Science.gov

Sample records for yeast identification system

  1. Evaluation of Automated Yeast Identification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred and nine teleomorphic and anamorphic yeast isolates representing approximately 30 taxa were used to evaluate the accuracy of the Biolog yeast identification system. Isolates derived from nomenclatural types, environmental, and clinica isolates of known identity were tested in the Biolog system. Of the isolates tested, 81 were in the Biolog database. The system correctly identified 40, incorrectly identified 29, and was unable to identify 12. Of the 28 isolates not in the database, 18 were given names, whereas 10 were not. The Biolog yeast identification system is inadequate for the identification of yeasts originating from the environment during space program activities.

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Three Commercial Identification Systems Using Common and Rare Bloodstream Yeast Isolates?

    PubMed Central

    Meletiadis, Joseph; Arabatzis, Michael; Bompola, Maria; Tsiveriotis, Konstantinos; Hini, Stavroula; Petinaki, Efthymia; Velegraki, Aristea; Zerva, Loukia

    2011-01-01

    The commercial yeast identification systems API ID32C, Auxacolor, and Vitek were evaluated using 251 molecularly identified bloodstream isolates and 2 reference strains, representing a total of 35 species (6 common and 29 rare). Correct identification rates were higher for common species (Auxacolor, 95%; API ID32C, 94%; Vitek, 92%) than for rare species (Auxacolor, 43%; API ID32C, 56%; Vitek, 64%). All systems performed equally among the former, and Vitek performed best among the latter. PMID:21543578

  3. Multicenter study evaluating the Vitek MS system for identification of medically important yeasts.

    PubMed

    Westblade, Lars F; Jennemann, Rebecca; Branda, John A; Bythrow, Maureen; Ferraro, Mary Jane; Garner, Omai B; Ginocchio, Christine C; Lewinski, Michael A; Manji, Ryhana; Mochon, A Brian; Procop, Gary W; Richter, Sandra S; Rychert, Jenna A; Sercia, Linda; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2013-07-01

    The optimal management of fungal infections is correlated with timely organism identification. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is revolutionizing the identification of yeasts isolated from clinical specimens. We present a multicenter study assessing the performance of the Vitek MS system (bioMérieux) in identifying medically important yeasts. A collection of 852 isolates was tested, including 20 Candida species (626 isolates, including 58 C. albicans, 62 C. glabrata, and 53 C. krusei isolates), 35 Cryptococcus neoformans isolates, and 191 other clinically relevant yeast isolates; in total, 31 different species were evaluated. Isolates were directly applied to a target plate, followed by a formic acid overlay. Mass spectra were acquired using the Vitek MS system and were analyzed using the Vitek MS v2.0 database. The gold standard for identification was sequence analysis of the D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene. In total, 823 isolates (96.6%) were identified to the genus level and 819 isolates (96.1%) were identified to the species level. Twenty-four isolates (2.8%) were not identified, and five isolates (0.6%) were misidentified. Misidentified isolates included one isolate of C. albicans (n = 58) identified as Candida dubliniensis, one isolate of Candida parapsilosis (n = 73) identified as Candida pelliculosa, and three isolates of Geotrichum klebahnii (n = 6) identified as Geotrichum candidum. The identification of clinically relevant yeasts using MS is superior to the phenotypic identification systems currently employed in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:23658267

  4. Multicenter Study Evaluating the Vitek MS System for Identification of Medically Important Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Westblade, Lars F.; Jennemann, Rebecca; Branda, John A.; Bythrow, Maureen; Ferraro, Mary Jane; Garner, Omai B.; Ginocchio, Christine C.; Lewinski, Michael A.; Manji, Ryhana; Mochon, A. Brian; Procop, Gary W.; Richter, Sandra S.; Rychert, Jenna A.; Sercia, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The optimal management of fungal infections is correlated with timely organism identification. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is revolutionizing the identification of yeasts isolated from clinical specimens. We present a multicenter study assessing the performance of the Vitek MS system (bioMérieux) in identifying medically important yeasts. A collection of 852 isolates was tested, including 20 Candida species (626 isolates, including 58 C. albicans, 62 C. glabrata, and 53 C. krusei isolates), 35 Cryptococcus neoformans isolates, and 191 other clinically relevant yeast isolates; in total, 31 different species were evaluated. Isolates were directly applied to a target plate, followed by a formic acid overlay. Mass spectra were acquired using the Vitek MS system and were analyzed using the Vitek MS v2.0 database. The gold standard for identification was sequence analysis of the D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene. In total, 823 isolates (96.6%) were identified to the genus level and 819 isolates (96.1%) were identified to the species level. Twenty-four isolates (2.8%) were not identified, and five isolates (0.6%) were misidentified. Misidentified isolates included one isolate of C. albicans (n = 58) identified as Candida dubliniensis, one isolate of Candida parapsilosis (n = 73) identified as Candida pelliculosa, and three isolates of Geotrichum klebahnii (n = 6) identified as Geotrichum candidum. The identification of clinically relevant yeasts using MS is superior to the phenotypic identification systems currently employed in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:23658267

  5. Evaluation of the Biolog MicroStation system for yeast identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, M. R.; Molina, T. C.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred and fifty-nine isolates representing 16 genera and 53 species of yeasts were processed with the Biolog MicroStation System for yeast identification. Thirteen genera and 38 species were included in the Biolog database. For these 129 isolates, correct identifications to the species level were 13.2, 39.5 and 48.8% after 24, 48 and 72 hours incubation at 30 degrees C, respectively. Three genera and 15 species which were not included in the Biolog database were also tested. Of the 30 isolates studied, 16.7, 53.3 and 56.7% of the isolates were given incorrect names from the system's database after 24,48 and 72 h incubation at 30 degrees C, respectively. The remaining isolates of this group were not identified.

  6. Evaluation of the Biolog MicroStation system for yeast identification.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, M R; Molina, T C; Pierson, D L; Mishra, S K

    1996-01-01

    One hundred and fifty-nine isolates representing 16 genera and 53 species of yeasts were processed with the Biolog MicroStation System for yeast identification. Thirteen genera and 38 species were included in the Biolog database. For these 129 isolates, correct identifications to the species level were 13.2, 39.5 and 48.8% after 24, 48 and 72 hours incubation at 30 degrees C, respectively. Three genera and 15 species which were not included in the Biolog database were also tested. Of the 30 isolates studied, 16.7, 53.3 and 56.7% of the isolates were given incorrect names from the system's database after 24,48 and 72 h incubation at 30 degrees C, respectively. The remaining isolates of this group were not identified. PMID:8912169

  7. Evaluation of the API 20C yeast identification system for the differentiation of some dematiaceous fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; McGinnis, M R; Pincus, D H; Goldson, P R; Kerkering, T M

    1989-01-01

    Ninety-seven isolates of Cladosporium spp., Exophiala spp., Fonsecaea spp., Lecythophora hoffmannii, Phaeoannellomyces werneckii, Phialophora spp., Wangiella dermatitidis, and Xylohypha bantiana were used to evaluate the API 20C Yeast Identification System for the differentiation of dematiaceous fungi. Using the API 20C system, we were able to distinguish most species of Phialophora and Cladosporium and to separate L. hoffmannii from the species of Phialophora tested; X. bantiana from C. carrionii, C. resinae, and C. sphaerospermum; and W. dermatitidis from Exophiala jeanselmei and Exophiala spinifera. Ninety-two (60.1%) of 153 possible species-pair combinations were separated. PMID:2808678

  8. Evaluation of the Uni-Yeast-Tek kit for the identification of medically important yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, P I; Ahearn, D G

    1975-01-01

    The Uni-Yeast-Tek system, a commercially prepared kit and scheme for the rapid identification of medically important yeasts (Corning Medical), was evaluated in comparison with a conventional procedure in the identification of 623 yeasts. The system permitted the presumptive identification of 99.8% of 436 isolates representing 16 common species commonly isolated in the clinical laboratory. Correct biochemical and morphological analyses were obtained with 48 other species, but their specific identification required additional data. Images PMID:1102563

  9. Comparative Evaluation of BD Phoenix and Vitek 2 Systems for Species Identification of Common and Uncommon Pathogenic Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Posteraro, Brunella; Ruggeri, Alberto; De Carolis, Elena; Torelli, Riccardo; Vella, Antonietta; De Maio, Flavio; Ricciardi, Walter; Posteraro, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    The BD Phoenix system was evaluated for species-level identification of yeasts (250 clinical isolates) and compared with the Vitek 2 system, using ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis as the gold standard. Considering only the species included in each system's database, 96.3% (236/245) and 91.4% (224/245) of the isolates were correctly identified by BD Phoenix and Vitek 2, respectively. PMID:23966500

  10. [Evaluation of common commercial systems for the identification of yeast isolates in microbiology laboratories: a multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Karab?çak, Nilgün; Uluda? Altun, Hatice; Karatuna, Onur; Haz?rolan, Gül?en; Aksu, Neriman; Adilo?lu, Ali; Akyar, I??n

    2015-04-01

    Accurate and rapid identification of yeast isolates have become important in recent years for not only antifungal susceptibility testing due to the species-specific clinical resistance breakpoints but also early initiation of appropriate antifungal therapy. In clinical microbiology laboratories species identification of yeasts is often performed with several commercial systems based on biochemical properties and rarely according to the physiological and morphological characteristics. The aim of this study was to compare the two common commercial systems, VITEK 2 YST ID Card (Vitek; bioMérieux, France) and API 20C AUX (API; bioMérieux, France) with conventional mycological methods. A total of 473 clinical yeast strains isolated from clinical specimens in different university and training/research hospitals and identified by Vitek system were included in the study. The isolates were re-identified with API and conventional methods including morphological identification in the Mycology Reference Laboratory of the Public Health Institute of Turkey. Candida dubliniensis MYA 583, Candida krusei ATCC 6258, Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019, Candida albicans ATCC 10231 and Cryptococcus neoformans ATCC 32268 were used as quality control strains and those standard strains were studied consecutively 10 days with both of the methods. The results of identification by Vitek and API were compared with the results of conventional methods for those 473 yeast isolates [6 genus (Candida, Cryptococcus, Blastoshizomyces, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces, Trichosporon), 17 species (5 common and 12 rarely isolated)]. The performances of the systems were better (Vitek: 95%; API: 96%) for the commonly detected species (C.albicans, C.parapsilosis, C.glabrata, C.tropicalis and C.krusei) than those for rarely detected species (Vitek: 78.4%; API: 71.6%) (p= 0.155). Misidentification or unidentification were mostly detected for C.parapsilosis (Vitek: 6/87; API: 7/87) and C.glabrata (Vitek: 9/104; API: 3/104) by both of the systems. For rarely detected yeast isolates, misidentification or unidentification were most frequently observed in species of C.pelliculosa (Vitek: 3/11; API: 6/11) and C.dubliniensis (API and Vitek: 2/5) isolates. Candida guilliermondii (API: 2/5) isolates had lower rate of identification with API compared to other species. Blastoschizomyces capitatus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates could not be identified by both of the systems. As a result, the accurate diagnosis of Vitek and API systems were similar in terms of consistency (86.3%). Two systems performed well in correct identification of common clinical yeast species (at least 95%), while the identification of rare species was more challenging indicating that they require further morphological and physiological testing. The addition of morphological identification to commercial systems will be useful for accurate diagnosis and treatment of mixed infections. PMID:26167821

  11. Anaerobic yeast killer systems.

    PubMed

    Polonelli, L; Menozzi, M G; Campani, L; Gerloni, M; Conti, S; Morace, G; Chezzi, C

    1992-05-01

    The influence of anaerobic conditions on the expression of the killer phenomenon of several yeast isolates belonging to recognized killer systems coded by different genetic determinants (Pichia spp., Kluyveromyces lactis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was studied. Anaerobiosis influenced the activity of killer toxins from some individual isolates of the genera Pichia and Saccharomyces on sensitive strains of P. anomala, K. lactis and Candida albicans. However, no influence was detectable on a S. cerevisiae sensitive isolate. Thus, anaerobic conditions seem to interfere more with the metabolic process of sensitive strains than with toxin production by killer yeasts. The selection of a panel of killer yeasts, able to display their activity against reference sensitive yeast isolates under anaerobic conditions in a medium that favored the growth of anaerobes, allowed the use of the killer system to type Bacteroides fragilis isolates for epidemiological purposes. PMID:1397211

  12. Yeast killer systems.

    PubMed Central

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Gerloni, M; Bertolotti, D; Polonelli, L

    1997-01-01

    The killer phenomenon in yeasts has been revealed to be a multicentric model for molecular biologists, virologists, phytopathologists, epidemiologists, industrial and medical microbiologists, mycologists, and pharmacologists. The surprisingly widespread occurrence of the killer phenomenon among taxonomically unrelated microorganisms, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, has engendered a new interest in its biological significance as well as its theoretical and practical applications. The search for therapeutic opportunities by using yeast killer systems has conceptually opened new avenues for the prevention and control of life-threatening fungal diseases through the idiotypic network that is apparently exploited by the immune system in the course of natural infections. In this review, the biology, ecology, epidemiology, therapeutics, serology, and idiotypy of yeast killer systems are discussed. PMID:9227858

  13. [Construction and Identification of the Bait Vector Containing Duck Circovirus Cap Gene for the Yeast Two-hybrid System].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu; Zhang, Zhilong; Lu, Yanyan; Zhang, Lei; Li, Pengfei; Jia, Renyong

    2015-05-01

    To construct a bait expression vector containing the duck circovirus Cap gene for use in the yeast two-hybrid system, the whole cap codon-optimized gene was inserted into pGBKT7 vector and confirmed by PCR, restriction enzyme digestion, and sequence analysis. After transformation into a Y2HGold yeast strain, the expression of Cap protein was analyzed by Western blotting. Toxicity and self-activation of the bait protein were detected using different dropout minimal base. PCR reaction, restriction enzyme digestion, and sequencing analyses indicated that the duck circovirus Cap gene was correctly inserted into pG- BKT7. Western blotting showed that the whole Cap protein was expressed. The recombinant bait protein had no toxicity and self-activation. Therefore, the bait vector with the Cap gene was constructed successfully, providing a foundation for future screening for interacting proteins in the yeast two-hybrid system. PMID:26470535

  14. Establishment of a transgenic yeast screening system for estrogenicity and identification of the anti-estrogenic activity of malachite green.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Baowei; Yeung, Eric K C; Chan, Chi Bun; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2008-12-15

    Endocrine disruptors refer to chemical compounds in the environment which interfere with the endocrine systems of organisms. Among them, environmental estrogens pose serious problems to aquatic organisms, in particular fish. It is therefore important and necessary to have a fast and low-cost system to screen the large number of different chemical compounds in the aquatic environment for their potential endocrine disrupting actions. In this study, a screening platform was developed to detect xenoestrogens in the aquatic environment using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and applied for compound screening. The aim was to demonstrate any significant potential differences between the fish screening system and the human screening system. To this end, a yeast expression vector harboring a fish estrogen receptor alpha and a reporter vector containing the estrogen responsive element fused with the Escherichia coli LacZ gene were constructed. After transformation with these two vectors, the transformed yeast clones were confirmed by Western blotting and selected on the basis of the beta-galactosidase activity. In this transgenic yeast system, the natural estrogen (estradiol) and other known xenoestrogens such as diethylstilbestrol, bisphenol A, genistein and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane exhibited dose-dependent activities. Using this system, more than 40 putative endocrine disruptors including phytoestrogens, pesticides, herbicides, industrial dyes and other industrial chemicals were screened. Ten of them were demonstrated to exhibit estrogenic actions. Industrial dyes such as malachite green (MG) that disrupt thyroid hormone synthesis are extensively used and are widely distributed in the aquatic environment. Using this system, MG did not show any estrogenic action, but was demonstrated to exhibit anti-estrogenic activity. PMID:18980245

  15. Yeast metabolic state identification using micro-fiber optics spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. S.; Castro, C. C.; Vicente, A. A.; Tafulo, P.; Jorge, P. A. S.; Martins, R. C.

    2011-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae morphology is known to be dependent on the cell physiological state and environmental conditions. On their environment, wild yeasts tend to form complex colonies architectures, such as stress response and pseudohyphal filaments morphologies, far away from the ones found inside bioreactors, where the regular cell cycle is observed under controlled conditions (e.g. budding and flocculating colonies). In this work we explore the feasibility of using micro-fiber optics spectroscopy to classify Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288C colony structures in YPD media, under different growth conditions, such as: i) no alcohol; ii) 1 % (v/v) Ethanol; iii) 1 % (v/v) 1-butanol; iv) 1 % (v/v) Isopropanol; v) 1 % (v/v) Tert-Amyl alcohol (2 Methyl-2-butanol); vi) 0,2 % (v/v) 2-Furaldehyde; vii) 5 % (w/v) 5 (Hydroxymethyl)-furfural; and viii) 1 % (w/v) (-)-Adenosine3', 5'cyclic monophosphate. The microscopy system includes a hyperspectral camera apparatus and a micro fiber (sustained by micro manipulator) optics system for spectroscopy. Results show that micro fiber optics system spectroscopy has the potential for yeasts metabolic state identification once the spectral signatures of colonies differs from each others. This technique associated with others physico-chemical information can benefit the creation of an information system capable of providing extremely detailed information about yeast metabolic state that will aid both scientists and engineers to study and develop new biotechnological products.

  16. Identification of alpha-tubulin as an hsp105alpha-binding protein by the yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Saito, Youhei; Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Ishihara, Keiichi; Hatayama, Takumi

    2003-06-10

    Hsp105alpha is a mammalian stress protein that belongs to the HSP105/110 family. Hsp105alpha prevents stress-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells and binds to Hsp70/Hsc70 and suppresses the Hsp70 chaperone activity in vitro. In this study, to further elucidate the function of Hsp105alpha, we searched for Hsp105alpha-binding proteins by screening a mouse FM3A cell cDNA library with full-length Hsp105alpha using the yeast two-hybrid system and obtained alpha-tubulin as an Hsp105alpha-binding protein. Hsp105alpha bound directly to alpha-tubulin both in vitro and in vivo. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis with anti-Hsp105 and anti-alpha-tubulin antibodies indicated that Hsp105alpha was colocalized with microtubules. Furthermore, the disorganization of microtubules induced by heat shock was prevented in Hsp105alpha-overexpressing COS-7 cells. These findings suggested that Hsp105alpha associates with alpha-tubulin and microtubules in cells and plays a role in protection of microtubules under conditions of stress. PMID:12749852

  17. Molecular identification of yeasts associated with traditional Egyptian dairy products.

    PubMed

    El-Sharoud, W M; Belloch, C; Peris, D; Querol, A

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the diversity and ecology of yeasts associated with traditional Egyptian dairy products employing molecular techniques in yeast identification. A total of 120 samples of fresh and stored Domiati cheese, kariesh cheese, and "Matared" cream were collected from local markets and examined. Forty yeast isolates were cultured from these samples and identified using the restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLPs) of 5.8S-ITS rDNA region and sequencing of the domains D1 and D2 of the 26S rRNA gene. Yeasts were identified as Issatchenkia orientalis (13 isolates), Candida albicans (4 isolates), Clavispora lusitaniae (Candida lusitaniae) (9 isolates), Kodamaea ohmeri (Pichia ohmeri) (1 isolate), Kluyveromyces marxianus (6 isolates), and Candida catenulata (7 isolates). With the exception of C. lusitaniae, the D1/D2 26S rRNA gene sequences were 100% identical for the yeast isolates within the same species. Phylogenetic reconstruction of C. lusitaniae isolates grouped them into 3 distinguished clusters. Kariesh cheese was found to be the most diverse in its yeast floras and contained the highest total yeast count compared with other examined dairy products. This was linked to the acidic pH and lower salt content of this cheese, which favor the growth and survival of yeasts in foodstuffs. Stored Domiati cheese also contained diverse yeast species involving isolates of the pathogenic yeast C. albicans. This raises the possibility of dairy products being vehicles of transmission of pathogenic yeasts. PMID:19895478

  18. Yeast Identification Algorithm Based on Use of the Vitek MS System Selectively Supplemented with Ribosomal DNA Sequencing: Proposal of a Reference Assay for Invasive Fungal Surveillance Programs in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Xiao, Meng; Wang, He; Gao, Ran; Fan, Xin; Brown, Mitchell; Gray, Timothy J.; Kong, Fanrong

    2014-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was employed as the gold standard method for yeast identification in the China Hospital Invasive Fungal Surveillance Net (CHIF-NET). It has subsequently been found that matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is potentially a more practical approach for this purpose. In the present study, the performance of the Vitek MS v2.0 system for the identification of yeast isolates collected from patients with invasive fungal infections in the 2011 CHIF-NET was evaluated. A total of 1,243 isolates representing 31 yeast species were analyzed, and the identification results by the Vitek MS v2.0 system were compared to those obtained by ITS sequence analysis. By the Vitek MS v2.0 system, 96.7% (n = 1,202) of the isolates were correctly assigned to the species level and 0.2% (n = 2) of the isolates were identified to the genus level, while 2.4% (n = 30) and 0.7% (n = 9) of the isolates were unidentified and misidentified, respectively. After retesting of the unidentified and misidentified strains, 97.3% (n = 1,209) of the isolates were correctly identified to the species level. Based on these results, a testing algorithm that combines the use of the Vitek MS system with selected supplementary ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing was developed and validated for yeast identification purposes. By employing this algorithm, 99.7% (1,240/1,243) of the study isolates were accurately identified with the exception of two isolates of Candida fermentati and one isolate of Cryptococcus gattii. In conclusion, the proposed identification algorithm could be practically implemented in strategic programs of fungal infection surveillance. PMID:24478490

  19. Microfermentation Test For Identification Of Yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Molina, Thomas C.

    1995-01-01

    Microfermentation test developed as supplementary method for use in identifying yeasts, especially in clinical and environmental studies. In comparison with traditional fermentation tests, simpler and easier, and requiries less equipment, material, and laboratory space. Results obtained in days instead of weeks.

  20. Identification of a Novel System for Boron Transport: Atr1 Is a Main Boron Exporter in Yeast? †

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Alaattin; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Boron is a micronutrient in plants and animals, but its specific roles in cellular processes are not known. To understand boron transport and functions, we screened a yeast genomic DNA library for genes that confer resistance to the element in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thirty boron-resistant transformants were isolated, and they all contained the ATR1 (YML116w) gene. Atr1 is a multidrug resistance transport protein belonging to the major facilitator superfamily. C-terminal green fluorescent protein-tagged Atr1 localized to the cell membrane and vacuole, and ATR1 gene expression was upregulated by boron and several stress conditions. We found that atr1? mutants were highly sensitive to boron treatment, whereas cells overexpressing ATR1 were boron resistant. In addition, atr1? cells accumulated boron, whereas ATR1-overexpressing cells had low intracellular levels of the element. Furthermore, atr1? cells showed stronger boron-dependent phenotypes than mutants deficient in genes previously reported to be implicated in boron metabolism. ATR1 is widely distributed in bacteria, archaea, and lower eukaryotes. Our data suggest that Atr1 functions as a boron efflux pump and is required for boron tolerance. PMID:19414602

  1. Identification of a novel system for boron transport: Atr1 is a main boron exporter in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Alaattin; Karakaya, Huseyin C; Fomenko, Dmitri E; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Koc, Ahmet

    2009-07-01

    Boron is a micronutrient in plants and animals, but its specific roles in cellular processes are not known. To understand boron transport and functions, we screened a yeast genomic DNA library for genes that confer resistance to the element in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thirty boron-resistant transformants were isolated, and they all contained the ATR1 (YML116w) gene. Atr1 is a multidrug resistance transport protein belonging to the major facilitator superfamily. C-terminal green fluorescent protein-tagged Atr1 localized to the cell membrane and vacuole, and ATR1 gene expression was upregulated by boron and several stress conditions. We found that atr1Delta mutants were highly sensitive to boron treatment, whereas cells overexpressing ATR1 were boron resistant. In addition, atr1Delta cells accumulated boron, whereas ATR1-overexpressing cells had low intracellular levels of the element. Furthermore, atr1Delta cells showed stronger boron-dependent phenotypes than mutants deficient in genes previously reported to be implicated in boron metabolism. ATR1 is widely distributed in bacteria, archaea, and lower eukaryotes. Our data suggest that Atr1 functions as a boron efflux pump and is required for boron tolerance. PMID:19414602

  2. Multicenter Evaluation of the New VITEK 2 Advanced Colorimetric Yeast Identification Card?

    PubMed Central

    Hata, D. Jane; Hall, Leslie; Fothergill, Annette W.; Larone, Davise H.; Wengenack, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of the new VITEK 2 Advanced Colorimetry yeast identification (YST) card for use with the VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux, Inc., Hazelwood, MO) was compared to that of the API 20C AUX (API) system (bioMérieux SA, Marcy-l'Etoile, France) in a multicenter evaluation. A total of 12 quality control, 64 challenge, and 623 clinical yeast isolates were used in the study. Comparisons of species identification, platform reliability, and substrate reproducibility were made between YST and API, with API considered the reference standard. Quality control testing to assess system and substrate reproducibility matched expected results ?95% of the time. The YST card correctly identified 100% of the challenge strains, which covered the species range of the manufacturer's performance claims. Using clinical isolates, the YST card correctly identified 98.5%, with 1.0% of isolates incorrectly identified and 0.5% unidentified. Among clinical isolates, the YST card generated fewer low-discrimination results (18.9%) than did API (30.0%). The time to identification with YST was 18 h, compared to 48 to 72 h with API. The colorimetric YST card used with the VITEK 2 provides a highly automated, objective yeast identification method with excellent performance and reproducibility. We found this system useful for timely and accurate identification of significant yeast species in the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:17267631

  3. YEASTS OF THE WORLD - MORPHOLOGY, PHYSIOLOGY, SEQUENCES AND IDENTIFICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication is a CD-ROM prepared by an international team of 12 scientists for the purpose of rapid identification of yeasts. Strains may be characterized from conventional growth tests or from sequences of selected genes. Test results are entered into the computer program where they are comp...

  4. [Yeasts in domestic animals: species identification and susceptibility to antifungals].

    PubMed

    Hamal, Petr; Koukalová, Dagmar

    2010-02-01

    Yeasts frequently colonize various kinds of domestic animals, but may also cause serious diseases. The aim of this study was to identify yeast isolates collected from dogs, cows and pigs, and to determine their in vitro antifungal susceptibility. Fifty-six yeast isolates from dogs (n = 24), cows (n = 20), and pigs (n = 12) were investigated. Appearance of colonies grown on Sabouraud agar, micromorphology on rice agar, as well as assimilation and fermentation of various carbon and nitrogen sources were evaluated. Susceptibility to six antifungals (flucytosine, amphotericin B, miconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole and fluconazole) was determined semiquantitatively using the commercially available Fungitest kit (Bio-Rad Laboratories). Ten yeast species were identified in dogs with relatively even distribution. On the other hand, cow and pig were clearly dominated by Candida krusei (from 7 species) and Candida rugosa (from 5 species), respectively. Further, most of yeast isolates exhibited good susceptibility to the antifungals tested particularly to amphotericin B, ketoconazole and itraconazole. Based on results, it can be concluded that significant differences in the species spectrum and distribution were documented between groups of yeasts from dogs, cows and pigs. This is probably due to different environmental conditions and the endogenous origin of the yeast isolates. Mostly good susceptibility to systemic antifungals should positively influence the therapy of diseases caused by yeasts in veterinary medicine. PMID:20401831

  5. Identification of Critical Amino Acids Conferring Lethality in VopK, a Type III Effector Protein of Vibrio cholerae: Lessons from Yeast Model System

    PubMed Central

    Bankapalli, Leela Krishna; Mishra, Rahul Chandra; Singh, Balvinder; Raychaudhuri, Saumya

    2015-01-01

    VopK, a type III effector protein, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Vibrio cholerae strains belonging to diverse serogroups. Ectopic expression of this protein exhibits strong toxicity in yeast model system. In order to map critical residues in VopK, we scanned the primary sequence guided by available data on various toxins and effector proteins. Our in silico analysis of VopK indicated the presence of predicted MCF1-SHE (SHxxxE) serine peptidase domain at the C-terminus region of the protein. Substitution of each of the predicted catalytic triad residues namely Ser314, His353 and Glu357 with alanine resulted in recombinant VopK proteins varying in lethality as evaluated in yeast model system. We observed that replacement of glutamate357 to alanine causes complete loss in toxicity while substitutions of serine314 and histidine353 with alanine exhibited partial loss in toxicity without affecting the stability of variants. In addition, replacement of another conserved serine residue at position 354 (S354) within predicted S314H353E357 did not affect toxicity of VopK. In essence, combined in silico and site directed mutagenesis, we have identified critical amino acids contributing to the lethal activity of VopK in yeast model system. PMID:26488395

  6. Comparison between the Biflex III-Biotyper and the Axima-SARAMIS systems for yeast identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Caroline; Sabou, Marcela; Moussaoui, Wardi; Prévost, Gilles; Delarbre, Jean-Marie; Candolfi, Ermanno; Gravet, Alain; Letscher-Bru, Valérie

    2013-04-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is emerging in laboratories as a new diagnostic tool for microorganism identification. We prospectively compared the performances of the Biflex III-Biotyper (Bruker Daltonics) and the Axima (Shimadzu)-SARAMIS (AnagnosTec) systems for the identification of 312 yeasts isolated from clinical specimens (249 Candida spp., including 19 C. albicans and 230 non-albicans species and 63 isolates belonging to different species of the genera Saccharomyces [20 isolates], Rhodotorula [8 isolates], Cryptococcus [8 isolates], Trichosporon [7 isolates], Pichia [7 isolates], Geotrichum [12 isolates], and Sporopachydermia cereana [1 isolate]). Species were identified by using routine conventional phenotypical methods and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing in case of discrepancy. We used expanded thresholds for species identification (log score of ?1.7 with 3 identical consecutive propositions and no discrepancy between the duplicates for the Bruker Daltonics system and similitude of ?40% with 5 successive identical propositions and no discrepancy between the duplicates for the Shimadzu system). Of the 312 isolates, 272 (87.2%) and 258 (82.7%) were successfully identified by the Bruker Daltonics and Shimadzu systems, respectively. All isolates were successfully identified within the most frequent and clinically relevant Candida species by the two systems. Nonvalid results corresponded mainly to species not or poorly represented in the databases. Major misidentifications were observed for 2 isolates (0.6%) by the Bruker Daltonics system and 4 isolates (1.3%) by the Shimadzu system. In conclusion, the performances of the Bruker Daltonics and the Shimadzu systems for yeast identification were good and comparable under routine clinical conditions, despite their differences in sample preparation, database content, and spectrum analysis. PMID:23390281

  7. Comparison between the Biflex III-Biotyper and the Axima-SARAMIS Systems for Yeast Identification by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Caroline; Sabou, Marcela; Moussaoui, Wardi; Prévost, Gilles; Delarbre, Jean-Marie; Candolfi, Ermanno; Gravet, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is emerging in laboratories as a new diagnostic tool for microorganism identification. We prospectively compared the performances of the Biflex III-Biotyper (Bruker Daltonics) and the Axima (Shimadzu)-SARAMIS (AnagnosTec) systems for the identification of 312 yeasts isolated from clinical specimens (249 Candida spp., including 19 C. albicans and 230 non-albicans species and 63 isolates belonging to different species of the genera Saccharomyces [20 isolates], Rhodotorula [8 isolates], Cryptococcus [8 isolates], Trichosporon [7 isolates], Pichia [7 isolates], Geotrichum [12 isolates], and Sporopachydermia cereana [1 isolate]). Species were identified by using routine conventional phenotypical methods and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing in case of discrepancy. We used expanded thresholds for species identification (log score of ?1.7 with 3 identical consecutive propositions and no discrepancy between the duplicates for the Bruker Daltonics system and similitude of ?40% with 5 successive identical propositions and no discrepancy between the duplicates for the Shimadzu system). Of the 312 isolates, 272 (87.2%) and 258 (82.7%) were successfully identified by the Bruker Daltonics and Shimadzu systems, respectively. All isolates were successfully identified within the most frequent and clinically relevant Candida species by the two systems. Nonvalid results corresponded mainly to species not or poorly represented in the databases. Major misidentifications were observed for 2 isolates (0.6%) by the Bruker Daltonics system and 4 isolates (1.3%) by the Shimadzu system. In conclusion, the performances of the Bruker Daltonics and the Shimadzu systems for yeast identification were good and comparable under routine clinical conditions, despite their differences in sample preparation, database content, and spectrum analysis. PMID:23390281

  8. Differential identification of Candida species and other yeasts by analysis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled polypeptide profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.D.; Choo, K.B.; Tsai, W.C.; Jen, T.M.; Yeh, J.Y.; Han, S.H.

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes a scheme for differential identification of Candida species and other yeasts based on autoradiographic analysis of protein profiles of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled cellular proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Using ATCC strains as references, protein profile analysis showed that different Candida and other yeast species produced distinctively different patterns. Good agreement in results obtained with this approach and with other conventional systems was observed. Being accurate and reproducible, this approach provides a basis for the development of an alternative method for the identification of yeasts isolated from clinical specimens.

  9. New method for yeast identification using Burrows-Wheeler transform.

    PubMed

    Pokrzywa, Rafal

    2008-04-01

    The explosive growth in biological data in recent years has led to the development of new methods to identify DNA sequences. Many algorithms have recently been developed that search DNA sequences looking for unique DNA sequences. This paper considers the application of the Burrows-Wheeler transform (BWT) to the problem of unique DNA sequence identification. The BWT transforms a block of data into a format that is extremely well suited for compression. This paper presents a time-efficient algorithm to search for unique DNA sequences in a set of genes. This algorithm is applicable to the identification of yeast species and other DNA sequence sets. PMID:18464330

  10. Yeast identification in floral nectar of Mimulus aurantiacus (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyauk, C.; Belisle, M.; Fukami, T.

    2009-12-01

    Nectar is such a sugar-rich resource that serves as a natural habitat in which microbes thrive. As a result, yeasts arrive to nectar on the bodies of pollinators such as hummingbirds and bees. Yeasts use the sugar in nectar for their own needs when introduced. This research focuses on the identification of different types of yeast that are found in the nectar of Mimulus aurantiacus (commonly known as sticky monkey-flower). Unopened Mimulus aurantiacus flower buds were tagged at Jasper Ridge and bagged three days later. Floral nectar was then extracted and plated on potato dextrose agar. Colonies on the plates were isolated and DNA was extracted from each sample using QIAGEN DNeasy Plant Mini Kit. The DNA was amplified through PCR and ran through gel electrophoresis. The PCR product was used to clone the nectar samples into an E.coli vector. Finally, a phylogenetic tree was created by BLAST searching sequences in GenBank using the Internal Transcribed Space (ITS) locus. It was found that 18 of the 50 identified species were Candida magnifica, 14 was Candida rancensis, 6 were Crytococcus albidus and there were 3 or less of the following: Starmella bombicola, Candida floricola, Aureobasidium pullulans, Pichia kluyvera, Metschnikowa cibodaserisis, Rhodotorua colostri, and Malassezia globosa. The low diversity of the yeast could have been due to several factors: time of collection, demographics of Jasper Ridge, low variety of pollinators, and sugar concentration of the nectar. The results of this study serve as a necessary first step for a recently started research project on ecological interactions between plants, pollinators, and nectar-living yeast. More generally, this research studies the use of the nectar-living yeast community as a natural microcosm for addressing basic questions about the role of dispersal and competitive and facilitative interactions in ecological succession.

  11. Human heart cell proteins interacting with a C-terminally truncated 2A protein of coxsackie B3 virus: identification by the yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tiansheng; Huang, Xiaotian; Xia, Yanhua

    2016-04-01

    Protein 2A is a non-structural protein of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), an important human pathogen that can cause a variety of human diseases. Protein 2A not only participates in viral life cycle, but also regulates host cell functions; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms of CVB3 2A's function, the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system was adopted to screen for CVB3 2A interactive proteins in the human heart cDNA library. Full-length 2A shows strong transcriptional activity in yeast cells, which interferes with the application of Y2H system; therefore, a series of 2A deletion mutants were constructed. Analysis of transcriptional self-activation revealed that 2A lost its transcriptional activity after truncation of 60 amino acids (aa) at the N-terminus or deletion of 17 aa at the C-terminus. Choosing the 2A mutant with 17 aa deletion at the C-terminus as the bait protein, four interactive cellular proteins were identified, including TIMP4, MYL2, COX7C, and ENO1. These proteins are mostly related to protein degradation and metabolism. Although the interactions detected by the Y2H system should be considered as preliminary results, the finding of proteins translated from a human heart cDNA library that interacts with the CVB3 2A will stimulate experiments testing the reactivity of a translational mixture derived from that library with full-length 2A protein, followed by co-immunoprecipitation studies. PMID:26781950

  12. [Automated method for yeast identification: ATB 32 C].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Molina, J M; Coque, M T; Campos, E; Rando, C; Leiva, E F

    1992-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ATB 32 C (API system) automatic medium for identifying yeasts in clinical samples. A total of 101 yeasts strains were studied, representing 8 genera and 18 different species, identified by conventional means. All 32 microdomes of the track, including dehydrated substrates, were inoculated in a semi-solid media (C medium). After their incubation at 30 degrees C for 48 hours, the reading device ATB 1520 and the computer of ATB system the reading and automatic interpretation of the results. Using the ATB method, 85 strains were identified (84%) at species level, 9 at genus level and a non-conclusive or unacceptable profile was recorded in 7 strains. From all clinically important yeasts species, a total of 96% were identified by ATB method according to conventional methods. From all non clinically relevant species, ATB 32 C identified correctly 23 strains (78%). ATB 32 C method is a good alternative approach to conventional techniques for identifying yeasts in clinical samples. PMID:1391001

  13. Comparative Performance of the RapID Yeast Plus System and the API 20C AUX Clinical Yeast System

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael B.; Dunklee, Daisy; Vu, Hangna; Woods, Gail L.

    1999-01-01

    The performance of the RapID Yeast Plus System (Innovative Diagnostic Systems, Norcross, Ga.), a 4-h micropanel using single-substrate enzymatic test reactions, was compared with that of the API 20C AUX Clinical Yeast System (bioMerieux Vitek, Hazelwood, Mo.), a 48- to 72-h carbohydrate assimilation panel. Two hundred twenty-five yeasts, yeast-like fungi, and algae, comprising 28 species and including 30 isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans, an important pathogen not tested in appreciable numbers in other comparisons, were tested by both methods. On initial testing, 196 (87.1%) and 215 (95.6%) isolates were correctly identified by the RapID and API systems, respectively. Upon repeat testing, the number of correctly identified isolates increased to 220 (97.8%) for the RapID system and 223 (99.1%) for the API system. Reducing the turbidity of the test inoculum to that of a no. 3 McFarland turbidity standard, which is below that recommended by the manufacturer, resulted in the correct identification of most of the isolates initially misidentified by the RapID system, including 10 of 30 C. neoformans isolates. Concordance between the RapID and API results after repeat testing was 97.3%. PMID:10405424

  14. Locally isolated yeasts from Malaysia: identification, phylogenetic study and characterization.

    PubMed

    Oslan, Siti Nurbaya; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Basri, Mahiran; Chor, Adam Leow Thean

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts are a convenient platform for many applications. They have been widely used as the expression hosts. There is a need to have a new yeast expression system to contribute the molecular cloning demands. Eight yeast isolates were screened from various environment sources and identified through ribosomal DNA (rDNA) Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS). Full sequence of the rDNA ITS region for each isolate was BLASTed and phylogenetic study was constructed by using MEGA4. Among the isolates, isolate WB from 'ragi' (used to ferment carbohydrates) could be identified as a new species in order Saccharomycetales according to rDNA ITS region, morphology and biochemical tests. Isolate SO (from spoiled orange), RT (rotten tomato) and RG (different type of 'ragi') were identified as Pichia sp. Isolates R1 and R2, S4 and S5 (from the surrounding of a guava tree) were identified as Issatchenkia sp. and Hanseniaspora sp., respectively. Geneticin, 50 µg/mL, was determined to be the antibiotic marker for all isolates excepted for isolates RT and SO which used 500 µg/mL and 100 µg/mL Zeocin, respectively. Intra-extracellular proteins were screened for lipolytic activity at 30°C and 70°C. Thermostable lipase activity was detected in isolates RT and R1 with 0.6 U/mg and 0.1 U/mg, respectively. In conclusion, a new yeast-vector system for isolate WB can be developed by using phleomycin or geneticin as the drugs resistance marker. Moreover, strains RT and R1 can be investigated as a novel source of a thermostable lipase. PMID:22577620

  15. Identifying Candida and Other Yeast-Like Fungi: Utility of an Identification Algorithm in Resource Limited Setting

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Suveb; Kattungal, Sushma; Bhatia, Simi

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The increasing recovery rates of unusual yeasts with innate drug resistance make accurate identification crucial for successful therapy and infection control measures. The current study was undertaken to study the utility of CHROMagar Candida (CC) and evaluate an identification algorithm, using germ tube test (GT), CC and a commercial identification kit, API ID 32C. Settings and Design: The prospective study was carried out at a private laboratory in Mumbai, India. Materials and Methods: Identification of 533 yeast and yeast like isolates was carried out using an identification algorithm, comprising of the GT, CC and API tests. Results: CC was useful to detect mixed cultures. We were able to identify 393/533, i.e. 73.7 % of isolates using GT and CC Tests only. This was because C. albicans and C. tropicalis, which can be reliably identified using CC, constituted 75.2 % of the isolates. We were unable to identify 140 isolates, i.e. 26.3 %, using GT and CC tests only and performed additional testing using API ID 32C. CC was not found to be reliable in identifying C. krusei. Conclusion: The diverse identification profile obtained in our study substantiates the need for all diagnostic microbiology laboratories to be better prepared for identifying unusual yeasts. Though GT or CC testing cannot alone suffice for identification of all clinically encountered Candida and yeast-like fungi, use of GT, CC and automated identification systems in a step-wise algorithm can enable the same in a more cost effective manner. PMID:25653943

  16. Identification of yeasts isolated from commercial shell eggs stored at refrigerated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, M T; Jones, D R; Hinton, A; Ingram, K D; Northcutt, J K

    2008-06-01

    Yeasts and molds can grow on or in eggs, causing spoilage. Washed and unwashed eggs (treatments) were collected aseptically on three separate days (replications) from a commercial processing facility and stored for 10 weeks at 4 degrees C. Ten eggs from each treatment were sampled weekly (110 eggs per treatment per replication). Yeasts and molds were enumerated from external shell rinses by plating onto acidified potato dextrose agar. Yeast colonies were picked randomly and stored for subsequent identification by gas chromatographic analysis of fatty acid methyl esters using the MIDI Microbial Identification System. Of 688 isolates analyzed, 380 were identified to genus or species. Genera identified by this method included Candida, Cryptococcus, Hansenula, Hyphopichia, Metschnikowia, Rhodotorula, Sporobolomyces, and Torulaspora. Candida spp. accounted for 84.5% (321 of 380) of the isolate identifications. Candida famata was the most prevalent species (n = 120), followed by Candida lusitaniae (n = 38). A group of 20 isolates was subjected to molecular or biochemical analyses for comparison with the MIDI results. Biochemical tests were performed using automatic and mini systems. Results of biochemical tests and ribosomal DNA sequencing were in agreement for 11 of the isolates, but only 7 of the 20 MIDI-identified isolates were in agreement with the sequencing results. C. famata, an anamorph of Debaryomyces hansenii var. hansenii, was the most commonly identified isolate by all methods. These data indicate that there was limited correlation between results obtained with the MIDI system and the information obtained from molecular databases. However, both systems were able to correctly identify C. famata, the species most often isolated throughout egg storage. PMID:18592756

  17. Yeast as a model system for identification of metabolic targets of a 'glucosamine complex' used as a therapeutic agent of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dillemans, Monique; Appelboom, Thierry; Van Nedervelde, Laurence

    2008-11-01

    This manuscript describes the effect of a glucosamine complex and its different constituents on the metabolism of yeast cells. Indeed, the yeast model biosystem offers important advantages in the understanding of basic cellular and molecular processes. For example, the possibility to differentiate aerobic and anaerobic metabolism allows the measurement of glycolysis and mitochondria importance in the control of energetic metabolism and stress-responsive. Yeast growth and division can be controlled efficiently and effectively by adjusting environmental conditions that mimic some aspect of those experienced by chondrocytes in an osteoarthritic milieu, such as low oxygen and nutriment availabilities, high oxidative stress, etc. The glucosamine complex or some of its components (glucosamine sulphate, MSM, Ribes nigrum and silicon) enhanced cellular proliferation and CO(2) production of yeast cells cultured under severe conditions. In addition, it allows a larger output of protons from the cells into the medium. Glucosamine complex supplementation also boosted cellular resistance to stresses such as heat shock, H(2)O(2)-induced peroxidation and ethanol. The beneficial effects of the complex were primarily due to R. nigrum and to glucosamine sulphate components. The protective effect of the glucosamine complex can be explained by an increase of cellular energy level through intensification of mitochondrial functionality and intracellular machinery (anaerobic glycolysis). An additional effect on protein kinase activation is not unlikely. PMID:18662850

  18. Identification and assessment of kefir yeast potential for sugar/ethanol-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, M.G.C.P.; Cardoso, P.G.; Magalhães-Guedes, K.T.; Schwan, R.F.

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical and molecular analysis was used for identification of different kefir yeasts species from Brazil, Canada and the United States of America. The sugar/ethanol-resistant activity of the yeasts was evaluated. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus had the highest growth rates, suggesting biotechnological applications possible for these strains. PMID:24159292

  19. Identification of propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Walter; Guo, Ten-Huei; Duyar, Ahmet

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a tutorial on the use of model identification techniques for the identification of propulsion system models. These models are important for control design, simulation, parameter estimation, and fault detection. Propulsion system identification is defined in the context of the classical description of identification as a four step process that is unique because of special considerations of data and error sources. Propulsion system models are described along with the dependence of system operation on the environment. Propulsion system simulation approaches are discussed as well as approaches to propulsion system identification with examples for both air breathing and rocket systems.

  20. A switchable yeast display/secretion system.

    PubMed

    Van Deventer, James A; Kelly, Ryan L; Rajan, Saravanan; Wittrup, K Dane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2015-10-01

    Display technologies such as yeast and phage display offer powerful alternatives to traditional immunization-based antibody discovery, but require conversion of displayed proteins into soluble form prior to downstream characterization. Here we utilize amber suppression to implement a yeast-based switchable display/secretion system that enables the immediate production of soluble, antibody-like reagents at the end of screening efforts. Model selections in the switchable format remain efficient, and library screening in the switchable format yields renewable sources of affinity reagents exhibiting nanomolar binding affinities. These results confirm that this system provides a seamless link between display-based screening and the production and evaluation of soluble forms of candidate binding proteins. Switchable display/secretion libraries provide a cloning-free, accessible approach to affinity reagent generation. PMID:26333274

  1. Use of PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis for identification of yeast species isolated from bovine intramammary infection.

    PubMed

    Fadda, M E; Pisano, M B; Scaccabarozzi, L; Mossa, V; Deplano, M; Moroni, P; Liciardi, M; Cosentino, S

    2013-01-01

    This study reports a rapid PCR-based technique using a one-enzyme RFLP for discrimination of yeasts isolated from bovine clinical and subclinical mastitis milk samples. We analyzed a total of 1,486 milk samples collected over 1 yr in south Sardinia and northern Italy, and 142 yeast strains were preliminarily grouped based on their cultural morphology and physiological characteristics. Assimilation tests were conducted using the identification kit API ID 32C and APILAB Plus software (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France). For PCR-RFLP analysis, the 18S-ITS1-5.8S ribosomal(r)DNA region was amplified and then digested with HaeIII, and dendrogram analysis of RFLP fragments was carried out. Furthermore, within each of the groups identified by the API or PCR-RFLP methods, the identification of isolates was confirmed by sequencing of the D1/D2 region using an ABI Prism 310 automatic sequencer (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). The combined phenotypic and molecular approach enabled the identification of 17 yeast species belonging to the genera Candida (47.9%), Cryptococcus (21.1%), Trichosporon (19.7%), Geotrichum (7.1%), and Rhodotorula (4.2%). All Candida species were correctly identified by the API test and their identification confirmed by sequencing. All strains identified with the API system as Geotrichum candidum, Cryptococcus uniguttulatus, and Rhodotorula glutinis also produced characteristic restriction patterns and were confirmed as Galactomyces geotrichum (a teleomorph of G. candidum), Filobasidium uniguttulatum (teleomorph of Crypt. uniguttulatus), and R. glutinis, respectively, by D1/D2 rDNA sequencing. With regard to the genus Trichosporon, preliminary identification by API was problematic, whereas the RFLP technique used in this study gave characteristic restriction profiles for each species. Moreover, sequencing of the D1/D2 region allowed not only successful identification of Trichosporon gracile where API could not, but also correct identification of misidentified isolates. In conclusion, the 18S-ITS1-5.8S region appears to be useful in detecting genetic variability among yeast species, which is valuable for taxonomic purposes and for species identification. We have established an RFLP database for yeast species identified in milk samples using the software GelCompar II and the RFLP database constitutes an initial method for veterinary yeast identification. PMID:24119798

  2. Detection and identification of wild yeast in Koumiss.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhishen; Yang, XuJin; Yuan, Hongli

    2012-09-01

    Koumiss is a slightly alcoholic fermented mare's milk beverage, originally obtained by using a natural mixed starter of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts. Yeast is an important component of Koumiss processing which can affect the aroma, texture, as well as the nutrients beneficial to human health, but few reports have examined the yeast ecology of local ecosystems. The purpose of this study was to isolate and identify the yeast present in Koumiss from three representative regions of China using a polyphasic method. A total of 655 yeast isolates were obtained from 96 Koumiss samples collected from three regions in China. Koumiss harbored yeast populations at 5-7 log CFU/ml. Twelve different yeast species belonging to nine genera were detected in the Koumiss samples tested, including Candida pararugosa, Dekkera anomala, Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia orientalis, Kazachstania unispora, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Pichia deserticola, Pichia fermentans, Pichia manshurica, Pichia membranaefaciens, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii. Kluyveromyces marxianus, Kazachstania unispora and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were the dominant species present in this traditional fermented dairy product. This study is the first to identify the yeast communities associated with Koumiss in China. The results enrich our knowledge of yeast in Koumiss, give us a more complete picture of the microbial diversity in Koumiss and can be used to promote the development of the local dairy industry. PMID:22608237

  3. Yeasts and yeast-like fungi associated with tree bark: diversity and identification of yeasts producing extracellular endoxylanases.

    PubMed

    Bhadra, Bhaskar; Rao, R Sreenivas; Singh, Pavan K; Sarkar, Partha K; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2008-05-01

    A total of 239 yeast strains was isolated from 52 tree bark samples of the Medaram and Srisailam forest areas of Andhra Pradesh, India. Based on analysis of D1/D2 domain sequence of 26S rRNA gene, 114 strains were identified as ascomycetous; 107 strains were identified as basidiomycetous yeasts; and 18 strains were identified as yeast-like fungi. Among the ascomycetous yeasts, 51% were identified as members of the genus Pichia, and the remaining 49% included species belonging to the genera Clavispora, Debaryomyces, Kluyveromyces, Hanseniaspora, Issatchenkia, Lodderomyces, Kodamaea, Metschnikowia, and Torulaspora. The predominant genera in the basidiomycetous yeasts were Cryptococcus (48.6%), Rhodotorula (29%), and Rhodosporidium (12.1%). The yeast-like fungi were represented by Aureobasidium pullulans (6.7%) and Lecythophora hoffmanii (0.8%). Of the 239 yeast strains tested for Xylanase, only five strains of Aureobasidium sp. produced xylanase on xylan-agar medium. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis and N-terminal amino-acid sequence of the xylanase of isolate YS67 showed high similarity with endo-1-4-beta-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) of Aureobasidium pullulans var. melanigenum. PMID:18219522

  4. Comparative Evaluation of the Bruker Biotyper and Vitek MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time Of Flight (MALDI-TOF) Mass Spectrometry Systems for Identification of Yeasts of Medical Importance

    PubMed Central

    De Carolis, Elena; Infurnari, Laura; Vella, Antonietta; Clementi, Nicola; Vaccaro, Luisa; Ruggeri, Alberto; Posteraro, Brunella; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo; Sanguinetti, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    We report the first comparative evaluation between the Bruker Biotyper MS (BMS) and the Vitek MS (VMS) for the identification of yeasts. The rate of correct identifications at the species level was comparable using the commercial databases (89.8% versus 84.3%; P = 0.712), but higher for BMS using an in-house-extended database (100% versus 84.3%; P = 0.245). Importantly, the rate of misidentification was significantly higher for VMS (1% versus 12.1%; P < 0.0001), including the rate of major errors (0% versus 4.5%; P = 0.0036). PMID:23678071

  5. Identification of superior lipid producing Lipomyces and Myxozyma yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleaginous yeasts are of interest for production of single cell oils from sugars. Here 17 members of the Lipomyces and Myxozyma clade were screened for lipid production when cultured on glucose. The highest ranking yeasts included L. tetrasporus (21 g/l), L. kononenkoae (19.6 g/l), and L. lipofer (1...

  6. Routine identification and mixed species detection in 6,192 clinical yeast isolates.

    PubMed

    Cassagne, Carole; Normand, Anne-Cécile; Bonzon, Lucas; L'Ollivier, Coralie; Gautier, Magali; Jeddi, Fakhri; Ranque, Stéphane; Piarroux, Renaud

    2016-03-01

    The clinical laboratory methods used to diagnose yeast infections should be rapid, reliable, and capable of detecting mixed infections with species exhibiting a distinct antifungal susceptibility profile. In this study, we report the performance of a procedure combining the detection of mixed yeast cultures with a chromogenic medium and MALDI-TOF identification of the colonies. We then evaluated the impact that (i) the isolation medium and (ii) lowering the identification log score (LS) threshold value have on yeast identification performance in the routine laboratory.Among 15,661 clinical samples analyzed, 5,671 tested positive and 6,192 yeasts of 42 distinct species were identified. Overall, 6,117 isolates (98.79%) were identified on the first or second MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry (MS) attempt, yielding an average yeast species identification turnaround time of 0.346 days (95% CI [0.326 to 0.364]). The 75 remaining isolates were identified via nucleotide sequencing. Mixed infections accounted for 498 (8.78%) of the positive samples. The MALDI-TOF MS identification procedure performed well, regardless of the culture media tested. Lowering the recommended 2.0 LS threshold value to 1.8 would reduce the number of required (i) second MALDI-TOF MS identification attempts (178 vs. 490) and (ii) ITS2 and D1-D2 sequence-based identifications (17 vs. 75), while achieving an adequate identification rate (6,183/6,192, 99.85%).In conclusion, we propose applying a 1.8 LS threshold combined with chromogenic medium subculture to optimize the yeast identification workflow and detect mixed infection in the clinical laboratory. PMID:26613703

  7. Identification of Yeasts From the Suwannee River Florida Estuary1

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, C. R.; Koburger, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The yeast flora of the Suwannee River estuary in Florida has been studied. The predominant genera were Candida and Rhodotorula; however, the yeast most frequently isolated was Cryptococcus laurentii. Nine ascosporogenous species were isolated, with Hansenula saturnus predominating. The salinity range of the sediments was 0.4 to 20.6%; in the estuary water, 0.07 to 0.25%; and in the open Gulf of Mexico, 18 to 20%. Images PMID:16349995

  8. Advantages of Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry as a Rapid Diagnostic Tool for Identification of Yeasts and Mycobacteria in the Clinical Microbiological Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jonathan H. K.; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Ngan, Antonio H. Y.; Fung, Ami M. Y.; Woo, Wai-Lan; Yan, Mei-Kum; Choi, Garnet K. Y.; Ho, Pak-Leung; Cheng, Vincent C. C.

    2013-01-01

    Yeast and mycobacteria can cause infections in immunocompromised patients and normal hosts. The rapid identification of these organisms can significantly improve patient care. There has been an increasing number of studies on using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for rapid yeast and mycobacterial identifications. However, studies on direct comparisons between the Bruker Biotyper and bioMérieux Vitek MS systems for the identification of yeast and mycobacteria have been limited. This study compared the performance of the two systems in their identification of 98 yeast and 102 mycobacteria isolates. Among the 98 yeast isolates, both systems generated species-level identifications in >70% of the specimens, of which Candida albicans was the most commonly cultured species. At a genus-level identification, the Biotyper system identified more isolates than the Vitek MS system for Candida (75/78 [96.2%]versus 68/78 [87.2%], respectively; P = 0.0426) and non-Candida yeasts (18/20 [90.0%]versus 7/20 [35.0%], respectively; P = 0.0008). For mycobacterial identification, the Biotyper system generated reliable identifications for 89 (87.3%) and 64 (62.8%) clinical isolates at the genus and species levels, respectively, from solid culture media, whereas the Vitek MS system did not generate any reliable identification. The MS method differentiated 12/21 clinical species, despite the fact that no differentiation between Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium chelonae was found by using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In summary, the MALDI-TOF MS method provides short turnaround times and a standardized working protocol for the identification of yeast and mycobacteria. Our study demonstrates that MALDI-TOF MS is suitable as a first-line test for the identification of yeast and mycobacteria in clinical laboratories. PMID:24048537

  9. [Evaluation of mass spectrometry: MALDI-TOF MS for fast and reliable yeast identification].

    PubMed

    Relloso, María S; Nievas, Jimena; Fares Taie, Santiago; Farquharson, Victoria; Mujica, María T; Romano, Vanesa; Zarate, Mariela S; Smayevsky, Jorgelina

    2015-01-01

    The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique known as MALDI-TOF MS is a tool used for the identification of clinical pathogens by generating a protein spectrum that is unique for a given species. In this study we assessed the identification of clinical yeast isolates by MALDI-TOF MS in a university hospital from Argentina and compared two procedures for protein extraction: a rapid method and a procedure based on the manufacturer's recommendations. A short protein extraction procedure was applied in 100 isolates and the rate of correct identification at genus and species level was 98.0%. In addition, we analyzed 201 isolates, previously identified by conventional methods, using the methodology recommended by the manufacturer and there was 95.38% coincidence in the identification at species level. MALDI TOF MS showed to be a fast, simple and reliable tool for yeast identification. PMID:25882136

  10. Identification and functional analysis of chaperonin 10, the groES homolog from yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Rospert, S; Glick, B S; Jenö, P; Schatz, G; Todd, M J; Lorimer, G H; Viitanen, P V

    1993-01-01

    Chaperonin 60 (cpn60) and chaperonin 10 (cpn10) constitute the chaperonin system in prokaryotes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. In Escherichia coli, these two chaperonins are also termed groEL and groES. We have used a functional assay to identify the groES homolog cpn10 in yeast mitochondria. When dimeric ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) is denatured and allowed to bind to yeast cpn60, subsequent refolding of Rubisco is strictly dependent upon yeast cpn10. The heterologous combination of cpn60 from E. coli plus yeast cpn10 is also functional. In contrast, yeast cpn60 plus E. coli cpn10 do not support refolding of Rubisco. In the presence of MgATP, yeast cpn60 and yeast cpn10 form a stable complex that can be isolated by gel filtration and that facilitates refolding of denatured Rubisco. Although the potassium-dependent ATPase activity of E. coli cpn60 can be inhibited by cpn10 from either E. coli or yeast, neither of these cpn10s inhibits the ATPase activity of yeast cpn60. Amino acid sequencing of yeast cpn10 reveals substantial similarity to the corresponding cpn10 proteins from rat mitochondria and prokaryotes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7902576

  11. Author Identification Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, A. Ben

    2009-01-01

    Many efforts are currently underway to disambiguate author names and assign unique identification numbers so that publications by a given scholar can be reliably grouped together. This paper reviews a number of operational and in-development services. Some systems like ResearcherId.Com depend on self-registration and self-identification of a…

  12. Identification of food and beverage spoilage yeasts from DNA sequence analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection, identification, and classification of yeasts has undergone a major transformation in the last decade and a half following application of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons. Development of a database (barcode) of easily determined DNA sequences from domains 1 and 2 (D1/D2) of th...

  13. Yeasts from kefir grains: isolation, identification, and probiotic characterization.

    PubMed

    Diosma, Gabriela; Romanin, David E; Rey-Burusco, María F; Londero, Alejandra; Garrote, Graciela L

    2014-01-01

    Kefir-a traditional beverage whose consumption has been associated with health benefits-is a logical natural product to investigate for new probiotic strains. The aim of the present work was to isolate and identify kefir yeasts and select those with acid and bile tolerance to study their adhesion to epithelial cells and their transit through mouse gut. From 4 milky and 3 sugary kefir grains, 34 yeast strains were isolated and identified by means of classical microbiological and molecular-genetic methods (whole-cell protein pattern, internal-transcribed-spacer amplification, and analysis of restriction-fragment-length polymorphisms). We identified 4 species belonging to 3 genera-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (15 strains), Saccharomyces unisporus (6 strains), Issatchenkia occidentalis (4 strains), and Kluyveromyces marxianus (9 strains)-and selected 13 strains on the basis of resistance to low pH and bile salts. Among the strains selected, Kluyveromyces marxianus CIDCA 8154 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae CIDCA 8112 were further studied. Both strains evidenced the capacity to adhere to epithelial intestine-derived cells in vitro and to survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract of BALB/c mice. The investigation of the potential probiotic features of these kefir-yeast strains should be useful for the development of novel functional foods. PMID:23824665

  14. Identification of Medically Important Yeast Species by Sequence Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Leaw, Shiang Ning; Chang, Hsien Chang; Sun, Hsiao Fang; Barton, Richard; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2006-01-01

    Infections caused by yeasts have increased in previous decades due primarily to the increasing population of immunocompromised patients. In addition, infections caused by less common species such as Pichia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon, and Saccharomyces spp. have been widely reported. This study extensively evaluated the feasibility of sequence analysis of the rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions for the identification of yeasts of clinical relevance. Both the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of 373 strains (86 species), including 299 reference strains and 74 clinical isolates, were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The sequences were compared to reference data available at the GenBank database by using BLAST (basic local alignment search tool) to determine if species identification was possible by ITS sequencing. Since the GenBank database currently lacks ITS sequence entries for some yeasts, the ITS sequences of type (or reference) strains of 15 species were submitted to GenBank to facilitate identification of these species. Strains producing discrepant identifications between the conventional methods and ITS sequence analysis were further analyzed by sequencing of the D1-D2 domain of the large-subunit rRNA gene for species clarification. The rates of correct identification by ITS1 and ITS2 sequence analysis were 96.8% (361/373) and 99.7% (372/373), respectively. Of the 373 strains tested, only 1 strain (Rhodotorula glutinis BCRC 20576) could not be identified by ITS2 sequence analysis. In conclusion, identification of medically important yeasts by ITS sequencing, especially using the ITS2 region, is reliable and can be used as an accurate alternative to conventional identification methods. PMID:16517841

  15. Optimized System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Longman, Richard W.

    1999-01-01

    In system identification, one usually cares most about finding a model whose outputs are as close as possible to the true system outputs when the same input is applied to both. However, most system identification algorithms do not minimize this output error. Often they minimize model equation error instead, as in typical least-squares fits using a finite-difference model, and it is seen here that this distinction is significant. Here, we develop a set of system identification algorithms that minimize output error for multi-input/multi-output and multi-input/single-output systems. This is done with sequential quadratic programming iterations on the nonlinear least-squares problems, with an eigendecomposition to handle indefinite second partials. This optimization minimizes a nonlinear function of many variables, and hence can converge to local minima. To handle this problem, we start the iterations from the OKID (Observer/Kalman Identification) algorithm result. Not only has OKID proved very effective in practice, it minimizes an output error of an observer which has the property that as the data set gets large, it converges to minimizing the criterion of interest here. Hence, it is a particularly good starting point for the nonlinear iterations here. Examples show that the methods developed here eliminate the bias that is often observed using any system identification methods of either over-estimating or under-estimating the damping of vibration modes in lightly damped structures.

