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1

Evolutionary erosion of yeast sex chromosomes by mating-type switching accidents  

PubMed Central

We investigate yeast sex chromosome evolution by comparing genome sequences from 16 species in the family Saccharomycetaceae, including data from genera Tetrapisispora, Kazachstania, Naumovozyma, and Torulaspora. We show that although most yeast species contain a mating-type (MAT) locus and silent HML and HMR loci structurally analogous to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, their detailed organization is highly variable and indicates that the MAT locus is a deletion hotspot. Over evolutionary time, chromosomal genes located immediately beside MAT have continually been deleted, truncated, or transposed to other places in the genome in a process that is gradually shortening the distance between MAT and HML. Each time a gene beside MAT is removed by deletion or transposition, the next gene on the chromosome is brought into proximity with MAT and is in turn put at risk for removal. This process has also continually replaced the triplicated sequence regions, called Z and X, that allow HML and HMR to be used as templates for DNA repair at MAT during mating-type switching. We propose that the deletion and transposition events are caused by evolutionary accidents during mating-type switching, combined with natural selection to keep MAT and HML on the same chromosome. The rate of deletion accelerated greatly after whole-genome duplication, probably because genes were redundant and could be deleted without requiring transposition. We suggest that, despite its mutational cost, switching confers an evolutionary benefit by providing a way for an isolated germinating spore to reform spores if the environment is too poor. PMID:22123960

Gordon, Jonathan L.; Armisén, David; Proux-Wéra, Estelle; ÓhÉigeartaigh, Seán S.; Byrne, Kevin P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

2011-01-01

2

The DNA Repair Protein yKu80 Regulates the Function of Recombination Enhancer during Yeast Mating Type Switching  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recombination enhancer (RE) is essential for regulating donor preference during yeast mating type switch- ing. In this study, by using minichromosome affinity purification (MAP) and mass spectrometry, we found that yeast Ku80p is associated with RE in MATa cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed its occupancy in vivo. Deletion of YKU80 results in altered chromatin structure in the RE region and

Chun Ruan; Jerry L. Workman; Robert T. Simpson

2005-01-01

3

Asymmetric Accumulation of Ash1p in Postanaphase Nuclei Depends on a Myosin and Restricts Yeast Mating-Type Switching to Mother Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cell division in haploid yeast gives rise to a “mother” cell capable of mating-type switching and a “daughter” cell that is not. Switching is initiated by the HO endonuclease, whose gene is only transcribed in cells that have previously given birth to a bud (mother cells). HO expression depends on a minimyosin, She1p\\/Myo4p, which accumulates preferentially in growing buds. We

Nicoletta Bobola; Ralf-Peter Jansen; Tae Ho Shin; Kim Nasmyth

1996-01-01

4

Inversion of the Chromosomal Region between Two Mating Type Loci Switches the Mating Type in Hansenula polymorpha  

PubMed Central

Yeast mating type is determined by the genotype at the mating type locus (MAT). In homothallic (self-fertile) Saccharomycotina such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluveromyces lactis, high-efficiency switching between a and ? mating types enables mating. Two silent mating type cassettes, in addition to an active MAT locus, are essential components of the mating type switching mechanism. In this study, we investigated the structure and functions of mating type genes in H. polymorpha (also designated as Ogataea polymorpha). The H. polymorpha genome was found to harbor two MAT loci, MAT1 and MAT2, that are ?18 kb apart on the same chromosome. MAT1-encoded ?1 specifies ? cell identity, whereas none of the mating type genes were required for a identity and mating. MAT1-encoded ?2 and MAT2-encoded a1 were, however, essential for meiosis. When present in the location next to SLA2 and SUI1 genes, MAT1 or MAT2 was transcriptionally active, while the other was repressed. An inversion of the MAT intervening region was induced by nutrient limitation, resulting in the swapping of the chromosomal locations of two MAT loci, and hence switching of mating type identity. Inversion-deficient mutants exhibited severe defects only in mating with each other, suggesting that this inversion is the mechanism of mating type switching and homothallism. This chromosomal inversion-based mechanism represents a novel form of mating type switching that requires only two MAT loci. PMID:25412462

Maekawa, Hiromi; Kaneko, Yoshinobu

2014-01-01

5

Mating-type switching by chromosomal inversion in methylotrophic yeasts suggests an origin for the three-locus Saccharomyces cerevisiae system  

PubMed Central

Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a complex system for switching the mating type of haploid cells, requiring the genome to have three mating-type (MAT)–like loci and a mechanism for silencing two of them. How this system originated is unknown, because the three-locus system is present throughout the family Saccharomycetaceae, whereas species in the sister Candida clade have only one locus and do not switch. Here we show that yeasts in a third clade, the methylotrophs, have a simpler two-locus switching system based on reversible inversion of a section of chromosome with MATa genes at one end and MATalpha genes at the other end. In Hansenula polymorpha the 19-kb invertible region lies beside a centromere so that, depending on the orientation, either MATa or MATalpha is silenced by centromeric chromatin. In Pichia pastoris, the orientation of a 138-kb invertible region puts either MATa or MATalpha beside a telomere and represses transcription of MATa2 or MATalpha2. Both species are homothallic, and inversion of their MAT regions can be induced by crossing two strains of the same mating type. The three-locus system of S. cerevisiae, which uses a nonconservative mechanism to replace DNA at MAT, likely evolved from a conservative two-locus system that swapped genes between expression and nonexpression sites by inversion. The increasing complexity of the switching apparatus, with three loci, donor bias, and cell lineage tracking, can be explained by continuous selection to increase sporulation ability in young colonies. Our results provide an evolutionary context for the diversity of switching and silencing mechanisms. PMID:25349420

Hanson, Sara J.; Byrne, Kevin P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

2014-01-01

6

A Recombinationally Repressed Region between Mat2 and Mat3 Loci Shares Homology to Centromeric Repeats and Regulates Directionality of Mating-Type Switching in Fission Yeast  

PubMed Central

Cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe switch mating type by replacing genetic information at the transcriptionally active mat1 locus with sequences copied from one of two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P or mat3-M. By a process referred to as directionality of switching, cells predominantly switch to the opposite mat1 allele; the mat1-P allele preferentially recombines with mat3, while mat1-M selects the mat2. In contrast to efficient recombination at mat1, recombination within the adjoining mat2-mat3 interval is undetectable. We defined the role of sequences between mat2 and mat3, designated the K-region, in directionality as well as recombinational suppression. Cloning and sequencing analysis revealed that a part of the K-region is homologous to repeat sequences present at centromeres, which also display transcriptional and recombinational suppression. Replacement of 7.5 kb of the K-region with the ura4(+) gene affected directionality in a variegated manner. Analysis of the swi6-mod locus, which was previously shown to affect directionality, in K?::ura4(+) strains suggested the existence of at least two overlapping directionality mechanisms. Our work furthers the model that directionality is regulated by cell-type-specific organization of the heterochromatin-like structure in the mating-type region and provides evidence that the K-region contributes to silencing of the mat2-mat3 interval. PMID:9258669

Grewal, SIS.; Klar, AJS.

1997-01-01

7

Swi6, a Gene Required for Mating-Type Switching, Prohibits Meiotic Recombination in the Mat2-Mat3 ``cold Spot'' of Fission Yeast  

PubMed Central

Mitotic interconversion of the mating-type locus (mat1) of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is initiated by a double-strand break at mat1. The mat2 and mat3 loci act as nonrandom donors of genetic information for mat1 switching such that switches occur primarily (or only) to the opposite mat1 allele. Location of the mat1 ``hot spot'' for transposition should be contrasted with the ``cold spot'' of meiotic recombination located within the adjoining mat2-mat3 interval. That is, meiotic interchromosomal recombination in mat2, mat3 and the intervening 15-kilobase region does not occur at all. swi2 and swi6 switching-deficient mutants possess the normal level of double-strand break at mat1, yet they fail to switch efficiently. By testing for meiotic recombination in the cold spot, we found the usual lack of recombination in a swi2 mutant but a significant level of recombination in a swi6 mutant. Therefore, the swi6 gene function is required to keep the donor loci inert for interchromosomal recombination. This finding, combined with the additional result that switching primarily occurs intrachromosomally, suggests that the donor loci are made accessible for switching by folding them onto mat1, thus causing the cold spot of recombination. PMID:1783290

Klar, AJS.; Bonaduce, M. J.

1991-01-01

8

The Clr1 Locus Regulates the Expression of the Cryptic Mating-Type Loci of Fission Yeast  

PubMed Central

The mat2-P and mat3-M loci of fission yeast contain respectively the plus (P) and minus (M) mating-type information in a transcriptionally silent state. That information is transposed from the mat2 or mat3 donor locus via recombination into the expressed mating-type locus (mat1) resulting in switching of the cellular mating type. We have identified a gene, named clr1 (for cryptic loci regulator), whose mutations allow expression of the mat2 and mat3 loci. clr1 mutants undergo aberrant haploid meiosis, indicative of transcription of the silent genes. Production of mRNA from mat3 is detectable in clr1 mutants. Furthermore, the ura4 gene inserted near mat3, weakly expressed in wild-type cells, is derepressed in clr1 mutants. The clr1 mutations also permit meiotic recombination in the 15-kb mat2-mat3 interval, where recombination is normally inhibited. The clr1 locus is in the right arm of chromosome II. We suggest that clr1 regulates silencing of the mat2 and mat3 loci, and participates in establishing the ``cold spot'' for recombination by organizing the chromatin structure of the mating-type region. PMID:1644273

Thon, G.; Klar, AJS.

1992-01-01

9

Trans-acting factors and properly positioned DNA elements repress mating-type genes in fission yeast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Repression of the mating-type P genes at the silent mat2-P locus in fission yeast is dependent on four cis-acting DNA elements, two on each side of the coding sequences. The mechanism by which these elements exert their influence on the mating-type promoter is studied here by insertion of a bacterial antibiotic resistance gene at several positions in the silent region.

Karl Ekwall; Tim Olsson; Tattoo Ruusala

1992-01-01

10

Directionality of Fission Yeast Mating-Type Interconversion Is Controlled by the Location of the Donor Loci  

PubMed Central

Cells of homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe efficiently switch between two mating types called P and M. The phenotypic switches are due to conversion of the expressed mating-type locus (mat1) by two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P and mat3-M, that contain unexpressed information for the P and M mating types, respectively. In this process, switching-competent cells switch to the opposite mating type in 72-90% of the cell divisions. Hence, mat2-P is a preferred donor of information to mat1 in M cells, whereas mat3-M is a preferred donor in P cells. We investigated the reason for the donor preference by constructing a strain in which the genetic contents of the donor loci were swapped. We found that switching to the opposite mating type was very inefficient in that strain. This shows that the location of the silent cassettes in the chromosome, rather than their content, is the deciding factor for recognition of the donor for each cell type. We propose a model in which switching is achieved by regulating accessibility of the donor loci, perhaps by changing the chromatin structure in the mating-type region, thus promoting an intrachromosomal folding of mat2 or mat3 onto mat1 in a cell type-specific fashion. We also present evidence for the involvement of the Swi6 and Swi6-mod trans-acting factors in the donor-choice mechanism. We suggest that these factors participate in forming the proposed folded structure. PMID:8375648

Thon, G.; Klar, AJS.

1993-01-01

11

Schizosaccharomyces pombe Switches Mating Type by the Synthesis-Dependent Strand-Annealing Mechanism  

PubMed Central

Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells can switch between two mating types, plus (P) and minus (M). The change in cell type occurs due to a replication-coupled recombination event that transfers genetic information from one of the silent-donor loci, mat2P or mat3M, into the expressed mating-type determining mat1 locus. The mat1 locus can as a consequence contain DNA encoding either P or M information. A molecular mechanism, known as synthesis-dependent strand annealing, has been proposed for the underlying recombination event. A key feature of this model is that only one DNA strand of the donor locus provides the information that is copied into the mat1. Here we test the model by constructing strains that switch using two different mutant P cassettes introduced at the donor loci, mat2 and mat3. We show that in such strains wild-type P-cassette DNA is efficiently generated at mat1 through heteroduplex DNA formation and repair. The present data provide an in vivo genetic test of the proposed molecular recombination mechanism. PMID:17660548

Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Klar, Amar J. S.; Dalgaard, Jacob Z.

2007-01-01

12

Yeast Silent Mating Type Loci Form Heterochromatic Clusters through Silencer Protein-Dependent Long-Range Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The organization of eukaryotic genomes is characterized by the presence of distinct euchromatic and heterochromatic sub-nuclear compartments. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae heterochromatic loci, including telomeres and silent mating type loci, form clusters at the nuclear periphery. We have employed live cell 3-D imaging and chromosome conformation capture (3C) to determine the contribution of nuclear positioning and heterochromatic factors in mediating associations

Adriana Miele; Kerstin Bystricky; Job Dekker

2009-01-01

13

Cell, Vol. 107, 739750, December 14, 2001, Copyright 2001 by Cell Press Yeast Cbk1 and Mob2 Activate Daughter-Specific  

E-print Network

to be revealed. Haploid yeast switch between a and mating types. Mothers switch mating type, while daughters do Institute have budded, the former daughters (now mothers)2168 Shattuck Avenue switch mating type (Strathern,In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mothers and daughters 1983), makes a double strand break at MAT (Strathernhave

Brent, Roger

14

Epigenetic Inheritance of Transcriptional Silencing and Switching Competence in Fission Yeast  

PubMed Central

Epigenetic events allow the inheritance of phenotypic changes that are not caused by an alteration in DNA sequence. Here we characterize an epigenetic phenomenon occuring in the mating-type region of fission yeast. Cells of fission yeast switch between the P and M mating-type by interconverting their expressed mating-type cassette between two allelic forms, mat1-P and mat1-M. The switch results from gene conversions of mat1 by two silent cassettes, mat2-P and mat3-M, which are linked to each other and to mat1. GREWAL and KLAR observed that the ability to both switch mat1 and repress transcription near mat2-P and mat3-M was maintained epigenetically in a strain with an 8-kb deletion between mat2 and mat3. Using a strain very similar to theirs, we determined that interconversions between the switching-and silencing-proficient state and the switching and silencing-deficient state occurred less frequently than once per 1000 cell divisions. Although transcriptional silencing was alleviated by the 8-kb deletion, it was not abolished. We performed a mutant search and obtained a class of trans-acting mutations that displayed a strong cumulative effect with the 8-kb deletion. These mutations allow to assess the extent to which silencing is affected by the deletion and provide new insights on the redundancy of the silencing mechanism. PMID:9055078

Thon, G.; Friis, T.

1997-01-01

15

Mutations in Rik1, Clr2, Clr3 and Clr4 Genes Asymmetrically Derepress the Silent Mating-Type Loci in Fission Yeast  

PubMed Central

In Schizosaccharomyces pombe the mating-type information is stored at two transcriptionally silent loci (mat2 and mat3). The region between these sites (K region) is inert for meiotic crossing over. The mating-type genes (M or P) are expressed only when present at a third, active locus (mat1). We have earlier shown that the positional regulation of P genes is based on repression at the silent site, caused by elements in the flanking DNA sequences. In this study we have mutagenized a sterile mat1 deleted strain and selected for cells that are able to conjugate. Recessive mutations of this type should define genes encoding trans-acting factors involved in repression of the silent mating-type loci. Before this work mutations in two genes, clr1 and swi6, had been shown to allow both expression of the silent loci and recombination in the K region. The sensitivity of the present selection is demonstrated by the isolation of new mutations that derepress one or both of the silent loci (M-mating or bi-mating). The frequency of M-mating mutants was almost two orders of magnitude higher than that of bi-mating mutants and in all mutants analyzed mat3-M expression was significantly higher than mat2-P expression. The mutations define three new genes, clr2, clr3 and clr4. In addition we show that the rik1 mutant previously known to allow recombination in the K region also derepresses the silent loci. PMID:8138176

Ekwall, K.; Ruusala, T.

1994-01-01

16

A Genome Sequence Survey Shows that the Pathogenic Yeast Candida parapsilosis Has a Defective MTLa1 Allele at Its Mating Type Locus†  

PubMed Central

Candida parapsilosis is responsible for ca. 15% of Candida infections and is of particular concern in neonates and surgical intensive care patients. The related species Candida albicans has recently been shown to possess a functional mating pathway. To analyze the analogous pathway in C. parapsilosis, we carried out a genome sequence survey of the type strain. We identified ca. 3,900 genes, with an average amino acid identity of 59% with C. albicans. Of these, 23 are predicted to be predominantly involved in mating. We identified a genomic locus homologous to the MTLa mating type locus of C. albicans, but the C. parapsilosis type strain has at least two internal stop codons in the MTLa1 open reading frame, and two predicted introns are not spliced. These stop codons were present in MTLa1 of all eight C. parapsilosis isolates tested. Furthermore, we found that all isolates of C. parapsilosis tested appear to contain only the MTLa idiomorph at the presumptive mating locus, unlike C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. MTL? sequences are present but at a different chromosomal location. It is therefore likely that all (or at least the majority) of C. parapsilosis isolates have a mating pathway that is either defective or substantially different from that of C. albicans. PMID:15947193

Logue, Mary E.; Wong, Simon; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Butler, Geraldine

2005-01-01

17

Neurospora Crassa a Mating-Type Region  

Microsoft Academic Search

The a mating-type region of Neurospora crassa controls several major events in both the sexual and asexual phases of the fungal life cycle. This 3235-base-pair DNA segment is not homologous to the comparable genetic region of the A mating type. The unique a and A regions are bordered by nearly identical DNA sequences. The a genetic region contains at least

Chuck Staben; Charles Yanofsky

1990-01-01

18

Isolation of the Mating-Type Genes of the Phytopathogenic Fungus Magnaporthe Grisea Using Genomic Subtraction  

PubMed Central

Using genomic subtraction, we isolated the mating-type genes (Mat1-1 and Mat1-2) of the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe grisea. Transformation of M. grisea strains of one mating type with a linearized cosmid clone carrying the opposite mating-type gene resulted in many ``dual maters,'' strains that contain both mating-type genes and successfully mate with both Mat1-1 and Mat1-2 testers. Dual maters differed in the frequency of production of perithecia in pure culture. Ascospores isolated from these homothallic crosses were either Mat1-1 or Mat1-2, but there were no dual maters. Most conidia from dual maters also had one or the other of the mating-type genes, but not both. Thus, dual maters appear to lose one of the mating-type genes during vegetative growth. The incidence of self-mating in dual maters appears to depend on the co-occurrence of strains with each mating type in vegetative cultures. In rare transformants, the incoming sequences had replaced the resident mating-type gene. Nearly isogenic pairs produced from three M. grisea laboratory strains were mated to investigate their fertility. One transformant with switched mating type appears to have a mutation that impairs the development of asci when its mating partner has a similar genetic background. The M. grisea Mat1-1 and Mat1-2 genes are idiomorphs approximately 2.5 and 3.5 kb in length, respectively. PMID:7828813

Kang, S.; Chumley, F. G.; Valent, B.

1994-01-01

19

Selective Gene Expression in Multigene Families from Yeast to Mammals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Cell identity is the direct consequence of the genes expressed. This STKE Review highlights the diverse mechanisms that cells use to achieve exclusive gene expression. The details of the molecular mechanism underlying yeast mating-type switching are compared and contrasted with the mechanisms involved in immunoglobulin gene expression and odorant receptor gene expression in mammals.

Jacob Z. Dalgaard (Marie Curie Research Institute; REV)

2004-10-26

20

Degradation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type regulator alpha1: genetic dissection of cis-determinants and trans-acting pathways.  

PubMed

Mating phenotype in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a dynamic trait, and efficient transitions between alternate haploid cell types allow the organism to access the advantageous diploid form. Mating identity is determined by cell type-specific transcriptional regulators, but these factors must be rapidly removed upon mating-type switching to allow the master regulators of the alternate state to establish a new gene expression program. Targeted proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is a commonly employed strategy to quickly disassemble regulatory networks, and yeast use this approach to evoke efficient switching from the alpha to the a phenotype by ensuring the rapid removal of the alpha2 transcriptional repressor. Transition to the a cell phenotype, however, also requires the inactivation of the alpha1 transcriptional activator, but the mechanism by which this occurs is currently unknown. Here, we report a central role for the ubiquitin-proteasome system in alpha1 inactivation. The alpha1 protein is constitutively short lived and targeted for rapid turnover by multiple ubiquitin-conjugation pathways. Intriguingly, the alpha-domain, a conserved region of unknown function, acts as a degradation signal for a pathway defined by the SUMO-targeted ligase Slx5-Slx8, which has also been implicated in the rapid destruction of alpha2. Our observations suggest coordinate regulation in the turnover of two master regulatory transcription factors ensures a rapid mating-type switch. PMID:20351217

Nixon, Christina E; Wilcox, Alexander J; Laney, Jeffrey D

2010-06-01

21

Dynamics of mitochondrial inheritance in the evolution of binary mating types and two sexes  

PubMed Central

The uniparental inheritance (UPI) of mitochondria is thought to explain the evolution of two mating types or even true sexes with anisogametes. However, the exact role of UPI is not clearly understood. Here, we develop a new model, which considers the spread of UPI mutants within a biparental inheritance (BPI) population. Our model explicitly considers mitochondrial mutation and selection in parallel with the spread of UPI mutants and self-incompatible mating types. In line with earlier work, we find that UPI improves fitness under mitochondrial mutation accumulation, selfish conflict and mitonuclear coadaptation. However, we find that as UPI increases in the population its relative fitness advantage diminishes in a frequency-dependent manner. The fitness benefits of UPI ‘leak’ into the biparentally reproducing part of the population through successive matings, limiting the spread of UPI. Critically, while this process favours some degree of UPI, it neither leads to the establishment of linked mating types nor the collapse of multiple mating types to two. Only when two mating types exist beforehand can associated UPI mutants spread to fixation under the pressure of high mitochondrial mutation rate, large mitochondrial population size and selfish mutants. Variation in these parameters could account for the range of UPI actually observed in nature, from strict UPI in some Chlamydomonas species to BPI in yeast. We conclude that UPI of mitochondria alone is unlikely to have driven the evolution of two mating types in unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:23986113

Hadjivasiliou, Zena; Lane, Nick; Seymour, Robert M.; Pomiankowski, Andrew

2013-01-01

22

Neurospora crassa a mating-type region.  

PubMed Central

The a mating-type region of Neurospora crassa controls several major events in both the sexual and asexual phases of the fungal life cycle. This 3235-base-pair DNA segment is not homologous to the comparable genetic region of the A mating type. The unique a and A regions are bordered by nearly identical DNA sequences. The a genetic region contains at least two functional segments. One segment encodes a perithecium maturation function that is dependent on the second segment for phenotypic expression. This second a segment encodes a spliced mRNA that specifies the mt a-1 polypeptide. This polypeptide appears to be responsible for vegetative incompatibility, mating identity, and perithecium induction. The a-1 transcript is produced vegetatively and under conditions that induce sexual differentiation. The amino-terminal half of the mt a-1 polypeptide is homologous to the shorter Schizosaccharomyces pombe mat-Mc polypeptide. This homology and the properties of mt a-1 mutants suggest that the a-1 polypeptide segment that is homologous to the mat-Mc polypeptide may be primarily responsible for mating functions, while the distal segment is required for vegetative incompatibility. PMID:2142304

Staben, C; Yanofsky, C

1990-01-01

23

Genetic association of mating types and virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans.  

PubMed Central

A pair of congenic Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans strains, B-4476 (a mating type) and B-4500 (alpha mating type), that presumably differ only in mating type was constructed. This pair and their progeny, five alpha type and five a type, were tested for virulence in mice. In the parent strains as well as the progeny, alpha type was clearly more virulent than a type. In addition, death tended to occur earlier among the alpha-strain-infected mice that died than among the mice that died by infection caused by a strains. These data strongly suggest the genetic association of virulence with mating type in this human fungal pathogen. Images PMID:1730495

Kwon-Chung, K J; Edman, J C; Wickes, B L

1992-01-01

24

Evidence of Recombination in Mixed-Mating-Type and  Only Populations of Cryptococcus gattii Sourced from Single Eucalyptus Tree Hollows  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disease caused by the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus gattii begins with the inhalation of an infectious propagule. As C. gattii is heavily encapsulated, this propagule is most likely to be a basidiospore. However, most C. gattii strains are infertile in laboratory crosses, and population studies indicate that recombination and dispersal are very restricted. In addition, strains of the mating type predominate,

Nathan Saul; Mark Krockenberger; Dee Carter

2008-01-01

25

Nonsex Genes in the Mating Type Locus of Candida albicans Play Roles in a/? Biofilm Formation, Including Impermeability and Fluconazole Resistance  

PubMed Central

The mating type locus (MTL) of Candida albicans contains the mating type genes and has, therefore, been assumed to play an exclusive role in the mating process. In mating-incompetent a/? cells, two of the mating type genes, MTLa1 and MTL?2, encode components of the a1-?2 corepressor that suppresses mating and switching. But the MTL locus of C. albicans also contains three apparently unrelated “nonsex” genes (NSGs), PIK, PAP and OBP, the first two essential for growth. Since it had been previously demonstrated that deleting either the a/? copy of the entire MTL locus, or either MTLa1 or MTL?2, affected virulence, we hypothesized that the NSGs in the MTL locus may also play a role in pathogenesis. Here by mutational analysis, it is demonstrated that both the mating type and nonsex genes in the MTL locus play roles in a/? biofilm formation, and that OBP is essential for impermeability and fluconazole resistance. PMID:22253594

Pujol, Claude; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Soll, David R.

2012-01-01

26

Identification and structure of the mating-type locus and development of PCR-based markers for mating type in powdery mildew fungi  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In fungi, mating compatibility is regulated by mating-type loci. The objectives of this study were to identify and sequence mating-type genes at the MAT1 locus in the grape powdery mildew fungus, Erysiphe necator, to develop a PCR-based marker for determining mating type in E. necator, and to devel...

27

Mating type sequences in asexually reproducing Fusarium species  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess the potential for mating in several Fusarium species with no known sexual stage, we developed degenerate and semidegenerate oligonucleotide primers to identify conserved mating type (MAT) sequences in these fungi. The putative and high-mobility-group (HMG) box sequences from Fusarium avenaceum, F. culmorum, F. poae, and F. semitectum were compared to similar sequences that were described previously for other

Z. Kenényi; Antonio Moretti; Cees Waalwijk; B. Oláh; L. Hornok

2004-01-01

28

DNAs of the Two Mating-Type Alleles of Neurospora crassa are Highly Dissimilar  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mating-type alleles A and a of Neurospora crassa control mating in the sexual cycle and function in establishing heterokaryon incompatibility in the vegetative cycle. The A and a alleles were cloned, and they were shown to encode both the sexual functions and vegetative incompatibility. The mating-type clones contain nonhomologous DNA segments that are flanked by common DNA sequences. Neurospora

N. Louise Glass; Steven J. Vollmer; Chuck Staben; Jeff Grotelueschen; Robert L. Metzenberg; Charles Yanofsky

1988-01-01

29

Sexual reproduction between partners of the same mating type in Cryptococcus neoformans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cryptococcus neoformans is a globally distributed human fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised patients. It has a defined sexual cycle involving haploid cells of alpha and a mating types, yet the vast majority of environmental and clinical isolates are alpha (ref. 3). Sexual recombination is normally expected to occur between isolates of opposite mating type in organisms with

Xiaorong Lin; Christina M. Hull; Joseph Heitman

2005-01-01

30

Comparative Genomics of the Mating-Type Loci of the Mushroom Flammulina velutipes Reveals Widespread  

E-print Network

, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America Abstract Background: Mating-type loci Development Administration, Suwon, Republic of Korea, 2 National Academy of Agricultural Science, Rural alleles. The genomic organization of mating-type loci has been solved in very few mushroom species, which

James, Timothy

31

Genetic and Physical Variability at the Mating Type Locus of the Oomycete, Phytophthora Infestans  

PubMed Central

Mating type in the oomyceteous fungus, Phytophthora infestans, is determined by a single locus. In a previous study of a few isolates, the locus segregated in a manner genetically consistent with its linkage to a system of balanced lethal loci. To determine the prevalence of this phenomenon within P. infestans, genetic analyses were performed using isolates representative of the diversity within the species that had been selected by DNA fingerprinting using probes linked to mating type. Non-Mendelian segregation of the mating type locus was observed in crosses performed with each isolate. An unusual group of isolates was identified in which the mating type determinants had been rearranged within the genome; these strains also produced an aberrantly large number of self-fertile progeny. Curiously, in all isolates, markers linked to the mating type locus appeared prone to duplication, transposition, deletion, or other rearrangement. This was not observed for loci unlinked to mating type. Data from the crosses and analyses of marker variation were used to erect models to explain the bases of mating type determination and of the unusual segregation of the chromosomal region containing the mating type locus. PMID:8913745

Judelson, H. S.

1996-01-01

32

Meiotic nuclear reorganization: switching the position of centromeres and telomeres in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.  

PubMed Central

In fission yeast meiotic prophase, telomeres are clustered near the spindle pole body (SPB; a centrosome-equivalent structure in fungi) and take the leading position in chromosome movement, while centromeres are separated from the SPB. This telomere position contrasts with mitotic nuclear organization, in which centromeres remain clustered near the SPB and lead chromosome movement. Thus, nuclear reorganization switching the position of centromeres and telomeres must take place upon entering meiosis. In this report, we analyze the nuclear location of centromeres and telomeres in genetically well-characterized meiotic mutant strains. An intermediate structure for telomere-centromere switching was observed in haploid cells induced to undergo meiosis by synthetic mating pheromone; fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that in these cells, both telomeres and centromeres were clustered near the SPB. Further analyses in a series of mutants showed that telomere-centromere switching takes place in two steps; first, association of telomeres with the SPB and, second, dissociation of centromeres from the SPB. The first step can take place in the haploid state in response to mating pheromone, but the second step does not take place in haploid cells and probably depends on conjugation-related events. In addition, a linear minichromosome was also co-localized with authentic telomeres instead of centromeres, suggesting that telomere clustering plays a role in organizing chromosomes within a meiotic prophase nucleus. PMID:9009280

Chikashige, Y; Ding, D Q; Imai, Y; Yamamoto, M; Haraguchi, T; Hiraoka, Y

1997-01-01

33

Genetic Instability in the Mating Type System of Tetrahymena pigmentosa  

PubMed Central

Selfing clones of Tetrahymena pigmentosa show several interesting genetic features, and provide some insight into the mechanisms of mating type (mt) determination. They differ significantly from those of Tetrahymena thermophila. They are distributed nonrandomly in crosses. Their rates of stabilization are highly variable, but most are much lower than those reported for T. thermophila. A number of subclones derived from nearly all the selfers have maintained stable mts in culture for several years. However, some subclones manifest persistent selfing, long after the calculated completion of allelic assortment for heterozygous loci. This phenomenon along with the perpetual maintenance of dominant mts in heterozygotes shows that phenotypic assortment is not involved in mt expression.—In crosses, many selfers exhibit quantitative and qualitative aberrations in the transmission of alleles to the gametes; some of the micronuclear changes underlying these aberrations occur during vegetative growth. There are rare illegitimate appearances of dominant alleles in sexual progeny, and more common illegitimate appearances of the most recessive phenotype.—Various models to explain mt determination in this species are considered. One which might account for the troubling phenomena of the system consists of an active mat expression site, with "cassettes" at other sites specific for the different dominant alleles and capable of transposition to the expression site. PMID:3692137

Simon, Ellen M.; Orias, Eduardo

1987-01-01

34

High Frequency of Sex and Equal Frequencies of Mating Types in Natural Populations of the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila  

Microsoft Academic Search

In ciliate protists, sex involves the temporary joining of two cells of compatible mating type, followed by meiosis and exchange of gametic nuclei between conjugants. Reproduction is by asexual binary fission following conjugation. For the many ciliates with fixed multiple mating types, frequency-dependent sex-ratio theory predicts equal frequencies of mating types, if sex is common in nature. Here, we report

F. Paul Doerder; Michael A. Gates; Frank P. Eberhardt; Muhittin Arslanyolu

1995-01-01

35

Pseudohomothallism and evolution of the mating-type chromosome in Neurospora tetrasperma  

SciTech Connect

Ascospores of Neurospora tetrasperma normally contain nuclei of both mating-type idiomorphs (a and A), resulting in self-fertile heterokaryons (a type of sexual reproduction termed pseudohomothallism). Occasional homokaryotic self-sterile strains (either a or A) behave as heterothallics and, in principal, provide N. tetrasperma to assess levels of intrastrain heterokaryosis (heterozygosity). The unexpected result was the mating-type chromosome and autosomes exhibited very different patterns of evolution, apparently because of suppressed recombination between mating-type chromosomes. Analysis of sequences on the mating-type chromosomes of wild-collected self-fertile strains revealed high levels of genetic variability between sibling A and a nuclei. In contrast, sequences on autosomes of sibling A and a nuclei exhibited nearly complete homogeneity. Conservation of distinct haplotype combinations on A and a mating-type chromosomes in strains from diverse locations further suggested an absence of recombination over substantial periods of evolutionary time. The suppression of recombination of the N. tetrasperma mating-type chromosome, expected to ensure a high frequency of self fertility, presents an interesting parallel with, and possible model for studying aspects of, the evolution of mammalian sex chromosomes. 39 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Merino, S.T.; Nelson, M.A.; Natvig, D.O. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1996-06-01

36

Sex-Determination System in the Diploid Yeast Zygosaccharomyces sapae  

PubMed Central

Sexual reproduction and breeding systems are driving forces for genetic diversity. The mating-type (MAT) locus represents a mutation and chromosome rearrangement hotspot in yeasts. Zygosaccharomyces rouxii complex yeasts are naturally faced with hostile low water activity (aw) environments and are characterized by gene copy number variation, genome instability, and aneuploidy/allodiploidy. Here, we investigated sex-determination system in Zygosaccharomyces sapae diploid strain ABT301T, a member of the Z. rouxii complex. We cloned three divergent mating type-like (MTL) ?-idiomorph sequences and designated them as ZsMTL? copies 1, 2, and 3. They encode homologs of Z. rouxii CBS 732T MAT?2 (amino acid sequence identities spanning from 67.0 to 99.5%) and MAT?1 (identity range 81.5–99.5%). ABT301T possesses two divergent HO genes encoding distinct endonucleases 100% and 92.3% identical to Z. rouxii HO. Cloning of MATa-idiomorph resulted in a single ZsMTLa locus encoding two Z. rouxii-like proteins MATa1 and MATa2. To assign the cloned ZsMTL? and ZsMTLa idiomorphs as MAT, HML, and HMR cassettes, we analyzed their flanking regions. Three ZsMTL? loci exhibited the DIC1-MAT-SLA2 gene order canonical for MAT expression loci. Furthermore, four putative HML cassettes were identified, two containing the ZsMTL? copy 1 and the remaining harboring ZsMTL? copies 2 and 3. Finally, the ZsMTLa locus was 3?-flanked by SLA2, suggesting the status of MAT expression locus. In conclusion, Z. sapae ABT301T displays an a??? genotype missing of the HMR silent cassette. Our results demonstrated that mating-type switching is a hypermutagenic process in Z. rouxii complex that generates genetic diversity de novo. This error-prone mechanism could be suitable to generate progenies more rapidly adaptable to hostile environments. PMID:24939186

Solieri, Lisa; Dakal, Tikam Chand; Giudici, Paolo; Cassanelli, Stefano

2014-01-01

37

The Mutator Gene Swi8 Effects Specific Mutations in the Mating-Type Region of Schizosaccharomyces Pombe  

PubMed Central

The swi8(+) gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe appears to be involved in the termination step of copy synthesis during mating-type (MT) switching. Mutations in swi8 confer a general mutator phenotype and, in particular, generate specific mutations in the MT region. Sequencing of the MT cassettes of the h(90) swi8-137 mutant revealed three altered sites. One is situated at the switching (smt) signal adjacent to the H1 homology box of the expression locus mat1:1. It reduces the rate of MT switching. The alteration at the smt signal arose frequently in other h(90) swi8 strains and is probably caused by gene conversion in which the sequence adjacent to the H1 box of mat2:2 is used as template. This change might be generated during the process of MT switching when hybrid DNA formation is anomalously extended into the more heterologous region flanking the H1 homology box. In addition to the gene conversion at mat1:1, two mutations were found in the H3 homology boxes of the silent cassettes mat2:2 and mat3:3. PMID:7851760

Fleck, O.; Rudolph, C.; Albrecht, A.; Lorentz, A.; Schar, P.; Schmidt, H.

1994-01-01

38

Mating-type genes for basidiomycete strain improvement in mushroom farming.  

PubMed

Mushroom production is dependent on the quality of the spawn used to inoculate the cultures. In order to produce high-quality spawn, breeding programs for strains resistant to certain diseases and able to form high-quality fruit bodies under standard growth conditions are necessary. The investigation of the molecular basis for mating provides access to the use of mating-type genes in order to facilitate breeding. For research purposes, two mushroom-forming homobasidiomycetes have been used due to their easy cultivation and sexual propagation on defined minimal media: Schizophyllum commune and Coprinus cinereus. The mating-type genes control formation of the dikaryon from two haploid strains. Only the dikaryon is fertile and able to form mushrooms under the right environmental conditions. These genes are now used in mating-type-assisted breeding programs for economically important mushrooms, especially the white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, and the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus, aiming at high-yield and high-quality standard mushroom production. Most mushroom species posses two mating-type loci that control their breeding. The genes encoded in the A loci lead to the formation of transcription factors that belong to the class of homeodomain proteins. Active transcription factors are formed by heterodimerization of two proteins of different allelic specificities. In nature, this is only the case if two cells of different mating type have fused to combine the different proteins in one cytoplasm. While fusion in homobasidiomycetes is found irrespectively of mating type, exchange of nuclei between mating mycelia is dependent on the products of the B mating-type loci. The B genes form a pheromone and receptor system that enables the fungi to initiate nuclear migration. The molecular details of the two genetic systems controlling breeding in basidiomycetes are presented in this review. PMID:11601606

Kothe, E

2001-09-01

39

Recent and massive expansion of the mating-type-specific region in the smut fungus microbotryum.  

PubMed

The presence of large genomic regions with suppressed recombination (SR) is a key shared property of some sex- and mating-type determining (mat) chromosomes identified to date in animals, plants, and fungi. Why such regions form and how they evolve remain central questions in evolutionary genetics. The smut fungus Microbotryum lychnis-dioicae is a basidiomycete fungus in which dimorphic mat chromosomes have been reported, but the size, age, and evolutionary dynamics of the SR region remains unresolved. To identify the SR region in M. lychnis-dioicae and to study its evolution, we sequenced 12 genomes (6 per mating type) of this species and identified the genomic contigs that show fixed sequence differences between the mating types. We report that the SR region spans more than half of the mat chromosome (>2.3 Mbp) and that it is of very recent origin (?2 × 10(6) years) as the average sequence divergence between mating types was only 2% in the SR region. This contrasts with a much higher divergence in and around the mating-type determining pheromone receptor locus in the SR, suggesting a recent and massive expansion of the SR region. Our results comprise the first reported case of recent massive SR expansion documented in a basidiomycete fungus. PMID:25567990

Whittle, Carrie A; Votintseva, Antonina; Ridout, Kate; Filatov, Dmitry A

2015-03-01

40

The genetic structure of the A mating-type locus of Lentinula edodes.  

PubMed

The Shiitake mushroom, Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Pegler is a tetrapolar basidiomycete with two unlinked mating-type loci, commonly called the A and B loci. Identifying the mating-types in shiitake is important for enhancing the breeding and cultivation of this economically-important edible mushroom. Here, we identified the A mating-type locus from the first draft genome sequence of L. edodes and characterized multiple alleles from different monokaryotic strains. Two intron-length polymorphism markers were developed to facilitate rapid molecular determination of A mating-type. L. edodes sequences were compared with those of known tetrapolar and bipolar basidiomycete species. The A mating-type genes are conserved at the homeodomain region across the order Agaricales. However, we observed unique genomic organization of the locus in L. edodes which exhibits atypical gene order and multiple repetitive elements around its A locus. To our knowledge, this is the first known exception among Homobasidiomycetes, in which the mitochondrial intermediate peptidase (mip) gene is not closely linked to A locus. PMID:24295887

Au, Chun Hang; Wong, Man Chun; Bao, Dapeng; Zhang, Meiyan; Song, Chunyan; Song, Wenhua; Law, Patrick Tik Wan; Kües, Ursula; Kwan, Hoi Shan

2014-02-10

41

Suppressed recombination and a pairing anomaly on the mating-type chromosome of Neurospora tetrasperma.  

PubMed Central

Neurospora crassa and related heterothallic ascomycetes produce eight homokaryotic self-sterile ascospores per ascus. In contrast, asci of N. tetrasperma contain four self-fertile ascospores each with nuclei of both mating types (matA and mata). The self-fertile ascospores of N. tetrasperma result from first-division segregation of mating type and nuclear spindle overlap at the second meiotic division and at a subsequent mitotic division. Recently, Merino et al. presented population-genetic evidence that crossing over is suppressed on the mating-type chromosome of N. tetrasperma, thereby preventing second-division segregation of mating type and the formation of self-sterile ascospores. The present study experimentally confirmed suppressed crossing over for a large segment of the mating-type chromosome by examining segregation of markers in crosses of wild strains. Surprisingly, our study also revealed a region on the far left arm where recombination is obligatory. In cytological studies, we demonstrated that suppressed recombination correlates with an extensive unpaired region at pachytene. Taken together, these results suggest an unpaired region adjacent to one or more paired regions, analogous to the nonpairing and pseudoautosomal regions of animal sex chromosomes. The observed pairing and obligate crossover likely reflect mechanisms to ensure chromosome disjunction. PMID:10655216

Gallegos, A; Jacobson, D J; Raju, N B; Skupski, M P; Natvig, D O

2000-01-01

42

Both mating types of the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola are present in Morocco.  

PubMed

Septoria tritici blotch caused by the heterothallic ascomycete Mycosphaerella graminicola is one of the most currently damaging diseases on wheat crops worldwide. So far, no information was reported about the status of sexual reproduction of this pathogen under Moroccan conditions. We investigated here for the first time the occurrence of the two mating types (MAT1-1 and MAT1-2) of M. graminicola in Morocco by sampling 141 single-conidial isolates from 4 important wheat producing regions (Gharb, Saïs, Chaouia and Tadla). The mating type of each isolate was determined by amplification with multiplex PCR of a partial sequence from the corresponding idiomorph. Overall, 43% out of the assessed isolates were MAT1-1 and 57 % were MAT1-2. Both mating types were identified within the 3 sampled regions Gharb, Saïs and Chaouia, but not in Tadla, where only MAT1-2 isolates were found. The presence of the two mating types highlighted here offers a suitable genetic condition for M. graminicola to occur sexual reproduction in Morocco. The potential of sexual recombination will be examined by the study of mating type frequencies using a large sample size as well as by searching and quantification of pseudothecia in the field. PMID:21534472

Elbekali, A Y; Ramdani, A; Tisserant, B; Deweer, C; Siah, A; Reignault, Ph; Halama, P

2010-01-01

43

Dimorphism and haploid fruiting in Cryptococcus neoformans: association with the alpha-mating type.  

PubMed Central

Cryptococcus neoformans is a major opportunistic fungal pathogen in AIDS and other immunosuppressed patients. We have shown that wild-type haploid C. neoformans can develop an extensive hyphal phase under appropriate conditions. Hyphae produced under these conditions are monokaryotic, possess unfused clamp connections, and develop basidia with viable basidiospores. The ability to undergo this transition is determined by the presence of the alpha-mating type locus and is independent of serotype. The association of the hyphal phase with the alpha-mating type may explain the preponderance of this mating type in the environment and the nature of the infectious propagule of C. neoformans. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8692992

Wickes, B L; Mayorga, M E; Edman, U; Edman, J C

1996-01-01

44

Evolution of Sexes from an Ancestral Mating-Type Specification Pathway  

PubMed Central

Male and female sexes have evolved repeatedly in eukaryotes but the origins of dimorphic sexes and their relationship to mating types in unicellular species are not understood. Volvocine algae include isogamous species such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, with two equal-sized mating types, and oogamous multicellular species such as Volvox carteri with sperm-producing males and egg-producing females. Theoretical work predicts genetic linkage of a gamete cell-size regulatory gene(s) to an ancestral mating-type locus as a possible step in the evolution of dimorphic gametes, but this idea has not been tested. Here we show that, contrary to predictions, a single conserved mating locus (MT) gene in volvocine algae—MID, which encodes a RWP-RK domain transcription factor—evolved from its ancestral role in C. reinhardtii as a mating-type specifier, to become a determinant of sperm and egg development in V. carteri. Transgenic female V. carteri expressing male MID produced functional sperm packets during sexual development. Transgenic male V. carteri with RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdowns of VcMID produced functional eggs, or self-fertile hermaphrodites. Post-transcriptional controls were found to regulate cell-type–limited expression and nuclear localization of VcMid protein that restricted its activity to nuclei of developing male germ cells and sperm. Crosses with sex-reversed strains uncoupled sex determination from sex chromosome identity and revealed gender-specific roles for male and female mating locus genes in sexual development, gamete fitness and reproductive success. Our data show genetic continuity between the mating-type specification and sex determination pathways of volvocine algae, and reveal evidence for gender-specific adaptations in the male and female mating locus haplotypes of Volvox. These findings will enable a deeper understanding of how a master regulator of mating-type determination in an ancestral unicellular species was reprogrammed to control sexually dimorphic gamete development in a multicellular descendant. PMID:25003332

Geng, Sa; De Hoff, Peter; Umen, James G.

2014-01-01

45

CLONING AND ANALYSIS OF THE MATING-TYPE IDIOMORPHS FROM THE BARLEY PATHOGENSEPTORIA PASSERINII  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

One hypothesis to explain the lack of a known sexual stage (teleomorph) for species of the fungal genus Septoria could be that many of them are recent, asexual derivatives of sexual species that have lost the ability to mate. To test this hypothesis, the mating-type region of S. passerinii, a specie...

