Sample records for yellow vein streak

  1. Ipomoviruses: Squash vein yellowing virus, Cucumber vein yellowing virus, Cassava brown streak virus, and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ipomoviruses including Squash vein yellowing virus, Cucumber vein yellowing virus and Cassava brown streak virus are currently causing significant economic impact on crop production in several regions of the world. Only recently have results of detailed characterization of their whitefly transmissi...

  2. BARLEY YELLOW STREAK MOSAIC VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley yellow streak mosaic virus (BaYSMV) was discovered in barley from Montana, U.S.A. in 1982, and later reported in several western states, Alaska, and Alberta, Canada. Barley plants show chlorotic streaks, stripes, and dashes parallel to the leaf veins and varying degrees of stunting; increased...

  3. Characterization of tomato yellow vein streak virus, a begomovirus from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, L C; Martin, D P; Avila, A C; Inoue-Nagata, A K

    2010-02-01

    Tomato yellow vein streak virus (ToYVSV) is a tentative begomovirus (Family Geminiviridae) species that seriously affects tomato and potato production in Brazil. Here, we have determined the genomic and biological characteristics of a ToYVSV isolate (Ba3) from a potato plant sampled in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. The DNA-A nucleotide sequence of Ba3 and another previously reported ToYVSV isolate share 89.7% sequence identity. These ToYVSV isolates should be classified as a new species in that they are most closely related to Soybean blistering mosaic virus with which they share only approximately 80% identity. Cloned constructs containing 1.5 mer copies of the ToYVSV genomic components were found, by biolistic bombardment, to be infectious in at least 11 plant species in 2 families (Solanaceae and Malvaceae). Symptoms on tomato and potato plants were identical to those originally observed on field-infected plants. ToYVSV was also sap-transmissible from Nicotiana benthamiana to N. benthamiana and tomato, but not to potato plants. PMID:19937269

  4. Blackberry Yellow Vein Disease Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new virus disease has emerged in the Midsouth and Southeastern United States and was named blackberry yellow vein disease (BYVD). Originally, it was thought the disease was caused by Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) as the virus was found in many diseased plants and symptoms were very similar to thos...

  5. A unique virus complex causes Ageratum yellow vein disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith Saunders; Ian D. Bedford; Rob W. Briddon; Peter G. Markham; Sek Man Wong; John Stanley

    2000-01-01

    Ageratum conyzoides L., a weed species widely distributed throughout southeast Asia, frequently exhibits striking yellow vein symptoms associated with infection by Ageratum yellow vein virus (AYVV), a member of the Geminiviridae (genus Begomovirus). Most begomoviruses have bipartite genomes (DNAs A and B), but only a DNA A has been identified for AYVV. We demonstrate that yellow vein disease of A.

  6. Comparison of wheat spindle streak mosaic virus (WSSMV) and barley yellow mosaic virus (BaYMV)

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Comparison of wheat spindle streak mosaic virus (WSSMV) and barley yellow mosaic virus (BaYMV): 2 streak mosaic bymovirus (WSSMV). Using different methods both viruses were found to be closely related. Electron microscopy studies revealed that both viruses lead to formation of 2 types of cytoplasmic

  7. Blackberry Yellow Vein Disease is Caused by Multiple Virus Complexes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blackberry yellow vein disease, with symptoms of vein clearing, yellow mottling, ringspots and plant decline has been observed in blackberry in the southeastern United States since about 2000. At least six viruses have been identified by cloning and sequencing of double-stranded RNA from diseased p...

  8. Comportement de deux virus filamenteux (Carnation Vein Mottle Virus, Carnation Streak

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Comportement de deux virus filamenteux (Carnation Vein Mottle Virus, Carnation Streak Virus) dans Botanique et de Pathologie végétale, Villa Thuret, B.P. 78, 06602 Antibes Cedex. R?SUM? Virus filamenteux, Dosage, Spectrophotométrie, OEillet. L'évolution de la teneur en virus de la Marbrure des Nervures de l

  9. Squash vein yellowing virus affecting watermelon in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we report the first detection of Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV)-induced watermelon vine decline outside of the continental U.S. This has implications for management of cucurbit virus diseases throughout the Caribbean....

  10. Plant pathology Immunogold labelling of beet necrotic yellow vein

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Plant pathology Immunogold labelling of beet necrotic yellow vein virus particles inside its fungal- * Present address: University of Agriculture, Department of Plant Pathology, 165 21 Praha ainsi que sa transmission la plante hte, des coupes ultrafines ont t rali- ses dans des

  11. Physiological effects of Squash vein yellowing virus infection on watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is the cause of viral watermelon vine decline. In this study, watermelon plants of different ages were inoculated with SqVYV to characterize the physiological response to infection and provide new insights into watermelon vine decline. Physiological responses to...

  12. Squash vein yellowing virus and its effects on watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV), a novel whitefly-transmitted member of the Potyviridae was recently shown to cause a watermelon vine decline in Florida. Watermelon plants were grown under whitefly-free conditions in a greenhouse and inoculated with buffer (mock), SqVYV, or SqVYV and Papaya rin...

  13. Characteristics of whitefly transmission of Squash vein yellowing virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV), a recently described ipomovirus, is transmitted by the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci Gennadius, B strain. Understanding the characteristics of transmission is essential for developing management strategies for this virus, which is the causal agent for watermelon vine ...

  14. Association of a distinct strain of hollyhock yellow vein mosaic virus and Ludwigia leaf distortion betasatellite with yellow vein mosaic disease of hollyhock (Alcea rosea) in India.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Kumar, S; Raj, S K; Pande, S S

    2014-10-01

    A distinct strain of hollyhock yellow vein mosaic virus (HoYVMV) and Ludwigia leaf distortion betasatellite (LuLDB) were associated with yellow vein mosaic of hollyhock. The viral DNA genome (JQ911766) and betasatellite (JQ408216) shared highest nucleotide sequence identity (89.2 %) with HoYVMV (the only available sequence in GenBank) and 92 % identity with LuLDB. Agroinfiltration of HoYVMV and LuLDB induced yellow vein mosaic symptoms on hollyhock, thereby demonstrating causality of the disease. PMID:24810100

  15. Squash vein yellowing virus, a novel ipomovirus, isolated from squash and watermelon in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel whitefly-transmitted member of the family Potyviridae was isolated from a squash plant (Cucurbita pepo) with vein yellowing symptoms in Florida. The virus, for which the name Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is proposed, has flexuous rod-shaped particles of ~840 nm in length. SqVYV was ...

  16. Occurrence of a Begomovirus with yellow vein mosaic disease of mesta ( Hibiscus cannabinus and Hibiscus sabdariffa )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Chatterjee; A. Roy; K. V. Padmalatha; V. G. Malathi; S. K. Ghosh

    2005-01-01

    A whitefly transmitted Begomovirus (Geminiviridae: Begomovirus) with a satellite (?-DNA associated with yellow vein mosaic disease of mesta (Hibiscus cannabinus and Hibiscus sabdariffa) has been detected for the first time in mesta growing regions of India.

  17. Identification and characterization of Citrus yellow vein clearing virus, a putative new member of the genus Mandarivirus infecting Citrus spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow vein clearing virus, an uncharacterized filamentous virus, was first observed in Pakistan in 1988 and later in India in 1997 in Etrog citron (Citrus medica). Based on electron microscopic evidence of filamentous particles, the virus, provisionally named Citrus yellow vein clearing virus (CYVC...

  18. EVALUATION OF COMMON BEAN FOR RESISTANCE TO CLOVER YELLOW VEIN VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) is a problematic virus causing the chocolate pod disease of common bean that has been plaguing bean production in the Great Lakes region since the rapid increase of soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) populations in 2000. Resistance to ClYVV is not well understood. We s...

  19. Proteome changes in sugarbeet in response to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus infection.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania, caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), is characterized by excessive growth of lateral roots and constriction of the taproot, resulting in decreased sugar yield. There are limited sources of resistance against the virus and resistance-breaking isolates are becoming increasing...

  20. Squash vein yellowing virus infection of vining cucurbits and the vine decline response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is the cause of viral watermelon vine decline. In this study, the responses of a diverse group of vining cucurbits to SqVYV inoculation was determined. The majority of cucurbits tested had either no symptoms of infection, or developed relatively mild symptoms. ...

  1. Responses of various vining cucurbits to Squash vein yellowing virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) induced watermelon vine decline is a major limitation to watermelon production in Florida. The symptoms of this disease are a systemic wilt and necrosis which spreads along the vines of plants and leads to complete collapse. Fruit on affected vines also often sh...

  2. Development of ELISA and qPCR for Squash vein yellowing virus detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watermelon vine decline caused by Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is a new and emerging disease that has caused severe losses to Florida watermelon growers in recent years. First identified in 2005, SqVYV is widely distributed in southwest and west-central Florida and has recently been found in...

  3. Sugar beet storability and the influence of beet necrotic yellow vein virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania in sugar beets caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) and storage losses are serious problems in sugar beet production. Storage issues associated with outdoor piles may be exacerbated by disease problems such as rhizomania. To investigate the influence of BNYVV on storability...

  4. Novel Defective Interfering DNAs Associated with Ageratum Yellow Vein Geminivirus Infection of Ageratum conyzoides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Stanley; Keith Saunders; Marion S. Pinner; Sek Man Wong

    1997-01-01

    Defective DNA forms of the geminivirus ageratum yellow vein virus (AYVV) have been identified in naturally infectedAgeratum conyzoidesplants. Several examples of the defective DNA have been cloned from purified virus-specific supercoiled DNA and characterized by sequence analysis. All are approximately half the size of AYVV genomic DNA, and all contain intergenic region sequences and the 5? terminus of geneC1as well

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of isolates of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus collected worldwide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Audrey Schirmer; Didier Link; Valerie Cognat; Monique Beuve; Alexandre Meunier; Claude Bragard; David Gilmer; Olivier Lemaire

    2005-01-01

    A study of molecular diversity was carried out on 136 sugar beets infected with Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV, Benyvirus) collected worldwide. The nucleotide sequences of the RNA-2-encoded CP, RNA-3-encoded p25 and RNA-5-encoded p26 proteins were analysed. The resulting phylogenetic trees allowed BNYVV to be classified into groups that show correlations between the virus clusters and geographic origins. The

  6. Complete genome sequence of nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus reveals its relationship to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ravendra P; Rajakaruna, Punsasi; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2015-03-01

    Complete genome sequences were obtained from nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus (CaYSV). CaYSV belongs to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses with johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV) as its closest relative. Multiple sequence alignments showed a pattern of amino acid substitutions in the CP sequences, which enabled us to relate these isolates to South East Asian or European isolates. Biological characterization of CaYSV identified Nicotiana benthamiana, Chenopodium quinoa and Phaseolus vulgaris as experimental hosts. Given the popularity and global trade of cannas, a clear picture of the genetic diversity of CaYSV is critical to disease management. PMID:25567205

  7. Progress and Challenges in Managing Watermelon Vine Decline caused by whitefly transmitted Squash Vein Yellowing Virus (SqVYV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watermelon vine decline (WVD) is an emerging threat to watermelon production in south-west and west-central Florida. Losses in 2004-2005 due to WVD were estimated to be more than 60 million U.S. dollars. The disease is caused by Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV), family: Potyviridae, genus: Ip...

  8. Squash vein yellowing virus, causal agent of viral watermelon vine decline in Florida, USA reservoirs, genome characterization and mixed infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) was identified in cucurbits in Florida in 2005, shown to be whitefly-transmissible and to induce a previously observed watermelon vine decline and fruit rind necrosis. SqVYV has been isolated from declining watermelons for the past six growing seasons in southwes...

  9. Development and evaluation of quanitative early monitoring techniques for Squash vein yellowing virus, the cause of watermelon vine decline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watermelon vine decline caused by whitefly-transmitted Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is an emerging disease that has caused severe losses to Florida watermelon growers in recent years. Although the late stage symptoms of watermelon vine decline are basically diagnostic for the presence of SqV...

  10. Physiological effects induced by Squash vein yellowing virus, causal agent of viral watermelon vine decline in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whitefly-transmitted Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) was recently shown to cause a watermelon vine decline that has had significant economic impact on watermelon production in southwest and west-central Florida during the past six years. Symptoms typically appear as a sudden decline of vines at...

  11. Effect of reflective mulch and insecticidal treatments on development of watermelon vine decline caused by squash vein yellowing virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vine decline (WVD) caused by the whitefly transmitted Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) has been a major limiting factor in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) production in southwest and west-central Florida for the past several years. Symptoms of WVD typically manifest as sudden decline of vines one...

  12. Squash vein yellowing virus detection using nested polymerase chain reaction demonstrates Momordica charantia is a reservoir host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is a recently described ipomovirus from cucurbits in Florida that induces the relatively unusual symptoms in watermelon of plant death and fruit rind necrosis and discoloration, commonly known in Florida as watermelon vine decline. In this report, we demonstrate ...

  13. Differentiating Rz-1 AND Rz-2 resistance reactions to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus through proteome analysis in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania, caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), is one of the most economically important diseases affecting sugarbeet, and is widely distributed in most sugarbeet growing areas of the world. Control is achieved almost exclusively through planting of resistant varieties. Following t...

  14. RNAi mediated gene silencing against betasatellite associated with Croton yellow vein mosaic begomovirus.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Anurag Kumar; Marwal, Avinash; Nehra, Chitra; Choudhary, Devendra Kumar; Sharma, Pradeep; Gaur, Rajarshi Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Plant viruses encode suppressors of posttranscriptional gene silencing, an adaptive antiviral defense responses that confines virus infection. Previously, we identified single-stranded DNA satellite (also known as DNA-?) of ~1,350 nucleotides in length associated with Croton yellow vein mosaic begomovirus (CYVMV) in croton plants. The expression of genes from DNA-? requires the begomovirus for packaged, replication, insect transmission and movement in plants. The present study demonstrates the effect of the ?C1 gene on the silencing pathway as analysed byusing both transgenic systems and transient Agrobacterium tumefaciens based delivery. Plants that carry an intron-hairpin construct covering the ?C1 gene accumulated cognate small-interfering RNAs and remained symptom-free after exposure to CYVMV and its satellite. These results suggest that ?C1 interferes with silencingmechanism. PMID:25086625

  15. A review of ipomoviruses and watermelon vine decline caused by the newly-described and whitefly-transmitted squash vein yellowing virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though few in number, ipomoviruses cause significant disease in cucurbits and other crops in various parts of the world. As the causal agent of watermelon vine decline in Florida, Squash vein yellowing virus has recently become an economically important pathogen....

  16. Genome organization of ageratum yellow vein virus, a monopartite whitefly-transmitted geminivirus isolated from a common weed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Priscilla H. N. Tan; Sek Man Wong; Mian Wu; Ian D. Bedford; Keith Saunders; John Stanley

    1995-01-01

    A full-length copy of a single genomic component of the whitefly-transmitted geminivirus ageratum yellow vein virus (AYVV) has been cloned from an extract of infected Ageratum conyzoides originating from Singapore. Sequence analysis shows that the genomic component encodes two virion-sense (V1 and V2) and four complementary-sense open reading frames (C1-C4), Phaseolus vulgaris and Lycopersicon esculentum when introduced into plants by

  17. Characterization of sequence elements from Malvastrum yellow vein betasatellite regulating promoter activity and DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many monopartite begomoviruses are associated with betasatellites, but only several promoters from which were isolated and studied. In this study, the ?C1 promoter from Malvastrum yellow vein betasatellite (MYVB) was characterized and important sequence elements were identified to modulate promoter activity and replication of MYVB. Results A 991 nucleotide (nt) fragment upstream of the translation start site of the ?C1 open reading frame of MYVB and a series of deletions within this fragment were constructed and fused to the ?-glucuronidase (GUS) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter genes, respectively. Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression assays showed that the 991 nt fragment was functional and that a 28 nt region (between ?390 nt and ?418 nt), which includes a 5?UTR Py-rich stretch motif, was important for promoter activity. Replication assays using Nicotiana benthamiana leaf discs and whole plants showed that deletion of the 5?UTR Py-rich stretch impaired viral satellite replication in the presence of the helper virus. Transgenic assays demonstrated that the 991 nt fragment conferred a constitutive expression pattern in transgenic tobacco plants and that a 214 nt fragment at the 3'-end of this sequence was sufficient to drive this expression pattern. Conclusion Our results showed that the ?C1 promoter of MYVB displayed a constitutive expression pattern and a 5?UTR Py-rich stretch motif regulated both ?C1 promoter activity and MYVB replication. PMID:23057573

  18. Development of a VIGS vector based on the ?-satellite DNA associated with bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jeyabharathy, C; Shakila, H; Usha, R

    2015-01-01

    Bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus (BYMV) is a monopartite begomovirus with an associated ?-satellite. ?C1 ORF encoded by the ?-satellite is the symptom determinant and a strong suppressor of post transcriptional gene silencing. To create a virus induced gene silencing vector based upon the ?-satellite associated with BYVMV the ?C1 ORF was replaced with multiple cloning sites. GFP transgene and plant endogenous genes Su, PDS, PCNA and AGO1 were cloned into ?-satellite based VIGS vector. GFP expression was silenced in the GFP expressing transgenic 16c Nicotiana benthamiana plants infiltrated with VIGS vector carrying GFP gene inside. N. benthamiana plants infiltrated with the VIGS vector harboring the endogenous genes Su, PDS, PCNA and AGO1 produced the phenotypic symptoms yellowing of the veins, photobleaching of the veins, stunting of the plant and upward leaf curling, respectively. Real time PCR analyses revealed a reduction in the levels of the corresponding transgene or endogenous target mRNA. The ?-satellite based VIGS vector was able to silence the target genes effectively. Hence, BYVMV ?-satellite based VIGS vector can be used in functional genomics studies. PMID:25169741

  19. Detection of Cereal yellow dwarf virus using small interfering RNAs and enhanced infection rate with Cocksfoot streak virus in wild cocksfoot grass (Dactylis glomerata).

    PubMed

    Pallett, Denise W; Ho, Thien; Cooper, Ian; Wang, Hui

    2010-09-01

    Small RNA sequences were obtained from leaf extracts of wild Dactylis glomerata (cocksfoot grass) using deep sequencing (454 Life Sciences, Roche Diagnostics), and were screened against virus sequences in GenBank using a local BLASTn search program (BioEdit). Putative small interfering (si)RNAs complementary in sequence to Cereal yellow dwarf virus (CYDV, genus Luteovirus) genomes were identified. Primer sequences were made against the "high scoring" siRNA sequences and RT-PCR was used to amplify a 438 bp CYDV fragment in total RNA extracts from D. glomerata leaves. Sequencing of the RT-PCR product confirmed the occurrence of a previously undescribed CYDV population with phylogenetic affinity to CYDV-RPS. In D. glomerata the CYDV infection rates were 42.3% (n=78) in 2008 and 50.0% (n=48) in 2009. Specific RT-PCR tests also showed that this D. glomerata population harboured Cocksfoot streak virus (CSV, genus Potyvirus). Dual infections by these viruses were observed in 20.5-22.9% of all plants tested in 2008-2009. Interestingly, infections of either CYDV or CSV enhanced the occurrence of the other virus in individual grasses. Opportunities are discussed for using siRNA sequencing approaches in virus survey and other ecology studies under field conditions. PMID:20558208

  20. Host range and genetic diversity of croton yellow vein mosaic virus, a weed-infecting monopartite begomovirus causing leaf curl disease in tomato.

    PubMed

    Pramesh, D; Mandal, Bikash; Phaneendra, Chigurupati; Muniyappa, V

    2013-03-01

    Croton yellow vein mosaic virus (CYVMV) is a widely occurring begomovirus in Croton bonplandianum, a common weed in the Indian subcontinent. In this study, CYVMV (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) was transmitted by whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci) to as many as 35 plant species belonging to 11 families, including many vegetables, tobacco varieties, ornamentals and weeds. CYVMV produced bright yellow vein symptoms in croton, whereas in all the other host species, the virus produced leaf curl symptoms. CYVMV produced leaf curl in 13 tobacco species and 22 cultivars of Nicotiana tabacum and resembled tobacco leaf curl virus (TobLCV) in host reactions. However, CYVMV was distinguished from TobLCV in four differential hosts, Ageratum conyzoides, C. bonplandianum, Euphorbia geniculata and Sonchus bracyotis. The complete genome sequences of four isolates originating from northern, eastern and southern India revealed that a single species of DNA-A and a betasatellite, croton yellow vein mosaic betasatellite (CroYVMB) were associated with the yellow vein mosaic disease of croton. The sequence identity among the isolates of CYVMV DNA-A and CroYVMB occurring in diverse plant species was 91.8-97.9 % and 83.3-100 %, respectively. The CYVMV DNA-A and CroYVMB generated through rolling-circle amplification of the cloned DNAs produced typical symptoms of yellow vein mosaic and leaf curling in croton and tomato, respectively. The progeny virus from both the croton and tomato plants was transmitted successfully by B. tabaci. The present study establishes the etiology of yellow vein mosaic disease of C. bonplandianum and provides molecular evidence that a weed-infecting monopartite begomovirus causes leaf curl in tomato. PMID:23096697

  1. Molecular characterization of isolates of anagyris vein yellowing virus, plantago mottle virus and scrophularia mottle virus comparison of various approaches for tymovirus classification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Koenig; C. W. A. Pleij; D.-E. Lesemann; S. Loss; H. J. Vetten

    2005-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences were determined for the genomic RNAs of three tymoviruses, i.e. isolates of anagyris vein yellowing virus (AVYV), plantago mottle virus (PlMoV) and scrophularia mottle virus (SrMV) which are all serologically closely related to ononis yellow mosaic virus (ibid) and to Nemesia ring necrosis virus (NeRNV), a recently described recombinant virus which is widely spread in commercially

  2. A resistance gene in common bean to Clover yellow vein virus is tightly linked with bc-3 gene which confers resistance to Bean common mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A strain of Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) that causes severe mosaic, top necrosis, stunting, and pod necrosis on infected plants has been plaguing snap bean production in the Great Lakes and Northeastern regions of the US since 2003. In preliminary virus screening experiments to identify resistan...

  3. Identification of plant reservoirs and genome characterization of Squash vein yellowing virus, causal agent of viral watermelon vine decline in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) was identified in cucurbits in Florida in 2005 and shown to be whitefly-transmissible and to induce a previously observed watermelon vine decline and fruit rind necrosis. Only cucurbits have been determined to be hosts for SqVYV so common cucurbit weeds in south ...

  4. Plant reservoirs of Squash vein yellowing virus, causal agent of viral watermelon vine decline, and other whitefly-transmitted cucurbit viruses in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) was identified in cucurbits in Florida in 2005 and shown to be sufficient to induce a watermelon vine decline and fruit rind necrosis that had been observed for several years previously. This novel virus species was shown to be whitefly-transmissible and has now ...

  5. 392291-VDR, a watermelon germplasm line with resistance to Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV)-caused watermelon vine decline (WVD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    392291-VDR (vine decline resistant) is a watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) germplasm line having resistance to watermelon vine decline (WVD) caused by the whitefly transmitted Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV). The line is derived from the U.S. Plant Introduction (PI) 392291, after succ...

  6. Use of latent class analysis to estimate the sensitivities and specificities of diagnostic tests for Squash vein yellowing virus in cucurbits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) causes watermelon vine decline in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus). Current methods for identification of SqVYV-infected plants are based on the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), tissue blot nucleic acid hybridization assays (NAHA), and visual symptom...

  7. Presence of P1b and absence of HC-Pro in Squash vein yellowing virus suggests a general feature of the genus Ipomovirus in the family Potyviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Ipomovirus is one of six currently recognized genera in the family Potyviridae. The complete nucleotide sequence of Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV), a putative ipomovirus recently described in Florida, has been determined. The SqVYV genomic RNA has one large open reading frame encoding...

  8. Association of a recombinant Cotton leaf curl Bangalore virus with yellow vein and leaf curl disease of okra in India.

    PubMed

    Venkataravanappa, V; Lakshminarayana Reddy, C N; Devaraju, A; Jalali, Salil; Krishna Reddy, M

    2013-09-01

    A begomovirus isolate (OY136A) collected from okra plants showing upward leaf curling, vein clearing, vein thickening and yellowing symptoms from Bangalore rural district, Karnataka, India was characterized. The sequence comparisons revealed that, this virus isolate share highest nucleotide identity with isolates of Cotton leaf curl Bangalore virus (CLCuBV) (AY705380) (92.8%) and Okra enation leaf curl virus (81.1-86.2%). This is well supported by phylogentic analysis showing, close clustering of the virus isolate with CLCuBV. With this data, based on the current taxonomic criteria for the genus Begomovirus, the present virus isolate is classified as a new strain of CLCuBV, for which CLCuBV-[India: Bangalore: okra: 2006] additional descriptor is proposed. The betasatellite (KC608158) associated with the virus is having more than 95% sequence similarity with the cotton leaf curl betasatellites (CLCuB) available in the GenBank.The recombination analysis suggested, emergence of this new strain of okra infecting begomovirus might have been from the exchange of genetic material between BYVMV and CLCuMuV. The virus was successfully transmitted by whitefly and grafting. The host range of the virus was shown to be very narrow and limited to two species in the family Malvaceae, okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) and hollyhock (Althaea rosea), and four in the family Solanaceae. PMID:24426275

  9. Primitive Streak, Oblique Overview

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Jack D Thatcher (West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine Structural Biology)

    2011-06-23

    This FlashTM animation is the seventh and last of a series that presents the primitive streak from different angles. This installment displays the streak from an oblique angle, which provides an overview of simultaneous processes. Cells that ingress through the steak early insert into the underlying hypoblast and differentiate into endodermal cells. The notochordal process emerges from Hensen?s node. Mesenchyme dissociates from the streak and spreads throughout the germ disc. The distal end of the notochordal process fuses with the endoderm and flattens into the notochordal plate. The plate dissociates form the endoderm to form the solid notochord. Eventually the streak completely regresses, leaving the three germ layers; ectoderm, mesoderm, endoderm, with the notochord buried in the paraxial mesoderm. To open the animation using Internet Explorer follow these steps. (1.) Click the link for the animation. (2.) A dialog box may pop up that begins with the statement "Windows cannot open this file:" If this box does not appear proceed to step four. If it does choose "Select the program from a list," then click OK. (3.) Another dialog box will pop up that lists different programs. Make sure "Internet Explorer" is selected, then click OK. (4.) Internet Explorer will pop up. Beneath the toolbars at the top of the window a yellow bar will appear that reads "To help protect your security, Internet Explorer has restricted this webpage from running scripts or Active X controls that could access your computer. Click here for options..." Pass the cursor over this yellow bar and click the right mouse button. (5.) A dialog box will pop up. Left click the option "Allow Blocked Content." (6.) Another dialog box will appear labeled "Security Warning" asking you to confirm that you want to run the content. Click "Yes." (7.) The Flash animation will appear in the Internet Explorer Window. (8.) Instructions for navigating the lesson are provided by the first frame of the animation.

  10. Analysis of sequences from field samples reveals the presence of the recently described pepper vein yellows virus (genus Polerovirus) in six additional countries.

    PubMed

    Knierim, Dennis; Tsai, Wen-Shi; Kenyon, Lawrence

    2013-06-01

    Polerovirus infection was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 29 pepper plants (Capsicum spp.) and one black nightshade plant (Solanum nigrum) sample collected from fields in India, Indonesia, Mali, Philippines, Thailand and Taiwan. At least two representative samples for each country were selected to generate a general polerovirus RT-PCR product of 1.4 kb length for sequencing. Sequence analysis of the partial genome sequences revealed the presence of pepper vein yellows virus (PeVYV) in all 13 samples. A 1990 Australian herbarium sample of pepper described by serological means as infected with capsicum yellows virus (CYV) was identified by sequence analysis of a partial CP sequence as probably infected with a potato leaf roll virus (PLRV) isolate. PMID:23307365

  11. Primitive Streak (dorsal view)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Jack D Thatcher (West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine Structural Biology)

    2011-06-23

    This FlashTM animation is the first of a seven part series that presents the primitive streak from different angles. This installment displays the dorsal view, which provides an overview of elongation and regression. Epiblast is seen migrating medially, towards and into the streak. The appearance of the neural tube and somites demonstrates that morphogenesis commences before the streak recedes away.

  12. An anchored linkage map for sugar beet based on AFLP, SNP and RAPD markers and QTL mapping of a new source of resistance to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. K. Grimmer; S. Trybush; S. Hanley; S. A. Francis; A. Karp; M. J. C. Asher

    2007-01-01

    Rhizomania, caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), is an important sugar-beet disease worldwide and can result in severe losses of root yield and sugar content. We\\u000a have identified a major QTL for BNYVV resistance from a new source in a segregating population of 158 individuals. The QTL\\u000a explained an estimated 78% of the observed phenotypic variation and the

  13. Expression of single-chain antibody fragments (scFv) specific for beet necrotic yellow vein virus coat protein or 25 kDa protein in Escherichia coli and Nicotiana benthamiana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lothar F. Fecker; Andrea Kaufmann; Ulrich Commandeur; Judith Commandeur; Renate Koenig; Wolfgang Burgermeister

    1996-01-01

    The coding sequences for the variable regions of heavy and light chains of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) coat protein (cp) or the 25 kDa nonstructural protein (P25) were cloned into the pCOCK vector and expressed as single-chain antibody fragments (scFv) in Escherichia coli. For expression in higher plants the scFv were targeted either to

  14. Agroinoculation of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus?cDNA clones results in plant systemic infection and efficient Polymyxa betae transmission.

    PubMed

    Delbianco, Alice; Lanzoni, Chiara; Klein, Elodie; Rubies Autonell, Concepcion; Gilmer, David; Ratti, Claudio

    2013-05-01

    Agroinoculation is a quick and easy method for the infection of plants with viruses. This method involves the infiltration of tissue with a suspension of Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying binary plasmids harbouring full-length cDNA copies of viral genome components. When transferred into host cells, transcription of the cDNA produces RNA copies of the viral genome that initiate infection. We produced full-length cDNA corresponding to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) RNAs and derived replicon vectors expressing viral and fluorescent proteins in pJL89 binary plasmid under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. We infected Nicotiana benthamiana and Beta macrocarpa plants with BNYVV by leaf agroinfiltration of combinations of agrobacteria carrying full-length cDNA clones of BNYVV RNAs. We validated the ability of agroclones to reproduce a complete viral cycle, from replication to cell-to-cell and systemic movement and, finally, plant-to-plant transmission by its plasmodiophorid vector. We also showed successful root agroinfection of B.?vulgaris, a new tool for the assay of resistance to rhizomania, the sugar beet disease caused by BNYVV. PMID:23384276

  15. Infection of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus with RNA4-encoded P31 specifically up-regulates pathogenesis-related protein 10 in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) is the infectious agent of sugar beet rhizomania, which consists of four or five plus-sense RNAs. RNA4 of BNYVV is not essential for virus propagation in Nicotiana benthamiana but has a major effect on symptom expression. Early reports showed that RNA4-encoded P31 was associated with severe symptoms, such as curling and dwarfing, in N. benthamiana. Results We discovered that the pathogenesis-related protein 10 (PR-10) gene can be up-regulated in BNYVV-infected N. benthamiana in the presence of RNA4 and that it had a close link with symptom development. Our frame-shift, deletion and substitution analysis showed that only the entire P31 could induce PR-10 up-regulation during BNYVV infection and that all the tryptophans and six cysteines (C174, C183, C186, C190, C197 and C199) in the cysteine-rich P31 had significant effects on PR-10 expression. However, P31 could not interact directly with PR-10 in yeast. Conclusions Our data demonstrated that only integrated P31 specifically induced PR-10 transcription, which coincided closely with the appearance of severe symptoms in BNYVV-infected N. benthamiana, although they could not interact directly with each other in yeast. PMID:24961274

  16. Interactive Separating Streak Surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Florian Ferstl; Kai Brger; Holger Theisel; Rdiger Westermann

    2010-01-01

    Streak surfaces are among the most important features to support 3D unsteady flow exploration, but they are also among the computationally most demanding. Furthermore, to enable a feature driven analysis of the flow, one is mainly interested in streak surfaces that show separation profiles and thus detect unstable manifolds in the flow. The computation of such separation surfaces requires to

  17. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1989-03-21

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

  18. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 KeV x-rays.

  19. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1984-09-28

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

  20. Effect of sugar beet genotype on the Beet necrotic yellow vein virus?P25 pathogenicity factor and evidence for a fitness penalty in resistance-breaking strains.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Kathrin; Varrelmann, Mark

    2013-05-01

    Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), vectored by Polymyxa betae, causes rhizomania in sugar beet. For disease control, the cultivation of hybrids carrying Rz1 resistance is crucial, but is compromised by resistance-breaking (RB) strains with specific mutations in the P25 protein at amino acids 67-70 (tetrad). To obtain evidence for P25 variability from soil-borne populations, where the virus persists for decades, populations with wild-type (WT) and RB properties were analysed by P25 deep sequencing. The level of P25 variation in the populations analysed did not correlate with RB properties. Remarkably, one WT population contained P25 with RB mutations at a frequency of 11%. To demonstrate selection by Rz1 and the influence of RB mutations on relative fitness, competition experiments between strains were performed. Following a mixture of strains with four RNAs, a shift in tetrad variants was observed, suggesting that strains did not mix or transreplicate. The plant genotype exerted a clear influence on the frequency of RB tetrads. In Rz1 plants, the RB variants outcompeted the WT variants, and mostly vice versa in susceptible plants, demonstrating a relative fitness penalty of RB mutations. The strong genotype effect supports the hypothesized Rz1?RB strain selection with four RNAs, suggesting that a certain tetrad needs to become dominant in a population to influence its properties. Tetrad selection was not observed when an RB strain, with an additional P26 protein encoded by a fifth RNA, competed with a WT strain, supporting its role as a second BNYVV pathogenicity factor and suggesting the reassortment of both types. PMID:23282068

  1. Safflor yellow B suppresses angiotensin II-mediated human umbilical vein cell injury via regulation of Bcl-2/p22{sup phox} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chaoyun; He, Yanhao [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China); Department of Pharmacology, Xi'an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Disease, Ministry of Education, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Yang, Ming; Sun, Hongliu; Zhang, Shuping [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China); Wang, Chunhua, E-mail: chunhuawang2012@163.com [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are derived from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. Angiotensin II (Ang II) can cause endothelial dysfunction by promoting intracellular ROS generation. Safflor yellow B (SYB) effectively inhibits ROS generation by upregulating Bcl-2 expression. In this study, we examined the effects of SYB on Ang II-induced injury to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and elucidated the roles of NADPH oxidase and Bcl-2. We treated cultured HUVECs with Ang II, SYB, and Bcl-2 siRNA, and determined NADPH oxidase activity and ROS levels. Furthermore, cellular and mitochondrial physiological states were evaluated, and the expression levels of target proteins were analyzed. Ang II significantly enhanced intracellular ROS levels, caused mitochondrial membrane dysfunction, and decreased cell viability, leading to apoptosis. This was associated with increased expression of AT1R and p22{sup phox}, increased NADPH oxidase activity, and an increased ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, leading to decreases in antioxidant enzyme activities, which were further strengthened after blocking Bcl-2. Compared to Ang II treatment alone, co-treatment with SYB significantly reversed HUVEC injury. Taken together, these results demonstrate that SYB could significantly protect endothelial cells from Ang II-induced cell damage, and that it does so by upregulating Bcl-2 expression and inhibiting ROS generation. - Highlights: Angiotensin II depresses mitochondria physiological function. Angiotensin II activates NADPH oxidase via up-regulating expresion of p22{sup phox}. Bcl-2 plays a pivotal role in improving mitochondria function and regulates ROS level. Inhibitor of Bcl-2 promotes angiotensin II mediated HUVEC injury. SYB attenuates angiotensin II mediated HUVEC injury via up regulating Bcl-2 expression.

  2. Deep SequencingBased Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Comprehensive Insights into the Responses of Nicotiana benthamiana to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus Infections Containing or Lacking RNA4

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Huiyan; Sun, Haiwen; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Xianbing; Li, Dawei; Yu, Jialin; Han, Chenggui

    2014-01-01

    Background Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), encodes either four or five plus-sense single stranded RNAs and is the causal agent of sugar beet rhizomania disease, which is widely distributed in most regions of the world. BNYVV can also infect Nicotiana benthamiana systemically, and causes severe curling and stunting symptoms in the presence of RNA4 or mild symptoms in the absence of RNA4. Results Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analyses showed that the RNA4-encoded p31 protein fused to the red fluorescent protein (RFP) accumulated mainly in the nuclei of N. benthamiana epidermal cells. This suggested that severe RNA4-induced symptoms might result from p31-dependent modifications of the transcriptome. Therefore, we used next-generation sequencing technologies to analyze the transcriptome profile of N. benthamiana in response to infection with different isolates of BNYVV. Comparisons of the transcriptomes of mock, BN3 (RNAs 1+2+3), and BN34 (RNAs 1+2+3+4) infected plants identified 3,016 differentially expressed transcripts, which provided a list of candidate genes that potentially are elicited in response to virus infection. Our data indicate that modifications in the expression of genes involved in RNA silencing, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, cellulose synthesis, and metabolism of the plant hormone gibberellin may contribute to the severe symptoms induced by RNA4 from BNYVV. Conclusions These results expand our understanding of the genetic architecture of N. benthamiana as well as provide valuable clues to identify genes potentially involved in resistance to BNYVV infection. Our global survey of gene expression changes in infected plants reveals new insights into the complicated molecular mechanisms underlying symptom development, and aids research into new strategies to protect crops against viruses. PMID:24416380

  3. Visible Embryo: Primitive Streak

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carmen Arbona (Mouseworks)

    2006-09-08

    the page on early placentation and primitive streak formation from a comprehensive resource of information on human development from conception to birth, designed for both medical student and interested lay people.

  4. Interactive separating streak surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ferstl, Florian; Brger, Kai; Theisel, Holger; Westermann, Rdiger

    2010-01-01

    Streak surfaces are among the most important features to support 3D unsteady flow exploration, but they are also among the computationally most demanding. Furthermore, to enable a feature driven analysis of the flow, one is mainly interested in streak surfaces that show separation profiles and thus detect unstable manifolds in the flow. The computation of such separation surfaces requires to place seeding structures at the separation locations and to let the structures move correspondingly to these locations in the unsteady flow. Since only little knowledge exists about the time evolution of separating streak surfaces, at this time, an automated exploration of 3D unsteady flows using such surfaces is not feasible. Therefore, in this paper we present an interactive approach for the visual analysis of separating streak surfaces. Our method draws upon recent work on the extraction of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) and the real-time visualization of streak surfaces on the GPU. We propose an interactive technique for computing ridges in the finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field at each time step, and we use these ridges as seeding structures to track streak surfaces in the time-varying flow. By showing separation surfaces in combination with particle trajectories, and by letting the user interactively change seeding parameters such as particle density and position, visually guided exploration of separation profiles in 3D is provided. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the reconstruction and display of semantic separable surfaces in 3D unsteady flows can be performed interactively, giving rise to new possibilities for gaining insight into complex flow phenomena. PMID:20975199

  5. Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus

    E-print Network

    Morgan, Gaylon

    2005-01-26

    Figure 1. Leaves infected with Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus. Picture from KSU Department of Plant Pathology web-site. Figure 2. Wheat plant infected with Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and High Plains Virus. Picture was provided by Dr. Charlie Rush, Plant....edu/Agriculture/Entomology/entfacts/fldcrops/ef117. htm ? Compendium of Wheat Diseases, Wiese. American Phy- topathological Society. 1987. Produced by AgriLife Communications and Marketing, Texas A&M System Extension publications can be found on the Web at: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Visit...

  6. Streak camera receiver definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Hunkler, L. T., Sr.; Letzring, S. A.; Jaanimagi, P.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed streak camera definition studies were made as a first step toward full flight qualification of a dual channel picosecond resolution streak camera receiver for the Geoscience Laser Altimeter and Ranging System (GLRS). The streak camera receiver requirements are discussed as they pertain specifically to the GLRS system, and estimates of the characteristics of the streak camera are given, based upon existing and near-term technological capabilities. Important problem areas are highlighted, and possible corresponding solutions are discussed.

  7. MAIZE FINE STREAK VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The report outlines the salient features of maize fine streak virus (MFSV) including a general description of the causal virus species, virion properties, genome description, the relationship of the virus to other taxa, biological properties of the disease and agronomic aspects of the disease. Maize...

  8. Jet Streak Circulations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    This Webcast is based on a presentation given by Dr. James T. Moore of Saint Louis University at the 5th Annual MSC/COMET Winter Weather Workshop on 30 November 2004 in Boulder, Colorado. Dr. Moore reviews many aspects of jet streak dynamics including convergence/divergence, ageostrophic winds, propagation, and coupled jets.

  9. The Primitive Streak, Cross Section

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Jack D Thatcher (West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine Structural Biology)

    2011-06-23

    This FlashTM animation is the third of a seven part series that presents the primitive streak from different angles. This installment displays the cross section, which is conducive to observing invagination. Epiblast cells ingress through the middle of the germ disc, to differentiate into either endoderm or mesenchymal mesoderm. The endoderm proliferates to drive the hypoblast into the extraembryonic endoderm of the yolk sac. The mesenchyme spreads between the epiblast and endoderm. Although not drawn to scale, the progressive thickening from lateral to paraxial mesoderm is depicted. To open the animation using Internet Explorer follow these steps. (1.) Click the link for the animation. (2.) A dialog box may pop up that begins with the statement "Windows cannot open this file:" If this box does not appear proceed to step four. If it does choose "Select the program from a list," then click OK. (3.) Another dialog box will pop up that lists different programs. Make sure "Internet Explorer" is selected, then click OK. (4.) Internet Explorer will pop up. Beneath the toolbars at the top of the window a yellow bar will appear that reads "To help protect your security, Internet Explorer has restricted this webpage from running scripts or Active X controls that could access your computer. Click here for options..." Pass the cursor over this yellow bar and click the right mouse button. (5.) A dialog box will pop up. Left click the option "Allow Blocked Content." (6.) Another dialog box will appear labeled "Security Warning" asking you to confirm that you want to run the content. Click "Yes." (7.) The Flash animation will appear in the Internet Explorer Window. (8.) Instructions for navigating the lesson are provided by the first frame of the animation.

  10. Triton's streaks as windblown dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, Carl; Chyba, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Explanations for the surface streaks observed by Voyager 2 on Triton's southern hemisphere are discussed. It is shown that, despite Triton's tenuous atmosphere, low-cohesion dust trains with diameters of about 5 micron or less may be carried into suspension by aeolian surface shear stress, given expected geostrophic wind speeds of about 10 m/s. For geyser-like erupting dust plumes, it is shown that dust-settling time scales and expected wind velocities can produce streaks with length scales in good agreement with those of the streaks. Thus, both geyserlike eruptions or direct lifting by surface winds appear to be viable mechanisms for the origin of the streaks.

  11. First Report of "Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous" (synonym "Ca. L. solanacearum") Associated with 'Tomato Vein-Greening' and 'Tomato psyllid yellows' Diseases in Commercial Greenhouses in Arizona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During 2006-2007, tomato plants in two independent, commercial greenhouses in Arizona were infested with potato psyllid Paratrioza cockerelli. Over 60% and ~20% of plants in GH-1 and GH-2, respectively, exhibited leaf curling, stunting, and shortened internodes, and GH-1 plants also showed vein-gree...

  12. Streaking into Middle School Science: The Dell Streak Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Susan Eudy

    2012-01-01

    A case study is conducted implementing the Dell Streak seven-inch android device into eighth grade science classes of one teacher in a rural middle school in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. The purpose of the study is to determine if the use of the Dell Streaks would increase student achievement on standardized subject testing, if the

  13. Cerberus Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 May 2002) The Science Cerberus is a dark region on Mars that has shrunk down from a continuous length of about 1000 km to roughly three discontinuous spots a few 100 kms in length in less than 20 years. There are two competing processes at work in the Cerberus region that produce the bright and dark features seen in this THEMIS image. Bright dust settles out of the atmosphere, especially after global dust storms, depositing a layer just thick enough to brighten the dark surfaces. Deposition occurs preferentially in the low wind 'shadow zones' within craters and downwind of crater rims, producing the bright streaks. The direction of the streaks clearly indicates that the dominant winds come from the northeast. Dust deposition would completely blot out the dark areas if it were not for the action of wind-blown sand grains scouring the surface and lifting the dust back into the atmosphere. Again, the shadow zones are protected from the blowing sand, preserving the bright layer of dust. Also visible in this image are lava flow features extending from the flanks of the huge Elysium volcanoes to the northwest. Two shallow channels and a raised flow lobe are just barely discernable. The lava channel in the middle of the image crosses the boundary of the bright and dark surfaces without any obvious change in its morphology. This demonstrates that the bright dust layer is very thin in this location, perhaps as little as a few millimeters. The Story Mars is an ever-changing land of spectacular contrasts. This THEMIS image shows the Cerberus region of Mars, a dark area located near the Elysium volcanoes and fittingly named after the three-headed, dragon-tailed dog who guards the door of the underworld. Two opposing processes are at work here: a thin layer of dust falling from the atmosphere and/or dust storms creating brighter surface areas (e.g. the top left portion of this image) and dust being scoured away by the action of the Martian wind disturbing the sand grains and freeing the lighter dust to fly away once more (the darker portions of this image). There are, however, some darker areas that are somewhat shielded and protected from the wind that have yielded bright, dusty crater floors and wind streaks that trail out behind the craters. These wind streaks tell a story all their own as to the prevailing wind direction coming from the northeast. This, added to the fact that this dark region was once 1000 km in length and has dwindled to just a few isolated dark splotches of 100 kilometers in the past 20 years, help us to see that the Martian environment is still quite dynamic and capable of changing. Finally, this being a volcanic region, a lobe of a lava flow from the immense Elysium volcanoes to the northwest is visible stretching across the bottom one-quarter of the image.

  14. Eragrostis minor streak virus: an Asian streak virus in Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darren P. Martin; Daphne Linderme; Pierre Lefeuvre; Dionne N. Shepherd; Arvind Varsani

    2011-01-01

    The genus Mastrevirus of the single-stranded DNA virus family Geminiviridae consists of four distinct virus lineages that have been sampled in different parts of the Old World. These include the Panicoideae-infecting African streak viruses (ten described species including the geographical outlier, Digitaria streak virus [DSV] from Vanuatu) and Australian striate mosaic viruses (three described species), the dicotyledonous-plant-infecting mastreviruses (seven described

  15. The P25 pathogenicity factor of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus targets the sugar beet 26S proteasome involved in the induction of a hypersensitive resistance response via interaction with an F-box protein.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Heike; Hleibieh, Kamal; Gilmer, David; Varrelmann, Mark

    2012-08-01

    P25, a Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) pathogenicity factor, interacts with a sugar beet protein with high homology to Arabidopsis thaliana kelch repeat containing F-box family proteins (FBK) of unknown function in yeast. FBK are members of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF) complex that mediate protein degradation. Here, we confirm this sugar beet FBK-P25 interaction in vivo and in vitro and provide evidence for in planta interaction and similar subcellular distribution in Nicotiana tabacum leaf cells. P25 even interacts with an FBK from A. thaliana, a BNYVV nonhost. FBK functional classification was possible by demonstrating the interaction with A. thaliana orthologs of Skp1-like (ASK) genes, a member of the SCF E3 ligase. By means of a yeast two-hybrid bridging assay, a direct effect of P25 on SCF-complex formation involving ASK1 protein was demonstrated. FBK transient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated expression in N. benthamiana leaves induced a hypersensitive response. The full-length F-box protein consists of one F-box domain followed by two kelch repeats, which alone were unable to interact with P25 in yeast and did not lead to cell-death induction. The results support the idea that P25 is involved in virus pathogenicity in sugar beet and suggest suppression of resistance response. PMID:22512382

  16. Vein Problems Related to Varicose Veins

    MedlinePLUS

    ... varicose veins include venous lakes, reticular veins, and hemorrhoids. Venous lakes are varicose veins that appear on ... flat blue veins often seen behind the knees. Hemorrhoids are varicose veins in and around the anus. ...

