may contain not only inhibitors to estrogenicity but also precursors of estrogenic substances formed by metabolic activation. PMID:11187740

  14. System Identification of a Vortex Lattice Aerodynamic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Kholodar, Denis; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The state-space presentation of an aerodynamic vortex model is considered from a classical and system identification perspective. Using an aerodynamic vortex model as a numerical simulator of a wing tunnel experiment, both full state and limited state data or measurements are considered. Two possible approaches for system identification are presented and modal controllability and observability are also considered. The theory then is applied to the system identification of a flow over an aerodynamic delta wing and typical results are presented.

  15. Identification and biophysical characterization of a very-long-chain-fatty-acid-substituted phosphatidylinositol in yeast subcellular membranes

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Morphological analysis of a conditional yeast mutant in acetyl-CoA carboxylase acc1ts/mtr7, the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis, suggested that the synthesis of C26 VLCFAs (very-long-chain fatty acids) is important for maintaining the structure and function of the nuclear membrane. To characterize this C26-dependent pathway in more detail, we have now examined cells that are blocked in pathways that require C26. In yeast, ceramide synthesis and remodelling of GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-anchors are two pathways that incorporate C26 into lipids. Conditional mutants blocked in either ceramide synthesis or the synthesis of GPI anchors do not display the characteristic alterations of the nuclear envelope observed in acc1ts, indicating that the synthesis of another C26-containing lipid may be affected in acc1ts mutant cells. Lipid analysis of isolated nuclear membranes revealed the presence of a novel C26-substituted PI (phosphatidylinositol). This C26-PI accounts for approx. 1% of all the PI species, and is present in both the nuclear and the plasma membrane. Remarkably, this C26-PI is the only C26-containing glycerophospholipid that is detectable in wild-type yeast, and the C26-substitution is highly specific for the sn-1 position of the glycerol backbone. To characterize the biophysical properties of this lipid, it was chemically synthesized. In contrast to PIs with normal long-chain fatty acids (C16 or C18), the C26-PI greatly reduced the bilayer to hexagonal phase transition of liposomes composed of 1,2-dielaidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DEPE). The biophysical properties of this lipid are thus consistent with a possible role in stabilizing highly curved membrane domains. PMID:15270698

  16. A homologous cell-free system for studying protein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Brennwald, P; Wise, J A

    1994-02-01

    We report the development of a homologous in vitro assay system for analysing translocation of proteins across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our protocol for preparing an S. pombe extract capable of translating natural messenger RNAs was modified from a procedure previously used for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which cells are lysed in a bead-beater. However, we were unable to prepare fission yeast microsomes active in protein translocation using existing budding yeast protocols. Instead, our most efficient preparations were isolated by fractionating spheroplasts, followed by extensive washing and size exclusion chromatography of the crude membranes. Translocation of two ER-targeted proteins, pre-acid phosphatase from S. pombe and prepro-alpha-factor from S. cerevisiae, was monitored using two distinct assays. First, evidence that a fraction of both proteins was sequestered within membrane-enclosed vesicles was provided by resistance to exogenously added protease. Second, the protected fraction of each protein was converted to a higher molecular weight, glycosylated form; attachment of carbohydrate to the translocated proteins was confirmed by their ability to bind Concanavalin A-Sepharose. Finally, we examined whether proteins could be translocated across fission yeast microsomal membranes after their synthesis was complete. Our results indicate that S. cerevisiae prepro-alpha-factor can be post-translationally imported into the fission yeast ER, while S. pombe pre-acid phosphatase crosses the membrane only by a co-translational mechanism. PMID:8203158

  17. 47 CFR 25.281 - Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...281 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25...Identification System (ATIS). All satellite uplink transmissions...

  18. 47 CFR 25.281 - Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...281 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25...Identification System (ATIS). All satellite uplink transmissions...

  19. 47 CFR 25.281 - Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...281 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25...Identification System (ATIS). All satellite uplink transmissions...

  20. 47 CFR 25.281 - Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...281 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25...Identification System (ATIS). All satellite uplink transmissions...

  1. System Identification of X-33 Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Shiv

    2003-01-01

    Modern flight control research has improved spacecraft survivability as its goal. To this end we need to have a failure detection system on board. In case the spacecraft is performing imperfectly, reconfiguration of control is needed. For that purpose we need to have parameter identification of spacecraft dynamics. Parameter identification of a system is called system identification. We treat the system as a black box which receives some inputs that lead to some outputs. The question is: what kind of parameters for a particular black box can correlate the observed inputs and outputs? Can these parameters help us to predict the outputs for a new given set of inputs? This is the basic problem of system identification. The X33 was supposed to have the onboard capability of evaluating the current performance and if needed to take the corrective measures to adapt to desired performance. The X33 is comprised of both rocket and aircraft vehicle design characteristics and requires, in general, analytical methods for evaluating its flight performance. Its flight consists of four phases: ascent, transition, entry and TAEM (Terminal Area Energy Management). It spends about 200 seconds in ascent phase, reaching an altitude of about 180,000 feet and a speed of about 10 to 15 Mach. During the transition phase which lasts only about 30 seconds, its altitude may increase to about 190,000 feet but its speed is reduced to about 9 Mach. At the beginning of this phase, the Main Engine is Cut Off (MECO) and the control is reconfigured with the help of aerosurfaces (four elevons, two flaps and two rudders) and reaction control system (RCS). The entry phase brings down the altitude of X33 to about 90,000 feet and its speed to about Mach 3. It spends about 250 seconds in this phase. Main engine is still cut off and the vehicle is controlled by complex maneuvers of aerosurfaces. The last phase TAEM lasts for about 450 seconds and the altitude and speed, both are reduced to zero. The present attempt, as a start, focuses only on the entry phase. Since the main engine remains cut off in this phase, there is no thrust acting on the system. This considerably simplifies the equations of motion. We introduce another simplification by assuming the system to be linear after some non-linearities are removed analytically from our consideration. Under these assumptions, the problem could be solved by Classical Statistics by employing the least sum of squares approach. Instead we chose to use the Neural Network method. This method has many advantages. It is modern, more efficient, can be adapted to work even when the assumptions are diluted. In fact, Neural Networks try to model the human brain and are capable of pattern recognition.

  2. Fractional System Identification: An Approach Using Continuous Order-Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the identification of fractional- and integer-order systems using the concept of continuous order-distribution. Based on the ability to define systems using continuous order-distributions, it is shown that frequency domain system identification can be performed using least squares techniques after discretizing the order-distribution.

  3. 30 CFR 75.1715 - Identification check system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Identification check system. 75.1715 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1715 Identification check system. Each operator of a coal mine shall establish a check-in and check-out system which will...

  4. 30 CFR 75.1715 - Identification check system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Identification check system. 75.1715 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1715 Identification check system. Each operator of a coal mine shall establish a check-in and check-out system which will...

  5. Growth control of the eukaryote cell: a systems biology study in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Castrillo, Juan I; Zeef, Leo A; Hoyle, David C; Zhang, Nianshu; Hayes, Andrew; Gardner, David CJ; Cornell, Michael J; Petty, June; Hakes, Luke; Wardleworth, Leanne; Rash, Bharat; Brown, Marie; Dunn, Warwick B; Broadhurst, David; O'Donoghue, Kerry; Hester, Svenja S; Dunkley, Tom PJ; Hart, Sarah R; Swainston, Neil; Li, Peter; Gaskell, Simon J; Paton, Norman W; Lilley, Kathryn S; Kell, Douglas B; Oliver, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    Background Cell growth underlies many key cellular and developmental processes, yet a limited number of studies have been carried out on cell-growth regulation. Comprehensive studies at the transcriptional, proteomic and metabolic levels under defined controlled conditions are currently lacking. Results Metabolic control analysis is being exploited in a systems biology study of the eukaryotic cell. Using chemostat culture, we have measured the impact of changes in flux (growth rate) on the transcriptome, proteome, endometabolome and exometabolome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each functional genomic level shows clear growth-rate-associated trends and discriminates between carbon-sufficient and carbon-limited conditions. Genes consistently and significantly upregulated with increasing growth rate are frequently essential and encode evolutionarily conserved proteins of known function that participate in many protein-protein interactions. In contrast, more unknown, and fewer essential, genes are downregulated with increasing growth rate; their protein products rarely interact with one another. A large proportion of yeast genes under positive growth-rate control share orthologs with other eukaryotes, including humans. Significantly, transcription of genes encoding components of the TOR complex (a major controller of eukaryotic cell growth) is not subject to growth-rate regulation. Moreover, integrative studies reveal the extent and importance of post-transcriptional control, patterns of control of metabolic fluxes at the level of enzyme synthesis, and the relevance of specific enzymatic reactions in the control of metabolic fluxes during cell growth. Conclusion This work constitutes a first comprehensive systems biology study on growth-rate control in the eukaryotic cell. The results have direct implications for advanced studies on cell growth, in vivo regulation of metabolic fluxes for comprehensive metabolic engineering, and for the design of genome-scale systems biology models of the eukaryotic cell. PMID:17439666

  6. Identification of lethal mutations in yeast threonyl-tRNA synthetase revealing critical residues in its human homolog.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Ye, Qing; Lei, Hui-Yan; Eriani, Gilbert; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Wang, En-Duo

    2015-01-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are a group of ancient enzymes catalyzing aminoacylation and editing reactions for protein biosynthesis. Increasing evidence suggests that these critical enzymes are often associated with mammalian disorders. Therefore, complete determination of the enzymes functions is essential for informed diagnosis and treatment. Here, we show that a yeast knock-out strain for the threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) gene is an excellent platform for such an investigation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ThrRS has a unique modular structure containing four structural domains and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. Using randomly mutated libraries of the ThrRS gene (thrS) and a genetic screen, a set of loss-of-function mutants were identified. The mutations affected the synthetic and editing activities and influenced the dimer interface. The results also highlighted the role of the N-terminal extension for enzymatic activity and protein stability. To gain insights into the pathological mechanisms induced by mutated aaRSs, we systematically introduced the loss-of-function mutations into the human cytoplasmic ThrRS gene. All mutations induced similar detrimental effects, showing that the yeast model could be used to study pathology-associated point mutations in mammalian aaRSs. PMID:25416776

  7. Identification of Small Aliphatic Aldehydes in Pretreated Lignocellulosic Feedstocks and Evaluation of Their Inhibitory Effects on Yeast.

    PubMed

    Cavka, Adnan; Stagge, Stefan; Jönsson, Leif J

    2015-11-11

    Six lignocellulosic hydrolysates produced through acid pretreatment were analyzed for the occurrence of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and glycolaldehyde. Acetaldehyde was found in all six (0.3-1.6 mM) and formaldehyde in four (?4.4 mM), whereas glycolaldehyde was not detected. To assess the relevance of these findings, fermentations with yeast and formaldehyde or acetaldehyde were performed in the concentration interval 0.5-10 mM. Formaldehyde already inhibited at 1.0 mM, whereas 5.0 mM acetaldehyde was needed to obtain a clear inhibitory effect. After 24 h of fermentation, 1.5 mM formaldehyde reduced the glucose consumption by 85%, the balanced ethanol yield by 92%, and the volumetric productivity by 91%. The results show that formaldehyde and acetaldehyde are prevalent in pretreated lignocellulose and that formaldehyde in some cases could explain a large part of the inhibitory effects on yeast by lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as three of six hydrolysates contained ?1.9 mM formaldehyde, which was shown to be strongly inhibitory. PMID:26528761

  8. Identification of Rbd2 as a candidate protease for sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) cleavage in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinsil; Ha, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Sujin; Choi, Ah-Reum; Lee, Sook-Jeong; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk

    2015-12-25

    Lipid homeostasis in mammalian cells is regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors that are activated through sequential cleavage by Golgi Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. Fission yeast SREBP, Sre1, engages a different mechanism involving the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase complex, but it is not clearly understood exactly how Sre1 is proteolytically cleaved and activated. In this study, we screened the Schizosaccharomyces pombe non-essential haploid deletion collection to identify missing components of the Sre1 cleavage machinery. Our screen identified an additional component of the SREBP pathway required for Sre1 proteolysis named rhomboid protein 2 (Rbd2). We show that an rbd2 deletion mutant fails to grow under hypoxic and hypoxia-mimetic conditions due to lack of Sre1 activity and that this growth phenotype is rescued by Sre1N, a cleaved active form of Sre1. We found that the growth inhibition phenotype under low oxygen conditions is specific to the strain with deletion of rbd2, not any other fission yeast rhomboid-encoding genes. Our study also identified conserved residues of Rbd2 that are required for Sre1 proteolytic cleavage. All together, our results suggest that Rbd2 is a functional SREBP protease with conserved residues required for Sre1 cleavage and provide an important piece of the puzzle to understand the mechanisms for Sre1 activation and the regulation of various biological and pathological processes involving SREBPs. PMID:26545776

  9. 33 CFR 401.20 - Automatic Identification System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Radio Communication Equipment and Systems—AIS—Part 2: Class A Shipborne...Shipborne Automatic Identification System (AIS), NAV 48/18, 6...Guards' maritime Differential Global Positioning System radiobeacon services; or...

  10. 33 CFR 401.20 - Automatic Identification System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Radio Communication Equipment and Systems—AIS—Part 2: Class A Shipborne...Shipborne Automatic Identification System (AIS), NAV 48/18, 6...Guards' maritime Differential Global Positioning System radiobeacon services; or...

  11. 33 CFR 401.20 - Automatic Identification System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Radio Communication Equipment and Systems—AIS—Part 2: Class A Shipborne...Shipborne Automatic Identification System (AIS), NAV 48/18, 6...Guards' maritime Differential Global Positioning System radiobeacon services; or...

  12. A novel screening system for yeast strains capable of secreting tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Gill, G S; Zaworski, P G; Marotti, K R; Rehberg, E F

    1990-10-01

    We have developed a simple screening procedure that allowed us to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains able to secrete human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) into the culture medium. The screen can be used to isolate more efficient secretor strains and to look for novel tPA analogs. Employing one of these strains to study the effect of glycosylation on secretion, we show that glycosylation in the catalytic domain of tPA plays an important role in folding and/or secretion of the molecule. Removing this glycosylation site resulted in a 3-5-fold reduction in the level of tPA secretion. We anticipate that this system will prove useful in studying yeast secretory pathway as well as structure-function relationships in the tPA molecule. PMID:1367474

  13. An overview of recent advances in system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the recent advances in system identification for modal testing and control of large flexible structures. Several techniques are discussed including the Observer/Kalman Filter Identification, the Observer/Controller Identification, and the State-Space System Identification in the Frequency Domain. The System/Observer/Controller Toolbox developed at NASA Langley Research Center is used to show the applications of these techniques to real aerospace structures such as the Hubble spacecraft telescope and the active flexible aircraft wing.

  14. Interaction of a mixed yeast culture in an ``autotroph-heterotroph'' system with a closed atmosphere cycle and spatially separated components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.; Somova, L. A.

    The study considers an experimental model of the "autotroph-heterotroph" system with a closed atmosphere cycle, in which the heterotrophic link is a mixed yeast population. The autotrophic link is represented by the algae Chlorella vulgaris and the heterotrophic link by the yeasts Candida utilis and Candida guilliermondii. The controls are populations of Chlorella and the same yeasts isolated from the atmosphere. It has been shown that the outcome of competition in the heterotrophic link depends on the strategy of the yeast population towards the substrate and oxygen. The C. utilis population quickly utilizes the substrate as it is an r-strategist and is less sensitive to oxygen deficiency. The C. guilliermondii population consumes low concentrations of the substrate because it is a K-strategist, but it is more sensitive to oxygen deficiency. That is why, in the "autotroph-heterotroph" system with a closed gas cycle, after a considerable amount of the substrate has been consumed, the C. guilliermondii population becomes more competitive that the C. utilis population. In the culture of yeasts, isolated from the atmosphere, the C. utilis population finds itself in more favorable conditions due to oxygen deficiency. The system with a complex heterotrophic component survive longer than a system whose heterotrophic component is represented by only one yeast species. This is explained for by the positive metabolite interaction of yeasts and a more complete utilization of the substrate by a mixed culture of yeasts featuring different strategies towards the substrate.

  15. Interaction of a mixed yeast culture in an "autotroph-heterotroph" system with a closed atmosphere cycle and spatially separated components.

    PubMed

    Pisman, T I; Somova, L A

    2003-01-01

    The study considers an experimental model of the "autotroph-heterotroph" system with a closed atmosphere cycle, in which the heterotrophic link is a mixed yeast population. The autotrophic link is represented by the algae Chlorella vulgaris and the heterotrophic link by the yeasts Candida utilis and Candida guilliermondii. The controls are populations of Chlorella and the same yeasts isolated from the atmosphere. It has been shown that the outcome of competition in the heterotrophic link depends on the strategy of the yeast population towards the substrate and oxygen. The C. utilis population quickly utilizes the substrate as it is an r-strategist and is less sensitive to oxygen deficiency. The C. guilliermondii population consumes low concentrations of the substrate because it is a K-strategist, but it is more sensitive to oxygen deficiency. That is why, in the "autotroph-heterotroph" system with a closed gas cycle, after a considerable amount of the substrate has been consumed, the C. guilliermondii population becomes more competitive that the C. utilis population. In the culture of yeasts, isolated from the atmosphere, the C. utilis population finds itself in more favorable conditions due to oxygen deficiency. The system with a complex heterotrophic component survive longer than a system whose heterotrophic component is represented by only one yeast species. This is explained for by the positive metabolite interaction of yeasts and a more complete utilization of the substrate by a mixed culture of yeasts featuring different strategies towards the substrate. PMID:14503513

  16. Interaction of the mixed yeast culture in the autotroph-heterotroph system with a closed gas cycle and spatially separated components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T.; Somova, L.

    The study considers the experimental model of the "autotroph-heterotroph" system with a closed gas cycle, in which the heterotrophic link is a mixed yeast population. The autotrophic link is represented by the algae Chlorella vulgaris and the heterotrophic link by the yeasts Candida utilis and Candida guilliermondii. The controls are separate links of Chlorella and yeasts isolated from the atmosphere. It has been shown that the outcome of the competition in the heterotrophic link depends on the strategy of the yeast population towards the substrate and oxygen. The C. utilis population quickly utilizes the substrate as it is an R-strategist and is less sensitive to oxygen deficiency. The C. guilliermondii population consumes low concentrations of the substrate because it is a K-strategist, but it is more sensitive to oxygen deficiency. That is why, in the "autotroph-heterotroph" system with a closed gas cycle, after a considerable amount of the substrate has been consumed, the C. guilliermondii population becomes more competitive that the C. utilis population. In the culture of a separate yeast link, isolated from the atmosphere, the C. utilis population finds itself in more favorable conditions due to oxygen deficiency. The system with a complex heterotrophic component exists longer than the system whose heterotrophic component is represented by one yeast species. This is accounted for by the positive metabolite interaction of yeasts and a more complete utilization of the substrate by a mixed culture of yeasts featuring different strategies towards the substrate.

  17. Probabilistic system identification in the time domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, James L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of system identification is to determine reliable dynamical models of a structure by systematically using its measured excitation and response. It brings together in an integrated fashion, experimental, analytical, and computational techniques in structural dynamics. Areas of application for system identification include the following: (1) Model Evaluation--assessing assumptions (linearity and equivalent viscous damping) and techniques (finite-element modeling) used to construct theoretical models of a structure; (2) Model Improvement--updating of a theoretical model to enable more accurate response predictions for possible future loads on the structure, or for control of the structure; (3) Empirical Modelling--developing empirical relationships (nonlinear models) or empirical parameter values (modal damping) because the present state of the art does not provide theoretical results; and (4) Damage Detection and Assessment--continual or episodic updating of a structural model through vibration monitoring to detect and locate any structural damage. It can be argued that since the construction or modification of models using test data is subject to inherent uncertainties, the above problems should be properly treated within a Bayesian probabilistic framework. Such a methodology is presented which allows the precision of the estimates of the model parameters to be computed. It also leads to a guiding principle in applications. Namely, when selecting a single model from a given class of models, one should take the most probable model in the class based on the experimental data. Practical applications of this principle are given which are based on the utilization of measured seismic motions in large civil structures. Examples include the application of a computer program MODE-ID to identify modal properties directly from seismic excitation and response time histories from a nine-story steel-frame building at JPL and from a freeway overpass bridge.

  18. Identification of an active-site residue in yeast invertase by affinity labeling and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, V A; Maley, F

    1990-07-01

    Deglycosylated yeast invertase is irreversibly inactivated by conduritol B epoxide (CBE), an active-site-directed reagent. The inactivated enzyme contained 0.8 mol of CBE/mol of invertase monomer suggesting that the inactivation results from the modification of a single amino acid residue. Peptic digestion of [3H]CBE-labeled invertase followed by reverse phase column chromatography yielded two labeled peptides, both located at the amino-terminal end of the enzyme. Sequence analyses of these peptides revealed that Asp-23 is the modified residue. The role of Asp-23 in the catalytic process was investigated by changing it to Asn using site-directed mutagenesis of the SCU2 gene. The mutant enzyme was basically inactive, confirming a role for Asp-23 in the catalytic process. PMID:2113524

  19. A Method of Visualizing Three-Dimensional Distribution of Yeast in Bread Dough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tatsurou; Do, Gab-Soo; Sugiyama, Junichi; Oguchi, Kosei; Shiraga, Seizaburou; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Takeya, Koji; Endo, Shigeru

    A novel technique was developed to monitor the change in three-dimensional (3D) distribution of yeast in frozen bread dough samples in accordance with the progress of mixing process. Application of a surface engineering technology allowed the identification of yeast in bread dough by bonding EGFP (Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein) to the surface of yeast cells. The fluorescent yeast (a biomarker) was recognized as bright spots at the wavelength of 520 nm. A Micro-Slicer Image Processing System (MSIPS) with a fluorescence microscope was utilized to acquire cross-sectional images of frozen dough samples sliced at intervals of 1 ?m. A set of successive two-dimensional images was reconstructed to analyze 3D distribution of yeast. Samples were taken from each of four normal mixing stages (i.e., pick up, clean up, development, and final stages) and also from over mixing stage. In the pick up stage yeast distribution was uneven with local areas of dense yeast. As the mixing progressed from clean up to final stages, the yeast became more evenly distributed throughout the dough sample. However, the uniformity in yeast distribution was lost in the over mixing stage possibly due to the breakdown of gluten structure within the dough sample.

  20. 40 CFR 72.33 - Identification of dispatch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.33 Identification of dispatch system. (a... otherwise required under a petition as approved under 40 CFR 72.33(f), the units and generators listed... dispatch system under 40 CFR 72.91 and 72.92, during the period that this identification of dispatch...

  1. 40 CFR 72.33 - Identification of dispatch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.33 Identification of dispatch system. (a... otherwise required under a petition as approved under 40 CFR 72.33(f), the units and generators listed... dispatch system under 40 CFR 72.91 and 72.92, during the period that this identification of dispatch...

  2. 40 CFR 72.33 - Identification of dispatch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.33 Identification of dispatch system. (a... otherwise required under a petition as approved under 40 CFR 72.33(f), the units and generators listed... dispatch system under 40 CFR 72.91 and 72.92, during the period that this identification of dispatch...

  3. 40 CFR 72.33 - Identification of dispatch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Identification of dispatch system. 72.33 Section 72.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.33 Identification of dispatch system. (a) Every Phase I unit shall be treated...

  4. 40 CFR 72.33 - Identification of dispatch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.33 Identification of dispatch system. (a... otherwise required under a petition as approved under 40 CFR 72.33(f), the units and generators listed... dispatch system under 40 CFR 72.91 and 72.92, during the period that this identification of dispatch...

  5. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) System 333 [2] . RFID. , ,

    E-print Network

    Kovintavewat, Piya

    _.php?gov=1187 [26] . (2549). . Retrieved July 14, 2008, from http://www.nectec.or.th/info/posters/pdf/ food/rfid Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) System 333 [1] , , , 2548 [2] . RFID. , , 192 , 2549 [3 Identification (RFID) System334 [14] Retrieved July 14, 2008, from http://www.automaticleasing.com/images/ Cards

  6. LOCALISATION SYSTEMS AND LOS/NLOS IDENTIFICATION IN INDOOR SCENARIOS

    E-print Network

    Braun, Torsten

    Positioning Systems 5 3.1 Indoor Positioning Systems by RSSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3/NLOS Identification 9 4.1 LOS/NLOS Identification by RSSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4.1.1 NLOS like advertising of free parking, location based audio explanation in museums, targeted advertising

  7. 33 CFR 401.20 - Automatic Identification System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Automatic Identification System. 401.20 Section 401.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.20 Automatic Identification System. (a) Each of...

  8. Dynamic Joint Outage Identification and State Estimation in Power Systems

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Yue

    Dynamic Joint Outage Identification and State Estimation in Power Systems Yue Zhao, Jianshu Chen@princeton.edu Abstract--Joint outage identification and state estimation is studied in power systems in which cascading that computes in closed form the joint posterior of cascades and network states at every time step. A beam

  9. 47 CFR 25.281 - Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS). 25.281 Section 25.281 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.281 Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS). All satellite...

  10. 47 CFR 25.281 - Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS). 25.281 Section 25.281 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.281 Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS). All satellite...

  11. A suppressor of mutations in the class III transcription system encodes a component of yeast TFIIIB.

    PubMed Central

    Rüth, J; Conesa, C; Dieci, G; Lefebvre, O; Düsterhöft, A; Ottonello, S; Sentenac, A

    1996-01-01

    Class III genes depend on TFIIIB for recruitment of RNA polymerase III. Yeast TFIIIB is comprised of three components: TBP, TFIIIB70 and a 90 kDa polypeptide contained in the fraction B". We report the isolation of the yeast gene TFC7 which, based on genetic and biochemical evidence, encodes the 90 kDa polypeptide. TFC7 was isolated as a multicopy suppressor of temperature-sensitive mutations in the two largest subunits of TFIIIC. It is an essential gene, encoding a polypeptide of 68 kDa migrating with an apparent size of approximately 90 kDa. In gel shift assays, recombinant TFC7 protein (rTFC7) alone did not bind detectably to DNA, or to the TFIIIC-DNA complex even in the presence of TBP or TFIIIB70, but it was required to assemble the TFIIIB-TFIIIC-DNA complex. The two-hybrid assay pointed to an interaction between TFC7 protein and tau 131, the second largest subunit of TFIIIC (that also interacts with TFIIIB70). rTFC7p can replace the B" component of TFIIIB for synthesis of U6 RNA in a system reconstituted with recombinant TBP and TFIIIB70 polypeptides and highly purified RNA polymerase III. Surprisingly, specific transcription of the SUP4 tRNATyr gene promoted by rTFC7p was much weaker than with B". An additional factor activity, provided by the recently identified TFIIIE fraction, was required to restore control levels of transcription. Images PMID:8617241

  12. Lightweight autonomous chemical identification system (LACIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozos, George; Lin, Hai; Burch, Timothy

    2012-06-01

    Smiths Detection and Intelligent Optical Systems have developed prototypes for the Lightweight Autonomous Chemical Identification System (LACIS) for the US Department of Homeland Security. LACIS is to be a handheld detection system for Chemical Warfare Agents (CWAs) and Toxic Industrial Chemicals (TICs). LACIS is designed to have a low limit of detection and rapid response time for use by emergency responders and could allow determination of areas having dangerous concentration levels and if protective garments will be required. Procedures for protection of responders from hazardous materials incidents require the use of protective equipment until such time as the hazard can be assessed. Such accurate analysis can accelerate operations and increase effectiveness. LACIS is to be an improved point detector employing novel CBRNE detection modalities that includes a militaryproven ruggedized ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with an array of electro-resistive sensors to extend the range of chemical threats detected in a single device. It uses a novel sensor data fusion and threat classification architecture to interpret the independent sensor responses and provide robust detection at low levels in complex backgrounds with minimal false alarms. The performance of LACIS prototypes have been characterized in independent third party laboratory tests at the Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI, Columbus, OH) and indoor and outdoor field tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). LACIS prototypes will be entering operational assessment by key government emergency response groups to determine its capabilities versus requirements.

  13. Rapid identification of 6328 isolates of pathogenic yeasts using MALDI-ToF MS and a simplified, rapid extraction procedure that is compatible with the Bruker Biotyper platform and database.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Mark; Brown, Zoe; Houldsworth, Marian; Borman, Andrew M; Johnson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of yeast isolates from clinical samples is essential, given their innately variable antifungal susceptibility profiles, and the proposal of species-specific antifungal susceptibility interpretive breakpoints. Here we have evaluated the utility of MALDI-ToF MS analysis for the identification of clinical isolates of pathogenic yeasts. A simplified, rapid extraction method, developed in our laboratory, was applied to 6343 isolates encompassing 71 different yeast species, which were then subjected to MALDI-ToF MS analysis using a Bruker Microflex and the resulting spectra were assessed using the supplied Bruker database. In total, 6328/6343 (99.8%) of isolates were correctly identified by MALDI-ToF MS. Our simplified extraction protocol allowed the correct identification of 93.6% of isolates, without the need for laborious full extraction, and a further 394 (6.2%) of isolates could be identified after full extraction. Clinically relevant identifications with both extraction methods were achieved using the supplied Bruker database and did not require the generation of bespoke, in-house databases created using profiles obtained with the adapted extraction method. In fact, the mean LogScores obtained using our method were as robust as those obtained using the recommended, published full extraction procedures. However, an in-house database can provide a useful additional identification tool for unusual or rarely encountered organisms. Finally, the proposed methodology allowed the correct identification of over 75% of isolates directly from the initial cultures referred to our laboratory, without the requirement for additional sub-culture on standardised mycological media. PMID:26591008

  14. Antibody engineering: comparison of bacterial, yeast, insect and mammalian expression systems.

    PubMed

    Verma, R; Boleti, E; George, A J

    1998-07-01

    Engineered antibody molecules, and their fragments, are being increasingly exploited as scientific and clinical tools. However, one factor that can limit the applicability of this technology is the ability to express large amounts of active protein. In this review we describe the relative advantages and disadvantages of bacterial, yeast, insect and mammalian expression systems, and discuss some of the problems that can be encountered when using them. There is no 'universal' expression system, that can guarantee high yields of recombinant product, as every antibody-based molecule will pose its own problems in terms of expression. As a result the choice of system will depend on many factors, including the molecular species being expressed, the precise sequence of the individual antibody and the preferences of the individual investigator. However, there are general rules with regards to the design of expression vectors and systems which will help the investigator to make informed choices as to which strategy might be appropriate for their application. PMID:9760222

  15. 78 FR 6732 - Changes to Standard Numbering System, Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ...Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report Database AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Rule; information collection...Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report Database rule became effective on April 27, 2012. Under the...

  16. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. 880.6300...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification...corresponding health information. This system may...

  17. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. 880.6300...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification...corresponding health information. This system may...

  18. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. 880.6300...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification...corresponding health information. This system may...

  19. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. 880.6300...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification...corresponding health information. This system may...

  20. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. 880.6300...radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification...corresponding health information. This system may...

  1. Entropy-based separation of yeast cells using a microfluidic system of conjoined spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai-Jian; Qin, S.-J.; Bai, Zhong-Chen; Zhang, Xin; Mai, John D.

    2013-11-01

    A physical model is derived to create a biological cell separator that is based on controlling the entropy in a microfluidic system having conjoined spherical structures. A one-dimensional simplified model of this three-dimensional problem in terms of the corresponding effects of entropy on the Brownian motion of particles is presented. This dynamic mechanism is based on the Langevin equation from statistical thermodynamics and takes advantage of the characteristics of the Fokker-Planck equation. This mechanism can be applied to manipulate biological particles inside a microfluidic system with identical, conjoined, spherical compartments. This theoretical analysis is verified by performing a rapid and a simple technique for separating yeast cells in these conjoined, spherical microfluidic structures. The experimental results basically match with our theoretical model and we further analyze the parameters which can be used to control this separation mechanism. Both numerical simulations and experimental results show that the motion of the particles depends on the geometrical boundary conditions of the microfluidic system and the initial concentration of the diffusing material. This theoretical model can be implemented in future biophysics devices for the optimized design of passive cell sorters.

  2. Entropy-based separation of yeast cells using a microfluidic system of conjoined spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Kai-Jian; Qin, S.-J. Bai, Zhong-Chen; Zhang, Xin; Mai, John D.