46

The MAT1 Locus of Histoplasma capsulatum Is Responsive in a Mating Type-Specific Manner  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recombination events associated with sexual replication in pathogens may generate new strains with altered virulence. Histoplasma capsulatum is a mating-competent, pathogenic fungus with two described phenotypic mating types, and . The mating (MAT) locus of H. capsulatum was identified to facilitate molecular studies of mating in this organism. Through syntenic analysis of the H. capsulatum genomic sequence databases, a MAT1-1

Meggan Bubnick; A. George Smulian

2007-01-01

47

Ascospore dimorphism-associated mating types of Sclerotinia trifoliorum equally capable of infecting chickpea  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Sclerotinia trifoliorum causes stem and crown rot of chickpea and other forage and grain legumes, and is one of the three important species of the genus Sclerotinia. S. trifoliorum is unique from the other two species in that it is heterothallic and has two opposite mating types required for comple...

48

Extensive divergence between mating-type chromosomes of the anther-smut fungus.  

PubMed

Genomic regions that determine mating compatibility are subject to distinct evolutionary forces that can lead to a cessation of meiotic recombination and the accumulation of structural changes between members of the homologous chromosome pair. The relatively recent discovery of dimorphic mating-type chromosomes in fungi can aid the understanding of sex chromosome evolution that is common to dioecious plants and animals. For the anther-smut fungus, Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae (= M. violaceum isolated from Silene latifolia), the extent of recombination cessation on the dimorphic mating-type chromosomes has been conflictingly reported. Comparison of restriction digest optical maps for the two mating-type chromosomes shows that divergence extends over 90% of the chromosome lengths, flanked at either end by two pseudoautosomal regions. Evidence to support the expansion of recombination cessation in stages from the mating-type locus toward the pseudoautosomal regions was not found, but evidence of such expansion could be obscured by ongoing processes that affect genome structure. This study encourages the comparison of forces that may drive large-scale recombination suppression in fungi and other eukaryotes characterized by dimorphic chromosome pairs associated with sexual life cycles. PMID:23150606

Hood, Michael E; Petit, Elsa; Giraud, Tatiana

2013-01-01

49

Degeneration of the nonrecombining regions in the mating-type chromosomes of the anther-smut fungi.  

PubMed

Dimorphic mating-type chromosomes in fungi are excellent models for understanding the genomic consequences of recombination suppression. Their suppressed recombination and reduced effective population size are expected to limit the efficacy of natural selection, leading to genomic degeneration. Our aim was to identify the sequences of the mating-type chromosomes (a1 and a2) of the anther-smut fungi and to investigate degeneration in their nonrecombining regions. We used the haploid a1 Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae reference genome sequence. The a1 and a2 mating-type chromosomes were both isolated electrophoretically and sequenced. Integration with restriction-digest optical maps identified regions of recombination and nonrecombination in the mating-type chromosomes. Genome sequence data were also obtained for 12 other Microbotryum species. We found strong evidence of degeneration across the genus in the nonrecombining regions of the mating-type chromosomes, with significantly higher rates of nonsynonymous substitution (dN/dS) than in nonmating-type chromosomes or in recombining regions of the mating-type chromosomes. The nonrecombining regions of the mating-type chromosomes also showed high transposable element content, weak gene expression, and gene losses. The levels of degeneration did not differ between the a1 and a2 mating-type chromosomes, consistent with the lack of homogametic/heterogametic asymmetry between them, and contrasting with X/Y or Z/W sex chromosomes. PMID:25534033

Fontanillas, Eric; Hood, Michael E; Badouin, Hélène; Petit, Elsa; Barbe, Valérie; Gouzy, Jérôme; de Vienne, Damien M; Aguileta, Gabriela; Poulain, Julie; Wincker, Patrick; Chen, Zehua; Toh, Su San; Cuomo, Christina A; Perlin, Michael H; Gladieux, Pierre; Giraud, Tatiana

2015-04-01

50

Degeneration of the Nonrecombining Regions in the Mating-Type Chromosomes of the Anther-Smut Fungi  

PubMed Central

Dimorphic mating-type chromosomes in fungi are excellent models for understanding the genomic consequences of recombination suppression. Their suppressed recombination and reduced effective population size are expected to limit the efficacy of natural selection, leading to genomic degeneration. Our aim was to identify the sequences of the mating-type chromosomes (a1 and a2) of the anther-smut fungi and to investigate degeneration in their nonrecombining regions. We used the haploid a1 Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae reference genome sequence. The a1 and a2 mating-type chromosomes were both isolated electrophoretically and sequenced. Integration with restriction-digest optical maps identified regions of recombination and nonrecombination in the mating-type chromosomes. Genome sequence data were also obtained for 12 other Microbotryum species. We found strong evidence of degeneration across the genus in the nonrecombining regions of the mating-type chromosomes, with significantly higher rates of nonsynonymous substitution (dN/dS) than in nonmating-type chromosomes or in recombining regions of the mating-type chromosomes. The nonrecombining regions of the mating-type chromosomes also showed high transposable element content, weak gene expression, and gene losses. The levels of degeneration did not differ between the a1 and a2 mating-type chromosomes, consistent with the lack of homogametic/heterogametic asymmetry between them, and contrasting with X/Y or Z/W sex chromosomes. PMID:25534033

Fontanillas, Eric; Hood, Michael E.; Badouin, Hélène; Petit, Elsa; Barbe, Valérie; Gouzy, Jérôme; de Vienne, Damien M.; Aguileta, Gabriela; Poulain, Julie; Wincker, Patrick; Chen, Zehua; Toh, Su San; Cuomo, Christina A.; Perlin, Michael H.; Gladieux, Pierre; Giraud, Tatiana

2015-01-01

51

Characterization of dip1p reveals a switch in Arp2/3-dependent actin assembly for fission yeast endocytosis  

PubMed Central

Summary Background During endocytosis in yeast, a choreographed series of discrete local events at the plasma membrane lead to a rapid burst of actin polymerization and then internalization of an endocytic vesicle. What initiates Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization in this process is not well understood. Results The Schizosaccharomyces pombe WISH/DIP/SPIN90 orthologue dip1p is an actin patch protein that regulates the temporal sequence of endocytic events. dip1? mutants exhibit a novel phenotype in which early events such as WASp localization occur normally, but arrival of Arp2/3, actin polymerization and subsequent steps are delayed and occur with apparently random timing. In studying this mutant, we demonstrate that positive feedback loops of WASp, rapid actin assembly, and Arp2/3 contribute to switch-like behavior that initiates actin polymerization. In the absence of dip1p, a subset of patches is activated concurrently with the “touch” of a neighboring endocytic vesicle. Conclusions These studies reveal a switch-like mechanism responsible for the initiation of actin assembly during endocytosis. This switch may be activated in at least two ways, through a dip1p-dependent mechanism and through contact with another endocytic vesicle. PMID:21620704

Basu, Roshni; Chang, Fred

2011-01-01

52

Conservation of the b mating-type gene complex among bipolar and tetrapolar smut fungi.  

PubMed Central

In the phytopathogenic fungus Ustilago hordei, one locus with two alternate alleles, MAT-1 and MAT-2, controls mating and the establishment of the infectious dikaryon (bipolar mating). In contrast, for U. maydis, these functions are associated with two different gene complexes, called a and b (tetrapolar mating); the a complex has two alternate specificities, and the b gene complex is multiallelic. We have found homologs for the b gene complex in U. hordei and have cloned one from each mating type using sequences from one bEast allele of U. maydis as a probe. Sequence analysis revealed two divergent open reading frames in each b complex, which we called bW (bWest) and bE (bEast) in analogy with the b gene complex of U. maydis. The predicted bW and bE gene products from the two different mating types showed approximately 75% identity when homologous polypeptides were compared. All of the characterized bW and bE gene products have variable amino-terminal regions, conserved carboxy-terminal regions, and similar homeodomain motifs. Sequence comparisons with the bW1 and bE1 genes of U. maydis showed conservation in organization and structure. Transformation of the U. hordei b gene complex into a U. hordei strain of opposite mating type showed that the b genes from the two mating types are functional alleles. The U. hordei b genes, when introduced into U. maydis, rendered the haploid transformants weakly pathogenic on maize. These results indicate that structurally and functionally conserved b genes are present in U. hordei. PMID:8439742

Bakkeren, G; Kronstad, J W

1993-01-01

53

Molecular Organization of Mating Type Loci in Heterothallic, Homothallic, and Asexual Gibberella\\/ Fusarium Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mating type (MAT) genes were cloned from three members of the Gibberella\\/Fusarium complex that differ in reproductive mode: heterothallic G. fujikuroi, homothallic G. zeae, and asexual F. oxysporum. The G. fujikuroi MAT locus organization is typical of other heterothallic pyrenomycetes characterized to date; i.e., there are three genes at MAT1-1 and one at MAT1-2. G. zeae has homologues of all

Sung-Hwan Yun; Tsutomu Arie; Isao Kaneko; O. C. Yoder; B. Gillian Turgeon

2000-01-01

54

Mating-type genes for basidiomycete strain improvement in mushroom farming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mushroom production is dependent on the quality of the spawn used to inoculate the cultures. In order to produce high-quality spawn, breeding programs for strains resistant to certain diseases and able to form high-quality fruit bodies under standard growth conditions are necessary. The investigation of the molecular basis for mating provides access to the use of mating-type genes in order

E. Kothe

2001-01-01

55

Characterisation of the mating-type locus in the genus Xanthoria (lichen-forming ascomycetes, Lecanoromycetes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conserved regions of mating-type genes were amplified in four representatives of the genus Xanthoria (X. parietina, X. polycarpa, X. flammea, and X. elegans) using PCR-based methods. The complete MAT locus, containing one ORF (MAT1-2-1) coding for a truncated HMG-box protein, and two partial flanking genes, were cloned by screening a genomic lambda phage library of the homothallic X. parietina. The

Sandra Scherrer; Undine Zippler; Rosmarie Honegger

2005-01-01

56

Molecular Complementarity of Yeast Glycoprotein Mating Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cell fusion between opposite mating types 5 and 21 of the yeast Hansenula wingei is initiated by a strong sexual agglutination reaction. The mating factors responsible for the specificity of cellular recognition are complementary glycoproteins which form a physical complex in vitro. The complex is assayed by recovery of agglutination activity of the multivalent 5-factor after the univalent 21-factor has

Marjorie Crandall; Lawrence M. Lawrence; Robert M. Saunders

1974-01-01

57

Both mating types in the heterothallic fungus Ophiostoma quercus contain MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 genes.  

PubMed

In heterothallic Ascomycota, two opposite but distinct mating types control all sexual processes. Using mating crosses, mating types were assigned to ten isolates of the heterothallic fungal species Ophiostoma quercus. Primers were subsequently designed to target the MAT1-1-1, MAT1-1-3 (of the mating type 1 idiomorph), and MAT1-2-1 (of the mating type 2 idiomorph) genes in these isolates. Results showed that all isolates contained the full gene sequence for the MAT1-2-1 gene. In addition, fragments of the MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-1-3 genes were sequenced from all isolates. These results were unexpected, as each isolate from a heterothallic species would typically contain only one of the two possible MAT idiomorphs. PMID:22385624

Wilken, P Markus; Steenkamp, Emma T; Hall, Tracy A; De Beer, Z Wilhelm; Wingfield, Michael J; Wingfield, Brenda D

2012-03-01

58

MAPK feedback encodes a switch and timer for tunable stress adaptation in yeast.  

PubMed

Signaling pathways can behave as switches or rheostats, generating binary or graded responses to a given cell stimulus. We evaluated whether a single signaling pathway can simultaneously encode a switch and a rheostat. We found that the kinase Hog1 mediated a bifurcated cellular response: Activation and commitment to adaptation to osmotic stress are switchlike, whereas protein induction and the resolution of this commitment are graded. Through experimentation, bioinformatics analysis, and computational modeling, we determined that graded recovery is encoded through feedback phosphorylation and a gene induction program that is both temporally staggered and variable across the population. This switch-to-rheostat signaling mechanism represents a versatile stress adaptation system, wherein a broad range of inputs generate an "all-in" response that is later tuned to allow graded recovery of individual cells over time. PMID:25587192

English, Justin G; Shellhammer, James P; Malahe, Michael; McCarter, Patrick C; Elston, Timothy C; Dohlman, Henrik G

2015-01-13

59

The occurrence of the A2 mating type of Phytophthora infestans in the Netherlands; significance and consequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, was first discovered in Europe in 1845. Until 1980, only A1 mating\\u000a type isolates were known to occur in Europe. The absence of A2 mating type isolates restrained the fungus from sexual reproduction.\\u000a In the early 1980s, A2 mating type isolates were discovered in Europe. Presumably, a new

A. Drenth; L. J. Turkensteen; F. Govers

1993-01-01

60

Evolution of the Bipolar Mating System of the Mushroom Coprinellus disseminatus From Its Tetrapolar Ancestors Involves Loss of Mating-Type-Specific Pheromone Receptor Function  

PubMed Central

Mating incompatibility in mushroom fungi is controlled by the mating-type loci. In tetrapolar species, two unlinked mating-type loci exist (A and B), whereas in bipolar species there is only one locus. The A and B mating-type loci encode homeodomain transcription factors and pheromones and pheromone receptors, respectively. Most mushroom species have a tetrapolar mating system, but numerous transitions to bipolar mating systems have occurred. Here we determined the genes controlling mating type in the bipolar mushroom Coprinellus disseminatus. Through positional cloning and degenerate PCR, we sequenced both the transcription factor and pheromone receptor mating-type gene homologs from C. disseminatus. Only the transcription factor genes segregate with mating type, discounting the hypothesis of genetic linkage between the A and B mating-type loci as the causal origin of bipolar mating behavior. The mating-type locus of C. disseminatus is similar to the A mating-type locus of the model species Coprinopsis cinerea and encodes two tightly linked pairs of homeodomain transcription factor genes. When transformed into C. cinerea, the C. disseminatus A and B homologs elicited sexual reactions like native mating-type genes. Although mating type in C. disseminatus is controlled by only the transcription factor genes, cellular functions appear to be conserved for both groups of genes. PMID:16461425

James, Timothy Y.; Srivilai, Prayook; Kües, Ursula; Vilgalys, Rytas

2006-01-01

61

Environmental and Genetic Determinants of Colony Morphology in Yeast  

PubMed Central

Nutrient stresses trigger a variety of developmental switches in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of the least understood of such responses is the development of complex colony morphology, characterized by intricate, organized, and strain-specific patterns of colony growth and architecture. The genetic bases of this phenotype and the key environmental signals involved in its induction have heretofore remained poorly understood. By surveying multiple strain backgrounds and a large number of growth conditions, we show that limitation for fermentable carbon sources coupled with a rich nitrogen source is the primary trigger for the colony morphology response in budding yeast. Using knockout mutants and transposon-mediated mutagenesis, we demonstrate that two key signaling networks regulating this response are the filamentous growth MAP kinase cascade and the Ras-cAMP-PKA pathway. We further show synergistic epistasis between Rim15, a kinase involved in integration of nutrient signals, and other genes in these pathways. Ploidy, mating-type, and genotype-by-environment interactions also appear to play a role in the controlling colony morphology. Our study highlights the high degree of network reuse in this model eukaryote; yeast use the same core signaling pathways in multiple contexts to integrate information about environmental and physiological states and generate diverse developmental outputs. PMID:20107600

Granek, Joshua A.; Magwene, Paul M.

2010-01-01

62

Presence and Functionality of Mating Type Genes in the Supposedly Asexual Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus oryzae  

PubMed Central

The potential for sexual reproduction in Aspergillus oryzae was assessed by investigating the presence and functionality of MAT genes. Previous genome studies had identified a MAT1-1 gene in the reference strain RIB40. We now report the existence of a complementary MAT1-2 gene and the sequencing of an idiomorphic region from A. oryzae strain AO6. This allowed the development of a PCR diagnostic assay, which detected isolates of the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 genotypes among 180 strains assayed, including industrial tane-koji isolates. Strains used for sake and miso production showed a near-1:1 ratio of the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 mating types, whereas strains used for soy sauce production showed a significant bias toward the MAT1-2 mating type. MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isogenic strains were then created by genetic manipulation of the resident idiomorph, and gene expression was compared by DNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) methodologies under conditions in which MAT genes were expressed. Thirty-three genes were found to be upregulated more than 10-fold in either the MAT1-1 host strain or the MAT1-2 gene replacement strain relative to each other, showing that both the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 genes functionally regulate gene expression in A. oryzae in a mating type-dependent manner, the first such report for a supposedly asexual fungus. MAT1-1 expression specifically upregulated an ?-pheromone precursor gene, but the functions of most of the genes affected were unknown. The results are consistent with a heterothallic breeding system in A. oryzae, and prospects for the discovery of a sexual cycle are discussed. PMID:22327593

Wada, Ryuta; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Yamaguchi, Haruka; Yamamoto, Nanase; Wagu, Yutaka; Paoletti, Mathieu; Archer, David B.; Dyer, Paul S.

2012-01-01

63

Genetic Variability and Distribution of Mating Type Alleles in Field Populations of Leptosphaeria maculans from France  

PubMed Central

Leptosphaeria maculans is the most ubiquitous fungal pathogen of Brassica crops and causes the devastating stem canker disease of oilseed rape worldwide. We used minisatellite markers to determine the genetic structure of L. maculans in four field populations from France. Isolates were collected at three different spatial scales (leaf, 2-m2 field plot, and field) enabling the evaluation of spatial distribution of the mating type alleles and of genetic variability within and among field populations. Within each field population, no gametic disequilibrium between the minisatellite loci was detected and the mating type alleles were present at equal frequencies. Both sexual and asexual reproduction occur in the field, but the genetic structure of these populations is consistent with annual cycles of randomly mating sexual reproduction. All L. maculans field populations had a high level of gene diversity (H = 0.68 to 0.75) and genotypic diversity. Within each field population, the number of genotypes often was very close to the number of isolates. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that >99.5% of the total genetic variability was distributed at a small spatial scale, i.e., within 2-m2 field plots. Population differentiation among the four field populations was low (GST < 0.02), suggesting a high degree of gene exchange between these populations. The high gene flow evidenced here in French populations of L. maculans suggests a rapid countrywide diffusion of novel virulence alleles whenever novel resistance sources are used. PMID:16391041

Gout, Lilian; Eckert, Maria; Rouxel, Thierry; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène

2006-01-01

64

Characterisation of the mating-type locus in the genus Xanthoria (lichen-forming ascomycetes, Lecanoromycetes).  

PubMed

Conserved regions of mating-type genes were amplified in four representatives of the genus Xanthoria (X. parietina, X. polycarpa, X. flammea, and X. elegans) using PCR-based methods. The complete MAT locus, containing one ORF (MAT1-2-1) coding for a truncated HMG-box protein, and two partial flanking genes, were cloned by screening a genomic lambda phage library of the homothallic X. parietina. The flanking genes, a homologue of SLA2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a DNA lyase gene, served to amplify the two idiomorphs of the X. polycarpa MAT locus. Each idiomorph contains a single gene: MAT1-2-1 codes for a HMG-box protein, MAT1-1-1 encodes an alpha domain protein. The occurrence of mating-type genes in eight single spore isolates derived from one ascus was studied with a PCR assay. In the homothallic X. parietina a HMG fragment, but no alpha box fragment was found in all isolates, whereas in X. elegans, another homothallic species, all tested isolates contained a fragment of both idiomorphs. Conversely, isolates of the heterothallic X. polycarpa contained either a HMG or an alpha box fragment, but never both. PMID:16266815

Scherrer, Sandra; Zippler, Undine; Honegger, Rosmarie

2005-12-01

65

Characterization of MATE-Type Multidrug Efflux Pumps from Klebsiella pneumoniae MGH78578  

PubMed Central

We previously described the cloning of genes related to drug resistance from Klebsiella pneumoniae MGH78578. Of these, we identified a putative gene encoding a MATE-type multidrug efflux pump, and named it ketM. Escherichia coli KAM32 possessing ketM on a plasmid showed increased minimum inhibitory concentrations for norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, acriflavine, Hoechst 33342, and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenyl indole (DAPI). The active efflux of DAPI was observed in E. coli KAM32 possessing ketM on a plasmid. The expression of mRNA for ketM was observed in K. pneumoniae cells, and we subsequently disrupted ketM in K. pneumoniae ATCC10031. However, no significant changes were observed in drug resistance levels between the parental strain ATCC10031 and ketM disruptant, SKYM. Therefore, we concluded that KetM was a multidrug efflux pump, that did not significantly contribute to intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial chemicals in K. pneumoniae. MATE-type transporters are considered to be secondary transporters; therefore, we investigated the coupling cations of KetM. DAPI efflux by KetM was observed when lactate was added to produce a proton motive force, indicating that KetM effluxed substrates using a proton motive force. However, the weak efflux of DAPI by KetM was also noted when NaCl was added to the assay mixture without lactate. This result suggests that KetM may utilize proton and sodium motive forces. PMID:25807080

Ogawa, Wakano; Minato, Yusuke; Dodan, Hayata; Onishi, Motoyasu; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa; Kuroda, Teruo

2015-01-01

66

Organization and evolutionary trajectory of the mating type (MAT) locus in dermatophyte and dimorphic fungal pathogens.  

PubMed

Sexual reproduction in fungi is governed by a specialized genomic region, the mating type (MAT) locus, whose gene identity, organization, and complexity are diverse. We identified the MAT locus of five dermatophyte fungal pathogens (Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton equinum, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton tonsurans) and a dimorphic fungus, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and performed phylogenetic analyses. The identified MAT locus idiomorphs of M. gypseum control cell type identity in mating assays, and recombinant progeny were produced. Virulence tests in Galleria mellonella larvae suggest the two mating types of M. gypseum may have equivalent virulence. Synteny analysis revealed common features of the MAT locus shared among these five dermatophytes: namely, a small size ( approximately 3 kb) and a novel gene arrangement. The SLA2, COX13, and APN2 genes, which flank the MAT locus in other Ascomycota are instead linked on one side of the dermatophyte MAT locus. In addition, the transcriptional orientations of the APN2 and COX13 genes are reversed compared to the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii. A putative transposable element, pogo, was found to have inserted in the MAT1-2 idiomorph of one P. brasiliensis strain but not others. In conclusion, the evolution of the MAT locus of the dermatophytes and dimorphic fungi from the last common ancestor has been punctuated by both gene acquisition and expansion, and asymmetric gene loss. These studies further support a foundation to develop molecular and genetic tools for dermatophyte and dimorphic human fungal pathogens. PMID:19880755

Li, Wenjun; Metin, Banu; White, Theodore C; Heitman, Joseph

2010-01-01

67

A generic approach to engineer antibody pH-switches using combinatorial histidine scanning libraries and yeast display.  

PubMed

There is growing interest in the fast and robust engineering of protein pH-sensitivity that aims to reduce binding at acidic pH, compared to neutral pH. Here, we describe a novel strategy for the incorporation of pH-sensitive antigen binding functions into antibody variable domains using combinatorial histidine scanning libraries and yeast surface display. The strategy allows simultaneous screening for both, high affinity binding at pH 7.4 and pH-sensitivity, and excludes conventional negative selection steps. As proof of concept, we applied this strategy to incorporate pH-dependent antigen binding into the complementary-determining regions of adalimumab. After 3 consecutive rounds of separate heavy and light chain library screening, pH-sensitive variants could be isolated. Heavy and light chain mutations were combined, resulting in 3 full-length antibody variants that revealed sharp, reversible pH-dependent binding profiles. Dissociation rate constants at pH 6.0 increased 230- to 780-fold, while high affinity binding at pH 7.4 in the sub-nanomolar range was retained. Furthermore, binding to huFcRn and thermal stability were not affected by histidine substitutions. Overall, this study emphasizes a generalizable strategy for engineering pH-switch functions potentially applicable to a variety of antibodies and further proteins-based therapeutics. PMID:25523975

Schröter, Christian; Günther, Ralf; Rhiel, Laura; Becker, Stefan; Toleikis, Lars; Doerner, Achim; Becker, Janine; Schönemann, Andreas; Nasu, Daichi; Neuteboom, Berend; Kolmar, Harald; Hock, Björn

2015-01-01

68

Global changes in gene expression associated with phenotypic switching of wild yeast  

PubMed Central

Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from natural settings form structured biofilm colonies that are equipped with intricate protective mechanisms. These wild strains are able to reprogram themselves with a certain frequency during cultivation in plentiful laboratory conditions. The resulting domesticated strains switch off certain protective mechanisms and form smooth colonies that resemble those of common laboratory strains. Results Here, we show that domestication can be reversed when a domesticated strain is challenged by various adverse conditions; the resulting feral strain restores its ability to form structured biofilm colonies. Phenotypic, microscopic and transcriptomic analyses show that phenotypic transition is a complex process that affects various aspects of feral strain physiology; it leads to a phenotype that resembles the original wild strain in some aspects and the domesticated derivative in others. We specify the genetic determinants that are likely involved in the formation of a structured biofilm colonies. In addition to FLO11, these determinants include genes that affect the cell wall and membrane composition. We also identify changes occurring during phenotypic transitions that affect other properties of phenotypic strain-variants, such as resistance to the impact of environmental stress. Here we document the regulatory role of the histone deacetylase Hda1p in developing such a resistance. Conclusions We provide detailed analysis of transcriptomic and phenotypic modulations of three related S. cerevisiae strains that arose by phenotypic switching under diverse environmental conditions. We identify changes specifically related to a strain’s ability to create complex structured colonies; we also show that other changes, such as genome rearrangement(s), are unrelated to this ability. Finally, we identify the importance of histone deacetylase Hda1p in strain resistance to stresses. PMID:24533484

2014-01-01

69

Molecular organization of the mating-type loci in the homothallic Ascomycete Eupenicillium crustaceum.  

PubMed

Eupenicillium species are the teleomorphic (sexual) forms of anamorphic (asexual) members of the genus Penicillium, which contains many species of industrial importance. Here we describe the first molecular analysis of the mating-type (MAT) locus from a homothallic (self-fertile) Eupenicillium species, E. crustaceum. This ascomycete is a sexual relative of the penicillin producer Penicillium chrysogenum, which while long considered asexual, was recently shown to possess the required genetic machinery for heterothallic breeding. The E. crustaceum genome contains two MAT loci, MAT1-1 and MAT1-2, in an arrangement characteristic of other known homothallic euascomycetes, such as Neosartorya fischeri. MAT1-1 is flanked by conserved APN2 (DNA lyase) and SLA2 (cytoskeleton assembly control) genes and encodes a homologue of the ?-box domain protein MAT1-1-1. Conversely, MAT1-2 carries a HMG-domain gene MAT1-2-1, and is flanked by a degenerate SLA2 gene and an intact homologue of the P. chrysogenum ORF Pc20g08960. Here we demonstrate the transcriptional expression of both mating-type genes during vegetative development. Furthermore, the MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 sequences were used to resolve the phylogenetic relationship of E. crustaceum with other ascomycetes. Phylogenetic trees confirmed a very close relationship between the homothallic E. crustaceum and the supposedly heterothallic P. chrysogenum. This close taxonomic association makes E. crustaceum an ideal candidate for future expression and evolutionary studies of sexual reproduction, with the ultimate aim of inducing sex in P. chrysogenum. PMID:21724167

Pöggeler, Stefanie; O'Gorman, Céline M; Hoff, Birgit; Kück, Ulrich

2011-07-01

70

Gene Conversion Occurs within the Mating-Type Locus of Cryptococcus neoformans during Sexual Reproduction  

PubMed Central

Meiotic recombination of sex chromosomes is thought to be repressed in organisms with heterogametic sex determination (e.g. mammalian X/Y chromosomes), due to extensive divergence and chromosomal rearrangements between the two chromosomes. However, proper segregation of sex chromosomes during meiosis requires crossing-over occurring within the pseudoautosomal regions (PAR). Recent studies reveal that recombination, in the form of gene conversion, is widely distributed within and may have played important roles in the evolution of some chromosomal regions within which recombination was thought to be repressed, such as the centromere cores of maize. Cryptococcus neoformans, a major human pathogenic fungus, has an unusually large mating-type locus (MAT, >100 kb), and the MAT alleles from the two opposite mating-types show extensive nucleotide sequence divergence and chromosomal rearrangements, mirroring characteristics of sex chromosomes. Meiotic recombination was assumed to be repressed within the C. neoformans MAT locus. A previous study identified recombination hot spots flanking the C. neoformans MAT, and these hot spots are associated with high GC content. Here, we investigated a GC-rich intergenic region located within the MAT locus of C. neoformans to establish if this region also exhibits unique recombination behavior during meiosis. Population genetics analysis of natural C. neoformans isolates revealed signals of homogenization spanning this GC-rich intergenic region within different C. neoformans lineages, consistent with a model in which gene conversion of this region during meiosis prevents it from diversifying within each lineage. By analyzing meiotic progeny from laboratory crosses, we found that meiotic recombination (gene conversion) occurs around the GC-rich intergenic region at a frequency equal to or greater than the meiotic recombination frequency observed in other genomic regions. We discuss the implications of these findings with regards to the possible functional and evolutionary importance of gene conversion within the C. neoformans MAT locus and, more generally, in fungi. PMID:22792079

Sun, Sheng; Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Heitman, Joseph

2012-01-01

71

Both mating types in the heterothallic fungus Ophiostoma quercus contain MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 genes  

E-print Network

Both mating types in the heterothallic fungus Ophiostoma quercus contain MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 genes P 2012 Corresponding Editor: Michael Lorenz Keywords: Fungal mating MAT1-1 MAT1-2 Ophiostoma a b s t r species Ophiostoma quercus. Primers were subsequently designed to target the MAT1-1-1, MAT1-1-3 (of

72

The evolutionary trajectory of the mating-type (mat) genes in Neurospora relates to reproductive behavior of taxa  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Comparative sequencing studies among a wide range of taxonomic groups, including fungi, have led to the discovery that reproductive genes evolve more rapidly than other genes. However, for fungal reproductive genes the question has remained whether the rapid evolution is a result of stochastic or deterministic processes. The mating-type (mat) genes constitute the master regulators of sexual reproduction in

Lotta Wik; Magnus Karlsson; Hanna Johannesson

2008-01-01

73

Genetical Homogeneity and the Stability of the Mating-type Factors of `Fairy Rings' of Marasmius oreacdes  

Microsoft Academic Search

EXAMINATIONS have been made of the distribution of multiple-allelomorphic mating-type factors (m.t.f.) carried by basidiospores and produced by adjacent carpophores of higher fungi. The spatial distribution patterns found have been interpreted to provide evidence concerning the disposition of the mycelium giving rise to the sporophores and its genetieal homogeneity or heterogeneity1.

J. H. Burnett; E. J. Evans

1966-01-01

74

Cloning of the Lentinula edodes B mating-type locus and identification of the genetic structure controlling B mating.  

PubMed

During the life cycle of heterothallic tetrapolar Agaricomycetes such as Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Pegler, the mating type system, composed of unlinked A and B loci, plays a vital role in controlling sexual development and resulting formation of the fruit body. L. edodes is produced worldwide for consumption and medicinal purposes, and understanding its sexual development is therefore of great importance. A considerable amount of mating type factors has been indicated over the past decades but few genes have actually been identified, and no complete genetic structures of L. edodes B mating-type loci are available. In this study, we cloned the matB regions from two mating compatible L. edodes strains, 939P26 and 939P42. Four pheromone receptors were identified on each new matB region, together with three and four pheromone precursor genes in the respective strains. Gene polymorphism, phylogenetic analysis and distribution of pheromone receptors and pheromone precursors clearly indicate a bipartite matB locus, each sublocus containing a pheromone receptor and one or two pheromone precursors. Detailed sequence comparisons of genetic structures between the matB regions of strains 939P42, 939P26 and a previously reported strain SUP2 further supported this model and allowed identification of the B mating type subloci borders. Mating studies confirmed the control of B mating by the identified pheromone receptors and pheromones in L. edodes. PMID:24029079

Wu, Lin; van Peer, Arend; Song, Wenhua; Wang, Hong; Chen, Mingjie; Tan, Qi; Song, Chunyan; Zhang, Meiyan; Bao, Dapeng

2013-12-01

75

Characterization of Ascochyta rabiei for population structure, mating type and pathogenic variability from Pakistan and United States  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Chickpea production is greatly hampered by blight causing fungal pathogen Ascochyta rabiei (AR) in chickpea growing regions of the world. Genetic variability and mating type frequency of thirty-two AR isolates from six geographical regions of Pakistan were compared with a US-AR population. Pakistani...

76

Analysis of Mycosphaerella Graminicola from California, Indiana, Kansas and North Dakota with Mating Type and SSR Markers  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Septoria tritici blotch, caused by Mycosphaerella graminicola, is one of the most important foliar diseases of wheat. Genetic diversity of 333 isolates of M. graminicola collected from spring (California, North Dakota) and winter wheat (Indiana, Kansas) was analyzed for mating type and 17 SSR marker...

77

DNA polymorphism in recombining and non-recombining mating-type-specific loci of the smut fungus Microbotryum.  

PubMed

The population-genetic processes leading to the genetic degeneration of non-recombining regions have mainly been studied in animal and plant sex chromosomes. Here, we report population genetic analysis of the processes in the non-recombining mating-type-specific regions of the smut fungus Microbotryum violaceum. M. violaceum has A1 and A2 mating types, determined by mating-type-specific 'sex chromosomes' that contain 1-2?Mb long non-recombining regions. If genetic degeneration were occurring, then one would expect reduced DNA polymorphism in the non-recombining regions of this fungus. The analysis of DNA diversity among 19 M. violaceum strains, collected across Europe from Silene latifolia flowers, revealed that (i) DNA polymorphism is relatively low in all 20 studied loci (??0.15%), (ii) it is not significantly different between the two mating-type-specific chromosomes nor between the non-recombining and recombining regions, (iii) there is substantial population structure in M. violaceum populations, which resembles that of its host species, S. latifolia, and (iv) there is significant linkage disequilibrium, suggesting that widespread selfing in this species results in a reduction of the effective recombination rate across the genome. We hypothesise that selfing-related reduction of recombination across the M. violaceum genome negates the difference in the level of DNA polymorphism between the recombining and non-recombining regions, and may possibly lead to similar levels of genetic degeneration in the mating-type-specific regions of the non-recombining 'sex chromosomes' and elsewhere in the genome. PMID:21081967

Votintseva, A A; Filatov, D A

2011-06-01

78

Female reproductive success and the evolution of mating-type frequencies in tristylous populations.  

PubMed

In tristylous populations, mating-type frequencies are governed by negative frequency-dependent selection typically resulting in equal morph ratios at equilibrium. However, Narcissus triandrus generally exhibits long-styled (L)-biased populations with a deficiency of the mid-styled (M)-morph. Here we used a pollen-transfer model and measurements of female fertility in natural populations to investigate whether these uneven morph ratios were associated with variation in female reproductive success. Our theoretical analysis demonstrated that morph ratio bias can result from maternal fitness differences among the morphs, and that these effects were magnified by asymmetrical mating. In nine out of 15 populations of N. triandrus, seed set differed significantly among the morphs, but pollen limitation occurred in only two of 11 populations investigated. Average seed set of the M-morph was positively associated with its frequency in populations. Flower size was negatively correlated with the seed set of the M-morph. Our results suggest that interactions between mating patterns and female fertility are responsible for variation in morph frequencies and loss of the M-morph from tristylous populations of N. triandrus. PMID:16866959

Hodgins, Kathryn A; Barrett, Spencer C H

2006-01-01

79

Evidence for interaction of Schizophyllum commune Y mating-type proteins in vivo.  

PubMed Central

The Aalpha mating-type locus of Schizophyllum commune regulates sexual development and contains the code for two proteins, Y and Z, which are thought to form a complex and function as a transcription factor. Import of these proteins into the nucleus may be an essential step in Aalpha-regulated sexual development. The Y proteins contain a bipartite basic sequence, which is an excellent candidate for a nuclear localization sequence (NLS), while Z proteins contain no such sequence. Here we describe experiments in which deletions were made in the putative NLS sequence of Y4. We show that this putative NLS is essential to the function of the Y protein and capable of mislocalizing green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the nucleus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Further, we describe genetic experiments that demonstrate the first Y-Y protein interactions in vivo. These results are consistent with our previously postulated hypothesis that the Y-Z complex is likely to be of a higher order than dimer. PMID:11973301

Robertson, C Ian; McMahon Kende, Alexander; Toenjes, Kurt; Novotny, Charles P; Ullrich, Robert C

2002-01-01

80

Female Fertility and Mating Type Effects on Effective Population Size and Evolution in Filamentous Fungi  

PubMed Central

The idealized individual in many fungal species is a haploid self-sterile hermaphrodite that may be propagated by asexually produced spores or that may reproduce sexually. In field populations, polymorphism occurs for female-sterile/hermaphrodite status, and female-sterile mutants, which function only as males during sexual reproduction, may comprise >50% of the population. The effective population number may be based on the number of strains of different mating type or the relative frequency of hermaphrodites. The female-sterile mutants are at a selective disadvantage every time sexual reproduction occurs, and must have an advantage during vegetative propagation to persist at a significant frequency. When a high frequency of female-sterile strains is observed in field populations, it indicates that vegetative propagation is a significant component of the fungus' natural history. Depending on the mutation rate to female sterility and the selective advantage of the female-sterile strains during vegetative propagation, the ratio of sexual:asexual generations can range from 1:15 to 1:2300 for species in the Gibberella fujikuroi complex. The relative rarity of sexual reproduction may permit female-sterile strains to accumulate to a level such that local populations could completely lose sexuality and appear as asexual (imperfect) species. PMID:8889520

Leslie, J. F.; Klein, K. K.

1996-01-01

81

Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the mating-type loci in the asexual ascomycete genus Ulocladium.  

PubMed

The genus Ulocladium is thought to be strictly asexual. Mating-type (MAT) loci regulate sexual reproduction in fungi and their study may help to explain the apparent lack of sexual reproduction in Ulocladium. We sequenced the full length of two MAT genes in 26 Ulocladium species and characterized the entire MAT idiomorphs plus flanking regions of Ulocladium botrytis. The MAT1-1 ORF encodes a protein with an alpha-box motif by the MAT1-1-1 gene and the MAT1-2 ORF encodes a protein with an HMG box motif by the MAT1-2-1 gene. Both MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 genes were detected in a single strain of every species. Moreover, the results of RT-PCR revealed that both MAT genes are expressed in all 26 Ulocladium species. This demonstrates that MAT genes of Ulocladium species might be functional and that they have the potential for sexual reproduction. Phylogenies based on MAT genes were compared with GAPDH and Alt a 1 phylograms in Ulocladium using maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayesian analysis. The MAT genealogies and the non-MAT trees displayed different topologies, indicating that MAT genes are unsuitable phylogenetic markers at the species level in Ulocladium. Furthermore, the conflicting topologies between MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 phylogeny indicate separate evolutionary events for the two MAT genes. However, the intergeneric phylogeny of four closely allied genera (Ulocladium, Alternaria, Cochliobolus, Stemphylium) based on MAT alignments demonstrated that MAT genes are suitable for phylogenetic analysis among allied genera. PMID:24891417

Geng, Yun; Li, Zhuang; Xia, Li-Yun; Wang, Qun; Hu, Xian-Mei; Zhang, Xiu-Guo

2014-01-01

82

Identification of the Minus-Dominance Gene Ortholog in the Mating-Type Locus of Gonium pectorale  

PubMed Central

The evolution of anisogamy/oogamy in the colonial Volvocales might have occurred in an ancestral isogamous colonial organism like Gonium pectorale. The unicellular, close relative Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has a mating-type (MT) locus harboring several mating-type-specific genes, including one involved in mating-type determination and another involved in the function of the tubular mating structure in only one of the two isogametes. In this study, as the first step in identifying the G. pectorale MT locus, we isolated from G. pectorale the ortholog of the C. reinhardtii mating-type-determining minus-dominance (CrMID) gene, which is localized only in the MT? locus. 3?- and 5?-RACE RT–PCR using degenerate primers identified a CrMID-orthologous 164-amino-acid coding gene (GpMID) containing a leucine-zipper RWP-RK domain near the C-terminal, as is the case with CrMID. Genomic Southern blot analysis showed that GpMID was coded only in the minus strain of G. pectorale. RT–PCR revealed that GpMID expression increased during nitrogen starvation. Analysis of F1 progeny suggested that GpMID and isopropylmalate dehydratase LEU1S are tightly linked, suggesting that they are harbored in a chromosomal region under recombinational suppression that is comparable to the C. reinhardtii MT locus. However, two other genes present in the C. reinhardtii MT locus are not linked to the G. pectorale LEU1S/MID, suggesting that the gene content of the volvocalean MT loci is not static over time. Inheritance of chloroplast and mitochondria genomes in G. pectorale is uniparental from the plus and minus parents, respectively, as is also the case in C. reinhardtii. PMID:18202374

Hamaji, Takashi; Ferris, Patrick J.; Coleman, Annette W.; Waffenschmidt, Sabine; Takahashi, Fumio; Nishii, Ichiro; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

2008-01-01

83

Evolutionary relationships between Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and F. oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici isolates inferred from mating type, elongation factor-1alpha and exopolygalacturonase sequences.  

PubMed

Fusarium oxysporum is a ubiquitous species complex of soilborne plant pathogens that comprises many different formae speciales, each characterized by a high degree of host specificity. In this study, the evolutionary relationships between different isolates of the F. oxysporum species complex have been examined, with a special emphasis on the formae speciales lycopersici and radicis-lycopersici, sharing tomato as host while causing different symptoms. Phylogenetic analyses of partial sequences of a housekeeping gene, the elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha) gene, and a gene encoding a pathogenicity trait, the exopolygalacturonase (pgx4) gene, were conducted on a worldwide collection of F. oxysporum strains representing the most frequently observed vegetative compatibility groups of these formae speciales. Based on the reconstructed phylogenies, multiple evolutionary lineages were found for both formae speciales. However, different tree topologies and statistical parameters were obtained for the cladograms as several strains switched from one cluster to another depending on the locus that was used to infer the phylogeny. In addition, mating type analysis showed a mixed distribution of the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 alleles in the F. oxysporum species complex, irrespective of the geographic origin of the tested isolates. This observation, as well as the topological conflicts that were detected between EF-1alpha and pgx4, are discussed in relation to the evolutionary history of the F. oxysporum species complex. PMID:19679185

Lievens, Bart; van Baarlen, Peter; Verreth, Christel; van Kerckhove, Stefan; Rep, Martijn; Thomma, Bart P H J

2009-10-01

84

The Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Mating Type Locus (MAT) Contains a 3.6-kb Region That Is Inverted in Every Meiotic Generation  

PubMed Central

Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a fungal plant pathogen and the causal agent of lettuce drop, an economically important disease of California lettuce. The structure of the S. sclerotiorum mating type locus MAT has previously been reported and consists of two idiomorphs that are fused end-to-end as in other homothallics. We investigated the diversity of S. sclerotiorum MAT using a total of 283 isolates from multiple hosts and locations, and identified a novel MAT allele that differed by a 3.6-kb inversion and was designated Inv+, as opposed to the previously known S. sclerotiorum MAT that lacked the inversion and was Inv-. The inversion affected three of the four MAT genes: MAT1-2-1 and MAT1-2-4 were inverted and MAT1-1-1 was truncated at the 3’-end. Expression of MAT genes differed between Inv+ and Inv- isolates. In Inv+ isolates, only one of the three MAT1-2-1 transcript variants of Inv- isolates was detected, and the alpha1 domain of Inv+ MAT1-1-1 transcripts was truncated. Both Inv- and Inv+ isolates were self-fertile, and the inversion segregated in a 1?1 ratio regardless of whether the parent was Inv- or Inv+. This suggested the involvement of a highly regulated process in maintaining equal proportions of Inv- and Inv+, likely associated with the sexual state. The MAT inversion region, defined as the 3.6-kb MAT inversion in Inv+ isolates and the homologous region of Inv- isolates, was flanked by a 250-bp inverted repeat on either side. The 250-bp inverted repeat was a partial MAT1-1-1 that through mediation of loop formation and crossing over, may be involved in the inversion process. Inv+ isolates were widespread, and in California and Nebraska constituted half of the isolates examined. We speculate that a similar inversion region may be involved in mating type switching in the filamentous ascomycetes Chromocrea spinulosa, Sclerotinia trifoliorum and in certain Ceratocystis species. PMID:23457637

Maruthachalam, Karunakaran; Wu, Bo-Ming; Subbarao, Krishna V.

2013-01-01

85

Isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans from Infected Animals Reveal Genetic Exchange in Unisexual,   Mating Type Populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sexual reproduction and genetic exchange are important for the evolution of fungal pathogens and for producing potentially infective spores. Studies to determine whether sex occurs in the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii have produced enigmatic results, however: basidiospores are the most likely infective propagules, and clinical isolates are fertile and genetically diverse, consistent with a sexual species, but almost

Tien Bui; Xiaorong Lin; Richard Malik; Joseph Heitman; Dee Carter

2008-01-01

86

Genetic basis of self-incompatibility in the lichen-forming fungus Lobaria pulmonaria and skewed frequency distribution of mating-type idiomorphs: implications for conservation.  