  17. The specific binding to 21-nt double-stranded RNAs is crucial for the anti-silencing activity of Cucumber vein yellowing virus P1b and perturbs endogenous small RNA populations

    PubMed Central

    Valli, Adrin; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Molnar, Attila; Baulcombe, David; Garca, Juan Antonio

    2011-01-01

    RNA silencing mediated by siRNAs plays an important role as an anti-viral defense mechanism in plants and other eukaryotic organisms, which is usually counteracted by viral RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs). The ipomovirus Cucumber vein yellowing virus (CVYV) lacks the typical RSS of members of the family Potyviridae, HCPro, which is replaced by an unrelated RSS, P1b. CVYV P1b resembles potyviral HCPro in forming complexes with synthetic siRNAs in vitro. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that P1b, like potyviral HCPro, interacts with double-stranded siRNAs, but is not able to bind single-stranded small RNAs or small DNAs. These assays also showed a preference of CVYV P1b for binding to 21-nt siRNAs, a feature also reported for HCPro. However, these two potyvirid RSSs differ in their requirements of 2-nucleotide (nt) 3? overhangs and 5? terminal phosphoryl groups for siRNA binding. Copurification assays confirmed in vivo P1bsiRNA interactions. We have demonstrated by deep sequencing of small RNA populations interacting in vivo with CVYV P1b that the size preference of P1b for small RNAs of 21 nt also takes place in the plant, and that expression of this RSS causes drastic changes in the endogenous small RNA populations. In addition, a site-directed mutagenesis analysis strongly supported the assumption that P1bsiRNA binding is decisive for the anti-silencing activity of P1b and localized a basic domain involved in the siRNA-binding activity of this protein. PMID:21531919

  18. Varicose vein stripping

    MedlinePLUS

    Vein stripping with ligation, avulsion, or ablation; vein ligation and stripping; vein surgery ... Surgical vein stripping reduces pain and improves the appearance of your leg. Rarely, vein stripping causes scars. Mild leg ...

  19. YELLOW BERRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow berry refers to the non-vitreous form of the wheat kernel. Individual kernels may be vitreous, non-vitreous (yellow berry) or have varying proportions of each (mottled). Yellow berry, in and of itself, represents no defect of the kernel. As in maize, rice and other cereals, the non-vitre...

  20. Movement of bymoviruses and functions of RNA2-encoded proteins of barley yellow mosaic virus

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Movement of bymoviruses and functions of RNA2- encoded proteins of barley yellow mosaic virus P and experimental data that were obtained from plants infected with bymoviruses such as barley yellow mosaic virus (BaYMV), barley mild mosaic virus (BaMMV), or wheat spindle streak mosaic virus (WSSMV) suggested

  1. Varicose Veins and Other Vein Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the skins surface. Varicose veins are usually dark purple or blue in color, and may look ropey or twisted. Smaller varicose veins may be thinner and red rather than purple and swollen; these are called spider veins. Other ...

  2. Time-resolved photoemission using attosecond streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagele, S.; Pazourek, R.; Wais, M.; Wachter, G.; Burgdrfer, J.

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study time-resolved photoemission in atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We review recent advances in the study of the photoelectric efect in the time domain and show that the experimentally accessible time shifts can be decomposed into distinct contributions that stem from the feld-free photoionization process itself and from probe-field induced corrections. We perform accurate quantum-mechanical as well as classical simulations of attosecond streaking for efective one-electron systems and determine all relevant contributions to the time delay with attosecond precision. In particular, we investigate the properties and limitations of attosecond streaking for the transition from short-ranged potentials (photodetachment) to long-ranged Coulomb potentials (photoionization). As an example for a more complex system, we study time-resolved photoionization for endohedral fullerenes A@C60 and discuss how streaking time shifts are modifed due to the interaction of the C60 cage with the probing infrared streaking field.

  3. Yellow Fever.

    PubMed

    Monath, Thomas P; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2015-03-01

    Yellow fever, a mosquito-borne flavivirus disease occurs in tropical areas of South America and Africa. It is a disease of major historical importance, but remains a threat to travelers to and residents of endemic areas despite the availability of an effective vaccine for nearly 70 years. An important aspect is the receptivity of many non-endemic areas to introduction and spread of yellow fever. This paper reviews the clinical aspects, pathogenesis, and epidemiology of yellow fever, with an emphasis on recent changes in the distribution and incidence of the disease. Recent knowledge about yellow fever 17D vaccine mechanism of action and safety are discussed. PMID:25453327

  4. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Deep Vein Thrombosis Overview What is deep vein thrombosis? Deep vein thrombosis (also called DVT) is a blood clot in a vein deep inside your body. These clots usually occur in ...

  5. Electro-optic Phase Grating Streak Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldin, F. J.

    2012-08-02

    The electro-optic phase grating streak spectrometer (EOPGSS) generates a time-resolved spectra equivalent to that obtained with a conventional spectrometer/streak camera combination, but without using a streak camera (by far the more expensive and problematic component of the conventional system). The EOPGSS is based on a phase, rather than an amplitude grating. Further, this grating is fabricated of electro-optic material such as, for example, KD*P, by either etching grooves into an E-O slab, or by depositing lines of the E-O material onto an optical flat. An electric field normal to the grating alters the materials index of refraction and thus affects a shift (in angle) of the output spectrum. Ramping the voltage streaks the spectrum correspondingly. The streak and dispersion directions are the same, so a second (static, conventional) grating disperses the spectrum in the orthogonal direction to prevent different wavelengths from overwriting each other. Because the streaking is done by the grating, the streaked output spectrum is recorded with a time-integrating device, such as a CCD. System model, typical design, and performance expectations will be presented.

  6. Photorealistic Rendering of Rain Streaks Kshitiz Garg Shree K. Nayar

    E-print Network

    Nayar, Shree K.

    Photorealistic Rendering of Rain Streaks Kshitiz Garg Shree K. Nayar Columbia University qview 30 10 RealImages ofRainStreaks Rendered RainStreaks o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o oo o o Figure 1: Appearance of actual rain streaks and rendered rain streaks. The top row shows

  7. Yellow fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... liver, and kidney. Bleeding disorders, seizures, coma, and delirium may also occur. Symptoms may include: Irregular heartbeats ( ... Bleeding (may progress to hemorrhage) Coma Decreased urination Delirium Fever Headache Yellow skin and eyes (jaundice) Muscle ...

  8. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePLUS

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the lower leg or ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a ...

  9. Black leaf streak and viral leaf streak: New banana diseases in East Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Dabek; J. M. Waller

    1990-01-01

    Black leaf streak, caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis a virulent pathogen of bananas and plantains, is recorded from Zanzibar. This is the first record of this important pathogen from East Africa. Viral leaf streak of bananas is also identified from Zanzibar. The presence of panama disease and high infestations of root nematode are also noted.

  10. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePLUS

    What is deep vein thrombosis (DVT)? Deep vein thrombosis is a condition in which blood clots (or thrombi) form in deep ... of Obstetricians and Gynecologists f AQ What is deep vein thrombosis (DVT)? How does a clot form ...

  11. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis? Espaol Deep vein thrombosis (throm-BO-sis), or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Blood clots occur when blood ...

  12. Yellow Fever Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    What is yellow fever?Yellow fever is a serious disease caused by the yellow fever virus. It is found in certain parts of Africa and South America. Yellow fever is spread through the bite of an infected ...

  13. Fusarium Yellows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium yellows, a disease caused by several Fusarium species, but primarily Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. betae, is a common problem in the western United States and also has been reported in several other parts of the world. The disease can cause significant reduction in yield and purity. The fungus...

  14. Large photocathode area picosecond streak tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, S. V.; Belolipetski, V. S.; Ivanova, S. R.; Kulechenkova, T. P.; Levina, G. P.; Makushina, V. A.; Monastyrskiy, M. A.; Polykarkina, N. D.; Schelev, M. Ya.; Semichastnova, Z. M.; Sokolov, V. E.

    2008-11-01

    The paper reports on the development of a new streak image tube with accelerating mesh and large (18 mm) photocathode work area. The tube's temporal resolution is close to one picosecond. To govern photoelectronic images the tube possesses shutter and deflector plates. Its geometric design allows uniform spatial resolution (more than 25 lp/mm) along the entire photocathode work area at 1.3 electron-optical magnification and negligibly small distortion. Being a continuation of the well-known PV and PIF - type streak image tubes developed in due time in GPI, the tube represents a promising tool for taking pictures of ultrafast processes in wide radiation spectrum range.

  15. The first satellite laser echoes recorded on the streak camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamal, Karel; Prochazka, Ivan; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, F.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the streak camera with the circular sweep for the satellite laser ranging is described. The Modular Streak Camera system employing the circular sweep option was integrated into the conventional Satellite Laser System. The experimental satellite tracking and ranging has been performed. The first satellite laser echo streak camera records are presented.

  16. Yellow Fever

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas P. Monath

    \\u000a In 1951, Max Theiler (Fig. 10.1), a Rockefeller Foundation scientist, became the only person to be awarded the Nobel Prize\\u000a in Medicine and Physiology for the development of a virus vaccine (Norrby 2007). His live, attenuated 17D vaccine was not\\u000a the first yellow fever vaccine to be tested in humans, but it was by far the most successful one. More

  17. Wind Streaks on Venus: Clues to Atmospheric Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Schubert, Gerald; Limonadi, Daniel; Bender, Kelly C.; Newman, William I.; Thomas, Peggy E.; Weitz, Catherine M.; Wall, Stephen D.

    1994-01-01

    Magellan images reveal surface features on Venus attributed to wind processes. Sand dunes, wind-sculpted hills, and more than 5830 wind streaks have been identified. The streaks serve as local "wind vanes," representing wind direction at the time of streak formation and allowing the first global mapping of near-surface wind patterns on Venus. Wind streaks are oriented both toward the equator and toward the west. When streaks associated with local transient events, such as impact cratering, are deleted, the westward component is mostly lost but the equatorward component remains. This pattern is consistent with a Hadley circulation of the lower atmosphere.

  18. Portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ronny; Mallet, Thierry; Gale, Michael; Soltys, Remigiusz; Loarte, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is the blockage or narrowing of the portal vein by a thrombus. It is relatively rare and has been linked with the presence of an underlying liver disease or prothrombotic disorders. We present a case of a young male who presented with vague abdominal symptoms for approximately one week. Imaging revealed the presence of multiple nonocclusive thrombi involving the right portal vein, the splenic vein, and the left renal vein, as well as complete occlusion of the left portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein. We discuss pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of both acute and chronic thrombosis. The presence of PVT should be considered as a clue for prothrombotic disorders, liver disease, and other local and general factors that must be carefully investigated. It is hoped that this case report will help increase awareness of the complexity associated with portal vein thrombosis among the medical community. PMID:25802795

  19. Varicose vein - noninvasive treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The vein will harden and then disappear. Laser treatment can be used on the surface of the skin. Small bursts of light make small varicose veins disappear. Phlebectomy treats surface ... guide treatment. This may be done along with other procedures, ...

  20. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Thierry; Soltys, Remigiusz; Loarte, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is the blockage or narrowing of the portal vein by a thrombus. It is relatively rare and has been linked with the presence of an underlying liver disease or prothrombotic disorders. We present a case of a young male who presented with vague abdominal symptoms for approximately one week. Imaging revealed the presence of multiple nonocclusive thrombi involving the right portal vein, the splenic vein, and the left renal vein, as well as complete occlusion of the left portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein. We discuss pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of both acute and chronic thrombosis. The presence of PVT should be considered as a clue for prothrombotic disorders, liver disease, and other local and general factors that must be carefully investigated. It is hoped that this case report will help increase awareness of the complexity associated with portal vein thrombosis among the medical community.

  1. Photonic streaking of attosecond pulse trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Taec; Zhang, Chunmei; Ruchon, Thierry; Hergott, Jean-Franois; Auguste, Thierry; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Qur, F.

    2013-08-01

    High harmonic radiation, produced when intense laser pulses interact with matter, is composed of a train of attosecond pulses. Individual pulses in this train carry information on ultrafast dynamics that vary from one half-optical-cycle to the next. Here, we demonstrate an all-optical photonic streaking measurement that provides direct experimental access to each attosecond pulse by mapping emission time onto propagation angle. This is achieved by inducing an ultrafast rotation of the instantaneous laser wavefront at the focus. We thus time-resolve attosecond pulse train generation, and hence the dynamics in the nonlinear medium itself. We apply photonic streaking to harmonic generation in gases and directly observe, for the first time, the influence of non-adiabatic electron dynamics and plasma formation on the generated attosecond pulse train. These experimental and numerical results also provide the first evidence of the generation of attosecond lighthouses in gases, which constitute ideal sources for attosecond pump-probe spectroscopy.

  2. Understanding baseball team standings and streaks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Sire; S. Redner

    2009-01-01

    Can one understand the statistics of wins and losses of baseball teams? Are their consecutive-game winning and losing streaks\\u000a self-reinforcing or can they be described statistically? We apply the Bradley-Terry model, which incorporates the heterogeneity\\u000a of team strengths in a minimalist way, to answer these questions. Excellent agreement is found between the predictions of\\u000a the Bradley-Terry model and the rank

  3. The New Streak Image Tube PIF-01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyareva, V. P.; Kulikov, Yu V.; Monastyrski, M. A.; Platonov, V. N.; Postovalov, V. E.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Ulasyuk, V. N.; Ushakov, V. K.; Schelev, M. Y.

    1985-02-01

    A new, small-size image-converter tube type PIF-01 has been developed for recording of various high speed phenomena with subpicosecond time resolution. The designing goal of the new image-converter tube having four electrodes geometry (photocathode, acceleration mesh, focusing electrode, anode diaphragm) and incorporating with a modern deflection system, was to simultaneously improve temporal resolution and dynamic range.Preliminary experimental results confirm the efficiency of the software developed for picofemtosecond streak tube computation and optimization.

  4. Design of microcontroller based system for automation of streak camera

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Joshi; J. Upadhyay; P. P. Deshpande; M. L. Sharma; C. P. Navathe

    2010-01-01

    A microcontroller based system has been developed for automation of the S-20 optical streak camera, which is used as a diagnostic tool to measure ultrafast light phenomenon. An 8 bit MCS family microcontroller is employed to generate all control signals for the streak camera. All biasing voltages required for various electrodes of the tubes are generated using dc-to-dc converters. A

  5. How Are Varicose Veins Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a vein using a very fine needle. The chemical scars the inner lining of the vein, causing it to close off. Laser Surgery This procedure applies light energy from a laser onto a varicose vein. The ...

  6. Comparative analysis of Panicum streak virus and Maize streak virus diversity, recombination patterns and phylogeography

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Panicum streak virus (PanSV; Family Geminiviridae; Genus Mastrevirus) is a close relative of Maize streak virus (MSV), the most serious viral threat to maize production in Africa. PanSV and MSV have the same leafhopper vector species, largely overlapping natural host ranges and similar geographical distributions across Africa and its associated Indian Ocean Islands. Unlike MSV, however, PanSV has no known economic relevance. Results Here we report on 16 new PanSV full genome sequences sampled throughout Africa and use these together with others in public databases to reveal that PanSV and MSV populations in general share very similar patterns of genetic exchange and geographically structured diversity. A potentially important difference between the species, however, is that the movement of MSV strains throughout Africa is apparently less constrained than that of PanSV strains. Interestingly the MSV-A strain which causes maize streak disease is apparently the most mobile of all the PanSV and MSV strains investigated. Conclusion We therefore hypothesize that the generally increased mobility of MSV relative to other closely related species such as PanSV, may have been an important evolutionary step in the eventual emergence of MSV-A as a serious agricultural pathogen. The GenBank accession numbers for the sequences reported in this paper are GQ415386-GQ415401 PMID:19903330

  7. Travelers' Health: Yellow Book

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Boxes Updates About Mobile Apps RSS Feeds Yellow Book Homepage Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Explore Travel Health with the 2014 Yellow Book! CDC Health Information for International Travel (commonly called ...

  8. High performance imaging streak camera for the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Opachich, Y P; Kalantar, D H; MacPhee, A G; Holder, J P; Kimbrough, J R; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Hatch, B; Brienza-Larsen, G; Brown, C; Brown, C G; Browning, D; Charest, M; Dewald, E L; Griffin, M; Guidry, B; Haugh, M J; Hicks, D G; Homoelle, D; Lee, J J; Mackinnon, A J; Mead, A; Palmer, N; Perfect, B H; Ross, J S; Silbernagel, C; Landen, O

    2012-12-01

    An x-ray streak camera platform has been characterized and implemented for use at the National Ignition Facility. The camera has been modified to meet the experiment requirements of the National Ignition Campaign and to perform reliably in conditions that produce high electromagnetic interference. A train of temporal ultra-violet timing markers has been added to the diagnostic in order to calibrate the temporal axis of the instrument and the detector efficiency of the streak camera was improved by using a CsI photocathode. The performance of the streak camera has been characterized and is summarized in this paper. The detector efficiency and cathode measurements are also presented. PMID:23278024

  9. Squash vein yellowing virus identified in watermelon in Indiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In September 2006, a commercial watermelon field in Sullivan County,Indiana was observed with moderate vine decline symptoms including vine collapse, wilt and root rot. No fruit symptoms were observed. Six plants displaying typical vine decline symptoms were collected and assayed for potyviruses i...

  10. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    You were treated for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). This is a condition in which a blood clot forms in a vein that is not on ... especially if it gets worse upon taking a deep breath in You cough up blood

  11. Focus on Varicose Veins

    MedlinePLUS

    ... procedure can be performed in the outpatient setting. Recovery time is usually fast with positive short and mid-term results. RF treatment involves controlled delivery of radio- frequency (RF) energy directly to a vein wall by a thin ...

  12. Streak image denoising and segmentation using adaptive Gaussian guided filter.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhuocheng; Guo, Baoping

    2014-09-10

    In streak tube imaging lidar (STIL), streak images are obtained using a CCD camera. However, noise in the captured streak images can greatly affect the quality of reconstructed 3D contrast and range images. The greatest challenge for streak image denoising is reducing the noise while preserving details. In this paper, we propose an adaptive Gaussian guided filter (AGGF) for noise removal and detail enhancement of streak images. The proposed algorithm is based on a guided filter (GF) and part of an adaptive bilateral filter (ABF). In the AGGF, the details are enhanced by optimizing the offset parameter. AGGF-denoised streak images are significantly sharper than those denoised by the GF. Moreover, the AGGF is a fast linear time algorithm achieved by recursively implementing a Gaussian filter kernel. Experimentally, AGGF demonstrates its capacity to preserve edges and thin structures and outperforms the existing bilateral filter and domain transform filter in terms of both visual quality and peak signal-to-noise ratio performance. PMID:25321679

  13. Semiclassical model for attosecond angular streaking.

    PubMed

    Smolarski, M; Eckle, P; Keller, U; Drner, R

    2010-08-16

    Attosecond angular streaking is a new technique to achieve unsurpassed time accuracy of only a few attoseconds. Recently this has been successfully used to set an upper limit on the electron tunneling delay time in strong laser field ionization. The measurement technique can be modeled with either the time-dependent Schrdinger equation (TDSE) or a more simple semiclassical approach that describes the process in two steps in analogy to the three-step model in high harmonic generation (HHG): step one is the tunnel ionization and step two is the classical motion in the strong laser field. Here we describe in detail a semiclassical model which is based on the ADK theory for the tunneling step, with subsequent classical propagation of the electron in the laser field. We take into account different ellipticities of the laser field and a possible wavelength-dependent ellipticity that is typically observed for pulses in the two-optical-cycle regime. This semiclassical model shows excellent agreement with the experimental result. PMID:20721150

  14. Dynamics of low-speed streak evolution and interaction in laminar boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Si-Chao; Pan, Chong; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-10-01

    The present paper presents an experimental effort on the regeneration process of two low-speed laminar streaks in a zero-pressure-gradient laminar boundary layer. Two vertical thin wires separated by a spanwise distance of 30mm are used to introduce disturbances of two rolls of transitional Krmn vortex street to the downstream boundary layer. Both hydrogen bubble visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement show that two low-speed streaks are induced through leading-edge receptivity process. As these streaks develop in the downstream, two additional low-speed streaks begin to appear outboard of the flank of the original two, together with complex dynamics of streak splitting and merging. A flow pattern of four streaks aligned along the spanwise direction occurs finally in the far downstream. It is found that besides the mechanisms of streak breakdown, the streak interaction is also an important factor characterizing the instability of low speed streaks and their regeneration process.

  15. Pelvic Vein Embolisation in the Management of Varicose Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnam, Lakshmi A. [St. George's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Marsh, Petra; Holdstock, Judy M.; Harrison, Charmaine S. [Stirling House, Whiteley Clinic (United Kingdom); Hussain, Fuad F. [Royal Surrey County Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Whiteley, Mark S. [Stirling House, Whiteley Clinic (United Kingdom); Lopez, Anthony, E-mail: consultant@radiologist.co.u [Royal Surrey County Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Pelvic vein incompetence is common in patients with atypical varicose veins, contributing to their recurrence after surgery. Therefore, refluxing pelvic veins should be identified and treated. We present our experience with pelvic vein embolisation in patients presenting with varicose veins. Patients presenting with varicose veins with a duplex-proven contribution from perivulval veins undergo transvaginal duplex sonography (TVUS) to identify refluxing pelvic veins. Those with positive scans undergo embolisation before surgical treatment of their lower limb varicose veins. A total of 218 women (mean age of 46.3 years) were treated. Parity was documented in the first 60 patients, of whom 47 (78.3%) were multiparous, 11 (18.3%) had had one previous pregnancy, and 2 (3.3%) were nulliparous. The left ovarian vein was embolised in 78%, the right internal iliac in 64.7%, the left internal iliac in 56.4%, and the right ovarian vein in 42.2% of patients. At follow-up TVUS, mild reflux only was seen in 16, marked persistent reflux in 6, and new reflux in 3 patients. These 9 women underwent successful repeat embolisation. Two patients experienced pulmonary embolisation of the coils, of whom 1 was asymptomatic and 1 was successfully retrieved; 1 patient had a misplaced coil protruding into the common femoral vein; and 1 patient had perineal thrombophlebitis. The results of our study showed that pelvic venous embolisation by way of a transjugular approach is a safe and effective technique in the treatment of pelvic vein reflux.

  16. Portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Basit, Syed Abdul; Stone, Christian D; Gish, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare event in the general medical setting that commonly complicates cirrhosis with portal hypertension, and can also occur with liver tumors. The diagnosis is often incidental when a thrombus is found in the portal vein on imaging tests. However, PVT may also present with clinical symptoms and can progress to life-threatening complications of ischemic hepatitis, liver failure, and/or small intestinal infarction. This article reviews the pathophysiology of this disorder, with a major focus on PVT in patients with cirrhosis, and presents detailed guidelines on optimal diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25454305

  17. Hitting Is Contagious in Baseball: Evidence from Long Hitting Streaks

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Joel R.; Maewal, Akhilesh; Gough, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Data analysis is used to test the hypothesis that hitting is contagious. A statistical model is described to study the effect of a hot hitter upon his teammates batting during a consecutive game hitting streak. Box score data for entire seasons comprising streaks of length games, including a total observations were compiled. Treatment and control sample groups () were constructed from core lineups of players on the streaking batters team. The percentile method bootstrap was used to calculate confidence intervals for statistics representing differences in the mean distributions of two batting statistics between groups. Batters in the treatment group (hot streak active) showed statistically significant improvements in hitting performance, as compared against the control. Mean for the treatment group was found to be to percentage points higher during hot streaks (mean difference increased points), while the batting heat index introduced here was observed to increase by points. For each performance statistic, the null hypothesis was rejected at the significance level. We conclude that the evidence suggests the potential existence of a statistical contagion effect. Psychological mechanisms essential to the empirical results are suggested, as several studies from the scientific literature lend credence to contagious phenomena in sports. Causal inference from these results is difficult, but we suggest and discuss several latent variables that may contribute to the observed results, and offer possible directions for future research. PMID:23251507

  18. Time delays for attosecond streaking in photoionization of neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, Johannes; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Nagele, Stefan; Pazourek, Renate; Burgdrfer, Joachim; Guan, Xiaoxu; Bartschat, Klaus; Schneider, Barry I.

    2014-03-01

    We revisit the time-resolved photoemission in neon atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We calculate streaking time shifts for the emission of 2p and 2s electrons and compare the relative delay as measured in a recent experiment by Schultze et al. [Science 328, 1658 (2010), 10.1126/science.1189401]. The B-spline R-matrix method is employed to calculate accurate Eisenbud-Wigner-Smith time delays from multielectron dipole transition matrix elements for photoionization. The additional laser field-induced time shifts in the exit channel are obtained from separate, time-dependent simulations of a full streaking process by solving the time-dependent Schrdinger equation on the single-active-electron level. The resulting accurate total relative streaking time shifts between 2s and 2p emission lie well below the experimental data. We identify the presence of unresolved shake-up satellites in the experiment as a potential source of error in the determination of streaking time shifts.

  19. Living with Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Deep Vein Thrombosis NHLBI Resources Pulmonary Embolism (Health Topics) Non-NHLBI Resources Deep Vein Thrombosis (MedlinePlus) Pulmonary Embolism (MedlinePlus) Clinical Trials ...

  20. Treatment of varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Nael, Raha; Rathbun, Suman

    2009-04-01

    Varicose veins (VVs) are the most common manifestation of chronic venous insufficiency, affecting 25% of women and 15% of men. Reticular veins and telangiectasias (spider veins) are found in more than 80% of the general population. VVs produce symptoms of pain, swelling, heaviness, fatigue, and pruritus and predispose patients to complications including bleeding, superficial thrombophlebitis, and ulcerations that interfere with activities of daily living and result in lost time from work. Current treatments for VVs include conservative measures, and when these are unsuccessful, more invasive surgical and endovenous interventions primarily aimed at reducing venous hypertension and preventing progression to chronic inflammation and ulcerations. Surgical procedures including saphenous vein stripping, ligation of the saphenofemoral junction, and ambulatory phlebectomy are effective in the treatment of VVs but are associated with a high complication rate and recovery time. Emerging endovenous therapies, including endovenous laser therapy, radiofrequency ablation, and endovenous foam sclerotherapy, have shown similar efficacy in the treatment of VVs compared with more invasive surgical procedures, with lower complication rates and less time lost from work. PMID:19289022

  1. Postpartum Ovarian Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Nicola; Bimbi, Marco; Lorenzetti, Luca; Pietrasanta, Dario; Goletti, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    Background: Ovarian vein thrombosis (OVT) is a rare but potentially serious postpartum complication, which occurs in 0.05% to 0.18% of pregnancies and is diagnosed on the right side in 80% to 90% of the cases. Case Report: A 32-year-old woman presented at 15 days postpartum to our emergency department with severe abdominal pain, fever, and abdominal distension. Abdominal examination revealed right lower quadrant pain with rebound tenderness. The plain abdominal radiography evidenced a diffuse fecal stasis; abdominal ultrasound showed the presence of free fluid in the Douglas pouch and between small bowel loops. Diagnosis of acute appendicitis was made. The patient immediately underwent explorative laparoscopy; at surgery, a woody tumoration consistent with right ovarian vein thrombosis was found. Laparoscopic ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis. Anticoagulation therapy and antibiotics were instituted. CT-scan confirmed the presence of thrombosis up to the vena cava. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. At 1-month follow-up, she remained stable and symptom free. Discussion: Even though postpartum ovarian vein thrombosis is rare, recognition and treatment is needed to institute adequate therapy and avoid potential serious sequelae. The diagnosis can be established by ultrasound, CT scan, and MRI examinations, although, as in the case described, the limitation of ultrasound includes obscuration of the gonadic vein by overlying bowel gas. Conclusion: OVT should be considered in any woman in the postpartum period with lower abdominal pain, fever, and leucocytosis. PMID:21902992

  2. A time-resolved image sensor for tubeless streak cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasutomi, Keita; Han, SangMan; Seo, Min-Woong; Takasawa, Taishi; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with draining-only modulation (DOM) pixels for tube-less streak cameras. Although the conventional streak camera has high time resolution, the device requires high voltage and bulky system due to the structure with a vacuum tube. The proposed time-resolved imager with a simple optics realize a streak camera without any vacuum tubes. The proposed image sensor has DOM pixels, a delay-based pulse generator, and a readout circuitry. The delay-based pulse generator in combination with an in-pixel logic allows us to create and to provide a short gating clock to the pixel array. A prototype time-resolved CMOS image sensor with the proposed pixel is designed and implemented using 0.11um CMOS image sensor technology. The image array has 30(Vertical) x 128(Memory length) pixels with the pixel pitch of 22.4um. .

  3. Wheat streak mosaic virus-Structural parameters for a Potyvirus

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Lauren [Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Kendall, Amy [Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Berger, P.H. [Department of Plant, Soil and Entomological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-2339 (United States); Shiel, P.J. [Department of Plant, Soil and Entomological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-2339 (United States); Stubbs, Gerald [Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)]. E-mail: gerald.stubbs@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-09-15

    Wheat streak mosaic virus is a Tritimovirus, a member of the Potyviridae family, which includes the very large Potyvirus genus. We have examined wheat streak mosaic virus by electron microscopy and fiber diffraction from partially oriented sols, and analyzed the results to estimate the symmetry and structural parameters of the viral helix. The virions have an apparent radius of 63 {+-} 5 A. The viral helix has a pitch of 33.4 A {+-} 0.6 A. There appear to be 6.9 subunits per turn of the helix, although we cannot completely eliminate values of 5.9 or 7.9 for this parameter.

  4. Comparative characteristics of various phosphor screens in streak tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageeva, N. I.; Brykhnevich, G. I.; Gorbenko, B. Z.; Ivanova, S. P.; Kulichenkova, T. P.; Semichastnova, Zoya M.; Skiballanovich, T. A.; Schelev, Mikhail Y.

    1999-06-01

    Effectiveness decrease of the phosphor screens of the P11 and P20 types for streak tubes in the picosecond region is shown. It is shown that the complete amplification of the circuit 'streak tube + image intensifier + CCD' in the picosecond region is the same as one of the circuit 'streak tube + etched CCD instead of the screen in a whole volume,' though the static amplification in the first case is by two orders higher. A special streak tube of the PV series has been manufactured. The screen of this tube consists of 4 various phosphor screens prepared on the same fiber-optical disk in the form of closely placed strips of 5 mm width: K-71 (blue), K-78 (green), 'cadmium' (green), IL-3P (red). A streak tube with the phosphor screen KL3-2 (green) has also been investigated. Principal scheme of the experiment is shown in Figure 1. In these experiments, the voltage between the tube's photocathode and screen was of 14 KeV, photocathode current density approximately 100 (mu) A/mm2, and duration of the pulse initiating the photocathode -- of 10-7 s. The shape of the phosphor screen irradiation response is presented in Figure 2 as an oscillogram. For each phosphor screen type the oscillogram is normalized to unit. In Table 1, the time intervals are presented during which the phosphor screen is lighting up being excited by current pulses of 10-7 s. With the use of the phosphor screen decaying curves it is possible to determine the duration of time during which the image amplifier (usually with MCP) should remain open being placed in the electron-optical camera between the streak tube and readout system. The time interval, during which about 70% of the lightsum for phosphor screens of three types are lighting up, is presented in Table 2. Taking into account that high noise level is inherent to the image intensifiers with MCP, it is advisable to use in streak tubes the phosphor screens with minor lighting-up time duration, and to turn on the MCP for a minimal required time. In the Russian streak camera 'Agat' this time is equal to (6 - 8) (DOT) 10-4 s, which significantly exceeds the required time.

  5. Mars - Wind streak production as related to obstacle type and size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of wind streaks associated with Martian craters and hills in the size range of 100 m to 80 km (corresponding to obstacle heights of a few to several hundred meters) have been analyzed from Viking Orbiter images. Both dark erosional and bright depositional streaks form over the entire obstacle size range, but there are preferred obstacle sizes for producing streaks. Bright streaks form more readily in association with relatively smaller obstacles than do dark streaks. Small obstacles produce both types of streaks more effectively than do large ones. Hills produce streaks as effectively as do craters of comparable height. Alternative explanations of bright streak formation are evaluated in terms of their ability to account for these observations. The most satisfactory models invoke blocking of atmospheric flow downwind of an obstacle and consequent deposition of dust within the sheltered zone.

  6. Localization of cells of the prospective neural plate, heart and somites within the primitive streak and epiblast of avian embryos at intermediate primitive-streak stages.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Sanchez, C; Garcia-Martinez, V; Schoenwolf, G C

    2001-01-01

    By constructing avian transplantation chimeras using fluorescently-labeled grafts and antibodies specific for grafted cells, we have generated a prospective fate map of the primitive streak and epiblast of the avian blastoderm at intermediate primitive-streak stages (stages 3a/3b). This high-resolution map confirms our previous study on the origin of the cardiovascular system from the primitive streak at these stages and provides new information on the epiblast origin of the neural plate, heart and somites. In addition, the origin of the rostral endoderm is now documented in more detail. The map shows that the prospective neural plate arises from the epiblast in close association with the rostral end of the primitive streak and lies within an area extending 250 microm rostral to the streak, 250 microm lateral to the streak and 125 microm caudal to the rostral border of the streak. The future floor plate of the neural tube arises within the midline just rostral to the streak, confirming our earlier study, but unlike at the late-primitive streak stages when both Hensen's node and the midline area rostral to Hensen's node contribute to the floor plate, only the area rostral to the primitive streak contributes to the floor plate at intermediate primitive-streak stages. Instead of contributing to the floor plate of the neural tube, the rostral end of the primitive streak at intermediate primitive-streak stages forms the notochord as well as the rostromedial endoderm, which lies beneath the prechordal plate mesoderm and extends caudolaterally on each side toward the cardiogenic areas. The epiblast lateral to the primitive streak and caudal to the neural plate contributes to the heart and it does so in rostrocaudal sequence (i.e., rostral grafts contribute to rostral levels of the straight heart tube, whereas progressively more caudal grafts contribute to progressively more caudal levels of the straight heart tube), and individual epiblast grafts contribute cells to both the myocardium and endocardium. The prospective somites (i.e., paraxial mesoderm) lie within the epiblast just lateral to the prospective heart mesoderm. Comparing this map with that constructed at late primitive-streak stages reveals that by the late primitive-streak stages, prospective heart mesoderm has moved from the epiblast through the primitive streak and into the mesodermal mantle, and that some of the prospective somitic mesoderm has entered the primitive streak and is undergoing ingression. PMID:11490112

  7. Hot streaks and phantom cooling in a turbine rotor passage. I - Separate effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, Richard J.; Dring, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental documentation and analytical correlations demonstrating the effects of hot streak accumulation and phantom cooling on turbine rotor airfoil surface temperature. Test results are shown for a range of controlling variables to identify where streak accumulation and phantom cooling are most likely to be strongest. These variables include streak injection location, streak-to-free stream density ratio and coolant-to-free stream density and velocity ratios.

  8. Reliable and repeatable characterization of optical streak cameras.

    PubMed

    Charest, Michael R; Torres, Peter; Silbernagel, Christopher T; Kalantar, Daniel H

    2008-10-01

    Optical streak cameras are used as primary diagnostics for a wide range of physics and laser experiments at facilities such as the National Ignition Facility. To meet the strict accuracy requirements needed for these experiments, the systematic nonlinearities of the streak cameras (attributed to nonlinearities in the optical and electrical components that make up the streak camera system) must be characterized. In some cases the characterization information is used as a guide to help determine how experiment data should be taken. In other cases, the characterization data are applied to the raw data images to correct for the nonlinearities. In order to characterize an optical streak camera, a specific set of data is collected, where the response to defined inputs are recorded. A set of analysis software routines has been developed to extract information such as spatial resolution, dynamic range, and temporal resolution from this data set. The routines are highly automated, requiring very little user input and thus provide very reliable and repeatable results that are not subject to interpretation. An emphasis on quality control has been placed on these routines due to the high importance of the camera characterization information. PMID:19044688

  9. Reliable and Repeatable Characterization of Optical Streak Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Charest Jr., Peter Torres III, Christopher Silbernagel, and Daniel Kalantar

    2008-10-31

    Optical streak cameras are used as primary diagnostics for a wide range of physics and laser experiments at facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To meet the strict accuracy requirements needed for these experiments, the systematic nonlinearities of the streak cameras (attributed to nonlinearities in the optical and electrical components that make up the streak camera system) must be characterized. In some cases the characterization information is used as a guide to help determine how experiment data should be taken. In other cases, the characterization data are applied to the raw data images to correct for the nonlinearities. In order to characterize an optical streak camera, a specific set of data is collected, where the response to defined inputs are recorded. A set of analysis software routines has been developed to extract information such as spatial resolution, dynamic range, and temporal resolution from this data set. The routines are highly automated, requiring very little user input and thus provide very reliable and repeatable results that are not subject to interpretation. An emphasis on quality control has been placed on these routines due to the high importance of the camera characterization information.

  10. Soft x-ray streak camera for laser fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stradling, G.L.

    1981-04-01

    This thesis reviews the development and significance of the soft x-ray streak camera (SXRSC) in the context of inertial confinement fusion energy development. A brief introduction of laser fusion and laser fusion diagnostics is presented. The need for a soft x-ray streak camera as a laser fusion diagnostic is shown. Basic x-ray streak camera characteristics, design, and operation are reviewed. The SXRSC design criteria, the requirement for a subkilovolt x-ray transmitting window, and the resulting camera design are explained. Theory and design of reflector-filter pair combinations for three subkilovolt channels centered at 220 eV, 460 eV, and 620 eV are also presented. Calibration experiments are explained and data showing a dynamic range of 1000 and a sweep speed of 134 psec/mm are presented. Sensitivity modifications to the soft x-ray streak camera for a high-power target shot are described. A preliminary investigation, using a stepped cathode, of the thickness dependence of the gold photocathode response is discussed. Data from a typical Argus laser gold-disk target experiment are shown.

  11. Constructing streak surfaces for 3D unsteady vector fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tony McLoughlin; Robert S. Laramee; Eugene Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Visualization of 3D, unsteady flow (4D) is very difficult due to both perceptual challenges and the large size of 4D vector field data. One approach to this challenge is to use integral surfaces to visualize the 4D properties of the field. However the construction of streak surfaces has remained elusive due to problems stemming from expensive computation and complex meshing

  12. Yellow Legged Frog

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS scientists found this adult mountain yellow-legged frog on June 10 in Tahquitz Creek, a rediscovered population of the endangered frog in the San Jacinto Wilderness, San Bernardino National Forest, California....

  13. New Experimental Hosts of Tobacco streak virus and Absence of True Seed Transmission in Leguminous Hosts.

    PubMed

    Vemana, K; Jain, R K

    2010-10-01

    Of 70 plant species tested, 50 species were susceptible to Tobacco streak virus (TSV) on sap inoculation. Both localized (necrotic and chlorotic spots) and systemic (necrotic spots, axillary shoot proliferation, stunting, total necrosis and wilt) symptoms are observed by majority of plant species. Eleven new experimental hosts were identified viz., Amaranthus blitum var. oleracea (Chaulai sag), Celosia cristata (Cocks comb), Beta vulgaris var. bengalensis (Palak/Indian spinach), Calendula officinalis (Pot marigold), Chrysanthemum indicum, Cosmos sulphurens (Yellow cosmos), Citrullus lunatus (Watermelon), Lagenaria siceraria (Bottle gourd), Coriandrum sativum (Coriander), Hibiscus subderiffa var. subderiffa (Roselle) and Portulaca oleraceae (Little hogweed). Detected groundnut seed infection with TSV for the first time by Direct antigen coated immunosorbent assay (DAC-ELISA) using whole seed. The seed infection ranged from 18.9 to 28.9% among the seeds collected from naturally infected and sap inoculated groundnut varieties (JL 24, TMV 2, Prasuna, Kadiri 6, Kadiri 9, Anantha and Kadiri 7 Bold) belonging to spanish and virginia types. Further, TSV was detected both in pod shell and seed testa and none of the samples showed the presence of TSV either in cotyledon or embryo. Grow-out and bio-assay tests proved the absence of seed transmission in groundnut and other legume crops. Hence, TSV isolate was not a true seed transmission case under Indian conditions in legumes. PMID:23637490

  14. Megahertz streak-mode Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Yun, Julie X.; Yuan, Xiaocong; Goodwin, Richard; Markwald, Roger R.; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2011-06-01

    Here we present an ultrahigh-speed Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) that records the OCT spectrum in streak mode with a high-speed area scan camera, which allows higher OCT imaging speed than can be achieved with a line-scan camera. Unlike parallel OCT techniques that also use area scan cameras, the conventional single-mode fiber-based point-scanning mechanism is retained to provide a confocal gate that rejects multiply scattered photons from the sample. When using a 1000 Hz resonant scanner as the streak scanner, 1,016,000 A-scans have been obtained in 1 s. This method's effectiveness has been demonstrated by recording in vivo OCT-image sequences of embryonic chick hearts at 1000 frames/s. In addition, 2-megahertz OCT data have been obtained with another high speed camera.

  15. 9. VIEW OF 'BLUE STREAK' HAMMER MILL (Prater Pulverizer Co., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF 'BLUE STREAK' HAMMER MILL (Prater Pulverizer Co., Chicago, Illinois), LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE BASEMENT, WAS ADDED IN THE EARLY 1930s. THIS WAS THE MILL'S FIRST ELECTRIC-POWERED MACHINERY. THE HAMMER MILL WAS USED TO PULVERIZE OATS, ALFALFA MEAL, AND CORN. Photographer: Louise Taft Cawood, July 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. How Is Deep Vein Thrombosis Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Deep Vein Thrombosis Treated? Doctors treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT) with medicines and other devices ... stockings. Rate This Content: Next >> October 28, 2011 Deep Vein Thrombosis Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research ...

  17. Who Is at Risk for Varicose Veins?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for varicose veins. This is because staying in one position for a long time may force your veins to work harder to ... Veins Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether ...

  18. Reliable and Repeatable Characterization of Optical Streak Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Charest, Peter Torres III, Christopher Silbernagel

    2008-03-01

    Optical streak cameras are used as primary diagnostics for a wide range of physics and laser performance verification experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To meet the strict accuracy requirements needed for these experiments, the systematic nonlinearities of the streak cameras (attributed to nonlinearities in the optical and electronic components that make up the streak camera system) must be characterized. In some cases the characterization information is used as a guide to help determine how experiment data should be taken. In other cases the characterization data is used to correct data images, to remove some of the nonlinearities. In order to obtain these camera characterizations, a specific data set is collected where the response to specific known inputs is recorded. A set of analysis software routines has been developed to extract information such as spatial resolution, dynamic range, temporal resolution, etc., from this data set. The routines are highly automated, requiring very little user input and thus provide very reliable and repeatable results that are not subject to interpretation. An emphasis on quality control has been placed on these routines due to the high importance of the camera characterization information.

  19. Design of microcontroller based system for automation of streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, M. J.; Upadhyay, J.; Deshpande, P. P.; Sharma, M. L.; Navathe, C. P.

    2010-08-01

    A microcontroller based system has been developed for automation of the S-20 optical streak camera, which is used as a diagnostic tool to measure ultrafast light phenomenon. An 8 bit MCS family microcontroller is employed to generate all control signals for the streak camera. All biasing voltages required for various electrodes of the tubes are generated using dc-to-dc converters. A high voltage ramp signal is generated through a step generator unit followed by an integrator circuit and is applied to the camera's deflecting plates. The slope of the ramp can be changed by varying values of the capacitor and inductor. A programmable digital delay generator has been developed for synchronization of ramp signal with the optical signal. An independent hardwired interlock circuit has been developed for machine safety. A LABVIEW based graphical user interface has been developed which enables the user to program the settings of the camera and capture the image. The image is displayed with intensity profiles along horizontal and vertical axes. The streak camera was calibrated using nanosecond and femtosecond lasers.

  20. Stabilization of boundary layer streaks by plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riherd, Mark; Roy, Subrata

    2014-03-01

    A flow's transition from laminar to turbulent leads to increased levels of skin friction. In recent years, dielectric barrier discharge actuators have been shown to be able to delay the onset of turbulence in boundary layers. While the laminar to turbulent transition process can be initiated by several different instability mechanisms, so far, only stabilization of the Tollmien-Schlichting path to transition has received significant attention, leaving the stabilization of other transition paths using these actuators less explored. To fill that void, a bi-global stability analysis is used here to examine the stabilization of boundary layer streaks in a laminar boundary layer. These streaks, which are important to both transient and by-pass instability mechanisms, are damped by the addition of a flow-wise oriented plasma body force to the boundary layer. Depending on the magnitude of the plasma actuation, this damping can be up to 25% of the perturbation's kinetic energy. The damping mechanism appears to be due to highly localized effects in the immediate vicinity of the body force, and when examined using a linearized Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes energy balance, indicate negative production of the perturbation's kinetic energy. Parametric studies of the stabilization have also been performed, varying the magnitude of the plasma actuator's body force and the spanwise wavenumber of the actuation. Based on these parametric studies, the damping of the boundary layer streaks appears to be linear with respect to the total amount of body force applied to the flow.

