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Sample records for yellow fever cases

  1. Yellow fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the heart, liver, and kidney. Bleeding disorders, seizures, coma, and delirium may also occur. Symptoms may include: Irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias) Bleeding (may progress to hemorrhage) Coma Decreased urination Delirium Fever Headache Yellow skin and ...

  2. Travelers' Health: Yellow Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... their work in forested areas. Table 3-21. Countries with risk of yellow fever virus (YFV) transmission ... Information, by Country ) for details. Table 3-22. Countries with low potential for exposure to yellow fever ...

  3. Yellow fever in the Americas.

    PubMed

    1985-01-01

    In 1983 the total number of jungle yellow fever cases in the Americas was one of the lowest in recent years. There were 2 outstanding occurrences during the year, representing the end of an epidemic that had taken place in the Santa Cruz region of Bolivia in 1981 and 1982. The small number of cases, in contrast with previous epidemics, was the result of an increasing number of vaccinations in the affected regions. At a Pan American Health Organization Seminar on the treatment and laboratory diagnosis of yellow fever held in Brazil in 1984, participants reviewed the epidemiologic situation in places where yellow fever poses a serious and ongoing public health problem. At this time, the general yellow fever situation in each of the affected countries of the Americas--Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru--is as follows. Yellow fever is endemic in 2/3 of Bolivia, primarily in the south. Males are affected more often (78%) than females (22%). Generally, the patients are adults, but during a recent epidemic in the Rincon del Tigre area 14.5% of the cases occurred in children under age 4 and 11.6% in children 5-9 years. In Brazil, the endemic zone comprises states in the northern, central, and western regions and also in the western strips of the State of Maranhao. The disease occurs rarely among children under age 11, and 70% of the victims are men ranging in age from 15-40 years who are working in the jungle; only 15% of the cases occur among women. Colombia's last urban yellow fever case occurred in 1929. At this time yellow fever is endemic in the eastern plains, which form part of the Amazone and Orinoco basins. It spreads in the form of epizootic and epidemic waves through the forests at the foot of the eastern cordillera. Yellow fever is endemo-epidemic in the northern and central jungle of Peru. Over 600 cases were reported from 1960-82. These cases occurred during the rainy season of January to May. Vaccination campaigns have been intensified during the last 3 years. Yellow fever is enzootic in the gallery forests of the tropical plain of the Orinoco Basin, Venezuela. The 15-55 age group is the group usually at risk, but 2% of the cases occur in children under age 5 and 2.8% in children under age 10. Between 1965-84, the countries of the Americas reported 2238 cases to the Pan American Health Organization, but this figure provides an incomplete idea of the real incidence of yellow fever. PMID:4052698

  4. Experimental therapies for yellow fever

    PubMed Central

    Julander, Justin G.

    2013-01-01

    A number of viruses in the family Flaviviridae are the focus of efforts to develop effective antiviral therapies. Success has been achieved with inhibitors for the treatment of hepatitis C, and there is interest in clinical trials of drugs against dengue fever. Antiviral therapies have also been evaluated in patients with Japanese encephalitis and West Nile encephalitis. However, no treatment has been developed against the prototype flavivirus, yellow fever virus (YFV). Despite the availability of the live, attenuated 17D vaccine, thousands of cases of YF continue to occur each year in Africa and South America, with a significant mortality rate. In addition, a small number of vaccinees develop severe systemic infections with the 17D virus. This paper reviews current efforts to develop antiviral therapies, either directly targeting the virus or blocking detrimental host responses to infection. PMID:23237991

  5. [Yellow fever epidemiology in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Mondet, B

    2001-08-01

    We have carried out a meticulous time-space-analysis of the incidence of yellow fever in humans in Brazil from 1954 to 1972 and especially from 1973 to 1999. This study has added to our knowledge of the epidemiology of yellow fever and enabled us to redefine epidemiological zones and determine their geographical limits. The endemic area is located within the Amazon basin; here cases are scattered and generally limited in number. However, there are also "foci of endemic emergence" within this area, where cases are less rare, although occurrence remains irregular. The epidemic area is for the most part situated outside the Amazon basin, to the north east and particularly to the south. It has been divided into two parts according to whether the occurrence of yellow fever is cyclic or sporadic. The epidemics, which are all sylvatic, follow either a circular path (in the forest area) or a linear path (in forest-galleries of the savannah area). The study of the development of the 3 main epidemics (1972-74; 1979-82; 1986-92) in the cyclic emergence area showed that, on each occasion, the yellow fever virus appeared at a particularly active outbreak site located in the "serra dos Carajás", and from there, it followed the courses of the Tocantins and Araguaia rivers upstream, moving southwards during the "pre-epidemic phase" which may be visible due to the occurrence of a few cases, or may remain invisible. Subsequently the virus reached the emergence area, where it appeared in the form of epidemics. In this zone, it also followed privileged south-western pathways, moving from one hydraulic basin to another along the upstream courses of the rivers. Almost exactly the same pathways have been identified for each of the 3 epidemics studied. The distances travelled by the virus over a period of one year--when it goes rapidly--can reach several hundred kilometers. On the other hand, it may be stationary for a period of one or two consecutive years, occasionally three, remaining present in the area but infecting humans only rarely if at all. The virus occasionally leaves the cyclic emergence area and appears in the sporadic emergence area to the east, in the states of Bahia, Minas Gerais and São Paulo, and, as a consequence, moving onto other hydraulic basins. The small river basins in Maranhão and NorthWest states, as well as in the northern part of the state of Roraima also form part of the sporadic emergence area. The epidemics that occur here are directly linked to the endemic area and are only preceded by sometimes indiscernible epizootics and can consequently not be foreseen. Again the virus appears to use privileged pathways to reach the sporadic emergence areas where human and monkey populations are generally only partially immunised against yellow fever and where contact with mosquitoes is intense despite the fact it is limited in space and time, being restricted to the often narrow strip of trees along the water courses. Other routes used by the virus may be the Madeira, Xingu and Tapajós rivers, the scene of outbreaks observed in the state of Rondônia and in the north of Mato Grosso, where ongoing environmental changes are likely to result in an increasing number of outbreaks in the coming years. Since the discovery of the sylvatic cycle of yellow fever in 1933, not only the extent of the epidemiological areas has changed, but also their limits. Ecological modifications that are currently taking place in the Amazon basin, which is an endemic reservoir of the virus, will inevitably facilitate an increase the contact between humans and vectors. While more and more urban areas harbour populations of Aedes aegypti, the domestic and urban vector of yellow fever, it is particularly important to try to protect human populations living in emergence zones and epidemic areas and thus to prevent the arrival of the virus in towns via humans with viremia--in other words the much feared urbanisation of yellow fever in Brazil. PMID:11681224

  6. [Yellow fever: study of an outbreak].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mirtes; Antunes, Carlos Maurício de Figueiredo

    2009-01-01

    This study had the aim of describing an outbreak of yellow fever that occurred in the municipalities under the jurisdiction of the Regional Healthcare Administration of Diamantina, Minas Gerais, between 2002 and 2003, in which 36 cases were notified. This was an autochthonous outbreak of wild-type yellow fever. Failure of vaccinal coverage and low levels of detection of mild cases were found. Among the cases, 33 (91.7%) were male and the age range was from 16 to 67 years. Nineteen (52.8%) of the cases were classified as severe and 12 men (33.3%) died of the disease. All of the cases came from rural areas and presented fever, headache, vomiting, jaundice, myalgia, oliguria and signs of hemorrhage. Surveillance through laboratory tests was the determining factor in diagnosing the outbreak. By describing the epidemiological and clinic findings, this study contributes towards diagnosing and classifying this disease. It was deduced that there is a relationship between deforestation, and outbreaks, and that there is a potential regional risk of yellow fever because of the local development of tourism. PMID:19967234

  7. Yellow Fever Outbreaks in Unvaccinated Populations, Brazil, 2008–2009

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Alessandro Pecego Martins; Costa, Zouraide Guerra Antunes; Ramos, Daniel Garkauskas; Andrade, Maria Auxiliadora; Jayme, Valéria de Sá; de Almeida, Marco Antônio Barreto; Vettorello, Kátia Campomar; Mascheretti, Melissa; Flannery, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the risk of severe vaccine-associated adverse events, yellow fever vaccination in Brazil is only recommended in areas considered at risk for disease. From September 2008 through June 2009, two outbreaks of yellow fever in previously unvaccinated populations resulted in 21 confirmed cases with 9 deaths (case-fatality, 43%) in the southern state of Rio Grande do Sul and 28 cases with 11 deaths (39%) in Sao Paulo state. Epizootic deaths of non-human primates were reported before and during the outbreak. Over 5.5 million doses of yellow fever vaccine were administered in the two most affected states. Vaccine-associated adverse events were associated with six deaths due to acute viscerotropic disease (0.8 deaths per million doses administered) and 45 cases of acute neurotropic disease (5.6 per million doses administered). Yellow fever vaccine recommendations were revised to include areas in Brazil previously not considered at risk for yellow fever. PMID:24625634

  8. Assessing yellow Fever risk in the ecuadorian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Izurieta, Ricardo O; Macaluso, Maurizio; Watts, Douglas M; Tesh, Robert B; Guerra, Bolivar; Cruz, Ligia M; Galwankar, Sagar; Vermund, Sten H

    2009-01-01

    This study reports results of a cross-sectional study based on interviews and seroepidemiological methods to identify risk factors for yellow fever infection among personnel of a military garrison in the Amazonian rainforest. Clinical symptoms and signs observed among yellow fever cases are also described. Humoral immune response to yellow fever, Mayaro, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, Oropouche, and dengue 2 infection was assessed by evaluating IgM and IgG specific antibodies. A yellow fever attack rate of 13% (44/341, with 3 fatal cases) was observed among military personnel. Signs of digestive track bleeding (14.6%) and hematuria (4.9%) were observed among the yellow fever cases. In 32.2% of the cases, we measured high levels of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase with maximum levels of 6,830 and 3,500, respectively. Signs of bleeding or jaundice were observed in some cases, and high levels of transaminases were seen. The epidemiological and laboratory investigations demonstrated that the military personnel were affected by a yellow fever outbreak. The association between clearing the rainforest and also being at the detachments with yellow fever infection confirms that clearing is the main factor in the jungle model of transmission, which takes place deep in the Amazonian rainforest. PMID:20300380

  9. Marylanders defeat Philadelphia: yellow fever updated.

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, T. E.; Beisel, W. R.; Faulkner, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Those strategic points which influence this amateur historian to declare a victory for Baltimore and Maryland over Philadelphia are: I. Based upon clinical and epidemiological data, two Marylanders, Potter and Davidge, were among the first to contest Rush and his contagion theory; they told him so and published their views. To prove this point, Potter went to the extreme of inoculating himself with presumedly infected material. Stubbins Ffirth, a young University of Pennsylvania medical student, did the same four years later. To Rush's credit was ultimate abandonment of his originally held views. II. John Crawford, of Baltimore, although not the originator of the insect concept of transmission of infectious agents, published his concepts in 1811. III. Henry Rose Carter, a Maryland graduate, clearly delineated, in 1898, that after identification of an index case of yellow fever an extrinsic incubation period was necessary before the evolution of secondary cases. IV. James Carroll, another University of Maryland graduate, who worked as Deputy under Walter Reed with Lazear and Agramonte, helped prove Finlay's original concept that the Aedes aegypti mosquito was the natural vector of yellow fever. Carroll himself was the first experimentally induced case. V. Studies in primates provide new approaches for management of yellow fever. Nutritional support and treatment with specific anti-viral agents may be useful for therapy of human yellow fever. Maryland members of the Climatological are mindful of Philadelphia's rich medical heritage and of the many battles won in the City of Brotherly Love. Physicians in colonial and early America experienced The best and worst of times, theirs was an age of foolishness and belief, of incredulity and light, of darkness, despair and hope. This tale of two cities ends in peace. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 PMID:822563

  10. History of Epidemiological Aspects of Yellow Fever

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Wilbur G.

    1982-01-01

    This review attempts to follow the trail of the development of epidemiological aspects and concepts of yellow fever and yellow fever transmission (vectors, vertebrate hosts, spacing of epidemic outbreaks) with less emphasis on well-documented early history and more emphasis on epidemiological problems still remaining, plus discussion of possible means of resolving certain of these problems. PMID:6758368

  11. The whole iceberg: estimating the incidence of yellow fever virus infection from the number of severe cases

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Michael A.; Vasconcelos, Pedro F. C.; Staples, J. Erin

    2015-01-01

    Background Like many infectious agents, yellow fever (YF) virus only causes disease in a proportion of individuals it infects and severe illness only represents the tip of the iceberg relative to the total number of infections, the more critical factor for virus transmission. Methods We compiled data on asymptomatic infections, mild disease, severe disease (fever with jaundice or hemorrhagic symptoms) and fatalities from 11 studies in Africa and South America between 1969 and 2011. We used a Bayesian model to estimate the probability of each infection outcome. Results For YF virus infections, the probability of being asymptomatic was 0.55 (95% credible interval [CI] 0.37– 0.74), mild disease 0.33 (95% CI 0.13–0.52) and severe disease 0.12 (95% CI 0.05–0.26). The probability of death for people experiencing severe disease was 0.47 (95% CI 0.31–0.62). Conclusions In outbreak situations where only severe cases may initially be detected, we estimated that there may be between one and seventy infections that are either asymptomatic or cause mild disease for every severe case identified. As it is generally only the most severe cases that are recognized and reported, these estimates will help improve the understanding of the burden of disease and the estimation of the potential risk of spread during YF outbreaks. PMID:24980556

  12. STUDIES ON SOUTH AMERICAN YELLOW FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nelson C.; Shannon, Raymond C.

    1929-01-01

    Yellow fever virus from M. rhesus has been inoculated into a South American monkey (Cebus macrocephalus) by blood injection and by bites of infected mosquitoes. The Cebus does not develop the clinical or pathological signs of yellow fever. Nevertheless, the virus persists in the Cebus for a time as shown by the typical symptoms and lesions which develop when the susceptible M. rhesus is inoculated from a Cebus by direct transfer of blood or by mosquito (A. aegypti) transmission. PMID:19869607

  13. Lost Trust: A Yellow Fever Patient Response

    PubMed Central

    Runge, John S.

    2013-01-01

    In the 19th century, yellow fever thrived in the tropical, urban trade centers along the American Gulf Coast. Industrializing and populated, New Orleans and Memphis made excellent habitats for the yellow fever-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and the virulence they imparted on their victims. Known for its jaundice and black, blood-filled vomit, the malady terrorized the region for decades, sometimes claiming tens of thousands of lives during the near annual summertime outbreaks. In response to the failing medical community, a small, pronounced population of sick and healthy laypeople openly criticized the efforts to rid the Gulf region of yellow jack. Utilizing newspapers and cartoons to vocalize their opinions, these critics doubted and mocked the medical community, contributing to the regional and seasonal dilemma yellow fever posed for the American South. These sentient expressions prove to be an early example of patient distrust toward caregivers, a current problem in clinical heath care. PMID:24348220

  14. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps. ...3 Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps. (a) Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers. (1) The...

  15. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps. ...3 Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps. (a) Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers. (1) The...

  16. Enzootic transmission of yellow fever virus, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Auguste, Albert J; Lemey, Philippe; Bergren, Nicholas A; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Moncada, Maria; Morón, Dulce; Hernandez, Rosa; Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Weaver, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of yellow fever virus (YFV) strains isolated from Venezuela strongly supports YFV maintenance in situ in Venezuela, with evidence of regionally independent evolution within the country. However, there is considerable YFV movement from Brazil to Venezuela and between Trinidad and Venezuela. PMID:25531105

  17. Enzootic Transmission of Yellow Fever Virus, Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Auguste, Albert J.; Lemey, Philippe; Bergren, Nicholas A.; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Moncada, Maria; Morón, Dulce; Hernandez, Rosa; Navarro, Juan-Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of yellow fever virus (YFV) strains isolated from Venezuela strongly supports YFV maintenance in situ in Venezuela, with evidence of regionally independent evolution within the country. However, there is considerable YFV movement from Brazil to Venezuela and between Trinidad and Venezuela. PMID:25531105

  18. Yellow fever in Africa: public health impact and prospects for control in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Oyewale

    2002-06-01

    In the last two decades, yellow fever re-emerged with vehemence to constitute a major public health problem in Africa. The disease has brought untold hardship and indescribable misery among different populations in Africa. It is one of Africa's stumbling blocks to economic and social development. Despite landmark achievements made in the understanding of the epidemiology of yellow fever disease and the availability of a safe and efficacious vaccine, yellow fever remains a major public health problem in both Africa and America where the disease affects annually an estimated 200,000 persons causing an estimated 30,000 deaths. Africa contributes more than 90% of global yellow fever morbidity and mortality. Apart from the severity in morbidity and mortality, which are grossly under reported, successive outbreaks of yellow fever and control measures have disrupted existing health care delivery services, overstretched scarce internal resources, fatigued donor assistance and resulted in gross wastage of vaccines. Recent epidemics of yellow fever in Africa have affected predominantly children under the age of fifteen years. Yellow fever disease can be easily controlled. Two examples from Africa suffice to illustrate this point. Between 1939 and 1952, yellow fever virtually disappeared in parts of Africa, where a systematic mass vaccination programme was in place. More recently, following the 1978-1979 yellow fever epidemic in the Gambia, a mass yellow fever vaccination programme was carried out, with a 97% coverage of the population over 6 months of age. Subsequently, yellow fever vaccination was added to the EPI Programme. The Gambia has since then maintained a coverage of over 80%, without a reported case of yellow fever, despite being surrounded by Senegal which experienced yellow fever outbreaks in 1995 and 1996. The resurgence of yellow fever in Africa and failure to control the disease has resulted from a combination of several factors, including: 1) collapse of health care delivery systems; 2) lack of appreciation of the full impact of yellow fever disease on the social and economic development of the affected communities; 3) insufficient political commitment to yellow fever control by governments of endemic countries; 4) poor or inadequate disease surveillance; 5) inappropriate disease control measures, and 6) preventable poverty coupled with misplaced priorities in resource allocation. Yellow fever can be controlled in Africa within the next 10 years, if African governments seize the initiative for yellow fever control by declaring an uncompromising resolve to control the disease, the governments back up their resolve with an unrelenting commitment and unwavering political will through adequate budgetary allocations for yellow fever control activities, and international organisations, such as WHO, UNICEF, GAVI, etc., provide support and technical leadership and guidance to yellow fever at risk countries. Over a ten-year period, of stage-by-stage mass yellow fever vaccination campaigns, integrated with successful routine immunisation, Africa can bring yellow fever under control. Subsequently, for yellow fever to cease being a public health problem, Africa must maintain at least an annual 80% yellow fever vaccine coverage of children under the age of 1 year, and sustain a reliable disease surveillance system with a responsive disease control programme. This can be achieved at an affordable annual expenditure of less than US$1.00 per person per year, with a reordering of priorities. PMID:12152484

  19. Anamnestic immune response to dengue and decreased severity of yellow Fever.

    PubMed

    Izurieta, Ricardo O; Macaluso, Maurizio; Watts, Douglas M; Tesh, Robert B; Guerra, Bolivar; Cruz, Ligia M; Galwankar, Sagar; Vermund, Sten H

    2009-07-01

    A protective immunity against yellow fever, from cross-reactive dengue antibodies, has been hypothesized as an explanation for the absence of yellow fever in Southern Asia where dengue immunity is almost universal. This study evaluates the association between protective immunity from cross-reactive dengue antibodies with yellow fever infection and severity of the disease. The study population consisted of military personnel of a jungle garrison and its detachments located in the Ecuadorian Amazonian rainforest. The cross-sectional study employed interviews as well as seroepidemiological methods. Humoral immune response to yellow fever, Mayaro, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, Oropouche, and dengue 2 infections was assessed by evaluating IgM and IgG specific antibodies. Log-linear regression analysis was used to evaluate age and presence of antibodies, against dengue type 2 virus, as predictors of yellow fever infection or severe disease. During the seroepidemiological survey, presence of dengue antibodies among yellow fever cases were observed in 77.3% cases from the coastal region, where dengue is endemic, 14.3% cases from the Amazon and 16.7 % cases from the Andean region. Dengue cross-reactive antibodies were not significantly associated with yellow fever infection but significantly associated with severity of the disease. The findings of this study suggest that previous exposure to dengue infection may have induced an anamnestic immune response that did not prevent yellow fever infection but greatly reduced the severity of the disease. PMID:20300401

  20. The Yellow Fever Vaccine: A History

    PubMed Central

    Frierson, J. Gordon

    2010-01-01

    After failed attempts at producing bacteria-based vaccines, the discovery of a viral agent causing yellow fever and its isolation in monkeys opened new avenues of research. Subsequent advances were the attenuation of the virus in mice and later in tissue culture; the creation of the seed lot system to avoid spontaneous mutations; the ability to produce the vaccine on a large scale in eggs; and the removal of dangerous contaminants. An important person in the story is Max Theiler, who was Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health at Yale from 1964-67, and whose work on virus attenuation created the modern vaccine and earned him the Nobel Prize. PMID:20589188

  1. Yellow Fever Vaccination of a Primary Vaccinee During Adalimumab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nash, Esther R; Brand, Myron; Chalkias, Spyridon

    2015-01-01

    In this case report, we describe a 63-year-old female with Crohn's disease since age 16 years, and on adalimumab therapy, who inadvertently received a yellow fever vaccine (YFV) 4 days before her next dose of adalimumab. She had never received YFV. Her next dose of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonist was held. She did not report any adverse effects referable to the vaccine. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for yellow fever (YF) viral RNA on days 12 and 18 postvaccination was negative. Neutralizing antibody to YF virus vaccine was immunoprotective on day 18 following vaccination, which further increased by day 26. A neutralizing antibody obtained 2 years following vaccination also remained immunoprotective. PMID:25922988

  2. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers... Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps. (a) Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers. (1) The Director is responsible for the designation of yellow fever vaccination...

  3. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers... Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps. (a) Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers. (1) The Director is responsible for the designation of yellow fever vaccination...

  4. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers... Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps. (a) Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers. (1) The Director is responsible for the designation of yellow fever vaccination...

  5. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers... Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps. (a) Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers. (1) The Director is responsible for the designation of yellow fever vaccination...

  6. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers... Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps. (a) Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers. (1) The Director is responsible for the designation of yellow fever vaccination...

  7. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...potent, and pure yellow fever vaccine. Medical facilities of Federal...authorized to obtain yellow fever vaccine without being designated as...administration of yellow fever vaccine. If a designated center fails...Certificates of Vaccination against cholera and yellow fever...

  8. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...potent, and pure yellow fever vaccine. Medical facilities of Federal...authorized to obtain yellow fever vaccine without being designated as...administration of yellow fever vaccine. If a designated center fails...Certificates of Vaccination against cholera and yellow fever...

  9. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...potent, and pure yellow fever vaccine. Medical facilities of Federal...authorized to obtain yellow fever vaccine without being designated as...administration of yellow fever vaccine. If a designated center fails...Certificates of Vaccination against cholera and yellow fever...

  10. Yellow fever, Asia and the East African slave trade.

    PubMed

    Cathey, John T; Marr, John S

    2014-05-01

    Yellow fever is endemic in parts of sub-Saharan Africa and South America, yet its principal vectors--species of mosquito of the genus Aedes--are found throughout tropical and subtropical latitudes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that yellow fever originated in Africa and that its spread to the New World coincided with the slave trade, but why yellow fever has never appeared in Asia remains a mystery. None of several previously proposed explanations for its absence there is considered satisfactory. We contrast the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and trade across the Sahara and to the Arabian Peninsula and Mesopotamia, with that to Far East and Southeast Asian ports before abolition of the African slave trade, and before the scientific community understood the transmission vector of yellow fever and the viral life cycle, and the need for shipboard mosquito control. We propose that these differences in slave trading had a primary role in the avoidance of yellow fever transmission into Asia in the centuries before the 20(th) century. The relatively small volume of the Black African slave trade between Africa and East and Southeast Asia has heretofore been largely ignored. Although focal epidemics may have occurred, the volume was insufficient to reach the threshold for endemicity. PMID:24743951

  11. Current status and future prospects of yellow fever vaccines.

    PubMed

    Beck, Andrew S; Barrett, Alan Dt

    2015-11-01

    Yellow fever 17D vaccine is one of the oldest live-attenuated vaccines in current use that is recognized historically for its immunogenic and safe properties. These unique properties of 17D are presently exploited in rationally designed recombinant vaccines targeting not only flaviviral antigens but also other pathogens of public health concern. Several candidate vaccines based on 17D have advanced to human trials, and a chimeric recombinant Japanese encephalitis vaccine utilizing the 17D backbone has been licensed. The mechanism(s) of attenuation for 17D are poorly understood; however, recent insights from large in silico studies have indicated particular host genetic determinants contributing to the immune response to the vaccine, which presumably influences the considerable durability of protection, now in many cases considered to be lifelong. The very rare occurrence of severe adverse events for 17D is discussed, including a recent fatal case of vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease. PMID:26366673

  12. The Global Distribution of Yellow Fever and Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, D.J.; Wilson, A.J.; Hay, S.I.; Graham, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Yellow fever has been subjected to partial control for decades, but there are signs that case numbers are now increasing globally, with the risk of local epidemic outbreaks. Dengue case numbers have also increased dramatically during the past 40 years and different serotypes have invaded new geographical areas. Despite the temporal changes in these closely related diseases, and their enormous public health impact, few attempts have been made to collect a comprehensive dataset of their spatial and temporal distributions. For this review, records of the occurrence of both diseases during the 20th century have been collected together and are used to define their climatic limits using remotely sensed satellite data within a discriminant analytical model framework. The resulting risk maps for these two diseases identify their different environmental requirements, and throw some light on their potential for co-occurrence in Africa and South East Asia. PMID:16647971

  13. Yellow fever risk assessment in the Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    Staples, J. Erin; Diallo, Mawlouth; Janusz, Kristen B.; Manengu, Casimir; Lewis, Rosamund F.; Perea, William; Yactayo, Sergio; Sall, Amadou A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Starting in 2008, the Central African Republic (CAR) experienced an unprecedented number of reported yellow fever (YF) cases. A risk assessment of YF virus (YFV) activity was conducted to estimate potential disease risk and vaccine needs. Methods A multistage cluster sampling design was used to sample humans, non-human primates, and mosquitoes in distinct ecologic zones. Humans and non-human primates were tested for YFV-specific antibodies; mosquitoes were tested for YFV RNA. Results Overall, 13.3% (125/938) of humans were found to have naturally-acquired YFV antibodies. Antibody levels were higher in zones in the southern and south central regions of CAR. All sampled non-human primates (n=56) were known YFV reservoirs; one tested positive for YFV antibodies. Several known YF vectors were identified including Aedes africanus, Ae. aegypti, Ae. luteocephalus, and Ae. simpsoni. Several more urban locations were found to have elevated Breateau and Container indices for Ae. aegypti. Conclusions A country-wide assessment of YF risk found YFV to be endemic in CAR. The potential for future YF cases and outbreaks, however, varied by ecologic zone. Improved vaccination coverage through mass campaign and childhood immunization was recommended to mitigate the YF risk. PMID:24947520

  14. Occurrence of Autoimmune Diseases Related to the Vaccine against Yellow Fever

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Ana Cristina Vanderley; Maria Henrique da Mota, Licia; dos Santos-Neto, Leopoldo Luiz; De Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Caldas, Iramaya Rodrigues; Martins Filho, Olindo Assis; Tauil, Pedro Luis

    2014-01-01

    Yellow fever is an infectious disease, endemic in South America and Africa. This is a potentially serious illness, with lethality between 5 and 40% of cases. The most effective preventive vaccine is constituted by the attenuated virus strain 17D, developed in 1937. It is considered safe and effective, conferring protection in more than 90% in 10 years. Adverse effects are known as mild reactions (allergies, transaminases transient elevation, fever, headache) and severe (visceral and neurotropic disease related to vaccine). However, little is known about its potential to induce autoimmune responses. This systematic review aims to identify the occurrence of autoinflammatory diseases related to 17D vaccine administration. Six studies were identified describing 13 possible cases. The diseases were Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, multiple points evanescent syndrome, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, autoimmune hepatitis, and Kawasaki disease. The data suggest that 17D vaccination may play a role in the mechanism of loss of self-tolerance. PMID:25405025

  15. Occurrence of Autoimmune Diseases Related to the Vaccine against Yellow Fever.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana Cristina Vanderley; Maria Henrique da Mota, Licia; Dos Santos-Neto, Leopoldo Luiz; De Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Caldas, Iramaya Rodrigues; Martins Filho, Olindo Assis; Tauil, Pedro Luis

    2014-01-01

    Yellow fever is an infectious disease, endemic in South America and Africa. This is a potentially serious illness, with lethality between 5 and 40% of cases. The most effective preventive vaccine is constituted by the attenuated virus strain 17D, developed in 1937. It is considered safe and effective, conferring protection in more than 90% in 10 years. Adverse effects are known as mild reactions (allergies, transaminases transient elevation, fever, headache) and severe (visceral and neurotropic disease related to vaccine). However, little is known about its potential to induce autoimmune responses. This systematic review aims to identify the occurrence of autoinflammatory diseases related to 17D vaccine administration. Six studies were identified describing 13 possible cases. The diseases were Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, multiple points evanescent syndrome, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, autoimmune hepatitis, and Kawasaki disease. The data suggest that 17D vaccination may play a role in the mechanism of loss of self-tolerance. PMID:25405025

  16. Yellow fever and Zika virus epizootics and enzootics in Uganda.

    PubMed

    McCrae, A W; Kirya, B G

    1982-01-01

    Data of monkey serology are presented which, together with past evidence, support the view that yellow fever (YF) virus circulates in its primary sylvan host populations, i.e., forest monkeys, in an enzootic state in Bwamba County in western Uganda but as series of epizootics in the forest-savanna mosaic zone of central Uganda. Evidence of an epizootic of Zika virus at the Zika Forest near Entebbe is described which occurred in two episodes, the first (in 1969) apparently following the build-up of non-immune monkey populations since a previous epizootic of 1962-63 and the second (in 1970) when Aedes africanus biting densities rose. This was followed only 18 months later by an intensive epizootic of YF virus, contradictory to the hypothesis that Zika virus alone would suppress subsequent epizootics of YF virus in nature, at least when redtail monkeys are involved. Conclusions are finally reviewed in the light of more recent evidence of transovarial flavivirus transmission in mosquitoes, pointing out that phlebotomine sandflies also require fresh attention. PMID:6304948

  17. A DNA vaccine against yellow fever virus: development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Milton; Cruz, Fábia da Silva Pereira; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; da Motta, Márcia Archer; Cassemiro, Klécia Marília Soares de Melo; Maia, Rita de Cássia Carvalho; de Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos da Silva; August, Joseph Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T A; Dhalia, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Attenuated yellow fever (YF) virus 17D/17DD vaccines are the only available protection from YF infection, which remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the tropical areas of the world. The attenuated YF virus vaccine, which is used worldwide, generates both long-lasting neutralizing antibodies and strong T-cell responses. However, on rare occasions, this vaccine has toxic side effects that can be fatal. This study presents the design of two non-viral DNA-based antigen formulations and the characterization of their expression and immunological properties. The two antigen formulations consist of DNA encoding the full-length envelope protein (p/YFE) or the full-length envelope protein fused to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein signal, LAMP-1 (pL/YFE), aimed at diverting antigen processing/presentation through the major histocompatibility complex II precursor compartments. The immune responses triggered by these formulations were evaluated in H2b and H2d backgrounds, corresponding to the C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice strains, respectively. Both DNA constructs were able to induce very strong T-cell responses of similar magnitude against almost all epitopes that are also generated by the YF 17DD vaccine. The pL/YFE formulation performed best overall. In addition to the T-cell response, it was also able to stimulate high titers of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies comparable to the levels elicited by the 17DD vaccine. More importantly, the pL/YFE vaccine conferred 100% protection against the YF virus in intracerebrally challenged mice. These results indicate that pL/YFE DNA is an excellent vaccine candidate and should be considered for further developmental studies. PMID:25875109

  18. Functional characterization of aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Lisa L.; Rodriguez, Stacy D.; Hansen, Immo A.

    2015-01-01

    After taking vertebrate blood, female mosquitoes quickly shed excess water and ions while retaining and concentrating the mostly proteinaceous nutrients. Aquaporins (AQPs) are an evolutionary conserved family of membrane transporter proteins that regulate the flow of water and in some cases glycerol and other small molecules across cellular membranes. In a previous study, we found six putative AQP genes in the genome of the yellow fever mosquito, Ae. aegypti, and demonstrated the involvement of three of them in the blood meal-induced diuresis. Here we characterized AQP expression in different tissues before and after a blood meal, explored the substrate specificity of AQPs expressed in the Malpighian tubules and performed RNAi-mediated knockdown and tested for changes in mosquito desiccation resistance. We found that AQPs are generally down-regulated 24?hrs after a blood meal. Ae. aegypti AQP 1 strictly transports water, AQP 2 and 5 demonstrate limited solute transport, but primarily function as water transporters. AQP 4 is an aquaglyceroporin with multiple substrates. Knockdown of AQPs expressed in the MTs increased survival of Ae. aegypti under dry conditions. We conclude that Malpighian tubules of adult female yellow fever mosquitoes utilize three distinct AQPs and one aquaglyceroporin in their osmoregulatory functions. PMID:25589229

  19. The 1802 Saint-Domingue yellow fever epidemic and the Louisiana Purchase.

    PubMed

    Marr, John S; Cathey, John T

    2013-01-01

    Epidemics have been pivotal in the history of the world as exemplified by a yellow fever epidemic in the Caribbean that clearly altered New World geopolitics. By the end of the 18th century, yellow fever--then an "emerging disease"--was widespread throughout the Caribbean and particularly lethal in Saint-Domingue (present day Haiti). From 1793 to 1798, case fatality rates among British troops in the West Indies (including Saint-Domingue) were as high as 70%. A worse fate befell newly arrived French armed forces in 1802, ostensibly sent by Napoleon to suppress a rebellion and to reestablish slavery. Historians have disagreed on why Napoleon initially dispatched nearly 30,000 soldiers and sailors to the island. Evidence suggests the troops were actually an expeditionary force with intensions to invade North America through New Orleans and to establish a major holding in the Mississippi valley. However, lacking knowledge of basic prevention and control measures, mortality from the disease left only a small and shattered fraction of his troops alive, thwarting his secret ambition to colonize and hold French-held lands, which later became better known as the Louisiana Purchase. If an event of the magnitude of France's experience were to occur in the 21st century, it might also have profound unanticipated consequences. PMID:23169407

  20. Advanced Yellow Fever Virus Genome Detection in Point-of-Care Facilities and Reference Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pranav; Yillah, Jasmin; Weidmann, Manfred; Méndez, Jairo A.; Nakouné, Emmanuel Rivalyn; Niedrig, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Reported methods for the detection of the yellow fever viral genome are beset by limitations in sensitivity, specificity, strain detection spectra, and suitability to laboratories with simple infrastructure in areas of endemicity. We describe the development of two different approaches affording sensitive and specific detection of the yellow fever genome: a real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and an isothermal protocol employing the same primer-probe set but based on helicase-dependent amplification technology (RT-tHDA). Both assays were evaluated using yellow fever cell culture supernatants as well as spiked and clinical samples. We demonstrate reliable detection by both assays of different strains of yellow fever virus with improved sensitivity and specificity. The RT-qPCR assay is a powerful tool for reference or diagnostic laboratories with real-time PCR capability, while the isothermal RT-tHDA assay represents a useful alternative to earlier amplification techniques for the molecular diagnosis of yellow fever by field or point-of-care laboratories. PMID:23052311

  1. "In the interest of humanity and the cause of science": the yellow fever volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pierce, John R

    2003-11-01

    The scientific discoveries of the U.S. Army Yellow Fever Board of 1900 are well known as are the Army physicians who led the board. Walter Reed, of course, is the best known, but James Carroll, Aristides Agramonte, and Jesse Lazear are also known, if not nationally, to their local communities. This article deals not with the known but with the unknown, meaning the volunteers who subjected themselves to the ravages of yellow fever and the real possibility of death. The year 1900 was known as a "yellow fever year" among the locals in Cuba because in the preceding year the epidemics had been relatively mild. Beginning its work in June 1900 in the midst of a deadly epidemic, the board conducted a truly remarkable set of experiments that set a benchmark for controlled clinical trials and informed consent. Because no animal model was known to be susceptible to yellow fever, they used human volunteers for their experiments. These volunteers were recruited from among Spanish immigrants and were accepted from soldiers and two civilians who volunteered. Over 30 men participated in the experiments, and 22 developed yellow fever. With expected death rates of 20% to 40%, it is incredible that none of these volunteers died. In 1929, the U.S. government honored the Americans who volunteered by placing their names on a Roll of Honor published annually in the Army Register. The successes of the 1900 U.S. Army Yellow Fever Board were truly remarkable, and many of the successes were made possible by the men who volunteered, some repeatedly, to risk their lives "in the interest of humanity and the cause of science." PMID:14680037

  2. An inactivated yellow fever 17DD vaccine cultivated in Vero cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Renata C; Silva, Andrea N M R; Souza, Marta Cristina O; Silva, Marlon V; Neves, Patrícia P C C; Silva, Andrea A M V; Matos, Denise D C S; Herrera, Miguel A O; Yamamura, Anna M Y; Freire, Marcos S; Gaspar, Luciane P; Caride, Elena

    2015-08-20

    Yellow fever is an acute infectious disease caused by prototype virus of the genus Flavivirus. It is endemic in Africa and South America where it represents a serious public health problem causing epidemics of hemorrhagic fever with mortality rates ranging from 20% to 50%. There is no available antiviral therapy and vaccination is the primary method of disease control. Although the attenuated vaccines for yellow fever show safety and efficacy it became necessary to develop a new yellow fever vaccine due to the occurrence of rare serious adverse events, which include visceral and neurotropic diseases. The new inactivated vaccine should be safer and effective as the existing attenuated one. In the present study, the immunogenicity of an inactivated 17DD vaccine in C57BL/6 mice was evaluated. The yellow fever virus was produced by cultivation of Vero cells in bioreactors, inactivated with ?-propiolactone, and adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide (alum). Mice were inoculated with inactivated 17DD vaccine containing alum adjuvant and followed by intracerebral challenge with 17DD virus. The results showed that animals receiving 3 doses of the inactivated vaccine (2 ?g/dose) with alum adjuvant had neutralizing antibody titers above the cut-off of PRNT50 (Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test). In addition, animals immunized with inactivated vaccine showed survival rate of 100% after the challenge as well as animals immunized with commercial attenuated 17DD vaccine. PMID:25862300

  3. Yellow fever and Max Theiler: the only Nobel Prize for a virus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Norrby, Erling

    2007-01-01

    In 1951, Max Theiler of the Rockefeller Foundation received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of an effective vaccine against yellow fever—a discovery first reported in the JEM 70 years ago. This was the first, and so far the only, Nobel Prize given for the development of a virus vaccine. Recently released Nobel archives now reveal how the advances in the yellow fever vaccine field were evaluated more than 50 years ago, and how this led to a prize for Max Theiler. PMID:18039952

  4. [Control discourses and power relations of yellow fever: Philadelphia in 1793].

    PubMed

    Kim, Seohyung

    2014-12-01

    1793 Yellow fever in Philadelphia was the most severe epidemics in the late 18th century in the United States. More than 10% of the population in the city died and many people fled to other cities. The cause of yellow fever in the United States had close relationship with slaves and sugar in Philadelphia. Sugarcane plantation had needed many labors to produce sugar and lots of Africans had to move to America as slaves. In this process, Aëdes aegypti, the vector of yellow fever had migrated to America and the circumstances of ships or cities provided appropriate conditions for its breeding. In this period, the cause of yellow fever could not be established exactly, so suggestions of doctors became entangled in political and intellectual discourses in American society. There was a critical conflict between Jeffersonian Republicanism and Federalism about the origin and treatment of yellow fever. Benjamin Rush, a Jeffersonian Republican, suggested urban sanitation reform and bloodletting. He believed the infectious disease happened because of unsanitary city condition, so he thought the United States could be a healthy nation by improvement of the public health and sanitation. He would like to cope with national crisis and develop American society on the basis of republicanism. While Rush suggested the improvement of public health and sanitation, the city government of Philadelphia suggested isolation of yellow fever patients and quarantine. City government isolated the patients from healthy people and it reconstructed space of hospital. Also, it built orphanages to take care of children who lost their parents during the epidemic and implemented power to control people put in the state of exception. Of course, city government tried to protect the city and nation by quarantine of every ship to Philadelphia. Control policies of yellow fever in 1793 showed different conflicts and interactions. Through the yellow fever, Jeffersonian Republicanism and Federalism had conflicted in politically, but they had interactions for control of the infectious disease. And with these kinds of infectious diseases policies, we can see interactions in local, national and global level. PMID:25608507

  5. [Serologic survey for yellow fever and other arboviruses among inhabitants of Rio Branco, Brazil, before and three months after receiving the yellow fever 17D vaccine].

    PubMed

    Tavares-Neto, José; Freitas-Carvalho, Juliano; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Rocha, Grace; Rodrigues, Sueli Guerreiro; Damasceno, Edilândio; Darub, Recleides; Viana, Sebastião; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa

    2004-01-01

    During a yellow fever vaccination campaign among residents of Rio Branco (Acre State), the frequency of HI antibodies to the most prevalent arboviruses in the Amazon region and to yellow fever virus was determined before and three months after immunization with YF 17D vaccine. From 390 inhabitants included in the first phase of serologic survey (August 1999), only 190 provided a second serum sample, after the use of 17D vaccine (January 2000). Among first phase samples, the frequency of HI antibodies was: 17D (27.2%); Ilheus (5.9%); Mayaro (5.4%); Caraparu (4.9%); Dengue-2 (4.1%); Oropouche (2.3%); and Dengue-1 (0.3%). In the second study phase, the serologic conversion to YF reached 89.7% among previously negative persons. Serologic conversions were also observed to Ilheus (6.2%); Dengue-3 (3.2%); Mayaro (1.1%); and Oropouche (1.1%) viruses. In conclusion, considering the high YF antibody rate after vaccination, the risk of urban yellow fever seems insignificant, although the lower prevalence of HI antibodies to dengue viruses, is of concern and inhabitants are under high risk of dengue outbreaks, especially to DEN-3 recently introduced in Brazil, as was observed in 2000 and 2001 with DEN-1 and DEN-2. PMID:15042172

  6. Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cover most of your body, • using an effective insect repellent, such as those containing DEET. 3 Yellow ... allergy to any component of the vaccine, including eggs, chicken proteins, or gelatin, or who has had ...

  7. Hawaii Facing Rise in Dengue Fever Cases

    MedlinePLUS

    Hawaii Facing Rise in Dengue Fever Cases 122 cases of the extremely painful, but rarely fatal, disease ... HealthDay News) -- Do your winter travel plans include Hawaii? You may want to pack bug repellent, experts ...

  8. Inaugural dissertation on Yellow Fever and on the treatment of that disease by saline medicines 

    E-print Network

    Bone, George Frederick

    1846-01-01

    Previous to my graduation in Edinburgh on the 1st of August 1845, I submitted to the Faculty of Medicine a Thesis on Yellow Fever. This Thesis I have since corrected and enlarged, and now venture to publish. The labour of writing it was not great...

  9. Safety and efficacy of yellow fever vaccine in children less thanone-year-old.

    PubMed

    Osinusi, K; Akinkugbe, F M; Akinwolere, O A; Fabiyi, A

    1990-01-01

    In a clinical trial of stabilized yellow fever vaccine from Institute Pasteur in 77 children aged seven to eight months, fever was the most significant immediate and delayed side effect. Fever occurred in 12 (15.6%) children with in 48 hours of vaccination while it occurred in 10 (12.9%) children within ten days of vaccination. Other recorded side effects were pain at innoculation site in four (5.2%) children and vomiting in one (1.3%) child. Temperature recorded in 20 of the 22 febrile episodes ranged from 37.8 degrees C to 38.6 degrees C. One of the two patients who had temperatures of 39 degrees C and above had malaria parasites in her blood film. All episodes of fever except one responded to antipyretic. There was no episode of febrile convulsion and no feature suggestive of encephalitis. Of the 20 children who had neutralization test carried out against yellow fever virus six weeks after vaccination, the test was positive in post vaccination sera of 12 (60%) children whose pre-vaccination sera were negative. Two others showed evidence of partial protection. Although the seroconversion rate of 60% is less than reported in adults and older children, the result of this study shows that yellow fever vaccine is safe and fairly effective in infants. It is our suggestion that if a larger trial confirms our findings, the vaccine may be incorporated into the expanded programme on immunization (EPI) to be given at the age of seven months after completion of diptheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliomyelitis vaccinations and before measles vaccination is due. PMID:2271433

  10. The Molecular Characterization of a Diuretic Hormone Receptor (GPRdih1) From Females of the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti (L.) 

    E-print Network

    Jagge, Christopher Lloyd

    2011-02-22

    In the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti (L.), hemolymph-circulating diuretic hormones act upon the renal organs (Malpighian tubules) to regulate primary urine composition and secretion rate; however, the molecular ...

  11. SATELLITE-BASED RIFT VALLEY FEVER FORECASTS PREDICT A LARGE YELLOW FEVER EPIDEMIC IN SUDAN, 2005

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustained, heavy East African rainfall is associated with Aedes spp. breeding in Kenyan grasslands and Rift Valley Fever (RVF) epidemics. Validated RVF forecasts use satellite measurements of vegetation greenness (which increases after heavy rains) and other eco-climate indicators. These models may ...

  12. The centennial of the Yellow Fever Commission and the use of informed consent in medical research.

    PubMed

    Güereña-Burgueño, Fernando

    2002-01-01

    The year 2000 marked the centennial of the discovery of the mode of transmission of yellow fever. Informed consent was systematically used for the first time in research. This process was the result of a complex social phenomenon involving the American Public Health Association, the US and Spanish Governments, American and Cuban scientists, the media, and civilian and military volunteers. The public health and medical communities face the AIDS pandemic at the beginning of the 21st Century, as they faced the yellow fever epidemic at the beginning of the 20th Century. Current medical research dilemmas have fueled the debate about the ethical conduct of research in human subjects. The AIDS pandemic is imposing enormous new ethical challenges on the conduct of medical research, especially in the developing world. Reflecting on the yellow fever experiments of 1900, lessons can be learned and applied to the current ethical challenges faced by the international public health research community. The English version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html. PMID:12053781

  13. Inactivated yellow fever 17D vaccine: development and nonclinical safety, immunogenicity and protective activity.

    PubMed

    Monath, Thomas P; Lee, Cynthia K; Julander, Justin G; Brown, Alicja; Beasley, David W; Watts, Douglas M; Hayman, Edward; Guertin, Patrick; Makowiecki, Joseph; Crowell, Joseph; Levesque, Philip; Bowick, Gavin C; Morin, Merribeth; Fowler, Elizabeth; Trent, Dennis W

    2010-05-14

    In the last 10 years new concerns have arisen about safety of the live, attenuated yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine, in particular viscerotropic adverse events, which have a case-fatality rate of 64%. A non-replicating cell culture-based vaccine would not cause these adverse events, and potentially could be used in persons with precautions or contraindications to use of the live vaccine, including age <9 months and >60 years, egg allergy, immune suppression, and pregnancy. We developed a whole virion vaccine from the 17D strain inactivated with beta-propiolactone, and adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide. The inactivated vaccine was highly immunogenic in mice, hamsters, and cynomolgus macaques. After a single dose in hamsters and macaques, neutralizing antibody titers were similar to those elicited by the live 17D vaccine (YF-VAX, Sanofi Pasteur). After two doses of inactivated vaccine, neutralizing antibody titers in hamsters were significantly higher than after a single dose of YF-VAX [geometric mean titer (GMT) 20,480 vs. 1940, respectively (P<0.001, ANOVA)]. Hamsters given a single dose or two doses of inactivated vaccine or a single dose of YF-VAX were fully protected against hepatitis, viremia, weight loss and death after challenge with YF virus (Jimenez strain). A clinical trial of the inactivated vaccine (XRX-001) has been initiated. PMID:20347059

  14. A case of ADEM following Chikungunya fever.

    PubMed

    Maity, Pranab; Roy, Pinaki; Basu, Arindam; Das, Biman; Ghosh, U S

    2014-05-01

    Chikungunya most often is a self-limiting febrile illness with polyarthritis and the virus is not known to be neurotropic. We are reporting a case of chikugunya fever presenting as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis(ADEM) which is very rare. PMID:25438499

  15. A Curious Case of Fever and Hyperpigmentation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Megaloblastic anaemia as a cause of pyrexia is a rare entity. Similarly, hyperpigmentation of skin has rarely been reported as the presenting manifestation of folate and/or vitamin B12 deficiency. The author reports the case of a patient who presented with fever and hyperpigmentation and was diagnosed to have megaloblastic anaemia secondary to vitamin B12 and folate deficiency after other infective, inflammatory/autoimmune, endocrine causes of pyrexia and hyperpigmentation were excluded by appropriate investigations. The patient responded remarkably well to the treatment with vitamin B12 and folic acid supplementation. Although presentation of megaloblastic anaemia as isolated fever or hyperpigmentation are noted in literature, simultaneous fever and hyperpigmentation as its initial presentation is exceedingly rare. PMID:25738019

  16. A curious case of Fever and hyperpigmentation.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Megaloblastic anaemia as a cause of pyrexia is a rare entity. Similarly, hyperpigmentation of skin has rarely been reported as the presenting manifestation of folate and/or vitamin B12 deficiency. The author reports the case of a patient who presented with fever and hyperpigmentation and was diagnosed to have megaloblastic anaemia secondary to vitamin B12 and folate deficiency after other infective, inflammatory/autoimmune, endocrine causes of pyrexia and hyperpigmentation were excluded by appropriate investigations. The patient responded remarkably well to the treatment with vitamin B12 and folic acid supplementation. Although presentation of megaloblastic anaemia as isolated fever or hyperpigmentation are noted in literature, simultaneous fever and hyperpigmentation as its initial presentation is exceedingly rare. PMID:25738019

  17. A yellow fever epizootic in Zika forest, Uganda, during 1972: Part 1: Virus isolation and sentinel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kirya, B G

    1977-01-01

    The results of the yellow fever immunity survey of Central and East Africa reported by SAWYER & WHITMAN in 1936 prompted scientists to undertake well-planned epidemiological studies on yellow fever in eastern Africa. A Yellow Fever Research Institute (the present East African Virus Research Institute) was established at Entebbe in 1936 for this purpose. One of the areas where much work has been carried out is a strip of typical tropical forest, the Zika Forest, 12 kilometres from the Institute. Routine surveillance work, particularly on the biting activity of the yellow fever vector mosquitoes, has been going on since 1946. It was during one of these studies in 1972 that the first yellow fever virus strain was isolated from Aedes africanus collected from the Zika and Sisa forests and one strain was isolated from Coquillettidia fuscopennata, also from the Zika Forest. Three sentinel rhesus monkeys, nomimmune to YF, which were kept in the Zika Forest during the time of the epizootic died of YF disease. The present observations indicate that YF is still present in Africa, and as such it still remains a potential menace to the human population. The epidemiological implications are discussed. PMID:407675

  18. Guiding dengue vaccine development using knowledge gained from the success of the yellow fever vaccine.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huabin; Lee, Min; Jin, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses comprise approximately 70 closely related RNA viruses. These include several mosquito-borne pathogens, such as yellow fever virus (YFV), dengue virus (DENV), and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which can cause significant human diseases and thus are of great medical importance. Vaccines against both YFV and JEV have been used successfully in humans for decades; however, the development of a DENV vaccine has encountered considerable obstacles. Here, we review the protective immune responses elicited by the vaccine against YFV to provide some insights into the development of a protective DENV vaccine. PMID:26435066

  19. Mortality and Morbidity Among Military Personnel and Civilians During the 1930s and World War II From Transmission of Hepatitis During Yellow Fever Vaccination: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzetti, Diane L.; Spragins, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    During World War II, nearly all US and Allied troops received yellow fever vaccine. Until May 1942, it was both grown and suspended in human serum. In April 1942, major epidemics of hepatitis occurred in US and Allied troops who had received yellow fever vaccine. A rapid and thorough investigation by the US surgeon general followed, and a directive was issued discontinuing the use of human serum in vaccine production. The large number of cases of hepatitis caused by the administration of this vaccine could have been avoided. Had authorities undertaken a thorough review of the literature, they would have discovered published reports, as early as 1885, of postvaccination epidemics of hepatitis in both men and horses. It would take 4 additional decades of experiments and epidemiological research before viruses of hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E were identified, their modes of transmission understood, and their genomes sequenced. PMID:23327242

  20. Docking studies towards exploring antiviral compounds against envelope protein of yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, Amineni; Kumar, Manne Muni; Pradhan, Dibyabhaba; Marisetty, Hemanthkumar

    2011-03-01

    Yellow fever is among one of the most lethal viral diseases for which approved antiviral therapies were yet to be discovered. Herein, functional assignment of complete YFV proteome was done through support vector machine. Major envelope (E) protein that mediates entry of YFV into host cell was selected as a potent molecular target. Three dimensional structure of the molecular target was predicted using Modeller9v7. The model was optimized in Maestro9.0 applying OPLS AA force field and was evaluated using PROCHECK, ProSA, ProQ and Profile 3D. The BOG pocket residues Val48, Glu197, Thr200, Ile204, Thr265, Thr268 and Gly278 were located in YFV E protein using SiteMap2.3. More than one million compounds of Ligandinfo Meta database were explored using a computational virtual screening protocol targeting BOG pocket of the E protein. Finally, ten top ranked lead molecules with strong binding affinity to BOG pocket of YFV E protein were identified based on XP Gscore. Drug likeliness and comparative bioactivity analysis for these leads using QikProp3.2 had shown that these molecules would have the potential to act as better drug. Thus, the 10 lead molecules suggested in the present study would be of interest as promising starting point for designing antiviral compound against yellow fever. PMID:21369890

  1. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of 1-undec-10-enoyl-piperidines as adulticides against the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti (L.), is considered the primary vector for both dengue and yellow fever. Using insecticide is one of the major ways to control this medically important insect pest. However, few new insecticides have been developed for mosquito control. As part of our collabo...

  2. The single kinin receptor signals to separate and independent physiological pathways in Malpighian tubules of the yellow fever mosquito

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the past we have used the leucokinins, the kinins of the cockroach Leucophaea, to evaluate the mechanism of diuretic action of kinin peptides in Malpighian tubules of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. Now using aedeskinins, the kinins of Aedes, are available, we find that in isolated Aede...

  3. Lewis W. Hackett and the early years of the International Health Board's Yellow Fever Program in Brazil, 1917-1924.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, D H

    2005-12-01

    Lewis W. Hackett joined the staff of the International Health Board (IHB) in 1914. He was sent to Brazil in 1916, where his original responsibility was hookworm control, but he was gradually and inevitably drawn into combating other diseases. Hackett had a strong influence on public health in Brazil. In 1922 he instituted grass-roots (local) health units and programs. The next year, he negotiated with the federal government a cooperative yellow fever control program, which was described in the IHB's 1923 annual report as the "new and final campaign against yellow fever" in Brazil. Eleven offices were established in northern Brazil, where it was expected that yellow fever would quickly be eradicated. Just as the new program got underway Hackett was reassigned to Italy, where he remained until the beginning of World War II. Nonetheless, Hackett had done a classic job of developing the IHB program in Brazil, moving carefully but authoritatively from the initial focus on hookworm, to the development of a more comprehensive public health program, and then to the strategic thrust toward yellow fever. PMID:16866041

  4. The Fat Body Transcriptomes of the Yellow Fever Mosquito Aedes aegypti, Pre-and Post-Blood Meal

    E-print Network

    Houde, Peter

    The Fat Body Transcriptomes of the Yellow Fever Mosquito Aedes aegypti, Pre- and Post- Blood Meal States of America Abstract Background: The fat body is the main organ of intermediary metabolism mosquito fat body physiology and to identify novel targets for insect control, we have conducted

  5. Gustatory receptor neuron responds to DEET and other insect repellents in the yellow fever mosquito, aedes aegypti

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three gustatory receptor neurons were characterized for contact chemoreceptive sensilla on the labella of female yellow fever mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti. The neuron with the smallest amplitude spike responded to the feeding deterrent, quinine, as well as DEET and other insect repellents. Two other ...