    2013-11-21

    A physical model is derived to create a biological cell separator that is based on controlling the entropy in a microfluidic system having conjoined spherical structures. A one-dimensional simplified model of this three-dimensional problem in terms of the corresponding effects of entropy on the Brownian motion of particles is presented. This dynamic mechanism is based on the Langevin equation from statistical thermodynamics and takes advantage of the characteristics of the Fokker-Planck equation. This mechanism can be applied to manipulate biological particles inside a microfluidic system with identical, conjoined, spherical compartments. This theoretical analysis is verified by performing a rapid and a simple technique for separating yeast cells in these conjoined, spherical microfluidic structures. The experimental results basically match with our theoretical model and we further analyze the parameters which can be used to control this separation mechanism. Both numerical simulations and experimental results show that the motion of the particles depends on the geometrical boundary conditions of the microfluidic system and the initial concentration of the diffusing material. This theoretical model can be implemented in future biophysics devices for the optimized design of passive cell sorters.

  3. High Throughput Identification of Monoclonal Antibodies to Membrane Bound and Secreted Proteins Using Yeast and Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lequn; Qu, Liang; Zhou, Jing; Sun, Zhengda; Zou, Hao; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Marks, James D.; Zhou, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are ubiquitous and essential reagents for biomedical research. Uses of antibodies include quantifying proteins, identifying the temporal and spatial pattern of expression in cells and tissue, and determining how proteins function under normal or pathological conditions. Specific antibodies are only available for a small portion of the proteome, limiting study of those proteins for which antibodies do not exist. The technologies to generate target-specific antibodies need to be improved to obtain high quality antibodies to the proteome at reasonable cost. Here we show that renewable, validated, and standardized monoclonal antibodies can be generated at high throughput, without the need for antigen production or animal immunizations. In this study, 60 protein domains from 24 selected secreted proteins were expressed on the surface of yeast and used for selection of phage antibodies, over 400 monoclonal antibodies were identified within 3 weeks. A subset of these antibodies was validated for binding to cancer cells that overexpress the target protein by flow cytometry or immunohistochemistry. This approach will be applicable to many of the membrane-bound and the secreted proteins, 20–40% of the proteome, accelerating the timeline for Ab generation while reducing the cost. PMID:25353955

  4. A combined database related and de novo MS-identification of yeast mannose-1-phosphate guanyltransferase PSA1 interaction partners at different phases of batch cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Ville; Joenväärä, Sakari; Peltoniemi, Hannu; Mattila, Pirkko; Renkonen, Risto

    2009-04-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomic research has become one of the main methods in protein-protein interaction research. Several high throughput studies have established an interaction landscape of exponentially growing Baker's yeast culture. However, many of the protein-protein interactions are likely to change in different environmental conditions. In order to examine the dynamic nature of the protein interactions we isolated the protein complexes of mannose-1-phosphate guanyltransferase PSA1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at four different time points during batch cultivation. We used the tandem affinity purification (TAP)-method to purify the complexes and subjected the tryptic peptides to LC-MS/MS. The resulting peak lists were analyzed with two different methods: the database related protein identification program X!Tandem and the de novo sequencing program Lutefisk. We observed significant changes in the interactome of PSA1 during the batch cultivation and identified altogether 74 proteins interacting with PSA1 of which only six were found to interact during all time points. All the other proteins showed a more dynamic nature of binding activity. In this study we also demonstrate the benefit of using both database related and de novo methods in the protein interaction research to enhance both the quality and the quantity of observations.

  5. Studies of the expression of human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identification of PARP-1 substrates by yeast proteome microarray screening.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhihua; Gao, Peng; Liu, Hung-Wen

    2009-12-15

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of various nuclear proteins catalyzed by a family of NAD(+)-dependent enzymes, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), is an important posttranslational modification reaction. PARP activity has been demonstrated in all types of eukaryotic cells with the exception of yeast, in which the expression of human PARP-1 was shown to lead to retarded cell growth. We investigated the yeast growth inhibition caused by human PARP-1 expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Flow cytometry analysis reveals that PARP-1-expressing yeast cells accumulate in the G(2)/M stage of the cell cycle. Confocal microscopy analysis shows that human PARP-1 is distributed throughout the nucleus of yeast cells but is enriched in the nucleolus. Utilizing yeast proteome microarray screening, we identified 33 putative PARP-1 substrates, six of which are known to be involved in ribosome biogenesis. The poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of three of these yeast proteins, together with two human homologues, was confirmed by an in vitro PARP-1 assay. Finally, a polysome profile analysis using sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation demonstrated that the ribosome levels in yeast cells expressing PARP-1 are lower than those in control yeast cells. Overall, our data suggest that human PARP-1 may affect ribosome biogenesis by modifying certain nucleolar proteins in yeast. The artificial PARP-1 pathway in yeast may be used as a simple platform to identify substrates and verify function of this important enzyme. PMID:19877712

  6. Development and validation of an in-house database for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry-based yeast identification using a fast protein extraction procedure.

    PubMed

    De Carolis, Elena; Vella, Antonietta; Vaccaro, Luisa; Torelli, Riccardo; Posteraro, Patrizia; Ricciardi, Walter; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella

    2014-05-01

    In recent studies evaluating the usefulness of the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based identification of yeasts for the routine diagnosis of fungal infections, preanalytical sample processing has emerged as a critical step for reliable MALDI-TOF MS outcomes, especially when the Bruker Daltonics Biotyper software was used. In addition, inadequate results often occurred due to discrepancies between the methods used for clinical testing and database construction. Therefore, we created an in-house MALDI-TOF MS library using the spectra from 156 reference and clinical yeast isolates (48 species in 11 genera), which were generated with a fast sample preparation procedure. After a retrospective validation study, our database was evaluated on 4,232 yeasts routinely isolated during a 6-month period and fast prepared for MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Thus, 4,209 (99.5%) of the isolates were successfully identified to the species level (with scores of ?2.0), with 1,676 (39.6%) having scores of >2.3. For the remaining 23 (0.5%) isolates, no reliable identification (with scores of <1.7) was obtained. Interestingly, these isolates were almost always from species uniquely represented or not included in the database. As the MALDI-TOF MS results were, except for 23 isolates, validated without additional phenotypic or molecular tests, our proposed strategy can enhance the rapidity and accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS in identifying medically important yeast species. However, while continuous updating of our database will be necessary to enrich it with more strains/species of new and emerging yeasts, the present in-house MALDI-TOF MS library can be made publicly available for future multicenter studies. PMID:24554755

  7. System Identification without Lennart Ljung: what would have been different?

    E-print Network

    Gevers, Michel

    presents a personal view on the development of identification theory in the control community, starting), gave birth to two main streams of research that have dominated the development of system identification laid the foundations for the highly successful Prediction Error methods based on parametric input

  8. System Identification and Modelling of a High Performance Hydraulic Actuator

    E-print Network

    Hayward, Vincent

    System Identification and Modelling of a High Performance Hydraulic Actuator Benoit Boulet, Laeeque with the experimental identification and modelling of the nonlinear dynamics ofa high performance hydraulic actuator. The actuator properties and performance are also discussed. 1 Introduction Hydraulic actuation used to be

  9. Growth control of the eukaryote cell: A systems biology study in yeast

    E-print Network

    Castrillo, Juan I.; Zeef, Leo A.; Hoyle, David C.; Zhang, Nianshu; Hayes, Andrew; Gardner, David C. J.; Cornell, Michael J.; Petty, June; Hakes, Luke; Wardleworth, Leanne; Rash, Bharat; Brown, Marie; Dunn, Warwick B.; Broadhurst, David; O'Donoghue, Kerry; Hester, Svenja S.; Dunkley, Tom P. J.; Hart, Sarah; Swainston, Neil; Li, Peter; Gaskell, Simon J.; Paton, Norman W.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Kell, Douglas B.; Oliver, Stephen G.

    2007-04-30

    ) on the transcriptome, proteome, endometabolome and exometabolome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each functional genomic level shows clear growth-rate-associated trends and discriminates between carbon-sufficient and carbon-limited conditions. Genes consistently...

  10. Neural system prediction and identification challenge

    PubMed Central

    Vlachos, Ioannis; Zaytsev, Yury V.; Spreizer, Sebastian; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Can we infer the function of a biological neural network (BNN) if we know the connectivity and activity of all its constituent neurons?This question is at the core of neuroscience and, accordingly, various methods have been developed to record the activity and connectivity of as many neurons as possible. Surprisingly, there is no theoretical or computational demonstration that neuronal activity and connectivity are indeed sufficient to infer the function of a BNN. Therefore, we pose the Neural Systems Identification and Prediction Challenge (nuSPIC). We provide the connectivity and activity of all neurons and invite participants (1) to infer the functions implemented (hard-wired) in spiking neural networks (SNNs) by stimulating and recording the activity of neurons and, (2) to implement predefined mathematical/biological functions using SNNs. The nuSPICs can be accessed via a web-interface to the NEST simulator and the user is not required to know any specific programming language. Furthermore, the nuSPICs can be used as a teaching tool. Finally, nuSPICs use the crowd-sourcing model to address scientific issues. With this computational approach we aim to identify which functions can be inferred by systematic recordings of neuronal activity and connectivity. In addition, nuSPICs will help the design and application of new experimental paradigms based on the structure of the SNN and the presumed function which is to be discovered. PMID:24399966

  11. 280 EXPRESSION IN YEAST [23] [23] Manipulating Yeast Genome Using Plasmid Vectors

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    280 EXPRESSION IN YEAST [23] [23] Manipulating Yeast Genome Using Plasmid Vectors By TIM STEARNS, HONG MA, and DAVID BOTSTEIN The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be a popular high status of yeast as an experimental system is in large part due to the work of the many geneticists

  12. Identification and regulation of a gene required for cell fusion during mating of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, G; Clay, F J; Kelsay, K; Sprague, G F

    1987-01-01

    We have devised a screen for genes from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose expression is affected by cell type or by the mating pheromones. From this screen we identified a gene, FUS1, whose pattern of expression revealed interesting regulatory strategies and whose product was required for efficient cell fusion during mating. Transcription of FUS1 occurred only in a and alpha cells, not in a/alpha cells, where it was repressed by a1 X alpha 2, a regulatory activity present uniquely in a/alpha cells. Transcription of FUS1 showed an absolute requirement for the products of five STE genes, STE4, STE5, STE7, STE11, and STE12. Since the activators STE4, STE5, and STE12 are themselves repressed by a1 X alpha 2, the failure to express FUS1 in a/alpha cells is probably the result of a cascade of regulatory activities; repression of the activators by a1 X alpha 2 in turn precludes transcription of FUS1. In addition to regulation of FUS1 by cell type, transcription from the locus increased 10-fold or more when a or alpha cells were exposed to the opposing mating pheromone. To investigate the function of the Fus1 protein, we created fus1 null mutants. In fus1 X fus1 matings, the cells of a mating pair adhered tightly and appeared to form zygotes. However, the zygotes were abnormal. Within the conjugation bridge the contained a partition that prevented nuclear fusion and mixing of organelles. The predicted sequence of the Fus1 protein (deduced from the FUS1 DNA sequence) and subcellular fractionation studies with Fus1-beta-galactosidase hybrid proteins suggest that Fus1 is a membrane or secreted protein. Thus, Fus1 may be located at a position within the cell where it is poised to catalyze cell wall or plasma membrane fusion. Images PMID:3313002

  13. An Ancient Yeast for Young Geneticists: A Primer on the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Model System

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Charles S.; Wood, Valerie; Fantes, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an important model organism for the study of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology. Studies of S. pombe, together with studies of its distant cousin, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have led to the discovery of genes involved in fundamental mechanisms of transcription, translation, DNA replication, cell cycle control, and signal transduction, to name but a few processes. However, since the divergence of the two species approximately 350 million years ago, S. pombe appears to have evolved less rapidly than S. cerevisiae so that it retains more characteristics of the common ancient yeast ancestor, causing it to share more features with metazoan cells. This Primer introduces S. pombe by describing the yeast itself, providing a brief description of the origins of fission yeast research, and illustrating some genetic and bioinformatics tools used to study protein function in fission yeast. In addition, a section on some key differences between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae is included for readers with some familiarity with budding yeast research but who may have an interest in developing research projects using S. pombe. PMID:26447128

  14. An Ancient Yeast for Young Geneticists: A Primer on the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Model System.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Charles S; Wood, Valerie; Fantes, Peter A

    2015-10-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an important model organism for the study of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology. Studies of S. pombe, together with studies of its distant cousin, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have led to the discovery of genes involved in fundamental mechanisms of transcription, translation, DNA replication, cell cycle control, and signal transduction, to name but a few processes. However, since the divergence of the two species approximately 350 million years ago, S. pombe appears to have evolved less rapidly than S. cerevisiae so that it retains more characteristics of the common ancient yeast ancestor, causing it to share more features with metazoan cells. This Primer introduces S. pombe by describing the yeast itself, providing a brief description of the origins of fission yeast research, and illustrating some genetic and bioinformatics tools used to study protein function in fission yeast. In addition, a section on some key differences between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae is included for readers with some familiarity with budding yeast research but who may have an interest in developing research projects using S. pombe. PMID:26447128

  15. Automated frequency domain system identification of a large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the development and experimental results of an automated on-orbit system identification method for large flexible spacecraft that yields estimated quantities to support on-line design and tuning of robust high performance control systems. The procedure consists of applying an input to the plant, obtaining an output, and then conducting nonparametric identification to yield the spectral estimate of the system transfer function. A parametric model is determined by curve fitting the spectral estimate to a rational transfer function. The identification method has been demonstrated experimentally on the Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory in JPL.

  16. Development of Identification System of cans And Bottle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yani, Irsyadi; Budiman, Ihsan

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of this research was developed an integrated simulation model of an intelligent sorting system based on machine vision, which is focused on object detection, identification and automatic sorting system of cans and bottle. In this research we used 60 cans and 40 bottles for database with five direction of each sample (upper, bottom, diagonal left and right side). Performance of the identification system for correct cans and bottles are 91.33% with estimated amount of 21,600 items per hour. The success of the identification depends on the size and type of the objects.

  17. Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Blades, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted under a NASA grant on the topic 'Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating.' The research concerns ongoing development of the Substructure System Identification Algorithm (SSID Algorithm), a system identification algorithm that can be used to obtain mathematical models of substructures, like Space Shuttle payloads. In the present study, particular attention was given to the following topics: making the algorithm robust to noisy test data, extending the algorithm to accept experimental FRF data that covers a broad frequency bandwidth, and developing a test analytical model (TAM) for use in relating test data to reduced-order finite element models.

  18. System Identification: Time Varying and Nonlinear Methods 

    E-print Network

    Majji, Manoranjan

    2010-07-14

    to develop first few time step models is detailed, providing a unified solution to the time varying identification problem. The practical problem of identifying the time varying generalized Markov parameters required for TVERA is presented as the next result...

  19. A linear discrete dynamic system model for temporal gene interaction and regulatory network influence in response to bioethanol conversion inhibitor HMF for ethanologenic yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A linear discrete dynamic system model is constructed to represent the temporal interactions among significantly expressed genes in response to bioethanol conversion inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural for ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study identifies the most significant linear...

  20. Properly defining the targets of a transcription factor significantly improves the computational identification of cooperative transcription factor pairs in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Transcriptional regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes is usually accomplished by cooperative transcription factors (TFs). Computational identification of cooperative TF pairs has become a hot research topic and many algorithms have been proposed in the literature. A typical algorithm for predicting cooperative TF pairs has two steps. (Step 1) Define the targets of each TF under study. (Step 2) Design a measure for calculating the cooperativity of a TF pair based on the targets of these two TFs. While different algorithms have distinct sophisticated cooperativity measures, the targets of a TF are usually defined using ChIP-chip data. However, there is an inherent weakness in using ChIP-chip data to define the targets of a TF. ChIP-chip analysis can only identify the binding targets of a TF but it cannot distinguish the true regulatory from the binding but non-regulatory targets of a TF. Results This work is the first study which aims to investigate whether the performance of computational identification of cooperative TF pairs could be improved by using a more biologically relevant way to define the targets of a TF. For this purpose, we propose four simple algorithms, all of which consist of two steps. (Step 1) Define the targets of a TF using (i) ChIP-chip data in the first algorithm, (ii) TF binding data in the second algorithm, (iii) TF perturbation data in the third algorithm, and (iv) the intersection of TF binding and TF perturbation data in the fourth algorithm. Compared with the first three algorithms, the fourth algorithm uses a more biologically relevant way to define the targets of a TF. (Step 2) Measure the cooperativity of a TF pair by the statistical significance of the overlap of the targets of these two TFs using the hypergeometric test. By adopting four existing performance indices, we show that the fourth proposed algorithm (PA4) significantly out performs the other three proposed algorithms. This suggests that the computational identification of cooperative TF pairs is indeed improved when using a more biologically relevant way to define the targets of a TF. Strikingly, the prediction results of our simple PA4 are more biologically meaningful than those of the 12 existing sophisticated algorithms in the literature, all of which used ChIP-chip data to define the targets of a TF. This suggests that properly defining the targets of a TF may be more important than designing sophisticated cooperativity measures. In addition, our PA4 has the power to predict several experimentally validated cooperative TF pairs, which have not been successfully predicted by any existing algorithms in the literature. Conclusions This study shows that the performance of computational identification of cooperative TF pairs could be improved by using a more biologically relevant way to define the targets of a TF. The main contribution of this study is not to propose another new algorithm but to provide a new thinking for the research of computational identification of cooperative TF pairs. Researchers should put more effort on properly defining the targets of a TF (i.e. Step 1) rather than totally focus on designing sophisticated cooperativity measures (i.e. Step 2). The lists of TF target genes, the Matlab codes and the prediction results of the four proposed algorithms could be downloaded from our companion website http://cosbi3.ee.ncku.edu.tw/TFI/ PMID:26679776

  1. [Bioassay for endocrine disruptors by using yeast two-hybrid system].

    PubMed

    Nishihara, T; Nishikawa, J

    2001-09-01

    One of the urgent tasks in understanding endocrine disruptors (EDs) is to compile a list of suspected substances among the huge number of chemicals by using the screening test method. An in vitro screening test is a more useful tool for primary selection of suspected EDs. We have developed an assay for EDs using the yeast two-hybrid system. The assay is based on the ligand-dependent interaction of two proteins, a hormone receptor and a coactivator, and the hormonal activity is detected by beta-galactosidase activity. This assay is a very simple and inexpensive test method with high repeatability to detect the agonist, and it is applicable for the detection of antagonist and active compounds after metabolism. Accordingly, it has been used in more than 40 laboratories in Japan. To date, we have tested the estrogenic activity of more than 500 chemicals including natural substances, medicines, pesticides and industrial chemicals. Sixty-four compounds were evaluated as positive and most of these possessed a common structure: phenol with a hydrophobic moiety at the para-position without bulky groups at the ortho-position. These results are expected to facilitate further risk assessment of chemicals, especially EDs. PMID:11577461

  2. Modeling of Biometric Identification System Using the Colored Petri Nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, G. R.; Ter-Vardanyan, L. A.; Gaboutchian, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present a model of biometric identification system transformed into Petri Nets. Petri Nets, as a graphical and mathematical tool, provide a uniform environment for modelling, formal analysis, and design of discrete event systems. The main objective of this paper is to introduce the fundamental concepts of Petri Nets to the researchers and practitioners, both from identification systems, who are involved in the work in the areas of modelling and analysis of biometric identification types of systems, as well as those who may potentially be involved in these areas. In addition, the paper introduces high-level Petri Nets, as Colored Petri Nets (CPN). In this paper the model of Colored Petri Net describes the identification process much simpler.

  3. System Identification and Active Control of a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    E-print Network

    Rathnasingham, Ruben

    An experimental investigation is made into the active control of the near-wall region of a turbulent boundary layer using a linear control scheme. System identification in the boundary layer provides optimal transfer ...

  4. Frequency-based structural damage identification and dynamic system characterisation 

    E-print Network

    Mao, Lei

    2012-11-29

    This thesis studies structural dynamic system identification in a frequency-based framework. The basic consideration stems from the fact that frequencies may generally be measured with higher accuracy than other pertinent ...

  5. Nonlinear stochastic system identification techniques for biological tissues/

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    This research develops a device capable of measuring the nonlinear dynamic mechanical properties of human tissue in vivo. The enabling technology is the use of nonlinear stochastic system identification techniques in ...

  6. Multi-channel blind system identification for central hemodynamic monitoring

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yi, 1973-

    2002-01-01

    Multi-channel Blind System Identification (MBSI) is a technique for estimating both an unknown input and unknown channel dynamics from simultaneous output measurements at different channels through which the input signal ...

  7. Research of Uncertainty Reasoning in Pineapple Disease Identification System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liqun; Fan, Haifeng

    In order to deal with the uncertainty of evidences mostly existing in pineapple disease identification system, a reasoning model based on evidence credibility factor was established. The uncertainty reasoning method is discussed,including: uncertain representation of knowledge, uncertain representation of rules, uncertain representation of multi-evidences and update of reasoning rules. The reasoning can fully reflect the uncertainty in disease identification and reduce the influence of subjective factors on the accuracy of the system.

  8. High-throughput analysis of yeast replicative aging using a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Jo, Myeong Chan; Liu, Wei; Gu, Liang; Dang, Weiwei; Qin, Lidong

    2015-07-28

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an important model for studying the molecular mechanisms of aging in eukaryotic cells. However, the laborious and low-throughput methods of current yeast replicative lifespan assays limit their usefulness as a broad genetic screening platform for research on aging. We address this limitation by developing an efficient, high-throughput microfluidic single-cell analysis chip in combination with high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. This innovative design enables, to our knowledge for the first time, the determination of the yeast replicative lifespan in a high-throughput manner. Morphological and phenotypical changes during aging can also be monitored automatically with a much higher throughput than previous microfluidic designs. We demonstrate highly efficient trapping and retention of mother cells, determination of the replicative lifespan, and tracking of yeast cells throughout their entire lifespan. Using the high-resolution and large-scale data generated from the high-throughput yeast aging analysis (HYAA) chips, we investigated particular longevity-related changes in cell morphology and characteristics, including critical cell size, terminal morphology, and protein subcellular localization. In addition, because of the significantly improved retention rate of yeast mother cell, the HYAA-Chip was capable of demonstrating replicative lifespan extension by calorie restriction. PMID:26170317

  9. High-throughput analysis of yeast replicative aging using a microfluidic system

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Myeong Chan; Liu, Wei; Gu, Liang; Dang, Weiwei; Qin, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an important model for studying the molecular mechanisms of aging in eukaryotic cells. However, the laborious and low-throughput methods of current yeast replicative lifespan assays limit their usefulness as a broad genetic screening platform for research on aging. We address this limitation by developing an efficient, high-throughput microfluidic single-cell analysis chip in combination with high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. This innovative design enables, to our knowledge for the first time, the determination of the yeast replicative lifespan in a high-throughput manner. Morphological and phenotypical changes during aging can also be monitored automatically with a much higher throughput than previous microfluidic designs. We demonstrate highly efficient trapping and retention of mother cells, determination of the replicative lifespan, and tracking of yeast cells throughout their entire lifespan. Using the high-resolution and large-scale data generated from the high-throughput yeast aging analysis (HYAA) chips, we investigated particular longevity-related changes in cell morphology and characteristics, including critical cell size, terminal morphology, and protein subcellular localization. In addition, because of the significantly improved retention rate of yeast mother cell, the HYAA-Chip was capable of demonstrating replicative lifespan extension by calorie restriction. PMID:26170317

  10. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing enzymes of yeasts.

  11. Identification of the sulphate ion as one of the key components of yeast spoilage of a sports drink through genome-wide expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Jayakody, Lahiru N; Tsuge, Keisuke; Suzuki, Akihiro; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Because of the growing market for sports drinks, prevention of yeast contamination of these beverages is of significant concern. This research was performed to achieve insight into the physiology of yeast growing in sports drinks through a genome-wide approach to prevent microbial spoilage of sports drinks. The genome-wide gene expression profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing in the representative sports drink was investigated. Genes that were relevant to sulphate ion starvation response were upregulated in the yeast cells growing in the drink. These results suggest that yeast cells are suffering from deficiency of extracellular sulphate ions during growth in the sports drink. Indeed, the concentration of sulphate ions was far lower in the sports drink than in a medium that allows the optimal growth of yeast. To prove the starvation of sulphate ions of yeast, several ions were added to the beverage and its effects were investigated. The addition of sulphate ions, but not chloride ions or sodium ions, to the beverage stimulated yeast growth in the beverage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the addition of sulphate ions to the sports drink increased the biosynthesis of sulphur-containing amino acids in yeast cells and hydrogen sulphide in the beverage. These results indicate that sulphate ion concentration should be regulated to prevent microbial spoilage of sports drinks. PMID:23863293

  12. Identification of active magnetic bearing system with a flexible rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhe; He, Ying; Zhao, Jingjing; Shi, Zhengang; Zhao, Lei; Yu, Suyuan

    2014-12-01

    Active magnetic bearings (AMBs) are widely applied in high-speed rotating machinery, especially in special environments. In designing and adjusting an AMB system, the mathematical model of the system plays an important role. Identification is a useful method to obtain the models of AMB systems. This paper concentrates on identification method for an AMB system with a flexible rotor. Based on the theoretical system model and the measured frequency-response model, the proposed method estimates the unknown parameters and establishes the transfer function matrix model of the AMB system. According to the theoretical model, this paper decomposes the identification procedure into a few steps and the model is sequentially reduced by these steps. In this procedure, the submodels are identified separately and finally combined together. The proposed method is validated by experiments on three AMB systems.

  13. Yeast screening system for the detection of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, M.L.

    1983-09-01

    Two strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were constructed to detect genetic damage. Strain XD99 can detect chromosome loss, important in the induction of teratogenesis, aneuploidy, and possibly carcinogenesis. Two positive selection techniques were developed which select for the simultaneous loss of both arms of chromosome X. Confirmation of chromosome loss using a centromere-linked marker was found to be essential for distinguishing chromosome loss from coincident crossing-over. The high selectivity of strain XD99 allowed the development of a spot test for chromosome loss. Methyl benzimidazole-2-yl-carbamate and ethyl methanesulfonate induced chromosome loss in the spot test. The two carcinogens 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine also induced chromosome loss. Chromosome X monosomics were found to be unstable and were restored to euploidy. This restoration of euploidy may have important implications regarding chromosome loss as a mechanism of promotion. Strain XD83 can detect multiple genetic changes: nuclear frameshift and base pair substitution mutations, nuclear mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion and mitochondrial large deletions and forward point mutations. Ethyl methanesulfonate, ICR-170, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, ultraviolet light and ethidium bromide were tested. None of the carcinogens were specific in their induced spectrum of damage. Only ethidium bromide induced a highly specific spectrum of damage: petite induction. The variety of endpoints monitored here may allow the detection of certain carcinogens and other genetically toxic agents which have escaped detection in other systems. This system may be useful in the study of possible mechanisms of carcinogenesis and aneuploidy.

  14. Kinetochore Structure: Pulling Answers from Yeast

    E-print Network

    Cheeseman, Iain McPherson

    Despite the identification of multiple kinetochore proteins, their structure and organization has remained unclear. New work uses electron microscopy to visualize isolated budding yeast kinetochore particles and reveal the ...

  15. Yeast Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Candida is the scientific name for yeast. It is a fungus that lives almost everywhere, including in ... infection that causes white patches in your mouth Candida esophagitis is thrush that spreads to your esophagus, ...

  16. Red yeast

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cholesterol levels and triglycerides. However, this specific product contains large amounts of a chemical similar to "statin" ... this product and other red yeast products that contain statins to be illegal unapproved drugs. However, outside ...

  17. Counting Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, Jonathan; Welton, Briana

    1998-01-01

    Describes changes to a traditional study of population in yeast colonies. Changes to the procedures include: (1) only one culture per student team; (2) cultures are inoculated only once; and (3) the same tube is sampled daily. (DDR)

  18. Isolation and Identification of Pathogenic Filamentous Fungi and Yeasts From Adult House Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) Captured From the Hospital Environments in Ahvaz City, Southwestern Iran.

    PubMed

    Kassiri, Hamid; Zarrin, Majid; Veys-Behbahani, Rahele; Faramarzi, Sama; Kasiri, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Musca domestica L., 1758 is capable of transferring a number of pathogenic viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites to animals and humans. The objective of this study was to isolate and identify medically important filamentous fungi and yeasts from adult M. domestica collected from two wards of three hospital environments in Ahvaz city, Khuzestan Province, southwestern Iran. The common house flies were caught by a sterile net. These insects were washed in a solution of 1% sodium hypochlorite for 3?min and twice in sterile distilled water for 1?min. The flies were individually crushed with sterile swabs in sterile test tubes. Then 2?ml of sterile normal saline (0.85%) was added to each tube, and the tube was centrifuged for 5?min. The supernatant was then discarded, and the remaining sediment was inoculated with a sterile swab in the Sabouraud's dextrose agar medium containing chloramphenicol. Isolation and identification of fungi were made by standard mycological methods. In this research, totally 190?M. domestica from hospital environments were captured. In total, 28 fungal species were isolated. The main fungi isolated were Aspergillus spp. (67.4%), Penicillium sp. (11.6%), Mucorales sp. (11%), Candida spp. (10.5%), and Rhodotorula sp. (8.4%). Among the house flies caught at the hospitals, about 80% were found to carry one or more medically important species of fungi. This study has established that common house flies carry pathogenic fungi in the hospital environments of Ahvaz. The control of M. domestica in hospitals is essential in order to control the nosocomial fungal infections in patients. PMID:26405077

  19. Gene engineering in yeast for biodegradation: Immunological cross-reactivity among cytochrome p-450 system proteins of saccharomyces cerevisiae and candida tropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Loper, J.C.; Chen, C.; Dey, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Yeasts are eukaryotic microorganisms whose cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase systems may be amenable to genetic engineering for the hydroxylation and detoxication of polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. The molecular genetic properties of strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and an n-alkane utilizing yeast, Candida tropicalis ATCC750 are examined. Standard methods were used to purify cytochrome P-450 and NADPH-cytochrome c (P-450) reductase proteins from cells cultured by semi-anaerobic glucose fermentation (S. cerevisiae, C. tropicalis) and by growth on tetradecane (C. tropicalis). Polyvalent antisera prepared in rabbits to some of these proteins were used in tests of immunological relatedness among the purified proteins using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and nitrocellulose filter immunoblots. The results provide evidence for gene relationships which should prove useful in gene isolation and subsequent engineering of P-450 enzyme systems in yeast.

  20. 49 CFR 1542.211 - Identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...that each individual in the secured area or SIDA continuously displays the identification...unescorted access to secured areas and SIDA's to ascertain the authority of any...unescorted access authority to a secured area or SIDA that— (1) Ensure that only...

  1. Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Allan E.

    1992-01-01

    Continuing work on frequency analysis for transfer function identification is discussed. A new study was initiated into a 'weighted' least squares algorithm within the context of the Fourier modulating function approach. The first phase of applying these techniques to the F-18 flight data is nearing completion, and these results are summarized.

  2. Molecular Phylogeny of the Yeasts: Impact on Classification and Prediction of Biotechnological Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA sequence analysis and other DNA-based methodologies have transformed the way in which yeasts are identified and classified. Development of species-specific gene sequence databases has provided a barcode system for rapid identification of known species and the recognition of undescribed species. ...

  3. System identification methods for aircraft flight control development and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.

    1995-01-01

    System-identification methods compose a mathematical model, or series of models, from measurements of inputs and outputs of dynamic systems. The extracted models allow the characterization of the response of the overall aircraft or component subsystem behavior, such as actuators and on-board signal processing algorithms. This paper discusses the use of frequency-domain system-identification methods for the development and integration of aircraft flight-control systems. The extraction and analysis of models of varying complexity from nonparametric frequency-responses to transfer-functions and high-order state-space representations is illustrated using the Comprehensive Identification from FrEquency Responses (CIFER) system-identification facility. Results are presented for test data of numerous flight and simulation programs at the Ames Research Center including rotorcraft, fixed-wing aircraft, advanced short takeoff and vertical landing (ASTOVL), vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL), tiltrotor aircraft, and rotor experiments in the wind tunnel. Excellent system characterization and dynamic response prediction is achieved for this wide class of systems. Examples illustrate the role of system-identification technology in providing an integrated flow of dynamic response data around the entire life-cycle of aircraft development from initial specifications, through simulation and bench testing, and into flight-test optimization.