  16. Identification of indigenous yeast flora isolated from the five winegrape varieties harvested in Xiangning, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Guo, Jingjing; Liu, Fubing; Liu, Yanlin

    2014-03-01

    Inoculated fermentation by selected indigenous yeast strains from a specific location could provide the wine with unique regional sensory characteristics. The identification and differentiation of local yeasts are the first step to understand the function of yeasts and develop a better strain-selection program for winemaking. The indigenous yeasts in five grape varieties, Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Marselan, and Merlot cultivated in Xiangning, Shanxi, China were investigated. Eight species of seven genera including Aureobasidium pullulans, Candida zemplinina, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora occidentalis, Issatchenkia terricola, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia kluyveri, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified using Wallerstein Laboratory Nutrient medium with sequencing of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain. H. uvarum and S. cerevisiae were the predominant species, while most non-Saccharomyces species were present in the whole fermentation process at different levels among the grape varieties. The genotypes of S. cerevisiae from each microvinification were determined by using interdelta sequence analysis. The 102 isolates showed eight different genotypes, and genotype III was the predominant genotype found. The distribution of S. cerevisiae strains during the fermentation of Marselan was also studied. Six genotypes were observed among the 92 strains with different genotypes of competitiveness at different sampling stages. Genotype V demonstrated the potential for organizing starter strains and avoiding inefficient fermentation. In general, this study explored the yeast species in the grapes grown in Xiangning County and provided important information of relationship of local yeast diversity and its regional wine sensory characteristics. PMID:24395034

  17. Deterministic Bilinear System Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheh-Han; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2015-08-01

    A unified identification method is proposed for system realization of a deterministic continuous-time/discrete-time bilinear models from input and output measurement data. A generalized Hankel matrix is formed with the output measurements obtained by applying a set of repeated input sequences to a bilinear system. A computational procedure is developed to extract a time varying discrete-time state-space model from the generalized Hankel matrix. The bilinear system models are realized by transforming the identified time varying discrete-time model to the bilinear models. Numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed identification method.

  18. Systematic identification of cell size regulators in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Soifer, Ilya; Barkai, Naama

    2014-01-01

    Cell size is determined by a complex interplay between growth and division, involving multiple cellular pathways. To identify systematically processes affecting size control in G1 in budding yeast, we imaged and analyzed the cell cycle of millions of individual cells representing 591 mutants implicated in size control. Quantitative metric distinguished mutants affecting the mechanism of size control from the majority of mutants that have a perturbed size due to indirect effects modulating cell growth. Overall, we identified 17 negative and dozens positive size control regulators, with the negative regulators forming a small network centered on elements of mitotic exit network. Some elements of the translation machinery affected size control with a notable distinction between the deletions of parts of small and large ribosomal subunit: parts of small ribosomal subunit tended to regulate size control, while parts of the large subunit affected cell growth. Analysis of small cells revealed additional size control mechanism that functions in G2/M, complementing the primary size control in G1. Our study provides new insights about size control mechanisms in budding yeast. PMID:25411401

  19. Identification of Yeast and Human 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-?-d-ribofuranoside (AICAr) Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Ceschin, Johanna; Saint-Marc, Christelle; Laporte, Jean; Labriet, Adrien; Philippe, Chloé; Moenner, Michel; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Pinson, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-?-d-ribofuranoside (AICAr) is the precursor of the active monophosphate form (AICAR), a small molecule with potent anti-proliferative and low energy mimetic properties. The molecular bases for AICAR toxicity at the cellular level are poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of several yeast AICAr-hypersensitive mutants. Identification of the cognate genes allowed us to establish that thiamine transporters Thi7 and Thi72 can efficiently take up AICAr under conditions where they are overexpressed. We establish that, under standard growth conditions, Nrt1, the nicotinamide riboside carrier, is the major AICAr transporter in yeast. A study of AICAR accumulation in human cells revealed substantial disparities among cell lines and confirmed that AICAr enters cells via purine nucleoside transporters. Together, our results point to significant differences between yeast and human cells for both AICAr uptake and AICAR accumulation. PMID:24778186

  20. Molecular-based identification of yeasts isolated from bovine clinical mastitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomohito; Sugita, Takashi; Hata, Eiji; Katsuda, Ken; Zhang, Enshi; Kiku, Yoshio; Sugawara, Kazue; Ozawa, Tomomi; Matsubara, Tomoko; Ando, Takaaki; Obayashi, Tetsu; Ito, Takaaki; Yabusaki, Takahiro; Kudo, Katsunori; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Koiwa, Masateru; Oshida, Toshio; Tagawa, Yuichi; Kawai, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed molecular-based identification of yeasts that associated with bovine clinical mastitis in Japan. Over 3,200 quarter milk samples from Holstein dairy cows collected in 2011 on Hokkaido and Honshu islands were examined. Yeast isolates were characterized by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of the D1/D2 region of the 26S rDNA. Molecular characterization confirmed that Candida spp. and Pichia spp. were most frequently isolated species. Our molecular analysis of mastitic milk samples demonstrated the prevalence of Pichia kudriavzevii(22/58) and Candida tropicalis(14/58). In addition, we demonstrated that molecular analysis of the D1/D2 region of the 26S rDNA is a rapid and reliable method for identifying clinically significant yeasts in dairy hygiene, including potentially new or emerging pathogenic species. PMID:23100116

  1. Identification of yeast and human 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-?-d-ribofuranoside (AICAr) transporters.

    PubMed

    Ceschin, Johanna; Saint-Marc, Christelle; Laporte, Jean; Labriet, Adrien; Philippe, Chloé; Moenner, Michel; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Pinson, Benoît

    2014-06-13

    5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-?-d-ribofuranoside (AICAr) is the precursor of the active monophosphate form (AICAR), a small molecule with potent anti-proliferative and low energy mimetic properties. The molecular bases for AICAR toxicity at the cellular level are poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of several yeast AICAr-hypersensitive mutants. Identification of the cognate genes allowed us to establish that thiamine transporters Thi7 and Thi72 can efficiently take up AICAr under conditions where they are overexpressed. We establish that, under standard growth conditions, Nrt1, the nicotinamide riboside carrier, is the major AICAr transporter in yeast. A study of AICAR accumulation in human cells revealed substantial disparities among cell lines and confirmed that AICAr enters cells via purine nucleoside transporters. Together, our results point to significant differences between yeast and human cells for both AICAr uptake and AICAR accumulation. PMID:24778186

  2. Identification of rose phenylacetaldehyde synthase by functional complementation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Farhi, Moran; Lavie, Orly; Masci, Tania; Hendel-Rahmanim, Keren; Weiss, David; Abeliovich, Hagai; Vainstein, Alexander

    2010-02-01

    Rose flowers, like flowers and fruits of many other plants, produce and emit the aromatic volatiles 2-phenylacetaldehyde (PAA) and 2-phenylethylalchohol (PEA) which have a distinctive flowery/rose-like scent. Previous studies in rose have shown that, similar to petunia flowers, PAA is formed from L: -phenylalanine via pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent L: -aromatic amino acid decarboxylase. Here we demonstrate the use of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae aro10 mutant to functionally characterize a Rosa hybrida cv. Fragrance Cloud sequence (RhPAAS) homologous to petunia phenylacetaldehyde synthase (PhPAAS). Volatile headspace analysis of the aro10 knockout strain showed that it produces up to eight times less PAA and PEA than the WT. Expression of RhPAAS in aro10 complemented the yeast's mutant phenotype and elevated PAA levels, similar to petunia PhPAAS. PEA production levels were also enhanced in both aro10 and WT strains transformed with RhPAAS, implying an application for metabolic engineering of PEA biosynthesis in yeast. Characterization of spatial and temporal RhPAAS transcript accumulation in rose revealed it to be specific to floral tissues, peaking in mature flowers, i.e., coinciding with floral scent production and essentially identical to other rose scent-related genes. RhPAAS transcript, as well as PAA and PEA production in flowers, displayed a daily rhythmic behavior, reaching peak levels during the late afternoon hours. Examination of oscillation of RhPAAS transcript levels under free-running conditions suggested involvement of the endogenous clock in the regulation of RhPAAS expression in rose flowers. PMID:19882107

  3. Performance of mass spectrometric identification of bacteria and yeasts routinely isolated in a clinical microbiology laboratory using MALDI-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiping; Xi, Haiyan; Huang, Mei; Wang, Jie; Fan, Ming; Chen, Yong; Shao, Haifeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an emerging technology newly applied to identifying bacterial and yeast strains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of the VITEK® MS system in the identification of bacteria and yeast strains routinely isolated from clinical samples. Methods We prospectively analyzed routine MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification in parallel with conventional phenotypic identification of bacteria and yeasts regardless of phylum or source of isolation. Discordant results were resolved with 16S rDNA or internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene sequencing. Colonies (a single deposit on a MALDI disposable target without any prior extraction step) were analyzed using the VITEK® MS system. Peptide spectra acquired by the system were compared with the VITEK® MS IVD database Version 2.0, and the identification scores were recorded. Results Of the 1,181 isolates (1,061 bacterial isolates and 120 yeast isolates) analyzed, 99.5% were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry; 95.7% identified to the species level, 3.6% identified to the genus level, and 0.3% identified within a range of species belonging to different genera. Conversely, 0.1% of isolates were misidentified and 0.4% were unidentified, partly because the species were not included in the database. Re-testing using a second deposit provided a successful identification for 0.5% of isolates unidentified with the first deposit. Our results show that the VITEK® MS system has exceptional performance in identifying bacteria and yeast by comparing acquired peptide spectra to those contained in its database. Conclusions MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is a rapid, accurate, and relatively inexpensive method for bacterial and yeast identification. Our results demonstrate that the VITEK® MS system is a fast and reliable technique, and has the potential to replace conventional phenotypic identification for most bacterial and yeast strains routinely isolated in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:24822114

  4. Identification of food and beverage spoilage yeasts from DNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-11-20

    Detection, identification and classification of yeasts have undergone major changes in the last decade and a half following application of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons. Development of a database (barcode) of easily determined DNA sequences from domains 1 and 2 (D1/D2) of the nuclear large subunit rRNA gene and from ITS now permits many laboratories to identify species quickly and accurately, thus replacing the laborious and often inaccurate phenotypic tests previously used. Phylogenetic analysis of gene sequences has resulted in a major revision of yeast systematics resulting in redefinition of nearly all genera. This new understanding of species relationships has prompted a change of rules for naming and classifying yeasts and other fungi, and these new rules are presented in the recently implemented International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (Melbourne Code). The use of molecular methods for species identification and the impact of Code changes on classification will be discussed, especially in the context of food and beverage spoilage yeasts. PMID:26051959

  5. Accurate identification of centromere locations in yeast genomes using Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Varoquaux, Nelle; Liachko, Ivan; Ay, Ferhat; Burton, Joshua N; Shendure, Jay; Dunham, Maitreya J; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Noble, William S

    2015-06-23

    Centromeres are essential for proper chromosome segregation. Despite extensive research, centromere locations in yeast genomes remain difficult to infer, and in most species they are still unknown. Recently, the chromatin conformation capture assay, Hi-C, has been re-purposed for diverse applications, including de novo genome assembly, deconvolution of metagenomic samples and inference of centromere locations. We describe a method, Centurion, that jointly infers the locations of all centromeres in a single genome from Hi-C data by exploiting the centromeres' tendency to cluster in three-dimensional space. We first demonstrate the accuracy of Centurion in identifying known centromere locations from high coverage Hi-C data of budding yeast and a human malaria parasite. We then use Centurion to infer centromere locations in 14 yeast species. Across all microbes that we consider, Centurion predicts 89% of centromeres within 5 kb of their known locations. We also demonstrate the robustness of the approach in datasets with low sequencing depth. Finally, we predict centromere coordinates for six yeast species that currently lack centromere annotations. These results show that Centurion can be used for centromere identification for diverse species of yeast and possibly other microorganisms. PMID:25940625

  6. Accurate identification of centromere locations in yeast genomes using Hi-C

    PubMed Central

    Varoquaux, Nelle; Liachko, Ivan; Ay, Ferhat; Burton, Joshua N.; Shendure, Jay; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Noble, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Centromeres are essential for proper chromosome segregation. Despite extensive research, centromere locations in yeast genomes remain difficult to infer, and in most species they are still unknown. Recently, the chromatin conformation capture assay, Hi-C, has been re-purposed for diverse applications, including de novo genome assembly, deconvolution of metagenomic samples and inference of centromere locations. We describe a method, Centurion, that jointly infers the locations of all centromeres in a single genome from Hi-C data by exploiting the centromeres’ tendency to cluster in three-dimensional space. We first demonstrate the accuracy of Centurion in identifying known centromere locations from high coverage Hi-C data of budding yeast and a human malaria parasite. We then use Centurion to infer centromere locations in 14 yeast species. Across all microbes that we consider, Centurion predicts 89% of centromeres within 5 kb of their known locations. We also demonstrate the robustness of the approach in datasets with low sequencing depth. Finally, we predict centromere coordinates for six yeast species that currently lack centromere annotations. These results show that Centurion can be used for centromere identification for diverse species of yeast and possibly other microorganisms. PMID:25940625

  7. Isolation of plant transcription factors using a modified yeast one-hybrid system

    PubMed Central

    Lopato, Sergiy; Bazanova, Natalia; Morran, Sarah; Milligan, Andrew S; Shirley, Neil; Langridge, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Background The preparation of expressional cDNA libraries for use in the yeast two-hybrid system is quick and efficient when using the dedicated Clontech™ product, the MATCHMAKER Library Construction and Screening Kit 3. This kit employs SMART technology for the amplification of full-length cDNAs, in combination with cloning using homologous recombination. Unfortunately, such cDNA libraries prepared directly in yeast can not be used for the efficient recovery of purified plasmids and thus are incompatible with existing yeast one-hybrid systems, which use yeast transformation for the library screen. Results Here we propose an adaptation of the yeast one-hybrid system for identification and cloning of transcription factors using a MATCHMAKER cDNA library. The procedure is demonstrated using a cDNA library prepared from the liquid part of the multinucleate coenocyte of wheat endosperm. The method is a modification of a standard one-hybrid screening protocol, utilising a mating step to introduce the library construct and reporter construct into the same cell. Several novel full length transcription factors from the homeodomain, AP2 domain and E2F families of transcription factors were identified and isolated. Conclusion In this paper we propose a method to extend the compatibility of MATCHMAKER cDNA libraries from yeast two-hybrid screens to one-hybrid screens. The utility of the new yeast one-hybrid technology is demonstrated by the successful cloning from wheat of full-length cDNAs encoding several transcription factors from three different families. PMID:16504065

  8. Polyphasic identification of yeasts isolated from bark of cork oak during the manufacturing process of cork stoppers.

    PubMed

    Villa-Carvajal, Mercedes; Coque, Juan José R; Alvarez-Rodríguez, María Luísa; Uruburu, Federico; Belloch, Carmela

    2004-05-01

    A two-step protocol was used for the identification of 52 yeasts isolated from bark of cork oak at initial stages of the manufacturing process of cork stoppers. The first step in the identification was the separation of the isolates into groups by their physiological properties and RFLPs of the ITS-5.8S rRNA gene. The second step was the sequencing of the D1/D2 domains of the 26S rRNA gene of selected isolates representing the different groups. The results revealed a predominance of basidiomycetous yeasts (11 species), while only two species represented the ascomycetous yeasts. Among the basidiomycetous yeasts, members representing the species Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae and Rhodotorula nothofagi, that have been previously isolated from plant material, were the most abundant. Yeasts pertaining to the species Debaryomyces hansenii var. fabryii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Trichosporon mucoides were isolated in small numbers. PMID:15093778

  9. Toward genome-wide identification of Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities in yeast: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2013-01-01

    The Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller (BDM) model of reproductive isolation by genetic incompatibility is a widely accepted model of speciation. Because of the exceptionally rich biological information about the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the identification of BDM incompatibilities in yeast would greatly deepen our understanding of the molecular genetic basis of reproductive isolation and speciation. However, despite repeated efforts, BDM incompatibilities between nuclear genes have never been identified between S. cerevisiae and its sister species S. paradoxus. Such negative results have led to the belief that simple nuclear BDM incompatibilities do not exist between the two yeast species. Here, we explore an alternative explanation that such incompatibilities exist but were undetectable due to limited statistical power. We discover that previously employed statistical methods were not ideal and that a redesigned method improves the statistical power. We determine, under various sample sizes, the probabilities of identifying BDM incompatibilities that cause F1 spore inviability with incomplete penetrance, and confirm that the previously used samples were too small to detect such incompatibilities. Our findings call for an expanded experimental search for yeast BDM incompatibilities, which has become possible with the decreasing cost of genome sequencing. The improved methodology developed here is, in principle, applicable to other organisms and can help detect epistasis in general. PMID:23742870

  10. Non-targeted Identification of Prions and Amyloid-forming Proteins from Yeast and Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Pripuzova, Natalia; Burnett, Barrington G.; Shewmaker, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The formation of amyloid aggregates is implicated both as a primary cause of cellular degeneration in multiple human diseases and as a functional mechanism for providing extraordinary strength to large protein assemblies. The recent identification and characterization of several amyloid proteins from diverse organisms argues that the amyloid phenomenon is widespread in nature. Yet identifying new amyloid-forming proteins usually requires a priori knowledge of specific candidates. Amyloid fibers can resist heat, pressure, proteolysis, and denaturation by reagents such as urea or sodium dodecyl sulfate. Here we show that these properties can be exploited to identify naturally occurring amyloid-forming proteins directly from cell lysates. This proteomic-based approach utilizes a novel purification of amyloid aggregates followed by identification by mass spectrometry without the requirement for special genetic tools. We have validated this technique by blind identification of three amyloid-based yeast prions from laboratory and wild strains and disease-related polyglutamine proteins expressed in both yeast and mammalian cells. Furthermore, we found that polyglutamine aggregates specifically recruit some stress granule components, revealing a possible mechanism of toxicity. Therefore, core amyloid-forming proteins as well as strongly associated proteins can be identified directly from cells of diverse origin. PMID:23926098

  11. Non-targeted identification of prions and amyloid-forming proteins from yeast and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Pripuzova, Natalia; Burnett, Barrington G; Shewmaker, Frank

    2013-09-20

    The formation of amyloid aggregates is implicated both as a primary cause of cellular degeneration in multiple human diseases and as a functional mechanism for providing extraordinary strength to large protein assemblies. The recent identification and characterization of several amyloid proteins from diverse organisms argues that the amyloid phenomenon is widespread in nature. Yet identifying new amyloid-forming proteins usually requires a priori knowledge of specific candidates. Amyloid fibers can resist heat, pressure, proteolysis, and denaturation by reagents such as urea or sodium dodecyl sulfate. Here we show that these properties can be exploited to identify naturally occurring amyloid-forming proteins directly from cell lysates. This proteomic-based approach utilizes a novel purification of amyloid aggregates followed by identification by mass spectrometry without the requirement for special genetic tools. We have validated this technique by blind identification of three amyloid-based yeast prions from laboratory and wild strains and disease-related polyglutamine proteins expressed in both yeast and mammalian cells. Furthermore, we found that polyglutamine aggregates specifically recruit some stress granule components, revealing a possible mechanism of toxicity. Therefore, core amyloid-forming proteins as well as strongly associated proteins can be identified directly from cells of diverse origin. PMID:23926098

  12. Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA): a new systems approach to identify therapeutic targets for human genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, David J.; Juan, Ilona; Le, Hao; Cai, Xiaodong; Baumbach, Lisa; Beattie, Christine; D'Urso, Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    Genetic interaction networks that underlie most human diseases are highly complex and poorly defined. Better-defined networks will allow identification of a greater number of therapeutic targets. Here we introduce our Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA) approach and test it with the X-linked spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) disease gene UBA1. First, we express UBA1 and a mutant variant in fission yeast and use high-throughput methods to identify fission yeast genetic modifiers of UBA1. Second, we analyze available protein-protein interaction network databases in both fission yeast and human to construct UBA1 genetic networks. Third, from these networks we identified potential therapeutic targets for SMA. Finally, we validate one of these targets in a vertebrate (zebrafish) SMA model. This study demonstrates the power of combining synthetic and chemical genetics with a simple model system to identify human disease gene networks that can be exploited for treating human diseases. PMID:25075304

  13. Are the Conventional Commercial Yeast Identification Methods Still Helpful in the Era of New Clinical Microbiology Diagnostics? A Meta-Analysis of Their Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Posteraro, Brunella; Efremov, Ljupcho; Leoncini, Emanuele; Amore, Rosarita; Posteraro, Patrizia; Ricciardi, Walter; Sanguinetti, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Accurate identification of pathogenic species is important for early appropriate patient management, but growing diversity of infectious species/strains makes the identification of clinical yeasts increasingly difficult. Among conventional methods that are commercially available, the API ID32C, AuxaColor, and Vitek 2 systems are currently the most used systems in routine clinical microbiology. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate and to compare the accuracy of the three systems, in order to assess whether they are still of value for the species-level identification of medically relevant yeasts. After adopting rigorous selection criteria, we included 26 published studies involving Candida and non-Candida yeasts that were tested with the API ID32C (674 isolates), AuxaColor (1,740 isolates), and Vitek 2 (2,853 isolates) systems. The random-effects pooled identification ratios at the species level were 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80 to 0.95) for the API ID32C system, 0.89 (95% CI, 0.83 to 0.93) for the AuxaColor system, and 0.93 (95% CI, 0.89 to 0.96) for the Vitek 2 system (P for heterogeneity, 0.255). Overall, the accuracy of studies using phenotypic analysis-based comparison methods was comparable to that of studies using molecular analysis-based comparison methods. Subanalysis of studies conducted on Candida yeasts showed that the Vitek 2 system was significantly more accurate (pooled ratio, 0.94 [95% CI, 0.85 to 0.99]) than the API ID32C system (pooled ratio, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.61 to 0.99]) and the AuxaColor system (pooled ratio, 0.76 [95% CI, 0.67 to 0.84]) with respect to uncommon species (P for heterogeneity, <0.05). Subanalysis of studies conducted on non-Candida yeasts (i.e., Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces, and Trichosporon) revealed pooled identification accuracies of ?98% for the Vitek 2, API ID32C (excluding Cryptococcus), and AuxaColor (only Rhodotorula) systems, with significant low or null levels of heterogeneity (P > 0.05). Nonetheless, clinical microbiologists should reconsider the usefulness of these systems, particularly in light of new diagnostic tools such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, which allow for considerably shortened turnaround times and/or avoid the requirement for additional tests for species identity confirmation. PMID:25994160

  14. Are the Conventional Commercial Yeast Identification Methods Still Helpful in the Era of New Clinical Microbiology Diagnostics? A Meta-Analysis of Their Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Efremov, Ljupcho; Leoncini, Emanuele; Amore, Rosarita; Posteraro, Patrizia; Ricciardi, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Accurate identification of pathogenic species is important for early appropriate patient management, but growing diversity of infectious species/strains makes the identification of clinical yeasts increasingly difficult. Among conventional methods that are commercially available, the API ID32C, AuxaColor, and Vitek 2 systems are currently the most used systems in routine clinical microbiology. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate and to compare the accuracy of the three systems, in order to assess whether they are still of value for the species-level identification of medically relevant yeasts. After adopting rigorous selection criteria, we included 26 published studies involving Candida and non-Candida yeasts that were tested with the API ID32C (674 isolates), AuxaColor (1,740 isolates), and Vitek 2 (2,853 isolates) systems. The random-effects pooled identification ratios at the species level were 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80 to 0.95) for the API ID32C system, 0.89 (95% CI, 0.83 to 0.93) for the AuxaColor system, and 0.93 (95% CI, 0.89 to 0.96) for the Vitek 2 system (P for heterogeneity, 0.255). Overall, the accuracy of studies using phenotypic analysis-based comparison methods was comparable to that of studies using molecular analysis-based comparison methods. Subanalysis of studies conducted on Candida yeasts showed that the Vitek 2 system was significantly more accurate (pooled ratio, 0.94 [95% CI, 0.85 to 0.99]) than the API ID32C system (pooled ratio, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.61 to 0.99]) and the AuxaColor system (pooled ratio, 0.76 [95% CI, 0.67 to 0.84]) with respect to uncommon species (P for heterogeneity, <0.05). Subanalysis of studies conducted on non-Candida yeasts (i.e., Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces, and Trichosporon) revealed pooled identification accuracies of ?98% for the Vitek 2, API ID32C (excluding Cryptococcus), and AuxaColor (only Rhodotorula) systems, with significant low or null levels of heterogeneity (P > 0.05). Nonetheless, clinical microbiologists should reconsider the usefulness of these systems, particularly in light of new diagnostic tools such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, which allow for considerably shortened turnaround times and/or avoid the requirement for additional tests for species identity confirmation. PMID:25994160

  15. Yeast Prions: Structure, Biology, and Prion-Handling Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shewmaker, Frank P.; Bateman, David A.; Edskes, Herman K.; Gorkovskiy, Anton; Dayani, Yaron; Bezsonov, Evgeny E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY A prion is an infectious protein horizontally transmitting a disease or trait without a required nucleic acid. Yeast and fungal prions are nonchromosomal genes composed of protein, generally an altered form of a protein that catalyzes the same alteration of the protein. Yeast prions are thus transmitted both vertically (as genes composed of protein) and horizontally (as infectious proteins, or prions). Formation of amyloids (linear ordered β-sheet-rich protein aggregates with β-strands perpendicular to the long axis of the filament) underlies most yeast and fungal prions, and a single prion protein can have any of several distinct self-propagating amyloid forms with different biological properties (prion variants). Here we review the mechanism of faithful templating of protein conformation, the biological roles of these prions, and their interactions with cellular chaperones, the Btn2 and Cur1 aggregate-handling systems, and other cellular factors governing prion generation and propagation. Human amyloidoses include the PrP-based prion conditions and many other, more common amyloid-based diseases, several of which show prion-like features. Yeast prions increasingly are serving as models for the understanding and treatment of many mammalian amyloidoses. Patients with different clinical pictures of the same amyloidosis may be the equivalent of yeasts with different prion variants. PMID:25631286

  16. Potential of yeast secretory vesicles in biodelivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kutralam-Muniasamy, Gurusamy; Flores-Cotera, Luis B; Perez-Guevara, Fermin

    2015-06-01

    Membranous vesicular organelles (MVOs), such as secretory vesicles and exosomes, perform a variety of biological functions ranging from secretion to cellular communication in eukaryotic cells. Exosomes, particularly those of mammalian cells, have been widely studied as potential carriers in human therapeutic applications. However, no study has yet demonstrated the use of yeast secretory vesicles for such applications. Therefore, we explore here the current state of knowledge on yeast secretory vesicles and their potential use in therapeutic delivery systems. We focus on the characteristics shared by exosomes and yeast secretory vesicles to provide insights into the use of the latter as delivery vehicles. From this perspective, we speculate on the potential application of post-Golgi vesicles (PGVs) in the biomedical field. PMID:25843637

  17. Identification of predominant yeasts associated with artisan Mexican cocoa fermentations using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches.

    PubMed

    Arana-Sánchez, A; Segura-García, L E; Kirchmayr, M; Orozco-Ávila, I; Lugo-Cervantes, E; Gschaedler-Mathis, A

    2015-02-01

    The process of cocoa fermentation is a very important step for the generation or aromatic compounds, which are attributable to the metabolism of the microorganisms involved. There are some reports about this process and the identification of microorganisms; however, there are no reports identifying the yeasts involved in a Mexican cocoa fermentation process using molecular biology techniques, including restricted fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The aim of this study was to identify the main yeast species associated with Mexican cocoa fermentations employing culture-dependent and -independent techniques achieving two samplings with a 1 year time difference at the same site. Isolation of the microorganisms was performed in situ. Molecular identification of yeast isolates was achieved by RFLP analysis and rDNA sequencing. Total DNA from the microorganisms on the cocoa beans was utilized for the DGGE analysis. Bands from the DGGE gels were excised and sequenced. Nineteen isolated yeasts were identified (al specie level), three of which had never before been associated with cocoa fermentations worldwide. The detected predominant yeast varied from one technique to another. Hanseniaspora sp. resulted dominant in DGGE however Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the principal isolated species. In conclusion, the culture-dependent and -independent techniques complement each other showing differences in the main yeasts involved in spontaneous cocoa fermentation, probably due to the physiological states of the viable but non culturable yeasts. Furthermore important differences between the species detected in the two samplings were detected. PMID:25566818

  18. Molecular identification and osmotolerant profile of wine yeasts that ferment a high sugar grape must.

    PubMed

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Chaves-López, Clemencia; Di Fabio, Federico; Schirone, Maria; Felis, Giovanna E; Torriani, Sandra; Paparella, Antonello; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2009-04-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeast populations involved in a spontaneous fermentation of a traditional high sugar must (Vino cotto) produced in central Italy. Molecular identification of a total of 78 isolates was achieved by a combination of PCR-RFLP of the 5.8S ITS rRNA region and sequencing of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. In addition, the isolates were differentiated by RAPD-PCR. Only a restricted number of osmotolerant yeast species, i.e. Candida apicola, Candida zemplinina and Zygosaccharomyces bailii, were found throughout all the fermentation process, while Saccharomyces cerevisiae prevailed after 15 days of fermentation. A physiological characterization of isolates was performed in relation to the resistance to osmotic stress and ethanol concentration. The osmotolerant features of C. apicola, C. zemplinina and Z. bailii were confirmed, while S. cerevisiae strains showed three patterns of growth in response to different glucose concentrations (2%, 20%, 40% and 60% w/v). The ability of some C. apicola and C. zemplinina strains to grow at 14% v/v ethanol is noteworthy. The finding that some yeast biotypes with higher multiple stress tolerance can persist in the entire winemaking process suggests possible future candidates as starter for Vino cotto production. PMID:19230999

  19. Uniform power plant identification system

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, W. ); Pannenbacker, K. ); Popp, H. ); Seltmann, A. )

    1990-01-01

    In the seventies in the Federal Republic of Germany a uniform power plant identification system (Kraftwerks-Kennzeichen-System, KKS) was developed and introduced. It allows to keep the identification by all engineering disciplines from planning to waste management for any type of power plant. The paper explains the historical development, the structure and the application of this system.

  20. Identification and characterization of yeasts causing chalk mould defects on par-baked bread.

    PubMed

    Deschuyffeleer, N; Audenaert, K; Samapundo, S; Ameye, S; Eeckhout, M; Devlieghere, F

    2011-08-01

    Pichia anomala, Hyphopichia burtonii and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera are spoilage yeasts causing chalk mould defects on par-baked breads packaged under modified atmosphere. The first objective of this study was to identify yeasts isolated from spoiled par-baked breads by means of a RAPD protocol and to determine the dominant spoilers amongst identified strains. The second objective was to determine the effects of water activity (a(w)) and pH value on the growth rates and lag phase durations of P. anomala, H. burtonii and S. fibuligera. 95% of the yeasts tested were identified as P. anomala and 5% as S. fibuligera, H. burtonii was not detected. In order to investigate the effect of a(w) and pH the growth of the three yeasts was tested within an a(w) range of 0.88-0.98 and a pH range of 2.8-8.0. P. anomala was able to grow from pH 2.8 to 8 without a clear optimum. S. fibuligera and H. burtonii showed a pH optimum for growth of 5. The optimum water activity for growth was different for the three strains and varied between 0.96 and 0.98. These growth data were further used to develop secondary models that describe the relationship between a(w) and the radial or colony growth rate (g, mm/d) or the lag phase duration (?, d). The identification of the spoilage organisms and a good understanding of the effects of a(w) and pH on the growth behavior is essential for future development of adequate conservation strategies against chalk mould defects. PMID:21569947

  1. Expressed Sequence Tag Analysis of the Human Pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Yeast Phase: Identification of Putative Homologues of Candida albicans Virulence and Pathogenicity Genes

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Gustavo H.; dos Reis Marques, Everaldo; Custódio Duarte Ribeiro, Diógenes; Ângelo de Souza Bernardes, Luciano; Quiapin, Andréa Carla; Vitorelli, Patrícia Marostica; Savoldi, Marcela; Semighini, Camile P.; de Oliveira, Regina C.; Nunes, Luiz R.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Puccia, Rosana; Batista, Wagner L.; Ferreira, Leslie Ecker; Moreira, Júlio C.; Bogossian, Ana Paula; Tekaia, Fredj; Nobrega, Marina Pasetto; Nobrega, Francisco G.; Goldman, Maria Helena S.

    2003-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a thermodimorphic fungus, is the causative agent of the prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America, paracoccidioidomycosis. We present here a survey of expressed genes in the yeast pathogenic phase of P. brasiliensis. We obtained 13,490 expressed sequence tags from both 5? and 3? ends. Clustering analysis yielded the partial sequences of 4,692 expressed genes that were functionally classified by similarity to known genes. We have identified several Candida albicans virulence and pathogenicity homologues in P. brasiliensis. Furthermore, we have analyzed the expression of some of these genes during the dimorphic yeast-mycelium-yeast transition by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Clustering analysis of the mycelium-yeast transition revealed three groups: (i) RBT, hydrophobin, and isocitrate lyase; (ii) malate dehydrogenase, contigs Pb1067 and Pb1145, GPI, and alternative oxidase; and (iii) ubiquitin, delta-9-desaturase, HSP70, HSP82, and HSP104. The first two groups displayed high mRNA expression in the mycelial phase, whereas the third group showed higher mRNA expression in the yeast phase. Our results suggest the possible conservation of pathogenicity and virulence mechanisms among fungi, expand considerably gene identification in P. brasiliensis, and provide a broader basis for further progress in understanding its biological peculiarities. PMID:12582121

  2. An autonomous system for identifying and governing a cell's state in yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissim, Lior; Beatus, Tsevi; Bar-Ziv, Roy

    2007-09-01

    We present an approach for an autonomous system that detects a particular state of interest in a living cell and can govern cell fate accordingly. Cell states could be better identified by the expression pattern of several genes than of a single one. Therefore, autonomous identification can be achieved by a system that measures the expression of these several genes and integrates their activities into a single output. We have constructed a system that diagnoses a unique state in yeast, in which two independent pathways, methionine anabolism and galactose catabolism, are active. Our design is based on modifications of the yeast two-hybrid system. We show that cells could autonomously report on their state, identify the state of interest, and inhibit their growth accordingly. The system's sensitivity is adjustable to detect states with limited dynamic range of inputs. The system's output depends only on the activity of input pathways, not on their identity; hence it is straightforward to diagnose any pair of inputs. A simple model is presented that accounts for the data and provides predictive power. We propose that such systems could handle real-life states-of-interest such as identification of aberrant versus normal growth.

  3. Comparison of the Accuracy of Two Conventional Phenotypic Methods and Two MALDI-TOF MS Systems with That of DNA Sequencing Analysis for Correctly Identifying Clinically Encountered Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Qiao-Ting; Lee, Tai-Fen; Teng, Shih-Hua; Peng, Li-Yun; Chen, Ping-Hung; Teng, Lee-Jene; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the accuracy of species-level identification of two commercially available matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems (Bruker Biotyper and Vitek MS) and two conventional phenotypic methods (Phoenix 100 YBC and Vitek 2 Yeast ID) with that of rDNA gene sequencing analysis among 200 clinical isolates of commonly encountered yeasts. The correct identification rates of the 200 yeast isolates to species or complex (Candida parapsilosis complex, C. guilliermondii complex and C. rugosa complex) levels by the Bruker Biotyper, Vitek MS (using in vitro devices [IVD] database), Phoenix 100 YBC and Vitek 2 Yeast ID (Sabouraud's dextrose agar) systems were 92.5%, 79.5%, 89%, and 74%, respectively. An additional 72 isolates of C. parapsilosis complex and 18 from the above 200 isolates (30 in each of C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis) were also evaluated separately. Bruker Biotyper system could accurately identify all C. parapsilosis complex to species level. Using Vitek 2 MS (IVD) system, all C. parapsilosis but none of C. metapsilosis, or C. orthopsilosis could be accurately identified. Among the 89 yeasts misidentified by the Vitek 2 MS (IVD) system, 39 (43.8%), including 27 C. orthopsilosis isolates, could be correctly identified Using the Vitek MS Plus SARAMIS database for research use only. This resulted in an increase in the rate of correct identification of all yeast isolates (87.5%) by Vitek 2 MS. The two species in C. guilliermondii complex (C. guilliermondii and C. fermentati) isolates were correctly identified by cluster analysis of spectra generated by the Bruker Biotyper system. Based on the results obtained in the current study, MALDI-TOF MS systems present a promising alternative for the routine identification of yeast species, including clinically commonly and rarely encountered yeast species and several species belonging to C. parapsilosis complex, C. guilliermondii complex, and C. rugosa complex. PMID:25330370

  4. Detection and identification of wild yeasts in Champús, a fermented Colombian maize beverage.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Cadavid, Esteban; Chaves-López, Clemencia; Tofalo, Rosanna; Paparella, Antonello; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the predominant yeasts in Champús, a traditional Colombian cereal-based beverage with a low alcoholic content. Samples of Champús from 20 production sites in the Cauca Valley region were analysed. A total of 235 yeast isolates were identified by conventional microbiological analyses and by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2. The dominant species were: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Issatchenkia orientalis, Pichia fermentans, Pichia kluyveri var. kluyveri, Zygosaccharomyces fermentati, Torulospora delbruekii, Galactomyces geotrichum and Hanseniaspora spp. Model Champús systems were inoculated with single strains of some isolated sporogenus species and the aromatic profiles were analysed by SPME. Analysis of data showed that Champús strains produced high amounts of esters. The aromatic compounds produced by Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts from Champús can exert a relevant influence on the sensory characteristics of the fermented beverage. The Champús strains could thus represent an important source for new yeast biotypes with potential industrial applications. PMID:18620968

  5. Dietary Yeasts Reduce Inflammation in Central Nerve System via Microflora

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Kazushiro; Tomita, Takayuki; Okuno, Tatsusada; Kinoshita, Makoto; Koda, Toru; Honorat, Josephe A; Takei, Masaya; Hagihara, Kouichiro; Sugimoto, Tomoyuki; Mochizuki, Hideki; Sakoda, Saburo; Nakatsuji, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The intestinal microflora affects the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases by influencing immune system function. Some bacteria, such as lactic acid bacteria, have been reported to have beneficial effects on immune function. However, little is known about the effects of yeasts. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of various dietary yeasts contained in fermented foods on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these effects. Methods The effects of eight yeasts selected from 18 types of yeasts contained in fermented foods were examined using an EAE model. Of these, Candida kefyr was investigated by analyzing the intestinal microflora and its effects on intestinal and systemic immune states. Results Administration of C. kefyr ameliorated the severity of EAE. Reduced numbers of Th17 cells, suppressed interleukin (IL)-6 production by intestinal explants, and increased Tregs and CD103-positive regulatory dendritic cells in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were observed. Analysis of 16s-rDNA from feces of C. kefyr-treated mice demonstrated increased Lactobacillales and decreased Bacteroides compared to control flora. Transfer of intestinal microbiota also resulted in decreased Bacteroides and ameliorated symptoms of EAE. Thus, oral administration of C. kefyr ameliorated EAE by altering the microflora, accompanied by increased Tregs and CD103-positive regulatory dendritic cells in MLNs and decreased Th17 cells in the intestinal lamina propria. Interpretation Oral ingestion of C. kefyr may have beneficial effects on MS by modifying microflora. In addition, our findings also suggested the potential health benefits of dietary yeasts. PMID:25642435

  6. Performance and Cost Analysis of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Routine Identification of Yeast?

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Neelam; Hall, Leslie; Wohlfiel, Sherri L.; Buckwalter, Seanne P.; Wengenack, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry was compared to phenotypic testing for yeast identification. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry yielded 96.3% and 84.5% accurate species level identifications (spectral scores, ?1.8) for 138 common and 103 archived strains of yeast. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is accurate, rapid (5.1 min of hands-on time/identification), and cost-effective ($0.50/sample) for yeast identification in the clinical laboratory. PMID:21270234

  7. RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDA ALBICANS DIRECTLY FROM YEAST POSITIVE BLOOD CULTURE BOTTLES BY FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION USING PNA PROBES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles is described. The test (C. albicans PNA FISH) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe targeting C. albicans 26...

  8. Evaluation of the Yeast Traffic Light PNA FISH Probes for Identification of Candida Species from Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Leslie; Le Febre, Kara M.; Deml, Sharon M.; Wohlfiel, Sherri L.

    2012-01-01

    The Yeast Traffic Light PNA FISH kit (YTL) correctly identified Candida spp. in 207/216 (96%) positive blood cultures. Discordant results were seen with known cross-reacting species and cultures containing Candida lambica and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. The YTL provides rapid, reliable identification of the five common Candida species found in blood cultures. PMID:22238445

  9. Identification of multivariate linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, J.M.

    1982-04-01

    Multivariate identification problems are treated with a least-squares approach. A chapter on scalar problems focuses attention on the classical parameter-estimate bias problem caused by measurement noise and develops a straightforward and effective way to remove the bias. A chapter on multivariate problems generalizes the bias removal method and develops a form selection procedure. The form selection procedure generally ensures more accurate identification than is possible with identification methods which rely on a fixed form. The concept of a form selection procedure is new to this work. A results chapter presents four example problems. Each example illustrates specific features of the identification technique. As a collection the examples emphasize the complexity of system identification and demonstrate that identification techniques will perform well when carefully applied.

  10. Killer systems of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    The killer systems of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are an unusual class of cytoplasmic symbionts of primitive eukaryotes. The genetic material of these symbionts is double-stranded RNA. They are characterized by the linearity of the genome, its fragmentation into a major and a minor fraction, which replicate separately, and their ability to control the synthesis of secretory mycocin proteins possessing a toxic action on closely related strains. The secretion of mycocins at the same time ensures acquiring of resistance to them. Strains containing killer symbionts are toxigenic and resistant to the action of their own toxin, but strains that are free of killer double-stranded RNAs are sensitive to the action of mycocins. The killer systems of S. cerevisiae have retained features relating them to viruses and are apparently the result of evolution of infectious viruses. The occurrences of such systems among monocellular eukaryotic organisms is an example of complication of the genome by means of its assembly from virus-like components. We discuss the unusual features of replication and the expression of killer systems and their utilization in the construction of vector molecules.

  11. Interlaboratory comparison of sample preparation methods, database expansions, and cutoff values for identification of yeasts by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry using a yeast test panel.

    PubMed

    Vlek, Anneloes; Kolecka, Anna; Khayhan, Kantarawee; Theelen, Bart; Groenewald, Marizeth; Boel, Edwin; Boekhout, Teun

    2014-08-01

    An interlaboratory study using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to determine the identification of clinically important yeasts (n = 35) was performed at 11 clinical centers, one company, and one reference center using the Bruker Daltonics MALDI Biotyper system. The optimal cutoff for the MALDI-TOF MS score was investigated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. The percentages of correct identifications were compared for different sample preparation methods and different databases. Logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the association between the number of spectra in the database and the percentage of strains that were correctly identified. A total of 5,460 MALDI-TOF MS results were obtained. Using all results, the area under the ROC curve was 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94 to 0.96). With a sensitivity of 0.84 and a specificity of 0.97, a cutoff value of 1.7 was considered optimal. The overall percentage of correct identifications (formic acid-ethanol extraction method, score ? 1.7) was 61.5% when the commercial Bruker Daltonics database (BDAL) was used, and it increased to 86.8% by using an extended BDAL supplemented with a Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS)-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre in-house database (BDAL+CBS in-house). A greater number of main spectra (MSP) in the database was associated with a higher percentage of correct identifications (odds ratio [OR], 1.10; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.15; P < 0.01). The results from the direct transfer method ranged from 0% to 82.9% correct identifications, with the results of the top four centers ranging from 71.4% to 82.9% correct identifications. This study supports the use of a cutoff value of 1.7 for the identification of yeasts using MALDI-TOF MS. The inclusion of enough isolates of the same species in the database can enhance the proportion of correctly identified strains. Further optimization of the preparation methods, especially of the direct transfer method, may contribute to improved diagnosis of yeast-related infections. PMID:24920782

  12. Interlaboratory Comparison of Sample Preparation Methods, Database Expansions, and Cutoff Values for Identification of Yeasts by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Using a Yeast Test Panel

    PubMed Central

    Vlek, Anneloes; Kolecka, Anna; Khayhan, Kantarawee; Theelen, Bart; Groenewald, Marizeth; Boel, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    An interlaboratory study using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to determine the identification of clinically important yeasts (n = 35) was performed at 11 clinical centers, one company, and one reference center using the Bruker Daltonics MALDI Biotyper system. The optimal cutoff for the MALDI-TOF MS score was investigated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. The percentages of correct identifications were compared for different sample preparation methods and different databases. Logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the association between the number of spectra in the database and the percentage of strains that were correctly identified. A total of 5,460 MALDI-TOF MS results were obtained. Using all results, the area under the ROC curve was 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94 to 0.96). With a sensitivity of 0.84 and a specificity of 0.97, a cutoff value of 1.7 was considered optimal. The overall percentage of correct identifications (formic acid-ethanol extraction method, score ? 1.7) was 61.5% when the commercial Bruker Daltonics database (BDAL) was used, and it increased to 86.8% by using an extended BDAL supplemented with a Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS)-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre in-house database (BDAL+CBS in-house). A greater number of main spectra (MSP) in the database was associated with a higher percentage of correct identifications (odds ratio [OR], 1.10; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.15; P < 0.01). The results from the direct transfer method ranged from 0% to 82.9% correct identifications, with the results of the top four centers ranging from 71.4% to 82.9% correct identifications. This study supports the use of a cutoff value of 1.7 for the identification of yeasts using MALDI-TOF MS. The inclusion of enough isolates of the same species in the database can enhance the proportion of correctly identified strains. Further optimization of the preparation methods, especially of the direct transfer method, may contribute to improved diagnosis of yeast-related infections. PMID:24920782

  13. Identification of novel secreted fatty acids that regulate nitrogen catabolite repression in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoying; Hirai, Go; Ueki, Masashi; Hirota, Hiroshi; Wang, Qianqian; Hongo, Yayoi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Hitora, Yuki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Osada, Hiroyuki; Hamamoto, Makiko; Yoshida, Minoru; Yashiroda, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of poor nitrogen sources such as branched-chain amino acids is repressed in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources such as NH4(+) and glutamate (Glu), which is called nitrogen catabolite repression. Amino acid auxotrophic mutants of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe were unable to grow on minimal medium containing NH4Cl or Glu even when adequate amounts of required amino acids were supplied. However, growth of these mutant cells was recovered in the vicinity of colonies of the prototrophic strain, suggesting that the prototrophic cells secrete some substances that can restore uptake of amino acids by an unknown mechanism. We identified the novel fatty acids, 10(R)-acetoxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid and 10(R)-hydroxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid, as secreted active substances, referred to as Nitrogen Signaling Factors (NSFs). Synthetic NSFs were also able to shift nitrogen source utilization from high-quality to poor nitrogen sources to allow adaptive growth of the fission yeast amino acid auxotrophic mutants in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources. Finally, we demonstrated that the Agp3 amino acid transporter was involved in the adaptive growth. The data highlight a novel intra-species communication system for adaptation to environmental nutritional conditions in fission yeast. PMID:26892493

  14. Identification of novel secreted fatty acids that regulate nitrogen catabolite repression in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoying; Hirai, Go; Ueki, Masashi; Hirota, Hiroshi; Wang, Qianqian; Hongo, Yayoi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Hitora, Yuki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Osada, Hiroyuki; Hamamoto, Makiko; Yoshida, Minoru; Yashiroda, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of poor nitrogen sources such as branched-chain amino acids is repressed in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources such as NH4+ and glutamate (Glu), which is called nitrogen catabolite repression. Amino acid auxotrophic mutants of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe were unable to grow on minimal medium containing NH4Cl or Glu even when adequate amounts of required amino acids were supplied. However, growth of these mutant cells was recovered in the vicinity of colonies of the prototrophic strain, suggesting that the prototrophic cells secrete some substances that can restore uptake of amino acids by an unknown mechanism. We identified the novel fatty acids, 10(R)-acetoxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid and 10(R)-hydroxy-8(Z)-octadecenoic acid, as secreted active substances, referred to as Nitrogen Signaling Factors (NSFs). Synthetic NSFs were also able to shift nitrogen source utilization from high-quality to poor nitrogen sources to allow adaptive growth of the fission yeast amino acid auxotrophic mutants in the presence of high-quality nitrogen sources. Finally, we demonstrated that the Agp3 amino acid transporter was involved in the adaptive growth. The data highlight a novel intra-species communication system for adaptation to environmental nutritional conditions in fission yeast. PMID:26892493

  15. Multisensor fusion for system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Sung-Han; Cho, Soojin; Park, Jong-Woong; Kim, Hyunjun

    2014-04-01

    System identification is a fundamental process for developing a numerical model of a physical structure. The system identification process typically involves in data acquisition; particularly in civil engineering applications accelerometers are preferred due to its cost-effectiveness, low noise, and installation convenience. Because the measured acceleration responses result in translational degrees of freedom (DOF) in the numerical model, moment-resisting structures such as beam and plate are not appropriately represented by the models. This study suggests a system identification process that considers both translational and rotational DOFs by using accelerometers and gyroscopes. The proposed approach suggests a systematic way of obtaining dynamic characteristics as well as flexibility matrix from two different measurements of acceleration and angular velocity. Numerical simulation and laboratory experiment are conducted to validate the efficacy of the proposed system identification process.

  16. Identification of Essential Host Factors Affecting Tombusvirus RNA Replication Based on the Yeast Tet Promoters Hughes Collection†

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yi; Serviene, Elena; Gal, Jozsef; Panavas, Tadas; Nagy, Peter D.

    2006-01-01

    To identify essential host genes affecting replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), a small model plant virus, we screened 800 yeast genes present in the yeast Tet promoters Hughes Collection. In total, we have identified 30 new host genes whose down-regulation either increased or decreased the accumulation of a TBSV replicon RNA. The identified essential yeast genes are involved in RNA transcription/metabolism, protein metabolism/transport, or other cellular processes. Detailed analysis of the effects of some of the identified yeast genes revealed that they might affect RNA replication by altering (i) the amounts/functions of p33 and p92pol viral replication proteins, (ii) the standard 10 to 20:1 ratio between p33 and p92pol in the viral replicase, (iii) the activity of the tombusvirus replicase, and (iv) the ratio of plus- versus minus-stranded RNA replication products. Altogether, this and previous genetic screening of yeast (Panavas et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102:7326-7331, 2005) led to the identification of 126 host genes (out of ?5,600 genes that represent ?95% of all the known and predicted yeast genes) that affected the accumulation of tombusvirus RNA. PMID:16840320

  17. NADP Regulates the Yeast GAL Induction System

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar,P.; Yao, Y.; Sternglanz, R.; Johnston, S.; Joshua-Tor, L.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the galactose-metabolizing genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on three core proteins: Gal4p, the transcriptional activator that binds to upstream activating DNA sequences (UASGAL); Gal80p, a repressor that binds to the carboxyl terminus of Gal4p and inhibits transcription; and Gal3p, a cytoplasmic transducer that, upon binding galactose and adenosine 5'-triphosphate, relieves Gal80p repression. The current model of induction relies on Gal3p sequestering Gal80p in the cytoplasm. However, the rapid induction of this system implies that there is a missing factor. Our structure of Gal80p in complex with a peptide from the carboxyl-terminal activation domain of Gal4p reveals the existence of a dinucleotide that mediates the interaction between the two. Biochemical and in vivo experiments suggests that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) plays a key role in the initial induction event.

  18. Running title: Yeasts from refrigerated commercial shell eggs Identification of yeasts isolated from commercial shell eggs stored at refrigerated temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts and molds can grow on or in eggs, causing spoilage. Washed and unwashed eggs (treatments) were collected aseptically on three separate days (replications) from a commercial processing facility and stored for 10 weeks at 4ºC. Ten eggs from each treatment were sampled weekly (110 eggs/treatme...

  19. Development and characterization of a reconstituted yeast translation initiation system.

    PubMed Central

    Algire, Mikkel A; Maag, David; Savio, Peter; Acker, Michael G; Tarun, Salvador Z; Sachs, Alan B; Asano, Katsura; Nielsen, Klaus H; Olsen, Deanne S; Phan, Lon; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Lorsch, Jon R

    2002-01-01

    To provide a bridge between in vivo and in vitro studies of eukaryotic translation initiation, we have developed a reconstituted translation initiation system using components from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have purified a minimal set of initiation factors (elFs) that, together with yeast 80S ribosomes, GTP, and initiator methionyl-tRNA, are sufficient to assemble active initiation complexes on a minimal mRNA template. The kinetics of various steps in the pathway of initiation complex assembly and the formation of the first peptide bond in vitro have been explored. The formation of active initiation complexes in this system is dependent on ribosomes, mRNA, Met-tRNAi, GTP hydrolysis, elF1, elF1A, elF2, elF5, and elF5B. Our data indicate that elF1 and elF1A both facilitate the binding of the elF2 x GTP x Met-tRNAi complex to the 40S ribosomal subunit to form the 43S complex. elF5 stimulates a step after 43S complex formation, consistent with its proposed role in activating GTP hydrolysis by elF2 upon initiation codon recognition. The presence of elF5B is required for the joining of the 40S and 60S subunits to form the 80S initiation complex. The step at which each of these factors acts in this reconstituted system is in agreement with previous data from in vivo studies and work using reconstituted mammalian systems, indicating that the system recapitulates fundamental events in translation initiation in eukaryotic cells. This system should allow us to couple powerful yeast genetic and molecular biological experiments with in vitro kinetic and biophysical experiments, yielding a better understanding of the molecular mechanics of this central, complex process. PMID:12008673

  20. Identification of Gene Encoding Plasmodium knowlesi Phosphatidylserine Decarboxylase by Genetic Complementation in Yeast and Characterization of in Vitro Maturation of Encoded Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Augagneur, Yoann; Mamoun, Choukri Ben; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    The 23-megabase genome of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of severe human malaria, contains ?5300 genes, most of unknown function or lacking homologs in other organisms. Identification of these gene functions will help in the discovery of novel targets for the development of antimalarial drugs and vaccines. The P. falciparum genome is unusually A + T-rich, which hampers cloning and expressing these genes in heterologous systems for functional analysis. The large repertoire of genetic tools available for Saccharomyces cerevisiae makes this yeast an ideal system for large scale functional complementation analyses of parasite genes. Here, we report the construction of a cDNA library from P. knowlesi, which has a lower A + T content compared with P. falciparum. This library was applied in a yeast complementation assay to identify malaria genes involved in the decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine. Transformation of a psd1?psd2?dpl1? yeast strain, defective in phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis, with the P. knowlesi library led to identification of a new parasite phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (PkPSD). Unlike phosphatidylserine decarboxylase enzymes from other eukaryotes that are tightly associated with membranes, the PkPSD enzyme expressed in yeast was equally distributed between membrane and soluble fractions. In vitro studies reveal that truncated forms of PkPSD are soluble and undergo auto-endoproteolytic maturation in a phosphatidylserine-dependent reaction that is inhibited by other anionic phospholipids. This study defines a new system for probing the function of Plasmodium genes by library-based genetic complementation and its usefulness in revealing new biochemical properties of encoded proteins. PMID:22057268

  1. Rapid Identification of Chemoresistance Mechanisms Using Yeast DNA Mismatch Repair Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ojini, Irene; Gammie, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to cancer therapy is a major obstacle in the long-term treatment of cancer. A greater understanding of drug resistance mechanisms will ultimately lead to the development of effective therapeutic strategies to prevent resistance from occurring. Here, we exploit the mutator phenotype of mismatch repair defective yeast cells combined with whole genome sequencing to identify drug resistance mutations in key pathways involved in the development of chemoresistance. The utility of this approach was demonstrated via the identification of the known CAN1 and TOP1 resistance targets for two compounds, canavanine and camptothecin, respectively. We have also experimentally validated the plasma membrane transporter HNM1 as the primary drug resistance target of mechlorethamine. Furthermore, the sequencing of mitoxantrone-resistant strains identified inactivating mutations within IPT1, a gene encoding inositolphosphotransferase, an enzyme involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis. In the case of bactobolin, a promising anticancer drug, the endocytosis pathway was identified as the drug resistance target responsible for conferring resistance. Finally, we show that that rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor previously shown to alter the fitness of the ipt1 mutant, can effectively prevent the formation of mitoxantrone resistance. The rapid and robust nature of these techniques, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, should accelerate the identification of drug resistance targets and guide the development of novel therapeutic combination strategies to prevent the development of chemoresistance in various cancers. PMID:26199284

  2. Assessment of Reproducibility of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Bacterial and Yeast Identification

    PubMed Central

    Westblade, Lars F.; Garner, Omai B.; MacDonald, Karen; Bradford, Constance; Pincus, David H.; Mochon, A. Brian; Jennemann, Rebecca; Manji, Ryhana; Bythrow, Maureen; Lewinski, Michael A.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has revolutionized the identification of clinical bacterial and yeast isolates. However, data describing the reproducibility of MALDI-TOF MS for microbial identification are scarce. In this study, we show that MALDI-TOF MS-based microbial identification is highly reproducible and can tolerate numerous variables, including differences in testing environments, instruments, operators, reagent lots, and sample positioning patterns. Finally, we reveal that samples of bacterial and yeast isolates prepared for MALDI-TOF MS identification can be repeatedly analyzed without compromising organism identification. PMID:25926486

  3. Assessment of Reproducibility of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Bacterial and Yeast Identification.

    PubMed

    Westblade, Lars F; Garner, Omai B; MacDonald, Karen; Bradford, Constance; Pincus, David H; Mochon, A Brian; Jennemann, Rebecca; Manji, Ryhana; Bythrow, Maureen; Lewinski, Michael A; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Ginocchio, Christine C

    2015-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has revolutionized the identification of clinical bacterial and yeast isolates. However, data describing the reproducibility of MALDI-TOF MS for microbial identification are scarce. In this study, we show that MALDI-TOF MS-based microbial identification is highly reproducible and can tolerate numerous variables, including differences in testing environments, instruments, operators, reagent lots, and sample positioning patterns. Finally, we reveal that samples of bacterial and yeast isolates prepared for MALDI-TOF MS identification can be repeatedly analyzed without compromising organism identification. PMID:25926486

  4. Advances in rotorcraft system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Peter G.; Kaletka, Jürgen

    1997-03-01

    System identification can best be described as the extraction of system characteristics from measured flight test data. Therefore it provides an excellent tool for determining and improving mathematical models for a wide range of applications. The increasing need for accurate models for the design of high bandwidth control systems for rotorcraft has initiated a high interest in and a more intensive use of system identification. This development was supported by the AGARD FVP Working Group 18 on ‘Rotorcraft System Identification’, which brought together specialists from research organisations and industry, tasked with exploring the potential of this tool. In the Group, the full range of identification approaches was applied to dedicated helicopter flight-test-data including data quality checking and the determination and verification of flight mechanical models. It was mainly concentrated on the identification of six degrees of freedom rigid body models, which provide a realistic description of the rotorcraft dynamics for the lower and medium frequency range. The accomplishment of the Working Group has increased the demand for applying these techniques more routinely and, in addition, for extending the model order by including explicit rotor degrees of freedom. Such models also accurately characterize the higher frequency range needed for high bandwidth control system designs. In the specific case of the DLR In-Flight Simulator BO 105 ATTHeS, the application of the identified higher order models for the model-following control system was a major prerequisite for the obtained high simulation quality.

  5. Identification of benzoquinones in pretreated lignocellulosic feedstocks and inhibitory effects on yeast.

    PubMed

    Stagge, Stefan; Cavka, Adnan; Jönsson, Leif J

    2015-12-01

    Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass under acidic conditions gives rise to by-products that inhibit fermenting microorganisms. An analytical procedure for identification of p-benzoquinone (BQ) and 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone (DMBQ) in pretreated biomass was developed, and the inhibitory effects of BQ and DMBQ on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were assessed. The benzoquinones were analyzed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole-mass spectrometry after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Pretreatment liquids examined with regard to the presence of BQ and DMBQ originated from six different lignocellulosic feedstocks covering agricultural residues, hardwood, and softwood, and were produced through impregnation with sulfuric acid or sulfur dioxide at varying pretreatment temperature (165-204 °C) and residence time (6-20 min). BQ was detected in all six pretreatment liquids in concentrations ranging up to 6 mg/l, while DMBQ was detected in four pretreatment liquids in concentrations ranging up to 0.5 mg/l. The result indicates that benzoquinones are ubiquitous as by-products of acid pretreatment of lignocellulose, regardless of feedstock and pretreatment conditions. Fermentation experiments with BQ and DMBQ covered the concentration ranges 2 mg/l to 1 g/l and 20 mg/l to 1 g/l, respectively. Even the lowest BQ concentration tested (2 mg/l) was strongly inhibitory to yeast, while 20 mg/l DMBQ gave a slight negative effect on ethanol formation. This work shows that benzoquinones should be regarded as potent and widespread inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, and that they warrant attention besides more well-studied inhibitory substances, such as aliphatic carboxylic acids, phenols, and furan aldehydes. PMID:26384342

  6. Systems identification - reprise and projections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A state-of-the-arts review is given for the field of system identification. Progress in the field is traced from the early models of dynamic systems by Sir Isaac Newton up to the present day use of advanced techniques for numerous applications.

  7. Yeast as a model system for mammalian seven-transmembrane segment receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeansonne, N.E.