  6. Safety profile of the yellow fever vaccine Stamaril®: a 17-year review.

    PubMed

    Cottin, Pascale; Niedrig, Matthias; Domingo, Cristina

    2013-11-01

    Since the creation by the manufacturer in 1993, of an electronic pharmacovigilance database for all spontaneous, voluntary reports of adverse events (AEs) after vaccination, 276 million doses of Stamaril® have been distributed worldwide. We review this database for the safety of Stamaril with emphasis on yellow fever (YF) vaccine associated acute viscerotropic and neurotropic diseases, anaphylaxis and on specific at risk groups: elderly adults, pregnant and lactating women and the immunosuppressed. Findings confirm that the vaccine's safety profile in routine practice is favorable and consistent with the summary of product characteristics. Estimated reporting rates of serious adverse events associated after Stamaril vaccination are lower than the previously published and widely cited estimates of the worldwide reporting rate for YF vaccines in general. These data provide important additional information for the prescribers in assessing the risks and benefits associated with the use of Stamaril in individuals exposed to YF virus. PMID:24066727

  7. Efficient, trans-complementing packaging systems for chimeric, pseudoinfectious dengue 2/yellow fever viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Shustov, Alexandr V.

    2010-04-25

    In our previous studies, we have stated to build a new strategy for developing defective, pseudoinfectious flaviviruses (PIVs) and applying them as a new type of vaccine candidates. PIVs combined the efficiency of live vaccines with the safety of inactivated or subunit vaccines. The results of the present work demonstrate further development of chimeric PIVs encoding dengue virus 2 (DEN2V) glycoproteins and yellow fever virus (YFV)-derived replicative machinery as potential vaccine candidates. The newly designed PIVs have synergistically functioning mutations in the prM and NS2A proteins, which abolish processing of the latter proteins and make the defective viruses capable of producing either only noninfectious, immature and/or subviral DEN2V particles. The PIV genomes can be packaged to high titers into infectious virions in vitro using the NS1-deficient YFV helper RNAs, and both PIVs and helpers can then be passaged as two-component genome viruses at an escalating scale.

  8. Rapid Molecular Assays for the Detection of Yellow Fever Virus in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Escadafal, Camille; Faye, Oumar; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Faye, Ousmane; Weidmann, Manfred; Strohmeier, Oliver; von Stetten, Felix; Drexler, Josef; Eberhard, Michael; Niedrig, Matthias; Patel, Pranav

    2014-01-01

    Background Yellow fever (YF) is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. The causative agent, the yellow fever virus (YFV), is found in tropical and subtropical areas of South America and Africa. Although a vaccine is available since the 1930s, YF still causes thousands of deaths and several outbreaks have recently occurred in Africa. Therefore, rapid and reliable diagnostic methods easy to perform in low-resources settings could have a major impact on early detection of outbreaks and implementation of appropriate response strategies such as vaccination and/or vector control. Methodology The aim of this study was to develop a YFV nucleic acid detection method applicable in outbreak investigations and surveillance studies in low-resource and field settings. The method should be simple, robust, rapid and reliable. Therefore, we adopted an isothermal approach and developed a recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay which can be performed with a small portable instrument and easy-to-use lyophilized reagents. The assay was developed in three different formats (real-time with or without microfluidic semi-automated system and lateral-flow assay) to evaluate their application for different purposes. Analytical specificity and sensitivity were evaluated with a wide panel of viruses and serial dilutions of YFV RNA. Mosquito pools and spiked human plasma samples were also tested for assay validation. Finally, real-time RPA in portable format was tested under field conditions in Senegal. Conclusion/Significance The assay was able to detect 20 different YFV strains and demonstrated no cross-reactions with closely related viruses. The RPA assay proved to be a robust, portable method with a low detection limit (<21 genome equivalent copies per reaction) and rapid processing time (<20 min). Results from real-time RPA field testing were comparable to results obtained in the laboratory, thus confirming our method is suitable for YFV detection in low-resource settings. PMID:24603874

  9. Case report: Dengue hemorrhagic fever with encephalopathy in an adult.

    PubMed

    Chotmongkol, Verajit; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2004-03-01

    Encephalopathy in dengue hemorrhagic fever is a very rare condition and usually occurrs in the febrile stage. We report a 29-year-old woman, who presented with acute fever, thrombocytopenia and positive IgM antibodies for dengue virus. On the fourth hospital day, the fever subsided and she developed a confusional stage. CT scan and MRI of the brain were within normal limits. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed generalized theta waves. Cerebrospinal fluid was normal. She was treated with supportive treatment. Five days later, she was fully recovered without any neurological deficits. This is a first case of encephalopathy in dengue hemorrhagic fever that developed after the fever subsided. PMID:15272761

  10. Unusual manifestation of the yellow nail syndrome - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Papaiordanou, Francine; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Miyaoka, Mariana Yumi; Yang, Jeane Jeong Hoon; Pires, Mario Cezar

    2014-01-01

    The yellow nail syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the classic triad of yellow and dystrophic nails, lymphedema and pleural effusion. We report in this paper a case of yellow nail syndrome, presenting the classic triad of the disease, associated with an unusual lymph accumulation in the abdomen region. PMID:24937826

  11. Is There a Risk of Yellow Fever Virus Transmission in South Asian Countries with Hyperendemic Dengue?

    PubMed Central

    Agampodi, Suneth B.; Wickramage, Kolitha

    2013-01-01

    The fact that yellow fever (YF) has never occurred in Asia remains an “unsolved mystery” in global health. Most countries in Asia with high Aedes aegypti mosquito density are considered “receptive” for YF transmission. Recently, health officials in Sri Lanka issued a public health alert on the potential spread of YF from a migrant group from West Africa. We performed an extensive review of literature pertaining to the risk of YF in Sri Lanka/South Asian region to understand the probability of actual risk and assist health authorities to form evidence informed public health policies/practices. Published data from epidemiological, historical, biological, molecular, and mathematical models were harnessed to assess the risk of YF in Asia. Using this data we examine a number of theories proposed to explain lack of YF in Asia. Considering the evidence available, we conclude that the probable risk of local transmission of YF is extremely low in Sri Lanka and for other South Asian countries despite a high Aedes aegypti density and associated dengue burden. This does not however exclude the future possibility of transmission in Asia, especially considering the rapid influx travelers from endemic areas, as we report, arriving in Sri Lanka. PMID:24367789

  12. Development and characterization of polyclonal peptide antibodies for the detection of Yellow fever virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Stock, N K; Escadafal, C; Achazi, K; Cissé, M; Niedrig, M

    2015-09-15

    There is still a considerable need for development of new tools and methods detecting specific viral proteins for the diagnosis and pathogenesis study of the Yellow fever virus (YFV). This study aimed to develop and characterize polyclonal peptide antisera for detection of YFV-C and -NS1 proteins. The antisera were used further to investigate NS1 protein expression during YFV infection in mammalian cells. YFV target proteins were detected by all antisera in western blot and immunofluorescence assays. No cross-reactivity was observed with Dengue virus, West Nile virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus and Japanese encephalitis virus. Nuclear localization of the YFV-C protein was demonstrated for the first time. Experiments investigating NS1 expression suggested a potential use of the YFV-NS1 antisera for development of diagnostic approaches targeting the secreted form of the NS1 protein. The antisera described in this study offer new possibilities for use in YFV research and for the development of novel diagnostic tests. PMID:26086983

  13. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Dias de Oliveira, Barbara C. E. P.; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Maia de Souza, Yuli Rodrigues; Ferro, Jessica Maria dos Santos; da Silva, Igor José; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Guedes, Priscila Tavares; dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo Cunha; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system. PMID:26371874

  14. Neuropeptides in the antennal lobe of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Siju, KP; Reifenrath, Anna; Scheiblich, Hannah; Neupert, Susanne; Predel, Reinhard; Hansson, Bill S; Schachtner, Joachim; Ignell, Rickard

    2014-01-01

    For many insects, including mosquitoes, olfaction is the dominant modality regulating their behavioral repertoire. Many neurochemicals modulate olfactory information in the central nervous system, including the primary olfactory center of insects, the antennal lobe. The most diverse and versatile neurochemicals in the insect nervous system are found in the neuropeptides. In the present study, we analyzed neuropeptides in the antennal lobe of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, a major vector of arboviral diseases. Direct tissue profiling of the antennal lobe by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry indicated the presence of 28 mature products from 10 different neuropeptide genes. In addition, immunocytochemical techniques were used to describe the cellular location of the products of up to seven of these genes within the antennal lobe. Allatostatin A, allatotropin, SIFamide, FMRFamide-related peptides, short neuropeptide F, myoinhibitory peptide, and tachykinin-related peptides were found to be expressed in local interneurons and extrinsic neurons of the antennal lobe. Building on these results, we discuss the possible role of neuropeptide signaling in the antennal lobe of Ae. aegypti. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:592–608, 2014. PMID:23897410

  15. Pressure-inactivated yellow fever 17DD virus: implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Luciane P; Mendes, Ygara S; Yamamura, Anna M Y; Almeida, Luiz F C; Caride, Elena; Gonçalves, Rafael B; Silva, Jerson L; Oliveira, Andréa C; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos S

    2008-06-01

    The successful Yellow Fever (YF) vaccine consists of the live attenuated 17D-204 or 17DD viruses. Despite its excellent record of efficacy and safety, serious adverse events have been recorded and influenced extensive vaccination in endemic areas. Therefore, alternative strategies should be considered, which may include inactivated whole virus. High hydrostatic pressure has been described as a method for viral inactivation and vaccine development. The present study evaluated whether high hydrostatic pressure would inactivate the YF 17DD virus. YF 17DD virus was grown in Vero cells in roller bottle cultures and subjected to 310MPa for 3h at 4 degrees C. This treatment abolished YF infectivity and eliminated the ability of the virus to cause disease in mice. Pressure-inactivated virus elicited low level of neutralizing antibody titers although exhibited complete protection against an otherwise lethal challenge with 17DD virus in the murine model. The data warrant further development of pressure-inactivated vaccine against YF. PMID:18420285

  16. Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by four families of viruses. These include the Ebola and Marburg, Lassa fever, and yellow fever viruses. ... Some VHFs cause mild disease, but some, like Ebola or Marburg, cause severe disease and death. VHFs ...

  17. The Aquaporin Gene Family of the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Lisa L.; Boudko, Dmitri Y.; Marinotti, Osvaldo; Carpenter, Victoria K.; Dawe, Angus L.; Hansen, Immo A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is the principal vector of the Dengue and yellow fever viruses. During feeding, an adult female can take up more than its own body weight in vertebrate blood. After a blood meal females excrete large amounts of urine through their excretion system, the Malpighian tubules (MT). Diuresis starts within seconds after the mosquito starts feeding. Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of membrane transporters that regulate the flow of water, glycerol and other small molecules across cellular membranes in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Our aim was to identify aquaporins that function as water channels, mediating transcellular water transport in MTs of adult female Ae. aegypti. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a bioinformatics approach we screened genome databases and identified six putative AQPs in the genome of Ae. aegypti. Phylogenetic analysis showed that five of the six Ae. aegypti AQPs have high similarity to classical water-transporting AQPs of vertebrates. Using microarray, reverse transcription and real time PCR analysis we found that all six AQPs are expressed in distinct patterns in mosquito tissues/body parts. AaAQP1, 4, and 5 are strongly expressed in the adult female MT. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the MT-expressed mosquito AQPs resulted in significantly reduced diuresis. Conclusions/Significance Our results support the notion that AQP1, 4, and 5 function as water transporters in the MTs of adult female Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. Our results demonstrate the importance of these AQPs for mosquito diuresis after blood ingestion and highlight their potential as targets for the development of novel vector control strategies. PMID:21249121

  18. Attenuation of Recombinant Yellow Fever 17D Viruses Expressing Foreign Protein Epitopes at the Surface

    PubMed Central

    Bonaldo, Myrna C.; Garratt, Richard C.; Marchevsky, Renato S.; Coutinho, Evandro S. F.; Jabor, Alfredo V.; Almeida, Luís F. C.; Yamamura, Anna M. Y.; Duarte, Adriana S.; Oliveira, Prisciliana J.; Lizeu, Jackeline O. P.; Camacho, Luiz A. B.; Freire, Marcos S.; Galler, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is a live attenuated virus. Three-dimensional (3D) homology modeling of the E protein structure from YF 17D virus and its comparison with that from tick-borne encephalitis virus revealed that it is possible to accommodate inserts of different sizes and amino acid compositions in the flavivirus E protein fg loop. This is consistent with the 3D structures of both the dimeric and trimeric forms in which the fg loop lies exposed to solvents. We demonstrate here that YF 17D viruses bearing foreign humoral (17D/8) and T-cell (17D/13) epitopes, which vary in sequence and length, displayed growth restriction. It is hypothesized that interference with the dimer-trimer transition and with the formation of a ring of such trimers in order to allow fusion compromises the capability of the E protein to induce fusion of viral and endosomal membranes, and a slower rate of fusion may delay the extent of virus production. This would account for the lower levels of replication in cultured cells and of viremia in monkeys, as well as for the more attenuated phenotype of the recombinant viruses in monkeys. Testing of both recombinant viruses (17D/8 and 17D/13) for monkey neurovirulence also suggests that insertion at the 17D E protein fg loop does not compromise the attenuated phenotype of YF 17D virus, further confirming the potential use of this site for the development of new live attenuated 17D virus-based vaccines. PMID:15956601

  19. Enrollment in YFV Vaccine Trial: An Evaluation of Recruitment Outcomes Associated with a Randomized Controlled Double-Blind Trial of a Live Attenuated Yellow Fever Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Frew, Paula M; Shapiro, Eve T; Lu, Lu; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Keyserling, Harry L; Mulligan, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    This investigation evaluated several factors associated with diverse participant enrollment of a clinical trial assessing safety, immunogenicity, and comparative viremia associated with administration of 17-D live, attenuated yellow fever vaccine given alone or in combination with human immune globulin. We obtained baseline participant information (e.g., sociodemographic, medical) and followed recruitment outcomes from 2005 to 2007. Of 355 potential Yellow Fever vaccine study participants, 231 cases were analyzed. Strong interest in study participation was observed among racial and ethnically diverse persons with 36.34% eligible following initial study screening, resulting in 18.75% enrollment. The percentage of white participants increased from 63.66% (prescreened sample) to 81.25% (enrollment group). The regression model was significant with white race as a predictor of enrollment (OR=2.744, 95% CI=1.415-5.320, p=0.003).In addition, persons were more likely to enroll via direct outreach and referral mechanisms compared to mass advertising (OR=2.433, 95% CI=1.102-5.369). The findings indicate that racially diverse populations can be recruited to vaccine clinical trials, yet actual enrollment may not reflect that diversity. PMID:25221781

  20. Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Children." No 2. Does your fever come and go and does your temperature stay between 97° and 102°? No Go to Question 8.* Yes 3. Have you had ... have a fever between 101° and 103°? No Go to Question 15.** Yes 9. Do you have ...

  1. Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    A fever is a body temperature that is higher than normal. It is not an illness. It is part of your body's defense against infection. Most bacteria ... cause infections do well at the body's normal temperature (98.6 F). A slight fever can make ...

  2. Clinical and immunological insights on severe, adverse neurotropic and viscerotropic disease following 17D yellow fever vaccination.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Luiza; Espírito-Santo, Luçandra Ramos; Martins, Marina Angela; Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Caminha, Ricardo Carvalho; de Andrade Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; de Menezes Martins, Reinaldo; Galler, Ricardo; da Silva Freire, Marcos; Marcovistz, Rugimar; Homma, Akira; Teuwen, Dirk E; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2010-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) vaccines (17D-204 and 17DD) are well tolerated and cause very low rates of severe adverse events (YEL-SAE), such as serious allergic reactions, neurotropic adverse diseases (YEL-AND), and viscerotropic diseases (YEL-AVD). Viral and host factors have been postulated to explain the basis of YEL-SAE. However, the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of YEL-SAE remain unknown. The present report provides a detailed immunological analysis of a 23-year-old female patient. The patient developed a suspected case of severe YEL-AVD with encephalitis, as well as with pancreatitis and myositis, following receipt of a 17D-204 YF vaccination. The patient exhibited a decreased level of expression of Fc-gammaR in monocytes (CD16, CD32, and CD64), along with increased levels of NK T cells (an increased CD3(+) CD16(+/-) CD56(+/-)/CD3(+) ratio), activated T cells (CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells), and B lymphocytes. Enhanced levels of plasmatic cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-17, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) as well as an exacerbated ex vivo intracytoplasmic cytokine pattern, mainly observed within NK cells (gamma interferon positive [IFN-gamma(+)], tumor necrosis factor alpha positive [TNF-alpha(+)], and IL-4 positive [IL-4(+)]), CD8(+) T cells (IL-4(+) and IL-5(+)), and B lymphocytes (TNF-alpha(+), IL-4(+), and IL-10(+)). The analysis of CD4(+) T cells revealed a complex profile that consisted of an increased frequency of IL-12(+) and IFN-gamma(+) cells and a decreased percentage of TNF-alpha(+), IL-4(+), and IL-5(+) cells. Depressed cytokine synthesis was observed in monocytes (TNF-alpha(+)) following the provision of antigenic stimuli in vitro. These results support the hypothesis that a strong adaptive response and abnormalities in the innate immune system may be involved in the establishment of YEL-AND and YEL-AVD. PMID:19906894

  3. Clinical and Immunological Insights on Severe, Adverse Neurotropic and Viscerotropic Disease following 17D Yellow Fever Vaccination?

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maria Luiza; Espírito-Santo, Luçandra Ramos; Martins, Marina Angela; Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Caminha, Ricardo Carvalho; de Andrade Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; de Menezes Martins, Reinaldo; Galler, Ricardo; da Silva Freire, Marcos; Marcovistz, Rugimar; Homma, Akira; Teuwen, Dirk E.; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2010-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) vaccines (17D-204 and 17DD) are well tolerated and cause very low rates of severe adverse events (YEL-SAE), such as serious allergic reactions, neurotropic adverse diseases (YEL-AND), and viscerotropic diseases (YEL-AVD). Viral and host factors have been postulated to explain the basis of YEL-SAE. However, the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of YEL-SAE remain unknown. The present report provides a detailed immunological analysis of a 23-year-old female patient. The patient developed a suspected case of severe YEL-AVD with encephalitis, as well as with pancreatitis and myositis, following receipt of a 17D-204 YF vaccination. The patient exhibited a decreased level of expression of Fc-?R in monocytes (CD16, CD32, and CD64), along with increased levels of NK T cells (an increased CD3+ CD16+/? CD56+/?/CD3+ ratio), activated T cells (CD4+ and CD8+ cells), and B lymphocytes. Enhanced levels of plasmatic cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-17, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) as well as an exacerbated ex vivo intracytoplasmic cytokine pattern, mainly observed within NK cells (gamma interferon positive [IFN-?+], tumor necrosis factor alpha positive [TNF-?+], and IL-4 positive [IL-4+]), CD8+ T cells (IL-4+ and IL-5+), and B lymphocytes (TNF-?+, IL-4+, and IL-10+). The analysis of CD4+ T cells revealed a complex profile that consisted of an increased frequency of IL-12+ and IFN-?+ cells and a decreased percentage of TNF-?+, IL-4+, and IL-5+ cells. Depressed cytokine synthesis was observed in monocytes (TNF-?+) following the provision of antigenic stimuli in vitro. These results support the hypothesis that a strong adaptive response and abnormalities in the innate immune system may be involved in the establishment of YEL-AND and YEL-AVD. PMID:19906894

  4. Pathophysiologic and Transcriptomic Analyses of Viscerotropic Yellow Fever in a Rhesus Macaque Model

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Flora; Josset, Laurence; Girke, Thomas; Park, Byung; Barron, Alex; Dewane, Jesse; Hammarlund, Erika; Lewis, Anne; Axthelm, Michael K.; Slifka, Mark K.; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2014-01-01

    Infection with yellow fever virus (YFV), an explosively replicating flavivirus, results in viral hemorrhagic disease characterized by cardiovascular shock and multi-organ failure. Unvaccinated populations experience 20 to 50% fatality. Few studies have examined the pathophysiological changes that occur in humans during YFV infection due to the sporadic nature and remote locations of outbreaks. Rhesus macaques are highly susceptible to YFV infection, providing a robust animal model to investigate host-pathogen interactions. In this study, we characterized disease progression as well as alterations in immune system homeostasis, cytokine production and gene expression in rhesus macaques infected with the virulent YFV strain DakH1279 (YFV-DakH1279). Following infection, YFV-DakH1279 replicated to high titers resulting in viscerotropic disease with ?72% mortality. Data presented in this manuscript demonstrate for the first time that lethal YFV infection results in profound lymphopenia that precedes the hallmark changes in liver enzymes and that although tissue damage was noted in liver, kidneys, and lymphoid tissues, viral antigen was only detected in the liver. These observations suggest that additional tissue damage could be due to indirect effects of viral replication. Indeed, circulating levels of several cytokines peaked shortly before euthanasia. Our study also includes the first description of YFV-DakH1279-induced changes in gene expression within peripheral blood mononuclear cells 3 days post-infection prior to any clinical signs. These data show that infection with wild type YFV-DakH1279 or live-attenuated vaccine strain YFV-17D, resulted in 765 and 46 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), respectively. DEGs detected after YFV-17D infection were mostly associated with innate immunity, whereas YFV-DakH1279 infection resulted in dysregulation of genes associated with the development of immune response, ion metabolism, and apoptosis. Therefore, WT-YFV infection is associated with significant changes in gene expression that are detectable before the onset of clinical symptoms and may influence disease progression and outcome of infection. PMID:25412185

  5. Immune correlates of protection against yellow fever determined by passive immunization and challenge in the hamster model.

    PubMed

    Julander, Justin G; Trent, Dennis W; Monath, Thomas P

    2011-08-11

    Live, attenuated yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is highly efficacious but causes rare, serious adverse events resulting from active replication in the host and direct viral injury to vital organs. We recently reported development of a potentially safer ?-propiolactone-inactivated whole virion YF vaccine (XRX-001), which was highly immunogenic in mice, hamsters, monkeys, and humans [10,11]. To characterize the protective efficacy of neutralizing antibodies stimulated by the inactivated vaccine, graded doses of serum from hamsters immunized with inactivated XRX-001 or live 17D vaccine were transferred to hamsters by the intraperitoneal (IP) route 24h prior to virulent, viscerotropic YF virus challenge. Neutralizing antibody (PRNT(50)) titers were determined in the sera of treated animals 4h before challenge and 4 and 21 days after challenge. Neutralizing antibodies were shown to mediate protection. Animals having 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT(50)) titers of ?40 4h before challenge were completely protected from disease as evidenced by viremia, liver enzyme elevation, and protection against illness (weight change) and death. Passive titers of 10-20 were partially protective. Immunization with the XRX-001 vaccine stimulated YF neutralizing antibodies that were equally effective (based on dose response) as antibodies stimulated by live 17D vaccine. The results will be useful in defining the level of seroprotection in clinical studies of new yellow fever vaccines. PMID:21718741

  6. A Case of Pediatric Q Fever Osteomyelitis Managed Without Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Ameneh; Sparks, Rebecca T; Marais, Ben J

    2015-12-01

    Q fever osteomyelitis, caused by infection with Coxiella burnetti, is rare but should be included in the differential diagnosis of children with culture-negative osteomyelitis, particularly if there is a history of contact with farm animals, and/or granulomatous change on histologic examination of a bone biopsy specimen. We describe a case of Q fever osteomyelitis in a 6-year-old boy in which a decision was made not to treat the patient with combination antimicrobial agents, balancing possible risks of recurrence against potential side effects of prolonged antibiotic treatment. The patient had undergone surgical debridement of a single lesion and was completely asymptomatic after recovery from surgery. This case suggests that a conservative approach of watchful waiting in an asymptomatic patient with chronic Q fever osteomyelitis may be warranted in select cases when close follow-up is possible. PMID:26574586

  7. RISK ANALYSIS: CASE HISTORY OF PUCCINIA JACEAE ON YELLOW STARTHISTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Risk analysis has five components: Risk awareness, Risk perception, Risk assessment, Risk management, and Risk communication. Using the case with the foreign plant pathogen, Puccinia jaceae, under evaluation for biological control of yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis, YST), approaches and...

  8. Q fever endocarditis in Iran: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yaghmaie, Farhad; Esmaeili, Saber; Francis, Sanjeev A; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we describe the first chronic case of Q fever endocarditis in a 72-year-old woman in Iran. The patient developed radiation-associated heart disease status post (s/p) coronary artery bypass surgery, mitral and aortic valve replacements, and tricuspid valve repair. Endocarditis was also suspected due to a history of heart valve surgery. Blood cultures were negative, but a diagnosis of Q fever endocarditis was confirmed based on serologic titers (IgG phase I 1:32,768). The patient was treated with doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine. PMID:25747823

  9. Q fever and lymphadenopathy: report of four new cases and review.

    PubMed

    Foucault, C; Lepidi, H; Poujet-Abadie, J F; Granel, B; Roblot, F; Ariga, T; Raoult, D

    2004-10-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is responsible for various clinical syndromes, but lymphadenitis has been described during Q fever in only three recent case reports. Four new cases of acute Q fever associated with lymphadenopathy are reported here, and these cases are discussed along with the three previously reported cases. Coxiella burnetii was isolated for the first time from a lymph node. Q fever should be considered an etiologic agent of lymphadenitis. PMID:15368098

  10. Imported Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever cases in Istanbul

    PubMed Central

    Midilli, Kenan; Garg?l?, Ay?en; Ergonul, Onder; ?engöz, Gönül; Ozturk, Recep; Bakar, Mehmet; Jongejan, Frans

    2007-01-01

    We described a series of imported cases of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) in Istanbul and investigated the genetic diversity of the virus. All the suspected cases of CCHF, who were applied to the health centers in Istanbul, were screened for CCHF virus (CCHFv) infection by using semi-nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) following RT-PCR. Simultaneous blood samples were also sent to the national reference laboratory in Ankara for serologic investigation. In 10 out of 91 patients, CCHFv was detected by PCR, and among 9 out of 10, anti-CCHFv IgM antibodies were also positive. Clinical features were characterized by fever, myalgia, and hemorrhage. The levels of liver enzymes, creatinine phosphokinase, and lactate dehydrogenase were elevated, and bleeding markers were prolonged. All the cases were treated with ribavirin. There was no fatal case. All the strains clustered within the same group as other Europe/Turkey isolates. PMID:17553137

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of imidazole-4,5- and pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxamides targeting dengue and yellow fever virus?

    PubMed Central

    Saudi, Milind; Zmurko, Joanna; Kaptein, Suzanne; Rozenski, Jef; Neyts, Johan; Van Aerschot, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The results of a high-throughput screening assay using the dengue virus-2 replicon showed that the imidazole 4,5-dicarboxamide (I45DC) derivative (15a) has a high dengue virus inhibitory activity. Based on 15a as a lead compound, a novel class of both disubstituted I45DCs and the resembling pyrazine 2,3-dicarboxamides (P23DCs) were synthesized. Here, we report on their in vitro inhibitory activity against dengue virus (DENV) and yellow fever virus (YFV). Some of these first generation compounds have shown activity against both viruses in the micromolar range. Within this series, compound 15b was observed to display the highest antiviral potency against YFV with an EC50 = 1.85 ?M. In addition, compounds 20a and 20b both potently inhibited replication of DENV (EC50 = 0.93 ?M) in Vero cells. PMID:25285371

  12. Defining Risk Groups to Yellow Fever Vaccine-Associated Viscerotropic Disease in the Absence of Denominator Data

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Stephen J.; Cohen, Joel E.; Itan, Yuval; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Pezzullo, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Several risk groups are known for the rare but serious, frequently fatal, viscerotropic reactions following live yellow fever virus vaccine (YEL-AVD). Establishing additional risk groups is hampered by ignorance of the numbers of vaccinees in factor-specific risk groups thus preventing their use as denominators in odds ratios (ORs). Here, we use an equation to calculate ORs using the prevalence of the factor-specific risk group in the population who remain well. The 95% confidence limits and P values can also be calculated. Moreover, if the estimate of the prevalence is imprecise, discrimination analysis can indicate the prevalence at which the confidence interval results in an OR of ?1 revealing if the prevalence might be higher without yielding a non-significant result. These methods confirm some potential risk groups for YEL-AVD and cast doubt on another. They should prove useful in situations in which factor-specific risk group denominator data are not available. PMID:24394480

  13. Response to Imported Case of Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever, the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Koopmans, Marion P.G.; Vossen, Ann C.T.M.; van Doornum, Gerard J.J.; Günther, Stephan; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; Verduin, Kees M.; Dittrich, Sabine; Emmerich, Petra; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Coutinho, Roel A.

    2009-01-01

    On July 10, 2008, Marburg hemorrhagic fever was confirmed in a Dutch patient who had vacationed recently in Uganda. Exposure most likely occurred in the Python Cave (Maramagambo Forest), which harbors bat species that elsewhere in Africa have been found positive for Marburg virus. A multidisciplinary response team was convened to perform a structured risk assessment, perform risk classification of contacts, issue guidelines for follow-up, provide information, and monitor the crisis response. In total, 130 contacts were identified (66 classified as high risk and 64 as low risk) and monitored for 21 days after their last possible exposure. The case raised questions specific to international travel, postexposure prophylaxis for Marburg virus, and laboratory testing of contacts with fever. We present lessons learned and results of the follow-up serosurvey of contacts and focus on factors that prevented overreaction during an event with a high public health impact. PMID:19751577

  14. The dissemination of 17D yellow fever vaccine in Africans in Kenya in relation to the interpretation of results of protection-test surveys

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, W. H. R.

    1954-01-01

    The extent of dissemination of 17D yellow fever vaccine among the population of Kenya, especially among Africans, is estimated, largely from information in the records of the Kenya Medical Department. The total recorded vaccinations of Africans between 1941 and 1951 amount to about 379,000, representing 7.2% of the African population in 1948; it is, however, possible that the actual number of vaccinations is considerably higher. At Mombasa, 78,000 persons of races other than Africans were given routine inoculation over the same period. After a study of the economy of use of vaccine, the author discusses the protection-test surveys performed before 1951 and during that year in relation to the dissemination of vaccine. It is tentatively concluded that natural infection of man with yellow fever is rare in both Kenya and Tanganyika. PMID:13209303

  15. Clozapine and Fever: A Case of Continued Therapy With Clozapine.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Valentina; Valiente-Gómez, Alicia; Alcoverro, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine is a major atypical antipsychotic drug used in treatment-resistant schizophrenia (Patel and Allin. Ther Adv Psychopharmacol 2011;1:25-29). It interferes with dopamine binding to D1, D2, D3, and D5 receptors but has high affinity to D4. It also has an anticholinergic effect and antagonizes ?-adrenergic, histaminergic, and serotoninergic receptors (Oerther and Ahlenius. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2000;292:731-736). Clozapine has proved effective in treating positive and negative symptoms in patients with refractory schizophrenia, thus accounting for its frequent use. Despite its effectiveness, this drug is not without its adverse effects. The most well known is agranulocytosis. There are, however, many others, such as myocarditis, aspiration pneumonia, ileus, fever, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, hypertriglycemia, tachycardia, and weight gain, among others (Bruijnzeel et al. Asian J Psychiatr 2014;11:3-7). Fever induced by clozapine is a common phenomenon (Lowe et al. Ann Pharmacother 2007;41:1700-1704), which usually occurs in the first 4 weeks of treatment, and its prevalence oscillates from 0.5% and 55%, depending on the study (Jeong et al. Schizophr Res 2002;56:191-193; Young et al. Schizophr Bull 1998;24:381-390). The fever lasts for 2.5 days on average, and unless the treatment is discontinued, it generally abates between day 8 and 16 of treatment (Kohen et al. Ann Pharmacother 2009;43:143-146). There are several different theories about the physiopathological mechanism; it could be a variation of malignant neuroleptic syndrome, an infection secondary to neutropenia, and allergic reaction or the emergence of the immunomodulating effect of clozapine. Some case reports in the bibliography have shown that patients in treatment with clozapine can develop a mild leukocytosis, but the presence of other concurrent symptoms, which indicate infection, is not common (Tham and Dickson. J Clin Psychiatry 2002;63:880-884). The theory of an allergic reaction is unsupported because of the fact that the fever does not recur after reintroducing clozapine. So we question, "What would be the attitudes to follow when we find clozapine-induced fever (Nielsen et al. J Clin Psychiatry 2013;74:603-613)?" The management of patients with clozapine-induced fever should include a complete blood picture, liver and renal function tests, a creatine kinase test urine culture, and a chest x-ray. A nasopharyngeal aspirate can also be useful to exclude infection (Pui-yin Chung et al. Can J Psychiatry 2008;53:857-862). On the other hand, some drugs have been suggested for treatment of fever induced by clozapine. The use of acetaminophen, in the treatment of the fever induced by clozapine, is supported by many studies (Jeong et al. Schizophr Res 2002;56:191-193). In one of these, clozapine was suspended and restarted successfully after 1 week. However, in some studies, such as the case report of Tremeau et al (Clin Neuropharmacol 1997;20:168-170), clozapine was reduced instead of discontinued. In other studies, the recommendation is continuating clozapine treatment (Martin and Williams. J Psychiatry Neurosci 2013;38:E9-E10). PMID:26166236

  16. A Possible connection between the 1878 yellow fever epidemic in the southern United States and the 1877-78 El Niño episode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diaz, Henry F.; McCabe, Gregory J.

    1999-01-01

    This study documents some of the extreme climate anomalies that were recorded in 1877 and 1878 in parts of the eastern United States, with particular emphasis on highlighting the evolution of these anomalies, as they might have contributed to the epidemic. Other years with major outbreaks of yellow fever in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries also occurred during the course of El Niño episodes, a fact that appears not to have been noted before in the literature.

  17. Analysis of a Reverse Transcription Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification (RT-LAMP) for yellow fever diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Marcio R T; Vianez, João Lídio; Nunes, Keley N B; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; Lima, Clayton P S; Guzman, Hilda; Martins, Lívia C; Carvalho, Valéria L; Tesh, Robert B; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2015-12-15

    Yellow Fever virus (YFV) is an important human pathogen in tropical areas of Africa and South America. Although an efficient vaccine is available and has been used since the early 1940s, sylvatic YFV transmission still occurs in forested areas where anthropogenic actions are present, such as mineral extraction, rearing livestock and agriculture, and ecological tourism. In this context, two distinct techniques based on the RT-PCR derived method have been previously developed, however both methods are expensive due to the use of thermo cyclers and labeled probes. We developed isothermal genome amplification, which is a rapid, sensitive, specific and low cost molecular approach for YFV genome detection. This assay used a set of degenerate primers designed for the NS1 gene and was able to amplify, within 30min in isothermal conditions, the YFV 17D vaccine strain derived from an African wild prototype strain (Asibi), as well as field strains from Brazil, other endemic countries from South and Central America, and the Caribbean. The generic RT-LAMP assay could be helpful for YFV surveillance in field and rapid response during outbreaks in endemic areas. PMID:26459206

  18. Immunogenicity of Yellow Fever Vaccine Coadministered With MenAfriVac in Healthy Infants in Ghana and Mali

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Panchali; Meier, Christian; Laraway, Hewad; Tang, Yuxiao; Hodgson, Abraham; Sow, Samba O.; Enwere, Godwin C.; Plikaytis, Brian D.; Kulkarni, Prasad S.; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Niedrig, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Yellow fever (YF) is still a major public health problem in endemic regions of Africa and South America. In Africa, one of the main control strategies is routine vaccination within the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). A new meningococcal A conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) is about to be introduced in the EPI of countries in the African meningitis belt, and this study reports on the immunogenicity of the YF-17D vaccines in infants when administered concomitantly with measles vaccine and PsA-TT. Methods.?Two clinical studies were conducted in Ghana and in Mali among infants who received PsA-TT concomitantly with measles and YF vaccines at 9 months of age. YF neutralizing antibody titers were measured using a microneutralization assay. Results.?In both studies, the PsA-TT did not adversely affect the immune response to the concomitantly administered YF vaccine at the age of 9 months. The magnitude of the immune response was different between the 2 studies, with higher seroconversion and seroprotection rates found in Mali vs Ghana. Conclusions.?Immunogenicity to YF vaccine is unaffected when coadministered with PsA-TT at 9 months of age. Further studies are warranted to better understand the determinants of the immune response to YF vaccine in infancy. Clinical Trials Registration.?ISRCTN82484612 (PsA-TT-004); PACTR201110000328305 (PsA-TT-007). PMID:26553692

  19. Fever versus Fever: the role of host and vector susceptibility and interspecific competition in shaping the current and future distributions of the sylvatic cycles of dengue virus and yellow fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Kathryn A.; Monath, Thomas P.; Weaver, Scott C.; Rossi, Shannan L.; Richman, Rebecca L.; Vasilakis, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Two different species of flaviviruses, dengue virus (DENV) and yellow fever virus (YFV), that originated in sylvatic cycles maintained in non-human primates and forest-dwelling mosquitoes have emerged repeatedly into sustained human-to-human transmission by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Sylvatic cycles of both viruses remain active, and where the two viruses overlap in West Africa they utilize similar suites of monkeys and Aedes mosquitoes. These extensive similarities render the differences in the biogeography and epidemiology of the two viruses all the more striking. First, the sylvatic cycle of YFV originated in Africa and was introduced into the New World, probably as a result of the slave trade, but is absent in Asia; in contrast, sylvatic DENV likely originated in Asia and has spread to Africa but not to the New World. Second, while sylvatic YFV can emerge into extensive urban outbreaks in humans, these invariably die out, whereas four different types of DENV have established human transmission cycles that are ecologically and evolutionarily distinct from their sylvatic ancestors. Finally, transmission of YFV among humans has been documented only in Africa and the Americas, whereas DENV is transmitted among humans across most of the range of competent Aedes vectors, which in the last decade has included every continent save Antarctica. This review summarizes current understanding of sylvatic transmission cycles of YFV and DENV, considers possible explanations for their disjunct distributions, and speculates on the potential consequences of future establishment of a sylvatic cycle of DENV in the Americas. PMID:23523817

  20. A Basic Cluster in the N Terminus of Yellow Fever Virus NS2A Contributes to Infectious Particle Production

    PubMed Central

    Voßmann, Stephanie; Wieseler, Janett; Kerber, Romy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The flavivirus NS2A protein is involved in the assembly of infectious particles. To further understand its role in this process, a charged-to-alanine scanning analysis was performed on NS2A encoded by an infectious cDNA clone of yellow fever virus (YFV). Fifteen mutants containing single, double, or triple charged-to-alanine changes were tested. Five of them did not produce infectious particles, whereas efficient RNA replication was detectable for two of the five NS2A mutants (R22A-K23A-R24A and R99A-E100A-R101A mutants). Prolonged cultivation of transfected cells resulted in the recovery of pseudorevertants. Besides suppressor mutants in NS2A, a compensating second-site mutation in NS3 (D343G) arose for the NS2A R22A-K23A-R24A mutant. We found this NS3 mutation previously to be suppressive for the NS2A? cleavage site Q189S mutant, also deficient in virion assembly. In this study, the subsequently suggested interaction between NS2A and NS3 was proven by coimmunoprecipitation analyses. Using selectively permeabilized cells, we could demonstrate that the regions encompassing R22A-K23A-R24A and Q189S in NS2A are localized to the cytoplasm, where NS3 is also known to reside. However, the defect in particle production observed for the NS2A R22A-K23A-R24A and Q189S mutants was not due to a defect in physical interaction between NS2A and NS3, as the NS2A mutations did not interrupt NS3 interaction. In fact, a region just upstream of R22-K23-R24 was mapped to be critical for NS2A-NS3 interaction. Taken together, these data support a complex interplay between YFV NS2A and NS3 in virion assembly and identify a basic cluster in the NS2A N terminus to be critical in this process. IMPORTANCE Despite an available vaccine, yellow fever remains endemic in tropical areas of South America and Africa. To control the disease, antiviral drugs are required, and an understanding of the determinants of virion assembly is central to their development. In this study, we identified a basic cluster of amino acids in the N terminus of YFV NS2A which inhibited virion assembly upon mutation. The defect was rescued by a spontaneously occurring mutation in NS3. Our study proves an interaction between NS2A and NS3, which, remarkably, was maintained for the NS2A mutant in the presence and absence of the NS3 mutation. This suggests a role for other viral and/or cellular proteins in virion assembly. Residues important for YFV virion production reported here only partially coincided with those reported for other flaviviruses, suggesting that the determinants for particle production are virus specific. Reconstruction of a YFV encoding tagged NS2A paves the way to identify further NS2A interaction partners. PMID:25694595

  1. Pharmacological and Genetic Evidence for Gap Junctions as Potential New Insecticide Targets in the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Travis L.; Piermarini, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti is an important vector of viral diseases that impact global health. Insecticides are typically used to manage mosquito populations, but the evolution of insecticide resistance is limiting their effectiveness. Thus, identifying new molecular and physiological targets in mosquitoes is needed to facilitate insecticide discovery and development. Here we test the hypothesis that gap junctions are valid molecular and physiological targets for new insecticides. Gap junctions are intercellular channels that mediate direct communication between neighboring cells and consist of evolutionarily distinct proteins in vertebrate (connexins) and invertebrate (innexins) animals. We show that the injection of pharmacological inhibitors of gap junctions (i.e., carbenoxolone, meclofenamic acid, or mefloquine) into the hemolymph of adult female mosquitoes elicits dose-dependent toxic effects, with mefloquine showing the greatest potency. In contrast, when applied topically to the cuticle, carbenoxolone was the only inhibitor to exhibit full efficacy. In vivo urine excretion assays demonstrate that both carbenoxolone and mefloquine inhibit the diuretic output of adult female mosquitoes, suggesting inhibition of excretory functions as part of their mechanism of action. When added to the rearing water of 1st instar larvae, carbenoxolone and meclofenamic acid both elicit dose-dependent toxic effects, with meclofenamic acid showing the greatest potency. Injecting a double-stranded RNA cocktail against innexins into the hemolymph of adult female mosquitoes knock down whole-animal innexin mRNA expression and decreases survival of the mosquitoes. Taken together these data indicate that gap junctions may provide novel molecular and physiological targets for the development of insecticides. PMID:26325403

  2. Development and validation of an ELISA kit (YF MAC-HD) to detect IgM to yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Basile, Alison Jane; Goodman, Christin; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Laven, Janeen; Panella, Amanda J; Kosoy, Olga; Lanciotti, Robert S; Johnson, Barbara W

    2015-12-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) is endemic in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, with around 180,000 human infections a year occurring in Africa. Serologic testing is the chief laboratory diagnostic means of identifying an outbreak and to inform the decision to commence a vaccination campaign. The World Health Organization disseminates the reagents for YFV testing to African reference laboratories, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is charged with producing and providing these reagents. The CDC M-antibody capture ELISA is a 2-day test, requiring titration of reagents when new lots are received, which leads to inconsistency in testing and wastage of material. Here we describe the development of a kit-based assay (YF MAC-HD) based upon the CDC method, that is completed in approximately 3.5h, with equivocal samples being reflexed to an overnight protocol. The kit exhibits >90% accuracy when compared to the 2-day test. The kits were designed for use with a minimum of equipment and are stored at 4°C, removing the need for freezing capacity. This kit is capable of tolerating temporary sub-optimal storage conditions which will ease shipping or power outage concerns, and a shelf life of >6 months was demonstrated with no deterioration in accuracy. All reagents necessary to run the YF MAC-HD are included in the kit and are single-use, with 8 or 24 sample options per kit. Field trials are envisioned for the near future, which will enable refinement of the method. The use of the YF MAC-HD is anticipated to reduce materials wastage, and improve the quality and consistency of YFV serologic testing in endemic areas. PMID:26342907

  3. Transcellular and Paracellular Pathways of Transepithelial Fluid Secretion in Malpighian (renal) Tubules of the Yellow Fever Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Beyenbach, Klaus W.; Piermarini, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Isolated Malpighian tubules of the yellow fever mosquito secrete NaCl and KCl from the peritubular bath to the tubule lumen via active transport of Na+ and K+ by principal cells. Lumen-positive transepithelial voltages are the result. The counter-ion Cl? follows passively by electrodiffusion through the paracellular pathway. Water follows by osmosis, but specific routes for water across the epithelium are unknown. Remarkably, the transepithelial secretion of NaCl, KCl and water is driven by a H+ V-ATPase located in the apical brush border membrane of principal cells and not the canonical Na/K ATPase. A hypothetical cation/H+ exchanger moves Na+ and K+ from the cytoplasm to the tubule lumen. Also remarkable is the dynamic regulation of the paracellular permeability with switch-like speed which mediates in part the post-blood-meal diuresis in mosquitoes. For example, the blood meal the female mosquito takes to nourish her eggs triggers the release of kinin diuretic peptides that 1) increases the Cl? conductance of the paracellular pathway, and 2) assembles V1 and V0 complexes to activate the H+ V-ATPase and cation/H+ exchange close by. Thus, transcellular and paracellular pathways are both stimulated to quickly rid the mosquito of the unwanted salts and water of the blood meal. Stellate cells of the tubule appear to serve a metabolic support role, exporting the HCO3? generated during stimulated transport activity. Septate junctions define the properties of the paracellular pathway in Malpighian tubules, but the proteins responsible for the permselectivity and barrier functions of the septate junction are unknown. PMID:20946239

  4. Pharmacological and Genetic Evidence for Gap Junctions as Potential New Insecticide Targets in the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Travis L; Piermarini, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti is an important vector of viral diseases that impact global health. Insecticides are typically used to manage mosquito populations, but the evolution of insecticide resistance is limiting their effectiveness. Thus, identifying new molecular and physiological targets in mosquitoes is needed to facilitate insecticide discovery and development. Here we test the hypothesis that gap junctions are valid molecular and physiological targets for new insecticides. Gap junctions are intercellular channels that mediate direct communication between neighboring cells and consist of evolutionarily distinct proteins in vertebrate (connexins) and invertebrate (innexins) animals. We show that the injection of pharmacological inhibitors of gap junctions (i.e., carbenoxolone, meclofenamic acid, or mefloquine) into the hemolymph of adult female mosquitoes elicits dose-dependent toxic effects, with mefloquine showing the greatest potency. In contrast, when applied topically to the cuticle, carbenoxolone was the only inhibitor to exhibit full efficacy. In vivo urine excretion assays demonstrate that both carbenoxolone and mefloquine inhibit the diuretic output of adult female mosquitoes, suggesting inhibition of excretory functions as part of their mechanism of action. When added to the rearing water of 1st instar larvae, carbenoxolone and meclofenamic acid both elicit dose-dependent toxic effects, with meclofenamic acid showing the greatest potency. Injecting a double-stranded RNA cocktail against innexins into the hemolymph of adult female mosquitoes knock down whole-animal innexin mRNA expression and decreases survival of the mosquitoes. Taken together these data indicate that gap junctions may provide novel molecular and physiological targets for the development of insecticides. PMID:26325403

  5. Characterization of the yellow fever mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene and ligand-bound protein structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, David H.; Vyazunova, Irina; Lorch, Jeffery M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Lan, Que

    2009-06-12

    The sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene (AeSCP-2L3), a new member of the SCP-2 protein family, is identified from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. The predicted molecular weight of AeSCP-2L3 is 13.4 kDa with a calculated pI of 4.98. AeSCP-2L3 transcription occurs in the larval feeding stages and the mRNA levels decrease in pupae and adults. The highest levels of AeSCP-2L3 gene expression are found in the body wall, and possibly originated in the fat body. This is the first report of a mosquito SCP-2-like protein with prominent expression in tissue other than the midgut. The X-ray protein crystal structure of AeSCP-2L3 reveals a bound C16 fatty acid whose acyl tail penetrates deeply into a hydrophobic cavity. Interestingly, the ligand-binding cavity is slightly larger than previously described for AeSCP-2 (Dyer et al. J Biol Chem 278:39085-39091, 2003) and AeSCP-2L2 (Dyer et al. J Lipid Res M700460-JLR200, 2007). There are also an additional 10 amino acids in SCP-2L3 that are not present in other characterized mosquito SCP-2s forming an extended loop between {beta}3 and {beta}4. Otherwise, the protein backbone is exceedingly similar to other SCP-2 and SCP-2-like proteins. In contrast to this observed high structural homology of members in the mosquito SCP2 family, the amino acid sequence identity between the members is less than 30%. The results from structural analysis imply that there have been evolutionary constraints that favor the SCP-2 C{alpha} backbone fold while the specificity of ligand binding can be altered.

  6. Yellow fever vaccine-associated adverse events following extensive immunization in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Biscayart, Cristián; Carrega, María Eugenia Pérez; Sagradini, Sandra; Gentile, Angela; Stecher, Daniel; Orduna, Tomás; Bentancourt, Silvia; Jiménez, Salvador García; Flynn, Luis Pedro; Arce, Gabriel Pirán; Uboldi, María Andrea; Bugna, Laura; Morales, María Alejandra; Digilio, Clara; Fabbri, Cintia; Enría, Delia; Diosque, Máximo; Vizzotti, Carla

    2014-03-01

    As a consequence of YF outbreaks that hit Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay in 2008-2009, a significant demand for YF vaccination was subsequently observed in Argentina, a country where the usual vaccine recommendations are restricted to provinces that border Brazil, Paraguay, and Bolivia. The goal of this paper is to describe the adverse events following immunization (AEFI) against YF in Argentina during the outbreak in the northeastern province of Misiones, which occurred from January 2008 to January 2009. During this time, a total of nine cases were reported, almost two million doses of vaccine were administered, and a total of 165 AEFI were reported from different provinces. Case study analyses were performed using two AEFI classifications. Forty-nine events were classified as related to the YF vaccine (24 serious and 1 fatal case), and 12 events were classified as inconclusive. As the use of the YF 17D vaccine can be a challenge to health systems of countries with different endemicity patterns, a careful clinical and epidemiological evaluation should be performed before its prescription to minimize serious adverse events. PMID:24456625

  7. Acta Tropica 104 (2007) 17 Surveillance of dengue fever cases using a novel

    E-print Network

    Severson, David

    2007-01-01

    Acta Tropica 104 (2007) 1­7 Surveillance of dengue fever cases using a novel Aedes aegypti Available online 23 June 2007 Abstract A novel dengue surveillance method is described and used to evaluate 100 suspected dengue fever (DF) cases in county St. Patrick, Trinidad, West Indies. From the 30

  8. A small animal peripheral challenge model of yellow fever using interferon-receptor deficient mice and the 17D-204 vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Thibodeaux, Brett A; Garbino, Nina C; Liss, Nathan M; Piper, Joseph; Blair, Carol D; Roehrig, John T

    2012-05-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV), a member of the genus Flavivirus, is a mosquito-borne pathogen that requires wild-type (wt), virulent strains to be handled at biosafety level (BSL) 3, with HEPA-filtration of room air exhaust (BSL3+). YFV is found in tropical regions of Africa and South America and causes severe hepatic disease and death in humans. Despite the availability of effective vaccines (17D-204 or 17DD), YFV is still responsible for an estimated 200,000 cases of illness and 30,000 deaths annually. Besides vaccination, there are no other prophylactic or therapeutic strategies approved for use in human YF. Current small animal models of YF require either intra-cranial inoculation of YF vaccine to establish infection, or use of wt strains (e.g., Asibi) in order to achieve pathology. We have developed and characterized a BSL2, adult mouse peripheral challenge model for YFV infection in mice lacking receptors for interferons ?, ?, and ? (strain AG129). Intraperitoneal challenge of AG129 mice with 17D-204 is a uniformly lethal in a dose-dependent manner, and 17D-204-infected AG129 mice exhibit high viral titers in both brain and liver suggesting this infection is both neurotropic and viscerotropic. Furthermore the use of a mouse model permitted the construction of a 59-biomarker multi-analyte profile (MAP) using samples of brain, liver, and serum taken at multiple time points over the course of infection. This MAP serves as a baseline for evaluating novel therapeutics and their effect on disease progression. Changes (4-fold or greater) in serum and tissue levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators as well as other factors associated with tissue damage were noted in AG129 mice infected with 17D-204 as compared to mock-infected control animals. PMID:22425792

  9. 17DD and 17D-213/77 Yellow Fever Substrains Trigger a Balanced Cytokine Profile in Primary Vaccinated Children

    PubMed Central

    Luiza-Silva, Maria; Batista, Maurício Azevedo; Martins, Marina Angela; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; da Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos; de Menezes Martins, Reinaldo; de Lourdes de Sousa Maia, Maria; Farias, Roberto Henrique Guedes; da Silva Freire, Marcos; Galler, Ricardo; Homma, Akira; Ribeiro, José Geraldo Leite; Lemos, Jandira Aparecida Campos; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Caldas, Iramaya Rodrigues; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aimed to compare the cytokine-mediated immune response in children submitted to primary vaccination with the YF-17D-213/77 or YF-17DD yellow fever (YF) substrains. Methods A non-probabilistic sample of eighty healthy primary vaccinated (PV) children was selected on the basis of their previously known humoral immune response to the YF vaccines. The selected children were categorized according to their YF-neutralizing antibody titers (PRNT) and referred to as seroconverters (PV-PRNT+) or nonseroconverters (PV-PRNT?). Following revaccination with the YF-17DD, the PV-PRNT? children (YF-17D-213/77 and YF-17DD groups) seroconverted and were referred as RV-PRNT+. The cytokine-mediated immune response was investigated after short-term in vitro cultures of whole blood samples. The results are expressed as frequency of high cytokine producers, taking the global median of the cytokine index (YF-Ag/control) as the cut-off. Results The YF-17D-213/77 and the YF-17DD substrains triggered a balanced overall inflammatory/regulatory cytokine pattern in PV-PRNT+, with a slight predominance of IL-12 in YF-17DD vaccinees and a modest prevalence of IL-10 in YF-17D-213/77. Prominent frequency of neutrophil-derived TNF-? and neutrophils and monocyte-producing IL-12 were the major features of PV-PRNT+ in the YF-17DD, whereas relevant inflammatory response, mediated by IL-12+CD8+ T cells, was the hallmark of the YF-17D-213/77 vaccinees. Both substrains were able to elicit particular but relevant inflammatory events, regardless of the anti-YF PRNT antibody levels. PV-PRNT? children belonging to the YF-17DD arm presented gaps in the inflammatory cytokine signature, especially in terms of the innate immunity, whereas in the YF-17D-213/77 arm the most relevant gap was the deficiency of IL-12-producing CD8+T cells. Revaccination with YF-17DD prompted a balanced cytokine profile in YF-17DD nonresponders and a robust inflammatory profile in YF-17D-213/77 nonresponders. Conclusion Our findings demonstrated that, just like the YF-17DD reference vaccine, the YF-17D-213/77 seed lot induced a mixed pattern of inflammatory and regulatory cytokines, supporting its universal use for immunization. PMID:23251351

  10. Yellow Fever Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cover most of your body, using an effective insect repellent, such as those containing DEET. ... allergy to any component of the vaccine, including eggs, chicken proteins, or gelatin, or who has had ...

  11. Child-Invented Health Education Games: A Case Study for Dengue Fever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Jeffrey L.; Coombs, David W.

    2006-01-01

    The study's goal was to demonstrate the ability of an 8-year-old child to create educational games for the topic of dengue fever control. A naturalistic descriptive case study method was employed. The child had two dengue fever educational game creation activities. The study demonstrated that a child could develop functional games related to…

  12. First case of Q fever endocarditis in Croatia and a short review.

    PubMed

    Zekanovi?, Drazen; Morovi?, Miro; Borcilo, Marina Neki?; Rode, Oktavija Dakovi?

    2010-09-01

    We present a 70-year-old man from Dalmatia, Croatia, with a history of prolonged high fever diagnosed as Q fever endocarditis. As far as we know, this is the first case of chronic Q fever in Croatia. The treatment was started as for culture-negative endocarditis, but was without clinical response. After significantly high anti-phase I IgG plus IgA antibodies titers to Coxiella burnetii were shown, the initial treatment with doxycycline was changed and ciprofloxacin was started with good clinical response. PMID:20977118

  13. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR analysis in virus infected cells: SARS corona virus, Yellow fever virus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus and Cytomegalovirus infections

    PubMed Central

    Radoni?, Aleksandar; Thulke, Stefanie; Bae, Hi-Gung; Müller, Marcel A; Siegert, Wolfgang; Nitsche, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Ten potential reference genes were compared for their use in experiments investigating cellular mRNA expression of virus infected cells. Human cell lines were infected with Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus, SARS coronavirus or Yellow fever virus. The expression levels of these genes and the viral replication were determined by real-time PCR. Genes were ranked by the BestKeeper tool, the GeNorm tool and by criteria we reported previously. Ranking lists of the genes tested were tool dependent. However, over all, ?-actin is an unsuitable as reference gene, whereas TATA-Box binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl-isomerase A are stable reference genes for expression studies in virus infected cells. PMID:15705200

  14. Samuel Holden Parsons Lee (1772-1863): American physician, entrepreneur and selfless fighter of the 1798 Yellow Fever epidemic of New London, Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Mattie, James K; Desai, Sukumar P

    2015-02-01

    Samuel Holden Parsons Lee practised medicine at a time when the germ theory of disease had not yet been proposed and antibiotics remained undiscovered. In 1798 he served selflessly as the only physician in town who was willing to battle the Yellow Fever outbreak of New London, Connecticut. Because he practised at the dawn of the age of patent medicine, unfortunately his name also came to be associated with medical quackery. We argue that his contributions have been grossly underestimated. He compounded and vended medications - including bilious pills and bitters - that were gold standards of the day. Moreover, one preparation for treatment of kidney stones led to his sub-specialization in this field and was met with such success that its sale continued for nearly 100 years after his death. While a talented medical man, Lee also had a knack for business, finding success in trading, whaling and real estate. PMID:24585580

  15. Activation/modulation of adaptive immunity emerges simultaneously after 17DD yellow fever first-time vaccination: is this the key to prevent severe adverse reactions following immunization?