PubMed

Fungal populations that reproduce sexually are likely to be genetically more diverse and have a higher adaptive potential than asexually reproducing populations. Mating systems of fungal species can be self-incompatible, requiring the presence of isolates of different mating-type genes for sexual reproduction to occur, or self-compatible, requiring only one. Understanding the distribution of mating-type genes in populations can help to assess the potential of self-incompatible species to reproduce sexually. In the locally threatened epiphytic lichen-forming fungus Lobaria pulmonaria (L.) Hoffm., low frequency of sexual reproduction is likely to limit the potential of populations to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Our study provides direct evidence of self-incompatibility (heterothallism) in L. pulmonaria. It can thus be hypothesized that sexual reproduction in small populations might be limited by an unbalanced distribution of mating-type genes. We therefore assessed neutral genetic diversity (using microsatellites) and mating-type ratio in 27 lichen populations (933 individuals). We found significant differences in the frequency of the two mating types in 13 populations, indicating a lower likelihood of sexual reproduction in these populations. This suggests that conservation translocation activities aiming at maximizing genetic heterogeneity in threatened and declining populations should take into account not only presence of fruiting bodies in transplanted individuals, but also the identity and balanced representation of mating-type genes. PMID:23236495

Singh, Garima; Dal Grande, Francesco; Cornejo, Carolina; Schmitt, Imke; Scheidegger, Christoph

2012-01-01

87

Genetic Basis of Self-Incompatibility in the Lichen-Forming Fungus Lobaria pulmonaria and Skewed Frequency Distribution of Mating-Type Idiomorphs: Implications for Conservation  

PubMed Central

Fungal populations that reproduce sexually are likely to be genetically more diverse and have a higher adaptive potential than asexually reproducing populations. Mating systems of fungal species can be self-incompatible, requiring the presence of isolates of different mating-type genes for sexual reproduction to occur, or self-compatible, requiring only one. Understanding the distribution of mating-type genes in populations can help to assess the potential of self-incompatible species to reproduce sexually. In the locally threatened epiphytic lichen-forming fungus Lobaria pulmonaria (L.) Hoffm., low frequency of sexual reproduction is likely to limit the potential of populations to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Our study provides direct evidence of self-incompatibility (heterothallism) in L. pulmonaria. It can thus be hypothesized that sexual reproduction in small populations might be limited by an unbalanced distribution of mating-type genes. We therefore assessed neutral genetic diversity (using microsatellites) and mating-type ratio in 27 lichen populations (933 individuals). We found significant differences in the frequency of the two mating types in 13 populations, indicating a lower likelihood of sexual reproduction in these populations. This suggests that conservation translocation activities aiming at maximizing genetic heterogeneity in threatened and declining populations should take into account not only presence of fruiting bodies in transplanted individuals, but also the identity and balanced representation of mating-type genes. PMID:23236495

Singh, Garima; Dal Grande, Francesco; Cornejo, Carolina; Schmitt, Imke; Scheidegger, Christoph

2012-01-01

88

SUM1-1, a dominant suppressor of SIR mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, increases transcriptional silencing at telomeres and HM mating-type loci and decreases chromosome stability.  

PubMed Central

Transcriptional silencing in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs at HML and HMR mating-type loci and telomeres and requires the products of the silent information regulator (SIR) genes. Recent evidence suggests that the silencer- and telomere-binding protein Rap1p initiates silencing by recruiting a complex of Sir proteins to the chromosome, where they act in some way to modify chromatin structure or accessibility. A single allele of the SUM1gene (SUM1-1) which restores silencing at HM loci in strains mutant for any of the four SIR genes was identified a number of years ago. However, conflicting genetic results and the lack of other alleles of SUM1 made it difficult to surmise the wild-type function of SUM1 or the manner in which the SUM1-1 mutation restores silencing in sir mutant strains. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the SUM1 gene and the SUM1-1 mutant allele. Our results indicate that SUM1-1 is an unusual altered-function mutation that can bypass the need for SIR function in HM silencing and increase repression at telomeres. A sum1 deletion mutation has only minor effects on silencing in SIR strains and does not restore silencing in sir mutants. In addition to its effect on transcriptional silencing, the SUM1-1 mutation (but not a sum1 deletion) increases the rate of chromosome loss and cell death. We suggest several speculative models for the action of SUM1-1 in silencing based on these and other data. PMID:8754829

Chi, M H; Shore, D

1996-01-01

89

Complex Mechanisms Regulate Developmental Expression of the matA (HMG) Mating Type Gene in Homothallic Aspergillus nidulans  

PubMed Central

Sexual reproduction is a fundamental developmental process that allows for genetic diversity through the control of zygote formation, recombination, and gametogenesis. The correct regulation of these events is paramount. Sexual reproduction in filamentous fungi, including mating strategy (self-fertilization/homothallism or outcrossing/heterothallism), is determined by the expression of mating type genes at mat loci. Aspergillus nidulans matA encodes a critical regulator that is a fungal ortholog of the hSRY/SOX9 HMG box proteins. In contrast to well-studied outcrossing systems, the molecular basis of homothallism and role of mating type genes during a self-fertile sexual cycle remain largely unknown. In this study the genetic model organism, A. nidulans, has been used to investigate the regulation and molecular functions of the matA mating type gene in a homothallic system. Our data demonstrate that complex regulatory mechanisms underlie functional matA expression during self-fertilization and sexual reproduction in A. nidulans. matA expression is suppressed in vegetative hyphae and is progressively derepressed during the sexual cycle. Elevated levels of matA transcript are required for differentiation of fruiting bodies, karyogamy, meiosis, and efficient formation of meiotic progeny. matA expression is driven from both initiator (Inr) and novel promoter elements that are tightly developmentally regulated by position-dependent and position-independent mechanisms. Deletion of an upstream silencing element, matA SE, results in derepressed expression from wild-type (wt) promoter elements and activation of an additional promoter. These studies provide novel insights into the molecular basis of homothallism in fungi and genetic regulation of sexual reproduction in eukaryotes. PMID:21868608

Czaja, Wioletta; Miller, Karen Y.; Miller, Bruce L.

2011-01-01

90

Microtubule Dynamics from Mating through the First Zygotic Division in the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have used time-lapse digital imaging mi- croscopy to examine cytoplasmic astral microtubules (Mts) and spindle dynamics during the mating pathway in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Mating be- gins when two cells of opposite mating type come into proximity. The cells arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cy- cle and grow a projection towards one another forming

Paul Maddox; E. Chin; A. Mallavarapu; E. Yeh; E. D. Salmon; K. Bloom

1999-01-01

91

Deacidification of grape juice with derepressed mutants of the yeast Hansenula anomala  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transport and utilization of malic acid by the yeast Hansenula anomala are subject to glucose repression. Derepressed diploid mutant strains were obtained by hybridization of derepressed haploid mutant strains of opposite mating type. Six diploid mutant strains displayed derepressed behaviour with respect to malic acid utilization in the presence of glucose up to 30% (w\\/v). Three of these diploid mutant

Manuela Côrte-Real; C. Lefio

1992-01-01

92

Mating Type Locus of Chinese Black Truffles Reveals Heterothallism and the Presence of Cryptic Species within the T. indicum Species Complex  

PubMed Central

Tuber spp. are filamentous ascomycetes which establish symbiosis with the roots of trees and shrub species. By virtue of this symbiosis they produce hypogeous ascocarps, known as truffles. Filamentous ascomycetes can reproduce by homothallism or heterothallism depending on the structure and organization of their mating type locus. The first mating type locus in a truffle species has been recently characterized in Tuber melanosporum and it has been shown that this fungus, endemic in Europe, is heterothallic. The availability of sequence information for T. melanosporum mating type genes is seminal to cloning their orthologs from other Tuber species and assessing their reproductive mode. Here we report on the organization of the mating type region in T. indicum, the black truffle species present in Asia, which is the closest relative to T. melanosporum and is characterized by an high level of morphological and genetic variability. The present study shows that T. indicum is also heterothallic. Examination of Asiatic black truffles belonging to different genetic classes, sorted according to the sequence polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region, has revealed sequence variations and rearrangements in both coding and non-coding regions of the mating type locus, to suggest the existence of cryptic species within the T. indicum complex. The presence of transposable elements within or linked to the mating type region suggests a role of these elements in generating the genotypic diversity present among T. indicum strains. Overall, comparative analyses of the mating type locus have thus allowed us to tackle taxonomical and phylogenetic issues within black truffles and make inferences about the evolution of T. melanosporum-T. indicum lineage. Our results are not only of fundamental but also of applied relevance as T. indicum produces edible fruit bodies that are imported also into Europe and thus may represent a biological threat for T. melanosporum. PMID:24358175

Belfiori, Beatrice; Riccioni, Claudia; Paolocci, Francesco; Rubini, Andrea

2013-01-01

93

Sexual reproduction and mating-type–mediated strain development in the penicillin-producing fungus Penicillium chrysogenum  

PubMed Central

Penicillium chrysogenum is a filamentous fungus of major medical and historical importance, being the original and present-day industrial source of the antibiotic penicillin. The species has been considered asexual for more than 100 y, and despite concerted efforts, it has not been possible to induce sexual reproduction, which has prevented sexual crosses being used for strain improvement. However, using knowledge of mating-type (MAT) gene organization, we now describe conditions under which a sexual cycle can be induced leading to production of meiotic ascospores. Evidence of recombination was obtained using both molecular and phenotypic markers. The identified heterothallic sexual cycle was used for strain development purposes, generating offspring with novel combinations of traits relevant to penicillin production. Furthermore, the MAT1-1–1 mating-type gene, known primarily for a role in governing sexual identity, was also found to control transcription of a wide range of genes with biotechnological relevance including those regulating penicillin production, hyphal morphology, and conidial formation. These discoveries of a sexual cycle and MAT gene function are likely to be of broad relevance for manipulation of other asexual fungi of economic importance. PMID:23307807

Böhm, Julia; Hoff, Birgit; O’Gorman, Céline M.; Wolfers, Simon; Klix, Volker; Binger, Danielle; Zadra, Ivo; Kürnsteiner, Hubert; Pöggeler, Stefanie; Dyer, Paul S.; Kück, Ulrich

2013-01-01

94

Localization of the Nic-7, Ac-29 and THI-10 Genes within the Mating-Type Locus of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii  

PubMed Central

The tight linkage observed between the mating-type (mt) locus of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and three auxotrophic mutations--nic-7 (nicotinamide-requiring), ac-29 (acetate-requiring), and thi-10 (thiamine-requiring)--has led to the hypothesis that recombination is suppressed in the mt region. The physical location of these three genes has been established by transformation with sets of cloned DNA from the mt region. They lie to the left and right of the highly rearranged (R) domain of the mt locus, which has been proposed to be responsible for the recombinational suppression in the region. The cloned nic-7(+) and thi-10(+) genes will be useful as selectable markers for cotransformation experiments. PMID:8647391

Ferris, P. J.

1995-01-01

95

The Transcription Factor Rbf1 Is the Master Regulator for b-Mating Type Controlled Pathogenic Development in Ustilago maydis  

PubMed Central

In the phytopathogenic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis, sexual and pathogenic development are tightly connected and controlled by the heterodimeric bE/bW transcription factor complex encoded by the b-mating type locus. The formation of the active bE/bW heterodimer leads to the formation of filaments, induces a G2 cell cycle arrest, and triggers pathogenicity. Here, we identify a set of 345 bE/bW responsive genes which show altered expression during these developmental changes; several of these genes are associated with cell cycle coordination, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. 90% of the genes that show altered expression upon bE/bW-activation require the zinc finger transcription factor Rbf1, one of the few factors directly regulated by the bE/bW heterodimer. Rbf1 is a novel master regulator in a multilayered network of transcription factors that facilitates the complex regulatory traits of sexual and pathogenic development. PMID:20700446

Vranes, Miroslav; Wahl, Ramon; Pothiratana, Chetsada; Schuler, David; Vincon, Volker; Finkernagel, Florian; Flor-Parra, Ignacio; Kämper, Jörg

2010-01-01

96

A ubiquitin-selective AAA-ATPase mediates transcriptional switching by remodelling a repressor-promoter DNA complex.  

PubMed

Switches between different phenotypes and their underlying states of gene transcription occur as cells respond to intrinsic developmental cues or adapt to changing environmental conditions. Post-translational modification of the master regulatory transcription factors that define the initial phenotype is a common strategy to direct such transitions. Emerging evidence indicates that the modification of key transcription factors by the small polypeptide ubiquitin has a central role in many of these transitions. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ubiquitylation regulates the switching of promoters between active and inactive states are largely unknown. Ubiquitylation of the yeast transcriptional repressor alpha2 is necessary to evoke the transition between mating-types, and here we dissect the impact of this modification on alpha2 dynamics at its target promoters. Ubiquitylation of alpha2 does not alter DNA occupancy by depleting the existing pool of the transcription factor, despite its well-characterized function in directing repressor turnover. Rather, alpha2 ubiquitylation has a direct role in the rapid removal of the repressor from its DNA targets. This disassembly of alpha2 from DNA depends on the ubiquitin-selective AAA-ATPase Cdc48. Our findings expand the functional targets of Cdc48 to include active transcriptional regulatory complexes in the nucleus. These data reveal an ubiquitin-dependent extraction pathway for dismantling transcription factor-DNA complexes and provide an archetype for the regulation of transcriptional switching events by ubiquitylation. PMID:19915556

Wilcox, Alexander J; Laney, Jeffrey D

2009-12-01

97

The Distribution of Mating-Type Bias in Natural Populations of the Anther-Smut Ustilago violacea on Silene alba in Virginia  

E-print Network

analysis used in genetic studies (Day and Jones, 1969). Two to three spore-laden anthers were placed in 5 mL of sterile distilled water (sdH20) and crushed to release the teliospores. The teliospore suspension was serially diluted, spread... of the mating-type bias phenom- enon clearly requires knowledge of the mechanism that produces the bias. We considered four hypoth- eses for the mechanism: direct killing of cells of one mating type by the other (spore killers-Perkins, 1992; Nauta...

Oudemans, Peter V.; Alexander, Helen M.; Antonovics, Janice; Altizer, S.; Thrall, Peter H.; Rose, L.

1998-05-01

98

Maintenance of Sex-Related Genes and the Co-Occurrence of Both Mating Types in Verticillium dahliae  

PubMed Central

Verticillium dahliae is a cosmopolitan, soilborne fungus that causes a significant wilt disease on a wide variety of plant hosts including economically important crops, ornamentals, and timber species. Clonal expansion through asexual reproduction plays a vital role in recurring plant epidemics caused by this pathogen. The recent discovery of recombination between clonal lineages and preliminary investigations of the meiotic gene inventory of V. dahliae suggest that cryptic sex appears to be rare in this species. Here we expanded on previous findings on the sexual nature of V. dahliae. Only 1% of isolates in a global collection of 1120 phytopathogenic V. dahliae isolates contained the MAT1-1 idiomorph, whereas 99% contained MAT1-2. Nine unique multilocus microsatellite types comprised isolates of both mating types, eight of which were collected from the same substrate at the same time. Orthologs of 88 previously characterized sex-related genes from fungal model systems in the Ascoymycota were identified in the genome of V. dahliae, out of 93 genes investigated. Results of RT-PCR experiments using both mating types revealed that 10 arbitrarily chosen sex-related genes, including MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1, were constitutively expressed in V. dahliae cultures grown under laboratory conditions. Ratios of non-synonymous (amino-acid altering) to synonymous (silent) substitutions in V. dahliae MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 sequences were indistinguishable from the ratios observed in the MAT genes of sexual fungi in the Pezizomycotina. Patterns consistent with strong purifying selection were also observed in 18 other arbitrarily chosen V. dahliae sex-related genes, relative to the patterns in orthologs from fungi with known sexual stages. This study builds upon recent findings from other laboratories and mounts further evidence for an ancestral or cryptic sexual stage in V. dahliae. PMID:25383550

Hu, Xiaoping; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Subbarao, Krishna V.

2014-01-01

99

Diversity of the Lactic Acid Bacterium and Yeast Microbiota in the Switch from Firm- to Liquid-Sourdough Fermentation  

PubMed Central

Four traditional type I sourdoughs were comparatively propagated (28 days) under firm (dough yield, 160) and liquid (dough yield, 280) conditions to mimic the alternative technology options frequently used for making baked goods. After 28 days of propagation, liquid sourdoughs had the lowest pH and total titratable acidity (TTA), the lowest concentrations of lactic and acetic acids and free amino acids, and the most stable density of presumptive lactic acid bacteria. The cell density of yeasts was the highest in liquid sourdoughs. Liquid sourdoughs showed simplified microbial diversity and harbored a low number of strains, which were persistent. Lactobacillus plantarum dominated firm sourdoughs over time. Leuconostoc lactis and Lactobacillus brevis dominated only some firm sourdoughs, and Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis persisted for some time only in some firm sourdoughs. Leuconostoc citreum persisted in all firm and liquid sourdoughs, and it was the only species detected in liquid sourdoughs at all times; it was flanked by Leuconostoc mesenteroides in some sourdoughs. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida humilis, Saccharomyces servazzii, Saccharomyces bayanus-Kazachstania sp., and Torulaspora delbrueckii were variously identified in firm and liquid sourdoughs. A total of 197 volatile components were identified through purge and trap–/solid-phase microextraction–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PT–/SPME–GC-MS). Aldehydes, several alcohols, and some esters were at the highest levels in liquid sourdoughs. Firm sourdoughs mainly contained ethyl acetate, acetic acid, some sulfur compounds, and terpenes. The use of liquid fermentation would change the main microbial and biochemical features of traditional baked goods, which have been manufactured under firm conditions for a long time. PMID:24632249

Di Cagno, Raffaella; Pontonio, Erica; Buchin, Solange; De Angelis, Maria; Lattanzi, Anna; Valerio, Francesca; Calasso, Maria

2014-01-01

100

Short title: The MAT locus in the SDS and BRR fusaria1 Genetic architecture and evolution of the mating type locus in fusaria that cause soybean2  

E-print Network

of the mating type locus in fusaria that cause soybean2 sudden death syndrome and bean root rot3 Teresa J. Hughes1 4 Crop Production and Pest Control Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department5.S. Department of Agriculture, Peoria, IL10 6160411 12 Alejandro P. Rooney13 Crop Bioprotection Research Unit

Bhattacharyya, Madan Kumar

101

Mating Type (MAT) Locus -Specific PCR Markers for Differentiation of Pyrenophora teres f. teres and P. teres f. maculata, the Causal Agents of Barley Net Blotch  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified at the mating-type (MAT) loci of Pyrenophora teres f. teres (Ptt), which causes net form (NF) net blotch, and P. teres f. maculata (Ptm), which causes spot form (SF) net blotch of barley. MAT-specific SNP primers were developed for poly...

102

Tracing the Origin of the fungal Sex a1 domain places its ancestor in the HMG-box superfamily: implication for fungal mating-type evolution  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fungal mating types in self-incompatible Pezizomycotina are specified by one of two alternate sequences occupying the same locus on corresponding chromosomes. One sequence is characterized by a gene encoding an HMG protein, while the hallmark of the other is a gene encoding a protein with an a1 doma...

103

SHARED ITS DNA SUBSTITUTIONS IN ISOLATES OF OPPOSITE MATING TYPE REVEAL A RECOMBIING HISTORY FOR THREE PRESUMED ASEXUAL SPECIES IN THE FILAMENTOUS ASCOMYCETE GENUS ALTERNARIA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

About 15,000 species of ascomycete fungi lack a known sexual state. For fungi with asexual states in the form genera Embellisia, Ulocladium and Alternaria, six species have known sexual states but more than 50 species do not. In sexual filamentous ascomycetes, opposite mating type information at t...

104

Mating type idiomorphs from a French population of the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola: widespread equal distribution and low but distinct levels of molecular polymorphism.  

PubMed

Septoria tritici blotch caused by the heterothallic ascomycete Mycosphaerella graminicola is currently the most frequent and the most economically damaging disease on wheat worldwide. Five hundred and ten strains of this fungus were sampled from 16 geographical locations representing the major wheat producing areas in France. Multiplex PCR amplification, PCR-RFLP-SSCP screening and sequencing of parts of mating type encoding sequences were performed in order to assess the distribution and molecular polymorphism of the mating type idiomorphs. The two idiomorphs were scored at similar frequencies within all sampled locations. Both mating types were also identified at the leaf spatial scale, on 42% of leaves from which two or three strains were isolated. No correlation was found between distribution of mating types and either host cultivars from which the sampling was carried out or in vitro colony phenotypes observed during the culture of strains on potato dextrose agar (PDA) medium. PCR-RFLP-SSCP assay highlighted only one MAT1-1 strain exhibiting a profile distinct from all other MAT1-1 strains, whereas ten MAT1-2 strains (among which two and four with same profiles, respectively) showed profiles differing from the other MAT1-2 strains. Sequencing revealed that all polymorphisms corresponded to single nucleotide variations and all strains displaying the same single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) profiles showed identical nucleotide sequences, thereby confirming the high sensitivity of SSCP. Only two out of the disclosed nucleotide variations were nonsynonymous. This study strongly suggests a large potential for sexual reproduction in the French population of M. graminicola and reports a high conservation of mating type sequences in the fungus at both nucleotide and population levels, with a great difference in molecular variability between the two idiomorphs. PMID:21036342

Siah, Ali; Tisserant, Benoit; El Chartouni, Léa; Duyme, Florent; Deweer, Caroline; Roisin-Fichter, Céline; Sanssené, Jean; Durand, Roger; Reignault, Philippe; Halama, Patrice

2010-01-01

105

Unequal Recombination and Evolution of the Mating-Type (MAT) Loci in the Pathogenic Fungus Grosmannia clavigera and Relatives  

PubMed Central

Sexual reproduction in fungi is regulated by the mating-type (MAT) locus where recombination is suppressed. We investigated the evolution of MAT loci in eight fungal species belonging to Grosmannia and Ophiostoma (Sordariomycetes, Ascomycota) that include conifer pathogens and beetle symbionts. The MAT1-2 idiomorph/allele was identified from the assembled and annotated Grosmannia clavigera genome, and the MAT locus is flanked by genes coding for cytoskeleton protein (SLA) and DNA lyase. The synteny of these genes is conserved and consistent with other members in Ascomycota. Using sequences from SLA and flanking regions, we characterized the MAT1-1 idiomorph from other isolates of G. clavigera and performed dotplot analysis between the two idiomorphs. Unexpectedly, the MAT1-2 idiomorph contains a truncated MAT1-1-1 gene upstream of the MAT1-2-1 gene that bears the high-mobility-group domain. The nucleotide and amino acid sequence of the truncated MAT1-1-1 gene is similar to its homologous copy in the MAT1-1 idiomorph in the opposite mating-type isolate, except that positive selection is acting on the truncated gene and the alpha(?)-box that encodes the transcription factor has been deleted. The MAT idiomorphs sharing identical gene organization were present in seven additional species in the Ophiostomatales, suggesting that the presence of truncated MAT1-1-1 gene is a general pattern in this order. We propose that an ancient unequal recombination event resulted in the ancestral MAT1-1-1 gene integrated into the MAT1-2 idiomorph and surviving as the truncated MAT1-1-1 genes. The ?-box domain of MAT1-1-1 gene, located at the same MAT locus adjacent to the MAT1-2-1 gene, could have been removed by deletion after recombination due to mating signal interference. Our data confirmed a 1:1 MAT/sex ratio in two pathogen populations, and showed that all members of the Ophiostomatales studied here including those that were previously deemed asexual have the potential to reproduce sexually. This ability can potentially increase genetic variability and can enhance fitness in new, ecological niches. PMID:23450093

Tsui, Clement K.-M.; DiGuistini, Scott; Wang, Ye; Feau, Nicolas; Dhillon, Braham; Bohlmann, Jörg; Hamelin, Richard C.

2013-01-01

106

Unequal recombination and evolution of the mating-type (MAT) loci in the pathogenic fungus Grosmannia clavigera and relatives.  

PubMed

Sexual reproduction in fungi is regulated by the mating-type (MAT) locus where recombination is suppressed. We investigated the evolution of MAT loci in eight fungal species belonging to Grosmannia and Ophiostoma (Sordariomycetes, Ascomycota) that include conifer pathogens and beetle symbionts. The MAT1-2 idiomorph/allele was identified from the assembled and annotated Grosmannia clavigera genome, and the MAT locus is flanked by genes coding for cytoskeleton protein (SLA) and DNA lyase. The synteny of these genes is conserved and consistent with other members in Ascomycota. Using sequences from SLA and flanking regions, we characterized the MAT1-1 idiomorph from other isolates of G. clavigera and performed dotplot analysis between the two idiomorphs. Unexpectedly, the MAT1-2 idiomorph contains a truncated MAT1-1-1 gene upstream of the MAT1-2-1 gene that bears the high-mobility-group domain. The nucleotide and amino acid sequence of the truncated MAT1-1-1 gene is similar to its homologous copy in the MAT1-1 idiomorph in the opposite mating-type isolate, except that positive selection is acting on the truncated gene and the alpha(?)-box that encodes the transcription factor has been deleted. The MAT idiomorphs sharing identical gene organization were present in seven additional species in the Ophiostomatales, suggesting that the presence of truncated MAT1-1-1 gene is a general pattern in this order. We propose that an ancient unequal recombination event resulted in the ancestral MAT1-1-1 gene integrated into the MAT1-2 idiomorph and surviving as the truncated MAT1-1-1 genes. The ?-box domain of MAT1-1-1 gene, located at the same MAT locus adjacent to the MAT1-2-1 gene, could have been removed by deletion after recombination due to mating signal interference. Our data confirmed a 1:1 MAT/sex ratio in two pathogen populations, and showed that all members of the Ophiostomatales studied here including those that were previously deemed asexual have the potential to reproduce sexually. This ability can potentially increase genetic variability and can enhance fitness in new, ecological niches. PMID:23450093

Tsui, Clement K-M; DiGuistini, Scott; Wang, Ye; Feau, Nicolas; Dhillon, Braham; Bohlmann, Jörg; Hamelin, Richard C

2013-03-01

107

The heterochromatin protein Swi6/HP1 activates replication origins at the pericentromeric region and silent mating-type locus.  

PubMed

Heterochromatin is a structurally compacted region of chromosomes in which transcription and recombination are inactivated. DNA replication is temporally regulated in heterochromatin, but the molecular mechanism for regulation has not been elucidated. Among heterochromatin loci in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the pericentromeric region and the silent mating-type (mat) locus replicate in early S phase, whereas the sub-telomeric region does not, suggesting complex mechanisms for regulation of replication in heterochromatic regions. Here, we show that Swi6, an S. pombe counterpart of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), is required for early replication of the pericentromeric region and the mat locus. Origin-loading of Sld3, which depends on Dfp1/Dbf4-dependent kinase Cdc7 (DDK), is stimulated by Swi6. An HP1-binding motif within Dfp1 is required for interaction with Swi6 in vitro and for early replication of the pericentromeric region and mat locus. Tethering of Dfp1 to the pericentromeric region and mat locus in swi6-deficient cells restores early replication of these loci. Our results show that a heterochromatic protein positively regulates initiation of replication in silenced chromatin by interacting with an essential kinase. PMID:19182789

Hayashi, Makoto T; Takahashi, Tatsuro S; Nakagawa, Takuro; Nakayama, Jun-ichi; Masukata, Hisao

2009-03-01

108

High-Resolution Structural Analysis of Chromatin at Specific Loci: Saccharomyces cerevisiae Silent Mating Type Locus HML?  

PubMed Central

Genetic studies have suggested that chromatin structure is involved in repression of the silent mating type loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Chromatin mapping at nucleotide resolution of the transcriptionally silent HML? and the active MAT? shows that unique organized chromatin structure characterizes the silent state of HML?. Precisely positioned nucleosomes abutting the silencers extend over the ?1 and ?2 coding regions. The HO endonuclease recognition site, nuclease hypersensitive at MAT?, is protected at HML?. Although two precisely positioned nucleosomes incorporate transcription start sites at HML?, the promoter region of the ?1 and ?2 genes is nucleosome free and more nuclease sensitive in the repressed than in the transcribed locus. Mutations in genes essential for HML silencing disrupt the nucleosome array near HML-I but not in the vicinity of HML-E, which is closer to the telomere of chromosome III. At the promoter and the HO site, the structure of HML? in Sir protein and histone H4 N-terminal deletion mutants is identical to that of the transcriptionally active MAT?. The discontinuous chromatin structure of HML? contrasts with the continuous array of nucleosomes found at repressed a-cell-specific genes and the recombination enhancer. Punctuation at HML? may be necessary for higher-order structure or karyoskeleton interactions. The unique chromatin architecture of HML? may relate to the combined requirements of transcriptional repression and recombinational competence. PMID:9710623

Weiss, Kerstin; Simpson, Robert T.

1998-01-01

109

Characterization of mat A-2, mat A-3 and deltamatA mating-type mutants of Neurospora crassa.  

PubMed Central

The mating-type locus of Neurospora crassa regulates mating identity and entry into the sexual cycle. The mat A idiomorph encodes three genes, mat A-1, mat A-2, and mat A-3. Mutations in mat A-1 result in strains that have lost mating identity and vegetative incompatibility with mat a strains. A strain containing mutations in both mat A-2 and mat A-3 is able to mate, but forms few ascospores. In this study, we describe the isolation and characterization of a mutant deleted for mat (deltamatA), as well as mutants in either mat A-2 or mat A-3. The deltamatA strain is morphologically wild type during vegetative growth, but it is sterile and heterokaryon compatible with both mat A and mat a strains. The mat A-2 and mat A-3 mutants are also normal during vegetative growth, mate as a mat A strain, and produce abundant biparental asci in crosses with mat a, and are thus indistinguishable from a wild-type mat A strain. These data and the fact that the mat A-2 mat A-3 double mutant makes few asci with ascospores indicate that MAT A-2 and MAT A-3 are redundant and may function in the same pathway. Analysis of the expression of two genes (sdv-1 and sdv-4) in the various mat mutants suggests that the mat A polypeptides function in concert to regulate the expression of some sexual development genes. PMID:9539425

Ferreira, A V; An, Z; Metzenberg, R L; Glass, N L

1998-01-01

110

Switches and switch interconnects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Switched networks are receiving much attention and supplying a major class of interconnect networks. This paper discusses major issues in switch design and switch interconnects. Due to the importance of high-speed switches in building switched LANs, major design issues are studied and several commercial switches are reviewed. Among different techniques used in switch design, cut-through switching promises short latency delivery

Lionel M. Ni; Wenjian Qiao; Mingyao Yang

1997-01-01

111

Sporothrix schenckii (sensu strict S. globosa) mating type 1-2 (MAT1-2) gene.  

PubMed

Sporotix schenckii is a pathogenic fungus that causes human and animal sporotrichosis, and based on morphology of the sessile conidia and molecular analysis, it was recently recognized as a species complex comprising at least the following six sibling species: S. albicans, S. brasiliensis, S. globosa, S. luriei, S. mexicana and S. schenckii. However, apart from S. schenckii sensu strict, only S. brasiliensis, S. globosa and S. luriei are associated with human and animal infection. S. globosa has been most commonly isolated in Asia, Europe and the USA; therefore, molecular epidemiological study for S. globosa is important in relation to human sporotrichosis in Japan. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to determine the mating type 1-2 (MAT1-2) gene of Sporothrix schenckii with the aim of understanding the taxonomy of the genus Sporothrix. The MAT1-2 gene (1618 bp) encodes a protein sequence of 198 amino acids. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis also detected MAT1-2 gene mRNA expression in all of the S. schenckii strains examined, indicating that this gene is expressed in S. schenckii cells. Phylogenetic analysis of the MAT1-2 gene fragments of Ophiostoma himal-ulmi, O. novo-ulmi, O. ulmi and S. schenckii indicated that these isolates could be classified into four clusters. MAT1-1 gene-specific polymerase chain reaction was positive in 15 isolates, but negative in four human isolates and one feline isolate. PMID:23855744

Kano, Rui; Anzawa, Kazushi; Mochizuki, Takashi; Nishimoto, Katsutaro; Hiruma, Masataro; Kamata, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

2013-09-01

112

Pleiotropic mutations at the TUP1 locus that affect the expression of mating-type-dependent functions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

SciTech Connect

The umr7-1 mutation, previously identified in a set of mutants that had been selected for defective uv-induced mutagenesis at CAN1, affects other cellular functions, including many of those regulated by the mating-type locus (MAT) in heterothallic Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recessive umr7-1 allele, mapping approximately 20 cM distal to thr4 on chromosome III, causes clumpy growth in both a and ..cap alpha.. cells and has no apparent effect on a mating functions. The most striking property of a umr7 strains is their altered morphology, in which mitotic cells develop an asymmetric pear shape, like that of normal a cells induced to form shmoos by interaction with a-factor. Some a/..cap alpha..-specific diploid functions are also affected by umr7; instead of polar budding patterns, a/..cap alpha.. umr7/umr7 diploids have medial budding like a/a, ..cap alpha../..cap alpha.. and haploid strains. Moreover, a/..cap alpha.. umr7/umr7 diploids have lost the ability to sporulate and are Bar+ like a or a/a strains. Revertant studies indicate that umr7-1 is a single point mutation. The umr7 mutant fails to complement mutants of both tup1 and cyc9 and all three isolates have similar genetic and phenotypic properties. It is suggested that the product of this gene plays some common central role in the complex regulation of the expression of both MAT-dependent and MAT-independent functions.

Lemontt, J.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN); Fugit, D.R.; MacKay, V.L.

1980-04-01

113

Genealogical concordance between the mating type locus and seven other nuclear genes supports formal recognition of nine phylogenetically distinct species within the Fusarium graminearum cladeq  

Microsoft Academic Search

Species limits were investigated within the Fusarium graminearum clade (Fg clade) through phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences from portions of 11 nuclear genes including the mating-type (MAT) locus. Nine phylogenetically distinct species were resolved within the Fg clade, and they all possess contiguous MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 idiomorphs consistent with a homothallic reproductive mode. In contrast, only one of the two

Kerry ODonnell; Todd J. Ward; David M. Geiser; H. Corby Kistler; Takayuki Aokid

114

Evidence for gene duplication and allelic codominance (not hierarchical dominance) at the mating-type locus of the ciliate, Euplotes crassus.  

PubMed

The high-multiple mating system of Euplotes crassus is known to be controlled by multiple alleles segregating at a single locus and manifesting relationships of hierarchical dominance, so that heterozygous cells would produce a single mating-type substance (pheromone). In strain L-2D, now known to be homozygous at the mating-type locus, we previously identified two pheromones (Ec-? and Ec-1) characterized by significant variations in their amino acid sequences and structure of their macronuclear coding genes. In this study, pheromones and macronuclear coding genes have been analyzed in strain POR-73 characterized by a heterozygous genotype and strong mating compatibility with L-2D strain. It was found that POR-73 cells contain three distinct pheromone coding genes and, accordingly, secrete three distinct pheromones. One pheromone revealed structural identity in amino acid sequence and macronuclear coding gene to the Ec-? pheromone of L-2D cells. The other two pheromones were shown to be new and were designated Ec-2 and Ec-3 to denote their structural homology with the Ec-1 pheromone of L-2D cells. We interpreted these results as evidence of a phenomenon of gene duplication at the E. crassus mating-type locus, and lack of hierarchical dominance in the expression of the macronuclear pheromone genes in cells with heterozygous genotypes. PMID:25040318

Vallesi, Adriana; Alimenti, Claudio; Federici, Sergio; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Dini, Fernando; Guella, Graziano; Luporini, Pierangelo

2014-01-01

115

Chromosomal Inheritance of Epigenetic States in Fission Yeast During Mitosis and Meiosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inheritance of the active and inactive states of gene expression by individual cells is crucial for development. In fission yeast, mating-type region consists of three loci called mat1, mat2, and mat3. Transcriptionally silent mat2 and mat3 loci are separated by a 15 kb interval, designated the K-region, and serve as donors of information for transcriptionally active mat1 interconversion. In a

Shiv I. S. Grewal; Amar J. S. Klar

1996-01-01

116

DNA Replication Forks Pause at Silent Origins near the HML Locus in Budding Yeast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chromosomal replicators in budding yeast contain an autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) that functions in a plasmid, but certain ARSs are silent as replication origins in their natural chromosomal context. In chromosome III, the HML ARS cluster (ARS302-ARS303-ARS320) and ARS301 flank the transcriptionally silent mating-type locus HML, and all of these ARSs are silent as replication origins. ARS301 and ARS302 function

YANGZHOU WANG; MARIJA VUJCIC; DAVID KOWALSKI

2001-01-01

117

A Chromodomain Protein, Swi6, Performs Imprinting Functions in Fission Yeast during Mitosis and Meiosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inheritance of stable states of gene expression is essential for cellular differentiation. In fission yeast, an epigenetic imprint marking the mating-type (mat2\\/3) region contributes to inheritance of the silenced state, but the nature of the imprint is not known. We show that a chromodomain-containing Swi6 protein is a dosage-critical component involved in imprinting the mat locus. Transient overexpression of Swi6

Jun-ichi Nakayama; Amar J. S. Klar; Shiv I. S. Grewal

2000-01-01

118

The Chromodomain Protein Swi6: A Key Component at Fission Yeast Centromeres  

Microsoft Academic Search

Centromeres attach chromosomes to the spindle during mitosis, thereby ensuring the equal distribution of chromosomes into daughter cells. Transcriptionally silent heterochromatin of unknown function is associated with centromeres in many organisms. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the silent mating-type loci, centromeres, and telomeres are assembled into silent heterochromatin-like domains. The Swi6 chromodomain protein affects this silencing, and now it

Karl Ekwall; Jean-Paul Javerzat; Axel Lorentz; Henning Schmidt; Gwen Cranston; Robin Allshire

1995-01-01

119

Except in Every Detail: Comparing and Contrasting G-Protein Signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe  

Microsoft Academic Search

When asked to explain the difference between the mecha- nisms controlling mating type switching in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharo- myces pombe, Brandeis University's Jim Haber once replied, \\

Charles S. Hoffman

2005-01-01

120

Fission Yeast Pxd1 Promotes Proper DNA Repair by Activating Rad16XPF and Inhibiting Dna2  

PubMed Central

Structure-specific nucleases play crucial roles in many DNA repair pathways. They must be precisely controlled to ensure optimal repair outcomes; however, mechanisms of their regulation are not fully understood. Here, we report a fission yeast protein, Pxd1, that binds to and regulates two structure-specific nucleases: Rad16XPF-Swi10ERCC1 and Dna2-Cdc24. Strikingly, Pxd1 influences the activities of these two nucleases in opposite ways: It activates the 3? endonuclease activity of Rad16-Swi10 but inhibits the RPA-mediated activation of the 5? endonuclease activity of Dna2. Pxd1 is required for Rad16-Swi10 to function in single-strand annealing, mating-type switching, and the removal of Top1-DNA adducts. Meanwhile, Pxd1 attenuates DNA end resection mediated by the Rqh1-Dna2 pathway. Disabling the Dna2-inhibitory activity of Pxd1 results in enhanced use of a break-distal repeat sequence in single-strand annealing and a greater loss of genetic information. We propose that Pxd1 promotes proper DNA repair by differentially regulating two structure-specific nucleases. PMID:25203555

Zhang, Jia-Min; Liu, Xiao-Man; Ding, Yue-He; Xiong, Liang-Yao; Ren, Jing-Yi; Zhou, Zhi-Xiong; Wang, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Mei-Jun; Yu, Yang; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Du, Li-Lin

2014-01-01

121

Transformation of protoplasted yeast cells is directly associated with cell fusion.  

PubMed Central

The frequency of cell fusion during transformation of yeast protoplasts with various yeast plasmids with a chromosome replicon (YRp or YCp) or 2 mu DNA (YEp) was estimated by two methods. In one method, a mixture of protoplasts of two haploid strains with identical mating type and complementary auxotrophic nuclear markers with or without cytoplasmic markers was transformed. When the number of various phenotypic classes of transformants for the nuclear markers was analyzed by equations derived from binominal distribution theory, the frequency of nuclear fusion among the transformants was 42 to 100% in transformations with the YRp or YCp plasmids and 28 to 39% with the YEp plasmids. In another method, a haploid bearing the sir mutation, which allows a diploid (or polyploid) homozygous for the MAT (mating type) locus to sporulate by the expression of the silent mating-type loci HML and HMR, was transformed with the plasmids. Sporulation ability was found in 43 to 95% of the transformants with the YRp or YCp plasmids, and 26 to 31% of the YEp transformants. When cytoplasmic mixing was included with the nuclear fusion, 96 to 100% of the transformants were found to be cell fusants. Based upon these observations, we concluded that transformation of yeast protoplasts is directly associated with cell fusion. PMID:6371497

Harashima, S; Takagi, A; Oshima, Y

1984-01-01

122

Size and competitive mating success in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

PubMed Central

In unicellular organisms like yeast, mating with the right partner is critical to future fitness because each individual can only mate once. Because cell size is important for viability, mating with a partner of the right size could be a significant advantage. To investigate this idea, we manipulated the size of unmated yeast cells and showed that their viability depended on environmental conditions; large cells do better on rich medium and small cells do better on poor medium. We also found that the fitness of offspring is determined by the size of their parents. Finally, we demonstrated that when a focal cell of one mating type was placed with a large and a small cell of the opposite mating type, it was more likely to mate with the cell that was closer to the optimum size for growth in a given environment. This pattern was not generated by differences in passive mating efficiency of large and small cells across environments but by competitive mating behavior, mate preference, or both. We conclude that the most likely mechanism underlying this interesting behavior is that yeast cells compete for mates by producing pheromone signals advertising their viability, and cells with the opportunity to choose prefer to mate with stronger signalers because such matings produce more viable offspring. PMID:24616602

2014-01-01

123

The Nuclease Activity of Mre11 Is Required for Meiosis but Not for Mating Type Switching, End Joining, or Telomere Maintenance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MRE11 gene is required for the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and for the initiation of meiotic recombination. Sequence analysis has revealed homology between Mre11 and SbcD, the catalytic subunit of an Escherichia coli enzyme with endo- and exonuclease activity, SbcCD. In this study, the purified Mre11 protein was found to have single-stranded endonuclease activity. This

SYLVIE MOREAU; JOHN R. FERGUSON; LORRAINE S. SYMINGTON

124

Recurrent polymorphic mating type variation in Madagascan Bulbophyllum species (Orchidaceae) exemplifies a high incidence of auto-pollination in tropical orchids  

PubMed Central

The transition from outcrossing to self-fertilization is one of the most common evolutionary changes in angiosperms. The orchid family exemplifies this evolutionary trend but, because of a general lack of large-scale surveys on auto-pollination in orchid taxa, the incidence and modes of auto-pollination among (sub)tropical orchids remain poorly known. In the present study, we assessed the frequency and mode of auto-pollination within and among species of a largely monophyletic group of Madagascan Bulbophyllum. The capacity for autonomous fruit set was investigated by bagging experiments in the greenhouse and the field, complemented with detailed floral micromorphological studies of the gynostemium. Our survey comprises 393 accessions, representing at least 78 species, and thus approximately 37% of the species diversity of the genus in the Madagascan region. Our studies revealed that mating type is directly related to gynostemium structure, most often involving the presence or absence of a physical barrier termed ‘rostellum’. As a novel and unexpected finding, we identified eight species of a single lineage of Madagascan Bulbophyllum (termed ‘clade C’), in which auto-pollinating morphs (selfers), either lacking a rostellum or (rarely) possessing a stigmatic rostellum, co-exist with their pollinator-dependent conspecifics (outcrossers). We hypothesize that auto-pollination via rostellum abortion has a simple genetic basis, and probably evolved rapidly and recurrently by subtle changes in the timing of rostellum development (heterochrony). Thus, species of clade C may have an intrinsic genetic and developmental lability toward auto-pollination, allowing rapid evolutionary response under environmental, perhaps human-disturbed conditions favouring reproductive assurance. Overall, these findings should stimulate further research on the incidence, evolution, and maintenance of mating type variation in tropical orchids, as well as how they adapt(ed) to changing environmental conditions.

Gamisch, Alexander; Fischer, Gunter A; Comes, Hans Peter

2014-01-01

125

In vitro Detection of Yeast-Like and Mycelial Colonies of Ustilago scitaminea in Tissue-Cultured Plantlets of Sugarcane Using Polymerase Chain Reaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plantlets of sugarcane cultivars NCO-310 (susceptible) and CP73-21 (resistant) were generated using in vitro apical meristem tissue culture method of leaf and culturing of the callous. Yeast-like and dikaryotic mycelial colonies were isolated and purified. The plantlets were inoculated with two types of yeast-like and dikaryotic mycelial colonies. Results of the PCR assay in plantlets inoculated with the two types of colonies indicated the detection of bE mating-type gene of sugarcane smut in all treated plantlets at all different times after inoculation. Whereas, the disease symptoms were seen in cuttings inoculated only with dikaryotic mycelia or mixed mating types of sporidia, 6 month after transplanting in pots.

Moosawi-Jorf, S. Ali; Izadi, Mahin B.

126

Spoilage yeasts.  

PubMed

Yeasts are best known for their beneficial contributions to society, and the literature abounds with discussions of their role in the fermentation of alcoholic beverages, bread, and other products. Yeasts also cause spoilage, but, with a few exceptions, this unwanted activity often goes unrecognized and underestimated as a major problem in the food and beverage industries. In some cases, there is only a fine line between what is perceived as either a spoilage or beneficial activity. This review examines the occurrence and growth of yeasts in foods and beverages with respect to their spoilage activities, the biochemistry of this spoilage, and technologies for the enumeration and identification of spoilage yeasts. PMID:1733519

Fleet, G

1992-01-01

127

RNA Methylation by the MIS Complex Regulates a Cell Fate Decision in Yeast  

E-print Network

For the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient limitation is a key developmental signal causing diploid cells to switch from yeast-form budding to either foraging pseudohyphal (PH) growth or meiosis and sporulation. ...

Agarwala, Sundeep

128

Red yeast  

MedlinePLUS

... problems. Other conditions. More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of red yeast for these uses. ... can affect the muscles. Red yeast can also affect the muscles. Taking niacin along with ... cautious with this combination.Talk with your health provider.

129

Dry yeast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Yeast is a type of eukaryotic organism that can live in a dormant state. It can be activated from its dormant state by water and sugar. The yeast uses the sugar to grow and produces carbon dioxide gas as a byproduct.

Ranveig Thattai (None; )

2005-09-27

130

Isolation of the MAT1-1 mating type idiomorph and evidence for selfing in the Chinese medicinal fungus Ophiocordyceps sinensis.  