    1994-05-01

    Investigators have used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system in which to study the {beta}-adrenergic receptor, the T-cell receptor pathway, initiation of mammalian DNA replication, initiation of mammalian transcription, secretion, the CDC2 kinase system, cell cycle control, and aging, as well as the function of oncogenes. This list continues to growth with the discovery of an immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding homologue in yeast, an Rb binding protein homologue, and a possible yeast arrestin. Yeast is relatively easy to maintain, to grow, and to genetically manipulate. A single gene can be overexpressed, selectively mutated or deleted from its chromosomal location. In this way, the in vivo function of a gene can be studied. It has become reasonable to consider yeast as a model system for studying the seven transmembrane segments (7-TMS) receptor family. Currently, subtypes of the {beta}-adrenergic receptor are being studied in yeast. The receptor and its G{sub {alpha}}-G-protein, trigger the mating pheromone receptor pathway. This provides a powerful assay for determining receptor function. Studies expressing the muscarinic cholinergic receptor in yeast are underway. The yeast pheromone receptor belongs to this receptor family, sharing sequences and secondary structure homology. An effective strategy has been to identify a yeast pathway or process which is homologous to a mammalian system. The pathway is delineated in yeast, identifying other genetic components. Then yeast genes are used to screen for human homologues of these components. The putative human homologues are then expressed in yeast and in mammalian cells to determine function. When this type of {open_quotes}mixing and matching{close_quotes} works, yeast genetics can be a powerful tool. 115 refs.

  8. Automated drug identification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campen, C. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    System speeds up analysis of blood and urine and is capable of identifying 100 commonly abused drugs. System includes computer that controls entire analytical process by ordering various steps in specific sequences. Computer processes data output and has readout of identified drugs.

  9. Raman Spectroscopy and Chemometrics for Identification and Strain Discrimination of the Wine Spoilage Yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Brettanomyces bruxellensis

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Mark A.; Thornton, Roy J.

    2013-01-01

    The yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Dekkera bruxellensis (anamorph, Brettanomyces bruxellensis), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the major spoilage agents of finished wine. A novel method using Raman spectroscopy in combination with a chemometric classification tool has been developed for the identification of these yeast species and for strain discrimination of these yeasts. Raman spectra were collected for six strains of each of the yeasts Z. bailii, B. bruxellensis, and S. cerevisiae. The yeasts were classified with high sensitivity at the species level: 93.8% for Z. bailii, 92.3% for B. bruxellensis, and 98.6% for S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between strains of these species. These yeasts were classified at the strain level with an overall accuracy of 81.8%. PMID:23913433

  10. Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics for identification and strain discrimination of the wine spoilage yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Brettanomyces bruxellensis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Susan B; Thornton, Mark A; Thornton, Roy J

    2013-10-01

    The yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Dekkera bruxellensis (anamorph, Brettanomyces bruxellensis), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the major spoilage agents of finished wine. A novel method using Raman spectroscopy in combination with a chemometric classification tool has been developed for the identification of these yeast species and for strain discrimination of these yeasts. Raman spectra were collected for six strains of each of the yeasts Z. bailii, B. bruxellensis, and S. cerevisiae. The yeasts were classified with high sensitivity at the species level: 93.8% for Z. bailii, 92.3% for B. bruxellensis, and 98.6% for S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between strains of these species. These yeasts were classified at the strain level with an overall accuracy of 81.8%. PMID:23913433

  11. Application of PCR and High-Resolution Melting for Rapid Identification of Yeasts Routinely Isolated in a Clinical Microbiology Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Ninghui, Guo; Bing, Wang; Wei, Ren; Mengmeng, Liu; Meiling, Chu; Dongya, Meng; Liqiong, Yao; Wencheng, Xue

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to develop a method for rapid and accurate identification of yeasts obtained in the clinic, especially from immunocompromised patients, in order to provide a timely and appropriate antifungal therapy. A total of 112 Candida isolates were analyzed in this study; 28 of them were used to validate the PCR-HRM method in species identification in a blinded manner. Strains were identified by conventional techniques that use VITEK 2 YST cards and Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). These methods were compared to the newly developed technique based on real-time polymerase-chain reaction high-resolution melting (PCR-HRM). Discordant results were resolved with internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene sequencing, the "golden standard" used to evaluate the reliability of all methods in identifying yeasts at the species level. PCR-HRM sensitivity was assessed with the isolated strains. VITEK 2, MALDI-TOF-MS, and PCR-HRM accurately identified 89.2% (74/83), 97.6% (81/83), 100% (83/83) of the isolates, respectively. PCR-HRM detection limit was 1fg/?l of yeasts. In validation assays, a 100% accuracy rate was achieved by the use of PCR-HRM. Therefore, the PCR-HRM method is a rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnostic approach, which provides a cost-effective and more suitable alternative for yeast identification in a clinical laboratory. Future research is needed for automation of data acquisition. PMID:26663799

  12. [Identification of C(2)M interacting proteins by yeast two-hybrid screening].

    PubMed

    Shanshan, Yue; Laixin, Xia

    2015-11-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a huge structure which assembles between the homologous chromosomes during meiotic prophase I. Drosophila germ cell-specific nucleoprotein C(2)M clustering at chromosomes can induce SC formation. To further study the molecular function and mechanism of C(2)M in meiosis, we constructed a bait vector for C(2)M and used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify C(2)M interacting proteins. Forty interacting proteins were obtained, including many DNA and histone binding proteins, ATP synthases and transcription factors. Gene silencing assays in Drosophila showed that two genes, wech and Psf1, may delay the disappearance of SC. These results indicate that Wech and Psf1 may form a complex with C(2)M to participate in the formation or stabilization of the SC complex. PMID:26582530

  13. A bimodal biometric identification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghari, Mohammad S.; Khuwaja, Gulzar A.

    2013-03-01

    Biometrics consists of methods for uniquely recognizing humans based upon one or more intrinsic physical or behavioral traits. Physicals are related to the shape of the body. Behavioral are related to the behavior of a person. However, biometric authentication systems suffer from imprecision and difficulty in person recognition due to a number of reasons and no single biometrics is expected to effectively satisfy the requirements of all verification and/or identification applications. Bimodal biometric systems are expected to be more reliable due to the presence of two pieces of evidence and also be able to meet the severe performance requirements imposed by various applications. This paper presents a neural network based bimodal biometric identification system by using human face and handwritten signature features.

  14. Lightning discharge identification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennon, C. L. (inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system for differentiating between cloud to cloud and cloud to ground lightning discharges is described which includes an electric field antenna that senses the rate of charge of an electric field produced by a lightning discharge. When the signal produced by the electric field exceeds a predetermined threshold, it is fed to a coincidence detector. A VHF antenna is also provided and generates a video signal responsive to a cloud to cloud lightning discharge, and this signal is fed through a level sensor, an inverter, to the coincidence detector simultaneously with the signal from the field detector. When signals from the electric field antenna and the VHF antenna appear at the coincidence detector simultaneously, such indicates that there is a cloud to cloud lightning discharge; whereas, when there is not a signal produced on the VHF antenna simultaneously with a signal produced by the field sensor, then a strike indicator connected to the coincidence detector indicates a cloud to ground lightning discharge.

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF YEASTS ISOLATED FROM COMMERCIAL SHELL EGGS STORED AT REFRIGERATED TEMPERATURES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts and molds, which are able to withstand harsh environmental stresses, can grow on or in eggs and cause spoilage. Egg meats readily absorb off odors, including those caused by yeast or mold growth, so their presence on eggs may constitute a quality concern. Washed and unwashed eggs (treatment...

  16. MALDI-TOF MS Andromas strategy for the routine identification of bacteria, mycobacteria, yeasts, Aspergillus spp. and positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Bille, E; Dauphin, B; Leto, J; Bougnoux, M-E; Beretti, J-L; Lotz, A; Suarez, S; Meyer, J; Join-Lambert, O; Descamps, P; Grall, N; Mory, F; Dubreuil, L; Berche, P; Nassif, X; Ferroni, A

    2012-11-01

    All organisms usually isolated in our laboratory are now routinely identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) using the Andromas software. The aim of this study was to describe the use of this strategy in a routine clinical microbiology laboratory. The microorganisms identified included bacteria, mycobacteria, yeasts and Aspergillus spp. isolated on solid media or extracted directly from blood cultures. MALDI-TOF MS was performed on 2665 bacteria isolated on solid media, corresponding to all bacteria isolated during this period except Escherichia coli grown on chromogenic media. All acquisitions were performed without extraction. After a single acquisition, 93.1% of bacteria grown on solid media were correctly identified. When the first acquisition was not contributory, a second acquisition was performed either the same day or the next day. After two acquisitions, the rate of bacteria identified increased to 99.2%. The failures reported on 21 strains were due to an unknown profile attributed to new species (9) or an insufficient quality of the spectrum (12). MALDI-TOF MS has been applied to 162 positive blood cultures. The identification rate was 91.4%. All mycobacteria isolated during this period (22) were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF MS without any extraction. For 96.3% and 92.2% of yeasts and Aspergillus spp., respectively, the identification was obtained with a single acquisition. After a second acquisition, the overall identification rate was 98.8% for yeasts (160/162) and 98.4% (63/64) for Aspergillus spp. In conclusion, the MALDI-TOF MS strategy used in this work allows a rapid and efficient identification of all microorganisms isolated routinely. PMID:22044600

  17. RAPID IDENTFICATION OF ASCOMYCETOUS YEASTS FROM CLINICAL SPECIMENS BY A MOLECULAR-BASED FLOW CYTOMETRY METHOD AND COMPARISION WITH IDENTIFICATIONS FROM PHENOTYPIC ASSAYS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to compare the identification of ascomycetous yeasts recovered from clinical specimens by using phenotypic assays (PA) and a molecular flow cytometric (FC) method. LSU rRNA D1/D2 gene sequence analysis was also performed and served as the reference for correct strain identif...

  18. Structural Aspects of System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, Keith

    1973-01-01

    The problem of identifying linear dynamical systems is studied by considering structural and deterministic properties of linear systems that have an impact on stochastic identification algorithms. In particular considered is parametrization of linear systems so that there is a unique solution and all systems in appropriate class can be represented. It is assumed that a parametrization of system matrices has been established from a priori knowledge of the system, and the question is considered of when the unknown parameters of this system can be identified from input/output observations. It is assumed that the transfer function can be asymptotically identified, and the conditions are derived for the local, global and partial identifiability of the parametrization. Then it is shown that, with the right formulation, identifiability in the presence of feedback can be treated in the same way. Similarly the identifiability of parametrizations of systems driven by unobserved white noise is considered using the results from the theory of spectral factorization.

  19. In-Flight System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1998-01-01

    A method is proposed and studied whereby the system identification cycle consisting of experiment design and data analysis can be repeatedly implemented aboard a test aircraft in real time. This adaptive in-flight system identification scheme has many advantages, including increased flight test efficiency, adaptability to dynamic characteristics that are imperfectly known a priori, in-flight improvement of data quality through iterative input design, and immediate feedback of the quality of flight test results. The technique uses equation error in the frequency domain with a recursive Fourier transform for the real time data analysis, and simple design methods employing square wave input forms to design the test inputs in flight. Simulation examples are used to demonstrate that the technique produces increasingly accurate model parameter estimates resulting from sequentially designed and implemented flight test maneuvers. The method has reasonable computational requirements, and could be implemented aboard an aircraft in real time.

  20. System identification of jet engines

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, N.

    2000-01-01

    System identification plays an important role in advanced control systems for jet engines, in which controls are performed adaptively using data from the actual engine and the identified engine. An identification technique for jet engine using the Constant Gain Extended Kalman Filter (CGEKF) is described. The filter is constructed for a two-spool turbofan engine. The CGEKF filter developed here can recognize parameter change in engine components and estimate unmeasurable variables over whole flight conditions. These capabilities are useful for an advanced Full Authority Digital Electric Control (FADEC). Effects of measurement noise and bias, effects of operating point and unpredicted performance change are discussed. Some experimental results using the actual engine are shown to evaluate the effectiveness of CGEKF filter.

  1. On-Orbit System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.; Bayard, D.; Eldred, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    Information derived from accelerometer readings benefits important engineering and control functions. Report discusses methodology for detection, identification, and analysis of motions within space station. Techniques of vibration and rotation analyses, control theory, statistics, filter theory, and transform methods integrated to form system for generating models and model parameters that characterize total motion of complicated space station, with respect to both control-induced and random mechanical disturbances.

  2. Identification of yeasts during alcoholic fermentation of tchapalo, a traditional sorghum beer from Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    N'guessan, Kouadio Florent; Brou, Kouakou; Jacques, Noémie; Casaregola, Serge; Dje, Koffi Marcellin

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the diversity and dynamics of yeasts involved in alcoholic fermentation of a traditional sorghum beer from Côte d'Ivoire, tchapalo. A total of 240 yeast strains were isolated from fermenting sorghum wort inoculated with dry yeast from two geographic regions of Côte d'Ivoire (Abidjan and Bondoukou). Initial molecular identification to the species level was carried out using RFLP of PCR-amplified internal transcribed spacers of rDNA (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2). Ten different profiles were obtained from the restriction of PCR products with the three endonucleases HaeIII, CfoI and HinfI. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA and the ACT1 gene allowed us to assign these groups to six different species: Saccharomyces cerevisiae-like, Candida tropicalis, Pichia kudriavzevii, Pichia kluyveri, Kodamaea ohmeri and Meyerozyma caribbica. The most frequent species associated with tchapalo fermentation was S. cerevisiae-like (87.36%), followed by C. tropicalis (5.45%) and M. caribbica (2.71%). S. cerevisiae-like strains were diploid heterozygotes and exhibited three to four nucleotides divergence from the type strain in the D1/D2 domain and several indels in the more discriminant sequence of the intron of the ACT1 gene. During the process, the yeast species isolated and their frequencies varied according to the geographic origin of the dry yeast. The occurrence of some species was sporadic and only two non-Saccharomyces species were found in the final product. PMID:21318423

  3. Automated systems for identification of microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Stager, C E; Davis, J R

    1992-01-01

    Automated instruments for the identification of microorganisms were introduced into clinical microbiology laboratories in the 1970s. During the past two decades, the capabilities and performance characteristics of automated identification systems have steadily progressed and improved. This article explores the development of the various automated identification systems available in the United States and reviews their performance for identification of microorganisms. Observations regarding deficiencies and suggested improvements for these systems are provided. PMID:1498768

  4. Budding Yeast for Budding Geneticists: A Primer on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model System

    PubMed Central

    Duina, Andrea A.; Miller, Mary E.; Keeney, Jill B.

    2014-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a powerful model organism for studying fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. This Primer article presents a brief historical perspective on the emergence of this organism as a premier experimental system over the course of the past century. An overview of the central features of the S. cerevisiae genome, including the nature of its genetic elements and general organization, is also provided. Some of the most common experimental tools and resources available to yeast geneticists are presented in a way designed to engage and challenge undergraduate and graduate students eager to learn more about the experimental amenability of budding yeast. Finally, a discussion of several major discoveries derived from yeast studies highlights the far-reaching impact that the yeast system has had and will continue to have on our understanding of a variety of cellular processes relevant to all eukaryotes, including humans. PMID:24807111

  5. The MICE Particle Identification System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomilov, M.; MICE Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at the ISIS accelerator located at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, will be the first experiment to study muon cooling at high precision. Demonstration of muon ionization cooling is a major technological step towards the construction of a neutrino factory or a muon collider. A muon beam is produced via pion decay in the MICE beam line within a range of emittances and momenta. Muon purity is assured by a system of detectors for particle identification (PID). We describe briefly the PID system here.

  6. Identification of respiratory chain gene mutations that shorten replicative life span in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hacioglu, Elise; Demir, Ayse Banu; Koc, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    Aging is the progressive accumulation of alterations in cells that elevates the risk of death. The mitochondrial theory of aging postulates that free radicals produced by the mitochondrial respiratory system contribute to the aging process. However, the roles of individual electron transfer chain (ETC) components in cellular aging have not been elucidated. In this study, we analyzed the replicative life span of 73 yeast deletion mutants lacking the genes of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain system, and found that nine of these mutants (?nde1, ?tcm62, ?rip1, ?cyt1, ?qrc8, ?pet117, ?cox11, ?atp11, ?fmc1) had significantly shorter life spans. These mutants had lower rates of respiration and were slightly sensitive to exogenous administration of hydrogen peroxide. However, only two of them, ?nde1 and ?fmc1, produced higher amounts of intrinsic superoxide radicals in the presence of glucose compared to that of wild type cells. Interestingly, there were no significant alterations in the mitochondrial membrane potentials of these mutants. We speculate that the shorter life spans of ETC mutants result from multiple mechanisms including the low respiration rate and low energy production rather than just a ROS-dependent path. PMID:22137892

  7. Yeast as a Heterologous Model System to Uncover Type III Effector Function.

    PubMed

    Popa, Crina; Coll, Núria S; Valls, Marc; Sessa, Guido

    2016-02-01

    Type III effectors (T3E) are key virulence proteins that are injected by bacterial pathogens inside the cells of their host to subvert cellular processes and contribute to disease. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an important heterologous system for the functional characterisation of T3E proteins in a eukaryotic environment. Importantly, yeast contains eukaryotic processes with low redundancy and are devoid of immunity mechanisms that counteract T3Es and mask their function. Expression in yeast of effectors from both plant and animal pathogens that perturb conserved cellular processes often resulted in robust phenotypes that were exploited to elucidate effector functions, biochemical properties, and host targets. The genetic tractability of yeast and its amenability for high-throughput functional studies contributed to the success of this system that, in recent years, has been used to study over 100 effectors. Here, we provide a critical view on this body of work and describe advantages and limitations inherent to the use of yeast in T3E research. "Favourite" targets of T3Es in yeast are cytoskeleton components and small GTPases of the Rho family. We describe how mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling, vesicle trafficking, membrane structures, and programmed cell death are also often altered by T3Es in yeast and how this reflects their function in the natural host. We describe how effector structure-function studies and analysis of candidate targeted processes or pathways can be carried out in yeast. We critically analyse technologies that have been used in yeast to assign biochemical functions to T3Es, including transcriptomics and proteomics, as well as suppressor, gain-of-function, or synthetic lethality screens. We also describe how yeast can be used to select for molecules that block T3E function in search of new antibacterial drugs with medical applications. Finally, we provide our opinion on the limitations of S. cerevisiae as a model system and its most promising future applications. PMID:26914889

  8. Yeast as a Heterologous Model System to Uncover Type III Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Crina; Coll, Núria S.; Valls, Marc; Sessa, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Type III effectors (T3E) are key virulence proteins that are injected by bacterial pathogens inside the cells of their host to subvert cellular processes and contribute to disease. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an important heterologous system for the functional characterisation of T3E proteins in a eukaryotic environment. Importantly, yeast contains eukaryotic processes with low redundancy and are devoid of immunity mechanisms that counteract T3Es and mask their function. Expression in yeast of effectors from both plant and animal pathogens that perturb conserved cellular processes often resulted in robust phenotypes that were exploited to elucidate effector functions, biochemical properties, and host targets. The genetic tractability of yeast and its amenability for high-throughput functional studies contributed to the success of this system that, in recent years, has been used to study over 100 effectors. Here, we provide a critical view on this body of work and describe advantages and limitations inherent to the use of yeast in T3E research. “Favourite” targets of T3Es in yeast are cytoskeleton components and small GTPases of the Rho family. We describe how mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling, vesicle trafficking, membrane structures, and programmed cell death are also often altered by T3Es in yeast and how this reflects their function in the natural host. We describe how effector structure–function studies and analysis of candidate targeted processes or pathways can be carried out in yeast. We critically analyse technologies that have been used in yeast to assign biochemical functions to T3Es, including transcriptomics and proteomics, as well as suppressor, gain-of-function, or synthetic lethality screens. We also describe how yeast can be used to select for molecules that block T3E function in search of new antibacterial drugs with medical applications. Finally, we provide our opinion on the limitations of S. cerevisiae as a model system and its most promising future applications. PMID:26914889

  9. A yEGFP-based reporter system for high-throughput yeast two-hybrid assay by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Zhou, Jianhong; Bae, Weon; Sanders, Claire K; Nolan, John P; Cai, Hong

    2008-04-01

    The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assay is a widely used method to study protein-protein interactions, a major objective in postgenome research. Despite the tremendous utility of the Y2H assay, several issues including accuracy, speed, automation, and cost-effectiveness limit its application in high-throughput analysis. We have created an improved Y2H assay reporter system by integrating the codon-optimized yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP) gene into the ADE2 locus of the AH109 yeast strain and evaluated reporter expression using the strong and weak triggers via flow cytometry. We also performed flow cytometry-based Y2H assays in liquid cultures as well as in a cDNA library screening. We have shown that yEGFP, but not EGFP, is a sensitive Y2H reporter for flow cytometric detection. We also show that this yEGFP-based Y2H could be easily adapted to high-throughput format without conventional agar plating. Moreover, our data demonstrate that this system can be used for cDNA library screening. We have developed sensitive and efficient flow cytometry-based Y2H assay system that is well suited for large-scale protein-protein interaction identification and characterization. When compared with the conventional plate and filter membrane-based nutrient and colorimetric analysis, our flow cytometric assay offers convenient, quantitative, and faster reporter analysis compatible with existing liquid handling robots. PMID:18307271

  10. Identification of inhibitors of yeast-to-hyphae transition in Candida albicans by a reporter screening assay.

    PubMed

    Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Eickhoff, Holger; Hohn, Erwin; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2013-03-10

    Candida albicans is one of the most common opportunistic fungal pathogens, causing life-threatening disease in immunocompromised patients. As it is not primarily a pathogen, but can exist in a commensal state, we aimed at the identification of new anti-infective compounds which do not eradicate the fungus, but primarily disable a virulence determinant. The yeast–hyphae-dimorphism of C. albicans is considered a major contributor to fungal disease, as mutants locked into either yeast or hyphal state have been shown to be less virulent in the mouse-model. We devised a high-throughput screening procedure which allows us to find inhibitors of the induction of hyphae. Hyphae-formation was induced by nitrogen starvation at 37 °C and neutral pH in a reporter strain, which couples promoter activity of the hyphae-specific HWP1 to ?-galactosidase expression. In a pilot screening of 720 novel synthetic compounds, we identified substances which inhibited the outgrowth of germ tubes. They belonged to chemical classes not yet known for antimycotic properties, namely methyl aryl-oxazoline carboxylates, dihydrobenzo[d]isoxazolones and thiazolo[4,5-e]benzoisoxazoles. In conclusion we developed a novel screening assay, which addresses the morphological switch from the yeast form of C. albicans to its hyphal form and identified novel chemical structures with activity against C. albicans. PMID:23262131

  11. Comparison of enteric identification systems.

    PubMed

    Borchardt, K A; Gibson, J

    1977-01-01

    An evaluation of methods for identification of Enterobacteriaceae was made employing the new commercial Micro-Media Enteric System (MMES) with that of the Analytab Products Incorporated (API) and the Conventional tube media schema as suggested by the Center for Disease Control (CDS). The MMES system employed 20 biochemical tests, the API 21, and the CDC procedure 25. Sixteen of these were identical biochemical tests. Two hundred clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae were tested employing procedures recommended by the manufacturers of MMES and API, and methods suggested by CDC. Among the sixteen identical biochemical tests the agreement was 98.0% (Conventional), 98.2% (API), and 97.98% (MMES). Bacteria misidentified by the API system totaled 5 (2.5%), 12 (6%) for the Conventional, and 13 (6.5%) for the MMES. Five of the bacteria misidentified with the MMES procedure were due to false positive citrate tests. This problem was subsequently eliminated. The results of this study indicated that the new MMES method for identification of Enterobacteriaceae compared favorably with both the API and Conventional procedures. However, significant advantages of the MMES method were evident in initial purchase price, utilization of technology time, and less tedium performing the test. PMID:319082

  12. Identification and Partial Characterization of Antilisterial Compounds Produced by Dairy Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Hatoum, Rima; Labrie, Steve; Fliss, Ismail

    2013-03-01

    Food-grade yeasts make significant contributions to flavor development in fermented foods. Some yeast species also inhibit undesirable bacteria, yeasts and molds, apparently by producing antimicrobial compounds called mycocins. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of wild yeasts, isolated from raw milk and cheese in the Quebec province area, to produce antilisterial compounds. Based on an agar-membrane screening test, 22 of 95 isolates, namely one Candida catenulata, one Candida parapsilosis, five Candida tropicalis, four Debaryomyces hansenii, one Geotrichum candidum, nine Pichia fermentans and one Pichia anomala, exhibited a significant inhibitory effect against Listeria ivanovii HPB28. Four in particular, namely C. tropicalis LMA-693, D. hansenii LMA-916, P. fermentans LMA-256 and P. anomala LMA-827, produced substances extractable from culture supernatant and capable of decreasing 18-h growth of L. ivanovii by, respectively, 97, 92, 84 and 78 %. Heating the extracted material (100 °C for 10 min) decreased these values to 72, 62, 58 and 31 %, respectively, while treatment with trypsin or pronase E decreased them to as little as 27 %. The extracts reduced the numbers of viable Listeria monocytogenes by as much as four log cycles within an hour. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a high proportion of lysis among the cells, apparently due to pore formation. This study clearly shows the potential of these four yeast isolates for use as bio-preservatives in a variety of dairy products. PMID:26782600

  13. Identification of the yeast cytidine deaminase CDD1 as an orphan C-->U RNA editase.

    PubMed

    Dance, G S; Beemiller, P; Yang, Y; Mater, D V; Mian, I S; Smith, H C

    2001-04-15

    Yeast co-expressing rat APOBEC-1 and a fragment of human apolipoprotein B (apoB) mRNA assembled functional editosomes and deaminated C6666 to U in a mooring sequence-dependent fashion. The occurrence of APOBEC-1-complementing proteins suggested a naturally occurring mRNA editing mechanism in yeast. Previously, a hidden Markov model identified seven yeast genes encoding proteins possessing putative zinc-dependent deaminase motifs. Here, only CDD1, a cytidine deaminase, is shown to have the capacity to carry out C-->U editing on a reporter mRNA. This is only the second report of a cytidine deaminase that can use mRNA as a substrate. CDD1-dependent editing was growth phase regulated and demonstrated mooring sequence-dependent editing activity. Candidate yeast mRNA substrates were identified based on their homology with the mooring sequence-containing tripartite motif at the editing site of apoB mRNA and their ability to be edited by ectopically expressed APOBEC-1. Naturally occurring yeast mRNAs edited to a significant extent by CDD1 were, however, not detected. We propose that CDD1 be designated an orphan C-->U editase until its native RNA substrate, if any, can be identified and that it be added to the CDAR (cytidine deaminase acting on RNA) family of editing enzymes. PMID:11292850

  14. Isolation, identification, and activity in vitro of killer yeasts against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolated from tropical fruits.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Jaqueline Rabelo; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros; Brandão, Luciana Rocha; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Viana, Francisco Marto Pinto

    2013-07-01

    A total of 580 yeasts strains, isolated from Ceara State of Brasil, were evaluated for their ability to produce killer toxin. Of these strains, 29 tested positive for the killer phenotype and were further evaluated for their ability to control Colletotrichum gloeosporioides germination in vitro. All yeast strains that expressed the killer phenotype were characterized by sequencing the D1/D2 regions of the large subunit of the rRNA gene. Five yeast strains provided a significant reduction in mycelial growth and conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides in vitro, especially Meyerozyma guilliermondii, which was able to reduce the fungal mycelial growth on solid medium (potato dextrose agar (PDA)) by 60% and block 100% of conidia germination in liquid media (potato dextrose broth (PDB)). Filtering and autoclaving the liquid cultures had no effect on the growth of the pathogen. These results indicate the potential use of antagonist yeasts isolated from tropical fruits in the control of anthracnose caused by C. gloeosporioides in papaya. Further elucidation of main mechanisms involved on anthracnose control by these yeasts could be helpful for the development of biocontrol techniques related to the management of this disease in tropical fruits. PMID:22915228

  15. Evolutionary Systems Biology of Amino Acid Biosynthetic Cost in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Michael D.; Delneri, Daniela; Oliver, Stephen G.; Rattray, Magnus; Bergman, Casey M.

    2010-01-01

    Every protein has a biosynthetic cost to the cell based on the synthesis of its constituent amino acids. In order to optimise growth and reproduction, natural selection is expected, where possible, to favour the use of proteins whose constituents are cheaper to produce, as reduced biosynthetic cost may confer a fitness advantage to the organism. Quantifying the cost of amino acid biosynthesis presents challenges, since energetic requirements may change across different cellular and environmental conditions. We developed a systems biology approach to estimate the cost of amino acid synthesis based on genome-scale metabolic models and investigated the effects of the cost of amino acid synthesis on Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression and protein evolution. First, we used our two new and six previously reported measures of amino acid cost in conjunction with codon usage bias, tRNA gene number and atomic composition to identify which of these factors best predict transcript and protein levels. Second, we compared amino acid cost with rates of amino acid substitution across four species in the genus Saccharomyces. Regardless of which cost measure is used, amino acid biosynthetic cost is weakly associated with transcript and protein levels. In contrast, we find that biosynthetic cost and amino acid substitution rates show a negative correlation, but for only a subset of cost measures. In the economy of the yeast cell, we find that the cost of amino acid synthesis plays a limited role in shaping transcript and protein expression levels compared to that of translational optimisation. Biosynthetic cost does, however, appear to affect rates of amino acid evolution in Saccharomyces, suggesting that expensive amino acids may only be used when they have specific structural or functional roles in protein sequences. However, as there appears to be no single currency to compute the cost of amino acid synthesis across all cellular and environmental conditions, we conclude that a systems approach is necessary to unravel the full effects of amino acid biosynthetic cost in complex biological systems. PMID:20808905

  16. Identification of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis resolved yeast proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Larsson, T; Norbeck, J; Karlsson, H; Karlsson, K A; Blomberg, A

    1997-01-01

    Protein extract from yeast cells growing exponentially in saline medium was separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE), with the separation in the first dimension on a wide range immobilized pH (3-10) gradient. From one preparative 2-D gel a number of previously identified proteins were used as test material for our initial matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) efforts on large scale rapid protein spot identification. Sample preparation via in-gel trypsin digestion was slightly modified to be compatible to MS analysis, and via this modified procedure MS generated peptide mass profiles could, in most cases with good precision, identify the protein in question. Preferential ionization was tested on a yeast aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD7), and it was shown that the ionization of some peptides was clearly suppressed by the presence of others. Roughly 50% of the observed peptide masses was found by the search routines in the database, and the mass measurement accuracy of the peptides was within 0.5 Da. Silver-stained gels could be used with good results for the generation of peptides to be analyzed by MALDI-MS. For one of the 2-D resolved proteins, glycerol 3-phosphatase (GPP1), the post-source decay (PSD) spectrum proved crucial in identification. PMID:9150920

  17. Discrete dynamical system modelling for gene regulatory networks of 5-hydroxymethylfural tolerance for ethanologenic yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Composed of linear difference equations, a discrete dynamic system model was designed to reconstruct transcriptional regulations in gene regulatory networks in response to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, a bioethanol conversion inhibitor for ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The modeling aims ...

  18. Personal identification credential system (PICS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressley, Jackson R.; Cantrell, Thomas; Page, Lochlin; Cudlitz, Stephen; Higgins, Roy

    2005-03-01

    A pilot Personal Identification Credential System (PICS) has been developed and fielded. The PICS is a wireless biometric credential that interfaces with access control systems. The PICS consists of individual handheld Personal Identification Credentials (PIC), a PICS Reader located at a facility entry control point that interfaces with the facility entry control system, and a PICS Enrollment Station. In operation, an individual approaching a facility entry point in a vehicle picks up the PIC handheld unit and places a finger on its sensor. The PIC then authenticates the user and from within the vehicle initiates two-way, secure RF communication with the PICS Reader as the vehicle approaches the gate. The PICS Reader then verifies that the individual is authorized for admittance and notifies the facility gate entry control system, which informs the sentry that the request for access was successful or unsuccessful. If the request for access is unsuccessful, the gate entry control system automatically will close the gate. This sequence of events takes place while the car is moving through a normally open entry lane. The PIC is a small, handheld device which contains the biometric sensor (fingerprint sensor), wireless RF transceiver, processor, encryption and battery. The PIC may be used while traveling in a vehicle or may be used while on foot for access to a PICS controlled man gate or secure area access portal. The PIC is small enough to be carried in a shirt pocket, or it can be left in the user's vehicle. The PIC battery will power the PIC for months and is rechargeable. Up to 10 fingers may be stored in the PIC.

  19. Isolation and identification of xylitol-producing yeasts from agricultural residues.

    PubMed

    Altamirano, A; Vázquez, F; de Figueroa, L I

    2000-01-01

    Selected yeast strains isolated from corn silage and viticulture residues were screened for their capacities to convert D-xylose into xylitol A conventional TLC was adapted for easy determination of xylose and xylitol in the culture supernatant solutions. This technique is suitable for the first steps of a screening program to select xylitol-producing yeasts from natural environments. Candida tropicalis ASM III (NRRL Y-27290), isolated from corn silage, appears to be a promising strain for xylitol production with a high yield (0.88 g xylitol per g of xylose consumed). PMID:11271811

  20. System/observer/controller identification toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Horta, Lucas G.; Phan, Minh

    1992-01-01

    System Identification is the process of constructing a mathematical model from input and output data for a system under testing, and characterizing the system uncertainties and measurement noises. The mathematical model structure can take various forms depending upon the intended use. The SYSTEM/OBSERVER/CONTROLLER IDENTIFICATION TOOLBOX (SOCIT) is a collection of functions, written in MATLAB language and expressed in M-files, that implements a variety of modern system identification techniques. For an open loop system, the central features of the SOCIT are functions for identification of a system model and its corresponding forward and backward observers directly from input and output data. The system and observers are represented by a discrete model. The identified model and observers may be used for controller design of linear systems as well as identification of modal parameters such as dampings, frequencies, and mode shapes. For a closed-loop system, an observer and its corresponding controller gain directly from input and output data.

  1. Identification of novel noncoding transcripts in telomerase-negative yeast using RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Rachel O; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Zappulla, David C

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains the ends of linear chromosomes in most eukaryotes. Loss of telomerase activity results in shortening of telomeric DNA and eventually a specific G2/M cell-cycle arrest known as senescence. In humans, telomere shortening occurs during aging, while inappropriate activation of telomerase is associated with approximately 90% of cancers. Previous studies have identified several classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) also associated with aging-related senescence and cancer, but whether ncRNAs are also involved in short-telomere-induced senescence in yeast is unknown. Here, we report 112 putative novel lncRNAs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 41 of which are only expressed in telomerase-negative yeast. Expression of approximately half of the lncRNAs is strongly correlated with that of adjacent genes, suggesting this subset may influence transcription of neighboring genes. Our results reveal a new potential mechanism governing adaptive changes in senescing and post-senescent survivor yeast cells. PMID:26786024

  2. Identification of novel noncoding transcripts in telomerase-negative yeast using RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Niederer, Rachel O.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Zappulla, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains the ends of linear chromosomes in most eukaryotes. Loss of telomerase activity results in shortening of telomeric DNA and eventually a specific G2/M cell-cycle arrest known as senescence. In humans, telomere shortening occurs during aging, while inappropriate activation of telomerase is associated with approximately 90% of cancers. Previous studies have identified several classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) also associated with aging-related senescence and cancer, but whether ncRNAs are also involved in short-telomere-induced senescence in yeast is unknown. Here, we report 112 putative novel lncRNAs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 41 of which are only expressed in telomerase-negative yeast. Expression of approximately half of the lncRNAs is strongly correlated with that of adjacent genes, suggesting this subset may influence transcription of neighboring genes. Our results reveal a new potential mechanism governing adaptive changes in senescing and post-senescent survivor yeast cells. PMID:26786024

  3. Identification of a functional homolog of the yeast copper homeostasis gene ATX1 from Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Himelblau, E.; Amasino, R.M.; Mira, H.; Penarrubia, L.; Lin, S.J.; Culotta, V.C.

    1998-08-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a homolog of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) gene Anti-oxidant 1 (ATX1) has been identified from Arabidopsis. This gene, referred to as Copper CHaperone (CCH), encodes a protein that is 36% identical to the amino acid sequence of ATX1 and has a 48-amino acid extension at the C-terminal end, which is absent from ATX1 homologs identified in animals. ATX1-deficient yeast (atx1) displayed a loss of high-affinity iron uptake. Expression of CCH in the atx1 strain restored high-affinity iron uptake, demonstrating that CCH is a functional homolog of ATX1. When overexpressed in yeast lacking the superoxide dismutase gene SOD1, both ATX1 and CCH protected the cell from the reactive oxygen toxicity that results from superoxide dismutase deficiency. CCH was unable to rescue the sod1 phenotype in the absence of copper, indicating that CCH function is copper dependent. In Arabidopsis CCH mRNA is present in the root, leaf, and in fluorescence and is up-regulated 7-fold in leaves undergoing senescence. In plants treated with 800 nL/L ozone for 30 min, CCH mRNA levels increased by 30%. In excised leaves and whole plants treated with high levels of exogenous CuSO{sub 4}, CCH mRNA levels decreased, indicating that CCH is regulated differently than characterized metallothionein proteins in Arabidopsis.

  4. Identification and characterization of genes and mutants for an N-terminal acetyltransferase from yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, J R; Kayne, P S; Moerschell, R P; Tsunasawa, S; Gribskov, M; Colavito-Shepanski, M; Grunstein, M; Sherman, F; Sternglanz, R

    1989-01-01

    A gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been mapped, cloned, sequenced and shown to encode a catalytic subunit of an N-terminal acetyltransferase. Regions of this gene, NAT1, and the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase genes of bacteria have limited but significant homology. A nat1 null mutant is viable but exhibits a variety of phenotypes, including reduced acetyltransferase activity, derepression of a silent mating type locus (HML) and failure to enter G0. All these phenotypes are identical to those of a previously characterized mutant, ard1. NAT1 and ARD1 are distinct genes that encode proteins with no obvious similarity. Concomitant overexpression of both NAT1 and ARD1 in yeast causes a 20-fold increase in acetyltransferase activity in vitro, whereas overexpression of either NAT1 or ARD1 alone does not raise activity over basal levels. A functional iso-1-cytochrome c protein, which is N-terminally acetylated in a NAT1 strain, is not acetylated in an isogenic nat1 mutant. At least 20 other yeast proteins, including histone H2B, are not N-terminally acetylated in either nat1 or ard1 mutants. These results suggest that NAT1 and ARD1 proteins function together to catalyze the N-terminal acetylation of a subset of yeast proteins. Images PMID:2551674

  5. In silico identification and functional annotation of yeast E3 ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 substrates.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaofeng; Hu, Lizhen; Han, Ping; Guo, Xuejiang; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    Rsp5, E3 ligases conserved from yeast to mammals, plays a key role in diverse processes in yeast. However, many of Rsp5 substrates are still unclear. Therefore we proposed an in silico method to recognise new substrates of Rsp5. To investigate the molecular determinants that affect the interaction between Rsp5 and its substrate, we have systematically analysed many features that perhaps correlated with the Rsp5 substrate recognition. It is found that PPxY motif, transmembrane region, disorder region and N-linked glycosylation modification are the most important features for substrate recognition. We have constructed an SVM-based classifier to recognise Rsp5 substrates, obtaining 81.5% sensitivity and 74.1% specificity averagely on ten independent testing dataset. We also applied the model on the whole yeast proteome, and identified -66 new Rsp5 substrates. Functional annotation reveals that half of these novel substrates function in the Rsp5 involved cell processes as Rsp5-interacting proteins. PMID:26547982

  6. Identification of a Functional Homolog of the Yeast Copper Homeostasis Gene ATX1 from Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Himelblau, Edward; Mira, Helena; Lin, Su-Ju; Cizewski Culotta, Valeria; Peñarrubia, Lola; Amasino, Richard M.

    1998-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a homolog of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) gene Anti-oxidant 1 (ATX1) has been identified from Arabidopsis. This gene, referred to as Copper CHaperone (CCH), encodes a protein that is 36% identical to the amino acid sequence of ATX1 and has a 48-amino acid extension at the C-terminal end, which is absent from ATX1 homologs identified in animals. ATX1-deficient yeast (atx1) displayed a loss of high-affinity iron uptake. Expression of CCH in the atx1 strain restored high-affinity iron uptake, demonstrating that CCH is a functional homolog of ATX1. When overexpressed in yeast lacking the superoxide dismutase gene SOD1, both ATX1 and CCH protected the cell from the reactive oxygen toxicity that results from superoxide dismutase deficiency. CCH was unable to rescue the sod1 phenotype in the absence of copper, indicating that CCH function is copper dependent. In Arabidopsis CCH mRNA is present in the root, leaf, and inflorescence and is up-regulated 7-fold in leaves undergoing senescence. In plants treated with 800 nL/L ozone for 30 min, CCH mRNA levels increased by 30%. In excised leaves and whole plants treated with high levels of exogenous CuSO4, CCH mRNA levels decreased, indicating that CCH is regulated differently than characterized metallothionein proteins in Arabidopsis. PMID:9701579

  7. Identification of Inhibitors of V-ATPase Pumps in Yeast by HTS Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rebecca M.; Allen, Chris; Melman, Sandra D.; Waller, Anna; Young, Susan M.; Sklar, Larry A.; Parra, Karlett J.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence intensity of the pH-sensitive carboxyfluorescein derivative BCECF was monitored by high throughput flow cytometry in living yeast cells. We measured fluorescence intensity of BCECF trapped in yeast vacuoles, acidic compartments equivalent to lysosomes where V-ATPases are abundant. Because V-ATPases maintain a low pH in the vacuolar lumen, V-ATPase inhibition by concanamycin A alkalinized the vacuole and increased BCECF fluorescence. Likewise, V-ATPase deficient mutant cells had greater fluorescence intensity than wild-type cells. Thus, we detected an increase of fluorescence intensity after short-term and long-term inhibition of V-ATPase function. We used yeast cells loaded with BCECF to screen a small chemical library of structurally diverse compounds in order to identify V-ATPase inhibitors. One compound, disulfiram, enhanced BCECF fluorescence intensity (although to a degree beyond anticipated for pH changes alone in the mutant cells). Once confirmed by dose response assays (EC50=26 ?M), we verified V-ATPase inhibition by disulfiram in secondary assays which measured ATP hydrolysis in vacuolar membranes. The inhibitory action of disulfiram against V-ATPase pumps revealed a novel effect previously unknown for this compound. Because V-ATPases are highly conserved, new inhibitors identified could be used as research and therapeutic tools in cancer, viral infections, and other diseases where V-ATPases are involved. PMID:20018164

  8. Evaluation of a novel rapid detection system for yeasts and molds.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Kei; Ii, Toshihiro; Kashiwabara, Fumi; Hara, Ryotaro; Uesaka, Yoshihiko; Kodaka, Hidemasa

    2010-12-01

    A novel system, the NISSUI rapid detection system, has been developed to rapidly detect yeasts and molds in food. This system consists of a liquid medium containing resazurin as a redox indicator, a unique original micro-well dish containing 676 micro-wells, and a fluorescence-monitoring instrument with an incubator. To evaluate this system, orange juice, milk, and physiological saline solutions artificially inoculated with yeasts or molds were used as samples. Comparison of the new system used at 28ºC for 48 h with a spread-plate method using a potato-dextrose-agar plate at 25ºC for 120 h yielded a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.95. Our data reveal that the new method considerably shortens the time required for detection of yeasts and molds in food. PMID:21212506

  9. Coated whey protein/alginate microparticles as oral controlled delivery systems for probiotic yeast.

    PubMed

    Hébrard, Géraldine; Hoffart, Valérie; Beyssac, Eric; Cardot, Jean-Michel; Alric, Monique; Subirade, Muriel

    2010-01-01

    Viable Saccharomyces boulardii, used as a biotherapeutic agent, was encapsulated in food-grade whey protein isolate (WP) and alginate (ALG) microparticles, in order to protect and vehicle them in gastrointestinal environment. Yeast-loaded microparticles with a WP/ALG ratio of 62/38 were produced with high encapsulation efficiency (95%) using an extrusion/cold gelation method and coated with ALG or WP by a simple immersion method. Swelling, yeast survival, WP loss and yeast release in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF, pH 1.2 and 7.5) with and without their respective digestive enzymes (pepsin and pancreatin) were investigated. In SGF, ALG network shrinkage limited enzyme diffusion into the WP/ALG matrix. Coated and uncoated WP/ALG microparticles were resistant in SGF even with pepsin. Survival of yeast cells in microparticles was 40% compared to 10% for free yeast cells and was improved to 60% by coating. In SIF, yeast cell release followed coated microparticle swelling with a desirable delay. Coated WP/ALG microparticles appear to have potential as oral delivery systems for Saccharomyces boulardii or as encapsulation means for probiotic cells in pharmaceutical or food processing applications. PMID:20163284

  10. System identification for robust control design

    SciTech Connect

    Dohner, J.L.

    1995-04-01

    System identification for the purpose of robust control design involves estimating a nominal model of a physical system and the uncertainty bounds of that nominal model via the use of experimentally measured input/output data. Although many algorithms have been developed to identify nominal models, little effort has been directed towards identifying uncertainty bounds. Therefore, in this document, a discussion of both nominal model identification and bounded output multiplicative uncertainty identification will be presented. This document is divided into several sections. Background information relevant to system identification and control design will be presented. A derivation of eigensystem realization type algorithms will be presented. An algorithm will be developed for calculating the maximum singular value of output multiplicative uncertainty from measured data. An application will be given involving the identification of a complex system with aliased dynamics, feedback control, and exogenous noise disturbances. And, finally, a short discussion of results will be presented.

  11. Microbe domestication and the identification of the wild genetic stock of lager-brewing yeast

    PubMed Central

    Libkind, Diego; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Valério, Elisabete; Gonçalves, Carla; Dover, Jim; Johnston, Mark; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2011-01-01

    Domestication of plants and animals promoted humanity's transition from nomadic to sedentary lifestyles, demographic expansion, and the emergence of civilizations. In contrast to the well-documented successes of crop and livestock breeding, processes of microbe domestication remain obscure, despite the importance of microbes to the production of food, beverages, and biofuels. Lager-beer, first brewed in the 15th century, employs an allotetraploid hybrid yeast, Saccharomyces pastorianus (syn. Saccharomyces carlsbergensis), a domesticated species created by the fusion of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ale-yeast with an unknown cryotolerant Saccharomyces species. We report the isolation of that species and designate it Saccharomyces eubayanus sp. nov. because of its resemblance to Saccharomyces bayanus (a complex hybrid of S. eubayanus, Saccharomyces uvarum, and S. cerevisiae found only in the brewing environment). Individuals from populations of S. eubayanus and its sister species, S. uvarum, exist in apparent sympatry in Nothofagus (Southern beech) forests in Patagonia, but are isolated genetically through intrinsic postzygotic barriers, and ecologically through host-preference. The draft genome sequence of S. eubayanus is 99.5% identical to the non-S. cerevisiae portion of the S. pastorianus genome sequence and suggests specific changes in sugar and sulfite metabolism that were crucial for domestication in the lager-brewing environment. This study shows that combining microbial ecology with comparative genomics facilitates the discovery and preservation of wild genetic stocks of domesticated microbes to trace their history, identify genetic changes, and suggest paths to further industrial improvement. PMID:21873232

  12. Microbe domestication and the identification of the wild genetic stock of lager-brewing yeast.

    PubMed

    Libkind, Diego; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Valério, Elisabete; Gonçalves, Carla; Dover, Jim; Johnston, Mark; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2011-08-30

    Domestication of plants and animals promoted humanity's transition from nomadic to sedentary lifestyles, demographic expansion, and the emergence of civilizations. In contrast to the well-documented successes of crop and livestock breeding, processes of microbe domestication remain obscure, despite the importance of microbes to the production of food, beverages, and biofuels. Lager-beer, first brewed in the 15th century, employs an allotetraploid hybrid yeast, Saccharomyces pastorianus (syn. Saccharomyces carlsbergensis), a domesticated species created by the fusion of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ale-yeast with an unknown cryotolerant Saccharomyces species. We report the isolation of that species and designate it Saccharomyces eubayanus sp. nov. because of its resemblance to Saccharomyces bayanus (a complex hybrid of S. eubayanus, Saccharomyces uvarum, and S. cerevisiae found only in the brewing environment). Individuals from populations of S. eubayanus and its sister species, S. uvarum, exist in apparent sympatry in Nothofagus (Southern beech) forests in Patagonia, but are isolated genetically through intrinsic postzygotic barriers, and ecologically through host-preference. The draft genome sequence of S. eubayanus is 99.5% identical to the non-S. cerevisiae portion of the S. pastorianus genome sequence and suggests specific changes in sugar and sulfite metabolism that were crucial for domestication in the lager-brewing environment. This study shows that combining microbial ecology with comparative genomics facilitates the discovery and preservation of wild genetic stocks of domesticated microbes to trace their history, identify genetic changes, and suggest paths to further industrial improvement. PMID:21873232

  13. Use of The Yeast Two-Hybrid System to Identify Targets of Fungal Effectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The yeast-two hybrid (Y2H) system is a binary method widely used to determine direct interactions between paired proteins. Although having certain limitations, this method has become one of the two main systemic tools (along with affinity purification/mass spectrometry) for interactome mapping in mo...

  14. Practical reactor systems for yeast cell immobilization using biomass support particles

    SciTech Connect

    Black, G.M.; Webb, C.; Mattews, T.M.; Atkinson, B.

    1984-01-01

    The technique of cell immobilization using porous support particles (biomass support particles) has been successfully applied to yeast cells. Two reactor configurations exploiting the use of these particles have been developed and assessed for use in aseptic yeast fermentations. A liquid-fluidized bed fermenter has been devised for use with particles denser than the fermentation liquor whilst a gas-stirred circulating bed fermenter proved suitable for particles of essentially neutral buoyancy. Both systems have been operated successfully for extended periods of continuous operation. The utilization of biomass support particle technology in such reactors provides a practical and robust system for immobilized cell reactors. This technology offers significant opportunities for further development.

  15. Identification of a non-mitochondrial phosphatidylserine decarboxylase activity (PSD2) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Trotter, P J; Voelker, D R

    1995-03-17

    Phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (PSD1) plays a central role in the biosynthesis of aminophospholipids in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes by catalyzing the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine. Recent reports (Trotter, P. J., Pedretti, J., and Voelker, D. R. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 21416-21424; Clancey, C. J., Chang, S.-C., and Dowhan, W. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 24580-24590) described the cloning of a yeast structural gene for this enzyme (PSD1) and the creation of the null allele. Based on the phenotype of strains containing a null allele for PSD1 (psd1-delta 1::TRP1) it was hypothesized that yeast have a second phosphatidylserine decarboxylase. The present studies demonstrate the presence of a second enzyme activity (denoted PSD2), which, depending on the method of evaluation, accounts for 4-12% of the total cellular phosphatidylserine decarboxylase activity found in wild type. Recessive mutations resulting in loss of this enzyme activity (denoted psd2) in cells containing the psd1-delta 1::TRP1 null allele also result in ethanolamine auxotrophy. When incubated with [3H]serine these double mutants accumulate label in phosphatidylserine, while very little (< 5%) is converted to phosphatidylethanolamine. In addition, these mutants have a approximately 70% decrease in the amount of total phosphatidylethanolamine even when grown in the presence of exogenous ethanolamine. Strains containing psd1 or psd2 mutations were utilized for the subcellular localization of the PSD2 enzyme activity. Unlike the PSD1 activity, the PSD2 enzyme activity does not localize to the mitochondria, but to a low density subcellular compartment with fractionation properties similar to both vacuoles and Golgi. PMID:7890739

  16. Isolation and Identification of Black Yeasts by Enrichment on Atmospheres of Monoaromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingjun; Zeng, Jingsi; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Attili-Angelis, Derlene

    2010-01-01

    Black yeast members of the Herpotrichiellaceae present a complex ecological behavior: They are often isolated from rather extreme environments polluted with aromatic hydrocarbons, while they are also regularly involved in human opportunistic infections. A selective technique to promote the in vitro growth of herpotrichiellaceous fungi was applied to investigate their ecophysiology. Samples from natural ecological niches and man-made environments that might contain black yeasts were enriched on an inert solid support at low humidity and under a controlled atmosphere rich in volatile aromatic hydrocarbons. Benzene, toluene, and xylene were provided separately as the sole carbon and energy source via the gas phase. The assayed isolation protocol was highly specific toward mesophilic Exophiala species (70 strains of this genus out of 71 isolates). Those were obtained predominantly from creosote-treated railway ties (53 strains), but isolates were also found on wild berries (11 strains) and in guano-rich soil samples (six strains). Most of the isolates were obtained on toluene (43 strains), but enrichments on xylene and benzene also yielded herpotrichiellaceous fungi (17 and 10 isolates, respectively). Based upon morphological characterizations and DNA sequences of the full internal transcriber spacers (ITS) and the 8.5S rRNA genes, the majority of the obtained isolates were affiliated to the recently described species Exophiala xenobiotica (32 strains) and Exophiala bergeri (nine strains). Members of two other phylogenetic groups (24 and two strains, respectively) somewhat related to E. bergeri were also found, and a last group (three strains) corresponded to an undescribed Exophiala species. PMID:20333373

  17. Identification of proteins associated with the yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase by tandem affinity purification

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Dmitriy A; Savkina, Maria; Anikin, Michael; Del Campo, Mark; Ecker, Karen; Lambowitz, Alan M; De Gnore, Jon P; McAllister, William T

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of mitochondrial (mt) transcripts varies under different conditions, and is thought to depend upon rates of transcription initiation, transcription termination/attenuation and RNA processing/degradation. The requirement to maintain the balance between RNA synthesis and processing may involve coordination between these processes; however, little is known about factors that regulate the activity of mtRNA polymerase (mtRNAP). Recent attempts to identify mtRNAP–protein interactions in yeast by means of a generalized tandem affinity purification (TAP) protocol were not successful, most likely because they involved a C-terminal mtRNAP–TAP fusion (which is incompatible with mtRNAP function) and because of the use of whole-cell solubilization protocols that did not preserve the integrity of mt protein complexes. Based upon the structure of T7 RNAP (to which mtRNAPs show high sequence similarity), we identified positions in yeast mtRNAP that allow insertion of a small affinity tag, confirmed the mature N-terminus, constructed a functional N-terminal TAP–mtRNAP fusion, pulled down associated proteins, and identified them by LC–MS–MS. Among the proteins found in the pull-down were a DEAD-box protein (Mss116p) and an RNA-binding protein (Pet127p). Previous genetic experiments suggested a role for these proteins in linking transcription and RNA degradation, in that a defect in the mt degradadosome could be suppressed by overexpression of either of these proteins or, independently, by mutations in either mtRNAP or its initiation factor Mtf1p. Further, we found that Mss116p inhibits transcription by mtRNAP in vitro in a steady-state reaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Mss116p and Pet127p are involved in modulation of mtRNAP activity. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:19536766

  18. Study of amyloids using yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wickner, Reed B.; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Shewmaker, Frank; McGlinchey, Ryan; Edskes, Herman K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism in such fields as the cell cycle, regulation of transcription, protein trafficking and cell biology, primarily because of its ease of genetic manipulation. This is no less so in the area of amyloid studies. The endogenous yeast amyloids described to date include prions, infectious proteins (Table 1), and some cell wall proteins (1). and amyloids of humans and a fungal prion have also been studied using the yeast system. Accordingly, the emphasis of this chapter will be on genetic, biochemical, cell biological and physical methods particularly useful in the study of yeast prions and other amyloids studied in yeast. We limit our description of these methods to those aspects which have been most useful in studying yeast prions, citing more detailed expositions in the literature. Volumes on yeast genetics methods (2–4), and on amyloids and prions (5, 6) are useful, and Masison has edited a volume of Methods on “Identification, analysis and characterization of fungal prions” which covers some of this territory (7). We also outline some useful physical methods, pointing the reader to more extensive and authoratative descriptions. PMID:22528100

  19. MALDI-TOF MS-based identification of black yeasts of the genus Exophiala.

    PubMed

    Özhak-Baysan, Betil; Ö?ünç, Dilara; Dö?en, Aylin; Ilkit, Macit; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the applicability of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identification of Exophiala species. The analysis included a total of 110 Exophiala isolates, including 15 CBS strains representing 4 species, Exophiala dermatitidis (61), E. phaeomuriformis (36), E. crusticola (9), and E. heteromorpha (4), that had been previously identified based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. We also compared the relative efficacies of Sabouraud glucose agar (SGA) and Columbia agar (CA) for use in MALDI-TOF MS. Remarkably, we obtained a log-score value ?2.0 by using either SGA or CA for all 15 CBS strains, indicating species-level identification. The remaining 95 Exophiala strains were identified to the genus or species levels, with identification rates of 96.8% and 90.5%, using SGA or CA, respectively. Most of the E. dermatitidis (100% and 92.9%), E. phaeomuriformis (80.6% and 83.9%), E. crusticola (50% and 100%), and E. heteromorpha (100% and 100%) isolates were correctly identified using SGA or CA, respectively. Furthermore, 58.9% and 26.3% of the strains had log-score values of ?2.0 by using SGA and CA, respectively. Our results indicate that MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid and reliable technique with high rates of correct taxonomic identification. PMID:25851261

  20. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the rapid identification of yeasts causing bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A K; Paul, S; Sood, P; Rudramurthy, S M; Rajbanshi, A; Jillwin, T J; Chakrabarti, A

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have systematically standardised and evaluated matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for identification of yeasts from bloodstream infections. This is rapidly becoming pertinent for early identification of yeasts and appropriate antifungal therapy. We used 354 yeast strains identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing for standardisation and 367 blind clinical strains for validation of our MALDI-TOF MS protocols. We also evaluated different sample preparation methods and found the on-plate formic acid extraction method as most cost- and time-efficient. The MALDI-TOF assay correctly identified 98.9% of PCR-sequenced yeasts. Novel main spectrum projections (MSP) were developed for Candida auris, C. viswanathii and Kodamaea ohmeri, which were missing from the Bruker MALDI-TOF MS database. Spectral cut-offs computed by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis showed 99.4% to 100% accuracy at a log score of ?1.70 for C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. pelliculosa, C. orthopsilosis, C. albicans, C. rugosa, C. guilliermondii, C. lipolytica, C. metapsilosis, C. nivariensis. The differences in the species-specific scores of our standardisation and blind validation strains were not statistically significant, implying the optimal performance of our test protocol. The MSPs of the three new species also were validated. We conclude that MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid, accurate and reliable tool for identification of bloodstream yeasts. With proper standardisation, validation and regular database expansion, its efficiency can be further enhanced. PMID:25658527

  1. Yeast and Fungal Prions: Amyloid-Handling Systems, Amyloid Structure, and Prion Biology.

    PubMed

    Wickner, R B; Edskes, H K; Gorkovskiy, A; Bezsonov, E E; Stroobant, E E

    2016-01-01

    Yeast prions (infectious proteins) were discovered by their outré genetic properties and have become important models for an array of human prion and amyloid diseases. A single prion protein can become any of many distinct amyloid forms (called prion variants or strains), each of which is self-propagating, but with different biological properties (eg, lethal vs mild). The folded in-register parallel β sheet architecture of the yeast prion amyloids naturally suggests a mechanism by which prion variant information can be faithfully transmitted for many generations. The yeast prions rely on cellular chaperones for their propagation, but can be cured by various chaperone imbalances. The Btn2/Cur1 system normally cures most variants of the [URE3] prion that arise. Although most variants of the [PSI+] and [URE3] prions are toxic or lethal, some are mild in their effects. Even the most mild forms of these prions are rare in the wild, indicating that they too are detrimental to yeast. The beneficial [Het-s] prion of Podospora anserina poses an important contrast in its structure, biology, and evolution to the yeast prions characterized thus far. PMID:26915272

  2. Identification of medically relevant species of arthroconidial yeasts by use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kolecka, Anna; Khayhan, Kantarawee; Groenewald, Marizeth; Theelen, Bart; Arabatzis, Michael; Velegraki, Aristea; Kostrzewa, Markus; Mares, Mihai; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Boekhout, Teun

    2013-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used for an extensive identification study of arthroconidial yeasts, using 85 reference strains from the CBS-KNAW yeast collection and 134 clinical isolates collected from medical centers in Qatar, Greece, and Romania. The test set included 72 strains of ascomycetous yeasts (Galactomyces, Geotrichum, Saprochaete, and Magnusiomyces spp.) and 147 strains of basidiomycetous yeasts (Trichosporon and Guehomyces spp.). With minimal preparation time, MALDI-TOF MS proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool that provided reliable identification of most (98%) of the tested strains to the species level, with good discriminatory power. The majority of strains were correctly identified at the species level with good scores (>2.0) and seven of the tested strains with log score values between 1.7 and 2.0. The MALDI-TOF MS results obtained were consistent with validated internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA sequencing results. Expanding the mass spectrum database by increasing the number of reference strains for closely related species, including those of nonclinical origin, should enhance the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS-based diagnostic analysis of these arthroconidial fungi in medical and other laboratories. PMID:23678074

  3. Identification of Medically Relevant Species of Arthroconidial Yeasts by Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kolecka, Anna; Khayhan, Kantarawee; Groenewald, Marizeth; Theelen, Bart; Arabatzis, Michael; Velegraki, Aristea; Kostrzewa, Markus; Mares, Mihai; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used for an extensive identification study of arthroconidial yeasts, using 85 reference strains from the CBS-KNAW yeast collection and 134 clinical isolates collected from medical centers in Qatar, Greece, and Romania. The test set included 72 strains of ascomycetous yeasts (Galactomyces, Geotrichum, Saprochaete, and Magnusiomyces spp.) and 147 strains of basidiomycetous yeasts (Trichosporon and Guehomyces spp.). With minimal preparation time, MALDI-TOF MS proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool that provided reliable identification of most (98%) of the tested strains to the species level, with good discriminatory power. The majority of strains were correctly identified at the species level with good scores (>2.0) and seven of the tested strains with log score values between 1.7 and 2.0. The MALDI-TOF MS results obtained were consistent with validated internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA sequencing results. Expanding the mass spectrum database by increasing the number of reference strains for closely related species, including those of nonclinical origin, should enhance the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS-based diagnostic analysis of these arthroconidial fungi in medical and other laboratories. PMID:23678074