    PubMed Central

    Martins, M Â; Silva, M L; Marciano, A P V; Peruhype-Magalhães, V; Eloi-Santos, S M; Ribeiro, J G L; Correa-Oliveira, R; Homma, A; Kroon, E G; Teixeira-Carvalho, A; Martins-Filho, O A

    2007-01-01

    Over past decades the 17DD yellow fever vaccine has proved to be effective in controlling yellow fever and promises to be a vaccine vector for other diseases, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which it elicits such broad-based immunity are still unclear. In this study we describe a detailed phenotypic investigation of major and minor peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations aimed at characterizing the kinetics of the adaptive immune response following primary 17DD vaccination. Our major finding is a decreased frequency of circulating CD19+ cells at day 7 followed by emerging activation/modulation phenotypic features (CD19+interleukin(IL)10R+/CD19+CD32+) at day 15. Increased frequency of CD4+human leucocyte antigen D-related(HLA-DR+) at day 7 and CD8+HLA-DR+ at day 30 suggest distinct kinetics of T cell activation, with CD4+ T cells being activated early and CD8+ T cells representing a later event following 17DD vaccination. Up-regulation of modulatory features on CD4+ and CD8+ cells at day 15 seems to be the key event leading to lower frequency of CD38+ T cells at day 30. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the co-existence of phenotypic features associated with activation events and modulatory pathways. Positive correlations between CD4+HLA-DR+ cells and CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells and the association between the type 0 chemokine receptor CCR2 and the activation status of CD4+ and CD8+ cells further support this hypothesis. We hypothesize that this controlled microenviroment seems to be the key to prevent the development of serious adverse events, and even deaths, associated with the 17DD vaccine reported in the literature. PMID:17309541

  16. Molecular Differentiation of the African Yellow Fever Vector Aedes bromeliae (Diptera: Culicidae) from Its Sympatric Non-vector Sister Species, Aedes lilii

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kelly Louise; Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Shija, Fortunate; Kaddumukasa, Martha; Djouaka, Rousseau; Misinzo, Gerald; Lutwama, Julius; Huang, Yiau-Min; Mitchell, Luke B.; Richards, Miriam; Tossou, Eric; Walton, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Yellow fever continues to be a problem in sub-Saharan Africa with repeated epidemics occurring. The mosquito Aedes bromeliae is a major vector of yellow fever, but it cannot be readily differentiated from its non-vector zoophilic sister species Ae. lilii using morphological characters. Genetic differences have been reported between anthropophilic Ae. bromeliae and zoophilic Ae. lilii and between forest and domestic populations. However, due to the application of different molecular markers and non-overlapping populations employed in previous studies, interpretation of species delimitation is unclear. Methodology/Principle Findings DNA sequences were generated from specimens of Ae. simpsoni s.l. from the Republic of Benin, Tanzania and Uganda for two nuclear genes apolipophorin 2 (apoLp2) and cytochrome p450 (CYPJ92), the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COI) barcoding region. Nuclear genes apoLp2 and CYPJ92 were unable to differentiate between species Ae. bromeliae and Ae. lilii due to ancestral lineage sorting, while ITS sequence data provided clear topological separation on a phylogeny. The standard COI barcoding region was shown to be subject to species introgression and unable to clearly distinguish the two taxa. Here we present a reliable direct PCR-based method for differentiation of the vector species Ae. bromeliae from its isomorphic, sympatric and non-biomedically important sister taxon, Ae. lilii, based on the ITS region. Using molecular species verification, we describe novel immature habitats for Ae. lilii and report both sympatric and allopatric populations. Whereas only Ae. lilii is found in the Republic of Benin and only Ae. bromeliae in Tanzania, both species are sympatric in Uganda. Conclusions/Significance Our accurate identification method will allow informed distribution and detailed ecological studies that will facilitate assessment of arboviral disease risk and development of future targeted vector control. PMID:26641858

  17. Autopsy findings in fatal dengue haemorrhagic fever – 06 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, K.R.; Arora, M.M.; Sahai, K.; Tripathi, S.; Singh, S.P.; Raman, D.K.; Anand, K.B.

    2012-01-01

    Background During recent outbreak of dengue fever in Delhi, there has been a significant increase in dengue-associated admission in hospitals. To better understand the pathology of dengue haemorrhagic fever, we conducted autopsies of dengue infections deaths within our hospital. Method This was an autopsy study of dengue-associated deaths at a large tertiary care hospital. Results From Sep 2009 to Dec 2010, a total of 1032 patients with serological evidence of dengue infection were admitted to our hospital. There were twelve deaths and autopsies were conducted in six. Adult respiratory distress syndrome, bleeding diathesis, hypotension, hepatic failure and acute renal failure were the common causes of death despite early hospitalization, intravenous fluid, and blood-product support. Conclusion Dengue is associated with severe disease, and deaths do occur despite current supportive management. Early predictors of disease severity and better clinical interventions are needed. PMID:24600119

  18. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. 96.2 Section 96.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. (b) Casings from... Drug Administration at 21 CFR 589.2000 may be imported. (2) Casings that are derived from bovines...

  19. Fever of unknown origin: report of 107 cases in a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kang-Kang; Chen, Sheng-Sen; Ling, Qing-Xia; Huang, Chong; Zheng, Jian-Ming; Cheng, Qi; Li, Ning; Chen, Ming-Quan; Shi, Guang-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is a challenging problem in clinical practice. Evaluation of patient’s characteristics may illustrate the etiologies of FUO. In present study, 107 patients with FUO hospitalized in our inpatient department between 2010 and 2011 were investigated. The median age of the patients was 48 years (15-94). The median fever duration was 8.5 weeks (3-104). The median hospital stay was 8.5 days (1-51). Etiologies of FUO were identified as follows: infectious diseases 32 (29.9%), malignancies 19 (17.8%), inflammatory rheumatic diseases 18 (16.8%), and miscellaneous diseases 15 (14.0%). In 23 (21.5%) patients, the diagnosis remained unclear. Infection group had relative shorter average fever duration and hospital stay than other groups. Shortened mean fever duration was observed in geriatric age group. In conclusion, as the most common cause of FUO in the present study, infectious cases had relative shorter average fever duration and hospital stay, and geriatric patients had shortened average fever duration as well. PMID:25664121

  20. Acute Q fever infection in Thuringia, Germany, after burial of roe deer fawn cadavers (Capreolus capreolus): a case report

    PubMed Central

    Schleenvoigt, B.T.; Sprague, L.D.; Mertens, K.; Moog, U.; Schmoock, G.; Wolf, G.; Neumann, M.; Pletz, M.W.; Neubauer, H.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a case of a 48-year-old man who presented with acute Q fever infection after burying two fawn cadavers (Capreolus capreolus). Recent outbreaks of Q fever in Europe have been traced back to intensive goat breeding units, sheep flocks in the proximity of highly populated urban areas or to farmed deer. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing Q fever infection in a human linked to roe deer as a source of infection. PMID:26566445

  1. Acute Q fever infection in Thuringia, Germany, after burial of roe deer fawn cadavers (Capreolus capreolus): a case report.

    PubMed

    Schleenvoigt, B T; Sprague, L D; Mertens, K; Moog, U; Schmoock, G; Wolf, G; Neumann, M; Pletz, M W; Neubauer, H

    2015-11-01

    We report on a case of a 48-year-old man who presented with acute Q fever infection after burying two fawn cadavers (Capreolus capreolus). Recent outbreaks of Q fever in Europe have been traced back to intensive goat breeding units, sheep flocks in the proximity of highly populated urban areas or to farmed deer. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing Q fever infection in a human linked to roe deer as a source of infection. PMID:26566445

  2. Viral haemorrhagic fever in Sweden: experiences from management of a case.

    PubMed

    Foberg, U; Frydén, A; Isaksson, B; Jahrling, P; Johnson, A; McKee, K; Niklasson, B; Normann, B; Peters, C; Bengtsson, M

    1991-01-01

    The first recognized case in Scandinavia with potential man to man transmission of viral haemorrhagic fever occurred in Linköping, Sweden, in January 1990. Following a visit to Kenya a 21-year-old male student suffered a very severe illness including extremely prolonged high grade fever, rash, disseminated intravascular coagulation with thrombocytopenia and severe bleedings. This necessitated one month of intensive care support including respirator treatment. The patient was discharged after 2 1/2 months in good condition, with a partial femoral nerve paresis. About 100 medical personnel were exposed to aerosol or blood before a strict containment regimen was established. No secondary cases occurred. PMID:1853161

  3. [Imported infectious diseases in fever of unknown origin in migrant children: 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Goikoetxea, M; Urabayen, R; Herranz, M; Moreno, L; Gil, F J; Bernaola, E

    2012-01-01

    The increase in migratory movements has increased the incidence of infectious diseases that were infrequent in our setting. In the presence of fever in children from endemic areas, imported infectious diseases must be ruled out in the first place. We present two cases of typhoid fever in immigrant children, recently diagnosed in our centre. Both from countries with a high prevalence of the disease were admitted for study of fever of unknown origin. The two patients had been living in our country for less than one month. Isolation of the gram-negative bacillus in the blood cultures provided the key for reaching the etiological diagnosis. In both cases endovenous antibiotherapy was established and both the blood cultures and stools became negative before discharge. At present the two children are free of the disease. PMID:22552138

  4. [An imported dengue Fever case in Turkey and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Uyar, Yavuz; Akta?, Eray; Ya?c? Ça?lay?k, Dilek; Ergönül, Onder; Yüce, Ay?e

    2013-01-01

    Dengue fever is an acute viral disease that can affect all age groups in tropical and subtropical countries. The predominant vectors are the mosquitoes namely Aedes aegypti and A.albopictus. Although there have been no case reports in Turkey due to DF, there is seroepidemiological evidence indicating the presence of Dengue virus (DENV) in Turkey. In this case report we presented an imported dengue fever case. The patient was 40 years old, previously healthy male, Switzerland citizen. He had immigrated from Dubai to India two weeks ago and after one week from immigration he attended to a hospital in India because of high fever. The NS1 antigen test (Bio-Rad Laboratories, USA) was found positive and the patient was followed-up with diagnosis of dengue fever in India. During his visit to Turkey, he attended to the hospital for a routine control and his analysis revealed thrombocytopenia (PLT: 48.000/µl), leukopenia (white blood cell: 2800/µL) and elevated liver enzymes (AST: 76 U/L, ALT: 83 U/L). Fever was not detected in follow-up. The patient had petechial rash on his lower extremities. white blood cell and PLT count increased to 4100/µl and 93.000/µl, respectively. Liver function tests revealed a decrease in AST (63 U/L) and ALT (78 U/L) on the third day. The PLT count increased to 150.000/ml. Since the patient had no fever and had normal physical and laboratory findings, he was discharged from the hospital. For the confirmation of dengue fever diagnosis the serum sample was sent to National Public Health Center, Virology Reference and Research Laboratory where IgM and IgG antibodies against DENV types 1-4 were investigated by indirect immunofluorescence method (Euroimmun, Germany). The serum sample yielded positive result at the dilutions of 1/1000 for IgM and 1/10.000 for IgG. The last dilution of type 3 DENV IgM and IgG were determined high density of fluorescein, thus the serotype was identified as "DENV type 3". Travel-related diseases become important with increasing travel opportunities, globalization and transportation, recently. As a result, this imported case with foreign nationality was the first dengue fever case confirmed by clinical and laboratory tests in Turkey. PMID:23390916

  5. Culture proven Salmonella typhi co-infection in a child with Dengue fever: a case report.

    PubMed

    Srinivasaraghavan, Rangan; Narayanan, Parameswaran; Kanimozhi, Thandapani

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Sometimes concurrent infections with multiple infectious agents may occur in one patient, which make the diagnosis and management a challenging task. The authors here present a case of co-infection of typhoid fever with dengue fever in a ten-year-old child and discuss the pertinent issues. The authors emphasize that the risk factors predicting the presence of such co-infections, if developed, will be immensely useful in areas where dengue outbreak occurs in the background of high transmission of endemic infections. PMID:26409747

  6. Yellow fever impact on brown howler monkeys (Alouatta guariba clamitans) in Argentina: a metamodelling approach based on population viability analysis and epidemiological dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Eduardo S; Agostini, Ilaria; Holzmann, Ingrid; Di Bitetti, Mario S; Oklander, Luciana I; Kowalewski, Martín M; Beldomenico, Pablo M; Goenaga, Silvina; Martínez, Mariela; Lestani, Eduardo; Desbiez, Arnaud LJ; Miller, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In South America, yellow fever (YF) is an established infectious disease that has been identified outside of its traditional endemic areas, affecting human and nonhuman primate (NHP) populations. In the epidemics that occurred in Argentina between 2007-2009, several outbreaks affecting humans and howler monkeys (Alouatta spp) were reported, highlighting the importance of this disease in the context of conservation medicine and public health policies. Considering the lack of information about YF dynamics in New World NHP, our main goal was to apply modelling tools to better understand YF transmission dynamics among endangered brown howler monkey (Alouatta guariba clamitans) populations in northeastern Argentina. Two complementary modelling tools were used to evaluate brown howler population dynamics in the presence of the disease: Vortex, a stochastic demographic simulation model, and Outbreak, a stochastic disease epidemiology simulation. The baseline model of YF disease epidemiology predicted a very high probability of population decline over the next 100 years. We believe the modelling approach discussed here is a reasonable description of the disease and its effects on the howler monkey population and can be useful to support evidence-based decision-making to guide actions at a regional level. PMID:26517499

  7. Alboserpin, a Factor Xa Inhibitor from the Mosquito Vector of Yellow Fever, Binds Heparin and Membrane Phospholipids and Exhibits Antithrombotic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Eric; Mizurini, Daniella M.; Sá-Nunes, Anderson; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.; Mans, Ben J.; Monteiro, Robson Q.; Kotsyfakis, Michail; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of factor Xa (FXa) inhibition by Alboserpin, the major salivary gland anticoagulant from the mosquito and yellow fever vector Aedes albopictus, has been characterized. cDNA of Alboserpin predicts a 45-kDa protein that belongs to the serpin family of protease inhibitors. Recombinant Alboserpin displays stoichiometric, competitive, reversible and tight binding to FXa (picomolar range). Binding is highly specific and is not detectable for FX, catalytic site-blocked FXa, thrombin, and 12 other enzymes. Alboserpin displays high affinity binding to heparin (KD ? 20 nm), but no change in FXa inhibition was observed in the presence of the cofactor, implying that bridging mechanisms did not take place. Notably, Alboserpin was also found to interact with phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine but not with phosphatidylserine. Further, annexin V (in the absence of Ca2+) or heparin outcompetes Alboserpin for binding to phospholipid vesicles, suggesting a common binding site. Consistent with its activity, Alboserpin blocks prothrombinase activity and increases both prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time in vitro or ex vivo. Furthermore, Alboserpin prevents thrombus formation provoked by ferric chloride injury of the carotid artery and increases bleeding in a dose-dependent manner. Alboserpin emerges as an atypical serpin that targets FXa and displays unique phospholipid specificity. It conceivably uses heparin and phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine as anchors to increase protein localization and effective concentration at sites of injury, cell activation, or inflammation. PMID:21673107

  8. Stranger's fever in Charleston, South Carolina: a mistaken diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Cohen, J; Cohen, J

    2007-06-01

    George Augustus Clough was a young Englishman who died in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1843. The cause of death, which unusually was given on his gravestone, was Stranger's fever, which is now known to be yellow fever. Stranger's fever first appeared in North America in Florida in 1649, and continued to cause both sporadic cases as well as serious epidemics, mainly in the South and along the Eastern seaboard of the US until the beginning of the twentieth century. It gained its name from its propensity to mainly afflict recent arrivals, and Clough had only been in Charleston for two years before his death. However, a re-examination of the evidence suggests that he may not in fact have died of yellow fever. PMID:18348507

  9. Regional dust storm modeling for health services: The case of valley fever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, William A.; Nickovic, Slobodan; Galgiani, John N.; Pejanovic, Goran; Petkovic, Slavko; Vujadinovic, Mirjam; Vukovic, Ana; Dacic, Milan; DiBiase, Scott; Prasad, Anup; El-Askary, Hesham

    2014-09-01

    On 5 July 2011, a massive dust storm struck Phoenix, Arizona (USA), raising concerns for increased cases of valley fever (coccidioidomycosis, or, cocci). A quasi-operational experimental airborne dust forecast system predicted the event and provides model output for continuing analysis in collaboration with public health and air quality communities. An objective of this collaboration was to see if a signal in cases of valley fever in the region could be detected and traced to the storm - an American haboob. To better understand the atmospheric life cycle of cocci spores, the DREAM dust model (also herein, NMME-DREAM) was modified to simulate spore emission, transport and deposition. Inexact knowledge of where cocci-causing fungus grows, the low resolution of cocci surveillance and an overall active period for significant dust events complicate analysis of the effect of the 5 July 2011 storm. In the larger context of monthly to annual disease surveillance, valley fever statistics, when compared against PM10 observation networks and modeled airborne dust concentrations, may reveal a likely cause and effect. Details provided by models and satellites fill time and space voids in conventional approaches to air quality and disease surveillance, leading to land-atmosphere modeling and remote sensing that clearly mark a path to advance valley fever epidemiology, surveillance and risk avoidance.

  10. Live virus vaccines based on a yellow fever vaccine backbone: standardized template with key considerations for a risk/benefit assessment.

    PubMed

    Monath, Thomas P; Seligman, Stephen J; Robertson, James S; Guy, Bruno; Hayes, Edward B; Condit, Richard C; Excler, Jean Louis; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viruses inserted into the backbone of another virus (so-called "chimeric virus vaccines"). Many viral vector vaccines are in advanced clinical trials. The first such vaccine to be approved for marketing (to date in Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines) is a vaccine against the flavivirus, Japanese encephalitis (JE), which employs a licensed vaccine (yellow fever 17D) as a vector. In this vaccine, two envelope proteins (prM-E) of YF 17D virus were exchanged for the corresponding genes of JE virus, with additional attenuating mutations incorporated into the JE gene inserts. Similar vaccines have been constructed by inserting prM-E genes of dengue and West Nile into YF 17D virus and are in late stage clinical studies. The dengue vaccine is, however, more complex in that it requires a mixture of four live vectors each expressing one of the four dengue serotypes. This vaccine has been evaluated in multiple clinical trials. No significant safety concerns have been found. The Phase 3 trials met their endpoints in terms of overall reduction of confirmed dengue fever, and, most importantly a significant reduction in severe dengue and hospitalization due to dengue. However, based on results that have been published so far, efficacy in preventing serotype 2 infection is less than that for the other three serotypes. In the development of these chimeric vaccines, an important series of comparative studies of safety and efficacy were made using the parental YF 17D vaccine virus as a benchmark. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing the key characteristics of the novel flavivirus vaccine vectors, in comparison to the parental YF 17D vaccine. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing the transparency and comparability of information. The Brighton Collaboration V3SWG template may also be useful as a guide to the evaluation of other recombinant viral vector vaccines. PMID:25446819

  11. [Rat-bite fever--two cases of infection with Streptobacillus moniliformis within two months].

    PubMed

    Regnath, Thomas; Kurb, Nadine; Wolf, Mareike; Ignatius, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    Medical history and clinical findings | Two cases of the rarely diagnosed Streptobacillus moniliformis infection (rat bite or haverhill fever) emerged within two months in Stuttgart. The first patient presented with typical symptoms, i.e., fever and arthralgia. The second patient, however, was afebrile with severe back pain and fatigue as only symptoms. None of the patients reported rat bites or other animal contacts. Examinations | Physical examination did not reveal any focus of infection in the first patient. Further examinations could not be completed. Suspected diagnosis was therefore "unclear, most likely viral infection". In the case of the second patient, ultrasound revealed an engorged right kidney and urinary obstruction. Upon concomitant detection of Escherichia coli in the urine, pyelonephritis was suspected. Laboratory parameters were not indicative in neither case. Detection of the infectious agents was accomplished by blood cultures and subsequent identification by mass spectrometry, albeit after discharge of the patients. Treatment and course | The first patient left the hospital against the doctors' advice the day after his admission. The second patient improved under ciprofloxacin and metamizole therapy and was discharged after five days with the recommendation to continue the antibiotic therapy. Conclusion | Cases of rat bite or haverhill fever are difficult to diagnose when no rat bites are recognized. Seroprevalence data of S. moniliformis infection would be desirable to estimate how often atypical or subclinical cases of this potentially lethal infection go undiagnosed. PMID:25970414

  12. Characterization of main cytokine sources from the innate and adaptive immune responses following primary 17DD yellow fever vaccination in adults.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Luiza; Martins, Marina Angela; Espírito-Santo, Luçandra Ramos; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Ribeiro, José Geraldo Leite; Homma, Akira; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2011-01-10

    The mechanisms of immune response following yellow fever (YF-17DD) vaccination are still poorly understood. In this study, we have performed a longitudinal investigation (days 0, 7, 15 and 30) to characterize the cytokine profile of innate and adaptive immunity following YF-17DD first-time vaccination. Data from non-stimulated cultures demonstrated a prominent participation of the innate immunity with increased frequency of TNF-?(+) neutrophils and IFN-?(+) NK-cells at day 7 besides TNF-?(+) monocytes at day 7, day 15 and day 30. Increased frequency of IL-10(+) monocytes was observed at day 15 and day 30, and decreased percentage of IL-4(+) NK-cells were detected at day 7, day 15 and day 30. Time-dependent and oscillating cytokine pattern was observed in CD4(+) T-cells, with low percentage of IL-12(+), IL-4(+) and IL-10(+) cells at day 7 and increased frequency of TNF-?(+) cells at day 15 besides IFN-?(+) and IL-5(+) cells at day 15 and day 30. Later changes with increased percentage of IL-12(+) and IL-5(+)CD8(+) T-cells were observed at day 30. Increased frequency of IL-10(+) B-cells was observed at day 15, when seroconversion was detected in all vaccinees. The overall cytokine analysis of non-stimulated leukocytes showed a transient shift towards a pro-inflammatory profile at day 7, mainly due to changes in the innate immunity, which draws back toward a mixed/regulatory pattern at day 15 and day 30. The changes induced by the in vitro YF-17DD vaccine-stimulation were mainly observed at day 0 and day 7 (before seroconversion) with minor changes at day 15 and day 30 (after seroconversion). These data support the hypothesis that a complex network with mixed pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine profile is associated with the establishment of the protective immunity following YF-17DD primo-vaccination, free of adverse events. PMID:20732465

  13. Binding of a fluorescence reporter and a ligand to an odorant-binding protein of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Gabriel M.; Leal, Walter S.

    2015-01-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), also named pheromone-binding proteins when the odorant is a pheromone, are essential for insect olfaction. They solubilize odorants that reach the port of entry of the olfactory system, the pore tubules in antennae and other olfactory appendages. Then, OBPs transport these hydrophobic compounds through an aqueous sensillar lymph to receptors embedded on dendritic membranes of olfactory receptor neurons. Structures of OBPs from mosquito species have shed new light on the mechanism of transport, although there is considerable debate on how they deliver odorant to receptors. An OBP from the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, binds the hydrophobic moiety of a mosquito oviposition pheromone (MOP) on the edge of its binding cavity. Likewise, it has been demonstrated that the orthologous protein from the malaria mosquito binds the insect repellent DEET on a similar edge of its binding pocket. A high school research project was aimed at testing whether the orthologous protein from the yellow fever mosquito, AaegOBP1, binds DEET and other insect repellents, and MOP was used as a positive control. Binding assays using the fluorescence reporter N-phenyl-1-naphtylamine (NPN) were inconclusive. However, titration of NPN fluorescence emission in AaegOBP1 solution with MOP led to unexpected and intriguing results. Quenching was observed in the initial phase of titration, but addition of higher doses of MOP led to a stepwise increase in fluorescence emission coupled with a blue shift, which can be explained at least in part by formation of MOP micelles to house stray NPN molecules. PMID:25671088

  14. Binding of a fluorescence reporter and a ligand to an odorant-binding protein of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Leal, Gabriel M; Leal, Walter S

    2014-01-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), also named pheromone-binding proteins when the odorant is a pheromone, are essential for insect olfaction. They solubilize odorants that reach the port of entry of the olfactory system, the pore tubules in antennae and other olfactory appendages. Then, OBPs transport these hydrophobic compounds through an aqueous sensillar lymph to receptors embedded on dendritic membranes of olfactory receptor neurons. Structures of OBPs from mosquito species have shed new light on the mechanism of transport, although there is considerable debate on how they deliver odorant to receptors. An OBP from the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, binds the hydrophobic moiety of a mosquito oviposition pheromone (MOP) on the edge of its binding cavity. Likewise, it has been demonstrated that the orthologous protein from the malaria mosquito binds the insect repellent DEET on a similar edge of its binding pocket. A high school research project was aimed at testing whether the orthologous protein from the yellow fever mosquito, AaegOBP1, binds DEET and other insect repellents, and MOP was used as a positive control. Binding assays using the fluorescence reporter N-phenyl-1-naphtylamine (NPN) were inconclusive. However, titration of NPN fluorescence emission in AaegOBP1 solution with MOP led to unexpected and intriguing results. Quenching was observed in the initial phase of titration, but addition of higher doses of MOP led to a stepwise increase in fluorescence emission coupled with a blue shift, which can be explained at least in part by formation of MOP micelles to house stray NPN molecules. PMID:25671088

  15. Brazilian spotted fever: real-time PCR for diagnosis of fatal cases.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Fabiana Cristina Pereira; do Nascimento, Elvira Maria Mendes; Katz, Gizelda; Angerami, Rodrigo Nogueira; Colombo, Silvia; de Souza, Eliana Rodrigues; Labruna, Marcelo Bahia; da Silva, Marcos Vinicius

    2012-12-01

    Suspicion of Brazilian spotted fever (BSF) should occur in endemic regions upon surveillance of the acute febrile icteric hemorrhagic syndrome (AFIHS). However, limitations associated with currently available laboratory tests pose a challenge to early diagnosis, especially in fatal cases. Two real-time PCR (qPCR) protocols were evaluated to diagnose BSF in 110 fatal AFIHS cases, collected in BSF-endemic regions in 2009-2010. Of these, 24 were positive and 86 negative by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) assay (cut-off IgG and/or IgM ? 128). DNA from these samples was used in the qPCR protocols: one to detect Rickettsia spp. (citrate synthase gene) and another to determine spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia species (OmpA gene). Of the 24 IFA-positive samples, 5 (21%) were positive for OmpA and 9 (38%) for citrate synthase. In the IFA-negative group (n=86), OmpA and citrate synthase were positive in 23 (27%) and 27 (31%), respectively. These results showed that the 2 qPCR protocols were about twice as sensitive as the IFA test alone (93% concordance). In conclusion, qPCR is a sensitive method for the diagnosis of fatal BSF cases and should be considered for routine surveillance of AFIHS in places like Brazil, where spotted fever-related lethality is high and other endemic diseases like dengue and leptospirosis can mislead diagnosis. PMID:23168050

  16. Acute mercury poisoning presenting as fever of unknown origin in an adult woman: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mercury intoxication may present in a wide range of clinical forms from a simple disease to fatal poisoning. This article presents a case of acute mercury poisoning, a rare condition that presents challenges for diagnosis with fever of unknown origin. Case presentation A 52-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to the hospital with high fever, sore throat, a rash over her entire body, itching, nausea, and extensive muscle pain. She had cervical, bilateral axillary and mediastinal lymphadenopathies. We learned that her son and husband had similar symptoms. After excluding infectious pathologies, autoimmune diseases and malignancy were investigated. Multiple organs of our patient were involved and her fever persisted at the fourth week of admission. A repeat medical history elicited that her son had brought mercury home from school and put it on the hot stove, and the family had been exposed to the fumes for a long period of time. Our patient’s serum and urine mercury levels were high. She was diagnosed with mercury poisoning and treated accordingly. Conclusions Mercury vapor is a colourless and odorless substance. Therefore, patients with various unexplained symptoms and clinical conditions should be questioned about possible exposure to mercury. PMID:25084829

  17. A pediatric case of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome in Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Sun, J M; Chen, L F; Shi, X G; Liu, K; Gong, Z Y; Chen, J; Zhang, R; Ren, J P; Jiang, J M

    2015-11-01

    This report describes a pediatric case of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS), which is an emerging disease that is caused by a novel bunyavirus. Interestingly, the previously reported SFTS cases typically involved elderly patients, while our case involved a 5-year-old child from Zhejiang Province, China. In this report, we describe our investigation of the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of this case, to improve our understanding of this emerging disease. Our principle finding was that the present case's clinical symptoms were milder than those that have been reported in adult cases of SFTS. Therefore, we recommend more careful screening of pediatric patients who present with mild symptoms that are consistent with SFTS. PMID:26469738

  18. Two cases with acute abdominal aneurysm and evidence of acute Q fever infection.

    PubMed

    Hagenaars, Julia C J P; Kampschreur, Linda M; de Jager-Leclercq, Monique G L; van Petersen, André S; Moll, Frans L; Renders, Nicole H M; Wever, Peter C; Koning, Olivier H J; Hoornenborg, Elske

    2014-02-01

    We report 2 patients with symptomatic aortic aneurysm and serologic evidence of acute Q fever with positive Coxiella burnetii PCR in blood/tissue. This suggests a role for acute Q fever in aneurysm progression. Diagnostic testing for Q fever infection in patients with symptomatic aneurysms in Q fever areas is recommended. PMID:24368182

  19. A case of Mediterranean spotted fever associated with severe respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dželalija, Boris; Punda-Poli?, Volga; Medi?, Alan; Mraovi?, Boris; Šimurina, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) is usually a mild endemic rickettsial disease occurring in southern Croatia. We have reported the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of an acute MSF case associated with severe respiratory distress syndrome and hemodynamical instability. The patient recovered completely after antimicrobial treatment. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (FOCUS Diagnostics Inc.) was performed to detect IgM and IgG antibodies to Rickettsia conorii. A significant increase of both IgM and IgG antibody titres found in paired acute- and convalescent-phase serum confirmed the diagnosis of acute MSF. PMID:26344605

  20. Chronic Q-Fever (Coxiella burnetii) Causing Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Lumbar Osteomyelitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Leahey, P. Alexander; Tahan, Steven R.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Albrecht, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a rare cause of chronic infection that most frequently presents as endocarditis. We report a case of C burnetii causing an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm with contiguous lumbar osteomyelitis resulting in spinal cord compromise. The diagnosis was established by serologic studies consistent with chronic Q-fever (ratio of C burnetii immunoglobulin [Ig]G phase II titer to IgG phase I titer <1) and was confirmed by positive C burnetii polymerase chain reaction of vertebral tissue in addition to pathology of vertebral bone showing intracellular Gram-negative coccobacillary bacteria. The patient clinically improved after surgical decompression and prolonged treatment with doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine.

  1. [Yellow oat grass intoxication in horses: Pitfalls by producing hay from extensive landscapes? A case report].

    PubMed

    Bockisch, F; Aboling, S; Coenen, M; Vervuert, I

    2015-10-14

    Vitamin-D intoxication by yellow oat grass is often reported under the syndrome of enzootic calcinosis in ruminants in the upper regions of the Alps. The intake of Trisetum flavescens in ruminants and horses induces calcification of soft tissue, including vessels, tendons and ligaments, lung, heart and kidneys. Clinical symptoms, including a reluctance to move, inappetence, body-weight loss and impaired organ function, are frequently observed. To date, there are only a very few case reports about yellow-oat-grass intoxication in horses. The present case report describes Vitamin-D intoxication by yellow oat grass in a riding stable in Thuringia, Germany. The horses, which were fed hay with a 50% contamination of Trisetum flavescens, displayed symptoms, including inappetence, body-weight loss, colic, polydipsia and polyuria. The hay, contaminated with Trisetum flavescens, was harvested from an extensively cultivated landscape according to the European Fauna-Flora-Habitat (FFH)-directive. The present case report demonstrates the pitfalls in producing hay from extensively used landscapes and indicates some peculiarities of Vitamin-D metabolism in horses. PMID:26346225

  2. Arterial Hypertension and Skin Allergy Are Risk Factors for Progression from Dengue to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Maria Glória; Paixão, Enny S.; Costa, Maria da Conceição N.; Cunha, Rivaldo V.; Pamplona, Luciano; Dias, Juarez P.; Figueiredo, Camila A.; Figueiredo, Maria Aparecida A.; Blanton, Ronald; Morato, Vanessa; Barreto, Maurício L.; Rodrigues, Laura C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, knowledge does not allow early prediction of which cases of dengue fever (DF) will progress to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), to allow early intervention to prevent progression or to limit severity. The objective of this study is to investigate the hypothesis that some specific comorbidities increase the likelihood of a DF case progressing to DHF. Methods A concurrent case-control study, conducted during dengue epidemics, from 2009 to 2012. Cases were patients with dengue fever that progressed to DHF, and controls were patients of dengue fever who did not progress to DHF. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between DHF and comorbidities. Results There were 490 cases of DHF and 1,316 controls. Among adults, progression to DHF was associated with self-reported hypertension (OR = 1.6; 95% CI 1.1-2.1) and skin allergy (OR = 1.8; 95% CI 1.1-3.2) with DHF after adjusting for ethnicity and socio-economic variables. There was no statistically significant association between any chronic disease and progression to DHF in those younger than 15 years. Conclusions Physicians attending patients with dengue fever should keep those with hypertension or skin allergies in health units to monitor progression for early intervention. This would reduce mortality by dengue. PMID:25996882

  3. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis presenting as fever of unknown origin: case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fever of unknown origin (FUO) can be defined as a body temperature higher than 38.3°C on several occasions over more than 3 weeks, the diagnosis of which remains uncertain after 1 week of evaluation. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a wide range of clinical manifestations. The highest incidence of ADEM is observed during childhood and it usually occurs following a viral or bacterial infection or, more rarely, following a vaccination, or without a preceding cause. Case presentation Here, we describe an atypical case of ADEM that initially manifested as several weeks of FUO in a fifteen years old boy. Conclusions This case report suggests a new possible syndromic association between ADEM and FUO, which should be considered in the clinical examination of patients with FUO, especially in the presence of also modest neurologic or neuropsychiatric symptoms. PMID:22074226

  4. El Niño Southern Oscillation and vegetation dynamics as predictors of dengue fever cases in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, D. O.; Troyo, A.; Beier, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are growing health concerns throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. This study focuses on Costa Rica, which experienced over 100 000 cases of DF/DHF from 2003 to 2007. We utilized data on sea-surface temperature anomalies related to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and two vegetation indices derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) from the Terra satellite to model the influence of climate and vegetation dynamics on DF/DHF cases in Costa Rica. Cross-correlations were calculated to evaluate both positive and negative lag effects on the relationships between independent variables and DF/DHF cases. The model, which utilizes a sinusoid and non-linear least squares to fit case data, was able to explain 83% of the variance in weekly DF/DHF cases when independent variables were shifted backwards in time. When the independent variables were shifted forward in time, consistently with a forecasting approach, the model explained 64% of the variance. Importantly, when five ENSO and two vegetation indices were included, the model reproduced a major DF/DHF epidemic of 2005. The unexplained variance in the model may be due to herd immunity and vector control measures, although information regarding these aspects of the disease system are generally lacking. Our analysis suggests that the model may be used to predict DF/DHF outbreaks as early as 40 weeks in advance and may also provide valuable information on the magnitude of future epidemics. In its current form it may be used to inform national vector control programs and policies regarding control measures; it is the first climate-based dengue model developed for this country and is potentially scalable to the broader region of Latin America and the Caribbean where dramatic increases in DF/DHF incidence and spread have been observed.

  5. Extensive Thrombosis in a Patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever, Despite Hyperimmunoglobulin D State in Serum - First Adult Case in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kowoon; Park, Won; Chung, Moon-Hyun; Lim, Mie-Jin; Jung, Kyong Hee; Heo, Yoonseok

    2013-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent episodes of fever accompanied by peritonitis, pleuritis, arthritis, or erysipelas-like erythema. It is known to occur mainly among Mediterranean and Middle Eastern populations such as non-Ashkenazi Jews, Arabs, Turks, and Armenians. FMF is not familiar to clinicians beyond this area and diagnosing FMF can be challenging. We report a 22-yr old boy who presented with fever, arthalgia and abdominal pain. He had a history of recurrent episodes of fever associated with arthalgia which would subside spontaneously or by antipyretics. Autosomal recessive periodic fever syndromes were suspected. Immunoglobulin D (IgD) level in the serum was elevated and DNA analysis showed complex mutations (p.Glu148Gln, p.Pro369Ser, p.Arg408Gln) in the MEFV gene. 3D angio computed tomography showed total thrombosis of splenic vein with partial thrombosis of proximal superior mesenteric vein, main portal vein and intrahepatic both portal vein. This is a case of FMF associated with multiple venous thrombosis and elevated IgD level. When thrombosis is associated with elevated IgD, FMF should be suspected. This is the first adult case reported in Korea. PMID:23400211

  6. Drug Fever Induced by Piperacillin/Tazobactam in a Scoliosis Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Shen, Jianxiong; Li, Qiyi; Chan, Matthew Tak Vai; Wu, William Ka Kei

    2015-11-01

    Drug fever is frequently underrecognized by clinicians despite its common occurrence. Fever induced by piperacillin/tazobactam has not been reported in scoliosis correction surgery.Drug fever caused by piperacillin/tazobactam in a scoliosis patient was described.A 36-year-old woman with adult scoliosis undergoing correction surgery was reported. She developed a fever after an intake of piperacillin/tazobactam for 3 days. Eosinophil count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive proteins were increased in her blood examination. Thorough history, chest radiography, blood cultures, physical examination, and urinalysis revealed no evidences of fever. A drug fever is therefore considered. The fever lasted for 2 weeks and her body temperature come back to normal 4 days after piperacillin/tazobactam cessation.Fever could be caused by piperacillin/tazobactam. The drug fever's diagnosis is easily confounded by a co-occurring infection. Therefore, it is crucial for clinicians to doubt drugs as a reason when no other origin of fever could be identified in a patient. PMID:26579799

  7. Coexistence of hereditary angioedema in a case of familial Mediterranean fever with partial response to colchicine

    PubMed Central

    Bahceci, Semiha Erdem; Genel, Ferah; Gulez, Nesrin

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a very rare and potentially life-threatening genetic disease characterised by episodes of edema in various parts of the body, including the extremities, face, and airway. The disease is usually associated with attacks of abdominal pain. On the other hand, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an inherited condition characterised by recurrent episodes of painful inflammation in the abdomen, chest, or joints. In this report, we present a child with FMF and undiagnosed HAE, which made him a partial responder to colchicine treatment. Consequently, HAE must be considered in differential diagnosis of cases in which a partial response is obtained from FMF treatment, particularly in countries where FMF is frequently encountered, because early diagnosis of HAE can facilitate prevention of life-threatening complications, such as upper airway obstruction. To our knowledge, our patient is the first patient reported in the literature with the diagnosis of HAE and FMF together. PMID:26155193

  8. A Case of Q Fever Prosthetic Joint Infection and Description of an Assay for Detection of Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    Tande, Aaron J.; Cunningham, Scott A.; Raoult, Didier; Sim, Franklin H.; Berbari, Elie F.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first published case of Coxiella burnetii prosthetic joint infection. Diagnosis was established with PCR and culture of periprosthetic tissue and synovial fluid (and serology). A novel PCR assay is described herein. Q fever should be considered in patients with prosthetic joint infection without an identified pathogen. PMID:23077126

  9. FDG PET-CT in the Diagnosis of Takayasu Arteritis Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joohae

    2015-01-01

    Takayasu arteritis is a chronic vasculitis involving the large vessels. At diagnosis, ischemic symptom are usually present in the affected vessels. However, fever of unknown origin (FUO) is rare as an initial presentation and renders the condition difficult to diagnose. In this case report, we describe a patient who presented with a fever of unknown origin. A 68-year-old female was diagnosed with Takayasu arteritis after fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) was performed at the prepulseless stage. FDG PET-CT can assist in the early diagnosis of Takayasu arteritis patients with FUO and can improve the prognosis of such patients. PMID:26483994

  10. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Dengue Fever KidsHealth > Parents > Infections > Bacterial & Viral Infections > Dengue ... can help lower the chances of infection. About Dengue Fever Dengue (DEN-gee) fever is caused by ...

  11. Rat Bite Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... bite fever is a disease that occurs in humans who have been bitten by an infected rat or, in some cases, squirrels, mice, cats, and weasels. On occasion, the disease can also be spread by ingestion of contaminated food or milk products (Haverhill fever). Most cases in the United ...

  12. A possible case of caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever in a domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a fatal herpesvirus infection, affecting various wild and domestic ruminants all over the world. Water buffaloes were reported to be particularly susceptible for the ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2) causing the sheep-associated form of MCF (SA-MCF). This report describes the first case of possibly caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever symptoms in a domestic water buffalo in Switzerland. Case presentation The buffalo cow presented with persistent fever, dyspnoea, nasal bleeding and haematuria. Despite symptomatic therapy, the buffalo died and was submitted to post mortem examination. Major findings were an abomasal ulceration, a mild haemorrhagic cystitis and multifocal haemorrhages on the epicardium and on serosal and mucosal surfaces. Eyes and oral cavity were not affected. Histopathology revealed a mild to moderate lymphohistiocytic vasculitis limited to the brain and the urinary bladder. Although these findings are typical for MCF, OvHV-2 DNA was not detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes or in paraffin-embedded brain, using an OvHV-2 specific real time PCR. With the aid of a panherpesvirus PCR, a caprine herpesvirus-2 (CpHV-2) sequence could be amplified from both samples. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of malignant catarrhal fever in the subfamily Bovinae, where the presence of CpHV-2 could be demonstrated. The etiological context has yet to be evaluated. PMID:22132808

  13. The geographic distribution of cases of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever: Kastamonu, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aker, Servet; Ak?nc?, Halil; K?l?ço?lu, Cem; Leblebicioglu, Hakan

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the epidemiological characteristics of cases diagnosed with Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) with the help of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and to establish an epidemiological risk map. Data for 434 cases diagnosed with CCHF between 01.01.2004 and 31.12.2013 were subjected to statistical analysis SPSS 13.0 software. A digital map of Kastamonu was transferred onto ArcGIS 10.0 software in order to establish a risk map for CCHF. The highest cumulative incidence of CCHF is 41.29/10,000, and in people living at altitudes of 1001-1200 meters. ROC analysis of altitudes above sea level of residences with CCHF cases revealed an area under the curve of 74.5% (95% CI: 0.72-0.76, p<0.05). At a cut-off point of 836.5 meters, sensitivity was 0.74 and specificity 0.76. Cumulative incidence of CCHF was significantly positively correlated with number of animals per head (r=0.76) and area of agricultural land per head (r=0.59) (p<0.05). No significant correlation was determined between cumulative incidence and forested area percentages. This study reveals that both men and women living at more than 836.5 meters above sea level and working in agriculture and animal husbandry are at risk of CCHF between May and July. Detailed examination of the ecology of vector ticks is now needed in order to fully determine the epidemiology of the disease. PMID:26139033

  14. A Case of Hyper IgD and Periodic Fever Syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hisashi; Hoshi, Akiyoshi; Ioi, Hiroaki; Ishii, Chiako; Sato, Satoshi; Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Takekuma, Kouji; Hoshika, Akinori

    2008-01-01

    We report a four-year-old Japanese girl with hyper IgD and periodic fever syndrome. There is a first report of hyper IgD syndrome (HIDS) of which the genomic study was done in Japan. In this report a girl complained of periodic fever and abdominal symptoms accompanied with high levels of mevalonic acid in urine and serum. She has been well controlled by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for 3 years. PMID:24179342

  15. Notes from the field: Increase in reported Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever cases--country of Georgia, 2014.

    PubMed

    Mamuchishvili, Nana; Salyer, Stephanie J; Stauffer, Kendra; Geleishvili, Marika; Zakhashvili, Khatuna; Morgan, Juliette

    2015-03-01

    During January-September 2014, Georgia's National Centers for Disease Control and Public Health (NCDC) detected 22 cases of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) in the country. CCHF is caused by infection with a tickborne virus of the Bunyaviridae family. Transmission occurs from the bite of an infected tick or from crushing an infected tick with bare skin. Secondary transmission can result from contact with blood or tissues of infected animals and humans. CCHF initially manifests as a nonspecific febrile illness that progresses to a hemorrhagic phase, marked by rapidly developing symptoms leading to multiorgan failure, shock, and death in severe cases. The clinical severity, transmissibility, and infectiousness of CCHF are responsible for its categorization as a viral hemorrhagic fever high-priority bioterrorism agent. PMID:25742385

  16. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Cases in the Country of Georgia: Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance Study Results

    PubMed Central

    Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Imnadze, Paata; Chokheli, Maiko; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Endeladze, Marina; Mshvidobadze, Ketevan; Clark, Danielle V.; Bautista, Christian T.; Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent; Hepburn, Matthew J.; Wölfel, Silke; Wölfel, Roman; Rivard, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Minimal information is available on the incidence of Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus and hantavirus infections in Georgia. From 2008 to 2011, 537 patients with fever ? 38°C for ? 48 hours without a diagnosis were enrolled into a sentinel surveillance study to investigate the incidence of nine pathogens, including CCHF virus and hantavirus. Of 14 patients with a hemorrhagic fever syndrome, 3 patients tested positive for CCHF virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies. Two of the patients enrolled in the study had acute renal failure. These 2 of 537 enrolled patients were the only patients in the study positive for hantavirus IgM antibodies. These results suggest that CCHF virus and hantavirus are contributing causes of acute febrile syndromes of infectious origin in Georgia. These findings support introduction of critical diagnostic approaches and confirm the need for additional surveillance in Georgia. PMID:24891463

  17. A randomised double-blind clinical trial of two yellow fever vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77 in children nine-23 months old

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This randomised, double-blind, multicentre study with children nine-23 months old evaluated the immunogenicity of yellow fever (YF) vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77. YF antibodies were tittered before and 30 or more days after vaccination. Seropositivity and seroconversion were analysed according to the maternal serological status and the collaborating centre. A total of 1,966 children were randomised in the municipalities of the states of Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais and São Paulo and blood samples were collected from 1,714 mothers. Seropositivity was observed in 78.6% of mothers and 8.9% of children before vaccination. After vaccination, seropositivity rates of 81.9% and 83.2%, seroconversion rates of 84.8% and 85.8% and rates of a four-fold increase over the pre-vaccination titre of 77.6% and 81.8% were observed in the 17D-213/77 and 17DD subgroups, respectively. There was no association with maternal immunity. Among children aged 12 months or older, the seroconversion rates of 69% were associated with concomitant vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. The data were not conclusive regarding the interference of maternal immunity in the immune response to the YF vaccine, but they suggest interference from other vaccines. The failures in seroconversion after vaccination support the recommendation of a booster dose in children within 10 years of the first dose. PMID:26517656

  18. De Novo Assembly and Annotation of the Asian Tiger Mosquito (Aedes albopictus) Repeatome with dnaPipeTE from Raw Genomic Reads and Comparative Analysis with the Yellow Fever Mosquito (Aedes aegypti)

    PubMed Central

    Goubert, Clément; Modolo, Laurent; Vieira, Cristina; ValienteMoro, Claire; Mavingui, Patrick; Boulesteix, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive DNA, including transposable elements (TEs), is found throughout eukaryotic genomes. Annotating and assembling the “repeatome” during genome-wide analysis often poses a challenge. To address this problem, we present dnaPipeTE—a new bioinformatics pipeline that uses a sample of raw genomic reads. It produces precise estimates of repeated DNA content and TE consensus sequences, as well as the relative ages of TE families. We shows that dnaPipeTE performs well using very low coverage sequencing in different genomes, losing accuracy only with old TE families. We applied this pipeline to the genome of the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus, an invasive species of human health interest, for which the genome size is estimated to be over 1 Gbp. Using dnaPipeTE, we showed that this species harbors a large (50% of the genome) and potentially active repeatome with an overall TE class and order composition similar to that of Aedes aegypti, the yellow fever mosquito. However, intraorder dynamics show clear distinctions between the two species, with differences at the TE family level. Our pipeline’s ability to manage the repeatome annotation problem will make it helpful for new or ongoing assembly projects, and our results will benefit future genomic studies of A. albopictus. PMID:25767248

  19. Q Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... few organisms may be required to cause infection. Q Fever Topics Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Signs of ... Guidelines and Recommendations... Prevention Avoid getting infected... Videos Q Fever: New Guidelines for Patient Management CDC Expert ...

  20. Rheumatic fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... infection with group A Streptococcus bacteria (such as strep throat or scarlet fever ). The disease can affect ... affects children ages 5 -15 who have had strep throat or scarlet fever. If it occurs, it ...

  1. [Q fever].

    PubMed

    Frangoulidis, Dimitrios; Fischer, Silke F

    2015-08-01

    The article summarizes some important recently identified findings about the Coxiella burnetii disease, Q fever. Beside new diagnostic parameters for follow-up issues, the importance of a timely identification of chronic Q fever and the peculiarities of the post Q fever fatigue syndrome are depicted. PMID:26261927

  2. Clinical and Pathological Findings on Intoxication by Yellow Phosphorus After Ingesting Firework Cracker: A Rare Case of Autopsy.

    PubMed

    Samdanci, Emine Türkmen; Cakir, Ebru; Sah?n, Nurhan; Elmali, Candan; Sayin, Sadegül

    2013-11-01

    Yellow phosphorus is a toxic substance used in the production of firework cracker, fireworks, ammunition and agricultural dung. When ingested, it shows its effects mainly in the liver, the kidneys, and the brain. A four-year-old girl had died as a result of acute hepatic failure caused by ingesting a firework cracker. The case showed high levels of hepatic enzymes, along with non-specific signs such as nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Autopsy revealed diffuse microvesicular steatosis in the liver and disseminated degeneration in the proximal tubules of the kidneys. In cases with concomitant hepatorenal failure and cardiovascular collapse, death is inevitable. However, when only hepatic failure develops, hepatic transplantation may be lifesaving. Although intoxication from ingesting yellow phosphorus has a very high rate of mortality, forensic cases are extremely rare in the literature. PMID:24272931

  3. Effect of Quorum Sensing by Staphylococcus epidermidis on the Attraction Response of Female Adult Yellow Fever Mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti aegypti (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Culicidae), to a Blood-Feeding Source

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyang; Crippen, Tawni L.; Coates, Craig J.; Wood, Thomas K.; Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, the principal vector of yellow fever and dengue fever, is responsible for more than 30,000 deaths annually. Compounds such as carbon dioxide, amino acids, fatty acids and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been widely studied for their role in attracting Ae. aegypti to hosts. Many VOCs from humans are produced by associated skin microbiota. Staphyloccocus epidermidis, although not the most abundant bacteria according to surveys of relative 16S ribosomal RNA abundance, commonly occurs on human skin. Bacteria demonstrate population level decision-making through quorum sensing. Many quorum sensing molecules, such as indole, volatilize and become part of the host odor plum. To date, no one has directly demonstrated the link between quorum sensing (i.e., decision-making) by bacteria associated with a host as a factor regulating arthropod vector attraction. This study examined this specific question with regards to S. epidermidis and Ae. aegypti. Pairwise tests were conducted to examine the response of female Ae. aegypti to combinations of tryptic soy broth (TSB) and S. epidermidis wildtype and agr- strains. The agr gene expresses an accessory gene regulator for quorum sensing; therefore, removing this gene inhibits quorum sensing of the bacteria. Differential attractiveness of mosquitoes to the wildtype and agr- strains was observed. Both wildtype and the agr- strain of S. epidermidis with TSB were marginally more attractive to Ae. aegypti than the TSB alone. Most interestingly, the blood-feeder treated with wildtype S. epidermidis/TSB attracted 74% of Ae. aegypti compared to the agr- strain of S. epidermidis/TSB (P ? 0.0001). This study is the first to suggest a role for interkingdom communication between host symbiotic bacteria and mosquitoes. This may have implications for mosquito decision-making with regards to host detection, location and acceptance. We speculate that mosquitoes “eavesdrop” on the chemical discussions occurring between host-associated microbes to determine suitability for blood feeding. We believe these data suggest that manipulating quorum sensing by bacteria could serve as a novel approach for reducing mosquito attraction to hosts, or possibly enhancing the trapping of adults at favored oviposition sites. PMID:26674802

  4. [An imported Chikungunya fever case from New Delhi, India to Ankara, Turkey: the first imported case of Turkey and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Ya?c? Ça?lay?k, Dilek; Uyar, Yavuz; Korukluo?lu, Gülay; Ertek, Mustafa; Unal, Serhat

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne alphavirus that causes an acute febrile illness, chikungunya fever. CHIKV virus is geographically distributed in Africa, India, and South-East Asia. Chikungunya fever outbreaks have been reported from India since 2006. The incubation period is 3-7 days, and the disease is characterized by sudden onset of high fever and severe arthralgia. Other symptoms can be rash, headache, fatigue, nausea-vomiting, and myalgias. Here, we report the first Chikungunya case imported from India, New-Delhi to Ankara, Turkey. In December 2010, a 55-year-old female Turkish government employee living in urban area of New Delhi for the last 3 years had sudden onset fever up to 38.4°C for 2 days. Itching rash and arthralgia also developed. Symptomatic treatment was given to patient in New Delhi. She returned to Turkey and was admitted to Hacettepe University Medical Faculty, Department of Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases Unit, since arthralgia has continued on the 26th day of her complaints. Hepatomegaly and tenosynovitis were detected in her physical examination. Serum sample sent to Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency, Virology Reference and Research Laboratory, yielded negative results for specific IgM and IgG antibodies against Hantavirus and Dengue virus types 1-4; however, the results were positive for CHIKV specific IgM and IgG antibodies by commercial immunofluorescence method (Euroimmun, Germany). CHIKV RNA which was searched by in-house real-time RT-PCR was negative. The second serum sample obtained three weeks later also found positive for CHIKV specific IgM and IgG antibodies. This was the first laboratory confirmed imported Chikungunya case in Turkey. There are predictions regarding the presence of Aedes species mosquitos that can transmit this virus in Turkey. This case report will be an alarming signal for the clinicians in our country to consider Chikungunya fever in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with fever, arthralgia and rash. PMID:22399181

  5. Large-Scale Environmental Influences on the Onset, Maintenance, and Dissipation of Six Sea Fog Cases over the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengyuan; Fu, Gang; Lu, Chungu

    2012-05-01

    Sea fog is typically formed and developed under a set of favorable environmental conditions, which are associated with the station pressure changes, sea level pressure, winds, temperature, water vapor supply, and sea surface temperature. Understanding of these environmental factors during the evolution of a sea fog episode is crucial for forecasting the occurrence and severity of sea fogs over the ocean and adjacent coastal areas. In this study, the large-scale environment variability of six fog events over the Yellow Sea was investigated. It was realized in the present study that the northwest Pacific Ocean high (NPH) is vital to fog formation over the Yellow Sea. In our study, six fog cases can be basically divided into two types: (1) pressure-weakening type, (2) pressure-strengthening type. The former type happened in spring and the latter type in summer. Prevailing southerly winds, accompanied with the well-positioned NPH, may supply a large amount of warm water vapor for the fog formation and maintenance. The intensity of the air temperature inversion is stronger in summer cases than that in spring ones. The wind direction change from south to north and the unstable lower atmosphere may lead to fog's dissipation. This study may provide a comprehensive understanding of sea fog's onset, maintenance, and dissipation over the Yellow Sea.