  4. Development of an Automatic Identification System Autonomous Positioning System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qing; Jiang, Yi; Zhang, Jingbo; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shufang

    2015-01-01

    In order to overcome the vulnerability of the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) and provide robust position, navigation and time (PNT) information in marine navigation, the autonomous positioning system based on ranging-mode Automatic Identification System (AIS) is presented in the paper. The principle of the AIS autonomous positioning system (AAPS) is investigated, including the position algorithm, the signal measurement technique, the geometric dilution of precision, the time synchronization technique and the additional secondary factor correction technique. In order to validate the proposed AAPS, a verification system has been established in the Xinghai sea region of Dalian (China). Static and dynamic positioning experiments are performed. The original function of the AIS in the AAPS is not influenced. The experimental results show that the positioning precision of the AAPS is better than 10 m in the area with good geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) by the additional secondary factor correction technology. This is the most economical solution for a land-based positioning system to complement the GNSS for the navigation safety of vessels sailing along coasts. PMID:26569258

  5. Immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography purification of alcohol dehydrogenase from baker's yeast using an expanded bed adsorption system.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, N A; Kirschner, T; Smith, M P; Hjorth, R; Titchener-Hooker, N J

    1999-04-30

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from solutions of homogenised packed bakers' yeast has been successfully purified using immobilised metal-ion affinity chromatography in an expanded bed. Method scouting carried out using pure ADH solutions loaded onto 5-ml HiTrap columns charged with Zn2+, Ni2+ and Cu2+ and eluted using 0-50 mM EDTA gradient found that charging with Zn2+ gave the highest recovery and the lowest EDTA concentration required for elution. These results were used to develop a protocol for the expanded bed system and further tested using clarified yeast homogenate loaded onto XK16/20 packed beds (approximately 30 ml) packed with Chelating Sepharose FastFlow matrix in order to determine the optimum elution conditions using EDTA. The ADH was found to elute at 5 mM EDTA and the dynamic and total binding capacities of Streamline chelating for ADH were found to be 235 U/ml and 1075 U/ml matrix, respectively. Expanded bed work based on a step EDTA elution protocol demonstrated that ADH could be successfully eluted from unclarified homogenised bakers' yeast diluted to 10 mg/ml total protein content with a recovery of 80-100% that was maintained over five consecutive runs with a vigorous clean-in-place procedure between each run. PMID:10343398

  6. Biology of the Heat Shock Response and Protein Chaperones: Budding Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Jacob; Abrams, Jennifer; Wang, Yanyu

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The eukaryotic heat shock response is an ancient and highly conserved transcriptional program that results in the immediate synthesis of a battery of cytoprotective genes in the presence of thermal and other environmental stresses. Many of these genes encode molecular chaperones, powerful protein remodelers with the capacity to shield, fold, or unfold substrates in a context-dependent manner. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be an invaluable model for driving the discovery of regulatory features of this fundamental stress response. In addition, budding yeast has been an outstanding model system to elucidate the cell biology of protein chaperones and their organization into functional networks. In this review, we evaluate our understanding of the multifaceted response to heat shock. In addition, the chaperone complement of the cytosol is compared to those of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, organelles with their own unique protein homeostasis milieus. Finally, we examine recent advances in the understanding of the roles of protein chaperones and the heat shock response in pathogenic fungi, which is being accelerated by the wealth of information gained for budding yeast. PMID:22688810

  7. Molecular cloning of amphioxus uncoupling protein and assessment of its uncoupling activity using a yeast heterologous expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kun; Sun, Guoxun; Lv, Zhiyuan; Wang, Chen; Jiang, Xueyuan; Li, Donghai; Zhang, Chenyu

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Invertebrates, for example amphioxus, do express uncoupling proteins. {yields} Both the sequence and the uncoupling activity of amphioxus UCP resemble UCP2. {yields} UCP1 is the only UCP that can form dimer on yeast mitochondria. -- Abstract: The present study describes the molecular cloning of a novel cDNA fragment from amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) encoding a 343-amino acid protein that is highly homologous to human uncoupling proteins (UCP), this protein is therefore named amphioxus UCP. This amphioxus UCP shares more homology with and is phylogenetically more related to mammalian UCP2 as compared with UCP1. To further assess the functional similarity of amphioxus UCP to mammalian UCP1 and -2, the amphioxus UCP, rat UCP1, and human UCP2 were separately expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the recombinant yeast mitochondria were isolated and assayed for the state 4 respiration rate and proton leak, using pYES2 empty vector as the control. UCP1 increased the state 4 respiration rate by 2.8-fold, and the uncoupling activity was strongly inhibited by GDP, while UCP2 and amphioxus UCP only increased the state 4 respiration rate by 1.5-fold and 1.7-fold in a GDP-insensitive manner, moreover, the proton leak kinetics of amphioxus UCP was very similar to UCP2, but much different from UCP1. In conclusion, the amphioxus UCP has a mild, unregulated uncoupling activity in the yeast system, which resembles mammalian UCP2, but not UCP1.

  8. Online Spectral Identification of Dynamical Systems Byron Boots

    E-print Network

    Guestrin, Carlos

    Online Spectral Identification of Dynamical Systems Byron Boots Machine Learning Department of researchers have proposed spectral algorithms for learning models of nonlin- ear dynamical systems of a nonlinear dynamical system in several partially observable domains. In our first experiment we empirically

  9. MAC, A System for Automatically IPR Identification, Collection and Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrão, Carlos

    Controlling Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) in the Digital World is a very hard challenge. The facility to create multiple bit-by-bit identical copies from original IPR works creates the opportunities for digital piracy. One of the most affected industries by this fact is the Music Industry. The Music Industry has supported huge losses during the last few years due to this fact. Moreover, this fact is also affecting the way that music rights collecting and distributing societies are operating to assure a correct music IPR identification, collection and distribution. In this article a system for automating this IPR identification, collection and distribution is presented and described. This system makes usage of advanced automatic audio identification system based on audio fingerprinting technology. This paper will present the details of the system and present a use-case scenario where this system is being used.

  10. Profiling of Yeast Lipids by Shotgun Lipidomics.

    PubMed

    Klose, Christian; Tarasov, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    Lipidomics is a rapidly growing technology for identification and quantification of a variety of cellular lipid molecules. Following the successful development and application of functional genomic technologies in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we witness a recent expansion of lipidomics applications in this model organism. The applications include detailed characterization of the yeast lipidome as well as screening for perturbed lipid phenotypes across hundreds of yeast gene deletion mutants. In this chapter, we describe sample handling, mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics methods developed for yeast lipidomics studies. PMID:26483029

  11. Simple method to detect triacylglycerol biosynthesis in a yeast-based recombinant system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Standard methods to quantify the activity of triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesizing enzymes DGAT and PDAT (TAG-SE) require a sensitive but rather arduous laboratory assay based on radio-labeled substrates. Here we describe two straightforward methods to detect TAG production in baker’s yeast Saccharomyc...

  12. Bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated soil by a combined system of biostimulation-bioaugmentation with yeast.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mei-Ying; Xie, Rui-Jie; Qin, Gang

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of a combined biostimulation-bioaugmentation treatment applied to a clay-loam soil contaminated with 16,300 mg/kg of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), which comprised 51% saturated hydrocarbons and 31% aromatic hydrocarbons. The bioaugmentation was performed with yeast Candida tropicalis SK21 isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil. The strain was able to grow in a pH range of 3-9 in liquid culture, and the optimum pH was found to be 6 for both growth and biosurfactant production. At pH 6, 96% and 42% of TPH were degraded by the strain at the initial diesel oil concentrations of 0.5% and 5% (v/v), respectively. The remediation via inoculating the yeast removed 83% of TPH in 180 days while the experiment with the indigenous microorganisms alone removed 61%. Microbial enumeration showed that the yeast SK21 could grow good in the soil. It was also found that dehydrogenase and polyphenoloxidase activities in soil were remarkably enhanced by the inoculation of the yeast. PMID:24600879

  13. Quality assessment of lager brewery yeast samples and strains using barley malt extracts with anti-yeast activity.

    PubMed

    van Nierop, Sandra N E; Axcell, Barry C; Cantrell, Ian C; Rautenbach, Marina

    2009-04-01

    Membrane active anti-yeast compounds, such as antimicrobial peptides and proteins, cause yeast membrane damage which is likely to affect yeast vitality and fermentation performance, parameters which are notoriously difficult to analyse. In this work the sensitivity of lager brewery yeast strains towards barley malt extracts with anti-yeast activity was assessed with an optimised assay. It was found that yeast, obtained directly from a brewery, was much more sensitive towards the malt extracts than the same yeast strain propagated in the laboratory. Sensitivity to the malt extracts increased during the course of a laboratory scale fermentation when inoculated with brewery yeast. As the assay was able to differentiate yeast samples with different histories, it shows promise as a yeast quality assay measuring the yeast's ability to withstand stress which can be equated to vitality. The assay was also able to differentiate between different lager yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae propagated in the laboratory when challenged with a number of malt extracts of varying anti-yeast activity. The assessment of yeast strains in the presence of malt extracts will lead to the identification of yeast strains with improved quality/vitality that can withstand malt-associated anti-yeast activity during brewery fermentations. PMID:19171262

  14. Improved Stochastic Subspace System Identification for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Loh, Chin-Hsiung

    2015-07-01

    Structural health monitoring acquires structural information through numerous sensor measurements. Vibrational measurement data render the dynamic characteristics of structures to be extracted, in particular of the modal properties such as natural frequencies, damping, and mode shapes. The stochastic subspace system identification has been recognized as a power tool which can present a structure in the modal coordinates. To obtain qualitative identified data, this tool needs to spend computational expense on a large set of measurements. In study, a stochastic system identification framework is proposed to improve the efficiency and quality of the conventional stochastic subspace system identification. This framework includes 1) measured signal processing, 2) efficient space projection, 3) system order selection, and 4) modal property derivation. The measured signal processing employs the singular spectrum analysis algorithm to lower the noise components as well as to present a data set in a reduced dimension. The subspace is subsequently derived from the data set presented in a delayed coordinate. With the proposed order selection criteria, the number of structural modes is determined, resulting in the modal properties. This system identification framework is applied to a real-world bridge for exploring the feasibility in real-time applications. The results show that this improved system identification method significantly decreases computational time, while qualitative modal parameters are still attained.

  15. Associations of UBE2I with RAD52, UBL1, p53, and RAD51 proteins in a yeast two-hybrid system

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Zhiyuan; Pardington-Purtymun, P.E.; Comeaux, J.C.

    1996-10-15

    The yeast RAD52-dependent pathway is involved in DNA recombination and double-strand break repair. Yeast ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBC9 participates in S- and M-phase cyclin degradation and mitotic control. Using the human RAD52 protein as the bait in a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified a human homolog of yeast UBC9, designated UBE2I, that interacts with RAD52, RAD51, p53, and a ubiquitin-like protein UBL1. These interactions are UBE2I-specific, since another DNA repair-related ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, RAD6 (UBC2), does not interact with these proteins. The interaction of UBE2I with RAD52 is mediated by RAD52`s self-association region. These results suggest that the RAD52-dependent processes, cell cycle control, p53-mediated pathway(s), and ubiquitination interact through human UBE2I. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  16. System identification of the Arabidopsis plant circadian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, Mathias; Somers, David E.; Kim, Pan-Jun

    2015-02-01

    The circadian system generates an endogenous oscillatory rhythm that governs the daily activities of organisms in nature. It offers adaptive advantages to organisms through a coordination of their biological functions with the optimal time of day. In this paper, a model of the circadian system in the plant Arabidopsis (species thaliana) is built by using system identification techniques. Prior knowledge about the physical interactions of the genes and the proteins in the plant circadian system is incorporated in the model building exercise. The model is built by using primarily experimentally-verified direct interactions between the genes and the proteins with the available data on mRNA and protein abundances from the circadian system. Our analysis reveals a great performance of the model in predicting the dynamics of the plant circadian system through the effect of diverse internal and external perturbations (gene knockouts and day-length changes). Furthermore, we found that the circadian oscillatory rhythm is robust and does not vary much with the biochemical parameters except those of a light-sensitive protein P and a transcription factor TOC1. In other words, the circadian rhythmic profile is largely a consequence of the network's architecture rather than its particular parameters. Our work suggests that the current experimental knowledge of the gene-to-protein interactions in the plant Arabidopsis, without considering any additional hypothetical interactions, seems to suffice for system-level modeling of the circadian system of this plant and to present an exemplary platform for the control of network dynamics in complex living organisms.

  17. Yeast Infection (Candidiasis)

    MedlinePLUS

    newsletter | contact Share | Yeast Infection (Candidiasis) Information for adults A A A This is a candida (yeast) infection of the skin folds of the abdomen. Overview Candidiasis, commonly known as a yeast infection, is an infection with the common yeast ( ...

  18. Decentralized system identification using stochastic subspace identification for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soojin; Park, Jong-Woong; Sim, Sung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) facilitate a new paradigm to structural identification and monitoring for civil infrastructure. Conventional structural monitoring systems based on wired sensors and centralized data acquisition systems are costly for installation as well as maintenance. WSNs have emerged as a technology that can overcome such difficulties, making deployment of a dense array of sensors on large civil structures both feasible and economical. However, as opposed to wired sensor networks in which centralized data acquisition and processing is common practice, WSNs require decentralized computing algorithms to reduce data transmission due to the limitation associated with wireless communication. In this paper, the stochastic subspace identification (SSI) technique is selected for system identification, and SSI-based decentralized system identification (SDSI) is proposed to be implemented in a WSN composed of Imote2 wireless sensors that measure acceleration. The SDSI is tightly scheduled in the hierarchical WSN, and its performance is experimentally verified in a laboratory test using a 5-story shear building model. PMID:25856325

  19. Decentralized System Identification Using Stochastic Subspace Identification for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soojin; Park, Jong-Woong; Sim, Sung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) facilitate a new paradigm to structural identification and monitoring for civil infrastructure. Conventional structural monitoring systems based on wired sensors and centralized data acquisition systems are costly for installation as well as maintenance. WSNs have emerged as a technology that can overcome such difficulties, making deployment of a dense array of sensors on large civil structures both feasible and economical. However, as opposed to wired sensor networks in which centralized data acquisition and processing is common practice, WSNs require decentralized computing algorithms to reduce data transmission due to the limitation associated with wireless communication. In this paper, the stochastic subspace identification (SSI) technique is selected for system identification, and SSI-based decentralized system identification (SDSI) is proposed to be implemented in a WSN composed of Imote2 wireless sensors that measure acceleration. The SDSI is tightly scheduled in the hierarchical WSN, and its performance is experimentally verified in a laboratory test using a 5-story shear building model. PMID:25856325

  20. Yeast: A Research Organism for Teaching Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manney, Thomas R.; Manney, Monta L.

    1992-01-01

    Explains why laboratory strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are particularly suited for classroom science activities. Describes the sexual life cycle of yeast and the genetic system with visible mutations. Presents an overview of activities that can be done with yeast and gives a source for teachers to obtain more information. (PR)

  1. YEASTBOOK PERSPECTIVES Yeast: An Experimental Organism

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    YEASTBOOK PERSPECTIVES Yeast: An Experimental Organism for 21st Century Biology David Botstein*,1, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 ABSTRACT In this essay, we revisit the status of yeast as a model system for biology. We first summarize important contributions of yeast to eukaryotic biology that we anticipated

  2. Bounded Error Identification of Hammerstein Systems with Backlash

    E-print Network

    Regruto, Diego

    of industrial machines is the backlash (see Figure 22.1), which commonly occurs in mechanical, hydraulic manufacturing tolerances or some- times may be deliberately incorporated into the system in order to describe the most common assumption in system identification is that measure- ment errors are statistically

  3. SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION OF A SPHERICAL AIR-BEARING SPACECRAFT SIMULATOR

    E-print Network

    Hall, Christopher D.

    Postgraduate School's air-bearing system,5 National Science Foundation Fellow, NASA Graduate Student ResearcherAAS 04-122 SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION OF A SPHERICAL AIR-BEARING SPACECRAFT SIMULATOR Jana L. Schwartz independent spherical air-bearing platforms, useful for formation-flying attitude control simulation

  4. Identification of hybrid systems: a tutorial Simone Paoletti1

    E-print Network

    that exhibit discontinuous be- haviors. For instance, the trajectory of a bouncing ball results from paper is concerned with the identification of hybrid models, i.e. dynamical models whose behavior Introduction Hybrid systems are heterogeneous dynamical systems whose behavior is determined by interacting

  5. Reweighted Nuclear Norm Minimization with Application to System Identification

    E-print Network

    Fazel, Maryam

    Reweighted Nuclear Norm Minimization with Application to System Identification Karthik Mohan that satisfies given convex constraints. It is NP-hard in general and has applications in con- trol, system nuclear norm minimization, we propose an efficient gradient-based implementation that takes advantage

  6. Identification of an extended Hammerstein system with input hysteresis nonlinearity

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jiandong

    Identification of an extended Hammerstein system with input hysteresis nonlinearity for control of an extended Hammerstein system. A point-slope-based hysteresis model is used to describe the input hysteresis. The basic idea is to separate the ascent and descent paths of the input hysteresis nonlinearity subject

  7. A biometric identification system based on eigenpalm and eigenfinger features.

    PubMed

    Ribaric, Slobodan; Fratric, Ivan

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a multimodal biometric identification system based on the features of the human hand. We describe a new biometric approach to personal identification using eigenfinger and eigenpalm features, with fusion applied at the matching-score level. The identification process can be divided into the following phases: capturing the image; preprocessing; extracting and normalizing the palm and strip-like finger subimages; extracting the eigenpalm and eigenfinger features based on the K-L transform; matching and fusion; and, finally, a decision based on the (k, l)-NN classifier and thresholding. The system was tested on a database of 237 people (1,820 hand images). The experimental results showed the effectiveness of the system in terms of the recognition rate (100 percent), the equal error rate (EER = 0.58 percent), and the total error rate (TER = 0.72 percent). PMID:16285370

  8. Identification of open quantum systems from observable time traces

    E-print Network

    Jun Zhang; Mohan Sarovar

    2015-07-04

    Estimating the parameters that dictate the dynamics of a quantum system is an important task for quantum information processing and quantum metrology, as well as fundamental physics. In this paper we develop a method for parameter estimation for Markovian open quantum systems using a temporal record of measurements on the system. The method is based on system realization theory and is a generalization of our previous work on identification of Hamiltonian parameters [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 080401 (2014)].

  9. Yeast Three-Hybrid System for the Detection of Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Natsumi; Trusov, Yuri; Botella, Jose R

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction studies provide useful insights into biological processes taking place within the living cell. A number of techniques are available to unravel large structural protein complexes, functional protein modules, and temporary protein associations occurring during signal transduction. The choice of method depends on the nature of the proteins and the interaction being studied. Here we present an optimized and simplified yeast three-hybrid method for analysis of protein interactions involving three components. PMID:26577787

  10. Scaffold number in yeast signaling system sets tradeoff between system output and dynamic range

    E-print Network

    Thomson, Ty M.

    Although the proteins comprising many signaling systems are known, less is known about their numbers per cell. Existing measurements often vary by more than 10-fold. Here, we devised improved quantification methods to ...

  11. Modeling and Identification of a Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, David E. (Editor); Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Hsiao, Min-Hung; Huang, Jen-Kuang

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of modeling and system identification efforts on the NASA Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF). The LAMSTF consists of a cylindrical permanent magnet which is levitated above a planar array of five electromagnets mounted in a circular configuration. The analytical model is first developed and open-loop characteristics are described. The system is shown to be highly unstable and requires feedback control in order to apply system identification. Limitations on modeling accuracy due to the effect of eddy-currents on the system are discussed. An algorithm is derived to identify a state-space model for the system from input/output data acquired during closed-loop operation. The algorithm is tested on both the baseline system and a perturbed system which has an increased presence of eddy currents. It is found that for the baseline system the analytic model adequately captures the dynamics, although the identified model improves the simulation accuracy. For the system perturbed by additional unmodeled eddy-currents the analytic model is no longer adequate and a higher-order model, determined through system identification, is required to accurately predict the system's time response.

  12. A network identity authentication system based on Fingerprint identification technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hong-Bin; Xu, Wen-Bo; Liu, Yuan

    2005-10-01

    Fingerprint verification is one of the most reliable personal identification methods. However, most of the automatic fingerprint identification system (AFIS) is not run via Internet/Intranet environment to meet today's increasing Electric commerce requirements. This paper describes the design and implementation of the archetype system of identity authentication based on fingerprint biometrics technology, and the system can run via Internet environment. And in our system the COM and ASP technology are used to integrate Fingerprint technology with Web database technology, The Fingerprint image preprocessing algorithms are programmed into COM, which deployed on the internet information server. The system's design and structure are proposed, and the key points are discussed. The prototype system of identity authentication based on Fingerprint have been successfully tested and evaluated on our university's distant education applications in an internet environment.

  13. Music Identification System Using MPEG-7 Audio Signature Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    You, Shingchern D.; Chen, Wei-Hwa; Chen, Woei-Kae

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a multiresolution system based on MPEG-7 audio signature descriptors for music identification. Such an identification system may be used to detect illegally copied music circulated over the Internet. In the proposed system, low-resolution descriptors are used to search likely candidates, and then full-resolution descriptors are used to identify the unknown (query) audio. With this arrangement, the proposed system achieves both high speed and high accuracy. To deal with the problem that a piece of query audio may not be inside the system's database, we suggest two different methods to find the decision threshold. Simulation results show that the proposed method II can achieve an accuracy of 99.4% for query inputs both inside and outside the database. Overall, it is highly possible to use the proposed system for copyright control. PMID:23533359

  14. Identification and chemical profiling of monacolins in red yeast rice using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Guo; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Zheng-Tao; Hu, Zhi-Bi

    2004-09-01

    Monascus purpureus-fermented rice (red yeast rice) was one of the food supplements that had the ability of lowering the blood-lipid levels, and monacolins have been proved to be main active constituents. In total 14 monacolin compounds such as monacolin K (mevinolin), J, L, M, X, and their hydroxy acid form, as well as dehydromonacolin K, dihydromonacolin L, compactin, 3alpha-hydroxy-3,5-dihydromonacolin L, etc. were identified in red yeast rice, using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector and tandem mass spectrometry. A chemical fingerprint profiling method to display bioactive monacolins in red yeast rice was established and could be used for the quality control of the target material and its related products. Ten finish products labeled as red yeast rice from different manufacturers in marketing were traced using the chromatographic chemical profiling method, and the results show that only two of them were similar while the other eight were significantly different from the reference red yeast rice. All of these materials including raw material powder and finished products available were quantified and the contents of monacolins were calculated with reference of monacolin K (mevinolin) as the standard. PMID:15336357

  15. Functional Expression of Parasite Drug Targets and Their Human Orthologs in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bilsland, Elizabeth; Pir, P?nar; Gutteridge, Alex; Johns, Alexander; King, Ross D.; Oliver, Stephen G.

    2011-01-01

    Background The exacting nutritional requirements and complicated life cycles of parasites mean that they are not always amenable to high-throughput drug screening using automated procedures. Therefore, we have engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to act as a surrogate for expressing anti-parasitic targets from a range of biomedically important pathogens, to facilitate the rapid identification of new therapeutic agents. Methodology/Principal Findings Using pyrimethamine/dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) as a model parasite drug/drug target system, we explore the potential of engineered yeast strains (expressing DHFR enzymes from Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, Homo sapiens, Schistosoma mansoni, Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi) to exhibit appropriate differential sensitivity to pyrimethamine. Here, we demonstrate that yeast strains (lacking the major drug efflux pump, Pdr5p) expressing yeast (ScDFR1), human (HsDHFR), Schistosoma (SmDHFR), and Trypanosoma (TbDHFR and TcDHFR) DHFRs are insensitive to pyrimethamine treatment, whereas yeast strains producing Plasmodium (PfDHFR and PvDHFR) DHFRs are hypersensitive. Reassuringly, yeast strains expressing field-verified, drug-resistant mutants of P. falciparum DHFR (Pfdhfr51I,59R,108N) are completely insensitive to pyrimethamine, further validating our approach to drug screening. We further show the versatility of the approach by replacing yeast essential genes with other potential drug targets, namely phosphoglycerate kinases (PGKs) and N-myristoyl transferases (NMTs). Conclusions/Significance We have generated a number of yeast strains that can be successfully harnessed for the rapid and selective identification of urgently needed anti-parasitic agents. PMID:21991399

  16. Interaction of CSFV E2 protein with swine host factors as detected by yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Gladue, Douglas P; Baker-Bransetter, Ryan; Holinka, Lauren G; Fernandez-Sainz, Ignacio J; O'Donnell, Vivian; Fletcher, Paige; Lu, Zhiqiang; Borca, Manuel V

    2014-01-01

    E2 is one of the envelope glycoproteins of pestiviruses, including classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). E2 is involved in several critical functions, including virus entry into target cells, induction of a protective immune response and virulence in swine. However, there is no information regarding any host binding partners for the E2 proteins. Here, we utilized the yeast two-hybrid system and identified fifty-seven host proteins as positive binding partners which bound E2 from both CSFV and BVDV with the exception of two proteins that were found to be positive for binding only to CSFV E2. Alanine scanning of CSFV E2 demonstrated that the binding sites for these cellular proteins on E2 are likely non-linear binding sites. The possible roles of the identified host proteins are discussed as the results presented here will be important for future studies to elucidate mechanisms of host protein-virus interactions during pestivirus infection. However, due to the limitations of the yeast two hybrid system, the proteins identified is not exhaustive and each interaction identified needs to be confirmed by independent experimental approaches in the context of virus-infected cells before any definitive conclusion can be drawn on relevance for the virus life cycle. PMID:24416391

  17. Immune System Toxicity and Immunotoxicity Hazard Identification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to chemicals may alter immune system health, increasing the risk of infections, allergy and autoimmune diseases. The chapter provides a concise overview of the immune system, host factors that affect immune system heal, and the effects that xenobiotic exposure may have ...

  18. Parameter identification and synchronization of fractional-order chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li-Guo; Yang, Qi-Gui

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge about parameters and order is very important for synchronization of fractional-order chaotic systems. In this article, identification of parameters and order of fractional-order chaotic systems is converted to an optimization problem. Particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to solve this optimization problem. Based on the above parameter identification, synchronization of the fractional-order Lorenz, Chen and a novel system (commensurate or incommensurate order) is derived using active control method. The new fractional-order chaotic system has four-scroll chaotic attractors. The existence and uniqueness of solutions for the new fractional-order system are also investigated theoretically. Simulation results signify the performance of the work.

  19. New results on the asymptotic theory of system identification

    E-print Network

    Garatti, Simone

    on the conditions of validity of the asymp- totic theory, and we prove a new statement of more general applicabilityNew results on the asymptotic theory of system identification for the assessment of the quality. Thanks to this statement, we can identify for which standard classes of models (ARMAX, Box Jenkins, etc

  20. A PERSONAL VIEW ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION 1

    E-print Network

    Gevers, Michel

    : This paper presents the author's personal view on the development of identification theory in the control and Bohlin, 1965), gave birth to two main streams of research that have dominated the development of system- Bohlin paper laid the foundations for Maximum Likelihood methods based on parametric input-output models

  1. PARAMETER AND SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION FOR FLUID FLOW IN UNDERGROUND RESERVOIRS

    E-print Network

    Ewing, Richard E.

    PARAMETER AND SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION FOR FLUID FLOW IN UNDERGROUND RESERVOIRS A.T. Watson Department and simulation of the flow of fluids in underground reservoirs is an essential exercise for planning aspects, #12; 1 INTRODUCTION 2 and the inaccessibility of the reservoir to measurements. Another feature

  2. A HIERARCHICAL GENETIC SYSTEM FOR SYMBOLIC FUNCTION IDENTIFICATION

    E-print Network

    Wright, Alden H.

    as Ohm's law, Newton's law of universal gravitation, Kepler's law, and Snell's law of refraction from learning systems to find empirical laws (function models) from the observations, such as BACON (Langley concept learning tasks of function identification problems and "rediscover" such classical scientific laws

  3. FORENSIC IDENTIFICATION REPORTING USING AUTOMATIC SPEAKER RECOGNITION SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    FORENSIC IDENTIFICATION REPORTING USING AUTOMATIC SPEAKER RECOGNITION SYSTEMS J. Gonzalez to the bayesian approach for evidence analysis and forensic reporting. This approach, firmly established in other forensic areas as fingerprint, DNA or fiber analysis, suits the needs of both the court and the forensic

  4. A Hybrid Multimodel Neural Network for Nonlinear Systems Identification

    E-print Network

    (NN) modelling and application to system identification, prediction and control was discussed for many authors [1], [2], [3], [4], [5]. Mainly, two types of NN models are used: Feedforward (FFNN) and Recurrent (RNN). There exists some drawbacks of all described in the literature NN models. As it could be seen

  5. DNA barcode-based molecular identification system for fish species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungmin; Eo, Hae-Seok; Koo, Hyeyoung; Choi, Jun-Kil; Kim, Won

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we applied DNA barcoding to identify species using short DNA sequence analysis. We examined the utility of DNA barcoding by identifying 53 Korean freshwater fish species, 233 other freshwater fish species, and 1339 saltwater fish species. We successfully developed a web-based molecular identification system for fish (MISF) using a profile hidden Markov model. MISF facilitates efficient and reliable species identification, overcoming the limitations of conventional taxonomic approaches. MISF is freely accessible at http://bioinfosys.snu.ac.kr:8080/MISF/misf.jsp . PMID:21110132

  6. Biometric identification systems: the science of transaction facilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Robert R.

    1994-10-01

    The future ofthe "secure transaction" and the success ofall undertakings that depend on absolute certainty that the individuals involved really are who and what they represent themselves to be is dependent upon the successful development of absolutely accurate, low-cost and easy-to-operate Biometric Identification Systems. Whether these transactions are political, military, financial or administrative (e.g. health cards, drivers licenses, welfare entitlement, national identification cards, credit card transactions, etc.), the need for such secure and positive identification has never been greater -and yet we are only at the beginning ofan era in which we will see the emergence and proliferation of Biometric Identification Systems in nearly every field ofhuman endeavor. Proper application ofthese systems will change the way the world operates, and that is precisely the goal ofComparator Systems Corporation. Just as with the photo-copier 40 years ago and the personal computer 20 years ago, the potential applications for positive personal identification are going to make the Biometric Identification System a commonplace component in the standard practice ofbusiness, and in interhuman relationships ofall kinds. The development of new and specific application hardware, as well as the necessary algorithms and related software required for integration into existing operating procedures and newly developed systems alike, has been a more-than-a-decade-long process at Comparator -and we are now on the verge of delivering these systems to the world markets so urgently in need of them. An individual could feel extremely confident and satisfied ifhe could present his credit, debit, or ATM card at any point of sale and, after inserting his card, could simply place his finger on a glass panel and in less than a second be positively accepted as being the person that the card purported him to be; not to mention the security and satisfaction of the vendor involved in knowing that his fraud risk had been reduced to virtually zero. In highly sensitive security applications, such a system would be imperative -and when combined, if necessary, with other biometric identifiers such as signature and/or voice recognition for simultaneous verification, one would have a nearly foolproof system. These are the tools of what we call Transaction Facilitation, and this is the realm of Comparator Systems Corp. Our technological developments over the last ten years have moved our Company forward into a position of potential leadership in what is fast becoming a worldwide market, and it is toward this end that we have applied all of our efforts.