  4. Identification of yeast genes that confer resistance to chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) using chemogenomics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chitosan oligosaccharide (COS), a deacetylated derivative of chitin, is an abundant, and renewable natural polymer. COS has higher antimicrobial properties than chitosan and is presumed to act by disrupting/permeabilizing the cell membranes of bacteria, yeast and fungi. COS is relatively non-toxic to mammals. By identifying the molecular and genetic targets of COS, we hope to gain a better understanding of the antifungal mode of action of COS. Results Three different chemogenomic fitness assays, haploinsufficiency (HIP), homozygous deletion (HOP), and multicopy suppression (MSP) profiling were combined with a transcriptomic analysis to gain insight in to the mode of action and mechanisms of resistance to chitosan oligosaccharides. The fitness assays identified 39 yeast deletion strains sensitive to COS and 21 suppressors of COS sensitivity. The genes identified are involved in processes such as RNA biology (transcription, translation and regulatory mechanisms), membrane functions (e.g. signalling, transport and targeting), membrane structural components, cell division, and proteasome processes. The transcriptomes of control wild type and 5 suppressor strains overexpressing ARL1, BCK2, ERG24, MSG5, or RBA50, were analyzed in the presence and absence of COS. Some of the up-regulated transcripts in the suppressor overexpressing strains exposed to COS included genes involved in transcription, cell cycle, stress response and the Ras signal transduction pathway. Down-regulated transcripts included those encoding protein folding components and respiratory chain proteins. The COS-induced transcriptional response is distinct from previously described environmental stress responses (i.e. thermal, salt, osmotic and oxidative stress) and pre-treatment with these well characterized environmental stressors provided little or any resistance to COS. Conclusions Overexpression of the ARL1 gene, a member of the Ras superfamily that regulates membrane trafficking, provides protection against COS-induced cell membrane permeability and damage. We found that the ARL1 COS-resistant over-expression strain was as sensitive to Amphotericin B, Fluconazole and Terbinafine as the wild type cells and that when COS and Fluconazole are used in combination they act in a synergistic fashion. The gene targets of COS identified in this study indicate that COS’s mechanism of action is different from other commonly studied fungicides that target membranes, suggesting that COS may be an effective fungicide for drug-resistant fungal pathogens. PMID:22727066

  5. IONS: Identification of Orthologs by Neighborhood and Similarity—an Automated Method to Identify Orthologs in Chromosomal Regions of Common Evolutionary Ancestry and its Application to Hemiascomycetous Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Seret, Marie-Line; Baret, Philippe V.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis is widely used to infer gene function and study genome evolution and requires proper ortholog identification across different genomes. We have developed a program for the Identification of Orthologs in one-to-one relationship by Neighborhood and Similarity (IONS) between closely related species. The algorithm combines two levels of evidence to determine co-ancestrality at the genome scale: sequence similarity and shared neighborhood. The method was initially designed to provide anchor points for syntenic blocks within the Génolevures project concerning nine hemiascomycetous yeasts (about 50,000 genes) and is applicable to different input databases. Comparison based on use of a Rand index shows that the results are highly consistent with the pillars of the Yeast Gene Order Browser, a manually curated database. Compared with SYNERGY, another algorithm reporting homology relationships, our method’s main advantages are its automation and the absence of dataset-dependent parameters, facilitating consistent integration of newly released genomes. PMID:21918595

  6. IONS: Identification of Orthologs by Neighborhood and Similarity-an Automated Method to Identify Orthologs in Chromosomal Regions of Common Evolutionary Ancestry and its Application to Hemiascomycetous Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Seret, Marie-Line; Baret, Philippe V

    2011-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis is widely used to infer gene function and study genome evolution and requires proper ortholog identification across different genomes. We have developed a program for the Identification of Orthologs in one-to-one relationship by Neighborhood and Similarity (IONS) between closely related species. The algorithm combines two levels of evidence to determine co-ancestrality at the genome scale: sequence similarity and shared neighborhood. The method was initially designed to provide anchor points for syntenic blocks within the Génolevures project concerning nine hemiascomycetous yeasts (about 50,000 genes) and is applicable to different input databases. Comparison based on use of a Rand index shows that the results are highly consistent with the pillars of the Yeast Gene Order Browser, a manually curated database. Compared with SYNERGY, another algorithm reporting homology relationships, our method's main advantages are its automation and the absence of dataset-dependent parameters, facilitating consistent integration of newly released genomes. PMID:21918595

  7. Identification of Chinese cabbage sentrin as a suppressor of Bax-induced cell death in yeast.

    PubMed

    Sawitri, Widhi Dyah; Slameto, Slameto; Sugiharto, Bambang; Kim, Kyung-Min

    2012-05-01

    Studies into the cell death program termed apoptosis have resulted in new information regarding how cells control and execute their own demise, including insights into the mechanism by which death-preventing factors can inhibit Bax-induced caspase activation. We investigated high temperature stress-induced cell death in Brassica rapa. Using a yeast functional screening from a Brassica rapa cDNA library, the BH5-127 EST clone encoding an apoptotic suppressor peptide was identified. However, a phylogenic tree showed that BH5-127 clusters within a clade containing SUMO-1 (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier- 1). BH5-127 was confirmed similar to have function to SUMO-1 as Fas suppression. Expression of BH5-127 showed that substantial suppression of cell death survived on SD-galactose-Leu--Ura- medium. The results suggest that BrSE (Brassica rapa Sentrin EST, BH5-127) is one of the important regulatory proteins in programming cell death, especially in the seedling stage of Chinese cabbage. PMID:22561852

  8. Identification and transcription control of fission yeast genes repressed by an ammonium starvation growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, C; Perret, E; Dumont, X; Picard, A; Caput, D; Lenaers, G

    2000-01-15

    In fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, ammonium starvation induces a growth arrest, a cell cycle exit in G(1) and a further switch to meiosis. This process is regulated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and the Wis1-dependent MAP kinase cascade, and downstream transcription factors. In order to understand how cells adapt their genetic programme to the switch from mitotic cycling to starvation, a differential transcript analysis comparing mRNA from exponentially growing and ammonium-starved cells was performed. Genes repressed by this stimulus mainly concern cell growth, i.e. protein synthesis and global metabolism. Comparison of the expression of two of them, the ribosomal proteins Rps6 and TCTP, in many different growing conditions, evidenced a strong correlation, suggesting that their transcriptions are coordinately regulated. Nevertheless, by repeating the ammonium starvation on strains constitutively activated for the PKA pathway (Deltacgs1), or unable to activate the Wis1-dependent MAP kinase pathway (Deltawis1), or with both characteristics (Deltacgs1+Deltawis1), the transcriptional inhibition was found to be governed either by the PKA pathway, or by the Wis1 pathway, or by both. These results suggest that during the switch from exponential growth to ammonium starvation, cell homeostasis is maintained by downregulating the transcription of the most expressed genes by a PKA and a Wis1-dependent process. Accession Nos for the S30 and L14 ribosomal protein cDNA sequences are AJ2731 and AJ2732, respectively. PMID:10620772

  9. Identification and Dissection of a Complex DNA Repair Sensitivity Phenotype in Baker's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Demogines, Ann; Smith, Erin; Kruglyak, Leonid; Alani, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Complex traits typically involve the contribution of multiple gene variants. In this study, we took advantage of a high-density genotyping analysis of the BY (S288c) and RM strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of 123 derived spore progeny to identify the genetic loci that underlie a complex DNA repair sensitivity phenotype. This was accomplished by screening hybrid yeast progeny for sensitivity to a variety of DNA damaging agents. Both the BY and RM strains are resistant to the ultraviolet light–mimetic agent 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO); however, hybrid progeny from a BY×RM cross displayed varying sensitivities to the drug. We mapped a major quantitative trait locus (QTL), RAD5, and identified the exact polymorphism within this locus responsible for 4-NQO sensitivity. By using a backcrossing strategy along with array-assisted bulk segregant analysis, we identified one other locus, MKT1, and a QTL on Chromosome VII that also link to the hybrid 4-NQO–sensitive phenotype but confer more minor effects. This work suggests an additive model for sensitivity to 4-NQO and provides a strategy for mapping both major and minor QTL that confer background-specific phenotypes. It also provides tools for understanding the effect of genetic background on sensitivity to genotoxic agents. PMID:18617998

  10. Identification of neuroglobin-interacting proteins using yeast two-hybrid screening.

    PubMed

    Yu, Z; Liu, N; Wang, Y; Li, X; Wang, X

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a globin protein that is highly and specifically expressed in brain neurons. A large volume of evidence has proven that Ngb is a neuroprotective molecule against hypoxic/ischemic brain injury and other related neurological disorder; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Aiming to provide more clues in understanding the molecular mechanisms of Ngb's neuroprotection, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening to search for proteins that interact with Ngb. From a mouse brain cDNA library, we found totally 36 proteins that potentially interact with Ngb, and 10 of them were each identified in multiple positive clones. The shared sequences within these multiple clones are more likely to be Ngb-interacting domains. In primary cultured mouse cortical neurons, immuno-precipitation was performed to confirm the interactions of selected proteins with Ngb. The discovered Ngb-interacting proteins in this study include those involved in energy metabolism, mitochondria function, and signaling pathways for cell survival and proliferation. Our findings provide molecular targets for investigating protein interaction-based biological functions and neuroprotective mechanisms of Ngb. PMID:22079573

  11. Identification of Neuroglobin-interacting Proteins Using Yeast Two-hybrid Screening

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhanyang; Liu, Ning; Wang, Yi; Li, Xiaokun; Wang, Xiaoying

    2011-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a globin protein that is highly and specifically expressed in brain neurons. A large volume of evidence has proven that Ngb is a neuroprotective molecule against hypoxic/ischemic brain injury and other related neurological disorder; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Aiming to provide more clues in understanding the molecular mechanisms of Ngb’s neuroprotection, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening to search for proteins that interact with Ngb. From a mouse brain cDNA library, we found totally 36 proteins that potentially interact with Ngb, and 10 of them were each identified in multiple positive clones. The shared sequences within these multiple clones are more likely to be Ngb-interacting domains. In primary cultured mouse cortical neurons, immuno-precipitation was performed to confirm the interactions of selected proteins with Ngb. The discovered Ngb-interacting proteins in this study include those involved in energy metabolism, mitochondria function and signaling pathways for cell survival and proliferation. Our findings provide molecular targets for investigating protein interaction-based biological functions and neuroprotective mechanisms of Ngb. PMID:22079573

  12. Identification and functional analysis of two U3 binding sites on yeast pre-ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, M; Tollervey, D

    1992-01-01

    It has long been known that U3 can be isolated hydrogen bonded to pre-ribosomal RNAs, but the sites of interaction are poorly characterized. Here we show that yeast U3 can be cross-linked to 35S pre-rRNA both in deproteinized extracts and in living cells. The sites of cross-linking were localized to the 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) and then identified at the nucleotide level. Two regions of U3 near the 5' end are cross-linked to pre-rRNA in vivo and in vitro; the evolutionarily conserved box A region and a 10 nucleotide (nt) sequence with perfect complementarity to an ETS sequence. Two in vivo cross-links are detected in the ETS, at +470, within the region complementary to U3, and at +655, close to the cleavage site at the 5' end of 18S rRNA. A tagged rDNA construct was used to follow the effects of mutations in the ETS in vivo. A small deletion around the +470 cross-linking site in the ETS prevents the synthesis of 18S rRNA. This region is homologous to the site of vertebrate ETS cleavage. We propose that this site may be evolutionarily conserved to direct the assembly of a pre-rRNA processing complex required for the cleavages that generate 18S rRNA. Images PMID:1563354

  13. The identification and characterization of osmotolerant yeast isolates from chemical wastewater evaporation ponds.

    PubMed

    Lahav, R; Fareleira, P; Nejidat, A; Abeliovich, A

    2002-04-01

    Ramat Hovav is a major chemical industrial park manufacturing pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and various aliphatic and aromatic halogens. All wastewater streams are collected in large evaporation ponds. Salinity in the evaporation ponds fluctuates between 3% (w/v) and saturation and pH values range between 2.0 and 10.0. We looked for microorganisms surviving in these extreme environmental conditions and found that 2 yeast strains dominate this biotope. 18S rDNA sequence analysis identified the isolates as Pichia guilliermondii and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. Both isolates grew in NaCl concentrations ranging up to 3.5 M and 2.5 M, respectively, and at a pH range of 2-10. There was a distinct difference between the Rhodotorula and Pichia strains and S. cerevisiae RS16 that served as a control strain with respect to accumulation of osmoregulators and internal ion concentrations when exposed to osmotic stress. The Pichia and Rhodotorula strains maintained high glycerol concentration also in media low in NaCl. Utilization of various carbon sources was examined. Using a tetrazolium-based assay we show that the Rhodotorula and Pichia strains are capable of utilizing a wide range of different carbon sources including anthracene, phenanthrene, and other cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:12037616

  14. Identification of Yeast V-ATPase Mutants by Western Blots Analysis of Whole Cell Lysates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Belky, Karlett

    2002-11-01

    A biochemistry laboratory was designed for an undergraduate course to help students better understand the link between molecular engineering and biochemistry. Students identified unknown yeast strains with high specificity using SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis of whole cell lysates. This problem-solving exercise is a common application of biochemistry in biotechnology research. Three different strains were used: a wild-type and two mutants for the proton pump vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase). V-ATPases are multisubunit enzymes and the mutants used were deletion mutants; each lacked one structural gene of the complex. After three, three-hour labs, mutant strains were easily identified by the students and distinguished from wild-type cells analyzing the pattern of SDS-PAGE distribution of proteins. Identifying different subunits of one multimeric protein allowed for discussion of the structure and function of this metabolic enzyme, which captured the interest of the students. The experiment can be adapted to other multimeric protein complexes and shows improvement of the described methodology over previous reports, perhaps because the problem and its solution are representative of the type of techniques currently used in research labs.

  15. Multi-level RF identification system

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-07-20

    A radio frequency identification system having a radio frequency transceiver for generating a continuous wave RF interrogation signal that impinges upon an RF identification tag. An oscillation circuit in the RF identification tag modulates the interrogation signal with a subcarrier of a predetermined frequency and modulates the frequency-modulated signal back to the transmitting interrogator. The interrogator recovers and analyzes the subcarrier signal and determines its frequency. The interrogator generates an output indicative of the frequency of the subcarrier frequency, thereby identifying the responding RFID tag as one of a "class" of RFID tags configured to respond with a subcarrier signal of a predetermined frequency.

  16. Nuclear Materials Identification System Operational Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, L.G.

    2001-04-10

    This report describes the operation and setup of the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) with a {sup 252}Cf neutron source at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The components of the system are described with a description of the setup of the system along with an overview of the NMIS measurements for scanning, calibration, and confirmation of inventory items.

  17. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Identification of Yeasts Is Contingent on Robust Reference Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Angie; Halliday, Catriona; Zahra, Melissa; van Hal, Sebastian; Olma, Tom; Maszewska, Krystyna; Iredell, Jonathan R.; Meyer, Wieland; Chen, Sharon C.-A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for yeast identification is limited by the requirement for protein extraction and for robust reference spectra across yeast species in databases. We evaluated its ability to identify a range of yeasts in comparison with phenotypic methods. Methods MALDI-TOF MS was performed on 30 reference and 167 clinical isolates followed by prospective examination of 67 clinical strains in parallel with biochemical testing (total n?=?264). Discordant/unreliable identifications were resolved by sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rRNA gene cluster. Principal Findings Twenty (67%; 16 species), and 24 (80%) of 30 reference strains were identified to species, (spectral score ?2.0) and genus (score ?1.70)-level, respectively. Of clinical isolates, 140/167 (84%) strains were correctly identified with scores of ?2.0 and 160/167 (96%) with scores of ?1.70; amongst Candida spp. (n?=?148), correct species assignment at scores of ?2.0, and ?1.70 was obtained for 86% and 96% isolates, respectively (vs. 76.4% by biochemical methods). Prospectively, species-level identification was achieved for 79% of isolates, whilst 91% and 94% of strains yielded scores of ?1.90 and ?1.70, respectively (100% isolates identified by biochemical methods). All test scores of 1.70–1.90 provided correct species assignment despite being identified to “genus-level”. MALDI-TOF MS identified uncommon Candida spp., differentiated Candida parapsilosis from C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis and distinguished between C. glabrata, C. nivariensis and C. bracarensis. Yeasts with scores of <1.70 were rare species such as C. nivariensis (3/10 strains) and C. bracarensis (n?=?1) but included 4/12 Cryptococcus neoformans. There were no misidentifications. Four novel species-specific spectra were obtained. Protein extraction was essential for reliable results. Conclusions MALDI-TOF MS enabled rapid, reliable identification of clinically-important yeasts. The addition of spectra to databases and reduction in identification scores required for species-level identification may improve its utility. PMID:22022438

  18. On Markov parameters in system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh; Juang, Jer-Nan; Longman, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed discussion of Markov parameters in system identification is given. Different forms of input-output representation of linear discrete-time systems are reviewed and discussed. Interpretation of sampled response data as Markov parameters is presented. Relations between the state-space model and particular linear difference models via the Markov parameters are formulated. A generalization of Markov parameters to observer and Kalman filter Markov parameters for system identification is explained. These extended Markov parameters play an important role in providing not only a state-space realization, but also an observer/Kalman filter for the system of interest.

  19. Reverse Engineering the Yeast RNR1 Transcriptional Control System

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Grace; Brody, James P.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription is controlled by multi-protein complexes binding to short non-coding regions of genomic DNA. These complexes interact combinatorially. A major goal of modern biology is to provide simple models that predict this complex behavior. The yeast gene RNR1 is transcribed periodically during the cell cycle. Here, we present a pilot study to demonstrate a new method of deciphering the logic behind transcriptional regulation. We took regular samples from cell cycle synchronized cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and extracted nuclear protein. We tested these samples to measure the amount of protein that bound to seven different 16 base pair sequences of DNA that have been previously identified as protein binding locations in the promoter of the RNR1 gene. These tests were performed using surface plasmon resonance. We found that the surface plasmon resonance signals showed significant variation throughout the cell cycle. We correlated the protein binding data with previously published mRNA expression data and interpreted this to show that transcription requires protein bound to a particular site and either five different sites or one additional sites. We conclude that this demonstrates the feasibility of this approach to decipher the combinatorial logic of transcription. PMID:21103376

  20. Choosing Between Yeast and Bacterial Expression Systems: Yield Dependent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Rebecca S.; Malone, Christine C.; Moore, Blake P.; Burk, Melissa; Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a naturally occurring fluorescent protein isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. The intrinsic fluorescence of the protein is due to a chromophore located in the center of the molecule. Its usefulness has been established as a marker for gene expression and localization of gene products. GFP has recently been utilized as a model protein for crystallization studies at NASA/MSFC, both in earth-based and in microgravity experiments. Because large quantities of purified protein were needed, the cDNA of GFP was cloned into the Pichia pastoris pPICZ(alpha) C strain, with very little protein secreted into the media. Microscopic analysis prior to harvest showed gigantic green fluorescent yeast, but upon harvesting most protein was degraded. Trial fermentations of GFP cloned into pPICZ A for intracellular expression provided unsatisfactory yield. GFP cloned into E, coli was overexpressed at greater than 150 mg/liter, with purification yields at greater than 100mg/liter.

  1. Encapsulated yeast cells inside Paramecium primaurelia: a model system for protection capability of polyelectrolyte shells.

    PubMed

    Krol, S; Cavalleri, O; Ramoino, P; Gliozzi, A; Diaspro, A

    2003-12-01

    One of the most promising applications of encapsulated living cells is their use as protected transplanted tissue into the human body. A suitable system for the protection of living cells is the use of nano- or microcapsules of polyelectrolytes. These shells can be deposited easily on top of the cells by means of a layer-by-layer technique. An interesting feature of the capsules is the possibility to control their properties on a nanometre level, tuning their wall texture via the preparation conditions. Here we introduce a model system to test the protection ability of polyelectrolyte capsules. Common bakery yeast cells were encapsulated. They were coated with a fluorescently labelled shell at conditions known to guarantee cell survival, and the cell interior was stained with DAPI. The protozoan Paramecium primaurelia was incubated with this double-stained living yeast and visualized by means of two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy. Cross-sections of the dye-stained material as well as autofluorescence of the fixed protozoan allowed us to follow the digestion of the coated yeast with time. Our investigation reveals that capsules prepared under these deposition conditions are permeable to lysosomal enzymes, leading to degradation of the yeast inside the intact capsules. Our preliminary results indicate the suitability of the introduced model as a test system of this permeability. PMID:14629549

  2. Identification of the Transcription Factor Znc1p, which Regulates the Yeast-to-Hypha Transition in the Dimorphic Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Vazquez, Azul; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Angelica; Domínguez, Ángel; Rachubinski, Richard; Riquelme, Meritxell; Cuellar-Mata, Patricia; Guzman, Juan Carlos Torres

    2013-01-01

    The dimorphic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is used as a model to study fungal differentiation because it grows as yeast-like cells or forms hyphal cells in response to changes in environmental conditions. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a gene, ZNC1, involved in the dimorphic transition in Y. lipolytica. The ZNC1 gene encodes a 782 amino acid protein that contains a Zn(II)2C6 fungal-type zinc finger DNA-binding domain and a leucine zipper domain. ZNC1 transcription is elevated during yeast growth and decreases during the formation of mycelium. Cells in which ZNC1 has been deleted show increased hyphal cell formation. Znc1p-GFP localizes to the nucleus, but mutations within the leucine zipper domain of Znc1p, and to a lesser extent within the Zn(II)2C6 domain, result in a mislocalization of Znc1p to the cytoplasm. Microarrays comparing gene expression between znc1::URA3 and wild-type cells during both exponential growth and the induction of the yeast-to-hypha transition revealed 1,214 genes whose expression was changed by 2-fold or more under at least one of the conditions analyzed. Our results suggest that Znc1p acts as a transcription factor repressing hyphal cell formation and functions as part of a complex network regulating mycelial growth in Y. lipolytica. PMID:23826133

  3. Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for improved xylose utilization with a three-plasmid SUMO yeast expression system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-plasmid yeast expression system utilizing the portable small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) vector set combined with the efficient endogenous yeast protease Ulp1 was developed for production of large amounts of soluble functional protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each vector has a differ...

  4. Hybrid yeast-bacteria cloning system used to capture and modify adenoviral and nonviral genomes.

    PubMed

    Hokanson, Craig A; Dora, Emery; Donahue, Brian A; Rivkin, Marianne; Finer, Mitchell; Mendez, Michael J

    2003-03-01

    Adenoviral vectors are widely used to express transgenes in vitro and in vivo. A major obstacle to the generation of adenoviral vectors is the manipulation of the large (35 kb) adenoviral genome. We developed a hybrid yeast-bacteria cloning system for the creation of novel adenoviral vectors. The adenovirus 5 (Ad5) genome was cloned into a shuttle vector that contains both yeast and bacterial elements for replication and therefore functions as both a yeast artificial plasmid (YAP) and as a plasmid artificial chromosome (PAC). Any sequence can be introduced into any region of the adenoviral genome via the highly efficient homologous recombination in yeast and then these recombinants are rapidly amplified in bacteria. Adenoviral vectors are generated by introduction of the PAC into the appropriate complementing mammalian cell without the need for plaque purification. Vectors were constructed with deletions in the E1, E3, and/or E4 regions. We have generated more than 100 vectors with a number of different transgenes and regulatory elements. In addition, the YAP/PAC vector was used to capture a DNA fragment encompassing the human factor IX gene, demonstrating the utility of this system to clone and analyze genomic DNA. This novel cloning strategy allows the rapid and versatile construction of adenoviral vectors for gene expression and gene therapy applications. PMID:12659674

  5. Yeast as a system for modeling mitochondrial disease mechanisms and discovering therapies.

    PubMed

    Lasserre, Jean-Paul; Dautant, Alain; Aiyar, Raeka S; Kucharczyk, Roza; Glatigny, Annie; Tribouillard-Tanvier, Déborah; Rytka, Joanna; Blondel, Marc; Skoczen, Natalia; Reynier, Pascal; Pitayu, Laras; Rötig, Agnès; Delahodde, Agnès; Steinmetz, Lars M; Dujardin, Geneviève; Procaccio, Vincent; di Rago, Jean-Paul

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are severe and largely untreatable. Owing to the many essential processes carried out by mitochondria and the complex cellular systems that support these processes, these diseases are diverse, pleiotropic, and challenging to study. Much of our current understanding of mitochondrial function and dysfunction comes from studies in the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because of its good fermenting capacity, S. cerevisiae can survive mutations that inactivate oxidative phosphorylation, has the ability to tolerate the complete loss of mitochondrial DNA (a property referred to as 'petite-positivity'), and is amenable to mitochondrial and nuclear genome manipulation. These attributes make it an excellent model system for studying and resolving the molecular basis of numerous mitochondrial diseases. Here, we review the invaluable insights this model organism has yielded about diseases caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, which ranges from primary defects in oxidative phosphorylation to metabolic disorders, as well as dysfunctions in maintaining the genome or in the dynamics of mitochondria. Owing to the high level of functional conservation between yeast and human mitochondrial genes, several yeast species have been instrumental in revealing the molecular mechanisms of pathogenic human mitochondrial gene mutations. Importantly, such insights have pointed to potential therapeutic targets, as have genetic and chemical screens using yeast. PMID:26035862

  6. Yeast as a system for modeling mitochondrial disease mechanisms and discovering therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lasserre, Jean-Paul; Dautant, Alain; Aiyar, Raeka S.; Kucharczyk, Roza; Glatigny, Annie; Tribouillard-Tanvier, Déborah; Rytka, Joanna; Blondel, Marc; Skoczen, Natalia; Reynier, Pascal; Pitayu, Laras; Rötig, Agnès; Delahodde, Agnès; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Dujardin, Geneviève; Procaccio, Vincent; di Rago, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial diseases are severe and largely untreatable. Owing to the many essential processes carried out by mitochondria and the complex cellular systems that support these processes, these diseases are diverse, pleiotropic, and challenging to study. Much of our current understanding of mitochondrial function and dysfunction comes from studies in the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because of its good fermenting capacity, S. cerevisiae can survive mutations that inactivate oxidative phosphorylation, has the ability to tolerate the complete loss of mitochondrial DNA (a property referred to as ‘petite-positivity’), and is amenable to mitochondrial and nuclear genome manipulation. These attributes make it an excellent model system for studying and resolving the molecular basis of numerous mitochondrial diseases. Here, we review the invaluable insights this model organism has yielded about diseases caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, which ranges from primary defects in oxidative phosphorylation to metabolic disorders, as well as dysfunctions in maintaining the genome or in the dynamics of mitochondria. Owing to the high level of functional conservation between yeast and human mitochondrial genes, several yeast species have been instrumental in revealing the molecular mechanisms of pathogenic human mitochondrial gene mutations. Importantly, such insights have pointed to potential therapeutic targets, as have genetic and chemical screens using yeast. PMID:26035862

  7. Subcritical flutter testing and system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houbolt, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Treatment is given of system response evaluation, especially in application to subcritical flight and wind tunnel flutter testing of aircraft. An evaluation is made of various existing techniques, in conjuction with a companion survey which reports theoretical and analog experiments made to study the identification of system response characteristics. Various input excitations are considered, and new techniques for analyzing response are explored, particularly in reference to the prevalent practical case where unwanted input noise is present, such as caused by gusts or wind tunnel turbulence. Further developments are also made of system parameter identification techniques.

  8. Identification of PDE6D as a molecular target of anecortave acetate via a methotrexate-anchored yeast three-hybrid screen.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Allan R; Conrow, Raymond E; Pang, Iok-Hou; Jacobson, Nasreen; Rezwan, Mandana; Rutschmann, Katrin; Auerbach, Daniel; Sriramaratnam, Rohitha; Cornish, Virginia W

    2013-03-15

    Glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration are ocular diseases targeted clinically by anecortave acetate (AA). AA and its deacetylated metabolite, anecortave desacetate (AdesA), are intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering and angiostatic cortisenes devoid of glucocorticoid activity but with an unknown mechanism of action. We used a methotrexate-anchored yeast three-hybrid (Y3H) technology to search for binding targets for AA in human trabecular meshwork (TM) cells, the target cell type that controls IOP, a major risk factor in glaucoma. Y3H hits were filtered by competitive Y3H screens and coimmunoprecipitation experiments and verified by surface plasmon resonance analysis to yield a single target, phosphodiesterase 6-delta (PDE6D). PDE6D is a prenyl-binding protein with additional function outside the PDE6 phototransduction system. Overexpression of PDE6D in mouse eyes caused elevated IOP, and this elevation was reversed by topical ocular application of either AA or AdesA. The identification of PDE6D as the molecular binding partner of AA provides insight into the role of this drug candidate in treating glaucoma. PMID:23301619

  9. Identification and functional reconstitution of yeast mitochondrial carrier for S-adenosylmethionine

    PubMed Central

    Marobbio, C.M.T.; Agrimi, G.; Lasorsa, F.M.; Palmieri, F.

    2003-01-01

    The genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains 35 members of the mitochondrial carrier protein family, most of which have not yet been functionally identified. Here the identification of the mitochondrial carrier for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) Sam5p is described. The corresponding gene has been overexpressed in bacteria and the protein has been reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles and identified by its transport properties. In confirmation of its identity, (i) the Sam5p–GFP protein was found to be targeted to mitochondria; (ii) the cells lacking the gene for this carrier showed auxotrophy for biotin (which is synthesized in the mitochondria by the SAM-requiring Bio2p) on fermentable carbon sources and a petite phenotype on non-fermentable substrates; and (iii) both phenotypes of the knock-out mutant were overcome by expressing the cytosolic SAM synthetase (Sam1p) inside the mitochondria. PMID:14609944

  10. GENE ENGINEERING IN YEAST FOR BIODEGRADATION: IMMUNOLOGICAL CROSS-REACTIVITY AMONG CYTOCHROME P-450 SYSTEM PROTEINS OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND CANDIDA TROPICALIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Yeasts are eukaryotic microorganisms whose cytochrome P-450 monoxygenase systems may be amenable to genetic engineering for the hydroxylation and detoxication of polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. e are examining the molecular genetic properties of strains of bakers yeast, Sa...

  11. Identification of impact odorants in Bordeaux red grape juice, in the commercial yeast used for its fermentation, and in the produced wine.

    PubMed

    Kotseridis, Y; Baumes, R

    2000-02-01

    The aroma extract dilution analysis method was used to detect the impact odorants of Bordeaux Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot wines extracts, as well as those of the extracts of the corresponding Cabernet Sauvignon juice and dry yeasts used for its fermentation. The wines and the yeasts were extracted using dichloromethane, and the juice was extracted using Amberlite XAD-2. Structural identification of the impact odorants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and atomic emission detection (sulfur acquisition) was achieved after enrichment of these extracts by silica gel and Affi-Gel 501 chromatography. The same odorants (with the exception of dimethyl sulfide among 48) were detected in both wine extracts, with about the same flavor dilution (FD) factors. The 18 impact odorants detected in the Cabernet Sauvignon juice and dry yeast extracts were also found in the wine extracts. The odorants with the highest FD factors were 3-(methylsulfanyl)propanal, (E,Z)-nona-2, 6-dienal, and decanal in the juice extract, 2-methyl-3-sulfanylfuran, 3-(methylsulfanyl)propanal, 2-/3-methylbutanoic acids, and phenylethanal in the dry yeast extract, and 2-/3-methylbutanols, 2-phenylethanol, 2-methyl-3-sulfanylfuran, acetic acid, 3-(methylsulfanyl)propanal, 2-/3-methylbutanoic acids, beta-damascenone, 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, Furaneol, and homofuraneol in the wine extracts. Determination of the odor thresholds of some of these impact odorants was carried out. PMID:10691647

  12. Qualitative, semi-quantitative, and quantitative simulation of the osmoregulation system in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Wei; Coghill, George M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how Morven, a computational framework which can perform qualitative, semi-quantitative, and quantitative simulation of dynamical systems using the same model formalism, is applied to study the osmotic stress response pathway in yeast. First the Morven framework itself is briefly introduced in terms of the model formalism employed and output format. We then built a qualitative model for the biophysical process of the osmoregulation in yeast, and a global qualitative-level picture was obtained through qualitative simulation of this model. Furthermore, we constructed a Morven model based on existing quantitative model of the osmoregulation system. This model was then simulated qualitatively, semi-quantitatively, and quantitatively. The obtained simulation results are presented with an analysis. Finally the future development of the Morven framework for modelling the dynamic biological systems is discussed. PMID:25864377

  13. Identification of lethal cluster of genes in the yeast transcription network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, K.; Jeong, H.; Kahng, B.

    2006-05-01

    Identification of essential or lethal genes would be one of the ultimate goals in drug designs. Here we introduce an in silico method to select the cluster with a high population of lethal genes, called lethal cluster, through microarray assay. We construct a gene transcription network based on the microarray expression level. Links are added one by one in the descending order of the Pearson correlation coefficients between two genes. As the link density p increases, two meaningful link densities pm and ps are observed. At pm, which is smaller than the percolation threshold, the number of disconnected clusters is maximum, and the lethal genes are highly concentrated in a certain cluster that needs to be identified. Thus the deletion of all genes in that cluster could efficiently lead to a lethal inviable mutant. This lethal cluster can be identified by an in silico method. As p increases further beyond the percolation threshold, the power law behavior in the degree distribution of a giant cluster appears at ps. We measure the degree of each gene at ps. With the information pertaining to the degrees of each gene at ps, we return to the point pm and calculate the mean degree of genes of each cluster. We find that the lethal cluster has the largest mean degree.

  14. Species-specific PCR primers for the rapid identification of yeasts of the genus Zygosaccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Muir, Alastair; Stratford, Malcolm; Wheals, Alan

    2011-06-01

    Species-specific primer pairs that produce a single band of known product size have been developed for members of the Zygosaccharomyces clade including Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Zygosaccharomyces bisporus, Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis, Zygosaccharomyces lentus, Zygosaccharomyces machadoi, Zygosaccharomyces mellis and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. An existing primer pair for the provisional new species Zygosaccharomyces pseudorouxii has been confirmed as specific. The HIS3 gene, encoding imidazole-glycerolphosphate dehydratase, was used as the target gene. This housekeeping gene evolves slowly and is thus well conserved among different isolates, but shows a significant number of base pair changes between even closely related species, sufficient for species-specific primer design. The primers were tested on type and wild strains of the genus Zygosaccharomyces and on members of the Saccharomycetaceae. Sequencing of the D1/D2 region of rDNA was used to confirm the identification of all nonculture collection isolates. This approach used extracted genomic DNA, but in practice, it can be used efficiently with a rapid colony PCR protocol. The method also successfully detected known and new hybrid strains of Z. rouxii and Z. pseudorouxii. The method is rapid, robust and inexpensive. It requires little expertise by the user and is thus useful for preliminary, large-scale screens. PMID:21332639

  15. Continuous-Time Bilinear System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe a new method for identification of a continuous-time multi-input and multi-output bilinear system. The approach is to make judicious use of the linear-model properties of the bilinear system when subjected to a constant input. Two steps are required in the identification process. The first step is to use a set of pulse responses resulting from a constant input of one sample period to identify the state matrix, the output matrix, and the direct transmission matrix. The second step is to use another set of pulse responses with the same constant input over multiple sample periods to identify the input matrix and the coefficient matrices associated with the coupling terms between the state and the inputs. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the concept and the computational algorithm for the identification method.

  16. Molecular comparisons for identification of food spoilage yeasts and prediction of species that may develop in different food products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spoilage of foods and beverages by yeasts is often characterized by objectionable odors, appearance, taste, texture or build-up of gas in packaging containers, resulting in loss of the product. Seldom is human health compromised by products spoiled by yeasts even though some spoilage is caused by sp...

  17. Robust orthogonal recombination system for versatile genomic elements rearrangement in yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiuhui; Qi, Hao; Wu, Yi; Yuan, Yingjin

    2015-01-01

    Rearrangement of genomic DNA elements in a dynamic controlled fashion is a fundamental challenge. Site-specific DNA recombinases have been tamed as a powerful tool in genome editing. Here, we reported a DNA element rearrangement on the basis of a pairwise orthogonal recombination system which is comprised of two site-specific recombinases of Vika/vox and Cre/loxp in yeast Saccharomyces Creevisiae. Taking the advantage of the robust pairwise orthogonality, we showed that multi gene elements could be organized in a programmed way, in which rationally designed pattern of loxP and vox determined the final genotype after expressing corresponding recombinases. Finally, it was demonstrated that the pairwise orthogonal recombination system could be utilized to refine synthetic chromosome rearrangement and modification by loxP-mediated evolution, SCRaMbLE, in yeast cell carrying a completely synthesized chromosome III. PMID:26477943

  18. Optical disk uses in criminal identification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sypherd, Allen D.

    1990-08-01

    A significant advancement in law enforcement tools has been made possible by the rapid and innovative development of electronic imaging for criminal identification systems. In particular, development of optical disks capable of high-capacity and random-access storage has provided a unique marriage of application and technology. Fast random access to any record, non-destructive reading of stored images, electronic sorting and transmission of images and an accepted legal basis for evidence are a few of the advantages derived from optical disk technology. This paper discusses the application of optical disk technology to both Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) and Automated Mugshot Retrieval Systems (AMRS). The following topics are addressed in light of AFIS and AMRS user requirements and system capabilities: Write once vs. rewritable, gray level and storage requirements, multi-volume library systems, data organization and capacity trends.

  19. Improved system identification with Renormalization Group.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Guo; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Yong

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes an improved system identification method with Renormalization Group. Renormalization Group is applied to a fine data set to obtain a coarse data set. The least squares algorithm is performed on the coarse data set. The theoretical analysis under certain conditions shows that the parameter estimation error could be reduced. The proposed method is illustrated with examples. PMID:24444706

  20. Evaluation of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Identification of Clinically Important Yeast Species ?

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Lindsay G.; Drake, Steven K.; Shea, Yvonne R.; Zelazny, Adrian M.; Murray, Patrick R.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the rapid identification of yeast species. Using Bruker Daltonics MALDI BioTyper software, we created a spectral database library with m/z ratios of 2,000 to 20,000 Da for 109 type and reference strains of yeast (44 species in 8 genera). The database was tested for accuracy by use of 194 clinical isolates (23 species in 6 genera). A total of 192 (99.0%) of the clinical isolates were identified accurately by MALDI-TOF MS. The MALDI-TOF MS-based method was found to be reproducible and accurate, with low consumable costs and minimal preparation time. PMID:20668126

  1. Production of ?-linolenic acid using a novel heterologous expression system in the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces kononenkoae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Wan, Xia; Zhang, Yinbo; Jiang, Mulan

    2011-10-01

    A novel expression system was established in the oleaginous yeast, Lipomyces kononenkoae. The expression vector pLK-rhPHG of L. kononenkoae was constructed and using the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene and green fluorescent protein gene as reporter genes. A delta 6-fatty acid desaturase gene (D6DM) from Cunninghamella echinulata MIAN6 was then expressed in this strain. The recombinant strain accumulated about 1.2% ?-linolenic acid in the total fatty acids. PMID:21681556

  2. Stabilization of the yeast desaturase system by low levels of oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkmann, C. M.; Klein, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    The stability of particulate palmitoyl-CoA desaturase preparations from anaerobically grown yeast cells was increased by exposure to low levels of oxygen. The stabilizing effect of oxygen may be based upon the increased amounts of palmitoleic acid and ergosterol that become available to the cells. These results suggest the evolutinary appearance of this system at a time when atmospheric oxygen was at a low level.

  3. Identification of Metabolic Pathway Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dolatshahi, Sepideh; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of parameters in even moderately large biological systems is a significant challenge. This challenge is greatly exacerbated if the mathematical formats of appropriate process descriptions are unknown. To address this challenge, the method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE) was proposed for the analysis of metabolic time series data. Under ideal conditions, the first phase of DFE yields numerical representations of all fluxes within a metabolic pathway system, either as values at each time point or as plots against their substrates and modulators. However, this numerical result does not reveal the mathematical format of each flux. Thus, the second phase of DFE selects functional formats that are consistent with the numerical trends obtained from the first phase. While greatly facilitating metabolic data analysis, DFE is only directly applicable if the pathway system contains as many dependent variables as fluxes. Because most actual systems contain more fluxes than metabolite pools, this requirement is seldom satisfied. Auxiliary methods have been proposed to alleviate this issue, but they are not general. Here we propose strategies that extend DFE toward general, slightly underdetermined pathway systems. PMID:26904095

  4. 78 FR 6732 - Changes to Standard Numbering System, Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ..., Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report Database AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Rule... Numbering System, Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report Database rule became...

  5. In vitro evaluation of atmospheric particulate matter and sedimentation particles using yeast bioassay system.

    PubMed

    Mori, Taiki; Inudo, Makiko; Takao, Yuji; Koga, Minoru; Takemasa, Takehiro; Shinohara, Ryota; Arizono, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Little information on the evaluation of airborne particulate matter (APM) and sedimentation particles from subway stations is available. The thermal metamorphism of train wheels generating toxic particles in subway stations is a possibility. In this study, the toxicity and physiological effects of particles from subway stations were evaluated using a yeast bioassay system. Estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of APM in APM extracts from subway stations were determined. No estrogenic activity was found in the APM fractions and their S9-activated APM samples. Sedimentation dust samples also showed no estrogen activity. In contrast, extracts from sedimentation dust samples showed antiestrogen activity. Marked yeast toxicity was observed in the samples extracted from sedimentation dust. Potent yeast toxicity was also found in the S9-activated extracts from sedimentation dust. The results suggest that sedimentation dust from a semiclosed area of a subway system has antiestrogen activity, although both the origin and generation system of this activity are uncertain. These pollutants in sedimentation dust may change to a more toxic form in vivo by S9 activation. PMID:17762843

  6. Tandem-yeast expression system for engineering and producing unspecific peroxygenase.

    PubMed

    Molina-Espeja, Patricia; Ma, Su; Mate, Diana M; Ludwig, Roland; Alcalde, Miguel

    2015-06-01

    Unspecific peroxygenase (UPO) is a highly efficient biocatalyst with a peroxide dependent monooxygenase activity and many biotechnological applications, but the absence of suitable heterologous expression systems has precluded its use in different industrial settings. Recently, the UPO from Agrocybe aegerita was evolved for secretion and activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [8]. In the current work, we describe a tandem-yeast expression system for UPO engineering and large scale production. By harnessing the directed evolution process in S. cerevisiae, the beneficial mutations for secretion enabled Pichia pastoris to express the evolved UPO under the control of the methanol inducible alcohol oxidase 1 promoter. Whilst secretion levels were found similar for both yeasts in flask fermentation (∼8mg/L), the recombinant UPO from P. pastoris showed a 27-fold enhanced production in fed-batch fermentation (217mg/L). The P. pastoris UPO variant maintained similar biochemical properties of the S. cerevisiae counterpart in terms of catalytic constants, pH activity profiles and thermostability. Thus, this tandem-yeast expression system ensures the engineering of UPOs to use them in future industrial applications as well as large scale production. PMID:26002501

  7. An efficient automatic firearm identification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan, Zun Liang; Liong, Choong-Yeun; Jemain, Abdul Aziz; Ghani, Nor Azura Md.

    2014-06-01

    Automatic firearm identification system (AFIS) is highly demanded in forensic ballistics to replace the traditional approach which uses comparison microscope and is relatively complex and time consuming. Thus, several AFIS have been developed for commercial and testing purposes. However, those AFIS are still unable to overcome some of the drawbacks of the traditional firearm identification approach. The goal of this study is to introduce another efficient and effective AFIS. A total of 747 firing pin impression images captured from five different pistols of same make and model are used to evaluate the proposed AFIS. It was demonstrated that the proposed AFIS is capable of producing firearm identification accuracy rate of over 95.0% with an execution time of less than 0.35 seconds per image.

  8. Identification of multivariate linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of modeling multivariate linear systems where noisy output measurements are the only available data. The techniques presented are valid for a class of canonical forms. Results from several simulations demonstrate the capability for structure and parameter estimation.

  9. A consensus yeast metabolic network reconstruction obtained from a community approach to systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Herrgård, Markus J.; Swainston, Neil; Dobson, Paul; Dunn, Warwick B.; Arga, K. Yalçin; Arvas, Mikko; Blüthgen, Nils; Borger, Simon; Costenoble, Roeland; Heinemann, Matthias; Hucka, Michael; Le Novère, Nicolas; Li, Peter; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Mo, Monica L.; Oliveira, Ana Paula; Petranovic, Dina; Pettifer, Stephen; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Smallbone, Kieran; Spasić, Irena; Weichart, Dieter; Brent, Roger; Broomhead, David S.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Kırdar, Betül; Penttilä, Merja; Klipp, Edda; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Sauer, Uwe; Oliver, Stephen G.; Mendes, Pedro; Nielsen, Jens; Kell, Douglas B.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic data now allow the large-scale manual or semi-automated reconstruction of metabolic networks. A network reconstruction represents a highly curated organism-specific knowledge base. A few genome-scale network reconstructions have appeared for metabolism in the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These alternative network reconstructions differ in scope and content, and further have used different terminologies to describe the same chemical entities, thus making comparisons between them difficult. The formulation of a ‘community consensus’ network that collects and formalizes the ‘community knowledge’ of yeast metabolism is thus highly desirable. We describe how we have produced a consensus metabolic network reconstruction for S. cerevisiae. Special emphasis is laid on referencing molecules to persistent databases or using database-independent forms such as SMILES or InChI strings, since this permits their chemical structure to be represented unambiguously and in a manner that permits automated reasoning. The reconstruction is readily available via a publicly accessible database and in the Systems Biology Markup Language, and we describe the manner in which it can be maintained as a community resource. It should serve as a common denominator for system biology studies of yeast. Similar strategies will be of benefit to communities studying genome-scale metabolic networks of other organisms. PMID:18846089

  10. Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Allan E.

    1990-01-01

    Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems is examined. It is presumed that the underlying model can be arranged into an input/output (I/O) differential operator equation of a generic form. The algorithm estimation is especially efficient since the equation error can be integrated exactly given any I/O pair to obtain an algebraic function of the parameters. The algorithm for parameter identification was extended to the order determination problem for linear differential system. The degeneracy in a least squares estimate caused by feedback was addressed. A method of frequency analysis for determining the transfer function G(j omega) from transient I/O data was formulated using complex valued Fourier based modulating functions in contrast with the trigonometric modulating functions for the parameter estimation problem. A simulation result of applying the algorithm is given under noise-free conditions for a system with a low pass transfer function.

  11. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  12. Microbial identification system for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Harlan D.; Scarlett, Janie B.; Skweres, Joyce A.; Fortune, Russell L.; Staples, John L.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Health System (EHS) and Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station Freedom will require a comprehensive microbiology capability. This requirement entails the development of an automated system to perform microbial identifications on isolates from a variety of environmental and clinical sources and, when required, to perform antimicrobial sensitivity testing. The unit currently undergoing development and testing is the Automated Microbiology System II (AMS II) built by Vitek Systems, Inc. The AMS II has successfully completed 12 months of laboratory testing and evaluation for compatibility with microgravity operation. The AMS II is a promising technology for use on Space Station Freedom.

  13. 47 CFR 25.281 - Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Automatic Transmitter Identification System... CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.281 Automatic Transmitter... identified through the use of an automatic transmitter identification system as specified below....

  14. 47 CFR 25.281 - Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Automatic Transmitter Identification System... CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.281 Automatic Transmitter... identified through the use of an automatic transmitter identification system as specified below....

  15. 47 CFR 25.281 - Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Automatic Transmitter Identification System... CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.281 Automatic Transmitter... identified through the use of an automatic transmitter identification system as specified below....

  16. Identification of oleaginous yeast strains able to accumulate high intracellular lipids when cultivated in alkaline pretreated corn stover.

    PubMed

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Jin, Mingjie; Fernandez, J Enrique; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Balan, Venkatesh; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2014-09-01

    Microbial oil is a potential alternative to food/plant-derived biodiesel fuel. Our previous screening studies identified a wide range of oleaginous yeast species, using a defined laboratory medium known to stimulate lipid accumulation. In this study, the ability of these yeasts to grow and accumulate lipids was further investigated in synthetic hydrolysate (SynH) and authentic ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). Most yeast strains tested were able to accumulate lipids in SynH, but only a few were able to grow and accumulate lipids in ACSH medium. Cryptococcus humicola UCDFST 10-1004 was able to accumulate as high as 15.5 g/L lipids, out of a total of 36 g/L cellular biomass when grown in ACSH, with a cellular lipid content of 40 % of cell dry weight. This lipid production is among the highest reported values for oleaginous yeasts grown in authentic hydrolysate. Preculturing in SynH media with xylose as sole carbon source enabled yeasts to assimilate both glucose and xylose more efficiently in the subsequent hydrolysate medium. This study demonstrates that ACSH is a suitable medium for certain oleaginous yeasts to convert lignocellullosic sugars to triacylglycerols for production of biodiesel and other valuable oleochemicals. PMID:25052467

  17. Identification of oleaginous yeast strains able to accumulate high intracellular lipids when cultivated in alkaline pretreated corn stover

    PubMed Central

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Jin, Mingjie; Fernandez, J. Enrique; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Balan, Venkatesh; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial oil is a potential alternative to food/plant-derived biodiesel fuel. Our previous screening studies identified a wide range of oleaginous yeast species, using a defined laboratory medium known to stimulate lipid accumulation. In this study, the ability of these yeasts to grow and accumulate lipids was further investigated in synthetic hydrolysate (SynH) and authentic ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). Most yeast strains tested were able to accumulate lipids in SynH, but only a few were able to grow and accumulate lipids in ACSH medium. Cryptococcus humicola UCDFST 10-1004 was able to accumulate as high as 15.5 g/L lipids, out of a total of 36 g/L cellular biomass when grown in ACSH, with a cellular lipid content of 40% of cell dry weight. This lipid production is among the highest reported values for oleaginous yeasts grown in authentic hydrolysate. Pre-culturing in SynH media with xylose as sole carbon source enabled yeasts to assimilate both glucose and xylose more efficiently in the subsequent hydrolysate medium. This study demonstrates that ACSH is a suitable medium for certain oleaginous yeasts to convert lignocellullosic sugars to triacylglycerols for production of biodiesel and other valuable oleochemicals. PMID:25052467

  18. Construction of a beta-glucosidase expression system using the multistress-tolerant yeast Issatchenkia orientalis.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Takao; Tokuhiro, Kenro; Sugiyama, Hidehiko; Kohda, Katsuhiro; Isono, Naoto; Hisamatsu, Makoto; Takahashi, Haruo; Imaeda, Takao

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate the value of the thermotolerant yeast Issatchenkia orientalis as a candidate microorganism for bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass with the goal of consolidated bioprocessing. The I. orientalis MF-121 strain is acid tolerant, ethanol tolerant, and thermotolerant, and is thus a multistress-tolerant yeast. To express heterologous proteins in I. orientalis, we constructed a transformation system for the MF-121 strain and then isolated the promoters of TDH1 and PGK1, two genes that were found to be strongly expressed during ethanol fermentation. As a result, expression of beta-glucosidase from Aspergillus aculeatus could be achieved with I. orientalis, demonstrating successful heterologous gene expression in I. orientalis for the first time. The transformant could convert cellobiose to ethanol under acidic conditions and at high temperature. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) was performed with the transformant, which produced 29 g l(-1) of ethanol in 72 h at 40 degrees C even without addition of beta-glucosidase when SSF was carried out in medium containing 100 g l(-1) of microcrystalline cellulose and a commercial cellulase preparation. These results suggest that using a genetically engineered thermotolerant yeast such as I. orientalis in SSF could lead to cost reduction because less saccharification enzymes are required. PMID:20467739

  19. Interference of chromium with biological systems in yeasts and fungi: a review.

    PubMed

    Poljsak, Borut; Pócsi, István; Raspor, Peter; Pesti, Miklós

    2010-02-01

    This paper deals with the interactions of chromium (Cr) with biological systems, focusing in particular on yeasts and fungi. These interactions are analysed with primarily regard to biochemical functions, but higher levels of organization are also considered. Thus, the morphological and cytological characteristics of selected microorganisms in response to exposure to chromium ions are evaluated. The different oxidation states of chromium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in redox reactions with chromium ions are presented and characterized. The interactions of the most exposed subcellular structures, including the cell wall, plasma membrane and nuclei, have been deeply investigated in recent years, for two major reasons. The first is the toxicity of chromium ions and their strong impact on the metabolism of many species, ranging from microbes to humans. The second is the still disputed usefulness of chromium ions, and in particular trivalent chromium, in the glucose and fat metabolisms. Chromium pollution is still an important issue in many regions of the world, and various solutions have been proposed for the bioremediation of soil and water with selected microbial species. Yeasts and especially moulds have been most widely investigated from this aspect, and the biosorption and bioaccumulation of chromium for bioremediation purposes have been demonstrated. Accordingly, the mechanisms of chromium tolerance or resistance of selected microbes are of particular importance in both bioremediation and waste water treatment technologies. The mechanisms of chromium toxicity and detoxification have been studied extensively in yeasts and fungi, and some promising results have emerged in this area. PMID:19810050

  20. System identification of the brompton bicycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladun, Monique Victoria Teresa

    The Brompton (a European folding design) bicycle was instrumented with a variety of sensors including acceleration, angular rate, speed, and steering sensors. A bicycle state estimator was designed to obtain additional information from this data including heading, turn rate, lean angle, steer rate, and positions of the wheels during a trajectory. The first part of the thesis describes the model setup for system identification including the Steer-to-Lean dynamics and Lean-to-Steer dynamics reduced models. CIFER software was used in the system identification process of these models. The second part describes the validation of the Empirical model by using the Rider Control model ([1]) and the Complete Rider/Vehicle model ([1]) to determine the feedback gains. The Theoretical model feedback gains were also determined by using the Rider Control model ([1]) and the Complete Rider/Vehicle model ([1]).

  1. Unique device identification system. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-09-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to establish a system to adequately identify devices through distribution and use. This rule requires the label of medical devices to include a unique device identifier (UDI), except where the rule provides for an exception or alternative placement. The labeler must submit product information concerning devices to FDA's Global Unique Device Identification Database (GUDID), unless subject to an exception or alternative. The system established by this rule requires the label and device package of each medical device to include a UDI and requires that each UDI be provided in a plain-text version and in a form that uses automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) technology. The UDI will be required to be directly marked on the device itself if the device is intended to be used more than once and intended to be reprocessed before each use. PMID:24066364

  2. 47 CFR 25.281 - Automatic Transmitter Identification System (ATIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automatic Transmitter Identification System... Identification System (ATIS). All satellite uplink transmissions carrying broadband video information shall be identified through the use of an automatic transmitter identification system as specified below....

  3. Reliability of the WIDERYST Susceptibility Testing System for Detection of In Vitro Antifungal Resistance in Yeasts?

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Gutierrez, M. Olga; Buitrago, M. Jose; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the WIDERYST system, a commercially available computer-assisted image-processing device for the antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts. A collection of 90 clinical isolates selected to represent ranges of susceptibilities in vitro as broad as possible was tested. An evaluation compared the results obtained by the new system with those achieved by both the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) microdilution reference procedure and the antifungal susceptibility standard of the European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Overall, the agreement and the correlation index between results obtained by the EUCAST method and the WIDERYST system were 89% and 0.84 (P < 0.01), respectively, and agreement and correlation index between data obtained by the CLSI procedure and the WIDERYST system were 90% and 0.86 (P < 0.01), respectively. The system was able to detect amphotericin B-resistant isolates. All Candida sp. isolates with resistance in vitro to azole agents were detected as well. The system misclassified some isolates belonging to the slowly growing genera Dipodascus and Pichia. A total of 2.7% very major errors were detected for fluconazole. The WIDERYST system is an alternative to reference procedures for antifungal susceptibility testing of clinical isolates of yeasts, particularly for Candida and Cryptococcus species. PMID:18195057

  4. 77 FR 40735 - Unique Device Identification System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to establish a unique device identification system to implement the requirement added to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) by section 226 of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA), Section 226 of FDAAA amended the FD&C Act to add new section 519(f), which directs FDA to promulgate regulations......

  5. Identification of dynamic systems, theory and formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, R. E.; Iliff, K. W.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of estimating parameters of dynamic systems is addressed in order to present the theoretical basis of system identification and parameter estimation in a manner that is complete and rigorous, yet understandable with minimal prerequisites. Maximum likelihood and related estimators are highlighted. The approach used requires familiarity with calculus, linear algebra, and probability, but does not require knowledge of stochastic processes or functional analysis. The treatment emphasizes unification of the various areas in estimation in dynamic systems is treated as a direct outgrowth of the static system theory. Topics covered include basic concepts and definitions; numerical optimization methods; probability; statistical estimators; estimation in static systems; stochastic processes; state estimation in dynamic systems; output error, filter error, and equation error methods of parameter estimation in dynamic systems, and the accuracy of the estimates.

  6. System identification of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Anmo J; Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

    2011-02-01

    The lack of a deeper understanding of how olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) encode odors has hindered the progress in understanding the olfactory signal processing in higher brain centers. Here we employ methods of system identification to investigate the encoding of time-varying odor stimuli and their representation for further processing in the spike domain by Drosophila OSNs. In order to apply system identification techniques, we built a novel low-turbulence odor delivery system that allowed us to deliver airborne stimuli in a precise and reproducible fashion. The system provides a 1% tolerance in stimulus reproducibility and an exact control of odor concentration and concentration gradient on a millisecond time scale. Using this novel setup, we recorded and analyzed the in-vivo response of OSNs to a wide range of time-varying odor waveforms. We report for the first time that across trials the response of OR59b OSNs is very precise and reproducible. Further, we empirically show that the response of an OSN depends not only on the concentration, but also on the rate of change of the odor concentration. Moreover, we demonstrate that a two-dimensional (2D) Encoding Manifold in a concentration-concentration gradient space provides a quantitative description of the neuron's response. We then use the white noise system identification methodology to construct one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson (LNP) cascade models of the sensory neuron for a fixed mean odor concentration and fixed contrast. We show that in terms of predicting the intensity rate of the spike train, the 2D LNP model performs on par with the 1D LNP model, with a root mean-square error (RMSE) increase of about 5 to 10%. Surprisingly, we find that for a fixed contrast of the white noise odor waveforms, the nonlinear block of each of the two models changes with the mean input concentration. The shape of the nonlinearities of both the 1D and the 2D LNP model appears to be, for a fixed mean of the odor waveform, independent of the stimulus contrast. This suggests that white noise system identification of Or59b OSNs only depends on the first moment of the odor concentration. Finally, by comparing the 2D Encoding Manifold and the 2D LNP model, we demonstrate that the OSN identification results depend on the particular type of the employed test odor waveforms. This suggests an adaptive neural encoding model for Or59b OSNs that changes its nonlinearity in response to the odor concentration waveforms. PMID:20730480

  7. System identification of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Anmo J.; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of a deeper understanding of how olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) encode odors has hindered the progress in understanding the olfactory signal processing in higher brain centers. Here we employ methods of system identification to investigate the encoding of time-varying odor stimuli and their representation for further processing in the spike domain by Drosophila OSNs. In order to apply system identification techniques, we built a novel low-turbulence odor delivery system that allowed us to deliver airborne stimuli in a precise and reproducible fashion. The system provides a 1% tolerance in stimulus reproducibility and an exact control of odor concentration and concentration gradient on a millisecond time scale. Using this novel setup, we recorded and analyzed the in-vivo response of OSNs to a wide range of time-varying odor waveforms. We report for the first time that across trials the response of OR59b OSNs is very precise and reproducible. Further, we empirically show that the response of an OSN depends not only on the concentration, but also on the rate of change of the odor concentration. Moreover, we demonstrate that a two-dimensional (2D) Encoding Manifold in a concentration-concentration gradient space provides a quantitative description of the neuron’s response. We then use the white noise system identification methodology to construct one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson (LNP) cascade models of the sensory neuron for a fixed mean odor concentration and fixed contrast. We show that in terms of predicting the intensity rate of the spike train, the 2D LNP model performs on par with the 1D LNP model, with a root mean-square error (RMSE) increase of about 5 to 10%. Surprisingly, we find that for a fixed contrast of the white noise odor waveforms, the nonlinear block of each of the two models changes with the mean input concentration. The shape of the nonlinearities of both the 1D and the 2D LNP model appears to be, for a fixed mean of the odor waveform, independent of the stimulus contrast. This suggests that white noise system identification of Or59b OSNs only depends on the first moment of the odor concentration. Finally, by comparing the 2D Encoding Manifold and the 2D LNP model, we demonstrate that the OSN identification results depend on the particular type of the employed test odor waveforms. This suggests an adaptive neural encoding model for Or59b OSNs that changes its nonlinearity in response to the odor concentration waveforms. PMID:20730480

  8. Cytochrome C oxidase III interacts with hepatitis B virus X protein in vivo by yeast two-hybrid system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Wang, Xiao-Zhong; Yu, Jie-Ping; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Huang, Yue-Hong; Tao, Qi-Min

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To screen and identify the proteins which interact with hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein in hepatocytes by yeast two-hybrid system and to explore the effects of X protein in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: With HBV X gene amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), HBV X bait plasmid, named pAS2-1-X, was constructed by yeast-two hybridization system3 and verified by auto-sequencing assay. pAS2-1-X was transformed into the yeast AH109, and X-BD fusion protein expressed in the yeast cells was detected by Western blotting. The yeast cells cotransformed with pAS2-1-X and normal human liver cDNA library were grown in selective SC/-trp-leu-his-ade medium. The second screen was performed with ?-gal activity detection, and false positive clones were eliminated by segregation analysis, true positive clones were amplified, sequenced and analyzed with bioinformatics. Mating experiment was peformed to confirm the binding of putative proteins to X protein in the yeast cells. RESULTS: Bait plasmid pAS2-1-X was successfully constructed and pAS2-1-X correctly expressed BD-X fusion protein in yeast AH109. One hundred and three clones grew in the selective SC/-trp-leu-his-ade medium, and only one clone passed through ?-gal activity detection and segregation analysis. The inserted cDNA fragment showed high homology with Homo sapiens cytochrome C oxidase III (cox III). Furthermore, mating experiment identified that the binding of cox III to X protein was specific. CONCLUSION: cox III protein is a novel protein that can interact with X protein in vivo by yeast two-hybrid system, and may contribute to the development of HCC through the interaction with X protein. PMID:15334674

  9. The osmotolerant fructophilic yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii employs two plasma-membrane fructose uptake systems belonging to a new family of yeast sugar transporters.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Maria José; Sychrová, Hana; Prista, Catarina; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C

    2011-02-01

    Owing to its high resistance to weak-acid preservatives and extreme osmotolerance, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is one of the main spoilage yeasts of sweet foods and beverages. In contrast with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Z. rouxii is a fructophilic yeast; it consumes fructose faster than glucose. So far, to our knowledge, no specific Z. rouxii proteins responsible for this fructophilic behaviour have been characterized. We have identified two genes encoding putative fructose transporters in the Z. rouxii CBS 732 genome. Heterologous expression of these two Z. rouxii ORFs in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking its own hexose transporters (hxt-null) and subsequent kinetic analysis of sugar transport showed that both proteins are functionally expressed at the plasma membrane: ZrFfz1 is a high-capacity fructose-specific facilitator (K(m)?400 mM and V(max)?13 mmol h(-1) g(-1)) and ZrFfz2 is a facilitator transporting glucose and fructose with similar capacity and affinity (K(m)?200 mM and V(max)?4 mmol h(-1) g(-1)). These two proteins together with the Zygosaccharomyces bailii Ffz1 fructose-specific transporter belong to a new family of sugar transport systems mediating the uptake of hexoses via the facilitated diffusion mechanism, and are more homologous to drug/H(+) antiporters (regarding their primary protein structure) than to other yeast sugar transporters of the Sugar Porter family. PMID:21051487

  10. Biodiversity of yeast mycobiota in "sucuk," a traditional Turkish fermented dry sausage: phenotypic and genotypic identification, functional and technological properties.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Ismet; Sagdic, Osman

    2014-11-01

    In this study, yeasts from Turkish fermented sucuks were identified and their functional and technological properties were evaluated. Two hundred fifty-five yeast isolates were obtained from 35 different sucuk samples from different regions of Turkey. The yeast isolates were determined as genotypic using 2 different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods (rep-PCR and RAPD-PCR). Functional and technological properties of including proteolytic, lipolytic, and catalase activities, tolerance to NaCl and bile, as well as growing rates at different temperature and pH conditions selected yeast strains were also evaluated. Candida zeylanoides and Debaryomyces hansenii were dominant strains in sucuk samples. All C. zeylanoides and D. hansenii tested could grow at the condition of 15% NaCl and 0.3% bile salt. However, none of the strains were able to grow at 37 °C, even though catalase activity, weak proteolytic and lipolytic activities was still observed. D. hansenii were able to grow only at pH 3, while some of C. zeylanoides could grow at lower pH levels (pH 2). Three and 4 strains of C. zeylanoides showed ?-hemolysis activity and nitrate reduction ability to nitrite, respectively. D. hansenii did not have properties, which are ?-hemolysis, nitrate reduction, or hydrogen sulfide production. Overall, diverse yeast mycobiota present in Turkish fermented sucuk and their functional and technological properties were revealed with this study. PMID:25273925

  11. Design and evaluation of a microfluidic system for inhibition studies of yeast cell signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamngren, Charlotte; Dinér, Peter; Grøtli, Morten; Goksör, Mattias; Adiels, Caroline B.

