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1

Significance of laboratory findings for the diagnosis of neurosyphilis.  

PubMed

Our objective is to assess the specificity and sensitivity, and thus elaborate the relevance, of different laboratory findings for the diagnosis of neurosyphilis. One hundred and fourteen HIV-negative pairs of serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were examined by the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test, a fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption (FTA-ABS) test, microhaemagglutination assay with Treponema pallidum antigen (MHA-TP) test (serum) and Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA) test (CSF); further, albumin, total protein, and total IgG were determined and, in the CSF, cell count was performed. The donors were 60 patients with active neurosyphilis and 54 healthy persons with a former history of syphilis and with persisting positive results in the T. pallidum haemagglutination tests (serum: MHA-TP, CSF: TPHA), who supplied specimens for control. Albumin quotient, IgG index, TPHA index, modified TPHA index, Intrathecally produced T. pallidum Antigen (ITpA) index, its 2 modifications and, in 12 samples, the adenovirus group antibody (AVGA)/TPHA index were ascertained. The specificity and sensitivity of the TPHA index were 100% and 98.3%, of the modified TPHA index 50.0% and 96.7%, of the ITpA index 42.6% and 90.0%, of the modified ITpA indices 51.8% and 68.3% (first modification) and 53.7% and 63.3% (second modification). The AVGA/TPHA index yielded a specificity of 91.7% (11/12). The CSF VDRL test was positive in 55/60 (91.7%) of samples from patients with neurosyphilis and in none of the controls (0/54). A CSF-TPHA titre greater than 1:320 was observed in 59/60 (98.3%) of the neurosyphilis specimens and in none of the controls (0/54). A TPHA index above an outcome of 70, a positive CSF-TPHA test at a titre greater than 1:320 and, with lower sensitivity, the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines yield the most reliable results for laboratory support to a diagnosis of neurosyphilis. The modified TPHA index, the ITpA index, and its 2 modifications produce results of minor sensitivity and poor specificity. Observations on the AVGA/THPA index are too limited yet for judgement. The diagnostic significance of a CSF-TPHA titre above 320 needs further confirmation on a greater number of observations made by different laboratories. PMID:10772085

Luger, A F; Schmidt, B L; Kaulich, M

2000-04-01

2

40 CFR 6.206 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...issue a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) (see 40 CFR 1508.13) only if the...environment. If the EA does not support a FONSI, the Responsible Official must prepare...Consistent with 40 CFR 1508.13, a FONSI must include: (1) The EA, or...

2014-07-01

3

40 CFR 6.206 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...issue a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) (see 40 CFR 1508.13) only if the...environment. If the EA does not support a FONSI, the Responsible Official must prepare...Consistent with 40 CFR 1508.13, a FONSI must include: (1) The EA, or...

2013-07-01

4

40 CFR 6.206 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...issue a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) (see 40 CFR 1508.13) only if the...environment. If the EA does not support a FONSI, the Responsible Official must prepare...Consistent with 40 CFR 1508.13, a FONSI must include: (1) The EA, or...

2011-07-01

5

40 CFR 6.206 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...issue a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) (see 40 CFR 1508.13) only if the...environment. If the EA does not support a FONSI, the Responsible Official must prepare...Consistent with 40 CFR 1508.13, a FONSI must include: (1) The EA, or...

2012-07-01

6

Patellar tendinitis: the significance of magnetic resonance imaging findings.  

PubMed

We evaluated the significance of magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with patellar tendinitis. Midline sagittal magnetic resonance images were taken of 12 knees from 10 patients and of 17 knees from 15 age- and activity-matched subjects who underwent imaging for reasons other than patellar tendinitis. Of the 12 magnetic resonance imaging scans of knees with clinical patellar tendinitis, 3 (25%) exhibited no defect and only 7 (58%) had unequivocal intratendinous lesions. Among the 17 scans of subjects without clinical patellar tendinitis, 5 (34%) showed no defect and 4 (24%) had unequivocal intratendinous lesions. Proximal tendon width was significantly larger for the tendinitis patient group (5.0 +/- 1.7 mm versus 3.9 +/- 1.0 mm), although considerable overlap was present. All subjects with unequivocal intratendinous signal changes had a significantly longer nonarticular inferior patellar pole and were significantly older (38.1 years versus 26.8 years). Only Blazina stage III lesions were associated with abnormal findings on magnetic resonance imaging. As a whole, the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging was 75% and 29%, respectively. In younger patients with relatively mild symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging did not show significant changes; in older, active patients changes may be present in asymptomatic knees. PMID:10352771

Shalaby, M; Almekinders, L C

1999-01-01

7

Genetic Diversity and Soybean Yield: Finding the Balance  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Based on national production statistics since 1924, average soybean yield in the U.S. has increased at a nearly steady rate of 22 kg ha-1 year-1. It is possible to show some changes in this rate depending on how these past 85 years are divided, but two conclusions seem evident. Soybean yield has not...

8

Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment: Significant and Quantitative Findings Made  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Direct examination of atomic interactions is difficult. One powerful approach to visualizing atomic interactions is to study near-index-matched colloidal dispersions of microscopic plastic spheres, which can be probed by visible light. Such spheres interact through hydrodynamic and Brownian forces, but they feel no direct force before an infinite repulsion at contact. Through the microgravity flight of the Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PHaSE), researchers have sought a more complete understanding of the entropically driven disorder-order transition in hard-sphere colloidal dispersions. The experiment was conceived by Professors Paul M. Chaikin and William B. Russel of Princeton University. Microgravity was required because, on Earth, index-matched colloidal dispersions often cannot be density matched, resulting in significant settling over the crystallization period. This settling makes them a poor model of the equilibrium atomic system, where the effect of gravity is truly negligible. For this purpose, a customized light-scattering instrument was designed, built, and flown by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field on the space shuttle (shuttle missions STS 83 and STS 94). This instrument performed both static and dynamic light scattering, with sample oscillation for determining rheological properties. Scattered light from a 532- nm laser was recorded either by a 10-bit charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera from a concentric screen covering angles of 0 to 60 or by sensitive avalanche photodiode detectors, which convert the photons into binary data from which two correlators compute autocorrelation functions. The sample cell was driven by a direct-current servomotor to allow sinusoidal oscillation for the measurement of rheological properties. Significant microgravity research findings include the observation of beautiful dendritic crystals, the crystallization of a "glassy phase" sample in microgravity that did not crystallize for over 1 year in 1g (Earth's gravity), and the emergence of face-centered-cubic (FCC) crystals late in the coarsening process (as small crystallites lost particles to the slow ripening of large crystallites). Significant quantitative findings from the microgravity experiments have been developed describing complex interactions among crystallites during the growth process, as concentration fields overlap in the surrounding disordered phase. Time-resolved Bragg scattering under microgravity captures one effect of these interactions quite conclusively for the sample at a volume fraction of 0.528. From the earliest time until the sample is almost fully crystalline, the size and overall crystallinity grow monotonically, but the number of crystallites per unit volume (number density) falls. Apparently nucleation is slower than the loss of crystallites because of the transfer of particles from small to large crystals. Thus, coarsening occurs simultaneously with growth, rather than following the completion of nucleation and growth as is generally assumed. In the same sample, an interesting signature appears in the apparent number density of crystallites and the volume fraction within the crystallites shortly before full crystallinity is reached. A brief upturn in both indicates the creation of more domains of the size of the average crystallite simultaneous with the compression of the crystallites. Only the emergence of dendritic arms offers a reasonable explanation. The arms would be "seen" by the light scattering as separate domains whose smaller radii of curvature would compress the interior phase. In fiscal year 1999, numerous papers, a doctoral dissertation, and the PHaSE final report were produced. Although this flight project has been completed, plans are in place for a follow-on colloid experiment by Chaikin and Russel that employs a light microscope within Glenn's Fluids and Combustion Facility on the International Space Station. PHaSE is providing us with a deeper understanding of the nure of phase transitions. The knowledge derived has added to the understandin

Doherty, Michael P.

2000-01-01

9

10 CFR 1021.322 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...significant impact. (a) DOE shall prepare a FONSI only if the related EA supports the...If a required DOE EA does not support a FONSI, DOE shall prepare an EIS and issue...requirements found at 40 CFR 1508.13, a DOE FONSI shall include the following:...

2013-01-01

10

10 CFR 1021.322 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...significant impact. (a) DOE shall prepare a FONSI only if the related EA supports the...If a required DOE EA does not support a FONSI, DOE shall prepare an EIS and issue...requirements found at 40 CFR 1508.13, a DOE FONSI shall include the following:...

2011-01-01

11

10 CFR 1021.322 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...significant impact. (a) DOE shall prepare a FONSI only if the related EA supports the...If a required DOE EA does not support a FONSI, DOE shall prepare an EIS and issue...requirements found at 40 CFR 1508.13, a DOE FONSI shall include the following:...

2012-01-01

12

10 CFR 1021.322 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...significant impact. (a) DOE shall prepare a FONSI only if the related EA supports the...If a required DOE EA does not support a FONSI, DOE shall prepare an EIS and issue...requirements found at 40 CFR 1508.13, a DOE FONSI shall include the following:...

2010-01-01

13

10 CFR 1021.322 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...significant impact. (a) DOE shall prepare a FONSI only if the related EA supports the...If a required DOE EA does not support a FONSI, DOE shall prepare an EIS and issue...requirements found at 40 CFR 1508.13, a DOE FONSI shall include the following:...

2014-01-01

14

SIMPLE MACHINE PERFUSION SIGNIFICANTLY ENHANCES HEPATOCYTE YIELDS OF ISCHEMIC AND FRESH RAT LIVERS  

PubMed Central

The scarcity of viable hepatocytes is a significant bottleneck in cell transplantation, drug discovery, toxicology, tissue engineering, and bioartificial assist devices, where trillions of high-functioning hepatocytes are needed annually. We took the novel approach of using machine perfusion to maximize cell recovery, specifically from uncontrolled cardiac death donors, the largest source of disqualified donor organs. In a rat model, we developed a simple 3 hour room temperature (20±2°C) machine perfusion protocol to treat non-premedicated livers exposed to 1 hour of warm (34°C) ischemia. Treated ischemic livers were compared to fresh, fresh-treated and untreated ischemic livers using viable hepatocyte yields and in vitro performance as quantitative endpoints. Perfusion treatment resulted in both a 25-fold increase in viable hepatocytes from ischemic livers, and a 40% increase from fresh livers. While cell morphology and function in suspension and plate cultures of untreated warm ischemic cells was significantly impaired, treated warm ischemic cells were indistinguishable from fresh hepatocytes. Further, a strong linear correlation between tissue ATP and cell yield enabled accurate evaluation of the extent of perfusion recovery. Maximal recovery of warm ischemic liver ATP content appears to be correlated with optimal flow through the microvasculature. These data demonstrate that the inclusion of a simple perfusion-preconditioning step can significantly increase the efficiency of functional hepatocyte yields and the number of donor livers that can be gainfully utilized. PMID:25431743

Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Calhoun, Candice; Uygun, Basak E.; Guzzardi, Maria Angela; Price, Gavrielle; Luitje, Martha; Saeidi, Nima; Yarmush, Martin L.; Uygun, Korkut

2014-01-01

15

7 CFR Exhibit I to Subpart G of... - Finding of No Significant Environmental Impact  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Finding of No Significant Environmental Impact I Exhibit I to Subpart G of Part 1940 Agriculture Regulations of... Environmental Program Pt. 1940, Subpt. G, Exh. I Exhibit I to Subpart G of Part 1940—Finding of No...

2013-01-01

16

7 CFR Exhibit I to Subpart G of... - Finding of No Significant Environmental Impact  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... true Finding of No Significant Environmental Impact I Exhibit I to Subpart G of Part 1940 Agriculture Regulations of... Environmental Program Pt. 1940, Subpt. G, Exh. I Exhibit I to Subpart G of Part 1940—Finding of No...

2011-01-01

17

7 CFR Exhibit I to Subpart G of... - Finding of No Significant Environmental Impact  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... true Finding of No Significant Environmental Impact I Exhibit I to Subpart G of Part 1940 Agriculture Regulations of... Environmental Program Pt. 1940, Subpt. G, Exh. I Exhibit I to Subpart G of Part 1940—Finding of No...

2010-01-01

18

7 CFR Exhibit I to Subpart G of... - Finding of No Significant Environmental Impact  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Finding of No Significant Environmental Impact I Exhibit I to Subpart G of Part 1940 Agriculture Regulations of... Environmental Program Pt. 1940, Subpt. G, Exh. I Exhibit I to Subpart G of Part 1940—Finding of No...

2012-01-01

19

Enhancing the Interpretation of "Significant" Findings: The Role of Mixed Methods Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present essay outlines how mixed methods research can be used to enhance the interpretation of significant findings. First, we define what we mean by significance in educational evaluation research. With regard to quantitative-based research, we define the four types of significance: statistical significance, practical significance, clinical…

Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Leech, Nancy L.

2004-01-01

20

33 CFR 230.11 - Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 230.11 Section 230.11 Navigation and Navigable...NEPA § 230.11 Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). A FONSI shall be prepared for a proposed action, not...

2013-07-01

21

33 CFR 230.11 - Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 230.11 Section 230.11 Navigation and Navigable...NEPA § 230.11 Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). A FONSI shall be prepared for a proposed action, not...

2012-07-01

22

33 CFR 230.11 - Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 230.11 Section 230.11 Navigation and Navigable...NEPA § 230.11 Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). A FONSI shall be prepared for a proposed action, not...

2014-07-01

23

33 CFR 230.11 - Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 230.11 Section 230.11 Navigation and Navigable...NEPA § 230.11 Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). A FONSI shall be prepared for a proposed action, not...

2010-07-01

24

33 CFR 230.11 - Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 230.11 Section 230.11 Navigation and Navigable...NEPA § 230.11 Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). A FONSI shall be prepared for a proposed action, not...

2011-07-01

25

78 FR 10620 - Draft Environmental Assessment and Preliminary Finding of No Significant Impact Concerning a...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...preliminary finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for those specific conditions of use...Atlantic salmon and a preliminary FONSI for those specific conditions of use. Comments on the draft EA and FONSI will inform FDA's decision whether...

2013-02-14

26

75 FR 2480 - Wildlife Services; Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Notices] [Pages 2480-2481] [FR Doc No: 2010-806...Plant Health Inspection Service [Docket No. APHIS-2009-0087] Wildlife Services...Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact AGENCY: Animal and...

2010-01-15

27

76 FR 28480 - Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Related to Exemption From Certain...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Notices] [Pages 28480-28481] [FR Doc No: 2011-12039] [[Page 28480...REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0108]; Docket No. 50-010 Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Related to Exemption...

2011-05-17

28

75 FR 25301 - Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc.; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Notices] [Pages 25301-25302] [FR Doc No: 2010-10828...NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [DOCKET NO. 70-143; NRC-2010-0175] Nuclear...Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for Proposed...

2010-05-07

29

The orthopaedic trauma literature: an evaluation of statistically significant findings in orthopaedic trauma randomized trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Evidence-based medicine posits that health care research is founded upon clinically important differences in patient centered outcomes. Statistically significant differences between two treatments may not necessarily reflect a clinically important difference. We aimed to quantify the sample sizes and magnitude of treatment effects in a review of orthopaedic randomized trials with statistically significant findings. METHODS: We conducted a comprehensive

Jinsil Sung; Judith Siegel; Paul Tornetta; Mohit Bhandari

2008-01-01

30

Prognostic Significance of Rheological and Biochemical Findings in Patients with Intermittent Claudication  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess the prognostic significance of clinical and laboratory findings in intermittent claudication a group of 62 untreated patients was followed up in detail for periods of from one to three years. There was a significant correlation between progressive deterioration of the peripheral circulatory disturbance and the initial blood viscosity, the plasma fibrinogen level, and the susceptibility of red cell

J. A. Dormandy; E. Hoare; A. H. Khattab; D. E. Arrowsmith; T. L. Dormandy

1973-01-01

31

75 FR 36701 - Issuance of Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for Modification of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Finding of No Significant Impact for Modification of Exemption From Certain U.S. Nuclear...effects of variability in climate and weather and the effects of radioactive decay...that the proposed action to grant a modification to EnergySolutions' exemption...

2010-06-28

32

THE TEN MOST SIGNIFICANT EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH FINDINGS IN THE PAST TEN YEARS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

TO ASCERTAIN THE SIGNIFICANCE OF RESEARCH IN EDUCATION, THREE QUESTIONS MAY BE ASKED--(1) TO WHAT EXTENT HAS THE BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUALS IN EDUCATION BEEN CHANGED. (2) HOW MANY ARTICLES HAVE BEEN WRITTEN AS A RESULT OF THE FINDINGS. (3) TO WHAT EXTENT DO EDUCATORS TALK ABOUT OR USE THE CONCEPTS GENERATED BY THE RESEARCH IN DISCUSSING THEIR OWN…

DAVIES, DANIEL R.; GRIFFITHS, DANIEL E.

33

Find may yield flu early warning -The Boston Globe THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING  

E-print Network

Find may yield flu early warning - The Boston Globe THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING Find may yield flu early warning By Stephen Smith, Globe Staff | January 7, 2008 For a decade, disease flu to easily infect people and ignite a firestorm of human illness akin to the 1918 global flu

Sasisekharan, Ram

34

Congenital Microcephaly with Simplified Gyral Pattern: Associated Findings and their Significance  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose Primary microcephalies are incompletely understood malformations that are often associated with developmental brain anomalies, yet it is not understood if the associated anomalies result from the microcephaly itself or from associated developmental/genetic mishaps. This study reviewed and analyzed a large number of MRI scans of children with microcephaly to determine the frequency of associated morphological findings and to assess whether these findings were associated with the severity of the microcephaly. Materials and Methods MRIs of 119 patients with clinically diagnosed microcephaly were retrospectively reviewed, focusing on the degree of microcephaly, simplification of gyri, white matter volume, abnormalities of corpus callosum, size and structure of posterior fossa contents, and myelination. Associations among the findings were evaluated using the Spearman correlation coefficient and the Fisher exact test. Results Among 7 patients with mild, 42 with moderate, and 70 with extreme microcephaly, a significant correlation was identified between a greater degree of microcephaly and both a greater degree of simplified gyration and decreased white matter volume. The severity of callosal anomaly showed a lower, but still significant, correlation with the severity of microcephaly. Degree of hypoplasia of posterior fossa structures, delay in myelination, and abnormality of basal ganglia did not correlate with the degree of microcephaly. Conclusion A strong correlation was found between the degree of microcephaly, the volume of white matter, and the presence of a simplified gyral pattern. These associations should be considered when attempting to use neuroimaging for segregation and classification of patients with microcephaly. PMID:21454410

Adachi, Yuko; Walsh, Christopher A.; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Yamashita, Fumio; Barkovich, A. James

2013-01-01

35

Diagnostic Yield of Recommendations for Chest CT Examination Prompted by Outpatient Chest Radiographic Findings.  