  6. Etiology of pediatric fever in western Kenya: a case-control study of falciparum malaria, respiratory viruses, and streptococcal pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Wendy P; Mott, Joshua A; Laktabai, Jeremiah; Wamburu, Kabura; Fields, Barry; Armstrong, Janice; Taylor, Steve M; MacIntyre, Charles; Sen, Reeshi; Menya, Diana; Pan, William; Nicholson, Bradly P; Woods, Christopher W; Holland, Thomas L

    2015-05-01

    In Kenya, more than 10 million episodes of acute febrile illness are treated annually among children under 5 years. Most are clinically managed as malaria without parasitological confirmation. There is an unmet need to describe pathogen-specific etiologies of fever. We enrolled 370 febrile children and 184 healthy controls. We report demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with Plasmodium falciparum, group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis, and respiratory viruses (influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus [RSV], parainfluenza [PIV] types 1-3, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus [hMPV]), as well as those with undifferentiated fever. Of febrile children, 79.7% were treated for malaria. However, P. falciparum was detected infrequently in both cases and controls (14/268 [5.2%] versus 3/133 [2.3%], P = 0.165), whereas 41% (117/282) of febrile children had a respiratory viral infection, compared with 24.8% (29/117) of controls (P = 0.002). Only 9/515 (1.7%) children had streptococcal infection. Of febrile children, 22/269 (8.2%) were infected with > 1 pathogen, and 102/275 (37.1%) had fevers of unknown etiology. Respiratory viruses were common in both groups, but only influenza or parainfluenza was more likely to be associated with symptomatic disease (attributable fraction [AF] 67.5% and 59%, respectively). Malaria was overdiagnosed and overtreated. Few children presented to the hospital with GAS pharyngitis. An enhanced understanding of carriage of common pathogens, improved diagnostic capacity, and better-informed clinical algorithms for febrile illness are needed. PMID:25758648

  7. Self limited disorder in a young female with fever, abdominal pain and lymphadenopathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease is a rare, benign cause of lymphadenopathy that is often associated with fever, night sweats, and weight loss. The clinical and laboratory manifestation of Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease are similar to those of lymphoma, tuberculosis, sarcoidosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and it is often mistaken for these disorders. Definitive diagnosis is accomplished by lymph node biopsy. Awareness of Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease among clinicians and pathologists is essential to avoid misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment of patients with this self-limited disorder. PMID:20062641

  8. Using Modelling to Disentangle the Relative Contributions of Zoonotic and Anthroponotic Transmission: The Case of Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Lo Iacono, Giovanni; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Garry, Robert F.; Grant, Donald S.; Khan, Sheik Humarr; Leach, Melissa; Moses, Lina M.; Schieffelin, John S.; Shaffer, Jeffrey G.; Webb, Colleen T.; Wood, James L. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Zoonotic infections, which transmit from animals to humans, form the majority of new human pathogens. Following zoonotic transmission, the pathogen may already have, or may acquire, the ability to transmit from human to human. With infections such as Lassa fever (LF), an often fatal, rodent-borne, hemorrhagic fever common in areas of West Africa, rodent-to-rodent, rodent-to-human, human-to-human and even human-to-rodent transmission patterns are possible. Indeed, large hospital-related outbreaks have been reported. Estimating the proportion of transmission due to human-to-human routes and related patterns (e.g. existence of super-spreaders), in these scenarios is challenging, but essential for planned interventions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we make use of an innovative modeling approach to analyze data from published outbreaks and the number of LF hospitalized patients to Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone to estimate the likely contribution of human-to-human transmission. The analyses show that almost of the cases at KGH are secondary cases arising from human-to-human transmission. However, we found much of this transmission is associated with a disproportionally large impact of a few individuals (‘super-spreaders’), as we found only of human cases result in an effective reproduction number (i.e. the average number of secondary cases per infectious case) , with a maximum value up to . Conclusions/Significance This work explains the discrepancy between the sizes of reported LF outbreaks and a clinical perception that human-to-human transmission is low. Future assessment of risks of LF and infection control guidelines should take into account the potentially large impact of super-spreaders in human-to-human transmission. Our work highlights several neglected topics in LF research, the occurrence and nature of super-spreading events and aspects of social behavior in transmission and detection. PMID:25569707

  9. Scarlet Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... condition and treatment information A A A This image displays the sandpaper-like appearance on the chin and a red tongue with red dots (red strawberry tongue) typical of scarlet fever. Overview Scarlet fever is an infection with a type of bacteria called Streptococcus, which not only causes a throat ...

  10. Dengue Fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    “Dengue Fever” will be included in “Health Information for International Travel, 2007-2008” which will be published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever are viral diseases transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. The disease is found in tropical and s...

  11. Pathogenesis of the viral hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Paessler, Slobodan; Walker, David H

    2013-01-24

    Four families of enveloped RNA viruses, filoviruses, flaviviruses, arenaviruses, and bunyaviruses, cause hemorrhagic fevers. These viruses are maintained in specific natural cycles involving nonhuman primates, bats, rodents, domestic ruminants, humans, mosquitoes, and ticks. Vascular instability varies from mild to fatal shock, and hemorrhage ranges from none to life threatening. The pathogenic mechanisms are extremely diverse and include deficiency of hepatic synthesis of coagulation factors owing to hepatocellular necrosis, cytokine storm, increased permeability by vascular endothelial growth factor, complement activation, and disseminated intravascular coagulation in one or more hemorrhagic fevers. The severity of disease caused by these agents varies tremendously; there are extremely high fatality rates in Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers, and asymptomatic infection predominates in yellow fever and dengue viral infections. Although ineffective immunity and high viral loads are characteristic of several viral hemorrhagic fevers, severe plasma leakage occurs at the time of viral clearance and defervescence in dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:23121052

  12. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    MedlinePLUS

    Hemorrhagic dengue; Dengue shock syndrome; Philippine hemorrhagic fever; Thai hemorrhagic fever; Singapore hemorrhagic fever ... Four different dengue viruses are known to cause dengue hemorrhagic fever. Dengue hemorrhagic fever occurs when a person is bitten by ...

  13. Lassa hemorrhagic fever in a late term pregnancy from northern sierra leone with a positive maternal outcome: case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lassa fever (LF) is a devastating viral disease prevalent in West Africa. Efforts to take on this public health crisis have been hindered by lack of infrastructure and rapid field deployable diagnosis in areas where the disease is prevalent. Recent capacity building at the Kenema Government Hospital Lassa Fever Ward (KGH LFW) in Sierra Leone has lead to a major turning point in the diagnosis, treatment and study of LF. Herein we present the first comprehensive rapid diagnosis and real time characterization of an acute hemorrhagic LF case at KGH LFW. This case report focuses on a third trimester pregnant Sierra Leonean woman from the historically non-endemic Northern district of Tonkolili who survived the illness despite fetal demise. Employed in this study were newly developed recombinant LASV Antigen Rapid Test cassettes and dipstick lateral flow immunoassays (LFI) that enabled the diagnosis of LF within twenty minutes of sample collection. Deregulation of overall homeostasis, significant hepatic and renal system involvement, and immunity profiles were extensively characterized during the course of hospitalization. Rapid diagnosis, prompt treatment with a full course of intravenous (IV) ribavirin, IV fluids management, and real time monitoring of clinical parameters resulted in a positive maternal outcome despite admission to the LFW seven days post onset of symptoms, fetal demise, and a natural still birth delivery. These studies solidify the growing rapid diagnostic, treatment, and surveillance capabilities at the KGH LF Laboratory, and the potential to significantly improve the current high mortality rate caused by LF. As a result of the growing capacity, we were also able to isolate Lassa virus (LASV) RNA from the patient and perform Sanger sequencing where we found significant genetic divergence from commonly circulating Sierra Leonean strains, showing potential for the discovery of a newly emerged LASV strain with expanded geographic distribution. Furthermore, recent emergence of LF cases in Northern Sierra Leone highlights the need for superior diagnostics to aid in the monitoring of LASV strain divergence with potentially increased geographic expansion. PMID:21843352

  14. YELLOW WILT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow wilt is a serious destructive sugar beet disease that occurs only in Argentina and Chile. Symptoms include yellowing and wilting of the leaves, resulting in the death of infected plants, especially when accompanied by drought and high temperatures. Yellow wilt is caused by a rickettsia-like o...

  15. YELLOW BERRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow berry refers to the non-vitreous form of the wheat kernel. Individual kernels may be vitreous, non-vitreous (yellow berry) or have varying proportions of each (“mottled”). Yellow berry, in and of itself, represents no defect of the kernel. As in maize, rice and other cereals, the non-vitre...

  16. Education Fever and the East Asian Fertility Puzzle: A case study of low fertility in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Thomas; Kohler, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Fertility throughout East Asia has fallen rapidly over the last five decades and is now below the replacement rate of 2.1 in every country in the region. Using South Korea as a case study, we argue that East Asia's ultra-low fertility rates can be partially explained by the steadfast parental drive to have competitive and successful children. Parents throughout the region invest large amounts of time and money to ensure that their children are able to enter prestigious universities and obtain top jobs. Accordingly, childrearing has become so expensive that the average couple cannot afford to have more than just one or two children. The trend of high parental investment in child education, also known as ‘education fever’, exemplifies the notion of ‘quality over quantity’ and is an important contributing factor to understanding low-fertility in East Asia. PMID:24883076

  17. Pox-like lesions and haemorrhagic fever in two concurrent cases in the Central African Republic: case investigation and management in difficult circumstances

    PubMed Central

    Froeschl, Guenter; Kayembe, Pitchou Kasongo

    2015-01-01

    Cases of monkeypox in humans are frequently reported from the Democratic Republic of Congo. The few reports from the Central African Republic have been limited to cases in the far South closely bordering the Congos. Team members of an international medical organisation have suspected clinically two human cases of MPX, associated with clinical signs of coagulopathy and haemorrhage in the North of the country. Key findings were history of a squirrel, fever and vesicular dermal eruptions. Subsequently patients developed profuse epistaxis and hematemesis, associated with clinical signs of shock. Both patients were isolated and treated symptomatically. Samples were sent to a regional reference laboratory, who initially issued a confirmation of the suspected diagnosis of MPX in both cases. The result was later revised, and additional analyses of samples could not confirm the diagnosis. PMID:26664524

  18. Typhoid Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... internationally. Typhoid fever is still common in the developing world, where it affects about 21.5 million persons ... Japan. Therefore, if you are traveling to the developing world, you should consider taking precautions. Over the past ...

  19. Lassa Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can become infected through contact with an infected rodent... Signs and Symptoms Symptoms of Lassa fever typically ... can be prevented by avoiding contact with Mastomys rodents... Outbreak Distribution Map Resources Factsheet: What you need ...

  20. [Humidifier fever].

    PubMed

    Lebedev, S V; Aleksandrovski?, V G; Chekhonin, V P

    1988-01-01

    Pollution of air ventilation and conditioning systems by microorganisms and products of their activity can lead to the development of infectious (legionnaires' disease) and allergic (humidifier fever) diseases. Clinical, immunological and hygienic investigations under natural conditions of 72 persons working in offices helped to study a respiratory disease which was similar to humidifier fever. The removal of dust and mud from the system and thorough cleaning of all conditioned rooms put an end to this disease. PMID:3238588

  1. Q Fever

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, M.; Raoult, D.

    1999-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis with a worldwide distribution with the exception of New Zealand. The disease is caused by Coxiella burnetii, a strictly intracellular, gram-negative bacterium. Many species of mammals, birds, and ticks are reservoirs of C. burnetii in nature. C. burnetii infection is most often latent in animals, with persistent shedding of bacteria into the environment. However, in females intermittent high-level shedding occurs at the time of parturition, with millions of bacteria being released per gram of placenta. Humans are usually infected by contaminated aerosols from domestic animals, particularly after contact with parturient females and their birth products. Although often asymptomatic, Q fever may manifest in humans as an acute disease (mainly as a self-limited febrile illness, pneumonia, or hepatitis) or as a chronic disease (mainly endocarditis), especially in patients with previous valvulopathy and to a lesser extent in immunocompromised hosts and in pregnant women. Specific diagnosis of Q fever remains based upon serology. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antiphase II antibodies are detected 2 to 3 weeks after infection with C. burnetii, whereas the presence of IgG antiphase I C. burnetii antibodies at titers of ?1:800 by microimmunofluorescence is indicative of chronic Q fever. The tetracyclines are still considered the mainstay of antibiotic therapy of acute Q fever, whereas antibiotic combinations administered over prolonged periods are necessary to prevent relapses in Q fever endocarditis patients. Although the protective role of Q fever vaccination with whole-cell extracts has been established, the population which should be primarily vaccinated remains to be clearly identified. Vaccination should probably be considered in the population at high risk for Q fever endocarditis. PMID:10515901

  2. Treatment of a patient with severe hemorrhagic fever accompanied by infection with methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, aspergillus and mucor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Wang, Xue; Lv, Jing; Dong, Yalin

    2015-12-01

    A 40-year-old Korean man developed hemorrhagic fever in Xi'an, which is one of the main endemic areas for this illness in China. According to the local epidemiological situation, his condition could have been due to hantavirus infection, but this was not confirmed. He presented with the typical symptoms of hemorrhagic fever and rapidly progressed to a severe multisystem illness. The clinical situation deteriorated rapidly after admission, and he became coinfected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, aspergillus, and mucor. The patient was successfully treated with appropriate fluid infusion, hemodynamic support, continuous renal replacement therapy, liver protectants, and antibacterials. This case indicates that the choice of antimicrobials and the required dose are crucial issues, and that the vaccination campaign for hemorrhagic fever in Xi'an needs greater attention. PMID:26521926

  3. Remote Sensing in a Changing Climate and Environment: the Rift Valley Fever Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourre, Y. M.; Lacaux, J.-P.; Vignolles, C.; Lafaye, M.

    2012-07-01

    Climate and environment are changing rapidly whilst global population already reached 7 billions people. New public health challenges are posed by new and re-emerging diseases. Innovation is a must i.e., 1) using high resolution remote sensing, 2) re-invent health politics and trans-disciplinary management. The above are part of the 'TransCube Approach' i.e., Transition, Translation, and Transformation. The new concept of Tele-epidemiology includes such approach. A conceptual approach (CA) associated with Rift Valley Fever (RVF) epidemics in Senegal is presented. Ponds are detected using high-resolution SPOT-5 satellite images and radar data from space. Data on rainfall events obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (NASA/JAXA) are combined with in-situ data. Localization of vulnerable and parked hosts (obtained from QuickBird satellite) is also used. The dynamic spatio-temporal distribution and aggressiveness of RVF mosquitoes, are based on total rainfall amounts, ponds' dynamics and entomological observations. Detailed risks maps (hazards + vulnerability) in real-time are expressed in percentages of parks where animals are potentially at risks. This CA which simply relies upon rainfall distribution from space, is meant to contribute to the implementation of the RVF early warning system (RVFews). It is meant to be applied to other diseases and elsewhere. This is particularly true in new places where new vectors have been rapidly adapting (such as Aedes albopictus) whilst viruses (such as West Nile and Chikungunya,) circulate from constantly moving reservoirs and increasing population.

  4. Control of Eggplant Yellows

    E-print Network

    Jones, S. E. (Sloan Earle)

    1942-01-01

    , and 1939. Only 24 or 3.7 percent of the 655 plants receiving this treat- ment were diseased as compared with an average of 37.2 percent infec- tion in the untreated check plots. In no case was more than 4.8 per- cent of the dusted plants diseased (Table...:lO-11. Janes, M. J. 1937. Eggplant yellows control. Texas Agr. Exp. Sta. Rpt. for 1937:303. Jones. S. E. 1938. Eggplant Yellows. Texas Agr. Exp. Sta. Rpt. for 1938: 262. Jones. S E. 1939. Eggplant yellows. Texas Agr. Exp. Sta. Rpt. for 1939...

  5. Spatio-temporal variations of precipitation in arid and semiarid regions of China: The Yellow River basin as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Peng, Juntai; Singh, Vijay P.; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Yongqin David

    2014-03-01

    Daily precipitation data from 64 precipitation gauging stations within the Yellow River basin were analyzed by defining 17 precipitation indices with the aim to investigate space and time changes in precipitation characteristics. The modified Mann-Kendall trend test method was used to detect trends in the precipitation series. The influence of Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) on the basin precipitation was also investigated. Results indicate that: (1) the Yellow River basin is dominated by decreasing precipitation and precipitation deficit may further deteriorate the shortage of water resources. The middle Yellow River basin may encounter increasingly serious shortage of water resources and higher risk of floods would be expected in the lower Yellow River basin; (2) a higher risk of droughts can be expected in spring and autumn and precipitation in winter is increasing, which imply evident seasonality and seasonal shifts of precipitation changes within the basin; (3) short-duration consecutive precipitation events are prevalent in the basin and frequency and amount of short-duration consecutive precipitation events are increasing; (4) precipitation extremes are not dominant in the Yellow River basin, except for some regions in the North China Plain and rainstorm events are generally decreasing; and (5) no evident impact of IPO on the precipitation in the Yellow River basin is found. In this case, precipitation deficit would be a major problem the basin-scale water resources management may face in the future.

  6. [Economic evaluation of cases of dengue fever attributed to the disaster of 2011 in Nova Friburgo (State of Rio de Janeiro/Brazil)].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carlos Alexandre Rodrigues; Barata, Martha Macedo de Lima; Hoelz, Melania de Paulo Cariello; Medeiros, Viviane Nunes Lopes Oliveira; Marincola, Felipe de Carvalho Vommaro; Costa Neto, Cristina; Marinho, Diana Pinheiro; Oliveira, Teresa Vieira Dos Santos; Trigo, Aline Guimarães Monteiro; Medeiros, Thiago Klein de

    2014-09-01

    The prospects outlined in climate scenarios produced for Brazil indicate a probable increase in the number of extreme hydrometeorological events in the coming years. Therefore, a study of the health scourges that may intensify due to these events is important. The scope of this article is to estimate the cost represented by the cases of dengue fever attributed to the 2011 disaster in Nova Friburgo (RJ). There were 1,356 suspected cases of dengue fever, 937 of which were confirmed. The total cost of the disease may have been between R$66,000 and R$499,000 taking the minimum salary as a benchmark, with approximately 70% of this amount being among the confirmed cases. The disaster caused extensive changes in the city's environment which, together with the urban sanitation and clearing up process that occurred in the post-event period, led to an increase in the number of potential mosquito breeding sites, facilitating their proliferation and increasing the number of cases of dengue fever. This was a disease that in the decade prior to the disaster recorded few cases of the disease in the municipality. This illustrates the potential of events like the one that occurred in 2011 in Nova Friburgo may have on the increase in the number of cases, and consequently on the cost of the disease. PMID:25184576

  7. Rat-bite fever

    MedlinePLUS

    Streptobacillary fever; Streptobacillosis; Haverhill fever; Epidemic arthritic erythema; Spirillary fever; Sodoku ... Rat-bite fever can be caused by 2 different bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus. Both of these are found in ...

  8. Dengue fever (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, ... second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening illness.

  9. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, L.; Mekonnen, M. M.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a quickly growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of water footprint estimates to changes in important input variables and quantifies the size of uncertainty in water footprint estimates. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall) and blue (from irrigation) water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat in the Yellow River Basin in the period 1996-2005. A grid-based daily water balance model at a 5 by 5 arcmin resolution was applied to compute green and blue water footprints of the four crops in the Yellow River Basin in the period considered. The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis focused on the effects on water footprint estimates at basin level (in m3 t-1) of four key input variables: precipitation (PR), reference evapotranspiration (ET0), crop coefficient (Kc), and crop calendar. The one-at-a-time method was carried out to analyse the sensitivity of the water footprint of crops to fractional changes of individual input variables. Uncertainties in crop water footprint estimates were quantified through Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the water footprint of crops is most sensitive to ET0 and Kc, followed by crop calendar and PR. Blue water footprints were more sensitive to input variability than green water footprints. The smaller the annual blue water footprint, the higher its sensitivity to changes in PR, ET0, and Kc. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop due to combined uncertainties in climatic inputs (PR and ET0) were about ±20% (at 95% confidence interval). The effect of uncertainties in ET0 was dominant compared to that of precipitation. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop as a result of combined key input uncertainties were on average ±26% (at 95% confidence level). The sensitivities and uncertainties differ across crop types, with highest sensitivities and uncertainties for soybean.

  10. Q Fever myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzis, I; Dimoglou, G; Sachpekidis, V

    2008-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of Q fever infection are fever, productive cough, decrease in exercise tolerance and chills. Cardiovascular involvement is well recognized and usually presents as endocarditis and infection of an aneurysm or vascular graft. Myocarditis has only rarely been described as a manifestation of acute Q fever infection. In this report we describe a case of a young adult who presented with angina-like symptoms and ECG and biochemical markers indicative of acute coronary syndrome. The diagnosis of myocarditis was ultimately made based on the results of a normal coronary angiography and increased anti-Coxiella burnetii antibody titer. The patient has not developed dilated cardiomyopathy after two years of follow up. PMID:18923753

  11. Fever in a Visitor to Canada: a Case of Mistaken Identity

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Rachel; Ralevski, Filip; Rau, Neil; Boggild, Andrea K.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of babesiosis in a traveler from India who was diagnosed with malaria on the basis of blood smears. Pan-Plasmodium PCR was positive, though species-specific assays were negative. Reexamination of blood smears and Babesia-specific PCR confirmed babesiosis. We highlight the overlapping clinical and diagnostic features of malaria and babesiosis and the potential cross-reactivity of Plasmodium primers in cases of babesiosis. PMID:25762775

  12. Orchid Fever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    Exotic, captivating, and seductive, orchids have long fascinated plant lovers. They first attracted the attention of Westerners in the 17th century, when explorers brought back samples from South America and Asia. By the mid-1800s, orchid collecting had reached a fever pitch, not unlike that of the Dutch tulip craze of the 1630s, with rich (and…

  13. Fever of unknown origin: a case of post obstructive pneumonia complicating mature teratoma.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Gc; Nandan, D; Sen, A; Kanaujia, P

    2013-07-01

    Mediastinal teratomas are rare germ cell tumors in children accounting for only 4.3% of all germ cell tumours. Here, we describe a three year old child who was misdiagnosed as a case of pulmonary tuberculosis at periphery despite of his chest X ray showing large homogenous opacification of left hemithorax with areas of calcifications and subsequently diagnosed as a case of benign mature teratoma with post obstructive pneumonia. Our case highlights the need for careful evaluation of chest X-ray (CXR) by the treating physicians, especially when CXR had a large homogenous opacity with shifting of mediastinum and presence of a few calcified shadows, which may clinch a rare diagnosis of an uncommon disorder. PMID:24116336

  14. Durable Regression of Primary Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma Following Fever-inducing Mistletoe Treatment: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Lace, Aija; Fonseca, Maria P.; von Laue, Broder H.; Geider, Stefan; Kienle, Gunver S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mistletoe is a complementary cancer treatment that is widely used, usually in addition to and alongside recommended conventional cancer therapy. However, little is known about its use, effectiveness, and safety in the treatment of cutaneous lymphoma. Case Report: Two patients with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (pT2bcNxM0 follicle center and pT2ac-NxM0 marginal zone) either declined or postponed recommended conventional treatment and received high-dose, fever-inducing mistletoe treatment; a combination of intratumoral, subcutaneous, and intravenous application was given; and one patient also underwent whole-body hyperthermia. The lymphoma regressed over a period of 12 and 8 months, respectively, and after administration of a cumulative dose of 12.98 g and 4.63 g mistletoe extract, respectively. The patients are in remission to date, 3.5 years after commencement of treatment. Neither patient received conventional cancer treatment during the entire observation period. PMID:24278797

  15. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, L.; Mekonnen, M. M.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2014-06-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a fast-growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of and uncertainty in crop water footprint (in m3 t-1) estimates related to uncertainties in important input variables. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall) and blue (from irrigation) water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat at the scale of the Yellow River basin in the period 1996-2005. A grid-based daily water balance model at a 5 by 5 arcmin resolution was applied to compute green and blue water footprints of the four crops in the Yellow River basin in the period considered. The one-at-a-time method was carried out to analyse the sensitivity of the crop water footprint to fractional changes of seven individual input variables and parameters: precipitation (PR), reference evapotranspiration (ET0), crop coefficient (Kc), crop calendar (planting date with constant growing degree days), soil water content at field capacity (Smax), yield response factor (Ky) and maximum yield (Ym). Uncertainties in crop water footprint estimates related to uncertainties in four key input variables: PR, ET0, Kc, and crop calendar were quantified through Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the sensitivities and uncertainties differ across crop types. In general, the water footprint of crops is most sensitive to ET0 and Kc, followed by the crop calendar. Blue water footprints were more sensitive to input variability than green water footprints. The smaller the annual blue water footprint is, the higher its sensitivity to changes in PR, ET0, and Kc. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop due to combined uncertainties in climatic inputs (PR and ET0) were about ±20% (at 95% confidence interval). The effect of uncertainties in ET0was dominant compared to that of PR. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop as a result of combined key input uncertainties were on average ±30% (at 95% confidence level).

  16. Quantitative plant resistance in cultivar mixtures: wheat yellow rust as a modeling case study.

    PubMed

    Sapoukhina, Natalia; Paillard, Sophie; Dedryver, Françoise; de Vallavieille-Pope, Claude

    2013-11-01

    Unlike qualitative plant resistance, which confers immunity to disease, quantitative resistance confers only a reduction in disease severity and this can be nonspecific. Consequently, the outcome of its deployment in cultivar mixtures is not easy to predict, as on the one hand it may reduce the heterogeneity of the mixture, but on the other it may induce competition between nonspecialized strains of the pathogen. To clarify the principles for the successful use of quantitative plant resistance in disease management, we built a parsimonious model describing the dynamics of competing pathogen strains spreading through a mixture of cultivars carrying nonspecific quantitative resistance. Using the parameterized model for a wheat-yellow rust system, we demonstrate that a more effective use of quantitative resistance in mixtures involves reinforcing the effect of the highly resistant cultivars rather than replacing them. We highlight the fact that the judicious deployment of the quantitative resistance in two- or three-component mixtures makes it possible to reduce disease severity using only small proportions of the highly resistant cultivar. Our results provide insights into the effects on pathogen dynamics of deploying quantitative plant resistance, and can provide guidance for choosing appropriate associations of cultivars and optimizing diversification strategies. PMID:23875842

  17. [Q fever].

    PubMed

    Kalinová, Zuzana; Dorko, Erik; Cisláková, Lýdia

    2007-06-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is a Gram negative coccobacillus. It resides and replicates in the host s monocytes and macrophages. The developmental cycle of C. burnetii includes macrocellular and microcellular forms and the formation of spore-like bodies. It undergoes a phase variation of outer cell surface antigens from virulent phase I to avirulent phase II after passaging in the yolk sac of embryonated chicken eggs or in cell cultures. C. burnetii belongs to the most resistant bacteria. The main reservoirs of C. burnetii are cattle, sheep and goats. Human Q fever usually results from inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Acute infection mostly takes the course of a flu-like disease, atypical pneumonia or hepatitis, the chronic form resembles endocarditis. Laboratory examinations are based on the presence of antibodies. The drugs of choice are broad-spectrum antibiotics. PMID:17703401

  18. Q Fever.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Mark W

    2015-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic disease found throughout the world. It is caused by the intracellular gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Infection by C. burnetii occurs primarily by inhalation of the aerosolized bacteria from birthing animals or contaminated dust. The bacterium is very resistant to drying and heat, and is considered highly endemic in the Middle East, where it is likely underdiagnosed. Special Operations Forces medical providers should be aware of this disease, which must be in the differential diagnosis of a patient who has a history of fever, elevated liver enzymes, pneumonia in its acute form, and endocarditis, especially in those with existing valvular heart disease in its chronic form. PMID:26125173

  19. Sequencing and phylogenetic characterisation of a fatal Crimean - Congo haemorrhagic fever case imported into the United Kingdom, October 2012.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, B; Latham, J; Chamberlain, J; Logue, C; O'Donoghue, L; Osborne, J; Carson, G; Brooks, T; Carroll, M; Jacobs, M; Hopkins, S; Hewson, R

    2012-01-01

    A patient with fever, and haemorrhagic symptoms was admitted to a hospital in Glasgow on 2 October 2012. Since he had returned from Afghanistan, serum samples were sent for diagnosis at the Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory, where a real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR diagnosis of Crimean – Congo haemorrhagic fever was made within 3 hrs after receipt of the sample. Hereafter the patient was transferred to a high-security infectious diseases unit in London but died on 6 October. PMID:23218389

  20. Use of retailer fidelity card schemes in the assessment of food additive intake: Sunset Yellow a case study.

    PubMed

    Sardi, M; Haldemann, Y; Nordmann, H; Bottex, B; Safford, B; Smith, B; Tennant, D; Howlett, J; Jasti, P R

    2010-11-01

    The feasibility of using a retailer fidelity card scheme to estimate food additive intake was investigated using the Swiss retailer MIGROS's Cumulus Card and the example of the food colour Sunset Yellow (E 110). Information held within the card scheme was used to identify a sample of households purchasing foods containing Sunset Yellow over a 15 day period. A sample of 1204 households was selected for interview, of which 830 households were retained in the study following interview. Interviews were conducted to establish household structure, patterns of consumption by different individuals within the household, and the proportion of foods containing Sunset Yellow habitually purchased at the retailer and/or consumed outside the home. Information provided by the retailer on levels of Sunset Yellow in the foods was combined with the information obtained at interview to calculate the per-capita intake of Sunset Yellow by members of participating households. More than 99% of consumers (n = 1902) of foods containing Sunset Yellow were estimated to consume less than 1 mg Sunset Yellow kg(-1) body weight day(-1). The method proved to be a simple and resource-efficient approach to estimate food additive intake on the basis of actual consumer behaviour and thus reports results more closely related to the actual consumption of foods by individuals. PMID:20672203

  1. Chronic Q Fever in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Karakousis, Petros C.; Trucksis, Michele; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Infections due to Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, are uncommon in the United States. Cases of chronic Q fever are extremely rare and most often manifest as culture-negative endocarditis in patients with underlying valvular heart disease. We describe a 31-year-old farmer from West Virginia with a history of congenital heart disease and recurrent fevers for 14 months who was diagnosed with Q fever endocarditis based on an extremely high antibody titer against Coxiella burnetii phase I antigen. Despite treatment with doxycycline, he continued to have markedly elevated Coxiella burnetii phase I antibody titers for 10 years after the initial diagnosis. To our knowledge, this case represents the longest follow-up period for a patient with chronic Q fever in the United States. We review all cases of chronic Q fever reported in the United States and discuss important issues pertaining to epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of this disease. PMID:16757641

  2. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever A male cayenne tick, Amblyomma cajennense, ... carrier of Rickettsia rickettsii bacteria, which cause Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Credit: CDC Rocky Mountain spotted fever ...

  3. Cholestatic presentation of yellow phosphorus poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, C P; Goel, Amit; Basu, Debdatta

    2014-01-01

    Yellow phosphorus, a component of certain pesticide pastes and fireworks, is well known to cause hepatotoxicity. Poisoning with yellow phosphorus classically manifests with acute hepatitis leading to acute liver failure which may need liver transplantation. We present a case of yellow phosphorus poisoning in which a patient presented with florid clinical features of cholestasis highlighting the fact that cholestasis can rarely be a presenting feature of yellow phosphorus hepatotoxicity. PMID:24554916

  4. [Dengue as haemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Olszy?ska-Krowicka, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is distributed in tropical and subtropical regions and transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. In September 2010 two cases of indigenous dengue fever were diagnosed in metropolitan France for the first time and next DENV infection was diagnosed in a German traveler returning from a trip to Croatia. The Aedes albopictus mosquitoes were found in several European countries (for example in greenhouses in Netherlands). The indigenous DENV infections in Europe are rare diseases, probably acquired after bites of infected mosquitoes imported by airplanes from endemic areas. Nonspecific symptoms including: fever (up to 39 degrees C), chills, arthralagia, headache, myalgia and abnormalities in laboratory tests such as: thrombocytopaenia, leukopaenia and liver tests cause problems with differential diagnosis ofhematologic and hepatologic syndromes. The most serious complications are associated with dengue shock syndrome with mortality rate of 50%. PMID:22390040

  5. Mevalonate kinase deficiency (hyper IgD syndrome with periodic fever)--different faces with separate treatments: two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gençp?nar, P?nar; Makay, Balahan B; Gattorno, Marco; Caroli, Francesco; Ünsal, Erbil

    2012-01-01

    The hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome (HIDS), so-called mevalonate kinase deficiency, is caused by recessive mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase enzyme. HIDS is characterized by recurrent fever attacks of 3-7 days that begin in infancy and recur every 4-6 weeks. The febrile period is accompanied by lymphadenopathy, arthralgia, abdominal pain, diarrhea, aphthous ulcers, and varying degree of skin involvement. The course and severity of the disease may be quite different. There is no effective or proven therapy for HIDS. We report two cases with HIDS, which had separate clinical findings and treatment strategies. PMID:23692791

  6. Clinical Profile of Concurrent Dengue Fever and Plasmodium vivax Malaria in the Brazilian Amazon: Case Series of 11 Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Belisa M. L.; Alexandre, Márcia A. A.; Siqueira, André M.; Melo, Gisely C.; Gimaque, João B. L.; Bastos, Michele S.; Figueiredo, Regina M. P.; Carvalho, Ricardo C.; Tavares, Michel A.; Naveca, Felipe G.; Alonso, Pedro; Bassat, Quique; Lacerda, Marcus V. G.; Mourão, Maria P. G.

    2012-01-01

    Malaria and dengue fever are the most prevalent vector-borne diseases worldwide. This study aims to describe the clinical profile of patients with molecular diagnosis of concurrent malaria and dengue fever in a tropical-endemic area. Eleven patients with concurrent dengue virus (DENV) and Plasmodium vivax infection are reported. Similar frequencies of DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4 were found, including DENV-3/DENV-4 co-infection. In eight patients, the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for severe malaria could be fulfilled (jaundice being the most common). Only one patient met severe dengue criteria, but warning signs were present in 10. Syndromic surveillance systems must be ready to identify this condition to avoid misinterpretation of severity attributed to a single disease. PMID:23033396

  7. Psychological stress contributed to the development of low-grade fever in a patient with chronic fatigue syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low-grade fever is a common symptom in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but the mechanisms responsible for its development are poorly understood. We submit this case report that suggests that psychological stress contributes to low-grade fever in CFS. Case presentation A 26-year-old female nurse with CFS was admitted to our hospital. She had been recording her axillary temperature regularly and found that it was especially high when she felt stress at work. To assess how psychological stress affects temperature and to investigate the possible mechanisms for this hyperthermia, we conducted a 60-minute stress interview and observed the changes in the following parameters: axillary temperature, fingertip temperature, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, plasma catecholamine levels, and serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1? and IL-6 (pyretic cytokines), tumor necrosis factor-? and IL-10 (antipyretic cytokines). The stress interview consisted of recalling and talking about stressful events. Her axillary temperature at baseline was 37.2°C, increasing to 38.2°C by the end of the interview. In contrast, her fingertip temperature decreased during the interview. Her heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and plasma levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline increased during the interview; there were no significant changes in either pyretic or antipyretic cytokines during or after the interview. Conclusions A stress interview induced a 1.0°C increase in axillary temperature in a CFS patient. Negative emotion-associated sympathetic activation, rather than pyretic cytokine production, contributed to the increase in temperature induced by the stress interview. This suggests that psychological stress may contribute to the development or the exacerbation of low-grade fever in some CFS patients. PMID:23497734

  8. Q fever and spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Quijada, S G; Terán, B M; Murias, P S; Anitua, A A; Cermeño, J L B; Frías, A B

    2012-06-01

    Q fever, caused by Coxiella burnetii, may result in abortions in infected animals and pregnant women. However, the role that Q fever plays in spontaneous abortions is still unknown. This study examined the association between Q fever serology and abortion in a region where Q fever is endemic. A case-control population-based study was conducted in General Yagüe Hospital (Burgos area, Spain) between June 2009 and July 2010. A total of 801 samples from 500 pregnant women were tested, of whom 273 had a spontaneous abortion and 227 gave birth. IgG and IgM antibody titres against Q fever were determined in their two phases (I and II) by immunofluorescence assay. Seropositivity (phase I IgG ?1:16 or phase II IgG ?1:80) was detected in 88/273 (32.2%) cases and 53/227 (23.3%) controls; p <0.01, OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.3. Seropositivity for both phases of IgG, compatible with recent or persistent infection, was detected in 55 (20.1%) vs 22 (9.7%); p <0.001, OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-3.9. High phase II IgG antibodies compatible with active or recent infection (titres ?1:160) were detected in 27 (9.6%) vs 7 (3.1%); p <0.002, OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.4-8.0, respectively. Q fever was diagnosed in 14 (5.1%) cases. The risk of abortion associated with serological markers of active or recent Q fever in pregnant women was measurable and noticeable in this population, and accounted for 12% (95% CI 4-21%). PMID:22471505

  9. SPOTTED FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, Henry; Hass, George M.

    1937-01-01

    Comparative studies were made of the microorganisms present in D. variabilis ticks, some of which served as a control series while the remainder were exposed to infection with D. rickettsi and thereafter maintained under various conditions. All female ticks contained in their ovaries a coccoid intracellular microorganism. About 50 per cent of all ticks after refeeding contained rickettsia-like microorganisms in variable numbers in nearly all organs. The groups of ticks exposed to infection with the virus of spotted fever, in addition to the above mentioned microorganisms, usually harbored large numbers of D. rickettsi, distinguishable with certainty from the non-pathogenic organisms only by their localization in nuclei of tick cells. No influence upon the size, number, or distribution of either the non-pathogenic rickettsiae or D. rickettsi in ticks was attributable to refeeding, variations of the temperature of incubation, or variations of the length of the period of incubation. We conclude from the results of these studies that the non-pathogenic rickettsiae which occur in D. variabilis ticks have no well defined relationship to D. rickettsi since they differ from the latter organism not only in the absence of virulence and immunizing properties, but also in their distribution in tick tissues and inability to multiply in the nuclei of cells. PMID:19870694

  10. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or...

  11. Staphylococcal enterotoxins in scarlet fever complicating chickenpox.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, M. G.; Bannister, B. A.

    1991-01-01

    Two cases of scarlet fever are described, both following super-infection of chickenpox. Enterotoxin B and C producing staphylococci were the only pathogens identified. The role of staphylococcal and streptococcal toxins in the pathogenesis of scarlet fever and toxic shock syndrome is discussed. PMID:1775408

  12. A rare case of fever of unknown origin: subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL).

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Yadala; Yadala, Vivek; Reddy, Indukuru Subbarayalu; De Padua, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with high-grade fever, chills, productive cough and episodic abdominal pain of 6?months duration. Physical examination revealed that the patient was febrile and had multiple, ill-defined, tender, indurated, erythematous nodules and plaques over the trunk and thighs. Systemic examination and investigations revealed bilateral exudative pleural effusion with an increased adenosine deaminase (ADA) level. Pulmonary tuberculosis was suspected and the patient was started on a standard four-drug antitubercular regimen. Since his fever persisted, biopsy of the plaque over the trunk was performed, which showed lobular panniculitis with atypical lymphoid cells. Immunohistochemistry showed atypical lymphoid cells, which were CD3 and CD8 positive and CD4 negative. Based on the clinical features, skin biopsy and immunohistochemistry, the diagnosis of subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma was made. The patient was treated with chemotherapy followed by bone marrow transplantation, and 4-year follow-up showed complete remission of lymphoma. PMID:26290563

  13. [Autoinflammatory syndromes/fever syndromes].

    PubMed

    Schedel, J; Bach, B; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Kötter, I

    2011-05-01

    Hereditary periodic (fever) syndromes, also called autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by relapsing fever and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, or joint symptoms. Some of these disorders present with organ involvement and serological signs of inflammation without fever. There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (SAA), resulting in an increased risk of secondary amyloidosis. There are monogenic disorders (familial mediterranean fever (FMF), hyper-IgD-syndrome (HIDS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), "pyogenic arthritis, acne, pyoderma gangrenosum" (PAPA), and "pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA) where mutations in genes have been described, which in part by influencing the function of the inflammasome, in part by other means, lead to the induction of the production of IL-1?. In "early-onset of enterocolitis (IBD)", a functional IL-10 receptor is lacking. Therapeutically, above all, the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra is used. In case of TRAPS and PGA, TNF-antagonists (etanercept) may also be used; in FMF colchicine is first choice. As additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis), Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet disease, gout, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and Crohn's disease also are mentioned. PMID:21541834

  14. Familial Mediterranean fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recurrent polyserositis; Benign paroxysmal peritonitis; Periodic disease; Periodic fever; FMF ... Familial Mediterranean fever is most often caused by a mutation in the MEFV gene. This gene creates proteins involved in inflammation. ...

  15. Hay Fever Medications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... MD, FAAAAI Seasonal allergic rhinitis known as hay fever symptoms range from being mildly annoying to seriously ... of your mouth, throat, eyes or ears. Hay fever symptoms are most often triggered by tree pollen ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Conditions Genes Chromosomes Handbook Glossary Resources Conditions > Fever Related topics on Genetics Home Reference: cold-induced sweating syndrome familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome familial Mediterranean fever mevalonate kinase deficiency Muckle-Wells syndrome Nakajo-Nishimura ...

  17. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePLUS

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease caused by a type of bacteria carried by ticks. ... Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii (R. Rickettsii) , which is carried by ticks. The ...

  18. Colorado tick fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... often start 3 to 6 days after the tick bite. A sudden fever continues for 3 days, goes ... Meagher KE, Decker CF. Other tick-borne illnesses: tularemia, Colorado tick fever, tick paralysis. Dis Mon . 2012; ...

  19. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever Leading to Unnecessary Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Lovekesh; Singh, Mahendra; Saxena, Ashish; Kolhe, Yuvraj; Karande, Snehal K.; Singh, Narendra; Venkatesh, P.; Meena, Rambabu

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arbovirus illness with an estimated incidence of 50–100 million cases per year. The common symptoms of dengue include fever, rash, malaise, nausea, vomiting, and musculoskeletal pain. Dengue fever may present as acute abdomen leading to diagnostic dilemma. The acute surgical complications of dengue fever include acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis, nonspecific peritonitis, and acute appendicitis. We report a case of dengue fever that mimicked acute appendicitis leading to unnecessary appendectomy. A careful history examination for dengue-related signs, and serial hemogram over the first 3-4 days of disease may prevent unnecessary appendectomy. PMID:26167314

  20. Fever in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alexander K.C.; Robson, W. Lane M.

    1992-01-01

    Viral infections account for the majority of fevers in children. Occasionally, fever heralds a serious illness. The younger the child, the greater the likelihood of bacteremia. A careful clinical assessment will identify most serious illness. Clinical assessment can suggest the need for laboratory tests. If possible, the underlying cause of the fever should be treated. PMID:21221315

  1. Fever of unknown origin: subacute thyroiditis versus typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Thermidor, Marjorie; Mohan, Sowjanya; Valsamis, Ageliki S; Johnson, Diane H

    2005-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is not infrequently a diagnostic dilemma for clinicians. Common infectious causes include endocarditis and abscesses in adults, and noninfectious causes include neoplasms and certain collagen vascular diseases, for example, polymyalgia rheumatica, various vasculitides, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (adult Still's disease). Subacute thyroiditis is a rare cause of FUO. Among the infectious causes of FUO, typhoid fever is relatively uncommon. We present a case of FUO in a traveler returning from India whose initial complaints were that of left-sided neck pain and angle of the jaw pain, which initially suggested the diagnosis of subacute thyroiditis. After an extensive FUO workup, when typhoid fever is a likely diagnostic possibility, an empiric trial of anti- Salmonella therapy has diagnostic and therapeutic significance. The presence of relative bradycardia, and response to quinolone therapy, was the basis of the clinical diagnosis of typhoid fever as the explanation for this patients FUO. This case illustrates the diagnostic difficulties in assessing patients with FUO with few diagnostic findings. PMID:15761461

  2. Clinical and radiological features of imported chikungunya fever in Japan: a study of six cases at the National Center for Global Health and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yasutaka; Kato, Yasuyuki; Takeshita, Nozomi; Ujiie, Mugen; Kobayashi, Taiichiro; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kudo, Koichiro; Lim, Chang-Kweng; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2011-06-01

    Chikungunya fever (CHIKF) is currently distributed in Africa and in South and Southeast Asia; outbreaks have occurred periodically in the region over the past 50 years. After a large outbreak had occurred in countries in the western Indian Ocean region in 2005, several countries reported cases of CHIKF from travelers who had visited affected areas. In Japan, there have been only 15 cases of CHIKF patients so far, according to the National Institute of Infectious Diseases. Therefore, to evaluate the clinical and radiological features associated with the disease, we describe 6 imported cases of CHIKF. All of the patients had had prolonged arthralgia on admission to our hospital, and diagnosis was confirmed with specific antibodies by using an IgM-capture enzyme-linked immunoassay and a plaque reduction neutralizing antibody assay. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of one patient revealed erosive arthritis and tenosynovitis during the convalescence stage. Clinicians should be aware of the late consequences of infection by the chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and recognize the possible association of subacute and chronic arthritis features. In addition, competent vectors of CHIKV, Aedes aegypti, can now be found in many temperate areas of the eastern and western hemispheres, including Japan. This fact raises concern that the virus could be introduced and become established in these areas. This necessitates an increased awareness of the disease, because imported cases are likely to contribute to the spread of CHIKV infection wherever the competent mosquito vectors are distributed. PMID:20862507

  3. [A mild blackwater fever].

    PubMed

    Bouldouyre, M-A; Dia, D; Carmoi, T; Fall, K Ba; Chevalier, B; Debonne, J-M

    2006-06-01

    We report a highly probable case of moderately severe blackwater fever. A French woman, living in Guinea Bissau, was used to taking self-medication halofantrine for malaria. On this occasion, she felt unusual chills and pyrexia after a non documented bout of malaria, followed by nausea, then jaundice with dark-red urines despite another treatment with halofantrine. A sepsis was eliminated by two negatives thick peripheral blood drop examinations. Hemolysis was noted with 8.1 g/dl of hemoglobin, Coombs positive, and LDH at 1,452 IU/l, associated to renal failure with 34 ml per minute of clearance. The outcome was favourable with rehydration. Blackwater fever has been described with the three aminoalcohols, but mainly in severe presentations. Clinicians are not familiar with this disease, even though it has major therapeutic implications: quinine, halofantrine, and mefloquine become strictly contra-indicated. Moderate forms may be unknown, and this observation should be taken into account to prevent mistreatment in future patients. PMID:16806779

  4. Climate impacts on environmental risks evaluated from space: a conceptual approach to the case of Rift Valley Fever in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Tourre, Yves M.; Lacaux, Jean-Pierre; Vignolles, Cécile; Lafaye, Murielle

    2009-01-01

    Background Climate and environment vary across many spatio-temporal scales, including the concept of climate change, which impact on ecosystems, vector-borne diseases and public health worldwide. Objectives To develop a conceptual approach by mapping climatic and environmental conditions from space and studying their linkages with Rift Valley Fever (RVF) epidemics in Senegal. Design Ponds in which mosquitoes could thrive were identified from remote sensing using high-resolution SPOT-5 satellite images. Additional data on pond dynamics and rainfall events (obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) were combined with hydrological in-situ data. Localisation of vulnerable hosts such as penned cattle (from QuickBird satellite) were also used. Results Dynamic spatio-temporal distribution of Aedes vexans density (one of the main RVF vectors) is based on the total rainfall amount and ponds’ dynamics. While Zones Potentially Occupied by Mosquitoes are mapped, detailed risk areas, i.e. zones where hazards and vulnerability occur, are expressed in percentages of areas where cattle are potentially exposed to mosquitoes’ bites. Conclusions This new conceptual approach, using precise remote-sensing techniques, simply relies upon rainfall distribution also evaluated from space. It is meant to contribute to the implementation of operational early warning systems for RVF based on both natural and anthropogenic climatic and environmental changes. In a climate change context, this approach could also be applied to other vector-borne diseases and places worldwide. PMID:20052381

  5. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...inspector at the port of arrival. (b) Ruminant casings . The importation of casings, except stomachs, from ruminants that originated in or were processed...that were from a flock subject to a ruminant feed ban equivalent to the...

  6. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...inspector at the port of arrival. (b) Ruminant casings . The importation of casings, except stomachs, from ruminants that originated in or were processed...that were from a flock subject to a ruminant feed ban equivalent to the...

  7. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...inspector at the port of arrival. (b) Ruminant casings . The importation of casings, except stomachs, from ruminants that originated in or were processed...that were from a flock subject to a ruminant feed ban equivalent to the...

  8. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...inspector at the port of arrival. (b) Ruminant casings . The importation of casings, except stomachs, from ruminants that originated in or were processed...that were from a flock subject to a ruminant feed ban equivalent to the...

  9. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...inspector at the port of arrival. (b) Ruminant casings . The importation of casings, except stomachs, from ruminants that originated in or were processed...that were from a flock subject to a ruminant feed ban equivalent to the...

  10. Persistent fever, neck swelling, and small vessel vasculitis following tonsillectomy in a patient with Behçet’s disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Behçet’s disease commonly presents with recurrent oral and genital mucocutaneous ulcerations, uveitis and various skin manifestations. Other clinical symptoms include gastrointestinal ulcerations, arthritis, venous thrombosis, arterial aneurysms and central nervous system affection. Vasculitis underlies most clinical symptoms of Behçet’s disease. Case presentation We report the case of a 62-year-old European Caucasian woman with Behçet’s disease who presented with persistent fever and neck soft-tissue swelling, despite broad antibiotic treatment, two weeks after acute tonsillitis and a tonsillectomy. Diffuse epi- and mesopharyngeal swelling shown on a computed tomography scan of her neck and persistently elevated serum markers of inflammation initially prompted suspicion of an infectious etiology. Magnet resonance imaging of her neck and a neck tissue biopsy finally confirmed small vessel vasculitis involving skin, subcutaneous tissue and muscle. Considering the clinical presentation, past medical history and histological findings, we interpreted our patient’s symptoms as a flare of Behçet’s disease. Immunosuppressive treatment led to rapid clinical improvement. Conclusion A patient with Behçet’s disease developed small vessel vasculitis of the soft tissue of her neck after tonsillitis and a tonsillectomy. Infection and surgery probably triggered a flare of Behçet’s disease. PMID:23110825

  11. Plasma endotoxin in typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Suyasa, I G; Reka, I G; Inada, K; Suda, H; Kojima, M; Mushiaki, K; Okamoto, S; Yoshida, M

    1995-10-01

    Plasma endotoxin contents of the patients with sepsis or typhoid fever were measured by two sophisticated chromogenic limulus tests; Endospecy and Toxicolor tests. Endospecy test is the endotoxin-specific test and Toxicolor is responsible for both endotoxin and (1,3)-beta-D-glucan. Plasma was pretreated by our new PCA method which resolved the problem as to the detection of a lesser amount of plasma endotoxin when pretreated by the conventional PCA method. Although Toxicolor values have been reported to exceed more than the Endospecy value, under complicated pathophysiological situations, almost all specimens of these patients had a similar value, except in one expired septic shock case. In 18 typhoid fever cases, Salmonella typhi was isolated only from the bile in 5 cases, however endotoxemia occurred in 11 cases (61.1%). Within the first 4 days, the incidence of endotoxemia was higher (10/14, 71.4%). These results suggest that endotoxin assay seemed to be a useful tool for the diagnosis of typhoid fever. PMID:8929638

  12. Fever-induced type 1 Brugada pattern.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Marta; Caetano, Francisca; Providência, Rui; Almeida, Inês; Trigo, Joana; Nascimento, José; Costa, Marco; Leitão Marques, António

    2015-04-01

    Brugada syndrome, first described over 20 years ago, is characterized by a typical electrocardiographic pattern with coved-type ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads and a high risk of sudden death in otherwise healthy young adults. The electrocardiographic pattern is sometimes intermittent, and fever is a possible trigger. The authors present the case of a 68-year-old woman who came to the emergency department with fever and syncope. A diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia was made. The electrocardiogram performed when the patient had fever revealed a type 1 Brugada pattern, which disappeared after the fever subsided. After other causes of Brugada-like pattern were excluded, Brugada syndrome was diagnosed and a cardioverter-defibrillator was implanted. This case demonstrates that this entity can be diagnosed at more advanced ages and highlights the usefulness of electrocardiography in a febrile state. PMID:25843309

  13. Chronic Q Fever Diagnosis—Consensus Guideline versus Expert Opinion

    PubMed Central

    Wegdam-Blans, Marjolijn C.A.; Wever, Peter C.; Renders, Nicole H.M.; Delsing, Corine E.; Sprong, Tom; van Kasteren, Marjo E.E.; Bijlmer, Henk; Notermans, Daan; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik; Stals, Frans S.; Nabuurs-Franssen, Marrigje H.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Q fever, caused by Coxiella burnetii, has high mortality and morbidity rates if left untreated. Controversy about the diagnosis of this complex disease has emerged recently. We applied the guideline from the Dutch Q Fever Consensus Group and a set of diagnostic criteria proposed by Didier Raoult to all 284 chronic Q fever patients included in the Dutch National Chronic Q Fever Database during 2006–2012. Of the patients who had proven cases of chronic Q fever by the Dutch guideline, 46 (30.5%) would not have received a diagnosis by the alternative criteria designed by Raoult, and 14 (4.9%) would have been considered to have possible chronic Q fever. Six patients with proven chronic Q fever died of related causes. Until results from future studies are available, by which current guidelines can be modified, we believe that the Dutch literature-based consensus guideline is more sensitive and easier to use in clinical practice. PMID:26277798

  14. A Sporadic Case of Fabry Disease Involving Repeated Fever, Psychiatric Symptoms, Headache, and Ischemic Stroke in an Adult Japanese Woman.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Jun; Katayama, Takayuki; Kano, Kohei; Asanome, Asuka; Takahashi, Kae; Saito, Tsukasa; Chinda, Junko; Nakagawa, Naoki; Sato, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Takashi; Yahara, Osamu; Momosaki, Ken; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Hasebe, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease can cause various neurological manifestations. We describe the case of a Japanese woman with Fabry disease who presented with ischemic stroke, aseptic meningitis, and psychiatric symptoms. The patient had a mutation in intron 4 of her ?-galactosidase A gene, which was not detected in her family. This case suggests that Fabry disease should be considered in young patients who exhibit central nervous system symptoms such as ischemic stroke, even if there is no family history of the condition. The episodes of aseptic meningitis and stroke experienced by our patient suggest that persistent inflammation might be the mechanism underlying Fabry disease. PMID:26631895

  15. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Meat Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) and regulations under the Act (9 CFR, chapter III, part 327... Drug Administration at 21 CFR 589.2000 may be imported. (2) Casings that are derived from bovines that... Safety and Inspection Service at 9 CFR 310.22 and the Food and Drug Administration at 21 CFR 189.5....

  16. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... et seq.) and regulations under the Act (9 CFR, chapter III, part 327), including requirements that... Drug Administration at 21 CFR 589.2000 may be imported. (2) Casings that are derived from bovines that... Safety and Inspection Service at 9 CFR 310.22 and the Food and Drug Administration at 21 CFR 189.5....

  17. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... et seq.) and regulations under the Act (9 CFR, chapter III, part 327), including requirements that... Drug Administration at 21 CFR 589.2000 may be imported. (2) Casings that are derived from bovines that... Safety and Inspection Service at 9 CFR 310.22 and the Food and Drug Administration at 21 CFR 189.5....

  18. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... et seq.) and regulations under the Act (9 CFR, chapter III, part 327), including requirements that... Drug Administration at 21 CFR 589.2000 may be imported. (2) Casings that are derived from bovines that... Safety and Inspection Service at 9 CFR 310.22 and the Food and Drug Administration at 21 CFR 189.5....

  19. Fevers and the rheumatologist.

    PubMed

    Manners, Prudence Joan; Guttinger, Robin

    2010-10-01

    Fevers in children are mainly due to infection, malignancy or inflammatory conditions. Rheumatologists have an important role in the care of inflammatory conditions, many of which are associated with fevers. Seven conditions, the hereditary recurrent fever syndromes, have been defined with the presenting symptom of recurring fever, and for which mutation of a single gene has been defined: Chronic infantile neurological articular syndrome (CINCA), Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FACS), Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), hyperimmunoglobulinemia D (HIDS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), Pyogenic sterile arthritis and Pyoderma gangrenosum (PAPA) and Tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) . These conditions will be discussed in detail in regard to how they fit into the wider picture of pediatric rheumatological conditions, how the diagnoses may be established and the current recommended treatments for each condition. PMID:20953850

  20. Differentiation of Acute Q Fever from Other Infections in Patients Presenting to Hospitals, the Netherlands1

    PubMed Central

    Krijger, Elmer; Delsing, Corine E.; Sprong, Tom; Nabuurs-Franssen, Marrigje H.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating acute Q fever from infections caused by other pathogens is essential. We conducted a retrospective case–control study to evaluate differences in clinical signs, symptoms, and outcomes for 82 patients with acute Q fever and 52 control patients who had pneumonia, fever and lower respiratory tract symptoms, or fever and hepatitis, but had negative serologic results for Q fever. Patients with acute Q fever were younger and had higher C-reactive protein levels but lower leukocyte counts. However, a large overlap was found. In patients with an indication for prophylaxis, chronic Q fever did not develop after patients received prophylaxis but did develop in 50% of patients who did not receive prophylaxis. Differentiating acute Q fever from other respiratory infections, fever, or hepatitis is not possible without serologic testing or PCR. If risk factors for chronic Q fever are present, prophylactic treatment is advised. PMID:26196955

  1. Unusual increase in reported cases of paratyphoid A fever among travellers returning from Cambodia, January to September 2013.