    2012-10-01

    In cell signaling, different perturbations lead to different responses and using traditional biological techniques that result in averaged data may obscure important cell-to-cell variations. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a four-inlet microfluidic system that enables single-cell analysis by investigating the effect on Hog1 localization post a selective Hog1 inhibitor treatment during osmotic stress. Optical tweezers was used to position yeast cells in an array of desired size and density inside the microfluidic system. By changing the flow rates through the inlet channels, controlled and rapid introduction of two different perturbations over the cell array was enabled. The placement of the cells was determined by diffusion rates flow simulations. The system was evaluated by monitoring the subcellular localization of a fluorescently tagged kinase of the yeast "High Osmolarity Glycerol" (HOG) pathway, Hog1-GFP. By sequential treatment of the yeast cells with a selective Hog1 kinase inhibitor and sorbitol, the subcellular localization of Hog1-GFP was analysed on a single-cell level. The results showed impaired Hog1-GFP nuclear localization, providing evidence of a congenial design. The setup made it possible to remove and add an agent within 2 seconds, which is valuable for investigating the dynamic signal transduction pathways and cannot be done using traditional methods. We are confident that the features of the four-inlet microfluidic system will be a valuable tool and hence contribute significantly to unravel the mechanisms of the HOG pathway and similar dynamic signal transduction pathways.

  12. Power system identification toolbox: Phase two progress

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes current progress on a project funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to develop a set of state-of-the-art analysis software (termed the Power System Identification [PSI] Toolbox) for fitting dynamic models to measured data. The project is being conducted as a three-phase effort. The first phase, completed in late 1992, involved investigating the characteristics of the analysis techniques by evaluating existing software and developing guidelines for best use. Phase Two includes extending current software, developing new analysis algorithms and software, and demonstrating and developing applications. The final phase will focus on reorganizing the software into a modular collection of documented computer programs and developing user manuals with instruction and application guidelines. Phase Two is approximately 50% complete; progress to date and a vision for the final product of the PSI Toolbox are described. The needs of the power industry for specialized system identification methods are particularly acute. The industry is currently pushing to operate transmission systems much closer to theoretical limits by using real-time, large-scale control systems to dictate power flows and maintain dynamic stability. Reliably maintaining stability requires extensive system-dynamic modeling and analysis capability, including measurement-based methods. To serve this need, the BPA has developed specialized system-identification computer codes through in-house efforts and university contract research over the last several years. To make full integrated use of the codes, as well as other techniques, the BPA has commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to further develop the codes and techniques into the PSI Toolbox.

  13. Realization-Based System Identification with Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Daniel N.

    The identification of dynamic system behavior from experimentally measured or computationally simulated data is fundamental to the fields of control system design, modal analysis, and defect detection. In this dissertation, methods for system identification are developed based on classical linear system realization theory. The common methods of state-space realization from a measured, discrete-time impulse response are generalized to the following additional types of experiments: measured step responses, arbitrary sets of input-output data, and estimated cross-covariance functions of input-output data. The methods are particularly well suited to systems with large input and/or output dimension, for which classical system identification methods based on maximum likelihood estimation may fail due to their reliance on non-convex optimizations. The realization-based methods by themselves require a finite number of linear algebraic operations. Because these methods implicitly optimize cost functions that are linear in state-space parameters, they may be augmented with convex constraints to form convex optimization problems. Several common behavioral constraints are translated into eigenvalue constraints stated as linear matrix inequalities, and the realization-based methods are converted into semidefinite programming problems. Some additional constraints on transient and steady-state behavior are derived and incorporated into a quadratic program, which is solved following the semidefinite program. The newly developed realization-based methods are applied to two experiments: the aeroelastic response of a fighter aircraft and the transient thermal behavior of a light-emitting diode. The algorithms for each experiment are implemented in two freely available software packages.

  14. System Identification Using Embedded Dynamic Signal Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Yong; Koo, Keunhwi; Huh, Junho; Cho, Hyeonwoo; Kim, Sang Woo

    2012-08-01

    The effect of model uncertainty is increased in optical disc drives (ODDs) because the mechanical and electrical components are manufactured with a wide error tolerance to reduce production costs. In this paper, we introduce a new technique for system identification whereby an embedded dynamic signal analyzer (EDSA) is used for the estimation of the system frequency characteristics. The estimated transfer function can be utilized to adapt a controller and improve the performance and stability of the system in terms of the model uncertainty. The EDSA comprises a sine generator, system identifier, and band-pass filter. A design methodology is proposed for the production of an accurate and cost-effective sine signal, which minimizes error and prevents overflow. Moreover, the proposed algorithms are implemented in a system-on-chip for an ODD. The experimental results show that the EDSA exhibits good performance and reliability.

  15. Research on fingerprint identification algorithm based on embedded system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Tongtong; Du, Xue; Yang, Shanglin; Yu, Peng

    2015-07-01

    Through the in-depth study on the existing fingerprint identification technologies, combined with the actual characteristics of the embedded system, this paper improves the existing fingerprint identification algorithm, reducing the time complexity of the matching algorithm. The experimental results show that the fingerprint identification algorithm proposed in this paper can perfectly meet the requirements of embedded system, therefore has high practical value.

  16. Automated Firearms Identification System (AFIDS), phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, R. J.; Framan, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    Items critical to the future development of an automated firearms identification system (AFIDS) have been examined, with the following specific results: (1) Types of objective data, that can be utilized to help establish a more factual basis for determining identity and nonidentity between pairs of fired bullets, have been identified. (2) A simulation study has indicated that randomly produced lines, similar in nature to the individual striations on a fired bullet, can be modeled and that random sequences, when compared to each other, have predictable relationships. (3) A schematic diagram of the general concept for AFIDS has been developed and individual elements of this system have been briefly tested for feasibility. Future implementation of such a proposed system will depend on such factors as speed, utility, projected total cost and user requirements for growth. The success of the proposed system, when operational, would depend heavily on existing firearms examiners.

  17. Identification and functional study of a new FLO10-derivative gene from the industrial flocculating yeast SPSC01.

    PubMed

    He, Lei-Yu; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Ge, Xu-Meng; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2012-08-01

    Yeast flocculation is an important property for the brewing industry as well as for ethanol fermentation to facilitate biomass recovery by sedimentation from the fermentation broth, which is cost-effective. In this study, a new flocculating gene FLO10 (spsc) of 4,221 bp homologous to FLO10 was identified in the industrial flocculating yeast SPSC01. Sequence analysis indicated that the N- and C-terminus of the deduced protein of this new FLO gene are 99 % identical to that of FLO10, but more intragenic repeats are included. The study on the function of FLO10 (spsc) by its integrative expression in the non-flocculating industrial yeast indicated severe inhibition in the flocculation of the transformant by mannose and maltose, moderate inhibition by sucrose and glucose and no inhibition by xylose and galactose, and thus the NewFlo type was established. Meanwhile, the flocculation of the transformant was stable when the temperature was below 50 °C and the pH was in the range of 4.0-6.0. Furthermore, the medium containing 250 g/l glucose was completely fermented within 48 h by the transformant, with about 110 g/l ethanol and 5.5 g(DCW)/l biomass produced, and no significant difference in ethanol fermentation performance was observed compared to its wide-type strain. Therefore, the FLO gene and corresponding transformation strategy provide a platform for engineering yeast strains with the flocculation phenotype to facilitate biomass recovery. PMID:22466447

  18. Identification of a novel pathway involving a GATA transcription factor in yeast and possibly plant Zn uptake and homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain a better understanding of the regulation of Zn homeostasis in plants and the degree of conservation of Zn homeostasis between plants and yeast, a cDNA library from the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulating plant species, Nocceae caerulescens, was screened for its ability to restore growth under Zn limitin...

  19. Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Allan E.

    1993-01-01

    This final technical report covers a three and one-half year period preceding February 28, 1993 during which support was provided under NASA Grant NAG-1-1065. Following a general description of the system identification problem and a brief survey of methods to attack it, the basic ideas behind the approach taken in this research effort are presented. The results obtained are described with reference to the published work, including the five semiannual progress reports previously submitted and two interim technical reports.

  20. Identification of a small molecule yeast TORC1 inhibitor with a flow cytometry-based multiplex screen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Young, Susan M.; Allen, Chris; Seeber, Andrew; Péli-Gulli, Marie-Pierre; Panchaud, Nicolas; Waller, Anna; Ursu, Oleg; Yao, Tuanli; Golden, Jennifer E.; Strouse, J. Jacob; Carter, Mark B.; Kang, Huining; Bologa, Cristian G.; Foutz, Terry D.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Peterson, Blake R.; Aubé, Jeffrey; Werner-Washburne, Margaret; Loewith, Robbie J.; De Virgilio, Claudio; Sklar, Larry A.

    2012-01-01

    TOR (target of rapamycin) is a serine/threonine kinase, evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human, which functions as a fundamental controller of cell growth. The moderate clinical benefit of rapamycin in mTOR-based therapy of many cancers favors the development of new TOR inhibitors. Here we report a high throughput flow cytometry multiplexed screen using five GFP-tagged yeast clones that represent the readouts of four branches of the TORC1 signaling pathway in budding yeast. Each GFP-tagged clone was differentially color-coded and the GFP signal of each clone was measured simultaneously by flow cytometry, which allows rapid prioritization of compounds that likely act through direct modulation of TORC1 or proximal signaling components. A total of 255 compounds were confirmed in dose-response analysis to alter GFP expression in one or more clones. To validate the concept of the high throughput screen, we have characterized CID 3528206, a small molecule most likely to act on TORC1 as it alters GFP expression in all five GFP clones in an analogous manner to rapamycin. We have shown that CID 3528206 inhibited yeast cell growth, and that CID 3528206 inhibited TORC1 activity both in vitro and in vivo with EC50s of 150 nM and 3.9 ?M, respectively. The results of microarray analysis and yeast GFP collection screen further support the notion that CID 3528206 and rapamycin modulate similar cellular pathways. Together, these results indicate that the HTS has identified a potentially useful small molecule for further development of TOR inhibitors. PMID:22260433

  1. Application of a wide-range yeast vector (CoMed™) system to recombinant protein production in dimorphic Arxula adeninivorans, methylotrophic Hansenula polymorpha and other yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Steinborn, Gerhard; Böer, Erik; Scholz, Anja; Tag, Kristina; Kunze, Gotthard; Gellissen, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    Background Yeasts provide attractive expression platforms in combining ease of genetic manipulation and fermentation of a microbial organism with the capability to secrete and to modify proteins according to a general eukaryotic scheme. However, early restriction to a single yeast platform can result in costly and time-consuming failures. It is therefore advisable to assess several selected systems in parallel for the capability to produce a particular protein in desired amounts and quality. A suitable vector must contain a targeting sequence, a promoter element and a selection marker that function in all selected organisms. These criteria are fulfilled by a wide-range integrative yeast expression vector (CoMed™) system based on A. adeninivorans- and H. polymorpha-derived elements that can be introduced in a modular way. Results The vector system and a selection of modular elements for vector design are presented. Individual single vector constructs were used to transform a range of yeast species. Various successful examples are described. A vector with a combination of an rDNA sequence for genomic targeting, the E. coli-derived hph gene for selection and the A. adeninivorans-derived TEF1 promoter for expression control of a GFP (green fluorescent protein) gene was employed in a first example to transform eight different species including Hansenula polymorpha, Arxula adeninivorans and others. In a second example, a vector for the secretion of IL-6 was constructed, now using an A. adeninivorans-derived LEU2 gene for selection of recombinants in a range of auxotrophic hosts. In this example, differences in precursor processing were observed: only in A. adeninivorans processing of a MF?1/IL-6 fusion was performed in a faithful way. Conclusion rDNA targeting provides a tool to co-integrate up to 3 different expression plasmids by a single transformation step. Thus, a versatile system is at hand that allows a comparative assessment of newly introduced metabolic pathways in several organisms or a comparative co-expression of bottleneck genes in cases where production or secretion of a certain product is impaired. PMID:17105649

  2. Networked Dynamic Systems: Identification, Controllability, and Randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi-Abdolyousefi, Marzieh

    The presented dissertation aims to develop a graph-centric framework for the analysis and synthesis of networked dynamic systems (NDS) consisting of multiple dynamic units that interact via an interconnection topology. We examined three categories of network problems, namely, identification, controllability, and randomness. In network identification, as a subclass of inverse problems, we made an explicit relation between the input-output behavior of an NDS and the underlying interacting network. In network controllability, we provided structural and algebraic insights into features of the network that enable external signal(s) to control the state of the nodes in the network for certain classes of interconnections, namely, path, circulant, and Cartesian networks. We also examined the relation between network controllability and the symmetry structure of the graph. Motivated by the analysis results for the controllability and observability of deterministic networks, a natural question is whether randomness in the network layer or in the layer of inputs and outputs generically leads to favorable system theoretic properties. In this direction, we examined system theoretic properties of random networks including controllability, observability, and performance of optimal feedback controllers and estimators. We explored some of the ramifications of such an analysis framework in opinion dynamics over social networks and sensor networks in estimating the real-time position of a Seaglider from experimental data.

  3. An Efficient Genome-Wide Fusion Partner Screening System for Secretion of Recombinant Proteins in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung-Hoon; Hyun Sung, Bong; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Park, Soon-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Mook; Kim, Mi-Jin; Lee, Cho-Ryong; Sohn, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    To produce rarely secreted recombinant proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we developed a novel genome-wide optimal translational fusion partner (TFP) screening system that involves recruitment of an optimal secretion signal and fusion partner. A TFP library was constructed from a genomic and truncated cDNA library by using the invertase-based signal sequence trap technique. The efficiency of the system was demonstrated using two rarely secreted proteins, human interleukin (hIL)-2 and hIL-32. Optimal TFPs for secretion of hIL-2 and hIL-32 were easily selected, yielding secretion of these proteins up to hundreds of mg/L. Moreover, numerous uncovered yeast secretion signals and fusion partners were identified, leading to efficient secretion of various recombinant proteins. Selected TFPs were found to be useful for the hypersecretion of other recombinant proteins at yields of up to several g/L. This screening technique could provide new methods for the production of various types of difficult-to-express proteins. PMID:26195161

  4. A piggyBac transposon-based mutagenesis system for the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Jia-Min; Li, Xin; Suo, Fang; Zhang, Mei-Jun; Hou, Wenru; Han, Jinghua; Du, Li-Lin

    2011-01-01

    The TTAA-specific transposon piggyBac (PB), originally isolated from the cabbage looper moth, Trichoplusia ni, has been utilized as an insertional mutagenesis tool in various eukaryotic organisms. Here, we show that PB transposes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and leaves almost no footprints. We developed a PB-based mutagenesis system for S. pombe by constructing a strain with a selectable transposon excision marker and an integrated transposase gene. PB transposition in this strain has low chromosomal distribution bias as shown by deep sequencing-based insertion site mapping. Using this system, we obtained loss-of-function alleles of klp5 and klp6, and a gain-of-function allele of dam1 from a screen for mutants resistant to the microtubule-destabilizing drug thiabendazole. From another screen for cdc25-22 suppressors, we obtained multiple alleles of wee1 as expected. The success of these two screens demonstrated the usefulness of this PB-mediated mutagenesis tool for fission yeast. PMID:21247877

  5. A consensus yeast metabolic network reconstruction obtained from a community approach to systems biology.

    PubMed

    Herrgård, Markus J; Swainston, Neil; Dobson, Paul; Dunn, Warwick B; Arga, K Yalçin; Arvas, Mikko; Blüthgen, Nils; Borger, Simon; Costenoble, Roeland; Heinemann, Matthias; Hucka, Michael; Le Novère, Nicolas; Li, Peter; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Mo, Monica L; Oliveira, Ana Paula; Petranovic, Dina; Pettifer, Stephen; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Smallbone, Kieran; Spasi?, Irena; Weichart, Dieter; Brent, Roger; Broomhead, David S; Westerhoff, Hans V; Kirdar, Betül; Penttilä, Merja; Klipp, Edda; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Sauer, Uwe; Oliver, Stephen G; Mendes, Pedro; Nielsen, Jens; Kell, Douglas B

    2008-10-01

    Genomic data allow the large-scale manual or semi-automated assembly of metabolic network reconstructions, which provide highly curated organism-specific knowledge bases. Although several genome-scale network reconstructions describe Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, they differ in scope and content, and use different terminologies to describe the same chemical entities. This makes comparisons between them difficult and underscores the desirability of a consolidated metabolic network that collects and formalizes the 'community knowledge' of yeast metabolism. We describe how we have produced a consensus metabolic network reconstruction for S. cerevisiae. In drafting it, we placed special emphasis on referencing molecules to persistent databases or using database-independent forms, such as SMILES or InChI strings, as this permits their chemical structure to be represented unambiguously and in a manner that permits automated reasoning. The reconstruction is readily available via a publicly accessible database and in the Systems Biology Markup Language (http://www.comp-sys-bio.org/yeastnet). It can be maintained as a resource that serves as a common denominator for studying the systems biology of yeast. Similar strategies should benefit communities studying genome-scale metabolic networks of other organisms. PMID:18846089

  6. Combinatorial Screening for Transgenic Yeasts with High Cellulase Activities in Combination with a Tunable Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoichiro; Yamanishi, Mamoru; Ikeuchi, Akinori; Imamura, Chie; Matsuyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Combinatorial screening used together with a broad library of gene expression cassettes is expected to produce a powerful tool for the optimization of the simultaneous expression of multiple enzymes. Recently, we proposed a highly tunable protein expression system that utilized multiple genome-integrated target genes to fine-tune enzyme expression in yeast cells. This tunable system included a library of expression cassettes each composed of three gene-expression control elements that in different combinations produced a wide range of protein expression levels. In this study, four gene expression cassettes with graded protein expression levels were applied to the expression of three cellulases: cellobiohydrolase 1, cellobiohydrolase 2, and endoglucanase 2. After combinatorial screening for transgenic yeasts simultaneously secreting these three cellulases, we obtained strains with higher cellulase expressions than a strain harboring three cellulase-expression constructs within one high-performance gene expression cassette. These results show that our method will be of broad use throughout the field of metabolic engineering. PMID:26692026

  7. MIMO system identification using frequency response data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medina, Enrique A.; Irwin, R. D.; Mitchell, Jerrel R.; Bukley, Angelia P.

    1992-01-01

    A solution to the problem of obtaining a multi-input, multi-output statespace model of a system from its individual input/output frequency responses is presented. The Residue Identification Algorithm (RID) identifies the system poles from a transfer function model of the determinant of the frequency response data matrix. Next, the residue matrices of the modes are computed guaranteeing that each input/output frequency response is fitted in the least squares sense. Finally, a realization of the system is computed. Results of the application of RID to experimental frequency responses of a large space structure ground test facility are presented and compared to those obtained via the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm.

  8. Autonomous Frequency-Domain System-Identification Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Mettler, Edward; Bayard, David S.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification (AU-FREDI) computer program implements system of methods, algorithms, and software developed for identification of parameters of mathematical models of dynamics of flexible structures and characterization, by use of system transfer functions, of such models, dynamics, and structures regarded as systems. Software considered collection of routines modified and reassembled to suit system-identification and control experiments on large flexible structures.

  9. Saccharomyces cerivisiae as a model system for kidney disease: what can yeast tell us about renal function?

    PubMed

    Kolb, Alexander R; Buck, Teresa M; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2011-07-01

    Ion channels, solute transporters, aquaporins, and factors required for signal transduction are vital for kidney function. Because mutations in these proteins or in associated regulatory factors can lead to disease, an investigation into their biogenesis, activities, and interplay with other proteins is essential. To this end, the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, represents a powerful experimental system. Proteins expressed in yeast include the following: 1) ion channels, including the epithelial sodium channel, members of the inward rectifying potassium channel family, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator; 2) plasma membrane transporters, such as the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, the Na(+)-phosphate cotransporter, and the Na(+)-H(+) ATPase; 3) aquaporins 1-4; and 4) proteins such as serum/glucocorticoid-induced kinase 1, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1, Rh glycoprotein kidney, and trehalase. The variety of proteins expressed and studied emphasizes the versatility of yeast, and, because of the many available tools in this organism, results can be obtained rapidly and economically. In most cases, data gathered using yeast have been substantiated in higher cell types. These attributes validate yeast as a model system to explore renal physiology and suggest that research initiated using this system may lead to novel therapeutics. PMID:21490136

  10. An In-House Assay Is Superior to Sepsityper for Direct Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) Mass Spectrometry Identification of Yeast Species in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Bidart, Marie; Bonnet, Isabelle; Hennebique, Aurélie; Kherraf, Zine Eddine; Pelloux, Hervé; Berger, François; Cornet, Muriel; Bailly, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    We developed an in-house assay for the direct identification, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, of yeasts in blood culture. Sixty-one representative strains from 12 species were analyzed in spiked blood cultures. Our assay accurately identified 95 of 107 (88.8%) positive blood cultures and outperformed the commercial Sepsityper kit (81.7% identification). PMID:25762771

  11. Whole Pichia pastoris Yeast Expressing Measles Virus Nucleoprotein as a Production and Delivery System to Multimerize Plasmodium Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Daria; Ruffie, Claude; Dubois, Myriam; Combredet, Chantal; Amino, Rogerio; Formaglio, Pauline; Gorgette, Olivier; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Guery, Charline; Puijalon, Odile; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Ménard, Robert; Tangy, Frédéric; Sala, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are largely used as bioreactors for vaccine production. Usually, antigens are produced in yeast then purified and mixed with adjuvants before immunization. However, the purification costs and the safety concerns recently raised by the use of new adjuvants argue for alternative strategies. To this end, the use of whole yeast as both production and delivery system appears attractive. Here, we evaluated Pichia pastoris yeast as an alternative vaccine production and delivery system for the circumsporozoite protein (CS) of Plasmodium, the etiologic agent of malaria. The CS protein from Plasmodium berghei (Pb) was selected given the availability of the stringent C57Bl/6 mouse model of infection by Pb sporozoites, allowing the evaluation of vaccine efficacy in vivo. PbCS was multimerized by fusion to the measles virus (MV) nucleoprotein (N) known to auto-assemble in yeast in large-size ribonucleoprotein rods (RNPs). Expressed in P. pastoris, the N-PbCS protein generated highly multimeric and heterogenic RNPs bearing PbCS on their surface. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence analyses revealed the shape of these RNPs and their localization in peripheral cytoplasmic inclusions. Subcutaneous immunization of C57Bl/6 mice with heat-inactivated whole P. pastoris expressing N-PbCS RNPs provided significant reduction of parasitemia after intradermal challenge with a high dose of parasites. Thus, in the absence of accessory adjuvants, a very low amount of PbCS expressed in whole yeast significantly decreased clinical damages associated with Pb infection in a highly stringent challenge model, providing a proof of concept of the intrinsic adjuvancy of this vaccine strategy. In addition to PbCS multimerization, the N protein contributed by itself to parasitemia delay and long-term mice survival. In the future, mixtures of whole recombinant yeasts expressing relevant Plasmodium antigens would provide a multivalent formulation applicable for antigen combination screening and possibly for large-scale production, distribution and delivery of a malaria vaccine in developing countries. PMID:24475165

  12. Identification of PLP2 and RAB5C as novel TPD52 binding partners through yeast two-hybrid screening.

    PubMed

    Shahheydari, Hamideh; Frost, Sarah; Smith, Brian J; Groblewski, Guy E; Chen, Yuyan; Byrne, Jennifer A

    2014-07-01

    Tumor protein D52 (TPD52) is overexpressed in different cancers, but its molecular functions are poorly defined. A large, low-stringency yeast two-hybrid screen using full-length TPD52 bait identified known partners (TPD52, TPD52L1, TPD52L2, MAL2) and four other preys that reproducibly bound TPD52 and TPD52L1 baits (PLP2, RAB5C, GOLGA5, YIF1A). PLP2 and RAB5 interactions with TPD52 were confirmed in pull down assays, with interaction domain mapping experiments indicating that both proteins interact with a novel binding region of TPD52. This study provides insights into TPD52 functions, and ways to maximise the efficiency of low-stringency yeast two-hybrid screens. PMID:24604726

  13. System Identification of X-33 Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Shiv

    2003-01-01

    Modern flight control research has improved spacecraft survivability as its goal. To this end we need to have a failure detection system on board. In case the spacecraft is performing imperfectly, reconfiguration of control is needed. For that purpose we need to have parameter identification of spacecraft dynamics. Parameter identification of a system is called system identification. We treat the system as a black box which receives some inputs that lead to some outputs. The question is: what kind of parameters for a particular black box can correlate the observed inputs and outputs? Can these parameters help us to predict the outputs for a new given set of inputs? This is the basic problem of system identification. The X33 was supposed to have the onboard capability of evaluating the current performance and if needed to take the corrective measures to adapt to desired performance. The X33 is comprised of both rocket and aircraft vehicle design characteristics and requires, in general, analytical methods for evaluating its flight performance. Its flight consists of four phases: ascent, transition, entry and TAEM (Terminal Area Energy Management). It spends about 200 seconds in ascent phase, reaching an altitude of about 180,000 feet and a speed of about 10 to 15 Mach. During the transition phase which lasts only about 30 seconds, its altitude may increase to about 190,000 feet but its speed is reduced to about 9 Mach. At the beginning of this phase, the Main Engine is Cut Off (MECO) and the control is reconfigured with the help of aerosurfaces (four elevons, two flaps and two rudders) and reaction control system (RCS). The entry phase brings down the altitude of X33 to about 90,000 feet and its speed to about Mach 3. It spends about 250 seconds in this phase. Main engine is still cut off and the vehicle is controlled by complex maneuvers of aerosurfaces. The last phase TAEM lasts for about 450 seconds and the altitude and speed, both are reduced to zero. The present attempt, as a start, focuses only on the entry phase. Since the main engine remains cut off in this phase, there is no thrust acting on the system. This considerably simplifies the equations of motion. We introduce another simplification by assuming the system to be linear after some non-linearities are removed analytically from our consideration. Under these assumptions, the problem could be solved by Classical Statistics by employing the least sum of squares approach. Instead we chose to use the Neural Network method. This method has many advantages. It is modern, more efficient, can be adapted to work even when the assumptions are diluted. In fact, Neural Networks try to model the human brain and are capable of pattern recognition.

  14. Identification of Candidate Substrates for the Golgi Tul1 E3 Ligase Using Quantitative diGly Proteomics in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zongtian; Kim, Min-Sik; Pandey, Akhilesh; Espenshade, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of protein homeostasis is essential for cellular survival. Central to this regulation are mechanisms of protein quality control in which misfolded proteins are recognized and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. One well-studied protein quality control pathway requires endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident, multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligases that function in ER-associated degradation. Using fission yeast, our lab identified the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase as required for proteolytic activation of fungal sterol regulatory element-binding protein transcription factors. The Dsc E3 ligase contains five integral membrane subunits and structurally resembles ER-associated degradation E3 ligases. Saccharomyces cerevisiae codes for homologs of Dsc E3 ligase subunits, including the Dsc1 E3 ligase homolog Tul1 that functions in Golgi protein quality control. Interestingly, S. cerevisiae lacks sterol regulatory element-binding protein homologs, indicating that novel Tul1 E3 ligase substrates exist. Here, we show that the S. cerevisiae Tul1 E3 ligase consists of Tul1, Dsc2, Dsc3, and Ubx3 and define Tul1 complex architecture. Tul1 E3 ligase function required each subunit as judged by vacuolar sorting of the artificial substrate Pep12D. Genetic studies demonstrated that Tul1 E3 ligase was required in cells lacking the multivesicular body pathway and under conditions of ubiquitin depletion. To identify candidate substrates, we performed quantitative diGly proteomics using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to survey ubiquitylation in wild-type and tul1Δ cells. We identified 3116 non-redundant ubiquitylation sites, including 10 sites in candidate substrates. Quantitative proteomics found 4.5% of quantified proteins (53/1172) to be differentially expressed in tul1Δ cells. Correcting the diGly dataset for these differences increased the number of Tul1-dependent ubiquitylation sites. Together, our data demonstrate that the Tul1 E3 ligase functions in protein homeostasis under non-stress conditions and support a role in protein quality control. This quantitative diGly proteomics methodology will serve as a robust platform for screening for stress conditions that require Tul1 E3 ligase activity. PMID:25078903

  15. Evaluation of the Utility of a Glycemic Pattern Identification System

    PubMed Central

    Tannan, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    Background: With the increasing prevalence of systems allowing automated, real-time transmission of blood glucose data there is a need for pattern recognition techniques that can inform of deleterious patterns in glycemic control when people test. We evaluated the utility of pattern identification with a novel pattern identification system named Vigilant™ and compared it to standard pattern identification methods in diabetes. Method: To characterize the importance of an identified pattern we evaluated the relative risk of future hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic events in diurnal periods following identification of a pattern in a data set of 536 patients with diabetes. We evaluated events 2 days, 7 days, 30 days, and 61-90 days from pattern identification, across diabetes types and cohorts of glycemic control, and also compared the system to 6 pattern identification methods consisting of deleterious event counts and percentages over 5-, 14-, and 30-day windows. Results: Episodes of hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, severe hypoglycemia, and severe hyperglycemia were 120%, 46%, 123%, and 76% more likely after pattern identification, respectively, compared to periods when no pattern was identified. The system was also significantly more predictive of deleterious events than other pattern identification methods evaluated, and was persistently predictive up to 3 months after pattern identification. Conclusions: The system identified patterns that are significantly predictive of deleterious glycemic events, and more so relative to many pattern identification methods used in diabetes management today. Further study will inform how improved pattern identification can lead to improved glycemic control. PMID:24876425

  16. Identification of a single transcriptional initiation site for the glutamic tRNA and COB genes in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, T; Edwards, J C; Mueller, D M; Rabinowitz, M

    1983-01-01

    We have identified a single transcriptional initiation site for the glutamic tRNA and COB (cytochrome b) genes by using the complementary techniques of in vitro capping of RNA and in vitro transcription. In the capping reaction, mitochondrial RNA is labeled with [alpha-32P]GTP by vaccinia virus guanylyltransferase. This reaction is specific for the 5' ends of RNA retaining the terminal triphosphate of transcriptional initiation. Exploiting the extremely low G+C content (18%) of yeast mitochondrial DNA, we digested in vitro capped transcripts from various petite deletion mutants with the G-specific RNase T1. By petite deletion mapping, a capped transcript giving rise to a 51-base RNase T1-generated oligonucleotide was localized near the glutamic tRNA gene. When the sequence of this oligonucleotide was determined, it perfectly matched the DNA sequence 391 base upstream of the glutamic tRNA. Purified yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase initiated transcription in vitro at the same site as shown by the sequence of the 33-base oligonucleotide product of the reaction performed in the absence of CTP. Initiation starts at a nonanucleotide sequence previously implicated in yeast mitochondrial transcriptional initiation. Because there is no evidence of an initiation site in the 1,050 bases between the glutamic tRNA and COB genes, the two genes are likely to be transcribed together. Further evidence of a long common transcript was provided by RNA blot hybridization. Images PMID:6136968

  17. Identification of Residues in Fission Yeast and Human P34(cdc2) Required for S-M Checkpoint Control

    PubMed Central

    Basi, G.; Enoch, T.

    1996-01-01

    In fission yeast, regulation of p34(cdc2) plays an important role in the checkpoint coupling mitosis to completion of DNA replication. The cdc2 mutations cdc2-3w (C67Y) and cdc2-4w (C67F) abolish checkpoint control without seriously affecting normal cell proliferation. However the molecular basis of this phenotype is not known. To better understand the role of p34(cdc2) in checkpoint control, we have screened for more mutations in Schizosaccharomyces pombe cdc2 with this phenotype. We have isolated cdc2-3w and cdc2-4w, as well as three new cdc2 alleles: cdc2-6w (N66I), cdc2-7w (E8V) and cdc2-8w (K9E). The altered residues map to two different regions on opposite faces of the protein, suggesting that the interaction between p34(cdc2) and components of the checkpoint pathway may be complex. In contrast to cdc2-3w and cdc2-4w, the new mutations alter residues that are conserved between the fission yeast cdc2(+) and other cdks, including the human CDC2 protein. Expression of the equivalent human CDC2 mutants in fission yeast abolishes checkpoint control, suggesting that these residues could be involved in checkpoint-dependent regulation of other eukaryotic cdks. PMID:8978030

  18. Cytokinesis and the contractile ring in fission yeast: towards a systems-level understanding

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the final stage of cell division in which the cytoplasm of a cell divides to form two daughter cells. In eukaryotes, it includes the placement, assembly and contraction of an actomyosin-based contractile ring. A highly conserved set of proteins and pathways involved in the process have been identified and characterized. Additionally, fluorescent protein fusion technology enables high-resolution imaging of protein dynamics in living cells. Thus, the study of cytokinesis is now ripe for quantitative, systems-level approaches. Here, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of contractile ring dynamics in the model organism Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast), focusing on recent examples that illustrate a synergistic integration of quantitative experimental data with computational modeling. A picture of a highly dynamic and integrated system consisting of overlapping networks is beginning to emerge, the detailed nature of which remains to be elucidated. PMID:19959363

  19. System Identification of a Vortex Lattice Aerodynamic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Kholodar, Denis; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The state-space presentation of an aerodynamic vortex model is considered from a classical and system identification perspective. Using an aerodynamic vortex model as a numerical simulator of a wing tunnel experiment, both full state and limited state data or measurements are considered. Two possible approaches for system identification are presented and modal controllability and observability are also considered. The theory then is applied to the system identification of a flow over an aerodynamic delta wing and typical results are presented.

  20. Rapid identification of fungi by sequencing the ITS1 and ITS2 regions using an automated capillary electrophoresis system.

    PubMed

    Pryce, T M; Palladino, S; Kay, I D; Coombs, G W

    2003-10-01

    We developed a standardized DNA sequence-based approach for the accurate and timely identification of medically important fungi by sequencing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products with a rapid automated capillary electrophoresis system. A simple DNA extraction method and PCR amplification using universal fungal primers was used to amplify ribosomal DNA from a range of clinical isolates and reference strains. The entire internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1-5.8S-ITS2 ribosomal DNA region was sequenced using automated dye termination sequencing for 89 clinical isolates. These had previously been identified by traditional methods and included 12 ascomycetous yeast species, three basidiomycetous yeast species, eight dermatophyte species and two thermally dimorphic fungi, Scedosporium prolificans and S. apiospermum. Furthermore, 21 reference strains representing 19 different Candida species, Geotrichum candidum and Malassezia furfur were also sequenced as part of this study and were used either as standards for sequence-based comparisons, or as assay controls. Sequence-based identification was compared to traditional identification in a blinded manner. Of the clinical isolates tested, 88/89 had DNA sequences that were highly homologous to those of reference strains accessioned in GenBank, and 87/89 gave a sequence-based identification result that correlated with the traditional identification. In contrast to relatively slow conventional methods of identification, a sequence-based identification from a pure culture can be obtained within 24 h of a DNA extraction carried out after a minimal period of culture growth. We conclude that this approach is rapid, and may be a more accurate cost-effective alternative than most phenotypic methods for identification of many medically important fungi frequently encountered in a routine diagnostic microbiology laboratory. PMID:14653513

  1. 30 CFR 75.1715 - Identification check system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Identification check system. 75.1715 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1715 Identification check system. Each operator of a coal mine shall establish a check-in and check-out system which will...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1715 - Identification check system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Identification check system. 75.1715 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1715 Identification check system. Each operator of a coal mine shall establish a check-in and check-out system which will...

  3. Fractional System Identification: An Approach Using Continuous Order-Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the identification of fractional- and integer-order systems using the concept of continuous order-distribution. Based on the ability to define systems using continuous order-distributions, it is shown that frequency domain system identification can be performed using least squares techniques after discretizing the order-distribution.

  4. Growth control of the eukaryote cell: a systems biology study in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Castrillo, Juan I; Zeef, Leo A; Hoyle, David C; Zhang, Nianshu; Hayes, Andrew; Gardner, David CJ; Cornell, Michael J; Petty, June; Hakes, Luke; Wardleworth, Leanne; Rash, Bharat; Brown, Marie; Dunn, Warwick B; Broadhurst, David; O'Donoghue, Kerry; Hester, Svenja S; Dunkley, Tom PJ; Hart, Sarah R; Swainston, Neil; Li, Peter; Gaskell, Simon J; Paton, Norman W; Lilley, Kathryn S; Kell, Douglas B; Oliver, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    Background Cell growth underlies many key cellular and developmental processes, yet a limited number of studies have been carried out on cell-growth regulation. Comprehensive studies at the transcriptional, proteomic and metabolic levels under defined controlled conditions are currently lacking. Results Metabolic control analysis is being exploited in a systems biology study of the eukaryotic cell. Using chemostat culture, we have measured the impact of changes in flux (growth rate) on the transcriptome, proteome, endometabolome and exometabolome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each functional genomic level shows clear growth-rate-associated trends and discriminates between carbon-sufficient and carbon-limited conditions. Genes consistently and significantly upregulated with increasing growth rate are frequently essential and encode evolutionarily conserved proteins of known function that participate in many protein-protein interactions. In contrast, more unknown, and fewer essential, genes are downregulated with increasing growth rate; their protein products rarely interact with one another. A large proportion of yeast genes under positive growth-rate control share orthologs with other eukaryotes, including humans. Significantly, transcription of genes encoding components of the TOR complex (a major controller of eukaryotic cell growth) is not subject to growth-rate regulation. Moreover, integrative studies reveal the extent and importance of post-transcriptional control, patterns of control of metabolic fluxes at the level of enzyme synthesis, and the relevance of specific enzymatic reactions in the control of metabolic fluxes during cell growth. Conclusion This work constitutes a first comprehensive systems biology study on growth-rate control in the eukaryotic cell. The results have direct implications for advanced studies on cell growth, in vivo regulation of metabolic fluxes for comprehensive metabolic engineering, and for the design of genome-scale systems biology models of the eukaryotic cell. PMID:17439666

  5. Inactivation of yeast and filamentous fungi by the lactoperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-thiocyanate-system.

    PubMed

    Popper, L; Knorr, D

    1997-02-01

    The antifungal activity of the lactoperoxidase (LPO) system with glucose oxidase (GOD) as source of hydrogen peroxide was determined in salt solution and in apple juice. The test organisms Rhodutorula rubra and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were cultivated aerobically in apple juice, Mucor rouxii was grown on wort agar adjusted to pH 4.5. Aspergillus niger and Byssochlamys fulva were kept on malt extract agar. Spores of the filamentous fungi were harvested by suspension in salt solution supplemented with Tween 80 and checked microscopically. The antifungal activity of the combined enzyme system was tested with initial counts of approx. 10(5) cfu.ml-1 (yeast cells or spores) suspended in salt solution supplemented with 25 mg.l-1 thiocyanate and 20 g.l-1 glucose or in apple juice supplemented with the same amount of thiocyanate. The tests were performed with 25 ml of the medium in 100 ml Erlenmeyer flasks shaken at 28 degrees C under aerobic conditions. Inactivation was achieved for all test organisms in both media. The yeast strains were found to be least stable while B. fulva was most resistant. A combination of 5 U.ml-1 LPO with 0.5 to 1 U.ml-1 GOD was sufficient for complete inactivation of this mold in salt solution within 2 h. The enzyme system also showed antifungal activity in apple juice at acid pH (3.2), although its effectiveness was reduced. In this medium, B. fulva was inactivated by 20 U.ml-1 LPD and 1 U.ml-1 GOD within 4 h. R. rubra and S. cerevisfiae were unable to survive in apple juice at 5 U.ml-1 LPO combined with 1 U.ml-1 GOD. For inhibition by GOD alone, higher amounts of this enzyme were needed and even then only M. rouxii and R. rubra have been affected within the concentration range tested (maximum 3 U.ml-1). PMID:9113668

  6. Thermal Signature Identification System (TheSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Scott; Bean, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We characterize both nonlinear and high order linear responses of fiber-optic and optoelectronic components using spread spectrum temperature cycling methods. This Thermal Signature Identification System (TheSIS) provides much more detail than conventional narrowband or quasi-static temperature profiling methods. This detail allows us to match components more thoroughly, detect subtle reversible shifts in performance, and investigate the cause of instabilities or irreversible changes. In particular, we create parameterized models of athermal fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), delay line interferometers (DLIs), and distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, then subject the alternative models to selection via the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Detailed pairing of components, e.g. FBGs, is accomplished by means of weighted distance metrics or norms, rather than on the basis of a single parameter, such as center wavelength.

  7. Yeast Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... taking antibiotics, it can multiply and cause an infection. Yeast infections affect different parts of the body in different ways: Thrush is a yeast infection that causes white patches in your mouth Candida ...

  8. Yeast Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... majority of vaginal yeast infections are caused by Candida Albicans ? There are some less common yeast organisms such as Torulopsis Glabrata that may cause infections that do not clear up with the ...

  9. System Identification of Physiological Systems Using Short Data Segments

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    System identification of physiological systems poses unique challenges, especially when the structure of the system under study is uncertain. Non-parametric techniques can be useful for identifying system structure, but these typically assume stationarity, and require large amounts of data. Both of these requirements are often not easily obtained in the study of physiological systems. Ensemble methods for time-varying, non-parametric estimation have been developed to address the issue of stationarity, but these require an amount of data that can be prohibitive for many experimental systems. To address this issue, we developed a novel algorithm that uses multiple short data segments. Using simulation studies, we showed that this algorithm produces system estimates with lower variability than previous methods when limited data are present. Furthermore we showed that the new algorithm generates time-varying system estimates with lower total error than an ensemble method. Thus, this algorithm is well suited for the identification of physiological systems that vary with time or from which only short segments of stationary data can be collected. PMID:23033429

  10. A Microfluidic System for Studying Ageing and Dynamic Single-Cell Responses in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Elco; Smith, Stewart; Swain, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of the importance of cell-to-cell variability in cellular decision-making and a growing interest in stochastic modeling of cellular processes has led to an increased demand for high density, reproducible, single-cell measurements in time-varying surroundings. We present ALCATRAS (A Long-term Culturing And TRApping System), a microfluidic device that can quantitatively monitor up to 1000 cells of budding yeast in a well-defined and controlled environment. Daughter cells are removed by fluid flow to avoid crowding allowing experiments to run for over 60 hours, and the extracellular media may be changed repeatedly and in seconds. We illustrate use of the device by measuring ageing through replicative life span curves, following the dynamics of the cell cycle, and examining history-dependent behaviour in the general stress response. PMID:24950344

  11. Apoptosis in yeast: a new model system with applications in cell biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Frank; Engelhardt, Silvia; Herker, Eva; Lehmann, Nina; Maldener, Corinna; Proksch, Astrid; Wissing, Silke; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe

    2002-07-01

    Apoptosis is a highly coordinated cellular suicide program crucial for metazoan health and diseases. Although its increasing importance in cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and AIDS led to intense research and a better understanding of apoptosis, many details of its regulation or the apoptotic phenotypes are poorly understood. The complex regulatory network and the often contradictory results obtained with human cell lines made application of an easier model system desirable. Apoptosis in yeast promises to provide a better understanding of the genetics of apoptosis. During the past 2 years, scientists were successful in identifying new cell-death regulators of humans, plants and fungi using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The finding of apoptotic phenotypes, even in protists, suggests that apoptosis developed in unicellular organisms long before the evolutionary separation between fungi, plants and metazoan animals occurred. PMID:12172961

  12. Distinct Signaling Roles of Ceramide Species in Yeast Revealed Through Systematic Perturbation and Systems Biology Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Montefusco, David J.; Chen, Lujia; Matmati, Nabil; Lu, Songjian; Newcomb, Benjamin; Cooper, Gregory F.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Lu, Xinghua

    2014-01-01

    Ceramide, the central molecule of sphingolipid metabolism, is an important bioactive molecule participating in cellular regulatory events and having implications for disease. A challenge in deciphering ceramide signaling emanates from the myriad of ceramide species that exist and the possibility that many of them may have distinct functions. Here, we applied systems biology and molecular approaches to perturb ceramide metabolism in the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and inferred causal relationships between ceramide species and their potential targets by combining lipidomic, genomic, and transcriptomic analyses. We find that during heat stress distinct metabolic mechanisms control the abundance of different groups of ceramide species. Additionally, distinct groups of ceramide species regulated different sets of functionally related genes, indicating that specific sub-groups of lipids participated in different regulatory pathways. These results indicate a previously unrecognized complexity and versatility of lipid-mediated cell regulation. PMID:24170935

  13. Identification and biophysical characterization of a very-long-chain-fatty-acid-substituted phosphatidylinositol in yeast subcellular membranes

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Morphological analysis of a conditional yeast mutant in acetyl-CoA carboxylase acc1ts/mtr7, the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis, suggested that the synthesis of C26 VLCFAs (very-long-chain fatty acids) is important for maintaining the structure and function of the nuclear membrane. To characterize this C26-dependent pathway in more detail, we have now examined cells that are blocked in pathways that require C26. In yeast, ceramide synthesis and remodelling of GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-anchors are two pathways that incorporate C26 into lipids. Conditional mutants blocked in either ceramide synthesis or the synthesis of GPI anchors do not display the characteristic alterations of the nuclear envelope observed in acc1ts, indicating that the synthesis of another C26-containing lipid may be affected in acc1ts mutant cells. Lipid analysis of isolated nuclear membranes revealed the presence of a novel C26-substituted PI (phosphatidylinositol). This C26-PI accounts for approx. 1% of all the PI species, and is present in both the nuclear and the plasma membrane. Remarkably, this C26-PI is the only C26-containing glycerophospholipid that is detectable in wild-type yeast, and the C26-substitution is highly specific for the sn-1 position of the glycerol backbone. To characterize the biophysical properties of this lipid, it was chemically synthesized. In contrast to PIs with normal long-chain fatty acids (C16 or C18), the C26-PI greatly reduced the bilayer to hexagonal phase transition of liposomes composed of 1,2-dielaidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DEPE). The biophysical properties of this lipid are thus consistent with a possible role in stabilizing highly curved membrane domains. PMID:15270698

  14. An overview of recent advances in system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the recent advances in system identification for modal testing and control of large flexible structures. Several techniques are discussed including the Observer/Kalman Filter Identification, the Observer/Controller Identification, and the State-Space System Identification in the Frequency Domain. The System/Observer/Controller Toolbox developed at NASA Langley Research Center is used to show the applications of these techniques to real aerospace structures such as the Hubble spacecraft telescope and the active flexible aircraft wing.

  15. System of Personal Identification by Using Tactile Stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Il; Uchida, Masafumi

    In present, personal identfication system have been used to input identification-numbers and passwords by keyboards and touch panels. When a user enters their identification-numbers and passwords an observer could easily see the user's secret details. In this report, new personal identification, which system constitutes tactile sense information using tactile stimuli and based on the cardinal trait of the tactile sense, is proposed.

  16. Lightweight autonomous chemical identification system (LACIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozos, George; Lin, Hai; Burch, Timothy

    2012-06-01

    Smiths Detection and Intelligent Optical Systems have developed prototypes for the Lightweight Autonomous Chemical Identification System (LACIS) for the US Department of Homeland Security. LACIS is to be a handheld detection system for Chemical Warfare Agents (CWAs) and Toxic Industrial Chemicals (TICs). LACIS is designed to have a low limit of detection and rapid response time for use by emergency responders and could allow determination of areas having dangerous concentration levels and if protective garments will be required. Procedures for protection of responders from hazardous materials incidents require the use of protective equipment until such time as the hazard can be assessed. Such accurate analysis can accelerate operations and increase effectiveness. LACIS is to be an improved point detector employing novel CBRNE detection modalities that includes a militaryproven ruggedized ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with an array of electro-resistive sensors to extend the range of chemical threats detected in a single device. It uses a novel sensor data fusion and threat classification architecture to interpret the independent sensor responses and provide robust detection at low levels in complex backgrounds with minimal false alarms. The performance of LACIS prototypes have been characterized in independent third party laboratory tests at the Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI, Columbus, OH) and indoor and outdoor field tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). LACIS prototypes will be entering operational assessment by key government emergency response groups to determine its capabilities versus requirements.

  17. Identification of Small Aliphatic Aldehydes in Pretreated Lignocellulosic Feedstocks and Evaluation of Their Inhibitory Effects on Yeast.

    PubMed

    Cavka, Adnan; Stagge, Stefan; Jönsson, Leif J

    2015-11-11

    Six lignocellulosic hydrolysates produced through acid pretreatment were analyzed for the occurrence of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and glycolaldehyde. Acetaldehyde was found in all six (0.3-1.6 mM) and formaldehyde in four (? 4.4 mM), whereas glycolaldehyde was not detected. To assess the relevance of these findings, fermentations with yeast and formaldehyde or acetaldehyde were performed in the concentration interval 0.5-10 mM. Formaldehyde already inhibited at 1.0 mM, whereas 5.0 mM acetaldehyde was needed to obtain a clear inhibitory effect. After 24 h of fermentation, 1.5 mM formaldehyde reduced the glucose consumption by 85%, the balanced ethanol yield by 92%, and the volumetric productivity by 91%. The results show that formaldehyde and acetaldehyde are prevalent in pretreated lignocellulose and that formaldehyde in some cases could explain a large part of the inhibitory effects on yeast by lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as three of six hydrolysates contained ? 1.9 mM formaldehyde, which was shown to be strongly inhibitory. PMID:26528761

  18. Identification of furfural as a key toxin in lignocellulosic hydrolysates and evolution of a tolerant yeast strain

    PubMed Central

    Heer, Dominik; Sauer, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Summary The production of fuel ethanol from low?cost lignocellulosic biomass currently suffers from several limitations. One of them is the presence of inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates that are released during pre?treatment. These compounds inhibit growth and hamper the production of ethanol, thereby affecting process economics. To delineate the effects of such complex mixtures, we conducted a chemical analysis of four different real?world lignocellulosic hydrolysates and determined their toxicological effect on yeast. By correlating the potential inhibitor abundance to the growth?inhibiting properties of the corresponding hydrolysates, we identified furfural as an important contributor to hydrolysate toxicity for yeast. Subsequently, we conducted a targeted evolution experiment to improve growth behaviour of the half industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain TMB3400 in the hydrolysates. After about 300 generations, representative clones from these evolved populations exhibited significantly reduced lag phases in medium containing the single inhibitor furfural, but also in hydrolysate?supplemented medium. Furthermore, these strains were able to grow at concentrations of hydrolysates that effectively killed the parental strain and exhibited significantly improved bioconversion characteristics under industrially relevant conditions. The improved resistance of our evolved strains was based on their capacity to remain viable in a toxic environment during the prolonged, furfural induced lag phase. PMID:21261870

  19. Identification of lethal mutations in yeast threonyl-tRNA synthetase revealing critical residues in its human homolog.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Ye, Qing; Lei, Hui-Yan; Eriani, Gilbert; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Wang, En-Duo

    2015-01-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are a group of ancient enzymes catalyzing aminoacylation and editing reactions for protein biosynthesis. Increasing evidence suggests that these critical enzymes are often associated with mammalian disorders. Therefore, complete determination of the enzymes functions is essential for informed diagnosis and treatment. Here, we show that a yeast knock-out strain for the threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) gene is an excellent platform for such an investigation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ThrRS has a unique modular structure containing four structural domains and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. Using randomly mutated libraries of the ThrRS gene (thrS) and a genetic screen, a set of loss-of-function mutants were identified. The mutations affected the synthetic and editing activities and influenced the dimer interface. The results also highlighted the role of the N-terminal extension for enzymatic activity and protein stability. To gain insights into the pathological mechanisms induced by mutated aaRSs, we systematically introduced the loss-of-function mutations into the human cytoplasmic ThrRS gene. All mutations induced similar detrimental effects, showing that the yeast model could be used to study pathology-associated point mutations in mammalian aaRSs. PMID:25416776

  20. Identification of Rbd2 as a candidate protease for sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) cleavage in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinsil; Ha, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Sujin; Choi, Ah-Reum; Lee, Sook-Jeong; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk

    2015-12-25

    Lipid homeostasis in mammalian cells is regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors that are activated through sequential cleavage by Golgi Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. Fission yeast SREBP, Sre1, engages a different mechanism involving the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase complex, but it is not clearly understood exactly how Sre1 is proteolytically cleaved and activated. In this study, we screened the Schizosaccharomyces pombe non-essential haploid deletion collection to identify missing components of the Sre1 cleavage machinery. Our screen identified an additional component of the SREBP pathway required for Sre1 proteolysis named rhomboid protein 2 (Rbd2). We show that an rbd2 deletion mutant fails to grow under hypoxic and hypoxia-mimetic conditions due to lack of Sre1 activity and that this growth phenotype is rescued by Sre1N, a cleaved active form of Sre1. We found that the growth inhibition phenotype under low oxygen conditions is specific to the strain with deletion of rbd2, not any other fission yeast rhomboid-encoding genes. Our study also identified conserved residues of Rbd2 that are required for Sre1 proteolytic cleavage. All together, our results suggest that Rbd2 is a functional SREBP protease with conserved residues required for Sre1 cleavage and provide an important piece of the puzzle to understand the mechanisms for Sre1 activation and the regulation of various biological and pathological processes involving SREBPs. PMID:26545776

  1. 40 CFR 72.33 - Identification of dispatch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Identification of dispatch system. 72.33 Section 72.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.33 Identification of dispatch system. (a) Every Phase I unit shall be treated...

  2. 40 CFR 72.33 - Identification of dispatch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.33 Identification of dispatch system. (a... otherwise required under a petition as approved under 40 CFR 72.33(f), the units and generators listed... dispatch system under 40 CFR 72.91 and 72.92, during the period that this identification of dispatch...

  3. 40 CFR 72.33 - Identification of dispatch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.33 Identification of dispatch system. (a... otherwise required under a petition as approved under 40 CFR 72.33(f), the units and generators listed... dispatch system under 40 CFR 72.91 and 72.92, during the period that this identification of dispatch...

  4. 40 CFR 72.33 - Identification of dispatch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.33 Identification of dispatch system. (a... otherwise required under a petition as approved under 40 CFR 72.33(f), the units and generators listed... dispatch system under 40 CFR 72.91 and 72.92, during the period that this identification of dispatch...

  5. 40 CFR 72.33 - Identification of dispatch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.33 Identification of dispatch system. (a... otherwise required under a petition as approved under 40 CFR 72.33(f), the units and generators listed... dispatch system under 40 CFR 72.91 and 72.92, during the period that this identification of dispatch...

  6. 33 CFR 164.46 - Automatic Identification System (AIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... “registered length” as defined in 46 CFR part 69. “Gross tonnage” refers to tonnage as defined under the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Identification System (AIS). (a) The following vessels must have a properly installed, operational, type...

  7. 33 CFR 164.46 - Automatic Identification System (AIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... “registered length” as defined in 46 CFR part 69. “Gross tonnage” refers to tonnage as defined under the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Identification System (AIS). (a) The following vessels must have a properly installed, operational, type...

  8. 33 CFR 164.46 - Automatic Identification System (AIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... “registered length” as defined in 46 CFR part 69. “Gross tonnage” refers to tonnage as defined under the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Identification System (AIS). (a) The following vessels must have a properly installed, operational, type...

  9. 33 CFR 164.46 - Automatic Identification System (AIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... “registered length” as defined in 46 CFR part 69. “Gross tonnage” refers to tonnage as defined under the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Identification System (AIS). (a) The following vessels must have a properly installed, operational, type...

  10. 33 CFR 164.46 - Automatic Identification System (AIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Automatic Identification System (AIS). 164.46 Section 164.46 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.46 Automatic Identification System (AIS). (a) The following...

  11. A Wide-Range Integrative Expression Vector (CoMed) System for Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinborn, Gerhard; Kunze, Gotthard; Gellissen, Gerd

    No single yeast-based platform exists which is optimal for every protein. It is advisable to assess several platform candidates in parallel for optimal expression characteristics in a given case. For this approach, a wide-range yeast vector has been established that can be targeted to the various yeast host strains. The vector is built up in a modular way. In its basic form, it contains conserved rDNA-derived segments for targeting. For heterologous gene expression control, it is equipped with a promoter that is functional in all yeast species tested so far. For selection, a range of dominant and auxotrophic selection markers can be employed. Examples are presented applying vector variants with dominant or auxotrophic selection markers to the comparative simultaneous integration and expression of single or multiple foreign genes in a range of yeast platforms.

  12. Multivariate system identification for cerebral autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tingying; Rowley, Alexander B; Ainslie, Philip N; Poulin, Marc J; Payne, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    The effect of spontaneous beat-to-beat mean arterial blood pressure (ABP) fluctuations and breath-to-breath end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) and end-tidal oxygen (PETO2) fluctuations on beat-to-beat cerebral bloodflow velocity (CBFV) variations is studied using a multiple coherence function. Multiple coherence is a measure of the extent to which the output, CBFV, can be represented as a linear time invariant system of multiple input signals. Analysis of experimental measurements from 13 different healthy subjects reveal that, with additional inputs, PETCO2 and PETO2, the multiple coherence for frequencies <0.05 Hz is significantly higher than the corresponding values obtained for univariate coherence with a single input of ABP. The result illustrates that the low value of univariate coherence at small frequencies may be due to the effects of PETCO2 and PETO2 fluctuations on CBFV variability. Moreover, it is also found that the transfer function between ABP and CBFVtime series identified from previous univariate techniques at low frequencies can be modified by CO2 and O2 reactivity and no longer represents pressure autoregulation only. Multivariate system identification provides a technique of incorporating additional variability and recovering from this artifact. Finally, a physiologically based model and its linear transfer function are used as a simulation tool to investigate possible causes of low univariate coherence. PMID:18066666

  13. Emergent system identification using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Mark S.; Feng, Xin

    2001-10-01

    Complex Adaptive Structures can be viewed as a combination of Complex Adaptive Systems and fully integrated autonomous Smart Structures. Traditionally when designing a structure, one combines rules of thumb with theoretical results to develop an acceptable solution. This methodology will have to be extended for Complex Adaptive Structures, since they, by definition, will participate in their own design. In this paper we introduce a new methodology for Emergent System Identification that is concerned with combining the methodologies of self-organizing functional networks (GMDH - Alexy G. Ivakhnenko), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO - James Kennedy and Russell C. Eberhart) and Genetic Programming (GP - John Koza). This paper will concentrate on the utilization of Particle Swarm Optimization in this effort and discuss how Particle Swarm Optimization relates to our ultimate goal of emergent self-organizing functional networks that can be used to identify overlapping internal structural models. The ability for Complex Adaptive Structures to identify emerging internal models will be a key component for their success.

  14. 49 CFR 1542.211 - Identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... secured area or SIDA continuously displays the identification medium issued to that individual on the... individual who has authorized unescorted access to secured areas and SIDA's to ascertain the authority of any... approved identification media. The procedure must— (1) Apply uniformly in secured areas, SIDAs,...

  15. 49 CFR 1542.211 - Identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... secured area or SIDA continuously displays the identification medium issued to that individual on the... individual who has authorized unescorted access to secured areas and SIDA's to ascertain the authority of any... approved identification media. The procedure must— (1) Apply uniformly in secured areas, SIDAs,...

  16. 49 CFR 1542.211 - Identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... secured area or SIDA continuously displays the identification medium issued to that individual on the... individual who has authorized unescorted access to secured areas and SIDA's to ascertain the authority of any... approved identification media. The procedure must— (1) Apply uniformly in secured areas, SIDAs,...

  17. 49 CFR 1542.211 - Identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... secured area or SIDA continuously displays the identification medium issued to that individual on the... individual who has authorized unescorted access to secured areas and SIDA's to ascertain the authority of any... approved identification media. The procedure must— (1) Apply uniformly in secured areas, SIDAs,...

  18. 49 CFR 1542.211 - Identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... secured area or SIDA continuously displays the identification medium issued to that individual on the... individual who has authorized unescorted access to secured areas and SIDA's to ascertain the authority of any... approved identification media. The procedure must— (1) Apply uniformly in secured areas, SIDAs,...

  19. Interaction of a mixed yeast culture in an ``autotroph-heterotroph'' system with a closed atmosphere cycle and spatially separated components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.; Somova, L. A.