PubMed

Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic yield of recommended chest computed tomography (CT) prompted by abnormalities detected on outpatient chest radiographic images. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. Reports of all outpatient chest radiographic examinations performed at a large academic center during 2008 (n = 29 138) were queried to identify studies that included a recommendation for a chest CT imaging. The radiology information system was queried for these patients to determine if a chest CT examination was obtained within 1 year of the index radiographic examination that contained the recommendation. For chest CT examinations obtained within 1 year of the index chest radiographic examination and that met inclusion criteria, chest CT images were reviewed to determine if there was an abnormality that corresponded to the chest radiographic finding that prompted the recommendation. All corresponding abnormalities were categorized as clinically relevant or not clinically relevant, based on whether further work-up or treatment was warranted. Groups were compared by using t test and Fisher exact test with a Bonferroni correction applied for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4.5% (1316 of 29138 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 4.3%, 4.8%]) of outpatient chest radiographic examinations that contained a recommendation for chest CT examination, and increasing patient age (P < .001) and positive smoking history (P = .001) were associated with increased likelihood of a recommendation for chest CT examination. Of patients within this subset who met inclusion criteria, 65.4% (691 of 1057 [95% CI: 62.4%, 68.2%) underwent a chest CT examination within the year after the index chest radiographic examination. Clinically relevant corresponding abnormalities were present on chest CT images in 41.4% (286 of 691 [95% CI: 37.7%, 45.2%]) of cases, nonclinically relevant corresponding abnormalities in 20.6% (142 of 691 [95% CI: 17.6%, 23.8%]) of cases, and no corresponding abnormalities in 38.1% (263 of 691 [95% CI: 34.4%, 41.8%]) of cases. Newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven malignancies were detected in 8.1% (56 of 691 [95% CI: 6.2%, 10.4%]) of cases. Conclusion A radiologist recommendation for chest CT to evaluate an abnormal finding on an outpatient chest radiographic examination has a high yield of clinically relevant findings. PMID:25531242

Harvey, H Benjamin; Gilman, Matthew D; Wu, Carol C; Cushing, Matthew S; Halpern, Elkan F; Zhao, Jing; Pandharipande, Pari V; Shepard, Jo-Anne O; Alkasab, Tarik K

2015-04-01

36

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project Steamboat Springs, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to provide the DOE and other public agency decision makers with the environmental documentation required to take informed discretionary action on the proposed Kalina Geothermal Demonstration project. The EA assesses the potential environmental impacts and cumulative impacts, possible ways to minimize effects associated with partial funding of the proposed project, and discusses alternatives to DOE actions. The DOE will use this EA as a basis for their decision to provide financial assistance to Exergy, Inc. (Exergy), the project applicant. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human or physical environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

N /A

1999-02-22

37

Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program, a small-scale production initiative designed to increase numbers of a weak but potentially recoverable population of spring chinook salmon in the Tucannon River in the State of Washington. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-l326) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

N /A

2000-05-24

38

Mid-Columbia Coho Reintroduction Feasibility Project : Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund research for 2 to 3 years on the feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon into mid-Columbia River basin tributaries. The research would take place in the Methow and Wenatchee river basins in Chelan and Okanogan Counties, Washington. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1282) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation; Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife

1999-04-01

39

Finding of No Significant Impact, proposed remediation of the Maybell Uranium Mill Processing Site, Maybell, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0347) on the proposed surface remediation of the Maybell uranium mill processing site in Moffat County, Colorado. The mill site contains radioactively contaminated materials from processing uranium ore that would be stabilized in place at the existing tailings pile location. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, Public Law 91-190 (42 U.S.C. {section}4321 et seq.), as amended. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

Not Available

1995-12-31

40

FOCUSED R&D FOR ELECTROCHROMIC SMART WINDOWS: SIGNIFICANT PERFORMANCE AND YIELD ENHANCEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Developments made under this program will play a key role in underpinning the technology for producing EC devices. It is anticipated that the work begun during this period will continue to improve materials properties, and drive yields up and costs down, increase durability and make manufacture simpler and more cost effective. It is hoped that this will contribute to a successful and profitable industry, which will help reduce energy consumption and improve comfort for building occupants worldwide. The first major task involved improvements to the materials used in the process. The improvements made as a result of the work done during this project have contributed to the enhanced performance, including dynamic range, uniformity and electrical characteristics. Another major objective of the project was to develop technology to improve yield, reduce cost, and facilitate manufacturing of EC products. Improvements directly attributable to the work carried out as part of this project and seen in the overall EC device performance, have been accompanied by an improvement in the repeatability and consistency of the production process. Innovative test facilities for characterizing devices in a timely and well-defined manner have been developed. The equipment has been designed in such a way as to make scaling-up to accommodate higher throughput necessary for manufacturing relatively straightforward. Finally, the third major goal was to assure the durability of the EC product, both by developments aimed at improving the product performance, as well as development of novel procedures to test the durability of this new product. Both aspects have been demonstrated, both by carrying out a number of different durability tests, both in-house and by independent third-party testers, and also developing several novel durability tests.

Marcus Milling

2004-09-23

41

Our previous studies on G. dumetorum yielded several aporphine alkaloids that showed significant activity against Leishmania spp.  

E-print Network

Our previous studies on G. dumetorum yielded several aporphine alkaloids that showed significant conducted additional isolation efforts on the minor alkaloids of this species. A standard alkaloid on the identification of alkaloids 1±9 from G. dumetorum (Fig.1). All nine of these metabolites were tested against

Coley, Phyllis

42

Regulated expression of an isopentenyltransferase gene (IPT) in peanut significantly improves drought tolerance and increases yield under field  

E-print Network

1 Regulated expression of an isopentenyltransferase gene (IPT) in peanut significantly improves. This report extends the earlier findings in tobacco and rice to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), an important oil crop and protein source. Regulated expression of IPT in peanut significantly improved drought tolerance

Blumwald, Eduardo

43

Focused R&D For Electrochromic Smart Windowsa: Significant Performance and Yield Enhancements  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to improve the energy efficiency of building envelopes as they are the primary factor governing the heating, cooling, lighting and ventilation requirements of buildings--influencing 53% of building energy use. In particular, windows contribute significantly to the overall energy performance of building envelopes, thus there is a need to develop advanced energy efficient window and glazing systems. Electrochromic (EC) windows represent the next generation of advanced glazing technology that will (1) reduce the energy consumed in buildings, (2) improve the overall comfort of the building occupants, and (3) improve the thermal performance of the building envelope. ''Switchable'' EC windows provide, on demand, dynamic control of visible light, solar heat gain, and glare without blocking the view. As exterior light levels change, the window's performance can be electronically adjusted to suit conditions. A schematic illustrating how SageGlass{reg_sign} electrochromic windows work is shown in Figure I.1. SageGlass{reg_sign} EC glazings offer the potential to save cooling and lighting costs, with the added benefit of improving thermal and visual comfort. Control over solar heat gain will also result in the use of smaller HVAC equipment. If a step change in the energy efficiency and performance of buildings is to be achieved, there is a clear need to bring EC technology to the marketplace. This project addresses accelerating the widespread introduction of EC windows in buildings and thus maximizing total energy savings in the U.S. and worldwide. We report on R&D activities to improve the optical performance needed to broadly penetrate the full range of architectural markets. Also, processing enhancements have been implemented to reduce manufacturing costs. Finally, tests are being conducted to demonstrate the durability of the EC device and the dual pane insulating glass unit (IGU) to be at least equal to that of conventional windows.

Mark Burdis; Neil Sbar

2003-01-31

44

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Sunrise II Water Supply Line  

SciTech Connect

Sunrise Power Company, LLC (Sunrise), has planned the modification of an existing power plant project to increase its generation capacity by 265 megawatts by 2003. The initial Sunrise facility was constructed in accordance with a license issued by the California Energy Commission (CEC) on December 6, 2000 and brought 320 MW of much needed power to commercial operation in June 2001. The Governor of the State of California issued recent Executive Orders to provide for emergency permit streamlining of projects that can help alleviate the current California energy crisis. Specifically, Executive Order D-25-01 directed the CEC to expedite processing amendments such as the Sunrise II modification that would increase generating capacity from 320 MW to 585 MW by summer 2003. As part of the modification, an approximately 15.3 mile water line will be installed. Additionally, improvements to West Kern Water District's (WKWD) Pumping Station ''B'', located on DOE land, will occur. Sunrise has requested a right-of-way grant for the construction of the water supply line on U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and DOE lands. Pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended, the potential impacts of the proposed action were analyzed in an Environmental Assessment (EA-1434) with the BLM acting as lead agency. Based on the analysis of the potential environmental impacts contained in the Environmental Assessment (EA), BLM has determined that significant impacts are not expected and an environmental impact statement is not required. The DOE, acting as a cooperating agency, has adopted the BLM's EA and is consequently issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

N /A

2002-10-09

45

75 FR 50036 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Availability of Finding of No Significant Impact...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Aviation Administration Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Availability of Finding...findings of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) August 2009...the EA). The FAA (Office of Commercial Space Transportation) participated as a...

2010-08-16

46

(Bradfield Electric and Alaska Power Authority Presidential permit): Finding of no significant impact (FONSI)  

SciTech Connect

The Economic Regulatory Administration (ERA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) is considering an application by Bradfield Electric, Inc. (Bradfield), and the Alaska Power Authority (APA) for a Presidential permit to construct, operate, maintain and connect a 69-kilovolt (kV) transmission line which would extend from the APA's Tyee Lake Hydroelectric Power Project located near Wrangell, Alaska, to a point on the US-Canadian international border just east of the South Fork Craig River. The DOE has reviewed an environmental assessment (EA) prepared by the US Forest Service (USFS) in connection with its issuance of a special use permit to construct the proposed line through the Tongass National Forest. Based on this EA, the USFS issued a decision notice and a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for the proposed project on May 9, 1988. The DOE is adopting this EA as DOE/EA-0375 in partial satisfaction of its responsibilities under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) regarding the issuance of a Presidential permit.

Not Available

1988-01-01

47

78 FR 14508 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the Field...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of no significant impact relative to the release of Aphelinus glycinis for the biological control of soybean aphid, Aphis glycines, in the continental United States. Based on its finding of no significant impact, the Animal and Plant Health...

2013-03-06

48

76 FR 19523 - Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Beaumont Layberth Facility  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Transportation, Maritime Administration...No Significant Impact...given that the Maritime Administration...S. Department Transportation (US DOT) has...No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the...Layberth Facility. An environmental assessment...

2011-04-07

49

75 FR 65294 - Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative: Notice of Finding of No Significant Impact  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative: Notice of Finding...Calvert and St. Mary's Counties, Maryland. The EA was prepared pursuant to the...impacts of and alternatives to a Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative (SMECO)...

2010-10-22

50

78 FR 46378 - La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor, Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-409; NRC-2013-0168] La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor, Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) for the La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor (LACBWR) facility and Independent Spent...

2013-07-31

51

UCSF researchers find that nonsmokers in automobiles are exposed to significant secondhand smoke  

Cancer.gov

Nonsmokers sitting in an automobile with a smoker for one hour had markers of significantly increased levels of carcinogens and other toxins in their urine, indicating that secondhand smoke in motor vehicles poses a potentially major health risk.

52

76 FR 41528 - Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Significant Impact for License Renewal for Uranium One USA Inc., Irigaray and Christensen Ranch Uranium In-Situ Recovery Projects (Willow Creek...CONTACT: Ron C. Linton, Project Manager, Uranium Recovery Licensing Branch, Division...

2011-07-14

53

78 FR 5514 - Supplemental Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for License Renewal...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...No Significant Impact for License Renewal for Uranium One USA, Inc., Willow Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project, Johnson and Campbell...Source Materials License SUA-1341 for continued uranium production operations and in-situ...

2013-01-25

54

76 FR 34273 - Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for Special Nuclear Material...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...require approximately 20 truck trips. Un-irradiated...assemblies and to assigned truck drivers. The exposure in the cab of a fuel transport truck was estimated to be 0...cause any significant health effects. If WBN2 is...

2011-06-13

55

76 FR 13597 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for a Biological...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...into the continental United States as a biological control agent to reduce the severity of infestations of hawkweeds (Hieracium spp.). Based on its finding of no significant impact, APHIS has determined that an environmental impact statement need not...

2011-03-14

56

75 FR 21659 - Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Draft Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI...the Draft Environmental Assessment and FONSI for Arroyo Colorado South Levee Rehabilitation...DATES: Comments on the Draft EA and Draft FONSI will be accepted through May 26,...

2010-04-26

57

78 FR 55330 - Notice of Approval of Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for Murdo Municipal Airport, Murdo...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Approval of Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for Murdo Municipal Airport, Murdo, SD...Murdo, South Dakota. The FAA approved the FONSI on August 22, 2013. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FONSI approved the Sponsor's proposed...

2013-09-10

58

Can I be sued for that? Liability risk and the disclosure of clinically significant genetic research findings  

PubMed Central

Genomic researchers increasingly are faced with difficult decisions about whether, under what circumstances, and how to return research results and significant incidental findings to study participants. Many have argued that there is an ethical—maybe even a legal—obligation to disclose significant findings under some circumstances. At the international level, over the last decade there has begun to emerge a clear legal obligation to return significant findings discovered during the course of research. However, there is no explicit legal duty to disclose in the United States. This creates legal uncertainty that may lead to unmanaged variation in practice and poor quality care. This article discusses liability risks associated with the disclosure of significant research findings for investigators in the United States. PMID:24676095

McGuire, Amy L.; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Zawati, Ma’n H.; Clayton, Ellen Wright

2014-01-01

59

A Visitor's Guide to Effect Sizes--Statistical Significance versus Practical (Clinical) Importance of Research Findings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effect Sizes (ES) are an increasingly important index used to quantify the degree of practical significance of study results. This paper gives an introduction to the computation and interpretation of effect sizes from the perspective of the consumer of the research literature. The key points made are: (1) "ES" is a useful indicator of the…

Hojat, Mohammadreza; Xu, Gang

2004-01-01

60

Finding the Intersection of the Learning Organization and Learning Transfer: The Significance of Leadership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This article aims to develop a conceptual framework delineating the key dimension of the learning organization which significantly influences learning transfer. Design/methodology/approach: The conceptual framework was developed by analyzing previous studies and synthesizing the results associated with the following four relationships:…

Kim, Jun Hee; Callahan, Jamie L.

2013-01-01

61

UCLA study finds survival significantly increased in early breast cancer after treatment with Herceptin and chemotherapy:  

Cancer.gov

Treating women with early stage breast cancer with a combination of chemotherapy and the molecularly targeted drug Herceptin significantly increases survival in patients with a specific genetic mutation that results in very aggressive disease, a researcher with UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center reported Wednesday.

62

Wharton's Jelly Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Future of Regenerative Medicine? Recent Findings and Clinical Significance  

PubMed Central

Around 5 million annual births in EU and 131 million worldwide give a unique opportunity to collect lifesaving Wharton's jelly derived mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSC). Evidences that these cells possess therapeutic properties are constantly accumulating. Collection of WJ-MSC is done at the time of delivery and it is easy and devoid of side effects associated with collection of adult stem cells from bone marrow or adipose tissue. Likewise, their rate of proliferation, immune privileged status, lack of ethical concerns, nontumorigenic properties make them ideal for both autologous and allogeneic use in regenerative medicine applications. This review provides an outline of the recent findings related to WJ-MSC therapeutic effects and possible advantage they possess over MSC from other sources. Results of first clinical trials conducted to treat immune disorders are highlighted. PMID:25861624

Kalaszczynska, Ilona; Ferdyn, Katarzyna

2015-01-01

63

Billy Shaw Dam and Reservoir : Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impacts.  

SciTech Connect

This notice announces BPA`s decision to fund the construction, operation, and maintenance of the Billy Shaw Dam and Reservoir on the Duck Valley Reservation. This project is part of a continuing effort to address system-wide fish and wildlife losses caused by the development of the hydropower system in the Columbia River Basin. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the potential environmental impacts of the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the Proposed Action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation, Nevada.

1997-03-01

64

Scientists Find X Rays from Stellar Winds That May Play Significant Role in Galactic Evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Colorful star-forming regions that have captivated stargazers since the advent of the telescope 400 years ago contain gas thousands of times more energetic than previously recognized, powered by colliding stellar winds. This multimillion-degree gas radiated as X rays is one of the long-sought sources of energy and elements in the Milky Way galaxy's interstellar medium. A team led by Leisa Townsley, a senior research associate in astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State University, uncovered this wind phenomenon in the Rosette Nebula, a stellar nursery. With the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the team found that the most massive stars in the nebula produce winds that slam into each other, create violent shocks, and infuse the region with 6-million-degree gas. The findings are presented in Washington, D.C., today at a conference entitled "Two Years of Science with Chandra." "A ghostly glow of diffuse X-ray emission pervades the Rosette Nebula and perhaps many other similar star-forming regions throughout the Galaxy," said Townsley. "We now have a new view of the engine lighting the beautiful Rosette Nebula and new evidence for how the interstellar medium may be energized." Townsley and her colleagues created a striking X-ray panorama of the Rosette Molecular Cloud from four images with Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. This is a swath of the sky nearly 100 light years across sprayed with hundreds of X-ray-emitting young stars. In one corner of the Rosette Molecular Cloud lies the Rosette Nebula, called an "H II region" because the hydrogen gas there has been stripped of its electrons due to the strong ultraviolet radiation from its young stars. This region, about 5,000 light years away in the constellation Monoceros, the Unicorn, has long been a favorite among amateur astronomers. The wispy, colorful display is visible with small telescopes. The Chandra survey reveals, for the first time, 6-million-degree gas at the center of the Rosette Nebula, occupying a volume of about 3,000 cubic light years. Fueling the fury are a handful of massive type-O and type-B stars at the core of the nebula, the most massive members of a populous "OB association" that also includes hundreds of lower- mass stars. Rosette Nebula Optical/X-ray Composite Press Image and Caption "Until this observation, no one really knew where the energy of the powerful OB stellar winds goes," said Eric Feigelson, professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State and a co-investigator in the study. "Theorists have speculated about this for decades, and we now see with Chandra the heat from the winds slamming into the cooler gas." Earlier X-ray telescopes did not have the resolution to differentiate between point sources and diffuse emission in the Rosette Nebula to the extent that Chandra has. Chandra imaged over 300 individual young stars in the Rosette Nebula, plus hundreds more in the Rosette Molecular Cloud. "We were able to identify the faint, diffuse radiation by subtracting out these point sources and looking at what was left over," explains team member Patrick Broos, a research assistant in astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State. The diffuse emission is not likely to be from supernova remnants left over from exploded stars because the Rosette Nebula is too young to have produced these, according to You- Hua Chu, of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Rather, the diffuse emission must be related to the way the stellar winds from OB associations dissipate their energy. Understanding the detailed processes involved will rely on front-line research done in the laboratory on energy transport in very hot gases, according to Thierry Montmerle, of the Centre d'Etudes de Saclay in France. Chu and Montmerle have joined the research team to help interpret the Chandra results. The observations were made with Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, which was conceived and developed for NASA by Penn State and Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the lead

2001-09-01

65

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Implementation of the Wetland Mitigation Bank Program at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1205) for the proposed implementation of a wetland mitigation bank program at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings.

N /A

1999-04-28

66

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Pond B Dam Repair Project at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1285) for the proposed repair of the Pond B dam at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings.

N /A

1999-09-27

67

Frequency and Clinical Significance of Previously Undetected Incidental Findings Detected on Computed Tomography Simulation Scans for Breast Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of previously undetected incidental findings found on computed tomography (CT) simulation images for breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: All CT simulation images were first interpreted prospectively by radiation oncologists and then double-checked by diagnostic radiologists. The official reports of CT simulation images for 881 consecutive postoperative breast cancer patients from 2009 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Potentially important incidental findings (PIIFs) were defined as any previously undetected benign or malignancy-related findings requiring further medical follow-up or investigation. For all patients in whom a PIIF was detected, we reviewed the clinical records to determine the clinical significance of the PIIF. If the findings from the additional studies prompted by a PIIF required a change in management, the PIIF was also recorded as a clinically important incidental finding (CIIF). Results: There were a total of 57 (6%) PIIFs. The 57 patients in whom a PIIF was detected were followed for a median of 17 months (range, 3-26). Six cases of CIIFs (0.7% of total) were detected. Of the six CIIFs, three (50%) cases had not been noted by the radiation oncologist until the diagnostic radiologist detected the finding. On multivariate analysis, previous CT examination was an independent predictor for PIIF (p = 0.04). Patients who had not previously received chest CT examinations within 1 year had a statistically significantly higher risk of PIIF than those who had received CT examinations within 6 months (odds ratio, 3.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-9.50; p = 0.01). Conclusions: The rate of incidental findings prompting a change in management was low. However, radiation oncologists appear to have some difficulty in detecting incidental findings that require a change in management. Considering cost, it may be reasonable that routine interpretations are given to those who have not received previous chest CT examinations within 1 year.

Nakamura, Naoki, E-mail: naokinak@luke.or.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tsunoda, Hiroko [Department of Radiology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, Osamu [Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kikuchi, Mari; Honda, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka (Japan); Akahane, Keiko; Sekiguchi, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-11-01

68

Association between industry funding and statistically significant pro-industry findings in medical and surgical randomized trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Conflicting reports exist in the medical literature re- garding the association between industry funding and pub- lished research findings. In this study, we examine the associa- tion between industry funding and the statistical significance of results in recently published medical and surgical trials. Methods: We examined a consecutive series of 332 randomized trials published between January 1999 and June

Mohit Bhandari; Jason W. Busse; Dianne Jackowski; Victor M. Montori; Holger Schünemann; Sheila Sprague; Derek Mears; Emil H. Schemitsch; Dianne Heels-Ansdell; P. J. Devereaux

2004-01-01

69

75 FR 39325 - Notice of Draft Finding of No Significant Impact for the Washington State Portion of the Pacific...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...draft finding of no significant impact (draft FONSI) and is inviting the public to comment on...will be considered and addressed in the final FONSI. Copies of both the Tier-1 EA and draft FONSI are available on FRA's Web site at:...