  1. The economics of vein disease.

    PubMed

    Sales, Clifford M; Podnos, Joan; Levison, Jonathan

    2007-09-01

    The management of cosmetic vein problems requires a very different approach than that for the majority of most other vascular disorders that occur in a vascular surgery practice. This article focuses on the business aspects of a cosmetic vein practice, with particular attention to the uniqueness of these issues. Managing patient expectations is critical to the success of a cosmetic vein practice. Maneuvering within the insurance can be difficult and frustrating for both the patient and the practice. Practices should use cost accounting principles to evaluate the success of their vein work. Vein surgery--especially if performed within the office--can undergo an accurate break-even analysis to determine its profitability. PMID:17911565

  2. Varicose Veins - Sclerotherapy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patient Education Institute

    This patient education program explains the benefits and risks of sclerotherapy for varicose veins. It also reviews the anatomy of the cardiovascular system, symptoms, causes, preventive measures, what the procedure involves, and possible complications. This resource is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: This tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

  3. Streak camera based SLR receiver for two color atmospheric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Thomas K.; Clarke, Christopher; Oldham, Thomas; Selden, Michael

    1993-01-01

    To realize accurate two-color differential measurements, an image digitizing system with variable spatial resolution was designed, built, and integrated to a photon-counting picosecond streak camera, yielding a temporal scan resolution better than 300 femtosecond/pixel. The streak camera is configured to operate with 3 spatial channels; two of these support green (532 nm) and uv (355 nm) while the third accommodates reference pulses (764 nm) for real-time calibration. Critical parameters affecting differential timing accuracy such as pulse width and shape, number of received photons, streak camera/imaging system nonlinearities, dynamic range, and noise characteristics were investigated to optimize the system for accurate differential delay measurements. The streak camera output image consists of three image fields, each field is 1024 pixels along the time axis and 16 pixels across the spatial axis. Each of the image fields may be independently positioned across the spatial axis. Two of the image fields are used for the two wavelengths used in the experiment; the third window measures the temporal separation of a pair of diode laser pulses which verify the streak camera sweep speed for each data frame. The sum of the 16 pixel intensities across each of the 1024 temporal positions for the three data windows is used to extract the three waveforms. The waveform data is processed using an iterative three-point running average filter (10 to 30 iterations are used) to remove high-frequency structure. The pulse pair separations are determined using the half-max and centroid type analysis. Rigorous experimental verification has demonstrated that this simplified process provides the best measurement accuracy. To calibrate the receiver system sweep, two laser pulses with precisely known temporal separation are scanned along the full length of the sweep axis. The experimental measurements are then modeled using polynomial regression to obtain a best fit to the data. Data aggregation using normal point approach has provided accurate data fitting techniques and is found to be much more convenient than using the full rate single shot data. The systematic errors from this model have been found to be less than 3 ps for normal points.

  4. Cell streak imaging cytometry for rare cell detection.

    PubMed

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2015-02-15

    Detection of rare cells, such as circulating tumor cells, have many clinical applications. To measure rare cells with increased sensitivity and improved data managements, we developed an imaging flow cytometer with a streak imaging mode capability. The new streak mode imaging mode utilizes low speed video to capture moving fluorescently labeled cells in a flow cell. Each moving cell is imaged on multiple pixels on each frame, where the cell path is marked as a streak line proportional to the length of the exposure. Finding rare cells (e.g., <1 cell/mL) requires measuring larger sample volumes to achieve higher sensitivity, therefore we combined streak mode imaging with a "wide" high throughput flow cell (e.g. flow rates set to 10 mL/min) in contrast to the conventional "narrow" hydrodynamic focusing cells typically used in cytometry that are inherently limited to low flow rates. The new flow cell is capable of analyzing 20 mL/min of fluorescently labeled cells. To further increase sensitivity, the signal to noise ratio of the images was also enhanced by combining three imaging methods: (1) background subtraction, (2) pixel binning, and (3) CMOS color channel selection. The streaking mode cytometer has been used for the analysis of SYTO-9 labeled THP-1 human monocytes in buffer and in blood. Samples of cells at 1 cell/mL and 0.1 cell/mL were analyzed in 30 mL with flow rates set to 10 mL/min and frame rates of 4 fps (frame per second). For the target of 1 cell/mL, an average concentration of 0.91 cell/mL was measured by cytometry, with a standard error of 0.03 (C(95) = 0.85-0.97). For the target of 0.1 cell/mL, an average concentration of 0.083 cell/mL was measured, with a standard error of 0.01 (C(95) = 0.065-0.102). Whole blood was also spiked with SYTO-9 labeled cells to a concentration of 10 cell/mL, and the average flow cytometry measurement was 8.7 cells/mL (i.e. 0.87 cells/mL in diluted blood) with a 95% CL of 8.1-9.2 cells/mL. This demonstrated the ability to detect rare cells in blood with high accuracy. Such detection approaches for rare cells have many potential clinical applications. Furthermore, the simplicity and low cost of this device may enable expansion of cell-based clinical diagnostics, especially in resource-poor settings. PMID:25212069

  5. Sagittal vein thrombosis caused by central vein catheter.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Karim, Hosein; Heydar Pour, Behzad; Faraji, Reza

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis, including thrombosis of cerebral veins and major dural sinuses, is an uncommon disorder in the general population. However, it has a higher frequency among patients younger than 40 years of age, patients with thrombophilia, pregnant patients or those receiving hormonal contraceptive therapy or has foreign body such as catheter in their veins or arterial system. In this case report, we described clinical and radiological findings in a patient with protein C-S deficiency and malposition of central vein catheter. PMID:25796028

  6. Barley Yellow Dwarf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley yellow dwarf is the most economically important virus disease affecting most cereal crops world wide. This manuscript summarizes the current knowledge of the disease etiology, epidemiology and management. This information is incorporated into the latest revision of the American Phytopathologi...

  7. Yellow leaf blotch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow leaf blotch occurs worldwide in temperate climates. The disease is reported from countries in Asia, Australasia, Oceania, Europe, North America, Central America, the West Indies, and South America. In the northern Great Plains of North America, it is often the major leaf disease on alfalfa....

  8. Hot streaks and phantom cooling in a turbine rotor passage. II - Combined effects and analytical modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, Richard J.; Dring, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental documentation and analytical correlations demonstrating the effects of hot streak accumulation and phantom cooling on turbine rotor airfoil surface temperature are presented. Results are shown which quantify the impact of a nonuniform temperature profile at the entrance of a turbine due to combustor-generated hot and cold streaks, and cooling air discharged from the trailing edge of the upstream stator. Experimental results are shown for a range of controlling variables to identify where streak accumulation and phantom cooling were most likely to be strongest. These variables include streak-to-free stream density ratio, streak injection location, and coolant-to-free stream density and velocity ratios. Experimental results are shown for the combined effects of hot streak and stator coolant on the adiabatic recovery temperature of the rotor.

  9. Hot streaks and phantom cooling in a turbine rotor passage. II - Combined effects and analytical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roback, Richard J.; Dring, Robert P.

    1992-06-01

    Experimental documentation and analytical correlations demonstrating the effects of hot streak accumulation and phantom cooling on turbine rotor airfoil surface temperature are presented. Results are shown which quantify the impact of a nonuniform temperature profile at the entrance of a turbine due to combustor-generated hot and cold streaks, and cooling air discharged from the trailing edge of the upstream stator. Experimental results are shown for a range of controlling variables to identify where streak accumulation and phantom cooling were most likely to be strongest. These variables include streak-to-free stream density ratio, streak injection location, and coolant-to-free stream density and velocity ratios. Experimental results are shown for the combined effects of hot streak and stator coolant on the adiabatic recovery temperature of the rotor.

  10. Learning from the pulmonary veins.

    PubMed

    Porres, Diego Varona; Morenza, Oscar Persiva; Pallisa, Esther; Roque, Alberto; Andreu, Jorge; Martnez, Manel

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic embryology and anatomy of the pulmonary veins and the various imaging techniques used to evaluate the pulmonary veins, as well as the radiologic findings in diseases affecting these structures. Specific cases highlight the clinical importance of the imaging features, particularly the findings obtained with multidetector computed tomography (CT). Pulmonary vein disease can be broadly classified into congenital or acquired conditions. Congenital disease, which often goes unnoticed until patients are adults, mainly includes (a) anomalies in the number or diameter of the vessels and (b) abnormal drainage or connection with the pulmonary arterial tree. Acquired disease can be grouped into (a) stenosis and obstruction, (b) hypertension, (c) thrombosis, (d) calcifications, and (e) collateral circulation. Pulmonary vein stenosis or obstruction, which often has important clinical repercussions, is frequently a result of radiofrequency ablation complications, neoplastic infiltration, or fibrosing mediastinitis. The most common cause of pulmonary venous hypertension is chronic left ventricular failure. This condition is difficult to differentiate from veno-occlusive pulmonary disease, which requires a completely different treatment. Pulmonary vein thrombosis is a rare, potentially severe condition that can have a local or distant cause. Calcifications have been described in rheumatic mitral valve disease and chronic renal failure. Finally, the pulmonary veins can act as conduits for collateral circulation in cases of obstruction of the superior vena cava. Multidetector CT is an excellent modality for imaging evaluation of the pulmonary veins, even when the examination is not specifically tailored for their assessment. PMID:23842969

  11. Vein matching using artificial neural network in vein authentication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori Hoshyar, Azadeh; Sulaiman, Riza

    2011-10-01

    Personal identification technology as security systems is developing rapidly. Traditional authentication modes like key; password; card are not safe enough because they could be stolen or easily forgotten. Biometric as developed technology has been applied to a wide range of systems. According to different researchers, vein biometric is a good candidate among other biometric traits such as fingerprint, hand geometry, voice, DNA and etc for authentication systems. Vein authentication systems can be designed by different methodologies. All the methodologies consist of matching stage which is too important for final verification of the system. Neural Network is an effective methodology for matching and recognizing individuals in authentication systems. Therefore, this paper explains and implements the Neural Network methodology for finger vein authentication system. Neural Network is trained in Matlab to match the vein features of authentication system. The Network simulation shows the quality of matching as 95% which is a good performance for authentication system matching.

  12. How Are Varicose Veins Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pain you're having. Diagnostic Tests and Procedures Duplex Ultrasound Your doctor may recommend duplex ultrasound to check blood flow in your veins and to look for blood clots. Duplex ultrasound combines traditional with Doppler ultrasound. Traditional ultrasound ...

  13. [Yellow fever: new recommendations].

    PubMed

    Rochat, L; Genton, B

    2014-05-01

    Indication for yellow fever vaccination is not always easy to assess. The decision to immunize is not only based on the actual risk of the disease in a specific location, but also on public health considerations in the visited country (in order to respectively avoid epidemics in endemic countries or the introduction of the virus in zones where the vectors mosquitoes are present) and on travelers' risk factors for severe or even fatal vaccine adverse events. WHO has recently published new recommendations regarding vaccination against yellow fever after concluding that one dose of vaccine generates a life-long protection. This article tends to clarify the strategy to adopt in 2013 using cases frequently encountered in the practice of travel medicine. PMID:24908746

  14. Agrobacterium-mediated infectivity of cloned digitaria streak virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Donson, J; Gunn, H V; Woolston, C J; Pinner, M S; Boulton, M I; Mullineaux, P M; Davies, J W

    1988-01-01

    A monomeric clone of double-stranded DNA synthesized in vitro DNA of the geminivirus Digitaria streak (DSV) was subcloned as a tandem dimeric unit into a binary vector of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, creating a plasmid pDS2. Inoculation of digitaria sanguinalis with A. tumefaciens carrying pDS2 resulted in viral infection. The symptoms, virus particles, and DNA forms obtained were indistinguishable from those of a natural DSV infection of D. sanguinalis. Inoculations have also induced infections in Zea mays and Avena sativa. The sequence of the Agrobacterium-mediated infectious clone of DSV has been determined. PMID:3341112

  15. Attosecond streaking of core lines of copper dihalides

    E-print Network

    J. D. Lee

    2011-09-26

    In the attosecond (as) streaking of Cu 3s core-level photoemission of copper dihalides, we predict theoretically that the satellite ($3d^9$) is emitted later than the main line ($3d^{10}L^{-1}$; $L$: ligand). The emission time delay is originated from the electron correlation between the core level and 3d shell, which leads to the difference in core-hole screening between satellite and main lines. Further, we find that the time delay corresponds to a quantification of the extrinsic loss of photoemission.

  16. Parametric frequency upconversion, optical fiber transmission, and streak camera recording

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, M.E.; Rotter, M.D.

    1987-01-30

    The use of optical fiber for the transmission of information over relatively long distances is being recognized as the only viable solution to many data transmission problems, particularly those requiring high information density and faithful temporal content. This necessary reliance upon the optical carrier has meant that the image-tube based optical streak camera is often the instrument of choice for recording single-shot multi-parameter events with high temporal resolution. However, current photocathode technology is incompatible with the trend of the optical fiber industry toward the use of the 1300 to 1600 nm wavelength regime. To retain the advantages of optical streak-camera recording and optical fiber transmission, a way must be found to ''upconvert'' the optical carrier to higher energy. This report describes the use of an intense lazer pump beam coincident with the IR signal into a non-linear crystal (LiIO/sub 3/) to increase the signal's frequency. A beam splitter is used to separate the signal from the pump beam at the detector. The physical theory underlying this process is described. (JDH)

  17. Microprocessor-controlled, wide-range streak camera

    SciTech Connect

    Amy E. Lewis, Craig Hollabaugh

    2006-09-01

    Bechtel Nevada/NSTec recently announced deployment of their fifth generation streak camera. This camera incorporates many advanced features beyond those currently available for streak cameras. The arc-resistant driver includes a trigger lockout mechanism, actively monitors input trigger levels, and incorporates a high-voltage fault interrupter for user safety and tube protection. The camera is completely modular and may deflect over a variable full-sweep time of 15 nanoseconds to 500 microseconds. The camera design is compatible with both large- and small-format commercial tubes from several vendors. The embedded microprocessor offers Ethernet connectivity, and XML [extensible markup language]-based configuration management with non-volatile parameter storage using flash-based storage media. The cameras user interface is platform-independent (Microsoft Windows, Unix, Linux, Macintosh OSX) and is accessible using an AJAX [asynchronous Javascript and XML]-equipped modem browser, such as Internet Explorer 6, Firefox, or Safari. User interface operation requires no installation of client software or browser plug-in technology. Automation software can also access the camera configuration and control using HTTP [hypertext transfer protocol]. The software architecture supports multiple-simultaneous clients, multiple cameras, and multiple module access with a standard browser. The entire user interface can be customized.

  18. A possible role for chemotaxis in primitive streak formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandersius, Sebastian A.; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Newman, Timothy J.

    2010-03-01

    One of the fundamental problems in modern biology is to understand the transformation of a fertilized egg to an adult organism. A key stage of this developmental process is gastrulation, in which cell germ layers are defined, and the basic three-dimensional body plan of the organism is established. Presented here is a model used to investigate the collective cell movement which is observed at the onset of gastrulation in the Chick embryo. In the avian embryo, gastrulation is initiated by a cadre of cells moving coherently, bisecting the embryo, thereby forming a structure known as the primitive streak. The mechanisms underlying primitive streak formation are the subject of recent experimental controversy. One hypothesis is that coherent cell motion is driven by chemotactic response to long-range signaling gradients. We will present results from large-scale computer simulations testing this hypothesis. In particular, we perform simulations using the Subcellular Element Model (SEM). Within the model framework, a single cell is represented by a collection of visco-elastically interacting elements. Dynamic interactions of elements are motivated, as coarse-grained representations, of the actively remodeling cell cytoskeleton. We have found that, in addition to chemotaxis, active cell migration is crucial for ``fluidizing" the tissue thereby allowing large-scale coherent cell movement.

  19. Simplified picosecond streak image tube for designing inexpensive commercial cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyareva, Valentina P.; Fedotov, V. I.; Korobkova, T. A.; Polikarkina, Nadejda D.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.; Schelev, Mikhail Y.; Smirnova, A. V.; Soldatov, N. F.; Titkov, Evgenij I.

    1993-01-01

    The current demand for inexpensive streak camera manufacturing leads to the necessity in development of a variety of relatively simple and low cost image-converter tubes. One such tube, known as PIF-C, designed and manufactured in the Photoelectronics Department of the General Physics Institute (GPI), is now commercially available. Its experimentally measured time resolution in streak mode has approached one picosecond, and 3 ps in synchroscan mode at 82 MHz operation frequency. In single frame mode at 100 ns exposure time, the spatial resolution over 6 mm input area is within 15 lp/mm. Electron optical magnification of the tube is 1.5 x. PIF-C tubes may be supplied with one of the S1/S20/S25 photocathodes, fabricated either on borosilicate glass, UV-glass, or MgF2 substrate. Its P11 phosphor screen is deposited onto the fiber optic window. EBI of the PIF-C/S1 tube is in the range of 5 (DOT) 10-10 A/cm2.

  20. Understanding Baseball Team Standings and Streaks C. Sire 1 and S. Redner 1, 2

    E-print Network

    Redner, Sidney

    Understanding Baseball Team Standings and Streaks C. Sire 1 and S. Redner 1, 2 1 Laboratoire de Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA Can one understand the statistics of wins and losses of baseball teams? Are their consecutive­ game winning and losing streaks self

  1. A Generalized Low-Rank Appearance Model for Spatio-Temporally Correlated Rain Streaks

    E-print Network

    Hsu, Chiou-Ting Candy

    A Generalized Low-Rank Appearance Model for Spatio-Temporally Correlated Rain Streaks Yi-Lei Chen rain streaks, just exploit the repeatability/similarity of rain steaks taken in the same scene! Our advantages:(1) no pre-processing (e.g., rain detection); (2) training-free (e.g., dictionary learning

  2. Mass movement within a slope streak on Mars Cynthia B. Phillips,1

    E-print Network

    Perfect, Ed

    , or by staining of the surface, preserving pre-existing topography within the streak. Theories also vary that transports, lubricates or stains the surface material [Ferguson and Lucchitta, 1984; Ferris et al., 2002 streak formation entailed or caused significant sediment movement and is not simply a surface staining

  3. Absence of retromandibular vein associated with atypical formation of external jugular vein in the parotid region.

    PubMed

    Patil, Jyothsna; Kumar, Naveen; Swamy, Ravindra S; D'Souza, Melanie R; Guru, Anitha; Nayak, Satheesha B

    2014-06-01

    Veins of the head and neck exhibiting anatomical variations or malformations are clinically significant. Anatomical variation in the external jugular vein is very common. However, anatomical variation in the retromandibular vein is rare. In this paper, we report a rare case of complete absence of the retromandibular vein. In the absence of the retromandibular vein, the maxillary vein divided into anterior and posterior divisions. The posterior division joined the superficial temporal vein to form an atypical external jugular vein, and the anterior division joined the facial vein to form an anonymous vein. In clinical practice, radiologists and surgeons use the retromandibular vein as a guide to expose the branches of the facial nerve during superficial parotidectomy. Therefore, absence of the retromandibular vein is a hurdle during this procedure and may affect the venous drainage pattern from the head and neck. PMID:24987551

  4. Portal Vein Thrombosis in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Kaiser; Jacob, Mathew; Asthana, Sonal

    2013-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is being increasingly recognized in patients with advanced cirrhosis and in those undergoing liver transplantation. Reduced flow in the portal vein is probably responsible for clotting in the spleno-porto-mesenteric venous system. There is also increasing evidence that hypercoagulability occurs in advanced liver disease and contributes to the risk of PVT. Ultrasound based studies have reported a prevalence of PVT in 1025% of cirrhotic patients without hepatocellular carcinoma. Partial thrombosis of the portal vein is more common and may not have pathophysiological consequences. However, there is high risk of progression of partial PVT to complete PVT that may cause exacerbation of portal hypertension and progression of liver insufficiency. It is thus, essential to accurately diagnose and stage PVT in patients waiting for transplantation and consider anticoagulation therapy. Therapy with low molecular weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists has been shown to achieve complete and partial recanalization in 3345% and 1535% of cases respectively. There are however, no guidelines to help determine the dose and therapeutic efficacy of anticoagulation in patients with cirrhosis. Anticoagulation therapy related bleeding is the most feared complication but it appears that the risk of variceal bleeding is more likely to be dependent on portal pressure rather than solely related to coagulation status. TIPS has also been reported to restore patency of the portal vein. Patients with complete PVT currently do not form an absolute contraindication for liver transplantation. Thrombectomy or thromboendovenectomy is possible in more than 75% of patients followed by anatomical end-to-end portal anastomosis. When patency of the portal vein and/or superior mesenteric vein is not achieved, only non-anatomical techniques (reno-portal anastomosis or cavo-portal hemitransposition) can be performed. These techniques, which do not fully reverse portal hypertension, are associated with higher morbidity and mortality risks in the short term. PMID:25755579

  5. Portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Raja, Kaiser; Jacob, Mathew; Asthana, Sonal

    2014-12-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is being increasingly recognized in patients with advanced cirrhosis and in those undergoing liver transplantation. Reduced flow in the portal vein is probably responsible for clotting in the spleno-porto-mesenteric venous system. There is also increasing evidence that hypercoagulability occurs in advanced liver disease and contributes to the risk of PVT. Ultrasound based studies have reported a prevalence of PVT in 10-25% of cirrhotic patients without hepatocellular carcinoma. Partial thrombosis of the portal vein is more common and may not have pathophysiological consequences. However, there is high risk of progression of partial PVT to complete PVT that may cause exacerbation of portal hypertension and progression of liver insufficiency. It is thus, essential to accurately diagnose and stage PVT in patients waiting for transplantation and consider anticoagulation therapy. Therapy with low molecular weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists has been shown to achieve complete and partial recanalization in 33-45% and 15-35% of cases respectively. There are however, no guidelines to help determine the dose and therapeutic efficacy of anticoagulation in patients with cirrhosis. Anticoagulation therapy related bleeding is the most feared complication but it appears that the risk of variceal bleeding is more likely to be dependent on portal pressure rather than solely related to coagulation status. TIPS has also been reported to restore patency of the portal vein. Patients with complete PVT currently do not form an absolute contraindication for liver transplantation. Thrombectomy or thromboendovenectomy is possible in more than 75% of patients followed by anatomical end-to-end portal anastomosis. When patency of the portal vein and/or superior mesenteric vein is not achieved, only non-anatomical techniques (reno-portal anastomosis or cavo-portal hemitransposition) can be performed. These techniques, which do not fully reverse portal hypertension, are associated with higher morbidity and mortality risks in the short term. PMID:25755579

  6. Extra-pair mating, male plumage coloration and sexual selection in yellow warblers (Dendroica petechia)

    PubMed Central

    Yezerinac, S. M.; Weatherhead, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Extra-pair mating has been proposed as a source of sexual selection responsible for secondary sexual traits that are common among socially monogamous birds, although supporting evidence is scant. In the socially monogamous yellow warbler, males are larger than females, and unlike females, have extensive reddish streaking on their breasts. Using DNA fingerprinting we show that within-pair parentage was positively related to male size, and that extra-pair mating success was positively related to the amount of streaking on the breast. To our knowledge, this is the first intraspecific evidence of an association between a male plumage ornament and gains of extra-pair paternity that is apparently independent of age. This study confirms that extra-pair mating can be an important mechanism of sexual selection even when the most successful sires are commonly cuckolded, and refutes a previous hypothesis that the variation in plumage and behaviour among male yellow warblers is an example of alternative, equally successful, evolutionarily stable strategies (ESS). More generally, the demonstrated independence of within-pair and extra-pair success and their associated traits indicates that where animals have multiple secondary sexual traits, different traits may be selected by different mechanisms that contribute to total reproductive success.

  7. StreakDet data processing and analysis pipeline for space debris optical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, Jenni; Flohrer, Tim; Muinonen, Karri; Granvik, Mikael; Torppa, Johanna; Poikonen, Jonne; Lehti, Jussi; Santti, Tero; Komulainen, Tuomo; Naranen, Jyri

    We describe a novel data processing and analysis pipeline for optical observations of space debris. The monitoring of space object populations requires reliable acquisition of observational data, to support the development and validation of space debris environment models, the build-up and maintenance of a catalogue of orbital elements. In addition, data is needed for the assessment of conjunction events and for the support of contingency situations or launches. The currently available, mature image processing algorithms for detection and astrometric reduction of optical data cover objects that cross the sensor field-of-view comparably slowly, and within a rather narrow, predefined range of angular velocities. By applying specific tracking techniques, the objects appear point-like or as short trails in the exposures. However, the general survey scenario is always a track before detect problem, resulting in streaks, i.e., object trails of arbitrary lengths, in the images. The scope of the ESA-funded StreakDet (Streak detection and astrometric reduction) project is to investigate solutions for detecting and reducing streaks from optical images, particularly in the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) domain, where algorithms are not readily available yet. For long streaks, the challenge is to extract precise position information and related registered epochs with sufficient precision. Although some considerations for low-SNR processing of streak-like features are available in the current image processing and computer vision literature, there is a need to discuss and compare these approaches for space debris analysis, in order to develop and evaluate prototype implementations. In the StreakDet project, we develop algorithms applicable to single images (as compared to consecutive frames of the same field) obtained with any observing scenario, including space-based surveys and both low- and high-altitude populations. The proposed processing pipeline starts from the segmentation of the acquired image (i.e., the extraction of all sources), followed by the astrometric and photometric characterization of the candidate streaks, and ends with orbital validation of the detected streaks. A central concept of the pipeline is streak classification which guides the actual characterization process by aiming to identify the interesting sources and to filter out the uninteresting ones, as well as by allowing the tailoring of algorithms for specific streak classes (e.g. point-like vs. long, disintegrated streaks). To validate the single-image detections, the processing is finalized by orbital analysis, resulting in preliminary orbital classification (Earth-bound vs. non-Earth-bound orbit) for the detected streaks.

  8. Photo yellowing of human hair.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, A C S; Richena, M; Dicelio, L E; Joekes, I

    2007-09-25

    In general, human hair is claimed to turn yellower after sun exposure. This is particularly affirmed for white hair. However, quantitative data relating yellowness to hair type and to the radiation wavelength are missing. This work shows results of the effect of full or UVB-filtered radiation of a mercury vapor or a xenon-arc lamp on the yellowness of virgin white, dark-brown, blond and red hair. All hair types showed a substantial change in yellowness after irradiation, which is dependent on the hair type and radiation wavelength. Surprisingly, white hair turns less yellow after both full and UVB-filtered radiation exposure. This effect is more pronounced when UVB is filtered from the radiation system. The only radiation that shows a photo-yellowing effect on white hair is infrared. As the yellowness of white hair is commonly related to tryptophan degradation, fluorescence experiments with hair solutions were performed to identify the natural degradation of tryptophan which occurs in hair after light irradiation. Pigmented hairs were also studied, as well as hair treated with a bleaching solution. Although we observe a decrease in tryptophan content of hair after lamp radiation, a direct correlation with hair yellowness was not achieved. Results are discussed in terms of hair type, composition and melanin content. PMID:17627835

  9. High-speed TV cameras for streak tube readout

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; Holmes, V.H. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Turko, B.T. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Two fast framing TV cameras have been characterized and compared as readout media for imaging of 40 mm diameter streak tube (P-11) phosphor screens. One camera is based upon a Focus-Projection-Scan (FPS) high-speed electrostatic deflected vidicon with 30-mm-diameter PbO target. The other uses an interline transfer charge-coupled device (CCD) with 8.8 {times} 11.4 mm rectangular Si target. The field-of-view (FOV), resolution, responsivity, and dynamic range provided by both cameras when exposed to short duration ({approx} 10 {mu} full width at half maximum (FWHM)) transient illumination followed by a single field readout period of {lt}3 ms are presented. 11 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Doppler streak mode Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Yun, Julie X.; Goodwin, Richard; Markwald, Roger; Runyan, Raymond B.; Gao, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Doppler Fourier domain optical coherence tomography is able to be used for in vivo blood flow measurement. In conventional methods, the highest velocity that can be measured is limited to the range the phase shift between two successively recorded depth profiles at the same probe-beam location, which cannot exceed (-?, ?), otherwise phase wrapping will occur. This phase-wrapping limit is determined by the time interval between two consecutive A-scans. We present a novel approach to shorten the time interval between two consecutive A-scans and thus increase the phase-wrapping limit by using an area scan camera to record the interference spectrum in a streak mode. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, the blood flows in HH18 and HH19 chick hearts were imaged and phase wrapping free Doppler images were obtained.

  11. fisheriesresearch Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) is

    E-print Network

    Miller, Tom

    fisheriesresearch feature Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) is an important ecological and economic in Lake Michigan: Evaluating Progress in a Cooperative Effort, 19972001 Yellow perch (Perca flavescens

  12. Streaking in Cascadia ETS Events and Implications for the Subduction Plate Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, H.; Ghosh, A.

    2011-12-01

    The manner in which episodic tremor and slow slip (ETS) propagates across the subduction plate interface provides constraints on its properties and the physical processes involved. We have been examining catalogs of tremor locations to study propagation patterns during ETS. Tremor in the large Cascadia ETS events propagates mainly via three modes: 1) the slow along-strike advance of ETS, 2) rapid tremor reversals (RTRs) that propagate back from the tremor front in an opposite direction to the along-strike advance, but at speeds 10-40 times faster (Houston et al., Nature Geoscience, 2011), and 3) streaks, even faster migrations of tremor parallel to the plate-convergence direction at speeds ~ 70 km/hr (Ghosh et al., G3, 2011). The UW Seismology group has recently deployed an EarthScope-funded seismic experiment, the Array of Arrays, to image tremor more precisely with eight subarrays. A 15-month catalog of high-resolution tremor locations has been generated based on the triangulation of back-projected beams from the subarrays. We detect tremor streaks in this catalog automatically and systematically determine streak propagation properties. Key issues for constraining streak-generation processes include systematic differences between up- and down-dip traveling streaks, how streak properties may depend on depth, and whether streaks accelerate or decelerate during propagation. Stacking automatically-detected streaks can address some of these issues. Two approaches to automatically detecting streaks have been developed and applied to the M6.8 2010 ETS. One method declares a streak when averaged epicenters continue to move in a roughly constant direction for more than 10 km. The second declares a streak if epicenters during a specified time interval, say 20 min, are sufficiently well-correlated with time. The two methods agree well and detect several streaks per day of 15-30 min duration with speeds consistent with those inferred for the 2008 ETS. Although the detection methods have no azimuthal bias, most of the detected streaks align with one direction; furthermore, that direction lies much closer to the plate convergence direction than directly down-dip (the down-dip and plate convergence directions differ significantly along most of Cascadia). Many more streaks are detected in the actual catalog than in randomized versions, in which the times within each hour are permuted. These results lend substantial credence to convergence-parallel streaks as real features of ETS. Streak propagation patterns suggest the plate interface is anisotropic along the slip direction. The ubiquity of streaking parallel to plate convergence implies control by corrugated or smeared structures on the plate interface. This could occur via such structures controlling the orientation of an advancing slip pulse, which could carry streaks along its peak (Rubin, G3, 2011), or more directly via heterogeneous physical properties (such as rheology or permeability) elongated in the convergence direction. In this connection, we note that daily tremor bands in Cascadia ETS are also often oriented parallel to the convergence direction whether the ETS is advancing north or south, even though the direction of ETS advance would be expected to affect the orientation of a slip pulse on a homogeneous interface.

  13. Quartz Vein in the Gunsight Formation

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Quartz vein in biotite-rich rock in the Gunsight Formation of the Mesoproterozoic Lemhi Group. Bluish green copper-bearing minerals coat the quartz vein. Pale pinkish cobalt bloom and white caliche coat adjacent biotite-rich wallrock....

  14. Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find synonyms Find synonyms Find exact match Print DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS OVERVIEW Venous thrombosis is a condition ... pain. Most commonly, venous thrombosis occurs in the "deep veins" in the legs, thighs, or pelvis ( figure ...

  15. If I Had - Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with Dr. Kenneth Saag, MD) If I Had - Deep Vein Thrombosis - Dr. David Lee, MD In the Spotlight - Dr. ... Researcher Back to Home Page If I Had - Deep Vein Thrombosis - Dr. David Lee, MD (November 15, 2007 - Insidermedicine) ...

  16. The Treatment of Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Subramonia, S; Lees, TA

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Over the past few years, there has been a move to less invasive endoluminal methods in the treatment of lower limb varicose veins combined with a renewed interest in sclerotherapy, with the recent addition of foam sclerotherapy. The development of these new techniques has led many to question some of the more conventional teaching on the treatment of varicose veins. This review examines these new treatments for lower limb varicose veins and the current evidence for their use. MATERIALS AND METHODS An extensive search of available electronic and paper-based databases was performed to identify studies relevant to the treatment of varicose veins with particular emphasis on those published within the last 10 years. These were analysed by both reviewers independently. RESULTS There is no single method of treatment appropriate for all cases. Conventional surgery is safe and effective and is still widely practised. Whilst the new treatments may be popular with both surgeons and patients, it is important that they are carefully evaluated not only for their clinical benefits and complications when compared to existing treatments but also for their cost prior to their wider acceptance into clinical practice. PMID:17346396

  17. Vaginal vein thrombosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Gitstein, S.; Ballas, S.; Peyser, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    Vaginal vein thrombosis in a pregnant woman is reported. This entity should be differentiated from vaginal arteriovenous fistula which may cause severe antepartum, intrapartum and post-partum haemorrhage. The humoral and mechanical factors which favour the occurrence of varicosities and thrombosis are briefly described. Surgical management is suggested as being both simple and effective. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6634550

  18. Ultra Fast X-ray Streak Camera for TIM Based Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, E; Shepherd, R; Fulkerson, E S; James, L; Emig, J; Norman, D

    2012-05-02

    Ultra fast x-ray streak cameras are a staple for time resolved x-ray measurements. There is a need for a ten inch manipulator (TIM) based streak camera that can be fielded in a newer large scale laser facility. The LLNL ultra fast streak camera's drive electronics have been upgraded and redesigned to fit inside a TIM tube. The camera also has a new user interface that allows for remote control and data acquisition. The system has been outfitted with a new sensor package that gives the user more operational awareness and control.

  19. Ultra fast x-ray streak camera for ten inch manipulator based platformsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, E. V.; Shepherd, R.; Fulkerson, S.; James, L.; Emig, J.; Norman, D.

    2012-10-01

    Ultra fast x-ray streak cameras are a staple for time resolved x-ray measurements. There is a need for a ten inch manipulator (TIM) based streak camera that can be fielded in a newer large scale laser facility. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ultra fast streak camera's drive electronics have been upgraded and redesigned to fit inside a TIM tube. The camera also has a new user interface that allows for remote control and data acquisition. The system has been outfitted with a new sensor package that gives the user more operational awareness and control.

  20. Emissivity spectrum of a large "dark streak" from themis infrared imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Brumby, Steven P.; Vaniman, D. T. (David T.); Bish, D. L. (David L.)

    2003-01-01

    'Dark streaks', also known as 'slope streaks', are unusual surface features found on Mars that are known to appear and fade away on timescales of years. Various explanations have been proposed for their origin and composition, including dry avalanches and wet debris or precipitates from brines. Previous investigations have been based on analysis of panchromatic imagery and altimetry from Viking and Mars Global Surveyor missions. We have obtained an infrared emissivity spectrum of a large dark streak on the north western edge of Olympus Mons, using imagery from the THEMIS instrument on the Mars Odyssey 2001 spacecraft.

  1. Ultra fast x-ray streak camera for ten inch manipulator based platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, E. V. [Physics and Life Science, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, M.S. L-490, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Shepherd, R.; Fulkerson, S.; James, L.; Emig, J.; Norman, D. [Physics and Life Science, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, M.S. L-490, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Ultra fast x-ray streak cameras are a staple for time resolved x-ray measurements. There is a need for a ten inch manipulator (TIM) based streak camera that can be fielded in a newer large scale laser facility. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ultra fast streak camera's drive electronics have been upgraded and redesigned to fit inside a TIM tube. The camera also has a new user interface that allows for remote control and data acquisition. The system has been outfitted with a new sensor package that gives the user more operational awareness and control.

  2. Streak camera crosstalk reduction using a multiple delay optical fiber bundle.

    PubMed

    Tsikouras, Anthony; Ning, Jin; Ng, Sandy; Berman, Richard; Andrews, David W; Fang, Qiyin

    2012-01-15

    The streak camera is one of the fastest photodetection systems, while its capability of multiplexing is particularly attractive to many applications requiring parallel data acquisition. The degree of multiplexing in a streak camera is limited by the crosstalk between input channels. We developed a technique that introducing a fixed time delay between adjacent fiber channels in a customized two-dimensional to one-dimensional fiber array to significantly reduce crosstalk both at the sample plane and at the input of a streak camera. A prototype system has been developed that supports 100 input channels, and its performance in fluorescence microscopy is demonstrated. PMID:22854483

  3. Surgical Access to Jejunal Veins for Local Thrombolysis and Stent Placement in Portal Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, Frank, E-mail: frank.schellhammer@med.uni-duesseldorf.d [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Esch, Jan Schulte am [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Department of General, Visceral and Pediatric Surgery (Germany); Hammerschlag, Sascha [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Department of General, Visceral and Pediatric Surgery (Germany); Fuerst, Guenter [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Portal vein thrombosis is an infrequent entity, which may cause high morbidity and mortality. We report a case of portal vein thrombosis due to benign stenosis following partial pancreatoduodenectomy with segmental replacement of the portal vein by a Gore-tex graft. Using a surgical access to jenunal veins, local thrombolysis, mechanical fragmentation of thrombus, and stent placement were successfully performed.

  4. A Model of Vein Graft Intimal Hyperplasia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger Tran-Son-Tay; Minki Hwang; Scott A. Berceli; C. Keith Ozaki; Marc Garbey

    2007-01-01

    When vein graft is implanted in the arterial system, the vein graft wall becomes thicker as an adaptive process. We have developed a model of early adaptive vein graft intimal thickening induced by shear stress. Intimal thickness and the rate of intimal thickening are expressed as functions of shear stress and time based on experimental data. The model describes the

  5. Abnormal patterns of the renal veins

    PubMed Central

    Azari, Hassan; Abedinzadeh, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the renal vascular anatomy may greatly contribute to the success of surgical, invasive and radiological procedures of the retroperitoneal region. Here, morphometric and histological studies of a human cadaveric specimen presented a complex, anomalous pattern of renal veins. The left renal vein had an oblique retro-aortic course and received two lumbar veins. It bifurcated near its drainage point into the inferior vena cava. The right renal vein received the right testicular vein. In addition, the left kidney was located at a low position. The spleen was enlarged. The present case is unique and provides information that may help surgeons or angiologists to apply safer interventions. PMID:22536553

  6. Standard design for National Ignition Facility x-ray streak and framing camerasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, J. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Holder, J. P.; Kalantar, D. K.; MacPhee, A. G.; Telford, S.

    2010-10-01

    The x-ray streak camera and x-ray framing camera for the National Ignition Facility were redesigned to improve electromagnetic pulse hardening, protect high voltage circuits from pressure transients, and maximize the use of common parts and operational software. Both instruments use the same PC104 based controller, interface, power supply, charge coupled device camera, protective hermetically sealed housing, and mechanical interfaces. Communication is over fiber optics with identical facility hardware for both instruments. Each has three triggers that can be either fiber optic or coax. High voltage protection consists of a vacuum sensor to enable the high voltage and pulsed microchannel plate phosphor voltage. In the streak camera, the high voltage is removed after the sweep. Both rely on the hardened aluminum box and a custom power supply to reduce electromagnetic pulse/electromagnetic interference (EMP/EMI) getting into the electronics. In addition, the streak camera has an EMP/EMI shield enclosing the front of the streak tube.

  7. A unique Yellow River-derived distal subaqueous delta in the Yellow Sea

    E-print Network

    Liu, Paul

    A unique Yellow River-derived distal subaqueous delta in the Yellow Sea Z.S. Yang a , J.P. Liu b deposited around the eastern tip of the Shandong Peninsula in the Yellow Sea. This clinoform deposit re-suspended and transported out of the Bohai Sea into the Yellow Sea. Overall, the Yellow River

  8. Detection and analysis of irregular streaks in dermoscopic images of skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Maryam; Lee, Tim K; McLean, David; Lui, Harvey; Atkins, M Stella

    2013-05-01

    Irregular streaks are important clues for Melanoma (a potentially fatal form of skin cancer) diagnosis using dermoscopy images. This paper extends our previous algorithm to identify the absence or presence of streaks in a skin lesions, by further analyzing the appearance of detected streak lines, and performing a three-way classification for streaks, Absent, Regular, and Irregular, in a pigmented skin lesion. In addition, the directional pattern of detected lines is analyzed to extract their orientation features in order to detect the underlying pattern. The method uses a graphical representation to model the geometric pattern of valid streaks and the distribution and coverage of the structure. Using these proposed features of the valid streaks along with the color and texture features of the entire lesion, an accuracy of 76.1% and weighted average area under ROC curve (AUC) of 85% is achieved for classifying dermoscopy images into streaks Absent, Regular, or Irregular on 945 images compiled from atlases and the internet without any exclusion criteria. This challenging dataset is the largest validation dataset for streaks detection and classification published to date. The data set has also been applied to the two-class sub-problems of Absent/Present classification (accuracy of 78.3% with AUC of 83.2%) and to Regular/Irregular classification (accuracy 83.6% with AUC of 88.9%). When the method was tested on a cleaned subset of 300 images randomly selected from the 945 images, the AUC increased to 91.8%, 93.2% and 90.9% for the Absent/Regular/Irregular, Absent/Present, and Regular/Irregular problems, respectively. PMID:23335664

  9. Split ring resonator based THz-driven electron streak camera featuring femtosecond resolution.

    PubMed

    Fabia?ska, Justyna; Kassier, Gnther; Feurer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Through combined three-dimensional electromagnetic and particle tracking simulations we demonstrate a THz driven electron streak camera featuring a temporal resolution on the order of a femtosecond. The ultrafast streaking field is generated in a resonant THz sub-wavelength antenna which is illuminated by an intense single-cycle THz pulse. Since electron bunches and THz pulses are generated with parts of the same laser system, synchronization between the two is inherently guaranteed. PMID:25010060

  10. Aerosols Over Yellow Sea Sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This SeaWiFS image shows complex phytoplankton distribution patterns in the Bohai and Yellow seas. A wide band of brownish water along the coast north and south of the mouth of the Yangtze River indicates a heavy load of suspended sediment. The air over eastern central China and the Yellow Sea is thick with aerosols. Farther north over the Manchurian Plain and Greater Khingan Range, the air is much clearer.

  11. Effects of Hot Streak Shape on Rotor Heating in a High-Subsonic Single-Stage Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Gundy-Burlet, Karen L.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data have shown that combustor temperature non-uniformities can lead to the excessive heating of first-stage rotor blades in turbines. This heating of the rotor blades can lead to thermal fatigue and degrade turbine performance. The results of recent studies have shown that variations in the circumferential location (clocking) of the hot streak relative to the first-stage vane airfoils can be used to minimize the adverse effects of the hot streak. The effects of the hot streak/airfoil count ratio on the heating patterns of turbine airfoils have also been evaluated. In the present investigation, three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes simulations have been performed for a single-stage high-pressure turbine operating in high subsonic flow. In addition to a simulation of the baseline turbine, simulations have been performed for circular and elliptical hot streaks of varying sizes in an effort to represent different combustor designs. The predicted results for the baseline simulation show good agreement with the available experimental data. The results of the hot streak simulations indicate: that a) elliptical hot streaks mix more rapidly than circular hot streaks, b) for small hot streak surface area the average rotor temperature is not a strong function of hot streak temperature ratio or shape, and c) hot streaks with larger surface area interact with the secondary flows at the rotor hub endwall, generating an additional high temperature region.

  12. New observations of Bolivian wind streaks by JPL Airborne SAR: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumberg, Dan G.; Greeley, Ronald

    1995-01-01

    In 1993 NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar system (AIRSAR) was deployed to South America to collect multi-parameter radar data over pre-selected targets. Among the sites targeted was a series of wind streaks located in the Altiplano of Bolivia. The objective of this investigation is to study the effect of wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle on the visibility of wind streaks in radar data. Because this is a preliminary evaluation of the recently acquired data we will focus on one scene and, thus, only on the effects of wavelength and polarization. Wind streaks provide information on the near-surface prevailing winds and on the abundance of winderodible material, such as sand. The potential for a free-flyer radar system that could provide global radar images in multiple wavelengths, polarizations, and incidence angles requires definition of system parameters for mission planning. Furthermore, thousands of wind streaks were mapped from Magellan radar images of Venus; their interpretation requires an understanding of the interaction of radar with wind streaks and the surrounding terrain. Our experiment was conducted on wind streaks in the Altiplano of Bolivia to address these issues.

  13. Spatial relationships among the cellular tapetum, visual streak and rod density in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Yasuhiro; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z; Uehara, Masato

    2015-03-01

    The dog visual system is well suited to dim light conditions due to rod-dominated retina and the reflective tapetum. The topographical distributions of rods and thickness of the tapetum of the dog were quantified in retinal whole mounts stained with thionine, and spatial relationships among the tapetum, rod density and visual streak of high ganglion cell density were elucidated. The relationship between the retina and tapetum was analyzed in parasagittal sections stained with thionine or hematoxylin-eosin. The tapetum was thick in its center, and the thickest part consisted of 9 to 12 tapetal cell layers. Rod density ranged from 200,000 to 540,000/mm(2). Maximum rod density was found in the area dorsal to the visual streak, and the density in that area was significantly higher than the rod density in the visual streak and accorded spatially with the thickest part of the tapetum. The horizontal visual streak was found over the horizontal line through the optic disc in the temporal half and extended slightly into the nasal half. The central area of the highest density of ganglion cells was approximately located midway between the nasal and temporal ends of the visual streak. The visual streak was located within the tapetal area, but ventrally to the thick part of the tapetum. PMID:25728250

  14. Spatial relationships among the cellular tapetum, visual streak and rod density in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Yasuhiro; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z; Uehara, Masato

    2014-10-30

    The dog visual system is well suited to dim light conditions due to rod-dominated retina and the reflective tapetum. The topographical distributions of rods and thickness of the tapetum of the dog were quantified in retinal wholemounts stained with thionine, and spatial relationships among the tapetum, rod density and visual streak of high ganglion cell density were elucidated. The relationship between the retina and tapetum was analyzed in parasagittal sections stained with thionine or hematoxylin-eosin. The tapetum was thick in its center, and the thickest part consisted of 9 to 12 tapetal cell layers. Rod density ranged from 200,000 to 540,000/mm(2). Maximum rod density was found in the area dorsal to the visual streak, and the density in that area was accorded significantly higher than the rod density in the visual streak and accorded spatially with the thickest part of the tapetum. The horizontal visual streak was found over the horizontal line through the optic disc in the temporal half and extended slightly into the nasal half. The central area of the highest density of ganglion cells was approximately located midway between the nasal and temporal ends of the visual streak. The visual streak was located within the tapetum, but ventrally to the thick part of the tapetum. PMID:25354794

  15. Spatial relationships among the cellular tapetum, visual streak and rod density in dogs

    PubMed Central

    YAMAUE, Yasuhiro; HOSAKA, Yoshinao Z.; UEHARA, Masato

    2014-01-01

    The dog visual system is well suited to dim light conditions due to rod-dominated retina and the reflective tapetum. The topographical distributions of rods and thickness of the tapetum of the dog were quantified in retinal whole mounts stained with thionine, and spatial relationships among the tapetum, rod density and visual streak of high ganglion cell density were elucidated. The relationship between the retina and tapetum was analyzed in parasagittal sections stained with thionine or hematoxylin-eosin. The tapetum was thick in its center, and the thickest part consisted of 9 to 12 tapetal cell layers. Rod density ranged from 200,000 to 540,000/mm2. Maximum rod density was found in the area dorsal to the visual streak, and the density in that area was significantly higher than the rod density in the visual streak and accorded spatially with the thickest part of the tapetum. The horizontal visual streak was found over the horizontal line through the optic disc in the temporal half and extended slightly into the nasal half. The central area of the highest density of ganglion cells was approximately located midway between the nasal and temporal ends of the visual streak. The visual streak was located within the tapetal area, but ventrally to the thick part of the tapetum. PMID:25728250

  16. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using proteins crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the unexpected hypothesis that the virus releases its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have fairly flat coats, but in TYNV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early stuties of TYMV, but McPherson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central void on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides linked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the void. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine

  17. Serotyping and strain identification of maize streak virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Pinner, M S; Markham, P G

    1990-08-01

    Four strains of maize streak virus, namely the Panicum maximum, Digitaria setigera and sugarcane strains, have been identified from 19 isolates by ELISA using polyclonal antisera cross-absorbed with particles of the maize strain. The results suggest there is an epitope of the maize strain which is not dependent on the capsid being intact and which is common to all the members of the group; other strain-specific epitopes are probably conformation-dependent. A specific epitope (probably internal) occurs on the coat protein of a maize strain isolate, D(R)D, grown in D. velutina, that is also present on the coat protein of the D. setigera (previously reported as D. sanguinalis) strain. Specific internal epitopes also occur in the coat proteins of sugarcane and P. maximum strains. The use of indirect ELISA was necessary for accurate serotyping. The serological reactivities of particles of all the members of each type were identical irrespective of the host from which they were extracted. Sap extracts proved to be more reliable sources of antigen than virus preparations, which could vary in their serological reactivity. Nevertheless, serological differentiation index values determined in tests using either type of antigen proved reliable and consistent. PMID:1697327

  18. Quantitative measurements using soft-x-ray streak cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.L.; Stradling, G.L.; Pierce, E.L.; Medecki, H.