    The study considers an experimental model of the "autotroph-heterotroph" system with a closed atmosphere cycle, in which the heterotrophic link is a mixed yeast population. The autotrophic link is represented by the algae Chlorella vulgaris and the heterotrophic link by the yeasts Candida utilis and Candida guilliermondii. The controls are populations of Chlorella and the same yeasts isolated from the atmosphere. It has been shown that the outcome of competition in the heterotrophic link depends on the strategy of the yeast population towards the substrate and oxygen. The C. utilis population quickly utilizes the substrate as it is an r-strategist and is less sensitive to oxygen deficiency. The C. guilliermondii population consumes low concentrations of the substrate because it is a K-strategist, but it is more sensitive to oxygen deficiency. That is why, in the "autotroph-heterotroph" system with a closed gas cycle, after a considerable amount of the substrate has been consumed, the C. guilliermondii population becomes more competitive that the C. utilis population. In the culture of yeasts, isolated from the atmosphere, the C. utilis population finds itself in more favorable conditions due to oxygen deficiency. The system with a complex heterotrophic component survive longer than a system whose heterotrophic component is represented by only one yeast species. This is explained for by the positive metabolite interaction of yeasts and a more complete utilization of the substrate by a mixed culture of yeasts featuring different strategies towards the substrate.

  20. Interaction of the mixed yeast culture in the autotroph-heterotroph system with a closed gas cycle and spatially separated components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T.; Somova, L.

    The study considers the experimental model of the "autotroph-heterotroph" system with a closed gas cycle, in which the heterotrophic link is a mixed yeast population. The autotrophic link is represented by the algae Chlorella vulgaris and the heterotrophic link by the yeasts Candida utilis and Candida guilliermondii. The controls are separate links of Chlorella and yeasts isolated from the atmosphere. It has been shown that the outcome of the competition in the heterotrophic link depends on the strategy of the yeast population towards the substrate and oxygen. The C. utilis population quickly utilizes the substrate as it is an R-strategist and is less sensitive to oxygen deficiency. The C. guilliermondii population consumes low concentrations of the substrate because it is a K-strategist, but it is more sensitive to oxygen deficiency. That is why, in the "autotroph-heterotroph" system with a closed gas cycle, after a considerable amount of the substrate has been consumed, the C. guilliermondii population becomes more competitive that the C. utilis population. In the culture of a separate yeast link, isolated from the atmosphere, the C. utilis population finds itself in more favorable conditions due to oxygen deficiency. The system with a complex heterotrophic component exists longer than the system whose heterotrophic component is represented by one yeast species. This is accounted for by the positive metabolite interaction of yeasts and a more complete utilization of the substrate by a mixed culture of yeasts featuring different strategies towards the substrate.

  1. A system identification model for adaptive nonlinear control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linse, Dennis J.; Stengel, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    A system identification model that combines generalized-spline function approximation with a nonlinear control system is described. The complete control system contains three main elements: a nonlinear-inverse-dynamic control law that depends on a comprehensive model of the plant, a state estimator whose outputs drive the control law, and a function approximation scheme that models the system dynamics. The system-identification task, which combines an extended Kalman filter with a function approximator modeled as an artificial neural network, is considered. The results of an application of the identification techniques to a nonlinear transport aircraft model are presented.

  2. Antibody engineering: comparison of bacterial, yeast, insect and mammalian expression systems.

    PubMed

    Verma, R; Boleti, E; George, A J

    1998-07-01

    Engineered antibody molecules, and their fragments, are being increasingly exploited as scientific and clinical tools. However, one factor that can limit the applicability of this technology is the ability to express large amounts of active protein. In this review we describe the relative advantages and disadvantages of bacterial, yeast, insect and mammalian expression systems, and discuss some of the problems that can be encountered when using them. There is no 'universal' expression system, that can guarantee high yields of recombinant product, as every antibody-based molecule will pose its own problems in terms of expression. As a result the choice of system will depend on many factors, including the molecular species being expressed, the precise sequence of the individual antibody and the preferences of the individual investigator. However, there are general rules with regards to the design of expression vectors and systems which will help the investigator to make informed choices as to which strategy might be appropriate for their application. PMID:9760222

  3. Identification of a group-I intron within the 25S rDNA from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans.

    PubMed

    Rösel, H; Kunze, G

    1996-09-30

    The 25S rDNA of the yeast Arxula adeninivorans LS3 has been closed from a genomic library and sequenced. This DNA could be localized on chromosome 1 from A. adeninivorans and comprised 3790 bp. The DNA sequence from this rDNA of the strain LS3 is very similar to the 25S rDNA of Candida albicans (91.7%), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (90.5%), Schizosaccharomyces pombe (83.8%) and Mucor racemosus (79.2%). Additionally a 411 bp insertion could be localized within the 25S rDNA. This intervening sequence, which is devoid of any long open reading frame, is a group-IC intron as revealed from its site of insertion, predicted secondary structure, and its self-splicing capability. The Arxula intron is intermediate in structure and sequence between the ribosomal introns of Tetrahymena thermophila and C. albicans. PMID:8905924

  4. Neural system prediction and identification challenge

    PubMed Central

    Vlachos, Ioannis; Zaytsev, Yury V.; Spreizer, Sebastian; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Can we infer the function of a biological neural network (BNN) if we know the connectivity and activity of all its constituent neurons?This question is at the core of neuroscience and, accordingly, various methods have been developed to record the activity and connectivity of as many neurons as possible. Surprisingly, there is no theoretical or computational demonstration that neuronal activity and connectivity are indeed sufficient to infer the function of a BNN. Therefore, we pose the Neural Systems Identification and Prediction Challenge (nuSPIC). We provide the connectivity and activity of all neurons and invite participants (1) to infer the functions implemented (hard-wired) in spiking neural networks (SNNs) by stimulating and recording the activity of neurons and, (2) to implement predefined mathematical/biological functions using SNNs. The nuSPICs can be accessed via a web-interface to the NEST simulator and the user is not required to know any specific programming language. Furthermore, the nuSPICs can be used as a teaching tool. Finally, nuSPICs use the crowd-sourcing model to address scientific issues. With this computational approach we aim to identify which functions can be inferred by systematic recordings of neuronal activity and connectivity. In addition, nuSPICs will help the design and application of new experimental paradigms based on the structure of the SNN and the presumed function which is to be discovered. PMID:24399966

  5. Autonomous system for pathogen detection and identification

    SciTech Connect

    Belgrader, P.; Benett, W.; Bergman, W.; Langlois, R.; Mariella, R.; Milanovich, F.; Miles, R.; Venkateswaran, K.; Long, G.; Nelson, W.

    1998-09-24

    This purpose of this project is to build a prototype instrument that will, running unattended, detect, identify, and quantify BW agents. In order to accomplish this, we have chosen to start with the world' s leading, proven, assays for pathogens: surface-molecular recognition assays, such as antibody-based assays, implemented on a high-performance, identification (ID)-capable flow cytometer, and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for nucleic-acid based assays. With these assays, we must integrate the capability to: l collect samples from aerosols, water, or surfaces; l perform sample preparation prior to the assays; l incubate the prepared samples, if necessary, for a period of time; l transport the prepared, incubated samples to the assays; l perform the assays; l interpret and report the results of the assays. Issues such as reliability, sensitivity and accuracy, quantity of consumables, maintenance schedule, etc. must be addressed satisfactorily to the end user. The highest possible sensitivity and specificity of the assay must be combined with no false alarms. Today, we have assays that can, in under 30 minutes, detect and identify simulants for BW agents at concentrations of a few hundred colony-forming units per ml of solution. If the bio-aerosol sampler of this system collects 1000 Ymin and concentrates the respirable particles into 1 ml of solution with 70% processing efficiency over a period of 5 minutes, then this translates to a detection/ID capability of under 0.1 agent-containing particle/liter of air.

  6. Entropy-based separation of yeast cells using a microfluidic system of conjoined spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Kai-Jian; Qin, S.-J. Bai, Zhong-Chen; Zhang, Xin; Mai, John D.

    2013-11-21

    A physical model is derived to create a biological cell separator that is based on controlling the entropy in a microfluidic system having conjoined spherical structures. A one-dimensional simplified model of this three-dimensional problem in terms of the corresponding effects of entropy on the Brownian motion of particles is presented. This dynamic mechanism is based on the Langevin equation from statistical thermodynamics and takes advantage of the characteristics of the Fokker-Planck equation. This mechanism can be applied to manipulate biological particles inside a microfluidic system with identical, conjoined, spherical compartments. This theoretical analysis is verified by performing a rapid and a simple technique for separating yeast cells in these conjoined, spherical microfluidic structures. The experimental results basically match with our theoretical model and we further analyze the parameters which can be used to control this separation mechanism. Both numerical simulations and experimental results show that the motion of the particles depends on the geometrical boundary conditions of the microfluidic system and the initial concentration of the diffusing material. This theoretical model can be implemented in future biophysics devices for the optimized design of passive cell sorters.

  7. Entropy-based separation of yeast cells using a microfluidic system of conjoined spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai-Jian; Qin, S.-J.; Bai, Zhong-Chen; Zhang, Xin; Mai, John D.

    2013-11-01

    A physical model is derived to create a biological cell separator that is based on controlling the entropy in a microfluidic system having conjoined spherical structures. A one-dimensional simplified model of this three-dimensional problem in terms of the corresponding effects of entropy on the Brownian motion of particles is presented. This dynamic mechanism is based on the Langevin equation from statistical thermodynamics and takes advantage of the characteristics of the Fokker-Planck equation. This mechanism can be applied to manipulate biological particles inside a microfluidic system with identical, conjoined, spherical compartments. This theoretical analysis is verified by performing a rapid and a simple technique for separating yeast cells in these conjoined, spherical microfluidic structures. The experimental results basically match with our theoretical model and we further analyze the parameters which can be used to control this separation mechanism. Both numerical simulations and experimental results show that the motion of the particles depends on the geometrical boundary conditions of the microfluidic system and the initial concentration of the diffusing material. This theoretical model can be implemented in future biophysics devices for the optimized design of passive cell sorters.

  8. Identification of human ferritin, heavy polypeptide 1 (FTH1) and yeast RGI1 (YER067W) as pro-survival sequences that counteract the effects of Bax and copper in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Eid, Rawan; Boucher, Eric; Gharib, Nada; Khoury, Chamel; Arab, Nagla T T; Murray, Alistair; Young, Paul G; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2016-03-01

    Ferritin is a sub-family of iron binding proteins that form multi-subunit nanotype iron storage structures and prevent oxidative stress induced apoptosis. Here we describe the identification and characterization of human ferritin, heavy polypeptide 1 (FTH1) as a suppressor of the pro-apoptotic murine Bax sequence in yeast. In addition we demonstrate that FTH1 is a general pro-survival sequence since it also prevents the cell death inducing effects of copper when heterologously expressed in yeast. Although ferritins are phylogenetically widely distributed and are present in most species of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, ferritin is conspicuously absent in most fungal species including Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An in silico analysis of the yeast proteome lead to the identification of the 161 residue RGI1 (YER067W) encoded protein as a candidate for being a yeast ferritin. In addition to sharing 20% sequence identity with the 183 residue FTH1, RGI1 also has similar pro-survival properties as ferritin when overexpressed in yeast. Analysis of recombinant protein by SDS-PAGE and by electron microscopy revealed the expected formation of higher-order structures for FTH1 that was not observed with Rgi1p. Further analysis revealed that cells overexpressing RGI1 do not show increased resistance to iron toxicity and do not have enhanced capacity to store iron. In contrast, cells lacking RGI1 were found to be hypersensitive to the toxic effects of iron. Overall, our results suggest that Rgi1p is a novel pro-survival protein whose function is not related to ferritin but nevertheless it may have a role in regulating yeast sensitivity to iron stress. PMID:26886577

  9. Marked for Success?: Identification Systems Impact Poultry Welfare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individual identification is a common method used in animal research. This study was designed to examine if various common identification systems, i.e., leg bands (LB), wing bands (WB), neck tags (ST), and livestock marker (LM), have different effects on hens' behavioral and physiological homeostasi...

  10. Application of system identification techniques to simulation model abstraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popken, Douglas A.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes preliminary research into the applicability of system identification techniques to simulation model abstraction. Model abstraction enables the construction of a valid, low-resolution surrogate to a more detailed, high-resolution simulation model. When rapid, approximate results will suffice, we can also apply system identification directly to actual system data, bypassing the simulation stage. Four non-traditional system identification techniques are discussed in relation to their ability to produce linear, time-invariant, state-space formulations of multivariable random systems. A simple example is provided in which one of the techniques, Hidden Markov Models, is used to identify the transition probabilities within a simulated Markov Chain. The example is used to illustrate the challenges in general simulation model abstraction caused by model transformation procedures, problem size, uncertainty, and computational complexity. At this stage, we can say that the application of systems identification to simulation model abstraction is promising, yet challenging.

  11. Automated frequency domain system identification of a large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the development and experimental results of an automated on-orbit system identification method for large flexible spacecraft that yields estimated quantities to support on-line design and tuning of robust high performance control systems. The procedure consists of applying an input to the plant, obtaining an output, and then conducting nonparametric identification to yield the spectral estimate of the system transfer function. A parametric model is determined by curve fitting the spectral estimate to a rational transfer function. The identification method has been demonstrated experimentally on the Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory in JPL.

  12. Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Blades, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted under a NASA grant on the topic 'Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating.' The research concerns ongoing development of the Substructure System Identification Algorithm (SSID Algorithm), a system identification algorithm that can be used to obtain mathematical models of substructures, like Space Shuttle payloads. In the present study, particular attention was given to the following topics: making the algorithm robust to noisy test data, extending the algorithm to accept experimental FRF data that covers a broad frequency bandwidth, and developing a test analytical model (TAM) for use in relating test data to reduced-order finite element models.

  13. Quantum parameter identification for a chaotic atom ensemble system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-02-01

    We propose an indirect method based on an adaptive technique for analyzing the chaos behavior of a general quantum system with complex nonlinear evolution. Using this method, we design an identification function that effectively recognizes the uncertain parameters in a chaotic quantum system only by measuring the system outputs. As an example, we study an atom ensemble in an optical cavity and we obtain a specific parameter identification scheme after analyzing the chaos behaviors. We also verify the accuracy of the identification scheme using numerical simulations and we discuss the influence of different types of errors on the accuracy.

  14. Development of Identification System of cans And Bottle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yani, Irsyadi; Budiman, Ihsan

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of this research was developed an integrated simulation model of an intelligent sorting system based on machine vision, which is focused on object detection, identification and automatic sorting system of cans and bottle. In this research we used 60 cans and 40 bottles for database with five direction of each sample (upper, bottom, diagonal left and right side). Performance of the identification system for correct cans and bottles are 91.33% with estimated amount of 21,600 items per hour. The success of the identification depends on the size and type of the objects.

  15. An Ancient Yeast for Young Geneticists: A Primer on the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Model System

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Charles S.; Wood, Valerie; Fantes, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an important model organism for the study of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology. Studies of S. pombe, together with studies of its distant cousin, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have led to the discovery of genes involved in fundamental mechanisms of transcription, translation, DNA replication, cell cycle control, and signal transduction, to name but a few processes. However, since the divergence of the two species approximately 350 million years ago, S. pombe appears to have evolved less rapidly than S. cerevisiae so that it retains more characteristics of the common ancient yeast ancestor, causing it to share more features with metazoan cells. This Primer introduces S. pombe by describing the yeast itself, providing a brief description of the origins of fission yeast research, and illustrating some genetic and bioinformatics tools used to study protein function in fission yeast. In addition, a section on some key differences between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae is included for readers with some familiarity with budding yeast research but who may have an interest in developing research projects using S. pombe. PMID:26447128

  16. Parameter estimation techniques for LTP system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofrarias Serra, Miquel

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is the precursor mission of LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) and the first step towards gravitational waves detection in space. The main instrument onboard the mission is the LTP (LISA Technology Package) whose scientific goal is to test LISA's drag-free control loop by reaching a differential acceleration noise level between two masses in √ geodesic motion of 3 × 10-14 ms-2 / Hz in the milliHertz band. The mission is not only challenging in terms of technology readiness but also in terms of data analysis. As with any gravitational wave detector, attaining the instrument performance goals will require an extensive noise hunting campaign to measure all contributions with high accuracy. But, opposite to on-ground experiments, LTP characterisation will be only possible by setting parameters via telecommands and getting a selected amount of information through the available telemetry downlink. These two conditions, high accuracy and high reliability, are the main restrictions that the LTP data analysis must overcome. A dedicated object oriented Matlab Toolbox (LTPDA) has been set up by the LTP analysis team for this purpose. Among the different toolbox methods, an essential part for the mission are the parameter estimation tools that will be used for system identification during operations: Linear Least Squares, Non-linear Least Squares and Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods have been implemented as LTPDA methods. The data analysis team has been testing those methods with a series of mock data exercises with the following objectives: to cross-check parameter estimation methods and compare the achievable accuracy for each of them, and to develop the best strategies to describe the physics underlying a complex controlled experiment as the LTP. In this contribution we describe how these methods were tested with simulated LTP-like data to recover the parameters of the model and we report on the latest results of these mock data exercises.

  17. Rapid identification of 6328 isolates of pathogenic yeasts using MALDI-ToF MS and a simplified, rapid extraction procedure that is compatible with the Bruker Biotyper platform and database.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Mark; Brown, Zoe; Houldsworth, Marian; Borman, Andrew M; Johnson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of yeast isolates from clinical samples is essential, given their innately variable antifungal susceptibility profiles, and the proposal of species-specific antifungal susceptibility interpretive breakpoints. Here we have evaluated the utility of MALDI-ToF MS analysis for the identification of clinical isolates of pathogenic yeasts. A simplified, rapid extraction method, developed in our laboratory, was applied to 6343 isolates encompassing 71 different yeast species, which were then subjected to MALDI-ToF MS analysis using a Bruker Microflex and the resulting spectra were assessed using the supplied Bruker database. In total, 6328/6343 (99.8%) of isolates were correctly identified by MALDI-ToF MS. Our simplified extraction protocol allowed the correct identification of 93.6% of isolates, without the need for laborious full extraction, and a further 394 (6.2%) of isolates could be identified after full extraction. Clinically relevant identifications with both extraction methods were achieved using the supplied Bruker database and did not require the generation of bespoke, in-house databases created using profiles obtained with the adapted extraction method. In fact, the mean LogScores obtained using our method were as robust as those obtained using the recommended, published full extraction procedures. However, an in-house database can provide a useful additional identification tool for unusual or rarely encountered organisms. Finally, the proposed methodology allowed the correct identification of over 75% of isolates directly from the initial cultures referred to our laboratory, without the requirement for additional sub-culture on standardised mycological media. PMID:26591008

  18. A Method of Visualizing Three-Dimensional Distribution of Yeast in Bread Dough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tatsurou; Do, Gab-Soo; Sugiyama, Junichi; Oguchi, Kosei; Shiraga, Seizaburou; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Takeya, Koji; Endo, Shigeru

    A novel technique was developed to monitor the change in three-dimensional (3D) distribution of yeast in frozen bread dough samples in accordance with the progress of mixing process. Application of a surface engineering technology allowed the identification of yeast in bread dough by bonding EGFP (Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein) to the surface of yeast cells. The fluorescent yeast (a biomarker) was recognized as bright spots at the wavelength of 520 nm. A Micro-Slicer Image Processing System (MSIPS) with a fluorescence microscope was utilized to acquire cross-sectional images of frozen dough samples sliced at intervals of 1 μm. A set of successive two-dimensional images was reconstructed to analyze 3D distribution of yeast. Samples were taken from each of four normal mixing stages (i.e., pick up, clean up, development, and final stages) and also from over mixing stage. In the pick up stage yeast distribution was uneven with local areas of dense yeast. As the mixing progressed from clean up to final stages, the yeast became more evenly distributed throughout the dough sample. However, the uniformity in yeast distribution was lost in the over mixing stage possibly due to the breakdown of gluten structure within the dough sample.

  19. A combined database related and de novo MS-identification of yeast mannose-1-phosphate guanyltransferase PSA1 interaction partners at different phases of batch cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Ville; Joenväärä, Sakari; Peltoniemi, Hannu; Mattila, Pirkko; Renkonen, Risto

    2009-04-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomic research has become one of the main methods in protein-protein interaction research. Several high throughput studies have established an interaction landscape of exponentially growing Baker's yeast culture. However, many of the protein-protein interactions are likely to change in different environmental conditions. In order to examine the dynamic nature of the protein interactions we isolated the protein complexes of mannose-1-phosphate guanyltransferase PSA1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at four different time points during batch cultivation. We used the tandem affinity purification (TAP)-method to purify the complexes and subjected the tryptic peptides to LC-MS/MS. The resulting peak lists were analyzed with two different methods: the database related protein identification program X!Tandem and the de novo sequencing program Lutefisk. We observed significant changes in the interactome of PSA1 during the batch cultivation and identified altogether 74 proteins interacting with PSA1 of which only six were found to interact during all time points. All the other proteins showed a more dynamic nature of binding activity. In this study we also demonstrate the benefit of using both database related and de novo methods in the protein interaction research to enhance both the quality and the quantity of observations.

  20. Modeling of Biometric Identification System Using the Colored Petri Nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, G. R.; Ter-Vardanyan, L. A.; Gaboutchian, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present a model of biometric identification system transformed into Petri Nets. Petri Nets, as a graphical and mathematical tool, provide a uniform environment for modelling, formal analysis, and design of discrete event systems. The main objective of this paper is to introduce the fundamental concepts of Petri Nets to the researchers and practitioners, both from identification systems, who are involved in the work in the areas of modelling and analysis of biometric identification types of systems, as well as those who may potentially be involved in these areas. In addition, the paper introduces high-level Petri Nets, as Colored Petri Nets (CPN). In this paper the model of Colored Petri Net describes the identification process much simpler.

  1. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy R.; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24018767

  2. Pexophagy in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Oku, Masahide; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Pexophagy, selective degradation of peroxisomes via autophagy, is the main system for reducing organelle abundance. Elucidation of the molecular machinery of pexophagy has been pioneered in studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the methylotrophic yeasts Pichia pastoris and Hansenula polymorpha. Recent analyses using these yeasts have elucidated the molecular machineries of pexophagy, especially in terms of the interactions and modifications of the so-called adaptor proteins required for guiding autophagic membrane biogenesis on the organelle surface. Based on the recent findings, functional relevance of pexophagy and another autophagic pathway, mitophagy (selective autophagy of mitochondria), is discussed. We also discuss the physiological importance of pexophagy in these yeast systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Peroxisomes edited by Ralf Erdmann. PMID:26409485

  3. Development of an Automatic Identification System Autonomous Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qing; Jiang, Yi; Zhang, Jingbo; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shufang

    2015-01-01

    In order to overcome the vulnerability of the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) and provide robust position, navigation and time (PNT) information in marine navigation, the autonomous positioning system based on ranging-mode Automatic Identification System (AIS) is presented in the paper. The principle of the AIS autonomous positioning system (AAPS) is investigated, including the position algorithm, the signal measurement technique, the geometric dilution of precision, the time synchronization technique and the additional secondary factor correction technique. In order to validate the proposed AAPS, a verification system has been established in the Xinghai sea region of Dalian (China). Static and dynamic positioning experiments are performed. The original function of the AIS in the AAPS is not influenced. The experimental results show that the positioning precision of the AAPS is better than 10 m in the area with good geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) by the additional secondary factor correction technology. This is the most economical solution for a land-based positioning system to complement the GNSS for the navigation safety of vessels sailing along coasts. PMID:26569258

  4. Development of an Automatic Identification System Autonomous Positioning System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qing; Jiang, Yi; Zhang, Jingbo; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shufang

    2015-01-01

    In order to overcome the vulnerability of the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) and provide robust position, navigation and time (PNT) information in marine navigation, the autonomous positioning system based on ranging-mode Automatic Identification System (AIS) is presented in the paper. The principle of the AIS autonomous positioning system (AAPS) is investigated, including the position algorithm, the signal measurement technique, the geometric dilution of precision, the time synchronization technique and the additional secondary factor correction technique. In order to validate the proposed AAPS, a verification system has been established in the Xinghai sea region of Dalian (China). Static and dynamic positioning experiments are performed. The original function of the AIS in the AAPS is not influenced. The experimental results show that the positioning precision of the AAPS is better than 10 m in the area with good geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) by the additional secondary factor correction technology. This is the most economical solution for a land-based positioning system to complement the GNSS for the navigation safety of vessels sailing along coasts. PMID:26569258

  5. Research of Uncertainty Reasoning in Pineapple Disease Identification System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liqun; Fan, Haifeng

    In order to deal with the uncertainty of evidences mostly existing in pineapple disease identification system, a reasoning model based on evidence credibility factor was established. The uncertainty reasoning method is discussed,including: uncertain representation of knowledge, uncertain representation of rules, uncertain representation of multi-evidences and update of reasoning rules. The reasoning can fully reflect the uncertainty in disease identification and reduce the influence of subjective factors on the accuracy of the system.

  6. A linear discrete dynamic system model for temporal gene interaction and regulatory network influence in response to bioethanol conversion inhibitor HMF for ethanologenic yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A linear discrete dynamic system model is constructed to represent the temporal interactions among significantly expressed genes in response to bioethanol conversion inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural for ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study identifies the most significant linear...

  7. High-throughput analysis of yeast replicative aging using a microfluidic system

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Myeong Chan; Liu, Wei; Gu, Liang; Dang, Weiwei; Qin, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an important model for studying the molecular mechanisms of aging in eukaryotic cells. However, the laborious and low-throughput methods of current yeast replicative lifespan assays limit their usefulness as a broad genetic screening platform for research on aging. We address this limitation by developing an efficient, high-throughput microfluidic single-cell analysis chip in combination with high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. This innovative design enables, to our knowledge for the first time, the determination of the yeast replicative lifespan in a high-throughput manner. Morphological and phenotypical changes during aging can also be monitored automatically with a much higher throughput than previous microfluidic designs. We demonstrate highly efficient trapping and retention of mother cells, determination of the replicative lifespan, and tracking of yeast cells throughout their entire lifespan. Using the high-resolution and large-scale data generated from the high-throughput yeast aging analysis (HYAA) chips, we investigated particular longevity-related changes in cell morphology and characteristics, including critical cell size, terminal morphology, and protein subcellular localization. In addition, because of the significantly improved retention rate of yeast mother cell, the HYAA-Chip was capable of demonstrating replicative lifespan extension by calorie restriction. PMID:26170317

  8. High-throughput analysis of yeast replicative aging using a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Jo, Myeong Chan; Liu, Wei; Gu, Liang; Dang, Weiwei; Qin, Lidong

    2015-07-28

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an important model for studying the molecular mechanisms of aging in eukaryotic cells. However, the laborious and low-throughput methods of current yeast replicative lifespan assays limit their usefulness as a broad genetic screening platform for research on aging. We address this limitation by developing an efficient, high-throughput microfluidic single-cell analysis chip in combination with high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. This innovative design enables, to our knowledge for the first time, the determination of the yeast replicative lifespan in a high-throughput manner. Morphological and phenotypical changes during aging can also be monitored automatically with a much higher throughput than previous microfluidic designs. We demonstrate highly efficient trapping and retention of mother cells, determination of the replicative lifespan, and tracking of yeast cells throughout their entire lifespan. Using the high-resolution and large-scale data generated from the high-throughput yeast aging analysis (HYAA) chips, we investigated particular longevity-related changes in cell morphology and characteristics, including critical cell size, terminal morphology, and protein subcellular localization. In addition, because of the significantly improved retention rate of yeast mother cell, the HYAA-Chip was capable of demonstrating replicative lifespan extension by calorie restriction. PMID:26170317

  9. Properly defining the targets of a transcription factor significantly improves the computational identification of cooperative transcription factor pairs in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Transcriptional regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes is usually accomplished by cooperative transcription factors (TFs). Computational identification of cooperative TF pairs has become a hot research topic and many algorithms have been proposed in the literature. A typical algorithm for predicting cooperative TF pairs has two steps. (Step 1) Define the targets of each TF under study. (Step 2) Design a measure for calculating the cooperativity of a TF pair based on the targets of these two TFs. While different algorithms have distinct sophisticated cooperativity measures, the targets of a TF are usually defined using ChIP-chip data. However, there is an inherent weakness in using ChIP-chip data to define the targets of a TF. ChIP-chip analysis can only identify the binding targets of a TF but it cannot distinguish the true regulatory from the binding but non-regulatory targets of a TF. Results This work is the first study which aims to investigate whether the performance of computational identification of cooperative TF pairs could be improved by using a more biologically relevant way to define the targets of a TF. For this purpose, we propose four simple algorithms, all of which consist of two steps. (Step 1) Define the targets of a TF using (i) ChIP-chip data in the first algorithm, (ii) TF binding data in the second algorithm, (iii) TF perturbation data in the third algorithm, and (iv) the intersection of TF binding and TF perturbation data in the fourth algorithm. Compared with the first three algorithms, the fourth algorithm uses a more biologically relevant way to define the targets of a TF. (Step 2) Measure the cooperativity of a TF pair by the statistical significance of the overlap of the targets of these two TFs using the hypergeometric test. By adopting four existing performance indices, we show that the fourth proposed algorithm (PA4) significantly out performs the other three proposed algorithms. This suggests that the computational identification of cooperative TF pairs is indeed improved when using a more biologically relevant way to define the targets of a TF. Strikingly, the prediction results of our simple PA4 are more biologically meaningful than those of the 12 existing sophisticated algorithms in the literature, all of which used ChIP-chip data to define the targets of a TF. This suggests that properly defining the targets of a TF may be more important than designing sophisticated cooperativity measures. In addition, our PA4 has the power to predict several experimentally validated cooperative TF pairs, which have not been successfully predicted by any existing algorithms in the literature. Conclusions This study shows that the performance of computational identification of cooperative TF pairs could be improved by using a more biologically relevant way to define the targets of a TF. The main contribution of this study is not to propose another new algorithm but to provide a new thinking for the research of computational identification of cooperative TF pairs. Researchers should put more effort on properly defining the targets of a TF (i.e. Step 1) rather than totally focus on designing sophisticated cooperativity measures (i.e. Step 2). The lists of TF target genes, the Matlab codes and the prediction results of the four proposed algorithms could be downloaded from our companion website http://cosbi3.ee.ncku.edu.tw/TFI/ PMID:26679776

  10. Development and validation of an in-house database for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry-based yeast identification using a fast protein extraction procedure.

    PubMed

    De Carolis, Elena; Vella, Antonietta; Vaccaro, Luisa; Torelli, Riccardo; Posteraro, Patrizia; Ricciardi, Walter; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella

    2014-05-01

    In recent studies evaluating the usefulness of the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based identification of yeasts for the routine diagnosis of fungal infections, preanalytical sample processing has emerged as a critical step for reliable MALDI-TOF MS outcomes, especially when the Bruker Daltonics Biotyper software was used. In addition, inadequate results often occurred due to discrepancies between the methods used for clinical testing and database construction. Therefore, we created an in-house MALDI-TOF MS library using the spectra from 156 reference and clinical yeast isolates (48 species in 11 genera), which were generated with a fast sample preparation procedure. After a retrospective validation study, our database was evaluated on 4,232 yeasts routinely isolated during a 6-month period and fast prepared for MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Thus, 4,209 (99.5%) of the isolates were successfully identified to the species level (with scores of ?2.0), with 1,676 (39.6%) having scores of >2.3. For the remaining 23 (0.5%) isolates, no reliable identification (with scores of <1.7) was obtained. Interestingly, these isolates were almost always from species uniquely represented or not included in the database. As the MALDI-TOF MS results were, except for 23 isolates, validated without additional phenotypic or molecular tests, our proposed strategy can enhance the rapidity and accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS in identifying medically important yeast species. However, while continuous updating of our database will be necessary to enrich it with more strains/species of new and emerging yeasts, the present in-house MALDI-TOF MS library can be made publicly available for future multicenter studies. PMID:24554755

  11. Development and Validation of an In-House Database for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry-Based Yeast Identification Using a Fast Protein Extraction Procedure

    PubMed Central

    De Carolis, Elena; Vella, Antonietta; Vaccaro, Luisa; Torelli, Riccardo; Posteraro, Patrizia; Ricciardi, Walter; Posteraro, Brunella

    2014-01-01

    In recent studies evaluating the usefulness of the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based identification of yeasts for the routine diagnosis of fungal infections, preanalytical sample processing has emerged as a critical step for reliable MALDI-TOF MS outcomes, especially when the Bruker Daltonics Biotyper software was used. In addition, inadequate results often occurred due to discrepancies between the methods used for clinical testing and database construction. Therefore, we created an in-house MALDI-TOF MS library using the spectra from 156 reference and clinical yeast isolates (48 species in 11 genera), which were generated with a fast sample preparation procedure. After a retrospective validation study, our database was evaluated on 4,232 yeasts routinely isolated during a 6-month period and fast prepared for MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Thus, 4,209 (99.5%) of the isolates were successfully identified to the species level (with scores of ?2.0), with 1,676 (39.6%) having scores of >2.3. For the remaining 23 (0.5%) isolates, no reliable identification (with scores of <1.7) was obtained. Interestingly, these isolates were almost always from species uniquely represented or not included in the database. As the MALDI-TOF MS results were, except for 23 isolates, validated without additional phenotypic or molecular tests, our proposed strategy can enhance the rapidity and accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS in identifying medically important yeast species. However, while continuous updating of our database will be necessary to enrich it with more strains/species of new and emerging yeasts, the present in-house MALDI-TOF MS library can be made publicly available for future multicenter studies. PMID:24554755

  12. Yeast screening system for the detection of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, M.L.

    1983-09-01

    Two strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were constructed to detect genetic damage. Strain XD99 can detect chromosome loss, important in the induction of teratogenesis, aneuploidy, and possibly carcinogenesis. Two positive selection techniques were developed which select for the simultaneous loss of both arms of chromosome X. Confirmation of chromosome loss using a centromere-linked marker was found to be essential for distinguishing chromosome loss from coincident crossing-over. The high selectivity of strain XD99 allowed the development of a spot test for chromosome loss. Methyl benzimidazole-2-yl-carbamate and ethyl methanesulfonate induced chromosome loss in the spot test. The two carcinogens 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine also induced chromosome loss. Chromosome X monosomics were found to be unstable and were restored to euploidy. This restoration of euploidy may have important implications regarding chromosome loss as a mechanism of promotion. Strain XD83 can detect multiple genetic changes: nuclear frameshift and base pair substitution mutations, nuclear mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion and mitochondrial large deletions and forward point mutations. Ethyl methanesulfonate, ICR-170, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, ultraviolet light and ethidium bromide were tested. None of the carcinogens were specific in their induced spectrum of damage. Only ethidium bromide induced a highly specific spectrum of damage: petite induction. The variety of endpoints monitored here may allow the detection of certain carcinogens and other genetically toxic agents which have escaped detection in other systems. This system may be useful in the study of possible mechanisms of carcinogenesis and aneuploidy.

  13. System identification of the Arabidopsis plant circadian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, Mathias; Somers, David E.; Kim, Pan-Jun

    2015-02-01

    The circadian system generates an endogenous oscillatory rhythm that governs the daily activities of organisms in nature. It offers adaptive advantages to organisms through a coordination of their biological functions with the optimal time of day. In this paper, a model of the circadian system in the plant Arabidopsis (species thaliana) is built by using system identification techniques. Prior knowledge about the physical interactions of the genes and the proteins in the plant circadian system is incorporated in the model building exercise. The model is built by using primarily experimentally-verified direct interactions between the genes and the proteins with the available data on mRNA and protein abundances from the circadian system. Our analysis reveals a great performance of the model in predicting the dynamics of the plant circadian system through the effect of diverse internal and external perturbations (gene knockouts and day-length changes). Furthermore, we found that the circadian oscillatory rhythm is robust and does not vary much with the biochemical parameters except those of a light-sensitive protein P and a transcription factor TOC1. In other words, the circadian rhythmic profile is largely a consequence of the network's architecture rather than its particular parameters. Our work suggests that the current experimental knowledge of the gene-to-protein interactions in the plant Arabidopsis, without considering any additional hypothetical interactions, seems to suffice for system-level modeling of the circadian system of this plant and to present an exemplary platform for the control of network dynamics in complex living organisms.

  14. A portable air jet actuator device for mechanical system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belden, Jesse; Staats, Wayne L.; Mazumdar, Anirban; Hunter, Ian W.

    2011-03-01

    System identification of limb mechanics can help diagnose ailments and can aid in the optimization of robotic limb control parameters and designs. An interesting fluid phenomenon—the Coand? effect—is utilized in a portable actuator to provide a stochastic binary force disturbance to a limb system. The design of the actuator is approached with the goal of creating a portable device which could be deployed on human or robotic limbs for in situ mechanical system identification. The viability of the device is demonstrated by identifying the parameters of an underdamped elastic beam system with fixed inertia and stiffness and variable damping. The nonparametric compliance impulse response yielded from the system identification is modeled as a second-order system and the resultant parameters are found to be in excellent agreement with those found using more traditional system identification techniques. The current design could be further miniaturized and developed as a portable, wireless, unrestrained mechanical system identification instrument for less intrusive and more widespread use.

  15. System identification methods for aircraft flight control development and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.

    1995-01-01

    System-identification methods compose a mathematical model, or series of models, from measurements of inputs and outputs of dynamic systems. The extracted models allow the characterization of the response of the overall aircraft or component subsystem behavior, such as actuators and on-board signal processing algorithms. This paper discusses the use of frequency-domain system-identification methods for the development and integration of aircraft flight-control systems. The extraction and analysis of models of varying complexity from nonparametric frequency-responses to transfer-functions and high-order state-space representations is illustrated using the Comprehensive Identification from FrEquency Responses (CIFER) system-identification facility. Results are presented for test data of numerous flight and simulation programs at the Ames Research Center including rotorcraft, fixed-wing aircraft, advanced short takeoff and vertical landing (ASTOVL), vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL), tiltrotor aircraft, and rotor experiments in the wind tunnel. Excellent system characterization and dynamic response prediction is achieved for this wide class of systems. Examples illustrate the role of system-identification technology in providing an integrated flow of dynamic response data around the entire life-cycle of aircraft development from initial specifications, through simulation and bench testing, and into flight-test optimization.

  16. A modular and hybrid connectionist system for speaker identification.

    PubMed

    Bennani, Y

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents and evaluates a modular/hybrid connectionist system for speaker identification. Modularity has emerged as a powerful technique for reducing the complexity of connectionist systems, and allowing a priori knowledge to be incorporated into their design. Text-independent speaker identification is an inherently complex task where the amount of training data is often limited. It thus provides an ideal domain to test the validity of the modular/hybrid connectionist approach. To achieve such identification, we develop, in this paper, an architecture based upon the cooperation of several connectionist modules, and a Hidden Markov Model module. When tested on a population of 102 speakers extracted from the DARPA-TIMIT database, perfect identification was obtained. PMID:7584887

  17. Patulin biodegradation by marine yeast Kodameae ohmeri.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Wei; Li, Chunsheng; Ma, Ning; Xu, Ying; Meng, Xianghong

    2015-01-01

    Patulin contamination of fruit- and vegetable-based products had become a major challenge for the food industry. Biological methods of patulin control can play an important role due to their safety and high efficiency. In this study, a strain of marine yeast with high patulin degradation ability was screened. The yeast was identified as Kodameae ohmeri by the BioLog identification system and partial 26S rRNA gene sequencing. The degradation products of patulin were identified as (E)- and (Z)-ascladiol through HPLC and LC-TOF/MS. High patulin tolerance at 100 μg ml(-1) and a high degradation rate at 35°C at a pH between 3 and 6 indicates the potential application of K. ohmeri for patulin detoxification of apple-derived products. PMID:25585640

  18. Evaluation of the Biolog automated microbial identification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingler, J. M.; Stowe, R. P.; Obenhuber, D. C.; Groves, T. O.; Mishra, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Biolog's identification system was used to identify 39 American Type Culture Collection reference taxa and 45 gram-negative isolates from water samples. Of the reference strains, 98% were identified to genus level and 76% to species level within 4 to 24 h. Identification of some authentic strains of Enterobacter, Klebsiella, and Serratia was unreliable. A total of 93% of the water isolates were identified.

  19. Evaluation of the Biolog automated microbial identification system.

    PubMed Central

    Klingler, J M; Stowe, R P; Obenhuber, D C; Groves, T O; Mishra, S K; Pierson, D L

    1992-01-01

    Biolog's identification system was used to identify 39 American Type Culture Collection reference taxa and 45 gram-negative isolates from water samples. Of the reference strains, 98% were identified to genus level and 76% to species level within 4 to 24 h. Identification of some authentic strains of Enterobacter, Klebsiella, and Serratia was unreliable. A total of 93% of the water isolates were identified. PMID:11536500

  20. Immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography purification of alcohol dehydrogenase from baker's yeast using an expanded bed adsorption system.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, N A; Kirschner, T; Smith, M P; Hjorth, R; Titchener-Hooker, N J

    1999-04-30

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from solutions of homogenised packed bakers' yeast has been successfully purified using immobilised metal-ion affinity chromatography in an expanded bed. Method scouting carried out using pure ADH solutions loaded onto 5-ml HiTrap columns charged with Zn2+, Ni2+ and Cu2+ and eluted using 0-50 mM EDTA gradient found that charging with Zn2+ gave the highest recovery and the lowest EDTA concentration required for elution. These results were used to develop a protocol for the expanded bed system and further tested using clarified yeast homogenate loaded onto XK16/20 packed beds (approximately 30 ml) packed with Chelating Sepharose FastFlow matrix in order to determine the optimum elution conditions using EDTA. The ADH was found to elute at 5 mM EDTA and the dynamic and total binding capacities of Streamline chelating for ADH were found to be 235 U/ml and 1075 U/ml matrix, respectively. Expanded bed work based on a step EDTA elution protocol demonstrated that ADH could be successfully eluted from unclarified homogenised bakers' yeast diluted to 10 mg/ml total protein content with a recovery of 80-100% that was maintained over five consecutive runs with a vigorous clean-in-place procedure between each run. PMID:10343398

  1. Molecular cloning of amphioxus uncoupling protein and assessment of its uncoupling activity using a yeast heterologous expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kun; Sun, Guoxun; Lv, Zhiyuan; Wang, Chen; Jiang, Xueyuan; Li, Donghai; Zhang, Chenyu

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Invertebrates, for example amphioxus, do express uncoupling proteins. {yields} Both the sequence and the uncoupling activity of amphioxus UCP resemble UCP2. {yields} UCP1 is the only UCP that can form dimer on yeast mitochondria. -- Abstract: The present study describes the molecular cloning of a novel cDNA fragment from amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) encoding a 343-amino acid protein that is highly homologous to human uncoupling proteins (UCP), this protein is therefore named amphioxus UCP. This amphioxus UCP shares more homology with and is phylogenetically more related to mammalian UCP2 as compared with UCP1. To further assess the functional similarity of amphioxus UCP to mammalian UCP1 and -2, the amphioxus UCP, rat UCP1, and human UCP2 were separately expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the recombinant yeast mitochondria were isolated and assayed for the state 4 respiration rate and proton leak, using pYES2 empty vector as the control. UCP1 increased the state 4 respiration rate by 2.8-fold, and the uncoupling activity was strongly inhibited by GDP, while UCP2 and amphioxus UCP only increased the state 4 respiration rate by 1.5-fold and 1.7-fold in a GDP-insensitive manner, moreover, the proton leak kinetics of amphioxus UCP was very similar to UCP2, but much different from UCP1. In conclusion, the amphioxus UCP has a mild, unregulated uncoupling activity in the yeast system, which resembles mammalian UCP2, but not UCP1.

  2. Biology of the Heat Shock Response and Protein Chaperones: Budding Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Jacob; Abrams, Jennifer; Wang, Yanyu

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The eukaryotic heat shock response is an ancient and highly conserved transcriptional program that results in the immediate synthesis of a battery of cytoprotective genes in the presence of thermal and other environmental stresses. Many of these genes encode molecular chaperones, powerful protein remodelers with the capacity to shield, fold, or unfold substrates in a context-dependent manner. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be an invaluable model for driving the discovery of regulatory features of this fundamental stress response. In addition, budding yeast has been an outstanding model system to elucidate the cell biology of protein chaperones and their organization into functional networks. In this review, we evaluate our understanding of the multifaceted response to heat shock. In addition, the chaperone complement of the cytosol is compared to those of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, organelles with their own unique protein homeostasis milieus. Finally, we examine recent advances in the understanding of the roles of protein chaperones and the heat shock response in pathogenic fungi, which is being accelerated by the wealth of information gained for budding yeast. PMID:22688810

  3. Gene engineering in yeast for biodegradation: Immunological cross-reactivity among cytochrome p-450 system proteins of saccharomyces cerevisiae and candida tropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Loper, J.C.; Chen, C.; Dey, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Yeasts are eukaryotic microorganisms whose cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase systems may be amenable to genetic engineering for the hydroxylation and detoxication of polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. The molecular genetic properties of strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and an n-alkane utilizing yeast, Candida tropicalis ATCC750 are examined. Standard methods were used to purify cytochrome P-450 and NADPH-cytochrome c (P-450) reductase proteins from cells cultured by semi-anaerobic glucose fermentation (S. cerevisiae, C. tropicalis) and by growth on tetradecane (C. tropicalis). Polyvalent antisera prepared in rabbits to some of these proteins were used in tests of immunological relatedness among the purified proteins using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and nitrocellulose filter immunoblots. The results provide evidence for gene relationships which should prove useful in gene isolation and subsequent engineering of P-450 enzyme systems in yeast.

  4. Simple method to detect triacylglycerol biosynthesis in a yeast-based recombinant system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Standard methods to quantify the activity of triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesizing enzymes DGAT and PDAT (TAG-SE) require a sensitive but rather arduous laboratory assay based on radio-labeled substrates. Here we describe two straightforward methods to detect TAG production in baker’s yeast Saccharomyc...

  5. Bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated soil by a combined system of biostimulation-bioaugmentation with yeast.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mei-Ying; Xie, Rui-Jie; Qin, Gang

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of a combined biostimulation-bioaugmentation treatment applied to a clay-loam soil contaminated with 16,300 mg/kg of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), which comprised 51% saturated hydrocarbons and 31% aromatic hydrocarbons. The bioaugmentation was performed with yeast Candida tropicalis SK21 isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil. The strain was able to grow in a pH range of 3-9 in liquid culture, and the optimum pH was found to be 6 for both growth and biosurfactant production. At pH 6, 96% and 42% of TPH were degraded by the strain at the initial diesel oil concentrations of 0.5% and 5% (v/v), respectively. The remediation via inoculating the yeast removed 83% of TPH in 180 days while the experiment with the indigenous microorganisms alone removed 61%. Microbial enumeration showed that the yeast SK21 could grow good in the soil. It was also found that dehydrogenase and polyphenoloxidase activities in soil were remarkably enhanced by the inoculation of the yeast. PMID:24600879

  6. Improved Stochastic Subspace System Identification for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Loh, Chin-Hsiung

    2015-07-01

    Structural health monitoring acquires structural information through numerous sensor measurements. Vibrational measurement data render the dynamic characteristics of structures to be extracted, in particular of the modal properties such as natural frequencies, damping, and mode shapes. The stochastic subspace system identification has been recognized as a power tool which can present a structure in the modal coordinates. To obtain qualitative identified data, this tool needs to spend computational expense on a large set of measurements. In study, a stochastic system identification framework is proposed to improve the efficiency and quality of the conventional stochastic subspace system identification. This framework includes 1) measured signal processing, 2) efficient space projection, 3) system order selection, and 4) modal property derivation. The measured signal processing employs the singular spectrum analysis algorithm to lower the noise components as well as to present a data set in a reduced dimension. The subspace is subsequently derived from the data set presented in a delayed coordinate. With the proposed order selection criteria, the number of structural modes is determined, resulting in the modal properties. This system identification framework is applied to a real-world bridge for exploring the feasibility in real-time applications. The results show that this improved system identification method significantly decreases computational time, while qualitative modal parameters are still attained.

  7. Comparison of peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization assays with culture-based matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for the identification of bacteria and yeasts from blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluid cultures.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, A; Martinelli, M; Motta, F; Larini, S; Arcangeletti, M C; Medici, M C; Chezzi, C; De Conto, F

    2014-08-01

    Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) is a molecular diagnostic tool for the rapid detection of pathogens directly from liquid media. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate PNA FISH assays in comparison with culture-based matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification, as a reference method, for both blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures, during a 1-year investigation. On the basis of the Gram stain microscopy results, four different PNA FISH commercially available assays were used ('Staphylococcus aureus/CNS', 'Enterococcus faecalis/OE', 'GNR Traffic Light' and 'Yeasts Traffic Light' PNA FISH assays, AdvanDx). The four PNA FISH assays were applied to 956 positive blood cultures (921 for bacteria and 35 for yeasts) and 11 CSF cultures. Among the 921 blood samples positive for bacteria, PNA FISH gave concordant results with MALDI-TOF MS in 908/921 (98.64%) samples, showing an agreement of 99.4% in the case of monomicrobial infections. As regards yeasts, the PNA FISH assay showed a 100% agreement with the result obtained by MALDI-TOF MS. When PNA FISH assays were tested on the 11 CSF cultures, the results agreed with the reference method in all cases (100%). PNA FISH assays provided species identification at least one work-day before the MALDI-TOF MS culture-based identification. PNA FISH assays showed an excellent efficacy in the prompt identification of main pathogens, yielding a significant reduction in reporting time and leading to more appropriate patient management and therapy in cases of sepsis and severe infections. PMID:24304149

  8. Red yeast

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cholesterol levels and triglycerides. However, this specific product contains large amounts of a chemical similar to "statin" ... this product and other red yeast products that contain statins to be illegal unapproved drugs. However, outside ...

  9. Counting Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, Jonathan; Welton, Briana

    1998-01-01

    Describes changes to a traditional study of population in yeast colonies. Changes to the procedures include: (1) only one culture per student team; (2) cultures are inoculated only once; and (3) the same tube is sampled daily. (DDR)

  10. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing enzymes of yeasts.

  11. Decentralized System Identification Using Stochastic Subspace Identification for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soojin; Park, Jong-Woong; Sim, Sung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) facilitate a new paradigm to structural identification and monitoring for civil infrastructure. Conventional structural monitoring systems based on wired sensors and centralized data acquisition systems are costly for installation as well as maintenance. WSNs have emerged as a technology that can overcome such difficulties, making deployment of a dense array of sensors on large civil structures both feasible and economical. However, as opposed to wired sensor networks in which centralized data acquisition and processing is common practice, WSNs require decentralized computing algorithms to reduce data transmission due to the limitation associated with wireless communication. In this paper, the stochastic subspace identification (SSI) technique is selected for system identification, and SSI-based decentralized system identification (SDSI) is proposed to be implemented in a WSN composed of Imote2 wireless sensors that measure acceleration. The SDSI is tightly scheduled in the hierarchical WSN, and its performance is experimentally verified in a laboratory test using a 5-story shear building model. PMID:25856325

  12. Decentralized system identification using stochastic subspace identification for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soojin; Park, Jong-Woong; Sim, Sung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) facilitate a new paradigm to structural identification and monitoring for civil infrastructure. Conventional structural monitoring systems based on wired sensors and centralized data acquisition systems are costly for installation as well as maintenance. WSNs have emerged as a technology that can overcome such difficulties, making deployment of a dense array of sensors on large civil structures both feasible and economical. However, as opposed to wired sensor networks in which centralized data acquisition and processing is common practice, WSNs require decentralized computing algorithms to reduce data transmission due to the limitation associated with wireless communication. In this paper, the stochastic subspace identification (SSI) technique is selected for system identification, and SSI-based decentralized system identification (SDSI) is proposed to be implemented in a WSN composed of Imote2 wireless sensors that measure acceleration. The SDSI is tightly scheduled in the hierarchical WSN, and its performance is experimentally verified in a laboratory test using a 5-story shear building model. PMID:25856325

  13. Optical security system for the protection of personal identification information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, Yang-Hoi; Yoon, Jong-Soo; Choi, Kyung-Hyun; Alam, Mohammad S.

    2005-02-01

    A new optical security system for the protection of personal identification information is proposed. First, authentication of the encrypted personal information is carried out by primary recognition of a personal identification number (PIN) with the proposed multiplexed minimum average correlation energy phase-encrypted (MMACE_p) filter. The MMACE_p filter, synthesized with phase-encrypted training images, can increase the discrimination capability and prevent the leak of personal identification information. After the PIN is recognized, speedy authentication of personal information can be achieved through one-to-one optical correlation by means of the optical wavelet filter. The possibility of information counterfeiting can be significantly decreased with the double-identification process. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  14. Associations of UBE2I with RAD52, UBL1, p53, and RAD51 proteins in a yeast two-hybrid system

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Zhiyuan; Pardington-Purtymun, P.E.; Comeaux, J.C.

    1996-10-15

    The yeast RAD52-dependent pathway is involved in DNA recombination and double-strand break repair. Yeast ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBC9 participates in S- and M-phase cyclin degradation and mitotic control. Using the human RAD52 protein as the bait in a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified a human homolog of yeast UBC9, designated UBE2I, that interacts with RAD52, RAD51, p53, and a ubiquitin-like protein UBL1. These interactions are UBE2I-specific, since another DNA repair-related ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, RAD6 (UBC2), does not interact with these proteins. The interaction of UBE2I with RAD52 is mediated by RAD52`s self-association region. These results suggest that the RAD52-dependent processes, cell cycle control, p53-mediated pathway(s), and ubiquitination interact through human UBE2I. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Numerical studies of identification in nonlinear distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Lo, C. K.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1989-01-01

    An abstract approximation framework and convergence theory for the identification of first and second order nonlinear distributed parameter systems developed previously by the authors and reported on in detail elsewhere are summarized and discussed. The theory is based upon results for systems whose dynamics can be described by monotone operators in Hilbert space and an abstract approximation theorem for the resulting nonlinear evolution system. The application of the theory together with numerical evidence demonstrating the feasibility of the general approach are discussed in the context of the identification of a first order quasi-linear parabolic model for one dimensional heat conduction/mass transport and the identification of a nonlinear dissipation mechanism (i.e., damping) in a second order one dimensional wave equation. Computational and implementational considerations, in particular, with regard to supercomputing, are addressed.

  16. Multi-objective differential evolution algorithm for stochastic system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Mita, Akira; Li, Rongshuai

    2013-04-01

    The last decade has witnessed rapid developments in structural system identification methodologies based on intelligent algorithms, which are formulated as multi-modal optimization problems. However, these deterministic methods more or less ignore uncertainties, such as modeling errors and measurement errors, that are inevitably involved in the system identification problem of civil-engineering structures. A new stochastic structural identification method is proposed that takes into account parametric uncertainties in the parameters of building structures. The proposed method merges the advantages of the multi-objective differential evolution optimization algorithm for the non-domination selection strategy and the probability density evolution method for incorporating parametric uncertainties. The results of simulations on identifying the unknown parameters of a structural system demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Identification of open quantum systems from observable time traces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2015-05-27

    Estimating the parameters that dictate the dynamics of a quantum system is an important task for quantum information processing and quantum metrology, as well as fundamental physics. In our paper we develop a method for parameter estimation for Markovian open quantum systems using a temporal record of measurements on the system. Furthermore, the method is based on system realization theory and is a generalization of our previous work on identification of Hamiltonian parameters.

  18. Production of recombinant proteins and metabolites in yeasts: when are these systems better than bacterial production systems?

    PubMed

    Porro, Danilo; Gasser, Brigitte; Fossati, Tiziana; Maurer, Michael; Branduardi, Paola; Sauer, Michael; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2011-02-01

    Recombinant DNA (rDNA) technologies allow the production of a wide range of peptides, proteins and metabolites from naturally non-producing cells. Since human insulin was the first heterologous compound produced in a laboratory in 1977, rDNA technology has become one of the most important technologies developed in the 20th century. Recombinant protein and metabolites production is a multi-billion dollar market. The development of a new product begins with the choice of the cell factory. The final application of the compound dictates the main criteria that should be taken into consideration: (1) quality, (2) quantity, (3) yield and (4) space time yield of the desired product. Quantity and quality are the most predominant requirements that must be considered for the commercial production of a protein. Quantity and yield are the requirements for the production of a metabolite. Finally, space time yield is crucial for any production process. It therefore becomes clear why the perfect host does not exist yet, and why-despite important advances in rDNA applications in higher eukaryotic cells-microbial biodiversity continues to represent a potential source of attractive cell factories. In this review, we compare the advantages and limitations of the principal yeast and bacterial workhorse systems. PMID:21125266

  19. Yeast Three-Hybrid System for the Detection of Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Natsumi; Trusov, Yuri; Botella, Jose R

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction studies provide useful insights into biological processes taking place within the living cell. A number of techniques are available to unravel large structural protein complexes, functional protein modules, and temporary protein associations occurring during signal transduction. The choice of method depends on the nature of the proteins and the interaction being studied. Here we present an optimized and simplified yeast three-hybrid method for analysis of protein interactions involving three components. PMID:26577787

  20. Yeast Mitochondria as a Model System to Study the Biogenesis of Bacterial β-Barrel Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Thomas; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Rapaport, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Beta-barrel proteins are found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. The evolutionary conservation in the biogenesis of these proteins allows mitochondria to assemble bacterial β-barrel proteins in their functional form. In this chapter, we describe exemplarily how the capacity of yeast mitochondria to process the trimeric autotransporter YadA can be used to study the role of bacterial periplasmic chaperones in this process. PMID:26427673

  1. Optimization of a yeast RNA interference system for controlling gene expression and enabling rapid metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Crook, Nathan C; Schmitz, Alexander C; Alper, Hal S

    2014-05-16

    Reduction of endogenous gene expression is a fundamental operation of metabolic engineering, yet current methods for gene knockdown (i.e., genome editing) remain laborious and slow, especially in yeast. In contrast, RNA interference allows facile and tunable gene knockdown via a simple plasmid transformation step, enabling metabolic engineers to rapidly prototype knockdown strategies in multiple strains before expending significant cost to undertake genome editing. Although RNAi is naturally present in a myriad of eukaryotes, it has only been recently implemented in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a heterologous pathway and so has not yet been optimized as a metabolic engineering tool. In this study, we elucidate a set of design principles for the construction of hairpin RNA expression cassettes in yeast and implement RNA interference to quickly identify routes for improvement of itaconic acid production in this organism. The approach developed here enables rapid prototyping of knockdown strategies and thus accelerates and reduces the cost of the design-build-test cycle in yeast. PMID:24328131

  2. Failure detection and identification for a reconfigurable flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallery, Francois

    1987-01-01

    Failure detection and identification logic for a fault-tolerant longitudinal control system were investigated. Aircraft dynamics were based upon the cruise condition for a hypothetical transonic business jet transport configuration. The fault-tolerant control system consists of conventional control and estimation plus a new outer loop containing failure detection, identification, and reconfiguration (FDIR) logic. It is assumed that the additional logic has access to all measurements, as well as to the outputs of the control and estimation logic. The pilot may also command the FDIR logic to perform special tests.

  3. Immune System Toxicity and Immunotoxicity Hazard Identification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to chemicals may alter immune system health, increasing the risk of infections, allergy and autoimmune diseases. The chapter provides a concise overview of the immune system, host factors that affect immune system heal, and the effects that xenobiotic exposure may have ...

  4. Yeast and Mammals Utilize Similar Cytosolic Components to Drive Protein Transport through the Golgi Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunphy, William G.; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.; Clary, Douglas O.; Wattenberg, Binks W.; Glick, Benjamin S.; Rothman, James E.

    1986-03-01

    Vesicular transport between successive compartments of the mammalian Golgi apparatus has recently been reconstituted in a cell-free system. In addition to ATP, transport requires both membrane-bound and cytosolic proteins. Here we report that the cytosol fraction from yeast will efficiently substitute for mammalian cytosol. Mammalian cytosol contains several distinct transport factors, which we have distinguished on the basis of gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. Yeast cytosol appears to contain the same collection of transport factors. Resolved cytosol factors from yeast and mammals complement each other in a synergistic manner. These findings suggest that the molecular mechanisms of intracellular protein transport have been conserved throughout evolution. Moreover, this hybrid cell-free system will enable the application of yeast genetics to the identification and isolation of cytosolic proteins that sustain intracellular protein transport.

  5. Modeling and Identification of a Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, David E. (Editor); Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Hsiao, Min-Hung; Huang, Jen-Kuang

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of modeling and system identification efforts on the NASA Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF). The LAMSTF consists of a cylindrical permanent magnet which is levitated above a planar array of five electromagnets mounted in a circular configuration. The analytical model is first developed and open-loop characteristics are described. The system is shown to be highly unstable and requires feedback control in order to apply system identification. Limitations on modeling accuracy due to the effect of eddy-currents on the system are discussed. An algorithm is derived to identify a state-space model for the system from input/output data acquired during closed-loop operation. The algorithm is tested on both the baseline system and a perturbed system which has an increased presence of eddy currents. It is found that for the baseline system the analytic model adequately captures the dynamics, although the identified model improves the simulation accuracy. For the system perturbed by additional unmodeled eddy-currents the analytic model is no longer adequate and a higher-order model, determined through system identification, is required to accurately predict the system's time response.