2010-07-08

70

77 FR 32173 - Notice of Availability of the Finding of No Significant Impact: Union and Henderson Counties, KY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...availability of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) to implement the US 60 Capacity and Safety...Administrator, FHWA-Kentucky Division signed the FONSI on April 9, 2012. ADDRESSES: The FHWA FONSI for the US 60 Capacity and Safety...

2012-05-31

71

76 FR 37842 - Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Related to Exemption for the Peach...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Finding of No Significant Impact Related to Exemption for the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Unit 1 License DPR-012, York...requirements in 10 CFR part 73 and 10 CFR 50.54(p) for the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station (PBAPS) Unit 1. This...

2011-06-28

72

Finding of no significant impact for the tritium facility modernization and consolidation project at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1222) for the proposed modernization and consolidation of the existing tritium facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issueing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1998-01-01

73

Findings  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Starting in February 2001, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) began publishing "Findings" magazine. The publication features research and findings from scholars doing work with funding from the NIGMS. Visitors can browse the archive of the publication by topic or date, and they can also check out the sample articles from the latest edition on the homepage. Recent pieces have included "Drugs from Deep Down", "Mesmerized by Metals", and "Just Found", which talks about potential sunburn treatments. The site also has the "Find More" area, which contains an image gallery, school resources, free slide kits, and interactive games. Also, the "Watch" area contains interviews with scientists like Dr. Kevin Tracey talking about his investigations into sepsis. Finally, visitors can also sign up to receive Findings via email.

74

Age-dependent yield of screening for undetected atrial fibrillation in stroke patients: the Find-AF study.  

PubMed

Diagnosis of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) in stroke patients is challenging, but highly clinically relevant. The percentage of stroke patients with permanent AF increases with age, but limited data are available for the age-dependent yield of paroxysmal AF by Holter monitoring. Patients with acute cerebral ischemia were included into the prospective observational Find-AF study. Patients free from AF at presentation received 7 day Holter monitoring. We calculated the percentage of otherwise undetected paroxysmal AF and the number needed to screen for age groups under 60 years, and in 5 year clusters from the age of 60 up to 85 and older. 272 patients were included, 43 (15.8 %) had AF at admission, 33 patients with paroxysmal AF were identified by 7 day Holter (n = 29) or medical history (n = 4).The yield of 7 day Holter ECG clearly increased with older age (p = 0.004): <60 years: 5 %, 60-64 years: 5 %, 65-69 years: 7 %, 70-74 years: 11 %, 75-79 years: 13 %, 80-84 years: 25 %, ? 85 years: 39 %. The number needed to screen (NNS) to find one patient with paroxysmal AF decreased with age: ? 60 years: 18, 60-64 years: 20, 65-69 years: 14, 70-74 years: 9, 75-79 years: 8, 80-84 years: 4, ? 85 years: 3, respectively. In patients <65 years, all AF cases were detected by Holter ECG. The percentage of paroxysmal AF in stroke patients increases with age. The 7 day Holter ECG is most efficient in elderly patients. PMID:23632947

Wachter, Rolf; Weber-Krüger, Mark; Seegers, Joachim; Edelmann, Frank; Wohlfahrt, Janin; Wasser, Katrin; Gelbrich, Götz; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Stahrenberg, Raoul; Liman, Jan; Gröschel, Klaus

2013-08-01

75

Significance of thermophilic fungi in mushroom compost preparation: effect on growth and yield of Agaricus bisporus (Lange) Sing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eighteen species of thermophilic and thermotolerant fungi were isolated from mushroom compost. Growth of Agaricus bisporus, was studied on sterile compost pre-colonized with four thermophilic fungi viz., Chaetomium thermophile, Malbranchea sulfurea, Thermomyces lanuginosus and Torula thermophila. All the four fungi were inoculated singly and in different combinations on sterilized compost to evaluate their potential to promote growth and yield of

R. K. Salar; K. R. Aneja

76

The bovine annexin 9 gene ( ANXA9) is significantly associated with milk-fat yield in a Spanish Holstein–Friesian population  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the basis of QTL studies for milk-fat yield trait on BTA3, annexin 9 protein (ANXA9), fatty acid transport protein type 3 (SLC27A3) and diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) were selected as candidate genes. Three different single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of bovine ANXA9, SLC27A3 and DGAT1 genes have been tested in a selective genotyping design for milk-fat yield. Significant allele frequency

A. Martínez-Royo; L. Ordovas; P. Zaragoza; J. Altarriba; M. Serrano; C. Rodellar; J. H. Calvo

2010-01-01

77

Finding of no significant impact proposed corrective action for the Northeast Site at the Pinellas Plant in Largo, Florida  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0976) of the proposed corrective action for the Northeast Site at the Pinellas Plant in Largo, Florida. The Northeast Site contains contaminated groundwater that would be removed, treated, and discharged to the Pinellas County Sewer System. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 U.S.C.4321 et.seq. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and the DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1995-06-01

78

Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Waste Disposition Activities at the Paducah Site Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1339), which is incorporated herein by reference, for proposed disposition of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes, low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site (Paducah Site) in Paducah, Kentucky. All of the wastes would be transported for disposal at various locations in the United States. Based on the results of the impact analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment with in the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

N /A

2002-11-05

79

Significance of laboratory and radiologic findings for differentiating between septic arthritis and transient synovitis of the hip.  

PubMed

Although significant differences exist in the methods of treatment and prognoses of septic coxitis and transient synovitis in children complaining of acute hip pain, similar symptoms are present in these two diseases at the early stages, and differential diagnosis is difficult. To differentiate between these two diseases, the authors evaluated the clinical, serologic, and radiologic findings and tried to determine factors that could be used as diagnostic criteria. The authors performed a retrospective study by evaluating medical records, plain hip radiographs, and clinical findings in 97 patients with transient synovitis and 27 patients with septic arthritis. Univariate analysis showed significant differences in body temperature, serum WBC count, and ESR and CRP levels of the two patient groups. Plain radiographs showed a displacement or blurring of periarticular fat pads in all patients with acute septic arthritis, and multivariate regression analysis showed that body temperature >37 degrees C, ESR >20 mm/h, CRP >1 mg/dL, WBC >11,000/mL, and an increased hip joint space of >2 mm were independent multivariate predictors of acute septic arthritis. The authors conclude that the independent multivariate predictors are effective indices for the differential diagnosis of acute septic coxitis and transient synovitis. PMID:12724602

Jung, Sung Taek; Rowe, Sung Man; Moon, Eun Sun; Song, Eun Kyoo; Yoon, Taek Rim; Seo, Hyoung Yeon

2003-01-01

80

Clinical significance of discordant findings between pre-therapy 123I and post-therapy 131I whole body scan in patients with thyroid cancer  

PubMed Central

Radioactive therapy with 131I (RAI) is commonly used during the management of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of discordant findings between pre-RAI whole body scan (WBS) with 123I and post-RAI WBS in the management of DTC. We retrospectively evaluated 342 individuals between 2002 and 2008 who had a diagnosis of DTC and underwent RAI. All had WBS one day before RAI and WBS one week after RAI. Patients were divided into 3 groups: 1) RAI-naive subjects without known distant metastatic disease (M1); 2) patients with history of prior RAI and persistent disease (except M1); and 3) patients with known M1. In Group 1 (n=311), 7% of patients (n=22) had discordant scans, but in only 4 of these cases did this represent true disease (3 unsuspected lung and 1 mediastinal node metastasis). In the remaining 18 patients, discordant findings corresponded to physiologic or other benign causes. In group 2 (n=23), 7 subjects (30%) had discordant findings and all of the discrepant sites consisted of loco-regional nodal disease in the neck/upper mediastinum (n=6) and M1 in lung (n=1). In group 3 (n=8), 5 patients (62%) showed discordant uptake in lung and bone which corresponded to the locations of known M1. A total of 12 patients with iodine-avid M1 were identified on post-RAI WBS (3.5% of entire cohort). Pre-RAI WBS was only concordant in 3 of these cases (25%). In conclusion, the significance of pre and post-RAI WBS is highly influenced by the clinical setting. Unsuspected distant metastatic disease is infrequent in RAI-naive patients without known M1, where most discordant findings are usually due to benign explanations, and represent false positive findings in this group. In contrast, in patients with history of previous RAI or known M1, discordant results likely correspond to true disease. In our study, pre-RAI scans showed a low yield to detect iodine-avid distant metastatic disease when compared to post-RAI scans. PMID:23724150

Bravo, Paco E; Goudarzi, Behnaz; Rana, Uzma; Filho, Paulo Togni; Castillo, Raymond; Rababy, Christopher; Ewertz, Marjorie; Ziessman, Harvey A; Cooper, David S; Ladenson, Paul W; Wahl, Richard L

2013-01-01

81

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project is a 21-megawatt (MW) wind generation project proposed by Florida Power and Light (FPL) Energy North Dakota Wind LLC (Dakota Wind) and Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin). The proposed windfarm would be located in La Moure County, south central North Dakota, near the rural farming communities of Kulm and Edgeley. The proposed windfarm is scheduled to be operational by the end of 2003. Dakota Wind and other project proponents are seeking to develop the proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project to provide utilities and, ultimately, electric energy consumers with electricity from a renewable energy source at the lowest possible cost. A new 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line would be built to transmit power generated by the proposed windfarm to an existing US Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration (Western) substation located near Edgeley. The proposed interconnection would require modifying Western's Edgeley Substation. Modifying the Edgeley Substation is a Federal proposed action that requires Western to review the substation modification and the proposed windfarm project for compliance with Section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332, and Department of Energy NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Western is the lead Federal agency for preparation of this Environmental Assessment (EA). The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is a cooperating agency with Western in preparing the EA. This document follows regulation issued by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for implementing procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and is intended to disclose potential impacts on the quality of the human environment resulting from the proposed project. If potential impacts are determined to be significant, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement would be required. If impacts are determined to be insignificant, Western would complete a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). Environmental protection measures that would be included in the design of the proposed project are included.

N /A

2003-04-15

82

Dimension Reduction via Unsupervised Learning Yields Significant Computational Improvements for Support Vector Machine Based Protein Family Classification.  

SciTech Connect

Reducing the dimension of vectors used in training support vector machines (SVMs) results in a proportional speedup in training time. For large-scale problems this can make the difference between tractable and intractable training tasks. However, it is critical that classifiers trained on reduced datasets perform as reliably as their counterparts trained on high-dimensional data. We assessed principal component analysis (PCA) and sequential project pursuit (SPP) as dimension reduction strategies in the biology application of classifying proteins into well-defined functional ‘families’ (SVM-based protein family classification) by their impact on run-time, sensitivity and selectivity. Homology vectors of 4352 elements were reduced to approximately 2% of the original data size without significantly affecting accuracy using PCA and SPP, while leading to approximately a 28-fold speedup in run-time.

Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

2009-02-26

83

Proposed fish passage improvements at Three Mile Falls Diversion Dam, Umatilla River, Oregon: Finding of no significant impact  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Reclamation proposes to administer the construction of fish passage and protective facilities at Three Mile Falls Diversion Dam on the Umatilla River in Oregon to increase the numbers of anadromous fish. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to provide funding for the project. These agencies' actions would implement section 904(d) of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program which addresses the provision of offsite enhancement to compensate for fish and wildlife losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. This Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) is the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) decision document for both agencies. The proposed action would improve both upstream and downstream passage by providing a new right bank ladder on Three Mile Falls Diversion Dam, modifying the existing left bank ladder, and installing rotary drum fish screens and related structures on the adjacent West Extension Irrigation District (WEID) Canal. Four other alternatives are considered in the environmental assessment (EA): a concrete apron plus a left bank ladder; a cap on the crest of the dam plus a left bank ladder; dam removal; and no action. 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-05-01

84

Feasibility, Yield, and Cost of Active Tuberculosis Case Finding Linked to a Mobile HIV Service in Cape Town, South Africa: A Cross-sectional Study  

PubMed Central

Background The World Health Organization is currently developing guidelines on screening for tuberculosis disease to inform national screening strategies. This process is complicated by significant gaps in knowledge regarding mass screening. This study aimed to assess feasibility, uptake, yield, treatment outcomes, and costs of adding an active tuberculosis case-finding program to an existing mobile HIV testing service. Methods and Findings The study was conducted at a mobile HIV testing service operating in deprived communities in Cape Town, South Africa. All HIV-negative individuals with symptoms suggestive of tuberculosis, and all HIV-positive individuals regardless of symptoms were eligible for participation and referred for sputum induction. Samples were examined by microscopy and culture. Active tuberculosis case finding was conducted on 181 days at 58 different sites. Of the 6,309 adults who accessed the mobile clinic, 1,385 were eligible and 1,130 (81.6%) were enrolled. The prevalence of smear-positive tuberculosis was 2.2% (95% CI 1.1–4.0), 3.3% (95% CI 1.4–6.4), and 0.4% (95% CI 1.4 015–6.4) in HIV-negative individuals, individuals newly diagnosed with HIV, and known HIV, respectively. The corresponding prevalence of culture-positive tuberculosis was 5.3% (95% CI 3.5–7.7), 7.4% (95% CI 4.5–11.5), 4.3% (95% CI 2.3–7.4), respectively. Of the 56 new tuberculosis cases detected, 42 started tuberculosis treatment and 34 (81.0%) completed treatment. The cost of the intervention was US$1,117 per tuberculosis case detected and US$2,458 per tuberculosis case cured. The generalisability of the study is limited to similar settings with comparable levels of deprivation and TB and HIV prevalence. Conclusions Mobile active tuberculosis case finding in deprived populations with a high burden of HIV and tuberculosis is feasible, has a high uptake, yield, and treatment success. Further work is now required to examine cost-effectiveness and affordability and whether and how the same results may be achieved at scale. PMID:22879816

Kranzer, Katharina; Lawn, Stephen D.; Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Vassall, Anna; Raditlhalo, Eudoxia; Govindasamy, Darshini; van Schaik, Nienke; Wood, Robin; Bekker, Linda-Gail

2012-01-01

85

77 FR 67057 - Notice of Availability of a Finding of No Significant Impact for the Port of Guam Modernization...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration...No Significant Impact for the Port...Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration...No Significant Impact for the Port...derived from the Environmental...

2012-11-08

86

The Welsh study of mothers and babies: protocol for a population-based cohort study to investigate the clinical significance of defined ultrasound findings of uncertain significance  

PubMed Central

Background Improvement in ultrasound imaging has led to the identification of subtle non-structural markers during the 18 – 20 week fetal anomaly scan, such as echogenic bowel, mild cerebral ventriculomegaly, renal pelvicalyceal dilatation, and nuchal thickening. These markers are estimated to occur in between 0.6% and 4.3% of pregnancies. Their clinical significance, for pregnancy outcomes or childhood morbidity, is largely unknown. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of seven markers in the general obstetric population and establish a cohort of children for longer terms follow-up to assess the clinical significance of these markers. Methods/Design All women receiving antenatal care within six of seven Welsh Health Boards who had an 18 to 20 week ultrasound scan in Welsh NHS Trusts between July 2008 and March 2011 were eligible for inclusion. Data were collected on seven markers (echogenic bowel, cerebral ventriculomegaly, renal pelvicalyceal dilatation, nuchal thickening, cardiac echogenic foci, choroid plexus cysts, and short femur) at the time of 18 – 20 week fetal anomaly scan. Ultrasound records were linked to routinely collected data on pregnancy outcomes (work completed during 2012 and 2013). Images were stored and reviewed by an expert panel. The prevalence of each marker (reported and validated) will be estimated. A projected sample size of 23,000 will allow the prevalence of each marker to be estimated with the following precision: a marker with 0.50% prevalence to within 0.10%; a marker with 1.00% prevalence to within 0.13%; and a marker with 4.50% prevalence to within 0.27%. The relative risk of major congenital abnormalities, stillbirths, pre-term birth and small for gestational age, given the presence of a validated marker, will be reported. Discussion This is a large, prospective study designed to estimate the prevalence of markers in a population-based cohort of pregnant women and to investigate associations with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The study will also establish a cohort of children that can be followed-up to explore associations between specific markers and longer-term health and social outcomes. PMID:24884594

2014-01-01

87

The In Vitro Mass-Produced Model Mycorrhizal Fungus, Rhizophagus irregularis, Significantly Increases Yields of the Globally Important Food Security Crop Cassava  

PubMed Central

The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is formed between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plant roots. The fungi provide the plant with inorganic phosphate (P). The symbiosis can result in increased plant growth. Although most global food crops naturally form this symbiosis, very few studies have shown that their practical application can lead to large-scale increases in food production. Application of AMF to crops in the tropics is potentially effective for improving yields. However, a main problem of using AMF on a large-scale is producing cheap inoculum in a clean sterile carrier and sufficiently concentrated to cheaply transport. Recently, mass-produced in vitro inoculum of the model mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis became available, potentially making its use viable in tropical agriculture. One of the most globally important food plants in the tropics is cassava. We evaluated the effect of in vitro mass-produced R. irregularis inoculum on the yield of cassava crops at two locations in Colombia. A significant effect of R. irregularis inoculation on yield occurred at both sites. At one site, yield increases were observed irrespective of P fertilization. At the other site, inoculation with AMF and 50% of the normally applied P gave the highest yield. Despite that AMF inoculation resulted in greater food production, economic analyses revealed that AMF inoculation did not give greater return on investment than with conventional cultivation. However, the amount of AMF inoculum used was double the recommended dose and was calculated with European, not Colombian, inoculum prices. R. irregularis can also be manipulated genetically in vitro, leading to improved plant growth. We conclude that application of in vitro R. irregularis is currently a way of increasing cassava yields, that there is a strong potential for it to be economically profitable and that there is enormous potential to improve this efficiency further in the future. PMID:23950975

Ceballos, Isabel; Ruiz, Michael; Fernández, Cristhian; Peña, Ricardo

2013-01-01

88

The in vitro mass-produced model mycorrhizal fungus, Rhizophagus irregularis, significantly increases yields of the globally important food security crop cassava.  

PubMed

The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is formed between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plant roots. The fungi provide the plant with inorganic phosphate (P). The symbiosis can result in increased plant growth. Although most global food crops naturally form this symbiosis, very few studies have shown that their practical application can lead to large-scale increases in food production. Application of AMF to crops in the tropics is potentially effective for improving yields. However, a main problem of using AMF on a large-scale is producing cheap inoculum in a clean sterile carrier and sufficiently concentrated to cheaply transport. Recently, mass-produced in vitro inoculum of the model mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis became available, potentially making its use viable in tropical agriculture. One of the most globally important food plants in the tropics is cassava. We evaluated the effect of in vitro mass-produced R. irregularis inoculum on the yield of cassava crops at two locations in Colombia. A significant effect of R. irregularis inoculation on yield occurred at both sites. At one site, yield increases were observed irrespective of P fertilization. At the other site, inoculation with AMF and 50% of the normally applied P gave the highest yield. Despite that AMF inoculation resulted in greater food production, economic analyses revealed that AMF inoculation did not give greater return on investment than with conventional cultivation. However, the amount of AMF inoculum used was double the recommended dose and was calculated with European, not Colombian, inoculum prices. R. irregularis can also be manipulated genetically in vitro, leading to improved plant growth. We conclude that application of in vitro R. irregularis is currently a way of increasing cassava yields, that there is a strong potential for it to be economically profitable and that there is enormous potential to improve this efficiency further in the future. PMID:23950975

Ceballos, Isabel; Ruiz, Michael; Fernández, Cristhian; Peña, Ricardo; Rodríguez, Alia; Sanders, Ian R

2013-01-01

89

75 FR 5757 - Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...result in a significant impact on the quality of the human environment. Therefore...benefits. The berms also serve as seed banks for native vegetation, and the...Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, and a...

2010-02-04

90

78 FR 7850 - Notice of Availability of Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed NOVA Chemicals Inc...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...No Significant Impact for the Proposed NOVA Chemicals Inc. Line 20 Facility Conversion...of No Significant Impact on the proposed NOVA Chemicals Inc. Line 20 Facilities Conversion...non-gaseous fuels to or from a foreign country. NOVA Chemicals Inc. (NOVA) has applied...