    1981-08-01

    A Soft X-Ray Streak Camera (SXRSC) is a fast timing instrument sensitive to x rays from 100 eV to 300 keV. The instrument has excellent time resolution (approx. 15 ps) and large dynamic range (approx. 10/sup 3/) which are well suited for measuring x-ray pulses produced by laser-fusion targets. The SXRSC uses a thin transmission photocathode to convert x-rays to a secondary electron signal which is accelerated, focused, and deflected onto a phosphor producing an image of the x-ray pulse time history. In the past, such instruments have been used only to make relative measurements of the time history. At LLNL we have calibrated the SXRSC in order to make absolute intensity measurements of the soft x-ray flux from laser fusion targets. Such measurements will assist in understanding the laser plasma processes and conditions needed to attain laser-produced fusion. Because of the nature of the instrument, we have calibrated it in the dynamic mode using a small laser-produced pulsed x-ray source.

  19. Molecular characterization of Indian sugarcane streak mosaic virus isolate.

    PubMed

    Parameswari, B; Bagyalakshmi, K; Viswanathan, R; Chinnaraja, C

    2013-02-01

    Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV), a member of the genus Poacevirus, family Potyviridae, is an important viral pathogen affecting sugarcane cultivation in India. The complete nucleotide sequence of a SCSMV isolate from India (SCSMV-IND) was determined. The linear, assembled, single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome of SCSMV-IND was 9,786 nucleotides in length (excluding the poly (A) tail) and encoded a polyprotein of 3,131 amino acid residues. The genome of SCSMV-IND shared high degree of sequence identity with SCSMV-PAK (93% at nucleotide and 97% at amino acid), and shared only 81% nucleotide and 94% amino acid identities with all the four SCSMV isolates (SCSMV-JP1, -JP2, -ID, and -THA). Phylogenetic tree analysis of the complete genome sequences of SCSMV isolates revealed that they can be clustered into two groups. SCSMV-IND and -AP isolates showed 18% (nucleotide) divergence within the highly conserved 3' partial genome, suggesting a high level of genetic diversity among the Indian SCSMV isolates. PMID:23011777

  20. Historical overview of varicose vein surgery.

    PubMed

    van den Bremer, Jephta; Moll, Frans L

    2010-04-01

    Varicose veins are as old as Hippocrates. Varicose vein treatments come and go. Surgery for varicose vein disease is one of the commonest elective general surgical procedures. The history of varicose vein surgery has been traced. We note the first descriptions of varicose veins, and we particularly focus on the ligation of the saphenofemoral junction, stripping of the great saphenous veins, phlebectomy, and perforant vein surgery. We end with the rapid rise of minimally invasive procedures, such as foam sclerotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, and endovenous lasertherapy. Within 10 years, the advantages of minimal invasiveness for these procedures, combined with claims of equivalent short-term outcomes and even better long-term results, have already influenced our everyday practice. At present, the gold standard treatment of varicose veins still is surgical ligation and stripping of the insufficient vein. Concomitantly or sequentially with the treatment of truncal insufficiency, residual varicosities can be treated by phlebectomy. New minimally invasive techniques, however, have changed the clinical landscape for varicose vein surgery tremendously. The dramatic changes of the last decade are probably the precursors of the next generation. PMID:20144527

  1. The sedimentology and dynamics of crater-affiliated wind streaks in western Arabia Terra, Mars and Patagonia, Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, J.A.P.; Tanaka, K.L.; Yamamoto, A.; Berman, D.C.; Zimbelman, J.R.; Kargel, J.S.; Sasaki, S.; Jinguo, Y.; Miyamoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    Wind streaks comprise recent aeolian deposits that have been extensively documented on Venus, Earth and Mars. Martian wind streaks are among the most abundant surface features on the planet and commonly extend from the downwind margins of impact craters. Previous studies of wind streaks emerging from crater interior deposits suggested that the mode of emplacement was primarily related to the deposition of silt-sized particles as these settled from plumes. We have performed geologic investigations of two wind streaks clusters; one situated in western Arabia Terra, a region in the northern hemisphere of Mars, and another in an analogous terrestrial site located in southern Patagonia, Argentina, where occurrences of wind streaks emanate from playas within maar craters. In both these regions we have identified bedforms in sedimentary deposits on crater floors, along wind-facing interior crater margins, and along wind streaks. These observations indicate that these deposits contain sand-sized particles and that sediment migration has occurred via saltation from crater interior deposits to wind streaks. In Arabia Terra and in Patagonia wind streaks initiate from crater floors that contain lithic and evaporitic sedimentary deposits, suggesting that the composition of wind streak source materials has played an important role in development. Spatial and topographic analyses suggest that regional clustering of wind streaks in the studied regions directly correlates to the areal density of craters with interior deposits, the degree of proximity of these deposits, and the craters' rim-to-floor depths. In addition, some (but not all) wind streaks within the studied clusters have propagated at comparable yearly (Earth years) rates. Extensive saltation is inferred to have been involved in its propagation based on the studied terrestrial wind streak that shows ripples and dunes on its surface and the Martian counterpart changes orientation toward the downslope direction where it extends into an impact crater. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Endovenous laser treatment for primary varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Van den Bussche, D; Moreels, N; De Letter, J; Lanckneus, M

    2006-01-01

    Venous insufficiency of the lower extremities is a highly prevalent condition. Successful treatment of superficial venous insufficiency will most often necessitate treatment of the saphenofemoral junction incompetence with correction of saphenous vein reflux. In the majority of patients it concerns a reflux of the greater saphenous vein. The standard procedure consists of ligation and stripping of the greater saphenous vein combined with with additional phlebectomies or ligation of insufficient perforant veins if necessary. Although the standard procedure is widely known and accepted, the postoperative morbidity and postoperative limitations of activity are high. In this context minimally invasive percutaneous endovenous techniques were developed to improve the patients comfort and faster resumption of work. Among these, endovenous laser ablation of the greater saphenous vein is a relatively new procedure. Percutaneous introduction of a laser fiber into the incompetent vein and ablation with pulsed laser energy is far less invasive than stripping. PMID:16612909

  3. Mars Eolian Geology at Airphoto Scales: The Large Wind Streaks of Western Arabia Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.

    2001-01-01

    More than 27,000 pictures at aerial photograph scales (1.5-12 m/pixel) have been acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) since September 1997. The pictures are valuable for testing hypotheses about geologic history and processes of Mars. Of particular interest are eolian features connected to surface albedo patterns. This work is focused on low-albedo wind streaks, some over 100 km long, in western Arabia Terra. Each streak is widest where it originates at an impact crater (typically 25-150 km diameter). The streaks taper downwind. Within the associated craters there is a lower-albedo surface that, in nearly all observed cases, includes barchan dunes indicative of transport in the same direction as the wind streaks. Upwind of the dunes there is usually an outcrop of layered material that might have served as a source for dune sand. MOC images show that the west Arabia streaks consist of a smooth-surfaced, multiple-meters-thick, mantle (smooth at 1.5 m/pixel) that appears to be superposed on local surfaces. No dunes are present, indicating that down-streak transport of sediment via saltation and traction have not occurred. Two models might explain the observed properties: (1) the streaks consist of dark silt- and clay-sized grains deflated from the adjacent crater interiors and deposited from suspension or (2) they are remnants (protected in the lee of impact crater rims) of a formerly much larger, regional covering of low albedo, smooth-surfaced mantle. The latter hypothesis is based on observation of low albedo mantled surfaces occurring south of west Arabia in Terra Meridiani. For reasons yet unknown, a large fraction of the martian equatorial regions are covered by low albedo, mesa-forming material that lies unconformably atop eroded layered and cratered terrain. Both hypotheses are being explored via continued selective targeting of new MOC images as well as analyses of the new data.

  4. 17DD yellow fever vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Reinaldo M.; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S.; Farias, Roberto Henrique G.; Camacho, Luiz Antonio B.; Freire, Marcos S.; Galler, Ricardo; Yamamura, Anna Maya Yoshida; Almeida, Luiz Fernando C.; Lima, Sheila Maria B.; Nogueira, Rita Maria R.; S, Gloria Regina S.; Hokama, Darcy A.; de Carvalho, Ricardo; Freire, Ricardo Aguiar V.; Filho, Edson Pereira; Leal, Maria da Luz Fernandes; Homma, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To verify if the Bio-Manguinhos 17DD yellow fever vaccine (17DD-YFV) used in lower doses is as immunogenic and safe as the current formulation. Results:Doses from 27,476 IU to 587 IU induced similar seroconversion rates and neutralizing antibodies geometric mean titers (GMTs). Immunity of those who seroconverted to YF was maintained for 10 mo. Reactogenicity was low for all groups. Methods:Young and healthy adult males (n = 900) were recruited and randomized into 6 groups, to receive de-escalating doses of 17DD-YFV, from 27,476 IU to 31 IU. Blood samples were collected before vaccination (for neutralization tests to yellow fever, serology for dengue and clinical chemistry), 3 to 7 d after vaccination (for viremia and clinical chemistry) and 30 d after vaccination (for new yellow fever serology and clinical chemistry). Adverse events diaries were filled out by volunteers during 10 d after vaccination. Volunteers were retested for yellow fever and dengue antibodies 10 mo later. Seropositivity for dengue was found in 87.6% of volunteers before vaccination, but this had no significant influence on conclusions. Conclusion:In young healthy adults Bio-Manguinhos/Fiocruz yellow fever vaccine can be used in much lower doses than usual. International Register ISRCTN 38082350. PMID:23364472

  5. A high degree of African streak virus diversity within Nigerian maize fields includes a new mastrevirus from Axonopus compressus.

    PubMed

    Oluwafemi, Sunday; Kraberger, Simona; Shepherd, Dionne N; Martin, Darren P; Varsani, Arvind

    2014-10-01

    The A-strain of maize streak virus (MSV-A; genus Mastrevirus, family Geminiviridae), the causal agent of maize streak disease, places a major constraint on maize production throughout sub-Saharan Africa. In West-African countries such as Nigeria, where maize is not cultivated year-round, this MSV strain is forced to overwinter in non-maize hosts. In order to both identify uncultivated grasses that might harbour MSV-A during the winter season and further characterise the diversity of related maize-associated streak viruses, we collected maize and grass samples displaying streak symptoms in a number of Nigerian maize fields. From these we isolated and cloned 18 full mastrevirus genomes (seven from maize and 11 from various wild grass species). Although only MSV-A isolates were obtained from maize, both MSV-A and MSV-F isolates were obtained from Digitaria ciliaris. Four non-MSV African streak viruses were also sampled, including sugarcane streak Reunion virus and Urochloa streak virus (USV) from Eleusine coacana, USV from Urochloa sp., maize streak Reunion virus (MSRV) from both Setaria barbata and Rottboellia sp., and a novel highly divergent mastrevirus from Axonopus compressus, which we have tentatively named Axonopus compressus streak virus (ACSV). Besides the discovery of this new mastrevirus species and expanding the known geographical and host ranges of MSRV, we have added D. ciliaris to the list of uncultivated species within which Nigerian MSV-A isolates are possibly able to overwinter. PMID:24796552

  6. Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) / Pulmonary Embolism (PE) - Blood Clot Forming in a Vein

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Form Controls NCBDDD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) / Pulmonary Embolism (PE) ?? Blood ... Espaol (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism (DVT/PE) are ...

  7. MR Venography for the Assessment of Deep Vein Thrombosis in Lower Extremities with Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the performance of magnetic resonance venography (MRV) for pelvis and deep vein thrombosis in the lower extremities before surgical interventions for varicose veins. Materials and Methods: We enrolled 72 patients who underwent MRV and ultrasonography before stripping for varicose veins of lower extremities. All images of the deep venous systems were evaluated by time-of-flight MRV. Results: Forty-six patients (63.9%) of all were female. Mean age was 65.2 10.2 years (3781 years). There were forty patients (55.6%) with varicose veins in both legs. Two deep vein thrombosis (2.8%) and three iliac vein thrombosis (4.2%) were diagnosed. All patients without deep vein thrombosis underwent the stripping of saphenous veins, and post-thrombotic change was avoided in all cases. Conclusion: MRV, without contrast medium, is considered clinically useful for the lower extremity venous system. PMID:25593625

  8. Smog Yellows Taj Mahal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Built as a monument to the favorite wife of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, the Taj Mahal has watched over the city of Agra, India, since the mid-seventeenth century with its pillars of gleaming white marble. By the spring of 2007, however, one of the world's most visited landmarks was turning yellow, and a panel of India's parliament had little trouble identifying the culprit: pollution. The panel blamed particles of soot and dirt suspended high in the atmosphere for the Taj Mahal's dinginess. The Taj Mahal's home, Agra, sits not far from the base of the Himalaya, and smog regularly collects along the southern side of the mountain range. On May 16, 2007, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the area around Agra, India. The closeup image shows the immediate vicinity of the Taj Majal. The larger image shows the surrounding area. In both pictures, dingy, gray-beige haze obscures the satellite's view of the land surface. India had tried to minimize the adverse impact of air pollution on the famous landmark. According to the BBC, in the late 1990s, India's Supreme Court ordered the closure of thousands of iron foundries and kilns that had belched smoke near the monument. Many of the 3 million tourists who visited the Taj Majal each year approached the monument on horse-drawn carriages or battery-operated buses as fossil-fuel-powered vehicles could not drive within 2 kilometers (1.5 miles). Since those efforts have failed to save the Taj Majal's complexion, Indian officials have considered applying a cleansing mud pack to the monument's surface to draw out the dirt. As India industrializes, smog results, and the Taj Mahal's gleaming whiteness is only one casualty. Pollution has been blamed for a decrease in Indian rice harvests, which had soared during the 'Green Revolution' of the 1960s and 1970s. Haze and dust also appear to bring on the region's monsoon rains earlier than normal.

  9. An Optical Streaking Method for Measuring Femtosecond Electron Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Bane, Karl L.F.; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    The measurement of the ultra-short electron bunch length on the femtosecond time scale constitutes a very challenging problem. In the x-ray free electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source, generation of a sub-ten femtoseconds electron beam with 20pC charge is possible, but direct measurements are very difficult due to the resolution limit of the present diagnostics. We propose a new method here based on the measurement of the electron beam energy modulation induced from laser-electron interaction in a short wiggler. A typical optical streaking method requires a laser wavelength much longer than the electron bunch length. In this paper a laser with its wavelength shorter than the electron bunch length has been adopted, while the slope on the laser intensity envelope is used to distinguish the different periods. With this technique it is possible to reconstruct the bunch longitudinal profile from a single shot measurement. Generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses at femtoseconds (fs) scale is of great interest within synchrotron radiation and free electron laser (FEL) user community. One of the simple methods is to operate the FEL facility at low charge. At the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we have demonstrated the capability of generating ultrashort electron-beam (e-beam) with a duration of less than 10 fs fwhm using 20 pC charge. The x-ray pulses have been delivered to the x-ray users with a similar or even shorter pulse duration. However, The measurement of such short electron or x-ray pulse length at the fs time-scale constitutes a challenging problem. A standard method using an S-band radio-frequency (rf) transverse deflector has been established at LCLS, which works like a streak camera for electrons and is capable of resolving bunch lengths as short as 25 fs fwhm. With this device, the electrons are transversely deflected by the high-frequency time-variation of the deflecting fields. Increasing the deflecting voltage and rf frequency are the right direction to achieve a better resolution. For example, by choosing an X-band transverse deflecting cavity, the expected resolution for LCLS beam with 4.3 GeV is about 1 fs rms. Typically the rf breakdown threshold and the power source availability prevent going to even higher voltage and frequency. With the highly-developed laser techniques, we can choose to streak the beam at optical frequencies. By jumping from rf to optical frequency, the wavelength is shortening by 4 to 5 orders. With an electron bunch length shorter than half period of the laser, we can apply the similar rf deflecting or zero-phasing method for e-beam bunch length measurements using a high-power laser. A short wiggler is required to provide interaction between the electron and the laser. For example, to measure the e-beam at the order of 1 m rms length, a laser with its wavelength of 10 {mu}m may be considered. For a typical few GeV e-beam, the wiggler period has to be large to satisfy the resonance condition. Also, if the e-beam is longer than one laser period, the different modulation periods will overlap and we cannot distinguish them. So this method is so far limited by the achievable long-wavelength laser power. To get an effective modulation on an e-beam of 4.3 GeV, the required laser power is about a few tens GW. In this paper we propose to adopt a high-power Ti:Sapphire laser (wavelength of 800 nm), and use the slope in the intensity envelope to distinguish the different modulation periods. First an ultrashort electron beam interacts with the Ti:Sapphire laser in a wiggler, where the electron energy is modulated at the same periods of the laser. If the laser pulse is long and the short electron bunch is overlapped (in time) with the middle part of the laser, such as the setup at LCLS laser heater, the different energy modulation periods on the electron beam will be overlapped on the energy profile. In this conditionwe typically have a double-horn distribution of the energy profile, and the electron-bunch length information cannot be retrieved. But if the laser pulse (

  10. Remodelling of the Superior Caval Vein After Angioplasty in an Infant with Superior Caval Vein Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Mert, Murat [Istanbul University, Institute of Cardiology, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Turkey)], E-mail: mmert@superonline.com; Saltik, Levent [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Department of Pediatric Cardiology (Turkey); Gunay, Ilhan [Istanbul University, Institute of Cardiology, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Turkey)

    2004-08-15

    An 8-month old girl was presented with superior caval vein syndrome early after cardiac surgery. Angiography showed severe stenosis of the superior caval vein with 50 mmHg pressure gradient. Following balloon angioplasty, the pressure gradient was reduced to 7 mmHg with some residual stenosis of the superior caval vein. When the patient was reevaluated 5 months after the procedure, angiography revealed a normal diameter of the superior caval vein without a pressure gradient.

  11. Serotonin (5HT) in Veins: Not All in Vain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Elizabeth Linder; Wei Ni; Jessica L. Diaz; Theodora Szasz; Robert Burnett; Stephanie W. Watts

    2007-01-01

    The circulatory system consists of veins and arteries. Com- pared with arteries, veins have been neglected in cardiovascu- lar research. Although veins are significantly less muscular than similarly sized arteries, the contribution of veins to cardiovas- cular homeostasis cannot be left un-noted because veins ac- commodate 70% of the circulating blood. Circulating blood platelets contain the majority of systemic 5-HT

  12. Cholestatic presentation of yellow phosphorus poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, C. P.; Goel, Amit; Basu, Debdatta

    2014-01-01

    Yellow phosphorus, a component of certain pesticide pastes and fireworks, is well known to cause hepatotoxicity. Poisoning with yellow phosphorus classically manifests with acute hepatitis leading to acute liver failure which may need liver transplantation. We present a case of yellow phosphorus poisoning in which a patient presented with florid clinical features of cholestasis highlighting the fact that cholestasis can rarely be a presenting feature of yellow phosphorus hepatotoxicity. PMID:24554916

  13. Cholestatic presentation of yellow phosphorus poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, C P; Goel, Amit; Basu, Debdatta

    2014-01-01

    Yellow phosphorus, a component of certain pesticide pastes and fireworks, is well known to cause hepatotoxicity. Poisoning with yellow phosphorus classically manifests with acute hepatitis leading to acute liver failure which may need liver transplantation. We present a case of yellow phosphorus poisoning in which a patient presented with florid clinical features of cholestasis highlighting the fact that cholestasis can rarely be a presenting feature of yellow phosphorus hepatotoxicity. PMID:24554916

  14. Holocene development of the Yellow River's subaqueous delta, North Yellow Sea

    E-print Network

    Liu, Paul

    Holocene development of the Yellow River's subaqueous delta, North Yellow Sea J. Paul Liua,*, John Yellow Sea reveal a 2040-m-thick subaqueous clinoform delta that wraps around the eastern end of the Shandong Peninsula, extending into the South Yellow Sea. This complex sigmoidal-oblique clinoform

  15. Nitroxidergic nerve stimulation relaxes human uterine vein

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noboru Toda; Toshio Kimura; Tomio Okamura

    1995-01-01

    The predominant action of nitroglycerin, a nitric oxide (NO) donor, on veins over arterioles is well recognized. This study was carried out to determine whether endogenous NO derived from vasodilator nerve regulates the tone of human uterine venous strips. The isolated vein partially contracted with prostaglandin F2? responded to nicotine with a contraction or a relaxation; the contraction was reversed

  16. Biometric Identification through Hand Vein Patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Yu?ksel; L. Akarun; B. Sankur

    2010-01-01

    Vein pattern is the vast network of blood vessels underneath a person's skin. These patterns in the hands are assumed to be unique to each individual and they do not change over time except in size. The properties of uniqueness, stability and strong immunity to forgery of the vein patterns make it a potentially good biometric trait. In this study,

  17. Arteries and veins of the zebra fish

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Katie Hale (CSUF; Biological Sciences)

    2007-06-19

    Arteries and veins are blood vessels and are part of the circulatory system. Arteries take oxygenated blood away from the heart and veins bring blood back to the heart after it has circulated through the body. The circulatory system distributes oxygen to the body and also moves around nutrients.

  18. JAMA Patient Page: Treatment of Varicose Veins

    MedlinePLUS

    ... socks that fit tightly over the legs and ankle can be used for symptom relief. For patients with varicose veins resulting from clots in the large, deep veins ( postthrombotic syndrome ) or patients with skin ulcers, stockings applying 30 to 40 mm Hg of ...

  19. Improving the management of varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Onida, Sarah; Lane, Tristan R A; Davies, Alun H

    2013-01-01

    Up to 30% of the UK population are affected by varicose veins. They are a manifestation of increased venous pressure in the lower limb caused by impaired venous return. Primary varicosities result from poor drainage from the superficial to the deep venous system. Secondary varicosities arise as a result of underlying pathology impeding venous drainage, such as deep venous thrombosis or increased intra-abdominal pressure caused by a mass, pregnancy or obesity. Patients with bleeding varicose veins should be referred to a vascular service immediately. Referral is also indicated in the following cases: symptomatic primary or recurrent varicose veins; lower limb skin changes thought to be caused by chronic venous insufficiency; superficial vein thrombosis and suspected venous incompetence; a venous leg ulcer or healed venous leg ulcer. Imaging is crucial in the assessment of the superficial and deep venous system to enable assessment of venous competence. The gold standard imaging technique is colour duplex ultrasonography. Duplex ultrasound should be used to confirm the diagnosis of varicose veins and the extent of truncal reflux, and to plan treatment for patients with suspected primary or recurrent varicose veins. Superficial vein ligation, phlebectomy and stripping have been the mainstay of treatment. In recent years, new techniques have been developed that are minimally invasive, enabling treatment of superficial venous incompetence with reduced morbidity. NICE recommends that endothermal ablation, in the form of radiofrequency or laser treatment, should be offered as treatment for patients with confirmed varicose veins and truncal reflux. PMID:24555256

  20. GPI/V.TEK streak/single-frame image converter camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovoi, Valerij I.; Postovalov, Valdis E.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.; Schelev, Mikhail Y.; Park, Seung-Han; Kim, Ung; Lee, Jae-Sun

    1993-01-01

    As a part of the joint research projects between General Physics Institute and Yonsei University/V.TEK Company, an experimental prototype of an image converter camera is designed and manufactured. The camera operates both in single frame and single shot streak modes. Single frame exposures are varied in the 250 - 1000 ns range, while recording intervals in streak mode are adjusted within the 2 - 1000 ns range over a 25 mm-wide output screen area. Temporal resolution at maximum streak speed is better than 10 ps. Total camera gain is 5 (DOT) 104. The camera is equipped with a specially designed PIF-V.1 image converter tube. Available are choices among S1, S20, or S25 photocathodes fabricated onto Molibden glass/UV glass, or MgF2 substrate.

  1. Element transport in veins during serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenbach, E. M.; Beard, J. S.; Caddick, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks has wide ranging implications for the petrology, rheology, and petrophysical properties of the oceanic lithosphere. During hydration of the peridotite, fluid-rock ratios and temperature control mineral formation in the veins. We studied a partly serpentinized peridotite from the Santa Elena ophiolite complex in Costa Rica and tracked element mobility during water-rock interaction. Serpentinization of the studied harzburgite is around 30 to 40%, with serpentinization of olivine being more advanced than serpentinization of orthopyroxene. Element mapping and point analyses show that the veins preserve characteristic element distributions within orthopyroxene and olivine, and with distance to orthopyroxene-hosted serpentine veins. With increasing distance from the orthopyroxene the following vein assemblages were observed in olivine: pure serpentine veins, serpentine + brucite veins, serpentine + brucite + magnetite veins. Veins are enriched in SiO2 in the proximity of orthopyroxene suggesting that a net transfer of SiO2 takes place from serpentinizing orthopyroxene to olivine. The magnetite-bearing serpentine veins mostly consist of Mg-rich serpentine (Mg# = 90 - 95) and Fe-rich brucite (Mg# = 70 - 75) finely intergrown. In contrast, the center of these veins contains a thin zone of high-Mg serpentine (Mg# 97), and high-Mg brucite (Mg# 92 - 94) next to magnetite. We infer from thermodynamic calculations that these mineral assemblages are controlled by H2O activity and low SiO2 activities. Within orthopyroxene, serpentine (Mg# = 84 - 89) with an elevated Al2O3 content (< 4.14wt.%) was detected, but talc was absent, indicating net loss of SiO2 from orthopyroxene during serpentinization. CaO and Al2O3 migrate from orthopyroxene, but occur only as trace components in serpentine at > 100 ?m and > 200 ?m, respectively, from the orthopyroxene. We infer that brucite is not stable in close proximity to orthopyroxene due to elevated SiO2 derived from orthopyroxene breakdown. Orthopyroxene serpentinization results in net transfer of Al2O3 into serpentine, but only in the immediate vicinity of the orthopyroxene. Overall, our study indicates that the extent of orthopyroxene serpentinization controls SiO2 and Al2O3 availability in the fluid and therefore the mineral assemblages present in the veins. The net transfer of SiO2 is manifested by the lack of talc in serpentine veins in orthopyroxene and the lack of brucite in serpentine veins proximal to orthopyroxene grain boundaries. Within veins, local transport of Si, Mg and Fe takes place during reaction of serpentine + brucite with H2O to form magnetite + Mg-rich serpentine + Mg-rich brucite.

  2. Anaphylaxis from yellow fever vaccine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John M. Kelso; Gina T. Mootrey; Theodore F. Tsai

    1999-01-01

    Background: There are very few reports of anaphylactic reactions to yellow fever (YF) vaccine in the literature, and these date from the 1940s. Objective: We sought to estimate the rate of YF vaccinerelated anaphylaxis. Methods: All reports of adverse reactions to YF vaccine submitted to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System between 1990 and 1997 were reviewed for those meeting

  3. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF YELLOW STARTHISTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six insects that attack yellow starthistle have become established in California, but only two species are very abundant, and only the seedheads are attacked. Little impact on the weed has occurred except at low elevation sites in Oregon which are not overgrazed or disturbed (e.g., roadsides). Add...

  4. 21 CFR 880.6970 - Liquid crystal vein locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liquid crystal vein locator. 880.6970 Section 880...Miscellaneous Devices 880.6970 Liquid crystal vein locator. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal vein locator is a device used to...

  5. 21 CFR 880.6970 - Liquid crystal vein locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Liquid crystal vein locator. 880.6970 Section 880...Miscellaneous Devices 880.6970 Liquid crystal vein locator. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal vein locator is a device used to...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4885 - External vein stripper.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External vein stripper. 870.4885 Section...Cardiovascular Surgical Devices 870.4885 External vein stripper. (a) Identification. An external vein stripper is an extravascular...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4885 - External vein stripper.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false External vein stripper. 870.4885 Section 870.4885 Food...Devices 870.4885 External vein stripper. (a) Identification. An external vein stripper is an extravascular device used to...

  8. Abbreviated method of determining vein volume in balloon-controlled vein ablation.

    PubMed

    Raines, J K; Garcia de Quevedo, W; Jahrmarkt, S; Mackay, E; Morrison, N; Almeida, J I

    2007-01-01

    Traditional surgical ligation and stripping for the treatment of saphenous vein incompetence has been replaced by minimally invasive alternative treatments during the last five years. Endovenous ablation with radiofrequency (RP) and laser (EVL) have proven to be safe, durable, and widely accepted by patients. Catheter-delivered sclerotherapy (CDS) with foam and liquid for ablation of the great saphenous vein is also under investigation. In this technique, vein volume must be measured accurately by ultrasound just prior to the procedure and can require up to 11 diameter measurements. The purpose of this study was to identify an abbreviated method of determining vein volume to expedite associated endovenous procedures. Seventy-five veins were treated in 55 subjects with catheter-directed sclerotherapy in a three-center clinical study using a standardized protocol. Vein volume was carefully calculated by determining vein diameter over the Treatment Length in 4 cm intervals. These measurements were compared to vein volume calculations where only three measurements were taken. Our results suggest that the abbreviated method is capable of significantly reducing the number of diameter measurements without sacrificing accuracy. We found the method produced a vein volume that fell within 1 mL or 15% of the actual vein volume in 80% of cases. The abbreviated method cannot be used with accuracy in veins that are Erratic. PMID:18265553

  9. System for photometric calibration of optoelectronic imaging devices especially streak cameras

    DOEpatents

    Boni, Robert; Jaanimagi, Paul

    2003-11-04

    A system for the photometric calibration of streak cameras and similar imaging devices provides a precise knowledge of the camera's flat-field response as well as a mapping of the geometric distortions. The system provides the flat-field response, representing the spatial variations in the sensitivity of the recorded output, with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) greater than can be achieved in a single submicrosecond streak record. The measurement of the flat-field response is carried out by illuminating the input slit of the streak camera with a signal that is uniform in space and constant in time. This signal is generated by passing a continuous wave source through an optical homogenizer made up of a light pipe or pipes in which the illumination typically makes several bounces before exiting as a spatially uniform source field. The rectangular cross-section of the homogenizer is matched to the usable photocathode area of the streak tube. The flat-field data set is obtained by using a slow streak ramp that may have a period from one millisecond (ms) to ten seconds (s), but may be nominally one second in duration. The system also provides a mapping of the geometric distortions, by spatially and temporarily modulating the output of the homogenizer and obtaining a data set using the slow streak ramps. All data sets are acquired using a CCD camera and stored on a computer, which is used to calculate all relevant corrections to the signal data sets. The signal and flat-field data sets are both corrected for geometric distortions prior to applying the flat-field correction. Absolute photometric calibration is obtained by measuring the output fluence of the homogenizer with a "standard-traceable" meter and relating that to the CCD pixel values for a self-corrected flat-field data set.

  10. MAPping Out Arteries and Veins

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ryan E. Lamont (Canada; University of Calgary, Calgary AB REV)

    2006-10-03

    Growing evidence suggests that a genetic program specifies the identity of arteries and veins before the onset of circulation. A signaling cascade involving sonic hedgehog (Shh), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), homeobox proteins Foxc1 and Foxc2, the Notch receptor, and the downstream transcription factor gridlock is required for expression of arterial markers, whereas only a single transcription factor, COUP-TFII (chicken ovalbumin upstream promotertranscription factor II), has previously been implicated in maintaining venous fate. Recent work has now implicated two competing pathways downstream of VEGFR2 in arterial versus venous specification: Activation of the phospholipase C? (PLC-?)mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway acts in arterial specification, whereas the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)Akt pathway acts to allow a venous fate by inhibition of the PLC-?MAPK pathway. Here, we review this work and discuss how activation of the MAPK signaling cascade could stimulate an arterial fate.

  11. Retinal vein occlusion: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, Rosangela; Torres Gimeno, Ana; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Bandello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a pathology noted for more than 150 years. Although a lot has been written on the matter, it is still a frequent condition with multifactorial etiopathogenesis with many unclear aspects. The RVO pathogenesis has varied systemic and local implications that make it difficult to elaborate treatment guidelines. The management of the patient with RVO is very complex and a multidisciplinary approach is required in order to identify and correct the associated risk factors. Laser therapy remains the gold standard in RVO, but only modest functional improvement has been shown in branch retinal occlusion forms. Multicenter studies of intravitreal drugs present them as an option to combine with laser. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, corticosteroids and sustained-release implants are the future weapons to stop disease progression and get a better visual outcome. Consequently, it is useful to clarify some aspects of the pathology that allow a better patient management. PMID:20938213

  12. Phylogenetic and recombination analysis of rice black-streaked dwarf virus segment 9 in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Weng, Jian-Feng; Chen, Yan-Ping; Liu, Chang-Lin; Han, Xiao-Hua; Hao, Zhuan-Fang; Li, Ming-Shun; Yong, Hong-Jun; Zhang, De-Gui; Zhang, Shi-Huang; Li, Xin-Hai

    2015-04-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) is an economically important virus that causes maize rough dwarf disease and rice black-streaked dwarf disease in East Asia. To study RBSDV variation and recombination, we examined the segment 9 (S9) sequences of 49 RBSDV isolates from maize and rice in China. Three S9 recombinants were detected in Baoding, Jinan, and Jining, China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Chinese RBSDV isolates could be classified into two groups based on their S9 sequences, regardless of host or geographical origin. Further analysis suggested that S9 has undergone negative and purifying selection. PMID:25633210

  13. Inhibition of maize streak virus (MSV) replication by transient and transgenic expression of MSV replication-associated protein mutants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dionne N. Shepherd; Tichaona Mangwende; Darren P. Martin; Marion Bezuidenhout; Jennifer A. Thomson; Edward P. Rybicki

    2007-01-01

    Maize streak disease is a severe agricultural problem in Africa and the development of maize genotypes resistant to the causal agent, Maize streak virus (MSV), is a priority. A transgenic approach to engineering MSV-resistant maize was developed and tested in this study. A pathogen- derived resistance strategy was adopted by using targeted deletions and nucleotide-substitution mutants of the multifunctional MSV

  14. Signal averaging x-ray streak camera with picosecond jitter A. Maksimchuk, M. Kim, J. Workman, G. Korn,a)

    E-print Network

    Umstadter, Donald

    resistance, two gold electrodes were deposited on the switch with a gap between the electrodes 4 mm wide picosecond x-ray streak camera using a dc-biased photoconductive switch as a generator of a high-voltage ramp that with the use of a high voltage photoconductive switch, which provides the sweep voltage for an optical streak

  15. A strain of Clover yellow vein virus that causes severe pod necrosis disease in snap bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 2000, the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) has been associated with severe virus epidemics in snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in the upper Midwestern states, New York, and Ontario, Canada. The causal agent of a disease causing severe mosaic, apical necrosis stunting and extensive pod necrosis wa...

  16. Semipersistent whitefly transmission of Squash vein yellowing virus, causal agent of viral watermelon vine decline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were completed to determine efficiency of transmission, effects of different acquisition and inoculation access periods, the length of time that whiteflies retained transmissible virus, and the minimum time needed to complete a cycle of acquisition and inoculation for SqVYV. ...

  17. Symptoms and distribution of Squash vein yellowing virus in vining cucurbits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distribution of SqVYV in cucurbit species other than watermelon is unknown. Virus distribution and symptoms of vining cucurbit species were determined by nucleic acid tissue blots and PCR. Comparisons of virus distribution between these cucurbits and watermelon are made....

  18. Varicose vein surgery and endovenous laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Reijnen, Michel M P J; Disselhoff, Ben C V M; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2007-01-01

    Varicose veins are a widespread problem, and are encountered by various medical specialists. Symptoms can appear from mild, such as tiredness of the legs, to severe chronic ulcers. Varicose veins are generally caused by the reflux of an incompetent saphenofemoral junction and long saphenous vein. In the presence of reflux, the treatment should be directed at the ablation of the hydrostatic forces of the reflux. Conventional surgical treatment consists of a high ligation of the saphenofemoral junction and stripping of the saphenous vein. In the era of minimally invasive surgery, various endovenous techniques have been developed, including endovenous laser therapy. This technique is relatively cheap and can be performed under only local anesthesia. During endovenous laser therapy, energy is delivered to the vein wall, causing it to shrink and eventually occlude. Currently, the mechanisms of action involved in laser treatment are not fully understood. Clinical studies have shown occlusion rates to be very competitive to conventional high ligation and stripping and superior cosmetics. Complications may include mild to moderate pain, ecchymosis, induration, hematoma, and phlebitis. All of these are generally self-limiting. In the challenge of finding the correct balance between a low incidence of varicose vein recurrence and complications and optimal cosmetic results, endovenous laser therapy is a promising modality. However, controlled studies that assess the effectiveness of endovenous laser therapy in comparison to saphenofemoral ligation with saphenous vein stripping are crucial before considering endovenous laser therapy as the new standard treatment. PMID:17429785

  19. Personal authentication through dorsal hand vein patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Bin; Hao, Shu-Sheng; Lee, Jen-Chun

    2011-08-01

    Biometric identification is an emerging technology that can solve security problems in our networked society. A reliable and robust personal verification approach using dorsal hand vein patterns is proposed in this paper. The characteristic of the approach needs less computational and memory requirements and has a higher recognition accuracy. In our work, the near-infrared charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is adopted as an input device for capturing dorsal hand vein images, it has the advantages of the low-cost and noncontact imaging. In the proposed approach, two finger-peaks are automatically selected as the datum points to define the region of interest (ROI) in the dorsal hand vein images. The modified two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis, which performs an alternate two-dimensional PCA (2DPCA) in the column direction of images in the 2DPCA subspace, is proposed to exploit the correlation of vein features inside the ROI between images. The major advantage of the proposed method is that it requires fewer coefficients for efficient dorsal hand vein image representation and recognition. The experimental results on our large dorsal hand vein database show that the presented schema achieves promising performance (false reject rate: 0.97% and false acceptance rate: 0.05%) and is feasible for dorsal hand vein recognition.

  20. Tie-dyed2 Encodes a Callose Synthase That Functions in Vein Development and Affects Symplastic Trafficking within the Phloem of Maize Leaves12[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Slewinski, Thomas L.; Baker, R. Frank; Stubert, Adam; Braun, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The tie-dyed2 (tdy2) mutant of maize (Zea mays) displays variegated green and yellow leaves. Intriguingly, the yellow leaf tissues hyperaccumulate starch and sucrose, the soluble sugar transported long distance through the phloem of veins. To determine the molecular basis for Tdy2 function, we cloned the gene and found that Tdy2 encodes a callose synthase. RNA in situ hybridizations revealed that in developing leaves, Tdy2 was most highly expressed in the vascular tissue. Comparative expression analysis with the vascular marker maize PINFORMED1a-yellow fluorescent protein confirmed that Tdy2 was expressed in developing vein tissues. To ascertain whether the defect in tdy2 leaves affected the movement of sucrose into the phloem or its long-distance transport, we performed radiolabeled and fluorescent dye tracer assays. The results showed that tdy2 yellow leaf regions were defective in phloem export but competent in long-distance transport. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy of tdy2 yellow leaf regions showed incomplete vascular differentiation and implicated a defect in cell-to-cell solute movement between phloem companion cells and sieve elements. The disruption of sucrose movement in the phloem in tdy2 mutants provides evidence that the Tdy2 callose synthase functions in vascular maturation and that the vascular defects result in impaired symplastic trafficking into the phloem translocation stream. PMID:22932757

  1. Systematic review of treatments for varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Leopardi, Deanne; Hoggan, Ben L; Fitridge, Robert A; Woodruff, Peter W H; Maddern, Guy J

    2009-03-01

    This systematic review compares the safety and efficacy of varicose vein treatments, including conservative therapy, sclerotherapy, phlebectomy, endovenous laser therapy, radiofrequency ablation, and surgery involving saphenous ligation and stripping. Systematic searches of medical bibliographic databases were conducted in February 2008 to identify suitable studies published from January 1988 onward. Articles were considered eligible for inclusion through the application of a predetermined protocol. Safety and effectiveness data from the comparison of two or more varicose vein procedures were extracted and analyzed. Seventeen studies, published between 2003 and 2007, were included in this review. Serious adverse events were rare. Minor adverse events were more common but generally self-limiting. All treatments displayed levels of effectiveness depending on the extent of the vein in question. Short-term advantages appeared to be associated with sclerotherapy and endovenous treatments, and long-term effectiveness was more apparent following surgical intervention. Evidence suggests conservative therapy is less effective than sclerotherapy and surgery for the treatment of varicose veins. Ligation with stripping plus phlebectomy is generally regarded as the "gold standard" for treating primary long saphenous veins. Sclerotherapy and surgery both appear to have a place in the management of varicose veins. Sclerotherapy and phlebectomy may also be more appropriate in patients with minor superficial varicose veins not related to reflux of the saphenous system or as a post- or adjunctive treatment to other procedures, such as surgery. Current evidence suggests endovenous laser therapy and radiofrequency ablation are as safe and effective as surgery, particularly in the treatment of saphenous veins. Most importantly, the type of varicose vein should govern the intervention of choice, with no single treatment universally employed. PMID:19059756

  2. A Reappraisal of Saphenous Vein Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Jing, Hua

    2011-01-01

    Autologous saphenous vein grafting has been broadly used as a bypass conduit, interposition graft, and patch graft in a variety of operations in cardiac, thoracic, neurovascular, general vascular, vascular access, and urology surgeries, since they are superior to prosthetic veins. Modified saphenous vein grafts (SVG), including spiral and cylindrical grafts, and vein cuffs or patches, are employed in vascular revascularization to satisfy the large size of the receipt vessels or to obtain a better patency. A loop SVG helps flap survival in a muscle flap transfer in plastic and reconstructive surgery. For dialysis or transfusion purposes, a straight or loop arteriovenous fistula created in the forearm or the thigh with an SVG has acceptable patency. The saphenous vein has even been used as a stent cover to minimize the potential complications of standard angioplasty technique. However, the use of saphenous vein grafting is now largely diminished in treating cerebrovascular disorders, superior vena cava syndrome, and visceral revascularization due to the introduction of angioplasty and stenting techniques. The SVG remains the preferable biomaterial in coronary artery bypass, coronary ostioplasty, free flap transfer, and surgical treatment of Peyronie disease. Implications associated with saphenous vein grafting in vascular access surgery for the purpose of dialysis and chemotherapy are considerable. Vascular cuffs and patches have been developed as an important and effective means of enhancing the patency rates of the grafts by linking the synthetic material to the receipt vessel. In addition, saphenous veins can be a cell source for tissue engineering. We review the versatile roles that saphenous vein grafting has played as well as its current status in therapy. PMID:21245602

  3. Hand vein recognition based on orientation of LBP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Wei; Wu, Xiangqian; Gao, Enying

    2012-06-01

    Vein recognition is becoming an effective method for personal recognition. Vein patterns lie under the skin surface of human body, and hence provide higher reliability than other biometric traits and hard to be damaged or faked. This paper proposes a novel vein feature representation method call orientation of local binary pattern (OLBP) which is an extension of local binary pattern (LBP). OLBP can represent the orientation information of the vein pixel which is an important characteristic of vein patterns. Moreover, the OLBP can also indicate on which side of the vein centerline the pixel locates. The OLBP feature maps are encoded by 4-bit binary values and an orientation distance is developed for efficient feature matching. Based on OLBP feature representation, we construct a hand vein recognition system employing multiple hand vein patterns include palm vein, dorsal vein, and three finger veins (index, middle, and ring finger). The experimental results on a large database demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  4. Plantar vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Barros, Mvl; Nascimento, Is; Barros, Tls; Labropoulos, N

    2015-02-01

    Plantar vein thrombosis is an unusual and under-diagnosed condition that affects the plantar deep venous system. Current ultrasound investigation protocols for deep venous thrombosis neglect this entity. To our knowledge, there are only seven reports in the literature of 20 patients with plantar vein thrombosis detected with sonography without an associated pulmonary embolism. We present a case report of a patient with a plantar vein thrombosis associated with pulmonary embolism. Patients who present with pain and/or swelling of the foot should undergo ultrasound examination and careful evaluation for respiratory symptoms. PMID:24429378

  5. Simultaneous velocity interferometry and electronic streak photography of laser-launched plates

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.; Garcia, I.A.

    1991-01-01

    Laser-launched, miniature, pseudo-one-dimensional flyer plates are evaluated by three distinct optical techniques that may be incorporated into an optical diagnostic system to give a complete understanding of the plate performance. These techniques are: velocity interferometry, streak photography, and pulsed laser stereo photography. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Journal of Theoretical Biology 233 (2005) 253269 Formation of the chick primitive streak as studied in

    E-print Network

    Stern, Claudio

    as studied in computer simulations L. Bodensteina,?, C.D. Sternb a Olana Technologies Inc.,5424 Arlington demonstrated that cells throughout the evolving streak are derived from Koller's sickle (an arc of cells at the posterior edge of the epiblast--see Appendix A) and the neighboring epiblast (here termed, sickle

  7. Carotenoid-based status signaling by females in the tropical streak-backed oriole

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Troy G. Murphy; Diego Hernndez-Mucio; Marcela Osorio-Beristain; Robert Montgomerie; Kevin E. Omland

    2009-01-01

    In many tropical bird species, both males and females maintain elaborate plumage traits. Although there is considerable evidence that many male plumage traits function as status signals that convey information about fighting ability, less is known about status signaling in females. We tested whether the carotenoid-based orange breast coloration of the female streak-backed oriole (Icterus pustulatus pustulatus) signals status during

  8. Chromatin Structure of Wheat Breeding Lines Resistant to Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus (WSMV) is an important disease limiting wheat production, however no WSMV resistance effective above 18C is present within the primary genetic pool of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In contrast, the wild relative Thinopyrum intermedium (2n=6x=42) shows good resistance to WS...

  9. MAIZE NECROTIC STREAK VIRUS IS MOST CLOSELY RELATED TO THE GENUS TOMBUSVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Initial reports indicated that Maize necrotic streak virus (MNeSV) is most closely related to viruses in the family Tombusviridae (Louie et al., 2000, Plant Dis. 84:1133-1139). The first two open reading frames (ORFs) encode a 33 kDa protein and a 92 kDa readthrough protein which are similar in siz...