PubMed

Ophiocordyceps sinensis is one of the most valued medicinal fungi in China. Research on the mating system and sexual development is vitally important to this endangered species. Previous efforts devoted to investigate the mating type (MAT) locus of O. sinensis, however, resulted in an incomplete understanding. In this study, the MAT1-1 locus of O. sinensis was investigated. The conserved ?-box and HMG-box regions of the MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-1-3 genes, respectively, and a conserved region of the DNA lyase gene were successfully amplified using degenerate PCR. A combination of TAIL-PCR and long-range PCR were used to connect these genes and obtain the sequence of the MAT1-1 locus. Screening of 22 single spore isolates by PCR demonstrated that both the MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 genes cooccurred within the same isolate. Additionally, both MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 are expressed in vegetative mycelia, providing evidence that O. sinensis is likely capable of selfing. DAPI (4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining of ascospores and hyphae showed that a majority of hyphal compartments are binucleate, suggesting that O. sinensis may be pseudohomothallic. Analyses of sequence diversity showed lower levels of genetic diversity in MAT1-1-1 compared to MAT1-2-1, indicating the possibility that different selective pressures act on the two MAT idiomorphs. The MAT1-1-1 sequences of O. sinensis and Tolypocladium inflatum cluster as a monophyletic group consistent with phylogenetic classification of Ophiocordycipitaceae. Comparison of the structure of the MAT1-1 locus across hypocrealean taxa showed that O. sinensis contains all three mating type genes (MAT1-1-1, MAT1-1-2, and MAT1-1-3) and supported previous observations that of the four families in Hypocreales, MAT1-1-3 has undergone a lineage specific loss only in some members of the Cordycipitaceae. PMID:24012300

Bushley, Kathryn E; Li, Yi; Wang, Wen-Jing; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Jiao, Lei; Spatafora, Joseph W; Yao, Yi-Jian

2013-09-01

131

Sexual agglutination in budding yeasts: structure, function, and regulation of adhesion glycoproteins.  

PubMed Central

The sexual agglutinins of the budding yeasts are cell adhesion proteins that promote aggregation of cells during mating. In each yeast species, complementary agglutinins are expressed by cells of opposite mating type that interact to mediate aggregation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-agglutinin and its analogs from other yeasts are single-subunit glycoproteins that contain N-linked and O-linked oligosaccharides. The N-glycosidase-sensitive carbohydrate is not necessary for activity. The proposed binding domain of alpha-agglutinin has features characteristic of the immunoglobulin fold structures of cell adhesion proteins of higher eukaryotes. The C-terminal region of alpha-agglutinin plays a role in anchoring the glycoprotein to the cell surface. The S. cerevisiae alpha-agglutinin and its analogs from other species contain multiple subunits; one or more binding subunits, which interact with the opposite agglutinin, are disulfide bonded to a core subunit, which mediates cell wall anchorage. The core subunits are composed of 80 to 95% O-linked carbohydrate. The binding subunits have less carbohydrate, and both carbohydrate and peptide play roles in binding. The alpha-agglutinin and alpha-agglutinin genes from S. cerevisiae have been cloned and shown to be regulated by the mating-type locus, MAT, and by pheromone induction. The agglutinins are necessary for mating under conditions that do not promote cell-cell contact. The role of the agglutinins therefore is to promote close interactions between cells of opposite mating type and possibly to facilitate the response to phermone, thus increasing the efficiency of mating. We speculate that they mediate enhanced response to sex pheromones by providing a synapse at the point of cell-cell contact, at which both pheromone secretion and cell fusion occur. PMID:1579109

Lipke, P N; Kurjan, J

1992-01-01

132

Mating Type Gene Homologues and Putative Sex Pheromone-Sensing Pathway in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, a Presumably Asexual Plant Root Symbiont  

PubMed Central

The fungal kingdom displays a fascinating diversity of sex-determination systems. Recent advances in genomics provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of sex, mating type determination, and evolution of sexual reproduction in many fungal species in both ancient and modern phylogenetic lineages. All major fungal groups have evolved sexual differentiation and recombination pathways. However, sexuality is unknown in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) of the phylum Glomeromycota, an ecologically vital group of obligate plant root symbionts. AMF are commonly considered an ancient asexual lineage dating back to the Ordovician, approximately 460 M years ago. In this study, we used genomic and transcriptomic surveys of several AMF species to demonstrate the presence of conserved putative sex pheromone-sensing mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, comparable to those described in Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. We also find genes for high mobility group (HMG) transcription factors, homologous to SexM and SexP genes in the Mucorales. The SexM genes show a remarkable sequence diversity among multiple copies in the genome, while only a single SexP sequence was detected in some isolates of Rhizophagus irregularis. In the Mucorales and Microsporidia, the sexM gene is flanked by genes for a triosephosphate transporter (TPT) and a RNA helicase, but we find no evidence for synteny in the vicinity of the Sex locus in AMF. Nonetheless, our results, together with previous observations on meiotic machinery, suggest that AMF could undergo a complete sexual reproduction cycle. PMID:24260466

Halary, Sébastien; Daubois, Laurence; Terrat, Yves; Ellenberger, Sabrina; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Hijri, Mohamed

2013-01-01

133

Genomes of Ashbya Fungi Isolated from Insects Reveal Four Mating-Type Loci, Numerous Translocations, Lack of Transposons, and Distinct Gene Duplications  

PubMed Central

The filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii is a cotton pathogen transmitted by insects. It is readily grown and manipulated in the laboratory and is commercially exploited as a natural overproducer of vitamin B2. Our previous genome analysis of A. gossypii isolate ATCC10895, collected in Trinidad nearly 100 years ago, revealed extensive synteny with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, leading us to use it as a model organism to understand the evolution of filamentous growth. To further develop Ashbya as a model system, we have investigated the ecological niche of A. gossypii and isolated additional strains and a sibling species, both useful in comparative analysis. We isolated fungi morphologically similar to A. gossypii from different plant-feeding insects of the suborder Heteroptera, generated a phylogenetic tree based on rDNA-ITS sequences, and performed high coverage short read sequencing with one A. gossypii isolate from Florida, a new species, Ashbya aceri, isolated in North Carolina, and a genetically marked derivative of ATCC10895 intensively used for functional studies. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, all strains carry four not three mating type loci, adding a new puzzle in the evolution of Ashbya species. Another surprise was the genome identity of 99.9% between the Florida strain and ATCC10895, isolated in Trinidad. The A. aceri and A. gossypii genomes show conserved gene orders rearranged by eight translocations, 90% overall sequence identity, and fewer tandem duplications in the A. aceri genome. Both species lack transposable elements. Finally, our work identifies plant-feeding insects of the suborder Heteroptera as the most likely natural reservoir of Ashbya, and that infection of cotton and other plants may be incidental to the growth of the fungus in its insect host. PMID:23749448

Dietrich, Fred S.; Voegeli, Sylvia; Kuo, Sidney; Philippsen, Peter

2013-01-01

134

Rare-Cell Fusion Events between Diploid and Haploid Strains of the Sexually Agglutinative Yeast HANSENULA WINGEI.  

PubMed

Diploids of the yeast Hansenula wingei are nonagglutinative and do not form zygotes in mixed cultures with either sexually agglutinative haploid mating type. However, a low frequency of diploid x haploid cell fusions (about 10(-3)) is detectable by prototrophic selection. This frequency of rare diploid x haploid matings is not increased after the diploid culture is induced for sexual agglutination. Therefore, we conclude that genes that repress mating are different from those that repress sexual agglutination.--Six prototrophs isolated from one diploid x haploid cross had an average DNA value (microg DNA per 10(8) cells) of 6.19, compared to 2.53 and 4.35 for the haploid and diploid strains, respectively. Four prototrophs were clearly cell-fusion products because they contained genes from both the diploid and the haploid partners. However, genetic analysis of the prototrophs yielded results inconsistent with triploid meiosis; all six isolates yielded a 2:2 segregation for the mating-type alleles and linked genes.--Mitotic segregation of monosomic (2n-1) cells lacking one homolog of the chromosome carrying the mating-type locus is proposed to explain the rare production of sexually active cells in the diploid cultures. Fusion between such monosomic cells and normal haploids is thought to have produced 3n-1 cells, disomic for the chromosome carrying the mating-type locus. We conclude that in the diploid strain we studied, the physiological mechanisms repressing sexual agglutination and conjugation function efficiently, but events occuring during mitosis lead to a low frequency of genetically altered cells in the population. PMID:17248985

Crandall, M; Caulton, J H

1979-12-01

135

A MAT1–2 wild-type strain from Penicillium chrysogenum: functional mating-type locus characterization, genome sequencing and mating with an industrial penicillin-producing strain  

PubMed Central

In heterothallic ascomycetes, mating is controlled by two nonallelic idiomorphs that determine the ‘sex’ of the corresponding strains. We recently discovered mating-type loci and a sexual life cycle in the penicillin-producing fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum. All industrial penicillin production strains worldwide are derived from a MAT1-1 isolate. No MAT1-2 strain has been investigated in detail until now. Here, we provide the first functional analysis of a MAT1-2 locus from a wild-type strain. Similar to MAT1-1, the MAT1-2 locus has functions beyond sexual development. Unlike MAT1-1, the MAT1-2 locus affects germination and surface properties of conidiospores and controls light-dependent asexual sporulation. Mating of the MAT1-2 wild type with a MAT1-1 high penicillin producer generated sexual spores. We determined the genomic sequences of parental and progeny strains using next-generation sequencing and found evidence for genome-wide recombination. SNP calling showed that derived industrial strains had an uneven distribution of point mutations compared with the wild type. We found evidence for meiotic recombination in all chromosomes. Our results point to a strategy combining the use of mating-type genes, genetics, and next-generation sequencing to optimize conventional strain improvement methods. PMID:25521009

Böhm, Julia; Dahlmann, Tim A; Gümü?er, Hendrik; Kück, Ulrich

2015-01-01

136

A MAT1-2 wild-type strain from Penicillium chrysogenum: functional mating-type locus characterization, genome sequencing and mating with an industrial penicillin-producing strain.  

PubMed

In heterothallic ascomycetes, mating is controlled by two nonallelic idiomorphs that determine the 'sex' of the corresponding strains. We recently discovered mating-type loci and a sexual life cycle in the penicillin-producing fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum. All industrial penicillin production strains worldwide are derived from a MAT1-1 isolate. No MAT1-2 strain has been investigated in detail until now. Here, we provide the first functional analysis of a MAT1-2 locus from a wild-type strain. Similar to MAT1-1, the MAT1-2 locus has functions beyond sexual development. Unlike MAT1-1, the MAT1-2 locus affects germination and surface properties of conidiospores and controls light-dependent asexual sporulation. Mating of the MAT1-2 wild type with a MAT1-1 high penicillin producer generated sexual spores. We determined the genomic sequences of parental and progeny strains using next-generation sequencing and found evidence for genome-wide recombination. SNP calling showed that derived industrial strains had an uneven distribution of point mutations compared with the wild type. We found evidence for meiotic recombination in all chromosomes. Our results point to a strategy combining the use of mating-type genes, genetics, and next-generation sequencing to optimize conventional strain improvement methods. PMID:25521009

Böhm, Julia; Dahlmann, Tim A; Gümü?er, Hendrik; Kück, Ulrich

2015-03-01

137

Pentose fermentation by yeasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

66 different yeast strains were screened for glucose, xylose and xylulose fermentation in shake flask cultures. None of the tested yeasts was able to grow or produce significant amounts of ethanol on xylose anaerobically. The best ethanol yields from xylulose were obtained with a wine yeast, two distillery yeasts, and a strain of Saccharomyces uvarum. The best conversion of xylulose

M.-L. Suihko; M. Dra?i?

1983-01-01

138

Yeast-Air Balloons  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners make a yeast-air balloon to get a better idea of what yeast can do. Learners discover that the purpose of leaveners like yeast is to produce the gas that makes bread rise. Learners discover that as yeast feeds on sugar, it produces carbon dioxide which slowly fills the balloon.

The Exploratorium

2012-03-10

139

A Feast for Yeast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity on page 6 of the PDF, learners investigate yeast. Learners prepare an experiment to observe what yeast cells like to eat. Learners feed the yeast cells various ingredients in plain bread--water, flour, sugar, and salt--to discover yeast's favorite food.

2013-07-08

140

Non-conventional yeasts.  

PubMed

In the beginning there was yeast, and it raised bread, brewed beer, and made wine. After many not days but centuries and even millenia later, it was named Saccharomyces cerevisiae. After more years and centuries there was another yeast, and it was named Schizosaccharomyces pombe; now there were two stars in the yeast heaven. In only a few more years there were other yeasts, and then more, and more, and more. The era of the non-conventional yeasts had begun. PMID:11878307

Spencer, J F T; Ragout de Spencer, A L; Laluce, C

2002-02-01

141

The role of phenotypic switching in the basic biology and pathogenesis of Candida albicans  

PubMed Central

The “white-opaque” transition in Candida albicans was discovered in 1987. For the next fifteen years, a significant body of knowledge accumulated that included differences between the cell types in gene expression, cellular architecture and virulence in cutaneous and systemic mouse models. However, it was not until 2002 that we began to understand the role of switching in the life history of this pathogen, the role of the mating type locus and the molecular pathways that regulated it. Then in 2006, both the master switch locus WORI and the pheromone-induced white cell biofilm were discovered. Since that year, a number of new observations on the regulation and biology of switching have been made that have significantly increased the perceived complexity of this fascinating phenotypic transition. PMID:24455104

Soll, David R.

2014-01-01

142

Method for Generation of in vivo Biotinylated Recombinant Antibodies by Yeast Mating.  

PubMed Central

We describe here a novel method for generation of yeast-secreted, in vivo biotinylated recombinant antibodies, or biobodies. Biobodies are secreted by diploid yeast resulting from the fusion of two haploid yeast of opposite mating type. One yeast carries a cDNA encoding an antibody recognition sequence fused to an IgA1 hinge and a biotin acceptor site (BCCP) at the C-terminus; the other carries a cDNA encoding an E. Coli biotin ligase (BirA) fused to KEX2 golgi-localization sequences, so that BirA can catalyze the biotin transfer to the recognition sequence-fused BCCP within the yeast secretory compartment. We illustrate this technology with biobodies against HE4, a biomarker for ovarian carcinoma. Anti-HE4 biobodies were derived from clones or pools of anti-HE4-specific yeast-display scFv, constituting respectively monoclonal (mBb) or polyclonal (pBb) biobodies. Anti-HE4 biobodies were secreted directly biotinylated thus bound to labeled-streptavidin and streptavidin-coated surfaces without Ni-purification. Anti-HE4 biobodies demonstrated specificity and sensitivity by ELISA assays, flow cytometry analysis and western blots prior to any maturation; dissociation equilibrium constants as measured by surface plasmon resonance sensor were of Kd= 4.8×10-9 M and Kd =5.1×10-9 M before and after Ni-purification respectively. Thus, yeast mating permits cost-effective generation of biotinylated recombinant antibodies of high affinity. PMID:17113097

Scholler, Nathalie; Garvik, Barbara; Quarles, Travis; Jiang, Shaoyi; Urban, Nicole

2007-01-01

143

Diplexer switch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Switch achieves high isolation and continuous input/output matching by using resonant coupling structure of diplexer. Additionally, dc bias network used to control switch is decoupled from RF input and output lines. Voltage transients in external circuits are thus minimized.

Grauling, C. H., Jr.; Parker, T. W.

1977-01-01

144

Yeast Education Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Yeast Education Network provides a variety of resources to facilitate use of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in undergraduate science curricula. Laboratory, classroom, and computer-based activities can be used with college and advanced high school students.

145

Vaginal Yeast Infections  

MedlinePLUS

... infection from your sexual partner. Condoms and dental dams may help prevent getting or passing yeast infections ... infection from your sexual partner. Condoms and dental dams may help prevent getting or passing yeast infections ...

146

Yeast Based Sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the first microbial cell sensor was studied by Karube et al. in 1977, many types of yeast based sensors have been developed as analytical tools. Yeasts are known as facultative anaerobes. Facultative anaerobes can survive in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The yeast based sensor consisted of a DO electrode and an immobilized omnivorous yeast. In yeast based sensor development, many kinds of yeast have been employed by applying their characteristics to adapt to the analyte. For example, Trichosporon cutaneum was used to estimate organic pollution in industrial wastewater. Yeast based sensors are suitable for online control of biochemical processes and for environmental monitoring. In this review, principles and applications of yeast based sensors are summarized.

Shimomura-Shimizu, Mifumi; Karube, Isao

147

Switching Amplifiers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by Work-Ready Electronics, a project of the Advanced Technological Education, this module walks visitors through switching amplifiers. The site content is divided up into four sections: Switching Amplifiers Introduction, Class D Switching Amplifiers, Switching RF Power Amplifiers, and Troubleshooting. There is a quiz for each section to test what students learned in the module in the Knowledge Probe section, and the Learning Resources section contains four activities to help cement student understanding. There are also further resources - both print and Web based - for more information and two Questor games, a Flash quiz that reiterates the material covered. The Notebook function allows visitors to take notes and review them at any time. This is an excellent resource students and educators in electronics technician programs to introduce and explore switching amplifiers.

148

Xylose fermentation by yeasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Utilization and fermentation of xylose by the yeasts Pachysolen tannophilus I fGB 0101 and Pichia stipitis 5773 to 5776 under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are investigated. Pa. tannophilus requires biotin and thiamine for growth, whereas Pi. stipitis does not, and growth of both yeasts is stimulated by yeast extract. Pi. stipitis converts xylose (30 g\\/l) to ethanol under anaerobic conditions

H. Dellweg; M. Rizzi; H. Methner; D. Debus

1984-01-01

149

Gene Switches  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners explore how genetic switches function and the role of genetic switches in the process of evolution. To make these concepts less abstract and more understandable, learners first view a series of video clips and animations from the HHMI DVD (or online) "Evolution: Constant Change and Common Threads." Then, learners construct a model of a gene switch using craft materials or FridgiGears (magnetic gears). This activity can be done as a demonstration, a student inquiry activity, or a combination of the two.

2013-07-30

150

Identification and characterization of genes and mutants for an N-terminal acetyltransferase from yeast.  

PubMed Central

A gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been mapped, cloned, sequenced and shown to encode a catalytic subunit of an N-terminal acetyltransferase. Regions of this gene, NAT1, and the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase genes of bacteria have limited but significant homology. A nat1 null mutant is viable but exhibits a variety of phenotypes, including reduced acetyltransferase activity, derepression of a silent mating type locus (HML) and failure to enter G0. All these phenotypes are identical to those of a previously characterized mutant, ard1. NAT1 and ARD1 are distinct genes that encode proteins with no obvious similarity. Concomitant overexpression of both NAT1 and ARD1 in yeast causes a 20-fold increase in acetyltransferase activity in vitro, whereas overexpression of either NAT1 or ARD1 alone does not raise activity over basal levels. A functional iso-1-cytochrome c protein, which is N-terminally acetylated in a NAT1 strain, is not acetylated in an isogenic nat1 mutant. At least 20 other yeast proteins, including histone H2B, are not N-terminally acetylated in either nat1 or ard1 mutants. These results suggest that NAT1 and ARD1 proteins function together to catalyze the N-terminal acetylation of a subset of yeast proteins. Images PMID:2551674

Mullen, J R; Kayne, P S; Moerschell, R P; Tsunasawa, S; Gribskov, M; Colavito-Shepanski, M; Grunstein, M; Sherman, F; Sternglanz, R

1989-01-01

151

Up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1) and autophagy-related genes by repeated treatments with resveratrol in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.  

PubMed

Resveratrol, a polyphenolic phytoalexin found in red wine and various plants, has been reported to up-regulate the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). However, this effect was neither long term in nature nor physiologically relevant at the concentration of resveratrol studied. In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated treatments with a lower concentration of resveratrol on the expression of genes in HUVEC. The expression levels of eNOS and silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1) were up-regulated in HUVEC by repeated treatments with 1 ?M-resveratrol for 6 d, but not with fenofibrate. Moreover, resveratrol treatment increased the expression of autophagy-regulated genes such as ?-aminobutyric acid A receptor-associated protein (GABARAP), microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B) and autophagy-related protein 3 (ATG3), the radical scavenger activity-related metallothionein-1X (MT1X) gene and the anti-inflammatory activity-related annexin A2 (ANXA) gene. In addition, resveratrol treatment down-regulated the expression of the cell-cycle checkpoint control RAD9 homologue B (RAD9B) gene. These results indicate the beneficial effects of resveratrol on the cardiovascular system. PMID:23750556

Takizawa, Yoshie; Kosuge, Yukiko; Awaji, Hiroyo; Tamura, Emi; Takai, Ayako; Yanai, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Reiko; Kokame, Koichi; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Nakata, Rieko; Inoue, Hiroyasu

2013-12-01

152

Population Growth in Yeasts  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson is the second of two that explore cellular respiration and population growth in yeasts. In the first lesson, students set up a simple way to indirectly observe and quantify the amount of respiration occurring in yeast-molasses cultures. Based on questions that arose during the first lesson and its associated activity, students in this lesson work in small groups to design experiments that determine how environmental factors affect yeast population growth.

Engineering K-PhD Program,

153

Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction  

MedlinePLUS

... links Read our disclaimer about external links Menu Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction On this page: Key ... will help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Red Yeast Rice Red yeast rice is made by ...

154

Xylose fermentation by yeasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Furfural as a product from thermic wood hydrolysis processes may be inhibitory to growth and fermentation of yeast cells. In order to determine the influence on the aerobic growth of the yeastPichiastipitis, expermiments were conducted in stirred reactors with the addition of furfural.

B. Weigert; C. Klein; M. Rizzi; C. Lauterbach; H. Dellweg

1988-01-01

155

Yeasts: Neglected Pathogens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Current research on Crohn’s disease (CD) concerns molecular events related to loss of tolerance to microbes that could trigger or maintain inflammation in genetically susceptible individuals. CD is also associated with antimicrobial antibodies, including the antibodies we described against yeast oligomannosides (ASCA). This prompted us to investigate a role for another yeast, Candida albicans, a very common commensal of

Daniel Poulain; Boualem Sendid; Annie Standaert-Vitse; Chantal Fradin; Thierry Jouault; Samir Jawhara; Jean-Frederic Colombel

2009-01-01

156

Alcoholic Fermentation in Yeast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn about the basics of aerobic cellular respiration and alcoholic fermentation and design and carry out experiments to test how variables such as sugar concentration influence the rate of alcoholic fermentation in yeast. In an optional extension activity students can use their yeast mixture to make a small roll of bread.

Ingrid Waldron

157

Identification of a novel pelD gene expressed uniquely in planta by Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi (Nectria haematococca, mating type VI) and characterization of its protein product as an endo-pectate lyase.  

PubMed

Antibodies prepared against a pectin-inducible pectate lyase (PLA) produced by a phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi (Nectria haematococca, mating type VI) were previously found to protect the host from infection. The gene (pelA) and two of its homologs were cloned and sequenced. Here we report the isolation of a new pectate lyase gene, pelD, from a genomic library of F. solani pisi. A 1.5-kb DNA fragment containing pelD and its flanking regions was sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of pelD would encode a protein of 24.5 kDa which shares 49, 44, and 65% amino acid sequence identity with PLA, PLB, and PLC, respectively, from the same fungus. Because the first 19 amino acid residues appeared to be a signal peptide, the mature enzyme could be a 22.7-kDa protein. pelD transcripts and PLD protein could not be detected in fungus cultured in glucose, pectin, pea epicotyl extract, or a pea cell wall preparation. However, pelD transcripts were readily found by RT-PCR with RNA isolated from infected pea tissues. The cDNA of pelD, thus obtained, was expressed in Pichia pastoris with the putative pelD signal sequence. The secreted PLD was purified and characterized to be an endopectate lyase, and its lyase activity could be inhibited by anti-PLA IgG. Thus, protection of the host observed with the anti-PLA antibodies could reflect inhibition of immunologically related pectate lyases including PLD which is expressed uniquely in planta. PMID:8806739

Guo, W; González-Candelas, L; Kolattukudy, P E

1996-08-15

158

Silencing motifs in the Clr2 protein from fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe.  

PubMed

The fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, is a well-established model for heterochromatin formation, but the exact sequence of events for initiation remains to be elucidated. The essential factors involved include RNA transcribed from repeated sequences together with the methyltransferase Clr4. In addition, histone deacetylases, like Clr3, found in the SHREC complex are also necessary for transcriptional silencing. Clr2 is another crucial factor required for heterochromatin formation found in the SHREC complex. The function of Clr2 has been difficult to establish due to the lack of conserved domains or homology to proteins of known molecular function. Using a bioinformatics approach, three conserved motifs in Clr2 were identified, which contained amino acids important for transcriptional repression. Analysis of clr2 mutant strains revealed a major role for Clr2 in mating-type and rDNA silencing, and weaker effects on centromeric silencing. The effect on mating-type silencing showed variegation in several of the strains with mutated versions of Clr2 indicating an establishment or maintenance defect. Moreover, the critical amino acids in Clr2 were also necessary for transcriptional repression in a minimal system, by the tethering of Clr4 upstream of a reporter gene, inserted into the euchromatic part of the genome. Finally, in silico modeling suggested that the mutations in Clr2 cause disruption of secondary structures in the Clr2 protein. Identification of these critical amino acids in the protein provides a useful tool to explore the molecular mechanism behind the role of Clr2 in heterochromatin formation. PMID:24475199

Steinhauf, Daniel; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Virgo, Gordon; Maksimov, Vladimir; Kristell, Carolina; Olsson, Ida; Linder, Tomas; Kossida, Sophia; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Bjerling, Pernilla

2014-01-01

159

Silencing Motifs in the Clr2 Protein from Fission Yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe  

PubMed Central

The fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, is a well-established model for heterochromatin formation, but the exact sequence of events for initiation remains to be elucidated. The essential factors involved include RNA transcribed from repeated sequences together with the methyltransferase Clr4. In addition, histone deacetylases, like Clr3, found in the SHREC complex are also necessary for transcriptional silencing. Clr2 is another crucial factor required for heterochromatin formation found in the SHREC complex. The function of Clr2 has been difficult to establish due to the lack of conserved domains or homology to proteins of known molecular function. Using a bioinformatics approach, three conserved motifs in Clr2 were identified, which contained amino acids important for transcriptional repression. Analysis of clr2 mutant strains revealed a major role for Clr2 in mating-type and rDNA silencing, and weaker effects on centromeric silencing. The effect on mating-type silencing showed variegation in several of the strains with mutated versions of Clr2 indicating an establishment or maintenance defect. Moreover, the critical amino acids in Clr2 were also necessary for transcriptional repression in a minimal system, by the tethering of Clr4 upstream of a reporter gene, inserted into the euchromatic part of the genome. Finally, in silico modeling suggested that the mutations in Clr2 cause disruption of secondary structures in the Clr2 protein. Identification of these critical amino acids in the protein provides a useful tool to explore the molecular mechanism behind the role of Clr2 in heterochromatin formation. PMID:24475199

Steinhauf, Daniel; Maksimov, Vladimir; Kristell, Carolina; Olsson, Ida; Linder, Tomas; Kossida, Sophia; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Bjerling, Pernilla

2014-01-01

160

Reset Switching Probability of Resistive Switching Devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reset switching probability of resistive switching devices is characterized in array testing. The measured switching probability can be quantitatively explained based on the mecha- nism of a thermally activated reset process. An analytical model of switching probability is developed to describe the dependence of reset probability on operation parameters, including applied voltage, selection transistor gate voltage, and pulsewidth. The

An Chen; Ming-Ren Lin

2011-01-01

161

Optical switching: switch fabrics, techniques, and architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The switching speeds of electronics cannot keep up with the transmission capacity offered by optics. All-optical switch fabrics play a central role in the effort to migrate the switching functions to the optical layer. Optical packet switching provides an almost arbitrary fine granularity but faces significant challenges in the processing and buffering of bits at high speeds. Generalized multiprotocol label

Georgios I. Papadimitriou; Chrisoula Papazoglou; Andreas S. Pomportsis

2003-01-01

162

Specific repression of the yeast silent mating locus HMR by an adjacent telomere.  

PubMed Central

The yeast silent mating loci HML and HMR are located at opposite ends of chromosome III adjacent to the telomeres. Mutations in the N terminus of histone H4 have been previously found to derepress the yeast silent mating locus HML to a much greater extent than HMR. Although differences in the a and alpha mating-type regulatory genes and in the cis-acting silencer elements do not appear to strongly influence the level of derepression at HMR, we have found that the differential between the two silent cassettes is largely due to the position of the HMR cassette relative to the telomere on chromosome III. While HML is derepressed to roughly the same extent by mutations in histone H4 regardless of its chromosomal location, HMR is affected to different extends depending upon its chromosomal positioning. We have found that HMR is more severely derepressed by histone H4 mutations when positioned far from the telomere (cdc14 locus on chromosome VI) but is only minimally affected by the same mutations when integrated immediately adjacent to another telomere (ADH4 locus on chromosome VII). These data indicate that the degree of silencing at HMR is regulated in part by its neighboring telomere over a distance of at least 23 kb and that this form of regulation is unique for HMR and not present at HML. These data also indicate that histone H4 plays an important role in regulating the silenced state at both HML and HMR. PMID:8264612

Thompson, J S; Johnson, L M; Grunstein, M

1994-01-01

163

Metschnikowia proteae sp. nov., a nectarivorous insect-associated yeast species from Africa.  

PubMed

A collection of yeasts isolated from nectar of flowers of Protea caffra (Proteaceae) and associated scarab beetles (Atrichelaphinis tigrina, Cyrtothyrea marginalis, Trichostetha fascicularis and Heterochelus sp.) and drosophilid flies in South Africa, contained 28 isolates that could not be assigned to known species. Comparisons of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rRNA gene demonstrated the existence of three separate phylotypes with an affinity to the genus Metschnikowia and more specifically to the beetle-associated large-spored Metschnikowia clade. Twenty-six strains that had similar D1/D2 sequences were mixed in all pairwise combinations. They were found to mate and give rise to large asci typical of those in the clade. The name Metschnikowia proteae sp. nov. (type strain EBDT1Y1(T)?=?CBS 12522(T)?=?NRRL Y-48784(T); allotype strain EBDC2Y2?=?CBS 12521?=?NRRL Y-48785) is proposed to accommodate this novel species. The ecology of this novel yeast species is discussed in relation to its potential plant and insect host species. The additional two single strains isolated from Heterochelus sp. represent two novel undescribed species (Candida sp. 1 EBDM2Y3 and Candida sp. 2 EBDM8Y1). As these single strains are probably haploid mating types of Metschnikowia species, their description is deferred until the species are sufficiently well sampled to permit meaningful descriptions. PMID:22407789

de Vega, Clara; Guzmán, Beatriz; Lachance, Marc-André; Steenhuisen, Sandy-Lynn; Johnson, Steven D; Herrera, Carlos M

2012-10-01

164

Genetic, genomic, and molecular tools for studying the protoploid yeast, L. waltii  

PubMed Central

Sequencing of the yeast Kluyveromyces waltii (recently renamed Lachancea waltii) provided evidence of a whole genome duplication event in the lineage leading to the well-studied Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While comparative genomic analyses of these yeasts have proven to be extremely instructive in modeling the loss or maintenance of gene duplicates, experimental tests of the ramifications following such genome alterations remain difficult. To transform L. waltii from an organism of the computational comparative genomic literature into an organism of the functional comparative genomic literature, we have developed genetic, molecular and genomic tools for working with L. waltii. In particular, we have characterized basic properties of L. waltii (growth, ploidy, molecular karyotype, mating type and the sexual cycle), developed transformation, cell cycle arrest and synchronization protocols, and have created centromeric and non-centromeric vectors as well as a genome browser for L. waltii. We hope that these tools will be used by the community to follow up on the ideas generated by sequence data and lead to a greater understanding of eukaryotic biology and genome evolution. PMID:21246627

Di Rienzi, Sara C.; Lindstrom, Kimberly C.; Lancaster, Ragina; Rolczynski, Lisa; Raghuraman, M. K.; Brewer, Bonita J.

2011-01-01

165

Improvement of switching time in a thermocapillarity optical switch  

Microsoft Academic Search

The switching time of existing thermocapillarity optical switches is about two orders of magnitude larger than that of other optical switches, such as a thermooptics switch and a free-space switch using microelectromechanical system technology. This paper reports a thermocapillarity switch whose switching time is comparable to that of the thermooptics and free-space switches. The greatly improved switching time is achieved

Tomomi Sakata; Hiroyoshi Togo; Mitsuhiro Makihara; Fusao Shimokawa; Kazumasa Kaneko

2001-01-01

166

Yeast expression platforms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yeasts provide attractive expression platforms. They combine ease of genetic manipulations and the option for a simple fermentation\\u000a design of a microbial organism with the capabilities of an eukaryotic organism to secrete and to modify a protein according\\u000a to a general eukaryotic scheme. For platform applications, a range of yeast species has been developed during the last decades.\\u000a We present

Erik Böer; Gerhard Steinborn; Gotthard Kunze; Gerd Gellissen

2007-01-01

167

Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing enzymes of yeasts.

Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

168

Forces in yeast flocculation.  

PubMed

In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion ("flocculation") is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding. PMID:25515338

El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N; Dufrêne, Yves F

2015-02-01

169

Forces in yeast flocculation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

2015-01-01

170

Induction and construct UV protective yeast plasmid.  

PubMed

In this study, we apply concepts of synthetic biology in combination with conventional methods to assemble different genetic components to construct yeast resistant to UV radiation, and to induce production of anti-UV proteins. This work combines sequences of different promoters, STRESS-proteins, heat shock protein (HSP), kinase proteins, alcohol dehydrogenase protein (ADH), ribosomal binding sites, fluorescent reporter proteins, terminators, and a synthetic ribosomal switch. The aim of this investigation was to induce an anti-UV proteins, and to construct an anti-UV yeast plasmid to be used for protection of skin cells against UV radiation. This investigation demonstrates induction and construction of anti-UV genes and production of their corresponding proteins. Cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ATCC # 66348) were exposed to short-wave UV radiation and were then subjected to time-PCR to assess specific gene expression. Proteins were identified using two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE) and LC-MS/MS. Different up-regulated and down-regulated proteins were identified. Highly expressed identified proteins were cloned into S. cerevisiae using a synthetic biology approach. Extracts from UV-induced genetically transformed yeasts were used to protect skin cell cultures (ATCC #2522-CRL) in vitro. Both microscopic analysis and an apoptosis assay showed protection of the skin cell cultures against UV radiation. PMID:23665192

Cuero, Raul; McKay, David S

2013-07-10

171

Yeast killer toxins and dimorphism.  

PubMed

The differential action of four selected yeast killer toxins on the mycelial and yeast forms of four isolates of the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii was comparatively evaluated. The results confirmed that the yeast killer phenomenon is present among hyphomycetes and yeasts and that both morphological forms of S. schenckii are susceptible to the action of the same yeast killer toxin. Quantitative differences in the response to the killer action of the mycelial and yeast forms in individual strains were also observed. To avoid retroconversion of the dimorphic forms, we used a modification of the conventional killer system. PMID:2754015

Polonelli, L; Conti, S; Campani, L; Morace, G; Fanti, F

1989-06-01

172

Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks  

PubMed Central

The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24018767

Hughes, Timothy R.; de Boer, Carl G.

2013-01-01

173

Evolutionary history of Ascomyceteous Yeasts  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Yeasts are important for many industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 20 ascomyceteous yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. A comp...

174

Ancient Evolutionary Trade-Offs between Yeast Ploidy States  

PubMed Central

The number of chromosome sets contained within the nucleus of eukaryotic organisms is a fundamental yet evolutionarily poorly characterized genetic variable of life. Here, we mapped the impact of ploidy on the mitotic fitness of baker's yeast and its never domesticated relative Saccharomyces paradoxus across wide swaths of their natural genotypic and phenotypic space. Surprisingly, environment-specific influences of ploidy on reproduction were found to be the rule rather than the exception. These ploidy–environment interactions were well conserved across the 2 billion generations separating the two species, suggesting that they are the products of strong selection. Previous hypotheses of generalizable advantages of haploidy or diploidy in ecological contexts imposing nutrient restriction, toxin exposure, and elevated mutational loads were rejected in favor of more fine-grained models of the interplay between ecology and ploidy. On a molecular level, cell size and mating type locus composition had equal, but limited, explanatory power, each explaining 12.5%–17% of ploidy–environment interactions. The mechanism of the cell size–based superior reproductive efficiency of haploids during Li+ exposure was traced to the Li+ exporter ENA. Removal of the Ena transporters, forcing dependence on the Nha1 extrusion system, completely altered the effects of ploidy on Li+ tolerance and evoked a strong diploid superiority, demonstrating how genetic variation at a single locus can completely reverse the relative merits of haploidy and diploidy. Taken together, our findings unmasked a dynamic interplay between ploidy and ecology that was of unpredicted evolutionary importance and had multiple molecular roots. PMID:23555297

Zörgö, Enikö; Chwialkowska, Karolina; Gjuvsland, Arne B.; Garré, Elena; Sunnerhagen, Per; Liti, Gianni; Blomberg, Anders; Omholt, Stig W.; Warringer, Jonas

2013-01-01

175

Yeast killer systems.  

PubMed Central

The killer phenomenon in yeasts has been revealed to be a multicentric model for molecular biologists, virologists, phytopathologists, epidemiologists, industrial and medical microbiologists, mycologists, and pharmacologists. The surprisingly widespread occurrence of the killer phenomenon among taxonomically unrelated microorganisms, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, has engendered a new interest in its biological significance as well as its theoretical and practical applications. The search for therapeutic opportunities by using yeast killer systems has conceptually opened new avenues for the prevention and control of life-threatening fungal diseases through the idiotypic network that is apparently exploited by the immune system in the course of natural infections. In this review, the biology, ecology, epidemiology, therapeutics, serology, and idiotypy of yeast killer systems are discussed. PMID:9227858

Magliani, W; Conti, S; Gerloni, M; Bertolotti, D; Polonelli, L

1997-01-01

176

Virtual Yeast Cell  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learning about the various parts of a cell can be tricky business, but this virtual yeast cell offered by The University of Nottingham will come in handy for biology students and science instructors. This learning resource was created to help students in the brewing science program learn about yeast cytology, though just about anyone with an interest in cells will learn something from visiting the site. After entering the interactive cell, visitors can click on different parts of the cell (such as the cytoplasm or the nucleus) in order to learn more about the importance of each one. Visitors should remember that they can also download the virtual yeast cell and use it in the classroom or just with a group of friends.

177

Cryopreservation of yeast cultures.  

PubMed

A method is described that allows a wide range of yeast species to be stored in liquid nitrogen while maintaining a high level of viability. Yeast cultures are sealed in commercially available polypropylene straws after having been mixed with a glycerol-based cryoprotectant. Once placed in a secondary cryotube the temperature of the sealed straws is reduced slowly to -30 degrees C in a methanol bath over a period of up to 3 h. The straws are then transferred directly to the liquid nitrogen and placed in a racking system for long-term storage. PMID:18080465

Bond, Chris

2007-01-01

178

Genetics of Yeasts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of yeasts in biotechnology processes dates back to ancient days. Before 7000 BC, beer was produced in Sumeria. Wine was made in Assyria in 3500 BC, and ancient Rome had over 250 bakeries, which were making leavened bread by 100 BC. And milk has been made into Kefyr and Koumiss in Asia for many centuries (Demain, Phaff, & Kurtzman, 1999). However, the importance of yeast in the food and beverage industries was only realized about 1860, when their role in food manufacturing became evident.

Querol, Amparo; Fernández-Espinar, M. Teresa; Belloch, Carmela

179

Dendritic Cells Discriminate between Yeasts and Hyphae of the Fungus Candida albicans : Implications for Initiation of T Helper Cell Immunity In Vitro and In Vivo  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fungus Candida albicans behaves as a commensal as well as a true pathogen of areas highly enriched in dendritic cells, such as skin and mucosal surfaces. The ability of the fungus to re- versibly switch between unicellular yeast to filamentous forms is thought to be important for virulence. However, whether it is the yeast or the hyphal form that

Cristiana Fè d'Ostiani; Giuseppe Del Sero; Angela Bacci; Claudia Montagnoli; Antonio Spreca; Antonella Mencacci; Paola Ricciardi-Castagnoli; Luigina Romani

180

Latching relay switch assembly  

DOEpatents

A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

Duimstra, Frederick A. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

1991-01-01

181

L-arabinose fermenting yeast  

DOEpatents

An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

2014-09-23

182

Genome evolution in yeasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identifying the mechanisms of eukaryotic genome evolution by comparative genomics is often complicated by the multiplicity of events that have taken place throughout the history of individual lineages, leaving only distorted and superimposed traces in the genome of each living organism. The hemiascomycete yeasts, with their compact genomes, similar lifestyle and distinct sexual and physiological properties, provide a unique opportunity

Bernard Dujon; David Sherman; Gilles Fischer; Pascal Durrens; Serge Casaregola; Ingrid Lafontaine; Jacky de Montigny; Christian Marck; Cécile Neuvéglise; Emmanuel Talla; Nicolas Goffard; Lionel Frangeul; Michel Aigle; Véronique Anthouard; Anna Babour; Valérie Barbe; Stéphanie Barnay; Sylvie Blanchin; Jean-Marie Beckerich; Emmanuelle Beyne; Claudine Bleykasten; Anita Boisramé; Jeanne Boyer; Laurence Cattolico; Fabrice Confanioleri; Antoine de Daruvar; Laurence Despons; Emmanuelle Fabre; Cécile Fairhead; Hélène Ferry-Dumazet; Alexis Groppi; Florence Hantraye; Christophe Hennequin; Nicolas Jauniaux; Philippe Joyet; Rym Kachouri; Alix Kerrest; Romain Koszul; Marc Lemaire; Isabelle Lesur; Laurence Ma; Héloïse Muller; Jean-Marc Nicaud; Macha Nikolski; Sophie Oztas; Odile Ozier-Kalogeropoulos; Stefan Pellenz; Serge Potier; Guy-Franck Richard; Marie-Laure Straub; Audrey Suleau; Dominique Swennen; Fredj Tekaia; Micheline Wésolowski-Louvel; Eric Westhof; Bénédicte Wirth; Maria Zeniou-Meyer; Ivan Zivanovic; Monique Bolotin-Fukuhara; Agnès Thierry; Christiane Bouchier; Bernard Caudron; Claude Scarpelli; Claude Gaillardin; Jean Weissenbach; Patrick Wincker; Jean-Luc Souciet

2004-01-01

183

Chemical genomics in yeast  

PubMed Central

Many drugs have unknown, controversial or multiple mechanisms of action. Four recent 'chemical genomic' studies, using genome-scale collections of yeast gene deletions that were either arrayed or barcoded, have presented complementary approaches to identifying gene-drug and pathway-drug interactions. PMID:15345040

Brenner, Charles

2004-01-01

184

Yeast DNA Extraction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This laboratory exercise is designed to show learners how DNA can easily be extracted from yeast using simple materials. Use this experiment to supplement any unit on genetics and to demonstrate how scientists study DNA. Adult supervision is recommended. This resource guide includes tips and suggestions for instructors as well as other DNA extraction experiments and a chart for learners to answer questions.

Lana Hays

2009-01-01

185

Radiation hard vacuum switch  

DOEpatents

A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

Boettcher, Gordon E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01

186

Phenotypic Switching of Candida guilliermondii is Associated with Pseudohyphae Formation and Antifungal Resistance.  

PubMed

Switching between two cell types in fungi is called phenotypic switching, and it is commonly observed in pathogenic yeast. Candida lusitaniae undergoes antifungal resistance-associated phenotypic switching and results in three colony colors: light brown, brown and dark brown. In this study, we included C. lusitaniae as control. This study had two objectives. First, we wanted to evaluate whether also a prevalent human pathogen C. guilliermondii can undergo phenotypic switching. Second, our aim was to determine whether switching can change yeasts susceptibility to antifungals. Yeast suspension (1 × 10(3)-5 × 10(3) c.f.u./ml) was plated on the YPD medium containing 1 mM CuSO4. Colonies exhibiting the original and variant phenotypes were counted and converted to percentage of the population. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of amphotericin B, formic acid and acetic acid for the cells from random colonies of the different phenotypes were determined by microdilution method. After 5 days of incubation, C. guilliermondii switched spontaneously and reversibly among two phenotypes distinguishable on CuSO4 containing agar, white and dark brown. Phenotypes occurred with greater frequency (10(-1)-10(-2)) than spontaneous mutations and were reversible, fulfilling the two phenotypic switching criteria. The study showed that phenotypic switching was associated with filamentation and affected antifungal resistance. Resistance to amphotericin B increased tenfold and was associated with C. lusitaniae dark brown phenotype. C. guilliermondii colonies with brown phenotype displayed 20 and 2 times higher resistance to amphotericin B and acetic acid, respectively. PMID:25481846

Lastauskien?, Egl?; ?eputyt?, Jolita; Girkontait?, Irut?; Zinkevi?ien?, Auks?

2015-04-01

187

Temporal switching jitter in photoconductive switches  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a recent comparison made between the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) gallium arsenide, optically-triggered switch test configuration and the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) gallium arsenide, optically-triggered switch test configuration. The purpose of these measurements was to compare the temporal switch jitter times. It is found that the optical trigger laser characteristics are dominant in determining the PCSS jitter.

GAUDET,JOHN A.; SKIPPER,MICHAEL C.; ABDALLA,MICHAEL D.; AHERN,SEAN M.; MAR,ALAN; LOUBRIEL,GUILLERMO M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.; O'MALLEY,MARTIN W.; HELGESON,WESLEY D.; ROMERO,SAMUEL P.

2000-04-13

188

Localized Deposition of Chitin on the Yeast Cell Surface in Response to Mating Pheromone  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treatment of a mating-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with the pheromone alpha -factor (secreted by alpha mating-type cells) induces the synthesis of chitin. Small daughter cells, which start with no detectable chitin, make 3 times more chitin when grown in the presence of alpha -factor than do untreated exponentially growing cells. Budding cells accumulate chitin in the nascent division septum [Cabib,

Randy Schekman; Vicki Brawley

1979-01-01

189

The fission yeast chromo domain encoding gene chp1(+) is required for chromosome segregation and shows a genetic interaction with alpha-tubulin.  