2013-02-04

91

75 FR 29365 - Job Corps: Final Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for Small Wind Turbine Installation at...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Significant Impact (FONSI) for Small Wind Turbine Installation at the Pine Ridge Job Corps...Significant Impact (FONSI) for Small Wind Turbine Installation at the Pine Ridge Job Corps...proposed construction of a small wind turbine at the Pine Ridge Job Corps Center,...

2010-05-25

92

76 FR 42675 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for a Biological...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...No Significant Impact for a Biological Control Agent for Hemlock Woolly Adelgid...United States for use as a biological control agent to reduce the severity...the proposed release of this biological control agent into the...

2011-07-19

93

76 FR 15935 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for a Biological...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...No Significant Impact for a Biological Control Agent for Air Potato AGENCY...United States for use as a biological control agent to reduce the severity...the proposed release of this biological control agent into the...

2011-03-22

94

78 FR 58517 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision (ROD) and Finding of No Significant Impact...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...significant impacts to the environment. The project area is located in east central Arkansas in...Counties, which forms the Bayou Meto Improvement Project Area. The project provides a water supply and on-farm infrastructure for...

2013-09-24

95

77 FR 67862 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Significant Impact/Record of Decision (FONSI/ROD) for the Aberdeen Regional Airport...Notice of Availability of a Final EA and FONSI/ROD...the Aberdeen Regional Airport Updates and FONSI/ROD for the proposed decoupling of...

2012-11-14

96

The significance of incidental noncardiac findings in Tc-99m sestamibi myocardial perfusion imaging: illustrated by a case.  

PubMed Central

Technetium 99m sestamibi is widely used in the evaluation of myocardial perfusion imaging. Although the aim of such imaging is cardiac evaluation, numerous other organs are included in the imaging field. Failure to identify incidental abnormal findings in these organs delays diagnosis and treatment. In common with other radiopharmaceutical agents, technetium 99m sestamibi is distributed throughout the body and accumulates in multiple tissues. When interpreting studies that involve this radiotracer, the physician must be aware of its physiologic distribution, in order to recognize abnormal uptake. We present an illustrative case in which areas of decreased tracer activity were noted incidentally during the evaluation of unprocessed single photon emission computed tomography data. These findings were due to metastasis of colon cancer to the liver. Images PMID:10524749

Chatziioannou, S N; Alfaro-Franco, C; Moore, W H; Alanis-Williams, L; Dhekne, R D; Ford, P V

1999-01-01

97

75 FR 14637 - James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Plant; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Significant Impact The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC...DPR-59, issued to Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. (the licensee...of the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Plant (JAFNPP) located...logistical impacts from adverse winter weather and from material...

2010-03-26

98

24 CFR 58.43 - Dissemination and/or publication of the findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...significant impact, it must prepare a FONSI notice, using the current HUD-recommended...the responsible entity must send the FONSI notice to individuals and groups known...responsible entity may also publish the FONSI notice in a newspaper of general...

2013-04-01

99

24 CFR 58.43 - Dissemination and/or publication of the findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...significant impact, it must prepare a FONSI notice, using the current HUD-recommended...the responsible entity must send the FONSI notice to individuals and groups known...responsible entity may also publish the FONSI notice in a newspaper of general...

2014-04-01

100

24 CFR 58.43 - Dissemination and/or publication of the findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...significant impact, it must prepare a FONSI notice, using the current HUD-recommended...the responsible entity must send the FONSI notice to individuals and groups known...responsible entity may also publish the FONSI notice in a newspaper of general...

2010-04-01

101

24 CFR 58.43 - Dissemination and/or publication of the findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...significant impact, it must prepare a FONSI notice, using the current HUD-recommended...the responsible entity must send the FONSI notice to individuals and groups known...responsible entity may also publish the FONSI notice in a newspaper of general...

2011-04-01

102

24 CFR 58.43 - Dissemination and/or publication of the findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...significant impact, it must prepare a FONSI notice, using the current HUD-recommended...the responsible entity must send the FONSI notice to individuals and groups known...responsible entity may also publish the FONSI notice in a newspaper of general...

2012-04-01

103

FatiGO: a web tool for finding significant associations of Gene Ontology terms with groups of genes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Summary: We present a simple but powerful procedure to extract Gene Ontology terms that are significantly over or under-represented in sets of genes within the context of a genome-scale experiment (DNA microarray, proteomics, etc.). Said procedure has been implemented as a web application, FatiGO, allowing for easy and interactive querying. FatiGO, which takes the multiple-testing nature of statistical contrast

Fátima Al-shahrour; Ramón Díaz-uriarte; Joaquín Dopazo

2004-01-01

104

Environmental assessment, finding of no significant impact, and response to comments. Sold residue treatment, repackaging, and storage  

SciTech Connect

From its founding in 1952 through the cessation of production in 1989, the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant (now the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site [the Site]) produced components for nuclear weapons. Some of those components were made of plutonium. As a result of the processes used to recover and purify plutonium and manufacture the components, a variety of materials became contaminated with plutonium. If the level of contamination were low, the material was considered waste. However, if the concentration of plutonium in the material exceeded the {open_quotes}economic discard limit,{close_quotes} the materials were classified as {open_quotes}residue{close_quotes} rather than{open_quotes}Waste{close_quotes} and were stored for later recovery of the plutonium. While large quantities of residues were processed, others, primarily those more difficult to process, accumulated at the Site in storage. Two important events regarding residues have occurred at the Site since production activities ceased. One event was the end of the Cold War in 1991, which made the return to production of nuclear weapons, with their Rocky Flats-made components, unnecessary. This event led to DOE`s decision to permanently cease production at the Site, clean up and remove radioactive and chemical contamination at the Site, and find alternative uses for the Site. This document describes methods for processing of the wastes for safe interim storage. Environmental impacts from the processing and storage are discussed.

NONE

1996-04-01

105

Rare allele of OsPPKL1 associated with grain length causes extra-large grain and a significant yield increase in rice.  

PubMed

Grain size and shape are important components determining rice grain yield, and they are controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Here, we report the cloning and functional characterization of a major grain length QTL, qGL3, which encodes a putative protein phosphatase with Kelch-like repeat domain (OsPPKL1). We found a rare allele qgl3 that leads to a long grain phenotype by an aspartate-to-glutamate transition in a conserved AVLDT motif of the second Kelch domain in OsPPKL1. The rice genome has other two OsPPKL1 homologs, OsPPKL2 and OsPPKL3. Transgenic studies showed that OsPPKL1 and OsPPKL3 function as negative regulators of grain length, whereas OsPPKL2 as a positive regulator. The Kelch domains are essential for the OsPPKL1 biological function. Field trials showed that the application of the qgl3 allele could significantly increase grain yield in both inbred and hybrid rice varieties, due to its favorable effect on grain length, filling, and weight. PMID:23236132

Zhang, Xiaojun; Wang, Jianfei; Huang, Ji; Lan, Hongxia; Wang, Cailin; Yin, Congfei; Wu, Yunyu; Tang, Haijuan; Qian, Qian; Li, Jiayang; Zhang, Hongsheng

2012-12-26

106

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The National Compact Stellarator Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

If the United States is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels, the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors, and the limitations of solar, hydro and wind alternatives. Fusion energy, the power source of the sun and other stars, has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion would provide substantially reduced environmental impacts as compared with current forms of energy generation. Thus, the United States and other countries around the world continue to pursue development of fusion energy as one of a number of potential power sources for the long term. Fusion research, using various machine configurations, has been proceeding since the early 1950's, and significant progress has been achieved in performance and in understanding of the underlying physics. For most of this period, fusion machines called stellarators and tokamaks, which are toroidal (doughnut-shaped) devices, have been most frequently used to conduct experiments for producing controlled nuclear fusion. It is now desirable to take a next step in the fusion development program, by providing an experimental device to investigate the attractiveness of a compact stellarator as the basis for a fusion power reactor. This concept has the potential to build upon advances in understanding of stellarators and tokamaks, and to combine the best features of both. The goal is to build a compact stellarator that would be smaller than conventional stellarators and operate more efficiently than previous tokamaks. Such a device would broaden our understanding of magnetic fusion science while contributing to the development of a potentially attractive fusion reactor solution that may have cost advantages over other fusion concepts.

N /A

2002-10-25

107

Yield of HIV-associated tuberculosis during intensified case finding in resource-limited settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Summary Intensified case finding is the regular screening for evidence of tuberculosis in people infected with HIV, at high risk of HIV, or living in congregate settings. We systematically reviewed studies of intensified case finding published between January, 1994, and April, 2009. In 78 eligible studies, the number of people with tuberculosis detected during intensified case finding varied substantially between countries and target groups of patients. Median prevalence of newly diagnosed tuberculosis was 0·7% in population-based surveys, 2·2% in contact-tracing studies, 2·3% in mines, 2·3% in programmes preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV, 2·5% in prisons, 8·2% in medical and antiretroviral treatment clinics, and 8·5% in voluntary counselling and testing services. Metaregression analysis of studies that included only people with HIV showed that for each increment in national prevalence of tuberculosis of 100 cases per 100?000 population, intensified case finding identified an additional one case per 100 screened individuals (p=0·03). Microbiological sputum examination of all individuals without prior selection by symptom screening yielded an additional four cases per 100 individuals screened (p=0·05). Data on the use of serial screening, treatment outcomes in actively identified cases of tuberculosis, and cost-effectiveness, however, were lacking. Concerted action is needed to develop intensified case finding as an important method for control of tuberculosis. PMID:20113978

Kranzer, Katharina; Houben, Rein MGJ; Glynn, Judith R; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Wood, Robin; Lawn, Stephen D

2010-01-01

108

The maize (Zea mays L.) roothairless 3 gene encodes a putative GPI-anchored, monocot-specific, COBRA-like protein that significantly affects grain yield.  

PubMed

The rth3 (roothairless 3) mutant is specifically affected in root hair elongation. We report here the cloning of the rth3 gene via a PCR-based strategy (amplification of insertion mutagenized sites) and demonstrate that it encodes a COBRA-like protein that displays all the structural features of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Genes of the COBRA family are involved in various types of cell expansion and cell wall biosynthesis. The rth3 gene belongs to a monocot-specific clade of the COBRA gene family comprising two maize and two rice genes. While the rice (Oryza sativa) gene OsBC1L1 appears to be orthologous to rth3 based on sequence similarity (86% identity at the protein level) and maize/rice synteny, the maize (Zea mays L.) rth3-like gene does not appear to be a functional homolog of rth3 based on their distinct expression profiles. Massively parallel signature sequencing analysis detected rth3 expression in all analyzed tissues, but at relatively low levels, with the most abundant expression in primary roots where the root hair phenotype is manifested. In situ hybridization experiments confine rth3 expression to root hair-forming epidermal cells and lateral root primordia. Remarkably, in replicated field trials involving near-isogenic lines, the rth3 mutant conferred significant losses in grain yield. PMID:18298667

Hochholdinger, Frank; Wen, Tsui-Jung; Zimmermann, Roman; Chimot-Marolle, Patricia; da Costa e Silva, Oswaldo; Bruce, Wesley; Lamkey, Kendall R; Wienand, Udo; Schnable, Patrick S

2008-06-01

109

Finding of No Significant for the Closure of the High-Level Waste Tanks in F-and H-Areas at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOEEA-1164) for the proposed closure of the high-level waste tanks in F- and H-Areas on the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

N /A

1996-07-31

110

Crop yield gaps in Cameroon.  

PubMed

Although food crop yields per hectare have generally been increasing in Cameroon since 1961, the food price crisis of 2008 and the ensuing social unrest and fatalities raised concerns about the country's ability to meet the food needs of its population. This study examines the country's potential for increasing crop yields and food production to meet this food security challenge. Fuzzy set theory is used to develop a biophysical spatial suitability model for different crops, which in turn is employed to ascertain whether crop production is carried out in biophysically suited areas. We use linear regression to examine the trend of yield development over the last half century. On the basis of yield data from experimental stations and farmers' fields we assess the yield gap for major food crops. We find that yields have generally been increasing over the last half century and that agricultural policies can have significant effects on them. To a large extent, food crops are cultivated in areas that are biophysically suited for their cultivation, meaning that the yield gap is not a problem of biophysical suitability. Notwithstanding, there are significantly large yield gaps between actual yields on farmers' farms and maximum attainable yields from research stations. We conclude that agronomy and policies are likely to be the reasons for these large yield gaps. A key challenge to be addressed in closing the yield gaps is that of replenishing and properly managing soil nutrients. PMID:23925855

Yengoh, Genesis T; Ardö, Jonas

2014-03-01

111

Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact for completion of flood protection works, Bannister Road Federal Complex, Kansas City, Missouri  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide partial funding to the Corps of Engineers (COE) for the completion of the flood protection works at the Bannister Road Federal Complex in Kansas City, Missouri. The DOE Kansas City Plant is a major tenant of the Complex. COE has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the project which includes the construction of levees, floodwalls, and drainage ditches. DOE has adopted the EA prepared by COE (DOE/EA-0509), this report. Based on the analyses in this EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

Not Available

1991-09-18

112

Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Idaho Department of Fish and Game Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE), is proposing to fund the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon Program (IDFG Program). The IDFG Program is a small-scale research and production initiative designed to increase numbers of three weak but recoverable populations of spring/summer chinook salmon in the Salmon River drainage. This would increase numbers of spring/summer chinook salmon within the Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU), and reduce population fragmentation within the ESU. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1301) evaluating the proposed IDFG Program. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the Proposed Action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined within the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

N /A

2000-10-12

113

Finding of no significant impact for the joint DOE/EPA program on national industrial competitiveness through energy efficiency and economics (NICE{sup 3})  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA), to assess the environment impacts associated with a joint DOE/EPA cost-sharing grant program named National Industrial Competitiveness through Energy Efficiency, Environment and Economics (NICE{sup 3}). The purpose of the NICE{sup 3} Program is to encourage waste minimization technology in industry by funding projects that develop activities and process improvements to conserve energy and reduce pollution. The proposed action would provide Federal financial assistance in the form of grants to industry in order to promote pollution prevention, energy efficiency, and cost competitiveness. Based on the analysis presented in the PEA, DOE has determined that the proposed action (providing NICE{sup 3} grants for projects which are consistent with the goals of the PPA and EPACT) does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not needed and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

NONE

1997-03-01

114

Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Project. The project proposes to continue to carry out harvest monitoring and stock status updates coordinated with fisheries management planning, annual young-of-the year recruitment indexing, research, experimental artificial propagation, and transport of white sturgeon to less densely populated areas of the river(s). Additionally, release of hatchery-reared juveniles is proposed to evaluate release strategies. Actions will take place in the following Columbia River mainstem reaches: Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day, and McNary Reservoirs; Hanford Reach, as well as the Wanapum and Rock Island Reservoirs; and the following Snake River mainstem reaches: Ice Harbor, Lower Monumental and Little Goose Reservoirs. Spawning and rearing are undertaken at established hatcheries at McNary Dam and also the Abernathy Fish Technology Center. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1367, April 2003) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

N /A

2003-04-23

115

Finding of no significant impact: Changes in the sanitary sludge land application program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1042) that evaluates potential impacts of proposed changes in the sanitary sludge land application program on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Changes in lifetime sludge land application limits and radionuclide loading are proposed, and two new sources of sewage sludge from DOE facilities would be transported to the City of Oak Ridge Publicly Owned Treatment Works (COR POTW). Lifetime sludge land application limits would increase from 22 tons/acre to 50 tons/acre, which is the limit approved and permitted by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). With the approval of TDEC, the permissible radiological dose from sludge land application would change from the current limit of 2x background radionuclide concentrations in receiving soils to a risk-based dose limit of 4 millirem (mrem) per year for the maximally exposed individual. Sludge land application sites would not change from those that are currently part of the program. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 70 refs., 2 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1996-10-01

116

A new direction for prenatal chromosome microarray testing: software-targeting for detection of clinically significant chromosome imbalance without equivocal findings  

PubMed Central

Purpose. To design and validate a prenatal chromosomal microarray testing strategy that moves away from size-based detection thresholds, towards a more clinically relevant analysis, providing higher resolution than G-banded chromosomes but avoiding the detection of copy number variants (CNVs) of unclear prognosis that cause parental anxiety. Methods. All prenatal samples fulfilling our criteria for karyotype analysis (n = 342) were tested by chromosomal microarray and only CNVs of established deletion/duplication syndrome regions and any other CNV >3 Mb were detected and reported. A retrospective full-resolution analysis of 249 of these samples was carried out to ascertain the performance of this testing strategy. Results. Using our prenatal analysis, 23/342 (6.7%) samples were found to be abnormal. Of the remaining samples, 249 were anonymized and reanalyzed at full-resolution; a further 46 CNVs were detected in 44 of these cases (17.7%). None of these additional CNVs were of clear clinical significance. Conclusion. This prenatal chromosomal microarray strategy detected all CNVs of clear prognostic value and did not miss any CNVs of clear clinical significance. This strategy avoided both the problems associated with interpreting CNVs of uncertain prognosis and the parental anxiety that are a result of such findings. PMID:24795849

Bint, Susan; Irving, Melita D.; Kyle, Phillipa M.; Akolekar, Ranjit; Mohammed, Shehla N.; Mackie Ogilvie, Caroline

2014-01-01

117

Revised Finding of No Significant Impact for Expansion and Operation of the Central Shops Borrow Pit at the Savannah River Site (10/29/03)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1194) in 1997 for the expansion and operation of the existing Central Shops Borrow Pit (i.e., SRS Facility 632-G) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. This EA was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended; the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CFR 15400-1508); and the DOE Regulations for Implementing NEPA (10 CFR 1021). Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the action was not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) was not required, and DOE issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) dated March 13, 1997. In an effort to provide the site with cost-effective future landfill capacity for construction and demolition (C&D) debris/structural fill, DOE is considering redefining the closure of the 632-G facility to encompass the permitted disposal of inert C&D debris into the excavation areas, which would then be closed as per regulatory requirements. Based on the existing infrastructure at the 632-G facility that would support a permitted Part III C&D Landfill, DOE has concluded that the environmental impacts of the proposed use of the excavated portions of this facility as an inert debris landfill is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required, and DOE is issuing this revised FONSI.

N /A

2003-10-29

118

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Widening Trench 36 of the 218-E-12B Low-Level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This environmental assessment was prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action to widen and operate unused Trench 36 in the 218-E-12B Low-Level Burial Ground for disposal of low-level waste. Information contained herein will be used by the Manager, U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, to determine if the Proposed Action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the Proposed Action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the Proposed Action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact will be issued and the action may proceed. Criteria used to evaluate significance can be found in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations 1508.27. This environmental assessment was prepared in compliance with the ''National Environmental Policy Act of1969'', as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations 1500-1508), and the U.S. Department of Energy Implementing Procedures for ''National Environmental Polio Act'' (Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations 1021). The following is a description of each section of this environmental assessment. (1) Purpose and Need for Action. This section provides a brief statement concerning the problem or opportunity the U.S, Department of Energy is addressing with the Proposed Action. Background information is provided. (2) Description of the Proposed Action. This section provides a description of the Proposed Action with sufficient detail to identify potential environmental impacts. (3) Alternatives to the Proposed Action. This section describes reasonable,alternative actions to the Proposed Action, which addresses the Purpose and Need. A No Action Alternative, as required by Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations 1021, also is described. (4) Affected Environment. This section provides a brief description of the locale in which the Proposed Action would take place. (5) Environmental Impacts. This section describes the range of environmental impacts, beneficial and adverse, of the Proposed Action. Impacts of alternatives briefly are discussed. (6) Permits and Regulatory Requirements. This section provides a brief description of permits and regulatory requirements for the Proposed Action. (7) Organizations Consulted. This section lists any outside groups, agencies, or individuals contacted as part of the environmental assessment preparation and/or review. (8) References. This section provides a list of documents used to contribute information or data in preparation of this environmental assessment.