  7. Molecular cloning of amphioxus uncoupling protein and assessment of its uncoupling activity using a yeast heterologous expression system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Sun, Guoxun; Lv, Zhiyuan; Wang, Chen; Jiang, Xueyuan; Li, Donghai; Zhang, Chenyu

    2010-10-01

    The present study describes the molecular cloning of a novel cDNA fragment from amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) encoding a 343-amino acid protein that is highly homologous to human uncoupling proteins (UCP), this protein is therefore named amphioxus UCP. This amphioxus UCP shares more homology with and is phylogenetically more related to mammalian UCP2 as compared with UCP1. To further assess the functional similarity of amphioxus UCP to mammalian UCP1 and -2, the amphioxus UCP, rat UCP1, and human UCP2 were separately expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the recombinant yeast mitochondria were isolated and assayed for the state 4 respiration rate and proton leak, using pYES2 empty vector as the control. UCP1 increased the state 4 respiration rate by 2.8-fold, and the uncoupling activity was strongly inhibited by GDP, while UCP2 and amphioxus UCP only increased the state 4 respiration rate by 1.5-fold and 1.7-fold in a GDP-insensitive manner, moreover, the proton leak kinetics of amphioxus UCP was very similar to UCP2, but much different from UCP1. In conclusion, the amphioxus UCP has a mild, unregulated uncoupling activity in the yeast system, which resembles mammalian UCP2, but not UCP1. PMID:20816931

  8. Molecular cloning of lamprey uncoupling protein and assessment of its uncoupling activity using a yeast heterologous expression system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Sun, Guoxun; Chen, Kun; Lv, Zhiyuan; Peng, Shiming; Jiang, Xueyuan; Xiang, Yang; Zhang, Chenyu

    2010-01-01

    We report the molecular cloning of a novel cDNA fragment from lamprey encoding a 313-amino acid protein that is highly homologous to human uncoupling proteins (UCP). We therefore named the protein lamprey UCP. This lamprey UCP, rat UCP1, human UCP2, and human mitochondrial oxoglutarate carrier were individually expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the recombinant yeast mitochondria were isolated and assayed for the state 4 respiration rate and proton leak. Only UCP1 showed a strong (3.6-fold increase of the ratio of mitochondrial state 4 respiration rate to FCCP-stimulated fully uncoupled respiration rate) and GDP-inhibitable uncoupling activity, while the uncoupling activities of both UCP2 and lamprey UCP were relatively weak (1.5-fold and 1.4-fold, respectively) and GDP-insensitive. The oxoglutarate carrier had no effect on the studied parameters. In conclusion, the lamprey UCP has a mild, unregulated uncoupling activity in the yeast system, which resembles UCP2, but not UCP1. PMID:19788939

  9. Cryptococcal Yeast Cells Invade the Central Nervous System via Transcellular Penetration of the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun C.; Stins, Monique F.; McCaffery, Michael J.; Miller, Georgina F.; Pare, Dan R.; Dam, Tapen; Paul-Satyasee, Maneesh; Kim, Kwang Sik; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.

    2004-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis develops as a result of hematogenous dissemination of inhaled Cryptococcus neoformans from the lung to the brain. The mechanism(s) by which C. neoformans crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key unresolved issue in cryptococcosis. We used both an in vivo mouse model and an in vitro model of the human BBB to investigate the cryptococcal association with and traversal of the BBB. Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) to C. neoformans triggered the formation of microvillus-like membrane protrusions within 15 to 30 min. Yeast cells of C. neoformans adhered to and were internalized by the HBMEC, and they crossed the HBMEC monolayers via a transcellular pathway without affecting the monolayer integrity. The histopathology of mouse brains obtained after intravenous injection of C. neoformans showed that the yeast cells either were associated with endothelial cells or escaped from the brain capillary vessels into the neuropil by 3 h. C. neoformans was found in the brain parenchyma away from the vessels by 22 h. Association of C. neoformans with the choroid plexus, however, was not detected during up to 10 days of observation. Our findings indicate that C. neoformans cells invade the central nervous system by transcellular crossing of the endothelium of the BBB. PMID:15321990

  10. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory electronic vehicle identification system

    SciTech Connect

    Landt, J.A.; Bobbett, R.E.; Koelle, A.R.; Salazar, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    A three-digit electronic identification system is described. Digits may be decimal (1000 combinations) or hexidecimal (8192 combinations). Battery-powered transponders are interrogated with a lower-power (1 W) radio signal. Line-of-sight interrogations up to 33 m (100 ft) are possible. Successful interrogations up to 7 m (20 ft) are possible for concealed transponders (that is, in the engine compartment). Vehicles moving at high rates of speed can be interrogated. This system provides data in a computer-compatible RS232 format. The system can be used for other applications with little or no modification. A similar system is in present use for identification and temperature monitoring of livestock. No unforeseen problems exist for expanding the coding scheme to identify larger numbers of objects.

  11. Subspace system identification of support-excited structures--part I: theory and black-box system identification

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    engineering field. The use of ambient excitations is convenient because of the technical difficulties exposed to moderate seismic ground motions; structural response data is used off-line to estimate black INTRODUCTION Output-only system identification using ambient vibrations is a popular practice in the civil

  12. A system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring

    E-print Network

    Hahn, Jin-Oh, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents a new system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring problem. For this objective, this thesis will develop and analyze blind system identification and input signal ...

  13. Platoon Identification System in Connected Vehicle Environment 

    E-print Network

    Lin, Lu

    2015-08-10

    Connected vehicle technology has the potential of drastically improving the safety and mobility of transportation system. Recognizing and identifying the vehicle platoons in a traffic stream has the potential of changing the arterial signal control...

  14. Reverse two-hybrid techniques in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Matthew A; Shern, Jack F; Kahn, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Use of the yeast two-hybrid system has provided definition to many previously uncharacterized pathways through the identification and characterization of novel protein-protein interactions. The two-hybrid system uses the bifunctional nature of transcription factors, such as the yeast enhancer Gal4, to allow protein-protein interactions to be monitored through changes in transcription of reporter genes. Once a positive interaction has been identified, either of the interacting proteins can be mutated by site-specific or randomly introduced changes, to produce proteins with a decreased ability to interact. Mutants generated using this strategy are very powerful reagents in tests of the biological significance of the interaction and in defining the residues involved in the interaction. Such techniques are termed reverse two-hybrid methods. We describe a reverse two-hybrid method that generates loss-of-interaction mutations of the catalytic subunit of the Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin (LTA1) with decreased binding to the active (GTP-bound) form of human ARF3, its protein cofactor. While newer methods are emerging for performing interaction screens in mammalian cells, instead of yeast, the use of reverse two-hybrid in yeast remains a robust and powerful means of identifying loss-of-interaction point mutants and compensating changes that remain among the most powerful tools of testing the biological significance of a protein-protein interaction. PMID:25859967

  15. Development of an expert system for amino acid sequence identification.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Saulinskas, E F; Johnson, P; Harrington, P B

    1996-08-01

    An expert system for amino acid sequence identification has been developed. The algorithm uses heuristic rules developed by human experts in protein sequencing. The system is applied to the chromatographic data of phenylthiohydantoin-amino acids acquired from an automated sequencer. The peak intensities in the current cycle are compared with those in the previous cycle, while the calibration and succeeding cycles are used as ancillary identification criteria when necessary. The retention time for each chromatographic peak in each cycle is corrected by the corresponding peak in the calibration cycle at the same run. The main improvement of our system compared with the onboard software used by the Applied Biosystems 477A Protein/Peptide Sequencer is that each peak in each cycle is assigned an identification name according to the corrected retention time to be used for the comparison with different cycles. The system was developed from analyses of ribonuclease A and evaluated by runs of four other protein samples that were not used in rule development. This paper demonstrates that rules developed by human experts can be automatically applied to sequence assignment. The expert system performed more accurately than the onboard software of the protein sequencer, in that the misidentification rates for the expert system were around 7%, whereas those for the onboard software were between 13 and 21%. PMID:8902358

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ALKANE-INDUCIBLE CYTOCHROME P450 (P450ALK) GENE FROM THE YEAST CANDIDA TROPICALIS: IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW P450 FAMILY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The P450alk gene, which is inducible by the assimilation of alkane in Candida tropicalis, was sequenced and characterized. Structural features described in promoter and terminator regions of Saccharomyces yeast genes are present in the P450alk gene and some particular structures ...

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ALKANE-INDUCIBLE CYTOCHROME P450 (P450ALK) GENE FROM THE YEAST CANDIDA TROPICALIS: IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW P450 GENE FAMILY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The P450ALK gene, which is inducible by the assimilation of alkane in Candida tropicalis, was sequenced and characterized. tructural features described in promoter and terminator regions of Saccharomyces yeast genes are present in the P450alk gene and some particular structures a...

  18. Discovery of a nucleocytoplasmic O-mannose glycoproteome in yeast.

    PubMed

    Halim, Adnan; Larsen, Ida Signe Bohse; Neubert, Patrick; Joshi, Hiren Jitendra; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Strahl, Sabine; Clausen, Henrik

    2015-12-22

    Dynamic cycling of N-Acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) on serine and threonine residues (O-GlcNAcylation) is an essential process in all eukaryotic cells except yeast, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. O-GlcNAcylation modulates signaling and cellular processes in an intricate interplay with protein phosphorylation and serves as a key sensor of nutrients by linking the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway to cellular signaling. A longstanding conundrum has been how yeast survives without O-GlcNAcylation in light of its similar phosphorylation signaling system. We previously developed a sensitive lectin enrichment and mass spectrometry workflow for identification of the human O-linked mannose (O-Man) glycoproteome and used this to identify a pleothora of O-Man glycoproteins in human cell lines including the large family of cadherins and protocadherins. Here, we applied the workflow to yeast with the aim to characterize the yeast O-Man glycoproteome, and in doing so, we discovered hitherto unknown O-Man glycosites on nuclear, cytoplasmic, and mitochondrial proteins in S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Such O-Man glycoproteins were not found in our analysis of human cell lines. However, the type of yeast O-Man nucleocytoplasmic proteins and the localization of identified O-Man residues mirror that of the O-GlcNAc glycoproteome found in other eukaryotic cells, indicating that the two different types of O-glycosylations serve the same important biological functions. The discovery opens for exploration of the enzymatic machinery that is predicted to regulate the nucleocytoplasmic O-Man glycosylations. It is likely that manipulation of this type of O-Man glycosylation will have wide applications for yeast bioprocessing. PMID:26644575

  19. Validation of High Resolution Melting Analysis (HRM) of the Amplified ITS2 Region for the Detection and Identification of Yeasts from Clinical Samples: Comparison with Culture and MALDI-TOF Based Identification

    PubMed Central

    Duyvejonck, Hans; Cools, Piet; Decruyenaere, Johan; Roelens, Kristien; Noens, Lucien; Vermeulen, Stefan; Claeys, Geert; Decat, Ellen; Van Mechelen, Els; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Aim Candida species are known as opportunistic pathogens, and a possible cause of invasive infections. Because of their species-specific antimycotic resistance patterns, reliable techniques for their detection, quantification and identification are needed. We validated a DNA amplification method for direct detection of Candida spp. from clinical samples, namely the ITS2-High Resolution Melting Analysis (direct method), by comparing it with a culture and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry based method (indirect method) to establish the presence of Candida species in three different types of clinical samples. Materials and Methods A total of 347 clinical samples, i.e. throat swabs, rectal swabs and vaginal swabs, were collected from the gynaecology/obstetrics, intensive care and haematology wards at the Ghent University Hospital, Belgium. For the direct method, ITS2-HRM was preceded by NucliSENS easyMAG DNA extraction, directly on the clinical samples. For the indirect method, clinical samples were cultured on Candida ID and individual colonies were identified by MALDI-TOF. Results For 83.9% of the samples there was complete concordance between both techniques, i.e. the same Candida species were detected in 31.1% of the samples or no Candida species were detected in 52.8% of the samples. In 16.1% of the clinical samples, discrepant results were obtained, of which only 6.01% were considered as major discrepancies. Discrepancies occurred mostly when overall numbers of Candida cells in the samples were low and/or when multiple species were present in the sample. Discussion Most of the discrepancies could be decided in the advantage of the direct method. This is due to samples in which no yeast could be cultured whereas low amounts could be detected by the direct method and to samples in which high quantities of Candida robusta according to ITS2-HRM were missed by culture on Candida ID agar. It remains to be decided whether the diagnostic advantages of the direct method compensate for its disadvantages. PMID:26295947

  20. Identification of open quantum systems from observable time traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2015-05-01

    Estimating the parameters that dictate the dynamics of a quantum system is an important task for quantum information processing and quantum metrology, as well as fundamental physics. In this paper we develop a method for parameter estimation for Markovian open quantum systems using a temporal record of measurements on the system. The method is based on system realization theory and is a generalization of our previous work on identification of Hamiltonian parameters [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 080401 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.080401].

  1. Parametric Identification of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeny, Brian

    2002-01-01

    In this project, we looked at the application of harmonic balancing as a tool for identifying parameters (HBID) in a nonlinear dynamical systems with chaotic responses. The main idea is to balance the harmonics of periodic orbits extracted from measurements of each coordinate during a chaotic response. The periodic orbits are taken to be approximate solutions to the differential equations that model the system, the form of the differential equations being known, but with unknown parameters to be identified. Below we summarize the main points addressed in this work. The details of the work are attached as drafts of papers, and a thesis, in the appendix. Our study involved the following three parts: (1) Application of the harmonic balance to a simulation case in which the differential equation model has known form for its nonlinear terms, in contrast to a differential equation model which has either power series or interpolating functions to represent the nonlinear terms. We chose a pendulum, which has sinusoidal nonlinearities; (2) Application of the harmonic balance to an experimental system with known nonlinear forms. We chose a double pendulum, for which chaotic response were easily generated. Thus we confronted a two-degree-of-freedom system, which brought forth challenging issues; (3) A study of alternative reconstruction methods. The reconstruction of the phase space is necessary for the extraction of periodic orbits from the chaotic responses, which is needed in this work. Also, characterization of a nonlinear system is done in the reconstructed phase space. Such characterizations are needed to compare models with experiments. Finally, some nonlinear prediction methods can be applied in the reconstructed phase space. We developed two reconstruction methods that may be considered if the common method (method of delays) is not applicable.

  2. Automated System Identification of Digitally-Controlled Multi-phase DC-DC Converters

    E-print Network

    Ha, Dong S.

    Automated System Identification of Digitally- Controlled Multi-phase DC-DC Converters Na Kong1 accordingly. In this paper, an automated system identification method for digitally-controlled multi-phase DC to a factory floor or even to an end customer's application. Index Terms- system identification, digital

  3. An Internet-Based Expert System for Reptile Identification Ralph F. Grove

    E-print Network

    Grove, Ralph

    An Internet-Based Expert System for Reptile Identification Ralph F. Grove Computer Science in the identification of amphibian and reptile species as part of an ongoing census of these species in Pennsylvania The Reptile Identification Helper (RIH) is an Internet-based expert system, i.e., a system that embodies

  4. Vaginal Yeast Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Vaginal Yeast Infection Vaginal yeast infection, or vulvovaginal candidiasis, is a common cause ... all adult women have had at least one "yeast infection" in their lifetime, according to the Centers ...

  5. Rapid identification of Listeria spp.: an AOAC performance test of the MIT 1000 rapid microbial identification system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods that rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The Micro Imaging Technology (MIT) 1000 Rapid Microbial Identification (RMID) System is a benchtop instrument that detects laser light scattered from individual bacterial cells in solution with an array of 35 ...

  6. PINS: A field PGNAA chemical identification system

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, R.J.; Caffrey, A.J.; Krebs, K.M.; Watts, K.D.; Oates, M.A.; McLaughlin, G.D. )

    1993-01-01

    Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) has long been employed for chemical analysis in process streams and laboratories. Recent improvements in the design of germanium gamma-ray spectrometers, the miniaturization of their associated components, and the development of [open quotes]powerful[close quotes] notebook personal computers (PCs) permit the design of PGNAA systems for truly portable in-field use. Portable isotopic neutron spectrometry (PINS) (of gamma rays) was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for in-field inspection and verification of chemical weapon inventories where a system that can be carried into an area inaccessible by wheeled transport (rough terrain, confined spaces, etc.) and that is capable of operating on battery power is required. PINS is now also finding use outside of military applications.

  7. Spacecraft structural system identification by modal test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.-C.; Peretti, L. F.; Garba, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A structural parameter estimation procedure using the measured natural frequencies and kinetic energy distribution as observers is proposed. The theoretical derivation of the estimation procedure is described and its constraints and limitations are explained. This procedure is applied to a large complex spacecraft structural system to identify the inertia matrix using modal test results. The inertia matrix is chosen after the stiffness matrix has been updated by the static test results.

  8. Closed Loop System Identification with Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.

    2004-01-01

    High performance control design for a flexible space structure is challenging since high fidelity plant models are di.cult to obtain a priori. Uncertainty in the control design models typically require a very robust, low performance control design which must be tuned on-orbit to achieve the required performance. Closed loop system identi.cation is often required to obtain a multivariable open loop plant model based on closed-loop response data. In order to provide an accurate initial plant model to guarantee convergence for standard local optimization methods, this paper presents a global parameter optimization method using genetic algorithms. A minimal representation of the state space dynamics is employed to mitigate the non-uniqueness and over-parameterization of general state space realizations. This control-relevant system identi.cation procedure stresses the joint nature of the system identi.cation and control design problem by seeking to obtain a model that minimizes the di.erence between the predicted and actual closed-loop performance.

  9. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  10. Applications of nonlinear system identification to structural health monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C. R.; Sohn, H.; Robertson, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    The process of implementing a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure is referred to as structural health monitoring (SHM). In many cases damage causes a structure that initially behaves in a predominantly linear manner to exhibit nonlinear response when subject to its operating environment. The formation of cracks that subsequently open and close under operating loads is an example of such damage. The damage detection process can be significantly enhanced if one takes advantage of these nonlinear effects when extracting damage-sensitive features from measured data. This paper will provide an overview of nonlinear system identification techniques that are used for the feature extraction process. Specifically, three general approaches that apply nonlinear system identification techniques to the damage detection process are discussed. The first two approaches attempt to quantify the deviation of the system from its initial linear characteristics that is a direct result of damage. The third approach is to extract features from the data that are directly related to the specific nonlinearity associated with the damaged condition. To conclude this discussion, a summary of outstanding issues associated with the application of nonlinear system identification techniques to the SHM problem is presented.

  11. Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Kerry D [Kennewick, WA; Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Gilbert, Ronald W [Morgan Hill, CA

    2011-02-01

    Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a communications device identification method includes providing identification information regarding a group of wireless identification devices within a wireless communications range of a reader, using the provided identification information, selecting one of a plurality of different search procedures for identifying unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices within the wireless communications range, and identifying at least some of the unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices using the selected one of the search procedures.

  12. Continuous-Time System Identification of a Smoking Cessation Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Timms, Kevin P.; Rivera, Daniel E.; Collins, Linda M.; Piper, Megan E.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major global public health issue and the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Toward a goal of designing better smoking cessation treatments, system identification techniques are applied to intervention data to describe smoking cessation as a process of behavior change. System identification problems that draw from two modeling paradigms in quantitative psychology (statistical mediation and self-regulation) are considered, consisting of a series of continuous-time estimation problems. A continuous-time dynamic modeling approach is employed to describe the response of craving and smoking rates during a quit attempt, as captured in data from a smoking cessation clinical trial. The use of continuous-time models provide benefits of parsimony, ease of interpretation, and the opportunity to work with uneven or missing data. PMID:25382865

  13. An experimental study of nonlinear dynamic system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stry, Greselda I.; Mook, D. Joseph

    1990-01-01

    A technique for robust identification of nonlinear dynamic systems is developed and illustrated using both simulations and analog experiments. The technique is based on the Minimum Model Error optimal estimation approach. A detailed literature review is included in which fundamental differences between the current approach and previous work is described. The most significant feature of the current work is the ability to identify nonlinear dynamic systems without prior assumptions regarding the form of the nonlinearities, in constrast to existing nonlinear identification approaches which usually require detailed assumptions of the nonlinearities. The example illustrations indicate that the method is robust with respect to prior ignorance of the model, and with respect to measurement noise, measurement frequency, and measurement record length.

  14. SSNN toolbox for non-linear system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzar, Marcel; Czajkowski, Andrzej

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop and design a State Space Neural Network toolbox for a non-linear system identification with an artificial state-space neural networks, which can be used in a model-based robust fault diagnosis and control. Such toolbox is implemented in the MATLAB environment and it uses some of its predefined functions. It is designed in the way that any non-linear multi-input multi-output system is identified and represented in the classical state-space form. The novelty of the proposed approach is that the final result of the identification process is the state, input and output matrices, not only the neural network parameters. Moreover, the toolbox is equipped with the graphical user interface, which makes it useful for the users not familiar with the neural networks theory.

  15. Material Outgassing, Identification and Deposition, MOLIDEP System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.; Montoya, Alex F.

    2002-01-01

    The outgassing tests are performed employing a modified vacuum operated Cahn analytical microbalance, identified as the MOLIDEP system. The test measures under high vacuum, the time varying Molecular mass loss of a material sample held at a chosen temperature; it Identifies the outgassing molecular components using an inline SRS 300 amu Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) and employs a temperature controlled 10 MHz Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) to measure the condensable DEPosits. Both the QCM and the RGA intercept within the conductive passage the outgassing products being evacuated by a turbomolecular pump. The continuous measurements of the mass loss, the rate of loss, the sample temperature, the rate of temperature change, the QCM temperature and the QCM recorded condensable deposits or rate of deposits are saved to an Excel spreadsheet. A separate computer controls the RGA.

  16. Prefire identification for pulse power systems

    DOEpatents

    Longmire, Jerry L. (Los Alamos, NM); Thuot, Michael E. (Espanola, NM); Warren, David S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01

    Prefires in a high-power, high-frequency, multi-stage pulse generator are detected by a system having an EMI shielded pulse timing transmitter associated with and tailored to each stage of the pulse generator. Each pulse timing transmitter upon detection of a pulse triggers a laser diode to send an optical signal through a high frequency fiber optic cable to a pulse timing receiver which converts the optical signal to an electrical pulse. The electrical pulses from all pulse timing receivers are fed through an OR circuit to start a time interval measuring device and each electrical pulse is used to stop an individual channel in the measuring device thereby recording the firing sequence of the multi-stage pulse generator.

  17. Prefire identification for pulse-power systems

    DOEpatents

    Longmire, J.L.; Thuot, M.E.; Warren, D.S.

    1982-08-23

    Prefires in a high-power, high-frequency, multi-stage pulse generator are detected by a system having an EMI shielded pulse timing transmitter associated with and tailored to each stage of the pulse generator. Each pulse timing transmitter upon detection of a pulse triggers a laser diode to send an optical signal through a high frequency fiber optic cable to a pulse timing receiver which converts the optical signal to an electrical pulse. The electrical pulses from all pulse timing receivers are fed through an OR circuit to start a time interval measuring device and each electrical pulse is used to stop an individual channel in the measuring device thereby recording the firing sequence of the multi-stage pulse generator.

  18. Gunshot identification system by integration of open source consumer electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López R., Juan Manuel; Marulanda B., Jose Ignacio

    2014-05-01

    This work presents a prototype of low-cost gunshots identification system that uses consumer electronics in order to ensure the existence of gunshots and then classify it according to a previously established database. The implementation of this tool in the urban areas is to set records that support the forensics, hence improving law enforcement also on developing countries. An analysis of its effectiveness is presented in comparison with theoretical results obtained with numerical simulations.

  19. Alu-primed polymerase chain reaction for regional assignment of 110 yeast artificial chromosome clones from the human X chromosome: Identification of clones associated with a disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.L.; Ballabio, A.; Victoria, M.F.; Pieretti, M.; Bies, R.D.; Gibbs, R.A.; Maley, J.A.; Chinault, A.C.; Webster, T.D.; Caskey, C.T. )

    1991-07-15

    Over 400 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones were isolated from the human X chromosome, and 110 of these were assigned to regions defined by chromosome translocation and deletion breakpoints. Polymerase chain reaction using Alu primers was applied to YAC clones in order to generate probes, to identify overlapping clones, and to derive fingerprints and sequence data directly from total yeast DNA. Several clones were identified in regions of medical interest. One set of three overlapping clones was found to cross a chromsomal translocation implicated in Lowe syndrome. The regional assignment of groups of YAC clones provides initiation points for further attempts to develop large cloned contiguous sequences, as well as material for investigation of regions involved in genetic diseases.

  20. High-frequency Model Identification of PM Synchronous Motor based on System Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kouhei; Doki, Shinji; Ishida, Muneaki

    This paper deals with the expression of the high-frequency model of permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) driven by a PWM inverter. The leakage current (common-mode current) flows through stray capacitance among stator windings and iron core (frame) of a synchronous motor at the switching instants of inverter transistors. A mathematical model of high-frequency model of PMSM are derived voltage and current data at the time of a PWM inverter drive based on system identification. It is verified that the proposed model can simulate oscillating current of various operating points on some motors.

  1. System IDentification Programs for AirCraft (SIDPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2002-01-01

    A collection of computer programs for aircraft system identification is described and demonstrated. The programs, collectively called System IDentification Programs for AirCraft, or SIDPAC, were developed in MATLAB as m-file functions. SIDPAC has been used successfully at NASA Langley Research Center with data from many different flight test programs and wind tunnel experiments. SIDPAC includes routines for experiment design, data conditioning, data compatibility analysis, model structure determination, equation-error and output-error parameter estimation in both the time and frequency domains, real-time and recursive parameter estimation, low order equivalent system identification, estimated parameter error calculation, linear and nonlinear simulation, plotting, and 3-D visualization. An overview of SIDPAC capabilities is provided, along with a demonstration of the use of SIDPAC with real flight test data from the NASA Glenn Twin Otter aircraft. The SIDPAC software is available without charge to U.S. citizens by request to the author, contingent on the requestor completing a NASA software usage agreement.

  2. Construction and analysis of the cDNA subtraction library of yeast and mycelial phases of Sporothrix globosa isolated in China: identification of differentially expressed genes*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qing-bi; He, Yu; Zhou, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Species included in the Sporothrix schenckii complex are temperature-dependent with dimorphic growth and cause sporotrichosis that is characterized by chronic and fatal lymphocutaneous lesions. The putative species included in the Sporothrix complex are S. brasiliensis, S. globosa, S. mexicana, S. pallida, S. schenckii, and S. lurei. S. globosa is the causal agent of sporotrichosis in China, and its pathogenicity appears to be closely related to the dimorphic transition, i.e. from the mycelial to the yeast phase, it adapts to changing environmental conditions. To determine the molecular mechanisms of the switching process that mediates the dimorphic transition of S. globosa, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to prepare a complementary DNA (cDNA) subtraction library from the yeast and mycelial phases. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to profile the relationship between differently expressed genes and the dimorphic transition. Two genes that were expressed at higher levels by the yeast form were selected, and their differential expression levels were verified using a quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). It is believed that these differently expressed genes are involved in the pathogenesis of S. globosa infection in China. PMID:26642182

  3. Construction and analysis of the cDNA subtraction library of yeast and mycelial phases of Sporothrix globosa isolated in China: identification of differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qing-Bi; He, Yu; Zhou, Xun

    2015-12-01

    Species included in the Sporothrix schenckii complex are temperature-dependent with dimorphic growth and cause sporotrichosis that is characterized by chronic and fatal lymphocutaneous lesions. The putative species included in the Sporothrix complex are S. brasiliensis, S. globosa, S. mexicana, S. pallida, S. schenckii, and S. lurei. S. globosa is the causal agent of sporotrichosis in China, and its pathogenicity appears to be closely related to the dimorphic transition, i.e. from the mycelial to the yeast phase, it adapts to changing environmental conditions. To determine the molecular mechanisms of the switching process that mediates the dimorphic transition of S. globosa, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to prepare a complementary DNA (cDNA) subtraction library from the yeast and mycelial phases. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to profile the relationship between differently expressed genes and the dimorphic transition. Two genes that were expressed at higher levels by the yeast form were selected, and their differential expression levels were verified using a quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). It is believed that these differently expressed genes are involved in the pathogenesis of S. globosa infection in China. PMID:26642182

  4. System identification methods for metal rubber devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Lang, Z. Q.; Billings, S. A.; Tomlinson, G. R.; Rongong, J. A.

    2013-08-01

    Metal rubber (MR) devices, a new wire mesh material, have been extensively used in recent years due to several unique properties especially in adverse environments. Although many practical studies have been completed, the related theoretical research on metal rubber is still in its infancy. In this paper, a semi-constitutive dynamic model that involves nonlinear elastic stiffness, nonlinear viscous damping and bilinear hysteresis Coulomb damping is adopted to model MR devices. The model is first approximated by representing the bilinear hysteresis damping as Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind and then generalised by taking into account the effects of noises. A very efficient systematic procedure based on the orthogonal least squares (OLS) algorithm, the adjustable prediction error sum of squares (APRESS) criterion and the nonlinear model validity tests is proposed for model structure detection and parameter estimation of MR devices for the first time. The OLS algorithm provides a powerful tool to effectively select the significant model terms step by step, one at a time, by orthogonalising the associated terms and maximising the error reduction ratio, in a forward stepwise manner. The APRESS statistic regularises the OLS algorithm to facilitate the determination of the optimal number of model terms that should be included into the model. And whether the final identified dynamic model is adequate and acceptable is determined by the model validity tests. Because of the orthogonal property of the OLS algorithm, the selection of the dynamic model terms and noise model terms are totally decoupled and the approach also leads to a parsimonious model. Numerical ill-conditioning problems which can arise in the conventional least squares algorithm can be avoided as well. The methods of choosing the sampling interval for nonlinear systems are also incorporated into the approach. Finally by utilising the response of a cylindrical MR specimen, it is shown how the model structure can be detected in a practical application.

  5. Local identification analyses of soils and soil-structure systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskay, Caglar

    Geotechnical structures and natural deposits are massive multi-phase particulate systems characterized by the development of localized response mechanisms under extreme loading conditions. A thorough monitoring of the whole response of such massive and distributed soil-systems commonly constitutes a significant challenge and would be prohibitively expensive. Identification and analysis of these systems based on inverse boundary value problem formulations and sparse measurements are generally overly indeterminate. This study presents an alternative inverse problem algorithm to evaluate the local response mechanisms of soil-systems. Point-wise identification analyses of the constitutive behavior of water-saturated geotechnical and geophysical systems are performed using acceleration and pore pressure records provided by a cluster of closely spaced instruments. The developed algorithm consists of: (1) estimation of strain-time histories using the motions recorded by the cluster, (2) evaluation of stress-time histories corresponding to the estimated strains employing a pre-selected class of constitutive models of soil response, (3) computation of accelerations associated with the estimated stresses and recorded pore-water pressures utilizing the equilibrium equations, and (4) evaluation and calibration of an optimal model of soil response by minimizing the discrepancies between recorded and computed accelerations. The developed novel algorithm does not require the availability of boundary condition measurements, or solution of an associated boundary value problem. The constitutive behavior at a specific location of a soil-system is analyzed independently of adjacent response mechanisms or properties. Computer simulations and downhole array records of Lotung (Taiwan) site were used to assess the validity of the proposed technique for level sites and infinite slopes, under conditions of vertical seismic wave propagation. Numerical simulations and centrifuge test data of a quay wall-soil system were employed to demonstrate the capabilities of the developed algorithm in multi-dimensional situations. Results of the identification analyses showed that the proposed technique provides an effective tool to identify local dynamic soil characteristics and properties.

  6. The yin and yang of yeast transcription: elements of a global feedback system between metabolism and chromatin.

    PubMed

    Machné, Rainer; Murray, Douglas B

    2012-01-01

    When grown in continuous culture, budding yeast cells tend to synchronize their respiratory activity to form a stable oscillation that percolates throughout cellular physiology and involves the majority of the protein-coding transcriptome. Oscillations in batch culture and at single cell level support the idea that these dynamics constitute a general growth principle. The precise molecular mechanisms and biological functions of the oscillation remain elusive. Fourier analysis of transcriptome time series datasets from two different oscillation periods (0.7 h and 5 h) reveals seven distinct co-expression clusters common to both systems (34% of all yeast ORF), which consolidate into two superclusters when correlated with a compilation of 1,327 unrelated transcriptome datasets. These superclusters encode for cell growth and anabolism during the phase of high, and mitochondrial growth, catabolism and stress response during the phase of low oxygen uptake. The promoters of each cluster are characterized by different nucleotide contents, promoter nucleosome configurations, and dependence on ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling complexes. We show that the ATP:ADP ratio oscillates, compatible with alternating metabolic activity of the two superclusters and differential feedback on their transcription via activating (RSC) and repressive (Isw2) types of promoter structure remodeling. We propose a novel feedback mechanism, where the energetic state of the cell, reflected in the ATP:ADP ratio, gates the transcription of large, but functionally coherent groups of genes via differential effects of ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling machineries. Besides providing a mechanistic hypothesis for the delayed negative feedback that results in the oscillatory phenotype, this mechanism may underpin the continuous adaptation of growth to environmental conditions. PMID:22685547

  7. Identification and Analysis of National Airspace System Resource Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Marien, Ty V.; Viken, Jeffery K.; Neitzke, Kurt W.; Kwa, Tech-Seng; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.; Fenbert, James W.; Hinze, Nicolas K.