PubMed Central

In eukaryotes, the segregation of chromosomes is co-ordinated by the centromere and must proceed accurately if aneuploidy and cell death are to be avoided. The fission yeast centromere is complex, containing highly repetitive regions of DNA showing the characteristics of heterochromatin. Two proteins, Swi6p and Clr4p, that are associated with the fission yeast centromere also contain a chromo (chromatin organisation modifier) domain and are required for centromere function. We have analysed a novel fission yeast gene encoding a putative chromo domain called chp 1(+) (chromo domain protein in Schizosaccharomyces p ombe ). In the absence of Chp1p protein, cells are viable but show chromosome segregation defects such as lagging chromosomes on the spindle during anaphase and high rates of minichromosome loss, phenotypes which are also displayed by swi 6 and clr 4. A fusion protein between green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Chp1p, like Swi6p, is localized to discrete sites within the nucleus. In contrast to Swi6p and Clr4p, Chp1p is not required to repress silent mating-type genes. We demonstrate a genetic interaction between chp 1(+) and alpha-tubulin ( nda 2(+)) and between swi 6(+) and beta-tubulin ( nda 3(+)). Chp1p and Swi6p proteins may be components of the kinetochore which captures and stabilizes the microtubules of the spindle. PMID:9722643

Doe, C L; Wang, G; Chow, C; Fricker, M D; Singh, P B; Mellor, E J

1998-01-01

190

Extracellular Polysaccharides Produced by Yeasts and Yeast-Like Fungi  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several yeasts and yeast-like fungi are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. Most of these contain D-mannose, either alone or in combination with other sugars or phosphate. A large chemical and structural variability is found between yeast species and even among different strains. The types of polymers that are synthesized can be chemically characterized as mannans, glucans, phosphoman-nans, galactomannans, glucomannans and glucuronoxylomannans. Despite these differences, almost all of the yeast exopolysaccharides display some sort of biological activity. Some of them have already applications in chemistry, pharmacy, cosmetics or as probiotic. Furthermore, some yeast exopolysaccharides, such as pullulan, exhibit specific physico-chemical and rheological properties, making them useful in a wide range of technical applications. A survey is given here of the production, the characteristics and the application potential of currently well studied yeast extracellular polysaccharides.

van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; de Maeseneire, Sofie L.; Vandamme, Erick J.

191

Latching micro optical switch  

DOEpatents

An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

2013-05-21

192

Extracellular Polysaccharides Produced by Yeasts and YeastLike Fungi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several yeasts and yeast-like fungi are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. Most of these contain D-mannose, either\\u000a alone or in combination with other sugars or phosphate. A large chemical and structural variability is found between yeast\\u000a species and even among different strains. The types of polymers that are synthesized can be chemically characterized as mannans,\\u000a glucans, phosphoman-nans, galactomannans, glucomannans and

Inge N. A. Bogaert; Sofie L. Maeseneire; Erick J. Vandamme

193

Extracellular Polysaccharides Produced by Yeasts and YeastLike Fungi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several yeasts and yeast-like fungi are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. Most of these contain D-mannose, either alone or in combination with other sugars or phosphate. A large chemical and structural variability is found between yeast species and even among different strains. The types of polymers that are synthesized can be chemically characterized as mannans, glucans, phosphoman-nans, galactomannans, glucomannans and

Inge N. A. van Bogaert; Sofie L. de Maeseneire; Erick J. Vandamme

2009-01-01

194

Teaching Microbial Physiology Using Glucose Repression Phenomenon in Baker's Yeast as an Example  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The yeast "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" has been used by human beings since ancient times for its ability to convert sugar to alcohol. Continual exposure to glucose in the natural environment for innumerable generations has probably enabled "S. cerevisiae" to grow in fermentative mode on sugars by switching off the genes responsible for respiration…

Raghevendran, Vijayendran; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth

2005-01-01

195

Xylose fermentation by yeasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Xylose reductase from the xylose-fermenting yeastPichia stipitis was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity via ion-exchange, gel and affinity chromatography. At physiological pH values the thermodynamic equilibrium constant was determined to be 0.575x1010 (l·mol-1). Product inhibiton studies are reported which clearly show that the kinetic mechanism of the xylose reductase is ordered-bi-bi with isomerisation of a stable enzyme form.

Manfred Rizzi; Petra Erlemann; Ngoc-Anh Bui-Thanh; Hanswerner Dellweg

1988-01-01

196

Mammalian Homology to Yeast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site allows researchers to retrieve a yeast-against-mammal Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) report by entering a gene or ORF name into a search function. The supporting data were first summarized in a recent Science article which is provided via a link to the journal (Science, 22 July 1997; Issue 277: p.1259). Steve Chervitz of Stanford University maintains this site.

1997-01-01

197

Glutathione Production in Yeast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glutathione, ? -glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine, is the most abundant non-protein thiol found in almost all eukaryotic cells (and in some prokaryotes). The tripeptide, which is synthesized non-ribosomally by the consecutive action of two soluble enzymes, is needed for carrying out numerous functions in the cell, most important of which is the maintenance of the redox buffer. The cycle of glutathione biosynthesis and degradation forms part of the ? -glutamyl cycle in most organisms although the latter half of the pathway has not been demonstrated in yeasts. Our current understanding of how glutathione levels are controlled at different levels in the cell is described. Several different routes and processes have been attempted to increase commercial production of glutathione using both yeast and bacteria. In this article we discuss the history of glutathione production in yeast. The current bottlenecks for increased glutathione production are presented based on our current understanding of the regulation of glutathione homeostasis, and possible strategies for overcoming these limitations for further enhancing and improving glutathione production are discussed

Bachhawat, Anand K.; Ganguli, Dwaipayan; Kaur, Jaspreet; Kasturia, Neha; Thakur, Anil; Kaur, Hardeep; Kumar, Akhilesh; Yadav, Amit

198

Latching relay switch assembly  

SciTech Connect

A latching relay switch assembly is described which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly. 9 figures.

Duimstra, F.A.

1991-03-05

199

Remote switch actuator  

DOEpatents

The invention provides a device and method for actuating electrical switches remotely. The device is removably attached to the switch and is actuated through the transfer of a user's force. The user is able to remain physically removed from the switch site obviating need for protective equipment. The device and method allow rapid, safe actuation of high-voltage or high-current carrying electrical switches or circuit breakers.

Haas, Edwin Gerard; Beauman, Ronald; Palo, Jr., Stefan

2013-01-29

200

Heat switches for ADRs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

2014-07-01

201

21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis ) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis ) may be safely used in food...

2011-04-01

202

21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis ) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis ) may be safely used in food...

2012-04-01

203

21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis ) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis ) may be safely used in food...

2014-04-01

204

21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis ) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis ) may be safely used in food...

2010-04-01

205

21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis ) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis ) may be safely used in food...

2013-04-01

206

Optically Controlled 22 Switching Cell for Packet-Switched Networks  

E-print Network

Optically Controlled 2Ã?2 Switching Cell for Packet-Switched Networks C. C. Lee1 , L. F. K. Lui1 a 10 Gb/s optically controlled 2Ã?2 switching cell which can be used to construct NÃ?N all-optical switches for all-optical packet-switched networks. All-optical packet-switching is performed based

Wai, Ping-kong Alexander

207

Apollo Ring Optical Switch  

SciTech Connect

An optical switch was designed, built, and installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to facilitate the integration of two Apollo computer networks into a single network. This report presents an overview of the optical switch as well as its layout, switch testing procedure and test data, and installation.

Maestas, J.H.

1987-03-01

208

Parasite epigenetics and immune evasion: lessons from budding yeast  

PubMed Central

The remarkable ability of many parasites to evade host immunity is the key to their success and pervasiveness. The immune evasion is directly linked to the silencing of the members of extended families of genes that encode for major parasite antigens. At any time only one of these genes is active. Infrequent switches to other members of the gene family help the parasites elude the immune system and cause prolonged maladies. For most pathogens, the detailed mechanisms of gene silencing and switching are poorly understood. On the other hand, studies in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have revealed similar mechanisms of gene repression and switching and have provided significant insights into the molecular basis of these phenomena. This information is becoming increasingly relevant to the genetics of the parasites. Here we summarize recent advances in parasite epigenetics and emphasize the similarities between S. cerevisiae and pathogens such as Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, Candida, and Pneumocystis. We also outline current challenges in the control and the treatment of the diseases caused by these parasites and link them to epigenetics and the wealth of knowledge acquired from budding yeast. PMID:24252437

2013-01-01

209

BIOSYNTHESIS OF YEAST CAROTENOIDS  

PubMed Central

Simpson, Kenneth L. (University of California, Davis), T. O. M. Nakayama, and C. O. Chichester. Biosynthesis of yeast carotenoids. J. Bacteriol. 88:1688–1694. 1964.—The biosynthesis of carotenoids was followed in Rhodotorula glutinis and in a new strain, 62-506. The treatment of the growing cultures by methylheptenone, or ionone, vapors permitted observations of the intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway. On the basis of concentration changes and accumulation in blocked pathways, the sequence of carotenoid formation is postulated as phytoene, phytofluene, ?-carotene, neurosporene, ?-zeacarotene, ?-carotene, torulin, a C40 aldehyde, and torularhodin. Torulin and torularhodin were established as the main carotenoids of 62-506. PMID:14240958

Simpson, Kenneth L.; Nakayama, T. O. M.; Chichester, C. O.

1964-01-01

210

Production of Food Grade Yeasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Yeasts have been known to humans for thousands of years as they have been used in traditional fermentation processes like wine, beer and bread making. Today, yeasts are also used as alternative sources of high nutritional value proteins, enzymes and vitamins, and have numerous applications in the health food industry as food additives, conditioners and flavouring agents, for the

Argyro Bekatorou; Costas Psarianos; Athanasios A. Koutinas

2006-01-01

211

Yeasts from ips sexdentatus (scolytidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yeasts from the digestive tract of Ips sexdentatus were isolated. Four strains, representing the different identified yeast species, were chosen. Their enzymatic activity on oligosaccharides, heterosides and polysaccharides was measured. Moreover, we showed that they excrete some B group vitamins which are necessary for the insect, unable to synthesize them.

Marie-Claire Pignal; C. Chararas; Michèle Bourgeay-Causse

1988-01-01

212

New and emerging yeast pathogens.  

PubMed Central

The most common yeast species that act as agents of human disease are Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The incidence of infections by other yeasts has increased during the past decade. The most evident emerging pathogens are Malassezia furfur, Trichosporon beigelii, Rhodotorula species, Hansenula anomala, Candida lusitaniae, and Candida krusei. Organisms once considered environmental contaminants or only industrially important, such as Candida utilis and Candida lipolytica, have now been implicated as agents of fungemia, onychomycosis, and systemic disease. The unusual yeasts primarily infect immunocompromised patients, newborns, and the elderly. The role of central venous catheter removal and antifungal therapy in patient management is controversial. The antibiograms of the unusual yeasts range from resistant to the most recent azoles and amphotericin B to highly susceptible to all antifungal agents. Current routine methods for yeast identification may be insufficient to identify the unusual yeasts within 2 days after isolation. The recognition of unusual yeasts as agents of sometimes life-threatening infection and their unpredictable antifungal susceptibilities increase the burden on the clinical mycology laboratory to pursue complete species identification and MIC determinations. Given the current and evolving medical practices for management of seriously ill patients, further evaluations of the clinically important data about these yeasts are needed. PMID:8665465

Hazen, K C

1995-01-01

213

The green monster process for the generation of yeast strains carrying multiple gene deletions.  

PubMed

Phenotypes for a gene deletion are often revealed only when the mutation is tested in a particular genetic background or environmental condition(1,2). There are examples where many genes need to be deleted to unmask hidden gene functions(3,4). Despite the potential for important discoveries, genetic interactions involving three or more genes are largely unexplored. Exhaustive searches of multi-mutant interactions would be impractical due to the sheer number of possible combinations of deletions. However, studies of selected sets of genes, such as sets of paralogs with a greater a priori chance of sharing a common function, would be informative. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, gene knockout is accomplished by replacing a gene with a selectable marker via homologous recombination. Because the number of markers is limited, methods have been developed for removing and reusing the same marker(5,6,7,8,9,10). However, sequentially engineering multiple mutations using these methods is time-consuming because the time required scales linearly with the number of deletions to be generated. Here we describe the Green Monster method for routinely engineering multiple deletions in yeast(11). In this method, a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter integrated into deletions is used to quantitatively label strains according to the number of deletions contained in each strain (Figure 1). Repeated rounds of assortment of GFP-marked deletions via yeast mating and meiosis coupled with flow-cytometric enrichment of strains carrying more of these deletions lead to the accumulation of deletions in strains (Figure 2). Performing multiple processes in parallel, with each process incorporating one or more deletions per round, reduces the time required for strain construction. The first step is to prepare haploid single-mutants termed 'ProMonsters,' each of which carries a GFP reporter in a deleted locus and one of the 'toolkit' loci-either Green Monster GMToolkit-a or GMToolkit-? at the can1? locus (Figure 3). Using strains from the yeast deletion collection(12), GFP-marked deletions can be conveniently generated by replacing the common KanMX4 cassette existing in these strains with a universal GFP-URA3 fragment. Each GMToolkit contains: either the a- or ?-mating-type-specific haploid selection marker(1) and exactly one of the two markers that, when both GMToolkits are present, collectively allow for selection of diploids. The second step is to carry out the sexual cycling through which deletion loci can be combined within a single cell by the random assortment and/or meiotic recombination that accompanies each cycle of mating and sporulation. PMID:23271437

Suzuki, Yo; Stam, Jason; Novotny, Mark; Yachie, Nozomu; Lasken, Roger S; Roth, Frederick P

2012-01-01

214

Modelling the Yeast Interactome  

PubMed Central

The topology behind biological interaction networks has been studied for over a decade. Yet, there is no definite agreement on the theoretical models which best describe protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Such models are critical to quantifying the significance of any empirical observation regarding those networks. Here, we perform a comprehensive analysis of yeast PPI networks in order to gain insights into their topology and its dependency on interaction-screening technology. We find that: (1) interaction-detection technology has little effect on the topology of PPI networks; (2) topology of these interaction networks differs in organisms with different cellular complexity (human and yeast); (3) clear topological difference is present between PPI networks, their functional sub-modules, and their inter-functional “linkers”; (4) high confidence PPI networks have more “geometrical” topology compared to predicted, incomplete, or noisy PPI networks; and (5) inter-functional “linker” proteins serve as mediators in signal transduction, transport, regulation and organisational cellular processes. PMID:24589662

Janji?, Vuk; Sharan, Roded; Pržulj, Nataša

2014-01-01

215

Cell-cell recognition in yeast: purification of Hansenula wingei 21-cell sexual agglutination factor and comparison of the factors from three genera.  

PubMed

Trypsin digestion of Hansenula wingei 21-cells releases a protein (21-factor-T) that inhibits the agglutination of 21-cells by purified 5-agglutinin obtained from 5-cells by subtilisin digestion [Crandall, M. A. & Brock, T. D. (1968) Bacteriol. Rev. 32, 139-163]. We have purified this inhibitor 415-fold by ion-exchange chromatography, affinity adsorption to 5-cells, and gel permeation chromatography. The material shows a diffuse band, on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate, with an apparent M(r) of 27,000. It has a pI of 3.8, is rich in acidic amino acids, contains 5% mannose and a trace of glucosamine, and is stable to reducing agents but is inactivated by heat. Zymolyase (beta1-->3-glucanase) digestion of 21-cells releases a similar inhibitor that, after purification, has a larger size than 21-factor-T. This 21-factor-Z appears to contain an additional portion that may serve to anchor 21-factor in the cell wall. Haploid cells of the yeasts Pichia amethionina and Saccharomyces kluyveri also show a constitutive sexual agglutination, and little or no crossreactivity is observed in heterologous mixtures. The agglutination factors in all three genera, however, have parallel properties; one cell type of each pair is heat stable and is inactivated by reducing agents (H. wingei 5-cells, P. amethionina alpha-cells, and S. kluyveri 16-cells), and the other is heat labile and is unaffected by reducing agents H. wingei 21-cells, P. amethionina a-cells, and S. kluyveri 17-cells). Because S. kluyveri 16-cells respond to Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-factor with the typical morphogenetic change of a mating half-reaction, the heat-stable agglutinin appears related to the S. cerevisiae a mating type and the heat-labile factor to the S. cerevisiae alpha mating type. PMID:6928623

Burke, D; Mendonça-Previato, L; Ballou, C E

1980-01-01

216

Effective switching frequency multiplier inverter  

DOEpatents

A switching frequency multiplier inverter for low inductance machines that uses parallel connection of switches and each switch is independently controlled according to a pulse width modulation scheme. The effective switching frequency is multiplied by the number of switches connected in parallel while each individual switch operates within its limit of switching frequency. This technique can also be used for other power converters such as DC/DC, AC/DC converters.

Su, Gui-Jia (Oak Ridge, TN); Peng, Fang Z. (Okemos, MI)

2007-08-07

217

Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

218

Lager Yeast Comes of Age  

PubMed Central

Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This “web of life” recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

2014-01-01

219

Lager yeast comes of age.  

PubMed

Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This "web of life" recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

Wendland, Jürgen

2014-10-01

220

Yeasts: From genetics to biotechnology  

SciTech Connect

Yeasts have been known and used in food and alcoholic fermentations ever since the Neolithic Age. In more recent times, on the basis of their peculiar features and history, yeasts have become very important experimental models in both microbiological and genetic research, as well as the main characters in many fermentative production processes. In the last 40 years, advances in molecular biology and genetic engineering have made possible not only the genetic selection of organisms, but also the genetic modification of some of them, especially the simplest of them, such as bacteria and yeasts. These discoveries have led to the availability of new yeast strains fit to fulfill requests of industrial production and fermentation. Moreover, genetically modified and transformed yeasts have been constructed that are able to produce large amounts of biologically active proteins and enzymes. Thus, recombinant yeasts make it easier to produce drugs, biologically active products, diagnostics, and vaccines, by inexpensive and relatively simple techniques. Yeasts are going to become more and more important in the {open_quotes}biotechnological revolution{close_quotes} by virtue of both their features and their very long and safe use in human nutrition and industry. 175 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Russo, S.; Poli, G. [Univ. of Milan (Italy); Siman-Tov, R.B. [Univ. of Jerusalem, Rehovot (Israel)

1995-12-31

221

Solid state switch  

DOEpatents

A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA); Dreifuerst, Gary R. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01

222

Thermally actuated thermionic switch  

DOEpatents

A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

1982-09-30

223

Thermally actuated thermionic switch  

DOEpatents

A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

Barrus, Donald M. (San Jose, CA); Shires, Charles D. (San Jose, CA)

1988-01-01

224

Marine yeast isolation and industrial application  

PubMed Central

Over the last century, terrestrial yeasts have been widely used in various industries, such as baking, brewing, wine, bioethanol and pharmaceutical protein production. However, only little attention has been given to marine yeasts. Recent research showed that marine yeasts have several unique and promising features over the terrestrial yeasts, for example higher osmosis tolerance, higher special chemical productivity and production of industrial enzymes. These indicate that marine yeasts have great potential to be applied in various industries. This review gathers the most recent techniques used for marine yeast isolation as well as the latest applications of marine yeast in bioethanol, pharmaceutical and enzyme production fields. PMID:24738708

Zaky, Abdelrahman Saleh; Tucker, Gregory A; Daw, Zakaria Yehia; Du, Chenyu

2014-01-01

225

Reusable fast opening switch  

DOEpatents

A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and insulating states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

Van Devender, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); Emin, David (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01

226

Reusable fast opening switch  

DOEpatents

A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

1983-12-21

227

Alarm toe switch  

DOEpatents

An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit n a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch. The reed switch is hermetically sealed with the magnet acting through the wall so the switch assembly S is capable of reliable operation even in wet and corrosive environments.

Ganyard, Floyd P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1982-01-01

228

Molecular Genetic Analysis in Yeast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The four exercises presented here use basic and advanced procedures of recombinant DNA technology to perform molecular genetic analysis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Their fulluse is intended for a senior-level molecular genetics (or similar) course; however, Experiments 1, 2, and 4 are appropriate for lower-level courses. It is expected that the instructor will have some familiarity with the concepts and terminology of recombinant DNA technology and with yeast genetics.

Daniel D. Burke (Seton Hall University; )

1989-06-06

229

Reflective HTS switch  

DOEpatents

A HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time. 6 figs.

Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.

1994-09-27

230

Reflective HTS switch  

SciTech Connect

A HTS switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time.

Martens, Jon S. (Albuquerque, NM); Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Hohenwarter, Gert K. G. (Madison, WI)

1994-01-01

231

The Electrical Switch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is inquiry-based in that students will perform the activity before they formally learn about how a switch works. They will use a multimeter to discover the different settings on a triple-throw switch. The teacher should show the students how

Michael Horton

2009-05-30

232

Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

233

Study of amyloids using yeast  

PubMed Central

Summary Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism in such fields as the cell cycle, regulation of transcription, protein trafficking and cell biology, primarily because of its ease of genetic manipulation. This is no less so in the area of amyloid studies. The endogenous yeast amyloids described to date include prions, infectious proteins (Table 1), and some cell wall proteins (1). and amyloids of humans and a fungal prion have also been studied using the yeast system. Accordingly, the emphasis of this chapter will be on genetic, biochemical, cell biological and physical methods particularly useful in the study of yeast prions and other amyloids studied in yeast. We limit our description of these methods to those aspects which have been most useful in studying yeast prions, citing more detailed expositions in the literature. Volumes on yeast genetics methods (2–4), and on amyloids and prions (5, 6) are useful, and Masison has edited a volume of Methods on “Identification, analysis and characterization of fungal prions” which covers some of this territory (7). We also outline some useful physical methods, pointing the reader to more extensive and authoratative descriptions. PMID:22528100

Wickner, Reed B.; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Shewmaker, Frank; McGlinchey, Ryan; Edskes, Herman K.

2012-01-01

234

Erected mirror optical switch  

DOEpatents

A microelectromechanical (MEM) optical switching apparatus is disclosed that is based on an erectable mirror which is formed on a rotatable stage using surface micromachining. An electrostatic actuator is also formed on the substrate to rotate the stage and mirror with a high angular precision. The mirror can be erected manually after fabrication of the device and used to redirect an incident light beam at an arbitrary angel and to maintain this state in the absence of any applied electrical power. A 1.times.N optical switch can be formed using a single rotatable mirror. In some embodiments of the present invention, a plurality of rotatable mirrors can be configured so that the stages and mirrors rotate in unison when driven by a single micromotor thereby forming a 2.times.2 optical switch which can be used to switch a pair of incident light beams, or as a building block to form a higher-order optical switch.

Allen, James J.

2005-06-07

235

Suppressors of Defective Silencing in Yeast: Effects on Transcriptional Repression at the Hmr Locus, Cell Growth and Telomere Structure  

PubMed Central

To identify factors that affect transcriptional silencing at the HMR mating-type locus in yeast, we characterized a set of extragenic suppressor mutations that restore metastable repression in cells containing both a mutant silencer-binding protein (rap1(s)) and a mutated silencer element (hmr?A). A total of 57 suppressors comprising 21 different complementation groups was identified. This report describes a detailed genetic analysis of these suppressors of defective silencing (sds) mutants. The sds mutants fall into several distinct categories based on secondary phenotypes, such as their ability to suppress the rap1(s) telomere lengthening phenotype, general effects on telomere length, temperature-dependent growth defects, and the ability to bypass the requirement for cis regulatory elements at the HMR-E silencer. One particular mutant, sds4-1, strongly suppresses the rap1(s) silencing defect, restores telomeres to nearly wild-type length, and displays a severe growth defect at all temperatures. SDS4 mutations also suppress the silencing defect caused by mutations in the RAP1-interacting factor RIF1. We cloned the SDS4 gene and show that it is identical to GAL11(SPT13), which encodes a component of a protein complex that mediates transcriptional activation. Possible mechanism(s) of suppression by sds4 and the other sds mutations is discussed. PMID:8582633

Sussel, L.; Vannier, D.; Shore, D.

1995-01-01

236

Metabolic regulation of yeast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

Fiechter, A.

1982-12-01

237

Riboneogenesis in yeast  

PubMed Central

Summary Gluconeogenesis converts three carbon units into glucose. Here we identify an analogous pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for converting three carbon units into ribose, a component of nucleic acids and nucleotides. This riboneogenic pathway involves the enzyme sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase (SHB17), whose activity was identified based on accumulation of sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphate in the corresponding knockout strain. We determined the crystal structure of Shb17 in complex with sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphate, and found that the sugar is bound in the closed furan form in the active site. Like fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphate is produced by aldolase, in this case from erythrose 4-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate. Hydrolysis of sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphate by SHB17 provides an energetically favorable input to the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway to drive ribose production. Flux through SHB17 is enhanced under conditions when ribose demand is high relative to demand for NADPH, including during ribosome biogenesis in metabolically synchronized yeast cells. Thus, riboneogenesis provides a thermodynamically-driven route of ribose production uncoupled from formation of NADPH. PMID:21663798

Clasquin, Michelle F.; Melamud, Eugene; Singer, Alexander; Gooding, Jessica R.; Xu, Xiaohui; Dong, Aiping; Cui, Hong; Campagna, Shawn R.; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Caudy, Amy A.

2011-01-01

238

Yeast and cancer cells – common principles in lipid metabolism  

PubMed Central

One of the paradigms in cancer pathogenesis is the requirement of a cell to undergo transformation from respiration to aerobic glycolysis – the Warburg effect – to become malignant. The demands of a rapidly proliferating cell for carbon metabolites for the synthesis of biomass, energy and redox equivalents, are fundamentally different from the requirements of a differentiated, quiescent cell, but it remains open whether this metabolic switch is a cause or a consequence of malignant transformation. One of the major requirements is the synthesis of lipids for membrane formation to allow for cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and cytokinesis. Enzymes involved in lipid metabolism were indeed found to play a major role in cancer cell proliferation, and most of these enzymes are conserved in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most notably, cancer cell physiology and metabolic fluxes are very similar to those in the fermenting and rapidly proliferating yeast. Both types of cells display highly active pathways for the synthesis of fatty acids and their incorporation into complex lipids, and imbalances in synthesis or turnover of lipids affect growth and viability of both yeast and cancer cells. Thus, understanding lipid metabolism in S. cerevisiae during cell cycle progression and cell proliferation may complement recent efforts to understand the importance and fundamental regulatory mechanisms of these pathways in cancer. PMID:22989772

Natter, Klaus; Kohlwein, Sepp D.

2013-01-01

239

Optical Circuit Switched Protocol  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present invention is a system and method embodied in an optical circuit switched protocol for the transmission of data through a network. The optical circuit switched protocol is an all-optical circuit switched network and includes novel optical switching nodes for transmitting optical data packets within a network. Each optical switching node comprises a detector for receiving the header, header detection logic for translating the header into routing information and eliminating the header, and a controller for receiving the routing information and configuring an all optical path within the node. The all optical path located within the node is solely an optical path without having electronic storage of the data and without having optical delay of the data. Since electronic storage of the header is not necessary and the initial header is eliminated by the first detector of the first switching node. multiple identical headers are sent throughout the network so that subsequent switching nodes can receive and read the header for setting up an optical data path.

Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor)

2000-01-01

240

Factors affecting the morphogenetic switch in Yarrowia lipolytica.  

PubMed

Yarrowia lipolytica is a dimorphic yeast usually isolated from dairy products. Here we described methods for inducing in a homogeneous way a true yeast-hypha transition in liquid medium. As a first step, the cells must be synchronized in the G1 phase of the cell cycle by nitrogen starvation. Using either N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) or serum as the only carbon sources, more than 90% of the cells form hypha after 4-6 h of incubation. Bovine albumin is also able to induce the yeast-hypha transition, although to a lesser extent. The addition of glucose to cultures growing with GlcNAc arrest the morphogenetic switch but not when added to cultures growing in the presence of serum. Serum also induces invasive growth in solid medium. Neither pH, nitrogen starvation, nor temperature play a relevant role in the morphogenetic switch. Our results suggest that, as occurs in Candida albicans, at least two morphogenetic signal pathways exist in Y. lipolytica. PMID:11685511

Pérez-Campo, F M; Domínguez, A

2001-12-01

241

Solid state switch  

DOEpatents

A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

1994-07-19

242

Telecommunications: Switches and Hubs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We all know how important computers are in our every day communication, but do you know how the computer in your office transfers information between the others? This online slideshow provided by Wisc-Online and the National Science Foundation explains the difference between a switch and a hub and the reasons to use them. For example, with helpful animations and a personalized speed, one can learn that hubs often cause broadcast collisions and are less efficient than switches when trying to send information quickly among networked computers. This is great for students and teachers introducing switches and hubs to their telecommunications repertoire.

Bartelt, Terry L. M.

243

Photoconductive switch package  

DOEpatents

A photoconductive switch is formed of a substrate that has a central portion of SiC or other photoconductive material and an outer portion of cvd-diamond or other suitable material surrounding the central portion. Conducting electrodes are formed on opposed sides of the substrate, with the electrodes extending beyond the central portion and the edges of the electrodes lying over the outer portion. Thus any high electric fields produced at the edges of the electrodes lie outside of and do not affect the central portion, which is the active switching element. Light is transmitted through the outer portion to the central portion to actuate the switch.

Ca[rasp, George J

2013-10-22

244

Yeast Genetics and Biotechnological Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Yeast can be recognized as one of the very important groups of microorganisms on account of its extensive use in the fermentation industry and as a basic eukaryotic model cellular system. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively used to elucidate the genetics and regulation of several key functions in the cell such as cell mating, electron transport chain, protein trafficking, cell cycle events and others. Even before the genome sequence of the yeast was out, the structural organization and function of several of its genes was known. With the availability of the origin of replication from the 2 ?m plasmid and the development of transformation system, it became the host of choice for expression of a number of important proteins. A large number of episomal and integrative shuttle vectors are available for expression of mammalian proteins. The latest developments in genomics and micro-array technology have allowed investigations of individual gene function by site-specific deletion method. The application of metabolic profiling has also assisted in understanding the cellular network operating in this yeast. This chapter is aimed at reviewing the use of this system as an experimental tool for conducting classical genetics. Various vector systems available, foreign genes expressed and the limitations as a host will be discussed. Finally, the use of various yeast enzymes in biotechnology sector will be reviewed.

Mishra, Saroj; Baranwal, Richa

245

Nuclear Transport of Yeast Proteasomes  

PubMed Central

Proteasomes are conserved protease complexes enriched in the nuclei of dividing yeast cells, a major site for protein degradation. If yeast cells do not proliferate and transit to quiescence, metabolic changes result in the dissociation of proteasomes into proteolytic core and regulatory complexes and their sequestration into motile cytosolic proteasome storage granuli. These granuli rapidly clear with the resumption of growth, releasing the stored proteasomes, which relocalize back to the nucleus to promote cell cycle progression. Here, I report on three models of how proteasomes are transported from the cytoplasm into the nucleus of yeast cells. The first model applies for dividing yeast and is based on the canonical pathway using classical nuclear localization sequences of proteasomal subcomplexes and the classical import receptor importin/karyopherin ??. The second model applies for quiescent yeast cells, which resume growth and use Blm10, a HEAT-like repeat protein structurally related to karyopherin ?, for nuclear import of proteasome core particles. In the third model, the fully-assembled proteasome is imported into the nucleus. Our still marginal knowledge about proteasome dynamics will inspire the discussion on how protein degradation by proteasomes may be regulated in different cellular compartments of dividing and quiescent eukaryotic cells. PMID:25333764

Enenkel, Cordula

2014-01-01

246

Activation of Silent Replication Origins at Autonomously Replicating Sequence Elements near the HML Locus in Budding Yeast  

PubMed Central

In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, replicators can function outside the chromosome as autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) elements; however, within chromosome III, certain ARSs near the transcriptionally silent HML locus show no replication origin activity. Two of these ARSs comprise the transcriptional silencers E (ARS301) and I (ARS302). Another, ARS303, resides between HML and the CHA1 gene, and its function is not known. Here we further localized and characterized ARS303 and in the process discovered a new ARS, ARS320. Both ARS303 and ARS320 are competent as chromosomal replication origins since origin activity was seen when they were inserted at a different position in chromosome III. However, at their native locations, where the two ARSs are in a cluster with ARS302, the I silencer, no replication origin activity was detected regardless of yeast mating type, special growth conditions that induce the transcriptionally repressed CHA1 gene, trans-acting mutations that abrogate transcriptional silencing at HML (sir3, orc5), or cis-acting mutations that delete the E and I silencers containing ARS elements. These results suggest that, for the HML ARS cluster (ARS303, ARS320, and ARS302), inactivity of origins is independent of local transcriptional silencing, even though origins and silencers share key cis- and trans-acting components. Surprisingly, deletion of active replication origins located 25 kb (ORI305) and 59 kb (ORI306) away led to detection of replication origin function at the HML ARS cluster, as well as at ARS301, the E silencer. Thus, replication origin silencing at HML ARSs is mediated by active replication origins residing at long distances from HML in the chromosome. The distal active origins are known to fire early in S phase, and we propose that their inactivation delays replication fork arrival at HML, providing additional time for HML ARSs to fire as origins. PMID:10454557

Vujcic, Marija; Miller, Charles A.; Kowalski, David

1999-01-01

247

Plasmonic enhanced ultrafast switch.  

SciTech Connect

Ultrafast electronic switches fabricated from defective material have been used for several decades in order to produce picosecond electrical transients and TeraHertz radiation. Due to the ultrashort recombination time in the photoconductor materials used, these switches are inefficient and are ultimately limited by the amount of optical power that can be applied to the switch before self-destruction. The goal of this work is to create ultrafast (sub-picosecond response) photoconductive switches on GaAs that are enhanced through plasmonic coupling structures. Here, the plasmonic coupler primarily plays the role of being a radiation condenser which will cause carriers to be generated adjacent to metallic electrodes where they can more efficiently be collected.

Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Harris, Tom.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Barrick, Todd A.

2009-09-01

248

Basics of Safety Switches  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This course is one of the quickStep series offered by Siemens in Safety Switches. These are FREE on-line industrial knowledge building tutorials. quickSTEPs are a great start for industry novices moving into technical jobs or staff in operational support rolls. They can also be very effectively used as out of class assignments for review or to build fundamental skills. Each course includes: an online tutorial organized as a number of units, lessons with self check quiz questions, a glossary of terms, a self-check final exam with scoring, an extensive downloadable PDF study guide. This course offers: current protection, fuses, enclosures, switch design, switch terminology, safety switches, a final exam, a glossary and a 72 page study guide.

249

Cygnus Water Switch Jitter  

SciTech Connect

The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources - Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following x-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rad at 1 m, 50-ns Full Width Half Max. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests which are performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse–forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance is jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the diode pulse. Therefore, PFL switch jitter contributes to shot-to-shot variation in source endpoint energy and dose. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and give the correlation with diode performance. For this analysis the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition to this analysis, PFL switch performance for different switch gap settings taken recently will be examined. Lastly, implications of source jitter for radiographic diagnosis of subcritical shots will be discussed.

Charles V. Mitton, George D. Corrow, Mark D. Hansen, David J. Henderson, et al.

2008-03-01

250

Cygnus PFL Switch Jitter  

SciTech Connect

The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources: Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following X-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rads at 1 m, 50-ns full-widthhalf-maximum. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are Marx generator, water-filled pulse forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, threecell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance may be jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the source X-ray spectrum and dose. Therefore, PFL switch jitter may contribute to shot-to-shot variation in these parameters, which are crucial to radiographic quality. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and present the correlation with dose. For this analysis, the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting, which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition the PFL switch performance for one larger switch gap setting will be examined.

C. Mitton, G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, et al.

2007-07-21

251

Switching power supply filter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A filter for a switching power supply. The filter includes a common mode inductor with coil configurations allowing differential mode current from a dc source to pass through but attenuating common mode noise from the power supply so that the noise does not reach the dc source. The invention also includes the use of feed through capacitors at the switching power supply input terminals to provide further high-frequency noise attenuation.

Kumar, Prithvi R. (Inventor); Abare, Wayne (Inventor)

1989-01-01

252

High Power Switching Transistor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Improved switching transistors handle 400-A peak currents and up to 1,200 V. Using large diameter silicon wafers with twice effective area as D60T, form basis for D7 family of power switching transistors. Package includes npn wafer, emitter preform, and base-contact insert. Applications are: 25to 50-kilowatt high-frequency dc/dc inverters, VSCF converters, and motor controllers for electrical vehicles.

Hower, P. L.; Kao, Y. C.; Carnahan, D. C.

1983-01-01

253

ORIGINAL PAPER Evolutionarily engineered ethanologenic yeast detoxifies  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL PAPER Evolutionarily engineered ethanologenic yeast detoxifies lignocellulosic biomass with subsequent fermentation of ethanol, posing significant challenges for a sustainable cellulosic ethanol conversion industry. Numerous yeast genes were found to be associated with the inhibitor tolerance. However

Song, Joe

254

PHYLOGENETICS OF SACCHAROMYCETALES, THE ASCOMYCETE YEASTS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Ascomycete yeasts (Phylum Ascomycota: Subphylum Saccharomycotina: Class Saccharomycetes: Order Saccharomycetales) comprise a monophyletic lineage with a single order of about 1000 known species. These yeasts live as saprobes, often in association with plants, animals, and their interfaces. A few s...

255

Bacteria, Yeast and Chemicals on Human Skin  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... the lower right-hand corner of the player. Bacteria, Yeast and Chemicals on Human Skin HealthDay April ... the distribution and quantity of metabolites, peptides, lipids, bacteria, yeast, proteins, chemicals and more. As expected, many ...

256

A CMOS Switched Transconductor Mixer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new CMOS active mixer topology can operate at low supply voltages by the use of switches exclusively connected to the supply voltages. Such switches require less voltage headroom and avoid gate-oxide reliability problems. Mixing is achieved by exploiting two transconductors with cross-coupled outputs, which are alternatingly activated by the switches. For ideal switching, the operation is equivalent to a

Eric A. M. Klumperink; Simon M. Louwsma; Gerard J. M. Wienk; Bram Nauta

2004-01-01

257

Cdc42 Oscillations in Yeasts  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A fundamental problem in cell biology is how cells define one or several discrete sites of polarity. Through mechanisms involving positive and negative feedback, the small Rho-family guanosine triphosphatase Cdc42 breaks symmetry in round budding yeast cells to define a single site of polarized cell growth. However, it is not clear how cells can define multiple sites of polarization concurrently. We discuss a study in which rod-shaped fission yeast cells, which naturally polarize growth at their two cell ends, exhibited oscillations of Cdc42 activity between these sites. We compare these findings with similar oscillatory behavior of Cdc42 detected in budding yeast cells and discuss the possible mechanism and functional outputs of these oscillations.

Felipe O. Bendezu (Switzerland; University of Lausanne REV)

2012-12-04

258

Sorption of grape proanthocyanidins and wine polyphenols by yeasts, inactivated yeasts, and yeast cell walls.  

PubMed

Inactivated yeast fractions (IYFs) can be used in enology to improve the stability and mouthfeel of red wines. However, information concerning the mechanisms involved and the impact of the IYF characteristics is scarce. Adsorption isotherms were used to investigate interactions between grape proanthocyanidin fractions (PAs) or wine polyphenols (WP) and a commercial yeast strain (Y), the inactivated yeast (IY), the yeast submitted to autolyzis and inactivation (A-IY), and the cell walls obtained by mechanical disruption (CW). High affinity isotherms and high adsorption capacities were observed for grape PAs and whole cells (Y, IY, and A-IY). Affinity and adsorbed amount were lower with wine PAs, due to chemical changes occurring during winemaking. By contrast to whole cells, grape PAs and WP adsorption on CW remained very low. This raises the issue of the part played by cell walls in the interactions between yeast and proanthocyanidins and suggests the passage of the latter through the wall pores and their interaction with the plasma membrane. PMID:25575250

Mekoue Nguela, J; Sieczkowski, N; Roi, S; Vernhet, A

2015-01-21

259

Thiol-Based Redox Switches and Gene Regulation  

PubMed Central

Abstract Cysteine is notable among the universal, proteinogenic amino acids for its facile redox chemistry. Cysteine thiolates are readily modified by reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive electrophilic species (RES), and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Although thiol switches are commonly triggered by disulfide bond formation, they can also be controlled by S-thiolation, S-alkylation, or modification by RNS. Thiol-based switches are common in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and activate functions that detoxify reactive species and restore thiol homeostasis while repressing functions that would be deleterious if expressed under oxidizing conditions. Here, we provide an overview of the best-understood examples of thiol-based redox switches that affect gene expression. Intra- or intermolecular disulfide bond formation serves as a direct regulatory switch for several bacterial transcription factors (OxyR, OhrR/2-Cys, Spx, YodB, CrtJ, and CprK) and indirectly regulates others (the RsrA anti-? factor and RegB sensory histidine kinase). In eukaryotes, thiol-based switches control the yeast Yap1p transcription factor, the Nrf2/Keap1 electrophile and oxidative stress response, and the Chlamydomonas NAB1 translational repressor. Collectively, these regulators reveal a remarkable range of chemical modifications exploited by Cys residues to effect changes in gene expression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1049—1063. PMID:20626317

2011-01-01

260

Yeast: A Research Organism for Teaching Genetics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains why laboratory strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are particularly suited for classroom science activities. Describes the sexual life cycle of yeast and the genetic system with visible mutations. Presents an overview of activities that can be done with yeast and gives a source for teachers to obtain more information. (PR)

Manney, Thomas R.; Manney, Monta L.

1992-01-01

261

A radiation hard vacuum switch  

DOEpatents

A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

Boettcher, G.E.

1988-07-19

262

Low inductance gas switching.  

SciTech Connect

The laser trigger switch (LTS) is a key component in ZR-type pulsed power systems. In ZR, the pulse rise time through the LTS is > 200 ns and additional stages of pulse compression are required to achieve the desired <100 ns rise time. The inductance of the LTS ({approx}500nH) in large part determines the energy transfer time through the switch and there is much to be gained in improving system performance and reducing system costs by reducing this inductance. The current path through the cascade section of the ZR LTS is at a diameter of {approx} 6-inches which is certainly not optimal from an inductance point of view. The LTS connects components of much greater diameter (typically 4-5 feet). In this LDRD the viability of switch concepts in which the diameter of cascade section is greatly increased have been investigated. The key technical question to be answered was, will the desired multi-channel behavior be maintained in a cascade section of larger diameter. This LDRD proceeded in 2 distinct phases. The original plan for the LDRD was to develop a promising switch concept and then design, build, and test a moderate scale switch which would demonstrate the key features of the concept. In phase I, a switch concept which meet all electrical design criteria and had a calculated inductance of 150 nH was developed. A 1.5 MV test switch was designed and fabrication was initiated. The LDRD was then redirected due to budgetary concerns. The fabrication of the switch was halted and the focus of the LDRD was shifted to small scale experiments designed to answer the key technical question concerning multi-channel behavior. In phase II, the Multi-channel switch test bed (MCST) was designed and constructed. The purpose of MCST was to provide a versatile, fast turn around facility for the study the multi-channel electrical breakdown behavior of a ZR type cascade switch gap in a parameter space near that of a ZR LTS. Parameter scans on source impedance, gap tilt, gap spacing and electrode diameter were conducted.

Chavez, Ray; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Wallace, Zachariah; Elizondo, Juan E.

2007-10-01

263

Overexpression of multisubunit replication factors in yeast.  

PubMed

Facile genetic and biochemical manipulation coupled with rapid cell growth and low cost of growth media has established the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a versatile workhorse. This article describes the use of yeast expression systems for the overproduction of complex multipolypeptide replication factors. The regulated overexpression of these factors in yeast provides for a readily accessible and inexpensive source of these factors in large quantities. The methodology is illustrated with the five-subunit replication factor C. Whole-cell extracts are prepared by blending yeast cells with glass beads or frozen yeast with dry ice. Procedures are described that maximize the yield of these factors while minimizing proteolytic degradation. PMID:10454996

Burgers, P M

1999-07-01

264

Switching power pulse system  

DOEpatents

A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source to a load using a storage capacitor charged through a rectifier, and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch and voltage comparator. A thyristor is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor and fractional turn saturable transformer having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n = n[sup 2]. The saturable reactor functions as a soaker'' while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor into the load through the coupling capacitor. The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core having two secondary windings tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network. To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core is provided around the resistive beampipe to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance until it is fully charged. 5 figs.

Aaland, K.

1983-08-09

265

Thermionic gas switch  

DOEpatents

The present invention is directed to an improved temperature responsive thermionic gas switch utilizing a hollow cathode and a folded emitter surface area. The folded emitter surface area of the thermionic switch substantially increases the on/off ratio by changing the conduction surface area involved in the two modes thereof. The improved switch of this invention provides an on/off ratio of 450:1 compared to the 10:1 ratio of the prior known thermionic switch, while providing for adjusting the on current. In the improved switch of this invention the conduction area is made small in the off mode, while in the on mode the conduction area is made large. This is achieved by utilizing a folded hollow cathode configuration and utilizing a folded emitter surface area, and by making the dimensions of the folds small enough so that a space charge will develop in the convolutions of the folds and suppress unignited current, thus limiting the current carrying surface in the off mode.

Hatch, G.L.; Brummond, W.A.; Barrus, D.M.

1984-04-05

266

Molecular Genetic Analysis in Yeast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource provides techniques and protocols used in basic and advanced procedures of recombinant DNA technology to perform molecular genetic analysis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Students will be exposed to techniques such as transformation, restriction endonuclease digestion, electrophoresis and Southern blot analysis.

Daniel D. Burke (Seton Hall University; )

1990-01-01

267

Barcoding the Yeasts – Which Genes?  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Old style yeast identification, as many know, is an onerous process requiring determination of growth reactions on 60-100 different media. Once completed, there is still a high degree of uncertainty about species identity. With the determination of sequences for domains 1 and 2 (D1/D2) of the nucl...

268

Yeast Proteomics and Protein Microarrays  

PubMed Central

Our understanding of biological processes as well as human diseases has improved greatly thanks to studies on model organisms such as yeast. The power of scientific approaches with yeast lies in its relatively simple genome, its facile classical and molecular genetics, as well as the evolutionary conservation of many basic biological mechanisms. However, even in this simple model organism, systems biology studies, especially proteomic studies had been an intimidating task. During the past decade, powerful high-throughput technologies in proteomic research have been developed for yeast including protein microarray technology. The protein microarray technology allows the interrogation of protein-protein, protein-DNA, protein-small molecule interaction networks as well as post-translational modification networks in a large-scale, high-throughput manner. With this technology, many groundbreaking findings have been established in studies with the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, most of which could have been unachievable with traditional approaches. Discovery of these networks has profound impact on explicating biological processes with a proteomic point of view, which may lead to a better understanding of normal biological phenomena as well as various human diseases. PMID:20728591

Chen, Rui; Snyder, Michael

2010-01-01

269

[Heterologous interferons synthesis in yeast Pichia pastoris].  