N /A

1999-02-11

119

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry Facility Raw Water Intake Pipeline Replacement Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1497, for the proposed replacement of the existing 107 centimeter (cm) [42 inch (in)] 6.87 kilometer (km) [4.27 mile (mi)] raw water intake pipeline (RWIPL). This action is necessary to allow for continued, optimum operations at the West Hackberry facility (main site/facility). The EA described the proposed action (including action alternatives) and three alternatives to the proposed action. The EA evaluated only the potential environmental consequences of the proposed action (one action alternative), and Alternative 3, which consisted of the No Build Action that is required by 10 CFR 1021.321(c). Based on the analysis in DOE/EA-1497, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting humans or the natural environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). To further minimize impacts to environmental media, the DOE will also implement a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for this action. The MAP is included as Appendix F of this EA, which is appended to this FONSI. The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, authorizes the creation of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to store crude oil to reduce the United States' vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Crude oil is stored in geologic formations, or salt domes, located under these facilities. The purpose of this proposed project is to construct a new RWIPL at the main site to replace the existing RWIPL which services this facility.

N /A

2004-08-31

120

Finding of no significant impact: Interim storage of enriched uranium above the maximum historical level at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Proposed Interim Storage of Enriched Uranium Above the Maximum Historical Storage Level at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/EA-0929, September, 1994). The EA evaluates the environmental effects of transportation, prestorage processing, and interim storage of bounding quantities of enriched uranium at the Y-12 Plant over a ten-year period. The State of Tennessee and the public participated in public meetings and workshops which were held after a predecisional draft EA was released in February 1994, and after the revised pre-approval EA was issued in September 1994. Comments provided by the State and public have been carefully considered by the Department. As a result of this public process, the Department has determined that the Y-12 Plant-would store no more than 500 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and no more than 6 metric tons of low enriched uranium (LEU). The bounding storage quantities analyzed in the pre-approval EA are 500 metric tons of HEU and 7,105.9 metric tons of LEU. Based on-the analyses in the EA, as revised by the attachment to the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), DOE has determined that interim storage of 500 metric tons of HEU and 6 metric tons of LEU at the Y-12 Plant does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-12-01

121

Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

Not Available

2012-07-01

122

Monosomy 1p36.31-33{yields}pter due to a paternal reciprocal translocation: Prognostic significance of FISH analysis  

SciTech Connect

A rare monosomy 1p36.31-33{r_arrow}pter was found in a child with physical anomalies, psycho-motor retardation, and seizures. Cytogenetic investigation suggested an unbalanced translocation between 1p and an acrocentric chromosome, but the rearrangement was difficult to assess accurately using conventional chromosome banding techniques. The half-cryptic translocation was further characterized using fluorescence in situ hybridization, and the aberrant chromosome 1 was shown to be a derivate of a paternal reciprocal translocation t(1;15)(p36.31-33;p11.2-12). The breakpoints on chromosome 1 and 15 were defined in detail using locus specific probes. The rearrangement did not include the region on chromosome 1p which previously has been suggested to predispose to the development of neuroblastoma in a case with a constitutional translocation. At 3 6/12 years, the patient has no clinical signs of this disease, which illustrates the prognostic significance of this investigation. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Blennow, E.; Bui, The-Hung; Wallin, A. [Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others] [Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); and others

1996-10-02

123

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Interim Measures for the Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater at the Burial Ground Complex at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed interim measures for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MW) groundwater at the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE proposes to install a small metal sheet pile dam to impound water around and over the BGC groundwater seepline. In addition, a drip irrigation system would be installed. Interim measures will also address the reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) from ''hot-spot'' regions associated with the Southwest Plume Area (SWPA). This action is taken as an interim measure for the MWMF in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to reduce the amount of tritium seeping from the BGC southwest groundwater plume. The proposed action of this EA is being planned and would be implemented concurrent with a groundwater corrective action program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). On September 30, 1999, SCDHEC issued a modification to the SRS RCRA Part B permit that adds corrective action requirements for four plumes that are currently emanating from the BGC. One of those plumes is the southwest plume. The RCRA permit requires SRS to submit a corrective action plan (CAP) for the southwest plume by March 2000. The permit requires that the initial phase of the CAP prescribe a remedy that achieves a 70-percent reduction in the annual amount of tritium being released from the southwest plume area to Fourmile Branch, a nearby stream. Approval and actual implementation of the corrective measure in that CAP may take several years. As an interim measure, the actions described in this EA would manage the release of tritium from the southwest plume area until the final actions under the CAP can be implemented. This proposed action is expected to reduce the release of tritium from the southwest plume area to Fourmile Branch between 25 to 35 percent. If this proposed action is undertaken and its effectiveness is demonstrated, it may become a component of the final action in the CAP. This document was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended; the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508); and the DOE Regulations for Implementing NEPA (10 CFR 1021). NEPA requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. Based on the potential for impacts described herein, DOE will either publish a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) or prepare an environmental impact statement (EM).

N /A

1999-12-08

124

Solid Surface Combustion Experiment Yields Significant Observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The spread of a flame over solid fuel is not only a fundamental textbook combustion phenomenon, but also the central element of destructive fires that cause tragic loss of life and property each year. Throughout history, practical measures to prevent and fight fires have been developed, but these have often been based on lessons learned in a costly fire. Since the 1960 s, scientists and engineers have employed powerful tools of scientific research to understand the details of flame spread and how a material can be rendered nonflammable. High-speed computers have enabled complex flame simulations, whereasand lasers have provided measurements of the chemical composition, temperature, and air velocities inside flames. The microgravity environment has emerged as the third great tool for these studies. Spreading flames are complex combinations of chemical reactions and several physical processes including the transport of oxygen and fuel vapor to the flame and the transfer of heat from the flame to fresh fuel and to the surroundings. Depending on its speed, air motion in the vicinity of the flame can affect the flame in substantially different ways. For example, consider the difference between blowing on a campfire and blowing out a match. On Earth, gravity induces air motion because of buoyancy (the familiar rising hot gases); this process cannot be controlled experimentally. For theoreticians, buoyant air motion complicates the problem modeling of flame spread beyond the capacity of modern computers to simulate. The microgravity environment provides experimental control of air motion near spreading flames, with results that can be compared with detailed theory. The Solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE) was designed to obtain benchmark flame spreading data in quiescent test atmospheres--the limiting case of flames spreading. Professor Robert Altenkirch, Vice President for Research at Mississippi State University, proposed the experiment concept, and the NASA Lewis Research Center designed, built, and tested the SSCE hardware. It was the first microgravity science experiment built by Lewis for the space shuttle and the first combustion science experiment flown in space.

Sacksteder, Kurt R.; Koudelka, John M.; Vergilii, Franklin

1999-01-01

125

Clinical significance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The meaningfulness of psychotherapy outcome as measured in therapy research is a persistent and important issue. Following a period of emphasis on statistically significant findings for treated versus control groups, many researchers are renewing efforts to investigate the meaningfulness of individual change. Several statistical methods are available to evaluate the meaningfulness of clients' changes occurring as a result of treatment.

Benjamin M Ogles; Kirk M Lunnen; Kyle Bonesteel

2001-01-01

126

Available online--http://www.usc.edu/admin/provost/oprs/news/archives/index.html Revised Policy: Significant New Findings/Information (SNIF) Addendum  

E-print Network

://www.usc.edu/admin/provost/oprs/private/docs/oprs/news_items/New_Findings_Memo.pdf iStar "Sandbox" Back in Action A practice site on iStar is available to assist training new users. The "sandbox" is for classroom are can log in to the "sandbox" site. The "sandbox", or training site can be found at: http

Biederman, Irving

127

From Bayes Through Marginal Utility to Effect Sizes: A Guide to Understanding the Clinical and Statistical Significance of the Results of Autism Research Findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this report are: (a) to trace the theoretical roots of the concept clinical significance that derives from\\u000a Bayesian thinking, Marginal Utility\\/Diminishing Returns in Economics, and the “just noticeable difference”, in Psychophysics.\\u000a These concepts then translated into: Effect Size (ES), strength of agreement, clinical significance, and related concepts,\\u000a and made possible the development of Power Analysis; (b) to

Domenic V. Cicchetti; Kathy Koenig; Ami Klin; Fred R. Volkmar; Rhea Paul; Sara Sparrow

2011-01-01

128

Clinically Significant Abnormal Findings on the ''Nondiagnostic'' CT Portion of Low-Amperage-CT Attenuation-Corrected Myocardial Perfusion SPECT\\/CT Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attenuation correction is recommended to optimize the perfor- mance of cardiac SPECT. The 2.5-mA CT commonly used for this purpose in myocardial perfusion SPECT is generally consid- ered ''nondiagnostic'' in quality. In other areas of cardiac and hybrid imaging, diagnostically relevant abnormal findings on higher-quality CT studies have been described. The purpose of this study was to establish the frequency

Sibyll Goetze; Harpreet K. Pannu; Richard L. Wahl

129

PatSearch: a pattern matcher software that finds functional elements in nucleotide and protein sequences and assesses their statistical significance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motivation: The identification of sequence patterns involved in gene regulation and expression is a major challenge in molecular biology. In this paper we describe a novel algorithm and the software for searching nu- cleotide and protein sequences for complex nucleotide patterns including potential secondary structure elements, also allowing for mismatches\\/mispairings below a user- fixed threshold, and assessing the statistical significance

Graziano Pesole; Sabino Liuni; Mark D'souza

2000-01-01

130

From Bayes through Marginal Utility to Effect Sizes: A Guide to Understanding the Clinical and Statistical Significance of the Results of Autism Research Findings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objectives of this report are: (a) to trace the theoretical roots of the concept clinical significance that derives from Bayesian thinking, Marginal Utility/Diminishing Returns in Economics, and the "just noticeable difference", in Psychophysics. These concepts then translated into: Effect Size (ES), strength of agreement, clinical…

Cicchetti, Domenic V.; Koenig, Kathy; Klin, Ami; Volkmar, Fred R.; Paul, Rhea; Sparrow, Sara

2011-01-01

131

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Curecanti-Lost Canyon 230-kV Transmission Line Reroute Project, Montrose County, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to reroute a section of the Curecanti-Lost Canyon 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line, in Montrose County, Colorado. A portion of the transmission line, situated 11 miles southeast of Montrose, Colorado, crosses Waterdog Peak, an area of significant geologic surface activity, which is causing the transmission line's lattice steel towers to shift. This increases stress to structure hardware and conductors, and poses a threat to the integrity of the transmission system. Western proposes to relocate the lattice steel towers and line to a more geologically stable area. The existing section of transmission line and the proposed relocation route cross Bureau of Land Management and private land holdings.

N /A

2000-03-20

132

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy needs to provide additional cost-effective personal protection and public safety through expanding training and equipment testing facilities at the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center (HAMMER) on the Hanford Site. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1412, for expanding training and equipment testing facilities at the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center (HAMMER) on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Based on the analysis in the EA, and considering tribal and agency comments, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required.

N /A

2002-11-06

133

Changes in Normal Liver and Spleen Volume after Radioembolization with {sup 90}Y-Resin Microspheres in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: Findings and Clinical Significance  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In clinical trials with yttrium-90-resin-microspheres for the management of colorectal cancer liver metastases, it was observed that radioembolization might result in splenomegaly and an increase in portal vein size. Subclinical hepatitis in normal liver tissue as well as the effects of radioembolization and prior chemotherapy are suspected to be responsible for this phenomenon. The purpose of this study was to quantify the changes in liver and spleen volume and portal vein diameter after radioembolization. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with liver-dominant metastatic disease from breast cancer who had not responded to chemotherapy or had to abandon chemotherapy because of its toxic effects were evaluated. Changes in liver and spleen volume and portal vein diameter as well as liver tumor volume and diameter were quantified using computed tomography scans. Results: Radioembolization was associated with a significant mean decrease in the whole liver volume of 10.2% (median 16.7%; P = 0.0024), mainly caused by a reduction in the right lobe volume (mean 16.0%; P < 0.0001). These changes were accompanied by a significant increase in the diameter of the main portal vein (mean 6.8%; P < 0.0001) as well as splenic volume (mean 50.4%; P < 0.0001). Liver-tumor volume and diameter decreased by a median of 24 and 39.7%. Conclusions: Radioembolization is an effective treatment for tumor size reduction in patients with breast cancer liver metastases. Treatment is associated with changes of hepatic parenchymal volume, splenic volume, and portal vein size that appear not to represent clinically important sequelae in this patient cohort.

Paprottka, Philipp M., E-mail: philipp.paprottka@med.uni-muenchen.de; Schmidt, G. P.; Trumm, C. G.; Hoffmann, R. T.; Reiser, M. F.; Jakobs, T. F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, University Hospitals Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology (Germany)

2011-10-15

134

Significant Findings: Tracking the SeaWiFS Record with a Coupled Physical/Biogeochemical/Radiative Model of the Global Oceans  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) has observed 2.5 years of routine global chlorophyll observations from space. The mission was launched into a record El Nino event, which eventually gave way to one of the most intensive and longest-lasting La Nina events ever recorded. The SeaWiFS chlorophyll record captured the response of ocean phytoplankton to these significant events in the tropical Indo-Pacific basins, but also indicated significant interannual variability unrelated to the El Nino/La Nina events. This included large variability in the North Atlantic and Pacific basins, in the North Central and equatorial Atlantic, and milder patterns in the North Central Pacific. This SeaWiFS record was tracked with a coupled physical/biogeochemical/radiative model of the global oceans using near-real-time forcing data such as wind stresses, sea surface temperatures, and sea ice. This provided an opportunity to offer physically and biogeochemically meaningful explanations of the variability observed in the SeaWiFS data set, since the causal mechanisms and interrelationships of the model are completely understood. The coupled model was able to represent the seasonal distributions of chlorophyll during the SeaWiFS era, and was capable of differentiating among the widely different processes and dynamics occurring in the global oceans. The model was also reasonably successful in representing the interannual signal, especially when it was large, such as, the El Nino and La Nina events in the tropical Pacific and Indian Oceans. The model provided different phytoplankton group responses for the different events in these regions: diatoms were predominant in the tropical Pacific during the La Nina but other groups were predominant during El Nino. The opposite condition occurred in the tropical Indian Ocean. Both situations were due to the different responses of the basins to El Nino. The interannual variability in the North Atlantic, which was exhibited in SeaWiFS data as a decline in the spring/summer bloom in 1999 relative to 1998, resulted in the model from a more slowly shoaling mixed layer, allowing herbivore populations to keep pace with increasing phytoplankton populations. However, several aspects of the interannual cycle were not well-represented by the model. Explanations ranged from inherent model deficiencies, to monthly averaging of forcing fields, to biases in SeaWiFS atmospheric correction procedures.

Watson, Gregg W.

2000-01-01

135

Optical Measurement Technologies for High Temperature, Radiation Exposure, and Corrosive Environments—Significant Activities and Findings: In-vessel Optical Measurements for Advanced SMRs  

SciTech Connect

Development of advanced Small Modular Reactors (aSMRs) is key to providing the United States with a sustainable, economically viable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The aSMR designs have attractive economic factors that should compensate for the economies of scale that have driven development of large commercial nuclear power plants to date. For example, aSMRs can be manufactured at reduced capital costs in a factory and potentially shorter lead times and then be shipped to a site to provide power away from large grid systems. The integral, self-contained nature of aSMR designs is fundamentally different than conventional reactor designs. Future aSMR deployment will require new instrumentation and control (I&C) architectures to accommodate the integral design and withstand the extreme in-vessel environmental conditions. Operators will depend on sophisticated sensing and machine vision technologies that provide efficient human-machine interface for in-vessel telepresence, telerobotic control, and remote process operations. The future viability of aSMRs is dependent on understanding and overcoming the significant technical challenges involving in-vessel reactor sensing and monitoring under extreme temperatures, pressures, corrosive environments, and radiation fluxes

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Suter, Jonathan D.

2012-09-01

136

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Project NO. 96-D-122 Pantex Plant Amarillo, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment (EA) addresses the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action regarding an upgrade of the Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF). Potential environmental consequences associated with the proposed action and alternative actions are provided. DOE proposes to design, build, and operate a new WWTF, consistent with the requirements of Title 30 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Chapter 317, ''Design Criteria for Sewage Systems,'' capable of supporting current and future wastewater treatment requirements of the Plant. Wastewater treatment at Pantex must provide sufficient operational flexibility to meet Pantex Plant's anticipated future needs, including potential Plant mission changes, alternative effluent uses, and wastewater discharge permit requirements. Treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water maybe used for irrigation on DOE-owned agricultural land. Five factors support the need for DOE action: (1) The current WWTF operation has the potential for inconsistent permit compliance. (2) The existing WWTF lies completely within the 100-year floodplain. (3) The Pantex Plant mission has the potential to change, requiring infrastructure changes to the facility. (4) The life expectancy of the existing facility would be nearing its end by the time a new facility is constructed. (5) The treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water would have a beneficial agricultural use through irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following factors are present and of concern at the proposed action site on Pantex Plant: (1) Periodic wastewater effluent permit exceedances; (2) Wetlands protection and floodplain management; (3) Capability of the existing facility to meet anticipated future needs of Pantex (4) Existing facility design life; and (5) Use of treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water for irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following conditions are not present, nor of concern at the proposed site on Pantex Plant, and no further analysis was conducted: (1) State or national parks, forests, or other conservation areas; (2) Wild and scenic rivers; (3) Natural resources, such as timber, range, soils, minerals; (4) Properties of historic, archeological, or architectural significance; (5) Native American concerns; (6) Minority and low-income populations; and (7) Prime or unique farmland. In this document, DOE describes the proposed action and a reasonable range of alternatives to the proposed action, including the ''No-Action'' alternative. The proposed action cited in the ''U.S. Department of Energy Application for a Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit Modifying Permit to Dispose of Waste, No. 02296,'' December 1998, included the construction of a new wastewater treatment facility, a new irrigation storage pond, and the conversion of the current wastewater treatment facility into an irrigation storage pond. Although a permit modification application has been filed, if a decision on this EA necessitates it, an amendment to the permit application would be made. The permit application would be required for any of the alternatives and the filing does not preclude or predetermine selection of an alternative considered by this EA. This permit change would allow Pantex to land-dispose treated wastewater by irrigating agricultural land. This construction for the proposed action would include designing two new lagoons for wastewater treatment. One of the lagoons could function as a facultative lagoon for treatment of wastewater. The second lagoon would serve as an irrigation storage impoundment (storage pond), with the alternative use as a facultative lagoon if the first lagoon is out of service for any reason. The new facultative lagoon and irrigation water storage pond would be sited outside of the 100-year flood plain. The existing WWTF lagoon would be used as a storage pond for treated wastewater effluent for irrigation water, as needed. The two new lagoons would be li

N /A

1999-05-27

137

prepared a Finding of No Significant  

E-print Network

to support polar research, the proposed action is expected to result in substantial benefits to science. The draft Environmental Assessment was available for public review for a 30-day period; several comments were received. DATES: Comments on the FONSI must be submitted on or before July 27, 2005.

unknown authors

138

Finding of no significant impact shipment of stabilized mixed waste from the K-25 Site to an off-site commercial disposal facility, Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the shipment of stabilized mixed waste, removed from K-1407-B and -C ponds, to an off-site commercial disposal facility (Envirocare) for permanent land disposal. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1994-12-31

139

Increasing Yield  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Maize yield improvement in the 20th century represents one of the great success stories of plant breeding and agronomy. Maize grain yield in the United States has increased on average by 0.122 metric tons per hectare per year since 1945 (Figure 1). This is in sharp contrast to essentially zero gain ...