    2015-01-01

    This analysis is the deliverable for the Airspace Systems Program, Systems Analysis Integration and Evaluation Project Milestone for the Systems and Portfolio Analysis (SPA) focus area SPA.4.06 Identification and Analysis of National Airspace System (NAS) Resource Constraints and Mitigation Strategies. "Identify choke points in the current and future NAS. Choke points refer to any areas in the en route, terminal, oceanic, airport, and surface operations that constrain actual demand in current and projected future operations. Use the Common Scenarios based on Transportation Systems Analysis Model (TSAM) projections of future demand developed under SPA.4.04 Tools, Methods and Scenarios Development. Analyze causes, including operational and physical constraints." The NASA analysis is complementary to a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) "Development of Tools and Analysis to Evaluate Choke Points in the National Airspace System" Contract # NNA3AB95C awarded to Logistics Management Institute, Sept 2013.

  8. Computer-assisted skull identification system using video superimposition.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, M; Matsuda, H; Kubota, S; Imaizumi, K; Miyasaka, S; Seta, S

    1997-12-01

    This system consists of two main units, namely a video superimposition system and a computer-assisted skull identification system. The video superimposition system is comprised of the following five parts: a skull-positioning box having a monochrome CCD camera, a photo-stand having a color CCD camera, a video image mixing device, a TV monitor and a videotape recorder. The computer-assisted skull identification system is composed of a host computer including our original application software, a film recorder and a color printer. After the determination of the orientation and size of the skull to those of the facial photograph using the video superimposition system, the skull and facial photograph images are digitized and stored within the computer, and then both digitized images are superimposed on the monitor. For the assessment of anatomical consistency between the digitized skull and face, the distance between the landmarks and the thickness of soft tissue of the anthropometrical points are semi-automatically measured on the monitor. The wipe images facilitates the comparison of positional relationships between the digitized skull and face. The software includes the polynomial functions and Fourier harmonic analysis for evaluating the match of the outline such as the forehead and mandibular line in both the digitized images. PMID:9493339

  9. Protein-protein interactions in two potyviruses using the yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Shi, Yuhong; Luo, Zhaopeng; Lu, Yuwen; Zheng, Hongying; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jiong; Chen, Jianping; Adams, M J; Wu, Yunfeng

    2009-06-01

    Interactions between all ten mature proteins of the potyviruses Soybean mosaic virus (Pinellia ternata isolate) and Shallot yellow stripe virus were investigated using yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assays. Consistently strong self-interactions were found between the pairs of HC-Pro, VPg, NIa-Pro, NIb and CP in both viruses. Apart from the NIb, such interactions have been previously reported for some other potyviruses. The 6K1/NIa-Pro combination gave a consistently moderate to strong interaction in both directions for both viruses. This interaction occurred even when the 6K1 of SMV-P was truncated to eliminate the C-terminal motif that acts as a recognition site for cleavage by the NIa-Pro. Many other interactions occurred only in one direction or only for one of the two viruses. When taken together with other published reports, the data suggest that interactions detected by Y2H should be regarded as only preliminary indications. PMID:19189854

  10. Research on liquid identification based on CCD imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haixiu; Tang, Huiqiang; Huang, Jingfeng

    2009-07-01

    Owing to the difference in physical and chemical properties, the liquid drops' growth states are dissimilar to different liquids under same conditions. And this drop growth difference to various liquids is embodied in the corresponding drop's contour feature obviously. Thus the liquid identification method based on CCD imaging system will be introduced in detail in this paper. Through experiments to different liquids, the region area, boundary girth, drop length, drop plumpness, drop circularity, and the profile edge of the liquid drop image will be extracted and analyzed. And with these information the liquid identification can be realized. From sample experiments the region area and the drop plumpness is more effective than other parameters in liquid discrimination. And the boundary girth and drop length difference is very small to some liquids, thus they are the realitive weaker character to liquid drops.

  11. Biological tissue identification using a multispectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delporte, Céline; Sautrot, Sylvie; Ben Chouikha, Mohamed; Viénot, Françoise; Alquié, Georges

    2013-02-01

    A multispectral imaging system enabling biological tissue identifying and differentiation is presented. The measurement of ?(?) spectral radiance factor cube for four tissue types (beef muscle, pork muscle, turkey muscle and beef liver) present in the same scene was carried out. Three methods for tissue identification are proposed and their relevance evaluated. The first method correlates the scene spectral radiance factor with tissue database characteristics. This method gives detection rates ranging from 63.5 % to 85 %. The second method correlates the scene spectral radiance factor derivatives with a database of tissue ?(?) derivatives. This method is more efficient than the first one because it gives detection rates ranging from 79 % to 89 % with over-detection rates smaller than 0.2 %. The third method uses the biological tissue spectral signature. It enhances contrast in order to afford tissue differentiation and identification.

  12. An approximation theory for the identification of linear thermoelastic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, I. G.; Su, Chien-Hua Frank

    1990-01-01

    An abstract approximation framework and convergence theory for the identification of thermoelastic systems is developed. Starting from an abstract operator formulation consisting of a coupled second order hyperbolic equation of elasticity and first order parabolic equation for heat conduction, well-posedness is established using linear semigroup theory in Hilbert space, and a class of parameter estimation problems is then defined involving mild solutions. The approximation framework is based upon generic Galerkin approximation of the mild solutions, and convergence of solutions of the resulting sequence of approximating finite dimensional parameter identification problems to a solution of the original infinite dimensional inverse problem is established using approximation results for operator semigroups. An example involving the basic equations of one dimensional linear thermoelasticity and a linear spline based scheme are discussed. Numerical results indicate how the approach might be used in a study of damping mechanisms in flexible structures.

  13. An experimental study of nonlinear dynamic system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stry, Greselda I.; Mook, D, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    A technique based on the Minimum Model Error optimal estimation approach is employed for robust identification of a nonlinear dynamic system. A simple harmonic oscillator with quadratic position feedback was simulated on an analog computer. With the aid of analog measurements and an assumed linear model, the Minimum Model Error Algorithm accurately identifies the quadratic nonlinearity. The tests demonstrate that the method is robust with respect to prior ignorance of the nonlinear system model and with respect to measurement record length, regardless of initial conditions.

  14. YEAST GENETICS Fred Winston

    E-print Network

    Winston, Fred

    YEAST GENETICS Fred Winston 7.1 Introduction Key Concepts · Genetic studies of the yeast. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an ideal experimental organism. It is a microorganism that has a fast biology. Yeast has been the focus of extensive studies in many aspects of molecular biology. These areas

  15. Nonlinear stochastic system identification of skin using volterra kernels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Hunter, Ian W

    2013-04-01

    Volterra kernel stochastic system identification is a technique that can be used to capture and model nonlinear dynamics in biological systems, including the nonlinear properties of skin during indentation. A high bandwidth and high stroke Lorentz force linear actuator system was developed and used to test the mechanical properties of bulk skin and underlying tissue in vivo using a non-white input force and measuring an output position. These short tests (5 s) were conducted in an indentation configuration normal to the skin surface and in an extension configuration tangent to the skin surface. Volterra kernel solution methods were used including a fast least squares procedure and an orthogonalization solution method. The practical modifications, such as frequency domain filtering, necessary for working with low-pass filtered inputs are also described. A simple linear stochastic system identification technique had a variance accounted for (VAF) of less than 75%. Representations using the first and second Volterra kernels had a much higher VAF (90-97%) as well as a lower Akaike information criteria (AICc) indicating that the Volterra kernel models were more efficient. The experimental second Volterra kernel matches well with results from a dynamic-parameter nonlinearity model with fixed mass as a function of depth as well as stiffness and damping that increase with depth into the skin. A study with 16 subjects showed that the kernel peak values have mean coefficients of variation (CV) that ranged from 3 to 8% and showed that the kernel principal components were correlated with location on the body, subject mass, body mass index (BMI), and gender. These fast and robust methods for Volterra kernel stochastic system identification can be applied to the characterization of biological tissues, diagnosis of skin diseases, and determination of consumer product efficacy. PMID:23264003

  16. Sensor network based vehicle classification and license plate identification system

    SciTech Connect

    Frigo, Janette Rose; Brennan, Sean M; Rosten, Edward J; Raby, Eric Y; Kulathumani, Vinod K

    2009-01-01

    Typically, for energy efficiency and scalability purposes, sensor networks have been used in the context of environmental and traffic monitoring applications in which operations at the sensor level are not computationally intensive. But increasingly, sensor network applications require data and compute intensive sensors such video cameras and microphones. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of two such systems: a vehicle classifier based on acoustic signals and a license plate identification system using a camera. The systems are implemented in an energy-efficient manner to the extent possible using commercially available hardware, the Mica motes and the Stargate platform. Our experience in designing these systems leads us to consider an alternate more flexible, modular, low-power mote architecture that uses a combination of FPGAs, specialized embedded processing units and sensor data acquisition systems.

  17. Tapping into yeast diversity.

    PubMed

    Fay, Justin C

    2012-11-01

    Domesticated organisms demonstrate our capacity to influence wild species but also provide us with the opportunity to understand rapid evolution in the context of substantially altered environments and novel selective pressures. Recent advances in genetics and genomics have brought unprecedented insights into the domestication of many organisms and have opened new avenues for further improvements to be made. Yet, our ability to engineer biological systems is not without limits; genetic manipulation is often quite difficult. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is not only one of the most powerful model organisms, but is also the premier producer of fermented foods and beverages around the globe. As a model system, it entertains a hefty workforce dedicated to deciphering its genome and the function it encodes at a rich mechanistic level. As a producer, it is used to make leavened bread, and dozens of different alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine. Yet, applying the awesome power of yeast genetics to understanding its origins and evolution requires some knowledge of its wild ancestors and the environments from which they were derived. A number of surprisingly diverse lineages of S. cerevisiae from both primeval and secondary forests in China have been discovered by Wang and his colleagues. These lineages substantially expand our knowledge of wild yeast diversity and will be a boon to elucidating the ecology, evolution and domestication of this academic and industrial workhorse. PMID:23281494

  18. Identification of a yeast artificial chromosome clone encoding an accessory factor for the human interferon [gamma] receptor: Evidence for multiple accessory factors

    SciTech Connect

    Soh, J.; Donnelly, R.J.; Mariano, T.M.; Cook, J.R.; Schwartz, B.; Pestka, S. )

    1993-09-15

    Human chromosomes 6 and 21 are both necessary to confer sensitivity to human interferon [gamma](Hu-IFN-[gamma]), as measured by the induction of human HLA class I antigen. Human chromosome 6 encodes the receptor for Hu-IFN-[gamma], and human chromosome 21 encodes accessory factors for generating biological activity through the Hu-IFN-[gamma] receptor. A small region of human chromosome 21 that is responsible for encoding such factors was localized with hamster-human somatic cell hybrids carrying an irradiation-reduced fragment of human chromosome 21. The cell line with the minimum chromosome 21-specific DNA is Chinese hamster ovary 3x1S. To localize the genes further, 10 different yeast artificial chromosome clones from six different loci in the vicinity of the 3x1S region were fused to a human-hamster hybrid cell line (designated 16-9) that contains human chromosome 6q (supplying the Hy-IFN-[gamma] receptor) and the human HLA-B7 gene. These transformed 16-9 cells were assayed for induction of class I HLA antigens upon treatment with Hu-IFN-[gamma]. Here the authors report that a 540-kb yeast artificial chromosome encodes the necessary species-specific factor(s) and can substitute for human chromosome 21 to reconstitute the Hu-IFN-[gamma]-receptor-mediated induction of class I HLA antigens. However, the factor encoded on the yeast artificial chromosome does not confer antiviral protection against encephalomyocarditis virus, demonstrating that an additional factor encoded on human chromosome 21 is required for the antiviral activity. 51 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Quantitative description of ion transport via plasma membrane of yeast and small cells

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of ion transport via plasma membrane needs identification and quantitative understanding of the involved processes. Brief characterization of main ion transport systems of a yeast cell (Pma1, Ena1, TOK1, Nha1, Trk1, Trk2, non-selective cation conductance) and determining the exact number of molecules of each transporter per a typical cell allow us to predict the corresponding ion flows. In this review a comparison of ion transport in small yeast cell and several animal cell types is provided. The importance of cell volume to surface ratio is emphasized. The role of cell wall and lipid rafts is discussed in respect to required increase in spatial and temporary resolution of measurements. Conclusions are formulated to describe specific features of ion transport in a yeast cell. Potential directions of future research are outlined based on the assumptions. PMID:26113853

  20. Quantitative description of ion transport via plasma membrane of yeast and small cells

    E-print Network

    Vadim Volkov

    2012-12-18

    Modelling of ion transport via plasma membrane needs identification and quantitative understanding of the involved processes. Brief characterisation of ion transport systems of a yeast cell (Pma1, Ena1, TOK1, Nha1, Trk1, Trk2, non-selective cation conductance) and estimates concerning the number of molecules of each transporter per a cell allow predicting the corresponding ion flows. Comparison of ion transport in small yeast cell and several animal cell types is provided and importance of cell volume to surface ratio is stressed. Role of cell wall and lipid rafts is discussed in aspect of required increase in spatial and temporary resolution of measurements. Conclusions are formulated to describe specific features of ion transport in a yeast cell. Potential directions of future research are outlined based on the assumptions.

  1. N-Myristoylation of the Rpt2 subunit of the yeast 26S proteasome is implicated in the subcellular compartment-specific protein quality control system.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Ayuko; Kurata, Yoichi; Nakabayashi, Jun; Kagawa, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination is the posttranslational modification of a protein by covalent attachment of ubiquitin. Controlled proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (\\UPS) alleviates cellular stress by clearing misfolded proteins. In budding yeast, UPS within the nucleus degrades the nuclear proteins as well as proteins imported from the cytoplasm. While the predominantly nuclear localization of the yeast proteasome is maintained by the importin-mediated transport, N-myristoylation of the proteasome subunit Rpt2 was indicated to cause dynamic nucleo-cytoplasmic localization of proteasomes. Here, we quantitatively analyzed the ubiquitinated peptides using anti-K-?-GG antibody in yeast cell lines with or without a mutation in the N-myristoylation site of Rpt2 and detected upregulated ubiquitination of proteins with nucleo-cytoplasmic localizations in the mutant strains. Moreover, both the protein and ubiquitinated peptide levels of two Hsp70 family chaperones involved in the nuclear import of misfolded proteins, Ssa and Sse1, were elevated in the mutant strains, whereas levels of an Hsp70 family chaperone involved in the nuclear export, Ssb, were reduced. Taken together, our results indicate that N-myristoylation of Rpt2 is involved in controlled proteolysis via regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic localization of the yeast proteasome. PMID:26344132

  2. Spatiotemporal System Identification With Continuous Spatial Maps and Sparse Estimation.

    PubMed

    Aram, Parham; Kadirkamanathan, Visakan; Anderson, Sean R

    2015-11-01

    We present a framework for the identification of spatiotemporal linear dynamical systems. We use a state-space model representation that has the following attributes: 1) the number of spatial observation locations are decoupled from the model order; 2) the model allows for spatial heterogeneity; 3) the model representation is continuous over space; and 4) the model parameters can be identified in a simple and sparse estimation procedure. The model identification procedure we propose has four steps: 1) decomposition of the continuous spatial field using a finite set of basis functions where spatial frequency analysis is used to determine basis function width and spacing, such that the main spatial frequency contents of the underlying field can be captured; 2) initialization of states in closed form; 3) initialization of state-transition and input matrix model parameters using sparse regression-the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator method; and 4) joint state and parameter estimation using an iterative Kalman-filter/sparse-regression algorithm. To investigate the performance of the proposed algorithm we use data generated by the Kuramoto model of spatiotemporal cortical dynamics. The identification algorithm performs successfully, predicting the spatiotemporal field with high accuracy, whilst the sparse regression leads to a compact model. PMID:25647667

  3. Terahertz imaging system performance model for concealed-weapon identification.

    PubMed

    Murrill, Steven R; Jacobs, Eddie L; Moyer, Steven K; Halford, Carl E; Griffin, Steven T; De Lucia, Frank C; Petkie, Douglas T; Franck, Charmaine C

    2008-03-20

    The U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory have developed a terahertz (THz) -band imaging system performance model for detection and identification of concealed weaponry. The MATLAB-based model accounts for the effects of all critical sensor and display components and for the effects of atmospheric attenuation, concealment material attenuation, and active illumination. The model is based on recent U.S. Army NVESD sensor performance modeling technology that couples system design parameters to observer-sensor field performance by using the acquire methodology for weapon identification performance predictions. This THz model has been developed in support of the Defense Advanced Research Project Agencies' Terahertz Imaging Focal-Plane Technology (TIFT) program and is currently being used to guide the design and development of a 0.650 THz active-passive imaging system. This paper will describe the THz model in detail, provide and discuss initial modeling results for a prototype THz imaging system, and outline plans to calibrate and validate the model through human perception testing. PMID:18709076

  4. Terahertz imaging system performance model for concealed-weapon identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrill, Steven R.; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Moyer, Steven K.; Halford, Carl E.; Griffin, Steven T.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Petkie, Douglas T.; Franck, Charmaine C.

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory have developed a terahertz (THz) -band imaging system performance model for detection and identification of concealed weaponry. The MATLAB-based model accounts for the effects of all critical sensor and display components and for the effects of atmospheric attenuation, concealment material attenuation, and active illumination. The model is based on recent U.S. Army NVESD sensor performance modeling technology that couples system design parameters to observer-sensor field performance by using the acquire methodology for weapon identification performance predictions. This THz model has been developed in support of the Defense Advanced Research Project Agencies' Terahertz Imaging Focal-Plane Technology (TIFT) program and is currently being used to guide the design and development of a 0.650 THz active-passive imaging system. This paper will describe the THz model in detail, provide and discuss initial modeling results for a prototype THz imaging system, and outline plans to calibrate and validate the model through human perception testing.

  5. Terahertz imaging system performance model for concealed weapon identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrill, Steven R.; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Moyer, Steven K.; Halford, Carl E.; Griffin, Steven T.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Petkie, Douglas T.; Franck, Charmaine C.

    2005-11-01

    The U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory have developed a terahertz-band imaging system performance model for detection and identification of concealed weaponry. The MATLAB-based model accounts for the effects of all critical sensor and display components, and for the effects of atmospheric attenuation, concealment material attenuation, and active illumination. The model is based on recent U.S. Army NVESD sensor performance models that couple system design parameters to observer-sensor field performance using the acquire methodology for weapon identification performance predictions. This THz model has been developed in support of the Defense Advanced Research Project Agencies' Terahertz Imaging Focal-Plane-Array Technology (TIFT) program and is presently being used to guide the design and development of a 0.650 THz active/passive imaging system. This paper will describe the THz model in detail, provide and discuss initial modeling results for a prototype THz imaging system, and outline plans to validate and calibrate the model through human perception testing.

  6. Indirect Identification of Linear Stochastic Systems with Known Feedback Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Hsiao, Min-Hung; Cox, David E.

    1996-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for identifying a state-space model of linear stochastic systems operating under known feedback controller. In this algorithm, only the reference input and output of closed-loop data are required. No feedback signal needs to be recorded. The overall closed-loop system dynamics is first identified. Then a recursive formulation is derived to compute the open-loop plant dynamics from the identified closed-loop system dynamics and known feedback controller dynamics. The controller can be a dynamic or constant-gain full-state feedback controller. Numerical simulations and test data of a highly unstable large-gap magnetic suspension system are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this indirect identification method.

  7. Studying Functions of All Yeast Genes Simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Eason, Robert G.; Poumand, Nader; Herman, Zelek S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Anthony Kevin; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2006-01-01

    A method of studying the functions of all the genes of a given species of microorganism simultaneously has been developed in experiments on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (commonly known as baker's or brewer's yeast). It is already known that many yeast genes perform functions similar to those of corresponding human genes; therefore, by facilitating understanding of yeast genes, the method may ultimately also contribute to the knowledge needed to treat some diseases in humans. Because of the complexity of the method and the highly specialized nature of the underlying knowledge, it is possible to give only a brief and sketchy summary here. The method involves the use of unique synthetic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences that are denoted as DNA bar codes because of their utility as molecular labels. The method also involves the disruption of gene functions through deletion of genes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a particularly powerful experimental system in that multiple deletion strains easily can be pooled for parallel growth assays. Individual deletion strains recently have been created for 5,918 open reading frames, representing nearly all of the estimated 6,000 genetic loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Tagging of each deletion strain with one or two unique 20-nucleotide sequences enables identification of genes affected by specific growth conditions, without prior knowledge of gene functions. Hybridization of bar-code DNA to oligonucleotide arrays can be used to measure the growth rate of each strain over several cell-division generations. The growth rate thus measured serves as an index of the fitness of the strain.

  8. Yeast Genetics and Biotechnological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Saroj; Baranwal, Richa

    Yeast can be recognized as one of the very important groups of microorganisms on account of its extensive use in the fermentation industry and as a basic eukaryotic model cellular system. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively used to elucidate the genetics and regulation of several key functions in the cell such as cell mating, electron transport chain, protein trafficking, cell cycle events and others. Even before the genome sequence of the yeast was out, the structural organization and function of several of its genes was known. With the availability of the origin of replication from the 2 ?m plasmid and the development of transformation system, it became the host of choice for expression of a number of important proteins. A large number of episomal and integrative shuttle vectors are available for expression of mammalian proteins. The latest developments in genomics and micro-array technology have allowed investigations of individual gene function by site-specific deletion method. The application of metabolic profiling has also assisted in understanding the cellular network operating in this yeast. This chapter is aimed at reviewing the use of this system as an experimental tool for conducting classical genetics. Various vector systems available, foreign genes expressed and the limitations as a host will be discussed. Finally, the use of various yeast enzymes in biotechnology sector will be reviewed.

  9. Methods, Systems and Apparatuses for Radio Frequency Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Lin, Gregory Y. (Inventor); Kennedy, Timothy F. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Brown, Dewey T. (Inventor); Byerly, Diane (Inventor); Boose, Haley C. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system for radio frequency identification (RFID) includes an enclosure defining an interior region interior to the enclosure, and a feed for generating an electromagnetic field in the interior region in response to a signal received from an RFID reader via a radio frequency (RF) transmission line and, in response to the electromagnetic field, receiving a signal from an RFID sensor attached to an item in the interior region. The structure of the enclosure may be conductive and may include a metamaterial portion, an electromagnetically absorbing portion, or a wall extending in the interior region. Related apparatuses and methods for performing RFID are provided.

  10. The yeast PHO5 promoter: from single locus to systems biology of a paradigm for gene regulation through chromatin.

    PubMed

    Korber, Philipp; Barbaric, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics crucially contributes to gene regulation. Studies of the yeast PHO5 promoter were key to establish this nowadays accepted view and continuously provide mechanistic insight in chromatin remodeling and promoter regulation, both on single locus as well as on systems level. The PHO5 promoter is a context independent chromatin switch module where in the repressed state positioned nucleosomes occlude transcription factor sites such that nucleosome remodeling is a prerequisite for and not consequence of induced gene transcription. This massive chromatin transition from positioned nucleosomes to an extensive hypersensitive site, together with respective transitions at the co-regulated PHO8 and PHO84 promoters, became a prime model for dissecting how remodelers, histone modifiers and chaperones co-operate in nucleosome remodeling upon gene induction. This revealed a surprisingly complex cofactor network at the PHO5 promoter, including five remodeler ATPases (SWI/SNF, RSC, INO80, Isw1, Chd1), and demonstrated for the first time histone eviction in trans as remodeling mode in vivo. Recently, the PHO5 promoter and the whole PHO regulon were harnessed for quantitative analyses and computational modeling of remodeling, transcription factor binding and promoter input-output relations such that this rewarding single-locus model becomes a paradigm also for theoretical and systems approaches to gene regulatory networks. PMID:25190457

  11. System for autonomous identification and nowcasting of space weather events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsuma, T.; Akioka, M.; Ishibashi, H.

    Using near-real time space environment data obtained from GOES and ACE satellites, we have developed algorithm for autonomous identification of space weather events, such as solar flares, proton events, and geomagnetic storms, and a procedure for nowcasting of these events which satisfy criteria of alert level. At first, we have introduced NOAA/SEC's definition of X-ray flare as the prototype algorithm. However, we have found that this algorithm sometimes misses the occurrence of LDE-type flare. So we tried to imporove the algorithm for detecting LDE-type flare. Nowcasting information is provided by e-mail message written in Japanese. This information can be received by a cellular phone. This system provides us an opportunity of monitoring space weather environment 24 hours a day without using human resources. This system is now in test operating phase. In this summer, we will start nowcasting of severe space weather events as a new domestic service of Regional Warning Center of Tokyo, which belongs to International Space Environment Service (ISES). Detailed descriptions of this system, algorithm of event identification, and the results of our test operation will be presented.

  12. A forward model-based validation of cardiovascular system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    We present a theoretical evaluation of a cardiovascular system identification method that we previously developed for the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in noninvasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and instantaneous lung volume. The method provides a dynamical characterization of the important autonomic and mechanical mechanisms responsible for coupling the fluctuations (inverse modeling). To carry out the evaluation, we developed a computational model of the cardiovascular system capable of generating realistic beat-to-beat variability (forward modeling). We applied the method to data generated from the forward model and compared the resulting estimated dynamics with the actual dynamics of the forward model, which were either precisely known or easily determined. We found that the estimated dynamics corresponded to the actual dynamics and that this correspondence was robust to forward model uncertainty. We also demonstrated the sensitivity of the method in detecting small changes in parameters characterizing autonomic function in the forward model. These results provide confidence in the performance of the cardiovascular system identification method when applied to experimental data.

  13. Fuzzy membership function optimization for system identification using an extended Kalman filter

    E-print Network

    Simon, Dan

    Fuzzy membership function optimization for system identification using an extended Kalman filter an extended Kalman filter to optimize the membership functions for system modeling, or system identification is that the proposed system acts as a noise-reducing filter. We demonstrate that the extended Kalman filter can

  14. Yeast cytochrome c oxidase: A model system to study mitochondrial forms of the haem–copper oxidase superfamily?

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Amandine; Meunier, Brigitte; Lee, David; Orengo, Christine; Rich, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    The known subunits of yeast mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase are reviewed. The structures of all eleven of its subunits are explored by building homology models based on the published structures of the homologous bovine subunits and similarities and differences are highlighted, particularly of the core functional subunit I. Yeast genetic techniques to enable introduction of mutations into the three core mitochondrially-encoded subunits are reviewed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory Oxidases. PMID:21925484

  15. Part identification in robotic assembly using vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabantaray, Bunil Kumar; Biswal, Bibhuti Bhusan

    2013-12-01

    Machine vision system acts an important role in making robotic assembly system autonomous. Identification of the correct part is an important task which needs to be carefully done by a vision system to feed the robot with correct information for further processing. This process consists of many sub-processes wherein, the image capturing, digitizing and enhancing, etc. do account for reconstructive the part for subsequent operations. Interest point detection of the grabbed image, therefore, plays an important role in the entire image processing activity. Thus it needs to choose the correct tool for the process with respect to the given environment. In this paper analysis of three major corner detection algorithms is performed on the basis of their accuracy, speed and robustness to noise. The work is performed on the Matlab R2012a. An attempt has been made to find the best algorithm for the problem.

  16. 978-1-4799-3360-0/14/$31.00 c 2014 IEEE A Parallel Identification Protocol for RFID Systems

    E-print Network

    978-1-4799-3360-0/14/$31.00 c 2014 IEEE A Parallel Identification Protocol for RFID Systems Linghe Identification Protocol (PIP) for RFID systems, which achieves the parallel identification paradigm and is com Frequency IDentification (RFID) systems are rapid- ly changing our lives with their low costs and ubiquitous

  17. High cell-density expression system: yeast cells in a phalanx efficiently produce a certain range of "difficult-to-express" secretory recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Kawarasaki, Yasuaki; Kurose, Takeshi; Ito, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Yeast's extracellular expression provides a cost-efficient means of producing recombinant proteins of academic or commercial interests. However, depending on the protein to be expressed, the production occasionally results in a poor yield, which is frequently accompanied with a deteriorated growth of the host. Here we describe our simple approach, high cell-density expression, to circumvent the cellular toxicity and achieve in a production of a certain range of "difficult-to-express" secretory protein in preparative amount. The system features an ease of performing: (1) precultivate yeast cells to the stationary phase in non-inducing condition, (2) suspend the cells to a small aliquot of inducing medium to form a high cell-density suspension or "a phalanx," and then (3) give a sufficient aeration to the phalanx. Factors and pitfalls that affect the system's performance are also described. PMID:25447864

  18. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing techniques. Bootstrap techniques have been developed to estimate confidence intervals for the electromechanical modes from field measured data. Results were obtained using injected signal data provided by BPA. A new probing signal was designed that puts more strength into the signal for a given maximum peak to peak swing. Further simulations were conducted on a model based on measured data and with the modifications of the 19-machine simulation model. Montana Tech researchers participated in two primary activities: (1) continued development of the 19-machine simulation test system to include a DC line; and (2) extensive simulation analysis of the various system identification algorithms and bootstrap techniques using the 19 machine model. Researchers at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks focused on the development and testing of adaptive filter algorithms for mode estimation using data generated from simulation models and on data provided in collaboration with BPA and PNNL. There efforts consist of pre-processing field data, testing and refining adaptive filter techniques (specifically the Least Mean Squares (LMS), the Adaptive Step-size LMS (ASLMS), and Error Tracking (ET) algorithms). They also improved convergence of the adaptive algorithms by using an initial estimate from block processing AR method to initialize the weight vector for LMS. Extensive testing was performed on simulated data from the 19 machine model. This project was also extensively involved in the WECC (Western Electricity Coordinating Council) system wide tests carried out in 2005 and 2006. These tests involved injecting known probing signals into the western power grid. One of the primary goals of these tests was the reliable estimation of electromechanical mode properties from measured PMU data. Applied to the system were three types of probing inputs: (1) activation of the Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake, (2) mid-level probing at the Pacific DC Intertie (PDCI), and (3) low-level probing on the PDCI. The Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake is a 1400 MW disturbance to the system and is injected for a ha

  19. Nonlinear System Identification for Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2008-01-01

    Representation and identification of a nonlinear aeroelastic pitch-plunge system as a model of the Nonlinear AutoRegressive, Moving Average eXogenous (NARMAX) class is considered. A nonlinear difference equation describing this aircraft model is derived theoretically and shown to be of the NARMAX form. Identification methods for NARMAX models are applied to aeroelastic dynamics and its properties demonstrated via continuous-time simulations of experimental conditions. Simulation results show that (1) the outputs of the NARMAX model closely match those generated using continuous-time methods, and (2) NARMAX identification methods applied to aeroelastic dynamics provide accurate discrete-time parameter estimates. Application of NARMAX identification to experimental pitch-plunge dynamics data gives a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  20. Non-Linear System Identification for Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2008-01-01

    Representation and identification of a non-linear aeroelastic pitch-plunge system as a model of the NARMAX class is considered. A non-linear difference equation describing this aircraft model is derived theoretically and shown to be of the NARMAX form. Identification methods for NARMAX models are applied to aeroelastic dynamics and its properties demonstrated via continuous-time simulations of experimental conditions. Simulation results show that (i) the outputs of the NARMAX model match closely those generated using continuous-time methods and (ii) NARMAX identification methods applied to aeroelastic dynamics provide accurate discrete-time parameter estimates. Application of NARMAX identification to experimental pitch-plunge dynamics data gives a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  1. Investigating the protein-protein interactions of the yeast Hsp90 chaperone system by two-hybrid analysis: potential uses and limitations of this approach

    PubMed Central

    Millson, Stefan H.; Truman, Andrew W.; Wolfram, Francis; King, Victoria; Panaretou, Barry; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Pearl, Laurence H.; Piper, Peter W.