PubMed

The HuIFNA16, HuIFNB, and BoIFNG genes encoding human [alpha]16, beta-interferons and bovine gamma-interferon were cloned under the control of the yeast Pichia pastoris AOX1 gene promoter. The yeast strains producing heterologous interferons intracellularly and extracellularly were constructed. There was no effect of high level of heterologous protein synthesis on the yeast P. pastoris cell growth, unlike yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The considerable part of the heterologous interferons was detected in the yeast P. pastoris soluble protein fraction but not in the "inclusion bodies." The treatment of human beta-interferon with endoglycosidase H showed that protein was expressed in glycosilated and unglycosilated forms. On the strength of these data, the hypothesis was suggested that the more effective heterologous gene expression in yeast P. pastoris and enhanced resistance of the methylotrophic yeast to negative effects of recombinant proteins was due to the special features of its metabolism. PMID:20873170

Padkina, M V; Parfenova, L V; Gradoboeva, A E; Sambuk, E V

2010-01-01

270

Switching power supply  

DOEpatents

The invention is a repratable capacitor charging, switching power supply. A ferrite transformer steps up a dc input. The transformer primary is in a full bridge configuration utilizing power MOSFETs as the bridge switches. The transformer secondary is fed into a high voltage, full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The transformer is designed to provide adequate leakage inductance to limit capacitor current. The MOSFETs are switched to the variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor from 0.6 kV. The peak current in a transformer primary and secondary is controlled by increasing the pulse width as the capacitor charges. A digital ripple counter counts pulses and after a preselected desired number is reached an up-counter is clocked.

Mihalka, A.M.

1984-06-05

271

SWITCH user's manual  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The planning program, SWITCH, and its surrounding changed-goal-replanning program, Runaround, are described. The evolution of SWITCH and Runaround from an earlier planner, DEVISER, is recounted. SWITCH's plan representation, and its process of building a plan by backward chaining with strict chronological backtracking, are described. A guide for writing knowledge base files is provided, as are narrative guides for installing the program, running it, and interacting with it while it is running. Some utility functions are documented. For the sake of completeness, a narrative guide to the experimental discrepancy-replanning feature is provided. Appendices contain knowledge base files for a blocksworld domain, and a DRIBBLE file illustrating the output from, and user interaction with, the program in that domain.

1987-01-01

272

Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch  

DOEpatents

A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM); Schare, Joshua M. (Albuquerque, NM); Bunch, Kyle (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-05-11

273

Polariton Condensate Transistor Switch  

E-print Network

A polariton condensate transistor switch is realized through optical excitation of a microcavity ridge with two beams. The ballistically ejected polaritons from a condensate formed at the source are gated using the 20 times weaker second beam to switch on and off the flux of polaritons. In the absence of the gate beam the small built-in detuning creates potential landscape in which ejected polaritons are channelled toward the end of the ridge where they condense. The low loss photon-like propagation combined with strong nonlinearities associated with their excitonic component makes polariton based transistors particularly attractive for the implementation of all-optical integrated circuits.

Gao, T; Liew, T C H; Tsintzos, S I; Stavrinidis, G; Deligeorgis, G; Hatzopoulos, Z; Savvidis, P G

2012-01-01

274

Thermionic gas switch  

DOEpatents

A temperature responsive thermionic gas switch having folded electron emitting surfaces. An ionizable gas is located between the emitter and an interior surface of a collector, coaxial with the emitter. In response to the temperature exceeding a predetermined level, sufficient electrons are derived from the emitter to cause the gas in the gap between the emitter and collector to become ionized, whereby a very large increase in current in the gap occurs. Due to the folded emitter surface area of the switch, increasing the "on/off" current ratio and adjusting the "on" current capacity is accomplished.

Hatch, George L. (San Francisco, CA); Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Barrus, Donald M. (San Jose, CA)

1986-01-01

275

A nanophotonic switching cell  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a nanophotonic/nanometric switching cell to operate in the infrared and terahertz frequency range of telecommunications. This switching cell is based on a directional coupler made of two graphene nanoribbons separated in the vertical direction, which are embedded in a hexagonal boron nitride substrate. Theoretical analysis revealed that a graphene based nanophotonics coupler, initially working in the bar state (or cross state), can be brought into the cross state (or bar state), by modifying the graphene sheet chemical potential via the gate voltage. The analytical results are confirmed by the finite element method simulations and numerical analysis scripts.

Wirth L, A.; Sombra, A. S. B.

2014-10-01

276

36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS FROM OPERATOR'S POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

277

35. END VIEW, INTERIOR, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS, BERK SWITCH TOWER, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

35. END VIEW, INTERIOR, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

278

41. INTERIOR VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

41. INTERIOR VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH LEVER ASSEMBLAGE AND DISPLAY BOARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

279

43. OBLIQUE VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

43. OBLIQUE VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH LEVER ASSEMBLAGE AND DISPLAY BOARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

280

Switch Design to Enable Predictive Multiplexed Switching in Multiprocessor Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predictive multiplexed switching is a new approach for building interconnection switches for high perfor- mance parallel systems. This approach advocates sacrific- ing some link bandwidth in return for more efficient network control and simpler connection management. The main idea is to depart from the traditional packet and worm- hole switching in favor of row data communication over established communication pipes

Zhu Ding; Raymond R. Hoare; Alex K. Jones; Dan Li; Shou-kuo Shao; Shen-chien Tung; Jiang Zheng; Rami G. Melhem

2005-01-01

281

Dynamic switch matrix for the TDMA satellite switching system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Future high capacity satellite communication systems require signal processing on board satellites. The on-board signal processing includes switching of RF signals between multiple antennas to provide interconnection between the uplink and downlink beams. This paper describes the development of a dynamic switch matrix for a TDMA satellite switching system to be used in the next generation communications satellites. In this

P. T. Ho; J. H. Wisniewski; J. R. Pelose; H. M. Perasso

1982-01-01

282

Formulations for switching transformation matrices of large switched networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author describes formulations of switching transformation matrices (STMs) which express the discontinuities of the state variables at the switching instances in active switched networks. The formulations are derived by using the initial-value-theorem of the Laplace transformation. Charge and flux conservations are not used. It is clear that the discontinuities are related to the first component of special resolution, which

Mamoru Tanaka

1988-01-01

283

Mating-type heterokaryosis in Aspergillus flavus in North Carolina  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Aspergillus flavus is a well-known pathogen of many important agricultural commodities and is a major producer of aflatoxins (AFs), which are carcinogenic polyketides that pose a serious health risk to humans and animals. Recently, heterokaryosis and the presence of cryptic alleles were shown to ex...

284

Mating-type heterokaryosis and population shifts in Aspergillus flavus  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Aspergillus flavus is a fungal pathogen of many agronomically important crops worldwide. We sampled A. flavus strains from a cornfield in Rocky Mount, NC. This field was planted in 2010 and plots were inoculated at tasselling with either AF36 or NRRL 21882 (=Afla-Guard) biocontrol strains, both of...

285

Photonic MEMS switch applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As carriers and service providers continue their quest for profitable network solutions, they have shifted their focus from raw bandwidth to rapid provisioning, delivery and management of revenue generating services. Inherently transparent to data rate the transmission wavelength and data format, MEMS add scalability, reliability, low power and compact size providing flexible solutions to the management and/or fiber channels in long haul, metro, and access networks. MEMS based photonic switches have gone from the lab to commercial availability and are now currently in carrier trials and volume production. 2D MEMS switches offer low up-front deployment costs while remaining scalable to large arrays. They allow for transparent, native protocol transmission. 2D switches enable rapid service turn-up and management for many existing and emerging revenue rich services such as storage connectivity, optical Ethernet, wavelength leasing and optical VPN. As the network services evolve, the larger 3D MEMS switches, which provide greater scalability and flexibility, will become economically viable to serve the ever-increasing needs.

Husain, Anis

2001-07-01

286

Kiowa Creek Switching Station  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to construct, operate, and maintain a new Kiowa Creek Switching Station near Orchard in Morgan County, Colorado. Kiowa Creek Switching Station would consist of a fenced area of approximately 300 by 300 feet and contain various electrical equipment typical for a switching station. As part of this new construction, approximately one mile of an existing 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line will be removed and replaced with a double circuit overhead line. The project will also include a short (one-third mile) realignment of an existing line to permit connection with the new switching station. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing the procedural provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 40 CFR Parts 1500--1508, the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required for the proposed project. This determination is based on the information contained in this environmental assessment (EA) prepared by Western. The EA identifies and evaluates the environmental and socioeconomic effects of the proposed action, and concludes that the advance impacts on the human environment resulting from the proposed project would not be significant. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-03-01

287

Switching surface wettability properties  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, recent developments regarding design and preparation of surfaces to modify their wettability behavior by switching between the superhydrophobic and the superhydrophilic state under physical and chemical stimuli are summarized. The complex systems and the strategies developed in nature are investigated as a fundamental support considering the potential applications of these two ‘superstates’ in basic research and in

Michele Ferrari

2012-01-01

288

RNA switch at enhancers.  

PubMed

Polycomb/Trithorax response elements (PRE/TREs) are genetic elements that can stably silence or activate genes. A new study describes how long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) transcribed from opposite strands of the Drosophila melanogaster vestigial PRE/TRE throw the switch between these two opposing epigenetic states. PMID:25162802

Quinn, Jeffrey J; Chang, Howard Y

2014-09-01

289

Automatic thermal switch. [spacecraft applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes two thermally conductive plates and a thermally conductive switch saddle pivotally mounted to the first plate. A flexible heat carrier is connected between the switch saddle and the second plate. A phase-change power unit, including a piston coupled to the switch saddle, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element biases the switch saddle in a predetermined position with respect to the first plate. When the phase-change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first place, the piston extends and causes the switch saddle to pivot, thereby varying the thermal conduction between the two plates through the switch saddle and flexible heat carrier. The biasing element, switch saddle, and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally opened thermally conductive path between the two plates.

Cunningham, J. W.; Wing, L. D. (inventors)

1983-01-01

290

Molecular Rotors as Switches  

PubMed Central

The use of a functional molecular unit acting as a state variable provides an attractive alternative for the next generations of nanoscale electronics. It may help overcome the limits of conventional MOSFETd due to their potential scalability, low-cost, low variability, and highly integratable characteristics as well as the capability to exploit bottom-up self-assembly processes. This bottom-up construction and the operation of nanoscale machines/devices, in which the molecular motion can be controlled to perform functions, have been studied for their functionalities. Being triggered by external stimuli such as light, electricity or chemical reagents, these devices have shown various functions including those of diodes, rectifiers, memories, resonant tunnel junctions and single settable molecular switches that can be electronically configured for logic gates. Molecule-specific electronic switching has also been reported for several of these device structures, including nanopores containing oligo(phenylene ethynylene) monolayers, and planar junctions incorporating rotaxane and catenane monolayers for the construction and operation of complex molecular machines. A specific electrically driven surface mounted molecular rotor is described in detail in this review. The rotor is comprised of a monolayer of redox-active ligated copper compounds sandwiched between a gold electrode and a highly-doped P+ Si. This electrically driven sandwich-type monolayer molecular rotor device showed an on/off ratio of approximately 104, a read window of about 2.5 V, and a retention time of greater than 104 s. The rotation speed of this type of molecular rotor has been reported to be in the picosecond timescale, which provides a potential of high switching speed applications. Current-voltage spectroscopy (I-V) revealed a temperature-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) associated with the device. The analysis of the device I–V characteristics suggests the source of the observed switching effects to be the result of the redox-induced ligand rotation around the copper metal center and this attribution of switching is consistent with the observed temperature dependence of the switching behavior as well as the proposed energy diagram of the device. The observed resistance switching shows the potential for future non-volatile memories and logic devices applications. This review will discuss the progress and provide a perspective of molecular motion for nanoelectronics and other applications.

Xue, Mei; Wang, Kang L.

2012-01-01

291

Transparent electrode for optical switch  

DOEpatents

The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

1984-10-19

292

Switching power pulse system  

DOEpatents

A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source (10) to a load (20) using a storage capacitor (C3) charged through a rectifier (D1, D2), and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch (Q1) and voltage comparator (12). A thyristor (22) is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor (18) and fractional turn saturable transformer (16) having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n=n.sup.2. The saturable reactor (18) functions as a "soaker" while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor (C4) charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor (C3) into the load through the coupling capacitor (C4). The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core (26) having two secondary windings (28, 30) tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes (32, 34) for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe (40) for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network (42). To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core (44) is provided around the resistive beampipe (40) to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance (42) until it is fully charged.

Aaland, Kristian (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01

293

Bidirectional motility of the fission yeast kinesin-5, Cut7.  

PubMed

Kinesin-5 is a homotetrameric motor with its motor domain at the N-terminus. Kinesin-5 crosslinks microtubules and functions in separating spindle poles during mitosis. In this study, the motile properties of Cut7, fission yeast kinesin-5, were examined for the first time. In in vitro motility assays, full-length Cut7 moved toward minus-end of microtubules, but the N-terminal half of Cut7 moved toward the opposite direction. Furthermore, additional truncated constructs lacking the N-terminal or C-terminal regions, but still contained the motor domain, did not switch the motile direction. These indicated that Cut7 was a bidirectional motor, and microtubule binding regions at the N-terminus and C-terminus were not involved in its directionality. PMID:24589736

Edamatsu, Masaki

2014-03-28

294

A RAILROAD SWITCHING YARD CONTROLLER  

E-print Network

A RAILROAD SWITCHING YARD CONTROLLER: DIGITAL ELECTRONICS AS AN EDUCATIONAL TOOL I. Program. Funding: NSF, DOE, CPS (~$45K / yr.) A Sample Lesson: Train Switching Yard Design #12;BUILDING A RAILROAD is then applied to building a railroad switching yard controller. STEP 1: Base 10 numbers, Base 2, TRUE or FALSE 1

Reed, Dale F.

295

Illuminated push-button switch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An illuminated push-button switch is described. It is characterized by the fact that is consists of a switch group, an operator button opening and closing the switch group, and a light-emitting element which illuminates the face of the operator button.

Iwagiri, T.

1983-01-01

296

Organic Materials For Optical Switching  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Equations predict properties of candidate materials. Report presents results of theoretical study of nonlinear optical properties of organic materials. Such materials used in optical switching devices for computers and telecommunications, replacing electronic switches. Optical switching potentially offers extremely high information throughout in compact hardware.

Cardelino, Beatriz H.

1993-01-01

297

Pheromone Signaling Pathways in Yeast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The actions of many extracellular stimuli are elicited by complexes of cell surface receptors, heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding proteins (G proteins), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) complexes. Analysis of haploid yeast cells and their response to peptide mating pheromones has produced important advances in the understanding of G protein and MAPK signaling mechanisms. Many of the components, their interrelationships, and their regulators were first identified in yeast. Examples include definitive demonstration of a positive signaling role for G protein ?? subunits, the discovery of a three-tiered structure of the MAPK module, development of the concept of a kinase-scaffold protein, and the discovery of the first regulator of G protein signaling protein. New and powerful genomic, proteomic, and computational approaches available in yeast are beginning to uncover new pathway components and interactions and have revealed their presence in unexpected locations within the cell. This updated Connections Map in the Database of Cell Signaling includes several major revisions to this prototypical signal response pathway.

Henrik G. Dohlman (University of North Carolina; Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics REV)

2006-12-05

298

Formation of complex and unstable chromosomal translocations in yeast.  

PubMed

Genome instability, associated with chromosome breakage syndromes and most human cancers, is still poorly understood. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, numerous genes with roles in the preservation of genome integrity have been identified. DNA-damage-checkpoint-deficient yeast cells that lack Sgs1, a RecQ-like DNA helicase related to the human Bloom's-syndrome-associated helicase BLM, show an increased rate of genome instability, and we have previously shown that they accumulate recurring chromosomal translocations between three similar genes, CAN1, LYP1 and ALP1. Here, the chromosomal location, copy number and sequence similarity of the translocation targets ALP1 and LYP1 were altered to gain insight into the formation of complex translocations. Among 844 clones with chromosomal rearrangements, 93 with various types of simple and complex translocations involving CAN1, LYP1 and ALP1 were identified. Breakpoint sequencing and mapping showed that the formation of complex translocation types is strictly dependent on the location of the initiating DNA break and revealed that complex translocations arise via a combination of interchromosomal translocation and template-switching, as well as from unstable dicentric intermediates. Template-switching occurred between sequences on the same chromosome, but was inhibited if the genes were transferred to different chromosomes. Unstable dicentric translocations continuously gave rise to clones with multiple translocations in various combinations, reminiscent of intratumor heterogeneity in human cancers. Base substitutions and evidence of DNA slippage near rearrangement breakpoints revealed that translocation formation can be accompanied by point mutations, and their presence in different translocation types within the same clone provides evidence that some of the different translocation types are derived from each other rather than being formed de novo. These findings provide insight into eukaryotic genome instability, especially the formation of translocations and the sources of intraclonal heterogeneity, both of which are often associated with human cancers. PMID:20711256

Schmidt, Kristina H; Viebranz, Emilie; Doerfler, Lillian; Lester, Christina; Rubenstein, Aaron

2010-01-01

299

Genetic characterization and construction of an auxotrophic strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae JP1, a Brazilian industrial yeast strain for bioethanol production.  

PubMed

Used for millennia to produce beverages and food, Saccharomyces cerevisiae also became a workhorse in the production of biofuels, most notably bioethanol. Yeast strains have acquired distinct characteristics that are the result of evolutionary adaptation to the stresses of industrial ethanol production. JP1 is a dominant industrial S. cerevisiae strain isolated from a sugarcane mill and is becoming increasingly popular for bioethanol production in Brazil. In this work, we carried out the genetic characterization of this strain and developed a set of tools to permit its genetic manipulation. Using flow cytometry, mating type, and sporulation analysis, we verified that JP1 is diploid and homothallic. Vectors with dominant selective markers for G418, hygromycin B, zeocin, and ?-fluoro-DL-phenylalanine were used to successfully transform JP1 cells. Also, an auxotrophic ura3 mutant strain of JP1 was created by gene disruption using integration cassettes with dominant markers flanked by loxP sites. Marker excision was accomplished by the Cre/loxP system. The resulting auxotrophic strain was successfully transformed with an episomal vector that allowed green fluorescent protein expression. PMID:22892884

Reis, Viviane Castelo Branco; Nicola, André Moraes; de Souza Oliveira Neto, Osmar; Batista, Vinícius Daniel Ferreira; de Moraes, Lidia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

2012-11-01

300

Yeasts Diversity in Fermented Foods and Beverages  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

People across the world have learnt to culture and use the essential microorganisms for production of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages. A fermented food is produced either spontaneously or by adding mixed/pure starter culture(s). Yeasts are among the essential functional microorganisms encountered in many fermented foods, and are commercially used in production of baker's yeast, breads, wine, beer, cheese, etc. In Asia, moulds are predominant followed by amylolytic and alcohol-producing yeasts in the fermentation processes, whereas in Africa, Europe, Australia and America, fermented products are prepared exclusively using bacteria or bacteria-yeasts mixed cultures. This chapter would focus on the varieties of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages produced by yeasts, their microbiology and role in food fermentation, widely used commercial starters (pilot production, molecular aspects), production technology of some common commercial fermented foods and alcoholic beverages, toxicity and food safety using yeasts cultures and socio-economy

Tamang, Jyoti Prakash; Fleet, Graham H.

301

Biopharmaceutical discovery and production in yeast.  

PubMed

The selection of an expression platform for recombinant biopharmaceuticals is often centered upon suitable product titers and critical quality attributes, including post-translational modifications. Although notable differences between microbial, yeast, plant, and mammalian host systems exist, recent advances have greatly mitigated any inherent liabilities of yeasts. Yeast expression platforms are important to both the supply of marketed biopharmaceuticals and the pipelines of novel therapeutics. In this review, recent advances in yeast-based expression of biopharmaceuticals will be discussed. The advantages of using glycoengineered yeast as a production host and in the discovery space will be illustrated. These advancements, in turn, are transforming yeast platforms from simple production systems to key technological assets in the discovery and selection of biopharmaceutical lead candidates. PMID:25014890

Meehl, Michael A; Stadheim, Terrance A

2014-12-01

302

Metabolic engineering of malolactic wine yeast.  

PubMed

Malolactic fermentation is essential for the deacidification of high acid grape must. We have constructed a genetically stable industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by integrating a linear cassette containing the Schizosaccharomyces pombe malate permease gene (mae1) and the Oenococcus oeni malolactic gene (mleA) under control of the S. cerevisiae PGK1 promoter and terminator sequences into the URA3 locus of an industrial wine yeast. The malolactic yeast strain, ML01, fully decarboxylated 5.5 g/l of malate in Chardonnay grape must during the alcoholic fermentation. Analysis of the phenotype, genotype, transcriptome, and proteome revealed that the ML01 yeast is substantially equivalent to the parental industrial wine yeast. The ML01 yeast enjoys 'Generally Regarded As Safe' status from the FDA and is the first genetically enhanced yeast that has been commercialized. Its application will prevent the formation of noxious biogenic amines produced by lactic acid bacteria in wine. PMID:16621641

Husnik, John I; Volschenk, Heinrich; Bauer, Jurgen; Colavizza, Didier; Luo, Zongli; van Vuuren, Hennie J J

2006-07-01

303

Physiological properties of some yeast strains.  

PubMed

Twenty yeast strains have recently been isolated in pure cultures from natural and industrial sources and identified based mainly on physiological properties. The majority of the strains (15) are alcohologenic belonging to the genus Saccharomyces and comprise two brewer's (beer) yeast strains (S. carlsbergensis= S. uvarum A and B), two baker's yeast strains (S. cerevisiae CA and CP), one spirit yeast strain (S. cerevisiae CF) and ten wine yeast strains (S. cerevisiae var. ellipsoideus = S. ellipsoideus 1, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 9; S. oviformis 2, 5 and 7; and S. uvarum 10). The other 5 yeast strains belong to different species: Kloeckera apiculate, Candida mycoderma (Mycoderma vini), Pichia membranaefaciens, Rhodotorula glutinis and Torulopsis holmii, respectively. PMID:16841476

Oprean, Letitia; Gaspar, Enikö; Lengyel, Ecaterina; Cristea, V

2006-06-01

304

Screening for l -arabinose fermenting yeasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Utilization of pentose sugars (d-xylose andl-arabinose) derived from hemi-cellulose is essential for the economic conversion of biomass to ethanol. Xylose-fermenting\\u000a yeasts were discovered in the 1980s, but to date, no yeasts have been found that fermentl-arabinose to ethanol in significant quantities. We have screened 116 different yeasts for the ability to fermentl-arabinose and have found the following species able to

Bruce S. Dien; Cletus P. Kurtzman; Badal C. Saha; Rodney J. Bothast

1996-01-01

305

Micromachined low-loss microwave switches  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design and fabrication of a micromechanical capacitive membrane microwave switching device is described. The switching element consists of a thin metallic membrane, which has two states, actuated or unactuated, depending on the applied bias. A microwave signal is switched on and off when the membrane is switched between the two states. These switches have a switching on speed of

Z. Jamie Yao; Shea Chen; Susan Eshelman; David Denniston; Chuck Goldsmith

1999-01-01

306

Characterisation of yeast microbial fuel cell with the yeast Arxula adeninivorans as the biocatalyst  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yeast microbial fuel cells have received little attention to date. Yeast should be ideal MFC catalyst because they are robust, easily handled, mostly non-pathogenic organisms with high catabolic rates and in some cases a broad substrate spectrum. Here we show that the non-conventional yeast Arxula adeninvorans transfers electrons to an electrode through the secretion of a reduced molecule that is

Nicholas D. Haslett; Frankie J. Rawson; Frèdèric Barriëre; Gotthard Kunze; Neil Pasco; Ravi Gooneratne; Keith H. R. Baronian

2011-01-01

307

Presence of glucosylceramide in yeast and its relation to alkali tolerance of yeast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glycosylceramide is a membrane lipid that has physiological functions in eukaryotic organisms. The presence of glucosylceramide has been confirmed in some yeast; however, the extent of the role of glucosylceramide in yeast is unknown. Thus, the extent of presence of glucosylceramide in yeast was surveyed using 90 strains of 24 genera. The strains were divided into two groups according to

Katsuichi Saito; Naoya Takakuwa; Masao Ohnishi; Yuji Oda

2006-01-01

308

APPENDIX 4LGrowth and Manipulation of Yeast PREPARATION OF SELECTED YEAST MEDIA  

E-print Network

no nutritional require- ments. However, it is used most often as a basal medium to which other supplementsAPPENDIX 4LGrowth and Manipulation of Yeast PREPARATION OF SELECTED YEAST MEDIA Like Escherichia coli, yeast can be grown in either liquid media or on the surface of (or embedded in) solid agar plates

Winston, Fred

309

Evaluation of Automated Yeast Identification System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One hundred and nine teleomorphic and anamorphic yeast isolates representing approximately 30 taxa were used to evaluate the accuracy of the Biolog yeast identification system. Isolates derived from nomenclatural types, environmental, and clinica isolates of known identity were tested in the Biolog system. Of the isolates tested, 81 were in the Biolog database. The system correctly identified 40, incorrectly identified 29, and was unable to identify 12. Of the 28 isolates not in the database, 18 were given names, whereas 10 were not. The Biolog yeast identification system is inadequate for the identification of yeasts originating from the environment during space program activities.

McGinnis, M. R.

1996-01-01

310

Role of glucose signaling in yeast metabolism  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of glucose to ethanol and carbon dioxide by yeast was the first biochemical pathway to be studied in detail. The initial observation that this process is catalyzed by an extract of yeast led to the discovery of enzymes and coenzymes and laid the foundation for modern biochemistry. In this article, knowledge concerning the relation between uptake of and signaling by glucose in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed and compared to the analogous process in prokaryotes. It is concluded that (much) more fundamental knowledge concerning these processes is required before rational redesign of metabolic fluxes from glucose in yeast can be achieved.

Dam, K. van [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). E.C. Slater Inst.

1996-10-05

311

Multiple pulse photoconductive semiconductor switching  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) with short carrier recombination lifetimes (1 to 100 ns) have exhibited comparable opening times in high power (57 kV, 1.0 kA) circuits. Such extremely fast recovery times are not available with the switches generally used for high power (greater than 10 kW) switching, e.g., spark gaps, thyratrons, and silicon controlled rectifiers. Furthermore, since these switches were made with relatively small pieces of semiconductor, and since PCSS scales linearly in two dimensions to higher voltages and currents, much higher power switches may be developed. New high power switches which have the ability to open and close in a 1 to 10 ns time scale provide the tools to switch high power radiofrequency (RF) circuits above 10 MHz actively. This paper presents three methods to create RF bursts with PCSS. The feasibility of each method is explored, and experiments being performed to test these techniques are described.

Zutavern, F. J.; McKenzie, B. B.; Loubriel, G. M.; Omalley, M. W.; Hamil, R. A.; Schanwald, L. P.

1988-05-01

312

Optical fiber switch  

DOEpatents

Optical fiber switches operated by electrical activation of at least one laser light modulator through which laser light is directed into at least one polarizer are used for the sequential transport of laser light from a single laser into a plurality of optical fibers. In one embodiment of the invention, laser light from a single excitation laser is sequentially transported to a plurality of optical fibers which in turn transport the laser light to separate individual remotely located laser fuel ignitors. The invention can be operated electro-optically with no need for any mechanical or moving parts, or, alternatively, can be operated electro-mechanically. The invention can be used to switch either pulsed or continuous wave laser light.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

2002-01-01

313

Switching Power Supplies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by Work-Ready Electronics, a project of the Advanced Technological Education program, this module walks visitors through the basics of switching power supplies. The content of the site is divided into four areas: SMPS Basics and Switching Regulators; DC-DC Converters: Charge Pumps, Forwards Converters and Flyback Converters; Inverters, UPS and Hysteresis Curve, and SMPS: Advantages, Disadvantages and Troubleshooting. There is a quiz for each area in the Knowledge Probe area, and the Learning Resources section contains five activities to help cement student understanding. There are also further resources - both print and Web based - for more information and two Questors, a Flash trivia game. The Notebook function allows visitors to take notes and review them at any time. This is an excellent resource students and educators in electronics technician programs.

314

Cryogenic switched MOSFET characterization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Both p channel and n channel enhancement mode MOSFETs can be readily switched on and off at temperatures as low as 2.8 K so that switch sampled readout of a VLWIR Ge:Ga focal plane is electronically possible. Noise levels as low as 100 rms electrons per sample (independent of sample rate) can be achieved using existing p channel MOSFETs, at overall rates up to 30,000 samples/second per multiplexed channel (e.g., 32 detectors at a rate of almost 1,000 frames/second). Run of the mill devices, including very low power dissipation n channel FETs would still permit noise levels of the order of 500 electrons/sample.

1981-01-01

315

Plasma opening switch  

DOEpatents

A command triggered plasma opening switch assembly using an amplification stage. The assembly surrounds a coaxial transmission line and has a main plasma opening switch (POS) close to the load and a trigger POS upstream from the main POS. The trigger POS establishes two different current pathways through the assembly depended on whether it has received a trigger current pulse. The initial pathway has both POS's with plasma between their anodes and cathodes to form a short across the transmission line and isolating the load. The final current pathway is formed when the trigger POS receives a trigger current pulse which energizes its fast coil to push the conductive plasma out from between its anode and cathode, allowing the main transmission line current to pass to the fast coil of the main POS, thus pushing its plasma out the way so as to establish a direct current pathway to the load.

Savage, Mark E. (Albuquerque, NM); Mendel, Jr., Clifford W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01

316

Automatic emergency hydraulic switch  

Microsoft Academic Search

tem automatically when large leaks appear in the system, or when the process piping ruptures suddenly, has been developed and tested at Penza Polytechnic Institute. This emergency hydraulic switch can be employed in various hydraulic systems serviug process machinery and equipment. It is designed to handle maximum flowrates at i00 liters\\/min, and to take pressures up to 200 kgf\\/cm 2.

B. T. Sitnikov; I. B. Matveev; V. N. Denisov

1972-01-01

317

CREE: Making the Switch  

SciTech Connect

CREE, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed a Silicon Carbide (SIC) transistor which can be used to create solid state transformers capable of meeting the unique needs of the emerging smart grid. SIC transistors are different from common silicon computer chips in that they handle grid scale voltages with ease and their high frequency switching is well suited to the intermittent nature of renewable energy generation.

Grider, David; Palmer, John

2014-03-06

318

Automatic switching matrix  

DOEpatents

An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

Schlecht, Martin F. (Cambridge, MA); Kassakian, John G. (Newton, MA); Caloggero, Anthony J. (Lynn, MA); Rhodes, Bruce (Dorchester, MA); Otten, David (Newton, MA); Rasmussen, Neil (Sudbury, MA)

1982-01-01

319

CREE: Making the Switch  

ScienceCinema

CREE, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed a Silicon Carbide (SIC) transistor which can be used to create solid state transformers capable of meeting the unique needs of the emerging smart grid. SIC transistors are different from common silicon computer chips in that they handle grid scale voltages with ease and their high frequency switching is well suited to the intermittent nature of renewable energy generation.

Grider, David; Palmer, John

2014-04-09

320

MCT/MOSFET Switch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Metal-oxide/semiconductor-controlled thyristor (MCT) and metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) connected in switching circuit to obtain better performance. Offers high utilization of silicon, low forward voltage drop during "on" period of operating cycle, fast turnon and turnoff, and large turnoff safe operating area. Includes ability to operate at high temperatures, high static blocking voltage, and ease of drive.

Rippel, Wally E.

1990-01-01

321

Ferroelectric switching of elastin  

PubMed Central

Ferroelectricity has long been speculated to have important biological functions, although its very existence in biology has never been firmly established. Here, we present compelling evidence that elastin, the key ECM protein found in connective tissues, is ferroelectric, and we elucidate the molecular mechanism of its switching. Nanoscale piezoresponse force microscopy and macroscopic pyroelectric measurements both show that elastin retains ferroelectricity at 473 K, with polarization on the order of 1 ?C/cm2, whereas coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations predict similar polarization with a Curie temperature of 580 K, which is higher than most synthetic molecular ferroelectrics. The polarization of elastin is found to be intrinsic in tropoelastin at the monomer level, analogous to the unit cell level polarization in classical perovskite ferroelectrics, and it switches via thermally activated cooperative rotation of dipoles. Our study sheds light onto a long-standing question on ferroelectric switching in biology and establishes ferroelectricity as an important biophysical property of proteins. This is a critical first step toward resolving its physiological significance and pathological implications. PMID:24958890

Liu, Yuanming; Cai, Hong-Ling; Zelisko, Matthew; Wang, Yunjie; Sun, Jinglan; Yan, Fei; Ma, Feiyue; Wang, Peiqi; Chen, Qian Nataly; Zheng, Hairong; Meng, Xiangjian; Sharma, Pradeep; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

2014-01-01

322

Drosophila Regulate Yeast Density and Increase Yeast Community Similarity in a Natural Substrate  

PubMed Central

Drosophila melanogaster adults and larvae, but especially larvae, had profound effects on the densities and community structure of yeasts that developed in banana fruits. Pieces of fruit exposed to adult female flies previously fed fly-conditioned bananas developed higher yeast densities than pieces of the same fruits that were not exposed to flies, supporting previous suggestions that adult Drosophila vector yeasts to new substrates. However, larvae alone had dramatic effects on yeast density and species composition. When yeast densities were compared in pieces of the same fruits assigned to different treatments, fruits that developed low yeast densities in the absence of flies developed significantly higher yeast densities when exposed to larvae. Across all of the fruits, larvae regulated yeast densities within narrow limits, as compared to a much wider range of yeast densities that developed in pieces of the same fruits not exposed to flies. Larvae also affected yeast species composition, dramatically reducing species diversity across fruits, reducing variation in yeast communities from one fruit to the next (beta diversity), and encouraging the consistent development of a yeast community composed of three species of yeast (Candida californica, C. zemplinina, and Pichia kluvyeri), all of which were palatable to larvae. Larvae excreted viable cells of these three yeast species in their fecal pools, and discouraged the growth of filamentous fungi, processes which may have contributed to their effects on the yeast communities in banana fruits. These and other findings suggest that D. melanogaster adults and their larval offspring together engage in ‘niche construction’, facilitating a predictable microbial environment in the fruit substrates in which the larvae live and develop. PMID:22860093

Stamps, Judy A.; Yang, Louie H.; Morales, Vanessa M.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

2012-01-01

323

TOPO3a Influences Antigenic Variation by Monitoring Expression-Site-Associated VSG Switching in  

E-print Network

Homologous recombination (HR) mediates one of the major mechanisms of trypanosome antigenic variation by placing a different variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene under the control of the active expression site (ES). It is believed that the majority of VSG switching events occur by duplicative gene conversion, but only a few DNA repair genes that are central to HR have been assigned a role in this process. Gene conversion events that are associated with crossover are rarely seen in VSG switching, similar to mitotic HR. In other organisms, TOPO3a (Top3 in yeasts), a type IA topoisomerase, is part of a complex that is involved in the suppression of crossovers. We therefore asked whether a related mechanism might suppress VSG recombination. Using a set of reliable recombination and switching assays that could score individual switching mechanisms, we discovered that TOPO3a function is conserved in Trypanosoma brucei and that TOPO3a plays a critical role in antigenic switching. Switching frequency increased 10–40-fold in the absence of TOPO3a and this hyper-switching phenotype required RAD51. Moreover, the preference of 70-bp repeats for VSG recombination was mitigated, while homology regions elsewhere in ES were highly favored, in the absence of TOPO3a. Our data suggest that TOPO3a may remove undesirable recombination intermediates constantly arising between active and silent ESs, thereby balancing ES

324

TOPO3? Influences Antigenic Variation by Monitoring Expression-Site-Associated VSG Switching in Trypanosoma brucei  

PubMed Central

Homologous recombination (HR) mediates one of the major mechanisms of trypanosome antigenic variation by placing a different variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene under the control of the active expression site (ES). It is believed that the majority of VSG switching events occur by duplicative gene conversion, but only a few DNA repair genes that are central to HR have been assigned a role in this process. Gene conversion events that are associated with crossover are rarely seen in VSG switching, similar to mitotic HR. In other organisms, TOPO3? (Top3 in yeasts), a type IA topoisomerase, is part of a complex that is involved in the suppression of crossovers. We therefore asked whether a related mechanism might suppress VSG recombination. Using a set of reliable recombination and switching assays that could score individual switching mechanisms, we discovered that TOPO3? function is conserved in Trypanosoma brucei and that TOPO3? plays a critical role in antigenic switching. Switching frequency increased 10–40-fold in the absence of TOPO3? and this hyper-switching phenotype required RAD51. Moreover, the preference of 70-bp repeats for VSG recombination was mitigated, while homology regions elsewhere in ES were highly favored, in the absence of TOPO3?. Our data suggest that TOPO3? may remove undesirable recombination intermediates constantly arising between active and silent ESs, thereby balancing ES integrity against VSG recombination. PMID:20628569

Kim, Hee-Sook; Cross, George A. M.

2010-01-01

325

YMDB: the Yeast Metabolome Database.  

PubMed

The Yeast Metabolome Database (YMDB, http://www.ymdb.ca) is a richly annotated 'metabolomic' database containing detailed information about the metabolome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modeled closely after the Human Metabolome Database, the YMDB contains >2000 metabolites with links to 995 different genes/proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in YMDB has been gathered from hundreds of books, journal articles and electronic databases. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the YMDB also contains an extensive collection of experimental intracellular and extracellular metabolite concentration data compiled from detailed Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) metabolomic analyses performed in our lab. This is further supplemented with thousands of NMR and MS spectra collected on pure, reference yeast metabolites. Each metabolite entry in the YMDB contains an average of 80 separate data fields including comprehensive compound description, names and synonyms, structural information, physico-chemical data, reference NMR and MS spectra, intracellular/extracellular concentrations, growth conditions and substrates, pathway information, enzyme data, gene/protein sequence data, as well as numerous hyperlinks to images, references and other public databases. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided that support text, chemical structure, spectral, molecular weight and gene/protein sequence queries. Because of S. cervesiae's importance as a model organism for biologists and as a biofactory for industry, we believe this kind of database could have considerable appeal not only to metabolomics researchers, but also to yeast biologists, systems biologists, the industrial fermentation industry, as well as the beer, wine and spirit industry. PMID:22064855

Jewison, Timothy; Knox, Craig; Neveu, Vanessa; Djoumbou, Yannick; Guo, An Chi; Lee, Jacqueline; Liu, Philip; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Sinelnikov, Igor; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S

2012-01-01

326

Unisexual and Heterosexual Meiotic Reproduction Generate Aneuploidy and Phenotypic Diversity De Novo in the Yeast Cryptococcus neoformans  

PubMed Central

Aneuploidy is known to be deleterious and underlies several common human diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders such as trisomy 21 in Down's syndrome. In contrast, aneuploidy can also be advantageous and in fungi confers antifungal drug resistance and enables rapid adaptive evolution. We report here that sexual reproduction generates phenotypic and genotypic diversity in the human pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, which is globally distributed and commonly infects individuals with compromised immunity, such as HIV/AIDS patients, causing life-threatening meningoencephalitis. C. neoformans has a defined a-? opposite sexual cycle; however, >99% of isolates are of the ? mating type. Interestingly, ? cells can undergo ?-? unisexual reproduction, even involving genotypically identical cells. A central question is: Why would cells mate with themselves given that sex is costly and typically serves to admix preexisting genetic diversity from genetically divergent parents? In this study, we demonstrate that ?-? unisexual reproduction frequently generates phenotypic diversity, and the majority of these variant progeny are aneuploid. Aneuploidy is responsible for the observed phenotypic changes, as chromosome loss restoring euploidy results in a wild-type phenotype. Other genetic changes, including diploidization, chromosome length polymorphisms, SNPs, and indels, were also generated. Phenotypic/genotypic changes were not observed following asexual mitotic reproduction. Aneuploidy was also detected in progeny from a-? opposite-sex congenic mating; thus, both homothallic and heterothallic sexual reproduction can generate phenotypic diversity de novo. Our study suggests that the ability to undergo unisexual reproduction may be an evolutionary strategy for eukaryotic microbial pathogens, enabling de novo genotypic and phenotypic plasticity and facilitating rapid adaptation to novel environments. PMID:24058295

Li, Wenjun; Floyd-Averette, Anna; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Dietrich, Fred S.; Heitman, Joseph

2013-01-01

327

Experimental evolution in budding yeast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I will discuss our progress in analyzing evolution in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We take two basic approaches. The first is to try and examine quantitative aspects of evolution, for example by determining how the rate of evolution depends on the mutation rate and the population size or asking whether the rate of mutation is uniform throughout the genome. The second is to try to evolve qualitatively novel, cell biologically interesting phenotypes and track the mutations that are responsible for the phenotype. Our efforts include trying to alter cell morphology, evolve multicellularity, and produce a biological oscillator.

Murray, Andrew

2012-02-01

328

Yeast flora of grape berries during ripening  

Microsoft Academic Search

The yeast flora associated with the surface of grapes during ripening was studied with regard to different sectors of the grape skin and the position in the bunch by means of traditional as well as more vigorous preisolation and precounting treatments. The yeast number per square centimeter of skin increases with ripening and is highest in the area immediately surrounding

Gianfranco Rosini; Federico Federici; Alessandro Martini

1982-01-01

329

Chronological aging leads to apoptosis in yeast  

Microsoft Academic Search

uring the past years, yeast has been successfully established as a model to study mechanisms of apoptotic regulation. However, the beneficial effects of such a cell suicide program for a unicellular organism remained obscure. Here, we demonstrate that chronologi- cally aged yeast cultures die exhibiting typical markers of apoptosis, accumulate oxygen radicals, and show caspase activation. Age-induced cell death is

Eva Herker; Helmut Jungwirth; Katharina A. Lehmann; Corinna Maldener; Kai-Uwe Fröhlich; Silke Wissing; Sabrina Büttner; Markus Fehr; Stephan Sigrist; Frank Madeo

2004-01-01

330

Production of recombinant proteins by yeast cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yeasts are widely used in production of recombinant proteins of medical or industrial interest. For each individual product, the most suitable expression system has to be identified and optimized, both on the genetic and fermentative level, by taking into account the properties of the product, the organism and the expression cassette. There is a wide range of important yeast expression

Eda Çelik; P?nar Çal?k

331

Growth of yeasts during wine fermentations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article emphasises the importance of making quantitative measurements of the growth of yeast species during wine fermentations. Although such studies confirm Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the principal wine yeast, they show that indigenous species of Kloeckera and Candida make a more significant contribution to the fermentation than previously thought. Inoculation of grape juice with S. cerevisiae does not necessarily suppress

Graham H. Fleet

1990-01-01

332

Fermentation studies using Saccharomyces diastaticus yeast strains  

SciTech Connect

The yeast species, Saccharomyces diastaticus, has the ability to ferment starch and dextrin, because of the extracellular enzyme, glucoamylase, which hydrolyzes the starch/dextrin to glucose. A number of nonallelic genes--DEX 1, DEX 2, and dextrinase B which is allelic to STA 3--have been isolated, which impart to the yeast the ability to ferment dextrin. Various diploid yeast strains were constructed, each being either heterozygous or homozygous for the individual dextrinase genes. Using 12 (sup 0) plato hopped wort (30% corn adjunct) under agitated conditions, the fermentation rates of the various diploid yeast strains were monitored. A gene-dosage effect was exhibited by yeast strains containing DEX 1 or DEX 2, however, not with yeast strains containing dextrinase B (STA 3). The fermentation and growth rates and extents were determined under static conditions at 14.4 C and 21 C. With all yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes, both fermentation and growth were increased at the higher incubation temperature. Using 30-liter fermentors, beer was produced with the various yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes and the physical and organoleptic characteristics of the products were determined. The concentration of glucose in the beer was found to increase during a 3-mo storage period at 21 C, indicating that the glucoamylase from Saccharomyces diastaticus is not inactivated by pasteurization. (Refs. 36).

Erratt, J.A.; Stewart, G.G.

1981-01-01

333

Rapid and reliable protein extraction from yeast  

Microsoft Academic Search

The methods currently used for protein extraction from yeast are either laborious or insufficiently reliable. Here I report a method for protein extraction for electrophoretic analysis that is both easy and reliable. In this method, yeast cells are subjected to mild alkali treatment and then boiled in a standard electrophoresis loading buffer. The method was tested for different strains of

Vitaly V. Kushnirov

2000-01-01

334

YEAST MEIOSIS Sister kinetochores are mechanically  

E-print Network

YEAST MEIOSIS Sister kinetochores are mechanically fused during meiosis I in yeast Krishna K Production of healthy gametes requires a reductional meiosis I division in which replicated sister chromatids comigrate, rather than separate as in mitosis or meiosis II. Fusion of sister kinetochores during meiosis I

Asbury, Chip

335

The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis  

PubMed Central

Recently, the non-conventional yeast Dekkera bruxellensis has been gaining more and more attention in the food industry and academic research. This yeast species is a distant relative of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is especially known for two important characteristics: on the one hand, it is considered to be one of the main spoilage organisms in the wine and bioethanol industry; on the other hand, it is 'indispensable' as a contributor to the flavour profile of Belgium lambic and gueuze beers. Additionally, it adds to the characteristic aromatic properties of some red wines. Recently this yeast has also become a model for the study of yeast evolution. In this review we focus on the recently developed molecular and genetic tools, such as complete genome sequencing and transformation, to study and manipulate this yeast. We also focus on the areas that are particularly well explored in this yeast, such as the synthesis of off-flavours, yeast detection methods, carbon metabolism and evolutionary history. © 2014 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24932634

Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Dashko, Sofia; Ishchuk, Olena P; Piškur, Jure

2014-01-01

336

Yeasts are essential for cocoa bean fermentation.  