140

Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Implementation of the Authorized Limits Process for Waste Acceptance at the C-746-U Landfill Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1414) for the proposed implementation of the authorized limits process for waste acceptance at the C-746-U Landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. Based on the results of the impact analysis reported in the EA, which is incorporated herein by this reference, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA). Therefore preparation of an environmental impact statement is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

N /A

2002-08-06

141

Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Testing and Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has completed an Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Test. Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action, the relocation of the Department's heat source and radioisotope power system operations, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

N /A

2002-08-30

142

Parsimonious Modeling of Yield Curves  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces a parametrically parsimonious model for yield curves that has the ability to represent the shapes generally associated with yield curves: monotonic, humped, and S-shaped. The authors find that the model explains 96 percent of the variation in bill yields across maturities during the period 1981-83. The movement of the parameters through time reflects and confirms a change

Charles R. Nelson; Andrew F. Siegel

1987-01-01

143

Flood-tolerant rice reduces yield variability and raises expected yield, differentially benefitting socially disadvantaged groups  

PubMed Central

Approximately 30% of the cultivated rice area in India is prone to crop damage from prolonged flooding. We use a randomized field experiment in 128 villages of Orissa India to show that Swarna-Sub1, a recently released submergence-tolerant rice variety, has significant positive impacts on rice yield when fields are submerged for 7 to 14 days with no yield penalty without flooding. We estimate that Swarna-Sub1 offers an approximate 45% increase in yields over the current popular variety when fields are submerged for 10 days. We show additionally that low-lying areas prone to flooding tend to be more heavily occupied by people belonging to lower caste social groups. Thus, a policy relevant implication of our findings is that flood-tolerant rice can deliver both efficiency gains, through reduced yield variability and higher expected yield, and equity gains in disproportionately benefiting the most marginal group of farmers. PMID:24263095

Dar, Manzoor H.; de Janvry, Alain; Emerick, Kyle; Raitzer, David; Sadoulet, Elisabeth

2013-01-01

144

Abscisic Acid Sprays Significantly Increase Yield per Plant in Vineyard-Grown Wine Grape ( Vitis vinifera L.) cv. Cabernet Sauvignon Through Increased Berry Set with No Negative Effects on Anthocyanin Content and Total Polyphenol Index of Both Juice and Wine  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many cultivars of Vitis vinifera periods of mild water stress during ripening are thought to increase grape quality for winemaking, even though yields may\\u000a be negatively affected. Because abscisic acid (ABA) is involved in the signaling of water stress in plants, we examine the\\u000a effects of the ABA signal being given without the concomitant water stress. ABA at 250 mg

Andrea M. Quiroga; Federico J. Berli; Daniela Moreno; Juan B. Cavagnaro; Rubén Bottini

2009-01-01

145

Propagation of Significant Figures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Shows that the rules of thumb for propagating significant figures through arithmetic calculations frequently yield misleading results. Also describes two procedures for performing this propagation more reliably than the rules of thumb. However, both require considerably more calculational effort than do the rules. (JN)

Schwartz, Lowell M.

1985-01-01

146

Genetic and molecular bases of rice yield.  

PubMed

Grain yield in rice is a complex trait multiplicatively determined by its three component traits: number of panicles, number of grains per panicle, and grain weight; all of which are typical quantitative traits. The developments in genome mapping, sequencing, and functional genomic research have provided powerful tools for investigating the genetic and molecular bases of these quantitative traits. Dissection of the genetic bases of the yield traits based on molecular marker linkage maps resolved hundreds of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for these traits. Mutant analyses and map-based cloning of QTLs have identified a large number of genes required for the basic processes underlying the initiation and development of tillers and panicles, as well as genes controlling numbers and sizes of grains and panicles. Molecular characterization of these genes has greatly advanced the mechanistic understanding of the regulation of these rice yield traits. These findings have significant implications in crop genetic improvement. PMID:20192739

Xing, Yongzhong; Zhang, Qifa

2010-01-01

147

Super-AGB yields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the first simulations of the full evolution of super-AGB stars through the entire thermally pulsing AGB phase. We analyse their structural and evolutionary properties and determine the first SAGB yields. Owing to their massive oxygen-neon core, SAGB stars suffer weak thermal pulses, have very short interpulse periods and develop very high temperatures at the base of their convective envelope leading to very efficient hot bottom burning. SAGB stars are consequently heavy manufacturers of 4He, 13C and 14N. They are also able to inject significant amounts of 7Li, 17O, 25Mg and 26,27Al in the interstellar medium. The 3DUP mainly affects the CNO yields, especially at low metallicity. This study also reveals that changes in the temperature at the base of the convective envelope have a dramatic impact on the yields and represents another major source of uncertainty.

Siess, Lionel

148

Finding food  

PubMed Central

A significant amount of travel is undertaken to find food. This paper examines challenges in measuring access to food using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), important in studies of both travel and eating behavior. It compares different sources of data available including fieldwork, land use and parcel data, licensing information, commercial listings, taxation data, and online street-level photographs. It proposes methods to classify different kinds of food sales places in a way that says something about their potential for delivering healthy food options. In assessing the relationship between food access and travel behavior, analysts must clearly conceptualize key variables, document measurement processes, and be clear about the strengths and weaknesses of data. PMID:21837264

Forsyth, Ann; Lytle, Leslie; Riper, David Van

2011-01-01

149

An Innovative Approach to Plant Utility Audits Yields Significant Results  

E-print Network

systems is a cost effective method to improve overall system efficiency and reliability. Typical returns for an industrial CHP fuel-switching powerhouse utilizing an EMRS range from $150K/Month to $450K/Month based on the facility size, functionality...

Robinson, J. E.; Moore, D. A.

2005-01-01

150

Genomic distribution of quantitative trait loci for yield and yield-related traits in common wheat.  

PubMed

A major objective of quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies is to find genes/markers that can be used in breeding programs via marker assisted selection (MAS). We surveyed the QTLs for yield and yield-related traits and their genomic distributions in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the available published reports. We then carried out a meta-QTL (MQTL) analysis to identify the major and consistent QTLs for these traits. In total, 55 MQTLs were identified, of which 12 significant MQTLs were located on wheat chromosomes 1A, 1B, 2A, 2D, 3B, 4A, 4B, 4D and 5A. Our study showed that the genetic control of yield and its components in common wheat involved the important genes such as Rht and Vrn. Furthermore, several significant MQTLs were found in the chromosomal regions corresponding to several rice genomic locations containing important QTLs for yield related traits. Our results demonstrate that meta-QTL analysis is a powerful tool for confirming the major and stable QTLs and refining their chromosomal positions in common wheat, which may be useful for improving the MAS efficiency of yield related traits. PMID:20977657

Zhang, Li-Yi; Liu, Dong-Cheng; Guo, Xiao-Li; Yang, Wen-Long; Sun, Jia-Zhu; Wang, Dao-Wen; Zhang, Aimin

2010-11-01

151

Find Someone  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Create a "Find Someone" list, with about 10 items, each containing a shape, number, or measurement. Can you find someone in the group with hair about 4 inches long? Someone wearing parallel lines? Someone born in the 10th month? Learners circulate, trying to find someone who matches each item on the list. To engage younger learners, base the “Find Someone” list on things to count: find someone wearing 7 buttons or find someone wearing 5 barrettes. Available as a web page or downloadable pdf. Students should have basic reading skills.

2010-01-01

152

Significant efficiency findings while controlling for the frequent confounders of CAI research in the PlanAlyzer project's computer-based, self-paced, case-based programs in anemia and chest pain diagnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Richard E. Clark in his widely published comprehensive studies and meta-analyses of the literature on computer assisted instruction (CAI) has decried the lack of carefully controlled research, challenging almost every study which shows the computer-based intervention to result in significant post-test proficiency gains over a non-computer-based intervention. We report on a randomized study in a medical school setting where the

Harold C. Lyon; James C. Healy; James R. Bell; Joseph F. O'Donnell; Edward K. Shultz; Robert S. Wigton; Frank Hirai; J. Robert Beck

1991-01-01

153

Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1953-1970: Description of individual studies, data files, codes, and summaries of significant findings  

SciTech Connect

Between 1953 and 1970, studies on the long-term effects of external x-ray and {gamma} irradiation on inbred and hybrid mouse stocks were carried out at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory. The results of these studies, plus the mating, litter, and pre-experimental stock records, were routinely coded on IBM cards for statistical analysis and record maintenance. Also retained were the survival data from studies performed in the period 1943-1953 at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The card-image data files have been corrected where necessary and refiled on hard disks for long-term storage and ease of accessibility. In this report, the individual studies and data files are described, and pertinent factors regarding caging, husbandry, radiation procedures, choice of animals, and other logistical details are summarized. Some of the findings are also presented. Descriptions of the different mouse stocks and hybrids are included in an appendix; more than three dozen stocks were involved in these studies. Two other appendices detail the data files in their original card-image format and the numerical codes used to describe the animal`s exit from an experiment and, for some studies, any associated pathologic findings. Tabular summaries of sample sizes, dose levels, and other variables are also given to assist investigators in their selection of data for analysis. The archive is open to any investigator with legitimate interests and a willingness to collaborate and acknowledge the source of the data and to recognize appropriate conditions or caveats.

Grahn, D.; Fox, C.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.

1994-05-01

154

Low and intermediate mass star yields.II: The evolution of nitrogen abundances  

E-print Network

We analyze the impact on the Galactic nitrogen abundances of using a new set of low and intermediate mass star yields. These yields have a significant yield of primary nitrogen from intermediate mass stars. We use these yields as an input to a Galactic Chemical Evolution model and study the nitrogen abundances in the halo and in the disc, and compare them with models obtained using other yield sets and with a large amount of observational data. We find that, using these new yields, our model adequately reproduce the observed trends. In particular, these yields solve the historical problem of the evolution of nitrogen, giving the right level of relative abundance N/O by the production of a primary component in intermediate mass stars. Moreover, using different evolutionary rates in each radial region of the Galaxy, we may explain the observed N dispersion.

Marta Gavilan; Mercedes Molla; James F. Buell

2006-01-16

155

Rock Finding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

2006-01-01

156

Grapevine canopy reflectance and yield  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Field spectroradiometric and airborne multispectral scanner data were applied in a study of Concord grapevines. Spectroradiometric measurements of 18 experimental vines were collected on three dates during one growing season. Spectral reflectance, determined at 30 intervals from 0.4 to 1.1 microns, was correlated with vine yield, pruning weight, clusters/vine, and nitrogen input. One date of airborne multispectral scanner data (11 channels) was collected over commercial vineyards, and the average radiance values for eight vineyard sections were correlated with the corresponding average yields. Although some correlations were significant, they were inadequate for developing a reliable yield prediction model.

Minden, K. A.; Philipson, W. R.

1982-01-01

157

Wafer yield prediction by the Mahalanobis-Taguchi system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distribution of yield from the production lines is concentrated at a high-yield area and tapers down to the lower-yield area. Production management would find it useful if the yield of individual wafers could be forecast. The yield is determined by the variability of electrical characteristics and dust. In this study, only the variability of electrical characteristics was discussed. One

M. Asada

2001-01-01

158

Potential for improving crop yields through better water management in rainfed regions.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to determine the effect of water supply at critical growth stage of sorghum in Arid Zone Research Institute, D.I. Khan. The results indicated that the yield components and grain yield were significantly affected by water supply. Irrigation applied at heading stage of the crop significantly increased plant height, maturity period, fresh and dry weight of heads plot(-1), 1000 grain weight and grain yield of sorghum irrespective to cultivars. Maximum grain yield of 3319 kg ha(-1) was obtained with irrigation as against 2206 kg ha(-1) obtained from un-irrigated treatments. The plant height, fresh and dry weight of heads plot(-1), 1000 grain weight and grain yield of different cultivars were also different significantly irrespective to irrigation. Maximum grain yield of 2976 kg ha(-1) was produced by the cultivar DS-2000 compared to 2550 kg ha(-1) by DS-97 Yarik. The interaction between irrigation and cultivar as regards yield and yield components of sorghum was non significant. The findings of this study suggested that the grain yield of sorghum can be increased by 50% with irrigation applied at the heading of sorghum. PMID:19090224

Khan, Rahmat Ullah; Rashid, Abdur; Ali, Zulfiqar; Khan, Muhammad Sohail

2007-09-01

159

Yield: Mainstream Delimited Continuations Roshan P. James  

E-print Network

Yield: Mainstream Delimited Continuations Roshan P. James Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana@indiana.edu Abstract Many mainstream languages have operators named yield that share common semantic roots but differ significantly in their details. We present the first known formal study of these mainstream yield operators

Sabry, Amr

160

Yield Factors Lithography-  

E-print Network

Yield Factors Parametric Lithography- based Defect Density 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 0.35 micron 0.25 micron 0.18 micron 0.13 micron 0.09 micron Process Technology NominalYields Defect Density Lithography-based Parametric Yield Yield-Aware Cache Architectures Serkan Ozdemir Debjit

Zhou, Hai

161

Yield Advances in Peanut  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Average yields of peanut in the U.S. set an all time record of 4,695 kg ha-1 in 2012. This far exceeded the previous record yield of 3,837 kg ha-1 in 2008. Favorable weather conditions undoubtedly contributed to the record yields in 2012; however, these record yields would not have been achievable...

162

Decomposing global crop yield variability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent food crises have highlighted the need to better understand the between-year variability of agricultural production. Although increasing future production seems necessary, the globalization of commodity markets suggests that the food system would also benefit from enhanced supplies stability through a reduction in the year-to-year variability. Here, we develop an analytical expression decomposing global crop yield interannual variability into three informative components that quantify how evenly are croplands distributed in the world, the proportion of cultivated areas allocated to regions of above or below average variability and the covariation between yields in distinct world regions. This decomposition is used to identify drivers of interannual yield variations for four major crops (i.e., maize, rice, soybean and wheat) over the period 1961–2012. We show that maize production is fairly spread but marked by one prominent region with high levels of crop yield interannual variability (which encompasses the North American corn belt in the USA, and Canada). In contrast, global rice yields have a small variability because, although spatially concentrated, much of the production is located in regions of below-average variability (i.e., South, Eastern and South Eastern Asia). Because of these contrasted land use allocations, an even cultivated land distribution across regions would reduce global maize yield variance, but increase the variance of global yield rice. Intermediate results are obtained for soybean and wheat for which croplands are mainly located in regions with close-to-average variability. At the scale of large world regions, we find that covariances of regional yields have a negligible contribution to global yield variance. The proposed decomposition could be applied at any spatial and time scales, including the yearly time step. By addressing global crop production stability (or lack thereof) our results contribute to the understanding of a key aspect of global food availability.

Ben-Ari, Tamara; Makowski, David

2014-11-01

163

21 CFR 25.41 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...CEQ regulations (40 CFR 1508.13), a FONSI is a document prepared by a Federal...therefore, an EIS will not be prepared. A FONSI includes the EA or a summary of it and...official(s) responsible for approving the FONSI will sign the document, thereby...

2010-04-01

164

21 CFR 25.41 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...CEQ regulations (40 CFR 1508.13), a FONSI is a document prepared by a Federal...therefore, an EIS will not be prepared. A FONSI includes the EA or a summary of it and...official(s) responsible for approving the FONSI will sign the document, thereby...

2012-04-01

165

21 CFR 25.41 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...CEQ regulations (40 CFR 1508.13), a FONSI is a document prepared by a Federal...therefore, an EIS will not be prepared. A FONSI includes the EA or a summary of it and...official(s) responsible for approving the FONSI will sign the document, thereby...

2011-04-01

166

21 CFR 25.41 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CEQ regulations (40 CFR 1508.13), a FONSI is a document prepared by a Federal...therefore, an EIS will not be prepared. A FONSI includes the EA or a summary of it and...official(s) responsible for approving the FONSI will sign the document, thereby...

2013-04-01

167

23 CFR 771.121 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...g), it will make a separate written FONSI incorporating by reference the EA and...environmental documents. (b) After a FONSI has been made by the Administration, a notice of availability of the FONSI shall be sent by the applicant...

2011-04-01

168

21 CFR 25.41 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...CEQ regulations (40 CFR 1508.13), a FONSI is a document prepared by a Federal...therefore, an EIS will not be prepared. A FONSI includes the EA or a summary of it and...official(s) responsible for approving the FONSI will sign the document, thereby...

2014-04-01

169

23 CFR 771.121 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...g), it will make a separate written FONSI incorporating by reference the EA and...environmental documents. (b) After a FONSI has been made by the Administration, a notice of availability of the FONSI shall be sent by the applicant...

2012-04-01

170

23 CFR 771.121 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...g), it will make a separate written FONSI incorporating by reference the EA and...environmental documents. (b) After a FONSI has been made by the Administration, a notice of availability of the FONSI shall be sent by the applicant...

2010-04-01

171

23 CFR 771.121 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...g), it will make a separate written FONSI incorporating by reference the EA and...environmental documents. (b) After a FONSI has been made by the Administration, a notice of availability of the FONSI shall be sent by the applicant...

2013-04-01

172

23 CFR 771.121 - Findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...g), it will make a separate written FONSI incorporating by reference the EA and...environmental documents. (b) After a FONSI has been made by the Administration, a notice of availability of the FONSI shall be sent by the applicant...

2014-04-01

173

- Fisheries DateFINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT  

E-print Network

Within the spirit and intent ofthe Council of Environmental Quality's regulations for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEP A) and other statutes, orders, and policies that protect fish and wildlife resources, I have established the following administrative record and have determined that the action of:

T. J. O& apos; brien Lock; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service Fonsi

174

76 FR 68260 - Availability of Finding of No Significant Impact  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the potential environmental impacts from replacement of a 600 foot section of timber pile supported pier with concrete pile supports and decking. The timber pile pier section to be replaced comprises a total area of 13,400 square feet. FOR...

2011-11-03

175

32 CFR 651.21 - Finding of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...necessary), and recommendations for the decision maker. The decision maker reviews the package, makes a decision, and signs...longer applies). If a FNSI is signed by the decision maker, the action can proceed...

2012-07-01

176

32 CFR 651.21 - Finding of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...necessary), and recommendations for the decision maker. The decision maker reviews the package, makes a decision, and signs...longer applies). If a FNSI is signed by the decision maker, the action can proceed...

2011-07-01

177

32 CFR 651.21 - Finding of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...necessary), and recommendations for the decision maker. The decision maker reviews the package, makes a decision, and signs...longer applies). If a FNSI is signed by the decision maker, the action can proceed...

2010-07-01

178

32 CFR 651.21 - Finding of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...necessary), and recommendations for the decision maker. The decision maker reviews the package, makes a decision, and signs...longer applies). If a FNSI is signed by the decision maker, the action can proceed...

2014-07-01

179

32 CFR 651.21 - Finding of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...necessary), and recommendations for the decision maker. The decision maker reviews the package, makes a decision, and signs...longer applies). If a FNSI is signed by the decision maker, the action can proceed...

2013-07-01

180

32 CFR 989.15 - Finding of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...proposed action and its potential for controversy. The greater the magnitude of...proposed action or its potential for controversy, the longer the time that...unnecessary due to the lack of potential controversy. (2) In the following...

2012-07-01

181

32 CFR 989.15 - Finding of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...proposed action and its potential for controversy. The greater the magnitude of...proposed action or its potential for controversy, the longer the time that...unnecessary due to the lack of potential controversy. (2) In the following...

2014-07-01

182

32 CFR 989.15 - Finding of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...proposed action and its potential for controversy. The greater the magnitude of...proposed action or its potential for controversy, the longer the time that...unnecessary due to the lack of potential controversy. (2) In the following...

2013-07-01

183

32 CFR 989.15 - Finding of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...proposed action and its potential for controversy. The greater the magnitude of...proposed action or its potential for controversy, the longer the time that...unnecessary due to the lack of potential controversy. (2) In the following...

2011-07-01

184

Pemphigus vulgaris associated with significant periodontal findings: A case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to report a case of Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) associated with periodontitis and role of dermatologist and periodontist in its management in the routine practice. Periodontitis is a plaque induced inflammation involving and destroying the supporting alveolar bone, cementum and periodontal ligament. Pemphigus is a group of bullous diseases that affect the oral mucosa and

A. R. Pradeep; S. Thorat Manojkumar; Arjun Raju

185

Changes in diurnal temperature range and national cereal yields  

SciTech Connect

Models of yield responses to temperature change have often considered only changes in average temperature (Tavg), with the implicit assumption that changes in the diurnal temperature range (DTR) can safely be ignored. The goal of this study was to evaluate this assumption using a combination of historical datasets and climate model projections. Data on national crop yields for 1961-2002 in the 10 leading producers of wheat, rice, and maize were combined with datasets on climate and crop locations to evaluate the empirical relationships between Tavg, DTR, and crop yields. In several rice and maize growing regions, including the two major nations for each crop, there was a clear negative response of yields to increased DTR. This finding reflects a nonlinear response of yields to temperature, which likely results from greater water and heat stress during hot days. In many other cases, the effects of DTR were not statistically significant, in part because correlations of DTR with other climate variables and the relatively short length of the time series resulted in wide confidence intervals for the estimates. To evaluate whether future changes in DTR are relevant to crop impact assessments, yield responses to projected changes in Tavg and DTR by 2046-2065 from 11 climate models were estimated. The mean climate model projections indicated an increase in DTR in most seasons and locations where wheat is grown, mixed projections for maize, and a general decrease in DTR for rice. These mean projections were associated with wide ranges that included zero in nearly all cases. The estimated impacts of DTR changes on yields were generally small (<5% change in yields) relative to the consistently negative impact of projected warming of Tavg. However, DTR changes did significantly affect yield responses in several cases, such as in reducing US maize yields and increasing India rice yields. Because DTR projections tend to be positively correlated with Tavg, estimates of yields under extreme warming scenarios were particularly affected by including DTR (up to 10%). Finally, based on the relatively poor performance of climate models in reproducing the magnitude of past DTR trends, it is possible that future DTR changes and associated yield responses will exceed the ranges considered here.