  10. FGF Signaling Regulates Mesoderm Cell Fate Specification and Morphogenetic Movement at the Primitive Streak

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian Ciruna; Janet Rossant

    2001-01-01

    Although FGF signaling plays an integral role in the migration and patterning of mesoderm at gastrulation, the mechanism and downstream targets of FGF activity have remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate that FGFR1 orchestrates the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and morphogenesis of mesoderm at the primitive streak by controlling Snail and E-cadherin expression. Furthermore, we show that FGFR1 functions in mesoderm

  11. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF PERENNIAL SMALL GRAINS TO SOILBORNE WHEAT MOSAIC VIRUS AND WHEAT SPINDLE STREAK MOSAIC VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An undetermined threat to perennial small grain production is infection by the soilborne viruses, Soilborne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) and Wheat spindle streak mosaic virus (WSSMV). We conducted preliminary experiments to assess whether perennial wheat and rye breeding lines were susceptible to SBW...

  12. EVALUATION OF RESISTANCE TO WHEAT SPINDLE STREAK MOSAIC VIRUS BY ANALYSIS OF DISEASE INCIDENCE DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Once Wheat spindle streak mosaic virus (WSSMV) becomes established in a field, the only available control tactic is the planting of resistant genotypes. In this study we assessed 113 genotypes of autumn-sown wheat, rye, triticale, and barley for resistance to WSSMV in a three-year trial in a field t...

  13. Multiplex Real Time PCR For Detection of Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and Triticum Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TRIMV) are widespread throughout the southwestern Great Plains states. Using conventional diagnostics such as Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA), these two viruses are commonly found together in infected wheat samples. Methods for m...

  14. Nuclear import of Maize fine streak virus proteins in Drosophila S2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize fine streak virus (MFSV) is a member of the genus Nucleorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae and is transmitted by the leafhopper Graminella nigrifons. The virus replicates in both its plant host and in its insect vector. Nucleorhabdoviruses replicate in the nucleus and assemble at the inner nu...

  15. Plant host range and leafhopper transmission of Maize fine streak virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize fine streak virus (MFSV), an emerging rhabdovirus species in the genus Nucleorhabdovirus, is persistently transmitted by the black-faced leafhopper, Graminella nigrifrons (Forbes). MFSV was transmitted to maize, wheat, oats, rye, barley, foxtail, annual ryegrass and quackgrass by G. nigrifron...

  16. WHEAT STREAK MOSAIC VIRUS (DESCRIPTIONS OF PLANT VIRUSES NO. 48, REVISED)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological and physical properties of Wheat streak mosaic virus (genus Tritimovirus) are presented in brief monograph form. The publication represents an updated revision of The Description of Plant Viruses No. 48, originally published in 1971 by the Association of Applied Biologists. Topics cover...

  17. Interactive Streak Surface Visualization on the GPU Kai Burger, Florian Ferstl, Holger Theisel, and Rudiger Westermann

    E-print Network

    , and R¨udiger Westermann Fig. 1. Our method generates adaptively refined integral surfaces in 3D flows generated and rendered in less than 50ms. Figure a) and b) show streak surfaces in unsteady flows. Figure c) shows a stream surface. Abstract--In this paper we present techniques for the visualization of unsteady

  18. Interactive Separating Streak Surfaces Florian Ferstl, Kai Burger, Holger Theisel, and Rudiger Westermann

    E-print Network

    ¨udiger Westermann Fig. 1. Our method generates streak surfaces revealing separating structures in unsteady 3D flow are among the most important features to support 3D unsteady flow exploration, but they are also among exploration of 3D unsteady flows using such surfaces is not feasible. Therefore, in this paper we present

  19. Deblurring Low-light Images with Light Streaks Sunghyun Cho2

    E-print Network

    Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    for estimating the blur kernel in an optimization framework. Our method also automatically detects useful lightDeblurring Low-light Images with Light Streaks Zhe Hu1 Sunghyun Cho2 Jue Wang2 Ming-Hsuan Yang1 1 University of California, Merced 2 Adobe Research Abstract Images taken in low-light conditions with handheld

  20. Formation and evolution of a hairpin vortex induced by subharmonic sinuous low-speed streaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Dong, Gang; Lu, Ziheng

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a process of the formation and evolution of hairpin vortices, which originated from the interaction between the spanwise-aligned low-speed streaks with a subharmonic sinuous (SS) oscillation mode, is studied using a direct numerical simulation method in a small periodic local region of an incompressible plane channel flow. The initial artificial perturbations are used to excite the SS-mode oscillation of two spanwise-aligned low-speed streaks in such a flow. A new mechanism of formation and decay of the hairpin vortices is proposed in which the shear layer induced by the spanwise collision and merging between the low-speed streaks is emphasized. Our results show that the streamwise vortices can be induced by the SS-mode streaks and then developed into an X-like pattern at the initial stage due to the mutual induction effect. The X-like vortices further enhance the spanwise oscillation and lift-up of the two streaks that thus lead to the spanwise collision and merging of the low-speed streaks and produce a low-speed region in high-speed fluid. The strong shear layer between the high- and low-speed fluids gives rise to the spanwise vorticity that connects the X-like streamwise vortices and forms the ?-like vortex. Once the low-speed region entirely enters the high-speed fluid, the shear layer shows the ring shape and results in the transition from a ?-like vortex to ?-like one. After that, the viscous diffusion of the low-speed region in the high-speed fluid leads to the decay of the ?-like vortex; the collision and merging of the low-speed streaks simultaneously reoccur upstream and give birth to a secondary ?-like vortex, which exhibits behavior that is nearly similar with that of the primary one. Although the hairpin vortex packet is not observed in the present plane channel flow, the regeneration of the hairpin vortex suggests that this type of vortical structure plays an important role in the wall-bounded flow.

  1. Portal vein stenting to treat portal vein tumor thrombus in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Higaki, I; Hirohashi, K; Kubo, S; Tanaka, H; Tsukamoto, T; Omura, T; Kinoshita, H

    2000-12-01

    Tumor thrombus in the portal vein is refractory to therapy and a serious negative prognostic factor in hepatocellular carcinoma. We describe herein the case of a patient in whom an expandable metallic stent was successfully employed to treat portal vein tumor thrombus by restoring blood flow. An expandable metallic stent was implanted in a patient with severe main portal vein stenosis caused by tumor thrombus protruding from the left portal vein branch. Immediately after stent placement, the stenotic lesion was effectively dilated, the portal blood flow restored, and portal hypertension relieved. Angiography, computed tomography, and doppler ultrasonography done 2 months after the stent placement revealed continued patency of the portal vein. Thus, intraportal placement of an expandable metallic stent appears to be an effective treatment for major portal vein tumor PMID:11252736

  2. Fate Mapping Identifies the Origin of SHF/AHF Progenitors in the Chick Primitive Streak

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Esther; Dietrich, Susanne; Mnsterberg, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Heart development depends on the spatio-temporally regulated contribution of progenitor cells from the primary, secondary and anterior heart fields. Primary heart field (PHF) cells are first recruited to form a linear heart tube; later, they contribute to the inflow myocardium of the four-chambered heart. Subsequently cells from the secondary (SHF) and anterior heart fields (AHF) are added to the heart tube and contribute to both the inflow and outflow myocardium. In amniotes, progenitors of the linear heart tube have been mapped to the anterior-middle region of the early primitive streak. After ingression, these cells are located within bilateral heart fields in the lateral plate mesoderm. On the other hand SHF/AHF field progenitors are situated anterior to the linear heart tube, however, the origin and location of these progenitors prior to the development of the heart tube remains elusive. Thus, an unresolved question in the process of cardiac development is where SHF/AHF progenitors originate from during gastrulation and whether they come from a region in the primitive streak distinct from that which generates the PHF. To determine the origin and location of SHF/AHF progenitors we used vital dye injection and tissue grafting experiments to map the location and ingression site of outflow myocardium progenitors in early primitive streak stage chicken embryos. Cells giving rise to the AHF ingressed from a rostral region of the primitive streak, termed region A. During development these cells were located in the cranial paraxial mesoderm and in the pharyngeal mesoderm. Furthermore we identified region B, located posterior to A, which gave rise to progenitors that contributed to the primary heart tube and the outflow tract. Our studies identify two regions in the early primitive streak, one which generates cells of the AHF and a second from which cardiac progenitors of the PHF and SHF emerge. PMID:23272192

  3. MRI diagnosis of bilateral adrenal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M F; Murphy, J P; Jay, R; Callum, J; MacDonald, D

    2003-08-01

    We report a case of bilateral adrenal vein thrombosis in an adult female who had a history of breast cancer. The patient does not have clinical, serological or imaging evidence of metastatic disease 14 months from the initial diagnosis. Adrenal vein thrombosis is a rare entity. There have been no previous reports specifically stating an association between adrenal vein thrombosis and hypercoaguability, but there are many cases in the literature documenting venous thrombosis elsewhere within the body in patients with hypercoaguable states. Laboratory testing performed to exclude a hypercoaguable state, revealed heterozygosity for the Factor V Leiden mutation/activated protein C resistance and elevated factor VIII levels [3660 IU l(-1) (<1500)]. This is the first reported case of bilateral metachronous adrenal vein thrombosis in which MRI established the diagnosis. PMID:12893701

  4. Isolated inferior mesenteric portal hypertension with giant inferior mesenteric vein and anomalous inferior mesenteric vein insertion.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G Raghavendra; Billa, Srikar; Bhandari, Pavaneel; Hussain, Aijaz

    2013-04-01

    Extrahepatic portal hypertension is not an uncommon disease in childhood, but isolated inferior mesenteric portal varices and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleed have not been reported till date. A 4-year-old girl presented with lower GI bleed. Surgical exploration revealed extrahepatic portal vein obstruction with giant inferior mesenteric vein and colonic varices. Inferior mesenteric vein was joining the superior mesenteric vein. The child was treated successfully with inferior mesenteric - inferior vena caval anastomosis. The child was relieved of GI bleed during the follow-up. PMID:23798814

  5. Fatal bilateral pneumothoraces complicating subclavian vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Maggs, P R; Schwaber, J R

    1977-04-01

    Bilateral pneumothoraces complicating attempted bilateral subclavian vein catheterization culminated in the iatrogenic death of the patient. Complications of subclavian vein catheterization are reviewed briefly. This procedure should be limited to patients in whom its use is clearly indicated and should be performed only by individuals who are experienced in the anatomy of the region, who are trained in the technique of subclavian puncture, and who have the means and ability to perform immediate tube thoracostomy should pneumothorax occur. PMID:404118

  6. [Portal vein embolization prior to liver surgery].

    PubMed

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Mahdi, Bassam; Nielsen, Henning Overgaard

    2013-01-14

    Portal vein embolization is performed with the intention to occlude the portal veins to liver segments with malignancies and direct the portal flow to the healthy part (usually the left lobe) of the liver. Thus, hyperperfusion through the non-embolized part of the liver will create hyperplasia and hyperfunction, which allow extensive liverresection at a later stage in patients where it otherwise would have been contradictory to operate because of too small volume of the residual liver. PMID:23331942

  7. Primary leiomyosarcoma of the innominate vein.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Miraldi, Fabio; Mazzesi, Giuseppe; D'urso, Antonio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Bezzi, Marcello

    2007-01-01

    Primary venous leiomyosarcoma is rare. We report the case of a primary leiomyosarcoma of the left innominate vein, with neoplastic thrombus extending into the left jugular and subclavian veins. The tumor was curatively resected en bloc with anterior mediastinal and laterocervical lymphatics, through a median sternotomy prolonged into left cervicotomy. Primary venous sarcomas may be associated with prolonged survival in individual cases, with curative resection recommended as the standard treatment, in the absence of distant spread. PMID:17349340

  8. Molecular characterization and pathogenicity of tomato yellow leaf curl virus in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Gong, Huanran; Zhou, Xueping

    2009-10-01

    Several tomato production regions in China were surveyed for tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD), and 31 tomato leaf samples showing TYLCD-like symptoms were collected. The partial or full-length genomes of these isolates were sequenced and tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) was detected in Shanghai, Zhejiang, Jiangsu Shandong and Hebei provinces of China. The TYLCV isolates found in China share high sequence identity ([98%) and have more than 97% sequence identity with TYLCVIL[ IL:Reo] (X15656). Phylogenetic relationship analysis reveals that although with little genetic variability, they can form two groups and all the TYLCV isolates in China belong to the group I. An infectious clone of TYLCV-[CN:SH2] (AM282874) was constructed and agro-inoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana, N. tabacum Samsun, N. glutinosa, Solanum lycopersicum, Petunia hybrida, Cucumis sativus, Gossypium hirsutum, S. melongena, and Capsicum annuum. TYLCV-[CN:SH2] can induce severe leaf curling and stunting symptoms in these plants except C. sativus, G. hirsutum, S. melongena and C. annuum.We verified that TYLCV can trans-replicate tomato yellow leaf curl China virus DNA-b in N. benthamiana and S. lycopersicum and induced more severe symptoms with distortion and yellow vein. PMID:19590945

  9. Current evaluation and treatment of lower extremity varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Kouri, Brian

    2009-06-01

    Historically, treatment for symptomatic lower extremity varicose veins has consisted primarily of surgical stripping of pathologic veins. Over the past 2 decades, therapeutic options for lower extremity varicose veins has greatly expanded and now includes several percutaneous and endovascular techniques. This article will discuss the pathophysiology, clinical significance and current therapy for varicose veins. PMID:19486710

  10. Biometric identification through palm and dorsal hand vein patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sanchit; Mauricio Ramalho; Paulo Lobato Correia; Luis Ducla Soares

    2011-01-01

    Hand vein patterns are among the biometric traits being investigated today for identification purposes, attracting interest from both the research community and industry. This paper presents a multimodal system that combines hand-palm vein and hand-dorsal vein biometrics information at the score level. The palm and dorsal veins are considered as texture samples being automatically extracted from the user's hand image.

  11. Subclavian vein thrombosis: A continuing challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, S.L.; Berry, R.E. (Community Hospital of Roanoke Valley, Roanoke Memorial Hospital, VA (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Subclavian vein thrombosis is a relatively uncommon but potentially morbid disease entity. To determine the frequency, cause, and best mode of treatment of this problem, we performed a chart review of all patients with a diagnosis of subclavian vein thrombosis at two major metropolitan hospitals during a 6-year period. A total of 40 patients were identified with subclavian vein thrombosis, which represented 3.5% of all venous thromboses detected during the 6-year period. No side or sex predilection was noted and the majority of patients were outpatients. The cause was fairly evenly divided among intravenous catheters (32%), anatomic abnormalities (45%), and carcinoma with postoperative radiation (22.5%). Despite the increasing use of the subclavian veins for pacemaker leads, hyperalimentation, and permanent intravenous access for chemotherapy, there has not been an increase in diagnosed subclavian vein thrombosis. Anatomic abnormalities with compression of the vein respond well to either heparinization or lytic therapy but require surgery if the venous abnormality persists. Treatment consisted of lytic therapy in 20%, heparinization in 55%, and elevation with removal of the central line in 25% of patients. All patients responded well to treatment, with a decrease in swelling and symptoms; no patient progressed to venous gangrene and only one (2.5%) had a documented pulmonary embolus. Medical treatment provides excellent long-term benefit in most cases unless complicated by an anatomic abnormality.

  12. Veins Improve Fracture Toughness of Insect Wings

    PubMed Central

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Taylor, David

    2012-01-01

    During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insects flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a materials resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.040.25 MPa?m). However, the cross veins increase the wings toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 m). This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically optimal solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial venous wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species. PMID:22927966

  13. Pharmacology of the human saphenous vein.

    PubMed

    Joviliano, Edwaldo E; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Celotto, Andrea Carla; Capellini, Verena K; Dalio, Marcelo B; Picconato, Carlos E; Evora, Paulo Roberto B

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays, the great saphenous vein is the vascular conduit that is most frequently employed in coronary and peripheral revascularization surgery. It is known that saphenous vein bypass grafts have shorter patency than arterial ones, partly because the wall of the normal saphenous vein has different structural and functional characteristics. The features of this vein can be affected by the large distention pressures it is submitted to during its preparation and insertion into the arterial system. Indeed, a vein graft is subjected to considerable changes in hemodynamic forces upon implantation into the arterial circulation, since it is transplanted from a non-pulsatile, low-pressure, low-flow environment with minimal shear stress to a highpressure system with pulsatile flow, where it undergoes cyclic strain and elevated shear. These changes can be responsible for functional and morphological alterations in the vessel wall, culminating in intima hyperproliferation and atherosclerotic degeneration, which contribute to early graft thrombosis. This review has followed a predetermined strategy for updating information on the human saphenous vein (HSV). Besides presenting the aspects relative to the basic pharmacology, this text also includes surgical aspects concerning HSV harvesting, the possible effects of the major groups of cardiovascular drugs on the HSV, and finally the interference of major cardiovascular diseases in the vascular reactivity of the HSV. PMID:21143161

  14. Effect of Yellow Filters on the Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slica, S.; Ikaunieks, G.; Rinkus, D.

    2010-03-01

    In the literature, controversial information could be found whether the yellow filters may improve the quality of vision. To find out what is the effect of yellow filters on the quality of vision, 27 individuals were examined for the contrast sensitivity using the Pelli-Robson chart, under normal (photopic) and reduced (mesopic) illumination. The measurements were carried out with and without yellow filters (light transmission 67%, measured with an Ocean Optic spectrometer). Also, the measurements were taken using a grey filter with transmission close to that of the yellow filter (73%). The results did not show statistically significant improvement when looking through yellow filters. However, 56% of the individuals asserted that under reduced illumination they found it more agreeable to look through yellow filters. Two persons were extra tested for low contrast visual acuity using a computerized test and objective measurements by the visual evoked potentials (VEP) method. These visual measurements also did not show statistically significant improvement of the visual contrast sensitivity when yellow filters were used. Our measurements do not confirm the data found in literature about the vision improvement owing to yellow filters. However, the mentioned above subjective improvement at using yellow filters in mesopic conditions shows that under very low illumination such filters may slightly increase the visual quality.

  15. Corrosion cast study of the canine hepatic veins.

    PubMed

    Uri?, M; Vrecl, M; Fazarinc, G

    2014-11-01

    This study presents a detailed description of the distribution, diameters and drainage patterns of hepatic veins on the basis of the corrosion cast analysis in 18 dogs. We classified the hepatic veins in three main groups: the right hepatic veins of the caudate process and right lateral liver lobe, the middle hepatic veins of the right medial and quadrate lobes and the left hepatic veins of both left liver lobes and the papillary process. The corrosion cast study showed that the number of the veins in the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria and most anatomical textbooks is underestimated. The number of various-sized hepatic veins of the right liver division ranged from 3 to 5 and included 1 to 4 veins from the caudate process and 2 to 4 veins from the right lateral liver lobe. Generally, in all corrosion casts, one middle-sized vein from the right part of the right medial lobe, which emptied separately in the caudal vena cava, was established. The other vein was a large-sized vein from the remainder of the central division, which frequently joined the common left hepatic vein from the left liver lobes. The common left hepatic vein was the largest of all the aforementioned hepatic veins. PMID:25448906

  16. Deep vein thrombosis: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Kesieme, Emeka; Kesieme, Chinenye; Jebbin, Nze; Irekpita, Eshiobo; Dongo, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Background: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is the formation of blood clots (thrombi) in the deep veins. It commonly affects the deep leg veins (such as the calf veins, femoral vein, or popliteal vein) or the deep veins of the pelvis. It is a potentially dangerous condition that can lead to preventable morbidity and mortality. Aim: To present an update on the causes and management of DVT. Methods: A review of publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google. Results: DVT affects 0.1% of persons per year. It is predominantly a disease of the elderly and has a slight male preponderance. The approach to making a diagnosis currently involves an algorithm combining pretest probability, D-dimer testing, and compression ultrasonography. This will guide further investigations if necessary. Prophylaxis is both mechanical and pharmacological. The goals of treatment are to prevent extension of thrombi, pulmonary embolism, recurrence of thrombi, and the development of complications such as pulmonary hypertension and post-thrombotic syndrome. Conclusion: DVT is a potentially dangerous condition with a myriad of risk factors. Prophylaxis is very important and can be mechanical and pharmacological. The mainstay of treatment is anticoagulant therapy. Low-molecular-weight heparin, unfractionated heparin, and vitamin K antagonists have been the treatment of choice. Currently anticoagulants specifically targeting components of the common pathway have been recommended for prophylaxis. These include fondaparinux, a selective indirect factor Xa inhibitor and the new oral selective direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran) and selective factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban and apixaban). Others are currently undergoing trials. Thrombolytics and vena caval filters are very rarely indicated in special circumstances. PMID:22287864

  17. Endovascular Radiofrequency Ablation for Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of the MAS evidence review was to conduct a systematic review of the available evidence on the safety, effectiveness, durability and costeffectiveness of endovascular radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of primary symptomatic varicose veins. Background The Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee (OHTAC) met on August 26th, 2010 to review the safety, effectiveness, durability, and cost-effectiveness of RFA for the treatment of primary symptomatic varicose veins based on an evidence-based review by the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS). Clinical Condition Varicose veins (VV) are tortuous, twisted, or elongated veins. This can be due to existing (inherited) valve dysfunction or decreased vein elasticity (primary venous reflux) or valve damage from prior thrombotic events (secondary venous reflux). The end result is pooling of blood in the veins, increased venous pressure and subsequent vein enlargement. As a result of high venous pressure, branch vessels balloon out leading to varicosities (varicose veins). Symptoms typically affect the lower extremities and include (but are not limited to): aching, swelling, throbbing, night cramps, restless legs, leg fatigue, itching and burning. Left untreated, venous reflux tends to be progressive, often leading to chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). A number of complications are associated with untreated venous reflux: including superficial thrombophlebitis as well as variceal rupture and haemorrhage. CVI often results in chronic skin changes referred to as stasis dermatitis. Stasis dermatitis is comprised of a spectrum of cutaneous abnormalities including edema, hyperpigmentation, eczema, lipodermatosclerosis and stasis ulceration. Ulceration represents the disease end point for severe CVI. CVI is associated with a reduced quality of life particularly in relation to pain, physical function and mobility. In severe cases, VV with ulcers, QOL has been rated to be as bad or worse as other chronic diseases such as back pain and arthritis. Lower limb VV is a very common disease affecting adults estimated to be the 7th most common reason for physician referral in the US. There is a very strong familial predisposition to VV. The risk in offspring is 90% if both parents affected, 20% when neither affected and 45% (25% boys, 62% girls) if one parent affected. The prevalence of VV worldwide ranges from 5% to 15% among men and 3% to 29% among women varying by the age, gender and ethnicity of the study population, survey methods and disease definition and measurement. The annual incidence of VV estimated from the Framingham Study was reported to be 2.6% among women and 1.9% among men and did not vary within the age range (40-89 years) studied. Approximately 1% of the adult population has a stasis ulcer of venous origin at any one time with 4% at risk. The majority of leg ulcer patients are elderly with simple superficial vein reflux. Stasis ulcers are often lengthy medical problems and can last for several years and, despite effective compression therapy and multilayer bandaging are associated with high recurrence rates. Recent trials involving surgical treatment of superficial vein reflux have resulted in healing and significantly reduced recurrence rates. Endovascular Radiofrequency Ablation for Varicose Veins RFA is an image-guided minimally invasive treatment alternative to surgical stripping of superficial venous reflux. RFA does not require an operating room or general anaesthesia and has been performed in an outpatient setting by a variety of medical specialties including surgeons and interventional radiologists. Rather than surgically removing the vein, RFA works by destroying or ablating the refluxing vein segment using thermal energy delivered through a radiofrequency catheter. Prior to performing RFA, color-flow Doppler ultrasonography is used to confirm and map all areas of venous reflux to devise a safe and effective treatment plan. The RFA procedure involves the introduction of a guide wire into the target v

  18. Ligation of superior mesenteric vein and portal to splenic vein anastomosis after superior mesenteric-portal vein confluence resection during pancreaticoduodenectomy Case report

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianlin; Abbas, Jihad; Hoetzl, Katherine; Allison, David; Osman, Mahamed; Williams, Mallory; Zelenock, Gerald B.

    2014-01-01

    62 year old Caucasian female with pancreatic head mass abutting the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) presented with fine needle aspiration biopsy confirmed diagnosis of ductal adenocarcinoma. CT scan showed near complete obstruction of portal vein and large SMV collateral development. After 3 months of neoadjuvant therapy, her portal vein flow improved significantly, SMV collateral circulation was diminished. Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and superior mesenteric portal vein (SMPV) confluence resection were performed; A saphenous vein interposition graft thrombosed immediately. The splenic vein remnant was distended and adjacent to the stump of the portal vein. Harvesting an internal jugular vein graft required extra time and using a synthetic graft posed a risk of graft thrombosis or infection. As a result, we chose to perform a direct anastomosis of the portal and splenic vein in a desperate situation. The anastomosis decompressed the mesenteric venous system, so we then ligated the SMV. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, except transient ascites. She redeveloped ascites more than one year later. At that time a PET scan showed bilateral lung and right femur metastatic disease. She expired 15 months after PD. Conclusion The lessons we learned are (1) Before SMPV confluence resection, internal jugular vein graft should be ready for reconstruction. (2) Synthetic graft is an alternative for internal jugular vein graft. (3) Direct portal vein to SMV anastomosis can be achieved by mobilizing liver. (4) It is possible that venous collaterals secondary to SMV tumor obstruction may have allowed this patient's post-operative survival. PMID:25568802

  19. 7 CFR 28.442 - Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

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  20. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section 28.441 Agriculture... 28.441 Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper than that of...

  1. 7 CFR 28.442 - Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.442 Section 28.442 Agriculture...Stained Cotton 28.442 Middling Yellow Stained Color. Middling Yellow Stained Color is American Upland cotton which in color is...

  2. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section 28.441 Agriculture... 28.441 Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper than that of...

  3. 7 CFR 28.442 - Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

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  4. 7 CFR 28.442 - Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.442 Section 28.442 Agriculture...Stained Cotton 28.442 Middling Yellow Stained Color. Middling Yellow Stained Color is American Upland cotton which in color is...

  5. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

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  6. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

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  7. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

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  8. 7 CFR 28.442 - Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.442 Section 28.442 Agriculture...Stained Cotton 28.442 Middling Yellow Stained Color. Middling Yellow Stained Color is American Upland cotton which in color is...

  9. 21 CFR 172.490 - Yellow prussiate of soda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2009-04-01 true Yellow prussiate of soda. 172...FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN...Anticaking Agents 172.490 Yellow prussiate of soda. (a) The food additive yellow prussiate of soda...

  10. The anatomy of the cardiac veins in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ciszek, Bogdan; Skubiszewska, Daria; Ratajska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Although the cardiac coronary system in mice has been the studied in detail by many research laboratories, knowledge of the cardiac veins remains poor. This is because of the difficulty in marking the venous system with a technique that would allow visualization of these large vessels with thin walls. Here we present the visualization of the coronary venous system by perfusion of latex dye through the right caudal vein. Latex injected intravenously does not penetrate into the capillary system. Murine cardiac veins consist of several principal branches (with large diameters), the distal parts of which are located in the subepicardium. We have described the major branches of the left atrial veins, the vein of the left ventricle, the caudal veins, the vein of the right ventricle and the conal veins forming the conal venous circle or the prepulmonary conal venous arch running around the conus of the right ventricle. The venous system of the heart drains the blood to the coronary sinus (the left cranial caval vein) to the right atrium or to the right cranial caval vein. Systemic veins such as the left cranial caval, the right cranial caval and the caudal vein open to the right atrium. Knowledge of cardiac vein location may help to elucidate abnormal vein patterns in certain genetic malformations. PMID:17553104

  11. Effects of diabatic heating on the ageostrophic circulation of an upper tropospheric jet streak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, D. A.; Johnson, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Interaction between the mass circulation within a mesoscale convective complex (MCC) and a direct mass circulation in the entrance region of an upper tropospheric polar jet streak was examined within the isentropic structure to investigate mechanisms responsible for linking these two scales of motion. The results establish that latent heating in the MCC modifies the direct mass circulation in the jet streak entrance region through the diabatically induced components of ageostrophic motion analyzed within isentropic coordinates. Within the strong mesoscale mass circulation of each MCC, strong horizontal mass flux convergence into the MCC at low levels is balanced by strong horizontal mass flux divergence away from the convergence at upper levels. Locations of large diabatic heating rates correspond well to the MCC position for each case; diabatic heating forces the upward vertical branch for the mesoscale mass circulation.

  12. Streaked radiography of an irradiated foam sample on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, A. B. R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S. A.; Moore, A. S.; Young, P. E.; Hsing, W. W.; Seugling, R.; Foord, M. E.; Sain, J. D.; May, M. J.; Marrs, R. E.; Maddox, B. R.; Lu, K.; Dodson, K.; Smalyuk, V.; Graham, P.; Foster, J. M.; Back, C. A.; Hund, J. F.

    2013-03-01

    Streaked x-ray radiography images of annular patterns in an evolving tantalum oxide foam under the influence of a driven, subsonic radiation wave were obtained on the National Ignition Facility. This is the first successful radiography measurement of the evolution of well-defined foam features under a driven, subsonic wave in the diffusive regime. A continuous record of the evolution was recorded on an x-ray streak camera, using a slot-apertured point-projection backlighter with an 8 ns nickel source (7.9 keV). Radiography images were obtained for four different annular patterns, which were corrected using a source-dependent flat-field image. The evolution of the foam features was well-modeled using the 3D KULL radiation hydrodynamics code. This experimental and modeling platform can be modified for scaled high-energy-density laboratory astrophysics experiments.

  13. Single-shot visualization of evolving laser wakefields using an all-optical streak camera.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengyan; Tsai, Hai-En; Zhang, Xi; Pai, Chih-Hao; Chang, Yen-Yu; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Khudik, V; Shvets, G; Downer, M C

    2014-08-22

    We visualize ps-time-scale evolution of an electron density bubble--a wake structure created in atmospheric density plasma by an intense ultrashort laser pulse--from the phase "streak" that the bubble imprints onto a probe pulse that crosses its path obliquely. Phase streaks, recovered in one shot using frequency-domain interferometric techniques, reveal the formation, propagation, and coalescence of the bubble within a 3 mm long ionized helium gas target. 3D particle-in-cell simulations validate the observed density-dependent bubble evolution, and correlate it with the generation of a quasimonoenergetic ? 100 MeV electron beam. The results provide a basis for understanding optimized electron acceleration at a plasma density n(e) ? 2 10(19) cm(-3), inefficient acceleration at lower density, and dephasing limits at higher density. PMID:25192102

  14. Single-Shot Visualization of Evolving Laser Wakefields Using an All-Optical Streak Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengyan; Tsai, Hai-En; Zhang, Xi; Pai, Chih-Hao; Chang, Yen-Yu; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Downer, M. C.

    2014-08-01

    We visualize ps-time-scale evolution of an electron density bubblea wake structure created in atmospheric density plasma by an intense ultrashort laser pulsefrom the phase "streak" that the bubble imprints onto a probe pulse that crosses its path obliquely. Phase streaks, recovered in one shot using frequency-domain interferometric techniques, reveal the formation, propagation, and coalescence of the bubble within a 3 mm long ionized helium gas target. 3D particle-in-cell simulations validate the observed density-dependent bubble evolution, and correlate it with the generation of a quasimonoenergetic 100 MeV electron beam. The results provide a basis for understanding optimized electron acceleration at a plasma density ne?21019 cm-3, inefficient acceleration at lower density, and dephasing limits at higher density.

  15. Controlling and Streaking Nanotip Photoemission by Enhanced Single-cycle Terahertz Pulses

    E-print Network

    Wimmer, L; Solli, D R; Yalunin, S V; Echternkamp, K; Ropers, C

    2013-01-01

    The active control of matter by strong electromagnetic fields is of growing importance, with applications all across the optical spectrum from the extreme-ultraviolet to the far-infrared. In recent years, phase-stable terahertz (THz) fields have shown tremendous potential in the observation and manipulation of elementary excitations in complex systems. The combination of concepts from attosecond science with advanced THz technology facilitates novel spectroscopic schemes, such as THz streaking. In general, driving charges at lower frequency enhances interaction energies and can promote drastically different dynamics. For example, mid-infrared excitation induces field-driven sub-cycle electron dynamics in nanostructure nearfields. Such frequency scalings will also impact nanostructure-based streaking, which has been theoretically proposed. Here, we experimentally demonstrate extensive control over nanostructure photoelectron emission using single-cycle THz transients. The locally enhanced THz near-field at a n...

  16. An approach for megahertz OCT: streak mode Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Yun, Julie X.; Yuan, Xiaocong; Goodwin, Richard; Markwald, Roger; Gao, Bruce

    2011-03-01

    We report a technique, which uses an area-scan camera to record the interference spectrum. Traditional point-scanning is remained in this streak-mode FDOCT so that the small aperture of the single-mode fiber functions as a confocal gate and screens multiply scattered photons very well. While the sample beam is scanning the specimen laterally, the interference spectrum is physically scanned on the area scan camera using a streak scanner. Therefore, pixels of the camera are illuminated by the spectrum of OCT signal row by row, corresponding to each A-scan at different lateral position. A unidirectional B-scan of 700 lines is obtained in 1 ms; thus, an A-scan time of 1.4 ?s is achieved. A Day 4 chick embryo sampled is imaged using this method. This technique is highly potential for multi-Megahertz OCT imaging.

  17. 4D imaging of embryonic chick hearts by streak-mode Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Yun, Julie X.; Goodwin, Richard; Markwald, Roger; Borg, Thomas K.; Runyan, Raymond B.; Gao, Bruce

    2012-02-01

    Recently, we developed the streak-mode Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique in which an area-scan camera is used in a streak-mode to record the OCT spectrum. Here we report the application of this technique to in ovo imaging HH18 embryonic chick hearts with an ultrahigh speed of 1,016,000 axial scans per second. The high-scan rate enables the acquisition of high temporal resolution 2D datasets (1,000 frames per second or 1 ms between frames) and 3D datasets (10 volumes per second), without use of prospective or retrospective gating technique. This marks the first time that the embryonic animal heart has been 4D imaged using a megahertz OCT.

  18. Ultrafast x-ray streak camera for use in ultrashort laser-produced plasma research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronnie Shepherd; Rex Booth; Dwight Price; Mark Bowers; Don Swan; Jim Bonlie; Bruce Young; Jim Dunn; Bill White; Richard Stewart

    1995-01-01

    In recent years there has been growing interest in energetic (?100 eV), temporally short (<10 ps) x rays produced by ultrashort laser-produced plasmas. The detection and temporal dispersion of the x rays using x-ray streak cameras has been limited to a resolution of 2 ps, primarily due to the transit time dispersion of the electrons between the photocathode and the

  19. Standard design for National Ignition Facility x-ray streak and framing cameras

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Kimbrough; P. M. Bell; D. K. Bradley; J. P. Holder; D. K. Kalantar; A. G. MacPhee; S. Telford

    2010-01-01

    The x-ray streak camera and x-ray framing camera for the National Ignition Facility were redesigned to improve electromagnetic pulse hardening, protect high voltage circuits from pressure transients, and maximize the use of common parts and operational software. Both instruments use the same PC104 based controller, interface, power supply, charge coupled device camera, protective hermetically sealed housing, and mechanical interfaces. Communication

  20. Ultrafast photonic-crystal fiber light flash for streak-camera fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konorov, Stanislav; Ivanov, Anatoly; Ivanov, Denis; Alfimov, Mikhail; Zheltikov, Aleksei

    2005-07-01

    Photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) provide a high efficiency of frequency upconversion of femtosecond Cr: forsterite laser pulses through the emission of dispersive waves by solitons and third-harmonic generation. Dispersion management allows the central wavelength of the frequency-upconverted signal in PCF output to be tuned within the range of wavelengths from 400 to 900 nm. PCF frequency shifters are employed as excitation sources for time-resolved fluorescence streak-camera measurements on fluorescein solution.

  1. Mars eolian geology at airphoto scales: The large wind streaks of western Arabia Terra

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2000-01-01

    More than 27,000 pictures at aerial photograph scales (1.5-12 m\\/pixel) have been acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) since September 1997. The pictures are valuable for testing hypotheses about geologic history and processes of Mars. Of particular interest are eolian features connected to surface albedo patterns. This work is focused on low-albedo wind streaks, some

  2. Complete Genome Sequence and In Planta Subcellular Localization of Maize Fine Streak Virus Proteins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chi-Wei Tsai; Margaret G. Redinbaugh; Kristen J. Willie; Sharon Reed; Michael Goodin; Saskia A. Hogenhout

    2005-01-01

    The genome of the nucleorhabdovirus maize fine streak virus (MFSV) consists of 13,782 nucleotides of nonsegmented, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA. The antigenomic strand consisted of seven open reading frames (ORFs), and transcripts of all ORFs were detected in infected plants. ORF1, ORF6, and ORF7 had significant similarities to the nucleocapsid protein (N), glycoprotein (G), and polymerase (L) genes of other rhabdoviruses,

  3. Changes Over a Martian Year -- New Dark Slope Streaks in Lycus Sucli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Now in its Extended Mission, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) is into its second Mars year of systematic observations of the red planet. With the Extended Mission slated to run through April 2002, the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) is being used, among other things, to look for changes that have occurred in the past martian year. Because Mars is farther from the Sun than Earth, its year is longer--about 687 Earth days.

    The two pictures shown here cover the same portion of Lycus Sulci, a rugged, ridged terrain north of the giant Olympus Mons volcano. The interval between the pictures span 92% of a martian year (August 2, 1999 to April 27, 2001). Dark streaks considered to result from the avalanching of dry, fine, bright dust are seen in both images. The disruption of the surface by the avalanching materials is thought to cause them to appear darker than their surroundings, just as the 1997 bouncing of Mars Pathfinder's airbags and the tire tracks made by the Sojourner rover left darkened markings indicating where the martian soil had been disrupted and disturbed. The arrows in the April 2001 picture indicate eight new streaks that formed on these slopes in Lycus Sulci since August 1999. These observations suggest that a new streak forms approximately once per martian year per kilometer (about 0.62 miles) along a slope.

    In both images, north is toward the top/upper right and sunlight illuminates each from the left. Dark (as well bright) slope streaks are most common in the dust-covered martian regions of Tharsis, Arabia, and Elysium.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of an Emerging Genotype of Tobacco Streak Virus in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Gao, Shan; Li, Rugang; Zhang, Shouan; Fei, Zhangjun

    2014-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus (TSV) infecting zucchini squash in Florida (TSV_FL13-07), obtained using deep sequencing of short RNAs (sRNAs) and validation by Sanger sequencing. TSV_FL13-07 shares only <90% sequence identity in all three genomic RNAs to several known U.S. isolates. PMID:25377714

  5. High-Speed Observer: Automated Streak Detection for the Aerospike Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieckhoff, T. J.; Covan, M. A.; OFarrell, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    A high-frame-rate digital video camera, installed on test stands at Stennis Space Center (SSC), has been used to capture images of the aerospike engine plume during test. These plume images are processed in real time to detect and differentiate anomalous plume events. Results indicate that the High-Speed Observer (HSO) system can detect anomalous plume streaking events that are indicative of aerospike engine malfunction.

  6. Complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus in the United States.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Gao, Shan; Li, Rugang; Zhang, Shouan; Fei, Zhangjun; Ling, Kai-Shu

    2014-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus (TSV) infecting zucchini squash in Florida (TSV_FL13-07), obtained using deep sequencing of short RNAs (sRNAs) and validation by Sanger sequencing. TSV_FL13-07 shares only <90% sequence identity in all three genomic RNAs to several known U.S. isolates. PMID:25377714

  7. Instability of streaks in pipe flow of shear-thinning fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lpez Carranza, S. N.; Jenny, M.; Nouar, C.

    2013-08-01

    This study is motivated by recent experimental results dealing with the transition to turbulence in a pipe flow of shear-thinning fluids, where a streaky flow with an azimuthal wave number n=1 is observed in the transitional regime. Here, a linear stability analysis of pipe flow of shear-thinning fluids modulated azimuthally by finite amplitude streaks is performed. The shear-thinning behavior of the fluid is described by the Carreau model. The streaky base flows considered are obtained from two-dimensional direct numerical simulation using finite amplitude longitudinal rolls as the initial condition and by extracting the velocity field at time tmax, where the amplitude of the streaks reaches its maximum, denoted by Amax. It is found that the amplitude Amax increases with increasing Reynolds number as well as with increasing amplitude E0 of the initial longitudinal rolls. For sufficiently large streaks amplitude, streamwise velocity profiles develop inflection points, leading to instabilities. Depending on the threshold amplitude Ac, two different modes may trigger the instability of the streaks. If Ac exceeds approximately 41.5% of the centerline velocity, the instability mode is located near the axis of the pipe, i.e., it is a center mode. For weaker amplitude Ac, the instability mode is located near the pipe wall, in the region of highest wall normal shear, i.e., it is a wall mode. The threshold amplitude Ac decreases with increasing shear-thinning effects. The energy equation analysis indicates that (i) wall modes are driven mainly by the work of the Reynolds stress against the wall normal shear and (ii) for center modes, the contribution of the normal wall shear remains dominant; however, it is noted that the contribution of the Reynolds stress against the azimuthal shear increases with increasing shear-thinning effects.

  8. Instability of streaks in pipe flow of shear-thinning fluids.

    PubMed

    Lpez Carranza, S N; Jenny, M; Nouar, C

    2013-08-01

    This study is motivated by recent experimental results dealing with the transition to turbulence in a pipe flow of shear-thinning fluids, where a streaky flow with an azimuthal wave number n=1 is observed in the transitional regime. Here, a linear stability analysis of pipe flow of shear-thinning fluids modulated azimuthally by finite amplitude streaks is performed. The shear-thinning behavior of the fluid is described by the Carreau model. The streaky base flows considered are obtained from two-dimensional direct numerical simulation using finite amplitude longitudinal rolls as the initial condition and by extracting the velocity field at time t(max), where the amplitude of the streaks reaches its maximum, denoted by A(max). It is found that the amplitude A(max) increases with increasing Reynolds number as well as with increasing amplitude E(0) of the initial longitudinal rolls. For sufficiently large streaks amplitude, streamwise velocity profiles develop inflection points, leading to instabilities. Depending on the threshold amplitude A(c), two different modes may trigger the instability of the streaks. If A(c) exceeds approximately 41.5% of the centerline velocity, the instability mode is located near the axis of the pipe, i.e., it is a "center mode." For weaker amplitude A(c), the instability mode is located near the pipe wall, in the region of highest wall normal shear, i.e., it is a "wall mode." The threshold amplitude A(c) decreases with increasing shear-thinning effects. The energy equation analysis indicates that (i) wall modes are driven mainly by the work of the Reynolds stress against the wall normal shear and (ii) for center modes, the contribution of the normal wall shear remains dominant; however, it is noted that the contribution of the Reynolds stress against the azimuthal shear increases with increasing shear-thinning effects. PMID:24032922

  9. Ocean Mixed-Layer Depth and Current Variation Estimated From Imagery of Surfactant Streaks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George O. Marmorino; Jakov V. Toporkov; Geoffrey B. Smith; Mark A. Sletten; Dragana Perkovic; Stephen Frasier; K. Peter Judd

    2007-01-01

    The ability of high-resolution imaging systems to resolve small-scale structure on the ocean surface suggests the possibility of using characteristics of Langmuir circulation to map the surface mixed-layer depth and near-surface current. We illustrate this using synthetic aperture radar and infrared imagery that are collected across the edge of the Gulf Stream (GS), which reveals surfactant streaks, or ldquowindrows,rdquo that

  10. HABITAT AND MOVEMENTS OF BREEDING YELLOW RAILS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    THEODORE A. BOOKHOUT; JEFFREY R. STENZEL

    Four pairs of Yellow Rails (Coturnicops noveboracensis) were radiotracked (1039 locations) in May-August 1980 at Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Michigan, to identify characteristics of breeding habitat and its use by Yellow Rails. Vegetation at nesting sites was dominated by Carex lasiocarpa (>90% of basal stems) in wet sedge meadows, which comprised nearly 90% of the 30-ha study area. Water depth

  11. RESEARCH ARTICLE Nucleotide Sequence of Yellow Fever

    E-print Network

    Eddy, Sean

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Nucleotide Sequence of Yellow Fever Virus: Implications for Flavivirus Gene related human or veterinary pathogens causing many serious illness- es, including dengue fever, Japanese, and yellow fever (1). Most fever was spread by ship to ports as far north as Boston and as far east as En

  12. PROSPECTIVE BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENTS FOR YELLOW STARTHISTLE.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow starthistle is an important alien weed that has invaded 20 million acres in the western U.S. Yellow starthistle is spiny plant that interferes with grazing livestock and outdoors recreation, it is fatally poisonous to horses, and it outcompetes desirable vegetation. Previously released agen...

  13. Low Albedo Surfaces and Eolian Sediment: Mars Orbiter Camera Views of Western Arabia Terra Craters and Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.

    2001-01-01

    High spatial resolution (1.5 to 12 m/pixel) Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera images obtained September 1997 through June 2001 indicate that the large, dark wind streaks of western Arabia Terra each originate at a barchan dune field on a crater floor. The streaks consist of a relatively thin coating of sediment deflated from the dune fields and their vicinity. This sediment drapes a previous mantle that more thickly covers nearly all of western Arabia Terra. No dunes or eolian bedforms are found within the dark wind streaks, nor do any of the intracrater dunes climb up crater walls to provide sand to the wind streaks. The relations between dunes, wind streak, and subjacent terrain imply that dark-toned grains finer than those which comprise the dunes are lifted into suspension and carried out of the craters to be deposited on the adjacent terrain. Such grains are most likely in the silt size range (3.9-62.5 micrometers). The streaks change in terms of extent, relative albedo, and surface pattern over periods measured in years, but very little evidence for recent eolian activity (dust plumes, storms, dune movement) has been observed.