  6. A Versatile Overexpression Strategy in the Pathogenic Yeast Candida albicans: Identification of Regulators of Morphogenesis and Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Vitor; Znaidi, Sadri; Goyard, Sophie; Bachellier-Bassi, Sophie; Firon, Arnaud; Legrand, Mélanie; Diogo, Dorothée; Naulleau, Claire; Rossignol, Tristan; d’Enfert, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequently encountered human fungal pathogen, causing both superficial infections and life-threatening systemic diseases. Functional genomic studies performed in this organism have mainly used knock-out mutants and extensive collections of overexpression mutants are still lacking. Here, we report the development of a first generation C. albicans ORFeome, the improvement of overexpression systems and the construction of two new libraries of C. albicans strains overexpressing genes for components of signaling networks, in particular protein kinases, protein phosphatases and transcription factors. As a proof of concept, we screened these collections for genes whose overexpression impacts morphogenesis or growth rates in C. albicans. Our screens identified genes previously described for their role in these biological processes, demonstrating the functionality of our strategy, as well as genes that have not been previously associated to these processes. This article emphasizes the potential of systematic overexpression strategies to improve our knowledge of regulatory networks in C. albicans. The C. albicans plasmid and strain collections described here are available at the Fungal Genetics Stock Center. Their extension to a genome-wide scale will represent important resources for the C. albicans community. PMID:23049891

  7. Subtask 1 report: emission control system identification. Task 25

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-22

    The emphasis here is the identification of emission control systems through information contained in the vehicle identification number (VIN). The data base which maps each combination of carline and engine symbol into the possible engine families is described in detail. The methods used in developing this data base are summarized. The instances in which major features of the emission control system can not be determined unambiguously from the VIN are identified. Recommendations are presented for resolving the ambiguities with the assistance of auto manufacturers. The ability of the several manufacturers to assist in further decoding of VINs and is reported and the information presently available on costs of doing so is provided. Data files that will be used to extract manufacturer, carline, and engine symbols from VINs and then access the master VIN/engine family data base are listed. The master data base is listed in its entirety. The cases of ambiguous emission control identification are listed. (MHR)

  8. Music Identification System Using MPEG-7 Audio Signature Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    You, Shingchern D.; Chen, Wei-Hwa; Chen, Woei-Kae

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a multiresolution system based on MPEG-7 audio signature descriptors for music identification. Such an identification system may be used to detect illegally copied music circulated over the Internet. In the proposed system, low-resolution descriptors are used to search likely candidates, and then full-resolution descriptors are used to identify the unknown (query) audio. With this arrangement, the proposed system achieves both high speed and high accuracy. To deal with the problem that a piece of query audio may not be inside the system's database, we suggest two different methods to find the decision threshold. Simulation results show that the proposed method II can achieve an accuracy of 99.4% for query inputs both inside and outside the database. Overall, it is highly possible to use the proposed system for copyright control. PMID:23533359

  9. Tris-sucrose buffer system: a new specially designed medium for extracellular invertase production by immobilized cells of isolated yeast Cryptococcus laurentii MT-61.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Mehmet Nuri; Taskin, Mesut; Canli, Ozden; Arslan, Nazli Pinar; Ortucu, Serkan

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to isolate new yeasts with high extracellular (exo) invertase activity and to investigate the usability of buffer systems as invertase production media by immobilized yeast cells. Among 70 yeast isolates, Cryptococcus laurentii MT-61 had the highest exo-invertase activity. Immobilization of yeast cells was performed using sodium alginate. Higher exo-invertase activity for immobilized cells was achieved in tris-sucrose buffer system (TSBS) compared to sodium acetate buffer system and potassium phosphate buffer system. TSBS was prepared by dissolving 30 g of sucrose in 1 L of tris buffer solution. The optimum pH, temperature, and incubation time for invertase production with immobilized cells were determined as 8.0, 35 °C and 36 h in TSBS, respectively. Under optimized conditions, maximum exo-invertase activity was found to be 28.4 U/mL in sterile and nonsterile TSBS. Immobilized cells could be reused in 14 and 12 successive cycles in sterile and nonsterile TSBS without any loss in the maximum invertase activity, respectively. This is the first report which showed that immobilized microbial cells could be used as a biocatalyst for exo-invertase production in buffer system. As an additional contribution, a new yeast strain with high invertase activity was isolated. PMID:23722276

  10. Molecular Phylogeny of the Yeasts: Impact on Classification and Prediction of Biotechnological Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA sequence analysis and other DNA-based methodologies have transformed the way in which yeasts are identified and classified. Development of species-specific gene sequence databases has provided a barcode system for rapid identification of known species and the recognition of undescribed species. ...

  11. Genetic characterization of a mammalian protein-protein interaction domain by using a yeast reverse two-hybrid system.

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, M; Braun, P; Chen, E; Boeke, J D; Harlow, E

    1996-01-01

    Many biological processes rely upon protein-protein interactions. Hence, detailed analysis of these interactions is critical for their understanding. Due to the complexities involved, genetic approaches are often needed. In yeast and phage, genetic characterizations of protein complexes are possible. However, in multicellular organisms, such characterizations are limited by the lack of powerful selection systems. Herein we describe genetic selections that allow single amino acid changes that disrupt protein-protein interactions to be selected from large libraries of randomly generated mutant alleles. The strategy, based on a yeast reverse two-hybrid system, involves a first-step negative selection for mutations that affect interaction, followed by a second-step positive selection for a subset of these mutations that maintain expression of full-length protein (two-step selection). We have selected such mutations in the transcription factor E2F1 that affect its ability to heterodimerize with DP1. The mutations obtained identified a putative helix in the marked box, a region conserved among E2F family members, as an important determinant for interaction. This two-step selection procedure can be used to characterize any interaction domain that can be tested in the two-hybrid system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8816798

  12. Investigation of an expert systems approach to bacterial identification.

    PubMed

    Brammer, R J; Bryant, T N; May, J H

    1991-10-01

    An investigation was carried out to assess the feasibility of using an expert systems approach to assist in the identification of unknown isolates of bacteria. A system was developed using Lisp which utilized the knowledge stored in standard bacteriological texts. A comparison of the expert systems approach and the probabilistic approach based on Bayes Theorem was made together with the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. PMID:1747777

  13. Agroforestry Systems In Poland A Preliminary Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borek, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper seeks to use state-of-the-art knowledge to depict the foundations and prospects for agroforestry systems in Poland to develop, in line with political, legal, historical and environmental conditions pertaining in the country. The main legal provisions concerning the presence of trees in agriculture are presented prior to a first-ever defining of key traditional agroforestry systems in Poland.

  14. Identification of a human cDNA encoding a protein that is structurally and functionally related to the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Matviw, Yu, G.; Young, D. )

    1992-11-01

    The adenylyl cyclases of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe are associated with related proteins named CAP. In S. cerevisiae, CAP is required for cellular responses mediated by the RAS/cyclic AMP pathway. Both yeast CAPs appear to be bifunctional proteins: The N-terminal domains are required for the proper function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains results in morphological and nutritional defects that appear to be unrelated to the cAMP pathways. Expression of either yeast CAP in the heterologous yeast suppresses phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of the endogenous CAP but does not suppress loss of the N-terminal domain. On the basis of the homology between the two yeast CAP proteins, we have designed degenerate oligonucleotides that we used to detect, by the polymerase chain reaction method, a human cDNA fragment encoding a CAP-related peptide. Using the polymerase chain reaction fragment as a probe, we isolated a human cDNA clone encoding a 475-amino-acid protein that is homologous to the yeast CAP proteins. Expressions of the human CAP protein in S. cerevisiae suppresses the phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of CAP but does not suppress phenotypes associated with loss of the N-terminal domain. Thus, CAP proteins have been structurally and, to some extent, functionally conserved in evolution between yeasts and mammals. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Early identification systems for emerging foodborne hazards.

    PubMed

    Marvin, H J P; Kleter, G A; Prandini, A; Dekkers, S; Bolton, D J

    2009-05-01

    This paper provides a non-exhausting overview of early warning systems for emerging foodborne hazards that are operating in the various places in the world. Special attention is given to endpoint-focussed early warning systems (i.e. ECDC, ISIS and GPHIN) and hazard-focussed early warning systems (i.e. FVO, RASFF and OIE) and their merit to successfully identify a food safety problem in an early stage is discussed. Besides these early warning systems which are based on monitoring of either disease symptoms or hazards, also early warning systems and/or activities that intend to predict the occurrence of a food safety hazard in its very beginning of development or before that are described. Examples are trend analysis, horizon scanning, early warning systems for mycotoxins in maize and/or wheat and information exchange networks (e.g. OIE and GIEWS). Furthermore, recent initiatives that aim to develop predictive early warning systems based on the holistic principle are discussed. The assumption of the researchers applying this principle is that developments outside the food production chain that are either directly or indirectly related to the development of a particular food safety hazard may also provide valuable information to predict the development of this hazard. PMID:18272277

  16. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... patient identification and health information. 880.6300 Section 880.6300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification. An implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information is a...

  17. On neural networks in identification and control of dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh; Juang, Jer-Nan; Hyland, David C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the applicability of neural networks in the identification and control of dynamic systems. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of how the neural networks handle linear systems and how the new approach is related to conventional system identification and control methods. Extensions of the approach to nonlinear systems are then made. The paper explains the fundamental concepts of neural networks in their simplest terms. Among the topics discussed are feed forward and recurrent networks in relation to the standard state-space and observer models, linear and nonlinear auto-regressive models, linear, predictors, one-step ahead control, and model reference adaptive control for linear and nonlinear systems. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of these important concepts.

  18. Training Sessions Provide Working Knowledge of National Animal Identification System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaze, J. Benton, Jr.; Ahola, Jason K.

    2010-01-01

    One in-service and two train-the-trainer workshops were conducted by University of Idaho Extension faculty, Idaho State Department of Agriculture personnel, and allied industry representatives to increase Extension educators' knowledge and awareness of the National Animal Identification System (NAIS) and related topics. Training sessions included…

  19. Training Sessions Provide Working Knowledge of National Animal Identification System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaze, J. Benton, Jr.; Ahola, Jason K.

    2010-01-01

    One in-service and two train-the-trainer workshops were conducted by University of Idaho Extension faculty, Idaho State Department of Agriculture personnel, and allied industry representatives to increase Extension educators' knowledge and awareness of the National Animal Identification System (NAIS) and related topics. Training sessions included…

  20. Self-Identification as a Tool for Temporary System Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumb, Glenn H.

    Presented are some findings concerning self-identification as a tool for temporary system evaluation based on the reactions of participants in a resource personnel leadership training workshop. Goodson's model for classification of individuals by influence style (tough battler, friendly helper, and logical thinker) was used to self-categorize the…

  1. Yeast as a drug discovery platform in Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2006-03-01

    The high degree of conservation of cellular and molecular processes between the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes have made it a valuable system for numerous studies of the basic mechanisms behind devastating illnesses such as cancer, infectious disease, and neurodegenerative disorders. Several studies in yeast have already contributed to our basic understanding of cellular dysfunction in both Huntington's and Parkinson's disease. Functional genomics approaches currently being undertaken in yeast may lead to novel insights into the genes and pathways that modulate neuronal cell dysfunction and death in these diseases. In addition, the budding yeast constitutes a valuable system for identification of new drug targets, both via target-based and non-target-based drug screening. Importantly, yeast can be used as a cellular platform to analyze the cellular effects of candidate compounds, which is critical for the development of effective therapeutics. While the molecular mechanisms that underlie neurodegeneration will ultimately have to be tested in neuronal and animal models, there are several distinct advantages to using simple model organisms to elucidate fundamental aspects of protein aggregation, amyloid toxicity, and cellular dysfunction. Here, we review recent studies that have shown that amyloid formation by disease-causing proteins and many of the resulting cellular deficits can be faithfully recapitulated in yeast. In addition, we discuss new yeast-based techniques for screening candidate therapeutic compounds for Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases. PMID:16897706

  2. Identification of Protective Antigens for Vaccination against Systemic Salmonellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bumann, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent medical need for improved vaccines with broad serovar coverage and high efficacy against systemic salmonellosis. Subunit vaccines offer excellent safety profiles but require identification of protective antigens, which remains a challenging task. Here, I review crucial properties of Salmonella antigens that might help to narrow down the number of potential candidates from more than 4000 proteins encoded in Salmonella genomes, to a more manageable number of 50–200 most promising antigens. I also discuss complementary approaches for antigen identification and potential limitations of current pre-clinical vaccine testing. PMID:25157252

  3. DNA barcode-based molecular identification system for fish species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungmin; Eo, Hae-Seok; Koo, Hyeyoung; Choi, Jun-Kil; Kim, Won

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we applied DNA barcoding to identify species using short DNA sequence analysis. We examined the utility of DNA barcoding by identifying 53 Korean freshwater fish species, 233 other freshwater fish species, and 1339 saltwater fish species. We successfully developed a web-based molecular identification system for fish (MISF) using a profile hidden Markov model. MISF facilitates efficient and reliable species identification, overcoming the limitations of conventional taxonomic approaches. MISF is freely accessible at http://bioinfosys.snu.ac.kr:8080/MISF/misf.jsp . PMID:21110132

  4. Hydrogenerator system identification using a simple genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Wrate, C.A.; Wozniak, L.

    1997-03-01

    This paper investigates an identification procedure for a hydrogenerator plant using an adaptive technique. The procedure operates on field data consisting of sampled gate position and electrical frequency. The field data was recorded while the plant was operating under various load conditions. The procedure adapted to ongoing plant changes by continuously updating the identification results. It is shown that the adaptive technique, in this case genetic algorithm based, was capable of identifying the hydrogenerator system and following plant parameter changes while the plant operated under conditions of sufficient frequency excursions. These conditions include off-line and isolated network operation where effective control is critical.

  5. Yeast: A Research Organism for Teaching Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manney, Thomas R.; Manney, Monta L.

    1992-01-01

    Explains why laboratory strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are particularly suited for classroom science activities. Describes the sexual life cycle of yeast and the genetic system with visible mutations. Presents an overview of activities that can be done with yeast and gives a source for teachers to obtain more information. (PR)

  6. Biometric identification systems: the science of transaction facilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Robert R.

    1994-10-01

    The future ofthe "secure transaction" and the success ofall undertakings that depend on absolute certainty that the individuals involved really are who and what they represent themselves to be is dependent upon the successful development of absolutely accurate, low-cost and easy-to-operate Biometric Identification Systems. Whether these transactions are political, military, financial or administrative (e.g. health cards, drivers licenses, welfare entitlement, national identification cards, credit card transactions, etc.), the need for such secure and positive identification has never been greater -and yet we are only at the beginning ofan era in which we will see the emergence and proliferation of Biometric Identification Systems in nearly every field ofhuman endeavor. Proper application ofthese systems will change the way the world operates, and that is precisely the goal ofComparator Systems Corporation. Just as with the photo-copier 40 years ago and the personal computer 20 years ago, the potential applications for positive personal identification are going to make the Biometric Identification System a commonplace component in the standard practice ofbusiness, and in interhuman relationships ofall kinds. The development of new and specific application hardware, as well as the necessary algorithms and related software required for integration into existing operating procedures and newly developed systems alike, has been a more-than-a-decade-long process at Comparator -and we are now on the verge of delivering these systems to the world markets so urgently in need of them. An individual could feel extremely confident and satisfied ifhe could present his credit, debit, or ATM card at any point of sale and, after inserting his card, could simply place his finger on a glass panel and in less than a second be positively accepted as being the person that the card purported him to be; not to mention the security and satisfaction of the vendor involved in knowing that his fraud risk had been reduced to virtually zero. In highly sensitive security applications, such a system would be imperative -and when combined, if necessary, with other biometric identifiers such as signature and/or voice recognition for simultaneous verification, one would have a nearly foolproof system. These are the tools of what we call Transaction Facilitation, and this is the realm of Comparator Systems Corp. Our technological developments over the last ten years have moved our Company forward into a position of potential leadership in what is fast becoming a worldwide market, and it is toward this end that we have applied all of our efforts.

  7. Nonlinear system identification with applications to space weather prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanthandalam-Madapusi, Harish J.

    2007-02-01

    System identification is the process of constructing empirical mathematical models of dynamcal systems using measured data. Since data represents a key link between mathematical principles and physical processes, system identification is an important research area that can benefit all disciplines. In this dissertation, we develop identification methods for Hammerstein-Wiener models, which are model structures based on the interconnection of linear dynamics and static nonlinearities. These identification methods identify models in state-space form and use known basis functions to represent the unknown nonlinear maps. Next, we use these methods to identify periodically- switching Hammerstein-Wiener models for predicting magnetic-field fluctuation on the surface of the Earth, 30 to 90 minutes into the future. These magnetic- field fluctuations caused by the solar wind (ejections of charged plasma from the surface of the Sun) can damage critical systems aboard satellites and drive currents in power grids that can overwhelm and damage transformers. By predicting magnetic-field fluctuations on the Earth, we obtain advance warning of future disturbances. Furthermore, to predict solar wind conditions 27 days in advance, we use solar wind measurements and image measurements to construct nonlinear time-series models. We propose a class of radial basis functions to represent the nonlinear maps, which have fewer parameters that need to be tuned by the user. Additionally, we develop an identification algorithm that simultaneously identifies the state space matrices of an unknown model and reconstructs the unknown input, using output measurements and known inputs. For this purpose, we formulate the concept of input and state observability, that is, conditions under which both the unknown input and initial state of a known model can be determined from output measurements. We provide necessary and sufficient conditions for input and state observability in discrete-time systems.

  8. Performance metrics for the evaluation of hyperspectral chemical identification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truslow, Eric; Golowich, Steven; Manolakis, Dimitris; Ingle, Vinay

    2016-02-01

    Remote sensing of chemical vapor plumes is a difficult but important task for many military and civilian applications. Hyperspectral sensors operating in the long-wave infrared regime have well-demonstrated detection capabilities. However, the identification of a plume's chemical constituents, based on a chemical library, is a multiple hypothesis testing problem which standard detection metrics do not fully describe. We propose using an additional performance metric for identification based on the so-called Dice index. Our approach partitions and weights a confusion matrix to develop both the standard detection metrics and identification metric. Using the proposed metrics, we demonstrate that the intuitive system design of a detector bank followed by an identifier is indeed justified when incorporating performance information beyond the standard detection metrics.

  9. 78 FR 58785 - Unique Device Identification System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to establish a system to adequately identify devices through distribution and use. This rule requires the label of medical devices to include a unique device identifier (UDI), except where the rule provides for an exception or alternative placement. The labeler must submit product information concerning devices to FDA's Global......

  10. PINS: A field PGNAA chemical identification system

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, R.J.; Caffrey, A.J.; Krebs, K.M.; Watts, K.D.; Oates, M.A.; McLaughlin, G.D. )

    1993-01-01

    Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) has long been employed for chemical analysis in process streams and laboratories. Recent improvements in the design of germanium gamma-ray spectrometers, the miniaturization of their associated components, and the development of [open quotes]powerful[close quotes] notebook personal computers (PCs) permit the design of PGNAA systems for truly portable in-field use. Portable isotopic neutron spectrometry (PINS) (of gamma rays) was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for in-field inspection and verification of chemical weapon inventories where a system that can be carried into an area inaccessible by wheeled transport (rough terrain, confined spaces, etc.) and that is capable of operating on battery power is required. PINS is now also finding use outside of military applications.

  11. Development of pilot scale nanofiltration system for yeast industry wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of the yeast industry wastewater was investigated by nanofiltration (NF) membrane process on a pilot scale. Two wastewaters were used as feed: (i) dilute wastewater with COD 2000 mg/L and (ii) concentrate wastewater with COD 8000 mg/L. The permeate flux, COD retention, color and electrical conductivity (EC) removal were evaluated in relation to trans-membrane pressure and long-term filtration. A linear growth in permeate flux was found with increasing in trans-membrane pressure for wastewaters. In addition, the COD retention, color and EC removal increased with trans-membrane pressure enhancement. The results obtained from the long-term nanofiltration of dilute wastewater indicated that the permeate flux decreased from 2300 L/day to 1250 L/day and COD retention increased from 86% to 92%. The quality of the permeate in term of COD is lower than the discharge standard in river (200 mg/L). Thus, this process is useful for treatment of wastewaters produced by yeast industry. PMID:24593865

  12. Development of an integrated electrochemical system for in vitro yeast viability testing.

    PubMed

    Adami, Andrea; Ress, Cristina; Collini, Cristian; Pedrotti, Severino; Lorenzelli, Leandro

    2013-02-15

    This work describes the development and testing of a microfabricated sensor for rapid cell growth monitoring, especially focused on yeast quality assessment for wine applications. The device consists of a NMOS ISFET sensor with Si(3)N(4) gate, able to indirectly monitor extracellular metabolism through pH variation of the medium, and a solid-state reference electrode implemented with PVC membranes doped with lipophilic salts (tetrabutylammonium-tetrabutylborate (TBA-TBB) and Potassium tetrakis(4-chlorphenyl)borate (KTClpB)). The use of a solid state reference electrode enables the implementation of a large number of cell assays in parallel, without the need of external conventional reference electrodes. Microbial growth testing has been performed both in standard culture conditions and on chip at different concentrations of ethanol in order to carry out a commonly used screening of wine yeast strains. Cell growth tests can be performed in few hours, providing a fast, sensitive and low cost analysis with respect to the conventional procedures. PMID:22944021

  13. Spacecraft structural system identification by modal test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.-C.; Peretti, L. F.; Garba, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A structural parameter estimation procedure using the measured natural frequencies and kinetic energy distribution as observers is proposed. The theoretical derivation of the estimation procedure is described and its constraints and limitations are explained. This procedure is applied to a large complex spacecraft structural system to identify the inertia matrix using modal test results. The inertia matrix is chosen after the stiffness matrix has been updated by the static test results.

  14. Closed Loop System Identification with Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.

    2004-01-01

    High performance control design for a flexible space structure is challenging since high fidelity plant models are di.cult to obtain a priori. Uncertainty in the control design models typically require a very robust, low performance control design which must be tuned on-orbit to achieve the required performance. Closed loop system identi.cation is often required to obtain a multivariable open loop plant model based on closed-loop response data. In order to provide an accurate initial plant model to guarantee convergence for standard local optimization methods, this paper presents a global parameter optimization method using genetic algorithms. A minimal representation of the state space dynamics is employed to mitigate the non-uniqueness and over-parameterization of general state space realizations. This control-relevant system identi.cation procedure stresses the joint nature of the system identi.cation and control design problem by seeking to obtain a model that minimizes the di.erence between the predicted and actual closed-loop performance.

  15. Identification and chemical profiling of monacolins in red yeast rice using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Guo; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Zheng-Tao; Hu, Zhi-Bi

    2004-09-01

    Monascus purpureus-fermented rice (red yeast rice) was one of the food supplements that had the ability of lowering the blood-lipid levels, and monacolins have been proved to be main active constituents. In total 14 monacolin compounds such as monacolin K (mevinolin), J, L, M, X, and their hydroxy acid form, as well as dehydromonacolin K, dihydromonacolin L, compactin, 3alpha-hydroxy-3,5-dihydromonacolin L, etc. were identified in red yeast rice, using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector and tandem mass spectrometry. A chemical fingerprint profiling method to display bioactive monacolins in red yeast rice was established and could be used for the quality control of the target material and its related products. Ten finish products labeled as red yeast rice from different manufacturers in marketing were traced using the chromatographic chemical profiling method, and the results show that only two of them were similar while the other eight were significantly different from the reference red yeast rice. All of these materials including raw material powder and finished products available were quantified and the contents of monacolins were calculated with reference of monacolin K (mevinolin) as the standard. PMID:15336357

  16. Linear antigenic mapping of flagellin (FliC) from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis with yeast surface expression system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoling; Shi, Bingtian; Li, Tao; Zuo, Teng; Wang, Bin; Si, Wei; Xin, Jiuqing; Yang, Kongbin; Shi, Xuanlin; Liu, Siguo; Liu, Henggui

    2016-02-29

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of food-borne illness around the world and can have significant health implications in humans, poultry and other animals. Flagellin (FliC) is the primary component of bacterial flagella. It has been shown that the FliC of S. Enteritidis is a significant antigenic structure and can elicit strong humoral responses against S. Enteritidis infection in chickens. Here, we constructed a FliC antigen library using a yeast surface expression system. Yeast cells expressing FliC peptide antigens were labeled with chicken sera against S. Enteritidis and sorted using FACS. The analyses of FliC peptides revealed that the FliC linear antigenicity in chickens resided on three domains which were able to elicit strong humoral responses in vivo. Animal experiments further revealed that the antibodies elicited by these antigenic domains were able to significantly inhibit the invasion of S. Enteritidis into the liver and spleen of chickens. These findings will facilitate our better understanding of the humoral responses elicited by FliC in chickens upon infection by S. Enteritidis. PMID:26854340

  17. Molecular cloning of amphioxus uncoupling protein and assessment of its uncoupling activity using a yeast heterologous expression system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Sun, Guoxun; Lv, Zhiyuan; Wang, Chen; Jiang, Xueyuan; Li, Donghai; Zhang, Chenyu

    2010-10-01

    The present study describes the molecular cloning of a novel cDNA fragment from amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) encoding a 343-amino acid protein that is highly homologous to human uncoupling proteins (UCP), this protein is therefore named amphioxus UCP. This amphioxus UCP shares more homology with and is phylogenetically more related to mammalian UCP2 as compared with UCP1. To further assess the functional similarity of amphioxus UCP to mammalian UCP1 and -2, the amphioxus UCP, rat UCP1, and human UCP2 were separately expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the recombinant yeast mitochondria were isolated and assayed for the state 4 respiration rate and proton leak, using pYES2 empty vector as the control. UCP1 increased the state 4 respiration rate by 2.8-fold, and the uncoupling activity was strongly inhibited by GDP, while UCP2 and amphioxus UCP only increased the state 4 respiration rate by 1.5-fold and 1.7-fold in a GDP-insensitive manner, moreover, the proton leak kinetics of amphioxus UCP was very similar to UCP2, but much different from UCP1. In conclusion, the amphioxus UCP has a mild, unregulated uncoupling activity in the yeast system, which resembles mammalian UCP2, but not UCP1. PMID:20816931

  18. Molecular cloning of lamprey uncoupling protein and assessment of its uncoupling activity using a yeast heterologous expression system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Sun, Guoxun; Chen, Kun; Lv, Zhiyuan; Peng, Shiming; Jiang, Xueyuan; Xiang, Yang; Zhang, Chenyu

    2010-01-01

    We report the molecular cloning of a novel cDNA fragment from lamprey encoding a 313-amino acid protein that is highly homologous to human uncoupling proteins (UCP). We therefore named the protein lamprey UCP. This lamprey UCP, rat UCP1, human UCP2, and human mitochondrial oxoglutarate carrier were individually expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the recombinant yeast mitochondria were isolated and assayed for the state 4 respiration rate and proton leak. Only UCP1 showed a strong (3.6-fold increase of the ratio of mitochondrial state 4 respiration rate to FCCP-stimulated fully uncoupled respiration rate) and GDP-inhibitable uncoupling activity, while the uncoupling activities of both UCP2 and lamprey UCP were relatively weak (1.5-fold and 1.4-fold, respectively) and GDP-insensitive. The oxoglutarate carrier had no effect on the studied parameters. In conclusion, the lamprey UCP has a mild, unregulated uncoupling activity in the yeast system, which resembles UCP2, but not UCP1. PMID:19788939

  19. Aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a model system for the regulation of a eukaryotic biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Braus, G H

    1991-01-01

    This review focuses on the gene-enzyme relationships and the regulation of different levels of the aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway in a simple eukaryotic system, the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most reactions of this branched pathway are common to all organisms which are able to synthesize tryptophan, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. The current knowledge about the two main control mechanisms of the yeast aromatic amino acid biosynthesis is reviewed. (i) At the transcriptional level, most structural genes are regulated by the transcriptional activator GCN4, the regulator of the general amino acid control network, which couples transcriptional derepression to amino acid starvation of numerous structural genes in multiple amino acid biosynthetic pathways. (ii) At the enzyme level, the carbon flow is controlled mainly by modulating the enzyme activities at the first step of the pathway and at the branch points by feedback action of the three aromatic amino acid end products. Implications of these findings for the relationship of S. cerevisiae to prokaryotic as well as to higher eukaryotic organisms and for general regulatory mechanisms occurring in a living cell such as initiation of transcription, enzyme regulation, and the regulation of a metabolic branch point are discussed. PMID:1943992

  20. Cryptococcal Yeast Cells Invade the Central Nervous System via Transcellular Penetration of the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun C.; Stins, Monique F.; McCaffery, Michael J.; Miller, Georgina F.; Pare, Dan R.; Dam, Tapen; Paul-Satyasee, Maneesh; Kim, Kwang Sik; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.

    2004-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis develops as a result of hematogenous dissemination of inhaled Cryptococcus neoformans from the lung to the brain. The mechanism(s) by which C. neoformans crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key unresolved issue in cryptococcosis. We used both an in vivo mouse model and an in vitro model of the human BBB to investigate the cryptococcal association with and traversal of the BBB. Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) to C. neoformans triggered the formation of microvillus-like membrane protrusions within 15 to 30 min. Yeast cells of C. neoformans adhered to and were internalized by the HBMEC, and they crossed the HBMEC monolayers via a transcellular pathway without affecting the monolayer integrity. The histopathology of mouse brains obtained after intravenous injection of C. neoformans showed that the yeast cells either were associated with endothelial cells or escaped from the brain capillary vessels into the neuropil by 3 h. C. neoformans was found in the brain parenchyma away from the vessels by 22 h. Association of C. neoformans with the choroid plexus, however, was not detected during up to 10 days of observation. Our findings indicate that C. neoformans cells invade the central nervous system by transcellular crossing of the endothelium of the BBB. PMID:15321990

  1. Generation of arming yeasts with active proteins and peptides via cell surface display system: cell surface engineering, bio-arming technology.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The cell surface display system in yeast enables the innovative strategy for improving cellular functions in a wide range of applications such as biofuel production, bioremediation, synthesis of valuable chemicals, recovery of rare metal ions, development of biosensors, and high-throughput screening of proteins/peptides library. Display of enzymes for polysaccharide degradation enables the construction of metabolically engineered whole-cell biocatalyst owing to the accessibility of the displayed enzymes to high-molecular-weight polysaccharides. In addition, along with fluorescence-based activity evaluation, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and yeast cell chip, the cell surface display system is an effective molecular tool for high-throughput screening of mutated proteins/peptides library. In this article, we describe the methods for cell surface display of proteins/peptides of interest on yeast, evaluation of display efficiency, and harvesting of the displayed proteins/peptides from cell surface. PMID:24744031

  2. Prefire identification for pulse-power systems

    DOEpatents

    Longmire, J.L.; Thuot, M.E.; Warren, D.S.

    1982-08-23

    Prefires in a high-power, high-frequency, multi-stage pulse generator are detected by a system having an EMI shielded pulse timing transmitter associated with and tailored to each stage of the pulse generator. Each pulse timing transmitter upon detection of a pulse triggers a laser diode to send an optical signal through a high frequency fiber optic cable to a pulse timing receiver which converts the optical signal to an electrical pulse. The electrical pulses from all pulse timing receivers are fed through an OR circuit to start a time interval measuring device and each electrical pulse is used to stop an individual channel in the measuring device thereby recording the firing sequence of the multi-stage pulse generator.

  3. Prefire identification for pulse power systems

    DOEpatents

    Longmire, Jerry L.; Thuot, Michael E.; Warren, David S.

    1985-01-01

    Prefires in a high-power, high-frequency, multi-stage pulse generator are detected by a system having an EMI shielded pulse timing transmitter associated with and tailored to each stage of the pulse generator. Each pulse timing transmitter upon detection of a pulse triggers a laser diode to send an optical signal through a high frequency fiber optic cable to a pulse timing receiver which converts the optical signal to an electrical pulse. The electrical pulses from all pulse timing receivers are fed through an OR circuit to start a time interval measuring device and each electrical pulse is used to stop an individual channel in the measuring device thereby recording the firing sequence of the multi-stage pulse generator.

  4. Material Outgassing, Identification and Deposition, MOLIDEP System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.; Montoya, Alex F.

    2002-01-01

    The outgassing tests are performed employing a modified vacuum operated Cahn analytical microbalance, identified as the MOLIDEP system. The test measures under high vacuum, the time varying Molecular mass loss of a material sample held at a chosen temperature; it Identifies the outgassing molecular components using an inline SRS 300 amu Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) and employs a temperature controlled 10 MHz Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) to measure the condensable DEPosits. Both the QCM and the RGA intercept within the conductive passage the outgassing products being evacuated by a turbomolecular pump. The continuous measurements of the mass loss, the rate of loss, the sample temperature, the rate of temperature change, the QCM temperature and the QCM recorded condensable deposits or rate of deposits are saved to an Excel spreadsheet. A separate computer controls the RGA.

  5. Neural network identification of power system transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Gillard, D.M.; Bollinger, K.E.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes an investigation into the use of a multilayered neural network for measuring the transfer function of a power system for use in power system stabilizer (PSS) tuning and assessing PSS damping. The objectives are to quickly and accurately measure the transfer function relating the electric power output to the AVR PSS reference voltage input of a system with the plant operating under normal conditions. In addition, the excitation signal used in the identification procedure is such that it will not adversely affect the terminal voltage or the system frequency. This research emphasized the development of a neural network that is easily trained and robust to changing system conditions. Performance studies of the trained neural network are described. Simulation studies suggest the practical feasibility of the algorithm as a stand-alone identification package and as a portion of a self-tuning algorithm requiring identification in the strategy. The same technique applied to a forward modeling scheme can be used to test the damping contribution from different control strategies.

  6. System Identification for Nonlinear Control Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.; Linse, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    An approach to incorporating artificial neural networks in nonlinear, adaptive control systems is described. The controller contains three principal elements: a nonlinear inverse dynamic control law whose coefficients depend on a comprehensive model of the plant, a neural network that models system dynamics, and a state estimator whose outputs drive the control law and train the neural network. Attention is focused on the system identification task, which combines an extended Kalman filter with generalized spline function approximation. Continual learning is possible during normal operation, without taking the system off line for specialized training. Nonlinear inverse dynamic control requires smooth derivatives as well as function estimates, imposing stringent goals on the approximating technique.

  7. Identification of open quantum systems from observable time traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2015-05-01

    Estimating the parameters that dictate the dynamics of a quantum system is an important task for quantum information processing and quantum metrology, as well as fundamental physics. In this paper we develop a method for parameter estimation for Markovian open quantum systems using a temporal record of measurements on the system. The method is based on system realization theory and is a generalization of our previous work on identification of Hamiltonian parameters [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 080401 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.080401].

  8. On the identification of hysteretic systems. Part I: Fitness landscapes and evolutionary identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, K.; Manson, G.

    2012-05-01

    Fairly recent work has shown that evolutionary optimisation schemes (genetic algorithms and differential evolution) offer an effective means of identifying nonlinear dynamical systems, even when the parameter estimation problem is complicated by nonlinearity in the parameters and/or the presence of unmeasured states. In particular, an evolutionary approach to the parameter estimation problem for hysteretic systems has shown promise. The current paper considers aspects of the parameter estimation problem for systems of Bouc-Wen type. In the first place, an investigation into the nature of the objective or cost function for the optimisation is made with the aim of better understanding the performance of the identification scheme. The first part of the paper also discusses the issue of setting initial estimates or ranges for the system parameters. The data on which the analysis is based are generated by computer simulation; the specific evolutionary algorithm considered is Differential Evolution (DE). Although the DE algorithm has proved to be very effective in the identification context, a minor disadvantage manifests itself in the need to set algorithm hyperparameters for the optimisation. This observation leads to the second main objective of the current paper which is to present a recently developed variant of the DE algorithm - the Self-Adaptive Differential Evolution (SADE) algorithm - which learns and adapts a subset of its own hyperparameters throughout the optimisation process. The use of the algorithm for the hysteretic system identification problem is illustrated using the simulated data and it is shown that the algorithm can provide several orders-of-magnitude improvement on the minimisation of the problem objective function.

  9. System Identification and POD Method Applied to Unsteady Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Deman; Kholodar, Denis; Juang, Jer-Nan; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The representation of unsteady aerodynamic flow fields in terms of global aerodynamic modes has proven to be a useful method for reducing the size of the aerodynamic model over those representations that use local variables at discrete grid points in the flow field. Eigenmodes and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) modes have been used for this purpose with good effect. This suggests that system identification models may also be used to represent the aerodynamic flow field. Implicit in the use of a systems identification technique is the notion that a relative small state space model can be useful in describing a dynamical system. The POD model is first used to show that indeed a reduced order model can be obtained from a much larger numerical aerodynamical model (the vortex lattice method is used for illustrative purposes) and the results from the POD and the system identification methods are then compared. For the example considered, the two methods are shown to give comparable results in terms of accuracy and reduced model size. The advantages and limitations of each approach are briefly discussed. Both appear promising and complementary in their characteristics.

  10. SSNN toolbox for non-linear system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzar, Marcel; Czajkowski, Andrzej

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop and design a State Space Neural Network toolbox for a non-linear system identification with an artificial state-space neural networks, which can be used in a model-based robust fault diagnosis and control. Such toolbox is implemented in the MATLAB environment and it uses some of its predefined functions. It is designed in the way that any non-linear multi-input multi-output system is identified and represented in the classical state-space form. The novelty of the proposed approach is that the final result of the identification process is the state, input and output matrices, not only the neural network parameters. Moreover, the toolbox is equipped with the graphical user interface, which makes it useful for the users not familiar with the neural networks theory.

  11. An experimental study of nonlinear dynamic system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stry, Greselda I.; Mook, D. Joseph

    1990-01-01

    A technique for robust identification of nonlinear dynamic systems is developed and illustrated using both simulations and analog experiments. The technique is based on the Minimum Model Error optimal estimation approach. A detailed literature review is included in which fundamental differences between the current approach and previous work is described. The most significant feature of the current work is the ability to identify nonlinear dynamic systems without prior assumptions regarding the form of the nonlinearities, in constrast to existing nonlinear identification approaches which usually require detailed assumptions of the nonlinearities. The example illustrations indicate that the method is robust with respect to prior ignorance of the model, and with respect to measurement noise, measurement frequency, and measurement record length.

  12. Continuous-Time System Identification of a Smoking Cessation Intervention.

    PubMed

    Timms, Kevin P; Rivera, Daniel E; Collins, Linda M; Piper, Megan E

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major global public health issue and the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Toward a goal of designing better smoking cessation treatments, system identification techniques are applied to intervention data to describe smoking cessation as a process of behavior change. System identification problems that draw from two modeling paradigms in quantitative psychology (statistical mediation and self-regulation) are considered, consisting of a series of continuous-time estimation problems. A continuous-time dynamic modeling approach is employed to describe the response of craving and smoking rates during a quit attempt, as captured in data from a smoking cessation clinical trial. The use of continuous-time models provide benefits of parsimony, ease of interpretation, and the opportunity to work with uneven or missing data. PMID:25382865

  13. Machine vision system for verification and identification of tire treads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Kwan-Hwa; Chen, Penny; Shubinsky, Gary D.

    1993-08-01

    A machine vision system was developed by BIRL to provide verification and identification of tire treads on the fabrication line. This paper discusses technical aspects of this successful application, from the original design to the final implementation. Specific emphases are given to the hardware and software implementation of the image acquisition and processing of the system. Aspects regarding the imaging of highly absorptive material (black rubber) and rapidly moving target are also discussed. Problems encountered during the development and integration of the system are described, and solutions are presented.

  14. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment—Prince William Sound. (a) Until December 31, 2004, each... of this subchapter must do so by an installed Automatic Identification System Shipborne...

  15. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment—Prince William Sound. (a) Until December 31, 2004, each... of this subchapter must do so by an installed Automatic Identification System Shipborne...

  16. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment—Prince William Sound. (a) Until December 31, 2004, each... of this subchapter must do so by an installed Automatic Identification System Shipborne...

  17. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment—Prince William Sound. (a) Until December 31, 2004, each... of this subchapter must do so by an installed Automatic Identification System Shipborne...

  18. Rapid identification of Listeria spp.: an AOAC performance test of the MIT 1000 rapid microbial identification system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods that rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The Micro Imaging Technology (MIT) 1000 Rapid Microbial Identification (RMID) System is a benchtop instrument that detects laser light scattered from individual bacterial cells in solution with an array of 35 ...

  19. Gunshot identification system by integration of open source consumer electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López R., Juan Manuel; Marulanda B., Jose Ignacio

    2014-05-01

    This work presents a prototype of low-cost gunshots identification system that uses consumer electronics in order to ensure the existence of gunshots and then classify it according to a previously established database. The implementation of this tool in the urban areas is to set records that support the forensics, hence improving law enforcement also on developing countries. An analysis of its effectiveness is presented in comparison with theoretical results obtained with numerical simulations.

  20. Effect of sterol metabolism in the yeast-Drosophila system on the frequency of radiation-induced aneuploidy in the Drosophila melanogaster oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Savitskii, V.V.; Luchnikova, E.M.; Inge-Vechtomov, S.G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of sterol metabolism on induced mutagenesis of Drosophila melanogaster was studied in the ecogenetic system of yeast-Drosophila. Sterol deficiency was created in Drosophila by using the biomass of live cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 9-2-P712 till mutation in locus nys/sup r1/ blocking the synthesis of ergosterol as the food. It was found that rearing of Drosophila females on the mutant yeast increases the frequency of loss and nondisjunction of X chromosomes induced in mature oocytes by X rays (1000 R). Addition of 0.1% of cholesterol solution in 10% ethanol to the yeast biomass restores the resistance of oocyte to X irradiation to the control level. The possible hormonal effect on membrane leading to increased radiation-induced aneuploidy in Drosophila and the role of sterol metabolism in determining the resistance to various damaging factors are discussed.

  1. Identification of Novel Host Factors via Conserved Domain Search: Cns1 Cochaperone Is a Novel Restriction Factor of Tombusvirus Replication in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing-Yi

    2013-01-01

    A large number of host-encoded proteins affect the replication of plus-stranded RNA viruses by acting as susceptibility factors. Many other cellular proteins are known to function as restriction factors of viral infections. Previous studies with tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) in a yeast model host have revealed the inhibitory function of TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domain-containing cyclophilins, which are members of the large family of host prolyl isomerases, in TBSV replication. In this paper, we tested additional TPR-containing yeast proteins in a cell-free TBSV replication assay and identified the Cns1p cochaperone for heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and Hsp90 chaperones as a strong inhibitor of TBSV replication. Cns1p interacted with the viral replication proteins and inhibited the assembly of the viral replicase complex and viral RNA synthesis in vitro. Overexpression of Cns1p inhibited TBSV replication in yeast. The use of a temperature-sensitive (TS) mutant of Cns1p in yeast revealed that at a semipermissive temperature, TS Cns1p could not inhibit TBSV replication. Interestingly, Cns1p and the TPR-containing Cpr7p cyclophilin have similar inhibitory functions during TBSV replication, although some of the details of their viral restriction mechanisms are different. Our observations indicate that TPR-containing cellular proteins could act as virus restriction factors. PMID:24027337

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ALKANE-INDUCIBLE CYTOCHROME P450 (P450ALK) GENE FROM THE YEAST CANDIDA TROPICALIS: IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW P450 FAMILY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The P450alk gene, which is inducible by the assimilation of alkane in Candida tropicalis, was sequenced and characterized. Structural features described in promoter and terminator regions of Saccharomyces yeast genes are present in the P450alk gene and some particular structures ...

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ALKANE-INDUCIBLE CYTOCHROME P450 (P450ALK) GENE FROM THE YEAST CANDIDA TROPICALIS: IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW P450 GENE FAMILY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The P450ALK gene, which is inducible by the assimilation of alkane in Candida tropicalis, was sequenced and characterized. tructural features described in promoter and terminator regions of Saccharomyces yeast genes are present in the P450alk gene and some particular structures a...

  4. Molecular identification and physiological characterization of yeasts, lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria isolated from heap and box cocoa bean fermentations in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Visintin, Simonetta; Alessandria, Valentina; Valente, Antonio; Dolci, Paola; Cocolin, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Yeast, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB) populations, isolated from cocoa bean heap and box fermentations in West Africa, have been investigated. The fermentation dynamicswere determined by viable counts, and 106 yeasts, 105 LAB and 82 AAB isolateswere identified by means of rep-PCR grouping and sequencing of the rRNA genes. During the box fermentations, the most abundant species were Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida ethanolica, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Acetobacter pasteurianus and Acetobacter syzygii, while S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia manshurica, C. ethanolica, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Lb. fermentum, Lb. plantarum, A. pasteurianus and Acetobacter lovaniensis were identified in the heap fermentations. Furthermore, the most abundant species were molecularly characterized by analyzing the rep-PCR profiles. Strains grouped according to the type of fermentations and their progression during the transformation process were also highlighted. The yeast, LAB and AAB isolates were physiologically characterized to determine their ability to grow at different temperatures, as well as at different pH, and ethanol concentrations, tolerance to osmotic stress, and lactic acid and acetic acid inhibition. Temperatures of 45 °C, a pH of 2.5 to 3.5, 12% (v/v) ethanol and high concentrations of lactic and acetic acid have a significant influence on the growth of yeasts, LAB and AAB. Finally, the yeastswere screened for enzymatic activity, and the S. cerevisiae, H. guilliermondii, H. uvarumand C. ethanolica species were shown to possess several enzymes that may impact the quality of the final product. PMID:26425801

  5. System IDentification Programs for AirCraft (SIDPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2002-01-01

    A collection of computer programs for aircraft system identification is described and demonstrated. The programs, collectively called System IDentification Programs for AirCraft, or SIDPAC, were developed in MATLAB as m-file functions. SIDPAC has been used successfully at NASA Langley Research Center with data from many different flight test programs and wind tunnel experiments. SIDPAC includes routines for experiment design, data conditioning, data compatibility analysis, model structure determination, equation-error and output-error parameter estimation in both the time and frequency domains, real-time and recursive parameter estimation, low order equivalent system identification, estimated parameter error calculation, linear and nonlinear simulation, plotting, and 3-D visualization. An overview of SIDPAC capabilities is provided, along with a demonstration of the use of SIDPAC with real flight test data from the NASA Glenn Twin Otter aircraft. The SIDPAC software is available without charge to U.S. citizens by request to the author, contingent on the requestor completing a NASA software usage agreement.

  6. High-frequency Model Identification of PM Synchronous Motor based on System Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kouhei; Doki, Shinji; Ishida, Muneaki

    This paper deals with the expression of the high-frequency model of permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) driven by a PWM inverter. The leakage current (common-mode current) flows through stray capacitance among stator windings and iron core (frame) of a synchronous motor at the switching instants of inverter transistors. A mathematical model of high-frequency model of PMSM are derived voltage and current data at the time of a PWM inverter drive based on system identification. It is verified that the proposed model can simulate oscillating current of various operating points on some motors.

  7. The Yeast Three-Hybrid System as an Experimental Platform to Identify Proteins Interacting with Small Signaling Molecules in Plant Cells: Potential and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Cottier, Stéphanie; Mönig, Timon; Wang, Zheming; Svoboda, Jiří; Boland, Wilhelm; Kaiser, Markus; Kombrink, Erich

    2011-01-01

    Chemical genetics is a powerful scientific strategy that utilizes small bioactive molecules as experimental tools to unravel biological processes. Bioactive compounds occurring in nature represent an enormous diversity of structures that can be used to dissect functions of biological systems. Once the bioactivity of a natural or synthetic compound has been critically evaluated the challenge remains to identify its molecular target and mode of action, which usually is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. To facilitate this task, we decided to implement the yeast three-hybrid (Y3H) technology as a general experimental platform to scan the whole Arabidopsis proteome for targets of small signaling molecules. The Y3H technology is based on the yeast two-hybrid system and allows direct cloning of proteins that interact in vivo with a synthetic hybrid ligand, which comprises the biologically active molecule of interest covalently linked to methotrexate (Mtx). In yeast nucleus the hybrid ligand connects two fusion proteins: the Mtx part binding to dihydrofolate reductase fused to a DNA-binding domain (encoded in the yeast strain), and the bioactive molecule part binding to its potential protein target fused to a DNA-activating domain (encoded on a cDNA expression vector). During cDNA library screening, the formation of this ternary, transcriptional activator complex leads to reporter gene activation in yeast cells, and thereby allows selection of the putative targets of small bioactive molecules of interest. Here we present the strategy and experimental details for construction and application of a Y3H platform, including chemical synthesis of different hybrid ligands, construction of suitable cDNA libraries, the choice of yeast strains, and appropriate screening conditions. Based on the results obtained and the current literature we discuss the perspectives and limitations of the Y3H approach for identifying targets of small bioactive molecules. PMID:22639623

  8. Characterization of two mutations associated with epimerase-deficiency galactosemia, by use of a yeast expression system for human UDP-galactose-4-epimerase.

    PubMed Central

    Quimby, B B; Alano, A; Almashanu, S; DeSandro, A M; Cowan, T M; Fridovich-Keil, J L

    1997-01-01

    UDP-galactose-4-epimerase (GALE) is a highly conserved enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of UDP-galactose and UDP-glucose. Impairment of this enzyme in humans results in one of two clinically distinct forms of epimerase-deficiency galactosemia-one benign, the other severe. The molecular and biochemical distinction between these disorders remains unknown. To enable structural and functional studies of both wild-type and patient-derived alleles of human GALE (hGALE), we have developed and applied a null-background yeast expression system for the human enzyme. We have demonstrated that wild-type hGALE sequences phenotypically complement a yeast gal10 deletion, and we have biochemically characterized the wild-type human enzyme isolated from these cells. Furthermore, we have expressed and characterized two mutant alleles, L183P-hGALE and N34S-hGALE, both derived from a patient with no detectable GALE activity in red blood cells but with approximately 14% activity in cultured lymphoblasts. Analyses of crude extracts of yeast expressing L183P-hGALE demonstrated 4% wild-type activity and 6% wild-type abundance. Extracts of yeast expressing N34S-hGALE demonstrated approximately 70% wild-type activity and normal abundance. However, yeast coexpressing both L183P-hGALE and N34S-hGALE exhibited only approximately 7% wild-type levels of activity, thereby confirming the functional impact of both substitutions and raising the intriguing possibility that some form of dominant-negative interaction may exist between the mutant alleles found in this patient. The results reported here establish the utility of the yeast-based hGALE-expression system and set the stage for more-detailed studies of this important enzyme and its role in epimerase-deficiency galactosemia. Images Figure 6 PMID:9326324

  9. Validation of High Resolution Melting Analysis (HRM) of the Amplified ITS2 Region for the Detection and Identification of Yeasts from Clinical Samples: Comparison with Culture and MALDI-TOF Based Identification

    PubMed Central

    Duyvejonck, Hans; Cools, Piet; Decruyenaere, Johan; Roelens, Kristien; Noens, Lucien; Vermeulen, Stefan; Claeys, Geert; Decat, Ellen; Van Mechelen, Els; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Aim Candida species are known as opportunistic pathogens, and a possible cause of invasive infections. Because of their species-specific antimycotic resistance patterns, reliable techniques for their detection, quantification and identification are needed. We validated a DNA amplification method for direct detection of Candida spp. from clinical samples, namely the ITS2-High Resolution Melting Analysis (direct method), by comparing it with a culture and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry based method (indirect method) to establish the presence of Candida species in three different types of clinical samples. Materials and Methods A total of 347 clinical samples, i.e. throat swabs, rectal swabs and vaginal swabs, were collected from the gynaecology/obstetrics, intensive care and haematology wards at the Ghent University Hospital, Belgium. For the direct method, ITS2-HRM was preceded by NucliSENS easyMAG DNA extraction, directly on the clinical samples. For the indirect method, clinical samples were cultured on Candida ID and individual colonies were identified by MALDI-TOF. Results For 83.9% of the samples there was complete concordance between both techniques, i.e. the same Candida species were detected in 31.1% of the samples or no Candida species were detected in 52.8% of the samples. In 16.1% of the clinical samples, discrepant results were obtained, of which only 6.01% were considered as major discrepancies. Discrepancies occurred mostly when overall numbers of Candida cells in the samples were low and/or when multiple species were present in the sample. Discussion Most of the discrepancies could be decided in the advantage of the direct method. This is due to samples in which no yeast could be cultured whereas low amounts could be detected by the direct method and to samples in which high quantities of Candida robusta according to ITS2-HRM were missed by culture on Candida ID agar. It remains to be decided whether the diagnostic advantages of the direct method compensate for its disadvantages. PMID:26295947

  10. Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Kerry D [Kennewick, WA; Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Gilbert, Ronald W [Morgan Hill, CA

    2011-02-01

    Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a communications device identification method includes providing identification information regarding a group of wireless identification devices within a wireless communications range of a reader, using the provided identification information, selecting one of a plurality of different search procedures for identifying unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices within the wireless communications range, and identifying at least some of the unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices using the selected one of the search procedures.

  11. Identification and Analysis of National Airspace System Resource Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Marien, Ty V.; Viken, Jeffery K.; Neitzke, Kurt W.; Kwa, Tech-Seng; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.; Fenbert, James W.; Hinze, Nicolas K.

    2015-01-01

    This analysis is the deliverable for the Airspace Systems Program, Systems Analysis Integration and Evaluation Project Milestone for the Systems and Portfolio Analysis (SPA) focus area SPA.4.06 Identification and Analysis of National Airspace System (NAS) Resource Constraints and Mitigation Strategies. "Identify choke points in the current and future NAS. Choke points refer to any areas in the en route, terminal, oceanic, airport, and surface operations that constrain actual demand in current and projected future operations. Use the Common Scenarios based on Transportation Systems Analysis Model (TSAM) projections of future demand developed under SPA.4.04 Tools, Methods and Scenarios Development. Analyze causes, including operational and physical constraints." The NASA analysis is complementary to a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) "Development of Tools and Analysis to Evaluate Choke Points in the National Airspace System" Contract # NNA3AB95C awarded to Logistics Management Institute, Sept 2013.

  12. An approximation theory for the identification of linear thermoelastic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, I. G.; Su, Chien-Hua Frank

    1990-01-01

    An abstract approximation framework and convergence theory for the identification of thermoelastic systems is developed. Starting from an abstract operator formulation consisting of a coupled second order hyperbolic equation of elasticity and first order parabolic equation for heat conduction, well-posedness is established using linear semigroup theory in Hilbert space, and a class of parameter estimation problems is then defined involving mild solutions. The approximation framework is based upon generic Galerkin approximation of the mild solutions, and convergence of solutions of the resulting sequence of approximating finite dimensional parameter identification problems to a solution of the original infinite dimensional inverse problem is established using approximation results for operator semigroups. An example involving the basic equations of one dimensional linear thermoelasticity and a linear spline based scheme are discussed. Numerical results indicate how the approach might be used in a study of damping mechanisms in flexible structures.

  13. Inverse source localization for EEG using system identification approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xanthopoulos, Petros; Yatsenko, Vitaliy; Kammerdiner, Alla; Pardalos, Panos M.

    2007-11-01

    The reconstruction of the brain current sources from scalp electric recordings (Electroen-cephalogram) also known as the inverse source localization problem is a highly underdetermined problem in the field of computational neuroscience, and this problem still remains open . In this chapter we propose an alternative formulation for the inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem based on optimization theory. For simulation purposes, a three shell realistic head model based on an averaged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) segmentation and Boundary Element method (BEM) is constructed. System identification methodology is employed in order to determine the parameters of the system. In the last stage the inverse problem is solved using the computed forward model.

  14. Non-parametric identification of non-linear oscillating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peifer, M.; Timmer, J.; Voss, H. U.

    2003-11-01

    The problem of system identification from a time series of measurements is solved by using non-parametric additive models. Having only few structural information about the system, a non-parametric approach may be more appropriate than a parametric one for which detailed prior knowledge is needed. Based on non-parametric regression, the functions in the additive models are estimated by a penalized least-squares approach using backfitting. The optimal smoothing parameters are determined via generalized cross-validation, making this approach completely adaptive to the data. The procedure is applied to identify the non-linear restoring force of vibrationally excited helical wire rope isolators.

  15. Protein-protein interactions in two potyviruses using the yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Shi, Yuhong; Luo, Zhaopeng; Lu, Yuwen; Zheng, Hongying; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jiong; Chen, Jianping; Adams, M J; Wu, Yunfeng

    2009-06-01

    Interactions between all ten mature proteins of the potyviruses Soybean mosaic virus (Pinellia ternata isolate) and Shallot yellow stripe virus were investigated using yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assays. Consistently strong self-interactions were found between the pairs of HC-Pro, VPg, NIa-Pro, NIb and CP in both viruses. Apart from the NIb, such interactions have been previously reported for some other potyviruses. The 6K1/NIa-Pro combination gave a consistently moderate to strong interaction in both directions for both viruses. This interaction occurred even when the 6K1 of SMV-P was truncated to eliminate the C-terminal motif that acts as a recognition site for cleavage by the NIa-Pro. Many other interactions occurred only in one direction or only for one of the two viruses. When taken together with other published reports, the data suggest that interactions detected by Y2H should be regarded as only preliminary indications. PMID:19189854

  16. A cre-lox recombination system for the targeted integration of circular yeast artificial chromosomes into embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Call, L M; Moore, C S; Stetten, G; Gearhart, J D

    2000-07-22

    The ability to produce embryonic stem (ES) cell lines containing different yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) integrated into the same location in the genome provides a system for comparing the bio-logical effects of YAC transgenes without the confounding influences of integration site and copy number. A targeting system was developed for the directed integration of circular YACs into mouse ES cells. The system combines Cre-lox recombination technology, specifically a positive-selection integration system, with circular YAC lipofection technology to achieve single copy targeted integration of a transgene. Three independent germline competent ES cell lines [lox-containing ES lines (designated LES)] were created that contain a '-neo-lox' cassette integrated at different sites within the ES genome. A plasmid containing YAC vector sequences and a complementary '-neo-lox' cassette was used to circularize two linear YACs containing genomic DNA from human chromosome 21. The circularized YACs were then targeted to the lox sites of the LES cell lines. Polymerase chain reaction and Southern analysis demonstrated that 21% (5 of 24) of lox-recombinants contain a full-length intact YAC. This system will make the study of YAC transgenic mice more reliable and reproducible, allowing the potential for direct comparison of different transgenes expressed from the same site within the genome. PMID:10915762

  17. The Yin and Yang of Yeast Transcription: Elements of a Global Feedback System between Metabolism and Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Machné, Rainer; Murray, Douglas B.

    2012-01-01

    When grown in continuous culture, budding yeast cells tend to synchronize their respiratory activity to form a stable oscillation that percolates throughout cellular physiology and involves the majority of the protein-coding transcriptome. Oscillations in batch culture and at single cell level support the idea that these dynamics constitute a general growth principle. The precise molecular mechanisms and biological functions of the oscillation remain elusive. Fourier analysis of transcriptome time series datasets from two different oscillation periods (0.7 h and 5 h) reveals seven distinct co-expression clusters common to both systems (34% of all yeast ORF), which consolidate into two superclusters when correlated with a compilation of 1,327 unrelated transcriptome datasets. These superclusters encode for cell growth and anabolism during the phase of high, and mitochondrial growth, catabolism and stress response during the phase of low oxygen uptake. The promoters of each cluster are characterized by different nucleotide contents, promoter nucleosome configurations, and dependence on ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling complexes. We show that the ATP:ADP ratio oscillates, compatible with alternating metabolic activity of the two superclusters and differential feedback on their transcription via activating (RSC) and repressive (Isw2) types of promoter structure remodeling. We propose a novel feedback mechanism, where the energetic state of the cell, reflected in the ATP:ADP ratio, gates the transcription of large, but functionally coherent groups of genes via differential effects of ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling machineries. Besides providing a mechanistic hypothesis for the delayed negative feedback that results in the oscillatory phenotype, this mechanism may underpin the continuous adaptation of growth to environmental conditions. PMID:22685547

  18. Direct Identification of Urinary Tract Pathogens From Urine Samples Using the Vitek MS System Based on Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeongsic; Park, Kang Gyun; Lee, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the coincidence rate between Vitek MS system (bioMérieux, France) and Vitek 2 in identifying uropathogens directly from urine specimens. Methods Urine specimens submitted to our microbiology laboratory between July and September 2013 for Gram staining and bacterial culture were analyzed. Bacterial identification was performed by using the conventional method. Urine specimens showing a single morphotype by Gram staining were processed by culturing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Of 2,370 urine specimens, 251 showed a single morphotype on Gram staining, and among them, 202 were available for MALDI-TOF MS. Results In these 202 specimens, colony growth was observed in 189 specimens, and 145 specimens had significant growth of single-colony morphotype in culture. One hundred and ten (75.9%) of them had colony counts of ?105 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL and included 71 enteric gram-negative bacteria (GNB), 5 glucose-non-fermenting GNB, 9 gram-positive cocci (GPC), and 25 yeasts. Furthermore, 70 (98.6%), 3 (60.0%), 4 (44.4%), and 5 (20.0%), respectively, of these were correctly identified by Vitek MS. Thirty-one specimens (21.4%; 11 GNB, 7 GPC, 12 yeasts, and 1 gram-positive bacillus) had colony counts of 104-105 CFU/mL. Four specimens (2.8%) yielded colony counts of 103-104 CFU/mL. Conclusions Vitek MS showed high rate of accuracy for the identification of GNB in urine specimens (?105 CFU/mL). This could become a rapid and accurate diagnostic method for urinary tract infection caused by GNB. However, for the identification of GPC and yeasts, further studies on appropriate pre-treatment are warranted. PMID:26131413

  19. Nonlinear stochastic system identification of skin using volterra kernels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Hunter, Ian W

    2013-04-01

    Volterra kernel stochastic system identification is a technique that can be used to capture and model nonlinear dynamics in biological systems, including the nonlinear properties of skin during indentation. A high bandwidth and high stroke Lorentz force linear actuator system was developed and used to test the mechanical properties of bulk skin and underlying tissue in vivo using a non-white input force and measuring an output position. These short tests (5 s) were conducted in an indentation configuration normal to the skin surface and in an extension configuration tangent to the skin surface. Volterra kernel solution methods were used including a fast least squares procedure and an orthogonalization solution method. The practical modifications, such as frequency domain filtering, necessary for working with low-pass filtered inputs are also described. A simple linear stochastic system identification technique had a variance accounted for (VAF) of less than 75%. Representations using the first and second Volterra kernels had a much higher VAF (90-97%) as well as a lower Akaike information criteria (AICc) indicating that the Volterra kernel models were more efficient. The experimental second Volterra kernel matches well with results from a dynamic-parameter nonlinearity model with fixed mass as a function of depth as well as stiffness and damping that increase with depth into the skin. A study with 16 subjects showed that the kernel peak values have mean coefficients of variation (CV) that ranged from 3 to 8% and showed that the kernel principal components were correlated with location on the body, subject mass, body mass index (BMI), and gender. These fast and robust methods for Volterra kernel stochastic system identification can be applied to the characterization of biological tissues, diagnosis of skin diseases, and determination of consumer product efficacy. PMID:23264003

  20. Sensor network based vehicle classification and license plate identification system

    SciTech Connect

    Frigo, Janette Rose; Brennan, Sean M; Rosten, Edward J; Raby, Eric Y; Kulathumani, Vinod K

    2009-01-01

    Typically, for energy efficiency and scalability purposes, sensor networks have been used in the context of environmental and traffic monitoring applications in which operations at the sensor level are not computationally intensive. But increasingly, sensor network applications require data and compute intensive sensors such video cameras and microphones. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of two such systems: a vehicle classifier based on acoustic signals and a license plate identification system using a camera. The systems are implemented in an energy-efficient manner to the extent possible using commercially available hardware, the Mica motes and the Stargate platform. Our experience in designing these systems leads us to consider an alternate more flexible, modular, low-power mote architecture that uses a combination of FPGAs, specialized embedded processing units and sensor data acquisition systems.