    PubMed

    Tourdjman, M; Le Hello, S; Gossner, C; Delmas, G; Tubiana, S; Fabre, L; Kerléguer, A; Tarantola, A; Fruth, A; Friesema, I; Thorstensen Brandal, L; Lawrence, J; Fisher, I; Dufour, M; Weill, F X; de Valk, H

    2013-01-01

    From January to September 2013, a marked increase in notifications of Salmonella Paratyphi A infections among travellers returning from Cambodia occurred in France. An investigation revealed 35 cases without a common source: 21 in France, five in Germany, three in the Netherlands, one in Norway, one in the United Kingdom, four in New-Zealand. Data suggest an ongoing event that should trigger further investigation. Travellers to Cambodia should observe preventive measures including good personal hygiene and food handling practices. PMID:24094059

  2. High household economic burden caused by hospitalization of patients with severe dengue fever cases in Can Tho province, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tam, Pham Thi; Dat, Nguyen Tan; Huu, Le Minh; Thi, Xuan Cuc Pham; Duc, Hoang Minh; Tu, Tran Cong; Kutcher, Simon; Ryan, Peter A; Kay, Brian H

    2012-09-01

    During 2006-2007, a cohort of 144 confirmed dengue cases in Can Tho Province, Vietnam were compared with a matching set of 144 households that had no dengue cases. Approximately 6-9 months after sickness, there were no significant differences in terms of knowledge of the etiology of dengue, mosquito breeding habitats, and prevention measures in respondents from both sets of households. There was also no difference in the abundance of Aedes aegypti (Linn.) adults but the average numbers of late instar and pupal Ae. aegypti per household were greater in the negative control houses. Thus, the risk seemed to be no higher in case households, although it is conceivable that changes may have occurred in either group over the intervening period. The average cost for a dengue patient was 2,798,000 Vietnamese Dong (VND) (US$167.77), 2,154,000 VND for direct costs, and 644,000 VND for indirect costs. There was a 22% difference in cost for those with and without health insurance. In terms of impact on family economies, 47.2% had to borrow money for treatment, and after 6 months, 71.7% had not begun or had only managed part repayments. Approximately 72.9% indicated that the cost of supporting a dengue patient had impacted on the family economy, with the loss averaging 36% of the annual income in the lowest economic quartile. PMID:22826478

  3. Airborne Dust Models in Valley Fever Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, W. A.; Galgiani, J. N.; Vujadinovic, M.; Pejanovic, G.; Vukovic, A. J.; Prasad, A. K.; Djurdjevic, V.; Nickovic, S.

    2011-12-01

    Dust storms (haboobs) struck Phoenix, Arizona, in 2011 on July 5th and again on July 18th. One potential consequence: an estimated 3,600 new cases of Valley Fever in Maricopa County from the first storm alone. The fungi, Coccidioides immitis, the cause of the respiratory infection, Valley Fever, lives in the dry desert soils of the American southwest and southward through Mexico, Central America and South America. The fungi become part of the dust storm and, a few weeks after inhalation, symptoms of Valley Fever may appear, including pneumonia-like illness, rashes, and severe fatigue. Some fatalities occur. Our airborne dust forecast system predicted the timing and extent of the storm, as it has done with other, often different, dust events. Atmosphere/land surface models can be part of public health services to reduce risk of Valley Fever and exacerbation of other respiratory and cardiovascular illness.

  4. Drug fever caused by propofol in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Yatabe, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Koichi; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have reported that fever is caused by intravenous sedative drugs even though these agents are widely used. We present a case of propofol-induced drug fever. A 57-year-old woman underwent hepatic segmentectomy. Although she was diagnosed with type I glycogen storage disease when in her twenties, her liver function was normal. As the operative hemorrhage was high, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU). Her temperature at ICU admission was 35.8 °C, and sedation with propofol and dexmedetomidine was initiated. Two hours after admission to the ICU, the patient had a fever of 38-39.5 °C. Remittent fever persisted until day 5 after surgery. Because of her persistent fever, pneumonia was suspected and antibiotics were initiated on day 4 after surgery. As the fever persisted after the initiation of antibiotics, drug fever was suspected. On day 5 after surgery, propofol infusion was discontinued and the patient was extubated. Her temperature of 37.7 °C at the discontinuation of propofol infusion, and rapidly decreased to 36.1 °C in the following 3 h. Propofol-induced drug fever must be considered in cases of fever of unknown origin when patients receive propofol and appear inappropriately well for the degree of fever that they have. PMID:25801543

  5. Groundwater flow and geochemistry in the lower reaches of the Yellow River: a case study in Shandang Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. Y.; Tang, C. Y.; Sakura, Y.; Kondoh, A.; Shen, Y. J.

    2002-08-01

    Water samples were collected from the Yellow River and from wells for chemical and isotopic measurement in the counties of Yucheng and Qihe, to which 6-9×108 m3 of water is diverted annually from the Yellow River. A zone of high electrical conductivity (EC) in groundwater corresponds well on the regional scale with a ridge in groundwater level, which is the main flow path through the region, but has a low gradient. The zone of highest EC along this ridge occurs at a position with the lowest ground altitude in the study area. The unique characteristic of the groundwater is the linear relationship among the principal anions as the result of mixing. The mixing effect is confirmed by its isotopic signature, which was then used to calculate the contributions from three sources: rainfall, old water, and diverted water with an average mixing rate of 18, 17, and 65%, respectively. As an indicator of water movement, Cl- content varies across a wide range in the profile from 30-10 m with a maximum concentration at about 1.2 m depth. Concentrations are relatively stable at about 2 m, which is the average boundary of the saturated and unsaturated zone. The water from the Yellow River has proved to be dominant in mixing in the aquifer in terms of groundwater flow and geochemistry. Résumé. En vue d'analyses chimiques et isotopiques, des échantillons d'eau ont été prélevés sur le Fleuve Jaune et dans des puits des comtés de Yucheng et Qihe, où l'on prélève sur le fleuve 6-9×108 m3. Une zone de forte conductivité électrique dans la nappe correspond bien, à l'échelle régionale, avec une crête piézométrique liée au principal canal traversant la région, mais avec une faible pente. La zone de plus fortes conductivités le long de cette crête se situe là où l'altitude est la plus basse dans la région. La caractéristique remarquable de la nappe est la relation linéaire entre les principaux anions, résultant d'un mélange. L'effet de mélange est confirmé par la signature isotopique, qui a alors été utilisée pour calculer les contributions des trois sources: la pluie, l'eau ancienne et l'eau prélevée dans le fleuve, avec un taux moyen de mélange respectivement de 18, 17 et 65%. Comme indicateur de l'écoulement de l'eau, la concentration en Cl- varie dans une large gamme, dans un profil de 30 cm à 10 m en profondeur, avec une concentration maximale à une profondeur d'environ 1,2 m. Les concentrations sont relativement stables à partir de 2 m, profondeur de la limite entre les zones non saturée et saturée. On a ainsi montré que l'eau du Fleuve Jaune est prédominante dans le mélange, au sein de l'aquifère en termes d'écoulement de la nappe et de composition chimique. Resumen. Se ha recogido muestras de agua del Río Amarillo y de pozos para obtener medidas químicas e isotópicas en los condados de Yucheng y Qihe, que se abastecen con 6-9×108 m3 anuales de aguas de dicho río. Hay una zona de conductividad eléctrica (CE) elevada en las aguas subterráneas, la cual se corresponde bien a escala regional con una divisoria en el nivel piezométrico que representa la vía principal de flujo a través de la región, pero con un gradiente bajo. La zona de mayor CE a lo largo de la divisoria está localizada en el punto con la menor cota topográfica en el ámbito de estudio. La característica principal de las aguas subterráneas es la relación lineal que existe entre los aniones principales como resultado de un proceso de mezcla. Este efecto se confirma mediante la huella isotópica, que se utilizó para calcular las contribuciones de tres orígenes distintos: precipitación, aguas antiguas y aguas derivadas del río, obteniéndose porcentajes respectivos del 18, 17, y 65%. Como trazador del agua, la concentración de cloruro varía ampliamente en el perfil del suelo de 0,3-10 m, con un máximo a una profundidad aproximada de 1,2 m. Las concentraciones son relativamente estables hacia 2 m de profundidad, que es la cota promedio del nivel freático. El agua del Río Amarillo domina en la mezcla de aguas

  6. [A Case of Dengue Fever and Subsequent Long-lasting Depression Accompanied by Alopecia in a Japanese Traveler Returning from Bali, Indonesia].

    PubMed

    Hitani, Akihiro; Yamaya, Waka; To, Masako; Kano, Ichino; Honda-Hosono, Natsue; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Haruki, Kosuke

    2015-03-01

    Recovery from dengue fever is generally rapid and uneventful. However, recuperation is often prolonged and may be accompanied by noticeable depression. We present herein on a traveler to Indonesia who developed long-lasting depression after the classic symptoms of dengue fever such as fever, arthralgia, and macropapular rash had resolved. A previously healthy 42-year old japanese woman presented to the Travel Clinic of Seirei Yokohama Hospital with complaints of 4 days of fever, joint aches, bone pain, and a macropapular rash on her torso. She had returned from Bali 5 days previously. During her 1-week stay, one day was spent in rural, mountainous areas where she was exposed to several mosquito bites. The 1st serum sample collected 4 days after the disease onset gave positive result in the rapid dengue IgM antibody test and the rapid dengue NS1 antigen immunechromatographic test. The DENV-1 genome was detected with RT-PCR. Her 13-year old son, who had accompanied her, was also diagnosed as having dengue fever and he recovered without event. The Above-mentioned symptoms resolved within one week. However, the patient suffered from prolonged depression. She also noticed loss of hair 3 months after the disease onset Administration of a Serotonin-Noradrenalin Reuptake Inhibitor and a minor tranquillizer required to allow her requied to lead a normal life. Although she gradually felt better, it took approximately 2 years until she had recovered completely without taking any antidepressant and minor tranquillizer. It is a well-known fact in endemic countries that dengue fever could have an significant impact on the patients' mental well-being. However, it appears that physicians in non-endemic countries are not fully aware of the prolonged depression, which can occur subsequent to the acute illness. Follow-up consultations of returing travelers who have recoverd from dengu fever should be arranged to monitor their mental and emotional states closely. PMID:26552127

  7. Tropical fevers: Management guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Sunit; Chaudhary, Dhruva; Varghese, George M.; Bhalla, Ashish; Karthi, N.; Kalantri, S.; Peter, J. V.; Mishra, Rajesh; Bhagchandani, Rajesh; Munjal, M.; Chugh, T. D.; Rungta, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Tropical fevers were defined as infections that are prevalent in, or are unique to tropical and subtropical regions. Some of these occur throughout the year and some especially in rainy and post-rainy season. Concerned about high prevalence and morbidity and mortality caused by these infections, and overlapping clinical presentations, difficulties in arriving at specific diagnoses and need for early empiric treatment, Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine (ISCCM) constituted an expert committee to develop a consensus statement and guidelines for management of these diseases in the emergency and critical care. The committee decided to focus on most common infections on the basis of available epidemiologic data from India and overall experience of the group. These included dengue hemorrhagic fever, rickettsial infections/scrub typhus, malaria (usually falciparum), typhoid, and leptospira bacterial sepsis and common viral infections like influenza. The committee recommends a ‘syndromic approach’ to diagnosis and treatment of critical tropical infections and has identified five major clinical syndromes: undifferentiated fever, fever with rash / thrombocytopenia, fever with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), fever with encephalopathy and fever with multi organ dysfunction syndrome. Evidence based algorithms are presented to guide critical care specialists to choose reliable rapid diagnostic modalities and early empiric therapy based on clinical syndromes. PMID:24678147

  8. Yellow nails, lymphedema and chronic cough: Yellow nail syndrome in an eight-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Ishita; Hughes, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Yellow nail syndrome is a rare disease and reported mainly in adults. A case of yellow nail syndrome involving an eight-year-old girl with associated discoloured yellowish nails on the fingers and toes, lymphedema and chronic cough, and sputum production is reported. PMID:22332131

  9. Autochthonous Dengue Fever, Tokyo, Japan, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yasuyuki; Moi, Meng Ling; Kotaki, Akira; Ota, Masayuki; Shinohara, Koh; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Yamamoto, Kei; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Mawatari, Momoko; Sato, Tastuya; Kunimatsu, Junwa; Takeshita, Nozomi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Ohmagari, Norio

    2015-01-01

    After 70 years with no confirmed autochthonous cases of dengue fever in Japan, 19 cases were reported during August–September 2014. Dengue virus serotype 1 was detected in 18 patients. Phylogenetic analysis of the envelope protein genome sequence from 3 patients revealed 100% identity with the strain from the first patient (2014) in Japan. PMID:25695200

  10. [Metal fume fever, an almost forgotten disease].

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Y; Cantin, D; Le Guerroué, G; Pourriat, J-L

    2010-05-01

    Metal fume fever is an ancient and almost forgotten occupational disease found among welders. Diagnosis is made difficult by the frequency and the non-specific flue-like symptomatology. We present the cases of three patients admitted for developing the symptoms after being exposed to welding fumes. Treatment was symptom based. Severe cases have been described after exposure to military fumes. PMID:20378299

  11. Fatal Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Dumler, J. Stephen; Mafra, Cláudio Lísias; Calic, Simone Berger; Chamone, Chequer Buffe; Filho, Gracco Cesarino; Olano, Juan Pablo; Walker, David H.

    2003-01-01

    The emergence and reemergence of a serious infectious disease are often associated with a high case-fatality rate because of misdiagnosis and inappropriate or delayed treatment. The current reemergence of spotted fever rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia rickettsii in Brazil has resulted in a high proportion of fatal cases. We describe two familial clusters of Brazilian spotted fever in the state of Minas Gerais, involving six children 9 months to 15 years of age; five died. Immunohistochemical investigation of tissues obtained at necropsy of a child in each location, Novo Cruzeiro and Coronel Fabriciano municipalities, established the diagnosis by demonstration of disseminated endothelial infection with spotted fever group rickettsiae. The diagnosis in the two fatal cases from Coronel Fabriciano and the surviving patient from Novo Cruzeiro was further supported by immunofluorescence serologic tests. PMID:14718082

  12. Kid's Guide to Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Games Kids' Medical Dictionary En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Girls and Puberty Boys and Puberty ... System How the Body Works Main Page A Kid's Guide to Fever KidsHealth > Kids > Illnesses & Injuries > I ...

  13. Q Fever Subunit Vaccine 

    E-print Network

    Cowen, Caitlyn

    2014-12-12

    Q fever is a globally important zoonotic infection caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Since C. burnetii is both an occupational hazard to humans interacting with naturally infected animals and a potential biothreat...

  14. [Chikungunya fever - A new global threat].

    PubMed

    Montero, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    The recent onset of epidemics caused by viruses such as Ebola, Marburg, Nipah, Lassa, coronavirus, West-Nile encephalitis, Saint Louis encephalitis, human immunodeficiency virus, dengue, yellow fever and Venezuelan hemorrhagic fever alerts about the risk these agents represent for the global health. Chikungunya virus represents a new threat. Surged from remote African regions, this virus has become endemic in the Indic ocean basin, the Indian subcontinent and the southeast of Asia, causing serious epidemics in Africa, Indic Ocean Islands, Asia and Europe. Due to their epidemiological and biological features and the global presence of their vectors, chikungunya represents a serious menace and could become endemic in the Americas. Although chikungunya infection has a low mortality rate, its high attack ratio may collapse the health system during epidemics affecting a sensitive population. In this paper, we review the clinical and epidemiological features of chikungunya fever as well as the risk of its introduction into the Americas. We remark the importance of the epidemiological control and mosquitoes fighting in order to prevent this disease from being introduced into the Americas. PMID:25087211

  15. Genetic Identification of Rickettsial Isolates from Fatal Cases of Brazilian Spotted Fever and Comparison with Rickettsia rickettsii Isolates from the American Continents

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fabiana C. P.; Ogrzewalska, Maria; Nascimento, Elvira M. M.; Colombo, Silvia; Marcili, Arlei; Angerami, Rodrigo N.

    2014-01-01

    Fifteen bacterial isolates from spotted fever group rickettsiosis in Brazil were genetically identified as Rickettsia rickettsii. In a phylogenetic analysis with other R. rickettsii isolates from GenBank, the Central/South American isolates showed low polymorphism and formed a clade distinct from two North American clades, with the North American clades having greater in-branch polymorphism. PMID:25078908

  16. Characterisation of inflammatory response, coagulation, and radiological findings in Katayama fever: a report of three cases at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Katayama fever is an acute clinical condition characterised by high fever, dry cough and general malaise occurring during early Schistosoma spp. infection. It is predominantly reported in travellers from non-endemic regions. Whereas the immunological response to Schistosoma infection is well characterised, alterations in inflammatory markers and coagulation in response to acute infection are poorly understood. Methods Here we report the clinical, laboratory and radiological characteristics of three returning travellers with Katayama fever. Inflammatory markers and coagulation status were assessed repeatedly during follow-up to characterise the host response to infection. Radiographic findings were correlated with clinical and laboratory markers. Results Clinical symptoms were suggestive of a significant inflammatory response in all patients including high fever (>39°C), cough, and general malaise. Classical inflammatory markers including blood sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and serum amyloid A were only moderately elevated. Marked eosinophilia (33–42% of white blood cells) was observed and persisted despite anti-inflammatory and anthelminthic treatment for up to 32 weeks. Analysis of blood coagulation markers indicated increased coagulability reflected by elevated D-dimer values (0.57–1.17 ?g/ml) and high thrombin generating potentials (peak thrombin activity: 311–384 nM). One patient showed particularly high levels of microparticle-associated tissue factor activity at initial presentation (1.64 pg/ml). Multiple pulmonary and hepatic opacities demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) scanning were associated with raised inflammatory markers in one patient. Conclusions The characterisation of the inflammatory response, blood coagulation parameters and radiological findings in three patients adds to our current understanding of Katayama fever and serves as a starting point for further systematic investigations of the pathophysiology of this acute helminthic infection. PMID:24985919

  17. Fever tree revisited: From malaria to autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Serena; Vuch, Josef; Bianco, Anna Monica; Taddio, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Over the centuries the idea of recurrent fevers has mainly been associated with malaria, but many other fevers, such as typhoid and diphtheria were cause for concern. It is only in recent times, with the more severe forms of fever from infectious origin becoming less frequent or a cause for worry that we started noticing recurrent fevers without any clear infectious cause, being described as having a pathogenesis of autoinflammatory nature. The use of molecular examinations in many cases can allow a diagnosis where the cause is monogenic. In other cases, however the pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and the diagnostic-therapeutic approach is strictly clinical. The old fever tree paradigm developed to describe fevers caused by malaria has been revisited here to describe today's periodic fevers from the periodic fever adenitis pharyngitis aphthae syndrome to the more rare autoinflammatory diseases. This model may allow us to place cases that are yet to be identified which are likely to be of multifactorial origin. PMID:26566482

  18. Fever tree revisited: From malaria to autoinflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Serena; Vuch, Josef; Bianco, Anna Monica; Taddio, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Over the centuries the idea of recurrent fevers has mainly been associated with malaria, but many other fevers, such as typhoid and diphtheria were cause for concern. It is only in recent times, with the more severe forms of fever from infectious origin becoming less frequent or a cause for worry that we started noticing recurrent fevers without any clear infectious cause, being described as having a pathogenesis of autoinflammatory nature. The use of molecular examinations in many cases can allow a diagnosis where the cause is monogenic. In other cases, however the pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and the diagnostic-therapeutic approach is strictly clinical. The old fever tree paradigm developed to describe fevers caused by malaria has been revisited here to describe today’s periodic fevers from the periodic fever adenitis pharyngitis aphthae syndrome to the more rare autoinflammatory diseases. This model may allow us to place cases that are yet to be identified which are likely to be of multifactorial origin. PMID:26566482

  19. Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley yellow dwarf (BYD) is the most widespread and economically important virus disease of cereals. The viruses causing BYD were initially grouped based on common biological properties, including persistent and often strain-specific transmission by aphids and induction of yellowing symptoms. The...

  20. [Periodic fever with increased IgD].

    PubMed

    Ammar, J; Abid, H; Yaalaoui, S; Hamzaoui, A

    2010-09-01

    Periodic fever or hereditary inflammatory fevers are characterized by intermittent inflammatory attacks. Many entities are well recognized today such as familial mediterranean fever (FMF) and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome (HIDS). We report on the case of a 6-year-old boy referred for evaluation of a recurrent fever associated with chest pain, pneumonitis, or pleuritis since the age of 5 years. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis, a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein; however, a permanent high serum level IgD was noted. Stereotypical episodes of fever appeared every 4-6 weeks, while infectious, malignant, and auto-immune causes were eliminated. A search for the most common mutations of the FMF gene in Tunisian patients (M694V, M680I, V726A, E148Q, M694I, and A744S) were negative. Likewise, urinary leukotriene E(4), which may be increased in HIDS, was normal in this patient. Mevalonate kinase activity in lymphocytes was not assayed. Ethnic origin and clinical presentation suggest FMF with an increased IgD rather than authentic HIDS, in spite of the lack of improvement under colchicine treatment and the negativity of the main mutations involved in FMF. PMID:20655711

  1. Travelers' Health: Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... VHFs) are caused by several families of enveloped RNA viruses: filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever), arenaviruses ( ... in hemorrhagic fever with high death rates. Old World (Eastern Hemisphere) and New World (Western Hemisphere) viruses ...

  2. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients. PMID:22668446

  3. Rift Valley Fever Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a disease of animals and humans that occurs in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. A Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae causes the disease that is transmitted by mosquitoes. Epidemics occur during years of unusually heavy rainfall that assessment models are being develo...

  4. Malignant Catarrhal Fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a frequently fatal viral disease of ruminant species, particularly cattle, bison, and deer. Clinical signs vary between species. Two major epidemiologic types of MCF exist, and are defined by the ruminant species that serve as natural reservoir hosts for infection...

  5. Three-day fever.

    PubMed

    Akakpo, A J

    2015-08-01

    Three-day fever is a viral disease caused by an Ephemerovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae, transmitted by arthropod vectors. It is common in tropical and sub-tropical regions, where it affects mainly domestic cattle and buffaloes, especially in intensive dairy or fattening production systems. It is of economic importance because it reduces milk production and fertility and causes abortion. The disease is generally benign. It manifests in several susceptible subjects simultaneously, with a sudden episode of fever accompanied by muscle involvement with arthritis, stiffness of the limbs, and lameness, followed by rapid recovery. The presence of a serofibrinous exudate in the joints is indicative of the disease. Clinical diagnosis is often difficult in the absence of pathognomonic signs. Epidemiological factors (proliferation of arthropod vectors), associated with a short-lived fever and the presence of many immature neutrophils, point strongly to three-day fever. In the absence of any specific treatment, the symptoms are treated with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. Medical prophylaxis currently uses live attenuated vaccines, pending the development of recombinant vaccines, which are giving promising results. PMID:26601454

  6. Selective myelosuppression following yellow phosphorus ingestion.

    PubMed

    Basheer, Aneesh; Mookkappan, Sudhagar; Padhi, Somanath; Iqbal, Nayyar

    2015-01-01

    Toxicity from accidental and intentional ingestion of yellow phosphorus, ubiquitously present in fireworks and rodenticides, has recently become more frequent. Gastrointestinal, renal, neurologic, and cardiovascular manifestations are common, with mortality of 23 per cent to 73 per cent. Reports of haematological abnormalities are rare. We report only the second case of severe neutropenia secondary to selective myelosuppression in a 14-year-old girl following intentional ingestion of yellow phosphorus. Leucocyte counts recovered spontaneously without further complications. Our case indicates that, besides hepatic and renal function monitoring, physicians should meticulously monitor blood counts in such cases for early detection of marrow suppression. Further studies are required to elucidate the complex mechanisms and significance of this unusual toxicity of yellow phosphorus. PMID:25848404

  7. Yellow Legged Frog

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS scientists found this adult mountain yellow-legged frog on June 10 in Tahquitz Creek, a rediscovered population of the endangered frog in the San Jacinto Wilderness, San Bernardino National Forest, California....

  8. Pontiac fever: an operational definition for epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Tossa, Paul; Deloge-Abarkan, Magali; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Hartemann, Philippe; Mathieu, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    Background Pontiac fever is usually described in epidemic settings. Detection of Pontiac fever is a marker of an environmental contamination by Legionella and should thereby call for prevention measures in order to prevent outbreak of Legionnaire's disease. The objective of this study is to propose an operational definition of Pontiac fever that is amenable to epidemiological surveillance and investigation in a non epidemic setting. Methods A population of 560 elderly subjects residing in 25 nursing homes was followed during 4 months in order to assess the daily incidence of symptoms associated, in the literature, with Pontiac fever. The water and aerosol of one to 8 showers by nursing home were characterized combining conventional bacterial culture of Legionella and the Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) technique that used oligonucleotides probes specific for Legionellaceae. A definition of Pontiac fever was devised based on clinical symptoms described in epidemic investigations and on their timing after the exposure event. The association between incidence of Pontiac fever and shower contamination levels was evaluated to test the relevance of this definition. Results The proposed definition of Pontiac fever associated the following criteria: occurrence of at least one symptom among headache, myalgia, fever and shivers, possibly associated with other 'minor' symptoms, within three days after a shower contaminated by Legionella, during a maximum of 8 days (minimum 2 days). 23 such cases occurred during the study (incidence rate: 0.125 cases per person-year [95% CI: 0.122–0.127]). A concentration of Legionella in water equal to or greater than 104.L-1 (FISH method) was associated with a significant increase of incidence of Pontiac fever (p = 0.04). Conclusion Once validated in other settings, the proposed definition of Pontiac fever might be used to develop epidemiological surveillance and help draw attention on sources of Legionella. PMID:16646972

  9. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saif; Gupta, N. D.; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2013-01-01

    Dengue fever is mosquito borne disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) of Flaviviridae family. The clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock and death. Here, we report a case of 20-year-old male patient undergoing orthodontic treatment presenting with acute gingival bleeding with a history of fever, weakness, backache, retro orbital pain and ecchymosis over his right arm. The hematological investigations revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia and positive dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen and also positive immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies for DENV. Patient was diagnosed as a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever and was immediately referred for appropriate management. This case report emphasizes the importance of taking correct and thorough medical history. PMID:24174736

  10. Dengue fever: natural management.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Abbas, Khizar; Tahir, Madeha; Irfan, Muhammad; Raza Bukhari, Syeda Fiza; Ahmed, Bilal; Hanif, Muhammad; Rasul, Akhtar; Ali, Muhammad

    2015-03-01

    Dengue fever is caused by the mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) serotypes 1-4, and is the most common arboviral infection of humans in subtropical and tropical regions of the world. Dengue virus infections can present with a spacious range of clinical signs, from a mild feverish illness to a life-threatening shock syndrome. Till now, there is no approved vaccine or drug against this virus. Therefore, there is an urgent need of development of alternative solutions for dengue. Several plant species have been reported with anti-dengue activity. Many herbal/natural drugs, most of which are commonly used as nutritional components, have been used as antiviral, larvicidal, mosquitocidal and mosquito repellents that may be used against dengue. The objective of this review article was to provide current approaches for the treatment and management/prevention of dengue fever by targeting viral proteins involved in replication cycle of the virus and different developmental stages of mosquito. PMID:25730815

  11. Q fever outbreak in industrial setting.

    PubMed

    van Woerden, Hugo C; Mason, Brendan W; Nehaul, Lika K; Smith, Robert; Salmon, Roland L; Healy, Brendan; Valappil, Manoj; Westmoreland, Diana; de Martin, Sarah; Evans, Meirion R; Lloyd, Graham; Hamilton-Kirkwood, Marysia; Williams, Nina S

    2004-07-01

    An outbreak of Q fever occurred in South Wales, United Kingdom, from July 15 through September 30, 2002. To investigate the outbreak a cohort and nested case-control study of persons who had worked at a cardboard manufacturing plant was conducted. The cohort included 282 employees and subcontractors, of whom 253 (90%) provided blood samples and 214 (76%) completed questionnaires. Ninety-five cases of acute Q fever were identified. The epidemic curve and other data suggested an outbreak source likely occurred August 5-9, 2002. Employees in the factory's offices were at greatest risk for infection (odds ratio 3.46; 95% confidence interval 1.38-9.06). The offices were undergoing renovation work around the time of likely exposure and contained straw board that had repeatedly been drilled. The outbreak may have been caused by aerosolization of Coxiella burnetii spore-like forms during drilling into contaminated straw board. PMID:15324550

  12. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2000 through 2010. Average annual incidence of Rocky Mountain spotted fever by age-group, 2000 through 2010: ... new category called Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis (including Rocky Mountain spotted fever). This change was made to better ...

  13. Barley Yellow Dwarf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley yellow dwarf is the most economically important virus disease affecting most cereal crops world wide. This manuscript summarizes the current knowledge of the disease etiology, epidemiology and management. This information is incorporated into the latest revision of the American Phytopathologi...

  14. Yellow leaf blotch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow leaf blotch occurs worldwide in temperate climates. The disease is reported from countries in Asia, Australasia, Oceania, Europe, North America, Central America, the West Indies, and South America. In the northern Great Plains of North America, it is often the major leaf disease on alfalfa....

  15. Mayaro fever virus, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Raimunda S S; Silva, Eliana V P; Carvalho, Valéria L; Rodrigues, Sueli G; Nunes-Neto, Joaquim P; Monteiro, Hamilton; Peixoto, Victor S; Chiang, Jannifer O; Nunes, Márcio R T; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2009-11-01

    In February 2008, a Mayaro fever virus (MAYV) outbreak occurred in a settlement in Santa Barbara municipality, northern Brazil. Patients had rash, fever, and severe arthralgia lasting up to 7 days. Immunoglobulin M against MAYV was detected by ELISA in 36 persons; 3 MAYV isolates sequenced were characterized as genotype D. PMID:19891877

  16. Molecular typing of multiple-antibiotic-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi from Vietnam: application to acute and relapse cases of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Wain, J; Hien, T T; Connerton, P; Ali, T; Parry, C M; Chinh, N T; Vinh, H; Phuong, C X; Ho, V A; Diep, T S; Farrar, J J; White, N J; Dougan, G

    1999-08-01

    The rate of multiple-antibiotic resistance is increasing among Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains in Southeast Asia. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and other typing methods were used to analyze drug-resistant and -susceptible organisms isolated from patients with typhoid fever in several districts in southern Vietnam. Multiple PFGE and phage typing patterns were detected, although individual patients were infected with strains of a single type. The PFGE patterns were stable when the S. enterica serovar Typhi strains were passaged many times in vitro on laboratory medium. Paired S. enterica serovar Typhi isolates recovered from the blood and bone marrow of individual patients exhibited similar PFGE patterns. Typing of S. enterica serovar Typhi isolates from patients with relapses of typhoid indicated that the majority of relapses were caused by the same S. enterica serovar Typhi strain that was isolated during the initial infection. However, some individuals were infected with distinct and presumably newly acquired S. enterica serovar Typhi isolates. PMID:10405386

  17. Cavity Forming Pneumonia Due to Staphylococcus aureus Following Dengue Fever.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Nobuyuki; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Amano, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Yohei; Kosuge, Youko

    2015-11-01

    While visiting Malaysia, a 22-year-old previously healthy Japanese man developed myalgia, headache, and fever, leading to a diagnosis of classical dengue fever. After improvement and returning to Japan after a five day hospitalization, he developed productive cough several days after defervescing from dengue. Computed tomography (CT) thorax scan showed multiple lung cavities. A sputum smear revealed leukocytes with phagocytized gram-positive cocci in clusters, and grew an isolate Staphylococcus aureus sensitive to semi-synthetic penicillin; he was treated successfully with ceftriaxone and cephalexin. This second reported case of pneumonia due to S. aureus occurring after dengue fever, was associated both with nosocomial exposure and might have been associated with dengue-associated immunosuppression. Clinicians should pay systematic attention to bacterial pneumonia following dengue fever to establish whether such a connection is causally associated. PMID:26304914

  18. Infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic Fever outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Raabea, Vanessa N; Borcherta, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Breaking the human-to-human transmission cycle remains the cornerstone of infection control during filoviral (Ebola and Marburg) hemorrhagic fever outbreaks. This requires effective identification and isolation of cases, timely contact tracing and monitoring, proper usage of barrier personal protection gear by health workers, and safely conducted burials. Solely implementing these measures is insufficient for infection control; control efforts must be culturally sensitive and conducted in a transparent manner to promote the necessary trust between the community and infection control team in order to succeed. This article provides a review of the literature on infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks focusing on outbreaks in a developing setting and lessons learned from previous outbreaks. The primary search database used to review the literature was PUBMED, the National Library of Medicine website. PMID:22529631

  19. Fatal spotted fever group rickettsiosis due to Rickettsia conorii conorii mimicking a hemorrhagic viral fever in a South African traveler in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Daniele N; Favacho, Alexsandra R; Rozental, Tatiana; Barcaui, Halime; Guterres, Alexandro; Gomes, Raphael; Levis, Silvana; Coelho, Janice; Chebabo, Alberto; Costa, Ligia C; Andrea, Salete; Barroso, Paulo F; de Lemos, Elba R S

    2010-09-01

    The authors present a fatal case of spotted fever group rickettsiosis (SFGR) caused by Rickettsia conorii conorii mimicking a hemorrhagic viral fever in a South African male on a business trip in Brazil. SFGR was confirmed by molecular and immunohistochemical analyses. PMID:21771523

  20. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Racsa, Lori D; Kraft, Colleen S; Olinger, Gene G; Hensley, Lisa E

    2016-01-15

    There are 4 families of viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), including Filoviridae. Ebola virus is one virus within the family Filoviridae and the cause of the current outbreak of VHF in West Africa. VHF-endemic areas are found throughout the world, yet traditional diagnosis of VHF has been performed in large reference laboratories centered in Europe and the United States. The large amount of capital needed, as well as highly trained and skilled personnel, has limited the availability of diagnostics in endemic areas except in conjunction with governmental and nongovernmental entities. However, rapid diagnosis of VHF is essential to efforts that will limit outbreaks. In addition, increased global travel suggests VHF diagnoses may be made outside of the endemic areas. Thus, understanding how to diagnose VHF is imperative for laboratories worldwide. This article reviews traditional and current diagnostic modalities for VHF. PMID:26354968

  1. Louse-borne relapsing fever (Borrelia recurrentis) in an Eritrean refugee arriving in Switzerland, August 2015.

    PubMed

    Goldenberger, D; Claas, G J; Bloch-Infanger, C; Breidthardt, T; Suter, B; Martínez, M; Neumayr, A; Blaich, A; Egli, A; Osthoff, M

    2015-01-01

    We report an imported case of louse-borne relapsing fever in a young adult Eritrean refugee who presented with fever shortly after arriving in Switzerland. Analysis of blood smears revealed spirochetes identified as Borrelia recurrentis by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We believe that louse-borne relapsing fever may be seen more frequently in Europe as a consequence of a recent increase in refugees from East Africa travelling to Europe under poor hygienic conditions in confined spaces. PMID:26290486

  2. The Yellow River basin becomes wetter or drier? The case as indicated by mean precipitation and extremes during 1961-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Kang; Liu, Sheng; Bai, Peng; Nie, Rong

    2015-02-01

    The Yellow River basin could be divided into three sub-regions, which makes it as the ideal target for studying regional climate change. On the basis of daily precipitation at 62 meteorological stations in the Yellow River basin, spatial distribution and temporal trends of annual and monthly mean precipitation and extremes were analyzed during 1961-2012. The Mann-Kendall trend test and linear least-square method were used to detect trends and magnitudes in annual and monthly mean precipitation and extremes. The results indicate that mean precipitation and extremes have different trends, and the three sub-regions also have distinct trends. Annual average precipitation shows a slight decrease in the whole basin with a trend of -8.8 mm/decade, a significant decrease in the eastern monsoon sub-region with trends of -14.4 mm/decade but increases in the high-elevation sub-region with trends of 1.3 mm/decade. Monthly precipitation in the Yellow River basin shows a different seasonality, December and June have largest positive trends, while November and October have largest negative trends. The change degree of annual precipitation extremes in the whole Yellow River basin decreased, reflected by seven indices (CWD, SDII, R10, R95p, R99p, Rx1day, and Rx5day) having negative trends but significantly different in the three sub-regions. Specifically, trends of all the ten annual precipitation extremes indices in the eastern monsoon sub-region were dominant negative, while mainly positive in the arid and semi-arid sub-region and high-elevation sub-region. The four monthly precipitation indices (PRCPTOT, SDII, Rx1day, and Rx5day) have main positive trends in February, May, June, and December, while negative trends in April, August, September, October, and November, in which the months having the most dominant positive trends are distinctly different (in February or June or December), while months with the most dominant negative trends are the same (in November). In the whole basin, eight indices (PRCPTOT, SDII, R10, R20, R95p, R99p, Rx1day, and Rx5day) have positive relations with elevation, while two indices (CDD and CWD) have negative relationship with elevation, but in the three sub-regions, relations between the ten indices and elevation are not significant. Relationship between extremes indices and large-scale atmospheric circulations show that, in the whole basin, all the ten annual indices have little relationship with Northern Hemisphere Subtropical High (NHSH) and Northern Hemisphere Polar Vortex (NHPV). But for the four monthly precipitation indices (i.e., Rx1day, Rx5day, PRCPTOT, and SDII), there were significant positive relationships with NHSH but significant negative relationships with NHPV. The results of this study are useful to master change rule of local mean precipitation and extremes change, which will help to prevent natural hazards caused by precipitation extremes.

  3. Mediterranean Spotted Fever in Southeastern Romania

    PubMed Central

    Olaru, Ioana D.; Badescu, Daniela; Rafila, Alexandru; Arama, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Although cases of Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) have been reported for decades in southeastern Romania, there are few published data. We retrospectively studied 339 patients, diagnosed with MSF at the National Institute of Infectious Diseases “Prof. Dr. Matei Bals” between 2000 and 2011, in order to raise awareness about MSF in certain regions of Romania. According to the Raoult diagnostic criteria 171 (50.4%) had a score >25 points. Mean age was 52.5 years. One hundred and fifty-five (90.6%) patients were from Bucharest and the surrounding region. Almost all patients presented with fever (99.4%) and rash (98.2%), and 57.9% had evidence of a tick bite. There were no recorded deaths. Serologic diagnosis was made by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Of the 171 patients, serology results for R. conorii were available in 147. One hundred and twenty-three (83.7%) of them had a titer IgG ?1?:?160 or a fourfold increase in titer in paired samples. MSF is endemic in southeastern Romania and should be considered in patients with fever and rash even in the absence of recognized tick exposure. Since the disease is prevalent in areas highly frequented by tourists, travel-associated MSF should be suspected in patients with characteristic symptoms returning from the endemic area. PMID:24024190

  4. [Periodic fever syndrome/autoinflammatory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kötter, I; Schedel, J; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B

    2009-03-01

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes (autoinflammatory syndromes) are characterised by relapsing fevers and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, and joint pain. Some of these disorders only present with organ manifestations and serological signs of inflammation without obvious fever (e.g. PAPA and Blau syndrome). There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (risk of secondary amyloidosis). There are monogenic disorders for which the mode of inheritance and gene mutation are known, but probably also polygenic diseases which present with similar symptoms to the classic autoinflammatory syndromes. Gene mutations have been described for the monogenic disorders (FMF, HIDS, CAPS, PAPA and Blau syndrome), which lead to an induction of the production of IL-1ss. Therapeutically, the IL-1-receptor antagonist anakinra is mainly used. In the case of TRAPS and Blau syndrome, TNF antagonists may also be used. PFAPA syndrome, the Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet's disaese and Crohn's disease also are mentioned as additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes. PMID:19255765

  5. Discriminating Fever Behavior in House Flies

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Robert D.; Blanford, Simon; Jenkins, Nina E.; Thomas, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Fever has generally been shown to benefit infected hosts. However, fever temperatures also carry costs. While endotherms are able to limit fever costs physiologically, the means by which behavioral thermoregulators constrain these costs are less understood. Here we investigated the behavioral fever response of house flies (Musca domestica L.) challenged with different doses of the fungal entomopathogen, Beauveria bassiana. Infected flies invoked a behavioral fever selecting the hottest temperature early in the day and then moving to cooler temperatures as the day progressed. In addition, flies infected with a higher dose of fungus exhibited more intense fever responses. These variable patterns of fever are consistent with the observation that higher fever temperatures had greater impact on fungal growth. The results demonstrate the capacity of insects to modulate the degree and duration of the fever response depending on the severity of the pathogen challenge and in so doing, balance the costs and benefits of fever. PMID:23620820

  6. Humidifier fever 1

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    MRC Symposium (1977).Thorax, 32, 653-663. Humidifier fever. In enclosed environments, it may be necessary to regulate temperature, ventilation, and humidity to maintain comfortable working conditions. Several systems can be used although in terms of installation and running costs a simple radiator system is far more economical than air conditioning with complete temperature and humidity control. Humidity control requires the introduction of water into a moving current of air, and in such a system baffle plates are often used to eliminate large droplets; also any unused water is usually recirculated. Organic dust drawn into the system and settling on the baffle plates and in the mixing chamber may be utilised by micro-organisms introduced from the atmosphere and from the water supply, and a biomass builds up. Microbial material is then voided into the working atmosphere by the ventilation system. Under appropriate exposure conditions susceptible individuals may succumb to an episode of humidifier fever, an influenza-like illness with pyrexia and malaise as the main symptoms, but cough, chest tightness, dyspnoea and weight loss may also be seen. The episodes usually occur after absence from work for a few days and have been termed `Monday sickness'. Individuals are often able to return to work the next day and appear refractory to further exposure. The disease is of the winter months probably due to the larger amount (up to 90%) of fresh air drawn into the humidifier during the summer. In the blood of exposed subjects precipitins are usually present to extracts of baffle plate material and recirculating water although they are not necessarily indicative of disease. Skin tests may be positive and inhalation challenge has reproduced the disease in susceptible individuals. Many organisms may be isolated from baffle plates and recirculating water but only amoeba extracts have produced consistently positive reactions with sera from affected individuals. Remedial actions such as changing from water to steam humidification or running recirculation water to waste have proved effective in some factories. Other measures may be considered, for example, adding microbicidal agents or prefiltering intake air. The pyrexial episode may be due to immune complex-complement or alternative pathway-complement activation, inducing the release of leucocyte pyrogen; alternatively, sensitised lymphocytes can release lymphokines capable of inducing leucocyte pyrogen release.

  7. Treatment for Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... need to stay in the hospital. For these types of infections, the course of treatment is usually longer than 6 months. Valley fever that develops into meningitis is fatal if it’s not treated, so lifelong ...

  8. Q Fever in French Guiana

    PubMed Central

    Eldin, Carole; Mahamat, Aba; Demar, Magalie; Abboud, Philippe; Djossou, Félix; Raoult, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is present worldwide. Recent studies have shown that this bacterium is an emerging pathogen in French Guiana and has a high prevalence (24% of community-acquired pneumonia). In this review, we focus on the peculiar epidemiology of Q fever in French Guiana. We place it in the context of the epidemiology of the disease in the surrounding countries of South America. We also review the clinical features of Q fever in this region, which has severe initial presentation but low mortality rates. These characteristics seem to be linked to a unique genotype (genotype 17). Finally, we discuss the issue of the animal reservoir of C. burnetii in French Guiana, which is still unknown. Further studies are necessary to identify this reservoir. Identification of this reservoir will improve the understanding of the Q fever epidemic in French Guiana and will provide new tools to control this public health problem. PMID:25092817

  9. NOTE: Any yellow text shading or red text annotations have been added by ORNL Subject Matter Experts (SMEs). The annotations have been made in order to document (1) certain Forest Service requirements that have been waived or (2) where some requirements f

    E-print Network

    1 NOTE: Any yellow text shading or red text annotations have been added by ORNL Subject Matter, usually on one side), and meningitis (fever, stiff neck, and severe headache). · Disease Diagnosis: If you

  10. Responses of streamflow and sediment load to climate change and human activity in the Upper Yellow River, China: a case of the Ten Great Gullies Basin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Huang, He Qing; Shao, Mingan; Yao, Wenyi; Gu, Jing; Yu, Guoan

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion and land desertification are the most serious environmental problems globally. This study investigated the changes in streamflow and sediment load from 1964 to 2012 in the Ten Great Gullies area of the Upper Yellow River. Tests for gradual trends (Mann-Kendall test) and abrupt changes (Pettitt test) identify that significant declines in streamflow and sediment load occurred in 1997-1998 in two typical gullies. A comparison of climatic variability before and after the change points shows no statistically significant trends in annual precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. Human activities have been very active in the region and during 1990-2010, 146.01 and 197.62 km2 of land were converted, respectively, to forests and grassland, with corresponding increases of 87.56 and 77.05%. In addition, a large number of check dams have been built up in the upper reaches of the ten gullies. These measures were likely responsible for the significant decline in the annual streamflow and sediment load over the last 49 years. PMID:26067511

  11. Holocene development of the Yellow River's subaqueous delta, North Yellow Sea

    E-print Network

    Liu, Paul

    Holocene development of the Yellow River's subaqueous delta, North Yellow Sea J. Paul Liua,*, John pulse 1B (MWP-1B) and increased discharge from the Yellow River to the North Yellow Sea due Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: epicontinental sea; Yellow Sea; Yellow River; subaqueous delta

  12. Clinicopathological Profile of Salmonella Typhi and Paratyphi Infections Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin in a Tropical Country

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Nayyar; Basheer, Aneesh; Mookkappan, Sudhagar; Ramdas, Anita; Varghese, Renu G’Boy; Padhi, Somanath; Shrimanth, Bhairappa; Chidambaram, Saranya; Anandhalakshmi, S.; Kanungo, Reba

    2015-01-01

    Background Enteric fever, a common infection in the tropics and endemic to India, often manifests as an acute febrile illness. However, presentation as fever of unknown origin (FUO) is not uncommon in tropical countries. Methods We aim to describe the clinical, laboratory and pathological features of patients hospitalized with fever of unknown origin and diagnosed as enteric fever. All culture proven cases of enteric fever were analyzed retrospectively over a period of three years from January 2011 to December 2013. Results Seven of 88 (8%) cases with enteric fever presented as FUO. Abdominal pain was the most common symptom besides fever. Relative bradycardia and splenomegaly were uncommon. Thrombocytopenia was the most common haematological abnormality while leucopenia was rare. Transaminase elevation was almost universal. S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A were isolated from six cases and one case respectively. Yield of organisms from blood culture was superior to that of bone marrow aspirate. Multiple granulomas were identified in 4 out of 6 (67%) of the bone marrows studied, including that due to S. Paratyphi A and histiocytic hemophagocytosis was noted in two cases. Conclusion FUO is a relatively common manifestation of enteric fever in the tropics. Clinical and laboratory features may be atypical in such cases, including absence of relative bradycardia, leucopenia, and presence of thrombocytopenia, bicytopenia or pancytopenia. In addition, in endemic countries, enteric fever should be considered as a differential diagnosis, next to tuberculosis, in the evaluation of bone marrow granulomas in cases with FUO and culture correlation should be mandatory. PMID:25745548

  13. Clinical Features and Patient Management of Lujo Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Sewlall, Nivesh H.; Richards, Guy; Duse, Adriano; Swanepoel, Robert; Paweska, Janusz; Blumberg, Lucille; Dinh, Thu Ha; Bausch, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2008 a nosocomial outbreak of five cases of viral hemorrhagic fever due to a novel arenavirus, Lujo virus, occurred in Johannesburg, South Africa. Lujo virus is only the second pathogenic arenavirus, after Lassa virus, to be recognized in Africa and the first in over 40 years. Because of the remote, resource-poor, and often politically unstable regions where Lassa fever and other viral hemorrhagic fevers typically occur, there have been few opportunities to undertake in-depth study of their clinical manifestations, transmission dynamics, pathogenesis, or response to treatment options typically available in industrialized countries. Methods and Findings We describe the clinical features of five cases of Lujo hemorrhagic fever and summarize their clinical management, as well as providing additional epidemiologic detail regarding the 2008 outbreak. Illness typically began with the abrupt onset of fever, malaise, headache, and myalgias followed successively by sore throat, chest pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, rash, minor hemorrhage, subconjunctival injection, and neck and facial swelling over the first week of illness. No major hemorrhage was noted. Neurological signs were sometimes seen in the late stages. Shock and multi-organ system failure, often with evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, ensued in the second week, with death in four of the five cases. Distinctive treatment components of the one surviving patient included rapid commencement of the antiviral drug ribavirin and administration of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), N-acetylcysteine, and recombinant factor VIIa. Conclusions Lujo virus causes a clinical syndrome remarkably similar to Lassa fever. Considering the high case-fatality and significant logistical impediments to controlled treatment efficacy trials for viral hemorrhagic fever, it is both logical and ethical to explore the use of the various compounds used in the treatment of the surviving case reported here in future outbreaks. Clinical observations should be systematically recorded to facilitate objective evaluation of treatment efficacy. Due to the risk of secondary transmission, viral hemorrhagic fever precautions should be implemented for all cases of Lujo virus infection, with specialized precautions to protect against aerosols when performing enhanced-risk procedures such as endotracheal intubation. PMID:25393244

  14. [Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome in Japan].

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Masayuki; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Tani, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Saijo, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is characterized by sudden onset of fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and gastrointestinal tract symptoms and approximately 12% of patients die from disseminated intravascular coagulation and/or multiple organ failures. Agent of the disease is a novel bunyavirus SFTS virus, and is transmitted by bite of a possible vector tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis, and through direct contact with virus-containing patient body fluids, or through unknown routes. SFTS case reports have been limited in China, and more than two thousand cases were reported in 2011 and 2012. In late 2012, a woman living in Yamaguchi prefecture in Japan showed symptoms reminiscent of those of SFTS and died 6 days after the onset of symptoms. Virus was isolated from her acute serum in Vero cells and a next generation-sequencing identified it as SFTS virus. SFTS viral genome and proteins were detected in the patient's serum. Based on the first demonstration of SFTS in Japan, a retrospective study started. Until March of 2013, totally 8 patients were diagnosed as having SFTS and the most early case was in 2005. Phylogenetic analysis of virus sequences revealed that Japanese isolates form an independent branch distinct from Chinese isolates, indicating that SFTS has been present not only in China but also in Japan. PMID:24769572

  15. Conflation and aggregation of spatial data improve predictive models for species with limited habitats: a case of the threatened yellow-billed cuckoo in Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villarreal, Miguel L.; Van Riper, Charles, III; Petrakis, Roy E.

    2013-01-01

    Riparian vegetation provides important wildlife habitat in the Southwestern United States, but limited distributions and spatial complexity often leads to inaccurate representation in maps used to guide conservation. We test the use of data conflation and aggregation on multiple vegetation/land-cover maps to improve the accuracy of habitat models for the threatened western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus occidentalis). We used species observations (n = 479) from a state-wide survey to develop habitat models from 1) three vegetation/land-cover maps produced at different geographic scales ranging from state to national, and 2) new aggregate maps defined by the spatial agreement of cover types, which were defined as high (agreement = all data sets), moderate (agreement ? 2), and low (no agreement required). Model accuracies, predicted habitat locations, and total area of predicted habitat varied considerably, illustrating the effects of input data quality on habitat predictions and resulting potential impacts on conservation planning. Habitat models based on aggregated and conflated data were more accurate and had higher model sensitivity than original vegetation/land-cover, but this accuracy came at the cost of reduced geographic extent of predicted habitat. Using the highest performing models, we assessed cuckoo habitat preference and distribution in Arizona and found that major watersheds containing high-probably habitat are fragmented by a wide swath of low-probability habitat. Focus on riparian restoration in these areas could provide more breeding habitat for the threatened cuckoo, offset potential future habitat losses in adjacent watershed, and increase regional connectivity for other threatened vertebrates that also use riparian corridors.

  16. Historical aspects of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Steer, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Few diseases have experienced such a remarkable change in their epidemiology over the past century, without the influence of a vaccine, than rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever has all but disappeared from industrialised countries after being a frequent problem in the 1940s and 1950s. That the disease still occurs at high incidence in resource limited settings and in Indigenous populations in industrialised countries, particularly in Australia and New Zealand, is an indication of the profound effect of socio-economic factors on the disease. Although there have been major changes in the epidemiology of rheumatic fever, diagnosis remains reliant on careful clinical judgement and management is remarkably similar to that 50 years ago. Over the past decade, increasing attention has been given to rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease as public health issues, including in Australia and particularly in New Zealand, as well as in selected low and middle income countries. Perhaps the greatest hope for public health control of rheumatic fever is the development of a vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes, and there are encouraging initiatives in this area. However, an effective vaccine is some time away and in the meantime public health efforts need to focus on effective translation of the known evidence around primary and secondary prophylaxis into policy and practice. PMID:25586841

  17. MORE ON IRIS YELLOW SPOT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iris yellow spot, caused by Iris yellow spot tospovirus, is an emerging disease of onion in the U.S. and world. Yield losses vary, but may range from undetectable to nearly 100% in onion seed crops. This article presents recent advances in understanding the etiology, epidemiology, and management o...

  18. Risk factors for shock in children with dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Pothapregada, Sriram; Kamalakannan, Banupriya; Thulasingham, Mahalakshmy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate and analyze the clinical and laboratory parameters that were predictive of the development of shock in children with dengue fever. Subjects and Methods: Retrospective study carried out from August 2012 to July 2014 at a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry. Results: Two hundred and fifty-four children were admitted with dengue fever and among them dengue fever without shock was present in 159 children (62.5%) and dengue fever with shock was present in 95 cases (37.4%). Various clinical and laboratory parameters were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression between the two groups and a P value of <0.05 was taken as significant. The most common risk factors for shock on univariate analysis were headache, retro-orbital pain, palmar erythema, joint pain, facial flush, splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, bleeding, giddiness, persistent vomiting, pleural effusion, ascites, hematocrit >20% with concomitant platelet count <50,000/mm3 on admission, deranged liver function tests, and gallbladder wall edema. On multivariate analysis, it was seen that in age >6 years, hepatomegaly, pain in the abdomen, and oliguria were the most common risk factors associated with shock in children with dengue fever. There were six deaths (2.4%) and out of them four presented with impaired consciousness (66.6%) at the time of admission. Conclusion: Age >6 years, hepatomegaly, abdomen pain, and oliguria were the most common risk factors for shock in children with dengue fever. Impaired consciousness at admission was the most ominous sign for mortality in dengue fever. Hence, these features should be identified early, monitored closely, and managed timely.