Lobell, D

2007-04-26

186

Diversification practices reduce organic to conventional yield gap.  

PubMed

Agriculture today places great strains on biodiversity, soils, water and the atmosphere, and these strains will be exacerbated if current trends in population growth, meat and energy consumption, and food waste continue. Thus, farming systems that are both highly productive and minimize environmental harms are critically needed. How organic agriculture may contribute to world food production has been subject to vigorous debate over the past decade. Here, we revisit this topic comparing organic and conventional yields with a new meta-dataset three times larger than previously used (115 studies containing more than 1000 observations) and a new hierarchical analytical framework that can better account for the heterogeneity and structure in the data. We find organic yields are only 19.2% (±3.7%) lower than conventional yields, a smaller yield gap than previous estimates. More importantly, we find entirely different effects of crop types and management practices on the yield gap compared with previous studies. For example, we found no significant differences in yields for leguminous versus non-leguminous crops, perennials versus annuals or developed versus developing countries. Instead, we found the novel result that two agricultural diversification practices, multi-cropping and crop rotations, substantially reduce the yield gap (to 9 ± 4% and 8 ± 5%, respectively) when the methods were applied in only organic systems. These promising results, based on robust analysis of a larger meta-dataset, suggest that appropriate investment in agroecological research to improve organic management systems could greatly reduce or eliminate the yield gap for some crops or regions. PMID:25621333

Ponisio, Lauren C; M'Gonigle, Leithen K; Mace, Kevi C; Palomino, Jenny; de Valpine, Perry; Kremen, Claire

2015-01-22

187

Finding Factors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson is designed to develop students' abilities to find factors of whole numbers. The lesson also introduces prime numbers. This lesson provides links to discussions and activities related to factors as well as suggested ways to integrate them into the lesson. Finally, the lesson provides links to follow-up lessons designed for use in succession with the current one.

2011-05-24

188

76 FR 16838 - Finding of No Significant Impact; Notice of Availability of the Finding of No Significant Impact...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Adult Male, Non-US Citizen, Criminal Aliens at a Contractor-Owned, Contractor-Operated...low-security, adult males, criminal aliens within one existing contractor owned...regarding sentenced and unsentenced criminal aliens. In response, the BOP is seeking...

2011-03-25

189

Acid soil infertility effects on peanut yields and yield components  

SciTech Connect

The interpretation of soil amelioration experiments with peanuts is made difficult by the unpredictibility of the crop and by the many factors altered when ameliorating acid soils. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of lime and gypsum applications on peanut kernel yield via the three first order yield components, pods per ha, kernels per pod, and kernel mass. On an acid medium sandy loam soil (typic Plinthustult), liming resulted in a highly significant kernel yield increase of 117% whereas gypsum applications were of no significant benefit. As indicated by path coefficient analysis, an increase in the number of pods per ha was markedly more important in increasing yield than an increase in either the number of kernels per pod or kernel mass. Furthermore, exch. Al was found to be particularly detrimental to pod number. It was postulated that poor peanut yields resulting from acid soil infertility were mainly due to the depressive effect of exch. Al on pod number. Exch. Ca appeared to play a secondary role by ameliorating the adverse effects of exch. Al.

Blamey, F.P.C.

1983-01-01

190

Main Findings  

Cancer.gov

This study looked at the ALTS patients with ASCUS who were found to have a precancerous lesion when they underwent colposcopy and biopsy. Its purpose was to find out how sensitive HPV testing was at identifying these women compared to repeat Pap testing. The study found that HPV testing was 96-percent sensitive - that is, identified 96% of the women with ASCUS who had a precancerous lesion. The authors concluded that HPV testing is a viable option for the management of ASCUS.

191

Factor Findings  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students first create factor posters for a variety of different numbers that will be displayed in the classroom to be utilized as a resource throughout the school year. They make discoveries about factors using color tiles, represent their discoveries using graph paper, and display their information on poster board as find factors of an assigned number. The plan includes a list of materials, questions, assessment options, and extensions.

Jamie Piecora

2000-01-01

192

Finding Colors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this chemistry challenge, learners combine acids and bases in a universal indicator to create five different colors. Using vinegar, washing soda, and Bogen universal indicator, the goal is to find combinations that create red, orange, yellow, green, and blue solutions. Background information explains a little about how acids and bases interact to affect the pH of a solution, and how the indicator changes color based on the pH. Safety notes are included.

Sciencenter

2014-08-27

193

Fossil Find  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this classroom activity, middle school students simulate a "dinosaur dig." The activity opens with background information for teachers about fossils. Working in groups, students excavate fossil sites created in advance by the teacher, or other group of students, and try to reconstruct a chicken skeleton. The activity closes with a two-page student worksheet that directs students to diagram the fossil site and includes probing questions to help them decode their findings.

194

The yield stress myth?  

Microsoft Academic Search

New experimental data obtained from constant stress rheometers are used to show that the yield stress concept is an idealization, and that, given accurate measurements, no yield stress exists. The simple Cross model is shown to be a useful empiricism for many non-Newtonian fluids, including those which have hitherto been thought to possess a yield stress.

H. A. Barnes; K. Walters

1985-01-01

195

The fingerprint of climate trends on European crop yields.  

PubMed

Europe has experienced a stagnation of some crop yields since the early 1990s as well as statistically significant warming during the growing season. Although it has been argued that these two are causally connected, no previous studies have formally attributed long-term yield trends to a changing climate. Here, we present two statistical tests based on the distinctive spatial pattern of climate change impacts and adaptation, and explore their power under a range of parameter values. We show that statistical power for the identification of climate change impacts is high in many settings, but that power for identifying adaptation is almost always low. Applying these tests to European agriculture, we find evidence that long-term temperature and precipitation trends since 1989 have reduced continent-wide wheat and barley yields by 2.5% and 3.8%, respectively, and have slightly increased maize and sugar beet yields. These averages disguise large heterogeneity across the continent, with regions around the Mediterranean experiencing significant adverse impacts on most crops. This result means that climate trends can account for ?10% of the stagnation in European wheat and barley yields, with likely explanations for the remainder including changes in agriculture and environmental policies. PMID:25691735

Moore, Frances C; Lobell, David B

2015-03-01

196

Finding Fossils  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This OLogy activity serves as a kid-friendly how-to manual about searching for fossils. In Not Just Any Rock Will Do, kids learn that fossils "hide out" in sedimentary rock and see examples of shale and sandstone. Do's and Don'ts for Fossil Hunters gives kids practical tips and a list of fossil-hunting supplies. In Fossils You May Find, there are photos of common invertebrate, vertebrate, and plant fossils to guide kids. Paleontology Clubs and Web Sites lists resources to help kids determine where to hunt for fossils. In Keeping a Field Journal, kids are shown a sample journal entry that points out the types of information they should record.

197

Prediction of water yield reductions following a bushfire in ash-mixed species eucalypt forest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous work on long-term yield trends following the 1939 bushfire in mountain ash eucalypt catchments near Melbourne concluded that a relationship exists between the age of the ash forest and average annual streamflow yield. In the light of additional hydrologic and forest data, this study reassesses and extends the earlier work. A two-parameter model of the long-term yield trend following a bushfire is proposed. It is shown to satisfactorily fit rainfall-runoff data for eight catchments affected by the 1939 fires. In addition, the fits confirm earlier findings of significant yield reductions and, moreover, suggest possible recovery in yields. Despite insufficient hydrologic data to confirm these recovery trends, forest age and composition data indicate that recovery in yield should be practically complete by the time the ash forest reaches maturity (about 100-150 yr after regeneration). The yield trend model is consistent with this information. Using a generalized least squares approach, regional models for the long-term yield trend parameters Lmax (the maximum yield reduction) and log K (the response time) are developed. Unlike an earlier regional model only one forest parameter, namely the percentage of 1939 regrowth ash, was found to be significant in the prediction of Lmax. A simple simulation model based on the regional models is then developed enabling evaluation of the effect of future bushfire (and logging) on catchment yield. This was used to resolve contradictory conclusions about the significance of yield trends in the O'Shannassy catchment where the effect of fires prior to 1939 was shown to obscure the yield trends due to the 1939 fire. In addition, the simulation model was used to illustrate the potential vulnerability of Melbourne's water supply to a major bushfire.

Kuczera, George

1987-10-01

198

Yields from the Primordial Stars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first stars were formed from matter fresh from the Big Bang, and the evidence of their nucleosynthesis should be evident in extremely metal-poor Population II stars. Estimates of these yields are sensitive to poorly understood features of convective mixing. The yields from H to Ni from a primordial star of 25 M_sun are discussed. The effective helium core is significantly smaller than in Population I stars. Significant amounts of primary nitrogen may be produced. The ratio of helium to ``metal'' production is relatively high, dY/dZ ~ 3.4. A significant neutron excess develops during hydrostatic carbon burning which places lower limits of the ratios of Na/Mg and Al/Mg, as well as for heavier odd-Z/even-Z pairs. Li and (3He) are produced, but weakly.

Arnett, David

1996-04-01

199

Event-Based Modeling of Driver Yielding Behavior to Pedestrians at Two-Lane Roundabout Approaches  

PubMed Central

Unlike other types of controlled intersections, drivers do not always comply with the “yield to pedestrian” sign at the roundabouts. This paper aims to identify the contributing factors affecting the likelihood of driver yielding to pedestrians at two-lane roundabouts. It further models the likelihood of driver yielding based on these factors using logistic regression. The models have been applied to 1150 controlled pedestrian crossings at entry and exit legs of two-lane approaches of six roundabouts across the country. The logistic regression models developed support prior research that the likelihood of driver yielding at the entry leg of roundabouts is higher than at the exit. Drivers tend to yield to pedestrians carrying a white cane more often than to sighted pedestrians. Drivers traveling in the far lane, relative to pedestrian location, have a lower probability of yielding to a pedestrian. As the speed increases the probability of driver yielding decreases. At the exit leg of the roundabout, drivers turning right from the adjacent lane have a lower propensity of yielding than drivers coming from other directions. The findings of this paper further suggest that although there has been much debate on pedestrian right-of-way laws and distinction between pedestrian waiting positions (in the street versus at the curb), this factor does not have a significant impact on driver yielding rate. The logistic regression models also quantify the effect of each of these factors on propensity of driver yielding. The models include variables which are specific to each study location and explain the impact size of each study location on probability of yielding. The models generated in this research will be useful to transportation professionals and researchers interested in understanding the factors that impact driver yielding at modern roundabouts. The results of the research can be used to isolate factors that may increase yielding (such as lower roundabout approach speeds), and can feasibly be incorporated into microsimulation algorithms to model driver yielding at roundabouts. PMID:24619314

Salamati, Katayoun; Schroeder, Bastian J.; Geruschat, Duane R.; Rouphail, Nagui M.

2013-01-01

200

Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

201

Yield Improvement in Steel Casting (Yield II)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents work conducted on the following main projects tasks undertaken in the Yield Improvement in Steel Casting research program: Improvement of Conventional Feeding and Risering Methods, Use of Unconventional Yield Improvement Techniques, and Case Studies in Yield Improvement. Casting trials were conducted and then simulated using the precise casting conditions as recorded by the participating SFSA foundries. These results present a statistically meaningful set of experimental data on soundness versus feeding length. Comparisons between these casting trials and casting trials performed more than forty years ago by Pellini and the SFSA are quite good and appear reasonable. Comparisons between the current SFSA feeding rules and feeding rules based on the minimum Niyama criterion reveal that the Niyama-based rules are generally less conservative. The niyama-based rules also agree better with both the trials presented here, and the casting trails performed by Pellini an d the SFSA years ago. Furthermore, the use of the Niyama criterion to predict centerline shrinkage for horizontally fed plate sections has a theoretical basis according to the casting literature reviewed here. These results strongly support the use of improved feeding rules for horizontal plate sections based on the Niyama criterion, which can be tailored to the casting conditions for a given alloy and to a desired level of soundness. The reliability and repeatability of ASTM shrinkage x-ray ratings was investigated in a statistical study performed on 128 x-rays, each of which were rated seven different times. A manual ''Feeding and Risering Guidelines for Steel Castings' is given in this final report. Results of casting trials performed to test unconventional techniques for improving casting yield are presented. These use a stacked arrangement of castings and riser pressurization to increase the casting yield. Riser pressurization was demonstrated to feed a casting up to four time s the distance of a non-pressurized riser, and can increase casting yield by decreasing the required number of risers. All case studies for this projects were completed and compiled into an SFSA Technical Report that is submitted part of this Final Report

Richard A. Hardin; Christoph Beckermann; Tim Hays

2002-02-18

202

Diagnostic yield of oesophagogastroduodenoscopy in children with abdominal pain  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Background Abdominal pain is the most common indication for oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) in children. However, existing studies examining the diagnostic outcomes of OGD in children with abdominal pain are limited. Aim To examine the diagnostic yield of OGD with biopsy in the evaluation of abdominal pain and to describe the endoscopic and histological findings in patients undergoing OGD for abdominal pain of unclear aetiology. Methods We performed a retrospective cross-sectional cohort study in children under 18 years of age who had OGD for the primary indication of abdominal pain, at Texas Children's Hospital and Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters from 1 January 2002 to 30 June 2005. Results Overall, OGD was diagnostic in 454 (38.1%) of the 1191 procedures, including reflux oesophagitis (23%, n = 271), Helicobacter pylori infections (5%, n = 55), peptic ulcers (3%, n = 32), eosinophilic oesophagitis (2%, n = 25), celiac disease (1%, n = 9) and Crohn's disease (0.5%, n = 7). Male gender, older age, elevated C-reactive protein and vomiting were associated with increased diagnostic yield. Conclusions Our findings suggest that OGD is valuable for the evaluation of chronic abdominal pain in children, with a diagnostic yield of 38%. The majority of alarm symptoms and routine laboratory tests are not significantly associated with diagnostic yield. PMID:19573168

THAKKAR, K.; CHEN, L.; TATEVIAN, N.; SHULMAN, R. J.; MCDUFFIE, A.; TSOU, M.; GILGER, M. A.; EL-SERAG, H. B.

2010-01-01

203

Linkages among climate change, crop yields and Mexico-US cross-border migration.  

PubMed

Climate change is expected to cause mass human migration, including immigration across international borders. This study quantitatively examines the linkages among variations in climate, agricultural yields, and people's migration responses by using an instrumental variables approach. Our method allows us to identify the relationship between crop yields and migration without explicitly controlling for all other confounding factors. Using state-level data from Mexico, we find a significant effect of climate-driven changes in crop yields on the rate of emigration to the United States. The estimated semielasticity of emigration with respect to crop yields is approximately -0.2, i.e., a 10% reduction in crop yields would lead an additional 2% of the population to emigrate. We then use the estimated semielasticity to explore the potential magnitude of future emigration. Depending on the warming scenarios used and adaptation levels assumed, with other factors held constant, by approximately the year 2080, climate change is estimated to induce 1.4 to 6.7 million adult Mexicans (or 2% to 10% of the current population aged 15-65 y) to emigrate as a result of declines in agricultural productivity alone. Although the results cannot be mechanically extrapolated to other areas and time periods, our findings are significant from a global perspective given that many regions, especially developing countries, are expected to experience significant declines in agricultural yields as a result of projected warming. PMID:20660749

Feng, Shuaizhang; Krueger, Alan B; Oppenheimer, Michael

2010-08-10

204

Improving Photosynthetic Efficiency for Greater Yield  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Increasing the yield potential of the major food grain crops has contributed very significantly to a rising global supply of grain over the past 50 years, which has until recently more than kept pace with rising global demand. Yield potential is the product of the solar radiation available at a giv...

205

Weed competition and dry bean yield components  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Weed competition can significantly reduce dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) yields and therefore the profitability for the producer. Depending on the dry bean variety produced, the yield components may be affected differently by the stress produced by weed competition. This research was conducted to ...

206

Ontogenesis, gender, and molting influence the venom yield in the spider Coremiocnemis tropix (Araneae, Theraphosidae)  

PubMed Central

The demand for spider venom increases along with the growing popularity of venoms-based research. A deeper understanding of factors that influence the venom yield in spiders would therefore be of interest to both commercial venom suppliers and research facilities. The present study addresses the influence of several factors on the venom yield by systematically analyzing the data obtained from 1773 electrical milkings of the Australian theraphosid spider Coremiocnemis tropix. Gender and ontogenesis were found to cause a major effect on the venom yield, as adult female C. tropix yielded significantly more venom than adult males. During ontogenesis, the venom yield increased with increasing size of the spiders. Furthermore, a significant reduction in the venom yield during the 50-day time interval preceding a molt was found. On the other hand, extended milking intervals (up to 449 days) and different states of nutrition (as an indication of how well the spider was fed) did not significantly affect the venom yield. Overall, the present findings suggest that venom production in spiders is carefully balanced between the demand for venom and the energy costs associated with its production. It can therefore be concluded that, in line with the venom optimization hypothesis, venom is a precious resource for spiders, which have implemented control mechanisms to ensure economical venom production and usage. PMID:21544186

Herzig, Volker

2010-01-01

207

Yields of hawthorn Crataegus monogyna berries under different hedgerow management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yields of hawthorn berries under different hedgerow management treatments were examined in experimental hedgerows at Monks Wood, Cambridgeshire, UK. Statistically significant differences existed between the management treatments with yields per unit area of hedgerows unmanaged for more than a decade out-yielding managed hedgerows by an order of magnitude. These differences were further inflated if yields were considered per unit length

T. H Sparks; T Martin

1999-01-01

208

Is Yield Increase Sufficient to Achieve Food Security in China?  

PubMed Central

Increasing demand for food, driven by unprecedented population growth and increasing consumption, will keep challenging food security in China. Although cereal yields have substantially improved during the last three decades, whether it will keep thriving to meet the increasing demand is not known yet. Thus, an integrated analysis on the trends of crop yield and cultivated area is essential to better understand current state of food security in China, especially on county scale. So far, yield stagnation has extensively dominated the main cereal-growing areas across China. Rice yield is facing the most severe stagnation that 53.9% counties tracked in the study have stagnated significantly, followed by maize (42.4%) and wheat (41.9%). As another important element for production sustainability, but often neglected is the planted area patterns. It has been further demonstrated that the loss in productive arable land for rice and wheat have dramatically increased the pressure on achieving food security. Not only a great deal of the planted areas have stagnated since 1980, but also collapsed. 48.4% and 54.4% of rice- and wheat-growing counties have lost their cropland areas to varying degrees. Besides, 27.6% and 35.8% of them have retrograded below the level of the 1980s. The combined influence (both loss in yield and area) has determined the crop sustainable production in China to be pessimistic for rice and wheat, and consequently no surprise to find that more than half of counties rank a lower level of production sustainability. Therefore, given the potential yield increase in wheat and maize, as well as substantial area loss of rice and wheat, the possible targeted adaptation measures for both yield and cropping area is required at county scale. Moreover, policies on food trade, alongside advocation of low calorie diets, reducing food loss and waste can help to enhance food security. PMID:25680193

Wei, Xing; Zhang, Zhao; Shi, Peijun; Wang, Pin; Chen, Yi; Song, Xiao; Tao, Fulu

2015-01-01

209

Is yield increase sufficient to achieve food security in China?  