    2004-01-01

    The Hsp90 chaperone cycle involves sequential assembly of different Hsp90-containing multiprotein complexes, the accessory proteins (“cochaperones”) that are associated with these complexes being exchanged as the cycle proceeds from its early to its late stages. To gain insight as to whether the 2-hybrid system could be used to probe the interactions of this Hsp90 system, yeast transformants were constructed that express the Gal4p deoxyribonucleic acid–binding domain (BD) fused to the 2 Hsp90 isoforms and the various Hsp90 system cochaperones of yeast. These “bait” fusions were then introduced by mating into other transformants expressing nearly all the 6000 proteins of yeast expressed as fusions to the Gal4p activation domain (AD). High throughput 2-hybrid screening revealed the ability of Hsp90 and Hsp90 system cochaperones to engage in stable interactions in vivo, both with each other and with the various other proteins of the yeast proteome. Consistent with the transience of most chaperone associations, interactions to Hsp90 itself were invariably weak and generally influenced by stress. Mutations within a Hsp90-BD bait fusion and an AD-Cdc37 “prey” fusion were used to provide in vivo confirmation of the in vitro data that shows that Cdc37p is interacting with the “relaxed” conformation of Hsp90 and also to provide indications that Cdc37p needs to be phosphorylated at its N-terminus for any appreciable interaction with Hsp90. A number of potentially novel cochaperone interactions were also identified, providing a framework for these to be analyzed further using other techniques. PMID:15633294

  2. Applications of yeast surface display for protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cherf, Gerald M.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    The method of displaying recombinant proteins on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae via genetic fusion to an abundant cell wall protein, a technology known as yeast surface display, or simply, yeast display, has become a valuable protein engineering tool for a broad spectrum of biotechnology and biomedical applications. This review focuses on the use of yeast display for engineering protein affinity, stability, and enzymatic activity. Strategies and examples for each protein engineering goal are discussed. Additional applications of yeast display are also briefly presented, including protein epitope mapping, identification of protein-protein interactions, and uses of displayed proteins in industry and medicine. PMID:26060074

  3. A Frequency-Domain Substructure System Identification Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blades, Eric L.; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A new frequency-domain system identification algorithm is presented for system identification of substructures, such as payloads to be flown aboard the Space Shuttle. In the vibration test, all interface degrees of freedom where the substructure is connected to the carrier structure are either subjected to active excitation or are supported by a test stand with the reaction forces measured. The measured frequency-response data is used to obtain a linear, viscous-damped model with all interface-degree of freedom entries included. This model can then be used to validate analytical substructure models. This procedure makes it possible to obtain not only the fixed-interface modal data associated with a Craig-Bampton substructure model, but also the data associated with constraint modes. With this proposed algorithm, multiple-boundary-condition tests are not required, and test-stand dynamics is accounted for without requiring a separate modal test or finite element modeling of the test stand. Numerical simulations are used in examining the algorithm's ability to estimate valid reduced-order structural models. The algorithm's performance when frequency-response data covering narrow and broad frequency bandwidths is used as input is explored. Its performance when noise is added to the frequency-response data and the use of different least squares solution techniques are also examined. The identified reduced-order models are also compared for accuracy with other test-analysis models and a formulation for a Craig-Bampton test-analysis model is also presented.

  4. Using yeast two-hybrid system to identify ECRG2 associated proteins and their possible interactions with ECRG2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yong-Ping; Wang, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Bi, Mei-Xia; Guo, Li-Ping; Lu, Shih-Hsin

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To identify esophageal cancer related gene2 (ECRG2) associated proteins and their possible interactions with ECRG2 gene. METHODS: In the yeast forward two-hybrid system, ECRG2 was fused with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of Gal4 and human fetal liver cDNA library was fused with the transcriptional activation domain (AD) of Gal4. We performed a high-stringency scale procedure to screen ECRG2 against human fetal liver cDNA library and characterized positives by sequence analysis. RESULTS: We found the following 9 putatively associated proteins. They were metallothionein2A, metallothionein1H, metallothionein1G, ferritin, erythrocyte membrane protein band4.2, mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12, hypothetical protein FLJ10101, and a novel gene whose cDNA was found to have no strong homology to any other previously characterized gene whose DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank accession number is AF422192 mapped to human chromosome 14q31. CONCLUSION: MT, a potential interaction partner for ECRG2, might be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis, and in various physiological processes. Determination of a reliability score for each single protein-protein interaction, especially interaction of ECRG2 and MT, permits the assignment of ECRG2 and unannotated proteins to biological pathways. A further understanding of the association between ECRG2 and MT should facilitate the functions of ECRG2 gene. PMID:12970870

  5. Actin structure and function: roles in mitochondrial organization and morphogenesis in budding yeast and identification of the phalloidin-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Drubin, D G; Jones, H D; Wertman, K F

    1993-01-01

    To further elucidate the functions of actin in budding yeast and to relate actin structure to specific roles and interactions in vivo, we determined the phenotypes caused by 13 charged-to-alanine mutations isolated previously in the single Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin gene. Defects in actin organization, morphogenesis, budding pattern, chitin deposition, septation, nuclear segregation, and mitochondrial organization were observed. In wild-type cells, mitochondria were found to be aligned along actin cables. Many of the amino acid substitutions that had the most severe effects on mitochondrial organization are located under the myosin "footprint" on the actin monomer, suggesting that actin-myosin interactions might underlie mitochondrial organization in yeast. In addition, one mutant (act1-129; R177A, D179A) produced an actin that assembled into cables and patches that could be visualized by anti-actin immunofluorescence in situ and that assembled into microfilaments of normal appearance in vitro as judged by electron microscopy but which could not be labeled by rhodamine-phalloidin in situ or in vitro. Rhodamine-phalloidin could label actin filaments assembled from all of the other mutant actins, including one (act1-119; R116A, E117A, K118A) that is altered at a residue (E117) that can be chemically cross-linked to phalloidin. The implication of residues R177 and/or D179 in phalloidin binding is in close agreement with a recently reported molecular model in which the phalloidin-binding site is proposed to be at the junction of two or three actin monomers in the filament. Images PMID:8167410

  6. Construction of a High-Quality Yeast Two-Hybrid Library and Its Application in Identification of Interacting Proteins with Brn1 in Curvularia lunata

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jin-Xin; Jing, Jing; Yu, Chuan-Jin; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Curvularia lunata is an important maize foliar fungal pathogen that distributes widely in maize growing area in China, and several key pathogenic factors have been isolated. An yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) library is a very useful platform to further unravel novel pathogenic factors in C. lunata. To construct a high-quality full length-expression cDNA library from the C. lunata for application to pathogenesis-related protein-protein interaction screening, total RNA was extracted. The SMART (Switching Mechanism At 5? end of the RNA Transcript) technique was used for cDNA synthesis. Double-stranded cDNA was ligated into the pGADT7-Rec vector with Herring Testes Carrier DNA using homologous recombination method. The ligation mixture was transformed into competent yeast AH109 cells to construct the primary cDNA library. Eventually, a high qualitative library was successfully established according to an evaluation on quality. The transformation efficiency was about 6.39 ×105 transformants/3 ?g pGADT7-Rec. The titer of the primary cDNA library was 2.5×108 cfu/mL. The numbers for the cDNA library was 2.46×105. Randomly picked clones show that the recombination rate was 88.24%. Gel electrophoresis results indicated that the fragments ranged from 0.4 kb to 3.0 kb. Melanin synthesis protein Brn1 (1,3,8-hydroxynaphthalene reductase) was used as a “bait” to test the sufficiency of the Y2H library. As a result, a cDNA clone encoding VelB protein that was known to be involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including control of secondary metabolism containing melanin and toxin production in many filamentous fungi was identified. Further study on the exact role of the VelB gene is underway. PMID:26060429

  7. Construction of a High-Quality Yeast Two-Hybrid Library and Its Application in Identification of Interacting Proteins with Brn1 in Curvularia lunata.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jin-Xin; Jing, Jing; Yu, Chuan-Jin; Chen, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Curvularia lunata is an important maize foliar fungal pathogen that distributes widely in maize growing area in China, and several key pathogenic factors have been isolated. An yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) library is a very useful platform to further unravel novel pathogenic factors in C. lunata. To construct a high-quality full length-expression cDNA library from the C. lunata for application to pathogenesis-related protein-protein interaction screening, total RNA was extracted. The SMART (Switching Mechanism At 5' end of the RNA Transcript) technique was used for cDNA synthesis. Double-stranded cDNA was ligated into the pGADT7-Rec vector with Herring Testes Carrier DNA using homologous recombination method. The ligation mixture was transformed into competent yeast AH109 cells to construct the primary cDNA library. Eventually, a high qualitative library was successfully established according to an evaluation on quality. The transformation efficiency was about 6.39 ×10(5) transformants/3 ?g pGADT7-Rec. The titer of the primary cDNA library was 2.5×10(8) cfu/mL. The numbers for the cDNA library was 2.46×10(5). Randomly picked clones show that the recombination rate was 88.24%. Gel electrophoresis results indicated that the fragments ranged from 0.4 kb to 3.0 kb. Melanin synthesis protein Brn1 (1,3,8-hydroxynaphthalene reductase) was used as a "bait" to test the sufficiency of the Y2H library. As a result, a cDNA clone encoding VelB protein that was known to be involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including control of secondary metabolism containing melanin and toxin production in many filamentous fungi was identified. Further study on the exact role of the VelB gene is underway. PMID:26060429

  8. Yeast: An Experimental Organism for Modern Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botstein, David; Fink, Gerald R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the applicability and advantages of using yeasts as popular and ideal model systems for studying and understanding eukaryotic biology at the cellular and molecular levels. Cites experimental tractability and the cooperative tradition of the research community of yeast biologists as reasons for this success. (RT)

  9. Vaginal Yeast Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > Teens > Infections > Fungal Infections > Vaginal Yeast ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  10. A forward model-based analysis of cardiovascular system identification methods

    E-print Network

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna, 1971-

    2000-01-01

    Cardiovascular system identification is a potentially powerful approach for intelligent patient monitoring of cardiovascular function. Rather than merely recording hemodynamic signals, the signals are mathematically analyzed ...

  11. Dynamic interaction of the protein translocation systems in the inner and outer membranes of yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Horst, M; Hilfiker-Rothenfluh, S; Oppliger, W; Schatz, G

    1995-01-01

    Mitochondria contain two distinct protein import systems, one in the outer and the other in the inner membrane. These systems can act independently of one another in submitochondrial fractions of if a protein is transported to the outer membrane or to the intermembrane space. It has been proposed that the two systems associate reversibly when a protein is transported across both membranes, but this hypothesis has remained unproven. In order to address this question, we have checked whether antibodies against a subunit of one system can co-immunoprecipitate subunits of the other system. We find that the two systems associate stably if a matrix-targeted precursor is arrested during import; no association is seen in the absence of a stuck precursor. These experiments provide direct evidence that protein import into the mitochondrial matrix is mediated by the reversible interaction of the two translocation systems. Images PMID:7774587

  12. Identification of veterinary pathogens by use of commercial identification systems and new trends in antimicrobial susceptibility testing of veterinary pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Watts, J L; Yancey, R J

    1994-01-01

    Veterinary diagnostic microbiology is a unique specialty within microbiology. Although isolation and identification techniques are similar to those used for human pathogens, many veterinary pathogens require unique cultivation or identification procedures. Commercial identification systems provide rapid, accurate identification of human pathogens. However, the accuracy of these systems with veterinary pathogens varies widely depending on the bacterial species and the host animal from which it was isolated. Increased numbers of veterinary strains or species in the data bases of the various systems would improve their accuracy. Current procedures and interpretive criteria used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of veterinary pathogens are based on guidelines used for human pathogens. The validity of these guidelines for use with veterinary pathogens has not been established. As with fastidious human pathogens, standardized methodologies and quality control isolates are needed for tests of organisms such as Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Haemophilus somnus. Furthermore, interpretive criteria for veterinary antimicrobial agents based on the MIC for veterinary pathogens, the pharmacokinetics of the antimicrobial agent in the host animal, and in vivo efficacy of the antimicrobial agent are needed. This article reviews both the commercial identification systems evaluated with veterinary pathogens and current methods for performing and interpreting antimicrobial susceptibility tests with veterinary pathogens. Recommendations for future improvements in both areas are discussed. PMID:7923054

  13. Identification of linear multivariable systems from a single set of data by identification of observers with assigned real eigenvalues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh; Juang, Jer-Nan; Longman, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    A formulation is presented for identification of linear multivariable from a single set of input-output data. The identification method is formulated with the mathematical framework of learning identifications, by extension of the repetition domain concept to include shifting time intervals. This method contrasts with existing learning approaches that require data from multiple experiments. In this method, the system input-output relationship is expressed in terms of an observer, which is made asymptotically stable by an embedded real eigenvalue assignment procedure. Through this relationship, the Markov parameters of the observer are identified. The Markov parameters of the actual system are recovered from those of the observer, and then used to obtain a state space model of the system by standard realization techniques. The basic mathematical formulation is derived, and numerical examples presented to illustrate.

  14. 30 CFR 75.1715 - Identification check system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...record shall bear a number identical to an identification check that is securely fastened to the lamp belt worn by the person underground. The identification check shall be made of a rust resistant metal of not less than 16...

  15. Scalable RFID Systems: A Privacy-Preserving Protocol with Constant-Time Identification

    E-print Network

    Poovendran, Radha

    1 Scalable RFID Systems: A Privacy-Preserving Protocol with Constant-Time Identification Basel,awclark,rp3}@uw.edu, jorge.cuellar@siemens.com Abstract--In RFID literature, most "privacy-complexity of private identification in large-scale RFID systems. We utilize the special architecture of RFID systems

  16. OPT: Optimal Protocol Tree for Efficient Tag Identification in Dense RFID Systems

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    OPT: Optimal Protocol Tree for Efficient Tag Identification in Dense RFID Systems Girish Khandelwal is based on the tree search algorithm for RFID systems. The basic principle of OPT relies on taking is to significantly reduce the total identification time, in order to render the deployment of dense RFID systems

  17. p53 Transactivation and the Impact of Mutations, Cofactors and Small Molecules Using a Simplified Yeast-Based Screening System

    PubMed Central

    Bisio, Alessandra; Lion, Mattia; Jordan, Jennifer; Fronza, Gilberto; Menichini, Paola; Resnick, Michael A.; Inga, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Background The p53 tumor suppressor, which is altered in most cancers, is a sequence-specific transcription factor that is able to modulate the expression of many target genes and influence a variety of cellular pathways. Inactivation of the p53 pathway in cancer frequently occurs through the expression of mutant p53 protein. In tumors that retain wild type p53, the pathway can be altered by upstream modulators, particularly the p53 negative regulators MDM2 and MDM4. Methodology/Principal Findings Given the many factors that might influence p53 function, including expression levels, mutations, cofactor proteins and small molecules, we expanded our previously described yeast-based system to provide the opportunity for efficient investigation of their individual and combined impacts in a miniaturized format. The system integrates i) variable expression of p53 proteins under the finely tunable GAL1,10 promoter, ii) single copy, chromosomally located p53-responsive and control luminescence reporters, iii) enhanced chemical uptake using modified ABC-transporters, iv) small-volume formats for treatment and dual-luciferase assays, and v) opportunities to co-express p53 with other cofactor proteins. This robust system can distinguish different levels of expression of WT and mutant p53 as well as interactions with MDM2 or 53BP1. Conclusions/Significance We found that the small molecules Nutlin and RITA could both relieve the MDM2-dependent inhibition of WT p53 transactivation function, while only RITA could impact p53/53BP1 functional interactions. PRIMA-1 was ineffective in modifying the transactivation capacity of WT p53 and missense p53 mutations. This dual-luciferase assay can, therefore, provide a high-throughput assessment tool for investigating a matrix of factors that can influence the p53 network, including the effectiveness of newly developed small molecules, on WT and tumor-associated p53 mutants as well as interacting proteins. PMID:21674059

  18. Quantitative Analysis of the Effective Functional Structure in Yeast Glycolysis

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Jesus

    Quantitative Analysis of the Effective Functional Structure in Yeast Glycolysis Ildefonso M. De la the technique of Transfer Entropy. The data were obtained by means of a yeast glycolytic model formed by three-core of the metabolic system, behaving for all conditions as the main source of the effective causal flows in yeast

  19. CFRP damage identification system based on FBG sensors and ELM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shizeng; Jiang, Mingshun; Jia, Lei; Sui, Qingmei; Sai, Yaozhang

    2015-02-01

    The identification of the damage state of Carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) structure is the necessary information for ensuring the safety of CFRP structure. In this paper, the structural damage identification system using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and the damage identification method were investigated. FBG sensors were used to detect the structural dynamic response signal, which was generated by an active actuation way. Fourier transform and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to extract the damage characteristic. After that, the structural damage identification model was constructed based on extreme learning machine (ELM), whose input is the damage characteristic and output is the damage state. Finally, the damage identification system was established and verified on a CFRP plate with 160 mm160 mm experiment area. The experimental results showed that the identification accuracy was more than 90 %. This paper provided a reliable method for CFRP structural damage identification.

  20. A System Identification and Change Detection Methodology for Stochastic Nonlinear Dynamic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Hae-Bum; Masri, Sami F.; Caffrey, John P.

    2008-07-08

    In this paper a component-level detection methodology for system identification and change detection is discussed. The methodology is based on non-parametric, data-driven, stochastic system identification classifications using statistical pattern recognition techniques. In order to validate the methodology discussed in this paper an experimental study was performed using a complex nonlinear magneto-rheological (MR) damper. The results of this study show that the proposed methodology is very promising to detect interpret changes in critical structural components such as nonlinear springs joints as well as various types of dampers.

  1. A Microfluidic System for Studying Ageing and Dynamic Single-Cell Responses in Budding Yeast

    E-print Network

    Swain, Peter

    -term Culturing And TRApping System), a microfluidic device that can quantitatively monitor up to 1000 cellsSys - Center for Synthetic and Systems Biology and School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh are credited. Funding: This work was supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

  2. Portable bacterial identification system based on elastic light scatter patterns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Conventional diagnosis and identification of bacteria requires shipment of samples to a laboratory for genetic and biochemical analysis. This process can take days and imposes significant delay to action in situations where timely intervention can save lives and reduce associated costs. To enable faster response to an outbreak, a low-cost, small-footprint, portable microbial-identification instrument using forward scatterometry has been developed. Results This device, weighing 9?lb and measuring 12?×?6?×?10.5?in., utilizes elastic light scatter (ELS) patterns to accurately capture bacterial colony characteristics and delivers the classification results via wireless access. The overall system consists of two CCD cameras, one rotational and one translational stage, and a 635-nm laser diode. Various software algorithms such as Hough transform, 2-D geometric moments, and the traveling salesman problem (TSP) have been implemented to provide colony count and circularity, centering process, and minimized travel time among colonies. Conclusions Experiments were conducted with four bacteria genera using pure and mixed plate and as proof of principle a field test was conducted in four different locations where the average classification rate ranged between 95 and 100%. PMID:22929757

  3. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for sure if yogurt with Lactobacillus or other probiotics can prevent or treat vaginal yeast infections. If ... for sure if yogurt with Lactobacillus or other probiotics can prevent or treat vaginal yeast infections. If ...

  4. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePLUS

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the ...

  5. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...by an installed Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment (AISSE) system consisting of a: (1) Twelve-channel all-in-view Differential Global Positioning System (dGPS) receiver; (2) Marine...

  6. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...by an installed Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment (AISSE) system consisting of a: (1) Twelve-channel all-in-view Differential Global Positioning System (dGPS) receiver; (2) Marine...

  7. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...by an installed Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment (AISSE) system consisting of a: (1) Twelve-channel all-in-view Differential Global Positioning System (dGPS) receiver; (2) Marine...

  8. Production of ethanol by immobilized yeast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.; Munnecke, D.M.

    1981-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were immobilized in calcium alginate beads for use in the continuous production of ethanol. Yeasts were grown in medium supplemented with ethanol to selectively screen for a culture which showed the greatest tolerance to ethanol inhibition. Yeast beads were produced from a yeast slurry containing 1.5% alginate (w/v) which was added as drops to a 0.05M CaCl2 solution. To determine their optimum fermentation parameters, ethanol production using glucose as a substrate was monitored in batch systems at varying physiological conditions (temperature,pH, ethanol concentration), cell densities, and gel concentrations. The data obtained were compared to optimum free cell ethanol fermentation parameters. The immobilized yeast cells were examined in a packed-bed reactor system operated under optimized parameters derived from batch-immobilized yeast cell experiments. Ethanol production rates, as well as residual sugar concentrations were monitored at different feedstock flow rates. (Refs. 13).

  9. Orthonormal filters for identification in active control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Many active noise and vibration control systems require models of the control paths. When the controlled system changes slightly over time, adaptive digital filters for the identification of the models are useful. This paper aims at the investigation of a special class of adaptive digital filters: orthonormal filter banks possess the robust and simple adaptation of the widely applied finite impulse response (FIR) filters, but at a lower model order, which is important when considering implementation on embedded systems. However, the filter banks require prior knowledge about the resonance frequencies and damping of the structure. This knowledge can be supposed to be of limited precision, since in many practical systems, uncertainties in the structural parameters exist. In this work, a procedure using a number of training systems to find the fixed parameters for the filter banks is applied. The effect of uncertainties in the prior knowledge on the model error is examined both with a basic example and in an experiment. Furthermore, the possibilities to compensate for the imprecise prior knowledge by a higher filter order are investigated. Also comparisons with FIR filters are implemented in order to assess the possible advantages of the orthonormal filter banks. Numerical and experimental investigations show that significantly lower computational effort can be reached by the filter banks under certain conditions.

  10. Construction of a highly active xylanase displaying oleaginous yeast: comparison of anchoring systems.

    PubMed

    Duquesne, Sophie; Bozonnet, Sophie; Bordes, Florence; Dumon, Claire; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Marty, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Three Yarrowia lipolytica cell wall proteins (YlPir, YlCWP1 and YlCBM) were evaluated for their ability to display the xylanase TxXYN from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus on the cell surface of Y. lipolytica. The fusion proteins were produced in Y. lipolytica JMY1212, a strain engineered for mono-copy chromosomal insertion, and enabling accurate comparison of anchoring systems. The construction using YlPir enabled cell bound xylanase activity to be maximised (71.6 U/g). Although 48% of the activity was released in the supernatant, probably due to proteolysis at the fusion zone, this system is three times more efficient for the anchoring of TxXYN than the YlCWP1 system formerly developed for Y. lipolytica. As far as we know it represents the best displayed xylanase activity ever published. It could be an attractive alternative anchoring system to display enzymes in Y. lipolytica. PMID:24743311

  11. Construction of a Highly Active Xylanase Displaying Oleaginous Yeast: Comparison of Anchoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Duquesne, Sophie; Bozonnet, Sophie; Bordes, Florence; Dumon, Claire; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Marty, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Three Yarrowia lipolytica cell wall proteins (YlPir, YlCWP1 and YlCBM) were evaluated for their ability to display the xylanase TxXYN from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus on the cell surface of Y. lipolytica. The fusion proteins were produced in Y. lipolytica JMY1212, a strain engineered for mono-copy chromosomal insertion, and enabling accurate comparison of anchoring systems. The construction using YlPir enabled cell bound xylanase activity to be maximised (71.6 U/g). Although 48% of the activity was released in the supernatant, probably due to proteolysis at the fusion zone, this system is three times more efficient for the anchoring of TxXYN than the YlCWP1 system formerly developed for Y. lipolytica. As far as we know it represents the best displayed xylanase activity ever published. It could be an attractive alternative anchoring system to display enzymes in Y. lipolytica. PMID:24743311

  12. Yeast Immunofluorescence Prepare Cells

    E-print Network

    Aris, John P.

    temperature for 30 minutes. 5. Microfuge ~15 seconds to pellet yeast. Do step 11 now. 6. Wash 3 X 5 minutesYeast Immunofluorescence Prepare Cells: 1. Grow yeast in 25 ml YPD to OD600 = 0.2. We usually. Swirl gently for 10 minutes at room temperature. Paraformaldehyde (30%): A. Add 2.0 g paraformaldehyde

  13. CLONTECHInnovative Yeast Protocols Handbook

    E-print Network

    Erickson, F. Les

    CLONTECHInnovative Tools to Accelerate Discovery Yeast Protocols Handbook PT3024-1 (PR13103 FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY #12;Yeast Protocols Handbook CLONTECH Laboratories, Inc. www.clontech.com Protocol # PT3024-1 2 Version # PR13103 I. Introduction 4 II. Introduction to Yeast Promoters 5 III. Culturing

  14. High throughput electronic cell identification techniques for microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, David; Braun, Gary; Fraikin, Jean-Luc; Swenson, Loren; Reich, Norbert; Cleland, Andrew

    2007-03-01

    We address the problem of whole-cell identification using an all-electronic microfluidic approach, with potential applications to cell sorting. We present the development of a radiofrequency microsensor, capable of detecting cells or cell labels in a microfluidic system. This device has demonstrated detection of individual cellular labels at throughputs of 30,000 labels/s in a single microfluidic channel. We also present the development of digital barcodes, which can be used to label cells for identifying individual strains in a diverse population. These barcodes were developed using fully-scalable lithographic techniques, providing a means for low-cost, large volume production. We have demonstrated biological functionalization of these barcodes as well as readout, using our radiofrequency microsensor, at throughputs greater than 1,000 labels/s.

  15. Structural system identification in time domain using measured acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Joo Sung; Park, Seung-Keun; Shin, Soobong; Lee, Hae Sung

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a system identification scheme in time domain to estimate stiffness and damping parameters of a structure using measured acceleration. An error function is defined as the time integral of the least-squared errors between measured accelerations and calculated accelerations by a numerical model of a structure. To alleviate the ill-posedness of SI problems a regularization technique is employed and a new regularization function for the time-domain SI is proposed. The regularization factor is determined by the geometric mean scheme. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by a numerical simulation study on a two-span truss bridge and by an experimental laboratory study on a three-story shear building model.

  16. Improving Performance of Speaker Identification System Using Complementary Information Fusion

    E-print Network

    Sahidullah, Md; Saha, Goutam

    2011-01-01

    Feature extraction plays an important role as a front-end processing block in speaker identification (SI) process. Most of the SI systems utilize like Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCC), Perceptual Linear Prediction (PLP), Linear Predictive Cepstral Coefficients (LPCC), as a feature for representing speech signal. Their derivations are based on short term processing of speech signal and they try to capture the vocal tract information ignoring the contribution from the vocal cord. Vocal cord cues are equally important in SI context, as the information like pitch frequency, phase in the residual signal, etc could convey important speaker specific attributes and are complementary to the information contained in spectral feature sets. In this paper we propose a novel feature set extracted from the residual signal of LP modeling. Higher-order statistical moments are used here to find the nonlinear relationship in residual signal. To get the advantages of complementarity vocal cord based decision score is f...

  17. Comparison of the Vitek 2 Antifungal Susceptibility System with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) Broth Microdilution Reference Methods and with the Sensititre YeastOne and Etest Techniques for In Vitro Detection of Antifungal Resistance in Yeast Isolates ? ?

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Bernal-Martinez, Leticia; Cuesta, Isabel; Buitrago, Maria J.; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2010-01-01

    The commercial technique Vitek 2 system for antifungal susceptibility testing of yeast species was evaluated. A collection of 154 clinical yeast isolates, including amphotericin B- and azole-resistant organisms, was tested. Results were compared with those obtained by the reference procedures of both the CLSI and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Two other commercial techniques approved for clinical use, the Etest and the Sensititre YeastOne, were included in the comparative exercise as well. The average essential agreement (EA) between the Vitek 2 system and the reference procedures was >95%, comparable with the average EAs observed between the reference procedures and the Sensititre YeastOne and Etest. The EA values were >97% for Candida spp. and stood at 92% for Cryptococcus neoformans. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between the commercial techniques and the reference procedures were statistically significant (P < 0.01). Percentages of very major errors were 2.6% between Vitek 2 and the EUCAST technique and 1.6% between Vitek 2 and the CLSI technique. The Vitek 2 MIC results were available after 14 to 18 h of incubation for all Candida spp. (average time to reading, 15.5 h). The Vitek 2 system was shown to be a reliable technique to determine antifungal susceptibility testing of yeast species and a more rapid and easier alternative for clinical laboratories than the procedures developed by either the CLSI or EUCAST. PMID:20220169

  18. Medical isotope identification with large mobile detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard

    2012-10-01

    The Remote Sensing laboratory (RSL) of National Security Technologies Inc. has built an array of large (5.08 - cm x 10.16 - cm x 40.6 - cm) thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI: Tl) scintillators to locate and screen gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes that are of interests to radiological emergency responders [1]. These vehicle mounted detectors provide the operators with rapid, simple, specific information for radiological threat assessment. Applications include large area inspection, customs inspection, border protection, emergency response, and monitoring of radiological facilities. These RSL mobile units are currently being upgraded to meet the Defense Threat Reduction Agency mission requirements for a next-generation system capable of detecting and identifying nuclear threat materials. One of the challenging problems faced by these gamma-ray detectors is the unambiguous identification of medical isotopes like 131I (364.49 keV [81.7%], 636.99 keV [7.17%]), 99Tcm (140.51 keV [89.1%]) and 67Ga (184.6 keV [19.7%], 300.2 [16.0%], 393.5 [4.5%] that are used in radionuclide therapy and often have overlapping gamma-ray energy regions of interest (ROI). The problem is made worse by short (about 5 seconds) acquisition time of the spectral data necessary for dynamic mobile detectors. This article describes attempts to identify medical isotopes from data collected from this mobile detection system in a short period of time (not exceeding 5 secs) and a large standoff distance (typically ~ 10 meters) The mobile units offer identification capabilities that are based on hardware auto stabilization of the amplifier gain. The 1461 keV gamma-energy line from 40K is tracked. It uses gamma-ray energy windowing along with embedded mobile Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) [2] simultaneously to deconvolve any overlapping gamma-energy ROIs. These high sensitivity detectors are capable of resolving complex masking scenarios and exceed all ANSI N42.34 (2006) requirements for the identification of bare, shielded and multiple isotopes.

  19. Identification of two novel mutations in the murine Nsdhl sterol dehydrogenase gene and development of a functional complementation assay in yeast.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Marsha E; Ma, Qi; Cunningham, David; Peters, Jo; Cattanach, Bruce; Bard, Martin; Elmore, Bradley K; Herman, Gail E

    2003-01-01

    Nsdhl is a 3beta-hydroxysterol dehydrogenase that is involved in the removal of C-4 methyl groups in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. Mutations in this gene are associated with the X-linked male lethal mouse mutations bare patches (Bpa) and striated (Str) and human CHILD syndrome. We have now detected the missense mutations V53D and A94T in conserved amino acids in two additional Bpa alleles. The latter alters the same amino acid as a missense mutation found in two unrelated CHILD patients, strongly suggesting that differences in the phenotype between Bpa mice and females with CHILD syndrome are unlikely to be explained by different types or sites of mutations. We have also demonstrated that the mouse NSDHL protein can rescue the lethality of erg26 deficient cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lack the yeast ortholog, substantiating the role of NSDHL as a C-3 sterol dehydrogenase. Using this in vivo assay, we have demonstrated that two Str alleles function as hypomorphs, while three Bpa and one Str allele provide no complementation or rescue. PMID:14567972

  20. Identification of Atg3 as an intrinsically disordered polypeptide yields insights into the molecular dynamics of autophagy-related proteins in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Popelka, Hana; Uversky, Vladimir N; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of autophagy relies on complex cell signaling and regulatory processes. Each cell contains many proteins that lack a rigid 3-dimensional structure under physiological conditions. These dynamic proteins, called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and protein regions (IDPRs), are predominantly involved in cell signaling and regulation. Yet, very little is known about their presence among proteins of the core autophagy machinery. In this work, we characterized the autophagy protein Atg3 from yeast and human along with 2 variants to show that Atg3 is an IDPRs-containing protein and that disorder/order predicted for these proteins from their amino acid sequence corresponds to their experimental characteristics. Based on this consensus, we applied the same prediction methods to all known Atg proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The data presented here provide an insight into the structural dynamics of each Atg protein. They also show that intrinsic disorder at various levels has to be taken into consideration for about half of the Atg proteins. This work should become a useful tool that will facilitate and encourage exploration of protein intrinsic disorder in autophagy. PMID:24879155

  1. System identification and model reduction using modulating function techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Yan

    1993-01-01

    Weighted least squares (WLS) and adaptive weighted least squares (AWLS) algorithms are initiated for continuous-time system identification using Fourier type modulating function techniques. Two stochastic signal models are examined using the mean square properties of the stochastic calculus: an equation error signal model with white noise residuals, and a more realistic white measurement noise signal model. The covariance matrices in each model are shown to be banded and sparse, and a joint likelihood cost function is developed which links the real and imaginary parts of the modulated quantities. The superior performance of above algorithms is demonstrated by comparing them with the LS/MFT and popular predicting error method (PEM) through 200 Monte Carlo simulations. A model reduction problem is formulated with the AWLS/MFT algorithm, and comparisons are made via six examples with a variety of model reduction techniques, including the well-known balanced realization method. Here the AWLS/MFT algorithm manifests higher accuracy in almost all cases, and exhibits its unique flexibility and versatility. Armed with this model reduction, the AWLS/MFT algorithm is extended into MIMO transfer function system identification problems. The impact due to the discrepancy in bandwidths and gains among subsystem is explored through five examples. Finally, as a comprehensive application, the stability derivatives of the longitudinal and lateral dynamics of an F-18 aircraft are identified using physical flight data provided by NASA. A pole-constrained SIMO and MIMO AWLS/MFT algorithm is devised and analyzed. Monte Carlo simulations illustrate its high-noise rejecting properties. Utilizing the flight data, comparisons among different MFT algorithms are tabulated and the AWLS is found to be strongly favored in almost all facets.