  19. Yellow intraocular filters in fishes.

    PubMed

    Heinermann, P H

    1984-01-01

    Yellow intraocular filters are common among the teleosts, especially highly diurnal species. This yellow pigmentation may be uniform, more dense dorsally, or localized to a narrow dorsal ring near the limbus. Certain species possess occlusable yellow corneas and can vary the corneal colour in response to the level of illumination. Yellow lenses and corneas function as hi-pass filters, with the cutoff points varying depending on species. Thus, the amount of short-wavelength light reaching the retina can be regulated. Three distinct yellow pigments may be present in each of the lens, cornea and the retina of certain South American cichlids. The spectral absorbance of the yellow corneal pigment bears a close resemblance to that of beta-carotene. Possible functions of these yellow filters are: a reduction in chromatic aberration, the reduction of glare and dazzle, the improvement of detail by the absorption of "blue haze", the improvement of contrast vision, and the rendering of bioluminescence more conspicuous. Yellow intraocular filters may result in a loss of scotopic sensitivity due to absorption of short wavelengths. Various adaptations in diurnal teleosts to avoid the loss of sensitivity resulting from a yellow filter are presented. Normally, bottom-dwelling fishes lack yellow filters. These filters cause the effective absorbance maximum of scotopic visual pigments to be shifted to longer wavelengths. No correlation has been found between the presence of such filters and the water colour, diet or spectral absorbance of the visual pigment. A possible explanation for the lack of correlation with visual pigments is discussed. Investigation of cone spectral sensitivities may possibly reveal such a correlation. PMID:6398222

  20. Subcutaneous Fat Necrosis of the Newborn: A Case Report of a Term Infant Presenting with Malaise and Fever at Age of 9 Weeks

    PubMed Central

    Chikaodinaka, Ayuk Adaeze; Jude, Anikene Chukwuemeka

    2015-01-01

    Background. Subcutaneous fat necrosis (SFN) is a rare, temporary, self-limited pathology affecting adipose tissue of full-term or postmature neonates. It is a rare entity especially in Nigeria and usually occurs in the first weeks following a complicated delivery. Because it is not very common, diagnosis is easily missed. It may resolve spontaneously without sequelae but patients need to be followed up because of development of late complications especially hypercalcemia. We report a case of SFN of the newborn noted within one week of birth and highlight the need for proper prompt diagnosis and the need for follow-up to assess possible complications. PMID:26635987

  1. [The dengue fever in Mexico. Knowledge for improving the quality in health].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Dolci, Germán; Meljem-Moctezuma, José; Vicente-González, Esther; Venegas-Páez, Francisco Vicente; Mazón-González, Betania; Aguirre-Gas, Héctor Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is a systemic infectious disease of viral etiology, transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. It causes between 50 and 100 million cases annually over 100 countries. In most of the cases it presents as influenza-like illness or undifferentiated fever and more than 500,000 patients develop dengue hemorrhagic fever. In America, dengue fever is considered the most important resurgent disease and its hemorrhagic form is becoming more relevant, especially given the steady increase in the number of deaths. The first outbreaks of dengue in America were described in 1635. Since the apparition of dengue hemorrhagic fever, in 1962, it has been considered a public health problem because half of the population lives in endemic areas. The purpose of this paper is to carry a briefly review of the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of dengue fever, as well as create recommendations in order to improve the quality of care and decrease mortality in these patients. PMID:23331749

  2. Modeled Forecasts of Dengue Fever in San Juan, PR Using NASA Satellite Enhanced Weather Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Cory; Quattrochi, Dale; Zavodsky, Bradley; Case, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus is transmitted between humans and mosquitoes of the genus Aedes and causes approximately 96 million cases of disease (dengue fever) each year (Bhatet al. 2013). Symptoms of dengue fever include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, and eye, muscle and joint pain (CDC). More sever manifestations such as abdominal pain, bleeding from nose and gums, vomiting of blood, and clammy skin occur in rare cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (CDC). Dengue fever occurs throughout tropical and sub-tropical regions worldwide, however, the geographical range and size of epidemics is increasing. Weather and climate are drivers of dengue virus transmission dynamics (Morin et al. 2013) by affecting mosquito proliferation and the virus extrinsic incubation period (i.e. required time for the virus to replicate and disseminate within the mosquito before it can retransmit the virus).

  3. TRAINING PROGRAM FOR NURSING STAFF REGARDING VIRAL HEMORRHAGIC FEVERS IN A MILITARY HOSPITAL.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Megahed, Laila Abdel-Mawla; Saleh, Halla Ahmed Abdullah; Abdelfattah, Magda Abdelhamid; Morsy, Tosson Aly

    2015-08-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) refer to a group of illnesses caused by several distinct families of viruses. In general, the term "viral hemorrhagic fever" is used to describe a severe multisystem syndrome (multisystem in that multiple organ systems in the bpdy are affected). Characteristically, the overall vascular system is damaged, and the body's ability to regulate itself is impaired. These symptoms are often accompanied by hemorrhage (bleeding); however, the bleeding is it rarely life-threatening. While some types of hemorrhagic fever viruses can cause relatively mild illnesses, many of these viruses cause severe, life-threatening disease. The selected disaster diseases for this study included: 1-Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic Fever, 2-Dengue Fever, 3-Ebola Fever, 4-Hem-orrhagic Fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), 5-Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, 6-Lassa Fever, 7-Marburg Fever, 8-Rift Valley Fever and 9-Yellow Fever. The educational training program was given over ten sessions to a group of Staff Nurses. The results showed that the program succeeded in enhancing nurse' knowledge, awareness, responsibility, and obligations toward patients with the Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers The results showed a significant impact of training sessions illuminated in the follow-up test on the knowledge score of nurses in all types of diseases except for the Congo hemorrhagic fever, while, statistical significance varied in some diseases in the study when it comes to the comparison between pretest and post-test. All results confirmed on the positive impact of the training program in enhancing the knowledge of nurses toward VHFs patients and their relevant. There was a significant positive impact of the training sessions on changing the attitude of nurses toward patients with VHFs. This result was confirmed on the collective level since the total scores on tests revealed significant positive impact of the study on changing the attitude of nurses toward relevant patients. The relationship included personal data (age, sex, level of education, & years of experiences) and main variables (knowledge scores & attitude change to patients) with the disease in question. This part revealed a significant relationship between all personal data and total knowledge score among nurses except for the level of education, while all results were insignificant for the relationship between the personal data and the nurses' attitude. Difference between the total nurses' attitude change and the total knowledge scores was significant on the three tests' levels; pre, post, and the follow-up. The overall evaluation showed that six criteria were adopted, regarding the educator, the length of presentations, the evaluation of the studied groups regarding the training facilities, the subject matters, the overall training program, and the importance of diseases in question to their practical working environment. The frequency distribution showed that the educator met nurses' expectations; the material tools were plausible enough to satisfy trainees and presentations were fairly short. But, the training facilities were just excellent by the vast majority of trainees. The entire material met specific needs of relevant health care organizations, but about 43% reported that it was difficult. The vast majority of trainees favored the program under almost all criteria studied in the final questionnaire. Above 50% of trainees were not confident enough toward their ability in applying their knowledge acquired practically. The final evaluation showed that the most important were Rift Valley fever, Ebola fever, Hanta virus pulmonary syndrome, Crimean Congo fever and lastly Dengue fever. Lassa and Marburg fevers were of less interest to nurses. PMID:26485844

  4. CAPRINE HERPESVIRUS 2 ASSOCIATED MALIGNANT CATARRHAL FEVER IN DEER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A presumptive histopathologic diagnosis of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) was made in three cases of disease in Sika deer and white-tailed deer with various degrees of hair loss and skin lesions. Antibody against an epitope conserved among the MCF group viruses was detected in the serum of all dise...

  5. Contamination assessment of arsenic and heavy metals in a typical abandoned estuary wetland--a case study of the Yellow River Delta Natural Reserve.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhenglei; Sun, Zhigao; Zhang, Hua; Zhai, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Coastal and estuarine areas are often polluted by heavy metals that result from industrial production and agricultural activities. In this study, we investigated the concentration trait and vertical pattern of trace elements, such as As, Cd, Ni, Zn, Pb, Cu, and Cr, and the relationship between those trace elements and the soil properties in coastal wetlands using 28 profiles that were surveyed across the Diaokouhe Nature Reserve (DKHNR). The goal of this study is to investigate profile distribution characteristics of heavy metals in different wetland types and their variations with the soil depth to assess heavy metal pollution using pollution indices and to identify the pollution sources using multivariate analysis and sediment quality guidelines. Principal component analysis, cluster analysis, and pollution level indices were applied to evaluate the contamination conditions due to wetland degradation. The findings indicated that the concentration of trace elements decreased with the soil depth, while Cd increases with soil depth. The As concentrations in reed swamps and Suaeda heteroptera surface layers were slightly higher than those in other land use types. All six heavy metals, i.e., Ni, Cu, As, Zn, Cr, and Pb, were strongly associated with PC1 (positive loading) and could reflect the contribution of natural geological sources of metals into the coastal sediments. PC2 is highly associated with Cd and could represent anthropogenic sources of metal pollution. Most of the heavy metals exhibited significant positive correlations with total concentrations; however, no significant correlations were observed between them and the soil salt and soil organic carbon. Soil organic carbon exhibited a positive linear relationship with Cu, Pb, and Zn in the first soil layer (0-20 cm); As, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the second layer (20-40 cm); and As, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the third layer (40-60 cm). Soil organic carbon exhibited only a negative correlation with Cd (P?Yellow River. The results that are associated with trace element contamination would be helpful in providing scientific directions to restore wetlands across the world. PMID:25034234

  6. Familial Mediterranean Fever With Complete Symptomatic Remission During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Taek; Lee, Jae Eun; Kim, Mi Kang; Yoo, Jun Jae; Lee, Gye Yeon; Kae, Sea Hyub; Lee, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder, ethnically restricted and commonly found among populations surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. FMF is the most prevalent autoinflammatory disease; is characterized by recurrent, self-limited episodes of fever with serositis; and is caused by Mediterranean fever gene (MEFV) mutations on chromosome 16. We describe a case of adult-onset FMF with complete symptomatic remission during pregnancy, without the use of colchicine. A 25-year-old woman had presented with periodic fever, abdominal pain, and vomiting since she was 21. Her abdominal computed tomography scan showed intestinal nonrotation. She underwent exploratory laparotomy and appendectomy for her symptoms 1 year prior. She had a symptom-free pregnancy period, but abdominal pain and fever recurred after delivery. Mutation analysis of the MEFV gene revealed two point mutations (p.Leu110Pro and p.Glu148Gln). We report an adult female patient with FMF in Korea with complete symptomatic remission during pregnancy. PMID:26131005

  7. What about My Child and Rheumatic Fever?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... onset of a sore throat • Pain on swallowing • Fever (usually 101-104°F) • Headache • Abdominal pain, nausea, ... or her to a doctor. How does rheumatic fever affect the body? It may affect many parts ...

  8. Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pregnant? What to Expect Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature KidsHealth > Parents > General Health > Your Kid's Body > Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Print A A A Text Size What's ...

  9. Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis) Risk and Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fungal Diseases Share Compartir Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis) Risk & Prevention Who gets valley fever? Anyone who lives in ... in Arizona, 1994-1997: incidence, risk factors, and prevention. J Infect Dis. 2000 Apr;181(4):1428- ...

  10. Fever, headache, and myalgias after deployment to the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Trayers, Frederick J; Simon, John; Praske, Steven P; Christopher, Kevi L

    2008-12-01

    Classic dengue fever presents with a triad of fever, headache, and rash. A "saddleback" fever pattern, morbilliform rash with islets of sparing after apyrexia, and hematological/hepatic abnormalities are common findings. As the most common arbovirus infection, dengue is a significant health threat to deployed military forces worldwide. preventive measures such as personal protective equipment and repellants should be employed by individuals and other preventive measures should be considered for units departing endemic areas. Due to the increased risk of severe or hemorrhagic syndromes in the case of reinfection, limiting redeployment of individuals who have been infected by dengue should be considered, and further research is needed in this area. Development of tetravalent or DNA-based vaccines should be a priority to improve health protection for deploying forces. PMID:19149337

  11. Wicking assay for the rapid detection of Rift Valley fever viral antigens in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Turell, M; Davé, K; Mayda, M; Parker, Z; Coleman, R; Davé, S; Strickman, D

    2011-05-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes outbreaks of severe disease in domestic ungulates as well as humans in Africa. There is a logical concern that RVFV could be introduced into the Americas and cause significant health and economic damage based on the precedent of the introduction and spread of West Nile virus (WNV). Unfortunately, there are currently no licensed diagnostic assays available for RVFV in the Americas. In this work, we report on the ability of a novel dipstick assay, VectorTest RVFV antigen assay, modeled on the VecTest assay for WNV, to detect a RVFV-infected female within a pool of mosquitoes. The dipsticks provided results in <20 min, were easy to use, and did not require a laboratory with containment facilities. Although readily able to detect a mosquito with a disseminated RVFV infection, it only occasionally detected RVFV in a mosquito with a nondisseminated infection, and therefore may fail to detect some pools that actually contain one or more positive mosquitoes. The RVFV dipstick assay was highly specific and did not react with samples to which had been added yellow fever, West Nile, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, sandfly fever Naples, sandfly fever Sicilian, or sandfly fever Toscana viruses. The RVFV assay can provide a rapid, safe, easy-to-use assay to alert public health personnel to the presence of RVFV in mosquitoes. Results from this assay will allow a rapid threat assessment and the focusing of vector control measures in high-risk areas. PMID:21661324

  12. Behavioral fever in newborn rabbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satinoff, E.; Mcewen, G. N., Jr.; Williams, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    New Zealand white rabbit pups aged 12 to 72 hr were divided into three groups and given an intraperitoneal injection of Pseudomonas polysaccharide, a saline vehicle alone, and no treatment, respectively. The animals injected with pyrogen and maintained at an ambient temperature of 32 C for 2 hr did not develop fever. When placed in a thermally graded alleyway, the animals injected with pyrogen selected gradient positions that represented significantly higher temperatures than controls injected with saline. Further stay at selected positions for 5 min caused a considerable increase in the rectal temperature of the pyrogen-injected pups but not that of controls. The results support the hypothesis that newborn rabbits will develop a fever by behavioral means after a single injection of an exogenous pyrogen if the opportunity for thermoregulatory behavior is present. No fever develops if the pups must rely solely on internal thermoregulatory mechanisms. The behavioral system for producing a fever is mature at birth, but an adequate system of internal reflexes does not appear to develop for some days.

  13. "Familial Mediterranean Fever" Professor Brutlag

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    ) patient may experience recurring attacks that include fever, peritonitis (inflammation of the abdomen, specifically the "thin tissue that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers most of the abdominal organs patients will feel intense pain and bloating in the abdomen caused by peritonitis; doctors often note

  14. Monoacylglycerol Lipase Regulates Fever Response

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Nguyen, William; Mori, Simone; Moroncini, Gianluca; Viader, Andreu; Nomura, Daniel K.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Conti, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as ibuprofen have been used for decades to control fever through reducing the levels of the pyrogenic lipid transmitter prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Historically, phospholipases have been considered to be the primary generator of the arachidonic acid (AA) precursor pool for generating PGE2 and other eicosanoids. However, recent studies have demonstrated that monoacyglycerol lipase (MAGL), through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol, provides a major source of AA for PGE2 synthesis in the mammalian brain under basal and neuroinflammatory states. We show here that either genetic or pharmacological ablation of MAGL leads to significantly reduced fever responses in both centrally or peripherally-administered lipopolysaccharide or interleukin-1?-induced fever models in mice. We also show that a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist does not attenuate these anti-pyrogenic effects of MAGL inhibitors. Thus, much like traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, MAGL inhibitors can control fever, but appear to do so through restricted control over prostaglandin production in the nervous system. PMID:26287872

  15. East London Experience with Enteric Fever 2007-2012

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Jayshree; Millar, Michael; Maxeiner, Horst; Freedman, Joanne; Meade, Rachel; Rosmarin, Caryn; Jordan, Matthew; Andrews, Nick; Holliman, Richard; Sefton, Armine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The clinical presentation and epidemiology for patients with enteric fever at two hospitals in East London during 2007–2012 is described with the aim to identify preventive opportunities and to reduce the cost of treatment. Methods A retrospective analysis of case notes from patients admitted with enteric fever during 2007 to 2012 with a microbiologically confirmed diagnosis was undertaken. Details on clinical presentation, travel history, demographic data, laboratory parameters, treatment, patient outcome and vaccination status were collected. Results Clinical case notes were available for 98/129 (76%) patients including 69 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) and 29 Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi (S. Paratyphi). Thirty-four patients (35%) were discharged from emergency medicine without a diagnosis of enteric fever and then readmitted after positive blood cultures. Seventy-one of the 98 patients (72%) were UK residents who had travelled abroad, 23 (23%) were foreign visitors/new entrants to the UK and four (4%) had not travelled abroad. Enteric fever was not considered in the initial differential diagnosis for 48/98 (49%) cases. The median length of hospital stay was 7 days (range 0–57 days). The total cost of bed days for managing enteric fever was £454,000 in the two hospitals (mean £75,666/year). Median time to clinical resolution was five days (range 1–20). Seven of 98 (7%) patients were readmitted with relapsed or continued infection. Six of the 71 (8%) patients had received typhoid vaccination, 34 (48%) patients had not received vaccination, and for 31 cases (44%) vaccination status was unknown. Conclusions Further interventions regarding education and vaccination of travellers and recognition of the condition by emergency medicine clinicians in travellers to South Asia is required. PMID:25790017

  16. Brassicaceae (Mustard family) Yellow rocket

    E-print Network

    and fruit Bright yellow flowers with four petals are found in terminal clusters. Fruit are slender, slightly curved, approximately 1-inch-long capsules with a slender beak at the tip; fruit are nearly square

  17. A Family By Yellow River

    E-print Network

    China Central Television (CCTV)

    2005-04-06

    This filmed 5 years' record of a small village community, namely Lijiashan (Li's Mountains) of Qikou, Shanxi Province, might serve as an illustration for a profoundly changing rural China. A town in the valley of the Yellow River, Qikou lies...

  18. Typhoid fever in Fiji: a reversible plague?

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Corinne N; Kama, Mike; Acharya, Shrish; Bera, Una; Clemens, John; Crump, John A; Dawainavesi, Aggie; Dougan, Gordon; Edmunds, W John; Fox, Kimberley; Jenkins, Kylie; Khan, M Imran; Koroivueta, Josefa; Levine, Myron M; Martin, Laura B; Nilles, Eric; Pitzer, Virginia E; Singh, Shalini; Raiwalu, Ratu Vereniki; Baker, Stephen; Mulholland, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The country of Fiji, with a population of approximately 870 000 people, faces a growing burden of several communicable diseases including the bacterial infection typhoid fever. Surveillance data suggest that typhoid has become increasingly common in rural areas of Fiji and is more frequent amongst young adults. Transmission of the organisms that cause typhoid is facilitated by faecal contamination of food or water and may be influenced by local behavioural practices in Fiji. The Fijian Ministry of Health, with support from Australian Aid, hosted a meeting in August 2012 to develop comprehensive control and prevention strategies for typhoid fever in Fiji. International and local specialists were invited to share relevant data and discuss typhoid control options. The resultant recommendations focused on generating a clearer sense of the epidemiology of typhoid in Fiji and exploring the contribution of potential transmission pathways. Additionally, the panel suggested steps such as ensuring that recommended ciprofloxacin doses are appropriate to reduce the potential for relapse and reinfection in clinical cases, encouraging proper hand hygiene of food and drink handlers, working with water and sanitation agencies to review current sanitation practices and considering a vaccination policy targeting epidemiologically relevant populations. PMID:25066005

  19. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using proteins crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the unexpected hypothesis that the virus releases its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have fairly flat coats, but in TYNV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early stuties of TYMV, but McPherson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central void on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides linked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the void. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine

  20. Association of Mean Platelet Volume with Severity, Serology & Treatment Outcome in Dengue Fever: Prognostic Utility

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. Dengue fever (DF) with its severe manifestations such as dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) has emerged as a major public health problem of international concern. Thrombocytopenia and bleeding are common complications of dengue fever, hence besides platelet counts, there is a need to assess the role of mean platelet volume. Aims Studying association of mean platelet volume (MPV) with severity, serology & treatment outcome to assess its prognostic utility, which can be of great help in limiting morbidity & mortality associated with dengue fever. Materials and Methods The present study was conducted in Central Pathology Lab of SMS Medical College & Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan from the period of March 2013 till October 2013. Blood samples were collected from 200 patients with NS 1 Antigen positivity experiencing febrile illness, clinically consistent with dengue infection. Evaluation of platelet counts, MPV, IgM and IgG antibodies was done in all these cases. Statistical Analysis Categorical data were presented as numbers (percent) and were compared among groups using Chi-square test. Groups compared for demographic data were presented as mean and standard deviation and were compared using student t-test, ANOVA and Post-Hoc Test, Tukey Test using SPSS, version 20 for Windows. Results A total of 200 Dengue fever cases were studied. Out of which, 68% cases were of DF, 23% DHF & 9% DSS i.e. classical dengue fever was most common presentation. Maximum (44%) cases were in age group of 15-24 years. Fever was the presenting complaint in all cases (100%). 98% cases of dengue had thrombocytopenia. MPV showed no significant correlation with severity, serology & treatment outcome, thus excluding its role in dengue cases. Conclusion Mean platelet volume is not important as prognostic parameter in dengue fever. PMID:26673082

  1. Yellow Hypergiants Show Long Secondary Periods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    2012-06-01

    There is observational evidence that intermittent long secondary periods of ~1000 days are present in the well-observed yellow hypergiants ? Cas and HR 8752. The long secondary period is interpreted here as the turnover time of giant convection cells in the convective envelope, as has been already suggested in the case of red giants and supergiants of high luminosity. The observed secondary periods and surface radial velocities of ? Cas and HR 8752 agree with the theoretical predictions, within the expected errors. These results support a theoretical interpretation that now covers the entire initial mass range from 1 to 50 M ? for luminous cool stars.

  2. YELLOW HYPERGIANTS SHOW LONG SECONDARY PERIODS?

    SciTech Connect

    Stothers, Richard B.

    2012-06-01

    There is observational evidence that intermittent long secondary periods of {approx}1000 days are present in the well-observed yellow hypergiants {rho} Cas and HR 8752. The long secondary period is interpreted here as the turnover time of giant convection cells in the convective envelope, as has been already suggested in the case of red giants and supergiants of high luminosity. The observed secondary periods and surface radial velocities of {rho} Cas and HR 8752 agree with the theoretical predictions, within the expected errors. These results support a theoretical interpretation that now covers the entire initial mass range from 1 to 50 M{sub Sun} for luminous cool stars.

  3. MUCOCUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Chikungunya fever (CF) is an arboviral acute febrile illness transmitted by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. After a quiescence of more than three decades, CF has recently re-emerged as a major public health problem of global scale. CF is characterized by an acute onset of high fever associated with a severe disabling arthritis often accompanied by prominent mucocutaneous manifestations. The disease is usually self-limiting, but the joint symptoms and some of the cutaneous features may persist after the defervescence. A wide range of mucocutaneous changes has been described to occur in association with CF during the current epidemic. Besides a morbilliform erythema, hyperpigmentation, xerosis, excoriated papules, aphthous-like ulcers, vesiculobullous and lichenoid eruptions, and exacerbation of pre-existing or quiescent dermatoses had been observed frequently. These unusual features may help in the clinical differential diagnosis of acute viral exanthems mimicking CF. PMID:20418982

  4. Association between sepsis and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Marcelo Rodrigues; Namura, José Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a disease caused by the Gram-negative coccobacillus Rickettsia ricketsii which has been on the rise since the last decade in the USA. The symptoms are common to the many viral diseases, and the classic triad of fever, rash and headache is not always present when RMSF is diagnosed. It may progress to severe cases such as renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and septicaemia. This report aims to present a fulminant case of RMSF associated with sepsis. It describes a female patient's case that quickly progressed to sepsis and death. The patient showed non-specific symptoms for 5 days before being admitted to a hospital. The fact that she lived in an area highly infested with Amblyomma aureolatum ticks was unknown to the medical staff until the moment she died. PMID:23220832

  5. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Keshtkar-Jahromi, Maryam; Sajadi, Mohammad M.; Ansari, Hossein; Mardani, Masoud; Naieni, Kourosh Holakouie

    2014-01-01

    The presence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) in Iran was first identified in studies of livestock sera and ticks in the 1970s, but the first human infection was not diagnosed until 1999. Since that time, the number of cases of CCHF in Iran has markedly increased. Through January 2012, articles in the published literature have reported a total of 870 confirmed cases, with 126 deaths, for a case fatality rate (CFR) of 17.6%. The disease has been seen in 26 of the country’s 31 provinces, with the greatest number of cases in Sistan and Baluchestan, Isfahan, Fars, Tehran, Khorasan, and Khuzestan provinces. The increase in CCHF in Iran has paralleled that in neighboring Turkey, though the number of cases in Turkey has been much larger, with an overall CFR of around 5%. In this article, we review the features of CCHF in Iran, including its history, epidemiology, animal and tick reservoirs, current surveillance and control programs, diagnostic methods, clinical features and experience with ribavirin therapy, and consider possible explanations for the difference in the CFR of CCHF between Iran and Turkey. The emergence of CCHF in Iran calls for countermeasures at many levels to protect the population, but also provides opportunities for studying the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of the disease. PMID:23872313

  6. Comparisons of predictors for typhoid and paratyphoid fever in Kolkata, India

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Dipika; Ali, Mohammad; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Manna, Byomkesh; Deen, Jacqueline L; Acosta, Camilo J; Clemens, John D; Bhattacharya, Sujit K

    2007-01-01

    Background: Exposure of the individual to contaminated food or water correlates closely with the risk for enteric fever. Since public health interventions such as water improvement or vaccination campaigns are implemented for groups of individuals we were interested whether risk factors not only for the individual but for households, neighbourhoods and larger areas can be recognised? Methods: We conducted a large enteric fever surveillance study and analyzed factors which correlate with enteric fever on an individual level and factors associated with high and low risk areas with enteric fever incidence. Individual level data were linked to a population based geographic information systems. Individual and household level variables were fitted in Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) with the logit link function to take into account the likelihood that household factors correlated within household members. Results: Over a 12-month period 80 typhoid fever cases and 47 paratyphoid fever cases were detected among 56,946 residents in two bustees (slums) of Kolkata, India. The incidence of paratyphoid fever was lower (0.8/1000/year), and the mean age of paratyphoid patients was older (17.1 years) than for typhoid fever (incidence 1.4/1000/year, mean age 14.7 years). Residents in areas with a high risk for typhoid fever had lower literacy rates and economic status, bigger household size, and resided closer to waterbodies and study treatment centers than residents in low risk areas. Conclusion: There was a close correlation between the characteristics detected based on individual cases and characteristics associated with high incidence areas. Because the comparison of risk factors of populations living in high versus low risk areas is statistically very powerful this methodology holds promise to detect risk factors associated with diseases using geographic information systems. PMID:17935611

  7. Epidemiology and Pathogenesis of Bolivian Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Michael; Grant, Ashley; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    The etiologic agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), Machupo virus (MACV) is reported to have a mortality rate of 25 to 35%. First identified in 1959, BHF was the cause of a localized outbreak in San Joaquin until rodent population controls were implemented in 1964. The rodent Calomys collosus was identified as the primary vector and reservoir for the virus. Multiple animal models were considered during the 1970’s with the most human-like disease identified in Rhesus macaques but minimal characterization of the pathogenesis has been published since. A reemergence of reported BHF cases has been reported in recent years, which necessitates the further study and development of a vaccine to prevent future outbreaks. PMID:24636947

  8. Periodic fever in MVK deficiency: a patient initially diagnosed with incomplete Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Thors, Valtyr S; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Wulffraat, Nico; van Royen, Annet; Frenkel, Joost; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique; de Koning, Tom J

    2014-02-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder causing 1 of 2 phenotypes, hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome and mevalonic aciduria, presenting with recurrent fever episodes, often starting in infancy, and sometimes evoked by stress or vaccinations. This autoinflammatory disease is caused by mutations encoding the mevalonate kinase (MVK) gene and is classified in the group of periodic fever syndromes. There is often a considerable delay in the diagnosis among pediatric patients with recurrent episodes of fever. We present a case of an 8-week-old girl with fever of unknown origin and a marked systemic inflammatory response. After excluding infections, a tentative diagnosis of incomplete Kawasaki syndrome was made, based on the finding of dilated coronary arteries on cardiac ultrasound and fever, and she was treated accordingly. However, the episodes of fever recurred, and alternative diagnoses were considered, which eventually led to the finding of increased excretion of mevalonic acid in urine. The diagnosis of MKD was confirmed by mutation analysis of the MVK gene. This case shows that the initial presentation of MKD can be indistinguishable from incomplete Kawasaki syndrome. When fever recurs in Kawasaki syndrome, other (auto-)inflammatory diseases must be ruled out to avoid inappropriate diagnostic procedures, ineffective interventions, and treatment delay. PMID:24470648

  9. Self-reported fever, treatment actions and malaria infection prevalence in the northern states of Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of fevers and their management in areas of low malaria transmission in Africa is not well understood. The characteristics of fever, its treatment and association with infection prevalence from a national household sample survey in the northern states of Sudan, an area that represents historically low parasite prevalence, are examined in this study. Methods In October-November 2009, a cluster sample cross-sectional household malaria indicator survey was undertaken in the 15 northern states of the Sudan. Data on household assets and individual level information on age, sex, whether the individual had a fever in the last 14 days and on the day of survey, actions taken to treat the fever including diagnostic services and drugs used and their sources were collected. Consenting household members were asked to provide a finger-prick blood sample and examined for malaria parasitaemia using a rapid diagnostic test (RDT). All proportions and odds ratios were weighted and adjusted for clustering. Results Of 26,471 respondents 19% (n = 5,299) reported a history of fever within the last two weeks prior to the survey and 8% had fever on the day of the survey. Only 39% (n = 2,035) of individuals with fever in last two weeks took any action, of which 43% (n = 875) were treated with anti-malarials. About 44% (n = 382) of malaria treatments were done using the nationally recommended first-line therapy artesunate+sulphadoxine-pryrimethamine (AS+SP) and 13% (n = 122) with non-recommended chloroquine or SP. Importantly 33.9% (n = 296) of all malaria treatments included artemether monotherapy, which is internationally banned for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria. About 53% of fevers had some form of parasitological diagnosis before treatment. On the day of survey, 21,988 individuals provided a finger-prick blood sample and only 1.8% were found positive for Plasmodium falciparum. Infection prevalence was higher among individuals who had fever in the last two weeks (OR = 3.4; 95%CI = 2.6 - 4.4, p < 0.001) or reported fever on the day of survey (OR = 6.2; 95%CI = 4.4 - 8.7, p < 0.001) compared to those without a history of fever. Conclusion Across the northern states of the Sudan, the period prevalence of fever is low. The proportion of fevers that are likely to be malaria is very low. Consequently, parasitological diagnosis of all fevers before treatment is an appropriate strategy for malaria case-management. Improved regulation and supervision of health workers is required to increase the use of diagnostics and remove the practice of prescribing artemisinin monotherapy. PMID:21575152

  10. Smog Yellows Taj Mahal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Built as a monument to the favorite wife of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, the Taj Mahal has watched over the city of Agra, India, since the mid-seventeenth century with its pillars of gleaming white marble. By the spring of 2007, however, one of the world's most visited landmarks was turning yellow, and a panel of India's parliament had little trouble identifying the culprit: pollution. The panel blamed particles of soot and dirt suspended high in the atmosphere for the Taj Mahal's dinginess. The Taj Mahal's home, Agra, sits not far from the base of the Himalaya, and smog regularly collects along the southern side of the mountain range. On May 16, 2007, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the area around Agra, India. The closeup image shows the immediate vicinity of the Taj Majal. The larger image shows the surrounding area. In both pictures, dingy, gray-beige haze obscures the satellite's view of the land surface. India had tried to minimize the adverse impact of air pollution on the famous landmark. According to the BBC, in the late 1990s, India's Supreme Court ordered the closure of thousands of iron foundries and kilns that had belched smoke near the monument. Many of the 3 million tourists who visited the Taj Majal each year approached the monument on horse-drawn carriages or battery-operated buses as fossil-fuel-powered vehicles could not drive within 2 kilometers (1.5 miles). Since those efforts have failed to save the Taj Majal's complexion, Indian officials have considered applying a cleansing mud pack to the monument's surface to draw out the dirt. As India industrializes, smog results, and the Taj Mahal's gleaming whiteness is only one casualty. Pollution has been blamed for a decrease in Indian rice harvests, which had soared during the 'Green Revolution' of the 1960s and 1970s. Haze and dust also appear to bring on the region's monsoon rains earlier than normal.

  11. Economic aspects of Q fever control in dairy goats.

    PubMed

    van Asseldonk, M A P M; Bontje, D M; Backer, J A; Roermund, H J W van; Bergevoet, R H M

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an economic analysis of Q fever control strategies in dairy goat herds in The Netherlands. Evaluated control strategies involved vaccination strategies (being either preventive or reactive) and reactive non-vaccination strategies (i.e., culling or breeding prohibition). Reactive strategies were initiated after PCR positive bulk tank milk or after an abortion storm (abortion percentage in the herd of 5% or more). Preventive vaccination eradicates Q fever in a herd on average within 2 and 7 years (depending on breeding style and vaccination strategy). Economic outcomes reveal that preventive vaccination is always the preferred Q fever control strategy on infected farms and this even holds for a partial analysis if only on-farm costs and benefits are accounted for and human health costs are ignored. Averted human health costs depend to a large extend on the number of infected human cases per infected farm or animal. Much is yet unknown with respect to goat-human transmission rates. When the pathogen is absent in both livestock and farm environment then the "freedom of Q fever disease" is achieved. This would enable a return to non-vaccinated herds but more insight is required with respect to the mechanisms and probability of re-infection. PMID:26164531

  12. Chikungunya fever. Rheumatic manifestations of an emerging disease in Europe.

    PubMed

    Horcada, M Loreto; Díaz-Calderón, Carlos; Garrido, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is a viral disease caused by an alphavirus belonging to the Togaviridae family, transmitted by several species of Aedes mosquitoes: Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (A. albopictus). It is endemic in Africa and Asia with recurrent outbreaks. It is an emerging disease and cases in Europe transmitted by A. albopictus have been established in Mediterranean areas. The first autochthonous cases detected on the Caribbean islands suppose a serious threat of spreading disease to America, which so far has been disease free. Clinical symptoms begin abruptly with fever, skin rash and polyarthritis. Although mortality is low, a high percentage of patients develop a chronic phase defined by persistent arthritis for months or even years. A severe immune response is responsible for joint inflammation. The absence of specific treatment and lack of vaccine requires detailed studies about its immunopathogenesis in order to determine the most appropriate target. PMID:25192946

  13. [Fever and right upper abdominal pain in a 26-year-old returning from travel abroad].

    PubMed

    Fitzner, S; Seiger, J; Landwehr, P; Meier, P N; Weiss, T; Wohlfart, J

    2014-12-01

    Persistent fever and unspecific general symptoms need a complete and detailed medical history and search for infection. We report on a case of amebiasis with liver abscesses of a 26-year-old man. He had stayed several weeks in India and South America. After being free of complaints for 4 months, unspecific general symptoms and fever appeared. Due to proven liver abscesses, a combination treatment was given. Within 12 days, he was free of symptoms and could be discharged. PMID:25070613

  14. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in a patient treated with anti-TNF-alpha inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mays, Rana M; Gordon, Rachel A; Durham, K Celeste; LaPolla, Whitney J; Tyring, Stephen K

    2013-01-01

    Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) is a tick-bourne illness, which can be fatal if unrecognized. We discuss the case of a patient treated with an anti-TNF-alpha inhibitor for rheumatoid arthritis who later developed a generalized erythematous macular eruption accompanied by fever. The clinical findings were suggestive of RMSF, which was later confirmed with serology. Prompt treatment with doxyclycine is recommended for all patients with clinical suspicion of RMSF. PMID:23552004

  15. Describing the Breakbone Fever: IDODEN, an Ontology for Dengue Fever

    PubMed Central

    Mitraka, Elvira; Topalis, Pantelis; Dritsou, Vicky; Dialynas, Emmanuel; Louis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Background Ontologies represent powerful tools in information technology because they enhance interoperability and facilitate, among other things, the construction of optimized search engines. To address the need to expand the toolbox available for the control and prevention of vector-borne diseases we embarked on the construction of specific ontologies. We present here IDODEN, an ontology that describes dengue fever, one of the globally most important diseases that are transmitted by mosquitoes. Methodology/Principal Findings We constructed IDODEN using open source software, and modeled it on IDOMAL, the malaria ontology developed previously. IDODEN covers all aspects of dengue fever, such as disease biology, epidemiology and clinical features. Moreover, it covers all facets of dengue entomology. IDODEN, which is freely available, can now be used for the annotation of dengue-related data and, in addition to its use for modeling, it can be utilized for the construction of other dedicated IT tools such as decision support systems. Conclusions/Significance The availability of the dengue ontology will enable databases hosting dengue-associated data and decision-support systems for that disease to perform most efficiently and to link their own data to those stored in other independent repositories, in an architecture- and software-independent manner. PMID:25646954

  16. Serological and virological features of dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in Thailand from 1999 to 2002.

    PubMed Central

    Anantapreecha, S.; Chanama, S.; A-nuegoonpipat, A.; Naemkhunthot, S.; Sa-Ngasang, A.; Sawanpanyalert, P.; Kurane, I.

    2005-01-01

    Serological and virological features of dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) in Thailand were analysed in 2715 patients from 1999 to 2002. The illness was caused by DEN-1 in 45%, DEN-2 in 32%, DEN-3 in 18% and DEN-4 in 5% of patients. Almost all of the DHF cases caused by DEN-2 and DEN-4 were in secondary infection, while approximately 20% of the DHF cases caused by DEN-1 and DEN-3 were in primary infection. Male:female ratio and age distribution were not different among four serotypes in primary and secondary infections. These results indicate that DEN-1 and DEN-3 induce DHF in both primary and secondary infections, and suggest that DEN-2 and DEN-4 in Thailand are less likely to cause DHF in primary infections. PMID:15962557

  17. Recurrent arthralgias in a patient with previous Mayaro fever infection.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Shawn F; Patel, Paresh R; Herold, Thomas J S

    2005-04-01

    Mayaro fever is an acute, self-limited, febrile, mosquito-borne viral disease manifested by fever, chills, headache, myalgias, and arthralgias. The virus belongs to the family Togaviridae and the genus Alphavirus. Five other mosquito-borne viruses have been described as causing a similar dengue-like illness. The virus was first isolated in 1954, and the first epidemics were described in 1955 in Brazil and Bolivia. Other cases have been reported in Suriname, Brazil, Peru, French Guiana, and Trinidad. Up to 10 to 15% of febrile illnesses in endemic areas have been attributed to Mayaro virus. The exact pathogenesis and pathophysiology among humans is unknown. Animal models have demonstrated necrosis of skeletal muscle, periosteum, perichondrial tissues, and evidence of meningitis and encephalitis. All previous cases of Mayaro fever describe a self-limited illness. No reports of recurrent symptoms exist in the literature. This report describes a case of recurrent arthralgias in a military service member presenting to the emergency department. PMID:15898531

  18. Blackberry Yellow Vein Disease Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new virus disease has emerged in the Midsouth and Southeastern United States and was named blackberry yellow vein disease (BYVD). Originally, it was thought the disease was caused by Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) as the virus was found in many diseased plants and symptoms were very similar to thos...

  19. Fever.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Noah

    2015-11-01

    An earthy smell seeps from the cinderblock room, and a fan in the corner rattles as it circulates the heat. My eyes cross trying to read the square black numbers on the thermometer. I feel achy and tired. I would not be so nervous about the result except that I have been caring for Ebola patients in West Africa. PMID:26556139

  20. Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... serious medical illness, such as a heart problem, sickle cell anemia, diabetes, or cystic fibrosis Recently had an immunization ... serious medical illness, such as a heart problem, sickle cell anemia, diabetes, cystic fibrosis, COPD, or other chronic lung ...

  1. Fevers, genes, and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J G; Kastner, D L

    2008-01-01

    The characterization of patients with recurrent inflammatory syndromes into distinct clinical phenotypes provided early clues to the mode of inheritance of these conditions and facilitated the subsequent identification of causative gene mutations. The prototype autoinflammatory syndrome, familial Mediterranean fever, is characterized by self-limiting episodes of localized inflammation. Hallmarks of the classical autoimmune response are largely absent. The use of positional cloning techniques led to the identification of the causative gene, MEFV, and its product pyrin. This previously unrecognized protein plays an important role in modulating the innate immune response. Cryopyrin, the protein encoded by CIAS1, is mutated in a spectrum of autoinflammatory conditions, the cryopyrinopathies. In response to a wide range of potential pathogens, it forms a macromolecular complex termed the "inflammasome," resulting in caspase-1 activation and subsequent release of the active proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). The role of an established biochemical pathway in regulating inflammation was uncovered by the discovery that the hyperimmunoglobulin D with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) results from mutations in MVK, which encodes an enzyme in the isoprenoid pathway. The discovery that mutations in the gene encoding tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFR1) cause a proinflammatory phenotype was unanticipated, as it seemed more likely that such mutations would instead have resulted in an immunodeficiency pattern. This review describes the clinical phenotypes of autoinflammatory syndromes, the underlying gene mutations, and current concepts regarding their pathophysiology. PMID:18727492

  2. Risk factors associated with an outbreak of dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Toan, D T T; Hoat, L N; Hu, W; Wright, P; Martens, P

    2015-06-01

    Dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF) appears to be emerging in Hanoi in recent years. A case-control study was performed to investigate risk factors for the development of DF/DHF in Hanoi. A total of 73 patients with DF/DHF and 73 control patients were included in the study. The risk factor analysis indicated that living in rented housing, living near uncovered sewers, and living in a house discharging sewage directly into to ponds were all significantly associated with DF/DHF. People living in rented houses were 2·2 times more at risk of DF/DHF than those living in their own homes [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2·2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·1-4·6]. People living in an unhygienic house, or in a house discharging sewage directly to the ponds were 3·4 times and 4·3 times, respectively, more likely to be associated with DF/DHF (aOR 3·4, 95% CI 1-11·7; aOR 4·3, 95% CI 1·1-16·9). These results contribute to the understanding of the dynamics of dengue transmission in Hanoi, which is needed to implement dengue prevention and control programmes effectively and efficiently. PMID:25308711

  3. Persistent Q fever and ischaemic stroke in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    González-Quijada, S; Salazar-Thieroldt, E; Mora-Simón, M J

    2015-04-01

    Whether persistent or chronic Q fever may act as a risk factor for stroke is unknown. A case-control study was conducted in the Hospital Universitario de Burgos (Spain) between February 2011 and December 2012. A total of 803 samples from 634 consecutive hospitalized patients ?65 years old were tested, of whom 111 were cases (patients with prevalent or incident ischaemic stroke and/or transient ischaemic attack) and 523 were controls (patients without ischaemic stroke and/or transient ischaemic attack). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titres phase I and II against Q fever, and IgG antibodies levels against Chlamydia pneumoniae and cytomegalovirus (CMV), were determined using immunofluorescence assay and ELISA methods, respectively. Phase I IgG titres against Coxiella burnetii ?1:256 (compatible with chronic or persistent Q fever) were detected in 16 of 110 (14.5%) cases and in 32 of 524 (6.1%) controls; P = .004, odds ratio (OR) 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 4.9. This ratio was maintained after adjusting for age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, cardioembolic focus, smoking, diabetes, other cardiovascular diseases, C-reactive protein, and leukocyte count (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3 to 5.3). High-titre IgG antibodies (top quartile) against CMV (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3 to 3.5), but not against C. pneumoniae (OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.5 to 1.6), also were associated with ischaemic stroke after adjustment for risk factors. In conclusion, serology compatible with persistent or chronic Q fever is associated with ischaemic stroke in elderly patients. High levels of IgG antibodies against CMV, but not against C. pneumoniae, also are associated with ischaemic stroke in these patients. PMID:25630457

  4. Multicentric Castleman disease presenting with fever.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christiana; Lee-Miller, Cathy; Dishop, Megan K; Cost, Carrye; Wang, Michael; Asturias, Edwin J

    2014-12-01

    Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder that usually manifests with nonspecific symptoms, including fever and lymphadenopathy. Treatment of pediatric MCD varies greatly. A 21-month-old child was diagnosed with MCD after presenting with fever. He had incomplete response to initial therapy directed at interleukin-6, but improved with subsequent chemotherapy. PMID:25282064

  5. The geographical distribution of Q fever

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Martin M.; Bertagna, P.

    1955-01-01

    The results of a WHO-assisted survey of the distribution of Q fever in 32 countries and an analysis of reports published to date indicate that Q fever exists in 51 countries on five continents. Q-fever infection was most often reported in man and the domestic ruminants, such as cattle, sheep, and goats. The disease was found to exist in most countries where investigations were carried out. Notable exceptions were Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, and the Scandinavian countries. With the exception of Poland, where the results were inconclusive, all these countries import relatively few domestic ruminants—the most important animal reservoirs of human Q-fever infection. It seems, therefore, that the traffic of infected ruminants may be one of the most important, if not the most important, means for the geographical spread of Q fever. The importance, if any, of ticks associated with such traffic needs to be defined. PMID:13284560

  6. Satellite Detection of Ebola River Hemorrhagic Fever Epidemics Trigger Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Compton J.; Pinzon, Jorge E.

    2006-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever, named after the Ebola River in Central Africa, first appeared in June 1976, during an outbreak in Nzara and Maridi, Sudan. In September 1976, a separate outbreak was recognized in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). One fatal case was identified in Tandala, DRC, in June 1977, followed by another outbreak in Nzara, Sudan, in July 1979. Ebola hemorrhagic fever outbreaks results in a very high mortality of patients who contract the disease: from 50 to 80% of infected people perish from this highly virulent disease. Death is gruesome, with those afflicted bleeding to death from massive hemorrhaging of organs and capillaries. The disease was not identified again until the end of 1994, when three outbreaks occurred almost simultaneously in Africa. In October, an outbreak was identified in a chimpanzee community studied by primatologists in Tal, Cote d'lvoire, with one human infection. The following month, multiple cases were reported in northeast Gabon in the gold panning camps of Mekouka, Andock, and Minkebe. Later that same month, the putative index case of the 1995 Kikwit, DRC, outbreak was exposed through an unknown mechanism while working in a charcoal pit. In Gabon, two additional outbreaks were reported in February and JuIy,1996, respectively, in Mayibout II, a village 40 km south of the original outbreak in the gold panning camps, and a logging camp between Ovan and Koumameyong, near Booue. The largest Ebola hemorrhagic fever epidemic occurred in Gulu District, Uganda from August 2000 to January 2001. In December 2001, Ebola reappeared in the Ogooue-lvindo Province, Gabon with extension into Mbomo District, The Republic of the Congo lasting until July 2002. Since 2002 there have been several outbreaks of Ebola hemorrhagic fever in Gabon and adjacent areas of Congo. Of interest is the seasonal context and occasional temporal clustering of Ebola hemorrhagic fever outbreaks. Near simultaneous appearances of Ebola epidemics in Nzara, Sudan and Yambuku, DRC in 1976 occurred within two months of each other in two geographic locations separated by hundreds of kilometers involving two separate viral strains (Sudan and Zaire EBO strains). The outbreaks of Tal, Cote d'lvoire; Mekouka, Gabon; and Kikwit, DRC in late 1994 also occurred within months of each other in three different geographic regions involving two different viral strains (Cote d'lvoire and Zaire EBO strains). Fifteen years passed between the 1976-9 and 1994-6 temporal clusters of Ebola cases without identification of additional cases.

  7. Molecular Basis for Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of New World Hemorrhagic Fever Mammarenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Mahmutovic, Selma; Clark, Lars; Levis, Silvana C; Briggiler, Ana M; Enria, Delia A; Harrison, Stephen C; Abraham, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    In the Western hemisphere, at least five mammarenaviruses cause human viral hemorrhagic fevers with high case fatality rates. Junín virus (JUNV) is the only hemorrhagic fever virus for which transfusion of survivor immune plasma that contains neutralizing antibodies ("passive immunity") is an established treatment. Here, we report the structure of the JUNV surface glycoprotein receptor-binding subunit (GP1) bound to a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The antibody engages the GP1 site that binds transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1)-the host cell surface receptor for all New World hemorrhagic fever mammarenaviruses-and mimics an important receptor contact. We show that survivor immune plasma contains antibodies that bind the same epitope. We propose that viral receptor-binding site accessibility explains the success of passive immunity against JUNV and that this functionally conserved epitope is a potential target for therapeutics and vaccines to limit infection by all New World hemorrhagic fever mammarenaviruses. PMID:26651946

  8. Spontaneous enterocutaneous fistula--A rare presentation of enteric fever.

    PubMed Central

    Otaigbe, Barbara Edewele; Anochie, Ifeoma Comfort; Gbobo, Ifefoma

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enterocutaneous fistulae (ECFs) after typhoid perforation have been previously recorded postoperatively due to repair leak or new perforation. Spontaneous ECF formation due to primary intra-abdominal pathologic processes has been attributed to infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and Crohn's disease. A review of the literature has shown no previous report of spontaneous ECF caused primarily by salmonella typhi infection. OBJECTIVE: To report a case of spontaneous ECF due to salmonella typhi infection. CASE REPORT: An eight-year-old female presented with high fever and weight loss of two weeks' duration and a one-week history of a foul-smelling umbilical discharge. She was ill looking, wasted, with evidence of peritonitis. An emergency exploratory laparotomy revealed multiple perforations at the antimesenteric border of the ileocecal valve. With intestinal resection and anastomosis and the use of broad spectrum antibiotics, her clinical state improved. Tissue biopsy showed hemorrhagic necrosis with infiltration by mononuclear inflammatory cells. CONCLUSION: ECF is a rare complication of enteric fever, Enteric fever should therefore be considered in ill children presenting with ECF in the absence of a history of previous surgery, or blunt or penetrating trauma. Images Figure 1 PMID:17052064

  9. [Neuroleptic malignant syndrome : Rare cause of fever of unknown origin].

    PubMed

    Chackupurakal, R; Wild, U; Kamm, M; Wappler, F; Reske, D; Sakka, S G

    2015-07-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a possible cause of fever of unknown origin (FUO) and is a potentially fatal adverse effect of various drugs, especially of neuroleptics. First generation antipsychotics, such as received by the patient described in this article, are more likely to cause NMS than second generation antipsychotics. The key symptoms are the development of severe muscle rigidity and elevated temperature associated with the use of neuroleptic medication. Malignant catatonia (MC) is an important differential diagnosis of NMS. While neuroleptics can trigger NMS and must be immediately discontinued if NMS occurs, neuroleptic therapy represents the first line treatment for MC. This article describes the case of a patient with schizoaffective disorder where initially the diagnosis of NMS was not clear. Eventually, fever and a markedly elevated serum creatine kinase (CK) led to the correct diagnosis and the appropriate therapy with dantrolene, bromocriptine and amantadine. Furthermore, a thorough review of the currently available literature on NMS is provided. PMID:26122200

  10. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rai, Mohammad A; Khanani, Mohammad R; Warraich, Haider J; Hayat, Abbas; Ali, Syed H

    2008-06-01

    Crimean-Congo virus, the causative agent of Crimean-Congo Virus Fever (CCVF) is endemic in Pakistan. Cases are documented sporadically ever year, mostly at and around the time of Eid-ul-Adha, an Islamic festival, celebrated on day 10 through 13 of the 12th month of each lunar calendar year. At this time of the year in Pakistan, livestock are brought down to the urban areas from the rural parts of the country. Animals are housed in open spaces and private houses until they are slaughtered during the 3 days of Eid-ul-Adha. This allows the CCHF virus, which is carried by a tick that inhabits the animal hide, to be transmitted through unprotected contact with live animals as well as through contact with animal blood subsequent to its slaughter. In this report, a typical case of CCVF is described that was encountered in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. A number of issues pertaining to the management of recurrent outbreaks of CCVF in the country are discussed. PMID:18428123

  11. Travelers' Health: Rickettsial (Spotted and Typhus Fevers) and Related Infections (Anaplasmosis and Ehrlichiosis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... spotted fever), R. rickettsii (known as both Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Brazilian spotted fever), O. tsutsugamushi ( ... lymphadenopathy R. raoultii Tick Unknown Europe, Asia Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Brazilian spotted fever, febre maculosa, São ...

  12. Antimicrobial therapies for Q fever.

    PubMed

    Kersh, Gilbert J

    2013-11-01

    Q fever is caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii and has both acute and chronic forms. The acute disease is a febrile illness often with headache and myalgia that can be self-limiting, whereas the chronic disease typically presents as endocarditis and can be life threatening. The normal therapy for the acute disease is a 2 week course of doxycycline, whereas chronic disease requires 18-24 months of doxycycline in combination with hydroxychloroquine. Alternative treatments are used for pregnant women, young children and those who cannot tolerate doxycycline. Doxycycline resistance is rare, but has been reported. Co-trimoxazole is a currently recommended alternative treatment, but quinolones, rifampin and newer macrolides may also provide some benefit. PMID:24073941

  13. Antimicrobial therapies for Q fever

    PubMed Central

    Kersh, Gilbert J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Q fever is caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii and has both acute and chronic forms. The acute disease is a febrile illness often with headache and myalgia that can be self-limiting whereas the chronic disease typically presents as endocarditis and can be life threatening. The normal therapy for the acute disease is a two week course of doxycycline, whereas chronic disease requires 18-24 months of doxycycline in combination with hydroxychloroquine. Alternative treatments are used for pregnant women, young children, and those who cannot tolerate doxycycline. Doxycycline resistance is rare but has been reported. Co-trimoxazole is a currently recommended alternative treatment, but quinolones, rifampin, and newer macrolides may also provide some benefit. PMID:24073941

  14. Fever as an Initial Manifestation of Enthesitis-Related Arthritis Subtype of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruru; Cao, Lanfang; Kong, Xianming; Liu, Xuesong; Xue, Haiyan; Shen, Lijuan; Li, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Objective We wished to determine the prevalence of fever as one of the first symptoms of the enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also, we wished to ascertain if ERA patients with fever at disease onset differed from those without fever. Methods Consecutive cases of ERA were diagnosed and followed in a retrospective observational study from 1998 to 2013. Information about clinical/laboratory data, medications, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and disease activity during the study period was also recorded. Results A total of 146 consecutive ERA patients were assessed. Among them, 52 patients (35.6%) had fever as one of the first symptoms at disease onset. Compared with ERA patients without fever at disease onset, patients with fever had significantly more painful joints (3.5 vs. 2.8), more swollen joints (1.1 vs. 0.8), and more enthesitis (1.0 vs. 0.4) (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Patients with fever had significantly higher mean values of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, platelet count, and child health assessment questionnaire (CHAQ) scores (40.8 vs. 26.4 mm/h; 20.7 vs. 9.7 mg/dL; 353.2×109/L vs. 275.6×109/L; 1.0 vs. 0.8, respectively; all p<0.05). During two-year follow-up, CHAQ score, number of flares, as well as the number of patients treated with oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids and combination therapy with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, were significantly higher in ERA patients with fever. Conclusions Fever was a frequent manifestation of ERA. ERA patients with fever had more active disease at disease onset and poorer outcomes than ERA patients without fever. PMID:26030261

  15. Fever in the returning traveller: the importance of sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Philip, K E J; Baddeley, R; Jenkins, M; Bovill, B

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 28-year-old man, presenting with episodes of fever and rigours, having recently returned from Cameroon and Uganda. Initial investigations for malaria were negative, and the patient was sent home without a clear diagnosis. Subsequent review of the blood film revealed the presence of Plasmodium ovale. This case highlights the importance of repeated and careful inspection of blood films, given the relatively low sensitivity of rapid diagnostic tests in P. ovale infection. It also illustrates the importance of the travel history in the diagnosis of malaria. PMID:26464405

  16. Fever following an Epidural Blood Patch in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Hunyady, Agnes I.; Anderson, Corrie T. M.; Kuratani, John D.; Kundu, Anjana

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that children suffer from the consequences of spontaneous or iatrogenic intracranial hypotension. Pediatric epidural blood patch is gaining popularity because of its ability to alter cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and to alleviate headaches attributed to low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. There is, however, still not enough data to document the safety profile of an epidural blood patch. Here we describe a case of a fever in a child temporally related to the administration of an epidural blood patch. This case depicts the dilemmas in making the diagnosis and instituting treatment for complications of this procedure in the pediatric population. PMID:23029626

  17. Interleukin 6 blockade for hyperimmunoglobulin D and periodic fever syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shendi, Hiba M; Devlin, Lisa A; Edgar, John David

    2014-03-01

    Hyperimmunoglobulin D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) is a rare, autoinflammatory condition caused by mutations in the mevalonate kinase gene. There is no standard treatment for HIDS, and randomized controlled trials are lacking. Corticosteroids, colchicine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, statins, and cyclosporine are of limited efficacy in controlling this condition. Recent case reports suggest that most patients respond to etanercept or anakinra. Interleukin 6 blockade in HIDS has not been described. We report the case of a 13-year-old girl with HIDS, who failed to respond to colchicine, corticosteroids, etanercept, and anakinra but was successfully treated with the anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody, tocilizumab. PMID:24561416

  18. SCID mouse model for lethal Q fever.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Masako; Naganawa, Takashi; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Fukushi, Hideto; Masegi, Toshiaki; Hirai, Katsuya

    2003-08-01

    Q fever, a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, has many manifestations in humans. Endocarditis is the most serious complication of Q fever. Animal models are limited to acute pulmonary or hepatic disease and reproductive disorders. An appropriate experimental animal model for Q fever endocarditis does not yet exist. In this study, severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice infected with C. burnetii showed persistent clinical symptoms and died, whereas immunocompetent mice similarly infected became asymptomatic and survived. The SCID mice examined in this study had severe chronic lesions in their primary organs: the heart, lung, spleen, liver, and kidney. The heart lesions of the SCID mice were similar to those in humans with chronic Q fever endocarditis: they had focal calcification and expanded macrophages containing C. burnetii. The 50% lethal dose of C. burnetii in SCID mice was at least 10(8) times less than that in immunocompetent mice. The SCID mouse is highly susceptible to C. burnetii, and the immunodeficiency of the host enhances the severity of Q fever. This animal model could provide a new tool for the study of chronic Q fever and Q fever in immunodeficient hosts. PMID:12874353

  19. Experience- and egg-mediated oviposition behaviour in the yellow fever mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (=Aedes aegypti)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animals may adapt foraging behavior in variable environments using environmental information. For repeated behaviors such as feeding or reproduction, past experiences can provide this information to guide future decision-making. By changing behavior to be more efficient in an animal’s specific env...