  1. Identification of crucial yeast inhibitors in bio-ethanol and improvement of fermentation at high pH and high total solids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongzhi; Guo, Xinyan; Li, Dongmin; Liu, Mengmeng; Wu, Jiafang; Ren, Haiyu

    2011-08-01

    Compounds inhibitory to enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation are generated from neutral steam exploded corn stover in the process of producing bio-ethanol. In this study, weak acids were identified as main yeast inhibitors, while phenols and aldehyde contribute to the inhibition to a lower degree. Main weak acids in hydrolysates are acetic acid and formic acid, for which critical levels for yeast inhibition are 6 and 4g/L, respectively. The inhibitory effect of these compounds can be greatly overcome by increasing pH of hydrolysates to 6.0-9.0, but there is a risk of bacterial contamination when fermenting at high pH. The relationship of pH, total solids of hydrolysates, fermentation and contamination was studied in detail. Results indicate that the contamination by bacteria when fermenting at high pH can be prevented effectively using hydrolysates with total solids of more than 20%. Meanwhile, ethanol yield is improved significantly. PMID:21624827

  2. 49 CFR 1544.231 - Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRCRAFT OPERATOR SECURITY: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Operations § 1544.231 Airport-approved... operator security program, revalidate the identification system or reissue identification media if...

  3. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  4. Identification of novel causative genes determining the complex trait of high ethanol tolerance in yeast using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Swinnen, Steve; Schaerlaekens, Kristien; Pais, Thiago; Claesen, Jürgen; Hubmann, Georg; Yang, Yudi; Demeke, Mekonnen; Foulquié-Moreno, María R.; Goovaerts, Annelies; Souvereyns, Kris; Clement, Lieven; Dumortier, Françoise; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2012-01-01

    High ethanol tolerance is an exquisite characteristic of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which enables this microorganism to dominate in natural and industrial fermentations. Up to now, ethanol tolerance has only been analyzed in laboratory yeast strains with moderate ethanol tolerance. The genetic basis of the much higher ethanol tolerance in natural and industrial yeast strains is unknown. We have applied pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis to map all quantitative trait loci (QTL) determining high ethanol tolerance. We crossed a highly ethanol-tolerant segregant of a Brazilian bioethanol production strain with a laboratory strain with moderate ethanol tolerance. Out of 5974 segregants, we pooled 136 segregants tolerant to at least 16% ethanol and 31 segregants tolerant to at least 17%. Scoring of SNPs using whole-genome sequence analysis of DNA from the two pools and parents revealed three major loci and additional minor loci. The latter were more pronounced or only present in the 17% pool compared to the 16% pool. In the locus with the strongest linkage, we identified three closely located genes affecting ethanol tolerance: MKT1, SWS2, and APJ1, with SWS2 being a negative allele located in between two positive alleles. SWS2 and APJ1 probably contained significant polymorphisms only outside the ORF, and lower expression of APJ1 may be linked to higher ethanol tolerance. This work has identified the first causative genes involved in high ethanol tolerance of yeast. It also reveals the strong potential of pooled-segregant sequence analysis using relatively small numbers of selected segregants for identifying QTL on a genome-wide scale. PMID:22399573

  5. Discovery of a nucleocytoplasmic O-mannose glycoproteome in yeast.

    PubMed

    Halim, Adnan; Larsen, Ida Signe Bohse; Neubert, Patrick; Joshi, Hiren Jitendra; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Strahl, Sabine; Clausen, Henrik

    2015-12-22

    Dynamic cycling of N-Acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) on serine and threonine residues (O-GlcNAcylation) is an essential process in all eukaryotic cells except yeast, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. O-GlcNAcylation modulates signaling and cellular processes in an intricate interplay with protein phosphorylation and serves as a key sensor of nutrients by linking the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway to cellular signaling. A longstanding conundrum has been how yeast survives without O-GlcNAcylation in light of its similar phosphorylation signaling system. We previously developed a sensitive lectin enrichment and mass spectrometry workflow for identification of the human O-linked mannose (O-Man) glycoproteome and used this to identify a pleothora of O-Man glycoproteins in human cell lines including the large family of cadherins and protocadherins. Here, we applied the workflow to yeast with the aim to characterize the yeast O-Man glycoproteome, and in doing so, we discovered hitherto unknown O-Man glycosites on nuclear, cytoplasmic, and mitochondrial proteins in S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Such O-Man glycoproteins were not found in our analysis of human cell lines. However, the type of yeast O-Man nucleocytoplasmic proteins and the localization of identified O-Man residues mirror that of the O-GlcNAc glycoproteome found in other eukaryotic cells, indicating that the two different types of O-glycosylations serve the same important biological functions. The discovery opens for exploration of the enzymatic machinery that is predicted to regulate the nucleocytoplasmic O-Man glycosylations. It is likely that manipulation of this type of O-Man glycosylation will have wide applications for yeast bioprocessing. PMID:26644575

  6. Construction and analysis of the cDNA subtraction library of yeast and mycelial phases of Sporothrix globosa isolated in China: identification of differentially expressed genes*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qing-bi; He, Yu; Zhou, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Species included in the Sporothrix schenckii complex are temperature-dependent with dimorphic growth and cause sporotrichosis that is characterized by chronic and fatal lymphocutaneous lesions. The putative species included in the Sporothrix complex are S. brasiliensis, S. globosa, S. mexicana, S. pallida, S. schenckii, and S. lurei. S. globosa is the causal agent of sporotrichosis in China, and its pathogenicity appears to be closely related to the dimorphic transition, i.e. from the mycelial to the yeast phase, it adapts to changing environmental conditions. To determine the molecular mechanisms of the switching process that mediates the dimorphic transition of S. globosa, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to prepare a complementary DNA (cDNA) subtraction library from the yeast and mycelial phases. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to profile the relationship between differently expressed genes and the dimorphic transition. Two genes that were expressed at higher levels by the yeast form were selected, and their differential expression levels were verified using a quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). It is believed that these differently expressed genes are involved in the pathogenesis of S. globosa infection in China. PMID:26642182

  7. Construction and analysis of the cDNA subtraction library of yeast and mycelial phases of Sporothrix globosa isolated in China: identification of differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qing-Bi; He, Yu; Zhou, Xun

    2015-12-01

    Species included in the Sporothrix schenckii complex are temperature-dependent with dimorphic growth and cause sporotrichosis that is characterized by chronic and fatal lymphocutaneous lesions. The putative species included in the Sporothrix complex are S. brasiliensis, S. globosa, S. mexicana, S. pallida, S. schenckii, and S. lurei. S. globosa is the causal agent of sporotrichosis in China, and its pathogenicity appears to be closely related to the dimorphic transition, i.e. from the mycelial to the yeast phase, it adapts to changing environmental conditions. To determine the molecular mechanisms of the switching process that mediates the dimorphic transition of S. globosa, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to prepare a complementary DNA (cDNA) subtraction library from the yeast and mycelial phases. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to profile the relationship between differently expressed genes and the dimorphic transition. Two genes that were expressed at higher levels by the yeast form were selected, and their differential expression levels were verified using a quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). It is believed that these differently expressed genes are involved in the pathogenesis of S. globosa infection in China. PMID:26642182

  8. Spatiotemporal System Identification With Continuous Spatial Maps and Sparse Estimation.

    PubMed

    Aram, Parham; Kadirkamanathan, Visakan; Anderson, Sean R

    2015-11-01

    We present a framework for the identification of spatiotemporal linear dynamical systems. We use a state-space model representation that has the following attributes: 1) the number of spatial observation locations are decoupled from the model order; 2) the model allows for spatial heterogeneity; 3) the model representation is continuous over space; and 4) the model parameters can be identified in a simple and sparse estimation procedure. The model identification procedure we propose has four steps: 1) decomposition of the continuous spatial field using a finite set of basis functions where spatial frequency analysis is used to determine basis function width and spacing, such that the main spatial frequency contents of the underlying field can be captured; 2) initialization of states in closed form; 3) initialization of state-transition and input matrix model parameters using sparse regression-the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator method; and 4) joint state and parameter estimation using an iterative Kalman-filter/sparse-regression algorithm. To investigate the performance of the proposed algorithm we use data generated by the Kuramoto model of spatiotemporal cortical dynamics. The identification algorithm performs successfully, predicting the spatiotemporal field with high accuracy, whilst the sparse regression leads to a compact model. PMID:25647667

  9. Microchip implant system used for animal identification in laboratory rabbits, guineapigs, woodchucks and in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Mrozek, M; Fischer, R; Trendelenburg, M; Zillmann, U

    1995-07-01

    Traditional methods for animal identification have a number of drawbacks. We evaluated a new system for individual identification using microchip implants in rabbits, guineapigs, woodchucks (Marmota monax) and amphibians (Xenopus laevis, Pleurodeles waltlii). Implantation procedure and long-term observations are described. Microchip implants proved to be a practicable and reliable system for animal identification without obvious adverse effects. The applicability of electronic animal identification in comparison with common methods and with regard to animal welfare and legal aspects is discussed. PMID:7564221

  10. Rare yeasts causing fungemia in immunocompromised and haematology patients: Case series from Delhi.

    PubMed

    Capoor, M R; Gupta, D K; Verma, P K; Sachdeva, H C

    2015-01-01

    Systemic fungal infection related to fluconazole-resistant yeasts are emerging in immunocompromised patients. In this case-series, we report eight cases of fungemia caused by Trichosporon spp. (2), Stephanoascus ceferrii (1), Kodamaea ohmeri (1), Pichia kutrawersi (2), Candida rugosa (1) and Candida lusitianae (1) in immunocompromised patients. All the yeasts except (Trichosporon asahii) were sequenced. As these rare species are inherently resistant to antifungal agents and they may lead to the development of nosocomial outbreaks, therefore, accurate identification followed by antifungal susceptibility testing is crucial for proper treatment and management. PMID:26470968

  11. Identification of linear systems by an asymptotically stable observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh Q.; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Longman, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    A formulation is presented for the identification of a linear multivariable system from single or multiple sets of input-output data. The system input-output relationship is expressed in terms of an observer, which is made asymptotically stable by an embedded eigenvalue assignment procedure. The prescribed eigenvalues for the observer may be real, complex, mixed real and complex, or zero. In this formulation, the Markov parameters of the observer are identified from input-output data. The Markov parameters of the actual system are then recovered from those of the observer and used to obtain a state space model of the system by standard realization techniques. The basic mathematical formulation is derived, and extensive numerical examples using simulated noise-free data are presented to illustrate the proposed method.

  12. Indirect Identification of Linear Stochastic Systems with Known Feedback Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Hsiao, Min-Hung; Cox, David E.

    1996-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for identifying a state-space model of linear stochastic systems operating under known feedback controller. In this algorithm, only the reference input and output of closed-loop data are required. No feedback signal needs to be recorded. The overall closed-loop system dynamics is first identified. Then a recursive formulation is derived to compute the open-loop plant dynamics from the identified closed-loop system dynamics and known feedback controller dynamics. The controller can be a dynamic or constant-gain full-state feedback controller. Numerical simulations and test data of a highly unstable large-gap magnetic suspension system are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this indirect identification method.

  13. System identification and interval analysis of the Green Bank Telescope structure and servo system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranka, Trupti; Garcia-Sanz, Mario; Weadon, Timothy L.; Ford, John

    2014-07-01

    To conduct astronomical observations during windy days and increase the time available for exploration with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) it is necessary to reduce the sensitivity of the telescope structure to wind forces. A promising approach is to design an advanced robust control system for wind induced vibration attenuation. As a first step it is necessary to (1) model analytically the structure and the servo system of the telescope and (2) validate the model through systems identification experiments. This paper presents the results of the identification experiments of the structure and the servo system along with the subsequent interval analysis.

  14. System identification of controlled pulse keyhole plasma arc welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chuanbao; Du, Yongpeng; Guo, Ning; Wang, Fang; Han, Yanfei

    2012-11-01

    The development of closed-loop control systems is one of the most effective ways to improve the stability of the keyhole status during keyhole plasma arc welding (K-PAW). Due to the disadvantages of the "one-pulse-one-keyhole" technology based on the conventional square current waveform, the controlled pulse welding current waveform is newly applied to control the keyhole open and close periodically. In order to realize the real-time control on the keyhole behavior with this advanced current waveform, welding experiments and system identification are conducted based on the classical control theory. One complete welding cycle can be divided into 3 periods. The keyhole establishing time is the most important time variable, which determines the keyhole behavior and welding process stability. At the same time, the averaged efflux plasma arc voltage during one pulse cycle can reflect the real keyhole dimension and status in a real-time manner. Therefore, two single-input-single-output (SISO) systems are proposed, in which keyhole establishing time and keyhole average dimension are taken as the system controlled variables respectively. Welding experiments are designed with the peak current varying randomly. Experiments show that the keyhole establishing time changes in an opposite direction to the varied peak current, and the averaged efflux plasma arc voltage varies with the same trend as the peak current. Based on the least squares technique and F test of classical system identification, second order difference equation for keyhole establishing time/peak current system and first order difference equation for keyhole average dimension/peak current system are obtained. It is proved that the calculated data by the two mathematical expressions are well matched with the measured data. The proposed research provides mathematical expressions and theoretical analysis to develop closed-loop systems for the controlled pulse K-PAW.

  15. Methods, Systems and Apparatuses for Radio Frequency Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Lin, Gregory Y. (Inventor); Kennedy, Timothy F. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Brown, Dewey T. (Inventor); Byerly, Diane (Inventor); Boose, Haley C. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system for radio frequency identification (RFID) includes an enclosure defining an interior region interior to the enclosure, and a feed for generating an electromagnetic field in the interior region in response to a signal received from an RFID reader via a radio frequency (RF) transmission line and, in response to the electromagnetic field, receiving a signal from an RFID sensor attached to an item in the interior region. The structure of the enclosure may be conductive and may include a metamaterial portion, an electromagnetically absorbing portion, or a wall extending in the interior region. Related apparatuses and methods for performing RFID are provided.

  16. DIRC, a new type of particle identification system For BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Schwiening, J.; BABAR-DIRC Collaboration

    1997-12-01

    The DIRC, a new type of Cherenkov imaging device, has been selected as the primary particle identification system for the BABAR detector at the asymmetric B-factory, PEP-II. It is based on total internal reflection and uses long, rectangular bars made from synthetic fused silica as Cherenkov radiators and light guides. In this paper, the principles of the DIRC ring imaging Cherenkov technique are explained and results from the prototype program are presented. The studies of the optical properties and radiation hardness of the quartz radiators are described, followed by a discussion of the detector design.

  17. Identification and robust control of linear parameter-varying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lawton Hubert

    This dissertation deals with linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems: linear dynamic systems that depend on time-varying parameters. These systems appear in gain scheduling problems, and much recent research has been devoted to their prospective usefulness for systematic gain scheduling. We primarily focus on robust control of uncertain LPV systems and identification of LPV systems that are modelable as linear-fractional transformations (LFTs). Using parameter-dependent quadratic Lyapunov functions, linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), and scaled small-gain arguments, we define notions of stability and induced-{cal L}sb2 performance for uncertain LPV systems whose parameters and rates of parameter variation satisfy given bounds. The performance criterion involves integral quadratic constraints and implies naturally parameter-dependent induced-{cal L}sb2 norm bounds. We formulate and solve an {cal H}sb{infty}-like control problem for an LPV plant with measurable parameters and an "Output/State Feedback" structure: the feedback outputs include some noiselessly measured states. Necessary and sufficient solvability conditions reduce to LMIs that can be solved approximately using finite-dimensional convex programming. Reduced-order LPV controllers are constructed from the LMI solutions. A D-K iteration-like procedure provides robustness to structured, time-varying, parametric uncertainty. The design method is applied to a motivating example: flight control for the F-16 VISTA throughout its subsonic flight envelope. Parameter-dependent weights and {cal H}sb{infty} design principles describe the performance objectives. Closed-loop responses exhibited by nonlinear simulations indicate satisfactory flying qualities. Identification of linear-fractional LPV systems is treated using maximum-likelihood parameter estimation. Computing the gradient and Hessian of a maximum-likelihood cost function reduces to simulating one LPV filter per identified parameter. We use nonlinear programming to (locally) minimize the cost function, paying careful attention to the need for good initial estimates. This identification scheme generalizes to all linear systems that can be written as LFTs (e.g., time-invariant, parameter-varying, multidimensional, uncertain). We also address the critical issue of identifiability. We characterize the well-known redundancy of LFT models by manifolds (generated by structured similarity transformations) in the parameter space. Restricting the nonlinear programming for iterative parameter estimation to directions that are orthogonal to the corresponding tangent spaces produces an identifiable local canonical form that greatly reduces the computational burden.

  18. A forward model-based validation of cardiovascular system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    We present a theoretical evaluation of a cardiovascular system identification method that we previously developed for the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in noninvasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and instantaneous lung volume. The method provides a dynamical characterization of the important autonomic and mechanical mechanisms responsible for coupling the fluctuations (inverse modeling). To carry out the evaluation, we developed a computational model of the cardiovascular system capable of generating realistic beat-to-beat variability (forward modeling). We applied the method to data generated from the forward model and compared the resulting estimated dynamics with the actual dynamics of the forward model, which were either precisely known or easily determined. We found that the estimated dynamics corresponded to the actual dynamics and that this correspondence was robust to forward model uncertainty. We also demonstrated the sensitivity of the method in detecting small changes in parameters characterizing autonomic function in the forward model. These results provide confidence in the performance of the cardiovascular system identification method when applied to experimental data.

  19. A grass molecular identification system for forensic botany: a critical evaluation of the strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jodie; Gilmore, Simon R; Robertson, James; Peakall, Rod

    2009-11-01

    Plant material is frequently encountered in criminal investigations but often overlooked as potential evidence. We designed a DNA-based molecular identification system for 100 Australian grasses that consisted of a series of polymerase chain reaction assays that enabled the progressive identification of grasses to different taxonomic levels. The identification system was based on DNA sequence variation at four chloroplast and two mitochondrial loci. Seventeen informative indels and 68 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were utilized as molecular markers for subfamily to species-level identification. To identify an unknown sample to subfamily level required a minimum of four markers or nine markers for species identification. The accuracy of the system was confirmed by blind tests. We have demonstrated "proof of concept" of a molecular identification system for trace botanical samples. Our evaluation suggests that the adoption of a system that combines this approach with DNA sequencing could assist the morphological identification of grasses found as forensic evidence. PMID:19818109

  20. N-Myristoylation of the Rpt2 subunit of the yeast 26S proteasome is implicated in the subcellular compartment-specific protein quality control system.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Ayuko; Kurata, Yoichi; Nakabayashi, Jun; Kagawa, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination is the posttranslational modification of a protein by covalent attachment of ubiquitin. Controlled proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (\\UPS) alleviates cellular stress by clearing misfolded proteins. In budding yeast, UPS within the nucleus degrades the nuclear proteins as well as proteins imported from the cytoplasm. While the predominantly nuclear localization of the yeast proteasome is maintained by the importin-mediated transport, N-myristoylation of the proteasome subunit Rpt2 was indicated to cause dynamic nucleo-cytoplasmic localization of proteasomes. Here, we quantitatively analyzed the ubiquitinated peptides using anti-K-?-GG antibody in yeast cell lines with or without a mutation in the N-myristoylation site of Rpt2 and detected upregulated ubiquitination of proteins with nucleo-cytoplasmic localizations in the mutant strains. Moreover, both the protein and ubiquitinated peptide levels of two Hsp70 family chaperones involved in the nuclear import of misfolded proteins, Ssa and Sse1, were elevated in the mutant strains, whereas levels of an Hsp70 family chaperone involved in the nuclear export, Ssb, were reduced. Taken together, our results indicate that N-myristoylation of Rpt2 is involved in controlled proteolysis via regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic localization of the yeast proteasome. PMID:26344132

  1. Experimental evaluation of a modal parameter based system identification procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Minli; Feng, Ningsheng; Hahn, Eric J.

    2016-02-01

    Correct modelling of the foundation of a rotor bearing foundation system (RBFS) is an invaluable asset for the balancing and efficient running of turbomachinery. Numerical experiments have shown that a modal parameter based identification approach could be feasible for this purpose but there is a lack of experimental verification of the suitability of such a modal approach for even the simplest systems. In this paper the approach is tested on a simple experimental rig comprising a clamped horizontal bar with lumped masses. It is shown that apart from damping, the proposed approach can identify reasonably accurately the relevant modal parameters of the rig; and that the resulting equivalent system can predict reasonably well the frequency response of the rig. Hence, the proposed approach shows promise but further testing is required, since application to identifying the foundation of an RBFS involves the additional problem of accurately obtaining the force excitation from motion measurements.

  2. Part identification in robotic assembly using vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabantaray, Bunil Kumar; Biswal, Bibhuti Bhusan

    2013-12-01

    Machine vision system acts an important role in making robotic assembly system autonomous. Identification of the correct part is an important task which needs to be carefully done by a vision system to feed the robot with correct information for further processing. This process consists of many sub-processes wherein, the image capturing, digitizing and enhancing, etc. do account for reconstructive the part for subsequent operations. Interest point detection of the grabbed image, therefore, plays an important role in the entire image processing activity. Thus it needs to choose the correct tool for the process with respect to the given environment. In this paper analysis of three major corner detection algorithms is performed on the basis of their accuracy, speed and robustness to noise. The work is performed on the Matlab R2012a. An attempt has been made to find the best algorithm for the problem.

  3. A Gamma Memory Neural Network for System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.; Principe, Jose C.

    1992-01-01

    A gamma neural network topology is investigated for a system identification application. A discrete gamma memory structure is used in the input layer, providing delayed values of both the control inputs and the network output to the input layer. The discrete gamma memory structure implements a tapped dispersive delay line, with the amount of dispersion regulated by a single, adaptable parameter. The network is trained using static back propagation, but captures significant features of the system dynamics. The system dynamics identified with the network are the Mach number dynamics of the 16 Foot Transonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The training data spans an operating range of Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.3.

  4. Genome and Transcriptome Analysis of the Food-Yeast Candida utilis

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yasuyuki; Ikeo, Kazuho; Tamakawa, Hideyuki; Gojobori, Takashi; Ikushima, Shigehito

    2012-01-01

    The industrially important food-yeast Candida utilis is a Crabtree effect-negative yeast used to produce valuable chemicals and recombinant proteins. In the present study, we conducted whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of C. utilis, which showed that this yeast diverged long before the formation of the CUG and Saccharomyces/Kluyveromyces clades. In addition, we performed comparative genome and transcriptome analyses using next-generation sequencing, which resulted in the identification of genes important for characteristic phenotypes of C. utilis such as those involved in nitrate assimilation, in addition to the gene encoding the functional hexose transporter. We also found that an antisense transcript of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene, which in silico analysis did not predict to be a functional gene, was transcribed in the stationary-phase, suggesting a novel system of repression of ethanol production. These findings should facilitate the development of more sophisticated systems for the production of useful reagents using C. utilis. PMID:22629373

  5. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing techniques. Bootstrap techniques have been developed to estimate confidence intervals for the electromechanical modes from field measured data. Results were obtained using injected signal data provided by BPA. A new probing signal was designed that puts more strength into the signal for a given maximum peak to peak swing. Further simulations were conducted on a model based on measured data and with the modifications of the 19-machine simulation model. Montana Tech researchers participated in two primary activities: (1) continued development of the 19-machine simulation test system to include a DC line; and (2) extensive simulation analysis of the various system identification algorithms and bootstrap techniques using the 19 machine model. Researchers at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks focused on the development and testing of adaptive filter algorithms for mode estimation using data generated from simulation models and on data provided in collaboration with BPA and PNNL. There efforts consist of pre-processing field data, testing and refining adaptive filter techniques (specifically the Least Mean Squares (LMS), the Adaptive Step-size LMS (ASLMS), and Error Tracking (ET) algorithms). They also improved convergence of the adaptive algorithms by using an initial estimate from block processing AR method to initialize the weight vector for LMS. Extensive testing was performed on simulated data from the 19 machine model. This project was also extensively involved in the WECC (Western Electricity Coordinating Council) system wide tests carried out in 2005 and 2006. These tests involved injecting known probing signals into the western power grid. One of the primary goals of these tests was the reliable estimation of electromechanical mode properties from measured PMU data. Applied to the system were three types of probing inputs: (1) activation of the Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake, (2) mid-level probing at the Pacific DC Intertie (PDCI), and (3) low-level probing on the PDCI. The Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake is a 1400 MW disturbance to the system and is injected for a ha

  6. Regulation of the antioxidant system in cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe after combined treatment with patulin and citrinin.

    PubMed

    Papp, Gábor; Máté, Gábor; Mike, Nóra; Gazdag, Zoltán; Pesti, Miklós

    2016-03-01

    The effects of combined treatment with patulin (PAT) and citrinin (CTN) on Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells were investigated in acute toxicity tests. In comparison with the controls the exposure of fission yeast cells (10(7) cells ml(-1)) to PAT + CTN (250 μM each) for 1 h at a survival rate of 66.6% significantly elevated the concentration of total reactive oxygen species (ROS) via increased levels of peroxides without affecting the concentrations of superoxides or the hydroxyl radical. This treatment induced a 3.08-fold increase in the specific concentration of glutathione and elevated specific activities of catalase and glutathione S-transferase, while at the same time the activity of glutathione reductase decreased. The pattern of the ROS was the same as that induced by CTN (Máté et al., 2014), while the presence of PAT in the PAT + CTN combination treatment modified the activities of the antioxidant system (Papp et al., 2012) in comparison with the individual PAT or CTN treatment, suggesting toxin-specific regulation of glutathione and the enzymes of the antioxidant system and the possibility that the transcription factor (pap1 and atf1) -regulated processes might be influenced directly by ROS. PMID:26752674

  7. The identification of nonlinear biological systems: Wiener and Hammerstein cascade models.

    PubMed

    Hunter, I W; Korenberg, M J

    1986-01-01

    Systems that can be represented by a cascade of a dynamic linear subsystem preceded (Hammerstein cascade model) or followed (Wiener cascade model) by a static nonlinearity are considered. Various identification schemes that have been proposed for the Hammerstein and Wiener systems are critically reviewed with reference to the special problems that arise in the identification of nonlinear biological systems. Examples of Wiener and Hammerstein systems are identified from limited duration input-output data using an iterative identification scheme. PMID:3801534

  8. Identification of protein secretion systems in bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Abby, Sophie S.; Cury, Jean; Guglielmini, Julien; Néron, Bertrand; Touchon, Marie; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria with two cell membranes (diderms) have evolved complex systems for protein secretion. These systems were extensively studied in some model bacteria, but the characterisation of their diversity has lagged behind due to lack of standard annotation tools. We built online and standalone computational tools to accurately predict protein secretion systems and related appendages in bacteria with LPS-containing outer membranes. They consist of models describing the systems’ components and genetic organization to be used with MacSyFinder to search for T1SS-T6SS, T9SS, flagella, Type IV pili and Tad pili. We identified ~10,000 candidate systems in bacterial genomes, where T1SS and T5SS were by far the most abundant and widespread. All these data are made available in a public database. The recently described T6SSiii and T9SS were restricted to Bacteroidetes, and T6SSii to Francisella. The T2SS, T3SS, and T4SS were frequently encoded in single-copy in one locus, whereas most T1SS were encoded in two loci. The secretion systems of diderm Firmicutes were similar to those found in other diderms. Novel systems may remain to be discovered, since some clades of environmental bacteria lacked all known protein secretion systems. Our models can be fully customized, which should facilitate the identification of novel systems. PMID:26979785

  9. Yeast cytochrome c oxidase: A model system to study mitochondrial forms of the haem–copper oxidase superfamily☆

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Amandine; Meunier, Brigitte; Lee, David; Orengo, Christine; Rich, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    The known subunits of yeast mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase are reviewed. The structures of all eleven of its subunits are explored by building homology models based on the published structures of the homologous bovine subunits and similarities and differences are highlighted, particularly of the core functional subunit I. Yeast genetic techniques to enable introduction of mutations into the three core mitochondrially-encoded subunits are reviewed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory Oxidases. PMID:21925484

  10. Identification of a yeast artificial chromosome clone encoding an accessory factor for the human interferon [gamma] receptor: Evidence for multiple accessory factors

    SciTech Connect

    Soh, J.; Donnelly, R.J.; Mariano, T.M.; Cook, J.R.; Schwartz, B.; Pestka, S. )

    1993-09-15

    Human chromosomes 6 and 21 are both necessary to confer sensitivity to human interferon [gamma](Hu-IFN-[gamma]), as measured by the induction of human HLA class I antigen. Human chromosome 6 encodes the receptor for Hu-IFN-[gamma], and human chromosome 21 encodes accessory factors for generating biological activity through the Hu-IFN-[gamma] receptor. A small region of human chromosome 21 that is responsible for encoding such factors was localized with hamster-human somatic cell hybrids carrying an irradiation-reduced fragment of human chromosome 21. The cell line with the minimum chromosome 21-specific DNA is Chinese hamster ovary 3x1S. To localize the genes further, 10 different yeast artificial chromosome clones from six different loci in the vicinity of the 3x1S region were fused to a human-hamster hybrid cell line (designated 16-9) that contains human chromosome 6q (supplying the Hy-IFN-[gamma] receptor) and the human HLA-B7 gene. These transformed 16-9 cells were assayed for induction of class I HLA antigens upon treatment with Hu-IFN-[gamma]. Here the authors report that a 540-kb yeast artificial chromosome encodes the necessary species-specific factor(s) and can substitute for human chromosome 21 to reconstitute the Hu-IFN-[gamma]-receptor-mediated induction of class I HLA antigens. However, the factor encoded on the yeast artificial chromosome does not confer antiviral protection against encephalomyocarditis virus, demonstrating that an additional factor encoded on human chromosome 21 is required for the antiviral activity. 51 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. A Method for Sporulating Budding Yeast Cells That Allows for Unbiased Identification of Kinase Substrates Using Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Suhandynata, Ray; Liang, Jason; Albuquerque, Claudio. P.; Zhou, Huilin; Hollingsworth, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics has been widely used to elucidate many cellular processes. In particular, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) has been instrumental in improving the quality of data generated from quantitative high-throughput proteomic studies. SILAC uses the cell’s natural metabolic pathways to label proteins with isotopically heavy amino acids. Incorporation of these heavy amino acids effectively labels a cell’s proteome, allowing the comparison of cell cultures treated under different conditions. SILAC has been successfully applied to a variety of model organisms including yeast, fruit flies, plants, and mice to look for kinase substrates as well as protein–protein interactions. In budding yeast, several kinases are known to play critical roles in different aspects of meiosis. Therefore, the use of SILAC to identify potential kinase substrates would be helpful in the understanding the specific mechanisms by which these kinases act. Previously, it has not been possible to use SILAC to quantitatively study the phosphoproteome of meiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, because yeast cells sporulate inefficiently after pregrowth in standard synthetic medium. In this study we report the development of a synthetic, SILAC-compatible, pre-sporulation medium (RPS) that allows for efficient sporulation of S. cerevisiae SK1 diploids. Pre-growth in RPS supplemented with heavy amino acids efficiently labels the proteome, after which cells proceed relatively synchronously through meiosis, producing highly viable spores. As proof of principle, SILAC experiments were able to identify known targets of the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1. PMID:25168012

  12. A Frequency-Domain Substructure System Identification Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blades, Eric L.; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A new frequency-domain system identification algorithm is presented for system identification of substructures, such as payloads to be flown aboard the Space Shuttle. In the vibration test, all interface degrees of freedom where the substructure is connected to the carrier structure are either subjected to active excitation or are supported by a test stand with the reaction forces measured. The measured frequency-response data is used to obtain a linear, viscous-damped model with all interface-degree of freedom entries included. This model can then be used to validate analytical substructure models. This procedure makes it possible to obtain not only the fixed-interface modal data associated with a Craig-Bampton substructure model, but also the data associated with constraint modes. With this proposed algorithm, multiple-boundary-condition tests are not required, and test-stand dynamics is accounted for without requiring a separate modal test or finite element modeling of the test stand. Numerical simulations are used in examining the algorithm's ability to estimate valid reduced-order structural models. The algorithm's performance when frequency-response data covering narrow and broad frequency bandwidths is used as input is explored. Its performance when noise is added to the frequency-response data and the use of different least squares solution techniques are also examined. The identified reduced-order models are also compared for accuracy with other test-analysis models and a formulation for a Craig-Bampton test-analysis model is also presented.

  13. Non-Linear System Identification for Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2008-01-01

    Representation and identification of a non-linear aeroelastic pitch-plunge system as a model of the NARMAX class is considered. A non-linear difference equation describing this aircraft model is derived theoretically and shown to be of the NARMAX form. Identification methods for NARMAX models are applied to aeroelastic dynamics and its properties demonstrated via continuous-time simulations of experimental conditions. Simulation results show that (i) the outputs of the NARMAX model match closely those generated using continuous-time methods and (ii) NARMAX identification methods applied to aeroelastic dynamics provide accurate discrete-time parameter estimates. Application of NARMAX identification to experimental pitch-plunge dynamics data gives a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  14. Nonlinear System Identification for Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2008-01-01

    Representation and identification of a nonlinear aeroelastic pitch-plunge system as a model of the Nonlinear AutoRegressive, Moving Average eXogenous (NARMAX) class is considered. A nonlinear difference equation describing this aircraft model is derived theoretically and shown to be of the NARMAX form. Identification methods for NARMAX models are applied to aeroelastic dynamics and its properties demonstrated via continuous-time simulations of experimental conditions. Simulation results show that (1) the outputs of the NARMAX model closely match those generated using continuous-time methods, and (2) NARMAX identification methods applied to aeroelastic dynamics provide accurate discrete-time parameter estimates. Application of NARMAX identification to experimental pitch-plunge dynamics data gives a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  15. On the orthogonalised reverse path method for nonlinear system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhamad, P.; Sims, N. D.; Worden, K.

    2012-09-01

    The problem of obtaining the underlying linear dynamic compliance matrix in the presence of nonlinearities in a general multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) system can be solved using the conditioned reverse path (CRP) method introduced by Richards and Singh (1998 Journal of Sound and Vibration, 213(4): pp. 673-708). The CRP method also provides a means of identifying the coefficients of any nonlinear terms which can be specified a priori in the candidate equations of motion. Although the CRP has proved extremely useful in the context of nonlinear system identification, it has a number of small issues associated with it. One of these issues is the fact that the nonlinear coefficients are actually returned in the form of spectra which need to be averaged over frequency in order to generate parameter estimates. The parameter spectra are typically polluted by artefacts from the identification of the underlying linear system which manifest themselves at the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies. A further problem is associated with the fact that the parameter estimates are extracted in a recursive fashion which leads to an accumulation of errors. The first minor objective of this paper is to suggest ways to alleviate these problems without major modification to the algorithm. The results are demonstrated on numerically-simulated responses from MDOF systems. In the second part of the paper, a more radical suggestion is made, to replace the conditioned spectral analysis (which is the basis of the CRP method) with an alternative time domain decorrelation method. The suggested approach - the orthogonalised reverse path (ORP) method - is illustrated here using data from simulated single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) and MDOF systems.

  16. iAID: an improved auxin-inducible degron system for the construction of a 'tight' conditional mutant in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Seiji; Miyazawa-Onami, Mayumi; Iida, Tetsushi; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Isolation of a 'tight' conditional mutant of a gene of interest is an effective way of studying the functions of essential genes. Strategies that use ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation to eliminate the product of a gene of interest, such as heat-inducible degron (td) and auxin-inducible degron (AID), are powerful methods for constructing conditional mutants. However, these methods do not work with some genes. Here, we describe an improved AID system (iAID) for isolating tight conditional mutants in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this method, transcriptional repression by the 'Tet-OFF' promoter is combined with proteolytic elimination of the target protein by the AID system. To provide examples, we describe the construction of tight mutants of the replication factors Dpb11 and Mcm10, dpb11-iAID, and mcm10-iAID. Because Dpb11 and Mcm10 are required for the initiation of DNA replication, their tight mutants are unable to enter S phase. This is the case for dpb11-iAID and mcm10-iAID cells after the addition of tetracycline and auxin. Both the 'Tet-OFF' promoter and the AID system have been shown to work in model eukaryotes other than budding yeast. Therefore, the iAID system is not only useful in budding yeast, but also can be applied to other model systems to isolate tight conditional mutants. PMID:26081484

  17. The lipophilic yeasts: state of the art and prospects.

    PubMed

    Midgley, G

    2000-01-01

    Malassezia yeasts (lipophilic yeasts), have been classified to include seven species. Although molecular methods such as sequencing of RNA and karyotyping were used to determine the species, traditional techniques are also being explored for their identification. These include studies of morphology and the utilization of individual lipids. Reports now show the predominance of individual species recovered from normal skin and from patients with diseases such as pityriasis versicolor and seborrhoeic dermatitis. The majority of systemic infections reported have been in the bloodstream of premature neonates. Clusters of cases have occurred and molecular techniques employed to study the epidemiology. With the development of discriminatory methods to determine individual species and strains present in disease and in nature, our understanding of the pathogenicity and the epidemiology of this genus can be advanced. PMID:11204169

  18. Tapping into yeast diversity.

    PubMed

    Fay, Justin C

    2012-11-01

    Domesticated organisms demonstrate our capacity to influence wild species but also provide us with the opportunity to understand rapid evolution in the context of substantially altered environments and novel selective pressures. Recent advances in genetics and genomics have brought unprecedented insights into the domestication of many organisms and have opened new avenues for further improvements to be made. Yet, our ability to engineer biological systems is not without limits; genetic manipulation is often quite difficult. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is not only one of the most powerful model organisms, but is also the premier producer of fermented foods and beverages around the globe. As a model system, it entertains a hefty workforce dedicated to deciphering its genome and the function it encodes at a rich mechanistic level. As a producer, it is used to make leavened bread, and dozens of different alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine. Yet, applying the awesome power of yeast genetics to understanding its origins and evolution requires some knowledge of its wild ancestors and the environments from which they were derived. A number of surprisingly diverse lineages of S. cerevisiae from both primeval and secondary forests in China have been discovered by Wang and his colleagues. These lineages substantially expand our knowledge of wild yeast diversity and will be a boon to elucidating the ecology, evolution and domestication of this academic and industrial workhorse. PMID:23281494

  19. Biopharmaceutical discovery and production in yeast.

    PubMed

    Meehl, Michael A; Stadheim, Terrance A

    2014-12-01

    The selection of an expression platform for recombinant biopharmaceuticals is often centered upon suitable product titers and critical quality attributes, including post-translational modifications. Although notable differences between microbial, yeast, plant, and mammalian host systems exist, recent advances have greatly mitigated any inherent liabilities of yeasts. Yeast expression platforms are important to both the supply of marketed biopharmaceuticals and the pipelines of novel therapeutics. In this review, recent advances in yeast-based expression of biopharmaceuticals will be discussed. The advantages of using glycoengineered yeast as a production host and in the discovery space will be illustrated. These advancements, in turn, are transforming yeast platforms from simple production systems to key technological assets in the discovery and selection of biopharmaceutical lead candidates. PMID:25014890

  20. The MeSsI (Merging Systems Identification) Algorithm & Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de los Rios, Martín; Domínguez, R. Mariano J.; Paz, Dante; Merchán., Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Merging galaxy systems provide observational evidence of the existence of dark matter and constraints on its properties. Therefore, statisticaly uniform samples of merging systems would be a powerful tool for several studies. In this work we present a new methodology for the identification of merging systems and the results of its application to galaxy redshift surveys. We use as a starting point a mock catalogue of galaxy systems, identified using FoF algorithms, which experienced a major merger as indicated by its merger tree. Applying machine learning techniques in this training sample, and using several features computed from the observable properties of galaxy members, it is possible to select galaxy groups with a high probability of having experienced a major merger. Next we apply a mixture of Gaussian technique on galaxy members in order to reconstruct the properties of the haloes involved in such merger. This methodology provides a highly reliable sample of merging systems with low contamination and precisely recovered properties. We apply our techniques to samples of galaxy systems obtained from SDSS-DR7, WINGS and HeCS. Our results recover previously known merging systems and provide several new candidates. We present their measured properties and discuss future analysis on current and forthcoming samples.

  1. SISO nonlinear system identification using a fuzzy-neural hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Lin, C J

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes a fuzzy-neural hybrid system for the identification of nonlinear dynamic systems with unknown parameters. The proposed model takes the form of a context-sensitive module in which a fuzzy system is used as a function module and a multilayer neural network is used as a context module. Fuzzy-neural hybrid systems with a decomposed structure reduce complexity and thus accelerate the learning process. Also, the parameters of a fuzzy system have clear physical meanings, which makes it possible to incorporate a priori knowledge into the selection of initial parameter values and constraints among parameter values. Since hybrid systems correspond to networks, it is feasible to construct fast, parallel devices to implement these models for practical applications. The gradient descent method for the adjustment of parameters in hybrid systems is discussed. Simulations demonstrate that the hybrid identification models suggested here for SISO dynamic systems are quite effective. PMID:9427106

  2. Identification and characterization of a novel yeast gene: the YGP1 gene product is a highly glycosylated secreted protein that is synthesized in response to nutrient limitation.

    PubMed Central

    Destruelle, M; Holzer, H; Klionsky, D J

    1994-01-01

    Nutrient starvation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to a number of physiological changes that accompany entry into stationary phase. The expression of genes whose products play a role in stress adaptation is regulated in a manner that allows the cell to sense and respond to changing environmental conditions. We have identified a novel yeast gene, YGP1, that displays homology to the sporulation-specific SPS100 gene. The expression of YGP1 is regulated by nutrient availability. The gene is expressed at a basal level during "respiro-fermentative" (logarithmic) growth. When the glucose concentration in the medium falls below 1%, the YGP1 gene is derepressed and the gene product, gp37, is synthesized at levels up to 50-fold above the basal level. The glucose-sensing mechanism is independent of the SNF1 pathway and does not operate when cells are directly shifted to a low glucose concentration. The expression of YGP1 also responds to the depletion of nitrogen and phosphate, indicating a general response to nutrient deprivation. These results suggest that the YGP1 gene product may be involved in cellular adaptations prior to stationary phase and may be a useful marker protein for monitoring early events associated with the stress response. Images PMID:8139573

  3. Screening and identification of proteins interacting with IL-24 by the yeast two-hybrid screen, Co-IP, and FRET assays.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hui; Wang, Tao; Chen, Jiaojiao; Yu, Fang; Liu, Huilin; Zuo, Zhenyu; Yang, Zhonghua; Fan, Handong

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin-24 (IL-24) is an ideal tumor-suppressor gene, but the mechanisms underlying its antitumor specificity remain to be elucidated. The best way to investigate these problems is to begin from the initiation of corresponding signaling cascades activated by IL-24 with screening and identifying those proteins that interacted with IL-24. With the aim of identifying these initial interactions, a yeast two-hybrid screening was performed by transforming AH109 cells containing PGBKT7-IL-24 with a liver cDNA plasmid library. These cells were then plated on synthetic nutrient medium (SD/-Trp/-Leu/-His) for the first screening and on quadruple dropout medium containing X-α-gal for the second screening. Positive colonies were further verified by repeating the MATE experiments, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) analysis, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays in vitro. Following the yeast two-hybrid screening, 15 genes were selected for sequencing, with two genes, HLA-C and NDUFA13, further verified using Co-IP assays and FRET assays. Both HLA-C and NDUFA13 were found to interact with IL-24. We found that HLA-C and NDUFA13 could interact with IL-24 and it may be involved in the signal induced by IL-24. Overall, this study contributes further insight into the cancer-specific apoptosis-inducing abilities of IL-24 to potentially enhance its therapeutic potential, and it also provides outlets for other biological functions of IL-24. PMID:26930462

  4. Characterization of a yeast D-amino acid oxidase microbiosensor for D-serine detection in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Pernot, Pierre; Mothet, Jean-Pierre; Schuvailo, Oleg; Soldatkin, Alexey; Pollegioni, Loredano; Pilone, Mirella; Adeline, Marie-Thérèse; Cespuglio, Raymond; Marinesco, Stéphane

    2008-03-01

    d-Serine is an endogenous ligand for N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and alterations in its concentration have been related to several brain disorders, especially schizophrenia. It is therefore an important target neuromodulator for the pharmaceutical industry. To monitor d-serine levels in vivo, we have developed a microbiosensor based on cylindrical platinum microelectrodes, covered with a membrane of poly-m-phenylenediamine (PPD) and a layer of immobilized d-amino acid oxidase from the yeast Rhodotorula gracilis (RgDAAO). By detecting the hydrogen peroxide produced by enzymatic degradation of d-serine, this microbiosensor shows a detection limit of 16 nM and a mean response time of 2 s. Interferences by ascorbic acid, uric acid, l-cysteine, and by biogenic amines and their metabolites are rejected at more than 97% by the PPD layer. Although several d-amino acids are potential substrates for RgDAAO, d-serine was the only endogenous substrate present in sufficient concentration to be detected by our microbiosensor in the central nervous system. When implanted in the cortex of anesthetized rats, this microbiosensor detected the increase in concentration of d-serine resulting from its diffusion across the blood-brain barrier after an intraperitoneal injection. This new device will make it possible to investigate in vivo the variations in d-serine concentrations occurring under normal and pathological conditions and to assess the pharmacological potency of new drugs designed to impact d-serine metabolism. PMID:18229946

  5. Similar subunit interactions contribute to assembly of clathrin adaptor complexes and COPI complex: analysis using yeast three-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Takatsu, H; Futatsumori, M; Yoshino, K; Yoshida, Y; Shin, H W; Nakayama, K

    2001-06-22

    Clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complexes are heterotetramers composed of two large, one medium, and one small subunits. By exploiting the yeast three-hybrid system, we have found that an interaction between the two large subunits of the AP-1 complex, gamma-adaptin and beta1-adaptin, is markedly enhanced in the presence of the small subunit, sigma1. Similarly, two large subunits of the AP-4 complex, epsilon-adaptin and beta4-adaptin, are found to interact with each other only in the presence of the small subunit, sigma4. Furthermore, we have found that an interaction between two large subunits of the COPI F subcomplex, gamma-COP and beta-COP, is detectable only in the presence of zeta-COP. Because these COPI subunits have common ancestral origins to the corresponding AP subunits, these three-hybrid data, taken together with the previous two-hybrid data, suggest that the AP complexes and the COPI F subcomplex assemble by virtue of similar subunit interactions. PMID:11409905

  6. A System Identification and Change Detection Methodology for Stochastic Nonlinear Dynamic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Hae-Bum; Masri, Sami F.; Caffrey, John P.

    2008-07-08

    In this paper a component-level detection methodology for system identification and change detection is discussed. The methodology is based on non-parametric, data-driven, stochastic system identification classifications using statistical pattern recognition techniques. In order to validate the methodology discussed in this paper an experimental study was performed using a complex nonlinear magneto-rheological (MR) damper. The results of this study show that the proposed methodology is very promising to detect interpret changes in critical structural components such as nonlinear springs joints as well as various types of dampers.

  7. Portable bacterial identification system based on elastic light scatter patterns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Conventional diagnosis and identification of bacteria requires shipment of samples to a laboratory for genetic and biochemical analysis. This process can take days and imposes significant delay to action in situations where timely intervention can save lives and reduce associated costs. To enable faster response to an outbreak, a low-cost, small-footprint, portable microbial-identification instrument using forward scatterometry has been developed. Results This device, weighing 9?lb and measuring 12?×?6?×?10.5?in., utilizes elastic light scatter (ELS) patterns to accurately capture bacterial colony characteristics and delivers the classification results via wireless access. The overall system consists of two CCD cameras, one rotational and one translational stage, and a 635-nm laser diode. Various software algorithms such as Hough transform, 2-D geometric moments, and the traveling salesman problem (TSP) have been implemented to provide colony count and circularity, centering process, and minimized travel time among colonies. Conclusions Experiments were conducted with four bacteria genera using pure and mixed plate and as proof of principle a field test was conducted in four different locations where the average classification rate ranged between 95 and 100%. PMID:22929757

  8. Investigating the protein-protein interactions of the yeast Hsp90 chaperone system by two-hybrid analysis: potential uses and limitations of this approach

    PubMed Central

    Millson, Stefan H.; Truman, Andrew W.; Wolfram, Francis; King, Victoria; Panaretou, Barry; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Pearl, Laurence H.; Piper, Peter W.

    2004-01-01

    The Hsp90 chaperone cycle involves sequential assembly of different Hsp90-containing multiprotein complexes, the accessory proteins (“cochaperones”) that are associated with these complexes being exchanged as the cycle proceeds from its early to its late stages. To gain insight as to whether the 2-hybrid system could be used to probe the interactions of this Hsp90 system, yeast transformants were constructed that express the Gal4p deoxyribonucleic acid–binding domain (BD) fused to the 2 Hsp90 isoforms and the various Hsp90 system cochaperones of yeast. These “bait” fusions were then introduced by mating into other transformants expressing nearly all the 6000 proteins of yeast expressed as fusions to the Gal4p activation domain (AD). High throughput 2-hybrid screening revealed the ability of Hsp90 and Hsp90 system cochaperones to engage in stable interactions in vivo, both with each other and with the various other proteins of the yeast proteome. Consistent with the transience of most chaperone associations, interactions to Hsp90 itself were invariably weak and generally influenced by stress. Mutations within a Hsp90-BD bait fusion and an AD-Cdc37 “prey” fusion were used to provide in vivo confirmation of the in vitro data that shows that Cdc37p is interacting with the “relaxed” conformation of Hsp90 and also to provide indications that Cdc37p needs to be phosphorylated at its N-terminus for any appreciable interaction with Hsp90. A number of potentially novel cochaperone interactions were also identified, providing a framework for these to be analyzed further using other techniques. PMID:15633294

  9. p53 Transactivation and the Impact of Mutations, Cofactors and Small Molecules Using a Simplified Yeast-Based Screening System

    PubMed Central

    Bisio, Alessandra; Lion, Mattia; Jordan, Jennifer; Fronza, Gilberto; Menichini, Paola; Resnick, Michael A.; Inga, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Background The p53 tumor suppressor, which is altered in most cancers, is a sequence-specific transcription factor that is able to modulate the expression of many target genes and influence a variety of cellular pathways. Inactivation of the p53 pathway in cancer frequently occurs through the expression of mutant p53 protein. In tumors that retain wild type p53, the pathway can be altered by upstream modulators, particularly the p53 negative regulators MDM2 and MDM4. Methodology/Principal Findings Given the many factors that might influence p53 function, including expression levels, mutations, cofactor proteins and small molecules, we expanded our previously described yeast-based system to provide the opportunity for efficient investigation of their individual and combined impacts in a miniaturized format. The system integrates i) variable expression of p53 proteins under the finely tunable GAL1,10 promoter, ii) single copy, chromosomally located p53-responsive and control luminescence reporters, iii) enhanced chemical uptake using modified ABC-transporters, iv) small-volume formats for treatment and dual-luciferase assays, and v) opportunities to co-express p53 with other cofactor proteins. This robust system can distinguish different levels of expression of WT and mutant p53 as well as interactions with MDM2 or 53BP1. Conclusions/Significance We found that the small molecules Nutlin and RITA could both relieve the MDM2-dependent inhibition of WT p53 transactivation function, while only RITA could impact p53/53BP1 functional interactions. PRIMA-1 was ineffective in modifying the transactivation capacity of WT p53 and missense p53 mutations. This dual-luciferase assay can, therefore, provide a high-throughput assessment tool for investigating a matrix of factors that can influence the p53 network, including the effectiveness of newly developed small molecules, on WT and tumor-associated p53 mutants as well as interacting proteins. PMID:21674059

  10. Using the Yeast Three-Hybrid System to Identify Proteins that Interact with a Phloem-Mobile mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Ki; Kang, Il-Ho; Carr, Tyrell; Hannapel, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Heterografting and RNA transport experiments have demonstrated the long-distance mobility of StBEL5 RNA, its role in controlling tuber formation, and the function of the 503-nt 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the RNA in mediating transport. Because the 3′ UTR of StBEL5 is a key element in regulating several aspects of RNA metabolism, a potato leaf cDNA library was screened using the 3′ UTR of StBEL5 as bait in the yeast three-hybrid (Y3H) system to identify putative partner RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). From this screen, 116 positive cDNA clones were isolated based on nutrient selection, HIS3 activation, and lacZ induction and were sequenced and classified. Thirty-five proteins that were predicted to function in either RNA- or DNA-binding were selected from this pool. Seven were monitored for their expression profiles and further evaluated for their capacity to bind to the 3′ UTR of StBEL5 using β-galactosidase assays in the Y3H system and RNA gel-shift assays. Among the final selections were two RBPs, a zinc finger protein, and one protein, StLSH10, from a family involved in light signaling. In this study, the Y3H system is presented as a valuable tool to screen and verify interactions between target RNAs and putative RBPs. These results can shed light on the dynamics and composition of plant RNA-protein complexes that function to regulate RNA metabolism. PMID:22969782

  11. Orthonormal filters for identification in active control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Many active noise and vibration control systems require models of the control paths. When the controlled system changes slightly over time, adaptive digital filters for the identification of the models are useful. This paper aims at the investigation of a special class of adaptive digital filters: orthonormal filter banks possess the robust and simple adaptation of the widely applied finite impulse response (FIR) filters, but at a lower model order, which is important when considering implementation on embedded systems. However, the filter banks require prior knowledge about the resonance frequencies and damping of the structure. This knowledge can be supposed to be of limited precision, since in many practical systems, uncertainties in the structural parameters exist. In this work, a procedure using a number of training systems to find the fixed parameters for the filter banks is applied. The effect of uncertainties in the prior knowledge on the model error is examined both with a basic example and in an experiment. Furthermore, the possibilities to compensate for the imprecise prior knowledge by a higher filter order are investigated. Also comparisons with FIR filters are implemented in order to assess the possible advantages of the orthonormal filter banks. Numerical and experimental investigations show that significantly lower computational effort can be reached by the filter banks under certain conditions.

  12. Construction of a Highly Active Xylanase Displaying Oleaginous Yeast: Comparison of Anchoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Duquesne, Sophie; Bozonnet, Sophie; Bordes, Florence; Dumon, Claire; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Marty, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Three Yarrowia lipolytica cell wall proteins (YlPir, YlCWP1 and YlCBM) were evaluated for their ability to display the xylanase TxXYN from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus on the cell surface of Y. lipolytica. The fusion proteins were produced in Y. lipolytica JMY1212, a strain engineered for mono-copy chromosomal insertion, and enabling accurate comparison of anchoring systems. The construction using YlPir enabled cell bound xylanase activity to be maximised (71.6 U/g). Although 48% of the activity was released in the supernatant, probably due to proteolysis at the fusion zone, this system is three times more efficient for the anchoring of TxXYN than the YlCWP1 system formerly developed for Y. lipolytica. As far as we know it represents the best displayed xylanase activity ever published. It could be an attractive alternative anchoring system to display enzymes in Y. lipolytica. PMID:24743311

  13. Yeast Genetics and Biotechnological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Saroj; Baranwal, Richa

    Yeast can be recognized as one of the very important groups of microorganisms on account of its extensive use in the fermentation industry and as a basic eukaryotic model cellular system. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively used to elucidate the genetics and regulation of several key functions in the cell such as cell mating, electron transport chain, protein trafficking, cell cycle events and others. Even before the genome sequence of the yeast was out, the structural organization and function of several of its genes was known. With the availability of the origin of replication from the 2 ?m plasmid and the development of transformation system, it became the host of choice for expression of a number of important proteins. A large number of episomal and integrative shuttle vectors are available for expression of mammalian proteins. The latest developments in genomics and micro-array technology have allowed investigations of individual gene function by site-specific deletion method. The application of metabolic profiling has also assisted in understanding the cellular network operating in this yeast. This chapter is aimed at reviewing the use of this system as an experimental tool for conducting classical genetics. Various vector systems available, foreign genes expressed and the limitations as a host will be discussed. Finally, the use of various yeast enzymes in biotechnology sector will be reviewed.

  14. Image processing and classification algorithm for yeast cell morphology in a microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang Yu, Bo; Elbuken, Caglar; Ren, Carolyn L.; Huissoon, Jan P.

    2011-06-01

    The study of yeast cell morphology requires consistent identification of cell cycle phases based on cell bud size. A computer-based image processing algorithm is designed to automatically classify microscopic images of yeast cells in a microfluidic channel environment. The images were enhanced to reduce background noise, and a robust segmentation algorithm is developed to extract geometrical features including compactness, axis ratio, and bud size. The features are then used for classification, and the accuracy of various machine-learning classifiers is compared. The linear support vector machine, distance-based classification, and k-nearest-neighbor algorithm were the classifiers used in this experiment. The performance of the system under various illumination and focusing conditions were also tested. The results suggest it is possible to automatically classify yeast cells based on their morphological characteristics with noisy and low-contrast images.

  15. Quantitative description of ion transport via plasma membrane of yeast and small cells.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of ion transport via plasma membrane needs identification and quantitative understanding of the involved processes. Brief characterization of main ion transport systems of a yeast cell (Pma1, Ena1, TOK1, Nha1, Trk1, Trk2, non-selective cation conductance) and determining the exact number of molecules of each transporter per a typical cell allow us to predict the corresponding ion flows. In this review a comparison of ion transport in small yeast cell and several animal cell types is provided. The importance of cell volume to surface ratio is emphasized. The role of cell wall and lipid rafts is discussed in respect to required increase in spatial and temporary resolution of measurements. Conclusions are formulated to describe specific features of ion transport in a yeast cell. Potential directions of future research are outlined based on the assumptions. PMID:26113853

  16. Quantitative description of ion transport via plasma membrane of yeast and small cells

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of ion transport via plasma membrane needs identification and quantitative understanding of the involved processes. Brief characterization of main ion transport systems of a yeast cell (Pma1, Ena1, TOK1, Nha1, Trk1, Trk2, non-selective cation conductance) and determining the exact number of molecules of each transporter per a typical cell allow us to predict the corresponding ion flows. In this review a comparison of ion transport in small yeast cell and several animal cell types is provided. The importance of cell volume to surface ratio is emphasized. The role of cell wall and lipid rafts is discussed in respect to required increase in spatial and temporary resolution of measurements. Conclusions are formulated to describe specific features of ion transport in a yeast cell. Potential directions of future research are outlined based on the assumptions. PMID:26113853

  17. Studying Functions of All Yeast Genes Simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Eason, Robert G.; Poumand, Nader; Herman, Zelek S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Anthony Kevin; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2006-01-01

    A method of studying the functions of all the genes of a given species of microorganism simultaneously has been developed in experiments on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (commonly known as baker's or brewer's yeast). It is already known that many yeast genes perform functions similar to those of corresponding human genes; therefore, by facilitating understanding of yeast genes, the method may ultimately also contribute to the knowledge needed to treat some diseases in humans. Because of the complexity of the method and the highly specialized nature of the underlying knowledge, it is possible to give only a brief and sketchy summary here. The method involves the use of unique synthetic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences that are denoted as DNA bar codes because of their utility as molecular labels. The method also involves the disruption of gene functions through deletion of genes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a particularly powerful experimental system in that multiple deletion strains easily can be pooled for parallel growth assays. Individual deletion strains recently have been created for 5,918 open reading frames, representing nearly all of the estimated 6,000 genetic loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Tagging of each deletion strain with one or two unique 20-nucleotide sequences enables identification of genes affected by specific growth conditions, without prior knowledge of gene functions. Hybridization of bar-code DNA to oligonucleotide arrays can be used to measure the growth rate of each strain over several cell-division generations. The growth rate thus measured serves as an index of the fitness of the strain.

  18. High throughput electronic cell identification techniques for microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, David; Braun, Gary; Fraikin, Jean-Luc; Swenson, Loren; Reich, Norbert; Cleland, Andrew

    2007-03-01

    We address the problem of whole-cell identification using an all-electronic microfluidic approach, with potential applications to cell sorting. We present the development of a radiofrequency microsensor, capable of detecting cells or cell labels in a microfluidic system. This device has demonstrated detection of individual cellular labels at throughputs of 30,000 labels/s in a single microfluidic channel. We also present the development of digital barcodes, which can be used to label cells for identifying individual strains in a diverse population. These barcodes were developed using fully-scalable lithographic techniques, providing a means for low-cost, large volume production. We have demonstrated biological functionalization of these barcodes as well as readout, using our radiofrequency microsensor, at throughputs greater than 1,000 labels/s.

  19. Medical isotope identification with large mobile detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard

    2012-10-01

    The Remote Sensing laboratory (RSL) of National Security Technologies Inc. has built an array of large (5.08 - cm x 10.16 - cm x 40.6 - cm) thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI: Tl) scintillators to locate and screen gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes that are of interests to radiological emergency responders [1]. These vehicle mounted detectors provide the operators with rapid, simple, specific information for radiological threat assessment. Applications include large area inspection, customs inspection, border protection, emergency response, and monitoring of radiological facilities. These RSL mobile units are currently being upgraded to meet the Defense Threat Reduction Agency mission requirements for a next-generation system capable of detecting and identifying nuclear threat materials. One of the challenging problems faced by these gamma-ray detectors is the unambiguous identification of medical isotopes like 131I (364.49 keV [81.7%], 636.99 keV [7.17%]), 99Tcm (140.51 keV [89.1%]) and 67Ga (184.6 keV [19.7%], 300.2 [16.0%], 393.5 [4.5%] that are used in radionuclide therapy and often have overlapping gamma-ray energy regions of interest (ROI). The problem is made worse by short (about 5 seconds) acquisition time of the spectral data necessary for dynamic mobile detectors. This article describes attempts to identify medical isotopes from data collected from this mobile detection system in a short period of time (not exceeding 5 secs) and a large standoff distance (typically ~ 10 meters) The mobile units offer identification capabilities that are based on hardware auto stabilization of the amplifier gain. The 1461 keV gamma-energy line from 40K is tracked. It uses gamma-ray energy windowing along with embedded mobile Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) [2] simultaneously to deconvolve any overlapping gamma-energy ROIs. These high sensitivity detectors are capable of resolving complex masking scenarios and exceed all ANSI N42.34 (2006) requirements for the identification of bare, shielded and multiple isotopes.

  20. CFRP damage identification system based on FBG sensors and ELM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shizeng; Jiang, Mingshun; Jia, Lei; Sui, Qingmei; Sai, Yaozhang

    2015-02-01

    The identification of the damage state of Carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) structure is the necessary information for ensuring the safety of CFRP structure. In this paper, the structural damage identification system using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and the damage identification method were investigated. FBG sensors were used to detect the structural dynamic response signal, which was generated by an active actuation way. Fourier transform and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to extract the damage characteristic. After that, the structural damage identification model was constructed based on extreme learning machine (ELM), whose input is the damage characteristic and output is the damage state. Finally, the damage identification system was established and verified on a CFRP plate with 160 mm160 mm experiment area. The experimental results showed that the identification accuracy was more than 90 %. This paper provided a reliable method for CFRP structural damage identification.