  14. Phasic activity of human dorsal foot veins.

    PubMed

    Barthel, W; Koth, W

    1988-01-01

    Phasic contractions of the dorsal foot veins were detected in 7 male subjects, aged 23 to 49 years, by means of a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) after congesting the veins by a pressure of 6.7 kPa (50 torr). This phasic activity (PA) had a frequency of 3 to 7 contractions per minute and led to a periodic diminution of the diameter of the distended veins by 12 to 44%. Using a double LVDT, the PA was shown to represent peristaltic waves travelling along the vessel wall concomitantly with the venous return. Determined in 3 out of the 7 subjects, the velocity of the waves amounted to 3.6 to 6.1 mm per second. A rheological significance of the peristaltic waves is assumed. PMID:3178793

  15. Rho kinase activity controls directional cell movements during primitive streak formation in the rabbit embryo

    PubMed Central

    Stankova, Viktoria; Tsikolia, Nikoloz; Viebahn, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    During animal gastrulation, the specification of the embryonic axes is accompanied by epithelio-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the first major change in cell shape after fertilization. EMT takes place in disparate topographical arrangements, such as the circular blastopore of amphibians, the straight primitive streak of birds and mammals or in intermediate gastrulation forms of other amniotes such as reptiles. Planar cell movements are prime candidates to arrange specific modes of gastrulation but there is no consensus view on their role in different vertebrate classes. Here, we test the impact of interfering with Rho kinase-mediated cell movements on gastrulation topography in blastocysts of the rabbit, which has a flat embryonic disc typical for most mammals. Time-lapse video microscopy, electron microscopy, gene expression and morphometric analyses of the effect of inhibiting ROCK activity showed besides normal specification of the organizer region a dose-dependent disruption of primitive streak formation; this disruption resulted in circular, arc-shaped or intermediate forms, reminiscent of those found in amphibians, fishes and reptiles. Our results reveal a crucial role of ROCK-controlled directional cell movements during rabbit primitive streak formation and highlight the possibility that temporal and spatial modulation of cell movements were instrumental for the evolution of gastrulation forms. PMID:25516971

  16. Signal-to-noise performance analysis of streak tube imaging lidar systems. I. Cascaded model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongru; Wu, Lei; Wang, Xiaopeng; Chen, Chao; Yu, Bing; Yang, Bin; Yuan, Liang; Wu, Lipeng; Xue, Zhanli; Li, Gaoping; Wu, Baoning

    2012-12-20

    Streak tube imaging lidar (STIL) is an active imaging system using a pulsed laser transmitter and a streak tube receiver to produce 3D range and intensity imagery. The STIL has recently attracted a great deal of interest and attention due to its advantages of wide azimuth field-of-view, high range and angle resolution, and high frame rate. This work investigates the signal-to-noise performance of STIL systems. A theoretical model for characterizing the signal-to-noise performance of the STIL system with an internal or external intensified streak tube receiver is presented, based on the linear cascaded systems theory of signal and noise propagation. The STIL system is decomposed into a series of cascaded imaging chains whose signal and noise transfer properties are described by the general (or the spatial-frequency dependent) noise factors (NFs). Expressions for the general NFs of the cascaded chains (or the main components) in the STIL system are derived. The work presented here is useful for the design and evaluation of STIL systems. PMID:23262622

  17. Optical fiducial timing system for X-ray streak cameras with aluminum coated optical fiber ends

    DOEpatents

    Nilson, David G. (Oakland, CA); Campbell, E. Michael (Pleasanton, CA); MacGowan, Brian J. (Livermore, CA); Medecki, Hector (Livermore, CA)

    1988-01-01

    An optical fiducial timing system is provided for use with interdependent groups of X-ray streak cameras (18). The aluminum coated (80) ends of optical fibers (78) are positioned with the photocathodes (20, 60, 70) of the X-ray streak cameras (18). The other ends of the optical fibers (78) are placed together in a bundled array (90). A fiducial optical signal (96), that is comprised of 2.omega. or 1.omega. laser light, after introduction to the bundled array (90), travels to the aluminum coated (82) optical fiber ends and ejects quantities of electrons (84) that are recorded on the data recording media (52) of the X-ray streak cameras (18). Since both 2.omega. and 1.omega. laser light can travel long distances in optical fiber with only a slight attenuation, the initial arial power density of the fiducial optical signal (96) is well below the damage threshold of the fused silica or other material that comprises the optical fibers (78, 90). Thus the fiducial timing system can be repeatably used over long durations of time.

  18. Biological and Genomic Sequence Characterization of Maize streak virus Isolates from Wheat.

    PubMed

    Willment, J A; Martin, D P; Van der Walt, E; Rybicki, E P

    2002-01-01

    ABSTRACT Maize streak virus (MSV) is best known as the causal agent of maize streak disease. However, only a genetically uniform subset of the viruses within this diverse species is actually capable of producing severe symptoms in maize. Whereas these "maize-type" viruses all share greater than 95% sequence identity, MSV strains isolated from grasses may share as little as 79% sequence identity with the maize-type viruses. Here, we present the complete genome sequences and biological characterization of two MSV isolates from wheat that share approximately 89% sequence identity with the maize-type viruses. Clonal populations of these two isolates, named MSV-Tas and MSV-VW, were leafhopper-transmitted to Digitaria sanguinalis and a range of maize, wheat, and barley genotypes. Whereas the two viruses showed some differences in their pathogenicity in maize, they were both equally pathogenic in D. sanguinalis and the various wheat and barley genotypes tested. Phylogenetic analyses involving the genome sequences of MSV-Tas and MSV-VW, a new maize-type virus also fully sequenced in this study (MSV-VM), and all other available African streak virus sequences, indicated that MSV-Tas and MSV-VW are close relatives that together represent a distinct MSV strain. Sequence analyses revealed that MSV-VM has a recombinant genome containing MSV-Tas/VW-like sequences within its movement protein gene. PMID:18944143

  19. Oct4 Is Required ?E7.5 for Proliferation in the Primitive Streak

    PubMed Central

    DeVeale, Brian; Brokhman, Irina; Mohseni, Paria; Babak, Tomas; Yoon, Charles; Lin, Anthony; Onishi, Kento; Tomilin, Alexey; Pevny, Larysa; Zandstra, Peter W.; Nagy, Andras; van der Kooy, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Oct4 is a widely recognized pluripotency factor as it maintains Embryonic Stem (ES) cells in a pluripotent state, and, in vivo, prevents the inner cell mass (ICM) in murine embryos from differentiating into trophectoderm. However, its function in somatic tissue after this developmental stage is not well characterized. Using a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase and floxed alleles of Oct4, we investigated the effect of depleting Oct4 in mouse embryos between the pre-streak and headfold stages, ?E6.0E8.0, when Oct4 is found in dynamic patterns throughout the embryonic compartment of the mouse egg cylinder. We found that depletion of Oct4 ?E7.5 resulted in a severe phenotype, comprised of craniorachischisis, random heart tube orientation, failed turning, defective somitogenesis and posterior truncation. Unlike in ES cells, depletion of the pluripotency factors Sox2 and Oct4 after E7.0 does not phenocopy, suggesting that ?E7.5 Oct4 is required within a network that is altered relative to the pluripotency network. Oct4 is not required in extraembryonic tissue for these processes, but is required to maintain cell viability in the embryo and normal proliferation within the primitive streak. Impaired expansion of the primitive streak occurs coincident with Oct4 depletion ?E7.5 and precedes deficient convergent extension which contributes to several aspects of the phenotype. PMID:24244203

  20. Oct4 is required ~E7.5 for proliferation in the primitive streak.

    PubMed

    DeVeale, Brian; Brokhman, Irina; Mohseni, Paria; Babak, Tomas; Yoon, Charles; Lin, Anthony; Onishi, Kento; Tomilin, Alexey; Pevny, Larysa; Zandstra, Peter W; Nagy, Andras; van der Kooy, Derek

    2013-11-01

    Oct4 is a widely recognized pluripotency factor as it maintains Embryonic Stem (ES) cells in a pluripotent state, and, in vivo, prevents the inner cell mass (ICM) in murine embryos from differentiating into trophectoderm. However, its function in somatic tissue after this developmental stage is not well characterized. Using a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase and floxed alleles of Oct4, we investigated the effect of depleting Oct4 in mouse embryos between the pre-streak and headfold stages, ~E6.0-E8.0, when Oct4 is found in dynamic patterns throughout the embryonic compartment of the mouse egg cylinder. We found that depletion of Oct4 ~E7.5 resulted in a severe phenotype, comprised of craniorachischisis, random heart tube orientation, failed turning, defective somitogenesis and posterior truncation. Unlike in ES cells, depletion of the pluripotency factors Sox2 and Oct4 after E7.0 does not phenocopy, suggesting that ~E7.5 Oct4 is required within a network that is altered relative to the pluripotency network. Oct4 is not required in extraembryonic tissue for these processes, but is required to maintain cell viability in the embryo and normal proliferation within the primitive streak. Impaired expansion of the primitive streak occurs coincident with Oct4 depletion ?E7.5 and precedes deficient convergent extension which contributes to several aspects of the phenotype. PMID:24244203

  1. 3 alternatives to standard varicose vein treatment.

    PubMed

    Schoonover, Jeffery P; King, J Theodore; Gray, Captain; Campbell, Keith; Sherman, Christopher

    2009-10-01

    Discuss minimally invasive procedures with patients considering surgery for treatment of chronic venous insufficiency. Thermal ablation, in particular, has higher success rates than vein stripping. Consider endovenous chemical ablation for treatment of tortuous saphenous tributary varicosities that cannot be treated with thermal ablation. Foamed sclerosant, injected under ultrasound guidance, allows for direct visualization and has equivalent efficacy rates when compared to venous stripping. Pregnancy, active deep vein thrombosis, poor health with limited mobility, and severe peripheral vascular disease are contraindications for both thermal and chemical ablation. PMID:19874730

  2. Endovascular Laser Therapy for Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of the MAS evidence review was to conduct a systematic review of the available evidence on the safety, effectiveness, durability and costeffectiveness of endovascular laser therapy (ELT) for the treatment of primary symptomatic varicose veins (VV). Background The Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee (OHTAC) met on November 27, 2009 to review the safety, effectiveness, durability and cost-effectiveness of ELT for the treatment of primary VV based on an evidence-based review by the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS). Clinical Condition VV are tortuous, twisted, or elongated veins. This can be due to existing (inherited) valve dysfunction or decreased vein elasticity (primary venous reflux) or valve damage from prior thrombotic events (secondary venous reflux). The end result is pooling of blood in the veins, increased venous pressure and subsequent vein enlargement. As a result of high venous pressure, branch vessels balloon out leading to varicosities (varicose veins). Symptoms typically affect the lower extremities and include (but are not limited to): aching, swelling, throbbing, night cramps, restless legs, leg fatigue, itching and burning. Left untreated, venous reflux tends to be progressive, often leading to chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). A number of complications are associated with untreated venous reflux: including superficial thrombophlebitis as well as variceal rupture and haemorrhage. CVI often results in chronic skin changes referred to as stasis dermatitis. Stasis dermatitis is comprised of a spectrum of cutaneous abnormalities including edema, hyperpigmentation, eczema, lipodermatosclerosis and stasis ulceration. Ulceration represents the disease end point for severe CVI. CVI is associated with a reduced quality of life particularly in relation to pain, physical function and mobility. In severe cases, VV with ulcers, QOL has been rated to be as bad or worse as other chronic diseases such as back pain and arthritis. Lower limb VV is a common disease affecting adults and estimated to be the seventh most common reason for physician referral in the US. There is a strong familial predisposition to VV with the risk in offspring being 90% if both parents affected, 20% when neither is affected, and 45% (25% boys, 62% girls) if one parent is affected. Globally, the prevalence of VV ranges from 5% to 15% among men and 3% to 29% among women varying by the age, gender and ethnicity of the study population, survey methods and disease definition and measurement. The annual incidence of VV estimated from the Framingham Study was reported to be 2.6% among women and 1.9% among men and did not vary within the age range (40-89 years) studied. Approximately 1% of the adult population has a stasis ulcer of venous origin at any one time with 4% at risk. The majority of leg ulcer patients are elderly with simple superficial vein reflux. Stasis ulcers are often lengthy medical problems and can last for several years and, despite effective compression therapy and multilayer bandaging are associated with high recurrence rates. Recent trials involving surgical treatment of superficial vein reflux have resulted in healing and significantly reduced recurrence rates. Endovascular Laser Therapy for VV ELT is an image-guided, minimally invasive treatment alternative to surgical stripping of superficial venous reflux. It does not require an operating room or general anesthesia and has been performed in outpatient settings by a variety of medical specialties including surgeons (vascular or general), interventional radiologists and phlebologists. Rather than surgically removing the vein, ELT works by destroying, cauterizing or ablating the refluxing vein segment using heat energy delivered via laser fibre. Prior to ELT, colour-flow Doppler ultrasonography is used to confirm and map all areas of venous reflux to devise a safe and effective treatment plan. The ELT procedure involves the introduction of a guide wire into the target vein under ultrasound guidance followed by the inse

  3. Experimental therapies for yellow fever

    PubMed Central

    Julander, Justin G.

    2013-01-01

    A number of viruses in the family Flaviviridae are the focus of efforts to develop effective antiviral therapies. Success has been achieved with inhibitors for the treatment of hepatitis C, and there is interest in clinical trials of drugs against dengue fever. Antiviral therapies have also been evaluated in patients with Japanese encephalitis and West Nile encephalitis. However, no treatment has been developed against the prototype flavivirus, yellow fever virus (YFV). Despite the availability of the live, attenuated 17D vaccine, thousands of cases of YF continue to occur each year in Africa and South America, with a significant mortality rate. In addition, a small number of vaccinees develop severe systemic infections with the 17D virus. This paper reviews current efforts to develop antiviral therapies, either directly targeting the virus or blocking detrimental host responses to infection. PMID:23237991

  4. Geology of the epithermal Ag-Au Huevos Verdes vein system and San Jos district, Deseado massif, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Andreas; Gutierrez, Ronald; Nelson, Eric P.; Layer, Paul W.

    2012-03-01

    The San Jos district is located in the northwest part of the Deseado massif and hosts a number of epithermal Ag-Au quartz veins of intermediate sulfidation style, including the Huevos Verdes vein system. Veins are hosted by andesitic rocks of the Bajo Pobre Formation and locally by rhyodacitic pyroclastic rocks of the Chon Aike Formation. New 40Ar/39Ar constraints on the age of host rocks and mineralization define Late Jurassic ages of 151.3 0.7 Ma to 144.7 0.1 Ma for volcanic rocks of the Bajo Pobre Formation and of 147.6 1.1 Ma for the Chon Aike Formation. Illite ages of the Huevos Verdes vein system of 140.8 0.2 and 140.5 0.3 Ma are 4 m.y. younger than the volcanic host rock unit. These age dates are among the youngest reported for Jurassic volcanism in the Deseado massif and correlate well with the regional context of magmatic and hydrothermal activity. The Huevos Verdes vein system has a strike length of 2,000 m, with several ore shoots along strike. The vein consists of a pre-ore stage and three main ore stages. Early barren quartz and chalcedony are followed by a mottled quartz stage of coarse saccharoidal quartz with irregular streaks and discontinuous bands of sulfide-rich material. The banded quartz-sulfide stage consists of sulfide-rich bands alternating with bands of quartz and bands of chlorite illite. Late-stage sulfide-rich veinlets are associated with kaolinite gangue. Ore minerals are argentite and electrum, together with pyrite, sphalerite, galena, chalcopyrite, minor bornite, covellite, and ruby silver. Wall rock alteration is characterized by narrow (< 3 m) halos of illite and illite/smectite next to veins, grading outward into propylitic alteration. Gangue minerals are dominantly massive quartz intergrown with minor to accessory adularia. Epidote, illite, illite/smectite, and, preferentially at deeper levels, Fe-chlorite gangue indicate near-neutral pH hydrothermal fluids at temperatures of >220C. Kaolinite occurring with the late sulfide-rich veinlet stage indicates pH < 4 and a temperature of <200C. The Huevos Verdes system has an overall strike of 325, dipping on average 65 NE. The orientations of individual ore shoots are controlled by vein strike and intersecting north-northwest-striking faults. We propose a structural model for the time of mineralization of the San Jos district, consisting of a conjugate shear pair of sinistral north-northwest- and dextral west-northwest-striking faults that correspond to R and R' in the Riedel shear model and that are related to master faults (M) of north-northeast-strike. Veins of 315 strike can be interpreted as nearly pure extensional fractures (T). Variations in vein strike predict an induced sinistral shear component for strike directions of >315, whereas strike directions of <315 are predicted with an induced dextral strike-slip movement. The components of the structural model appear to be present on a regional scale and are not restricted to the San Jos district.

  5. Percutaneous Portal Vein Access and Transhepatic Tract Hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Wael E. A.; Madoff, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous portal vein interventions require minimally invasive access to the portal venous system. Common approaches to the portal vein include transjugular hepatic vein to portal vein access and direct transhepatic portal vein access. A major concern of the transhepatic route is the risk of postprocedural bleeding, which is increased when patients are anticoagulated or receiving pharmaceutical thrombolytic therapy. Thus percutaneous portal vein access and subsequent closure are important technical parts of percutaneous portal vein procedures. At present, various techniques have been used for either portal access or subsequent transhepatic tract closure and hemostasis. Regardless of the method used, meticulous technique is required to achieve the overall safety and effectiveness of portal venous procedures. This article reviews the various techniques of percutaneous transhepatic portal vein access and the various closure and hemostatic methods used to reduce the risk of postprocedural bleeding. PMID:23729976

  6. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Deep Vein Thrombosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Deep Vein Thrombosis? The signs and symptoms of deep ... serious, possibly life-threatening problems if not treated. Deep Vein Thrombosis Only about half of the people ...

  7. Varicose Veins: Role of Mechanotransduction of Venous Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Hussein M.

    2012-01-01

    Varicose veins affect approximately one-third of the adult population and result in significant psychological, physical, and financial burden. Nevertheless, the molecular pathogenesis of varicose vein formation remains unidentified. Venous hypertension exerted on veins of the lower extremity is considered the principal factor in varicose vein formation. The role of mechanotransduction of the high venous pressure in the pathogenesis of varicose vein formation has not been adequately investigated despite a good progress in understanding the mechanomolecular mechanisms involved in transduction of high blood pressure in the arterial wall. Understanding the nature of the mechanical forces, the mechanosensors and mechanotransducers in the vein wall, and the downstream signaling pathways will provide new molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of varicose veins. This paper summarized the current understanding of mechano-molecular pathways involved in transduction of hemodynamic forces induced by blood pressure and tries to relate this information to setting of venous hypertension in varicose veins. PMID:22489273

  8. Crossectomy and great saphenous vein stripping.

    PubMed

    Winterborn, R J; Earnshaw, J J

    2006-02-01

    Crossectomy and stripping have been the standard of care for primary great saphenous varicose veins since the high failure rates of sclerotherapy became apparent in the 1970s. As the specialty of venous surgery has evolved, a number of clinical trials have established the optimal methods of surgical treatment, and the clinical benefit of routine stripping. Long-term trials, however, have uncovered a high recurrence rate after varicose vein surgery that approaches 70% after 10 years. There is much debate about whether this is the result of the dilatation of existing tributaries in the groin or the growth of new veins as a result of angiogenesis that follows surgical treatment and healing (neovascularisation). The addition of barrier technology to current crossectomy has the potential to improve the results of surgery in the future. In the meanwhile, new techniques are evolving to obliterate the great saphenous vein, including endovenous laser, radiofrequency ablation and foam sclerotherapy. Randomised clinical trials are urgently required to compare these new treatments against standard surgery, and they will need to focus on whether the short-term gains in reduced convalescence and morbidity are balanced by durable long-term results. PMID:16434942

  9. Preoperative portal vein embolization for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroaki Kinoshita; Katsuji Sakai; Kazuhiro Hirohashi; Sumito Igawa; Osamu Yamasaki; Shoji Kubo

    1986-01-01

    As a countermeasure to portal tumor thrombi, which are a serious danger in liver cancer, we did portal vein embolization (PVE) during percutaneous transhepatic portography. Our 21 patients later underwent hepatic resection. After PVE, portal pressure increased and there was slight liver function damage, but this procedure was safer than transarterial embolization (TAE). We examined the pathologic specimens to view

  10. Diagnostic Methods for Deep Vein Thrombosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brownell Wheeler

    1995-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is unreliable, and treatment should not be undertaken without objective confirmation. The traditional gold standard for the diagnosis of DVT has been venography, but ultrasonic imaging has now replaced venography as the new diagnostic standard in many hospitals. A variety of noninvasive physiologic tests are also useful in selected circumstances. These include plethysmography,

  11. Measuring 8250 ps short pulses using a high-speed streak camera on kilojoule, petawatt-class laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, J.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Boni, R.; Bromage, J.; Hill, E. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Short-pulse measurements using a streak camera are sensitive to space-charge broadening, which depends on the pulse duration and shape, and on the uniformity of photocathode illumination. An anamorphic-diffuser-based beam-homogenizing system and a space-charge-broadening calibration method were developed to accurately measure short pulses using an optical streak camera. This approach provides a more-uniform streak image and enables one to characterize space-charge-induced pulse-broadening effects.

  12. Isolated thrombosis of the external jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Colomina, M J; Godet, C; Bag, J; Pellis, F; Puig, O; Villanueva, C

    2000-08-01

    Thrombosis of the external jugular vein (EJV) is an infrequent clinical condition that has been associated with central venous catheterization, head and neck infections, intravenous drug abuse, and compression at the affected site. The authors report a case of thrombotic obstruction of the EJV in the late postoperative period after laparoscopic anterior lumbar interbody fusion. A 40-year-old morbidly obese woman with a depressive syndrome was diagnosed with L5-S1 discopathy and was submitted to laparoscopic anterior isthmic fusion. The operation lasted approximately 6 hours, during which the patient remained in a supine decubitus and Trendelenburg position. The left radial artery, peripheral veins, and right internal jugular vein were canalized. The internal jugular vein catheter was electively withdrawn 24 hours after the intervention. The postoperative period was satisfactory, and the patient was started on prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin. She sat up and began walking at 24 hours and was discharged to her home 4 days after the procedure. Eight days after discharge she returned, experiencing right cervical pain. Palpation revealed a painful induration and erythematous area under the anterior edge of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Results of otoscopy and laryngoscopy were normal. Cervical echo-Doppler disclosed an image consistent with EJV thrombosis. The most frequent causes of jugular vein thrombosis are mentioned above. A higher incidence has been described after upper abdomen and pelvic surgery; other contributing factors are age, obesity, and associated illness. There are few references in the literature to position-induced EJV thrombosis in the late postoperative period. The authors' patient presented signs and symptoms of EJV thrombosis (probably because of various factors), which was confirmed by echo-Doppler study and treated with 10 days of calcic heparin. PMID:10961761

  13. Long-term assessment of cryopreserved vein bypass grafting success

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda Harris; Monica O'Brien-Irr; John J. Ricotta

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: When autogenous vein is unavailable, cryopreserved veins have been used in patients as a means of attempted limb salvage. We evaluated the long-term patency and limb salvage rates for patients undergoing bypass grafting with cryopreserved veins. Methods: Medical records were reviewed for patients undergoing cryovein bypass grafting at two hospitals from 1992 to 1997. Follow-up data were obtained from

  14. Laser treatment of varicose veins: order out of chaos.

    PubMed

    Ash, Jennifer L; Moore, Colleen J

    2010-06-01

    Varicose veins of the lower extremity are commonly encountered by vascular surgeons. Historically, the standard treatment of varicose veins has been high ligation and stripping of the great saphenous vein. Endovenous ablation techniques have been adopted by many surgeons over the past few years. Techniques of endovenous laser surgery are reviewed, as are the common complications and expected outcomes. PMID:20685564

  15. Who Is at Risk for Deep Vein Thrombosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Deep Vein Thrombosis? The risk factors for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) include: A history of DVT. ... increase the risk of clotting. Injury to a deep vein from surgery, a broken bone, or other ...

  16. Sand veins and wedges in cold aeolian environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julian B. Murton; Peter Worsley; Jan Gozdzik

    2000-01-01

    Sedimentary structures formed by the progressive primary infilling of thermal contraction cracks with sand are termed primary sand veins and sand wedges. In addition to simple vein- or wedge-shapes irregularities can be caused by sand veins branching from their sides and toes. Primary sand wedges form widely in sandy polar deserts, locally in sandy areas of tundra and probably in

  17. Aneurysm of external jugular vein mimicking hemangioma of neck.

    PubMed

    Aiyappan, Senthil Kumar; Ranga, Upasana; Veeraiyan, Saveetha

    2013-12-01

    Venous aneurysms are one of the rare causes of neck swellings. Among neck veins, external jugular vein aneurysms are uncommon. We present a case of a woman who presented with a nontender compressible swelling in the left lower neck region, which initially thought to be hemangioma, was later found to be external jugular vein aneurysm on Doppler ultrasound and CT angiography. PMID:24465108

  18. Spermatic vein phlebography in patients with testicular tumors.

    PubMed

    Karparov, M; Gospodinov, G; Baldjiisky, A; Zlatanov, T; Karadimov, A

    1977-01-01

    The performance of funicular lymphography and spermatic vein phlebography during orchiectomy in patients with testicular tumors demonstrates the close proximity of the spermatic vein to the lymph nodes draining the testicles. In the case of metastatic lymph node involvement the spermatic vein phlebography may add supplementary diagnostic information. The examination was proved successful in eight patients with malignant testicular tumors. PMID:904745

  19. Wound healing around and within saphenous vein bypass grafts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James E. O'Brien; Yi Shi; Ali Fard; Thomas Bauer; Andrew Zalewski; John D. Mannion

    1997-01-01

    Background: Myofibroblasts are a prominent cell type in wound healing. The goal of this study was to examine the extent to which myofibroblasts contribute to structural changes in saphenous vein bypass grafts. Methods and results: Control veins and reversed saphenous vein bypass conduits of porcine carotid arteries were examined 2 to 4, 7 to 14, and 30 to 90 days

  20. A Comprehensive Evaluation of Yellow-flowering Magnolias

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A collection of yellow-flowering magnolias were evaluated for flower color, bloom duration and growth rate in USDA Hardiness Zone 6b. All selections were reported to have yellow blooms; however, tepal color in this test ranged from light pink with some yellow coloration to dark yellow. The darkest...

  1. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137.285 Food and...Related Products 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms...

  2. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137.285 Food and...Related Products 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms...

  3. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137.285 Food and...Related Products 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms...

  4. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137.285 Food and...Related Products 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms...

  5. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137.285 Food and...Related Products 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms...

  6. Internal vein texture and vein evolution of the epithermal Shila-Paula district, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, Alain; Bailly, Laurent; Andr, Anne-Sylvie; Moni, Patrick; Cassard, Daniel; Tajada, Fernando Llosa; Vargas, Juan Rosas; Tuduri, Johann

    2006-07-01

    The epithermal Shila-Paula Au-Ag district is characterized by numerous veins hosted in Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Western Cordillera (southern Peru). Field studies of the ore bodies reveal a systematic association of a main E-W vein with secondary N55-60W veinstwo directions that are also reflected by the orientation of fluid-inclusion planes in quartz crystals of the host rock. In areas where this pattern is not recognized, such as the Apacheta sector, vein emplacement seems to have been guided by regional N40E and N40W fractures. Two main vein-filling stages are identified. stage 1 is a quartz-adularia-pyrite-galena-sphalerite-chalcopyrite-electrum-Mn silicate-carbonate assemblage that fills the main E-W veins. stage 2, which contains most of the precious-metal mineralization, is divided into pre-bonanza and bonanza substages. The pre-bonanza substage consists of a quartz-adularia-carbonate assemblage that is observed within the secondary N45-60W veins, in veinlets that cut the stage 1 assemblage, and in final open-space fillings. The two latter structures are finally filled by the bonanza substage characterized by a Fe-poor sphalerite-chalcopyrite-pyrite-galena-tennantite-tetrahedrite-polybasite-pearceite-electrum assemblage. The ore in the main veins is systematically brecciated, whereas the ore in the secondary veins and geodes is characteristic of open-space crystallization. Microthermometric measurements on sphalerite from both stages and on quartz and calcite from stage 2 indicate a salinity range of 0 to 15.5 wt% NaCl equivalent and homogenization temperatures bracketed between 200 and 330C. Secondary CO2-, N2- and H2S-bearing fluid inclusions are also identified. The age of vein emplacement, based on 40Ar/39Ar ages obtained on adularia of different veins, is estimated at around 11 Ma, with some overlap between adularia of stage 1 (11.40.4 Ma) and of stage 2 (10.80.3 Ma). A three-phase tectonic model has been constructed to explain the vein formation. Phase 1 corresponds to the assumed development of E-W sinistral shear zones and associated N60W cleavages under the effects of a NE-SW shortening direction that is recognized at Andean scale. These structures contain the stage 1 ore assemblage that was brecciated during ongoing deformation. Phase 2 is a reactivation of earlier structures under a NW-SE shortening direction that allowed the reopening of the preexisting schistosity and the formation of scarce N50E-striking S2-cleavage planes filled by the stage 2 pre-bonanza minerals. Phase 3 coincides with the bonanza ore emplacement in the secondary N45-60W veins and also in open-space in the core of the main E-W veins. Our combined tectonic, textural, mineralogical, fluid-inclusion, and geochronological study presents a complete model of vein formation in which the reactivation of previously formed tectonic structures plays a significant role in ore formation.

  7. MDCT Venography Evaluation of a Rare Collateral Vein Draining from the Left Subclavian Vein to the Great Cardiac Vein

    PubMed Central

    Abchee, Antoine; Saade, Charbel; Al-Mohiy, Hussain; El-Merhi, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    Congenital vascular anomalies of the venous drainage in the chest affect both cardiac and non-cardiac structures. Collateral venous drainage from the left subclavian vein to the great cardiac vein is a rare venous drainage pattern. These anomalies present a diagnostic challenge. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) is useful in the diagnosis and treatment planning of these clinically complex disorders. We present a case report of an 18-year-old Caucasian male who came to our institute for evaluation of venous drainage patterns to the heart. We describe the contrast technique of bilateral dual injection MDCT venography and the imaging features of the venous drainage patterns to the heart. PMID:25379351

  8. An Endangered Yellow-Legged Frog

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS biologists are leading the monitoring and reintroduction effort of the Southern California mountain yellow-legged frog -- federally listed as endangered with only 200 wild adults remaining in the mountains surrounding Los Angeles County....

  9. Assessing Sites for Yellow Legged Frog

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Assessing suitable sites in southern California for reintroducing endangered southern mountain yellow-legged frogs, USGS scientists rediscovered a population in the San Jacinto Wilderness, 50 years since this frog was last seen there....

  10. Lost Trust: A Yellow Fever Patient Response

    PubMed Central

    Runge, John S.

    2013-01-01

    In the 19th century, yellow fever thrived in the tropical, urban trade centers along the American Gulf Coast. Industrializing and populated, New Orleans and Memphis made excellent habitats for the yellow fever-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and the virulence they imparted on their victims. Known for its jaundice and black, blood-filled vomit, the malady terrorized the region for decades, sometimes claiming tens of thousands of lives during the near annual summertime outbreaks. In response to the failing medical community, a small, pronounced population of sick and healthy laypeople openly criticized the efforts to rid the Gulf region of yellow jack. Utilizing newspapers and cartoons to vocalize their opinions, these critics doubted and mocked the medical community, contributing to the regional and seasonal dilemma yellow fever posed for the American South. These sentient expressions prove to be an early example of patient distrust toward caregivers, a current problem in clinical heath care. PMID:24348220

  11. Lost trust: a yellow fever patient response.

    PubMed

    Runge, John S

    2013-12-01

    In the 19th century, yellow fever thrived in the tropical, urban trade centers along the American Gulf Coast. Industrializing and populated, New Orleans and Memphis made excellent habitats for the yellow fever-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and the virulence they imparted on their victims. Known for its jaundice and black, blood-filled vomit, the malady terrorized the region for decades, sometimes claiming tens of thousands of lives during the near annual summertime outbreaks. In response to the failing medical community, a small, pronounced population of sick and healthy laypeople openly criticized the efforts to rid the Gulf region of yellow jack. Utilizing newspapers and cartoons to vocalize their opinions, these critics doubted and mocked the medical community, contributing to the regional and seasonal dilemma yellow fever posed for the American South. These sentient expressions prove to be an early example of patient distrust toward caregivers, a current problem in clinical heath care. PMID:24348220

  12. Teachable Fiction Comes to Yellow Sky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tietz, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Proposes that teachable fiction is efficient, strategically sound, and very visual. Analyzes Stephen Crane's "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" to show it fulfills these three characteristics. Suggests the story should be taught later in the semester. (PM)

  13. Transcutaneous laser treatment of leg veins.

    PubMed

    Meesters, Arne A; Pitassi, Luiza H U; Campos, Valeria; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Dierickx, Christine C

    2014-03-01

    Leg telangiectasias and reticular veins are a common complaint affecting more than 80% of the population to some extent. To date, the gold standard remains sclerotherapy for most patients. However, there may be some specific situations, where sclerotherapy is contraindicated such as needle phobia, allergy to certain sclerosing agents, and the presence of vessels smaller than the diameter of a 30-gauge needle (including telangiectatic matting). In these cases, transcutaneous laser therapy is a valuable alternative. Currently, different laser modalities have been proposed for the management of leg veins. The aim of this article is to present an overview of the basic principles of transcutaneous laser therapy of leg veins and to review the existing literature on this subject, including the most recent developments. The 532-nm potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser, the 585-600-nm pulsed dye laser, the 755-nm alexandrite laser, various 800-983-nm diode lasers, and the 1,064-nm neodymium yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser and various intense pulsed light sources have been investigated for this indication. The KTP and pulsed dye laser are an effective treatment option for small vessels (<1 mm). The side effect profile is usually favorable to that of longer wavelength modalities. For larger veins, the use of a longer wavelength is required. According to the scarce evidence available, the Nd:YAG laser produces better clinical results than the alexandrite and diode laser. Penetration depth is high, whereas absorption by melanin is low, making the Nd:YAG laser suitable for the treatment of larger and deeply located veins and for the treatment of patients with dark skin types. Clinical outcome of Nd:YAG laser therapy approximates that of sclerotherapy, although the latter is associated with less pain. New developments include (1) the use of a nonuniform pulse sequence or a dual-wavelength modality, inducing methemoglobin formation and enhancing the optical absorption properties of the target structure, (2) pulse stacking and multiple pass laser treatment, (3) combination of laser therapy with sclerotherapy or radiofrequency, and (4) indocyanin green enhanced laser therapy. Future studies will have to confirm the role of these developments in the treatment of leg veins. The literature still lacks double-blind controlled clinical trials comparing the different laser modalities with each other and with sclerotherapy. Such trials should be the focus of future research. PMID:24220848

  14. Widespread occurrence and diversity of Cassava brown streak virus (Potyviridae: Ipomovirus) in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Rwegasira, G M; Momanyi, G; Rey, M E C; Kahwa, G; Legg, J P

    2011-10-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) has been a problem in Tanzania since 1936. Existing literature indicated limited distribution of the disease to low altitudes, usually <100 m above sea level, but the current geographical distribution of the disease was not known. Whether a single or many strains for the virus exist in Tanzania had not been reported to date. In this study, CBSD was recorded from sea level to ?1,800 m above sea level. In total, 2,730 cassava plants were assessed for CBSD leaf symptoms in 91 fields and root symptoms were assessed at 81 sites. A sample was taken from each site for laboratory screening for Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV). CBSD mean foliar and root incidences were 38 and 36%, respectively. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction of a partial 3'-terminal coat protein (CP) region of CBSV indicated the presence of CBSV in 67 of the 91 (73%) samples. Forty-three amplicons were sequenced, and phylogenetic comparisons with nucleotide sequences from GenBank (National Center for Biotechnology Information database) suggested that one major clade of CBSV primarily exists in Tanzania. However, there was nucleotide sequence divergence of up to 19% among the 42 isolates. In all, 42 of the 43 sequences had 80 to 100% nucleotide identity with 6 previously reported CP-CBSV sequences (from Mozambique and Tanzania). In total, 13 of 42 isolates had <80% nucleotide identities with three previously reported Ugandan CBSV sequences. One isolate, FJ687177, shared <78% sequence identity with the other Tanzanian sequences but was closely related (93%) to Ugandan isolates. It is likely that isolate FJ687177 may belong to a less widely distributed recently described species (clade 2) of CBSV, named Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV). PMID:21916624

  15. The effect of Aloe vera leaf gel on fatty streak formation in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Nasim; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy; Asgary, Sedigheh; Asnaashari, Hossein; Abdian, Narges

    2012-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is a complex disease that is associated with a variety of etiologic factors such as hyperlipidemia and inflammation. Aloe vera (Liliaceae family) has been used traditionally as an anti-inflammatory drug. The aims of this survey were to define the beneficial effects of Aloe vera leaf gel on some of the atherosclerosis risk factors, and also fatty streak formation in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Materials ans Methods: 32 white male rabbits were randomly divided into four experimental groups (n = 8, each). During the study, the animals had a standard diet (control group), high cholesterol diet (HC group), high cholesterol diet with Aloe vera leaf gel (3.2%v/v) (HC+ Aloe group) and Aloe vera leaf gel (Aloe group) for 30 days. Fasting blood samples were collected from all animals at the beginning and end of the study. Then total cholesterol (TC), fasting blood sugar (FBS), triglyceride (TG) and CRP were measured before and after experimental periods. By the end of the study, the aortas were removed and investigated for atherosclerosis plaque formation. Results: Significant differences were observed in TC and CRP levels of the high-cholesterol diet with Aloe vera and the high-cholesterol diet alone (p < 0.05). The formation of fatty streaks in the aorta was also significantly lower in the same animals under the influence of dietary Aloe vera(p < 0.05). The control and Aloe group did not show any evidence of atherosclerosis. No significant difference was found between the groups in TG and FBS. Conclusions: The data suggests that Aloe vera has beneficial effects on the prevention of fatty streak development; it may reduce the development of atherosclerosis through modification of risk factors. However, further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms whereby this plant exerts its anti-atherosclerotic effects. PMID:23626607

  16. Absolute calibration method for nanosecond-resolved, time-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Mark D; Oliver, Bryan V; Droemer, Darryl W; Frogget, Brent; Crain, Marlon D; Maron, Yitzhak

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a convenient and accurate method to calibrate fast (<1 ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such systems are inherently difficult to calibrate due to the lack of sufficiently intense, calibrated light sources. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA) at Sandia National Laboratories. On RITS, plasma light is collected through a small diameter (200 ?m) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of a 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator. For this paper, a 300 W xenon short arc lamp (Oriel Model 6258) was used as the calibration source. Since the radiance of the xenon arc varies from cathode to anode, just the area around the tip of the cathode ("hotspot") was imaged onto the fiber, to produce the highest intensity output. To compensate for chromatic aberrations, the signal was optimized at each wavelength measured. Output power was measured using 10 nm bandpass interference filters and a calibrated photodetector. These measurements give power at discrete wavelengths across the spectrum, and when linearly interpolated, provide a calibration curve for the lamp. The shape of the spectrum is determined by the collective response of the optics, monochromator, and streak tube across the spectral region of interest. The ratio of the spectral curve to the measured bandpass filter curve at each wavelength produces a correction factor (Q) curve. This curve is then applied to the experimental data and the resultant spectra are given in absolute intensity units (photons/sec/cm(2)/steradian/nm). Error analysis shows this method to be accurate to within +?- 20%, which represents a high level of accuracy for this type of measurement. PMID:22938275

  17. Absolute calibration method for nanosecond-resolved, time-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Oliver, Bryan V.; Droemer, Darryl W.; Frogget, Brent; Crain, Marlon D.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a convenient and accurate method to calibrate fast (<1 ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such systems are inherently difficult to calibrate due to the lack of sufficiently intense, calibrated light sources. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA) at Sandia National Laboratories. On RITS, plasma light is collected through a small diameter (200 ?m) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of a 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator. For this paper, a 300 W xenon short arc lamp (Oriel Model 6258) was used as the calibration source. Since the radiance of the xenon arc varies from cathode to anode, just the area around the tip of the cathode ("hotspot") was imaged onto the fiber, to produce the highest intensity output. To compensate for chromatic aberrations, the signal was optimized at each wavelength measured. Output power was measured using 10 nm bandpass interference filters and a calibrated photodetector. These measurements give power at discrete wavelengths across the spectrum, and when linearly interpolated, provide a calibration curve for the lamp. The shape of the spectrum is determined by the collective response of the optics, monochromator, and streak tube across the spectral region of interest. The ratio of the spectral curve to the measured bandpass filter curve at each wavelength produces a correction factor (Q) curve. This curve is then applied to the experimental data and the resultant spectra are given in absolute intensity units (photons/sec/cm2/steradian/nm). Error analysis shows this method to be accurate to within +/- 20%, which represents a high level of accuracy for this type of measurement.

  18. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using protein crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the enexpected hypothesis that the virus release its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have farly flat coats, but in TYMV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early studies of TYMV, but McPhereson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central viod on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides liked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the voild. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine.

  19. Redox alters yellow dragonflies into red

    PubMed Central

    Futahashi, Ryo; Kurita, Ryoji; Mano, Hiroaki; Fukatsu, Takema

    2012-01-01

    Body color change associated with sexual maturationso-called nuptial colorationis commonly found in diverse vertebrates and invertebrates, and plays important roles for their reproductive success. In some dragonflies, whereas females and young males are yellowish in color, aged males turn vivid red upon sexual maturation. The male-specific coloration plays pivotal roles in, for example, mating and territoriality, but molecular basis of the sex-related transition in body coloration of the dragonflies has been poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that yellow/red color changes in the dragonflies are regulated by redox states of epidermal ommochrome pigments. Ratios of reduced-form pigments to oxidized-form pigments were significantly higher in red mature males than yellow females and immature males. The ommochrome pigments extracted from the dragonflies changed color according to redox conditions in vitro: from red to yellow in the presence of oxidant and from yellow to red in the presence of reductant. By injecting the reductant solution into live insects, the yellow-to-red color change was experimentally reproduced in vivo in immature males and mature females. Discontinuous yellow/red mosaicism was observed in body coloration of gynandromorphic dragonflies, suggesting a cell-autonomous regulation over the redox states of the ommochrome pigments. Our finding extends the mechanical repertoire of pigment-based body color change in animals, and highlights an impressively simple molecular mechanism that regulates an ecologically important color trait. PMID:22778425

  20. Temporal Characterization of Electron Beam Bunches with a Fast Streak Camera at the JLab FEL Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zhang; S.V. Benson; D. Douglas; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2005-08-21

    The design and construction of an optical transport that brings synchrotron radiation from electron bunches to a fast streak camera in a remote area has become a useful tool for online observation of bunch length and stability. This paper will report on the temporal measurements we have done, comparison with simulations, and the on-going work for another imaging optical transport system that will make possible the direct measurement of the longitudinal phase space by measuring the bunch length as a function of energy

  1. Follow-up Observatory for Low Earth Orbit Objects with a Detection Algorithm Using Streaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, M.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Oda, H.; Hanada, T.

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a simplified facility for a follow-up observation method. A tri-axis altazimuth mount instrument is required in the conventional observation facility to keep a target as a light spot during a visible pass. The tri-axis instrument enables the facility to observe the target with a high signal-to-noise-ratio. However, such instrument becomes costly due to its complexity. The proposed method uses a bi-axis altazimuth to guide a telescope into an observation target region. It should be noted that the bi-axis altazimth does not guide the telescope toward the target continuously therefore the target appears as streaks in images. Intensities in the streak are degraded in signal-to-noise-ratio in comparison to that in the light spot taken by a telescope on a tri-axis altazimuth because original intensity was divided into the pixels. The proposed method recovers such low signal-to-noise-ratio using 1) an image-processing algorithm and 2) multi-telescope. The image-processing algorithm developed for this study aims to detect an object appeared as faint streaks in images. The initial study also found that the algorithm requires primary orbit information of the target to complete detection calculation in reasonable time consumption. The algorithm can recovers signal-to-noise-ratio. However, it is still lower than that of continuous guiding observation result. The multi-telescope denotes an observation using two or more telescopes toward same region. We can improve signal-to-noise-ratio by summing images taken by the telescopes. We found that the image-processing algorithm improves signal-to-noise-ratio proportional to square root of streaks length. The multi-telescope observation method also improves signal-to-noise-ratio proportional to square root of number of the telescope. The proposed method combines the algorithm and the technique to recover degraded signal-to-noise-ratio. This paper discusses a feasibility of the proposed method and summarizes a mission scenario.

  2. Physics and roller coasters-The Blue Streak at Cedar Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speers, Robert R.

    1991-06-01

    The use of a roller coaster for external classroom studies of kinematics, forces, dynamics, and energy conservation is discussed. Experimental accelerometer measurements of the vertical forces acting on riders of the Blue Streak at Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio are presented. Theoretically, the track profile is used to calculate/predict the vertical forces acting on a rider at the hilltops, valley bottoms, and several other points of interest along the track. Finally the experimental results and theoretical predictions are compared in the context of a rider's experiences.

  3. Design of a streaked radiography instrument for ICF ablator tuning measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R. E.; Geissel, M.; Kellogg, J. W.; Bennett, G. R.; Edens, A. D.; Atherton, B. W.; Leeper, R. J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Holder, J. P.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    A streaked radiography diagnostic has been proposed as a technique to determine the ablator mass remaining in an inertial confinement fusion ignition capsule at peak velocity. This instrument, the 'HXRI-5', has been designed to fit within a National Ignition Facility Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator. The HXRI-5 will be built at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and initial testing will be done at the SNL Z-Beamlet Facility. In this paper, we will describe the National Ignition Campaign requirements for this diagnostic, the instrument design, and the planned test experiments.

  4. Streaked Optical Pyrometer System for Laser-Driven Shock-Wave Experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Boehly, T.R.; Melchior, Meyerhofer, D.D.; Celliers, P.M.; Eggert, J.H.; Hicks, D.G.; Sorce, C.M.; Oertel, J.A.; Emmel, P.M.

    2007-03-23

    The temperature of laser-driven shock waves is of interest to inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics. We report on a streaked optical pyrometer that measures the self-emission of laser-driven shocks simultaneously with a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). Together these diagnostics are used to obtain the temporally and spatially resolved temperatures of ~Mbar shocks driven by the OMEGA laser. We provide a brief description of the diagnostic and how it is used with VISAR. Key spectral calibration results are discussed and important characteristics of the recording system are presented.

  5. Finger vein extraction using gradient normalization and principal curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joon Hwan; Song, Wonseok; Kim, Taejeong; Lee, Seung-Rae; Kim, Hee Chan

    2009-02-01

    Finger vein authentication is a personal identification technology using finger vein images acquired by infrared imaging. It is one of the newest technologies in biometrics. Its main advantage over other biometrics is the low risk of forgery or theft, due to the fact that finger veins are not normally visible to others. Extracting finger vein patterns from infrared images is the most difficult part in finger vein authentication. Uneven illumination, varying tissues and bones, and changes in the physical conditions and the blood flow make the thickness and brightness of the same vein different in each acquisition. Accordingly, extracting finger veins at their accurate positions regardless of their thickness and brightness is necessary for accurate personal identification. For this purpose, we propose a new finger vein extraction method which is composed of gradient normalization, principal curvature calculation, and binarization. As local brightness variation has little effect on the curvature and as gradient normalization makes the curvature fairly uniform at vein pixels, our method effectively extracts finger vein patterns regardless of the vein thickness or brightness. In our experiment, the proposed method showed notable improvement as compared with the existing methods.

  6. Nanophthalmos and hemiretinal vein occlusion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Albar, Ahmad A.; Nowilaty, Sawsan R.; Ghazi, Nicola G.

    2014-01-01

    Many risk factors have been linked to retinal vein occlusions (RVOs) whether central or branch retinal vein occlusion. Ocular risk factors include glaucoma and hypermetropia. Controversy exists to whether short axial length is a risk factor for retinal vein occlusions. We report an extreme case that supports the latter hypothesis. A 33-year-old male presented with decreased visual acuity in the left eye. He turned out to have nanophthalmos with hemiretinal vein occlusion and macular edema with unremarkable systemic work up for retinal vein occlusion except for a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level of 7%. To our knowledge this is the first case report of hemiretinal vein occlusion in the setting of nanophthalmos and suggests that short axial length may be a risk factor for retinal vein occlusion.