  20. Phoenix dactylifera L. spathe essential oil: Chemical composition and repellent activity against the yellow fever mosquito

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Date palm, Phoenix dactylifera L. (Arecaceae), grows commonly in the Arabian Peninsula and is traditionally used to treat various diseases. The aim of the present study was to identify chemical composition of the essential oil and to investigate the repellent activity. The essential oil of P. dacty...

  1. Experience- and age-mediated oviposition behaviour in the yellow fever mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (=Aedes aegypti).

    PubMed

    Ruktanonchai, N W; Lounibos, L P; Smith, D L; Allan, S A

    2015-09-01

    In repeated behaviours such as those of feeding and reproduction, past experiences can inform future behaviour. By altering their behaviour in response to environmental stimuli, insects in highly variable landscapes can tailor their behaviour to their particular environment. In particular, female mosquitoes may benefit from plasticity in their choice of egg-laying site as these sites are often temporally variable and clustered. The opportunity to adapt egg-laying behaviour to past experience also exists for mosquito populations as females typically lay eggs multiple times throughout their lives. Whether experience and age affect egg-laying (or oviposition) behaviour in the mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (=Aedes aegypti) (Diptera: Culicidae) was assessed using a wind tunnel. Initially, gravid mosquitoes were provided with a cup containing either repellent or well water. After ovipositing in these cups, the mosquitoes were blood-fed and introduced into a wind tunnel. In this wind tunnel, an oviposition cup containing repellent was placed in the immediate vicinity of the gravid mosquitoes. A cup containing well water was placed at the opposite end of the tunnel so that if the females flew across the chamber, they encountered the well water cup, in which they readily laid eggs. Mosquitoes previously exposed to repellent cups became significantly more likely to later lay eggs in repellent cups, suggesting that previous experience with suboptimal oviposition sites informs mosquitoes of the characteristics of nearby oviposition sites. These results provide further evidence that mosquitoes modify behaviour in response to environmental information and are demonstrated in a vector species in which behavioural plasticity may be ecologically and epidemiologically meaningful. PMID:25982411

  2. Multicolored silver nanoparticles for multiplexed disease diagnostics: distinguishing dengue, yellow fever, and Ebola viruses.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chun-Wan; de Puig, Helena; Tam, Justina O; Gómez-Márquez, José; Bosch, Irene; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly; Gehrke, Lee

    2015-04-01

    Rapid point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices are needed for field-forward screening of severe acute systemic febrile illnesses. Multiplexed rapid lateral flow diagnostics have the potential to distinguish among multiple pathogens, thereby facilitating diagnosis and improving patient care. Here, we present a platform for multiplexed pathogen detection using multi-colored silver nanoplates. This design requires no external excitation source and permits multiplexed analysis in a single channel, facilitating integration and manufacturing. PMID:25672590

  3. Heritable CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing in the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shengzhang; Lin, Jingyi; Held, Nicole L.; Clem, Rollie J.; Passarelli, A. Lorena; Franz, Alexander W. E.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo targeted gene disruption is a powerful tool to study gene function. Thus far, two tools for genome editing in Aedes aegypti have been applied, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN). As a promising alternative to ZFN and TALEN, which are difficult to produce and validate using standard molecular biological techniques, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated sequence 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system has recently been discovered as a "do-it-yourself" genome editing tool. Here, we describe the use of CRISPR/Cas9 in the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. In a transgenic mosquito line expressing both Dsred and enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) from the eye tissue-specific 3xP3 promoter in separated but tightly linked expression cassettes, we targeted the ECFP nucleotide sequence for disruption. When supplying the Cas9 enzyme and two sgRNAs targeting different regions of the ECFP gene as in vitro transcribed mRNAs for germline transformation, we recovered four different G1 pools (5.5% knockout efficiency) where individuals still expressed DsRed but no longer ECFP. PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing of PCR amplicons revealed indels in the ECFP target gene ranging from 2-27 nucleotides. These results show for the first time that CRISPR/Cas9 mediated gene editing is achievable in Ae. aegypti, paving the way for further functional genomics related studies in this mosquito species. PMID:25815482

  4. Epidemiology of Typhoid Fever in Iran during Last Five Decades from 1962–2011

    PubMed Central

    MASOUMI ASL, Hossein; GOUYA, Mohammad Mehdi; NABAVI, Mahmood; AGHILI, Nooshin

    2013-01-01

    Background Typhoid fever is one of the most important infectious diseases transmitted by contaminated food and water. This study aimed at epidemiological features of disease during the last five decades, over the period from 1962–2011. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted using typhoid fever national surveillance data. Results: The highest incidence of typhoid fever was registered in 1965 with 133.4 /100,000 cases/year and the lowest in 2011 with 0.52/100,000 cases/year. Typhoid fever incidence in Iran had three phases. Before the year 1969, with high incidence >100 (phase 1), the period between 1969–1996 with medium (10–100), (Phase 2) and the phase 3 has inaugurated from 1996 until now with low incidence rate less than 10 /100,000. Kermanshah Province was the most infected area. Most cases were occurred in warm months in 2010. Of 196 (31%) cases were under 15 years old whom were more affected. 53.6% of total cases in 2010 were female and 56.6% stayed in rural area. In 2010, 27.8% cases were confirmed. Among positive cases, the sources of culture were 46.8% stool, 37.2% blood, 14.6% urine and 1.2% bone marrow. Following treatment, 97.8% of cases were recovered completely and in 1.6% of cases had experienced complications and only 0.6% of confirmed cases have been died. Conclusion: As a result of development in socio-economic condition in Iran, the typhoid fever incidence has been dramatically declined from high (133.4/100,000 cases/year) in 1965 to low (0.52/100,000 cases/year) in 2011. PMID:23513182

  5. Association of Human Q Fever with Animal Husbandry, Taiwan, 2004–2012

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chung-Hsu; Chang, Lin-Li; Lin, Jiun-Nong; Liao, Ming-Huei; Liu, Shyh-Shyan; Lee, Hsu-Hsun; Lin, Hsi-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    In Taiwan, Q fever cases in humans began increasing in 2004 and peaked in 2007 but dramatically declined in 2008 and 2011. Cases were significantly correlated with the number of goats. The decline might be associated with the collateral effects of measures to control goat pox in 2008 and 2010. PMID:26583537

  6. Association of Human Q Fever with Animal Husbandry, Taiwan, 2004-2012.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chung-Hsu; Chang, Lin-Li; Lin, Jiun-Nong; Liao, Ming-Huei; Liu, Shyh-Shyan; Lee, Hsu-Hsun; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2015-12-01

    In Taiwan, Q fever cases in humans began increasing in 2004 and peaked in 2007 but dramatically declined in 2008 and 2011. Cases were significantly correlated with the number of goats. The decline might be associated with the collateral effects of measures to control goat pox in 2008 and 2010. PMID:26583537

  7. Naturally occurring sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever in North American pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two cases of sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in pigs were diagnosed on a small farm in New York State, and in Kentucky, U.S.A. In both cases initial diagnosis was based on histopathological changes representing typical lymphoproliferative vasculitis in multiple tissues of the affect...

  8. Molecular Diagnostics for Lassa Fever at Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Nigeria: Lessons Learnt from Two Years of Laboratory Operation

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Meike; Gabriel, Martin; Ölschläger, Stephan; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Folarin, Onikepe; Phelan, Eric; Ehiane, Philomena E.; Ifeh, Veritas E.; Uyigue, Eghosasere A.; Oladapo, Yemisi T.; Muoebonam, Ekene B.; Osunde, Osagie; Dongo, Andrew; Okokhere, Peter O.; Okogbenin, Sylvanus A.; Momoh, Mojeed; Alikah, Sylvester O.; Akhuemokhan, Odigie C.; Imomeh, Peter; Odike, Maxy A. C.; Gire, Stephen; Andersen, Kristian; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Happi, Christian T.; Akpede, George O.; Günther, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Background Lassa fever is a viral hemorrhagic fever endemic in West Africa. However, none of the hospitals in the endemic areas of Nigeria has the capacity to perform Lassa virus diagnostics. Case identification and management solely relies on non-specific clinical criteria. The Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital (ISTH) in the central senatorial district of Edo State struggled with this challenge for many years. Methodology/Principal Findings A laboratory for molecular diagnosis of Lassa fever, complying with basic standards of diagnostic PCR facilities, was established at ISTH in 2008. During 2009 through 2010, samples of 1,650 suspected cases were processed, of which 198 (12%) tested positive by Lassa virus RT-PCR. No remarkable demographic differences were observed between PCR-positive and negative patients. The case fatality rate for Lassa fever was 31%. Nearly two thirds of confirmed cases attended the emergency departments of ISTH. The time window for therapeutic intervention was extremely short, as 50% of the fatal cases died within 2 days of hospitalization—often before ribavirin treatment could be commenced. Fatal Lassa fever cases were older (p?=?0.005), had lower body temperature (p<0.0001), and had higher creatinine (p<0.0001) and blood urea levels (p<0.0001) than survivors. Lassa fever incidence in the hospital followed a seasonal pattern with a peak between November and March. Lassa virus sequences obtained from the patients originating from Edo State formed—within lineage II—a separate clade that could be further subdivided into three clusters. Conclusions/Significance Lassa fever case management was improved at a tertiary health institution in Nigeria through establishment of a laboratory for routine diagnostics of Lassa virus. Data collected in two years of operation demonstrate that Lassa fever is a serious public health problem in Edo State and reveal new insights into the disease in hospitalized patients. PMID:23029594

  9. Familial Mediterranean Fever in Armenian population.

    PubMed

    Sarkisian, T; Ajrapetian, H; Beglarian, A; Shahsuvarian, G; Egiazarian, A

    2008-03-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is an inherited, recessively transmitted inflammatory condition usually occurred in populations from Mediterranean descent (Armenian, Arab, Jewish, Greek, Turkish and Italian populations). Identification of MEFV gene mutations has been of tremendous help for early diagnosis of most cases. The frequency of FMF is different. The prevalence of heterozygous carriers of one of the mutations of MEFV gene is as high as 1 in 5 healthy individuals in Armenia. Genetic testing of this rare Mendelian disorder (MIM no 249100) is efficient for early and prenatal diagnosis of the disease, especially for atypic cases, for carrier screening and pregnancy planning since certain mutations have been shown to have significant correlation with renal amyloidosis (RA), the most severe possible manifestation of FMF. Also genetic testing is very important for colchicine therapy correction. Twelve MEFV mutations are identified in 7000 Armenian FMF patients. Investigation of MEFV mutations in FMF patients (heterozygotes, homozygotes and compound heterozygotes) in comparison with healthy individuals has revealed the most frequent mutations and genotypes, and the information was received about the heterozygous carriers and genotype-phenotype correlation. In heterozygote carriers the most prevalent and severe cases are caused by the presence of a single M694V mutation. Our results could confirm that the MEFV gene analysis provides the first objective diagnostic criterion for FMF (characterisation of the two MEFV mutated alleles in more than 90% of the patients). Molecular testing is also used to screen the MEFV gene for mutations in patients with a clinical suspicion of FMF. We also demonstrated the unfavourable prognostic value of the M694V homozygous genotype, and provided the first molecular evidence for incomplete penetrance and pseudo-dominant transmission of the disease. Overall, these data, which confirm the involvement of the MEFV gene in the development of FMF, should be essential in clinical practice, leading to new ways of managment and treatment of FMF patients. PMID:18403822

  10. [Q fever: bone marrow characteristic granuloma].

    PubMed

    Szablewski, Vanessa; Costes, Valérie; Rousset, Thérèse; Mania, Emile; El Aoufi, Nasreddine

    2012-08-01

    Q fever is a worldwise zoonosis, caused by an obligate intracellular bacterium, Coxiella burnetii. In humans, acute disease, when symptomatic, can manifest by a flu-like illness, pneumonia or hepatitis. Patients with predisposing conditions can evolve with chronic disease, which major clinical presentation is endocarditis with negative routine blood cultures. Histological studies of Q fever based on infected organs biopsies (liver and bone marrow) have demonstrated a distinctive type of granuloma, typically appearing as a "doughnut" granuloma, characterized by a central clean space surrounded by inflammatory cells and rimmed with an eosinophilic fibrinoid material. We describe a 37-year-old man, admitted to hospital for persistent fever. Bone marrow biopsy showed the characteristic "doughnut" granuloma, suggesting a Q fever. Diagnosis was then confirmed by serological tests for C. burnetii. PMID:23010400

  11. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever) Note: Javascript is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Legionella Home About the Disease Causes & Transmission Signs & Symptoms ...

  12. Fever - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... XYZ List of All Topics All Fever - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (???????) Bosnian (Bosanski) Chinese - Simplified (????) French (français) Japanese (???) Korean (???) Portuguese (português) Russian (???????) Somali (af Soomaali) ...

  13. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, petechial rash (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a potentially fatal infection transmitted to humans by ticks. This photograph shows the classical appearing rash which often begins on the wrists and ankles, and spreads rapidly towards the center of the ...

  14. Causes of Fever in Rural Southern Laos

    PubMed Central

    Mayxay, Mayfong; Sengvilaipaseuth, Onanong; Chanthongthip, Anisone; Dubot-Pérès, Audrey; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Parola, Philippe; Craig, Scott B.; Tulsiani, Suhella; Burns, Mary-Anne; Khanthavong, Maniphone; Keola, Siamphay; Pongvongsa, Tiengkham; Raoult, Didier; Dittrich, Sabine; Newton, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of fever in rural Lao People's Democratic Republic (Laos) has remained obscure until recently owing to the lack of laboratory facilities. We conducted a study to determine the causes of fever among 229 patients without malaria in Savannakhet Province, southern Laos; 52% had evidence of at least one diagnosis (45% with single and 7% with apparent multiple infections). Among patients with only one diagnosis, dengue (30.1%) was the most common, followed by leptospirosis (7.0%), Japanese encephalitis virus infection (3.5%), scrub typhus (2.6%), spotted fever group infection (0.9%), unspecified flavivirus infection (0.9%), and murine typhus (0.4%). We discuss the empirical treatment of fever in relation to these findings. PMID:26149859

  15. Titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ataya, Ali; Kline, Kristopher P.; Cope, Jessica; Alnuaimat, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Yellow nail syndrome is a rare disease of unclear etiology. We describe a patient who develops yellow nail syndrome, with primary nail and sinus manifestations, shortly after amalgam dental implants. A study of the patient's nail shedding showed elevated nail titanium levels. The patient had her dental implants removed and had complete resolution of her sinus symptoms with no change in her nail findings. Since the patient's nail findings did not resolve we do not believe titanium exposure is a cause of her yellow nail syndrome but perhaps a possible relationship exists between titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome that requires further studies.

  16. Familial Mediterranean fever in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Pagava, K; Rauscher, B; Korinteli, I A; Shonvadze, D; Kriegshauser, G; Oberkanins, Ch

    2014-05-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder caused by mutations in the MEFV gene. Carrier rates are known to be particularly high among Sephardic Jews, Turks, Armenians and Arab populations. Our literature survey regarding FMF and MEFV mutations in Georgia revealed a lack of existing studies. We applied multiplex PCR and reverse-hybridization teststrips (FMF StripAssay) to simultaneously analyze twelve common MEFV mutations in DNA samples from dried blood on filter cards, which had been obtained from 202 unselected newborns at various hospitals in Tbilisi, Georgia. We found 30 samples to be heterozygous and one to be compound heterozygous or carrier of a complex allele (two mutations in cis). The carrier rate of MEFV mutations (15.3%) was remarkable. The most frequently observed variants were E148Q (15x), M680I G/C (5x) and M694V (4x). Five other MEFV mutations were found at lower prevalence (V726A, A744S, R761H: 2x each; P369S, F479L: 1x each). Based on these new findings, the awareness for FMF and the availability of appropriate testing should be further promoted in Georgia. PMID:24940862

  17. A unique Yellow River-derived distal subaqueous delta in the Yellow Sea

    E-print Network

    Liu, Paul

    River sediments carried down by the coastal current, interacting with the local waves, tidesA unique Yellow River-derived distal subaqueous delta in the Yellow Sea Z.S. Yang a , J.P. Liu b high-resolution Chirp sonar profiles reveal a unique Yellow River-derived, alongshore distributed

  18. Flesh color inheritance and gene interactions among canary yellow, pale yellow and red watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two loci, C and i-C were previously reported to determine flesh color between canary yellow and red watermelon. Recently LCYB was found as a color determinant gene for canary yellow (C) and co-dominant CAPS marker was developed to identify canary yellow and red alleles. Another report suggested th...

  19. Commercial yellow sticky strips more attractive than yellow boards to western cherry fruit fly (Dipt., Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bright yellow sticky rectangles made of paper boards were previously identified as the most effective traps for capturing western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae). Thin rectangular sheets of yellow plastic allow higher light passage than yellow boards and may b...

  20. [To communicate with who doesn't communicate: an "unexplained" fever in an elderly woman with Alzheimer's dementia at an advanced stage].

    PubMed

    Manzo, Ciro

    2015-07-01

    Fever of unknown origin is per se a -diagnostic challenge. In elderly patients with advanced Alzheimer disease the impairment of verbal communication adds another critical element. We describe the clinical case of an elderly woman in which fever, proved secondary to Horton disease, was accompanied by manifestations misinterpreted as behavioral disorders. PMID:26228726

  1. Familial Mediterranean Fever: Diagnosing as Early as 3 Months of Age

    PubMed Central

    Aldemir, Esin; Aydo?mu?, Çi?dem; Aydo?an, Gönül; Kavuncuo?lu, Sultan

    2014-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever is an autosomal recessive disease. Major symptoms of disease are recurrent fever accompanied by serositis attacks. The disease is usually diagnosed before 20 years of age. Symptoms related to FMF are noted when children become more verbal, usually after 2 years of age. In this case report, the youngest patient with the diagnosis of FMF is presented. She was consulted to pediatric rheumatology for the high acute phase response and fever. It was learned that her mother had recurrent swelling of her ankle joints. Mutation analysis was performed and two homozygous mutations (M694V and R202Q) were identified. She was diagnosed as FMF at 3 months of age and colchicine was started. She responded to colchicine. Her uncontrolled acute phase response declined gradually. This case was reported to point out the importance of early remembrance of autoinflammatory diseases even at very early ages especially at endemic countries. PMID:24800095

  2. Subacute, tetracycline-responsive, granulomatous osteomyelitis in an adult man, consistent with Q fever infection.

    PubMed

    Bayard, Cornelia; Dumoulin, Alexis; Ikenberg, Kristian; Günthard, Huldrych F

    2015-01-01

    Osteomyelitis due to Coxiella burnetii infection is a rare condition in adults. We report the case of a healthy young man presenting with subacute osteomyelitis of the left cheek bone, evolving gradually after an episode of acute febrile illness. Histological evaluation confirmed subacute granulomatous inflammation. Despite antibody titres not reaching the standard cut-off for chronic Q fever (phase I IgG 1/160, phase II IgG 1/2560), osteomyelitis was radiologically and histologically confirmed. A 6-month course of doxycycline/hydroxychloroquine brought clinical and radiological cure while various conventional antibiotic treatments had failed to improve the clinical condition. Currently, at 6-month follow-up, no relapse has occurred and antibody titres have declined. A shorter course of doxycycline/hydroxychloroquine than that used for chronic Q fever osteomyelitis may be sufficient to treat subacute Q fever osteomyelitis in some cases. PMID:26661283

  3. Scaling-up attention to nonmalaria acute undifferentiated fever.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Kassim, Ani Izzuani Binti Mohd

    2012-06-01

    Studies have reported that only a small fraction of fever cases in malaria-endemic areas are actually caused by malaria. Much greater emphasis is now needed to step up attention to the appropriate management of nonmalarial acute undifferentiated febrile illness. There is an overlap at the start of clinical manifestations of different febrile illnesses which makes it difficult to adhere to the clinical guidelines. The development of rigorous guidelines based on high quality research and a consensus from the core group of content experts are needed. An innovative financing mechanism for universal access to such appropriate management should also be considered. PMID:22541873

  4. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section 28.441 Agriculture... § 28.441 Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper than that of...

  5. 7 CFR 28.442 - Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.442 Section 28.442 Agriculture...Stained Cotton § 28.442 Middling Yellow Stained Color. Middling Yellow Stained Color is American Upland cotton which in color is...

  6. 7 CFR 28.442 - Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.442 Section 28.442 Agriculture...Stained Cotton § 28.442 Middling Yellow Stained Color. Middling Yellow Stained Color is American Upland cotton which in color is...

  7. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section 28.441 Agriculture... § 28.441 Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper than that of...

  8. 7 CFR 28.442 - Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.442 Section 28.442 Agriculture...Stained Cotton § 28.442 Middling Yellow Stained Color. Middling Yellow Stained Color is American Upland cotton which in color is...

  9. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section 28.441 Agriculture... § 28.441 Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper than that of...

  10. 7 CFR 28.442 - Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.442 Section 28.442 Agriculture...Stained Cotton § 28.442 Middling Yellow Stained Color. Middling Yellow Stained Color is American Upland cotton which in color is...

  11. 7 CFR 28.442 - Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.442 Section 28.442 Agriculture...Stained Cotton § 28.442 Middling Yellow Stained Color. Middling Yellow Stained Color is American Upland cotton which in color is...

  12. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section 28.441 Agriculture... § 28.441 Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper than that of...

  13. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section 28.441 Agriculture... § 28.441 Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper than that of...

  14. Multiple neural mechanisms of fever.

    PubMed

    Székely, M; Balaskó, M; Kulchitsky, V A; Simons, C T; Ivanov, A I; Romanovsky, A A

    2000-12-20

    In rats, fevers induced by moderate-to-high doses of intravenous lipopolysaccharide consist of three phases (phases 1, 2 and 3) with body temperature peaks at approximately 1, 2, and 5 h postinjection, respectively. In this study, the effects of bilateral truncal subdiaphragmatic vagotomy and intraperitoneal capsaicin desensitization on febrile phases 1-3 were assessed in adult Wistar rats. Surgical vagotomy was performed approximately 30 d before the experiment; this procedure interrupts both afferent and efferent vagal fibers. Capsaicin was administered intraperitoneally in two consecutive injections (2 and 3 mg/kg, 3 h apart) 1 week prior to the experiment; this procedure desensitizes afferent fibers, primarily within the abdominal cavity, and does not lead to the known thermal effects of systemic capsaicin desensitization. At a neutral ambient temperature, the rats were given Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (10 microg/kg) through a preimplanted jugular catheter, and their colonic temperature wes measured by thermocouples for 7 h. The control rats exhibited the typical triphasic febrile responses. Confirming our earlier studies, subdiaphragmatic vagotomy did not affect phases 1 and 2; it did, however, result in a 2.5-fold reduction of phase 3. Capsaicin desensitization modified the febrile response differently: phases 2 and 3 were unaffected, but phase 1 disappeared. We suggest that neural afferent fibers (nonvagal but perhaps vagal as well) play an important role in the early febrile response (phase 1) by transducing peripheral pyrogenic signals to the brain. We also suggest that vagal efferent fibers are likely to participate in the later febrile response (phase 3) via an unknown mechanism. PMID:11189030

  15. Demographic and Clinico-Epidemiological Features of Dengue Fever in Faisalabad, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Faiz Ahmed; Rehman, Shafiq ur; Khalid, Ruqyya; Ahmad, Jameel; Ashraf, Sajjad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Hasnain, Shahida

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was carried out to explore the epidemiological and clinical features of dengue fever in Faisalabad, Pakistan during 2011 and 2012. During the study period, anti-dengue IgM positive cases were reported in the post-monsoon period during the months of August–December. Certain hotspots for the dengue infection were identified in the city that coincide with the clusters of densely populated urban regions of the city. Out of total 299 IgM positive patients (male 218 and female 81); there were 239 dengue fever (DF) and 60 dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) patients. There was decrease in the median age of dengue patients from 31 years in 2011 to 21.5 years in 2012 (p<0.001). Abdominal pain was seen in 35% DHF patients followed by nausea in 28.3%, epistaxis in 25% and rash in 20% patients (p<0.05). Patients reported to be suffering from high-grade fever for an average of 8.83 days in DHF as compared to 5.82 days in DF before being hospitalized. Co-morbidities were found to be risk factor for the development of DHF in dengue patients. Clinical and laboratory features of dengue cases studied could be used for the early identification of patients at risk of severe dengue fever. PMID:24595236

  16. PROSPECTIVE BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENTS FOR YELLOW STARTHISTLE.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow starthistle is an important alien weed that has invaded 20 million acres in the western U.S. Yellow starthistle is spiny plant that interferes with grazing livestock and outdoors recreation, it is fatally poisonous to horses, and it outcompetes desirable vegetation. Previously released agen...

  17. Key technologies of land use information extraction based upon multisource remote sensing data: a case study of hilly-plain transition region in the middle and lower reaches of the Yellow River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Heli; Liu, Guifang

    2010-11-01

    It was a trend that image was classified through combining multi-source remote sensing data with non-remote sensing data by GIS technology. In this paper, technological framework of land use information extraction was established using multi-sources remote sensing data (TM and CBERS-02B), DEM, slope data, land use map and other geographic auxiliary data. The result showed :( 1) It was possible to combine TM and CBERS-02B as land use sources data because of their similar spatial resolution and spectral resolution. In this research the method of multi-level supervised classification was adopted. (2) Interpretation accuracy was improved by establishing background database through GIS technology. First, non-remote sensing information, such as topographic map, soil map, land-use map, transportation map, etc, was integrated as background database. Then land use classifications were overlapped with above database. The results showed that uncertainty could reduce by 23.2%. (3) In the study area dry land spectrums in plain area, hilly area and the Yellow River flood plain were very different and spectrums of habitation in plain and the Yellow River land wash were the same. As for above phenomenon of "same object with different spectrums" and "different objects with same spectrum", expert knowledge database was established based upon relationship between remote sensing image and geographical environment. As a result average classification accuracy was improved by 12.1%.

  18. Cytokines as biomarkers of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Tsergouli, Katerina; Ça?lay?k, Dilek Ya?c?; Bino, Silvia; Como, Najada; Uyar, Yavuz; Korukluoglu, Gulay

    2016-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a potentially severe disease caused by CCHF virus. As in other viral hemorrhagic fevers, it is considered that the course and outcome of the disease depend on the viral load and the balance among the immune response mediators, and that a fatal outcome is the result of a "cytokine storm." The level of 27 cytokines was measured in serum samples taken from 29 patients during the acute phase of the disease. Two cases were fatal. Among survivors, significant differences between severe and non-severe cases were observed in the levels of IP-10, and MCP-1, while the levels of IL-1b, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-15, IP-10, MCP-1, TNF-?, and RANTES differed significantly between fatal and non-fatal cases (P?

  19. Afebrile Spotted Fever Group Rickettsia Infection After a Bite from a Dermacentor variabilis Tick Infected with Rickettsia montanensis

    PubMed Central

    McQuiston, Jennifer H.; Zemtsova, Galina; Perniciaro, Jamie; Hutson, Mark; Singleton, Joseph; Nicholson, William L.; Levin, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Several spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) previously believed to be nonpathogenic are speculated to contribute to infections commonly misdiagnosed as Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) in the United States, but confirmation is difficult in cases with mild or absent systemic symptoms. We report an afebrile rash illness occurring in a patient 4 days after being bitten by a Rickettsia montanensis-positive Dermacentor variabilis tick. The patient’s serological profile was consistent with confirmed SFGR infection. PMID:23153005

  20. Investigation of chikungunya fever outbreak in Laguna, Philippines, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Zapanta, Ma Justina; de los Reyes, Vikki Carr; Sucaldito, Ma Nemia; Tayag, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Background In July 2012, the Philippines National Epidemiology Center received a report of a suspected chikungunya fever outbreak in San Pablo City, Laguna Province, the first chikungunya cases reported from the city since surveillance started in 2007. We conducted an outbreak investigation to identify risk factors associated with chikungunya. Methods A case was defined as any resident of Concepcion Village in San Pablo City who had fever of at least two days duration and either joint pains or rash between 23 June and 6 August 2012. Cases were ascertained by conducting house-to-house canvassing and medical records review. An unmatched case-control study was conducted and analysed using a multivariate logistic regression. An environmental investigation was conducted by observing water and sanitation practices, and 100 households were surveyed to determine House and Breteau Indices. Human serum samples were collected for confirmation for chikungunya IgM through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results There were 98 cases identified. Multivariate analysis revealed that having a chikungunya case in the household (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 6.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.0–12.9) and disposing of garbage haphazardly (aOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.4–5.4) were associated with illness. House and Breteau Indices were 27% and 28%, respectively. Fifty-eight of 84 (69%) serum samples were positive for chikungunya IgM. Conclusion It was not surprising that having a chikungunya case in a household was associated with illness in this outbreak. However, haphazard garbage disposal is not an established risk factor for the disease, although this could be linked to increased breeding sites for mosquitoes. PMID:26668759

  1. [Malignant catarrhal fever in zoo ruminants].

    PubMed

    Hänichen, T; Reid, H W; Wiesner, H; Hermanns, W

    1998-09-01

    An outbreak of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in Indian gauer (Bos gaurus gaurus) and Javan banteng (Bos javanicus javanicus) occurred in the year 1964 and killed almost all animals of the groups of these species kept at the Munich zoo at that time. In the consecutive years at highly irregular intervals cases of the head-and-eye-form of MCF occurred sporadically at the zoo in European and American bison (Bison bonasus, B. bison' bison, B. bison athabascae), elk (Alces alces), red deer (Cervus elaphus), Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus) and again in gaur and banteng. The clinical and pathomorphological observations, including those of prophylactic and tentative treatment are reported. The subspecies of caprinae and alcelaphinae potentionally latently infected with viral agents of MCF kept at the zoo over the reported period are listed. Some details concerning housing, taking care of the animals etc. of the latently infected carriers of the family caprinae and the susceptible species of bovidae and cervidae are also given as far as they are of epidemiological interest. The results of the retrospective analysis and the results of testing paraffin-embedded tissue samples for the presence of ovine herpesvirus-2 (OHV-2)-specific DNA and alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 (AHV-1)-specific DNA from 1964 up to 1997 are discussed. The negative results for OHV-2-specific DNA suggest that MCF at Munich zoo until 1979 could have been "wildebeest-associated", also because until 1974 blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus taurinus) and until 1983 white-tailed gnu (Connochaetes gnou) were kept. However, positive results for OHV-2-specific DNA in the tissues collected from 1985 onwards, strongly suggest the "sheep-associated" MCF. PMID:9810608

  2. [Pleuritis in yellow nail syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kossakowski, C A; Schmiegelow, P; Müller, K-M

    2012-03-01

    A 76-year-old man presented clinically with coughing and shortness of breath and was diagnosed radiologically to have massive pleural effusion as a combined feature of yellow nail syndrome. A lung biopsy was taken and revealed histologically: chronic non-specific inflammation in the pleuropulmonary border, intrapleural edema with eightfold pleural thickening in comparison to normal, angiogenesis in both the nutritive and functional intrapleural blood vessels, no abnormalities of lymphatic vessels with normal topographical distribution as detected by immunohistochemistry for antibody D2-40, granulomatous chronic foreign body reaction as a consequence of pleural effusion therapy by talcum pleurodesis.The histopathological findings of chronic non-specific pleuritis with angiogenesis and increased permeability of blood vessels led to massive intrapleural edema with pleural effusion. Abnormalities of lymphatic vessels could not be confirmed. Considering the features of this disease, they are probably secondary to chronic r infectious or immunological inflammation or paraneoplastic complications with angiogenesis (in about 19%). PMID:22048329

  3. Descriptive Epidemiology of Typhoid Fever during an Epidemic in Harare, Zimbabwe, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Polonsky, Jonathan A.; Martínez-Pino, Isabel; Nackers, Fabienne; Chonzi, Prosper; Manangazira, Portia; Van Herp, Michel; Maes, Peter; Porten, Klaudia; Luquero, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Typhoid fever remains a significant public health problem in developing countries. In October 2011, a typhoid fever epidemic was declared in Harare, Zimbabwe - the fourth enteric infection epidemic since 2008. To orient control activities, we described the epidemiology and spatiotemporal clustering of the epidemic in Dzivaresekwa and Kuwadzana, the two most affected suburbs of Harare. Methods A typhoid fever case-patient register was analysed to describe the epidemic. To explore clustering, we constructed a dataset comprising GPS coordinates of case-patient residences and randomly sampled residential locations (spatial controls). The scale and significance of clustering was explored with Ripley K functions. Cluster locations were determined by a random labelling technique and confirmed using Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic. Principal Findings We analysed data from 2570 confirmed and suspected case-patients, and found significant spatiotemporal clustering of typhoid fever in two non-overlapping areas, which appeared to be linked to environmental sources. Peak relative risk was more than six times greater than in areas lying outside the cluster ranges. Clusters were identified in similar geographical ranges by both random labelling and Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic. The spatial scale at which typhoid fever clustered was highly localised, with significant clustering at distances up to 4.5 km and peak levels at approximately 3.5 km. The epicentre of infection transmission shifted from one cluster to the other during the course of the epidemic. Conclusions This study demonstrated highly localised clustering of typhoid fever during an epidemic in an urban African setting, and highlights the importance of spatiotemporal analysis for making timely decisions about targetting prevention and control activities and reinforcing treatment during epidemics. This approach should be integrated into existing surveillance systems to facilitate early detection of epidemics and identify their spatial range. PMID:25486292

  4. Pulsational instability of yellow hypergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, Yu. A.

    2011-06-01

    Instability of population I ( X = 0.7, Z = 0.02) massive stars against radial oscillations during the post-main-sequence gravitational contraction of the helium core is investigated. Initial stellar masses are in the range 65 M ? ? M ZAMS ? 90 M ?. In hydrodynamic computations of self-exciting stellar oscillations we assumed that energy transfer in the envelope of the pulsating star is due to radiative heat conduction and convection. The convective heat transfer was treated in the framework of the theory of time-dependent turbulent convection. During evolutionary expansion of outer layers after hydrogen exhaustion in the stellar core the star is shown to be unstable against radial oscillations while its effective temperature is T eff > 6700 K for M ZAMS = 65 M ? and T eff > 7200 K for M ZAMS = 90 M ?. Pulsational instability is due to the ?-mechanism in helium ionization zones and at lower effective temperature oscillations decay because of significantly increasing convection. The upper limit of the period of radial pulsations on this stage of evolution does not exceed ?200 day. Radial oscillations of the hypergiant resume during evolutionary contraction of outer layers when the effective temperature is T eff > 7300 K for M ZAMS = 65 M ? and T eff > 7600 K for M ZAMS = 90 M ?. Initially radial oscillations are due to instability of the first overtone and transition to fundamental mode pulsations takes place at higher effective temperatures ( T eff > 7700 K for M ZAMS = 65 M ? and T eff > 8200 K for M ZAMS = 90 M ?). The upper limit of the period of radial oscillations of evolving blueward yellow hypergiants does not exceed ?130 day. Thus, yellow hypergiants are stable against radial stellar pulsations during the major part of their evolutionary stage.

  5. The lessons of Walcheren Fever, 1809.

    PubMed

    Lynch, John

    2009-03-01

    The British landed on Walcheren Island on July 30, 1809 in an attempt to form another front against Napoleon. The British objectives were to destroy a French fleet based in Holland, to destroy the arsenals at Antwerp, and to deny navigation of the Scheldt to the French. Over 300 ships and 42,000 soldiers took part in the expedition. In less than a month the British expeditionary force, bogged on the island, went on the defensive because of Walcheren fever incapacitating their regiments. The British eventually suffered over 8,000 dead and tens of thousands sickened; recovery was prolonged and many of the sick were invalided out of the service. Walcheren fever was likely a combination of malaria, typhus, and typhoid fever. Today we can still draw valid public health, medical, military, and political lessons from this 19th century expedition. PMID:19354099

  6. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome in Japan and Public Health Communication

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Kazuko; Umeki, Kazunori; Nakajima, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    A fatal case of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome was reported in Japan in 2013. The ensuing process of public communication offers lessons on how to balance public health needs with patient privacy and highlights the importance of multilateral collaborations between scientific and political communities. PMID:25695132

  7. Prolonged fever and splinter hemorrhages in an immunocompetent traveler with disseminated histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Bitterman, Roni; Oren, Ilana; Geffen, Yuval; Sprecher, Hannah; Schwartz, Eli; Neuberger, Ami

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of progressive disseminated histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent traveler. Histoplasmosis was acquired in South America; its manifestations included prolonged fever, splinter hemorrhages, erythema multiforme, arthritis, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. To the best of our knowledge no splinter hemorrhages had previously been reported in a patient with histoplasmosis. PMID:23279234

  8. Outbreak of malignant catarrhal fever among cattle associated with a state livestock exhibition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Case description – Severe disease and death in cattle exhibited at a state fair and naturally infected with Ovine Herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2). Clinical Findings – Most affected cattle had anorexia, depression, diarrhea, fever and respiratory distress ultimately leading to death. Average duration of clin...

  9. NMR STUDIES OF THE GLYCOPROTEIN CYTOPLASMIC TAILS OF HANTAVIRUS AND CRIMEAN CONGO HEMORRHAGIC FEVER VIRUS

    E-print Network

    Estrada, David Fernando

    2011-04-25

    and Nairoviruses, can have a collection of symptoms that include hemorrhagic fevers, pulmonary edema, severe ecchymosis of the extremities, and in the most serious cases, respiratory failure. Outbreaks of the Hantavirus in the U.S. in 1993 and the Crimean Congo...

  10. A geographical cluster of malignant catarrhal fever in Moose (Alces alces)in Norway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three cases of lethal sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF) in free-ranging moose (Alces alces) were diagnosed in Lesja, Norway, December 2008 – February 2010. The diagnosis was based on PCR identification of ovine herpesvirus 2 DNA (n=3) and typical histopathological lesions (n=1). To...

  11. Long distance spread of malignant catarrhal fever virus from feedlot lambs to ranch bison

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is potentially devastating to American bison. Virtually all bison MCF cases in North America are caused by ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), a member of the gammaherpesvirus subfamily, which is carried almost exclusively by sheep. In this communication, we report transm...

  12. An outbreak of dengue fever in St. Croix (U. S. Virgin Islands), 2005.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the summer of 2005, an outbreak of dengue virus serotype-2 with cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occurred in St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. The medical records of all dengue laboratory-positive patients either seen in the Emergency Department of or admitted to the Governor Juan F. Luis Hosp...

  13. Lookback Exercise with Imported Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever, Senegal and France

    PubMed Central

    Nabeth, Pierre; Tattevin, Pierre; Michelet, Christian; Zeller, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    A patient with suspected malaria was hospitalized successively in 2 hospitals, first in Dakar, Senegal, then in Rennes, France, where tests diagnosed Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. An international incident management group was set up in France and Senegal, which traced 181 contacts and analyzed 50 samples from 3 countries. No secondary cases were identified clinically. PMID:17073094

  14. Seroepidemiologic Study of Human Infections with Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Delisle, Josie; Johnson, Joey; Daves, Gaylen; Williams, Carl; Reber, Jodi; Mendell, Nicole L.; Bouyer, Donald H.; Nicholson, William L.; Moncayo, Abelardo C.; Meshnick, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing entomologic and epidemiologic evidence suggests that spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) other than Rickettsia rickettsii are responsible for spotted fever rickettsioses in the United States. A retrospective seroepidemiologic study was conducted on stored acute- and convalescent-phase sera that had been submitted for Rocky Mountain spotted fever testing to the North Carolina State Laboratory of Public Health. We evaluated the serologic reactivity of the paired sera to R. rickettsii, Rickettsia parkeri, and Rickettsia amblyommii antigens. Of the 106 eligible pairs tested, 21 patients seroconverted to one or more antigens. Cross-reactivity to multiple antigens was observed in 10 patients, and seroconversions to single antigens occurred in 11 patients, including 1 against R. rickettsii, 4 against R. parkeri, and 6 against R. amblyommii. Cross-absorption of cross-reactive sera and/or Western blots identified two presumptive cases of infection with R. parkeri, two presumptive cases of infection with R. rickettsii, and one presumptive case of infection with R. amblyommii. These findings suggest that species of SFGR other than R. rickettsii are associated with illness among North Carolina residents and that serologic testing using R. rickettsii antigen may miss cases of spotted fever rickettsioses caused by other species of SFGR. PMID:25187639

  15. Experimental induction of malignant catarrhal fever in pigs with ovine herpesvirus 2 by intranasal nebulization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), a frequently fatal herpesviral disease, has been sporadically reported in pigs. All cases of naturally-occurring porcine MCF reported to date have been linked to ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), a gammaherpesvirus in the genus Macavirus carried by sheep. Experimental in...

  16. Noneruptive fever revealing murine typhus in a traveler returning from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Gastellier, Laura; Lanternier, Fanny; Renvoisé, Aurélie; Rivière, Sébastien; Raoult, Didier; Lortholary, Olivier; Lecuit, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsia species are increasingly being recognized as a cause of infection among returning travelers. Murine typhus (MT) was mistakenly thought to have disappeared in the 1970s in Tunisia, yet recent serological data show that Rickettsia typhi, the causative agent of MT, still circulates in the Tunisian population. We report here a case of MT in a woman returning from Tunisia and hospitalized in France. Her presentation was nonspecific, with acute noneruptive fever. Diagnosis was confirmed by cross-adsorption and immunoblotting. Clinicians taking care of returning travelers with fever should be aware of MT, and know how to diagnose and treat it. PMID:25158857

  17. Behcet's Disease with Intracardiac Thrombus Presenting with Fever of Unknown Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Ajmani, Sajal; Misra, Durga Prasanna; Raja, Deep Chandh; Mohindra, Namita; Agarwal, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    A young male was referred to us for evaluation of fever of unknown origin (FUO). He had history of recurrent painful oral ulcers for one year and moderate to high grade fever, pustulopapular rash, and recurrent genital ulcers for 6 months and hemoptysis for 3 days. He was detected to have intracardiac thrombi and pulmonary arterial thrombosis along with underlying Behcet's disease (BD). Patient responded to high dose prednisolone (1?mg/Kg/day) along with monthly parenteral cyclophosphamide therapy. This case highlights the fact that BD is an important cause for pulmonary artery vasculitis with intracardiac thrombus formation, and such patients can present with FUO. PMID:26425377

  18. Milk Fever Control Principles: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Three main preventive principles against milk fever were evaluated in this literature review, and the efficacy of each principle was estimated from the results of controlled investigations. Oral calcium drenching around calving apparently has a mean efficacy of 50%–60% in terms of milk fever prevention as well as prevention of milk fever relapse after intravenous treatment with calcium solutions. However, some drenches have been shown to cause lesions in the forestomacs. When using the DCAD (dietary cation-anion difference) principle, feeding rations with a negative DCAD (measured as (Na + K) – (Cl + S)) significantly reduce the milk fever incidence. Calculating the relative risk (RR) of developing milk fever from controlled experiments results in a mean RR between 0.19 and 0.35 when rations with a negative versus positive DCAD are compared. The main drawback from the DCAD principle is a palatability problem. The principle of feeding rations low in calcium is highly efficient in milk fever prevention provided the calcium intake in the dry period is kept below 20 g per day. Calculating the relative risk (RR) of developing milk fever from controlled experiments results in a very low mean RR (between 0 and 0.20) (daily calcium intake below versus above 20 g/d). The main problem in implementing the low-Ca principle is difficulties in formulating rations sufficiently low in calcium when using commonly available feeds. The use of large doses of vitamin D metabolites and analogues for milk fever prevention is controversial. Due to toxicity problems and an almost total lack of recent studies on the subject this principle is not described in detail. A few management related issues were discussed briefly, and the following conclusions were made: It is important to supply the periparturient cow with sufficient magnesium to fulfil its needs, and to prevent the dry cows from being too fat. Available information on the influence of carbohydrate intake, and on the effect of the length of the dry period and prepartum milking, is at present insufficient to include these factors in control programmes. PMID:12071112

  19. [Technical guidelines for the prevention and treatment of chikungunya fever].

    PubMed

    Barrera-Cruz, Antonio; Díaz-Ramos, Rita Delia; Viniegra-Osorio, Arturo; Grajales-Muñiz, Concepción; Dávila-Torres, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is an emerging disease caused by an alphavirus belonging to the Togaviridae family, transmitted by the bite of Aedes genus species: Aedesaegypti and Aedesalbopictus. In 2013, PAHO/WHO received confirmation of the first cases of indigenous transmission of chikungunya in the Americas. This disease may be acute, subacute and chronic, affecting all age groups. Following an incubation period from three to seven days, the patient usually begins with a high fever (greater than 39 °C), arthralgia, back pain, headache, nausea, vomiting, arthritis, rash, and conjunctivitis (acute phase: 3-10 days). Most patients recover fully, but in some cases, joint involvement may persist chronically and cause discapacity and affect life quality. Serious complications are rare, however, attention must be focused on vulnerable populations (the elderly, children and pregnant women). So far, there is no specific antiviral treatment or effective vaccine, so it is giving priority symptomatic and supportive treatment for the acute phase and make an early diagnosis of atypical and severe forms, and to implement effective prevention and control measures. Given the eco-epidemiological conditions and distribution of vectors in the region of the Americas, the spread of the virus to other countries is likely, so that health professionals should be aware of and identify risk factors and major clinical manifestations, allow timely prevention and safe and effective treatment of this disease. PMID:25680650

  20. Phosphorus in seagull colonies and the effect on the habitats. The case of yellow-legged gulls (Larus michahellis) in the Atlantic Islands National Park (Galicia-NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Otero, X L; Tejada, O; Martín-Pastor, M; De La Peña, S; Ferreira, T O; Pérez-Alberti, A

    2015-11-01

    During the period 1980-2000, the yellow-legged gull population underwent exponential growth due to an increase in the availability of anthropogenic food resources. The aim of this study was to highlight the effect of the gull colonies on the P soil cycle and the associated effects on coastal ecosystems. Samples of soil, water and faecal material were collected in a colony of yellow-legged gulls (Cíes Islands) and in a control area. Four sampling plots were installed in the study areas, and samples were collected in summer and winter in 1997 and 2011. Sample analysis included soil characterization and determination of the total P content (TP), bioavailable-P and fractionated-P forms in the soils and faecal material. The (31)P NMR technique was also used to determine organic P forms. Clear differences between the gull colony soils and the control soil were observed. The TP was 3 times higher in the gull colony soil, and the bioavailable P was 30 times higher than in the control soil. The P forms present at highest concentrations in the faecal material (P-apatite, P-residual and P-humic acid) were also present at high concentrations in the colony soil. The absence of any seasonal or annual differences in P concentration indicates that the P has remained stable in the soil over time, regardless of the changes in the gull population density. The degree of P saturation indicated that soils are saturated with P due to the low concentration of Fe/Al-hydroxides, which is consistent with a high P concentration in the run-off from the colonies. The P output from the colony soils to coastal waters may cause eutrophication of a nearby lagoon and the disappearance of a Zostera marina seagrass meadow. Similarly, the enrichment of P concentration in dune system of Muxieiro may induce irreversible changes in the plant communities. PMID:26081740

  1. Role of innate and adaptive immunity in the control of Q fever.

    PubMed

    Capo, Christian; Mege, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    Acute Q fever is commonly resolved without an antibiotic regimen, but a primary infection may develop into a chronic infection in a minority of cases. Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is known to infect macrophages both in vitro and in vivo. It has been observed that the intracellular survival of C. burnetii requires the subversion of the microbicidal properties of macrophages. Adaptive immunity is also essential to cure C. burnetii infection, as demonstrated by clinical studies and animal models. Indeed, the control of infection in patients with primary Q fever involves a systemic cell-mediated immune response and granuloma formation with an essential role for interferon-? in the protection against C. burnetii. In contrast, chronic Q fever is characterized by defective cell-mediated immunity with the defective formation of granulomas and over-production of interleukin-10, an immunoregulatory cytokine. Finally, epidemiological data demonstrate that age and gender are risk factors for Q fever. The analysis of gene expression programs in mice reveals the importance of sex-related genes in C. burnetii infection because only 14% of the modulated genes are sex-independent, while the remaining 86% are differentially expressed in males and females. These results open a new field to understand how host metabolism controls C. burnetii infection in humans. PMID:22711637

  2. Spotted fever group rickettsiae: a brief review and a Canadian perspective.

    PubMed

    Wood, H; Artsob, H

    2012-09-01

    Spotted fever group rickettsioses (SFGR) are infections caused by established and emerging human pathogens worldwide. These rickettsial agents are transmitted to humans via arthropods and may result in mild to severe and potentially fatal diseases. Spotted fever group rickettsioses are characterized by similar clinical features, including fever, rash, headache and myalgias, with the development of an inoculation eschar in many, but not all cases. Endemic rickettsial infections do occur but are infrequent in Canada, in contrast to the United States, where these infections are far more prevalent. Travel-associated rickettsioses, however, are being diagnosed with increasing frequency in Canadian travellers returning from international trips abroad, in particular in travellers returning from Africa. The diagnosis of rickettsial infections can be challenging owing to the non-specific nature of the clinical symptoms and the requirement for specialized testing. Serology cannot distinguish between the approximately 20 spotted fever group rickettsial species currently known or suspected to be capable of causing human infection. Molecular testing is required to determine the rickettsial species responsible for infection, but requires greater effort on the part of the clinician to collect appropriate samples, including cutaneous skin swabs from under the eschar or skin punch biopsies of the eschar or rash. Infections with spotted fever group rickettsiae likely occur more commonly than currently recognized and should be considered in patients with appropriate symptoms and exposure histories. PMID:22958251

  3. Mediterranean spotted fever in the Trakya region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kuloglu, Figen; Rolain, Jean Marc; Akata, Filiz; Eroglu, Cafer; Celik, Aygul Dogan; Parola, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) is caused by a tick-borne pathogen, Rickettsia conorii subsp. conorii, belonging to the spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cases with confirmed diagnosis of MSF from 2003 to 2009 in the Trakya region of Turkey. Patients with high fever, maculopapular rash (involving the palms or soles) and/or a black inoculation eschar at the site of the tick bite (tache noire) were included in the study. Before doxycycline treatment, skin biopsy specimens, preferably from the eschar or from the maculopapular rash, were obtained for DNA extraction. Immunofluorescence assay (IFA) was performed to detect IgM and IgG antibodies against R. conorii in acute and convalescent sera. Afterwards, a standard PCR reaction using primers suitable for hybridisation within the conserved region of genes coding for outer membrane protein A (ompA) and citrate synthase (gltA) and DNA sequencing were performed. There were 128 patients with confirmed MSF diagnosis. Using IFA, seroconversion or a fourfold or greater rise in titre was observed in 97 (77%) patients, whereas a single high titre was demonstrated in 16 (12.7%) patients. According to PCR analysis, 77 (72.6%) of 106 biopsy samples showed positive results. Of these, 58 (73%) of 79 biopsy specimens were from the eschar and 19 (70%) of 27 specimens were from the maculopapular rash. No significant difference was found between the rate of positive skin biopsies taken from the eschar and the maculopapular rash. DNA sequence analysis was performed to all PCR-positive cases, and R. conorii conorii (type strain: Malish, ATCC VR-613) was detected in each of them. MSF is prevalent, but has been underdiagnosed and underreported so far in Turkey. It is a potentially severe and even fatal disease resembling viral haemorrhagic fevers that has to be included in the differential diagnosis of febrile illness associated with thrombocytopenia, even in the absence of an eschar or a tick bite. While IFA allows for retrospective diagnosis in MSF, advanced molecular techniques provide the rapid detection of rickettsia in all skin samples, including eschar and maculopapular rash. PMID:23168048

  4. Use of Antimalarial in the Management of Fever during a Community Survey in the Kintampo Districts of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Abokyi, Livesy Naafoe; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Mahama, Emmanuel; Gyaase, Stephaney; Sulemana, Abubakari; Kwarteng, Anthony; Ayaam, Jennifer; Dosoo, David; Adu-Gyasi, Dennis; Amenga Etego, Seeba; Ogutu, Bernhards; Akweongo, Patricia; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiology of malaria and related fevers in most parts of Africa is changing due to scale up of interventions such as appropriate use of ACTs in the effort towards sustained control and eventual elimination of malaria. The use of ACTs in the management of malaria-associated fever was evaluated in the Kintampo districts of Ghana. Methods Household survey was conducted between October 2009 and February, 2011. A random selection of 370 households was generated from 25,000 households existing within the Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems in Kintampo, Ghana at the time. All household members present at the time of survey in the eligible households were interviewed based on a two weeks reported fever recall and the use of antimalarial for the management of fever. A finger-prick blood sample was also obtained from each member of the household present and later examined for malaria parasites using microscopy. Descriptive analysis was performed, with univariate and multivariate analysis used to identify predictors of fever and malaria parasitemia. Results A total of 1436 individuals were interviewed from 370 households. Overall, fever prevalence was 23.8% (341/1436) and was 38.8% (77/198) in children < 5 years, 21.3% (264/1238) in older children plus adults. Participants who sought treatment for fever were 84% (285/341) with 47.7% (136/285) using any anti-malarial. Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy use was in 69.1% (94/136) of cases while 30.9% used mono-therapies. Malaria parasitaemia rate was 28.2% (397/1407). Conclusion The study reports high community fever prevalence, frequent use of antimalarials for fever treatment and relatively high use of mono-therapies especially in children < 5 years in an area with high malaria parasite prevalence in Ghana. PMID:26580076

  5. When your baby or infant has a fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fever a baby or infant has is often scary for parents. Most fevers are harmless and are ... seizures occur in some children and can be scary to parents. However, most febrile seizures are over ...

  6. An inhalation model of acute Q fever in guinea pigs 

    E-print Network

    Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi Elizabeth

    2009-05-15

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular pathogen that can cause both acute and chronic disease (Q fever) in humans and infects many animals with varying clinical illness and persistence. A guinea pig aerosol-challenge model of acute Q fever...

  7. Fungal Pneumonia: A Silent Epidemic Coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever)

    MedlinePLUS

    Fungal pneumonia: a silent epidemic Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) Coccidioidomycosis, a fungal disease called “cocci” or “valley fever,” is a major cause of community-acquired pneumonia in the southwestern US. A costly problem • In ...