PubMed

Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao) are the major raw material for chocolate production and fermentation of the beans is essential for the development of chocolate flavor precursors. In this study, a novel approach was used to determine the role of yeasts in cocoa fermentation and their contribution to chocolate quality. Cocoa bean fermentations were conducted with the addition of 200ppm Natamycin to inhibit the growth of yeasts, and the resultant microbial ecology and metabolism, bean chemistry and chocolate quality were compared with those of normal (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii and Kluyveromyces marxianus, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in the control fermentation. In fermentations with the presence of Natamycin, the same bacterial species grew but yeast growth was inhibited. Physical and chemical analyses showed that beans fermented without yeasts had increased shell content, lower production of ethanol, higher alcohols and esters throughout fermentation and lesser presence of pyrazines in the roasted product. Quality tests revealed that beans fermented without yeasts were purplish-violet in color and not fully brown, and chocolate prepared from these beans tasted more acid and lacked characteristic chocolate flavor. Beans fermented with yeast growth were fully brown in color and gave chocolate with typical characters which were clearly preferred by sensory panels. Our findings demonstrate that yeast growth and activity were essential for cocoa bean fermentation and the development of chocolate characteristics. PMID:24462702

Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

2014-03-17

337

Yeast: An Experimental Organism for Modern Biology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the applicability and advantages of using yeasts as popular and ideal model systems for studying and understanding eukaryotic biology at the cellular and molecular levels. Cites experimental tractability and the cooperative tradition of the research community of yeast biologists as reasons for this success. (RT)

Botstein, David; Fink, Gerald R.

1988-01-01

338

Task switching and the measurement of "switch costs".  

PubMed

The measurement of "switch costs" is held to be of interest because, as is widely believed, they may reflect the control processes that are engaged when subjects switch between two (or more) competing tasks. [In task-switching experiments, the reaction time (RT) switch cost is typically measured as the difference in RT between switch and non-switch (repeat) trials.] In this report we focus on the RT switch costs that remain even after the subject has had some time to prepare for the shift of task, when the switch cost may be approximately asymptotic (so-called residual switch costs). Three experiments are presented. All three experiments used Stroop colour/word, and neutral stimuli. Participants performed the two tasks of word-reading and colour-naming in a regular, double alternation, using the "alternating runs" paradigm (R. D. Rogers & S. Monsell, 1995). The experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that RT switch costs depend on a form of proactive interference (PI) arising from the performance of a prior, competing task. A. Allport, E. A. Styles and S. Hsieh (1994) suggested that these PI effects resulted from "task-set inertia", that is, the persisting activation-suppression of competing task-sets, or competing task-processing pathways. The results confirmed the existence of long-lasting PI from the competing task as a major contributor to switch costs. Non-switch trials, used as the baseline in the measurement of switch costs, were also shown to be strongly affected by similar PI effects. However, task-set inertia was not sufficient to account for these results. The results appeared inconsistent also with all other previous models of task switching. A new hypothesis to explain these between-task interference effects was developed, based on the stimulus-triggered retrieval of competing stimulus-response (S-R) associations, acquired (or strengthened) in earlier trials. Consistent with this retrieval hypothesis, switch costs were shown to depend primarily on the S-R characteristics of the preceding task (the task that was switched from) rather than the upcoming task. Further, the effects of the other, competing task were found to persist over many successive switching trials, affecting switch costs long after the stimulus overlap (and hence the principal S-R competition) between the current tasks had been removed. Switch costs were also found to be affected by recent, item-specific experience with a given stimulus, in either the same or the competing task. Finally, the results showed that switch costs were massively affected by the ratio of the number of prior trials, in response to the same stimuli, that had implemented either the currently intended or the competing S-R mappings. None of these effects are predicted by current models of residual switch costs, which appeal to the differences in control processes assumed to be engaged in switch versus non-switch trials. PMID:11004877

Wylie, G; Allport, A

2000-01-01

339

Low-Crosstalk Composite Optical Crosspoint Switches  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Composite optical switch includes two elementary optical switches in tandem, plus optical absorbers. Like elementary optical switches, composite optical switches assembled into switch matrix. Performance enhanced by increasing number of elementary switches. Advantage of concept: crosstalk reduced to acceptably low level at moderate cost of doubling number of elementary switches rather than at greater cost of tightening manufacturing tolerances and exerting more-precise control over operating conditions.

Pan, Jing-Jong; Liang, Frank

1993-01-01

340

Structural basis of high-fidelity DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerase [delta  

SciTech Connect

DNA polymerase {delta} (Pol {delta}) is a high-fidelity polymerase that has a central role in replication from yeast to humans. We present the crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of yeast Pol {delta} in ternary complex with a template primer and an incoming nucleotide. The structure, determined at 2.0-{angstrom} resolution, catches the enzyme in the act of replication, revealing how the polymerase and exonuclease domains are juxtaposed relative to each other and how a correct nucleotide is selected and incorporated. The structure also reveals the 'sensing' interactions near the primer terminus, which signal a switch from the polymerizing to the editing mode. Taken together, the structure provides a chemical basis for the bulk of DNA synthesis in eukaryotic cells and a framework for understanding the effects of cancer-causing mutations in Pol {delta}.

Swan, Michael K.; Johnson, Robert E.; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya; Aggarwal, Aneel K.; (Sinai); (Texas)

2009-09-25

341

Engineering the Substrate Specificity of the DhbE Adenylation Domain by Yeast Cell Surface Display  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY The adenylation (A) domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) activate aryl acids or amino acids to launch their transfer through the NRPS assembly line for the biosynthesis of many medicinally important natural products. In order to expand the substrate pool of NRPSs, we developed a method based on yeast cell surface display to engineer the substrate specificities of the A-domains. We acquired A-domain mutants of DhbE that have 11- and 6-fold increases in kcat/Km with nonnative substrates 3-hydroxybenzoic acid and 2-aminobenzoic acid, respectively and corresponding 3- and 33-fold decreases in kcat/Km values with the native substrate 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, resulting in a dramatic switch in substrate specificity of up to 200-fold. Our study demonstrates that yeast display can be used as a high throughput selection platform to reprogram the “nonribosomal code” of A-domains. PMID:23352143

Zhang, Keya; Nelson, Kathryn M.; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Grimes, Kimberly D.; Zhao, Bo; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Yin, Jun

2013-01-01

342

Yeasts that utilize lactose in sweet whey  

SciTech Connect

Since processing costs are usually higher for whey than for other available food or feed nutrients, only about one-third of whey produced in the US is used by food and feed industries. As a result whey disposal costs are a problem. Further; when whey is disposed of through municipal sewerage systems, the lactose present is changed by bacteria to lactic acid which tends to act as a preservative and retards further oxidation of whey constituents. This article describes a method of utilizing lactose-fermenting yeasts to produce large quantities of yeast cells, single-cell protein. Kluveromyces fragilis was found to be the most effective yeast species and the yeast cells produced could be used as a natural food or feed additive. Results of this study determined that certain methods and yeast strains could reduce whey-related pollution and thus help reduce costs of whey disposal.

Gholson, J.H.; Gough, R.H.

1980-01-01

343

Production of ethanol by immobilized yeast cells  

SciTech Connect

Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were immobilized in calcium alginate beads for use in the continuous production of ethanol. Yeasts were grown in medium supplemented with ethanol to selectively screen for a culture which showed the greatest tolerance to ethanol inhibition. Yeast beads were produced from a yeast slurry containing 1.5% alginate (w/v) which was added as drops to a 0.05M CaCl2 solution. To determine their optimum fermentation parameters, ethanol production using glucose as a substrate was monitored in batch systems at varying physiological conditions (temperature,pH, ethanol concentration), cell densities, and gel concentrations. The data obtained were compared to optimum free cell ethanol fermentation parameters. The immobilized yeast cells were examined in a packed-bed reactor system operated under optimized parameters derived from batch-immobilized yeast cell experiments. Ethanol production rates, as well as residual sugar concentrations were monitored at different feedstock flow rates. (Refs. 13).

Williams, D.; Munnecke, D.M.

1981-08-01

344

Power transistor switching characterization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The switching properties of power transistors are investigated. The devices studied were housed in IO-3 cases and were of an n(+)-p-n(-)-n(+) vertical dopant structure. The effects of the magnitude of the reverse-base current and temperature on the reverse-bias second breakdown characteristics are discussed. Brief discussions of device degradation due to second breakdown and of a constant voltage turn-off circuit are included. A description of a vacuum tube voltage clamp circuit which reduces clamped collector voltage overshoot is given.

Blackburn, D. L.

1981-01-01

345

Composite Thermal Switch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lithium primary and lithium ion secondary batteries provide high specific energy and energy density. The use of these batteries also helps to reduce launch weight. Both primary and secondary cells can be packaged as high-rate cells, which can present a threat to crew and equipment in the event of external or internal short circuits. Overheating of the cell interior from high current flows induced by short circuits can result in exothermic reactions in lithium primary cells and fully charged lithium ion secondary cells. Venting of the cell case, ejection of cell components, and fire have been reported in both types of cells, resulting from abuse, cell imperfections, or faulty electronic control design. A switch has been developed that consists of a thin layer of composite material made from nanoscale particles of nickel and Teflon that conducts electrons at room temperature and switches to an insulator at an elevated temperature, thus interrupting current flow to prevent thermal runaway caused by internal short circuits. The material is placed within the cell, as a thin layer incorporated within the anode and/or the cathode, to control excess currents from metal-to-metal or metal-to-carbon shorts that might result from cell crush or a manufacturing defect. The safety of high-rate cells is thus improved, preventing serious injury to personnel and sensitive equipment located near the battery. The use of recently available nanoscale particles of nickel and Teflon permits an improved, homogeneous material with the potential to be fine-tuned to a unique switch temperature, sufficiently below the onset of a catastrophic chemical reaction. The smaller particles also permit the formation of a thinner control film layer (<50 m), which can be incorporated into commercial high-rate lithium primary and secondary cells. The innovation permits incorporation in current lithium and lithium-ion cell designs with a minimal impact on cell weight and volume. The composite thermal switch (CTS(TradeMark)) coating can be incorporated in either the anode or cathode or both. The coating can be applied in a variety of different processes that permits incorporation in the cell and electrode manufacturing processes. The CTS responds quickly and halts current flow in the hottest parts of the cell first. The coating can be applied to metal foil and supplied as a cell component onto which the active electrode materials are coated.

McDonald, Robert; Brawn, Shelly; Harrison, Katherine; O'Toole, Shannon; Moeller, Michael

2011-01-01

346

Dilated Networks for Photonic Switching  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present some novel architectures for rearrangeably nonblocking multistage photonic space switches implemented using arrays ofTi:LiNbO_{3}directional couplers. Multistage networks, studied mostly in the electronic domain, are obtained by minimizing the number of 2 × 2 elements needed to implement a switch. Unfortunately, straightforward extensions of these networks to the photonic domain show that the switch size has to be severely

K. Padmanabhan; A. Netravali

1987-01-01

347

Switch-level VHDL descriptions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors show that switched-level models can be written in VHDL (VHSIC hardware descriptive language) without special-purpose knowledge in the VHDL simulator. As a result, such VHDL switch-level descriptions may be executed on any simulator supporting the VHDL. The authors present a VHDL switch-level value system, discuss resolution functions, modeling tools written in VHDL, and describe an algorithm coded in

A. G. Stanculescu; A. S. Tsay; A. N. D. Zamfirescu; D. L. Perry

1989-01-01

348

DNA-Controlled Excitonic Switches  

PubMed Central

Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a promising means of enabling information processing in nanoscale devices, but dynamic control over exciton pathways is required. Here, we demonstrate the operation of two complementary switches consisting of diffusive FRET transmission lines in which exciton flow is controlled by DNA. Repeatable switching is accomplished by the removal or addition of fluorophores through toehold-mediated strand invasion. In principle, these switches can be networked to implement any Boolean function. PMID:22401838

2012-01-01

349

Nucleotide excision repair in yeast.  

PubMed

In nucleotide excision repair (NER) in eukaryotes, DNA is incised on both sides of the lesion, resulting in the removal of a fragment approximately 25-30 nucleotides long. This is followed by repair synthesis and ligation. The proteins encoded by the various yeast NER genes have been purified, and the incision reaction reconstituted in vitro. This reaction requires the damage binding factors Rad14, RPA, and the Rad4-Rad23 complex, the transcription factor TFIIH which contains the two DNA helicases Rad3 and Rad25, essential for creating a bubble structure, and the two endonucleases, the Rad1-Rad10 complex and Rad2, which incise the damaged DNA strand on the 5'- and 3'-side of the lesion, respectively. Addition of the Rad7-Rad16 complex to this reconstituted system stimulates the incision reaction many fold. The various NER proteins exist in vivo as part of multiprotein subassemblies which have been named NEFs (nucleotide excision repair factors). Rad14 and Rad1-Rad10 form one subassembly called NEF1, the Rad4-Rad23 complex is named NEF2, Rad2 and TFIIH constitute NEF3, and the Rad7-Rad16 complex is called NEF4. Although much has been learned from yeast about the function of NER genes and proteins in eukaryotes, the underlying mechanisms by which damage is recognized, NEFs are assembled at the damage site, and the DNA is unwound and incised, remain to be elucidated. PMID:10915862

Prakash, S; Prakash, L

2000-06-30

350

Regulation of yeast oscillatory dynamics  

PubMed Central

When yeast cells are grown continuously at high cell density, a respiratory oscillation percolates throughout the population. Many essential cellular functions have been shown to be separated temporally during each cycle; however, the regulatory mechanisms involved in oscillatory dynamics remain to be elucidated. Through GC-MS analysis we found that the majority of metabolites show oscillatory dynamics, with 70% of the identified metabolite concentrations peaking in conjunction with NAD(P)H. Through statistical analyses of microarray data, we identified that biosynthetic events have a defined order, and this program is initiated when respiration rates are increasing. We then combined metabolic, transcriptional data and statistical analyses of transcription factor activity, identified the top oscillatory parameters, and filtered a large-scale yeast interaction network according to these parameters. The analyses and controlled experimental perturbation provided evidence that a transcriptional complex formed part of the timing circuit for biosynthetic, reductive, and cell cycle programs in the cell. This circuitry does not act in isolation because both have strong translational, proteomic, and metabolic regulatory mechanisms. Our data lead us to conclude that the regulation of the respiratory oscillation revolves around coupled subgraphs containing large numbers of proteins and metabolites, with a potential to oscillate, and no definable hierarchy, i.e., heterarchical control. PMID:17284613

Murray, Douglas B.; Beckmann, Manfred; Kitano, Hiroaki

2007-01-01

351

Neuromorphic Atomic Switch Networks  

PubMed Central

Efforts to emulate the formidable information processing capabilities of the brain through neuromorphic engineering have been bolstered by recent progress in the fabrication of nonlinear, nanoscale circuit elements that exhibit synapse-like operational characteristics. However, conventional fabrication techniques are unable to efficiently generate structures with the highly complex interconnectivity found in biological neuronal networks. Here we demonstrate the physical realization of a self-assembled neuromorphic device which implements basic concepts of systems neuroscience through a hardware-based platform comprised of over a billion interconnected atomic-switch inorganic synapses embedded in a complex network of silver nanowires. Observations of network activation and passive harmonic generation demonstrate a collective response to input stimulus in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Further, emergent behaviors unique to the complex network of atomic switches and akin to brain function are observed, namely spatially distributed memory, recurrent dynamics and the activation of feedforward subnetworks. These devices display the functional characteristics required for implementing unconventional, biologically and neurally inspired computational methodologies in a synthetic experimental system. PMID:22880101

Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Shieh, Hsien Hang; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.

2012-01-01

352

Hybrid switch for resonant power converters  

DOEpatents

A hybrid switch comprising two semiconductor switches connected in parallel but having different voltage drop characteristics as a function of current facilitates attainment of zero voltage switching and reduces conduction losses to complement reduction of switching losses achieved through zero voltage switching in power converters such as high-current inverters.

Lai, Jih-Sheng; Yu, Wensong

2014-09-09

353

Solid State Spark Gap Replacement Switches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Improvements in solid state high voltage switching technology now makes it feasible to replace triggered spark gap switches, used in many medical and commercial applications to switch tens of kilovolts and thousands of amperes, with compact solid state switches. The solid state switch we have developed is triggered by a single 10 V isolated trigger pulse to only one stage

S. C. Glidden; H. D. Sanders

2005-01-01

354

EDITORIAL: Molecular switches at surfaces Molecular switches at surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In nature, molecules exploit interaction with their environment to realize complex functionalities on the nanometer length scale. Physical, chemical and/or biological specificity is frequently achieved by the switching of molecules between microscopically different states. Paradigmatic examples are the energy production in proton pumps of bacteria or the signal conversion in human vision, which rely on switching molecules between different configurations or conformations by external stimuli. The remarkable reproducibility and unparalleled fatigue resistance of these natural processes makes it highly desirable to emulate nature and develop artificial systems with molecular functionalities. A promising avenue towards this goal is to anchor the molecular switches at surfaces, offering new pathways to control their functional properties, to apply electrical contacts, or to integrate switches into larger systems. Anchoring at surfaces allows one to access the full range from individual molecular switches to self-assembled monolayers of well-defined geometry and to customize the coupling between molecules and substrate or between adsorbed molecules. Progress in this field requires both synthesis and preparation of appropriate molecular systems and control over suitable external stimuli, such as light, heat, or electrical currents. To optimize switching and generate function, it is essential to unravel the geometric structure, the electronic properties and the dynamic interactions of the molecular switches on surfaces. This special section, Molecular Switches at Surfaces, collects 17 contributions describing different aspects of this research field. They analyze elementary processes, both in single molecules and in ensembles of molecules, which involve molecular switching and concomitant changes of optical, electronic, or magnetic properties. Two topical reviews summarize the current status, including both challenges and achievements in the field of molecular switches on metal surfaces, focusing on electronic and vibrational spectroscopy in one case and scanning tunneling microscopy studies in the other. Original research articles describe results in many aspects of the field, including: Self-assembly, self-organization, and controlled growth of molecular layers on various substrates. Highly-ordered arrays provide model systems with extraordinary structural properties, allowing one to adjust interactions between molecules and between molecule and substrate, and can be robustly prepared from solution, an essential prerequisite for applications. Conformational or electronic switching of molecules adsorbed at metal and semiconductor surfaces. These studies highlight the elementary processes governing molecular switching at surfaces as well as the wide range of possible stimuli. Carbon-based substrates such as graphene or carbon nanotubes. These substrates are attractive due to their effective two-dimensionality which implies that switching of adsorbed molecules can effect a significant back-action on the substrate. Mechanisms of conformational switching. Several contributions study the role of electron-vibron coupling and heating in current-induced conformational switching. We hope that the collection of articles presented here will stimulate and encourage researchers in surface physics and interfacial chemistry to contribute to the still emerging field of molecular switches at surfaces. We wish to acknowledge the support and input from many colleagues in preparing this special section. A significant part of this work has been conducted in the framework of the Sonderforschungsbereich 658 Elementary Processes in Molecular Switches at Surfaces of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, to which we are grateful for financial support. Molecular surfaces at switches contents Molecular switches at surfacesMartin Weinelt and Felix von Oppen Optically and thermally induced molecular switching processes at metal surfacesPetra Tegeder Effects of electron-vibration coupling in transport through single moleculesKatharina J Franke and Jose Ignaci

Weinelt, Martin; von Oppen, Felix

2012-10-01

355

Dual feedback loops in the GAL regulon suppress cellular heterogeneity in yeast.  

PubMed

Transcriptional noise is known to be an important cause of cellular heterogeneity and phenotypic variation. The extent to which molecular interaction networks may have evolved to either filter or exploit transcriptional noise is a much debated question. The yeast genetic network regulating galactose metabolism involves two proteins, Gal3p and Gal80p, that feed back positively and negatively, respectively, on GAL gene expression. Using kinetic modeling and experimental validation, we demonstrate that these feedback interactions together are important for (i) controlling the cell-to-cell variability of GAL gene expression and (ii) ensuring that cells rapidly switch to an induced state for galactose uptake. PMID:16936734

Ramsey, Stephen A; Smith, Jennifer J; Orrell, David; Marelli, Marcello; Petersen, Timothy W; de Atauri, Pedro; Bolouri, Hamid; Aitchison, John D

2006-09-01

356

Compartmentalization of a bistable switch enables memory to cross a feedback-driven transition.  

PubMed

Cells make accurate decisions in the face of molecular noise and environmental fluctuations by relying not only on present pathway activity, but also on their memory of past signaling dynamics. Once a decision is made, cellular transitions are often rapid and switch-like due to positive feedback loops in the regulatory network. While positive feedback loops are good at promoting switch-like transitions, they are not expected to retain information to inform subsequent decisions. However, this expectation is based on our current understanding of network motifs that accounts for temporal, but not spatial, dynamics. Here, we show how spatial organization of the feedback-driven yeast G1/S switch enables the transmission of memory of past pheromone exposure across this transition. We expect this to be one of many examples where the exquisite spatial organization of the eukaryotic cell enables previously well-characterized network motifs to perform new and unexpected signal processing functions. PMID:25768911

Doncic, Andreas; Atay, Oguzhan; Valk, Ervin; Grande, Alicia; Bush, Alan; Vasen, Gustavo; Colman-Lerner, Alejandro; Loog, Mart; Skotheim, Jan M

2015-03-12

357

Study of optoelectronic switch for satellite-switched time-division multiple access  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of optoelectronic switching for satellite switched time division multiple access will improve the isolation and reduce the crosstalk of an IF switch matrix. The results are presented of a study on optoelectronic switching. Tasks include literature search, system requirements study, candidate switching architecture analysis, and switch model optimization. The results show that the power divided and crossbar switching architectures are good candidates for an IF switch matrix.

Su, Shing-Fong; Jou, Liz; Lenart, Joe

1987-01-01

358

A Caspase-Related Protease Regulates Apoptosis in Yeast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yeast can undergo cell death accompanied by cellular markers of apoptosis. However, orthologs of classical mammalian apoptosis regulators appeared to be missing from the yeast genome, challenging a common mechanism of yeast and mammalian apoptosis. Here we investigate Yor197w, a yeast protein with structural homology to mammalian caspases, and demonstrate caspase-like processing of the protein. Hydrogen peroxide treatment induces apoptosis

Frank Madeo; Eva Herker; Corinna Maldener; Silke Wissing; Stephan Lächelt; Mark Herlan; Markus Fehr; Kirsten Lauber; Stephan J Sigrist; Sebastian Wesselborg; Kai-Uwe Fröhlich

2002-01-01

359

Original article Effect of a viable yeast culture on digestibility  

E-print Network

Original article Effect of a viable yeast culture on digestibility and rumen fermentation in sheep that the effect of yeast culture on ru- men fermentation may depend on the nature of.the diet. Living yeast cell survived the passage through the digestive tract. yeast I rumen fermentation I volatile fatty acids I sheep

Boyer, Edmond

360

The genetics of aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

Microsoft Academic Search

The yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae possesses a finite life span similar in many attributes and implications to that of higher eukaryotes. Here, the measure of the life span is the number of generations or divisions the yeast cell has undergone. The yeast cell is the organism, simplifying many aspects of aging research. Most importantly, the genetics of yeast is highly-developed and readily

S. Michal Jazwinski

1993-01-01

361

Transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling mechanisms at PHO5  

E-print Network

in nucleosome remodeling. The most widely studied complex is the Swi-Snf complex in yeast, named for its role in mating- type switching as well as sucrose fermentation (reviewed in Martens and Winston, 2003). Defects in the human Swi-Snf complex are linked... with permission from Archana Dhasarathy. 12 An earlier study showed that yeast genes could be classified into three distinct classes based on their requirement for the chromatin remodelers Swi- Snf and SAGA: 1) those genes which require both Swi-Snf...

Carvin, Christopher Dumas

2005-08-29

362

Switching Matrix For Optical Signals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proposed matrix of electronically controlled shutters switches signals in optical fibers between multiple input and output channels. Size, weight, and power consumption reduced. Device serves as building block for small, low-power, broad-band television- and data-signal-switching systems providing high isolation between nominally disconnected channels.

Grove, Charles H.

1990-01-01

363

IP switching and gigabit routers  

Microsoft Academic Search

To cope with the growth in the Internet and corporate IP networks, we require IP routers capable of much higher performance than is possible with existing architectures. This article examines two approaches to the design of a high-performance router, the gigabit router and the IP switch, and then provides some detail on the implementation of an IP switch and the

P. Newman; G. Minshall; T. Lyon; L. Huston

1997-01-01

364

Battery switch for downhole tools  

SciTech Connect

An electrical circuit for a downhole tool may include a battery, a load electrically connected to the battery, and at least one switch electrically connected in series with the battery and to the load. The at least one switch may be configured to close when a tool temperature exceeds a selected temperature.

Boling, Brian E. (Sugar Land, TX)

2010-02-23

365

Dual switched mode power converter  

Microsoft Academic Search

A dual power converter is introduced which addresses the problem of output ripple and switching losses in a switched power converter. One stage of the power converter is a conventional PWM (pulse-width modulated) converter, and the other stage is a linear source. The linear source controls the voltage directly, and the output current of the linear stage is used to

PALLAB MIDYA; FRED H. SCHLERETH

1989-01-01

366

[Effects of nitrogen on performance and yeast morphology of yeast-SBR system].  

PubMed

Effects of nitrogen on yeast cell morphology, settleability and performance of wastewater treatment were investigated in treating oil-containing wastewater by yeast-SBR system. The results show that: nitrogen supply affects directly yeast biomass, settleability, pH and treatment efficiency of system; the absence of nitrogen induces the transformation of certain yeast cells from single cell to hypha morphology. Based on an overall consideration of efficiency and stability of yeast-SBR system, the optimum BOD/N ratio of influent is 20/1. The optimum nitrogen supply can improve wastewater treatment efficiency of systems with different degrees of nitrogen absence and make yeast morphology become the predominant morphology for slightly mycelial system over a short time, but for severe mycelial system, the hypha morphology still keeps dominant. PMID:18624205

Lü, Wen-Zhou; Liu, Ying; Chen, He-Ping; Zhu, Jian-Lin

2008-05-01

367

MAP kinase dynamics in yeast.  

PubMed

MAP kinase pathways play key roles in cellular responses towards extracellular signals. In several cases, the three core kinases interact with a scaffold molecule, but the function of these scaffolds is poorly understood. They have been proposed to contribute to signal specificity, signal amplification, or subcellular localization of MAP kinases. Several MAP kinases translocate to the nucleus in response to their activation, suggesting that nuclear transport may provide a regulatory mechanism. Here we describe new applications for Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescence Loss In Photobleaching (FLIP), to study dynamic translocations of MAPKs between different subcellular compartments. We have used these methods to measure the nuclear/cytoplasmic dynamics of several yeast MAP kinases, and in particular to address the role of scaffold proteins for MAP-kinase signaling. PMID:11730324

van Drogen, F; Peter, M

2001-09-01

368

Corning and Kroger turn whey to yeast  

SciTech Connect

It is reported that Corning and Kroger intend to build a 35,000 sq. ft. plant in Winchester, Ky., that will turn whey into bakers' yeast. The plant will convert whey from Kroger's dairies into bakers' yeast, supplying about 60% of the yeast needed for nine Kroger bakeries. It will also produce syrups and whey protein concentrate for use in other food processing activities. In addition to making useful products, the project will convert the whey to glucose and galactose. The protein component of the whey will be concentrated and used in various foods and feeds.

Not Available

1981-11-16

369

Yeast molecular biology recombinant DNA. Recent advances  

SciTech Connect

Insights into recombinant DNA technology, as applied to yeast research, are described in this volume based on the First Berkeley Workshop on Recent Advances in Yeast Molecular Biology. The results of various genetic engineering techniques in recombinant DNA studies in yeast are detailed and discussed. The papers describe experimental approaches using the newest technologies of DNA transformations, molecular cloning, and DNA sequence analysis. These techniques are employed to gain new information regarding chromosomal structure, gene regulation, DNA recombination and repair, and cell type control.

Esposito, M.S.

1984-01-01

370

Yeast culture volatiles as attractants for Rhodnius prolixus: electroantennogram responses and captures in yeast-baited traps  

Microsoft Academic Search

Responses to air currents carrying volatiles from yeast cultures were measured by means of electroantennograms (EAGs) in the haematophagous bug Rhodnius prolixus and we tested yeast-baited traps in the laboratory. The volatiles liberated by yeast cultures generated a clear electrophysiological response, much higher than that obtained during stimulation with clean air. The addition of yeast cultures to the traps dramatically

M. G. Lorenzo; G. Manrique; H. H. R. Pires; M. G. de Brito Sánchez; L. Diotaiuti; C. R. Lazzari

1999-01-01

371

Robust adaptive control of switched systems  

E-print Network

In this thesis, robust adaptive controllers are developed for classes of switched nonlinear systems. Switched systems are those governed by differential equations, which undergo vector field switching due to sudden changes ...

El-Rifai, Khalid, 1979-

2007-01-01

372

''Smart'' watchdog safety switch  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus for monitoring a process having a periodic output so that the process equipment is not damaged in the event of a controller failure, comprising a low-pass and peak clipping filter, an event detector that generates an event pulse for each valid change in magnitude of the filtered periodic output, a timing pulse generator, a counter that increments upon receipt of any timing pulse and resets to zero on receipt of any event pulse, an alarm that alerts when the count reaches some preselected total count, and a set of relays that opens to stop power to process equipment. An interface module can be added to allow the switch to accept a variety of periodic output signals. 21 figures.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-10-01

373

"Smart" watchdog safety switch  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus for monitoring a process having a periodic output so that the process equipment is not damaged in the event of a controller failure, comprising a low-pass and peak clipping filter, an event detector that generates an event pulse for each valid change in magnitude of the filtered periodic output, a timing pulse generator, a counter that increments upon receipt of any timing pulse and resets to zero on receipt of any event pulse, an alarm that alerts when the count reaches some preselected total count, and a set of relays that opens to stop power to process equipment. An interface module can be added to allow the switch to accept a variety of periodic output signals.

Kronberg, James W. (353 Church Rd., Beech Island, SC 29842)

1991-01-01

374

High voltage coaxial switch  

DOEpatents

A coaxial high voltage, high current switch having a solid cylindrical cold cathode coaxially surrounded by a thin hollow cylindrical inner electrode and a larger hollow cylindrical outer electrode. A high voltage trigger between the cathode and the inner electrode causes electrons to be emitted from the cathode and flow to the inner electrode preferably through a vacuum. Some of the electrons penetrate the inner electrode and cause a volumetric discharge in the gas (which may be merely air) between the inner and outer electrodes. The discharge provides a low impedance path between a high voltage charge placed on the outer electrode and a load (which may be a high power laser) coupled to the inner electrode. For high repetition rate the gas between the inner and outer electrodes may be continuously exchanged or refreshed under pressure.

Rink, John P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1983-07-19

375

High voltage coaxial switch  

DOEpatents

A coaxial high voltage, high current switch having a solid cylindrical cold cathode coaxially surrounded by a thin hollow cylindrical inner electrode and a larger hollow cylindrical outer electrode. A high voltage trigger between the cathode and the inner electrode causes electrons to be emitted from the cathode and flow to the inner electrode preferably through a vacuum. Some of the electrons penetrate the inner electrode and cause a volumetric discharge in the gas (which may be merely air) between the inner and outer electrodes. The discharge provides a low impedance path between a high voltage charge placed on the outer electrode and a load (which may be a high power laser) coupled to the inner electrode. For high repetition rate the gas between the inner and outer electrodes may be continuously exchanged or refreshed under pressure. 3 figs.

Rink, J.P.

1983-07-19

376

Optimized scalable network switch  

DOEpatents

In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton On Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

2007-12-04

377

Optimized scalable network switch  

DOEpatents

In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton on Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

2010-02-23

378

YeastWeb: a workset-centric web resource for gene family analysis in yeast  

PubMed Central

Background Currently, a number of yeast genomes with different physiological features have been sequenced and annotated, which provides invaluable information to investigate yeast genetics, evolutionary mechanism, structure and function of gene families. Description YeastWeb is a novel database created to provide access to gene families derived from the available yeast genomes by assigning the genes into putative families. It has many useful features that complement existing databases, such as SGD, CYGD and Génolevures: 1) Detailed computational annotation was conducted with each entry with InterProScan, EMBOSS and functional/pathway databases, such as GO, COG and KEGG; 2) A well established user-friendly environment was created to allow users to retrieve the annotated genes and gene families using functional classification browser, keyword search or similarity-based search; 3) Workset offers users many powerful functions to manage the retrieved data efficiently, associate the individual items easily and save the intermediate results conveniently; 4) A series of comparative genomics and molecular evolution analysis tools are neatly implemented to allow users to view multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic tree of gene families. At present, YeastWeb holds the gene families clustered from various MCL inflation values from a total of 13 available yeast genomes. Conclusions Given the great interest in yeast research, YeastWeb has the potential to become a useful resource for the scientific community of yeast biologists and related researchers investigating the evolutionary relationship of yeast gene families. YeastWeb is available at http://centre.bioinformatics.zj.cn/Yeast/. PMID:20624324

2010-01-01

379

Prion formation by a yeast GLFG nucleoporin  

E-print Network

The self-assembly of proteins into higher order structures is both central to normal biology and a dominant force in disease. Certain glutamine/asparagine (Q/N)-rich proteins in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae ...

Halfmann, Randal

380

Monitoring Air Quality with Leaf Yeasts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Proposes that leaf yeast serve as quick, inexpensive, and effective techniques for monitoring air quality. Outlines procedures and provides suggestions for data analysis. Includes results from sample school groups who employed this technique. (ML)

Richardson, D. H. S.; And Others

1985-01-01

381

Yeast Genomic DNA Prep Sterile distilled water  

E-print Network

Auble Lab Yeast Genomic DNA Prep Reagents: Sterile distilled water -mercaptoethanol Sorbitol Buffer conical tube at 3,000 rpms for 5 minutes. 3. Resuspend in 10 ml of sterile distilled (SD) water, then spin

Auble, David

382

Comparative Functional Genomics of the Fission Yeasts  

E-print Network

The fission yeast clade—comprising Schizosaccharomyces pombe, S. octosporus, S. cryophilus, and S. japonicus—occupies the basal branch of Ascomycete fungi and is an important model of eukaryote biology. A comparative ...

Regev, Aviv

383

Protection from nitrosative stress by yeast flavohemoglobin  

PubMed Central

Yeast hemoglobin was discovered close to half a century ago, but its function has remained unknown. Herein, we report that this flavohemoglobin protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae from nitrosative stress. Deletion of the flavohemoglobin gene (YHB1) abolished the nitric oxide (NO)-consuming activity of yeast cells. Levels of protein nitrosylation were more than 10-fold higher in yhb1 mutant yeast than in isogenic wild-type cells after incubation with NO donors. Growth of mutant cells was inhibited by a nitrosative challenge that had little effect on wild-type cells, whereas the resistance of mutant cells to oxidative stress was unimpaired. Protection conferred by yeast flavohemoglobin against NO and S-nitrosothiols was seen under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions, consistent with a primary function in NO detoxification. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that protection from nitrosative stress is likely to be a conserved function among microorganismal flavohemoglobins. Flavohemoglobin is therefore a potential target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:10758168

Liu, Limin; Zeng, Ming; Hausladen, Alfred; Heitman, Joseph; Stamler, Jonathan S.

2000-01-01

384

Macromolecular synthesis by yeasts under frozen conditions  

E-print Network

by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Experi- ments at -5°C under frozen and liquid conditionsMacromolecular synthesis by yeasts under frozen conditions Pierre Amato,* Shawn Doyle and Brent C

Christner, Brent C.

385

Featured Organism: Schizosaccharomyces pombe, The Fission Yeast  

PubMed Central

Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the fission yeast, has long been a crucial model for the study of the eukaryote cell cycle. We take a look at this important yeast, whose genome has recently been completed, featuring comments from Valerie Wood, Jürg Bähler, Ramsay McFarlane, Susan Forsburg, Iain Hagan and Paul Nurse on the implications of having the complete sequence and future prospects for pombe genomics. PMID:18628834

2002-01-01

386

Whey Alcohol Fermentation with Mixed Yeast Cultures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper study the process of whey alcohol fermentation with mixed yeasts cultures. After the experiments of strains combination, the yeast strains of Saccharomyces uvarum TY-3, Saccharomyces uvarum TY-1 and Saccharomyces carlsbergensis AY-5 were selected and mixed at the ratio of 5.0:2.5:2.5. The optimized fermenting condition was obtained through orthogonal experiments with the result as follows: the initial pH value

Wang Jianming; Guo Linhai; Zhao Guoren

2009-01-01

387

Mitochondria, metabolism, and aging in yeast  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Quantitative and qualitative changes in metabolism take place when the lifespan is extended in yeast either by genetic or\\u000a nutritional manipulation. In particular, remodeling of mitochondrial function occurs, and the relationship between this organelle\\u000a and other cellular compartments moves to the fore. Two separate pathways, the retrograde response and calorie restriction,\\u000a operate as metabolic mechanisms for life extension in yeast.

S. Michal Jazwinski

388

How to Make Yeast Cells Thrive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students set up and run the experiments they designed in the Population Growth in Yeasts associated lesson, using simple yeast-molasses cultures in test tubes. Population growth is indicated by the amount of respiration occurring in the cultures, which in turn is indicated by the growth of carbon dioxide bubbles trapped within the culture tubes. Using this method, students test for a variety of environmental influences, such as temperature, food supply and pH.

2014-09-18

389

Multiple pulse photoconductive semiconductor switching  

SciTech Connect

Photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) with short carrier recombination lifetimes (1-100ns) have exhibited comparable opening times in high power (57 kV, 1.0 kA) circuits. Such extremely fast recovery times are not available with the switches generally used for high power (>10kW) switching, e.g., spark gaps, thyratrons, and silicon controlled rectifiers. Furthermore, since these switches were made with relatively small pieces of semiconductor (2.54 cm dia. by 625 ..mu..m thick), and since PCSS scales linearly in two dimensions to higher voltages and currents, much higher power switches may be developed. New high power switches which have the ability to open and close in a 1-10 ns time scale provide the tools to switch high power radiofrequency (RF) circuits above 10 MHz actively. This paper presents three methods to create RF bursts with PCSS. The feasibility of each method is explored, and experiments being performed to test these techniques are described. 9 refs., 11 figs.

Zutavern, F.J.; McKenzie, B.B.; Loubriel, G.M.; O'Malley, M.W.; Hamil, R.A.; Schanwald, L.P.

1988-01-01

390

Ultrafast optical switch evaluation facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current major limiting factor in digital optical computing is the absence of a fast, efficient, cascadable optical switch. Material and processing approaches to optical switch construction are not limited to the well known semiconductors and fabrication methods of electronics. A facility to evaluate candidate devices has been constructed. Multiline and tunable femtosecond and picosecond laser systems, as well as frequency mixing systems, are used as light sources. The facility has at least picosecond source capability from 200 nm to 2 micrometers . The switch transfer function is evaluated in a pump-probe system with femtosecond and picosecond autocorrelators to measure temporal properties, an optical multichannel analyzer to measure spectral properties, a CCD or pyroelectric camera system to measure mode modification, and a multi-detector system to measure switching energy and insertion loss both in absorption and in reflection. The switch or switching array under test is mounted in a 6 axis micropositioner system with a 0 - 20 goniometer, x, y, and z translators, and a tilt goniometer. The system's design, as well as initial measurements of nonlinear interface optical switches based on photorefractive thin films are presented.

Osman, Joseph M.; Chaiken, Joseph; DeVaul, Brian

1993-01-01

391

Alarm toe switch. [Patent application  

DOEpatents

An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit in a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch.

Ganyard, F.P.

1980-11-18

392

Yeast communities in a natural tequila fermentation.  

PubMed

Fresh and cooked agave, Drosophila spp., processing equipment, agave molasses, agave extract, and fermenting must at a traditional tequila distillery (Herradura, Amatitan, Jalisco, México) were studied to gain insight on the origin of yeasts involved in a natural tequila fermentations. Five yeast communities were identified. (1) Fresh agave contained a diverse mycobiota dominated by Clavispora lusitaniae and an endemic species, Metschnikowia agaveae. (2) Drosophila spp. from around or inside the distillery yielded typical fruit yeasts, in particular Hanseniaspora spp., Pichia kluyveri, and Candida krusei. (3) Schizosaccharomyces pombe prevailed in molasses. (4) Cooked agave and extract had a considerable diversity of species, but included Saccharomyces cerevisiae. (5) Fermenting juice underwent a gradual reduction in yeast heterogeneity. Torulaspora delbrueckii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Hanseniaspora spp. progressively ceded the way to S. cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Candida milleri, and Brettanomyces spp. With the exception of Pichia membranaefaciens, which was shared by all communities, little overlap existed. That separation was even more manifest when species were divided into distinguishable biotypes based on morphology or physiology. It is concluded that crushing equipment and must holding tanks are the main source of significant inoculum for the fermentation process. Drosophila species appear to serve as internal vectors. Proximity to fruit trees probably contributes to maintaining a substantial Drosophila community, but the yeasts found in the distillery exhibit very little similarity to those found in adjacent vegetation. Interactions involving killer toxins had no apparent direct effects on the yeast community structure. PMID:8546452

Lachance, M A

1995-08-01

393

The growth of solar radiated yeast  

SciTech Connect

This researcher plans to determine if solar radiation affects the growth of yeast. The irradiated yeast was obtained from a sample exposed in space during a Space Shuttle flight of September 9-20, 1994. Further, the control groups were held at: (1) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland; and (2) South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The procedure used was based on the fact that yeast is most often used in consumable baked goods. Therefore, the yeast was incorporated into a basic Betty Crocker bread recipe. Data was collected by placing measured amounts of dough into sample containers with fifteen minute growth in height measurements collected and recorded. This researcher assumed the viability of yeast to be relative to its ability to produce carbon dioxide gas and cause the dough to rise. As all ingredients and surroundings were equal, this researcher assumed the yeast will produce the only significant difference in data collected. This researcher noted the approximate use date on all sample packages to be prior to arrival and experiment date. All dates equal, it was then assumed each would act in a similar manner of response. This assumption will allow for equally correct data collection.

Kraft, T.

1995-09-01

394

The growth of solar radiated yeast  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This researcher plans to determine if solar radiation affects the growth of yeast. The irradiated yeast was obtained from a sample exposed in space during a Space Shuttle flight of September 9-20, 1994. Further, the control groups were held at: (1) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland; and (2) South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The procedure used was based on the fact that yeast is most often used in consumable baked goods. Therefore, the yeast was incorporated into a basic Betty Crocker bread recipe. Data was collected by placing measured amounts of dough into sample containers with fifteen minute growth in height measurements collected and recorded. This researcher assumed the viability of yeast to be relative to its ability to produce carbon dioxide gas and cause the dough to rise. As all ingredients and surroundings were equal, this researcher assumed the yeast will produce the only significant difference in data collected. This researcher noted the approximate use date on all sample packages to be prior to arrival and experiment date. All dates equal, it was then assumed each would act in a similar manner of response. This assumption will allow for equally correct data collection.

Kraft, Tyrone

1995-01-01

395

Glutaraldehyde enhanced dielectrophoretic yeast cell separation  

PubMed Central

We introduce a method for improved dielectrophoretic (DEP) discrimination and separation of viable and nonviable yeast cells. Due to the higher cell wall permeability of nonviable yeast cells compared with their viable counterpart, the cross-linking agent glutaraldehyde (GLT) is shown to selectively cross-link nonviable cells to a much greater extent than viable yeast. The DEP crossover frequency (cof) of both viable and nonviable yeast cells was measured over a large range of buffer conductivities (22 ?S?cm–400 ?S?cm) in order to study this effect. The results indicate that due to selective nonviable cell cross-linking, GLT modifies the DEP cof of nonviable cells, while viable cell cof remains relatively unaffected. To investigate this in more detail, a dual-shelled oblate spheroid model was evoked and fitted to the cof data to study cell electrical properties. GLT treatment is shown to minimize ion leakage out of the nonviable yeast cells by minimizing changes in cytoplasm conductivity over a large range of ionic concentrations. This effect is only observable in nonviable cells where GLT treatment serves to stabilize the cell cytoplasm conductivity over a large range of buffer conductivity and allow for much greater differences between viable and nonviable cell cofs. As such, by taking advantage of differences in cell wall permeability GLT magnifies the effect DEP has on the field induced separation of viable and nonviable yeasts. PMID:20216970

Gagnon, Zachary; Mazur, Jill; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

2009-01-01

396

Physiological and environmental control of yeast prions  

PubMed Central

Prions are self-perpetuating protein isoforms that cause fatal and incurable neurodegenerative disease in mammals. Recent evidence indicates that a majority of human proteins involved in amyloid and neural inclusion disorders possess at least some prion properties. In lower eukaryotes, such as yeast, prions act as epigenetic elements, which increase phenotypic diversity by altering a range of cellular processes. While some yeast prions are clearly pathogenic, it is also postulated that prion formation could be beneficial in variable environmental conditions. Yeast and mammalian prions have similar molecular properties. Crucial cellular factors and conditions influencing prion formation and propagation were uncovered in the yeast models. Stress-related chaperones, protein quality control deposits, degradation pathways and cytoskeletal networks control prion formation and propagation in yeast. Environmental stresses trigger prion formation and loss, supposedly acting via influencing intracellular concentrations of the prion-inducing proteins, and/or by localizing prionogenic proteins to the prion induction sites via heterologous ancillary helpers. Physiological and environmental modulation of yeast prions points to new opportunities for pharmacological intervention and/or prophylactic measures targeting general cellular systems rather than the properties of individual amyloids and prions. PMID:24236638

Chernova, Tatiana A.; Wilkinson, Keith D.; Chernoff, Yury O.

2014-01-01

397

Switch dynamics for stochastic model of genetic toggle switch  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, more and more biological experiments have indicated that noise plays an important role in bistable systems, such as the case of the bimodal population distribution in the genetic toggle switch. In this paper, we further verify that noises in degradation rates can indeed induce switching in the genetic toggle switch. Meanwhile, we apply the theory of mean first passage time (MFPT) in high dimensional system to the above stochastic model. According to our assumption, the high order finite difference method is used to compute the MFPT (that the average time switching from one steady state to the other) and we find that the relationship between the MFPT and noise intensity is negative correlation. The result is also verified through another numerical simulation method.