  7. Atypical penile Mondor's disease - involvement of the circumflex vein.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rahul; Sonthalia, Sidharth; Gera, Tanu; Sarkar, Rashmi

    2015-04-01

    Mondor's disease is a rare condition characterised by superficial thrombophlebitis of subcutaneous veins, most commonly over the anterior chest wall. Penile Mondor's disease is rarer, arising out of thrombophlebitis of the penile veins. It typically involves the dorsal vein of the penis and presents with a cord-like indurated lesion with a beaded feel, palpable along the length of the involved vein. Though penile Mondor's disease involving the dorsal vein of the penis has been reported by many authors, we report a peculiar case of penile Mondor's disease in a 26-year-old sexually active man with thrombophlebitis of the circumflex vein of the penis with sparing of the dorsal vein. Diagnosis was confirmed on Doppler ultrasonography of the penile venous system. Despite exhaustive history taking, no cause could be elicited. The lesion completely subsided within three days with daily local hot fomentation. We propose the term 'atypical penile Mondor's disease' for such a case. PMID:24867818

  8. Dilated vein of Galen in Kabuki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Snchez-Carpintero, Roco; Herranz, Ana; Reynoso, Csar; Zubieta, Jos Luis

    2012-01-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) comprises multiple congenital abnormalities and is characterized by a peculiar facial appearance, dermatoglyphic anomalies, mental retardation, skeletal abnormalities and postnatal growth retardation. We describe the case of a 23-month-old boy with the typical features of KS who had several malformations in the veins of the brain, which had not previously been described in patients with this syndrome. The MRI phlebogram of this patient showed that the vein of Galen was dilated and that it drained anomalously. The sinus rectus was abnormal and the longitudinal inferior venous sinus was absent. In view of this finding, together with the fact that structural brain abnormalities in KS are more frequent than in other congenital syndromes with multiple malformations, we propose that MRI be used in the diagnostic work-up of all patients with KS. PMID:21330077

  9. Finger Vein Recognition with Personalized Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiaoming; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Meng, Xianjing

    2013-01-01

    Finger veins are a promising biometric pattern for personalized identification in terms of their advantages over existing biometrics. Based on the spatial pyramid representation and the combination of more effective information such as gray, texture and shape, this paper proposes a simple but powerful feature, called Pyramid Histograms of Gray, Texture and Orientation Gradients (PHGTOG). For a finger vein image, PHGTOG can reflect the global spatial layout and local details of gray, texture and shape. To further improve the recognition performance and reduce the computational complexity, we select a personalized subset of features from PHGTOG for each subject by using the sparse weight vector, which is trained by using LASSO and called PFS-PHGTOG. We conduct extensive experiments to demonstrate the promise of the PHGTOG and PFS-PHGTOG, experimental results on our databases show that PHGTOG outperforms the other existing features. Moreover, PFS-PHGTOG can further boost the performance in comparison with PHGTOG. PMID:23974154

  10. Brucellosis Associated with Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tolaj, Ilir; Mehmeti, Murat; Ramadani, Hamdi; Tolaj, Jasmina; Dedushi, Kreshnike; Fejza, Hajrullah

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 10 years more than 700 cases of brucellosis have been reported in Kosovo, which is heavily oriented towards agriculture and animal husbandry. Here, brucellosis is still endemic and represents an uncontrolled public health problem. Human brucellosis may present with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations; among them, vascular complications are uncommon. Hereby we describe the case of a 37-year-old male patient with brucellosis complicated by deep vein thrombosis on his left leg. PMID:25568754

  11. Brucellosis associated with deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Tolaj, Ilir; Mehmeti, Murat; Ramadani, Hamdi; Tolaj, Jasmina; Dedushi, Kreshnike; Fejza, Hajrullah

    2014-11-19

    Over the past 10 years more than 700 cases of brucellosis have been reported in Kosovo, which is heavily oriented towards agriculture and animal husbandry. Here, brucellosis is still endemic and represents an uncontrolled public health problem. Human brucellosis may present with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations; among them, vascular complications are uncommon. Hereby we describe the case of a 37-year-old male patient with brucellosis complicated by deep vein thrombosis on his left leg. PMID:25568754

  12. Percutaneous Transumbilical Portal Vein Embolization in a Patient with a Ruptured Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by the Portal Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soo Chin; Kim, Hyo-Cheol, E-mail: angiointervention@gmail.com; Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We describe a case of a ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma supplied by the portal vein that was successfully treated with portal vein embolization via a percutaneous transumbilical approach. A contrast material-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scan showed the presence of a large hypervascular tumor on portal venous phase as well as right hepatic vein thrombosis and hemoperitoneum that prevented portal vein embolization by the use of the percutaneous and transjugular transhepatic approach. The use of percutaneous transumbilical portal vein embolization can be an alternative option in this situation.

  13. Patterning of Leaf Vein Networks by Convergent Auxin Transport Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sawchuk, Megan G.; Edgar, Alexander; Scarpella, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    The formation of leaf vein patterns has fascinated biologists for centuries. Transport of the plant signal auxin has long been implicated in vein patterning, but molecular details have remained unclear. Varied evidence suggests a central role for the plasma-membrane (PM)-localized PIN-FORMED1 (PIN1) intercellular auxin transporter of Arabidopsis thaliana in auxin-transport-dependent vein patterning. However, in contrast to the severe vein-pattern defects induced by auxin transport inhibitors, pin1 mutant leaves have only mild vein-pattern defects. These defects have been interpreted as evidence of redundancy between PIN1 and the other four PM-localized PIN proteins in vein patterning, redundancy that underlies many developmental processes. By contrast, we show here that vein patterning in the Arabidopsis leaf is controlled by two distinct and convergent auxin-transport pathways: intercellular auxin transport mediated by PM-localized PIN1 and intracellular auxin transport mediated by the evolutionarily older, endoplasmic-reticulum-localized PIN6, PIN8, and PIN5. PIN6 and PIN8 are expressed, as PIN1 and PIN5, at sites of vein formation. pin6 synthetically enhances pin1 vein-pattern defects, and pin8 quantitatively enhances pin1pin6 vein-pattern defects. Function of PIN6 is necessary, redundantly with that of PIN8, and sufficient to control auxin response levels, PIN1 expression, and vein network formation; and the vein pattern defects induced by ectopic PIN6 expression are mimicked by ectopic PIN8 expression. Finally, vein patterning functions of PIN6 and PIN8 are antagonized by PIN5 function. Our data define a new level of control of vein patterning, one with repercussions on other patterning processes in the plant, and suggest a mechanism to select cell files specialized for vascular function that predates evolution of PM-localized PIN proteins. PMID:23437008

  14. Frequency-Domain Streak Camera and Tomography for Ultrafast Imaging of Evolving and Channeled Plasma Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Reed, Stephen; Dong, Peng; Downer, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate a prototype Frequency Domain Streak Camera (FDSC) that can capture the picosecond time evolution of the plasma accelerator structure in a single shot. In our prototype Frequency-Domain Streak Camera, a probe pulse propagates obliquely to a sub-picosecond pump pulse that creates an evolving nonlinear index "bubble" in fused silica glass, supplementing a conventional Frequency Domain Holographic (FDH) probe-reference pair that co-propagates with the "bubble". Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT) generalizes Frequency-Domain Streak Camera by probing the "bubble" from multiple angles and reconstructing its morphology and evolution using algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans. Multiplexing methods (Temporal Multiplexing and Angular Multiplexing) improve data storage and processing capability, demonstrating a compact Frequency Domain Tomography system with a single spectrometer.

  15. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid detection of the causal agents of cassava brown streak disease.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, J A; Ostoja-Starzewska, S; Adams, I P; Miano, D W; Abidrabo, P; Kinyua, Z; Alicai, T; Dickinson, M J; Peters, D; Boonham, N; Smith, J

    2013-08-01

    The causal agents of cassava brown streak disease have recently been identified as Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV). Primers have been developed for rapid detection of these viruses by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP). Performance of the RT-LAMP assays compared favourably with published RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR methods. Furthermore, amplification by RT-LAMP is completed in 40 min and does not require thermal cycling equipment. Modification of the RT-LAMP reactions to use labelled primers allowed rapid detection of amplification products using lateral flow devices containing antibodies specific to the incorporated labels, avoiding the need for fluorescence detection or gel electrophoresis. PMID:22820076

  16. Management of proximal deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Nyamekye, I; Merker, L

    2012-01-01

    Iliofemoral DVT constitutes approximately 20-25% of lower limb DVT and represents a specific subgroup of patients at highest risk for post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). Anticoagulation alone has no significant thrombolytic activity and has not impact on PTS prevention. Early thrombus removal has reduced PTS in uncontrolled reports and reviews but major trials are awaited. The optimal timing for treatment appear to be thrombus <2 weeks old and, methods for thrombus removal include direct open or suction thrombectomy, catheter directed thrombolysis (CDT), with or without percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) devices. Three principle types of PMT device are in use (rotational, rheolytic and ultrasound enhanced devices) and are combined with CDT in pharmocomechanical thrombolysis (PhMT) to enhance early thrombus removal. These devices have individual device specific attributes and side effects that are additional to the bleeding complications of thrombolysis. A number of additional interventions may be utilised to the improve results of CDT and PhMT. IVC filter deployment to reduce periprocedural PE, is supported by little evidence unless an indication for its use already exists. However, balloon venoplasty and vein stents undoubtedly vein patency after treatment. Early thrombus removal comes with additional upfront costs derived from devices, imaging and critical care bed usage. However, significant potential savings from reduction in PTS and rethrombosis rates may reduce overall societal costs. This review focuses on iliofemoral thrombosis, however, the less commonly encountered but clinically important subclavian vein thrombosis is also discussed. PMID:22457306

  17. How I treat splanchnic vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ageno, Walter; Dentali, Francesco; Squizzato, Alessandro

    2014-12-11

    Antithrombotic treatment of splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) is a clinical challenge. Depending on the site of thrombosis, patients are at risk of developing liver insufficiency, portal hypertension, or bowel infarction and may experience recurrence in both the splanchnic veins and other vein segments. To prevent recurrence, anticoagulant therapy should be started as soon as possible after diagnosis and is often continued for an indefinite period of time. However, active bleeding is not infrequent at the time of SVT diagnosis, and major risk factors for bleeding, such as esophageal varices or a low platelet count, are frequently present in these patients. In real-world clinical practice, a proportion of SVT patients are left untreated because the risks associated with anticoagulant therapy are felt to exceed its benefits. However, the majority of patients receive anticoagulant drugs, with heterogeneous timing of initiation, drug choice, and dosages. Evidence to drive treatment decisions is limited because no randomized controlled trials have been carried out in these patients. This review provides practical guidance for the use of anticoagulant drugs in patients presenting with SVT, including symptomatic as well as incidentally detected events. PMID:25320239

  18. Isolated and Complex Scimitar Vein Anomalies and Their Differentiation from the Meandering Right Pulmonary Vein

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Four pediatric patients with isolated (the adult form) and complex (the infantile form) scimitar vein anomalies were reviewed and compared with patients with meandering right pulmonary veins. Materials and Methods From January 1990 to December 2006, 4 female patients, aged 2 days to 3.5 years, with isolated and complex scimitar vein anomalies were retrospectively studied. The clinical features, chest radiographs, echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, computer tomography, bronchography, cardiac catheterization with angiography, surgery, and autopsy were reviewed to substantiate the diagnosis of isolated and complex scimitar vein anomalies. Results Clinical manifestations were lung infections with radiographic scimitar signs in 4 patients (3 right; 1 left), respiratory distress, congestive heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and/or cyanosis in 3 patients, dextrocardia, heterotaxy, and/or right atrial isomerism in 2 patients, as well as dextroversion, right bronchial isomerism, bronchial stenosis, and/or sepsis in 1 patient. Two patients with right atrial isomerism expired. Conclusion The clinical discrimination between scimitar vein anomaly with and without cardiovascular and bronchopulmonary malformations is crucial for the outcomes vary. PMID:18159589

  19. Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 6.9, Longitude 69.4 East (290.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. An Optical Streak Diagnostic for Observing Anode-Cathode Plasmas for Radiographic Source Development

    SciTech Connect

    Droemer, Darryl W. [National Security Technologies, LLC; Crain, Marlon D.; Lare, Gregory A. [National Security Technologies, LLC; Bennett, Nichelle L. [National Security Technologies, LLC; Johnston, Mark D. [Sandia National Laboratories

    2013-06-13

    National Security Technologies, LLC, and Sandia National Laboratories are collaborating in the development of pulsed powerdriven flash x-ray radiographic sources that utilize high-intensity electron beam diodes. The RITS 6 (Radiographic Integrated Test Stand) accelerator at Sandia is used to drive a self magnetic pinch diode to produce a Bremsstrahlung x-ray source. The high electric fields and current densities associated with these short A-K gap pinch beam diodes present many challenges in diode development. Plasmas generated at both the anode and cathode affect the diode performance, which is manifested in varying spot (source) sizes, total dose output, and impedance profiles. Understanding the nature of these plasmas including closure rates and densities is important in modeling their behavior and providing insight into their mitigation. In this paper we describe a streak camerabased optical diagnostic that is capable of observing and measuring plasma evolution within the A-K gap. By imaging a region of interest onto the input slit of a streak camera, we are able to produce a time-resolved one-dimensional image of the evolving plasma. Typical data are presented.

  1. Gas-phase lifetimes of nucleobase analogues by picosecond pumpionization and streak techniques.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Susan; Frey, Hans-Martin; Heid, Cornelia G; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    The picosecond (ps) timescale is relevant for the investigation of many molecular dynamical processes such as fluorescence, nonradiative relaxation, intramolecular vibrational relaxation, molecular rotation and intermolecular energy transfer, to name a few. While investigations of ultrafast (femtosecond) processes of biological molecules, e.g. nucleobases and their analogues in the gas phase are available, there are few investigations on the ps time scale. We have constructed a ps pump-ionization setup and a ps streak camera fluorescence apparatus for the determination of lifetimes of supersonic jet-cooled and isolated molecules and clusters. The ps pump-ionization setup was used to determine the lifetimes of the nucleobase analogue 2-aminopurine (2AP) and of two 2AP?(H2O)n water cluster isomers with n=1 and 2. Their lifetimes lie between 150 ps and 3 ns and are strongly cluster-size dependent. The ps streak camera setup was used to determine accurate fluorescence lifetimes of the uracil analogue 2-pyridone (2PY), its self-dimer (2PY)2, two isomers of its trimer (2PY)3 and its tetramer (2PY)4, which lie in the 7-12 ns range. PMID:24983611

  2. Tumors of bilateral streak gonads in patients with disorders of sex development containing y chromosome material.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Fumi; Shimada, Kenji; Ida, Shinobu

    2014-07-01

    The presence of Y chromosome material in patients with disorders of sex development (DSD) has been associated with a high risk of gonadoblastoma. Therefore, gonadectomy is recommended in females with bilateral streak gonads and Y chromosome material. The aim of this study was to present our experience with prophylactic gonadectomy in those patients and evaluate their risk of gonadal tumors. We reviewed the charts of 11 female patients who had bilateral gonadectomy (by laparoscopically in 9 patients, by laparotomy in 2 patients) between 1991 and 2012 at our hospital. Seven patients with Turner syndrome (TS) who carry a Y mosaic karyotype in peripheral blood, 3 patients with Swyer syndrome and one patient with Frasier syndrome were included. All patients had an unambiguous female phenotype. Age at surgery and follow-up ranged from 2 to 23 (mean 11) and 0.5 to 20 (mean 8) yr, respectively. Pathologic examination revealed gonadal tumors in 6 of 11 patients (56%), including 4 with TS, the youngest of which was 2 yr old, one with Swyer syndrome and one with Frasier syndrome. A gonadoblastoma was detected in 8 gonads, and an association of dysgerminoma with gonadoblastoma was detected in 2 gonads. Imaging studies showed no metastasis, and the postoperative course was uneventful in all patients. In our series of DSD patients with bilateral streak gonads and Y chromosome material, the risk of gonadal tumor was high. Considering the early occurrence of gonadoblastoma and its high potential for malignant transformation, early prophylactic gonadectomy is strongly recommended. PMID:25110393

  3. Tumors of Bilateral Streak Gonads in Patients with Disorders of Sex Development Containing Y Chromosome Material

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Fumi; Shimada, Kenji; Ida, Shinobu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The presence of Y chromosome material in patients with disorders of sex development (DSD) has been associated with a high risk of gonadoblastoma. Therefore, gonadectomy is recommended in females with bilateral streak gonads and Y chromosome material. The aim of this study was to present our experience with prophylactic gonadectomy in those patients and evaluate their risk of gonadal tumors. We reviewed the charts of 11 female patients who had bilateral gonadectomy (by laparoscopically in 9 patients, by laparotomy in 2 patients) between 1991 and 2012 at our hospital. Seven patients with Turner syndrome (TS) who carry a Y mosaic karyotype in peripheral blood, 3 patients with Swyer syndrome and one patient with Frasier syndrome were included. All patients had an unambiguous female phenotype. Age at surgery and follow-up ranged from 2 to 23 (mean 11) and 0.5 to 20 (mean 8) yr, respectively. Pathologic examination revealed gonadal tumors in 6 of 11 patients (56%), including 4 with TS, the youngest of which was 2 yr old, one with Swyer syndrome and one with Frasier syndrome. A gonadoblastoma was detected in 8 gonads, and an association of dysgerminoma with gonadoblastoma was detected in 2 gonads. Imaging studies showed no metastasis, and the postoperative course was uneventful in all patients. In our series of DSD patients with bilateral streak gonads and Y chromosome material, the risk of gonadal tumor was high. Considering the early occurrence of gonadoblastoma and its high potential for malignant transformation, early prophylactic gonadectomy is strongly recommended. PMID:25110393

  4. Mapping the distribution of maize streak virus genotypes across the forest and transition zones of Ghana.

    PubMed

    Oppong, Allen; Offei, Samuel K; Ofori, Kwadwo; Adu-Dapaah, Hans; Lamptey, Joseph N L; Kurenbach, Brigitta; Walters, Matthew; Shepherd, Dionne N; Martin, Darren P; Varsani, Arvind

    2015-02-01

    Throughout sub-Saharan Africa, maize streak virus strain A (MSV-A), the causal agent of maize streak disease (MSD), is an important biological constraint on maize production. In November/December 2010, an MSD survey was carried out in the forest and transition zones of Ghana in order to obtain MSV-A virulence sources for the development of MSD-resistant maize genotypes with agronomic properties suitable for these regions. In 79 well-distributed maize fields, the mean MSD incidence was 18.544% and the symptom severity score was 2.956 (1=no symptoms and 5=extremely severe). We detected no correlation between these two variables. Phylogenetic analysis of cloned MSV-A isolates that were fully sequenced from samples collected in 51 of these fields, together with those sampled from various other parts of Africa, indicated that all of the Ghanaian isolates occurred within a broader cluster of West African isolates, all belonging to the highly virulent MSV-A1 subtype. Besides being the first report of a systematic MSV survey in Ghana, this study is the first to characterize the full-genome sequences of Ghanaian MSV isolates. The 51 genome sequences determined here will additionally be a valuable resource for the rational selection of representative MSV-A variant panels for MSD resistance screening. PMID:25344899

  5. Means of extending streak camera recording into the important 1300 to 1600 nm wavelength regime: parametric frequency upconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, M.E.; Rotter, M.D.; Jander, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    We present preliminary data demonstrating the feasibility of coupling an optical parametric frequency upconverter to a streak camera, thereby realizing a hybrid recording system that can sensitively record very fast (approx. 10 ps) single-shot infrared events. The data presented in this paper represent experimental work in the upconversion of 845-nm light. This wavelength was chosen for experimental convenience to expedite our proof of principle demonstration. Our results give an estimated upconversion quantum efficiency of about 25%. We also discuss details of our future experiments in upconversion/streak camera recording at 1300 nm.

  6. Wheat Curl Mite and Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus Spread from Volunteer Wheat Figure 2. Spectral profiles at three points identified in Figure

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Wheat Curl Mite and Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus Spread from Volunteer Wheat Figure 2. Spectral Management Information Technologies (CALMIT) (apeters@calmit.unl.edu) Background: Wheat streak mosaic (WSM) is the most severe disease of winter wheat in the Great Plains. Estimates indicate WSM causes an average loss

  7. Quantification of Maize Fine Streak Virus Genomic and Positive-sense RNAs in Infected Maize Reveals High Level Accumulation of ORF 3 and 4 MFSV Transcripts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantification of Maize fine streak virus genomic and positive-sense RNAs in infected maize reveals high level accumulation of ORF 3 and 4 MFSV transcripts. We improved methods to analyze RNA produced by Maize fine streak virus (MVSF) within infected maize tissue using real-time RT-qPCR. We designe...

  8. A vein display system based on three-dimensional reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Danting; Zhou, Ya; Hu, Xiaoming; Wu, Zhaoguo; Dai, Xiaobin

    2014-10-01

    Venipuncture is the most common way of all invasive medical procedures. A vein display system can make vein access easier by capturing the vein information and projecting a visible vein image onto the skin, which is correctly aligned with the subject's vein. The existing systems achieve correct alignment by the design of coaxial structure. Such a structure causes complex optical and mechanical design and big physical dimensions inevitably. In this paper, we design a stereovision- based vein display system, which consists of a pair of cameras, a DLP projector and a near-infrared light source. We recover the three-dimensional venous structure from image pair acquired from two near-infrared cameras. Then the vein image from the viewpoint of projector is generated from the three-dimensional venous structure and projected exactly onto skin by the DLP projector. Since the stereo cameras get the depth information of vessels, the system can make sure the alignment of projected veins and the real veins without a coaxial structure. The experiment results prove that we propose a feasible solution for a portable and low-cost vein display device.

  9. Development of HIFU Therapy System for Lower Extremity Varicose Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, Ryuhei; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokyo 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Suzuki, Jun; Deguchi, Juno; Miyata, Tetsuro [Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2009-04-14

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment utilizing microbubbles was investigated in the present study. It is known that microbubbles have the potential to enhance the heating effects of an ultrasound field. In this study, the heat accompanying microbubble oscillation was used to occlude varicose veins. Alteration of veins was observed after ultrasound irradiation. Veins were resected by stripping. In this study, two vein conditions were adopted during HIFU irradiation; non-compressed and compressed. Compressing the vein was expected to improve occlusion by rubbing the altered intima under compressed conditions. The frequency of the ultrasound was 1.7 MHz, the intensity at the focus was 2800 W/cm{sup 2}, and the irradiation time was 20 s. In this study, the contrast agent Levovist registered was chosen as a microbubble source, and the void fraction (ratio of total gas volume to liquid) in the vein was fixed at 10{sup -5}. Under non-compressed conditions, changes were observed only at the adventitia of the vein anterior wall. In contrast, under compressed conditions, changes were observed from the intima to the adventitia of both the anterior and posterior walls, and they were partly stuck together. In addition, more experiments with hematoxylin-eosin staining suggested that the changes in the vein were more substantial under the latter conditions. From these results, it was confirmed that the vein was occluded more easily with vein compression.

  10. Pre-operative long saphenous vein mapping predicts vein anatomy and quality leading to improved post-operative leg morbidity.

    PubMed

    Luckraz, Heyman; Lowe, Julie; Pugh, Neil; Azzu, Ahmed A

    2008-04-01

    Long saphenous vein harvesting for coronary bypass surgery is associated with significant morbidity. Furthermore, vein quality is often variable sometimes requiring incisions in both legs. This prospective randomised control study assessed the usefulness of pre-operative long saphenous vein mapping in terms of conduit quality and location, incision lengths and post-operative morbidity. The long saphenous vein was assessed and mapped pre-operatively (n=31) by venous Doppler ultrasound or not (n=30). The size and anatomical distribution of the long saphenous vein was well predicted by the ultrasound study (correlation coefficient=0.87). Intra-operatively, the mean length of leg wound incision per vein graft performed was significantly less in the mapped group [16.8 (4.0) vs. 24.1 (10.4) cm, P=0.005]. This translated in a shorter operative time for vein harvesting per length of vein graft needed [36 (13) vs. 47 (17) min, P=0.04]. Post-operatively there was a tendency to less leg wound complications in the mapped group (P=0.08) and earlier hospital discharge (median length of stay 6.5 days vs. 8.0 days, P=0.05). Thus, long saphenous vein mapping pre-operatively predicted the size and anatomy of the vein appropriately. This led to a selective leg wound incision and reduced operative time with the benefit of reduced leg complication post-operatively. PMID:18203766

  11. Extracorporeal shock waves as curative therapy for varicose veins?

    PubMed Central

    Angehrn, Fiorenzo; Kuhn, Christoph; Sonnabend, Ortrud; Voss, Axel

    2008-01-01

    In this prospective design study the effects of low-energy partially focused extracorporeal generated shock waves (ESW) onto a subcutaneous located varicose vein left vena saphena magna (VSM) are investigated. The treatment consisted of 4 ESW applications within 21 days. The varicose VSM of both sides were removed by surgery, and samples analyzed comparing the treated and untreated by means of histopathology. No damage to the treated varicose vein in particular and no mechanical destruction to the varicose veins wall could be demonstrated. However, an induction of neo-collagenogenesis was observed. The thickness of the varicose veins wall increased. Optimization of critical application parameters by investigating a larger number of patients may turn ESW into a non-invasive curative varicose treatment. PMID:18488887

  12. Portal vein arterialization technique for liver transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Jiang, Yi; Lv, Li-Zhi; Cai, Qiu-Cheng; Yang, Fang; Hu, Huan-Zhang; Zhang, Xiao-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantations were performed on two patients with hepatic failure caused by liver cirrhosis. Hard obsolete thrombi and portal venous sclerosis were observed in the major portal veins of both patients. The arteria colica media of one recipient and the portal vein of the donor were anastomosed end-to-end. The hepatic artery of the first donor was anastomosed end-to end with the gastroduodenal artery of the first recipient; meanwhile, the portal vein of the second donor was simultaneously anastomosed end- to-end with the common hepatic artery of the second recipient. The blood flow of the portal vein, the perfusion of the donor liver and liver function were satisfactory after surgery. Portal vein arterialization might be an effective treatment for patients whose portal vein reconstruction was difficult. PMID:25232274

  13. Use of varicose veins as arterial bypass grafts.

    PubMed

    Moritz, A; Grabenwger, F; Raderer, F; Ptakovsky, H; Magometschnigg, H; Ullrich, R; Staudacher, M

    1993-10-01

    Varicose veins are not generally used as arterial bypass grafts despite their physiological endothelial flow surface. The large, irregular diameter and the thin wall renders these veins inadequate. Experimental studies have shown that a considerable reduction in the diameter of veins can be achieved by external wrapping without the generation of obstructing folds of the vein wall. A Dacron mesh tube surrounding varicose veins was used as a bypass graft in 13 infrainguinal arterial reconstructions. Ligated larger side branches and connections of the mesh segments caused irregularities of the otherwise smooth flow surfaces. Ten grafts were patent after a mean follow-up of 17 months. Two grafts have remained patent despite severe outflow obstruction in one and proximal occlusion in the other; both underwent successful interventions. The antithrombogenic properties of these grafts were partly due to a marked increase of the vasa vasorum. Externally constricted varicose veins may be used as arterial bypass conduits with good intermediate-term patency. PMID:8076087

  14. [Spondylogenic hypertension of deep veins of the brain].

    PubMed

    Gongal'ski?, V V; Prokopovich, E V

    2005-01-01

    The cerebral deep veins hypertension criteria using bloodstream in large cerebral vein (Galen's vein) are worked up. An increase in venous pressure was proved to be connected with congenital and acquired pathology of cervical spine and craniovertebral isthmus. The new roentgenologic sign of pathology located in craniovertebral isthmus is determined. It is characterized by abnormal high front arc of the atlas, that hinders the outflow of venous blood from the cranial cavity. PMID:15915998

  15. An idiopathic azygos vein aneurysm mimicking a mediastinal mass.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Yoshinobu; Hamatsu, Takayuki; Suehiro, Taketoshi; Koike, Makiko; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Sugimachi, Keizo

    2014-07-01

    Azygos vein aneurysms are very rare causes of mediastinal masses and are usually accidental findings on chest roentgenography. Most are detected in patients with portal hypertension or venous malformations. An idiopathic azygos vein aneurysm is assumed to be congenital and is much more exceptional. We present the case of a 76-year-old man who underwent excision of an idiopathic azygos vein aneurysm by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). PMID:24996721

  16. Partial anomalous connection of both superior pulmonary veins.

    PubMed

    Marianeschi, Stefano M; Cannata, Aldo; Uricchio, Nicola; Pedretti, Stefano; Vignati, Gabriele

    2012-08-01

    Several patterns of anomalous pulmonary venous drainage have been described in the literature, and bilateral partial pulmonary anomalous vein connection (PAPVC) has been described as a rare congenital cardiac anomaly. We report an unusual type of bilateral PAPVC, involving both the superior right and left pulmonary veins draining into the left brachiocephalic vein in a young adult who was symptomatic with dyspnea and a dry cough. PMID:22818314

  17. Can vein patterns be used to estimate rock permeabilities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Daniel; Vass, Anna; Ghani, Irfan; Toussaint, Renaud; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Urai, Janos L.; Arndt, Max; Virgo, Simon; Wendler, Frank; Blum, Philipp; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver

    2014-05-01

    Fracturing of rocks due to tectonic stresses or local high fluid pressures and the formation of fluid pathways is important for a whole range of industrially relevant processes in the Earth's upper crust reaching from groundwater transport, hydrocarbon migration to geothermal systems. Fracturing and the opening of fluid pathways become especially important in tight rocks where fluid migration through the rock matrix is restricted. In addition observations show that fractures are often partly or completely sealed and occur as veins in geological systems. How can we interpret the permeability of these vein systems? The internal structure of veins often indicates that they are formed by several cracking and sealing events. In addition some geological systems contain partly sealed veins that have a preserved porosity and may add to the overall permeability of the system. We are comparing field areas that contain different vein patterns with hydrodynamic numerical models where fractures develop as a function of gravity, extension and fluid pressure gradients. In addition fractures seal where the developing veins can have variable properties in terms of elasticity, breaking strength and porosity. Results indicate that permeability in such systems is not a constant but may vary strongly over time. In an active system the amount of veins and number of open fractures depends not only on the timing of sealing but also on the breaking strength of the veins. Strong veins can clog the system whereas weak veins tend to lead to possible connected fracture networks. In addition one cannot link veins directly to fluid flow, intense veining does not mean that the system has or had a high permeability. We will present a first attempt to classify different fracturing and sealing systems based on field observations and numerical models.

  18. Origin of pegmatitic segregation veins within flood basalts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOHN H. PUFFER; DAWN L. HORTER

    1993-01-01

    Subhorizontal veins and lenses of coarse-grained rock composed of plagioclase, augite, and Fe-Ti oxides in a glassy and vesicular mesostasis occur within several thick subaerial basalt flows in the Columbia River Basalt province of Washington and in the eastern North American Mesozoic basalt province. The veins and lenses, referred to as pegmatitic segregation veins, are typically 1-10 cm thick and

  19. Accuracy of clinical assessment of deep-vein thrombosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip S. Wells; Jack Hirsh; David R. Anderson; Anthony W. A. Lensing; Gary Foster; Clive Kearon; Jeffrey Weitz; Robert D'Ovidio; Alberto Cogo; Paolo Prandoni; Antonio Girolami; Jeffrey S. Ginsberg

    1995-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of deep-vein thrombosis is generally thought to be unreliable. From experience, we hypothesised that this widely held view might be incorrect. We developed a clinical model and prospectively tested its ability in three tertiary care centres to stratify symptomatic outpatients with suspected deep-vein thrombosis into groups with high, moderate, or low probability groups of deep-vein thrombosis. We

  20. GPU-accelerated Faint Streak Detection for Uncued Surveillance of LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, P.; Ackermann, M.; McGraw, J. T.

    2013-09-01

    By astronomical standards, small objects (<10cm) in LEO illuminated by the Sun under terminator conditions are quite bright, depositing 100's to 1000's of photons per second into small telescope apertures (< 1m diameter). The challenge in discovering these objects with no a priori knowledge of their orbit (i.e. uncued surveillance) is that their relative motion with respect to a ground-based telescope makes them appear to have large angular rates of motion, up to and exceeding 1 degree per second. Thus in even a short exposure, the signal from the object is smeared out in a streak with low signal-to-noise per pixel. Go Green Termite (GGT), Inc. of Gilroy, CA, in collaboration with the University of New Mexico (UNM), is building two proof-of-concept wide-field imaging systems to test, develop and prove a novel streak detection technique. The imaging systems are built from off-the-shelf optics and detectors resulting in a 350mm aperture and a 6 square degree field of view. For streak detection, field of view is of critical importance because the maximum exposure time on the object is limited by its crossing time. In this way, wider fields of view impact surveys for LEO objects both by increasing the survey volume and increasing sensitivity. Using our newly GPU-accelerated detection scheme, the proof-of-concept systems are expected to be able to detect objects fainter than 12th magnitude moving at 1 degree per second and possibly as faint as 13th magnitude for slower moving objects. Meter-class optical systems using these techniques should be able to detect objects fainter than 14th magnitude, which is roughly equivalent to a golf ball at 1000km altitude. The goal of this work is to demonstrate a scalable system for near real time detection of fast moving objects that can be then handed off to other instruments capable of tracking and characterizing them. The two proof-of-concept systems, separated by ~30km, work together by taking simultaneous images of the same volume to constrain the orbits of detected objects using parallax measurements. These detections will then be followed-up by photometric observations taken at UNM to independently assess the objects and the quality of the derived orbits. We believe this will demonstrate the potential of small telescope arrays for detecting and cataloguing heretofore unknown LEO objects.

  1. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Yellow Perch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krieger, Douglas A.; Terrell, James W.; Nelson, Patrick C.

    1983-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop riverine and lacustrine habitat models for yellow perch (Perca flavescens). The models are scaled to produce an index of habitat suitability between 0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1 (optimally suitable habitat) for riverine, lacustrine, and palustrine habitat in the 48 contiguous United States. Habitat Suitability Indexes (HSI's) are designed for use with the Habitat Evaluation Procedures developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Also included are discussions of Suitability Index (SI) curves as used in the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) and SI curves available for an IFIM analysis of yellow perch habitat.

  2. Effects of wheat streak mosaic virus on root development and water-use efficiency of hard red winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greenhouse and field studies were conducted to determine the effects of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), a member of the family Potyviridae, on root development and water-use efficiency (WUE) of two hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivars, one susceptible and one resistant to WSMV. In t...

  3. Wheat streak mosaic virus genotypes introduced to Argentina are closely related to isolates from the American Pacific Northwest and Australia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) was first detected in Argentina in 2002. Comparison of 78 WSMV coat protein sequences revealed that three Argentine isolates were closely related to isolates from the American Pacific Northwest (APNW) and Australia. Complete sequences were determined for one Argen...

  4. Diagnosing coupled jet-streak circulations for a northern plains snow band from the operational nested-grid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakim, Gregory J.; Uccellini, Louis W.

    1992-01-01

    On 17 March 1989, moderate to heavy snow developed in a 100- to 200-km-wide band extending from South Dakota to northern Michigan. The 4- to 8-inch snowfall within this band was not associated with major cyclogenesis, and developed 500 to 600 km north of a stationary surface front. A diagnostic analysis based on an application of the General Meteorological Package (GEMPAK 5.0) to a numerical simulation from the operational nested-grid model (NGM) is utilized to show that the development of this snow band is related to the interaction of two upper-tropospheric jet streaks and their associated transverse circulation patterns. The eastward propagation of a jet streak from the West Coast toward the middle United States and to the south of a slower-moving jet along the U.S.-Canadian border led to a merger of the ascent maxima associated with the direct and indirect circulations of the northern and southern jets, respectively. The snow band developed as the ascending branches of the jet-streak circulation patterns merged, with the eastward propagation of the heaviest snow linked to the motion of the coupled circulation pattern. The study also demonstrates the usefulness of the operational NGM for providing the higher-resolution datasets required to relate the evolution of jet-streak circulation patterns to the development of mesoscale precipitation bands.

  5. Determination of shaped-jet characteristics by double orthogonal synchro streak technique and double x-ray technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Tosello; Mohamed Mehaddi; Henry Marrot

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a method that allows very accurate measurements for a full characterization of shaped charge jets. A double visualization of the jets is achieved by means of both a modified high speed camera CORDIN in Double Orthogonal Synchro Streak Technique (DOSST) configuration and a classical Double XRays Technique (DXRT). The interests of this method are twofold: Firstly, the

  6. Promoters for pregenomic RNA of banana streak badnavirus are active for transgene expression in monocot and dicot plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peer M. Schenk; Tony Remans; Lszl Sgi; Adrian R. Elliott; Ralf G. Dietzgen; Rony Swennen; Paul R. Ebert; Christopher P. L. Grof; John M. Manners

    2001-01-01

    Two putative promoters from Australian banana streak badnavirus (BSV) isolates were analysed for activity in different plant species. In transient expression systems the My (2105 bp) and Cv (1322 bp) fragments were both shown to have promoter activity in a wide range of plant species including monocots (maize, barley, banana, millet, wheat, sorghum), dicots (tobacco, canola, sunflower, Nicotiana benthamiana, tipu

  7. Two Dimensions Are Not Better than One: STREAK and the Univariate Signal Detection Model of Remember/Know Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starns, Jeffrey J.; Ratcliff, Roger

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated STREAK and the univariate signal detection model of Remember/Know (RK) judgments in terms of their ability to fit empirical data and produce psychologically meaningful parameter estimates. Participants studied pairs of words and completed item recognition tests with RK judgments as well as associative recognition tests. Fits to the RK

  8. Structure of the Maize Streak Virus Geminate Particle Wei Zhang,* Norman H. Olson,* Timothy S. Baker,* Lee Faulkner,,

    E-print Network

    Baker, Timothy S.

    ; maize streak virus; ssDNA virus; three-dimen- sional image reconstruction. INTRODUCTION At the beginning-stranded DNA (ssDNA) genomes. The characteristic twinned or "gemi- nate" particles, which consist of two joined-dimensional image reconstruction methods. The particle, of dimensions 220 380 , has an overall 52-point- group

  9. Compositions of Low Albedo Intracrater Materials and Wind Streaks on Mars: Examination of MGS TES Data in Western Arabia Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandfield, J. L.; Wyatt, M. B.; Christensen, P.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Basalt and andesite surface compositions are identified within individual low albedo intracrater features and adjacent dark wind streaks. High resolution mapping of compositional heterogeneities may help constrain origin hypotheses for these features. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Avoiding acidic region streaking in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis: Case study with two bacterial whole cell protein

    E-print Network

    Pal, Debnath

    Avoiding acidic region streaking in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis: Case study with two by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. J. Commun. Dis. 38 255­262 Blokpoel MC, Smeulders MJ, Hubbard JA of IEF-program for 7 cm and 17 cm IPG strips. #12;Supplementary figure 6. 2DE gel images of E. coli WCPE

  11. COMPLETE DELETION OF WHEAT STREAK MOSAIC VIRUS HC-PRO: A NULLL MUTANT IS VIABLE FOR SYSTEMIC INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) genome lacking HC-Pro was constructed and confirmed by RT-PCR to systemically infect wheat, oat, and corn. Coupled in vitro transcription/translation reactions indicated that WSMV P1 proteinase cleaved the polyprotein at the P1/P3 junction of the HC-Pro null mutan...

  12. A 'chemotactic dipole' mechanism for large-scale vortex motion during primitive streak formation in the chick embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandersius, S. A.; Chuai, M.; Weijer, C. J.; Newman, T. J.

    2011-08-01

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves significant coordinated cell movement lateral to the streak, in addition to the posterior-anterior movement of cells in the streak proper. Cells lateral to the streak are observed to undergo 'polonaise movements', i.e. two large counter-rotating vortices, reminiscent of eddies in a fluid. In this paper, we propose a mechanism for these movement patterns which relies on chemotactic signals emitted by a dipolar configuration of cells in the posterior region of the epiblast. The 'chemotactic dipole' consists of adjacent regions of cells emitting chemo-attractants and chemo-repellents. We motivate this idea using a mathematical analogy between chemotaxis and electrostatics, and test this idea using large-scale computer simulations. We implement active cell response to both neighboring mechanical interactions and chemotactic gradients using the Subcellular Element Model. Simulations show the emergence of large-scale vortices of cell movement. The length and time scales of vortex formation are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. We also provide quantitative estimates for the robustness of the chemotaxis dipole mechanism, which indicate that the mechanism has an error tolerance of about 10% to variation in chemotactic parameters, assuming that only 1% of the cell population is involved in emitting signals. This tolerance increases for larger populations of cells emitting signals.

  13. Identification of distinct functions of Wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein in virion assembly and virus movement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is the type member of Tritimovirus genus of the family Potyviridae. The WSMV coat protein (CP) was subjected to point and deletion mutation analyses. WSMV mutants changing aspartic acid residues at amino acid (aa) positions 289, 290, 326, 333, and 334 to alanine elic...

  14. Quantification of yield loss caused by Triticum mosaic virus and Wheat streak mosaic virus in winter wheat under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) and Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) infect winter wheat in the Great Plains region of the United States. The two viruses are transmitted by wheat curl mites, which also transmit High Plains virus. In a field study conducted in 2011 and 2012, winter wheat cultivars Mi...

  15. Modified ecometric technique (four-quadrant sequential streak) to evaluate Campylobacter enrichment broth proficiency in suppressing background microflora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecometric technique is a semi-quantitative scoring method used for quality control of culture media in microbiological laboratories. The technique involves inoculation with defined populations of specific culture onto solid media via a standardized chronological streaking technique, leading to ever-...

  16. Making electrocompetent cells 1. Streak out desired strain from frozen stock and incubate overnight (include drug if

    E-print Network

    Segall, Anca

    Making electrocompetent cells 1. Streak out desired strain from frozen stock and incubate overnight with colony from step one (include drug if present) and shake/incubate overnight. 3. Subculture 5 ml into 500 ml of media (include drug if present). 4. Shake/incubate until an OD600 of 0.5 is reached (this takes

  17. Vascular Streak Dieback of cacao in Southeast Asia and Melanesia: in planta detection of the pathogen and a new taxonomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary J. Samuels; Adnan Ismaiel; Ade Rosmana; Muhammad Junaid; David Guest; Peter Mcmahon; Philip Keane; Agus Purwantara; Smilja Lambert; Marianela Rodriguez-Carres; Marc A. Cubeta

    Vascular Streak Dieback (VSD) disease of cacao (Theobroma cacao) in Southeast Asia and Melanesia is caused by a basidiomycete (Ceratobasidiales) fungus Oncobasidium theobromae (syn. =Thanatephorus theobromae). The most characteristic symptoms of the disease are green-spotted leaf chlorosis or, commonly since about 2004, necrotic blotches, followed by senescence of leaves beginning on the second or third flush behind the shoot apex,

  18. A compensating wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium Robertsonian translocation conferring resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), is a potentially devastating disease of common wheat in the Great Plains of North America. So far, two genes conferring resistance to WSMV have been named and used in cultivar improvement. Here we report a new source of resistance that was derived from a wheat-Th. i...

  19. Endovenous saphenous vein ablation in patients with acute isolated superficial-vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The possible benefits of endovenous saphenous ablation (EVSA) as initial treatment in patients presenting with isolated superficial-vein thrombosis (SVT) and saphenous vein reflux include: (1) definitive treatment of the underlying pathology and (2) elimination of the saphenous vein as a path for pulmonary emboli, which (3) may eliminate the need for anticoagulation. Methods: In a ten-year review of 115 limbs presenting with acute isolated SVT, 72 limbs (71 patients) with saphenous reflux were given a choice of two treatments following an explanation of the risks and benefits of each. Group I limbs (n?=?41) were treated with office EVSA using radiofrequency or laser with or without thrombophlebectomy if performed within 45 days of diagnosis. Post-treatment anticoagulants were not given. Group II limbs (n?=?31) were treated with compression hose and repeat Duplex within one week, with added anticoagulants if SVT extended into the thigh. Results: In group I, mean interval from diagnosis to treatment was 13.7 days. One calf deep vein thrombosis was noted. In group II no complications were noted. In late follow-up of group II patients, 12/29 underwent EVSA more than 45 days after initial presentation. Conclusions: The safety and efficacy of EVSA and thrombophlebectomy appear indistinguishable from conservative measures and may be offered as initial treatment to patients presenting with SVT and saphenous reflux. PMID:24307241

  20. [Idiopathic palmar vein thrombosis of the fingers - rare but relevant].

    PubMed

    Spies, C K; Schwarz-Furlan, S; Hahn, P; Oppermann, J; Unglaub, F

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic thrombosis of palmar finger veins is rare and women suffer from it almost exclusively. Synovial cysts, epidermoid inclusion cysts, giant cell tumours and haemangiomatous lesions should be considered in the process of diagnosis. We present a 56-year-old woman with idiopathic and symptomatic thrombosis of palmar finger veins. Using the palmar approach the painful veins were identified and excised completely. An uncomplicated wound healing has followed with completely unrestricted and painless range of motion. Surgical excision of the finger vein thrombosis should be considered if there is continuing pain. PMID:24089306

  1. Congenitally absent pulmonary veins--diagnostic pitfalls. Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Van der Merwe, P L; Kalis, N N; Gie, R P; Dumoulin, M; Gewillig, M

    1996-06-01

    Two patients with partial absence of the right and left pulmonary veins respectively are described. Congenitally absent pulmonary veins are a rare phenomenon and the diagnosis is often missed or delayed. When children present with haemoptysis and/or recurrent respiratory infections with no obvious underlying cause, absence of the pulmonary veins must be part of the differential diagnosis. Special investigations to be done in these patients are chest roentgenograph to compare the lung volumes, radio-isotope scan, echocardiography and cardiac catheterisation. Magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful in defining the cause and site of obstruction of the pulmonary veins. Depending on the cause, surgery might be considered. PMID:8768776

  2. Two cases of jugular vein thrombosis in severely burned patients

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Hanghui; He, Xiaojie

    2013-01-01

    Here we present two cases of jugular vein thrombosis in burn patients, with diagnosis, risk factor analysis, and treatment approaches. Severely burned patients have high risk of deep vein thrombosis occurrence due to multiple surgeries. The deep vein catheter should be carefully performed. Once deep vein thrombosis is detected, a wide ultrasonography helps to find other thrombosis sites. During the acute phase, low molecular weight heparin can be used. Upon long-term anti-thrombosis treatment, combined use of herbal medicine during rehabilitation is helpful. PMID:23885177

  3. Finger-vein verification based on multi-features fusion.

    PubMed

    Qin, Huafeng; Qin, Lan; Xue, Lian; He, Xiping; Yu, Chengbo; Liang, Xinyuan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new scheme to improve the performance of finger-vein identification systems. Firstly, a vein pattern extraction method to extract the finger-vein shape and orientation features is proposed. Secondly, to accommodate the potential local and global variations at the same time, a region-based matching scheme is investigated by employing the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) matching method. Finally, the finger-vein shape, orientation and SIFT features are combined to further enhance the performance. The experimental results on databases of 426 and 170 fingers demonstrate the consistent superiority of the proposed approach. PMID:24196433

  4. Absence of the superior petrosal veins and sinus: Surgical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Ken; Ribas, Eduardo Santamaria Carvalhal; Kiyosue, Hiro; Komune, Noritaka; Miki, Koichi; Rhoton, Albert L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The superior petrosal vein, one of the most constant and largest drainage pathways in the posterior fossa, may result in complications if occluded. This study calls attention to a unique variant in which the superior petrosal veins and sinus were absent unilaterally, and the venous drainage was through the galenic and tentorial drainage groups. Methods: This study examines one venogram and another anatomic specimen in which the superior petrosal vein and sinus were absent. Results: The superior petrosal veins, described as 13 bridging veins, emptying into the superior petrosal sinus, are the major drainage pathways of the petrosal group of posterior fossa veins. In the cases presented, the superior petrosal vein and sinus were absent and venous drainage was through the galenic and tentorial groups, including the lateral mesencephalic or bridging vein on the tentorial cerebellar surface. Conclusions: In cases in which the superior petrosal sinus and veins are absent, care should be directed to preserving the collateral drainage through the galenic and tentorial tributaries. Although surgical strategies for intraoperative management and preservation of venous structures are still controversial, knowledge of the possible anatomical variations is considered to be essential to improve surgical outcomes.