  2. Identification of dominant modes in random dynamical and aeroelastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Nurtaj; Sarkar, Soumyadipta; Ghosh, Debraj

    2015-11-01

    Identification of dominant modes is an important step in studying linearly vibrating systems, including flow-induced vibrations. In the presence of uncertainty, when some of the system parameters and the external excitation are modeled as random quantities, this step becomes more difficult. This work is aimed at giving a systematic treatment to this end. The ability to capture the time-averaged kinetic energy is chosen as the primary criterion for selection of modes. Accordingly, a methodology is proposed based on the overlap of probability density functions (pdf) of the natural and excitation frequencies, proximity of the natural frequencies of the mean or baseline system, modal participation factor, and stochastic variation of mode shapes in terms of the modes of the baseline system - termed here as statistical modal overlapping. The probabilistic descriptors of the natural frequencies and mode shapes are found by solving a random eigenvalue problem. Three distinct vibration scenarios are considered: (i) undamped and damped free vibrations of a bladed disk assembly, (ii) forced vibration of a building, and (iii) flutter of a bridge model. Through numerical studies, it is observed that the proposed methodology gives an accurate selection of modes.

  3. A Systems-Level Analysis of Perfect Adaptation in Yeast Osmoregulation

    E-print Network

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    pressure. Importantly, we find that the nuclear enrichment of the MAP kinase Hog1 perfectly adapts of the mechanism responsible for perfect adaptation. We conclude that the system contains only one effective integrating mechanism, which requires Hog1 kinase activity and regulates glycerol synthesis but not leakage

  4. Yeast Virus-Derived Stimulator of the Innate Immune System Augments the Efficacy of Virus Vector-Based Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Claudepierre, Marie-Christine; Hortelano, Julie; Schaedler, Emmanuelle; Kleinpeter, Patricia; Geist, Michel; Remy-Ziller, Christelle; Brandely, Renée; Tosch, Caroline; Laruelle, Laurence; Jawhari, Anass; Menguy, Thierry; Marchand, Jean-Baptiste; Romby, Pascale; Schultz, Patrick; Hartmann, Gunther; Rooke, Ronald; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves; Preville, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To identify novel stimulators of the innate immune system, we constructed a panel of eight HEK293 cell lines double positive for human Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and an NF-?B-inducible reporter gene. Screening of a large variety of compounds and cellular extracts detected a TLR3-activating compound in a microsomal yeast extract. Fractionation of this extract identified an RNA molecule of 4.6 kb, named nucleic acid band 2 (NAB2), that was sufficient to confer the activation of TLR3. Digests with single- and double-strand-specific RNases showed the double-strand nature of this RNA, and its sequence was found to be identical to that of the genome of the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) L-BC virus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A large-scale process of production and purification of this RNA was established on the basis of chemical cell lysis and dsRNA-specific chromatography. NAB2 complexed with the cationic lipid Lipofectin but neither NAB2 nor Lipofectin alone induced the secretion of interleukin-12(p70) [IL-12(p70)], alpha interferon, gamma interferon-induced protein 10, macrophage inflammatory protein 1?, or IL-6 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. While NAB2 activated TLR3, Lipofectin-stabilized NAB2 also signaled via the cytoplasmic sensor for RNA recognition MDA-5. A significant increase of RMA-MUC1 tumor rejection and survival was observed in C57BL/6 mice after prophylactic vaccination with MUC1-encoding modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) and NAB2-Lipofectin. This combination of immunotherapies strongly increased at the injection sites the percentage of infiltrating natural killer (NK) cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), cell types which can modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. IMPORTANCE Virus-based cancer vaccines offer a good alternative to the treatment of cancer but could be improved. Starting from a screening approach, we have identified and characterized an unexplored biological molecule with immunomodulatory characteristics which augments the efficacy of an MVA-based immunotherapeutic agent. The immune modulator consists of the purified dsRNA genome isolated from a commercially used yeast strain, NAB2, mixed with a cationic lipid, Lipofectin. NAB2-Lipofectin stimulates the immune system via TLR3 and MDA-5. When it was injected at the MVA vaccination site, the immune modulator increased survival in a preclinical tumor model. We could demonstrate that NAB2-Lipofectin augments the MVA-induced infiltration of natural killer and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. We suggest indirect mechanisms of activation of these cell types by the influence of NAB2-Lipofectin on innate and adaptive immunity. Detailed analysis of cell migration at the vaccine injection site and the appropriate choice of an immune modulator should be considered to achieve the rational improvement of virus vector-based vaccination by immune modulators. PMID:24574403

  5. Season: Shelving Interference and Joint Identification in Large-scale RFID Systems

    E-print Network

    Liu, Yunhao

    Season: Shelving Interference and Joint Identification in Large-scale RFID Systems (Technical-collision for Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) systems usually schedule adjacent readers to exclusively readers (termed as contentious tags), even if the number of such tags is very small, introduce

  6. 28 CFR 20.36 - Participation in the Interstate Identification Index System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Participation in the Interstate Identification Index System. 20.36 Section 20.36 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE... in the Interstate Identification Index System. (a) In order to acquire and retain direct access...

  7. COMPARISON OF SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION TECHNIQUES FOR A SPHERICAL AIR-BEARING

    E-print Network

    Hall, Christopher D.

    AAS 03-611 COMPARISON OF SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION TECHNIQUES FOR A SPHERICAL AIR-BEARING SPACECRAFT independent spher- ical air-bearing platforms for formation flying attitude control simula- tion is impractical. We document the process to determine an appropriate system identification technique for an air-bearing

  8. Automatic feature-queried bird identification system based on entropy and fuzzy similarity

    E-print Network

    Yao, Xin

    Automatic feature-queried bird identification system based on entropy and fuzzy similarity Xingqi not have any intelligence and cannot tolerate noises either. A bird identification system, BirdID is proposed and implemented. To identify birds, BirdID imitates bird experts to automatically direct

  9. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound. 164.43 Section 164.43 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment—Prince William Sound. (a) Until December 31, 2004,...

  10. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound. 164.43 Section 164.43 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment—Prince William Sound. (a) Until December 31, 2004,...

  11. SIPredict: Efficient Post-layout Waveform Prediction via System Identification Qicheng Huang1

    E-print Network

    Li, Xin

    SIPredict: Efficient Post-layout Waveform Prediction via System Identification Qicheng Huang1 University, Pittsburgh, PA, U.S.A. Abstract-- In this paper, we propose a post-layout waveform prediction method by System Identification (SI) based on the fact that the waveforms of pre-layout and post-layout

  12. 75 FR 49869 - Changes to Standard Numbering System, Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Reopening of Comment Period On May 7, 2010, we published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register (75 FR 25137..., Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report Database AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS....

  13. Decoupling Identification for Serial Two-Link Two-Inertia System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oaki, Junji; Adachi, Shuichi

    The purpose of our study is to develop a precise model by applying the technique of system identification for the model-based control of a nonlinear robot arm, under taking joint-elasticity into consideration. We previously proposed a systematic identification method, called “decoupling identification,” for a “SCARA-type” planar two-link robot arm with elastic joints caused by the Harmonic-drive® reduction gears. The proposed method serves as an extension of the conventional rigid-joint-model-based identification. The robot arm is treated as a serial two-link two-inertia system with nonlinearity. The decoupling identification method using link-accelerometer signals enables the serial two-link two-inertia system to be divided into two linear one-link two-inertia systems. The MATLAB®'s commands for state-space model estimation are utilized in the proposed method. Physical parameters such as motor inertias, link inertias, joint-friction coefficients, and joint-spring coefficients are estimated through the identified one-link two-inertia systems using a gray-box approach. This paper describes accuracy evaluations using the two-link arm for the decoupling identification method under introducing closed-loop-controlled elements and varying amplitude-setup of identification-input. Experimental results show that the identification method also works with closed-loop-controlled elements. Therefore, the identification method is applicable to a “PUMA-type” vertical robot arm under gravity.

  14. The Impact of Early Design Phase Risk Identification Biases on Space System Project Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, John D., Jr.; Eveleigh, Tim; Holzer, Thomas; Sarkani, Shahryar

    2012-01-01

    Risk identification during the early design phases of complex systems is commonly implemented but often fails to result in the identification of events and circumstances that truly challenge project performance. Inefficiencies in cost and schedule estimation are usually held accountable for cost and schedule overruns, but the true root cause is often the realization of programmatic risks. A deeper understanding of frequent risk identification trends and biases pervasive during space system design and development is needed, for it would lead to improved execution of existing identification processes and methods.

  15. Yeasts that utilize lactose in sweet whey

    SciTech Connect

    Gholson, J.H.; Gough, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Since processing costs are usually higher for whey than for other available food or feed nutrients, only about one-third of whey produced in the US is used by food and feed industries. As a result whey disposal costs are a problem. Further; when whey is disposed of through municipal sewerage systems, the lactose present is changed by bacteria to lactic acid which tends to act as a preservative and retards further oxidation of whey constituents. This article describes a method of utilizing lactose-fermenting yeasts to produce large quantities of yeast cells, single-cell protein. Kluveromyces fragilis was found to be the most effective yeast species and the yeast cells produced could be used as a natural food or feed additive. Results of this study determined that certain methods and yeast strains could reduce whey-related pollution and thus help reduce costs of whey disposal.

  16. Advanced terahertz imaging system performance model for concealed weapon identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrill, Steven R.; Redman, Brian; Espinola, Richard L.; Franck, Charmaine C.; Petkie, Douglas T.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Griffin, Steven T.; Halford, Carl E.; Reynolds, Joe

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) have developed a terahertz-band imaging system performance model for detection and identification of concealed weaponry. The details of this MATLAB-based model which accounts for the effects of all critical sensor and display components, and for the effects of atmospheric attenuation, concealment material attenuation, and active illumination, were reported on at the 2005 SPIE Europe Security and Defence Symposium. The focus of this paper is to report on recent advances to the base model which have been designed to more realistically account for the dramatic impact that target and background orientation can have on target observability as related to specular and Lambertian reflections captured by an active-illumination-based imaging system. The advanced terahertz-band imaging system performance model now also accounts for target and background thermal emission, and has been recast into a user-friendly, Windows-executable tool. This advanced THz model has been developed in support of the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency's (DARPA) Terahertz Imaging Focal-Plane Technology (TIFT) program. This paper will describe the advanced THz model and its new radiometric sub-model in detail, and provide modeling and experimental results on target observability as a function of target and background orientation.

  17. Usefulness of the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system for identification of anaerobic Gram positive bacilli isolated from blood cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lau, S K P; Ng, K H L; Woo, P C Y; Yip, K?t; Fung, A M Y; Woo, G K S; Chan, K?m; Que, T?l

    2006-01-01

    Using full 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing as the gold standard, 20 non?duplicating anaerobic Gram positive bacilli isolated from blood cultures were analysed by the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system. The MicroSeq system successfully identified 13 of the 20 isolates. Four and three isolates were misidentified at the genus and species level, respectively. Although the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system is better than three commercially available identification systems also evaluated, its database needs to be expanded for accurate identification of anaerobic Gram positive bacilli. PMID:16443743

  18. Segmental Dynamics of Forward Fall Arrests: System Identification Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyu-Jung; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Fall-related injuries are multifaceted problems, necessitating thorough biodynamic simulation to identify critical biomechanical factors. Methods A 2-degree-of-freedom discrete impact model was constructed through system identification and validation processes using the experimental data to understand dynamic interactions of various biomechanical parameters in bimanual forward fall arrests. Findings The bimodal reaction force response from the identified models had small identification errors for the first and second force peaks less than 3.5% and high coherence between the measured and identified model responses (R2=0.95). Model validation with separate experimental data also demonstrated excellent validation accuracy and coherence, less than 7% errors and R2=0.87, respectively. The first force peak was usually greater than the second force peak and strongly correlated with the impact velocity of the upper extremity, while the second force peak was associated with the impact velocity of the body. The impact velocity of the upper extremity relative to the body could be a major risk factor to fall-related injuries as observed from model simulations that a 75% faster arm movement relative to the falling speed of the body alone could double the first force peak from soft landing, thereby readily exceeding the fracture strength of the distal radius. Interpretation Considering that the time-critical nature of falling often calls for a fast arm movement, the use of the upper extremity in forward fall arrests is not biomechanically justified unless sufficient reaction time and coordinated protective motion of the upper extremity are available. PMID:19250726

  19. Characterization of the yeast copper-inducible promoter system in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, C. L.; Cyr, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Inducible promoters or gene-switches are used to both spatially and temporally regulate gene expression. Such regulation can provide information concerning the function of a gene in a developmental context as well as avoid potential harmful effects due to overexpression. A gfp construct under the control of a copper-inducible promoter was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and the regulatory parameters of this inducible promoter were determined. Here, we describe the time-course of up- and down-regulation of GFP expression in response to copper level, the optimal regulatory levels of copper, and the tissue specificity of expression in three transgenic lines. We conclude that the copper-inducible promoter system may be useful in regulating the time and location of gene expression in A. thaliana.

  20. Comparison of Five System Identification Algorithms for Rotorcraft Higher Harmonic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents an analysis and performance comparison of five system identification algorithms. The methods are presented in the context of identifying a frequency-domain transfer matrix for the higher harmonic control (HHC) of helicopter vibration. The five system identification algorithms include three previously proposed methods: (1) the weighted-least- squares-error approach (in moving-block format), (2) the Kalman filter method, and (3) the least-mean-squares (LMS) filter method. In addition there are two new ones: (4) a generalized Kalman filter method and (5) a generalized LMS filter method. The generalized Kalman filter method and the generalized LMS filter method were derived as extensions of the classic methods to permit identification by using more than one measurement per identification cycle. Simulation results are presented for conditions ranging from the ideal case of a stationary transfer matrix and no measurement noise to the more complex cases involving both measurement noise and transfer-matrix variation. Both open-loop identification and closed- loop identification were simulated. Closed-loop mode identification was more challenging than open-loop identification because of the decreasing signal-to-noise ratio as the vibration became reduced. The closed-loop simulation considered both local-model identification, with measured vibration feedback and global-model identification with feedback of the identified uncontrolled vibration. The algorithms were evaluated in terms of their accuracy, stability, convergence properties, computation speeds, and relative ease of implementation.

  1. Identification of the cis-elements mediating the autogenous control of ribosomal protein L2 mRNA stability in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Presutti, C; Villa, T; Hall, D; Pertica, C; Bozzoni, I

    1995-01-01

    The ribosomal protein L2 (rpL2) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulates the accumulation of its own mRNA by a feedback mechanism. An RNA sequence is responsible for this control, initially characterized as a 360 nucleotide-long region, localized at the 5' end of the transcript. This region, fused to an unrelated coding sequence, is able to down-regulate the accumulation of the chimeric transcript when increased levels of rpL2 are induced in the cell. The target regulatory region also responds to regulation when inserted inside an intron, demonstrating that the control process can take place inside the nucleus. Deletion analysis from the 5' and 3' borders have restricted the responsive region to approximately 200 nt. The insertion of a poly-G cassette downstream of the regulatory region allowed the identification of truncated 3' cut-off poly(A)+ RNA molecules. The parallel identification of cut-off molecules containing the 5' portion of the transcript allowed us to deduce that the truncated products originate by endonucleolytic cleavage. Altogether, these results are consistent with a mechanism by which the presence of excess amounts of rpL2 in the cell triggers its own mRNA to a degradative pathway; this involves an initial endonucleolytic cleavage that is followed by exonucleolytic trimming. Such a regulatory mechanism shows interesting analogies with the translational regulation of r-proteins in Escherichia coli. Images PMID:7664741

  2. System identification and trajectory optimization for guided store separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Ryan E.

    Combat aircraft utilize expendable stores such as missiles, bombs, flares, and external tanks to execute their missions. Safe and acceptable separation of these stores from the parent aircraft is essential for meeting the mission objectives. In many cases, the employed missile or bomb includes an onboard guidance and control system to enable precise engagement of the selected target. Due to potential interference, the guidance and control system is usually not activated until the store is sufficiently far away from the aircraft. This delay may result in large perturbations from the desired flight attitude caused by separation transients, significantly reducing the effectiveness of the store and jeopardizing mission objectives. The purpose of this research is to investigate the use of a transitional control system to guide the store during separation. The transitional control system, or "store separation autopilot", explicitly accounts for the nonuniform flow field through characterization of the spatially variant aerodynamics of the store during separation. This approach can be used to mitigate aircraft-store interference and leverage aerodynamic interaction to improve separation characteristics. This investigation proceeds in three phases. First, system identification is used to determine a parametric model for the spatially variant aerodynamics. Second, the store separation problem is recast into a trajectory optimization problem, and optimal control theory is used to establish a framework for designing a suitable reference trajectory with explicit dependence on the spatially variant aerodynamics. Third, neighboring optimal control is used to construct a linear-optimal feedback controller for correcting deviations from the nominal reference trajectory due varying initial conditions, modeling errors, and flowfield perturbations. An extended case study based on actual wind tunnel and flight test measurements is used throughout to illustrate the effectiveness of the approach and to highlight the anticipated benefits of guided store separation.

  3. Temporal system-level organization of the switch from glycolytic to gluconeogenic operation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zampar, Guillermo G; Kümmel, Anne; Ewald, Jennifer; Jol, Stefan; Niebel, Bastian; Picotti, Paola; Aebersold, Ruedi; Sauer, Uwe; Zamboni, Nicola; Heinemann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The diauxic shift in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an ideal model to study how eukaryotic cells readjust their metabolism from glycolytic to gluconeogenic operation. In this work, we generated time-resolved physiological data, quantitative metabolome (69 intracellular metabolites) and proteome (72 enzymes) profiles. We found that the diauxic shift is accomplished by three key events that are temporally organized: (i) a reduction in the glycolytic flux and the production of storage compounds before glucose depletion, mediated by downregulation of phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase reactions; (ii) upon glucose exhaustion, the reversion of carbon flow through glycolysis and onset of the glyoxylate cycle operation triggered by an increased expression of the enzymes that catalyze the malate synthase and cytosolic citrate synthase reactions; and (iii) in the later stages of the adaptation, the shutting down of the pentose phosphate pathway with a change in NADPH regeneration. Moreover, we identified the transcription factors associated with the observed changes in protein abundances. Taken together, our results represent an important contribution toward a systems-level understanding of how this adaptation is realized. PMID:23549479

  4. Evidence for multiple nitrate uptake systems in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Machín, F; Perdomo, G; Pérez, M D; Brito, N; Siverio, J M

    2001-01-15

    Hansenula polymorpha mutants disrupted in the high-affinity nitrate transporter gene (YNT1) are still able to grow in nitrate. To detect the nitrate transporter(s) responsible for this growth a strain containing disruption of the nitrate assimilation gene cluster and expressing nitrate reductase gene (YNR1) under the control of H. polymorpha MOX1 (methanol oxidase) promoter was used (FM31 strain). In this strain nitrate taken up is transformed into nitrite by nitrate reductase and excreted to the medium where it is easily detected. Nitrate uptake which is neither induced by nitrate nor repressed by reduced nitrogen sources was detected in the FM31 strain. Likewise, nitrate uptake detected in the strain FM31 is independent of both Ynt1p and Yna1p and is not affected by ammonium, glutamine or chlorate. The inhibition of nitrite extrusion by extracellular nitrite suggests that the nitrate uptake system shown in the FM31 strain could also be involved in nitrite uptake. PMID:11164303

  5. Blind System Identification KARIM ABED-MERAIM, WANZHI QIU, MEMBER, IEEE, AND YINGBO HUA, SENIOR MEMBER, IEEE

    E-print Network

    Hua, Yingbo

    Blind System Identification KARIM ABED-MERAIM, WANZHI QIU, MEMBER, IEEE, AND YINGBO HUA, SENIOR MEMBER, IEEE Blind system identification (BSI) is a fundamental signal processing technology aimed applications such as mobile communications, speech reverberation cancellation, and blind image restoration

  6. Multiinnovation least-squares identification for system modeling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Feng; Liu, Peter X; Liu, Guangjun

    2010-06-01

    A multiinnovation least-squares (MILS) identification algorithm is presented for linear regression models with unknown parameter vectors by expanding the innovation length in the traditional recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm from the viewpoint of innovation modification. Because the proposed MILS algorithm uses p innovations (not only the current innovation but also past innovations) at each iteration (with the integer p > 1 being an innovation length), the accuracy of parameter estimation is improved, compared with that of the RLS algorithm. Performance analysis and simulation results show that the proposed MILS algorithm is consistently convergent. Moreover, a new interval-varying MILS algorithm is proposed, for which the key is to dynamically change the interval in order to deal with cases where some measurement data are missing. Furthermore, an auxiliary-model-based MILS algorithm is derived for pseudolinear models corresponding to output error moving average systems with colored noises. Finally, the proposed algorithms are applied to model an experimental water level control system. PMID:19884093

  7. Identification of cancer mechanisms through computational systems modeling

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhen; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent causes of cancer death. It has been studied extensively for a long time, and numerous genetic and epigenetic events have been associated with the disease. However, its molecular mechanisms are still unclear. High-throughput metabolomics data, combined with customized computational systems modeling, can assist our understanding of some of these mechanisms by revealing connections between alterations in enzymatic activities and their consequences for a person’s metabolic profile. Of particular importance in this context is purine metabolism, as it provides the nucleotides needed for cell proliferation. Methods and findings We employ a computational systems approach to infer molecular mechanisms associated with purine metabolism in colorectal carcinoma. The approach uses a dynamic model of purine metabolism as the simulation system and metabolomics data as input. The execution of large-scale Monte Carlo simulations and optimization with the model permits a step-wise reduction in possibly affected enzyme mechanisms, from which likely targets emerge. Conclusions According to our results, some enzymes in the purine pathway system are very unlikely the targets of colorectal carcinoma. In fact, only three enzymatic steps emerge with statistical confidence as most likely being affected, namely: amidophosphoribosyltransferase (ATASE), 5?-nucleotidase (5NUC), and the xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase (XD) reactions. The first of these enzymes catalyzes the first committed step of de novo purine biosynthesis, while the other two enzymes are associated with critical purine salvage pathways. The identification of these enzymes is statistically significant and robust. In addition, the results suggest potential secondary targets. The computational method cannot discern whether the inferred mechanisms constitute symptoms of colorectal carcinoma, or whether they might be causative and critical components of the uncontrolled cellular growth in cancer. The inferred molecular mechanisms present testable hypotheses that suggest targeted experiments for future studies of colorectal carcinoma and might eventually lead to improved diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Active vibration control using genetic algorithm-based system identification and positive position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszulik, Ryan R.; Shan, Jinjun

    2012-05-01

    A system identification and vibration control strategy for a flexible manipulator with a collocated piezoelectric sensor/actuator pair is presented in this paper. An iteratively implemented genetic algorithm is applied to the system identification problem of the flexible manipulator. A control law based upon positive position feedback is developed for vibration suppression. A minimization criterion based on the H?-norm of the closed loop system is solved by a genetic algorithm to derive optimal controller parameters. Numerical simulations are performed to verify the effectiveness of the system identification and vibration controller.

  9. Optical Verification Laboratory Demonstration System for High Security Identification Cards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javidi, Bahram

    1997-01-01

    Document fraud including unauthorized duplication of identification cards and credit cards is a serious problem facing the government, banks, businesses, and consumers. In addition, counterfeit products such as computer chips, and compact discs, are arriving on our shores in great numbers. With the rapid advances in computers, CCD technology, image processing hardware and software, printers, scanners, and copiers, it is becoming increasingly easy to reproduce pictures, logos, symbols, paper currency, or patterns. These problems have stimulated an interest in research, development and publications in security technology. Some ID cards, credit cards and passports currently use holograms as a security measure to thwart copying. The holograms are inspected by the human eye. In theory, the hologram cannot be reproduced by an unauthorized person using commercially-available optical components; in practice, however, technology has advanced to the point where the holographic image can be acquired from a credit card-photographed or captured with by a CCD camera-and a new hologram synthesized using commercially-available optical components or hologram-producing equipment. Therefore, a pattern that can be read by a conventional light source and a CCD camera can be reproduced. An optical security and anti-copying device that provides significant security improvements over existing security technology was demonstrated. The system can be applied for security verification of credit cards, passports, and other IDs so that they cannot easily be reproduced. We have used a new scheme of complex phase/amplitude patterns that cannot be seen and cannot be copied by an intensity-sensitive detector such as a CCD camera. A random phase mask is bonded to a primary identification pattern which could also be phase encoded. The pattern could be a fingerprint, a picture of a face, or a signature. The proposed optical processing device is designed to identify both the random phase mask and the primary pattern [1-3]. We have demonstrated experimentally an optical processor for security verification of objects, products, and persons. This demonstration is very important to encourage industries to consider the proposed system for research and development.

  10. System identification and the modeling of sailing yachts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legursky, Katrina

    This research represents an exploration of sailing yacht dynamics with full-scale sailing motion data, physics-based models, and system identification techniques. The goal is to provide a method of obtaining and validating suitable physics-based dynamics models for use in control system design on autonomous sailing platforms, which have the capacity to serve as mobile, long range, high endurance autonomous ocean sensing platforms. The primary contributions of this study to the state-of-the-art are the formulation of a five degree-of-freedom (DOF) linear multi-input multi-output (MIMO) state space model of sailing yacht dynamics, the process for identification of this model from full-scale data, a description of the maneuvers performed during on-water tests, and an analysis method to validate estimated models. The techniques and results described herein can be directly applied to and tested on existing autonomous sailing platforms. A full-scale experiment on a 23ft monohull sailing yacht is developed to collect motion data for physics-based model identification. Measurements include 3 axes of accelerations, velocities, angular rates, and attitude angles in addition to apparent wind speed and direction. The sailing yacht herein is treated as a dynamic system with two control inputs, the rudder angle, deltaR, and the mainsail angle, delta B, which are also measured. Over 20 hours of full scale sailing motion data is collected, representing three sail configurations corresponding to a range of wind speeds: the Full Main and Genoa (abbrev. Genoa) for lower wind speeds, the Full Main and Jib (abbrev. Jib) for mid-range wind speeds, and the Reefed Main and Jib (abbrev. Reef) for the highest wind speeds. The data also covers true wind angles from upwind through a beam reach. A physics-based non-linear model to describe sailing yacht motion is outlined, including descriptions of methods to model the aerodynamics and hydrodynamics of a sailing yacht in surge, sway, roll, and yaw. Existing aerodynamic models for sailing yachts are unsuitable for control system design as they do not include a physical description of the sails' dynamic effect on the system. A new aerodynamic model is developed and validated using the full-scale sailing data which includes sail deflection as a control input to the system. The Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) algorithm is used with non-linear simulation data to successfully estimate a set of hydrodynamic derivatives for a sailing yacht. It is shown that all sailing yacht models will contain a second order mode (referred to herein as Mode 1A.S or 4B.S) which is dependent upon trimmed roll angle. For the test yacht it is concluded that for this mode when the trimmed roll angle is, roll rate and roll angle are the dominant motion variables, and for surge velocity and yaw rate dominate. This second order mode is dynamically stable for . It transitions from stability in the higher values of to instability in the region defined by. These conclusions align with other work which has also found roll angle to be a driving factor in the dynamic behavior of a tall-ship (Johnson, Miles, Lasher, & Womack, 2009). It is also shown that all linear models also contain a first order mode, (referred to herein as Mode 3A.F or 1B.F), which lies very close to the origin of the complex plane indicating a long time constant. Measured models have indicated this mode can be stable or unstable. The eigenvector analysis reveals that the mode is stable if the surge contribution is < 40% and the sway contribution is > 20%. The small set of maneuvers necessary for model identification, quick OSLS estimation method, and detailed modal analysis of estimated models outlined in this work are immediately applicable to existing autonomous mono-hull sailing yachts, and could readily be adapted for use with other wind-powered vessel configurations such as wing-sails, catamarans, and tri-marans. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  11. A förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based system provides insight into the ordered assembly of yeast septin hetero-octamers

    E-print Network

    2015-01-01

    work   showed   that   the   five   mitotic   septins   of   yeast  work   has   demonstrated   that   Shs1   can   replace   Cdc11   and   thus   serve   as   an   alternative   terminal   subunit   in   yeast  

  12. A Parallel Identification Protocol for RFID Systems Linghe Kong, Liang He, Yu Gu, Min-You Wu, Tian He

    E-print Network

    A Parallel Identification Protocol for RFID Systems Linghe Kong, Liang He, Yu Gu, Min-You Wu, Tian as the system scale increases. In this paper, we propose a Parallel Identification Protocol (PIP) for RFID systems, which achieves the parallel identification paradigm and is com- patible with current RFID devices

  13. In-vitro bacterial identification using fluorescence spectroscopy with an optical fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spector, Brian C.; Werkhaven, Jay A.; Smith, Dana; Reinisch, Lou

    2000-05-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) remains a source of significant morbidity in children. With the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, tympanocentesis has become an important method of bacterial identification in the setting of treatment failures. Previous studies described a prototype system for the non-invasive fluorescence identification of bacteria in vitro. We demonstrate the addition of an optical fiber to allow for the identification of a specimen distant to the spectrofluorometer. Emission spectra from three bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus were successfully obtained in vitro. This represents a necessary step prior to the study of in vivo identification of bacteria in AOM using fluorescence spectroscopy.

  14. Fast Identification of the Missing Tags in a Large RFID System

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Rui

    Fast Identification of the Missing Tags in a Large RFID System Rui Zhang, Yunzhong Liu, Yanchao University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA jysun@eecs.utk.edu Abstract--RFID (radio-frequency identification, and inventory management. How to quickly identify the missing RFID tags and thus their associated objects

  15. Set-membership Identification of Block-Structured Nonlinear Feedback Systems

    E-print Network

    Regruto, Diego

    Set-membership Identification of Block-Structured Nonlinear Feedback Systems V. Cerone, D. Piga, D. Regruto Abstract-- In this paper a three-stage procedure for Set- membership identification of block. Computation of both the nonlinear block parameters and the inner-signal bounds is formulated in terms

  16. Recorded seismic response of Pacific Park Plaza. II. System identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, F.; Celebi, M.

    1992-01-01

    This is the second of two companion papers on the recorded seismic response of the Pacific Park Plaza building, in Emeryville, Calif., during the October 17, 1989, Ms = 7.1 (surface-wave magnitude) Loma Prieta earthquake. In this second part, the recorded data are analyzed in more detail by using system-identification techniques. The three-dimensional behavior and the coupled modes of the building are determined, and the effects of soil-structure interaction are investigated. The study shows that the response of the building is nonlinear at the beginning, and becomes linear after 17 sec into the earthquake. The dominant motion of the building follows an elliptical path oriented in the southeast-northwest direction. Some of the modes are complex, with nonproportional damping, and there are phase differences among modal response components. The fundamental mode of the building is a translation in the southeast-northwest direction at 0.4 Hz, with 13% damping. The wing displacements relative to the center core are large, about 50% of the center core displacements, and indicate significant torsion in the center core. The soil-structure interaction is characterized by a vibration at 0.7 Hz. This is believed to be the fundamental frequency of the surrounding soil medium. The rocking motions of the building are negligible.