  8. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever: An emerging threat for the intensivist

    PubMed Central

    Bhanot, Abhinav; Khanna, Arjun; Talwar, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old female, who presented with 15 days of fever with rash, pancytopenia, and altered behavior. She was investigated for routine causes of fever with rash and multi organ dysfunction and treated for the same. As she tested negative for all routine causes of such an illness and did not show improvement to therapy, she was investigated for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever and tested positive for the same. She was started on ribavirin, but eventually succumbed to her illness. This disease has rarely been reported from the Northern India and we need to have high clinical suspicion for this deadly disease so that appropriate therapy can be started in time for the patient and prophylaxis given to all inadvertently exposed. PMID:26430344

  9. Rift Valley fever virus: A review of diagnosis and vaccination, and implications for emergence in Europe.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Karen L; Banyard, Ashley C; McElhinney, Lorraine; Johnson, Nicholas; Horton, Daniel L; Hernández-Triana, Luis M; Fooks, Anthony R

    2015-10-13

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne virus, and is the causative agent of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a zoonotic disease characterised by an increased incidence of abortion or foetal malformation in ruminants. Infection in humans can also lead to clinical manifestations that in severe cases cause encephalitis or haemorrhagic fever. The virus is endemic throughout much of the African continent. However, the emergence of RVFV in the Middle East, northern Egypt and the Comoros Archipelago has highlighted that the geographical range of RVFV may be increasing, and has led to the concern that an incursion into Europe may occur. At present, there is a limited range of veterinary vaccines available for use in endemic areas, and there is no licensed human vaccine. In this review, the methods available for diagnosis of RVFV infection, the current status of vaccine development and possible implications for RVFV emergence in Europe, are discussed. PMID:26296499

  10. Brazilian Spotted Fever: the importance of dermatological signs for early diagnosis*

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Daíne Vargas; Medeiros, Marcelo Zanolli; Hans, Gunter; de Lima, Alexandre Moretti; Barbosa, Aline Blanco; Vicari, Carolina Faria Santos

    2015-01-01

    Brazilian spotted fever is an acute febrile infectious disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, transmitted by tick bite. As this disease is rare and has high mortality rates in Brazil, the clinical aspects and epidemiological data may help the diagnosis. We report a case of Brazilian spotted fever in a 19-year-old patient who presented maculopapular exanthema in the palmar region and upper limbs, lymphadenopathy, fever, chills, headache, conjunctival hyperemia, nausea, vomiting, dyspnea, myalgia, developing neurological signs and abdominal pain. He was treated with doxycycline with clinical improvement. We emphasize the importance of the recognition of this disease by dermatologists as cutaneous manifestations are the key findings to establish early diagnosis and prevent complications. PMID:25830998

  11. Value of a single-tube widal test in diagnosis of typhoid fever in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Parry, C M; Hoa, N T; Diep, T S; Wain, J; Chinh, N T; Vinh, H; Hien, T T; White, N J; Farrar, J J

    1999-09-01

    The diagnostic value of an acute-phase single-tube Widal test for suspected typhoid fever was evaluated with 2,000 Vietnamese patients admitted to an infectious disease referral hospital between 1993 and 1998. Test patients had suspected typhoid fever and a blood culture positive for Salmonella typhi (n= 1,400) or Salmonella paratyphi A (n = 45). Control patients had a febrile illness for which another cause was confirmed (malaria [n = 103], dengue [n = 76], or bacteremia due to another microorganism [n = 156] or tetanus (n = 265). An O-agglutinin titer of >/=100 was found in 18% of the febrile controls and 7% of the tetanus patients. Corresponding values for H agglutinins were 8 and 1%, respectively. The O-agglutinin titer was >/=100 in 83% of the blood culture-positive typhoid fever cases, and the H-agglutinin titer was >/=100 in 67%. The disease prevalence in investigated patients in this hospital was 30.8% (95% confidence interval, 26.8 to 35.1%); at this prevalence, an elevated level of H agglutinins gave better positive predictive values for typhoid fever than did O agglutinins. With a cutoff titer of >/=200 for O agglutinin or >/=100 for H agglutinin, the Widal test would diagnose correctly 74% of the blood culture-positive cases of typhoid fever. However, 14% of the positive results would be false-positive, and 10% of the negative results would be false-negative. The Widal test can be helpful in the laboratory diagnosis of typhoid fever in Vietnam if interpreted with care. PMID:10449469

  12. Increased Prevalence of Anellovirus in Pediatric Patients with Fever

    PubMed Central

    McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Wylie, Kristine M.; Deych, Elena; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George; Storch, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    The Anelloviridae family consists of non-enveloped, circular, single-stranded DNA viruses. Three genera of anellovirus are known to infect humans, named TTV, TTMDV, and TTMV. Although anelloviruses were initially thought to cause non-A-G viral hepatitis, continued research has shown no definitive associations between anellovirus and human disease to date. Using high-throughput sequencing, we investigated the association between anelloviruses and fever in pediatric patients 2–36 months of age. We determined that although anelloviruses were present in a large number of specimens from both febrile and afebrile patients, they were more prevalent in the plasma and nasopharyngeal (NP) specimens of febrile patients compared to afebrile controls. Using PCR to detect each of the three species of anellovirus that infect humans, we found that anellovirus species TTV and TTMDV were more prevalent in the plasma and NP specimens of febrile patients compared to afebrile controls. This was not the case for species TTMV which was found in similar percentages of febrile and afebrile patient specimens. Analysis of patient age showed that the percentage of plasma and NP specimens containing anellovirus increased with age until patients were 19–24 months of age, after which the percentage of anellovirus positive patient specimens dropped. This trend was striking for TTV and TTMDV and very modest for TTMV in both plasma and NP specimens. Finally, as the temperature of febrile patients increased, so too did the frequency of TTV and TTMDV detection. Again, TTMV was equally present in both febrile and afebrile patient specimens. Taken together these data indicate that the human anellovirus species TTV and TTMDV are associated with fever in children, while the highly related human anellovirus TTMV has no association with fever. PMID:23226428

  13. Is the Epidemiology of Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever Changing? : A Three-Year Overview in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Memish, Ziad A.; Fagbo, Shamsudeen F.; Osman Ali, Ahmed; AlHakeem, Rafat; Elnagi, Fathelrhman M.; Bamgboye, Elijah A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever disease is yet to be fully understood since the virus was isolated in 1994 in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Setting Preventive Medicine department, Ministry of Health, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Design Retrospective analysis of all laboratory confirmed cases of Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever disease collected through active and passive surveillance from 1st-January 2009 to December, 31, 2011. Results Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever (AHFV) disease increased from 59 cases in 2009 to 93 cases in 2011. Cases are being discovered outside of the region where it was initially diagnosed in Saudi Arabia. About a third of cases had no direct contact with animals or its products. Almost all cases had gastro-intestinal symptoms. Case fatality rate was less than 1%. Conclusions Findings in this study showed the mode of transmission of AHFV virus may not be limited to direct contact with animals or its products. Gastro-intestinal symptoms were not previously documented. Observed low case fatality rate contradicted earlier reports. Close monitoring of the epidemiology of AHFV is recommended to aid appropriate diagnosis. Housewives are advised to wear gloves when handling animals and animal products as a preventive measure. PMID:24516520

  14. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137.285 Food and...Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms...

  15. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137.285 Food and...Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms...

  16. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137.285 Food and...Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms...

  17. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137.285 Food and...Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms...

  18. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137.285 Food and...Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms...

  19. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and... Related Products § 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.250 for white corn meal except that cleaned yellow corn is used instead...

  20. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is...

  1. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.265...

  2. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and... Related Products § 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.250 for white corn meal except that cleaned yellow corn is used instead...

  3. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and... Related Products § 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.250 for white corn meal except that cleaned yellow corn is used instead...

  4. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.265...

  5. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.265...

  6. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and... Related Products § 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.250 for white corn meal except that cleaned yellow corn is used instead...

  7. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is...

  8. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is...

  9. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is...

  10. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.265...

  11. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is...

  12. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and... Related Products § 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.250 for white corn meal except that cleaned yellow corn is used instead...

  13. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.265...

  14. Myocarditis Leading to Severe Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Patient with Dengue Fever

    PubMed Central

    Daruwalla, Vistasp; Hayat, Saleem

    2015-01-01

    Background. Majority of dengue fever cases follow a benign self-limiting course but recently rare presentations and complications are increasingly seen due to rising burden of disease. Cardiac involvement in dengue fever with fatal outcome is a very rare complication. We report a case of 44-year-old patient who presented with symptoms of severe acute congestive heart secondary to myocarditis induced cardiomyopathy caused by dengue virus infection. Case Presentation. A 44-year-old man presented to ER with the complaints of high fever, fatigue, and shortness of breath. Patient was lethargic and blood pressure was low when he was brought to the ER. CXR showed cardiomegaly with pulmonary congestion and echocardiography revealed dilated left ventricle and ejection fraction of 10%. Patient condition worsened and he got admitted to the ICU because of acute hypoxic respiratory failure. Despite aggressive measures, patient died on day 5. Conclusion. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a rare complication of dengue myocarditis. Early recognition of acute DCM caused by dengue myocarditis is imperative in the management of dengue fever as early detection and management of cardiac failure can improve the survival of patient. PMID:25802766

  15. The health status of Q-fever patients after long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the Netherlands, from 2007 to 2009, 3,522 Q-fever cases were notified from three outbreaks. These are the largest documented outbreaks in the world. Previous studies suggest that symptoms can persist for a long period of time, resulting in a reduced quality of life (QoL). The aim of this study was to qualify and quantify the health status of Q-fever patients after long-term follow-up. Methods 870 Q-fever patients of the 2007 and 2008 outbreaks were mailed a questionnaire 12 to 26 months after the onset of illness. We assessed demographic data and measured health status with the Nijmegen Clinical Screening Instrument (NCSI). The NCSI consists of three main domains of functional impairment, symptoms and QoL that are divided into eight sub-domains. The NCSI scores of Q-fever patients older than 50 years (N = 277) were compared with patients younger than 50 years (N = 238) and with norm data from healthy individuals (N = 65) and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (N = 128). Results The response rate was 65.7%. After applying exclusion criteria 515 Q-fever patients were included in this study. The long-term health status of two thirds of Q-fever patients (both younger and older than 50 years) was severely affected for at least one sub-domain. Patients scores were most severely affected on the sub-domains general QoL (44.9%) and fatigue (43.5%). Hospitalisation in the acute phase was significantly related to long-term behavioural impairment (OR 2.8, CI 1.5-5.1), poor health related QoL (OR 2.3,CI 1.5-4.0) and subjective symptoms (OR 1.9, CI 1.1-3.6). Lung or heart disease, depression and arthritis significantly affected the long-term health status of Q-fever patients. Conclusions Q-fever patients presented 12 to 26 months after the onset of illness severe -clinically relevant- subjective symptoms, functional impairment and impaired QoL. All measured sub-domains of the health status were impaired. Hospitalisation and co-morbidity were predictors for worse scores. Our data emphasise that more attention is needed not only to prevent exposure to Q-fever but also for the prevention and treatment of the long-term consequences of this zoönosis. PMID:21501483

  16. [Therapeutic experience with cefadroxil syrup in acute infections, especially scarlet fever, in pediatric field (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Minamitani, M; Hachimori, K; Nakazawa, H; Tomori, N

    1981-02-01

    Clinical effects were investigated on cefadroxil powder for syrup (containing 100 mg of cefadroxil per 1 g) for acute bacterial infections (mostly scarlet fever) in the field of pediatrics, and the results were obtained as follows. Cefadroxil was applied in 100 cases of scarlet fever. Among 49 cases administered 30-39 mg/kg/day, the results were excellent in 34 cases and good in 15 cases, efficacy ratio being thus 100%. Among 38 cases administered 40-49 mg/kg/day, the results were excellent in 33 cases, and good in 5 cases, efficacy ratio being thus 100%. Out of 4 cases administered 20-29 mg/kg/day, the results were excellent in 3 cases and good in 1 case, while out of 9 cases administered 50-59 mg/kg/day, excellent in 4 cases and good in 5 cases. Among 78 cases of scarlet fever from which beta-hemolytic Streptococcus was proven from swab liquid of palatal tonsil, 67 cases received cefadroxil at a daily dose of 30-49 mg/kg, and the bacteria turned to negative the next day of administration in 72 cases, 2 days later in 6 cases. Cefadroxil was administered at a daily dose of 46 mg/kg for 7 days in 1 case of SSS syndrome of which Staphylococcus aureus was proven from skin lesion, and local bacteria turned to negative, as well as clinical effect was excellent. No pathogen was proven in 1 case of acute tonsillitis, maybe because ampicillin (ABPC) and cefazolin (CEZ) were administered before cefadroxil treatment, and yet a clinical efficacy was judged by administering cefadroxil at a daily dose of 46 mg/kg, though no clinical improvement was observed with the prior antibiotics. As to the side effects of cefadroxil in 102 cases, a slight vomiting was noticed in 6 cases, though the administration could be continued, and a slight rise of GOT or GPT was observed respectively in 3 cases and 1 case, all of which were recovered without abnormal clinical findings. Among the patients of scarlet fever, after beta-hemolytic Streptococcus became negative, reelimination or recurrence was noticed in 2 cases, but these patients were cured completely by readministration of cefadroxil or administration of amoxicillin (AMPC). Cefadroxil powder for syrup was absorbed quite well, its serum levels were maintained for long, and it was easily administered in children. Considering from its superior antibacterial activity, cefadroxil may be expected to be useful for a remedy in slight or middle infections of children. PMID:7253196

  17. Asthma, Hay Fever and Heart Disease Risk

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... at the association between allergic diseases and cardiovascular risk factors using health data from more than 13,000 children. 14 ... opportunity to modify their lifestyles and turn this risk around.” I’m Dr. Cindy Haines of HealthDay TV with ... Asthma in Children Children's Health Hay Fever ...

  18. Metal fume fever among galvanized welders.

    PubMed

    Wardhana; Datau, E A

    2014-07-01

    The metal fume fever (MFF) is an inhalation fever syndrome in welders of galvanized steel, who join and cut metal parts using flame or electric arc and other sources of heat. Inhalation of certain freshly formed metal oxides produced from welding process can cause MFF as an acute self-limiting flulike illness. The most common cause of MFF is the inhalation of zinc oxide (ZnO). The inhalation of ZnO particles can provoke a number of clinical responses of which accompanied by changes in composition of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, including early increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory marker, and recruitment of inflammatory cells in the lungs. The MFF is characterized by fever, cough, sputing, wheezing, chest tightness, fatique, chills, fever, myalgias, cough, dyspnea, leukocytosis with a left shift, thirst, metallic taste, and salivations. The diagnosis of MFF diagnosis is based on clinical finding and occupational history. The symptoms resolved spontaneously. The treatment of MFF is entirely symptomatic, no specific treatment is indicated for MFF. The mainstay of management of MFF is prevention of sub-sequent exposure to harmful metals. Including public and physician awareness of MFF may help to reduce the occurrence of the disease. PMID:25348190

  19. Fever and sickness behavior: Friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Harden, L M; Kent, S; Pittman, Q J; Roth, J

    2015-11-01

    Fever has been recognized as an important symptom of disease since ancient times. For many years, fever was treated as a putative life-threatening phenomenon. More recently, it has been recognized as an important part of the body's defense mechanisms; indeed at times it has even been used as a therapeutic agent. The knowledge of the functional role of the central nervous system in the genesis of fever has greatly improved over the last decade. It is clear that the febrile process, which develops in the sick individual, is just one of many brain-controlled sickness symptoms. Not only will the sick individual appear "feverish" but they may also display a range of behavioral changes, such as anorexia, fatigue, loss of interest in usual daily activities, social withdrawal, listlessness or malaise, hyperalgesia, sleep disturbances and cognitive dysfunction, collectively termed "sickness behavior". In this review we consider the issue of whether fever and sickness behaviors are friend or foe during: a critical illness, the common cold or influenza, in pregnancy and in the newborn. Deciding whether these sickness responses are beneficial or harmful will very much shape our approach to the use of antipyretics during illness. PMID:26187566

  20. Rift Valley fever: A neglected zoonotic disease?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a serious viral disease of animals and humans in Africa and the Middle East that is transmitted by mosquitoes. First isolated in Kenya during an outbreak in 1930, subsequent outbreaks have had a significant impact on animal and human health, as well as national economies. ...

  1. RIFT VALLEY FEVER POTENTIAL, ARABIAN PENINSULA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) was first confirmed outside of Africa in September 2000. This outbreak, which occurred in southwestern coastal Saudi Arabia and neighboring coastal areas of Yemen, followed elevated rainfall levels in nearby highlands which flooded the coastal areas, providing ideal environm...

  2. Epidemiology and control of bovine ephemeral fever.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter J; Klement, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (or 3-day sickness) is an acute febrile illness of cattle and water buffaloes. Caused by an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus, bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV), the disease occurs seasonally over a vast expanse of the globe encompassing much of Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Australia. Although mortality rates are typically low, infection prevalence and morbidity rates during outbreaks are often very high, causing serious economic impacts through loss of milk production, poor cattle condition at sale and loss of traction power at harvest. There are also significant impacts on trade to regions in which the disease does not occur, including the Americas and most of Europe. In recent years, unusually severe outbreaks of bovine ephemeral fever have been reported from several regions in Asia and the Middle East, with mortality rates through disease or culling in excess of 10-20%. There are also concerns that, like other vector-borne diseases of livestock, the geographic distribution of bovine ephemeral fever could expand into regions that have historically been free of the disease. Here, we review current knowledge of the virus, including its molecular and antigenic structure, and the epidemiology of the disease across its entire geographic range. We also discuss the effectiveness of vaccination and other strategies to prevent or control infection. PMID:26511615

  3. An Endangered Yellow-Legged Frog

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS biologists are leading the monitoring and reintroduction effort of the Southern California mountain yellow-legged frog -- federally listed as endangered with only 200 wild adults remaining in the mountains surrounding Los Angeles County....

  4. Assessing Sites for Yellow Legged Frog

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Assessing suitable sites in southern California for reintroducing endangered southern mountain yellow-legged frogs, USGS scientists rediscovered a population in the San Jacinto Wilderness, 50 years since this frog was last seen there....

  5. Medical examiners and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever contamination risk.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Sait; Gokmen, Asude; Ozdemir, Mehtap; Akduman, Baris; Korkusuz, Irfan; Javan, Gulnaz T

    2015-11-01

    Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is an acute zoonotic infection caused by the CCHF virus. The viruses' activity peaks during April and May with a mortality rate of 3-30%. Transmission of the virus to human occurs through tick bites or exposure to infected animals' tissues or blood. The major at-risk group includes farmers living in endemic areas. Health-care workers are the second most affected group. Virus has shown up in a diverse geographic area which includes Middle East, Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe and is considered one of the most wide-spread tick borne infections. The most recent cases are from Iran and Turkey. This article represents autopsy results of four CCHF infected cases in 2011 and 2012, in Ankara, Turkey. PMID:26367781

  6. Pattern of acute rheumatic fever in a local teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Omar, A

    1995-06-01

    Hospital records of children admitted to the department of Paediatrics, University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, from January 1981 to December 1990, who were diagnosed to have acute rheumatic fever (ARF) were studied. 134 children satisfied the Jones' modified criteria, thus giving a hospital incidence of 21.2/100,000 paediatric admission per year, of which incidence of first attack was 15.8/100,000 per year and recurrent attack was 5.38/100,000 per year. The M:F ratio is 1.39:1. Majority of cases occur in the 6-11 years age group with 6 cases encountered below the age of 5. The Indians had a higher relative risk to develop both the first acute attack as well as recurrences with a relative risk of 2.4 and 4.10 respectively as compared to the Malays. Majority of the patients, irrespective of the ethnic group, came from families with low income. PMID:7565180

  7. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using protein crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the enexpected hypothesis that the virus release its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have farly flat coats, but in TYMV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early studies of TYMV, but McPhereson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central viod on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides liked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the voild. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine.

  8. Paratyphoid Fever: Splicing the Global Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Cindy Shuan Ju; Chua, Kek Heng; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of enteric fever caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A (S. Paratyphi A) is increasing in many parts of the world. Although there is no major outbreak of paratyphoid fever in recent years, S. Paratyphi A infection still remains a public health problem in many tropical countries. Therefore, surveillance studies play an important role in monitoring infections and the emergence of multidrug resistance, especially in endemic countries such as India, Nepal, Pakistan and China. In China, enteric fever was caused predominantly by S. Paratyphi A rather than by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi). Sometimes, S. Paratyphi A infection can evolve into a carrier state which increases the risk of transmission for travellers. Hence, paratyphoid fever is usually classified as a “travel-associated” disease. To date, diagnosis of paratyphoid fever based on the clinical presentation is not satisfactory as it resembles other febrile illnesses, and could not be distinguished from S. Typhi infection. With the availability of Whole Genome Sequencing technology, the genomes of S. Paratyphi A could be studied in-depth and more specific targets for detection will be revealed. Hence, detection of S. Paratyphi A with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method appears to be a more reliable approach compared to the Widal test. On the other hand, due to increasing incidence of S. Paratyphi A infections worldwide, the need to produce a paratyphoid vaccine is essential and urgent. Hence various vaccine projects that involve clinical trials have been carried out. Overall, this review provides the insights of S. Paratyphi A, including the bacteriology, epidemiology, management and antibiotic susceptibility, diagnoses and vaccine development. PMID:24904229

  9. Mapping the zoonotic niche of Lassa fever in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mylne, Adrian Q. N.; Pigott, David M.; Longbottom, Joshua; Shearer, Freya; Duda, Kirsten A.; Messina, Jane P.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Moyes, Catherine L.; Golding, Nick; Hay, Simon I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lassa fever is a viral haemorrhagic illness responsible for disease outbreaks across West Africa. It is a zoonosis, with the primary reservoir species identified as the Natal multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis. The host is distributed across sub-Saharan Africa while the virus' range appears to be restricted to West Africa. The majority of infections result from interactions between the animal reservoir and human populations, although secondary transmission between humans can occur, particularly in hospital settings. Methods Using a species distribution model, the locations of confirmed human and animal infections with Lassa virus (LASV) were used to generate a probabilistic surface of zoonotic transmission potential across sub-Saharan Africa. Results Our results predict that 37.7 million people in 14 countries, across much of West Africa, live in areas where conditions are suitable for zoonotic transmission of LASV. Four of these countries, where at-risk populations are predicted, have yet to report any cases of Lassa fever. Conclusions These maps act as a spatial guide for future surveillance activities to better characterise the geographical distribution of the disease and understand the anthropological, virological and zoological interactions necessary for viral transmission. Combining this zoonotic niche map with detailed patient travel histories can aid differential diagnoses of febrile illnesses, enabling a more rapid response in providing care and reducing the risk of onward transmission. PMID:26085474

  10. Dengue fever as a cause of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Noely; Moura, Nathalie Bianchini Vieira; Cardoso, Débora Morais; Hirose, Maki; Ferronato, Angela Espósito; Pastorino, Antônio Carlos; Lo, Denise Swei; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is endemic in more than 100 countries in Southeast Asia, the Americas, the western Pacific, Africa and the eastern Mediterranean regions. The virus is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease is the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in humans and is a global and national public health concern in several countries. A seasonal pattern of dengue disease is consistently observed. The highest incidences usually correspond to the period of highest rainfall and humidity, providing suitable conditions for Aedes aegypti breeding and survival. In Brazil for instance it is from January to June. Dengue may cause marked changes in bone marrow that result in hypocellularity and, consequently, thrombocytopenia and leucopenia, along with an increase in hematocrit, which is secondary to capillary leakage. However, those abnormalities are usually self-limited, and do not warrant further investigations, such as a marrow biopsy or a myelogram. The occurrence of persistent reactive hemophagocytosis is uncommon and usually leads to serious adverse outcomes. The authors report the case of an 8-year old girl complaining of high-grade fever, malaise, headache, abdominal pain and a cutaneous rash. Laboratory examination revealed atypical lymphocytosis on peripheral blood count, hyperbilirrunemia, abnormal liver enzymes and clotting tests. Serology was positive for dengue. Because of the persistence of fever and laboratory examinations were consistent with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) a bone marrow aspiration was performed, which confirmed the presence of hemophagocytosis. Hence we report a rare presentation of dengue accompanied by self-limited HLH that hopefully evolve to favorable outcome. PMID:26558245

  11. Outbreak of Pontiac fever due to Legionella anisa.

    PubMed

    Fenstersheib, M D; Miller, M; Diggins, C; Liska, S; Detwiler, L; Werner, S B; Lindquist, D; Thacker, W L; Benson, R F

    1990-07-01

    An outbreak of Pontiac fever occurred among 34 of 56 people attending conferences at a hotel in Santa Clara County, California, in 1988. Two groups had an acute febrile upper respiratory illness, with a mean attack rate of 82% and a mean incubation period of 56 hours. Symptoms resolved spontaneously within 5 days. Legionella anisa, which had not previously been associated with outbreaks of Pontiac fever or legionnaires' disease, was isolated from a decorative fountain in the hotel lobby. In addition, 5 of 8 pairs of serum samples from cases showed a more than fourfold rise in antibody titre to the L anisa recovered from the fountain. 42% of hotel employees had titres greater than or equal to 256 against L anisa, whereas none of 48 serum samples from matched controls had titres greater than or equal to 128. The findings raise concern about water treatment protocols for extent of disease that might be caused by exposure to aerosols containing L anisa and other Legionella species. PMID:1973219

  12. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus: new outbreaks, new discoveries.

    PubMed

    Ergonul, Onder

    2012-04-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a fatal viral infection described in Asia, Africa and Europe. Humans become infected through the bites of ticks, by contact with a patient with CCHF during the acute phase of infection, or by contact with blood or tissues from viremic livestock. The occurrence of CCHF closely approximates the known world distribution of Hyalomma spp. ticks. The novel studies of phylogenetic analyses reveal the interesting relations between the strains from distant outbreaks. The clinical features show common dramatic progress characterized by hemorrhage, myalgia, and fever. Besides the direct infection of endothelium, indirect damage by viral or virus mediated host-derived soluble factors that cause endothelial activations and dysfunction occur. In diagnosis, enzyme linked immunoassay and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction are used. Early diagnosis is critical for the patient and potential nosocomial infections. Supportive therapy is the essential part of the case management. Ribavirin was suggested as an effective drug in recent studies, and it was found to be beneficial. The health care workers are under serious risk of transmission of the infection, particularly during the follow-up of the patient, with hemorrhages from the nose, mouth, gums, vagina, and injection sites. PMID:22482717

  13. Systematic review of the global epidemiology, clinical and laboratory profile of enteric fever

    PubMed Central

    Azmatullah, Asma; Qamar, Farah Naz; Thaver, Durrane; Zaidi, Anita KM; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2015-01-01

    Background Children suffer the highest burden of enteric fever among populations in South Asian countries. The clinical features are non–specific, vary in populations, and are often difficult to distinguish clinically from other febrile illnesses, leading to delayed or inappropriate diagnosis and treatment. We undertook a systematic review to assess the clinical profile and laboratory features of enteric fever across age groups, economic regions, level of care and antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Methods We searched PubMed (January 1964–December 2013) for studies describing clinical features in defined cohorts of patients over varying time periods. Studies with all culture–confirmed cases or those with at least 50% culture–confirmed cases were included. 242 reports were screened out of 4398 relevant articles and 180 reports were included for final review. Results 96% of studies were from an urban location, 96% were hospital–based studies, with 41% of studies were from South Asia. Common clinical features in hospitalized children include high–grade fever, coated tongue, anaemia, nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly neutrophilia, abdominal distension and GI bleeding. In adults’ nausea/vomiting, thrombocytopenia and GI perforation predominate. The case–fatality rate in children under 5 years is higher than school aged children and adolescents, and is highest in Sub Saharan Africa and North Africa/Middle East regions. Multi–drug resistant enteric fever has higher rates of complications than drug sensitive enteric fever, but case fatality rates were comparable in both. Conclusions Our findings indicate variability in disease presentation in adults compared to children, in different regions and in resistant vs sensitive cases. Majority of studies are from hospitalized cases, and are not disaggregated by age. Despite higher complications in MDR enteric fever, case fatality rate is comparable to sensitive cases, with an overall hospital based CFR of 2%, which is similar to recent global estimates. This review underscores the importance of further epidemiological studies in community settings among children and adults, and the need for further preventable measures to curtail the burden of disease. PMID:26649174

  14. Variation at HLA-DRB1 is associated with resistance to enteric fever.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, Sarah J; Hue, Nguyen Thi; Han, Buhm; Li, Zheng; Tram, Trinh Thi Bich; Sim, Kar Seng; Parry, Christopher M; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Vinh, Ha; Lan, Nguyen Phu Huong; Thieu, Nga Tran Vu; Vinh, Phat Voong; Koirala, Samir; Dongol, Sabina; Arjyal, Amit; Karkey, Abhilasha; Shilpakar, Olita; Dolecek, Christiane; Foo, Jia Nee; Phuong, Le Thi; Lanh, Mai Ngoc; Do, Tan; Aung, Tin; Hon, Do Nu; Teo, Yik Ying; Hibberd, Martin L; Anders, Katherine L; Okada, Yukinori; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Simmons, Cameron P; Baker, Stephen; de Bakker, Paul I W; Basnyat, Buddha; Hien, Tran Tinh; Farrar, Jeremy J; Khor, Chiea Chuen

    2014-12-01

    Enteric fever affects more than 25 million people annually and results from systemic infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi or Paratyphi pathovars A, B or C(1). We conducted a genome-wide association study of 432 individuals with blood culture-confirmed enteric fever and 2,011 controls from Vietnam. We observed strong association at rs7765379 (odds ratio (OR) for the minor allele = 0.18, P = 4.5 × 10(-10)), a marker mapping to the HLA class II region, in proximity to HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DRB1. We replicated this association in 595 enteric fever cases and 386 controls from Nepal and also in a second independent collection of 151 cases and 668 controls from Vietnam. Imputation-based fine-mapping across the extended MHC region showed that the classical HLA-DRB1*04:05 allele (OR = 0.14, P = 2.60 × 10(-11)) could entirely explain the association at rs7765379, thus implicating HLA-DRB1 as a major contributor to resistance against enteric fever, presumably through antigen presentation. PMID:25383971

  15. Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A elaborate distinct systemic metabolite signatures during enteric fever

    PubMed Central

    Näsström, Elin; Vu Thieu, Nga Tran; Dongol, Sabina; Karkey, Abhilasha; Voong Vinh, Phat; Ha Thanh, Tuyen; Johansson, Anders; Arjyal, Amit; Thwaites, Guy; Dolecek, Christiane; Basnyat, Buddha; Baker, Stephen; Antti, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The host–pathogen interactions induced by Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A during enteric fever are poorly understood. This knowledge gap, and the human restricted nature of these bacteria, limit our understanding of the disease and impede the development of new diagnostic approaches. To investigate metabolite signals associated with enteric fever we performed two dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC/TOFMS) on plasma from patients with S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A infections and asymptomatic controls, identifying 695 individual metabolite peaks. Applying supervised pattern recognition, we found highly significant and reproducible metabolite profiles separating S. Typhi cases, S. Paratyphi A cases, and controls, calculating that a combination of six metabolites could accurately define the etiological agent. For the first time we show that reproducible and serovar specific systemic biomarkers can be detected during enteric fever. Our work defines several biologically plausible metabolites that can be used to detect enteric fever, and unlocks the potential of this method in diagnosing other systemic bacterial infections. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03100.001 PMID:24902583

  16. EPIDEMIOLOGY, CLINICAL AND LABORATORY FEATURES OF CRIMEAN-CONGO HEMORRHAGIC FEVER IN GEORGIA.

    PubMed

    Vashakidze, E; Mikadze, I

    2015-10-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus transmitted to humans by Hyalomma ticks or by direct contact with the blood of infected humans or domestic animals. The most common clinical signs of CCHF are fever, nausea, headache, diarrhea, myalgia, petechial rash, and bleeding. CCHF is a severe disease in humans with a fatality rate up to 15-85%. This study was undertaken to determine the predictors of fatality among patients with CCHF based on epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory findings. 34 patients were enrolled in the study, aged 4 to 77; 17 - male and 17 female. 3 of them were fatal cases. All of them were from Shua Kartli: Khashuri, Gori and Kaspi districts, involved in farming/handling livestock and the history of tick bite was present in most of patients. Evaluation of the epidemiological characteristics of this cases showed that the female to male ratio was nearly similar. The disease is common in the rural areas of the region, mostly in the actively working age group and almost all patients were farmers. The results of our study show that the most cardinal clinical and laboratory features of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever are - acute beginning of disease, high fever, intoxication and hemorrhagic symptoms, thrombocytopenia, high level of aminotransferases and creatine. Predictors of fatality are: an altered mental status, in early stage of disease dramatic decreased thrombocytes count and significantly high level of aspartate aminotransferase, also longer the mean prothrombin time and INR. PMID:26483375

  17. Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A elaborate distinct systemic metabolite signatures during enteric fever.

    PubMed

    Näsström, Elin; Vu Thieu, Nga Tran; Dongol, Sabina; Karkey, Abhilasha; Voong Vinh, Phat; Ha Thanh, Tuyen; Johansson, Anders; Arjyal, Amit; Thwaites, Guy; Dolecek, Christiane; Basnyat, Buddha; Baker, Stephen; Antti, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The host-pathogen interactions induced by Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A during enteric fever are poorly understood. This knowledge gap, and the human restricted nature of these bacteria, limit our understanding of the disease and impede the development of new diagnostic approaches. To investigate metabolite signals associated with enteric fever we performed two dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC/TOFMS) on plasma from patients with S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A infections and asymptomatic controls, identifying 695 individual metabolite peaks. Applying supervised pattern recognition, we found highly significant and reproducible metabolite profiles separating S. Typhi cases, S. Paratyphi A cases, and controls, calculating that a combination of six metabolites could accurately define the etiological agent. For the first time we show that reproducible and serovar specific systemic biomarkers can be detected during enteric fever. Our work defines several biologically plausible metabolites that can be used to detect enteric fever, and unlocks the potential of this method in diagnosing other systemic bacterial infections. PMID:24902583

  18. [Epidemiological study of Brazilian purpuric fever. Epidemic in a locality of São Paulo state (Brazil), 1986].

    PubMed

    Kerr-Pontes, L R; Ruffino-Netto, A

    1991-10-01

    A case control model was used in the study of an outbreak of Brazilian purpuric fever BPF which occurred in Serrana, S. Paulo State, Brazil, in 1986. Three hypotheses were raised: 1--purulent conjunctivitis is associated with BPF; 2--a cluster effect occurs in BPF; 3--respiratory symptoms may be a variation of the clinical picture of the disease. Numerical values were attributed to different findings, as follows: fever = 5; diarrhea and/or vomiting = 1; haemorrhagic findings = 3; thrombocytopenia and/or leukopenia = 3; Haemophilus aegyptius positive hemoculture and/or Haemophilus aegyptius positive cerebrospinal fluid culture and/or H. a. oropharynx culture = 7; Waterhouse Friedrichsen syndrome = 7. Those cases for which the sum total of points reached or exceeded 13 were considered as confirmed and those obtaining between 8 and 12 were considered as suspect. Children with a score below 5 were taken as control cases. Cases and controls were matched according to sex, age and socioeconomic level. The total groups studied included 14 confirmed cases, 38 suspect cases and 78 controls. It was concluded that purpuric fever is strongly associated with previous and/or present purulent conjunctivities; a cluster effect seems to occur; respiratory symptoms such as coughing and/or coryza were not associated with BPF. PMID:1820627

  19. A Study on the Serum Adenosine Deaminase Activity in Patients with Typhoid Fever and Other Febrile Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Ketavarapu, Sameera; Ramani G., Uma; Modi, Prabhavathi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) has been suggested to be an important enzyme which is associated with the cell mediated immunity, but its clinical significance in typhoid fever has not yet been characterized. The present study was taken up to evaluate the serum ADA activity in patients of typhoid fever. The levels of ADA were also measured in the patients who were suffering from other febrile illnesses. Material and Method: This was a case control study. The subjects who were included in this study were divided into 3 groups. Group A consisted of 50 normal healthy individuals who served as the controls. Group B consisted of 50 patients, both males and females of all age groups, who were suffering from culture positive typhoid fever. Group C consisted of 50 patients who were suffering from febrile illnesses other than typhoid fever like viral fever, gastro enteritis, malaria, tonsillitis, upper respiratory tract infections, etc. The serum levels of ADA were estimated in all the subjects who were under study. Results: The serum ADA level was found to be increased in the patients of typhoid fever as compared to that in those with other febrile illnesses and in the controls. Conclusion: From the present study, it can be concluded that there was a statistically significant increase in the serum ADA levels in the patients with typhoid. PMID:23730630

  20. A spatiotemporal dengue fever early warning model accounting for nonlinear associations with meteorological factors: a Bayesian maximum entropy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chieh-Han; Yu, Hwa-Lung; Chien, Lung-Chang

    2014-05-01

    Dengue fever has been identified as one of the most widespread vector-borne diseases in tropical and sub-tropical. In the last decade, dengue is an emerging infectious disease epidemic in Taiwan especially in the southern area where have annually high incidences. For the purpose of disease prevention and control, an early warning system is urgently needed. Previous studies have showed significant relationships between climate variables, in particular, rainfall and temperature, and the temporal epidemic patterns of dengue cases. However, the transmission of the dengue fever is a complex interactive process that mostly understated the composite space-time effects of dengue fever. This study proposes developing a one-week ahead warning system of dengue fever epidemics in the southern Taiwan that considered nonlinear associations between weekly dengue cases and meteorological factors across space and time. The early warning system based on an integration of distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) and stochastic Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) analysis. The study identified the most significant meteorological measures including weekly minimum temperature and maximum 24-hour rainfall with continuous 15-week lagged time to dengue cases variation under condition of uncertainty. Subsequently, the combination of nonlinear lagged effects of climate variables and space-time dependence function is implemented via a Bayesian framework to predict dengue fever occurrences in the southern Taiwan during 2012. The result shows the early warning system is useful for providing potential outbreak spatio-temporal prediction of dengue fever distribution. In conclusion, the proposed approach can provide a practical disease control tool for environmental regulators seeking more effective strategies for dengue fever prevention.

  1. An Update on Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Appannanavar, Suma B; Mishra, Baijayantimala

    2011-01-01

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is one of the deadly hemorrhagic fevers that are endemic in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East. It is a tick-borne zoonotic viral disease caused by CCHF virus of genus Nairovirus (family Bunyaviridae). CCHF not only forms an important public health threat but has a significant effect on the healthcare personnel, especially in resource-poor countries. India was always a potentially endemic area until an outbreak hit parts of Gujarat, taking four lives including the treating medical team. The current review is an attempt to summarize the updated knowledge on the disease particularly in modern era, with special emphasis on nosocomial infections. The knowledge about the disease may help answer certain questions regarding entry of virus in India and future threat to community. PMID:21887063

  2. Tickborne Relapsing Fever, Bitterroot Valley, Montana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Joshua; Fischer, Robert J.; McCoy, Brandi N.; Raffel, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    In July 2013, a resident of the Bitterroot Valley in western Montana, USA, contracted tickborne relapsing fever caused by an infection with the spirochete Borrelia hermsii. The patient’s travel history and activities before onset of illness indicated a possible exposure on his residential property on the eastern side of the valley. An onsite investigation of the potential exposure site found the vector, Ornithodoros hermsi ticks, and 1 chipmunk infected with spirochetes, which on the basis of multilocus sequence typing were identical to the spirochete isolated from the patient. Field studies in other locations found additional serologic evidence and an infected tick that demonstrated a wider distribution of spirochetes circulating among the small mammal populations. Our study demonstrates that this area of Montana represents a previously unrecognized focus of relapsing fever and poses a risk for persons of acquiring this tickborne disease. PMID:25625502

  3. Mayaro fever in the city of Manaus, Brazil, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Mourão, Maria Paula Gomes; Bastos, Michele de Souza; de Figueiredo, Regina Pinto; Gimaque, João Bosco Lima; Galusso, Elizabeth dos Santos; Kramer, Valéria Munique; de Oliveira, Cintia Mara Costa; Naveca, Felipe Gomes; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2012-01-01

    Mayaro Alphavirus is an arbovirus that causes outbreaks of acute febrile illness in the Amazon region of South America. We show here the cases of Mayaro fever that occurred in 2007-2008, in Manaus, a large city and capital of the Amazonas State, in Western Brazilian Amazon. IgM antibodies to Mayaro virus (MAYV) were detected by an enzyme immunoassay using infected cell cultures as antigen in the sera of 33 patients from both genera and 6-65 years old. MAYV genome was also detected by RT-PCR in the blood of 1/33 of these patients. The patients presented mainly with headache, arthralgia, myalgia, ocular pain, and rash. These cases of Mayaro fever are likely to represent the tip of an iceberg, and probably a much greater number of cases occurred in Manaus in the study period. PMID:21923266

  4. Pathogenesis of lassa fever in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lassa virus (LASV) infection causes an acute and sometimes fatal hemorrhagic disease in humans and nonhuman primates; however, little is known about the development of Lassa fever. Here, we performed a pilot study to begin to understand the progression of LASV infection in nonhuman primates. Methods Six cynomolgus monkeys were experimentally infected with LASV. Tissues from three animals were examined at an early- to mid-stage of disease and compared with tissues from three animals collected at terminal stages of disease. Results Dendritic cells were identified as a prominent target of LASV infection in a variety of tissues in all animals at day 7 while Kupffer cells, hepatocytes, adrenal cortical cells, and endothelial cells were more frequently infected with LASV in tissues of terminal animals (days 13.5-17). Meningoencephalitis and neuronal necrosis were noteworthy findings in terminal animals. Evidence of coagulopathy was noted; however, the degree of fibrin deposition in tissues was less prominent than has been reported in other viral hemorrhagic fevers. Conclusion The sequence of pathogenic events identified in this study begins to shed light on the development of disease processes during Lassa fever and also may provide new targets for rational prophylactic and chemotherapeutic interventions. PMID:21548931

  5. Q fever pneumonia in children in Japan.

    PubMed Central

    To, H; Kako, N; Zhang, G Q; Otsuka, H; Ogawa, M; Ochiai, O; Nguyen, S V; Yamaguchi, T; Fukushi, H; Nagaoka, N; Akiyama, M; Amano, K; Hirai, K

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence of Q fever pneumonia among children with atypical pneumonia from whom only an acute-phase serum sample was available was traced by using an indirect immunofluorescence (IF) test, nested PCR, and isolation. Twenty (34.5%) of 58 sera were found to have both polyvalent and immunoglobulin M antibodies to the phase II antigen of Coxiella burnetii by the IF test. Q fever pneumonia was present in 23 (39.7%) of 58 patients as determined by both the nested PCR and isolation and in 20 patients as determined by the IF test. The sensitivities for nested PCR and isolation were 100%, and that for the IF test was 87%. Our results indicate that nested PCR was faster and more sensitive than isolation and the IF test in the diagnosis of acute Q fever when a single acute-phase serum was available. These findings suggest that C. burnetii is an important cause of atypical pneumonia in children in Japan. PMID:8904431

  6. [Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hidemasa; Heike, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Hyperimmunogloblinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) is inherited autoinflammatory syndrome caused by deficiency of the mevalonate kinase (MK), which is involved in metabolism of cholesterol. The disease is characterized as periodic fever from early infancy accompanied by elevated serum C-reactive protein. Since clinical symptoms such as abdominal symptom, skin rash, and arthritis are common to other autoinflammatory disease, the diagnosis of HIDS during clinical work is difficult for the physicians without suspicion of HIDS for infants suffering from fever of unknown origin. Moreover, serum IgD levels are not high during infancy conflicting to the name of the disease, which is often misunderstood in the clinicians. Thus, the diagnosis of HIDS in Japan is bothering, depending on the lack of correct recognition of the disease and on the lack of commercially available examination for the disease. It is important for clinicians, especially pediatricians to update current knowledge about HIDS and to learn the appropriate way to the definitive diagnosis of HIDS, because HIDS patients exist also in Japan and the specific therapies for HIDS would be developed in the near future. PMID:22041426

  7. Q fever in Plymouth, 1972-88. A review with particular reference to neurological manifestations.

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, S.; Northwood, J. L.; Caul, E. O.

    1990-01-01

    Between 1972 and 1988 we have serologically confirmed 103 Coxiella burnetii infections: 46 were acute, 5 were chronic, 52 represented past infections. Details of 61 cases are presented. Of acute cases 80% had respiratory involvement; at least 63% had pneumonias. The incidence (22%) of neurological complications was of particular interest; 40% of these patients had prolonged sequelae. One acutely ill patient died of fulminating hepatitis. Patients with pre-existing pathology or immunosuppression were especially susceptible to C. burnetii. In the absence of acute sera, the complement fixation test alone provided inadequate differentiation between recent and past Q fever: phase II titres persisted at greater than or equal to 80 for more than 1 year after the acute infection in 15 cases; maximum duration of persistence was 14 years. Three patients acquired high phase I titres. Only 5% of cases had chronic Q fever, but in view of the diverse sequelae observed in this series, we suggest that long-term serological and clinical follow-up of all cases of Q fever is fully justified. PMID:2209742

  8. [The "Black Death" : Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Wiemer, Dorothea

    2015-07-01

    The Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tick-borne viral disease that has been known for centuries. In the last years more frequent cases reflect the effects of climate change, globalization and the increasing encroachment of humans into previously unexploited areas. Humans acquire the infection by tick bites or through the slaughtering and processing of infected animals. The course of the disease can be severe and the average mortality reaches up to 30?%. It is transmissible from human to human and there is no causal treatment. Thus, CCHF meets the criteria for a highly contagious life-threatening disease. In the following current data on the virus, its vector, the distribution and transmission will be presented, as well as information on the diagnosis, the disease, the underlying pathophysiology and consequences in dealing with patients and deceased. PMID:25963644

  9. Hemoperitoneum in Dengue Fever with Normal Coagulation Profile

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, Nagesh Kumar Talakad; Krishnappa, Rashmi; Reddy, Chandra Sekara; Narayan, Arun

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old male living in Bengaluru sought emergency services due to high-grade fever, headache, myalgia, abdominal pain and distension. Platelet count (except the first-96,000/mm3) and coagulation profile was in normal limits. The dengue serology was positive for IgM and Ig G (immunoglobulin M and G) antibodies. Ultrasound abdomen showed gross ascites, mild bilateral pleural effusion and hepatosplenomegaly. The patient continued to have abdominal pain and progressive distention Ascitic tap was hemorrhagic. Later laparoscopy showed 1.5 liters peritoneal fluid with blood clots and mild diffuse congestion of the peritoneum. Liver, spleen and blood vessels were normal. Then what would be the possible mechanism to explain hemoperitoneum, is it the increased vascular permeability caused by the virus? India being endemic for dengue illness, it is an interesting and rare case presentation. PMID:23599615

  10. Spatial Analysis of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Ehsan; Haghdoost, AliAkbar; Khakifirouz, Sahar; Chinikar, Sadegh

    2013-01-01

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral zoonotic disease. During 1999–2011, 871 human cases of CCHF were diagnosed in Iran. A history of serologic conversion for CCHF virus was seen in 58.7% of 2,447 sheep samples, 25.0% of 1,091 cattle samples and 24.8% of 987 goat samples from different parts of Iran. Spatial analysis showed that the main foci of this disease in humans during these years were in eastern Iran (P < 0.01) and the second most common foci were in northeastern and central Iran. Two livestock foci were detected in the northeastern northwestern Iran. On the basis of the results of this study, infection likely entered Iran from eastern and western neighboring countries. PMID:24166038

  11. Rodent control programmes in areas affected by Bolivian haemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Mercado R., Rodolfo

    1975-01-01

    Bolivian haemorrhagic fever (BHF) caused by Machupo virus is acquired by contact with the excretions and secretions of Calomys callosus, an indigenous cricetine rodent which is preadapted to peridomestic habitats. It competes successfully with Mus musculus, but not with Rattus rattus. A successful disease control programme has functioned in Beni Department since 1964. It is based on trapping surveys and the detection of splenomegaly in Calomys rodents as an index of chronic virus infection. Mass trapping and poisoning are used initially, and regular trapping is employed to control Calomys populations in towns where disease has occurred. More than 1000 cases of BHF were recorded from 1960-1964, but less than 200 in the past 10 years. The cost of this programme is approximately $30 000 annually. PMID:182405

  12. Fever of unknown origin and the role of Plasmodium vivax in Sao Paulo.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Marcelo Rodrigues; Santos, Janaina Aparecida Boide; Zing, Natalia C P; Bragatto, Felipe Barca

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is a disease that hits the northern part of Brazil in an endemic form. Recorded cases outside this region are unusual and, in most cases, limited to travellers. The southeast of Brazil has an extensive wilderness area with a type of vegetation similar to the one found in the equatorial rainforest. We present the case of a patient living in the southeast, with no reported travel history, who evolved to periodic fever, associated with myalgia and chills. With the positive test result for Plasmodium, the treatment for malaria was started. This case enabled the study in the Anopheles mosquito affected area, where the patient reported infection, outside the Amazon region. PMID:23833104

  13. Q fever outbreak in a goat herd--diagnostic investigations and measures for control.

    PubMed

    Sting, Reinhard; Molz, Kerstin; Benesch, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    This is a case report about a Q fever infection of a goat herd with abortions and excretions of pathogens accompanied by human infection and disease. Following a diagnosis of Q fever in a goat herd, all animals were vaccinated with an inactivated phase 1 vaccine. The herd was kept isolated and animals were neither removed nor introduced so that monitoring of the course of the Q fever infection of the individual dam was possible. Over a period of two years following the diagnosis of a Q fever infection (abortion), diagnostic investigations on detection of Coxiella (C.) burnetii were performed using quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR) and for serological studies complement fixation test (CFT) and ELISA. Excretion of pathogens decreased from > 500 000 units per genital swab in the first year to < 50 units in the second year after the initial diagnosis. Serological studies of the dams using CFT revealed a dominance of phase 2 antibodies with a proportion of 35.4% (17/48) positive animals in 2006. This level decreased to a value of 2.3% (2/87) two years later. The mixed phase 1 and 2 ELISA initially yielded 20.8% (10/48) positive dams with an increase to 98.9% (86/87) two years later. The control measures which were implemented after a round table meeting are illustrated and discussed. PMID:24199381

  14. Robotic health assistant (Feverkit) for the rational management of fevers among nomads in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akogun, Oladele

    2011-06-01

    The innovation described in this paper was motivated by concern that in Africa, parasite resistance to antimalarial drugs is associated with irrational drug use where health facilities are inaccessible. However, advancement in digital technology, simple diagnostic devices and smart drug packaging inspire innovative strategies. The combination of communication technology, rapid diagnostic tools, and antibiotic and antimalarial medicines can increase access to evidence-based malaria management, reduce mortality and slow the development of resistance to drugs. The author initiated development of a solar-powered device (Feverkit) programmed with user-interactive capabilities and equipped with a detachable laboratory and dispensary for community management of fevers. The operational performance of 10 units of the device was evaluated among 20 nomadic Fulani communities in northeastern Nigeria. A brief introduction to its parts and functions was sufficient for community-selected nomadic caregivers to use it competently for managing 207 fever cases in eight weeks, with a 97% (p=.000) recovery rate. The Feverkit guided the nomads to distinguish between malaria and non-malaria-induced fevers, and thus selectively treat them. Camp communities accepted the device and were willing to pay between US$33 and $334 (mean, $113; mode, $67) to keep it. Public-private sector collaboration is essential for sustaining and scaling up production of the Feverkit as a commercial health device for the management of fevers among nomads. PMID:21730769

  15. Dengue Fever Outbreak in Delhi, North India: A Clinico-Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nishat Hussain; Broor, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dengue viruses, single-stranded positive polarity ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses of the family Flaviviridae, are the most common cause of arboviral disease in the world. We report a clinico-epidemiological study of the dengue fever outbreak of 2010 from a tertiary care hospital in Delhi, North India. Objectives: Objectives of the study were to know the incidence of laboratory-confirmed dengue cases among the clinically suspected patients; to study the clinical profile of dengue-positive cases; and to co-relate the above with the prevalent serotype and environmental conditions. Materials and Methods: Four thousand three hundred and seventy serum samples from clinically suspected cases of dengue infection were subjected to ?-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of dengue-virus-specific IgM antibodies. Virus isolation was done in 55 samples on C6/36 cell mono-layers. Clinical and demographic details of the patients were obtained from requisition forms of the patients or from treating clinicians. Results: Out of the 4,370 serum samples, 1,700 were positive for dengue-virus-specific IgM antibodies (38.9%). Prevalent serotype was dengue virus type-1. Thrombocytopenia and myalgia was seen in 23.1% and 18.3% of the 1,700 dengue IgM-positive patients, respectively. Also, 10.3% of 1,700 were dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) patients; and the mortality in serologically confirmed dengue fever cases was 0.06%. Conclusions: A change in the predominant circulating serotype, unprecedented rains, enormous infrastructure development, and increased reporting due to improved diagnostic facilities were the factors responsible for the unexpected number of dengue fever cases confronted in 2010. PMID:25861176

  16. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sanchita; Rundell, Mark S.; Mirza, Aashiq H.; Pingle, Maneesh R.; Shigyo, Kristi; Garrison, Aura R.; Paragas, Jason; Smith, Scott K.; Olson, Victoria A.; Larone, Davise H.; Spitzer, Eric D.; Barany, Francis; Golightly, Linnie M.

    2015-01-01

    CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR). The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus) as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively). The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus). PMID:26381398

  17. Transient 2nd Degree Av Block Mobitz Type II: A Rare Finding in Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Ashwini Kumar; Agarwal, Ayush; Singh, Amit K; Yadav, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    Dengue has been a major problem as endemic occurs almost every year and causes a state of panic due to lack of proper diagnostic methods and facilities for proper management. Patients presenting with classical symptoms are easy to diagnose, however as a large number of cases occur every year, a number of cases diagnosed with dengue fever on occasion presents with atypical manifestations, which cause extensive evaluation of the patients, unnecessary referral to higher centre irrespective of the severity and therefore a rough idea of these manifestations must be present in the backdrop in order to prevent these problems. Involvement of cardiovascular system in dengue has been reported in previous studies, and they are usually benign and self-limited. The importance of study of conduction abnormalities is important as sometimes conduction blocks are the first sign of acute myocarditis in patients of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever in shock. We present here a case of 2nd Degree Mobitz Type II atrioventricular AV block in a case of Dengue Hemorrhagic fever reverting to the normal rhythm in recovery phase and no signs thereafter on follow up. PMID:26155512

  18. Epidemiology of dengue in Sri Lanka before and after the emergence of epidemic dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Messer, William B; Vitarana, U Tissa; Sivananthan, Kamalanayani; Elvtigala, Jayanthi; Preethimala, L D; Ramesh, R; Withana, Nalini; Gubler, Duane J; De Silva, Aravinda M

    2002-06-01

    Before 1989, dengue epidemiology in Sri Lanka was characterized by frequent transmission of all four dengue serotypes but a low incidence of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). After 1989, cases of DHF dramatically increased. Here we present the results of epidemiologic studies conducted in Colombo, Sri Lanka before and after epidemic emergence of DHF in 1989. We compared the proportion of dengue cases among people with fever attending clinics from 1980 to 1984 and in 1997 and 1998 to determine if an increase in dengue transmission was associated with more DHF cases being reported. We also compared the relative distribution of dengue virus serotypes circulating in Colombo before and after the emergence of DHF. We detected no significant differences in dengue as a proportion of fever cases or in serotype distribution between the pre and post-DHF periods. We conclude that an increase in virus transmission or a change in circulating serotypes does not explain the epidemic emergence of DHF in Sri Lanka. PMID:12224589

  19. Efficacy trial of Vi polysaccharide vaccine against typhoid fever in south-western China.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H. H.; Wu, C. G.; Xie, G. Z.; Gu, Q. W.; Wang, B. R.; Wang, L. Y.; Wang, H. F.; Ding, Z. S.; Yang, Y.; Tan, W. S.; Wang, W. Y.; Wang, X. C.; Qin, M.; Wang, J. H.; Tang, H. A.; Jiang, X. M.; Li, Y. H.; Wang, M. L.; Zhang, S. L.; Li, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the efficacy of locally produced Vi vaccine over a time period of longer than one year. METHODS: A double-blinded, randomized field trial was performed in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in south-western China, using 30 micrograms doses of locally produced Vi. Enrolled subjects were 3-50 years of age, although the majority (92%) were school-aged children, who have the highest rate of typhoid fever in this setting. A total of 131,271 people were systematically allocated a single dose of 30 micrograms of Vi polysaccharide or saline placebo. The study population was followed for 19 months, with passive surveillance conducted in the Ministry of Health and the Regional Health and Anti-epidemic Centre (HAEC). Clinically suspected cases of typhoid fever were confirmed by blood culture, or by serological reaction with O-antigen (Widal tests). FINDINGS: After 19 months, there were 23 culture-confirmed cases of typhoid fever in the placebo group versus 7 cases in the Vi group (Protective efficacy (PE) = 69%; 95% CI = 28%, 87%). Most of the isolates were from school-aged children: 22 cases in the placebo group versus 6 in the Vi group (PE = 72%; 95% CI = 32%, 82%). No serious post-injection reactions were observed. The locally produced Vi polysaccharide vaccine showed levels of protective efficacy similar to those for Vi vaccine produced in industrial countries. CONCLUSION: The slightly higher dose of vaccine did not seem to alter efficacy significantly in China. PMID:11477965

  20. Typhoid fever acquired in the United States, 1999-2010: epidemiology, microbiology, and use of a space-time scan statistic for outbreak detection.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, M; Newton, A E; Vieira, A R; Gonzalez-Aviles, G; Kendall Scott, M E; Manikonda, K; Maxwell, T N; Halpin, J L; Freeman, M M; Medalla, F; Ayers, T L; Derado, G; Mahon, B E; Mintz, E D

    2015-08-01

    Although rare, typhoid fever cases acquired in the United States continue to be reported. Detection and investigation of outbreaks in these domestically acquired cases offer opportunities to identify chronic carriers. We searched surveillance and laboratory databases for domestically acquired typhoid fever cases, used a space-time scan statistic to identify clusters, and classified clusters as outbreaks or non-outbreaks. From 1999 to 2010, domestically acquired cases accounted for 18% of 3373 reported typhoid fever cases; their isolates were less often multidrug-resistant (2% vs. 15%) compared to isolates from travel-associated cases. We identified 28 outbreaks and two possible outbreaks within 45 space-time clusters of ?2 domestically acquired cases, including three outbreaks involving ?2 molecular subtypes. The approach detected seven of the ten outbreaks published in the literature or reported to CDC. Although this approach did not definitively identify any previously unrecognized outbreaks, it showed the potential to detect outbreaks of typhoid fever that may escape detection by routine analysis of surveillance data. Sixteen outbreaks had been linked to a carrier. Every case of typhoid fever acquired in a non-endemic country warrants thorough investigation. Space-time scan statistics, together with shoe-leather epidemiology and molecular subtyping, may improve outbreak detection. PMID:25427666