  5. Laser-produced plasma x-ray diagnostics with an x-ray streak camera at the Iskra-4 plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovski, Arkadi G.; Gubanov, Yuri I.; Pryanishnikov, Ivan G.; Murugov, Vasili M.; Petrov, Sergej I.; Senik, Alexei V.

    1991-04-01

    An X.raj streak camera with an Xray streak tube used for laser-produced plasma soft Xrays measurement is described, and experimental results are given. In investigating short-Jived high temperature plasma, and inertial control of thermonuclear fusion in particular, measurement techniques based on registration of X-.rays emitted by the investigated object are of great value. They make it possible to get much information on the dynamics of plasma evolution, its form, dimensions, temperature, and density. The instrumentation used for these purposes must meet the following main requirements: it must provide measuring X-.rays time, intensity and spatial coordinate; its spectral range must be wide, from relatively hard to extremely soft X-rays (tens of keV to tens of eV quantum energy); its tiive resolution must be high (of the order of 10 s). At present the only type of an instrument satisfying the above requirements is a streak camera with an X-ray' streak tube (X'RST). The XRST operation principle has been known long ago: the photocathode converts the incident X-rays into an electron beam, which is accelerated and focused by the electric fields onto the output phosphor screen, where a visible image of the incident radiation cross-.section appears. The image travels very rapidly over the screen, resulting in a time sweep. The design and development of such kind of instrumentation was begun in our country more than 10 years ago. In 1986 the All-Union Research Institute of experimental Physics, in collaboration with the Research Institute of Pulse Technique, designed and built first instruments with satisfactory parameters. These instruments found use in laser thermonuclear fusion research. Mainly two types of X-.ray streak tubes are used for X-.ray spatial-temporal structure registration: special type X-ray streak tubes with X-ray sensitive photocathodes and transparent for X-ray input windows, and X-ray streak tubes with X-ray sensitive photocathodes and without an input win dow; these tubes are joined to a continuously pumped-out vacuum plant with an X-ray source inside it. The quantum energy lower limit of the registered X-rays depends on the input window thickness and. material, which determine its transparency for the radiation being investigated.

  6. Emergence of larval yellow perch, Perca flavescens, in South Dakota lakes: potential implications for

    E-print Network

    Emergence of larval yellow perch, Perca flavescens, in South Dakota lakes: potential implications and hatch dates were described for larval yellow perch, Perca flavescens (Mitchill), captured in surface, otoliths, Perca flavescens, yellow perch. Introduction Yellow perch, Perca flavescens (Mitchill), support

  7. An assessment of yellow perch, Perca flavescens, stocking contributions in eastern South Dakota

    E-print Network

    An assessment of yellow perch, Perca flavescens, stocking contributions in eastern South Dakota, USA Abstract The success and value of yellow perch, Perca flavescens (Mitchill), stocking programmes, oxytetracycline, stocking, yellow perch. Introduction Panfish [yellow perch, Perca flavescens (Mitchill), crappies

  8. Comparative Genome Analysis of the Yellow Fever Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    E-print Network

    Severson, David

    Comparative Genome Analysis of the Yellow Fever Mosquito Aedes aegypti with Drosophila melanogaster aegypti, and Culex pipiens, the primary vectors for malaria, yellow fever and dengue, and lymphatic 103

  9. YELLOW-BELLIED MARMOTS (MARMOTA FLAVIVENTRIS) HIBERNATE SOCIALLY

    E-print Network

    Grether, Gregory

    YELLOW-BELLIED MARMOTS (MARMOTA FLAVIVENTRIS) HIBERNATE SOCIALLY DANIEL T. BLUMSTEIN,* SOYEON IM Marmota, Family Sciuridae), only 2, the woodchuck (M. monax) and yellow- bellied marmot (M. flaviventris patterns. Key words: climate change, evolution of sociality, Marmota flaviventris, social hibernation

  10. Identification of Drosophila melanogaster yellow-f and yellow-f2 proteins as dopachrome-conversion enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qian; Fang, Jianmin; Ding, Haizhen; Johnson, Jody K; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2002-01-01

    This study describes the identification of Drosophila yellow-f and yellow-f2 as dopachrome-conversion enzymes responsible for catalysing the conversion of dopachrome into 5,6-dihydroxyindole in the melanization pathway. Drosophila yellow -y gene and yellow -b, -c, -f and -f2 genes were expressed in an insect cell/baculovirus expression system and their corresponding recombinant proteins were screened for dopachrome-conversion enzyme activity. Among the yellow and yellow -related genes, the yellow -f and yellow -f2 genes were identified as the genes coding for Drosophila dopachrome-conversion enzyme based on the high activity of their recombinant proteins in catalysing the production of 5,6-dihydroxyindole from dopachrome. Both yellow-f and yellow-f2 are capable of mediating a decarboxylative structural rearrangement of dopachrome, as well as an isomerization/tautomerization of dopamine chrome and dopa methyl ester chrome. Northern hybridization revealed the transcription of yellow -f in larvae and pupae, but a high abundance of mRNA was observed in later larval and early pupal stages. In contrast, yellow-f2 transcripts were present at all stages, but high abundance of its mRNA was observed in later-stage pupae and adults. These data indicate that yellow-f and yellow-f2 complement each other during Drosophila development and that the yellow-f is involved in larval and pupal melanization, and yellow-f2 plays a major role in melanization reactions in Drosophila during later pupal and adult development. Results from this study provide the groundwork towards a better understanding of the physiological roles of the Drosophila yellow gene family. PMID:12164780

  11. Multiple abdominal veins thrombosis secondary to protein s deficiency - a case report.

    PubMed

    Kodali, Venkata Umakant; Borra, Seshulakshmi; Mandarapu, Surendra Babu; Sanda, Mallikarjuna Rao; Bolla, Srinivasa Rao

    2014-06-01

    Abdominal venous thrombosis may present either as Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) caused by hepatic vein or proximal inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction or as an extra hepatic portal obstruction (EHPVO) caused by Portal vein thrombosis or mesenteric vein thrombosis, but a mixed involvement is uncommon. Multiple abdominal venous obstructions presenting with thrombosis of hepatic vein, IVC, portal vein and renal vein are very rarely seen . We are reporting a rare case with thrombosis of IVC, hepatic vein, portal vein and renal vein, with protein S and protein C deficiencies, which was managed by giving anticoagulant therapy. PMID:25121018

  12. Reconstruction of middle hepatic vein of a living-donor right lobe liver graft with recipient left portal vein.

    PubMed

    Cattral, M S; Greig, P D; Muradali, D; Grant, D

    2001-06-27

    Venous outflow problems in right lobe, living-donor liver transplantation are uncommon, but devastating when they occur. We describe the successful use of the recipient's left portal vein as an interposition graft to drain a dominant middle hepatic vein in a right lobe liver transplant. Two weeks after transplantation, the vein graft accounted for 56% of the total venous outflow of the liver. PMID:11455273

  13. Time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence in sulfuric acid with a streak camera.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weizhong; Huang, Wei; Liang, Yue; Gao, Xianxian; Cui, Weicheng

    2008-09-01

    The time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in sulfuric acid have been observed with a streak camera after a spectrograph. The spectral center evolves from infrared to ultraviolet gradually within a SBSL duration, which corresponds to an increase of temperature. The peak temperature within one sonoluminescence (SL) duration is 5-9 times higher than the average temperature based on the average spectrum in our experiment. Furthermore, the ratio of the peak temperature to average temperature increases with the increase of driving pressure. The SBSL flash dies out after a dramatic heating-up, and there is no cooling procedure observed at the time resolution of 110 SL duration, which is incompatible with the radius-related adiabatic heating model as the mechanism of SBSL. PMID:18851095

  14. Maize streak virus-resistant transgenic maize: a first for Africa.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Dionne N; Mangwende, Tichaona; Martin, Darren P; Bezuidenhout, Marion; Kloppers, Frederik J; Carolissen, Charlene H; Monjane, Adrito L; Rybicki, Edward P; Thomson, Jennifer A

    2007-11-01

    In this article, we report transgene-derived resistance in maize to the severe pathogen maize streak virus (MSV). The mutated MSV replication-associated protein gene that was used to transform maize showed stable expression to the fourth generation. Transgenic T2 and T3 plants displayed a significant delay in symptom development, a decrease in symptom severity and higher survival rates than non-transgenic plants after MSV challenge, as did a transgenic hybrid made by crossing T2 Hi-II with the widely grown, commercial, highly MSV-susceptible, white maize genotype WM3. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first maize to be developed with transgenic MSV resistance and the first all-African-produced genetically modified crop plant. PMID:17924935

  15. Streaking temporal double slit interference by an orthogonal two-color laser field

    E-print Network

    Richter, Martin; Schffler, Markus; Jahnke, Till; Schmidt, Lothar P H; Li, Min; Liu, Yunquan; Drner, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    We investigate electron momentum distributions from single ionization of Ar by two orthogonally polarized laser pulses of different color. The two-color scheme is used to experimentally control the interference between electron wave packets released at different times within one laser cycle. This intracycle interference pattern is typically hard to resolve in an experiment. With the two-color control scheme these features become the dominant contribution to the electron momentum distribution. Furthermore the second color can be used for streaking of the otherwise interfering wave packets establishing a which-way marker. Our investigation shows that the visibility of the interference fringes depends on the degree of the which-way information determined by the controllable phase between the two pulses.

  16. Evidence of recombination and genetic diversity in southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Xia, Zihao; Peng, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Fan, Zaifeng

    2013-10-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) causes one of the most serious viral diseases of rice in China and Vietnam. Sequence identities of S10, encoding the major capsid protein, were 98.0%-100% and 98.3%-100% at the nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively. Our results suggest that the codon at position 550 of S10 is under positive selection, while most of the other codons are under neutral evolution. Putative recombination events were identified in genomic RNA segments S1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 10, which are rare in plant-infecting dsRNA viruses. This study reveals the current state of SRBSDV evolution. PMID:23605668

  17. Microstructure investigations of streak formation in 6063 aluminum extrusions by optical metallographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Vander Voort, George; Surez-Pea, Beatriz; Asensio-Lozano, Juan

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the solidification strategy for AA 6063 alloy on the surface appearance of anodized extrusions. The microstructure of the samples was analyzed using both light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that if heavy segregation occurs from rapid solidification, coarse Mg2Si particles form, thus reducing the potential for precipitation strengthening by the finer ?-Mg2Si developed in the solid state. Differentially-strained regions formed during hot extrusion induce differences in particle size for magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) precipitates. Anodizing generates surface roughness due to Mg2Si particle dissolution and AlFeSi decohesion, which is related to both particle size and deformation. During anodizing, an oxide layer forms on the surface of the extruded products, which can lead to streak formation, usually a subject of rejection due to unacceptable heterogeneous reflectivity. PMID:23481588

  18. Mapping of Digitaria streak virus transcripts reveals different RNA species from the same transcription unit.

    PubMed Central

    Accotto, G P; Donson, J; Mullineaux, P M

    1989-01-01

    All, except 19 [corrected] bp, of the Digitaria streak virus (DSV) genome is transcribed. Two RNA transcripts (1+ and 2+) are encoded by the virion DNA strand and up to five (1- to 5-) by the complementary DNA strand [corrected]. Detailed mapping of these RNAs has revealed evidence for splicing in one species (RNA 4-), which together with its more abundant unspliced counterpart (RNA 2-) could synthesize both a 30.5 and 41 kd polypeptide from the same transcription unit. This extensive overlapping of spliced and unspliced RNAs could indicate that the initiation and splicing of transcripts is temporally regulated. At least one transcript (RNA 1-) may have a non-translational role. Transcription of the DSV genome shows similarities to some animal DNA viruses, particularly the papovaviruses. Images PMID:2472960

  19. Development of a probe-based blotting technique for the detection of tobacco streak virus.

    PubMed

    Sarovar, B; Saigopal, D V R

    2010-01-01

    Digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled DNA probe was developed for a sensitive and rapid detection of the tobacco streak virus (TSV) isolates in India by dot-blot and tissue print hybridization techniques. DIG-labeled DNA probe complementary to the coat protein (CP) region of TSV sunflower isolate was designed and used to detect the TSV presence at field levels. Dot-blot hybridization was used to check a large number of TSV isolates with a single probe. In addition, a sensitivity of the technique was examined with the different sample extraction methods. Another technique, the tissue blot hybridization offered a simple, reliable procedure and did not require a sample processing. Thus, both non-radioactively labeled probe techniques could facilitate the sample screening during TSV outbreaks and offer an advantage in quarantine services. PMID:20822316

  20. Myosin-II-mediated cell shape changes and cell intercalation contribute to primitive streak formation.

    PubMed

    Rozbicki, Emil; Chuai, Manli; Karjalainen, Antti I; Song, Feifei; Sang, Helen M; Martin, Ren; Knlker, Hans-Joachim; MacDonald, Michael P; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2015-03-27

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves large-scale highly coordinated flows of more than 100,000 cells in the epiblast. These large-scale tissue flows and deformations can be correlated with specific anisotropic cell behaviours in the forming mesendoderm through a combination of light-sheet microscopy and computational analysis. Relevant behaviours include apical contraction, elongation along the apical-basal axis followed by ingression, and asynchronous directional cell intercalation of small groups of mesendoderm cells. Cell intercalation is associated with sequential, directional contraction of apical junctions, the onset, localization and direction of which correlate strongly with the appearance of active myosin II cables in aligned apical junctions in neighbouring cells. Use of class specific myosin inhibitors and gene-specific knockdown shows that apical contraction and intercalation are myosin II dependent and also reveal critical roles for myosin I and myosin V family members in the assembly of junctional myosin II cables. PMID:25812521

  1. Vein Power Plane for Printed Circuit Board Based on Constructal Theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hui-Fen Huang; Wei-Guo; Qing-Xin Chu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel vein power tree design tech- nique based on constructal theory is introduced for optimal direct current performance. The designed vein tree has multifunctions of low electrical resistance, equidistribution, and compactness. In the meantime, a vein power plane based on the vein tree is de- veloped for printed circuit board. The designed vein power plane example

  2. Guidelines for the management of varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Gloviczki, P; Gloviczki, M L

    2012-03-01

    Recently published evidence-based guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and the American Venous Forum (AVF) include recommendations for evaluation, classification, outcome assessment and therapy of patients with varicose veins and more advanced chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). The need for such guidelines has been evident since imaging techniques and minimally invasive technologies have progressed by leaps and bounds and radiofrequency ablation, laser and sclerotherapy have largely replaced classical open surgery of saphenous stripping. This report reviews the most important guidelines recommended by the SVS/AVF Venous Guideline Committee. It is obvious, however, that some of the technology that is recommended in North America is either not available or not affordable in some parts of the world for patients with varicose veins and CVI. The readers are urged therefore to also consult the guidelines of their national societies, recent publications of the National Institute for Clinical Excellence and the Venous Forum of the Royal Society of Medicine. Venous specialists should also keep in mind that scientific evidence should always be combined with the physician's clinical experience and the patient's preference when the best treatment is selected for an individual patient. PMID:22312060

  3. Portal vein thrombosis: what is new?

    PubMed

    Manzano-Robleda, Mara Del Carmen; Barranco-Fragoso, Beatriz; Uribe, Misael; Mndez-Snchez, Nahum

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is one of the most common vascular disorders of the liver with significant morbidity and mortality. Large cohort studies have reported a global prevalence of 1%, but in some risk groups it can be up to 26%. Causes of PVT are cirrhosis, hepatobiliary malignancy, abdominal infectious or inflammatory diseases, and myeloproliferative disorders. Most patients with PVT have a general risk factor. The natural history of PVT results in portal hypertension leading to splenomegaly and the formation of portosystemic collateral blood vessels and esophageal, gastric, duodenal, and jejunal varices. Diagnosis of PVT is made by imaging, mainly Doppler ultrasonography. According to its time of development, localization, pathophysiology, and evolution, PVT should be classified in every patient. Some clinical features such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and hepatic transplantation are areas of special interest and are discussed in this review. The goal of treatment of acute PVT is to reconstruct the blocked veins. Endoscopic variceal ligation is safe and highly effective in patients with variceal bleeding caused by chronic PVT. In conclusion, PVT is the most common cause of vascular disease of the liver and its prevalence has being increasing, especially among patients with an underlying liver disease. All patients should be investigated for thrombophilic conditions, and in those with cirrhosis, anticoagulation prophylaxis should be considered. PMID:25536638

  4. Pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Bounameaux, Henri

    2012-05-12

    Pulmonary embolism is the third most common cause of death from cardiovascular disease after heart attack and stroke. Sequelae occurring after venous thromboembolism include chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and post-thrombotic syndrome. Venous thromboembolism and atherothrombosis share common risk factors and the common pathophysiological characteristics of inflammation, hypercoagulability, and endothelial injury. Clinical probability assessment helps to identify patients with low clinical probability for whom the diagnosis of venous thromboembolism can be excluded solely with a negative result from a plasma D-dimer test. The diagnosis is usually confirmed with compression ultrasound showing deep vein thrombosis or with chest CT showing pulmonary embolism. Most patients with venous thromboembolism will respond to anticoagulation, which is the foundation of treatment. Patients with pulmonary embolism should undergo risk stratification to establish whether they will benefit from the addition of advanced treatment, such as thrombolysis or embolectomy. Several novel oral anticoagulant drugs are in development. These drugs, which could replace vitamin K antagonists and heparins in many patients, are prescribed in fixed doses and do not need any coagulation monitoring in the laboratory. Although rigorous clinical trials have reported the effectiveness and safety of pharmacological prevention with low, fixed doses of anticoagulant drugs, prophylaxis remains underused in patients admitted to hospital at moderate risk and high risk for venous thromboembolism. In this Seminar, we discuss pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis of the legs. PMID:22494827

  5. Streaked x-ray spectrometer having a discrete selection of Bragg geometries for Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Millecchia, M.; Regan, S. P.; Bahr, R. E.; Romanofsky, M.; Sorce, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The streaked x-ray spectrometer (SXS) is used with streak cameras [D. H. Kalantar, P. M. Bell, R. L. Costa, B. A. Hammel, O. L. Landen, T. J. Orzechowski, J. D. Hares, and A. K. L. Dymoke-Bradshaw, in 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, edited by D. L. Paisley and A. M. Frank (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1997), Vol. 2869, p. 680] positioned with a ten-inch manipulator on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] and OMEGA EP [L. J. Waxer et al., Presented at CLEO/QELS 2008, San Jose, CA, 4-9 May 2008 (Paper JThB1)] for time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas in the 1.4- to 20-keV photon-energy range. These experiments require measuring a portion of this photon-energy range to monitor a particular emission or absorption feature of interest. The SXS relies on a pinned mechanical reference system to create a discrete set of Bragg reflection geometries for a variety of crystals. A wide selection of spectral windows is achieved accurately and efficiently using this technique. It replaces the previous spectrometer designs that had a continuous Bragg angle adjustment and required a tedious alignment calibration procedure. The number of spectral windows needed for the SXS was determined by studying the spectral ranges selected by OMEGA users over the last decade. These selections are easily configured in the SXS using one of the 25 discrete Bragg reflection geometries and one of the six types of Bragg crystals, including two curved crystals.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1973 - Beeswax (yellow and white).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2009-04-01 true Beeswax (yellow and white). 184.1973 Section 184.1973...GRAS 184.1973 Beeswax (yellow and white). (a) Beeswax (CAS Reg...wax is referred to as yellow beeswax. White beeswax is produced by bleaching the...

  7. Wind-driven effects on the Yellow Sea Warm Current

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea C. Mask; James J. O'Brien; Ruth Preller

    1998-01-01

    The Yellow Sea is a shallow basin with an average depth of 44 m located between China_and the Korean Peninsula. One of the dominant ocean circulation features of the Yellow Sea is a warm water intrusion known as the Yellow Sea Warm Current. This feature is present throughout the year but reaches its farthest northward extension in winter. The circulation

  8. COMPOSITION OF ORANGE, YELLOW, AND RED FLESHED WATERMELON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the composition of yellow or orange watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) varieties. In this study, moisture content, sugars, fiber, minerals, lycopene and phenolic content of rind and flesh of yellow and orange watermelons was determined. Yellow and orange watermelon varities had ...

  9. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and Drugs...Cereal Flours and Related Products 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of...

  10. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and Drugs...Cereal Flours and Related Products 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of...

  11. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and Drugs...Cereal Flours and Related Products 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of...

  12. 21 CFR 137.280 - Bolted yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bolted yellow corn meal. 137.280 Section 137.280 Food and...and Related Products 137.280 Bolted yellow corn meal. Bolted yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of...

  13. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and Drugs...Cereal Flours and Related Products 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of...

  14. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and Drugs...Cereal Flours and Related Products 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of...

  15. 21 CFR 137.280 - Bolted yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bolted yellow corn meal. 137.280 Section 137.280 Food and...and Related Products 137.280 Bolted yellow corn meal. Bolted yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of...

  16. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food and...Cereal Flours and Related Products 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of...

  17. 21 CFR 137.280 - Bolted yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bolted yellow corn meal. 137.280 Section 137.280 Food and...and Related Products 137.280 Bolted yellow corn meal. Bolted yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of...

  18. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food and...Cereal Flours and Related Products 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of...

  19. 21 CFR 137.280 - Bolted yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bolted yellow corn meal. 137.280 Section 137.280 Food and...and Related Products 137.280 Bolted yellow corn meal. Bolted yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of...

  20. 21 CFR 137.280 - Bolted yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bolted yellow corn meal. 137.280 Section 137.280 Food and...and Related Products 137.280 Bolted yellow corn meal. Bolted yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of...

  1. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food and...Cereal Flours and Related Products 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of...

  2. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food and...Cereal Flours and Related Products 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of...

  3. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food and...Cereal Flours and Related Products 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of...

  4. Unusual manifestation of the yellow nail syndrome - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Papaiordanou, Francine; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Miyaoka, Mariana Yumi; Yang, Jeane Jeong Hoon; Pires, Mario Cezar

    2014-01-01

    The yellow nail syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the classic triad of yellow and dystrophic nails, lymphedema and pleural effusion. We report in this paper a case of yellow nail syndrome, presenting the classic triad of the disease, associated with an unusual lymph accumulation in the abdomen region. PMID:24937826

  5. Symptomology, Agronomy, and Economic Considerations in Aster Yellows Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip Northover

    The aster yellows phytoplasma (formerly a mycoplasma like organism or MLO), is a single- celled prokaryotic microorganism, lacking a cell wall, capable of inciting disease in over 300 plant species. Vectored by the aster leafhopper (Macrosteles quadrilineatus Forbes =M. fascifrons), aster yellows (AY) symptoms, include proliferation, alteration of tissue pigments (red, orange, yellow, and purple), phyllody, and reduced palatability in

  6. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF KNAPWEEDS AND YELLOW STARTHISTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant genus Centaurea (family Asteraceae) includes many species that are important invasive alien weeds in the western U.S. These include spotted, diffuse, squarrose and meadow knapweeds and yellow starthistle. Russian knapweed (Acroptilon repens) is closely related and was once included in th...

  7. A Western Yellow-Billed Cuckoo

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The western yellow-billed cuckoo is a shy, neotropical migrant bird once common throughout the American West; it is currently a candidate for protection under the Endangered Species Act. After spending the winter in South America, western cuckoos arrive in the Western United States beginning in June...

  8. Resistance in spelt wheat to yellow rust

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gert H. J. Kema

    1992-01-01

    Theories on the origin and dissemination of spelt wheat (Triticum aestivum ssp. spelta) are evaluated. Recent information on resistance to yellow rust (Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici) and variation for gliadin patterns in spelt wheat accessions originating from Iran and Europe is superimposed on literature reports concerning the origin, status and dissemination of spelt wheat. The data support the

  9. Improving Growth in Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Given that the role of the somatotropic axis (e.g. growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I) in yellow perch growth is uniquely unresolved, and the interplay of sex steroids with the somatotropic axis unknown, research efforts are focused in this area. To accomplish this, we will isolate and...

  10. Yellow River Delta 1989-2009

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NASA Earth Obesrvatory

    Series of Landsat color images shows China's Huang He (Yellow River) Delta at 5 year intervals from 1989-2009 with changes in growth patterns, channel switching, delta environments, new delta lobe growth, offshore sediment plumes, and results of engineering projects. Explanatory text is included.

  11. Enzootic transmission of yellow fever virus, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Auguste, Albert J; Lemey, Philippe; Bergren, Nicholas A; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Moncada, Maria; Morn, Dulce; Hernandez, Rosa; Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Weaver, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of yellow fever virus (YFV) strains isolated from Venezuela strongly supports YFV maintenance in situ in Venezuela, with evidence of regionally independent evolution within the country. However, there is considerable YFV movement from Brazil to Venezuela and between Trinidad and Venezuela. PMID:25531105

  12. Genetic diversity of yellow grouper (Epinephelus awoara)

    E-print Network

    China Sea. Materials and methods Sample preparation and DNA extraction Yellow grouper were obtained from at -20C until analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted according to the DNA extraction method of DeSalle et to investigate Most other DNA-based methods are the genetic variation in two popula- more laborious and time

  13. Enzootic Transmission of Yellow Fever Virus, Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Auguste, Albert J.; Lemey, Philippe; Bergren, Nicholas A.; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Moncada, Maria; Morn, Dulce; Hernandez, Rosa; Navarro, Juan-Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of yellow fever virus (YFV) strains isolated from Venezuela strongly supports YFV maintenance in situ in Venezuela, with evidence of regionally independent evolution within the country. However, there is considerable YFV movement from Brazil to Venezuela and between Trinidad and Venezuela. PMID:25531105

  14. Yellow-bellied marmots are generalist herbivores

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. A. Frase; K. B. Armitage

    1989-01-01

    Yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) eat a wide variety of grasses, forbs, and seeds, but do not feed on all items in proportion to their abundance in the environment. In this study, relationships between the marmot diet and estimated protein, water, caloric value, relative biomass, and toxicity of the available plant species were investigated. The epidermis of all forb species did

  15. Phytoplankton and sediments in Yellow Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sediment and phytoplankton cloud the waters of the Yellow Sea in this true-color MODIS image acquired March 18, 2002. The swirls of sediment appear as a murky brownish blue color, while the phytoplankton are purely blue green and are concentrated around the small island in the lower right corner of the image.

  16. Holocene development of the Yellow River's subaqueous delta, North Yellow Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Paul Liu; John D. Milliman; Shu Gao; Peng Cheng

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution seismic profiles from the North Yellow Sea reveal a 2040-m-thick subaqueous clinoform delta that wraps around the eastern end of the Shandong Peninsula, extending into the South Yellow Sea. This complex sigmoidal-oblique clinoform, containing an estimated 400 km3 of sediment, overlies prominent relict transgressive surfaces. The nearshore topset of the clinoform, <30-m water depth, has a ?1:1000 gradient, with

  17. Subclavian Vein Compression and Thrombosis Presenting as Upper Extremity Pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jihad G. Jiha; Charles E. Laurito; Richard W. Rosenquist

    1997-01-01

    e report a case of upper extremity pain that eluded diagnosis. Only after ultrasonography was repeated with the patient in the sitting position was external compression of the subclavian vein and a subclavian vein thrombosis detected. The patient was diagnosed as having hypertrophied ante- rior scalene muscles that compressed the venous structures when he assumed the upright position. Per- formance

  18. Composition of arsenopyrite from topaz greisen veins in southeastern Missouri

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Lowell; C. Gasparrini

    1982-01-01

    Arsenopyrite occurs in greisen-sulfide veins hosted by unmetamorphosed Precambrian granite and rhyolite in the Silver Mine district of southeastern Missouri, Greisenization and sulfide mineralization appear to have been a continuous depositional sequence which recorded falling temperature in a near-surface vein environment. Textural criteria imply that equilibrium existed between arsenopyrite and pyrite and that this pair crystallized in an intermediate paragenetic

  19. Significance of minor-vein anatomy to carbohydrate transport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda L. Flora; Monica A. Madore

    1996-01-01

    Plant species which translocate distinct combinations of carbohydrates in the phloem were investigated to assess whether differences in minor-vein anatomy were associated with differences in carbohydrate composition of the phloem sap. In Vicia faba L., a species in which the minor-vein companion cells are modified into transfer cells, sucrose alone was found to be the translocated form of carbohydrate. In

  20. La duplicit de la veine cave infrieure sous-rnale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Pillet; P. Albaret; J. Y. Soret; J. M. Chevalier; B. Enon; A. Dauver; C. Caron-Poitreau

    1980-01-01

    Rsum A l'occasion d'anomalies de la veine cave infrieure dont 6 cas nouveaux sont prsents, l'tude de l'organogense de la veine cave infrieure est reprise partir de la littrature et de reconstructions personnelles d'embryons: l'volution de cette organogense est prcise par rapport aux stades de Streeter.

  1. Pulmonary Vein Stenosis After Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivan M. Robbins; Edward V. Colvin; Thomas P. Doyle; W. Evans Kemp; James E. Loyd; William S. McMahon; G. Neal Kay

    BackgroundThis report describes the complication of pulmonary vein stenosis with resultant severe pulmonary hypertension that developed in 2 patients after successful catheter ablation of chronic atrial fibrillation. Methods and ResultsThree months after successful catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation, both patients developed progressive dyspnea and pulmonary hypertension. Both were found to have severe stenosis of all 4 pulmonary veins near the

  2. Plantar Vein ThrombosisEvaluation by Ultrasound and Clinical Outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcio Vinicius Lins Barros; Nicos Labropoulos

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to describe the characteristics and clinical outcome of patients diagnosed with plantar vein thrombosis. Methods: Patients presenting with sudden pain and\\/or swelling of the foot were evaluated by duplex scanning of the affected leg. All the main foot veins were imaged with high resolution multi-linear array transducers. The location and extent of thrombosis was recorded

  3. Finger-vein image separation algorithms and realization with MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaoyan; Ma, Junshan; Wu, Jiajie

    2010-10-01

    According to the characteristics of the finger-vein image, we adopted a series of methods to enhance the contrast of the image in order to separate the finger-vein areas from the background areas, and made prepare for the subsequent research such as feature extraction and recognition processing . The method consists of three steps: denoising, contrast enhancement and image binarization. In denoising, considering the relationship between gray levels in the adjacent areas of the finger-vein image, we adopted the Gradient Inverse Weighted Smoothing method. In contrast enhancement, we improved the conventional High Frequency Stress Filtering method and adopted a method which combined the traditional High Frequency Stress Filtering algorithm together with the Histogram Equalization. With this method, the contrast of the finger-vein area and the background area has been enhanced significantly. During the binarization process, after taking the differences of the gray levels between the different areas of the finger-vein image into consideration, we proposed a method which combined the binarization by dividing the image into several segments and the Morphological Image Processing means. Our experiment results show that after a series of processing mentioned above by using MATLAB, the finger-vein areas can be separated from the background areas obviously. We can get a vivid figure of the finger-vein which provided some references for the following research such as finger-vein image feature extraction, matching and identification.

  4. Renal Vein Leiomyoma: A Rare Entity with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Mittal, Ankur; Devana, Sudheer Kumar; Singh, Shrawan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Tumors of vascular origin are unusual. These tumors are predominantly malignant and commonly arise from the inferior vena cava. Benign smooth muscle tumors arising from renal vein are very rare. We present a case of leiomyoma of renal vein in a post-menopausal woman that clinically resembled a retroperitoneal paraganglioma. PMID:25161811

  5. PREVALENCE OF HYPERHOMOCYSTEINEMIA IN PATIENTS WITH RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Manaviat; M. R. Shoja; M. R. Besharaty

    Recently multiple studies have shown that elevated homocysteine levels may be associated with ophthalmic vascular disease. To investigate the role of high plasma levels of homocysteine in the patients with retinal vein occlusion, 21 patients with retinal vein occlusion (RVO) and 20 age and sex matched controls without RVO were included in this retrospective case-control study. Information regarding sex, age,

  6. Hemodynamically Driven Vein Graft Remodeling: A Systems Biology Approach

    E-print Network

    Garbey, Marc

    in an animal vein graft model, human phase I and II clinical studies were initiated.1-3 Demonstrating safety-PAAuthorManuscriptNIH-PAAuthorManuscriptNIH-PAAuthorManuscript #12;promising therapies that should move forward into clinical testing are inadequate and (2) tools components and providing predictive models to anticipate these results, offers an alternative approach. Vein

  7. Adrenal vein sampling in primary aldosteronism: towards a standardised protocol.

    PubMed

    Monticone, Silvia; Viola, Andrea; Rossato, Denis; Veglio, Franco; Reincke, Martin; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso; Mulatero, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Primary aldosteronism comprises subtypes that need different therapeutic strategies. Adrenal vein sampling is recognised by Endocrine Society guidelines as the only reliable way to correctly diagnose the subtype of primary aldosteronism. Unfortunately, despite being the gold-standard procedure, no standardised procedure exists either in terms of performance or interpretation criteria. In this Personal View, we address several questions that clinicians are presented with when considering adrenal vein sampling. For each of these questions we provide responses based on the available evidence, and opinions based on our experience. In particular, we discuss the most appropriate way to prepare the patient, whether adrenal vein sampling can be avoided for some subgroups of patients, the use of ACTH (1-24) during the procedure, the most appropriate criteria for interpretation of adrenal vein cannulation and lateralisation, the use of contralateral suppression, and strategies to improve success rates of adrenal vein sampling in centres with little experience. PMID:24831990

  8. Design of a clinical vein contrast enhancing projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, Herbert D.; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Deshmukh, Harshal

    2001-06-01

    A clinical study has been initiated to compare an experimental IR device, the Vein Contrast Enhancer (VCE), with standard techniques for finding veins for venipuncture. The aims of this proposal are (1) to evaluate the performance of the VCE in a clinical setting, specifically by comparing its sensitivity of detection with existing vein-finding techniques used by experienced nurses or phlebotomists, (2) to study its usefulness in subjects who are obese, who have difficult venous access or thrombosed veins, or whose veins are not visible or difficult to palpate, and (3) to show that it performs as well on subjects with darkly pigmented skin as on subjects with lightly pigmented skin. The VCE will first be studied in adult subjects, and then in pediatric subjects.

  9. Portal Vein Embolization: What Do We Know?

    SciTech Connect

    Denys, Alban, E-mail: Alban.Denys@chuv.ch [Centre Hospitalo Universitaire Vaudois, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology Unit (Switzerland); Prior, John [Centre Hospitalo Universitaire Vaudois, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Bize, Pierre; Duran, Rafael [Centre Hospitalo Universitaire Vaudois, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology Unit (Switzerland); Baere, Thierry De [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Halkic, Nermin; Demartines, Nicolas [Centre Hospitalo Universitaire Vaudois, Department of Visceral Surgery (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    Portal vein embolization (PVE) has been developed to increase the size of the future remnant liver (FRL) left in place after major hepatectomy, thus reducing the risk of postoperative liver insufficiency. PVE consist in embolizing preoperatively portal branches of the segments that will be resected. Indication is based on preoperative measurements of the FRL by computed tomography and its ratio with either the theoretical liver volume or by direct measurement of the functional liver volume. After PVE, the volume and function of the FRL increases in 3 to 6 weeks, permitting extensive resections in patients otherwise contraindicated for liver resection. The PVE technique is variable from one center to another; however n-butyl-cyano-acrylate provides an interesting compromise between hypertrophy rate and procedure risk.

  10. Warfarin-induced deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Binymin, Khalid A; Nasher, Magda; Patel, Dipti

    2014-01-01

    We are presenting a 72-year-old female who was admitted to hospital with deep vein thrombosis (DVT). She was known to have atrial fibrillation and was initiated on warfarin for stroke prophylaxis 3 days earlier. She was given warfarin therapy without low molecular weight heparin cover as per slow-start regimen protocol. The warfarin dose was increased after 3 days to achieve rapid anticoagulation, resulting in DVT in the left leg. We propose that the higher unopposed warfarin dose utilized in this case resulted in DVT. Warfarin loading doses may paradoxically result in a hypercoagulable state and potential clot formation because of significant reductions in protein C and protein S levels. PMID:25246809

  11. Practical management of retinal vein occlusions.

    PubMed

    La Spina, Carlo; De Benedetto, Umberto; Parodi, Maurizio Battaglia; Coscas, Gabriel; Bandello, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is the second most common cause of visual impairment due to retinal disease after diabetic retinopathy. Nowadays, the introduction of new, powerful diagnostic tools, such as spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and the widespread diffusion of intravitreal drugs, such as vascular endothelial grow factor inhibitors or implantable steroids, have dramatically changed the management and prognosis of RVO. The authors aim to summarize and review the main clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of this condition. The authors conducted a review of the most relevant clinical trials and observational studies published within the last 30years using a keyword search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Current Contents, and Cochrane Library. Furthermore, for all treatments discussed, the level of evidence supporting its use, as per the US Preventive Task Force Ranking System, is provided. PMID:25135583

  12. Development of HIFU Treatment for Lower Extremity Varicose Veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoo, Naohiko; Ushijima, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Jun; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Deguchi, Juno; Takagi, Shu; Miyata, Tetsuro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2011-09-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has recently been developed as a noninvasive therapeutic method. In our study, a novel noninvasive therapy with HIFU was proposed for occlusion of lower extremity varicose veins. The temperature increase caused by HIFU is used to occlude varicose veins. Occluded veins became fibrotic, resulting in complete recovery. Our final goal is the medical application of HIFU treatment for varicose veins. In this study, we attempted to occlude the veins of rabbits. Prior to venous occlusion experiments, the area heated by HIFU was investigated using bovine serum albumin (BSA) gel, which denatures at >70 C. The results indicate that the size of the heated area mainly depends on intensity at the focal point and the exposure time. A tendency was also seen for the heated area to extend toward the transducer with increasing exposure time. In animal experiments, skin burns during HIFU exposure represented a critical problem. We therefore examined the safe range of HIFU intensities in abdominal exposure experiments before conducting venous occlusion experiments. The ultrasound frequency was 1.7 MHz. Intensity at the focal point was 900 W/cm2, and the exposure time was 20 s. Rabbits underwent chemical depilation and echo gel was applied to the exposed skin to fill the boundary gap. Target veins were compressed during HIFU exposure to avoid thermal dissipation, and hyaluronan water solution was injected between the veins and skin to maintain the distance between the skin and veins at ?5 mm. Veins were then exposed to HIFU and occluded. The capability of HIFU treatment to occlude lower extremity varicose veins was verified by the present study.

  13. Repair of peripheral nerve with vein wrapping*

    PubMed Central

    LEUZZI, S.; ARMENIO, A.; LEONE, L.; DE SANTIS, V.; DI TURI, A.; ANNOSCIA, P.; BUFANO, L.; PASCONE, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The posttraumatic neuro-anastomosis must be protected from the surrounding environment. This barrier must be biologically inert, biodegradable, not compressing but protecting the nerve. Formation of painful neuroma is one of the major issues with neuro-anastomosis; currently there is no consensus on post-repair neuroma prevention. Aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of neuroanastomosis performed with venous sheath to reduce painful neuromas formation, improve the electrical conductivity of the repaired nerve, and reduce the discrepancies of the sectioned nerve stumps. Patients and methods From a trauma population of 320 patients treated in a single centre between January 2008 and December 2011, twenty-six patients were identified as having an injury to at least one of the peripheral nerves of the arm and enrolled in the study. Patients were divided into two groups. In the group A (16 patients) the end-to-end nerve suture was wrapped in a vein sheath and compared with the group B (10 patients) in which a simple end-to-end neurorrhaphy was performed. The venous segment used to cover the nerve micro-suture was harvested from the superficial veins of the forearm. The parameters analyzed were: functional recovery of motor nerves, sensitivity and pain. Results Average follow-up was 14 months (range: 1224 months). The group A showed a more rapid motor and sensory recovery and a reduction of the painful symptoms compared to the control group (B). Conclusions The Authors demonstrated that, in their experience, the venous sheath provides a valid solution to avoid the dispersion of the nerve fibres, to prevent adherent scars and painful neuromas formation. Moreover it can compensate the different size of two nerve stumps, allowing, thereby, a more rapid functional and sensitive recovery without expensive devices. PMID:24841688

  14. Endovenous laser ablation of saphenous vein is an effective treatment modality for lower extremity varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Kavuturu, S; Girishkumar, H; Ehrlich, F

    2006-08-01

    We present our first experiences with the use of a new minimally invasive treatment of lower extremity varicose veins. We studied the occlusion rates of the great saphenous vein (GSV) with laser ablation, its failure rates, and its complications. Sixty-six limbs in 62 consecutive patients were treated and followed-up for 1 year. All of the patients had incompetent GSV proven by means of duplex scanning. The GSV segment from 2 cm distal to the sapheno-femoral junction to just above the knee was ablated by using laser energy. In addition, all patients had stab avulsions of the varicose veins of the leg with Crochet hooks. All patients were followed postoperatively on the 3rd day, 1 month, 3 months, and 1 year after surgery. All patients were treated as day-case surgeries. Among 62 patients studied, 46 patients were women (74%) and 16 were men (26%). The median age of the patients was 53 years (range 28-69 years). Median operation time was 65 min (range 40-140 min). Successful treatment (total obliteration of the GSV on duplex) was accomplished in 64 of 66 limbs (97%). In two cases, recanalization of the lower one-third of the treated segment of the GSV was noted after 3 months. There were no instances of neuropathy or skin burn. Endovenous laser ablation of varicose veins is effective in inducing thrombotic vessel occlusion and is associated with only minor adverse effects. The procedure seems to be a promising alternative for surgical stripping of the GSV. PMID:16913308

  15. Factors Associated with Recurrence of Varicose Veins after Thermal Ablation: Results of The Recurrent Veins after Thermal Ablation Study

    PubMed Central

    Bush, R. G.; Bush, P.; Flanagan, J.; Fritz, R.; Gueldner, T.; Koziarski, J.; McMullen, K.; Zumbro, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The goal of this retrospective cohort study (REVATA) was to determine the site, source, and contributory factors of varicose vein recurrence after radiofrequency (RF) and laser ablation. Methods. Seven centers enrolled patients into the study over a 1-year period. All patients underwent previous thermal ablation of the great saphenous vein (GSV), small saphenous vein (SSV), or anterior accessory great saphenous vein (AAGSV). From a specific designed study tool, the etiology of recurrence was identified. Results. 2,380 patients were evaluated during this time frame. A total of 164 patients had varicose vein recurrence at a median of 3 years. GSV ablation was the initial treatment in 159 patients (RF: 33, laser: 126, 52 of these patients had either SSV or AAGSV ablation concurrently). Total or partial GSV recanalization occurred in 47 patients. New AAGSV reflux occurred in 40 patients, and new SSV reflux occurred in 24 patients. Perforator pathology was present in 64% of patients. Conclusion. Recurrence of varicose veins occurred at a median of 3 years after procedure. The four most important factors associated with recurrent veins included perforating veins, recanalized GSV, new AAGSV reflux, and new SSV reflux in decreasing frequency. Patients who underwent RF treatment had a statistically higher rate of recanalization than those treated with laser. PMID:24592172

  16. Aneurysmal dilatation of persistent vitelline vein with thrombus in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kun Woo; Sung, Deuk Jae; Park, Beom Jin; Kim, Min Ju; Cho, Sung Bum

    2014-07-01

    The paired vitelline veins selectively involute and form a part of the portal vein during embryonic development. The presence of a persistent vitelline vein segment after birth is very rare and can be confused with anomalies of the portal and umbilical veins. We present sonographic, CT and MRI findings of aneurysmal dilatation of a persistent vitelline vein with thrombus in a neonate; this case was first misdiagnosed as an umbilical vein varix by prenatal US. MRI was used to identify the persistent vitelline vein segment and the remnant umbilical vein segment. PMID:24306734

  17. Coil Protruding into the Common Femoral Vein Following Pelvic Venous Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Petra, E-mail: petra@thewhiteleyclinic.co.uk; Holdstock, Judith M. [The Whiteley Clinic (United Kingdom); Bacon, Jennifer L.; Lopez, Anthony J. [The Royal Surrey County Hospital (United Kingdom); Whiteley, Mark S.; Price, Barrie A. [The Whiteley Clinic (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-15

    Pelvic venous embolization is performed for pelvic congestion syndrome and prior to lower limb varicose vein surgery in females with associated pelvic venous insufficiency. The procedure is analogous to varicocele embolization in males, although refluxing internal iliac vein tributaries may also be embolized. We report a case of inadvertent coil placement in the common femoral vein while embolizing the obturator vein, during pelvic vein embolization for recurrent lower limb varicose veins. There were no clinical consequences and the coil was left in situ. We advise caution when embolizing internal iliac vein tributaries where there is clinically significant communication with veins of the lower limb.

  18. Temporal performances of A 400 kHz Triggered streak camera used with a mode-locked cavity dumped dye laser

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Geist; F. Heisel; A. Martz; J. A. Miehe

    1983-01-01

    The influence of the cavity length of the dye laser on the overall time resolution of the measuring system is discussed. Streak camera measurements for repetitive mode and for single shot operations are compared to autocorrelation data.

  19. Computer analysis identifies sequence homologies between potential gene products of Maize Streak Virus and those of Cassava Latent Virus and Tomato Golden Mosaic Virus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. Mullineaux; J. Donson; M. I. Boulton; B. A. M. Morris-Krsinich; P. G. Markham; J. W. Davies

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the putative polypeptides of maize streak virus (MSV) have been systematically compared with those of cassava latent virus (CLV) and tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV) using the programme DIAGON (8).

  20. High-efficiency 20 W yellow VECSEL.

    PubMed

    Kantola, Emmi; Leinonen, Tomi; Ranta, Sanna; Tavast, Miki; Guina, Mircea

    2014-03-24

    A high-efficiency optically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser emitting 20 W at a wavelength around 588 nm is demonstrated. The semiconductor gain chip emitted at a fundamental wavelength around 1170-1180 nm and the laser employed a V-shaped cavity. The yellow spectral range was achieved by intra-cavity frequency doubling using a LBO crystal. The laser could be tuned over a bandwidth of ~26 nm while exhibiting watt-level output powers. The maximum conversion efficiency from absorbed pump power to yellow output was 28% for continuous wave operation. The VECSEL's output could be modulated to generate optical pulses with duration down to 570 ns by directly modulating the pump laser. The high-power pulse operation is a key feature for astrophysics and medical applications while at the same time enables higher slope efficiency than continuous wave operation owing to decreased heating. PMID:24663985