  17. Seismic response of transamerica building. II. System identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.; Celebi, M.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the recorded seismic response of the Transamerica Building during the October 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is presented. The system identification algorithm used for the analysis is based on the discrete-time linear filtering approach with least-squares approximation, and assumes a multi-input, single-output model for the building. Fifteen modes in the north-south direction, and 18 modes in the east-west direction are identified from the records. The analysis shows that the building's response to the earthquake was dominated by a coupled mode of vibration at 0.28 Hz in the southwest-northeast direction, which is almost parallel to one of the diagonals in the building's square cross section. The reason for this behavior is the symmetry of the building's structural characteristics, as well as the strong polarization of the S-waves of the earthquake. Several higher modes of the building were excited during the strong-motion part of the earthquake. The results also show a significant amount of rocking in the building at a frequency of 2.15 Hz.

  18. A novel system identification technique for improved wearable hemodynamics assessment.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Andrew D; Inan, Omer T

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances have led to renewed interest in ballistocardiography (BCG), a noninvasive measure of the small movements of the body due to cardiovascular events. A broad range of platforms have been developed and verified for BCG measurement including beds, chairs, and weighing scales: while the body is coupled to such a platform, the cardiogenic movements are measured. Wearable BCG, measured with an accelerometer affixed to the body, may enable continuous, or more regular, monitoring during the day; however, the signals from such wearable BCGs represent local or distal accelerations of skin and tissue rather than the whole body. In this paper, we propose a novel method to reconstruct the BCG measured with a weighing scale (WS BCG) from a wearable sensor via a training step to remove these local effects. Preliminary validation of this method was performed with 15 subjects: the wearable sensor was placed at three locations on the surface of the body while WS BCG measurements were recorded simultaneously. A regularized system identification approach was used to reconstruct the WS BCG from the wearable BCG. Preliminary results suggest that the relationship between local and central disturbances is highly dependent on both the individual and the location where the accelerometer is placed on the body and that these differences can be resolved via calibration to accurately measure changes in cardiac output and contractility from a wearable sensor. Such measurements could be highly effective, for example, for improved monitoring of heart failure patients at home. PMID:25561589

  19. A Model of Automatic Identification of Groundwater Parameters using an Expert System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, P.; Chang, L.; Jung, C.; Huang, C.; Chen, J.; Tsai, P. J.; Chen, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Conventional methods for identification of groundwater parameters could be categorized into manual identification of parameters and automatic identification of parameters. Manual identification of parameters determines parameter values using a manual decision-making process. The manual identification process is flexible and is also understandable. However, the complete process is time-consuming and requires background knowledge of groundwater simulation. In contrast, automatic identification of parameters, which is traditionally, founded on optimization-based approaches, has a relatively greater degree of computational efficiency. The automatic method uses optimization formulas to represent the concepts of parameter identification and includes objective functions and constraints. However, because the formulas are complicated and abstract, application of this method to complicated field problems may be limited. Larger dimensions of parameters also imply an increased computational load when using the optimization method. This study used a rule-based expert system and a groundwater simulation model, MODFLOW 2000, to develop an automatic system for identification of groundwater parameters that retains the interpretability and flexibility of manual identification and the computational efficiency of automatic identification. With the expert system as the center of parameter modification, the proposed system can increase its capacity for identification by adding new rules. After empirical data on identification of groundwater parameters have been generalized and transformed into rules stored in the knowledge base, the expert system is preceded by rule inference generated by the inference engine. In contrast to traditional procedures, the expert system, due to the inference engine, is not sensitive to the order of the execution of rules. This advantage makes maintaining and expanding the knowledge base easier and more flexible. To demonstrate the accuracy and capacity of the proposed system in regards to identification of parameters, this study applied the system to a three-aquifer groundwater model to identify the parameters of the rate of net recharge in the top aquifer and the rate of pumping in the other two aquifers. Results demonstrated the capacity of the proposed system and indicated that it could be reliably applied to future field cases.

  20. Diversity in Genetic In Vivo Methods for Protein-Protein Interaction Studies: from the Yeast Two-Hybrid System to the Mammalian Split-Luciferase System

    PubMed Central

    Stynen, Bram; Tournu, Hélène; Tavernier, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The yeast two-hybrid system pioneered the field of in vivo protein-protein interaction methods and undisputedly gave rise to a palette of ingenious techniques that are constantly pushing further the limits of the original method. Sensitivity and selectivity have improved because of various technical tricks and experimental designs. Here we present an exhaustive overview of the genetic approaches available to study in vivo binary protein interactions, based on two-hybrid and protein fragment complementation assays. These methods have been engineered and employed successfully in microorganisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli, but also in higher eukaryotes. From single binary pairwise interactions to whole-genome interactome mapping, the self-reassembly concept has been employed widely. Innovative studies report the use of proteins such as ubiquitin, dihydrofolate reductase, and adenylate cyclase as reconstituted reporters. Protein fragment complementation assays have extended the possibilities in protein-protein interaction studies, with technologies that enable spatial and temporal analyses of protein complexes. In addition, one-hybrid and three-hybrid systems have broadened the types of interactions that can be studied and the findings that can be obtained. Applications of these technologies are discussed, together with the advantages and limitations of the available assays. PMID:22688816

  1. An automatic identification and monitoring system for coral reef fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, Joseph; Tonde, Chetan; Sundar, Ganesh; Huang, Ning; Barinov, Lev; Baxi, Jigesh; Bibby, James; Rapport, Andrew; Pavoni, Edward; Tsang, Serena; Garcia, Eri; Mateo, Felix; Lubansky, Tanya M.; Russell, Gareth J.

    2012-10-01

    To help gauge the health of coral reef ecosystems, we developed a prototype of an underwater camera module to automatically census reef fish populations. Recognition challenges include pose and lighting variations, complicated backgrounds, within-species color variations and within-family similarities among species. An open frame holds two cameras, LED lights, and two `background' panels in an L-shaped configuration. High-resolution cameras send sequences of 300 synchronized image pairs at 10 fps to an on-shore PC. Approximately 200 sequences containing fish were recorded at the New York Aquarium's Glover's Reef exhibit. These contained eight `common' species with 85-672 images, and eight `rare' species with 5-27 images that were grouped into an `unknown/rare' category for classification. Image pre-processing included background modeling and subtraction, and tracking of fish across frames for depth estimation, pose correction, scaling, and disambiguation of overlapping fish. Shape features were obtained from PCA analysis of perimeter points, color features from opponent color histograms, and `banding' features from DCT of vertical projections. Images were classified to species using feedforward neural networks arranged in a three-level hierarchy in which errors remaining after each level are targeted by networks in the level below. Networks were trained and tested on independent image sets. Overall accuracy of species-specific identifications typically exceeded 96% across multiple training runs. A seaworthy version of our system will allow for population censuses with high temporal resolution, and therefore improved statistical power to detect trends. A network of such devices could provide an `early warning system' for coral ecosystem collapse.

  2. Dual-LED imaging system for secure fingerprint identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujieda, Ichiro; Tai, Katsuki; Matsuyama, Etsuji; Kurita, Masashi

    2005-12-01

    Counterfeiting a finger will become an important issue for unattended fingerprint identification. To fight against this threat, we have proposed to look at the color changes in a deformed finger during an input action. When a finger is pressed upon an optical fingerprint sensor, it is gradually deformed and the color of the fingerprint images changes. This is due to the blood movements inside the finger. If the extent of this color change exceeds a certain threshold, we judge that the finger is alive. In this paper, we report on the spectral changes of the light scattered by a deformed finger first. As the pressure applied to the finger increases, the relative intensity of the red portion of the spectrum decreases. Even after the pressure is off, it takes some time for this intensity to recover to its original value. Second, we discuss a dual-LED imaging system based on scattered light detection. Here, red and green-emitting LEDs are mounted on an edge of a plastic plate which serves as a light-guide. The light scattered by a finger placed on this light-guide is captured by a standard color camera. Based on the experiments conducted on several types of replicas as well as 42 volunteers, we show that this system is capable of identifying the live fingers. Signal extraction process is investigated for stable separation between live fingers and replicas. A model based on the blood movement inside a finger is developed. A mobility-index is proposed and is correlated with the ages of the volunteers participated in this study.

  3. Analysis and application of minimum variance discrete time system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H.; Kotob, S.

    1975-01-01

    An on-line minimum variance parameter identifier is developed which embodies both accuracy and computational efficiency. The formulation results in a linear estimation problem with both additive and multiplicative noise. The resulting filter which utilizes both the covariance of the parameter vector itself and the covariance of the error in identification is proven to be mean square convergent and mean square consistent. The MV parameter identification scheme is then used to construct a stable state and parameter estimation algorithm.

  4. Molecular Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility of Yeast Isolates Causing Fungemia Collected in a Population-Based Study in Spain in 2010 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Guinea, Jesús; Zaragoza, Óscar; Escribano, Pilar; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Pemán, Javier; Sánchez-Reus, Ferrán

    2014-01-01

    We report the molecular identifications and antifungal susceptibilities of the isolates causing fungemia collected in the CANDIPOP population-based study conducted in 29 Spanish hospitals. A total of 781 isolates (from 767 patients, 14 of them having mixed fungemia) were collected. The species found most frequently were Candida albicans (44.6%), Candida parapsilosis (24.5%), Candida glabrata (13.2%), Candida tropicalis (7.6%), Candida krusei (1.9%), Candida guilliermondii (1.7%), and Candida lusitaniae (1.3%). Other Candida and non-Candida species accounted for approximately 5% of the isolates. The presence of cryptic species was low. Compared to findings of previous studies conducted in Spain, the frequency of C. glabrata has increased. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed by using EUCAST and CLSI M27-A3 reference procedures; the two methods were comparable. The rate of fluconazole-susceptible isolates was 80%, which appears to be a decrease compared to findings of previous studies, explained mainly by the higher frequency of C. glabrata. Using the species-specific breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values, the rate of voriconazole and posaconazole in vitro resistance was low (<2%). In the case of C. tropicalis, using the EUCAST procedure, the rate of azole resistance was around 20%. There was a correlation between the previous use of azoles and the presence of fluconazole-resistant isolates. Resistance to echinocandins was very rare (2%), and resistance to amphotericin B also was very uncommon. The sequencing of the hot spot (HS) regions from FKS1 or FKS2 genes in echinocandin-resistant isolates revealed previously described point mutations. The decrease in the susceptibility to fluconazole in Spanish isolates should be closely monitored in future studies. PMID:24366741

  5. Occurrence and diversity of marine yeasts in Antarctica environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Hua, Mingxia; Song, Chunli; Chi, Zhenming

    2012-03-01

    A total of 28 yeast strains were obtained from the sea sediment of Antarctica. According to the results of routine identification and molecular characterization, the strains belonged to species of Yarrowia lipolytica, Debaryomyces hansenii, Rhodotorula slooffiae, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Sporidiobolus salmonicolor, Aureobasidium pullulans, Mrakia frigida and Guehomyces pullulans, respectively. The Antarctica yeasts have wide potential applications in biotechnology, for some of them can produce ?-galactosidase and killer toxins.

  6. Structural system identification using degree of freedom-based reduction and hierarchical clustering algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Seongmin; Baek, Sungmin; Kim, Ki-Ook; Cho, Maenghyo

    2015-06-01

    A system identification method has been proposed to validate finite element models of complex structures using measured modal data. Finite element method is used for the system identification as well as the structural analysis. In perturbation methods, the perturbed system is expressed as a combination of the baseline structure and the related perturbations. The changes in dynamic responses are applied to determine the structural modifications so that the equilibrium may be satisfied in the perturbed system. In practical applications, the dynamic measurements are carried out on a limited number of accessible nodes and associated degrees of freedom. The equilibrium equation is, in principle, expressed in terms of the measured (master, primary) and unmeasured (slave, secondary) degrees of freedom. Only the specified degrees of freedom are included in the equation formulation for identification and the unspecified degrees of freedom are eliminated through the iterative improved reduction scheme. A large number of system parameters are included as the unknown variables in the system identification of large-scaled structures. The identification problem with large number of system parameters requires a large amount of computation time and resources. In the present study, a hierarchical clustering algorithm is applied to reduce the number of system parameters effectively. Numerical examples demonstrate that the proposed method greatly improves the accuracy and efficiency in the inverse problem of identification.

  7. 75 FR 58346 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ...EPA-R06-RCRA-2009-0312; SW FRL-9206-9] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste AGENCY: Environmental Protection...to exclude (or delist) certain solid wastes generated by its Longview,...

  8. 76 FR 5110 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ...SW-FRL-9259-3] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification...Historical information on waste generation and management practices; and (2) Analytical...becomes final, Gulf West's management of the wastes covered by this...

  9. 75 FR 11002 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ...EPA-R04-RCRA-2008-0900; FRL-9124-8] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing...environment once released from the waste, plausible and specific types of management of the petitioned waste, the quantities of waste...

  10. 77 FR 12497 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ...FRL-9640-2] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste Exclusion AGENCY: Environmental...rules relating to agency management or personnel; and...protection, Hazardous waste, Recycling,...

  11. 77 FR 36447 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ...FRL-9685-6] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification...Historical information on waste generation and management practices; and (2) analytical...becomes final, ExxonMobil's management of the wastes covered by this...

  12. 75 FR 58315 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Direct Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ...FRL-9206-8] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...plausible and specific types of management of the petitioned waste, the quantities of waste...wastewater treatment plant and waste management in the RKI through...

  13. 76 FR 76677 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ...FRL-9502-4] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion AGENCY...plausible and specific types of management of the petitioned waste; (7) the quantity of...

  14. 77 FR 41720 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ...FRL-9699-4] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...Mail: Sharon Leitch, RCRA Waste Management and UST Section, Office of...Delivery: Sharon Leitch, RCRA Waste Management and UST Section, Office...

  15. 75 FR 16037 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ...SW-FRL-9131-6] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...RCRA Subtitle D landfill: The Waste Management Industrial Landfill, North...Subtitle C facility, Chemical Waste Management in Sulphur, LA 70556....

  16. 76 FR 55846 - Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste: Carbon Dioxide...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ...RIN 2050-AG60 Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and...the regulations for hazardous waste management under the Resource Conservation...the regulations for hazardous waste management under the Resource...

  17. 75 FR 57686 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ...EPA-R05-RCRA-2010-0758; FRL-9201-2] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste Amendment AGENCY: Environmental Protection...facilities to demonstrate that a specific waste from a particular generating...

  18. 77 FR 58315 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ...FRL-9730-5] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...Historical information on waste generation and management practices; and (2) Analytical...using the ``landfill'' waste management unit (WMU) input, but...

  19. 76 FR 16534 - Hazardous Waste Management System Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ...FRL-9285-7] Hazardous Waste Management System Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion AGENCY...rules relating to agency management or personnel; and...protection, Hazardous waste, Recycling,...

  20. 77 FR 56558 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ...FRL-9727-2] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...CONTACT: Sharon Leitch, RCRA Waste Management and UST Section, Office of...adversely affected by common waste management practices for this...

  1. 75 FR 78918 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Removal of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ...FRL-9239-8] RIN 2050-AG55 Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of...to these same facilities from reduced waste management costs, by the expected shift of waste management from RCRA Subtitle C hazardous...

  2. 75 FR 61356 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ...SW-FRL-9209-8] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Correction AGENCY...appendix IX to part 261--Waste Excluded Under Sec...review by the Office of Management and Budget...

  3. 75 FR 51671 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...SW-FRL-9191-8] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...RCRA Subtitle D landfill: The Waste Management Industrial Landfill, North...Subtitle C facility, Chemical Waste Management in Sulphur, LA 70556....

  4. Experience of de-identification system development for clinical research in tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Lyu, Yongman; Shin, Yongdon; Choi, Hyo Joung; Park, Jihyun; Kim, Woo-Sung; Lee, Jae Ho

    2013-01-01

    To protect patients' privacy and to improve the convenience of research, Asan Medical Center (AMC) has been developing a de-identification system for biomedical research, which mainly consists of three components: de-identification tool, search tool, and chart review tool. The de-identification tool can substitute a randomly assigned research ID for a hospital patient ID, remove the identifiers in the structured format, and mask them in the unstructured format, i.e., texts. The search tool can find the number of patients which satisfies given criteria. The chart review tool can provide de-identified patient's clinical data for review. We found that clinical data warehouse was essential for successful implementation of de-identification system, and this system should be tightly linked to an electronic institutional review board system for easy operation of honest brokers. PMID:23920818

  5. OPTIMAL EXCITATION SIGNAL DESIGN FOR FREQUENCY DOMAIN SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION USING SEMIDEFINITE PROGRAMMING

    E-print Network

    OPTIMAL EXCITATION SIGNAL DESIGN FOR FREQUENCY DOMAIN SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION USING SEMIDEFINITE discusses two methods of optimal excitation signal design for identi cation with Maximum Likelihood introduce an interior point method for excitation signal design. The implementations of the two methods

  6. A Novel System Identification Technique for Improved Wearable Hemodynamics Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Andrew D.; Inan, Omer T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances have led to renewed interest in ballistocardiography (BCG), a non-invasive measure of the small reaction forces on the body from cardiovascular events. A broad range of platforms have been developed and verified for BCG measurement including beds, chairs, and weighing scales: while the body is coupled to such a platform, the cardiogenic movements of the center-of-mass (COM) are measured. Wearable BCG, measured with an accelerometer affixed to the body, may enable continuous, or more regular, monitoring during the day; however, the signals from such wearable BCGs represent local or distal accelerations of skin and tissue rather than the displacement of the body's COM. In this paper we propose a novel method to reconstruct the COM BCG from a wearable sensor via a training step to remove these local effects. Preliminary validation of this method was performed with fifteen subjects: the wearable sensor was placed at three locations on the surface of the body while COM BCG measurements were recorded simultaneously with a modified weighing scale. A regularized system identification approach was used to reconstruct the COM BCG from the wearable signal. Preliminary results suggest that the relationship between local and central forces is highly dependent on both the individual and the location where the wearable sensor is placed on the body and that these differences can be resolved via calibration to accurately measure changes in cardiac output and contractility from a wearable sensor. Such measurements could be highly effective, for example, for improved monitoring of heart failure patients at home. PMID:25561589

  7. A comparative overview of modal testing and system identification for control of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Pappa, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative overview of the disciplines of modal testing used in structural engineering and system identification used in control theory. A list of representative references from both areas is given and the basic methods are briefly described. Recent progress on the interaction of modal testing and control disciplines is discussed. It is concluded that combined efforts of researchers in both disciplines are required for unification of modal testing and system identification methods for control of flexible structures.

  8. A comparative overview of modal testing and system identification for control of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J.-N.; Pappa, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative overview is presented of the disciplines of modal testing used in structural engineering and system identification used in control theory. A list of representative references from both areas is given, and the basic methods are described briefly. Recent progress on the interaction of modal testing and control disciplines is discussed. It is concluded that combined efforts of researchers in both disciplines are required for unification of modal testing and system identification methods for control of flexible structures.

  9. Complementation of the Yeast Model System Reveals that Caenorhabditis elegans OCT-1 Is a Functional Transporter of Anthracyclines

    PubMed Central

    Brosseau, Nicolas; Andreev, Emil; Ramotar, Dindial

    2015-01-01

    The yeast plasma membrane protein Agp2 belongs to the family of amino acid transporters. It acts as a regulator that controls the expression of several uptake transporter genes such as DUR3 and SAM3 encoding two high-affinity polyamine permeases. agp2? mutants display extreme resistance to several cationic compounds including polyamines, the anticancer agent bleomycin, and cationic antifungal peptides. We propose that Agp2 might be involved in regulating the uptake of other cationic anticancer drugs. To date, an uptake transporter has not been reported for anthracyclines, a family of chemotherapeutic agents that are used for treating adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Herein, we develop assay conditions to monitor the uptake of the anthracycline doxorubicin into yeast cells and demonstrate for the first time that Agp2 is required for the drug uptake. Deletion of both the DUR3 and SAM3 genes reduced doxorubicin uptake, but not the deletion of either gene alone, while the agp2? mutant was severely compromised, suggesting that Agp2 controls the drug uptake via Dur3 and Sam3 and at least one additional transporter. Overexpression of DUR3 or SAM3 from the endogenous promoter rescued doxorubicin uptake into the sam3?dur3? double mutant, consistent with a role for these transporters in the uptake of anthracyclines. We further show by cross-species complementation analysis that expression of the Caenorhabditis elegans oct-1 gene encoding an organic cation transporter restored full doxorubicin uptake in the agp2? mutant. Four separate variants of CeOCT-1 derived by substituting the amino acid residues Gln15, Cys31, Gln109 and Lys300 with alanine were stably expressed, but did not mediate doxorubicin uptake into the agp2? mutant. Moreover, we show that overexpression of CeOCT-1 sensitized parent yeast cells to doxorubicin, suggesting that CeOCT-1 related members might be key transporters to facilitate entry of anthracyclines into human cells. PMID:26177450

  10. 75 FR 35127 - Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Special Wastes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... Protection Agency 40 CFR Parts 257, 261, 264 et al. Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System... Solid Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Special Wastes; Disposal of Coal Combustion... system is not an ``anonymous access'' system. If you send an e-mail comment directly to the...

  11. Recent Taxonomic Developments with Candida and Other Opportunistic Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Shawn R.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in susceptible patient populations and advances in identification methods have resulted in the continued recognition of novel yeasts as agents of human infection. Most of these agents are members of the well-recognized genera Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon, and Rhodotorula. Some of these agents are “cryptic species,” members of species complexes, and may not be detectable using classical carbohydrate assimilation-based methods of yeast identification. Such species require DNA- or MALDI-based methods for correct identification, although sporadic isolates may not routinely require delineation to the individual species level. The coming end of the fungal taxonomy rules requiring separate names for sexual and asexual forms of the same fungus will hopefully allow greater clarity, as names for medically important yeast can now be based on the needs of the medical mycology community and the common goal of better communication between laboratory and clinician. PMID:26526658

  12. Prions in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Susan W.; Chernoff, Yury O.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a prion as an infectious self-propagating protein isoform was initially proposed to explain certain mammalian diseases. It is now clear that yeast also has heritable elements transmitted via protein. Indeed, the “protein only” model of prion transmission was first proven using a yeast prion. Typically, known prions are ordered cross-? aggregates (amyloids). Recently, there has been an explosion in the number of recognized prions in yeast. Yeast continues to lead the way in understanding cellular control of prion propagation, prion structure, mechanisms of de novo prion formation, specificity of prion transmission, and the biological roles of prions. This review summarizes what has been learned from yeast prions. PMID:22879407

  13. Wind turbine control systems: Dynamic model development using system identification and the fast structural dynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.G.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01

    Mitigating the effects of damaging wind turbine loads and responses extends the lifetime of the turbine and, consequently, reduces the associated Cost of Energy (COE). Active control of aerodynamic devices is one option for achieving wind turbine load mitigation. Generally speaking, control system design and analysis requires a reasonable dynamic model of {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} (i.e., the system being controlled). This paper extends the wind turbine aileron control research, previously conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), by presenting a more detailed development of the wind turbine dynamic model. In prior research, active aileron control designs were implemented in an existing wind turbine structural dynamics code, FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). In this paper, the FAST code is used, in conjunction with system identification, to generate a wind turbine dynamic model for use in active aileron control system design. The FAST code is described and an overview of the system identification technique is presented. An aileron control case study is used to demonstrate this modeling technique. The results of the case study are then used to propose ideas for generalizing this technique for creating dynamic models for other wind turbine control applications.

  14. Identification of inner parameters in laser radar measuring system through system error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhengchun; Zhang, Shujie; Wei, Yongfei; Hong, Maisheng

    2008-10-01

    This paper concerns the study of error modeling and inner parameter identification of 3D laser radar measuring system (LRMS) equipped with 2D laser sensor and electric servo motor, for the potential application of on-site measurement of the heavy forging object with temperature as high as 1000°C Firstly the physical and geometric model of 3D laser radar measuring system is presented. Detail discussion about the deterministic error and random error of the measuring system is conducted. Consequently the discipline of the deterministic error and the variation laws of random errors are achieved by the nonlinear equations set through the coordinate transformation. Finally based on the above discuss the identification method of inner geometrical parameter of the measuring system is presented by using the local linearization for nonlinear equations with Tailor Series Expansion Formula and the Least Square Algorithm. Therefore its measuring accuracy has been improved significantly. The results show this calibration method is helpful to the similar application of other measuring systems.

  15. Nonparametric identification of a class of nonlinear close-coupled dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Udwadia, F. E.; Kuo, C. P.

    1981-01-01

    A nonparametric identification technique for the identification of close coupled dynamic systems with arbitrary memoryless nonlinearities is presented. The method utilizes noisy recorded data (acceleration, velocity and displacement) to identify the restoring forces in the system. The masses in the system are assumed to be known (or fairly well estimated from the design drawings). The restoring forces are expanded in a series of orthogonal polnomials and the coefficients of these polynomial expansions are obtained by using least square fit method. A particularly simple and computationally efficient method is proposed for dealing with separable restoring forces. The identified results are found to be relatively insensitive to measurement noise. An analysis of the effects of measurement noise on the quality of the estimates is given. The computations are shown to be relatively quick (when compared say to the Wiener identification method) and the core storage required relatively small, making the method suitable for onboard identification of large space structures.

  16. Identification and expression of a new delta-12 fatty acid desaturase (FAD2-4) gene in upland cotton and its functional expression in yeast and Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daiyuan; Pirtle, Irma L; Park, Stacy J; Nampaisansuk, Mongkol; Neogi, Purnima; Wanjie, Sylvia W; Pirtle, Robert M; Chapman, Kent D

    2009-06-01

    A cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) genomic clone encompassing a 17.9-kb DNA fragment was found to contain a delta-12 fatty acid desaturase gene (designated FAD2-4). The FAD2-4 open reading frame has 1,155bp and is uninterrupted, encoding a conceptual FAD2-4 polypeptide of 384 amino acids that has 98% identity with the cotton FAD2-3 polypeptide. The FAD2-4 gene has a single intron of 2,780 bp in its 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR). The 3'-flanking regions and 5'-UTR introns in the FAD2-4 and FAD2-3 genes are quite different, indicating that the genes might be paralogs in the cotton genome. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis indicated that the FAD2-4 and FAD2-3 genes were expressed in all tissues examined, including seeds, seedling tissues, young and mature leaves, roots, stems, developing flower buds, and ovule fibers. These constitutive patterns of expression were notably different from that of the FAD2-1 gene, which was restricted to seeds and developing flower buds, or to the expression of a newly-identified FAD2-2 gene isoform, which was barely detectable in roots, hypocotyls, stems, and fibers, but was expressed in all other tissues. The FAD2-4 coding region was expressed in yeast and shown to encode a functional delta-12 desaturase, converting oleic acid (C18:1) to linoleic acid (C18:2) in recombinant yeast cells. In addition, both the FAD2-4 and the FAD2-3 genes were transferred into the Arabidopsis thaliana fad2-1 mutant background where they effectively restored wild type fatty acid composition and growth characteristics. Finally, the cotton FAD2-4 green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion polypeptide appeared to be localized in the endomembrane system of transgenic Arabidopsis plants in the complemented fad2-1 mutant background, supporting a functional ER location for the cotton FAD2-4 polypeptide in this heterologous plant system. Thus, a new functional member of the FAD2 gene family in cotton has been characterized, indicating a complex regulation of membrane lipid desaturation in this important fiber/oilseed crop. PMID:19217793

  17. Integrated lipase production and in situ biodiesel synthesis in a recombinant Pichia pastoris yeast: an efficient dual biocatalytic system composed of cell free enzymes and whole cell catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipase-catalyzed biotransformation of acylglycerides or fatty acids into biodiesel via immobilized enzymes or whole cell catalysts has been considered as one of the most promising methods to produce renewable and environmentally friendly alternative liquid fuels, thus being extensively studied so far. In all previously pursued approaches, however, lipase enzymes are prepared in an independent process separated from enzymatic biodiesel production, which would unavoidably increase the cost and energy consumption during industrial manufacture of this cost-sensitive energy product. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel cost-effective biocatalysts and biocatalytic processes with genuine industrial feasibility. Result Inspired by the consolidated bioprocessing of lignocellulose to generate bioethanol, an integrated process with coupled lipase production and in situ biodiesel synthesis in a recombinant P. pastoris yeast was developed in this study. The novel and efficient dual biocatalytic system based on Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase took advantage of both cell free enzymes and whole cell catalysts. The extracellular and intracellular lipases of growing yeast cells were simultaneously utilized to produce biodiesel from waste cooking oils in situ and in one pot. This integrated system effectively achieved 58% and 72% biodiesel yield via concurrent esterified-transesterified methanolysis and stepwise hydrolysis-esterification at 3:1 molar ratio between methanol and waste cooking oils, respectively. Further increasing the molar ratio of methanol to waste cooking oils to 6:1 led to an 87% biodiesel yield using the stepwise strategy. Both water tolerance and methanol tolerance of this novel system were found to be significantly improved compared to previous non-integrated biodiesel production processes using separately prepared immobilized enzymes or whole cell catalysts. Conclusion We have proposed a new concept of integrated biodiesel production. This integrated system couples lipase production to lipase-catalyzed biodiesel synthesis in one pot. The proof-of-concept was established through construction of a recombinant P. pastoris yeast strain that was able to grow, overexpress T. lanuginosus lipase, and efficiently catalyze biodiesel production from fed waste cooking oils and methanol simultaneously. This simplified single-step process represents a significant advance toward achieving economical production of biodiesel at industrial scale via a ‘green’ biocatalytic route. PMID:24713071

  18. Integrative Analysis of the Mitochondrial Proteome in Yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Prokisch, Holger; Scharfe, Curt M.; Camp, David G.; Xiao, Wenzhong; David, Lior; Andreoli, Christophe; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Kozany, Christian; Hixson, Kim K.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Zischka, Hans; Ueffing, Marius; Herman, Zelek S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Meitinger, Thomas; Oefner, Peter; Smith, Richard D.; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2004-06-30

    In this study yeast mitochondria were used as a model system to apply, evaluate, and integrate different genomic approaches to define the proteins of an organelle. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry applied to purified mitochondria identified 546 proteins. By expression analysis and comparison to other proteome studies, we demonstrate that the proteomic approach identifies primarily highly abundant proteins. By expanding our evaluation to other types of genomic approaches, including systematic deletion phenotype screening, expression profiling, subcellular localization studies, protein interaction analyses, and computational predictions, we show that an integration of approaches moves beyond the limitations of any single approach. We report the success of each approach by benchmarking it against a reference set of known mitochondrial proteins, and predict approximately 700 proteins associated with the mitochondrial organelle from the integration of 22 datasets. We show that a combination of complementary approaches like deletion phenotype screening and mass spectrometry can identify over 75% of the known mitochondrial proteome. These findings have implications for choosing optimal genome-wide approaches for the study of other cellular systems, including organelles and pathways in various species. Furthermore, our systematic identification of genes involved in mitochondrial function and biogenesis in yeast expands the candidates genes available for mapping Mendelian and complex mitochondrial disorders in humans.

  19. Isolation of Yeast Nuclei Growth of Yeast

    E-print Network

    Aris, John P.

    )] X final volume. Preparation of Spheroplasts 1. Harvest yeast at OD600 = 0.6 - 0.8 (OD600 = 0.8 is ~5 in ddH2O. Centrifuge again as in step 4. Prepare pretreatment buffer. 6. Pretreatment: Resuspend cell pellet(s) per 1 g of wet weight in 4 ml of freshly prepared Pretreatment Buffer at room temperature

  20. Yeast transcription factors Kevin Struhl

    E-print Network

    Yeast transcription factors Kevin Struhl Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA Studies of yeast Transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are fundamentally similar in eukaryotic organisms from yeasts to humans (for reviews of yeast transcription, see [1,2]). Compo- nents of the chromatin template and the basic RNA