Xu, Yong; Zhu, Ya-nan; Shen, Jianwei; Su, Jianbin

2014-12-01

398

Four switching categories of ferroelectrics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We classify the switching kinetics of ferroelectrics including both epitaxial/polycrystalline thin films and single-crystalline/ceramic bulks at various applied fields into four categories, depending on whether the depolarization field and/or the polarization reversal induced by the switching promotion effect between adjacent parts can be neglected. We show that our statistical model developed very recently [X. J. Lou, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21, 012207 (2009)] in its generalized form applies to all these four categories. Finally, we make the comparison between our model and the conventional Kolmogorov-Avrami-Ishibashi model and discuss the behavior of the switching currents for different n.

Lou, X. J.

2009-05-01

399

Conduction switching of photochromic molecules.  

PubMed

We report a theoretical study of single molecule conduction switching of photochromic dithienylethene molecules. The light-induced intramolecular transformation drives a swapping of the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital between two distinct conjugated paths. The shuffling of single and double bonds produces a significant conductance change when the molecule is sandwiched between metal electrodes. We model the switching event using quantum molecular dynamics and the conductance changes using Green's function electronic transport theory. We find large on-off conductance ratios (between 10 and over 100) depending on the side group outside the switching core. PMID:15697867

Li, Jun; Speyer, Gil; Sankey, Otto F

2004-12-10

400

Characteristics of switching plasma in an inverse-pinch switch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Characteristics of the plasma that switches on tens of giga volt-ampere in an inverse-pinch plasma switch (INPIStron) have been made. Through optical and spectroscopic diagnostics of the current carrying plasma, the current density, the motion of current paths, dominant ionic species have been determined in order to access their effects on circuit parameters and material erosion. Also the optimum operational condition of the plasma-puff triggering method required for azimuthally uniform conduction in the INPIStron has been determined.

Lee, Ja H.; Choi, Sang H.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Han, Kwang S.; Nam, Sang H.

1993-01-01

401

Switching performance of a cryogenic silicon photoconductive power switch  

Microsoft Academic Search

The silicon photoconductive power switch has the potential to replace gaseous discharge switches like thyratrons, krytrons, ignitrons, and spark gaps, that are commonly found in high-voltage and high-current pulse circuits. This offers the possibility of developing advanced laser and radar drive circuits that are all-solid state, and which enjoy the advantages of improved efficiency, compactness, and life expectancy. Silicon operating

R. A. Petr; W. C. Nunnally; C. V. Smith

1988-01-01

402

Switching performance of Nb3Sn persistent current switch  

Microsoft Academic Search

We designed a persistent current switch consisting of Nb3Sn superconducting wire for Superconducting Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic Propulsion Ship (MHDS). Nb3Sn has Tc higher than NbTi, which is commonly used for the conventional persistent current switch, and thus is expected to show a higher stability against the disturbance. We therefore performed numerical simulations for the heat transfer in a 10kA-class Nb3Sn persistent current

M. Tomita; K. Nemoto; K. Sugawara; M. Murakami

2000-01-01

403

The MATA locus of the dimorphic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica consists of two divergently oriented genes.  

PubMed

The MATA locus of Yarrowia lipolytica, which was on the basis of its ability to induce sporulation in a diploid B/B strain, represses the mating capacity of this strain. The gene functions required for induction of sporulation and repression of conjugation could be separated by subcloning. Sequence analysis revealed two ORFs in the MATA locus. One of them (MATA1) codes for a protein of 119 amino acids which is required to induce sporulation. The other (MATA2) codes for a protein of 291 amino acids that is able to repress conjugation. Both genes are oriented divergently from a central promoter region, which possesses putative TATA and CAAT boxes for both genes. The product of MATA1 shows no homology to any known protein and seems to represent a new class of mating-type genes. MATA2 contains a HMG box with homology to other mating-type genes. Both MATA1 and MATA2 are mating-type specific. In cells of both mating types, the regions flanking the MATA locus contain sequences with homology to either S. cerevisiae SLA2 and ORF YBB9, respectively. From hybridization and subcloning data we estimate that the MATA region is approximately 2 kb long and is present only once in the genome. PMID:10503550

Kurischko, C; Schilhabel, M B; Kunze, I; Franzl, E

1999-08-01

404

Regenerative switching CMOS system  

DOEpatents

Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a seriesed combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided.

Welch, James D. (10328 Pinehurst Ave., Omaha, NE 68124)

1998-01-01

405

Regenerative switching CMOS system  

DOEpatents

Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a series combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electrically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided. 14 figs.

Welch, J.D.

1998-06-02

406

The magnetoelectrochemical switch  

PubMed Central

In the field of spintronics, the archetype solid-state two-terminal device is the spin valve, where the resistance is controlled by the magnetization configuration. We show here how this concept of spin-dependent switch can be extended to magnetic electrodes in solution, by magnetic control of their chemical environment. Appropriate nanoscale design allows a huge enhancement of the magnetic force field experienced by paramagnetic molecular species in solutions, which changes between repulsive and attractive on changing the electrodes’ magnetic orientations. Specifically, the field gradient force created within a sub-100-nm-sized nanogap separating two magnetic electrodes can be reversed by changing the orientation of the electrodes’ magnetization relative to the current flowing between the electrodes. This can result in a breaking or making of an electric nanocontact, with a change of resistance by a factor of up to 103. The results reveal how an external field can impact chemical equilibrium in the vicinity of nanoscale magnetic circuits. PMID:25009179

Lunca Popa, Petru; Kemp, Neil T.; Majjad, Hicham; Dalmas, Guillaume; Faramarzi, Vina; Andreas, Christian; Hertel, Riccardo; Doudin, Bernard

2014-01-01

407

Discussion of teleomorphic and anamorphic Ascomycetous yeasts and yeast-like taxa  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The relationship of ascomycetous yeasts with other members of the ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) has been controversial for over 100 years. Because yeasts are morphologically simple, it was proposed that they represent primitive forms of ascomycetes (e.g., Guilliermond 1912). Alternatively, the ide...

408

Yeast Transformation Inoculate 100 ml YPD with 1 single (reasonably fat) yeast colony at about 5  

E-print Network

. Heat shock 15 minutes at 42 C. Pellet cells 5 seconds in microfuge, discard supernatant. ResuspendAuble Lab Yeast Transformation Inoculate 100 ml YPD with 1 single (reasonably fat) yeast colony cells in 0.2 ml TE. Plate 200 µl of each transformation. Wrap plates and incubate at 30 C. #12;Auble Lab

Auble, David

409

Theory of molecular hysteresis switch  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Molecular hysteresis switching has been recently observed in a series of experiments that measured the I-V spectrum of bipyridyl-dinitro oligophenylene-ethylene dithiol (BPDN) based molecular devices [1]. The experimental observations clearly show the presence of Coulomb blockade in single organic molecules that is responsible for the voltage-induced switching. We present the theory of the hysteresis switch which explains the non-linear hysteresis I-V characteristics based on the mechanisms of Coulomb blockade and the existence of two different molecular conformations of neutral and charged states of the molecule. [1] A.S. Blum, J.G. Kushmerick, D.P. Long, C.H. Patterson, J.C. Yang, J.C. Henderson, Y.X. Yao, J.M. Tour, R. Shashidhar, and B.R. Ratna, ``Molecularly inherent voltage-controlled conductance switching'' , Nature Materials 4, 167 (2005).

Kozhushner, Mortko; Oleynik, Ivan

2006-03-01

410

Electron collisions in gas switches  

SciTech Connect

Many technologies rely on the conduction/insulation properties of gaseous matter for their successful operation. Many others (e.g., pulsed power technologies) rely on the rapid change (switching or modulation) of the properties of gaseous matter from an insulator to a conductor and vice versa. Studies of electron collision processes in gases aided the development of pulsed power gas switches, and in this paper we shall briefly illustrate the kind of knowledge on electron collision processes which is needed to optimize the performance of such switching devices. To this end, we shall refer to three types of gas switches: spark gap closing, self-sustained diffuse discharge closing, and externally-sustained diffuse discharge opening. 24 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Christophorou, L.G.

1989-01-01

411

Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches  

SciTech Connect

Photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) have been investigated since the late 1970s. Some devices have been developed that withstand tens of kilovolts and others that switch hundreds of amperes. However, no single device has been developed that can reliably withstand both high voltage and switch high current. Yet, photoconductive switches still hold the promise of reliable high voltage and high current operation with subnanosecond risetimes. Particularly since good quality, bulk, single crystal, wide bandgap semiconductor materials have recently become available. In this chapter we will review the basic operation of PCSS devices, status of PCSS devices and properties of the wide bandgap semiconductors 4H-SiC, 6H-SiC and 2H-GaN.

Sullivan, J S

2012-01-17

412

Yeast and human mitochondrial helicases.  

PubMed

Mitochondria are semiautonomous organelles which contain their own genome. Both maintenance and expression of mitochondrial DNA require activity of RNA and DNA helicases. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the nuclear genome encodes four DExH/D superfamily members (MSS116, SUV3, MRH4, IRC3) that act as helicases and/or RNA chaperones. Their activity is necessary for mitochondrial RNA splicing, degradation, translation and genome maintenance. In humans the ortholog of SUV3 (hSUV3, SUPV3L1) so far is the best described mitochondrial RNA helicase. The enzyme, together with the matrix-localized pool of PNPase (PNPT1), forms an RNA-degrading complex called the mitochondrial degradosome, which localizes to distinct structures (D-foci). Global regulation of mitochondrially encoded genes can be achieved by changing mitochondrial DNA copy number. This way the proteins involved in its replication, like the Twinkle helicase (c10orf2), can indirectly regulate gene expression. Here, we describe yeast and human mitochondrial helicases that are directly involved in mitochondrial RNA metabolism, and present other helicases that participate in mitochondrial DNA replication and maintenance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Biology of RNA helicases - Modulation for life. PMID:23454114

Szczesny, Roman J; Wojcik, Magdalena A; Borowski, Lukasz S; Szewczyk, Maciej J; Skrok, Magda M; Golik, Pawel; Stepien, Piotr P

2013-08-01

413

The One Hour Yeast Proteome*  

PubMed Central

We describe the comprehensive analysis of the yeast proteome in just over one hour of optimized analysis. We achieve this expedited proteome characterization with improved sample preparation, chromatographic separations, and by using a new Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer equipped with a mass filter, a collision cell, a high-field Orbitrap analyzer, and, finally, a dual cell linear ion trap analyzer (Q-OT-qIT, Orbitrap Fusion). This system offers high MS2 acquisition speed of 20 Hz and detects up to 19 peptide sequences within a single second of operation. Over a 1.3 h chromatographic method, the Q-OT-qIT hybrid collected an average of 13,447 MS1 and 80,460 MS2 scans (per run) to produce 43,400 (x?) peptide spectral matches and 34,255 (x?) peptides with unique amino acid sequences (1% false discovery rate (FDR)). On average, each one hour analysis achieved detection of 3,977 proteins (1% FDR). We conclude that further improvements in mass spectrometer scan rate could render comprehensive analysis of the human proteome within a few hours. PMID:24143002

Hebert, Alexander S.; Richards, Alicia L.; Bailey, Derek J.; Ulbrich, Arne; Coughlin, Emma E.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.

2014-01-01

414

Distinctive Responses to Nitrogen Starvation in the Dominant Active Mutants of the Fission Yeast Rheb GTPase  

PubMed Central

Rheb, a Ras-like small GTPase conserved from human to yeast, controls Tor kinase and plays a central role in the regulation of cell growth depending on extracellular conditions. Rhb1 (a fission yeast homolog of Rheb) regulates amino acid uptake as well as response to nitrogen starvation. In this study, we generated two mutants, rhb1-DA4 and rhb1-DA8, and characterized them genetically. The V17A mutation within the G1 box defined for the Ras-like GTPases was responsible for rhb1-DA4 and Q52R I76F within the switch II domain for rhb1-DA8. In fission yeast, two events—the induction of the meiosis-initiating gene mei2+ and cell division without cell growth—are a typical response to nitrogen starvation. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, Rheb stimulates Tor kinase, which, in turn, suppresses the response to nitrogen starvation. While amino acid uptake was prevented by both rhb1-DA4 and rhb1-DA8 in a dominant fashion, the response to nitrogen starvation was prevented only by rhb1-DA4. rhb1-DA8 thereby allowed genetic dissection of the Rheb-dependent signaling cascade. We postulate that the signaling cascade may branch below Rhb1 or Tor2 and regulate the amino acid uptake and response to nitrogen starvation independently. PMID:19620394

Murai, Tomoka; Nakase, Yukiko; Fukuda, Keiko; Chikashige, Yuji; Tsutsumi, Chihiro; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro

2009-01-01

415

Tagging Morphogenetic Genes by Insertional Mutagenesis in the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica  

PubMed Central

The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is distantly related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can be genetically modified, and can grow in both haploid and diploid states in either yeast, pseudomycelial, or mycelial forms, depending on environmental conditions. Previous results have indicated that the STE and RIM pathways, which mediate cellular switching in other dimorphic yeasts, are not required for Y. lipolytica morphogenesis. To identify the pathways involved in morphogenesis, we mutagenized a wild-type strain of Y. lipolytica with a Tn3 derivative. We isolated eight tagged mutants, entirely defective in hyphal formation, from a total of 40,000 mutants and identified seven genes homologous to S. cerevisiae CDC25, RAS2, BUD6, KEX2, GPI7, SNF5, and PPH21. We analyzed their abilities to invade agar and to form pseudomycelium or hyphae under inducing conditions and their sensitivity to temperature and to Calcofluor white. Chitin staining was used to detect defects in their cell walls. Our results indicate that a functional Ras-cyclic AMP pathway is required for the formation of hyphae in Y. lipolytica and that perturbations in the processing of extracellular, possibly parietal, proteins result in morphogenetic defects. PMID:11325938

Richard, Mathias; Quijano, Raymundo Rosas; Bezzate, Samira; Bordon-Pallier, Florence; Gaillardin, Claude

2001-01-01

416

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and mad cows: lessons learnt from yeast cells.  

PubMed

Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that affect mammals including humans. The proteinaceous nature of the infectious agent, the prion, and its propagation, challenge established dogmas in biology. It is now widely accepted that prion diseases are caused by unconventional agents principally composed of a misfolded host-encoded protein, PrP. Surprisingly, major break-throughs in prion research came from studies on functionally unrelated proteins in yeast and filamentous fungi. Aggregates composed of these proteins act as epigenetic elements of inheritance that can propagate their alternative states by a conformational switch into an ordered ß-sheet rich polymer just like mammalian prions. Since their discovery prions of lower eukaryotes have provided invaluable insights into all aspects of prion biogenesis. Importantly, yeast prions provide proof-of-principle that distinct protein conformers can be infectious and can serve as genetic elements that have the capacity to encipher strain specific information. As a powerful and tractable model system, yeast prions will continue to increase our understanding of prion-host cell interaction and potential mechanisms of protein-based epigenetic inheritance. PMID:22270552

Hofmann, J; Wolf, H; Grassmann, A; Arndt, V; Graham, J; Vorberg, I

2012-01-01

417

High PRF high current switch  

DOEpatents

A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

Moran, Stuart L. (Fredericksburg, VA); Hutcherson, R. Kenneth (College Park, MD)

1990-03-27

418

A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

2014-01-01

419

Micromachined Planar Triggered Spark Gap Switch  

Microsoft Academic Search

High voltage switches capable of operating at high speeds with high current levels are used in a variety of applications in commercial and government systems. This paper discusses the fabrication and characterization of a novel micromachined planar triggered spark gap switch. The switch provides a low cost alternative to conventional triggered spark gap switches. The structure is designed for direct

Thomas A. Baginski; Robert Neal Dean; Edwin J. Wild

2011-01-01

420

Advanced semiconductor switches for EM launchers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electric launchers may be energized by switching pulses of variable magnitude and time from a pulsed alternator or a pulse forming network. In order to achieve the desired muzzle energy, the switches must withstand the action of the current pulse: the square of current integrated over time. High pressure spark gap switches and vacuum switches of various architectures have been

Hardev Singh; Charles R. Hummer

2001-01-01

421

Optical Packet Switching -1 Optical Networks  

E-print Network

Optical Packet Switching - 1 Optical Networks: from fiber transmission to photonic switching Optical Packet Switching Fabio Neri and Marco Mellia TLC Networks Group ­ Electronics Department e.mellia@polito.it ­ tel. 011 564 4173 #12;Optical Packet Switching - 2 · This work is licensed under the Creative Commons

Mellia, Marco

422

Sealed reed relay limit switches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sealed reed relay limit switches are described which overcome the inherent deficiencies traditionally present in these devices: high material, labor consumption, and difficult operation. Series VSG limit switches developed at the All-Union Scientific Research and Technological Planning Institute for Relay Engineering (Cheboksary) for use in buildings are described. The VSG1 has a single switching contact, the VSG2 a single normally open contact, and the VSG3 a single normally closed contact. The VSG1 employs type MKS-27103 sealed reed relays, while the VSG2 and VSG3 employ KEM-1 reed relays. The magnet system, which consists of magnets and a plate, and the sealed reed relay are contained in a nonmagnetic casing with a slit in it. The mathematical expression defining the geometric dimensions of the magnet system is given. The basic parameteres of all three types of switches are tabulated. The VSG series switches can be used to replace VBK and BVK switches, thus saving electricity, labor, and materials, including silver.

Ivanov, I. P.; Svintsov, G. P.; Yefimova, M. A.; Lebedev, A. V.; Samsonov, Y. P.

1986-01-01

423

The ecological role of killer yeasts in natural communities of yeasts.  

PubMed

The killer phenomenon of yeasts was investigated in naturally occurring yeast communities. Yeast species from communities associated with the decaying stems and fruits of cactus and the slime fluxes of trees were studied for production of killer toxins and sensitivity to killer toxins produced by other yeasts. Yeasts found in decaying fruits showed the highest incidence of killing activity (30/112), while yeasts isolated from cactus necroses and tree fluxes showed lower activity (70/699 and 11/140, respectively). Cross-reaction studies indicated that few killer-sensitive interactions occur within the same habitat at a particular time and locality, but that killer-sensitive reactions occur more frequently among yeasts from different localities and habitats. The conditions that should be optimal for killer activity were found in fruits and young rots of Opuntia cladodes where the pH is low. The fruit habitat appears to favor the establishment of killer species. Killer toxin may affect the natural distribution of the killer yeast Pichia kluyveri and the sensitive yeast Cryptococcus cereanus. Their distributions indicate that the toxin produced by P. kluyveri limits the occurrence of Cr. cereanus in fruit and Opuntia pads. In general most communities have only one killer species. Sensitive strains are more widespread than killer strains and few species appear to be immune to all toxins. Genetic study of the killer yeast P. kluyveri indicates that the mode of inheritance of killer toxin production is nuclear and not cytoplasmic as is found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis. PMID:3690423

Starmer, W T; Ganter, P F; Aberdeen, V; Lachance, M A; Phaff, H J

1987-09-01

424

Nanomechanical switch for integration with CMOS logic.  

SciTech Connect

We designed, fabricated and measured the performance of nanoelectromechanical (NEMS) switches. Initial data are reported with one of the switch designs having a measured switching time of 400 ns and an operating voltage of 5 V. The switches operated laterally with unmeasurable leakage current in the 'off' state. Surface micromachining techniques were used to fabricate the switches. All processing was CMOS compatible. A single metal layer, defined by a single mask step, was used as the mechanical switch layer. The details of the modeling, fabrication and testing of the NEMS switches are reported.

Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Wolfley, Steven L.; Baker, Michael Sean; Czaplewski, David A.; Wendt, Joel Robert; Kraus, Garth Merlin; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Patrizi, Gary A.

2008-11-01

425

Electronic logic for enhanced switch reliability  

DOEpatents

A logic circuit is used to enhance redundant switch reliability. Two or more switches are monitored for logical high or low output. The output for the logic circuit produces a redundant and fail-safe representation of the switch outputs. When both switch outputs are high, the output is high. Similarly, when both switch outputs are low, the logic circuit's output is low. When the output states of the two switches do not agree, the circuit resolves the conflict by memorizing the last output state which both switches were simultaneously in and produces the logical complement of this output state. Thus, the logic circuit of the present invention allows the redundant switches to be treated as if they were in parallel when the switches are open and as if they were in series when the switches are closed. A failsafe system having maximum reliability is thereby produced.

Cooper, J.A.

1984-01-20

426

Magnetic Cellular Switches  

PubMed Central

This paper focuses on the development of magnetic cellular switches to enable magnetic control of intracellular functions in living mammalian cells, including receptor signal transduction and gene transcription. Our approach takes advantage of the mechanosensitivity of adenosine 3?,5?-monophosphate (cAMP) induction and downstream transcription controlled by the cAMP regulatory element (CRE) to engineer gene constructs that optically report gene expression in living cells. We activate transcription of these gene reporters by applying magnetic (mechanical) stress to magnetic microbeads bound to cell surface integrin receptors. In these gene reporter constructs, CRE motifs drive the expression of fluorescent proteins or enzymes that produce fluorescent products, such as DsRed and ?-lactamase (BLA), respectively. We demonstrate that a chemical inducer of cAMP (forskolin) increases expression of CRE-DsRed in living cells. More importantly, a threefold increase in CRE-BLA expression is induced by application of mechanical stress to magnetic microbeads (4.5 µm) bound to cell surface integrin receptors. Induction of cAMP could be detected within 5 min using a protein fragment complementation assay involving interactions between the KID and KIX domains of the CRE binding protein linked to complementary halves of the BLA enzyme. These studies confirm that application of magnetic stress to integrins induces gene transcription by activating the cAMP-dependent transcription factor CREB. Ongoing studies focus on optimizing sensitivity and reducing signal-to-noise by establishing stable cell lines that express these gene reporters. These studies collectively demonstrate the feasibility of using magnetic technologies to control function in living mammalian cells and, hence, support the possibility of developing magnetically-actuated cellular components for use in future micro- and nanotechnologies. PMID:23097592

Overby, Darryl R.; Alenghat, Francis J.; Montoya-Zavala, Martín; Bei, HuCheng; Oh, Philmo; Karavitis, John; Ingber, Donald E.

2012-01-01

427

The UniMIN switch architecture for large-scale ATM switches  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general expansion architecture is proposed that can be used in building large-scale switches using any type of asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) switch. The proposed universal multistage interconnection network (UniMIN) switch is composed of a buffered distribution network (DN) and a column of output switch modules (OSM's), which can be any type of ATM switch. ATM cells are routed to

Sung Hyuk Byun; Dan Keun Sung

2000-01-01

428

Non-latching relay switch assembly  

DOEpatents

A non-latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes a permanent magnet and an electromagnet. The respective sections are arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch has a "normal" position and is selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly. The switch returns to the "normal" position when the overriding electromagnetic assembly is inactive.

Duimstra, Frederick A. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

1991-01-01

429

Solid State Spark Gap Replacement Switches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Improvements in solid state high voltage switching technology now make it feasible to replace triggered spark gap switches, used in many medical and commercial applications to switch tens of kilovolts and thousands of amperes, with compact solid-state switches. We have developed a multi-stage high voltage solid-state switch that is triggered by a single 10 V isolated trigger pulse to only

S. C. Glidden; H. D. Sanders

2006-01-01

430

Mitochondrial membrane lipidome defines yeast longevity  

PubMed Central

Our studies revealed that lithocholic acid (LCA), a bile acid, is a potent anti-aging natural compound that in yeast cultured under longevity-extending caloric restriction (CR) conditions acts in synergy with CR to enable a significant further increase in chronological lifespan. Here, we investigate a mechanism underlying this robust longevity-extending effect of LCA under CR. We found that exogenously added LCA enters yeast cells, is sorted to mitochondria, resides mainly in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and also associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane. LCA elicits an age-related remodeling of glycerophospholipid synthesis and movement within both mitochondrial membranes, thereby causing substantial changes in mitochondrial membrane lipidome and triggering major changes in mitochondrial size, number and morphology. In synergy, these changes in the membrane lipidome and morphology of mitochondria alter the age-related chronology of mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential, ATP synthesis and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. The LCA-driven alterations in the age-related dynamics of these vital mitochondrial processes extend yeast longevity. In sum, our findings suggest a mechanism underlying the ability of LCA to delay chronological aging in yeast by accumulating in both mitochondrial membranes and altering their glycerophospholipid compositions. We concluded that mitochondrial membrane lipidome plays an essential role in defining yeast longevity. PMID:23924582

Burstein, Michelle T.; Bourque, Simon D.; Koupaki, Olivia; Juneau, Mylène; Feldman, Rachel; Iouk, Tatiana; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

2013-01-01

431

Yeasts associated with Sardinian ewe's dairy products.  

PubMed

In the present work, the occurrence of yeasts in different types of typical Sardinian ewe's cheeses (32 samples of pecorino, 32 of caciotta, 40 of feta, 56 of ricotta) was determined. For the strains isolated the following properties were studied: proteolytic and lipolytic activities, the ability to grow at different temperatures, different concentrations of salt, and to assimilate and/or ferment compounds like lactate, citrate, lactose, glucose, galactose, lactic acid. Of 160 samples analysed, 76.2% yielded growth of yeasts. Yeast counts showed a certain variability among the samples. The highest levels were observed in caciotta and feta cheeses. A total of 281 strains belonging to 16 genera and 25 species were identified. In general, Debaryomyces hansenii was the dominant species, representing 28.8% of the total isolates. Other frequently appearing species were Geotrichum candidum, Kluyveromyces lactis and K. marxianus. Other genera encountered were Pichia, Candida, Dekkera, Yarrowia and Rhodotorula. With regard to the biochemical and technological properties of the yeasts, only K. lactis, K. marxianus and Dek. anomala assimilated and fermented lactose, whereas the majority of the species assimilated lactic acid. The assimilation of citrate was a characteristic of D. hansenii, R. rubra and Y. lipolytica. On the whole, the yeasts were weakly proteolytic while lipolytic activity was present in several species. A high percentage of strains showed a certain tolerance to low temperatures while only some strains of D. hansenii and K. lactis were able to grow at a 10% NaCl concentration. PMID:11589560

Cosentino, S; Fadda, M E; Deplano, M; Mulargia, A F; Palmas, F

2001-09-19

432

Regulated assembly and disassembly of the yeast telomerase quaternary complex  

PubMed Central

The enzyme telomerase, which elongates chromosome termini, is a critical factor in determining long-term cellular proliferation and tissue renewal. Hence, even small differences in telomerase levels can have substantial consequences for human health. In budding yeast, telomerase consists of the catalytic Est2 protein and two regulatory subunits (Est1 and Est3) in association with the TLC1 RNA, with each of the four subunits essential for in vivo telomerase function. We show here that a hierarchy of assembly and disassembly results in limiting amounts of the quaternary complex late in the cell cycle, following completion of DNA replication. The assembly pathway, which is driven by interaction of the Est3 telomerase subunit with a previously formed Est1–TLC1–Est2 preassembly complex, is highly regulated, involving Est3-binding sites on both Est2 and Est1 as well as an interface on Est3 itself that functions as a toggle switch. Telomerase subsequently disassembles by a mechanistically distinct pathway due to dissociation of the catalytic subunit from the complex in every cell cycle. The balance between the assembly and disassembly pathways, which dictate the levels of the active holoenzyme in the cell, reveals a novel mechanism by which telomerase (and hence telomere homeostasis) is regulated. PMID:25240060

Tucey, Timothy M.

2014-01-01

433

Sequencing and comparison of yeast species to identify genes  

E-print Network

of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on high-quality draft sequences of three related species (S. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for example, has enjoyed a complete genome sequence since 1996 (ref. 1

Batzoglou, Serafim

434

Discriminative Clustering of Yeast Stress Samuel Kaski1,2  

E-print Network

received much at- tention. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae several hundred genes out of about stress response. 1 Introduction The ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome to respond to en

Kaski, Samuel

435

YEASTS FROM THE NORTH SEA AND AMOCO CADIZ OIL  

EPA Science Inventory

The species and densities of yeasts isolated from North Sea waters before and after the production of oil were compared. Debaryomyces hansenii was the predominant species, but after oil production, Candida guillieromondii, a hydrocarbonoclastic yeast, was more commonly isolated a...

436

`Injecting' yeast Daniel Riveline1,2 & Paul Nurse1  

E-print Network

the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we sheared local regions of individual cells with a piezoelectric. The fission yeast cell is a rod, 15 mm in length and 4 mm in diameter, with a rigid carbohydrate cell wall

Cai, Long

437

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Histone modification pattern evolution after yeast  

E-print Network

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Histone modification pattern evolution after yeast gene duplication for evolutionary innovations. Many studies evidenced that genetic regulatory network evolved rapidly shortly after gene duplication. In this study, we conducted detailed analyses on yeast histone modification (HM

Gu, Xun

438

Original article Chromium yeast affects growth performance but not  

E-print Network

Original article Chromium yeast affects growth performance but not whole carcass composition the effects of supplemented trivalent chromium (Cr) from chromium yeast on growth performance, carcass vs. ad libitum in other reported experiments). (© Elsevier / Inra) chromium / pig / carcass

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

439

Yeasts and yeast-like organisms associated with fruits and blossoms of different fruit trees.  

PubMed

Yeasts are common inhabitants of the phyllosphere, but our knowledge of their diversity in various plant organs is still limited. This study focused on the diversity of yeasts and yeast-like organisms associated with matured fruits and fully open blossoms of apple, plum, and pear trees, during 2 consecutive years at 3 localities in southwest Slovakia. The occurrence of yeasts and yeast-like organisms in fruit samples was 2½ times higher and the yeast community more diverse than that in blossom samples. Only 2 species (Aureobasidium pullulans and Metschnikowia pulcherrima) occurred regularly in the blossom samples, whereas Galactomyces candidus, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Hanseniaspora uvarum, M. pulcherrima, Pichia kluyveri, Pichia kudriavzevii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were the most frequently isolated species from the fruit samples. The ratio of the number of samples where only individual species were present to the number of samples where 2 or more species were found (consortium) was counted. The occurrence of individual species in comparison with consortia was much higher in blossom samples than in fruit samples. In the latter, consortia predominated. Aureobasidium pullulans, M. pulcherrima, and S. cerevisiae, isolated from both the fruits and blossoms, can be considered as resident yeast species of various fruit tree species cultivated in southwest Slovakia localities. PMID:23210991

Vadkertiová, Renáta; Molnárová, Jana; Vránová, Dana; Sláviková, Elena

2012-12-01

440

Cytotoxic Mechanism of Selenomethionine in Yeast*  

PubMed Central

Although selenium is an essential element, its excessive uptake is detrimental to living organisms. The significance of selenium for living organisms has been exploited for various purposes. However, the molecular basis of selenium toxicity is not completely understood. Here, we applied a capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approach to analysis of yeast cells treated with selenomethionine. The data indicated that intracellular thiol compounds are significantly decreased, and diselenide and selenosulfide compounds are increased in selenomethionine-treated cells. The growth defect induced by selenomethionine was recovered by extracellular addition of cysteine and by genetic modification of yeast cells that have an additional de novo synthetic pathway for cysteine. Because cysteine is an intermediate of thiol compounds, these results suggested that the loss of a reduced form of thiol compounds due to selenomethionine causes a growth defect of yeast cells. PMID:22311978

Kitajima, Toshihiko; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Chiba, Yasunori

2012-01-01

441

Yeast oligo-mediated genome engineering (YOGE).  

PubMed

High-frequency oligonucleotide-directed recombination engineering (recombineering) has enabled rapid modification of several prokaryotic genomes to date. Here, we present a method for oligonucleotide-mediated recombineering in the model eukaryote and industrial production host Saccharomyces cerevisiae , which we call yeast oligo-mediated genome engineering (YOGE). Through a combination of overexpression and knockouts of relevant genes and optimization of transformation and oligonucleotide designs, we achieve high gene-modification frequencies at levels that only require screening of dozens of cells. We demonstrate the robustness of our approach in three divergent yeast strains, including those involved in industrial production of biobased chemicals. Furthermore, YOGE can be iteratively executed via cycling to generate genomic libraries up to 10 (5) individuals at each round for diversity generation. YOGE cycling alone or in combination with phenotypic selections or endonuclease-based negative genotypic selections can be used to generate modified alleles easily in yeast populations with high frequencies. PMID:24160921

DiCarlo, James E; Conley, Andrew J; Penttilä, Merja; Jäntti, Jussi; Wang, Harris H; Church, George M

2013-12-20

442

Yeast Oligo-mediated Genome Engineering (YOGE)  

PubMed Central

High-frequency oligonucleotide-directed recombination engineering (recombineering) has enabled rapid modification of several prokaryotic genomes to date. Here, we present a method for oligonucleotide-mediated recombineering in the model eukaryote and industrial production host S. cerevisiae, which we call Yeast Oligo-mediated Genome Engineering (YOGE). Through a combination of overexpression and knockouts of relevant genes and optimization of transformation and oligonucleotide designs, we achieve high gene modification frequencies at levels that only require screening of dozens of cells. We demonstrate the robustness of our approach in three divergent yeast strains, including those involved in industrial production of bio-based chemicals. Furthermore, YOGE can be iteratively executed via cycling to generate genomic libraries up to 105 individuals at each round for diversity generation. YOGE cycling alone, or in combination with phenotypic selections or endonuclease-based negative genotypic selections, can be used to easily generate modified alleles in yeast populations with high frequencies. PMID:24160921

DiCarlo, JE; Conley, AJ; Penttilä, M; Jäntti, J; Wang, HH; Church, GM

2014-01-01

443

Comparative Functional Genomics of the Fission Yeasts  

PubMed Central

The fission yeast clade, comprising Schizosaccharomyces pombe, S. octosporus, S. cryophilus and S. japonicus, occupies the basal branch of Ascomycete fungi and is an important model of eukaryote biology. A comparative annotation of these genomes identified a near extinction of transposons and the associated innovation of transposon-free centromeres. Expression analysis established that meiotic genes are subject to antisense transcription during vegetative growth, suggesting a mechanism for their tight regulation. In addition, trans-acting regulators control new genes within the context of expanded functional modules for meiosis and stress response. Differences in gene content and regulation also explain why, unlike the Saccharomycotina, fission yeasts cannot use ethanol as a primary carbon source. These analyses elucidate the genome structure and gene regulation of fission yeast and provide tools for investigation across the Schizosaccharomyces clade. PMID:21511999

Rhind, Nicholas; Chen, Zehua; Yassour, Moran; Thompson, Dawn A; Haas, Brian J; Habib, Naomi; Wapinski, Ilan; Roy, Sushmita; Lin, Michael F.; Heiman, David I; Young, Sarah K; Furuya, Kanji; Guo, Yabin; Pidoux, Alison; Chen, Huei Mei; Robbertse, Barbara; Goldberg, Jonathan M.; Aoki, Keita; Bayne, Elizabeth H.; Berlin, Aaron M; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Dobbs, Edward; Dukaj, Livio; Fan, Lin; FitzGerald, Michael G; French, Courtney; Gujja, Sharvari; Hansen, Klavs; Keifenheim, Dan; Levin, Joshua Z.; Mosher, Rebecca A.; Müller, Carolin A.; Pfiffner, Jenna; Priest, Margaret; Russ, Carsten; Smialowska, Agata; Swoboda, Peter; Sykes, Sean M; Vaughn, Matthew; Vengrova, Sonya; Yoder, Ryan; Zeng, Qiandong; Allshire, Robin; Baulcombe, David; Birren, Bruce W.; Brown, William; Ekwall, Karl; Kellis, Manolis; Leatherwood, Janet; Levin, Henry; Margalit, Hanah; Martienssen, Rob; Nieduszynski, Conrad A.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Friedman, Nir; Dalgaard, Jacob Z.; Baumann, Peter; Niki, Hironori; Regev, Aviv; Nusbaum, Chad

2011-01-01

444

A heritable switch in carbon source utilization driven by an unusual yeast prion  

E-print Network

Several well-characterized fungal proteins act as prions, proteins capable of multiple conformations, each with different activities, at least one of which is self-propagating. Through such self-propagating changes in ...

Lindquist, Susan

445

Temporal system-level organization of the switch from glycolytic to gluconeogenic operation in yeast  

PubMed Central

The diauxic shift in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an ideal model to study how eukaryotic cells readjust their metabolism from glycolytic to gluconeogenic operation. In this work, we generated time-resolved physiological data, quantitative metabolome (69 intracellular metabolites) and proteome (72 enzymes) profiles. We found that the diauxic shift is accomplished by three key events that are temporally organized: (i) a reduction in the glycolytic flux and the production of storage compounds before glucose depletion, mediated by downregulation of phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase reactions; (ii) upon glucose exhaustion, the reversion of carbon flow through glycolysis and onset of the glyoxylate cycle operation triggered by an increased expression of the enzymes that catalyze the malate synthase and cytosolic citrate synthase reactions; and (iii) in the later stages of the adaptation, the shutting down of the pentose phosphate pathway with a change in NADPH regeneration. Moreover, we identified the transcription factors associated with the observed changes in protein abundances. Taken together, our results represent an important contribution toward a systems-level understanding of how this adaptation is realized. PMID:23549479

Zampar, Guillermo G; Kümmel, Anne; Ewald, Jennifer; Jol, Stefan; Niebel, Bastian; Picotti, Paola; Aebersold, Ruedi; Sauer, Uwe; Zamboni, Nicola; Heinemann, Matthias

2013-01-01

446

Photoresistance switching of plasmonic nanopores.  

PubMed

Fast and reversible modulation of ion flow through nanosized apertures is important for many nanofluidic applications, including sensing and separation systems. Here, we present the first demonstration of a reversible plasmon-controlled nanofluidic valve. We show that plasmonic nanopores (solid-state nanopores integrated with metal nanocavities) can be used as a fluidic switch upon optical excitation. We systematically investigate the effects of laser illumination of single plasmonic nanopores and experimentally demonstrate photoresistance switching where fluidic transport and ion flow are switched on or off. This is manifested as a large (? 1-2 orders of magnitude) increase in the ionic nanopore resistance and an accompanying current rectification upon illumination at high laser powers (tens of milliwatts). At lower laser powers, the resistance decreases monotonically with increasing power, followed by an abrupt transition to high resistances at a certain threshold power. A similar rapid transition, although at a lower threshold power, is observed when the power is instead swept from high to low power. This hysteretic behavior is found to be dependent on the rate of the power sweep. The photoresistance switching effect is attributed to plasmon-induced formation and growth of nanobubbles that reversibly block the ionic current through the nanopore from one side of the membrane. This explanation is corroborated by finite-element simulations of a nanobubble in the nanopore that show the switching and the rectification. PMID:25514824

Li, Yi; Nicoli, Francesca; Chen, Chang; Lagae, Liesbet; Groeseneken, Guido; Stakenborg, Tim; Zandbergen, Henny W; Dekker, Cees; Van Dorpe, Pol; Jonsson, Magnus P

2015-01-14

447

HOLLOTRON switch for megawatt lightweight space inverters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of satisfying the switching requirements for a megawatt ultralight inverter system using HOLLOTRON switch technology was determined. The existing experimental switch hardware was modified to investigate a coaxial HOLLOTRON switch configuration and the results were compared with those obtained for a modified linear HOLLOTRON configuration. It was concluded that scaling the HOLLOTRON switch to the current and voltage specifications required for a megawatt converter system is indeed feasible using a modified linear configuration. The experimental HOLLOTRON switch operated at parameters comparable to the scaled coaxial HOLLOTRON. However, the linear HOLLOTRON data verified the capability for meeting all the design objectives simultaneously including current density (greater than 2 A/sq cm), voltage (5 kV), switching frequency (20 kHz), switching time (300 ns), and forward voltage drop (less than or equal to 20 V). Scaling relations were determined and a preliminary design was completed for an engineering model linear HOLLOTRON switch to meet the megawatt converter system specifications.

Poeschel, R. L.; Goebel, D. M.; Schumacher, R. W.

1991-01-01

448

Binary switching in a ‘symmetric' potential landscape  

PubMed Central

A binary switch is the basic building block for information processing. The potential energy profile of a bistable binary switch is a ‘symmetric' double well. The traditional method of switching it from one state (one well) to the other is to tilt the profile towards the desired state. Here, we present a case, where no such tilting is necessary to switch successfully, even in the presence of thermal noise. This happens because of the built-in dynamics inside the switch itself. It differs from the general perception on binary switching that in a ‘symmetric' potential landscape, the switching probability is 50% in the presence of thermal noise. Our results, considering the complete three-dimensional potential landscape, demonstrate intriguing phenomena on binary switching mechanism. With experimentally feasible parameters, we theoretically demonstrate such intriguing possibility in electric field induced magnetization switching of a shape-anisotropic single-domain magnetostrictive nanomagnet with two stable states at room-temperature. PMID:24154561

Roy, Kuntal; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

2013-01-01

449

Production of ethanol by immobilized yeast cells  

SciTech Connect

Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were immobilized in calcium alginate beads for use in the continuous production of ethanol. Yeasts were grown in medium supplemented with ethanol to selectively screen for a culture which showed the greatest tolerance to ethanol inhibition. The immobilized yeast cells were examined in a packed-bed reactor system operated under optimized parameters. Ethanol production rates, as well as residual sugar concentrations were monitored at different feedstock flow rates. The results show that the higher cell densities obtained with the immobilized system assured higher rates of ethanol production than the nonimmobilized system. 13 refs.

Williams, D.; Munnecke, D.M.

1981-08-01

450

Production of lipid compounds in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review describes progress using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism for the fast and efficient analysis of genes and enzyme activities involved in the lipid biosynthetic pathways of several donor organisms. Furthermore, we assess the impact of baker's yeast on the production of novel, high-value lipid compounds. Yeast can be genetically modified to produce selected substances in

M. Veen; C. Lang

2004-01-01

451

Glucose and sucrose: hazardous fast-food for industrial yeast?  

E-print Network

, such as slow or incom- plete fermentation, `off flavors' and poor maintenance of yeast vitality. Recent studies applications of yeast biotechnology, including alcoholic fermentation, bread pro- duction and the fabricationGlucose and sucrose: hazardous fast-food for industrial yeast? Kevin J. Verstrepen1,2 , Dirk

452

Gene Expression in Yeast. Helsinki 1983, ed. by M.  

E-print Network

of the Alko Yeast Symposium Korhola & E. Viiisiinen, Foundation for Fermentation Research I (1983): 19Gene Expression in Yeast. Helsinki 1983, ed. by M. Biotechnical and Industrial Proceedings-29. A RELATIONSHIP BETI^IEENCHROMATIN STRUCTUREAND GENETIC ELEMENTS AT THE YEAST HIS3 LOCUS Department of Biological

453

21 CFR 172.381 - Vitamin D2 bakers yeast.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...bakers yeast. (c) The additive may be used in yeast-leavened baked goods and baking mixes and yeast-leavened baked snack foods at levels not to exceed 400 International Units of vitamin D2 per 100 grams in the finished food. (d) To...

2013-04-01

454

21 CFR 172.381 - Vitamin D2 bakers yeast.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...bakers yeast. (c) The additive may be used in yeast-leavened baked goods and baking mixes and yeast-leavened baked snack foods at levels not to exceed 400 International Units of vitamin D2 per 100 grams in the finished food. (d) To...

2014-04-01

455

GENE ENGINEERING OF YEASTS FOR THE DEGRADATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE  

EPA Science Inventory

The research examined the structure and function of cytochrome P-450 genes in yeast as a model for gene engineering such as eukaryotic P-450 enzymes for biodegradation of hazardous waste by yeasts. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida tropicalis are two yeasts known to produce ma...

456

Fission Yeast Tel1ATM and Rad3ATR  

E-print Network

Fission Yeast Tel1ATM and Rad3ATR Promote Telomere Protection and Telomerase Recruitment Bettina A organisms, including budding and fission yeasts, Arabidopsis, Drosophila, and mammals. However, such as fission yeast and humans. Here, we demonstrate by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays

Nakamura, Toru M.

457

Signal Transduction by MAP Kinases: Regulation by Phosphorylation-Dependent Switches  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The kinases of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades transmit signals through sequential phosphorylation and activation of the enzymes. However, recent evidence indicates that protein-protein interactions between the kinases themselves or with substrates or other components are also a critical means of regulation. Whitmarsh and Davis summarize these findings with emphasis on new evidence from yeast that, when phosphorylated, a MAP kinase kinase actually switches from a negative regulator that binds to and inhibits its target MAP kinase to a positive regulator of that same enzyme.

Alan J. Whitmarsh (University of Massachusetts Medical School; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Program in Molecular Medicine; REV)

1999-09-28

458

Adaptive optical label packet switching  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper introduces a kind of Adaptive Optical Label Packet Switching (AOLPS) technology. Based on Optical Packet Switching (OPS), AOLPS uses optical label to achieve self-routing, and the size of optical packet is self-adaptive. At the edge nodes, IP packets are fist classified into different first-in-fist-out memories (FIFOs) according to their priority levels and destinations, and then being encapsulated into optical packets. The traffic at each FIFO is real-time monitored, and the controller in edge node employs an optimal strategy to generate suitable sized packets for transmission. Large sized packets will be adopted when traffic is heavy, and small sized packets will be used when traffic is light. This self-adaptive switching granularity can greatly improve the network performance.

Xiao, Shilin; Liu, Zhixin; Liang, Zheng; Zhao, Zhihui; Qu, Kefeng

2007-11-01

459

Explosive opening switch work at Westinghouse  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An explosive switch that commutated 315 kA into a resistor and a second version designed to switch up to 1 MA into an HPG (homopolar generator)-driven railgun system are presented. These switches are located very near the load and consist of a set of main busbars in a low-inductance configuration shorted by a thinner switch busbar. Linear-shaped charges are used to sever this switch busbar at several locations when a preselected current level is attained, commutating the current into the load. The feasibility of multishot explosive switches for electromagnetic-launch systems is also considered.

Aivaliotis, E.; Peterhans, M.

1989-01-01

460

Liquid metal switches for electromagnetic railgun systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The need for a reliable and effective commutating switch is essential to the operation of a homopolar-generator-driven (HPG-driven) railgun system. This switch must offer the lowest possible resistance during the current build up time and then must commutate the current quickly and efficiently into the railgun barrel. The essential requirements for such a switch are discussed, and, after a brief review of the available switch technologies, a type of switch based on a liquid metal switching medium is described.

Mitcham, A. J.; Prothero, D. H.; Brooks, J. C.

1991-01-01