PubMed

Increasing demand for food, driven by unprecedented population growth and increasing consumption, will keep challenging food security in China. Although cereal yields have substantially improved during the last three decades, whether it will keep thriving to meet the increasing demand is not known yet. Thus, an integrated analysis on the trends of crop yield and cultivated area is essential to better understand current state of food security in China, especially on county scale. So far, yield stagnation has extensively dominated the main cereal-growing areas across China. Rice yield is facing the most severe stagnation that 53.9% counties tracked in the study have stagnated significantly, followed by maize (42.4%) and wheat (41.9%). As another important element for production sustainability, but often neglected is the planted area patterns. It has been further demonstrated that the loss in productive arable land for rice and wheat have dramatically increased the pressure on achieving food security. Not only a great deal of the planted areas have stagnated since 1980, but also collapsed. 48.4% and 54.4% of rice- and wheat-growing counties have lost their cropland areas to varying degrees. Besides, 27.6% and 35.8% of them have retrograded below the level of the 1980s. The combined influence (both loss in yield and area) has determined the crop sustainable production in China to be pessimistic for rice and wheat, and consequently no surprise to find that more than half of counties rank a lower level of production sustainability. Therefore, given the potential yield increase in wheat and maize, as well as substantial area loss of rice and wheat, the possible targeted adaptation measures for both yield and cropping area is required at county scale. Moreover, policies on food trade, alongside advocation of low calorie diets, reducing food loss and waste can help to enhance food security. PMID:25680193

Wei, Xing; Zhang, Zhao; Shi, Peijun; Wang, Pin; Chen, Yi; Song, Xiao; Tao, Fulu

2015-01-01

210

A Proposed Fourth Measure of Significance: The Role of Economic Significance in Educational Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to examine economic significance as a fourth measure of significance. In addition to describing and operationalising the concept of economic significance, a typology of economic significance indices is presented, including an example of how to compute these measures, as well as how to utilise them in applied research. We demonstrate how interventions that yield

Nancy L. Leech; Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie

2004-01-01

211

Argentina corn yield model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model based on multiple regression was developed to estimate corn yields for the country of Argentina. A meteorological data set was obtained for the country by averaging data for stations within the corn-growing area. Predictor variables for the model were derived from monthly total precipitation, average monthly mean temperature, and average monthly maximum temperature. A trend variable was included for the years 1965 to 1980 since an increasing trend in yields due to technology was observed between these years.

Callis, S. L.; Sakamoto, C.

1984-01-01

212

Argentina soybean yield model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model based on multiple regression was developed to estimate soybean yields for the country of Argentina. A meteorological data set was obtained for the country by averaging data for stations within the soybean growing area. Predictor variables for the model were derived from monthly total precipitation and monthly average temperature. A trend variable was included for the years 1969 to 1978 since an increasing trend in yields due to technology was observed between these years.

Callis, S. L.; Sakamoto, C.

1984-01-01

213

Lung in Dengue: Computed Tomography Findings  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. Dengue virus infection may be asymptomatic or lead to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever with or without warning signs, or severe dengue. Lower respiratory symptoms are unusual and lung-imaging data in patients with dengue are scarce. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate lung changes associated with dengue infection, we retrospectively analyzed 2,020 confirmed cases of dengue. Twenty-nine of these patients (11 females and 18 males aged 16–90 years) underwent chest computed tomography (CT), which yielded abnormal findings in 17 patients: 16 patients had pleural effusion (the sole finding in six patients) and 11 patients had pulmonary abnormalities. Lung parenchyma involvement ranged from subtle to moderate unilateral and bilateral abnormalities. The most common finding was ground-glass opacity in eight patients, followed by consolidation in six patients. Less common findings were airspace nodules (two patients), interlobular septal thickening (two patients), and peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (one patient). Lung histopathological findings in four fatal cases showed thickening of the alveolar septa, hemorrhage, and interstitial edema. Conclusions/Significance In this largest series involving the use of chest CT to evaluate lung involvement in patients with dengue, CT findings of lower respiratory tract involvement were uncommon. When abnormalities were present, pleural effusion was the most frequent finding and lung involvement was often mild or moderate and bilateral. Extensive lung abnormalities are infrequent even in severe disease and when present should lead physicians to consider other diagnostic possibilities. PMID:24836605

Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Brum, Ana Livia Garcia; Paes, Marciano Viana; Póvoa, Tiago Fajardo; Basilio-de-Oliveira, Carlos Alberto; Marchiori, Edson; Borghi, Danielle Provençano; Ramos, Grazielle Viana; Bozza, Fernando Augusto

2014-01-01

214

Yield gaps and yield relationships in US soybean production systems  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The magnitude of yield gaps (YG) (potential yield – farmer yield) provides some indication of the prospects for increasing crop yield to meet the food demands of future populations. Quantile regression analysis was applied to county soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] yields (1971 – 2011) from Kentuc...

215

Ecosystem Viable Yields  

E-print Network

The World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg, 2002) encouraged the application of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States undertook to restore and exploit their stocks at maximum sustainable yield (MSY), a concept and practice without ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific model. Acknowledging this gap, we propose a definition of "ecosystem viable yields" (EVY) as yields compatible i) with biological viability levels for all time and ii) with an ecosystem dynamics. To the difference of MSY, this notion is not based on equilibrium, but on viability theory, which offers advantages for robustness. For a generic class of multispecies models with harvesting, we provide explicit expressions for the EVY. We apply our approach to the anchovy--hake couple in the Peruvian upwelling ecosystem between the years 1971 and 1981.

De Lara, Michel; Oliveros-Ramos, Ricardo; Tam, Jorge

2011-01-01

216

Minimizing Significant Figure Fuzziness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses the principles and problems associated with the use of significant figures. Explains uncertainty, the meaning of significant figures, the Simple Rule, the Three Rule, and the 1-5 Rule. Also provides examples of the Rules. (ML)

Fields, Lawrence D.; Hawkes, Stephen J.

1986-01-01

217

Effects of leaf rust and powdery mildew on yield, yield components, and quality characters of winter wheats  

E-print Network

). Experiments were conducted in both experimental nur- series and commercial fields during the 1981-82 and 1982-83 seasons. The effects of fungicide treatments on grain yield, yield components, above-ground dry matter yield, harvest index, plant height, test... of powdery mi 1 dew. Yield component analysis was performed on cultivars in the primary experiments which had significant grain yield response to treatment. Tiller number and seed/spike generally were negatively correlated with each other, and highly...

Shafer, Brian Andrew

1985-01-01

218

Ecologically Significant Wetlands  

E-print Network

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, and Swan River Valleys FINAL REPORT Also: Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork of the Flathead River Valley Appendix 29b #12;Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, and Swan River Valleys JUNE 1, 1999 DEQ

219

Tests of Significance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site gives an explanation, a definition of and an example for tests of significance. Topics include null and alternative hypotheses for population mean, one-sided and two-sided z and t tests, levels of significance, and matched pairs analysis. Overall, this is a nice presentation of significance tests for any mathematics classroom.

Lacey, Michelle

220

Yield and Solidification of Yield-Stress Materials in Rigid Networks and Porous Structures  

E-print Network

In this paper, we address the issue of threshold yield pressure of yield-stress materials in rigid networks of interconnected conduits and porous structures subject to a pressure gradient. We compare the results as obtained dynamically from solving the pressure field to those obtained statically from tracing the path of the minimum sum of threshold yield pressures of the individual conduits by using the threshold path algorithms. We refute criticisms directed recently to our previous findings that the pressure field solution generally produces a higher threshold yield pressure than the one obtained by the threshold path algorithms. Issues related to the solidification of yield stress materials in their transition from fluid phase to solid state have also been investigated and assessed as part of the investigation of the yield point.

Sochi, Taha

2013-01-01

221

Study of B{yields}ppK* and B{yields}pp{rho}  

SciTech Connect

We study the three-body baryonic B decays of B{yields}pp(K*,{rho}) in the standard model. The baryonic matrix elements are calculated in terms of the SU(3) flavor symmetry and the QCD power counting rules within the perturbative QCD. We find that the decay branching ratios, angular, and direct CP asymmetries of (B{sup -}{yields}ppK*{sup -}, B{sup 0}{yields}ppK*{sup 0}, B{sup -}{yields}pp{rho}{sup -}) are around (6,1,30)x10{sup -6}, (13,-27,11)%, and (22,1,-3)%, which are consistent with the current BABAR and Belle data, respectively. The large values of the branching ratio in B{sup -}{yields}pp{rho}{sup -} and the direct CP asymmetry in B{sup {+-}}{yields}ppK*{sup {+-}} are useful to test the standard model and search for new physics.

Geng, C. Q.; Hsiao, Y. K. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300 (China); Theory group, TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C. (Canada); Ng, J. N. [Theory group, TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C. (Canada)

2007-05-01

222

Biotechnology of Forest Yield  

Microsoft Academic Search

Silvicultural and genetic manipulation of Douglas fir and loblolly pine plantations have increased their productivity 70 and 300 percent, respectively, over natural forests on the same sites. Yet these intensively managed plantations are achieving less than 50 percent of their potential productivity. Future increases in yield will result from optimization of nutritional treatments, control of noncrop vegetation, and advances in

Peter Farnum; Roger Timmis; J. Laurence Kulp

1983-01-01

223

Detecting Novelty and Significance  

PubMed Central

Studies of cognition often use an “oddball” paradigm to study effects of stimulus novelty and significance on information processing. However, an oddball tends to be perceptually more novel than the standard, repeated stimulus as well as more relevant to the ongoing task, making it difficult to disentangle effects due to perceptual novelty and stimulus significance. In the current study, effects of perceptual novelty and significance on ERPs were assessed in a passive viewing context by presenting repeated and novel pictures (natural scenes) that either signaled significant information regarding the current context or not. A fronto-central N2 component was primarily affected by perceptual novelty, whereas a centro-parietal P3 component was modulated by both stimulus significance and novelty. The data support an interpretation that the N2 reflects perceptual fluency and is attenuated when a current stimulus matches an active memory representation and that the amplitude of the P3 reflects stimulus meaning and significance. PMID:19400680

Ferrari, Vera; Bradley, Margaret M.; Codispoti, Maurizio; Lang, Peter J.

2013-01-01

224

Prognostic significance of antenatally detected fetal pyelectasis.  

PubMed

In order to evaluate the prognostic significance of ultrasonographically detected fetal pyelectasis, a retrospective review was performed of patients evaluated for fetal pyelectasis over a 24-month period. From 84 patients a total of 98 fetal kidneys with pyelectasis were identified. Fetal pyelectasis was more common in the left kidney and in males. Postpartum evaluation revealed 48 (57.1%) neonates with hydronephrosis. Among these, mean (SD; range) values of antenatal fetal pyelectasis were 17.0 mm (8.4; 5-26) before 33 weeks and 16.9 mm (8.5; 5-34) after 33 weeks in the left kidney and 15.4 mm (3.3; 10-24) and 17.1 mm (5.1; 5-36), respectively, in the right kidney. Thirteen infants (15.4%) with hydronephrosis required surgical pyeloplasties (mean age 6 months; range 3-18 months). It was found, from a receiver-operating characteristic curve, that fetal pyelectasis of 8 mm was 91% sensitive and 72% specific in predicting subsequent hydronephrosis. Use of a threshold of 5 mm yielded a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 24%. On the basis of these findings, we recommend that women with ultrasonographically detected antenatal fetal pyelectasis of > or = 5 mm at any gestational age have follow-up ultrasound examinations and detailed postnatal evaluation. PMID:8807759

Ouzounian, J G; Castro, M A; Fresquez, M; al-Sulyman, O M; Kovacs, B W

1996-06-01

225

Some factors governing rice-ratoon yields  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Studies on rice ratooning showed that the height of cutting the main crop affected the maturity period and the yield of the\\u000a ratoon. The ratoon yield was significantly higher when the main crop was cut at ground level versus cutting at 4,8 and 12\\u000a cm high, but the maturity period was lower with a higher cutting. Delaying first watering for

C. R. K. Prashar

1970-01-01

226

Teaching Significant Figures  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is suggested that students would not be so careless about significant figures if they could actually see a demonstration of figures which are not significant. Such a demonstration is described, as is a simple teaching machine designed to give students facility in identifying insignificant figures in their calculations.

Tracy H. Logan

1964-01-01

227

Atmospheric Fluorescence Yield  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric fluorescence from these showers. Accurate knowledge of the conversion from atmospheric fluorescence to energy loss by ionizing particles in the atmosphere is key to this technique. In this paper we discuss a small balloon-borne instrument to make the first in situ measurements versus altitude of the atmospheric fluorescence yield. The instrument can also be used in the lab to investigate the dependence of the fluorescence yield in air on temperature, pressure and the concentrations of other gases that present in the atmosphere. The results can be used to explore environmental effects on and improve the accuracy of cosmic ray energy measurements for existing ground-based experiments and future space-based experiments.

Adams, James H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

228

Yield function development for aluminum alloy sheets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, yield surfaces were measured for binary aluminum-magnesium sheet samples which were fabricated by different processing paths to obtain different microstructures. The yielding behavior was measured using biaxial compression tests on cubic specimens made from laminated sheet samples. The yield surfaces were also predicted from a polycrystal model using crystallographic texture data as input and from a phenomenological yield function usually suitable for polycrystalline materials. The experimental yield surfaces were found to be in good agreement with the polycrystal predictions for all materials and with the phenomenological predictions for most materials. However, for samples processed with high cold rolling reduction prior to solution heat treatment, a significant difference was observed between the phenomenological and the experimental yield surfaces in the pure shear region. In this paper, a generalized phenomenological yield description is proposed to account for the behavior of the solute strengthened aluminum alloy sheets studied in this work. It is subsequently shown that this yield function is suitable for the description of the plastic behavior of any aluminum alloy sheet.

Barlat, F.; Maeda, Y.; Chung, K.; Yanagawa, M.; Brem, J. C.; Hayashida, Y.; Lege, D. J.; Matsui, K.; Murtha, S. J.; Hattori, S.; Becker, R. C.; Makosey, S.

1997-11-01

229

UNCONVENTIONAL METHODS FOR YIELD IMPROVEMENT  

E-print Network

/average casting weight (yield decreases with its increase). VARIABLES IMPACTING YIELD IN STEEL CASTING of Iowa researchers are conducting a casting yield survey to deter- mine the average metal yield in steel techniques for decreasing the size and number of risers re- quired to produce quality castings

Beckermann, Christoph

230

Yield stress and elastic modulus of suspensions of noncolloidal particles in yield stress fluids  

E-print Network

We study experimentally the behavior of isotropic suspensions of noncolloidal particles in yield stress fluids. This problem has been poorly studied in the literature, and only on specific materials. In this paper, we manage to develop procedures and materials that allow us to focus on the purely mechanical contribution of the particles to the yield stress fluid behavior, independently of the physicochemical properties of the materials. This allows us to relate the macroscopic properties of these suspensions to the mechanical properties of the yield stress fluid and the particle volume fraction, and to provide results applicable to any noncolloidal particle in any yield stress fluid. We find that the elastic modulus-concentration relationship follows a Krieger-Dougherty law, and we show that the yield stress-concentration relationship is related to the elastic modulus-concentration relationship through a very simple law, in agreement with results from a micromechanical analysis.

Fabien Mahaut; Xavier Chateau; Philippe Coussot; Guillaume Ovarlez

2008-10-20

231

Estimating agricultural yield gap in Africa using MODIS NDVI dataset  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global agriculture has undergone a period of rapid intensification characterized as 'Green Revolution', except for Africa, which is the region most affected by unreliable food access and undernourishment. Increasing crop production will be one of the most challenges and most effectual way to mitigate food insecurity there, as Africa's agricultural yield is on a much lower level comparing to global average. In this study we characterize cropland vegetation phenology in Africa based on MODIS NDVI time series between 2000 and 2012. Cumulated NDVI is a proxy for net primary productivity and used as an indicator for evaluating the potential yield gap in Africa. It is achieved via translating the gap between optimum attainable productivity level in each classification of cropping systems and actual productivity level by the relationship of cumulated NDVI and cereal-equivalent production. The results show most of cropland area in Africa have decreasing trend in cumulated NDVI, distributing in the Nile Delta, Eastern Africa and central of semi-arid to arid savanna area, except significant positive cumulated NDVI trends are mainly found between Senegal and Benin. Using cumulated NDVI and statistics of cereal equivalent production, we find remarkable potential yield gap at the Horn of East Africa (especially in Somalia), Northern Africa (Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia). Meanwhile, countries locating at the savanna area near Sahel desert and South Africa also show significant potential, though they already have a relatively high level of productivity. Our results can help provide policy recommendation for local government or NGO to tackle food security problems by identifying zones with high potential of yield improvement.

Luan, Y.; Zhu, W.; Luo, X.; Liu, J.; Cui, X.

2013-12-01

232

Significant lexical relationships  

SciTech Connect

Statistical NLP inevitably deals with a large number of rare events. As a consequence, NLP data often violates the assumptions implicit in traditional statistical procedures such as significance testing. We describe a significance test, an exact conditional test, that is appropriate for NLP data and can be performed using freely available software. We apply this test to the study of lexical relationships and demonstrate that the results obtained using this test are both theoretically more reliable and different from the results obtained using previously applied tests.

Pedersen, T.; Kayaalp, M.; Bruce, R. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-12-31

233

Significance of brown dwarfs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The significance of brown dwarfs for resolving some major problems in astronomy is discussed. The importance of brown dwarfs for models of star formation by fragmentation of molecular clouds and for obtaining independent measurements of the ages of stars in binary systems is addressed. The relationship of brown dwarfs to planets is considered.

Black, D. C.

1986-01-01

234

Finding overlapping images Finding overlapping images  

E-print Network

Finding overlapping images #12;Finding overlapping images · Close-range image sets are often unordered · no "natural" order of acquisition · no systematic block structure · How to find images to match? · obvious idea: try all pairs - does not scale to big projects · 1'000 images 499'500 pairs · 10'000 images

Giger, Christine

235

Where boosted significances come from  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In an era of increasingly advanced experimental analysis techniques it is crucial to understand which phase space regions contribute a signal extraction from backgrounds. Based on the Neyman-Pearson lemma we compute the maximum significance for a signal extraction as an integral over phase space regions. We then study to what degree boosted Higgs strategies benefit ZH and tt¯H searches and which transverse momenta of the Higgs are most promising. We find that Higgs and top taggers are the appropriate tools, but would profit from a targeted optimization towards smaller transverse momenta. MadMax is available as an add-on to MadGraph 5.

Plehn, Tilman; Schichtel, Peter; Wiegand, Daniel

2014-03-01

236

Finding Canadian Government Pubs.  

E-print Network

Finding Canadian Government Pubs. Econ 773 Peggy Findlay Reference Librarian Mills Research Help 2 Objectives Finding print Canadian government publications Electronic Canadian government publications Census Information/ Survey Data #12;Finding Canadian Documents ­ Econ 773 Finding Print Canadian Government

Haykin, Simon

237

[Submitting studies without significant results].  

PubMed

When a study finds that no exposure factor or therapy is significantly related to a given effect, researchers legitimately wonder if the results should be submitted for publication and to what journal. Clinical trials that report significant associations have a higher probability of publication, a phenomenon known as selective publication. The principal reasons of this selective publication include author self-censorship, peer-reviewing, trials not intended for publication, interpretation of the p value, cost of journal subscriptions, and policies. Subsequent reviews and meta-analyses are biased by the unavailability of nonsignificant results. Suggestions for preventing this risk include university training, trial registries, an international standard randomised controlled trial number (ISRCTN), Cochrane collaboration, and the gray literature. Journals (including electronic journals) interested in studies with nonsignificant results are listed. New technologies are changing the relations between publishers, libraries, authors and readers. PMID:17287106

Texier, Gaëtan; Meynard, Jean-Baptiste; Michel, Rémy; Migliani, René; Boutin, Jean-Paul

2007-03-01

238

Measures of Clinical Significance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavioral scientists are interested in answering three basic questions when examining the relationships between vari- ables (Kirk, 2001). First, is an observed result real or should it be attributed to chance (i.e., statistical significance)? Sec- ond, if the result is real, how large is it (i.e., effect size)? Third, is the result large enough to be meaningful and useful (i.e.,

HELENA CHMURA KRAEMER; GEORGE A. MORGAN; NANCY L. LEECH; JEFFREY A. GLINER; JERRY J. VASKE; ROBERT J. HARMON

2003-01-01

239

Statistical Applets: Statistical Significance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by authors Duckworth, McCabe, Moore and Sclove for W.H. Freeman of Co., this applet is designed to help students visualize the rejection region of a statistical test by allowing them to set null and alternate hypotheses, population parameters, sample statistics, and significance level. It accompanies "Â?Â?Practice of Business Statistics," but can be used without this text. Even though brief, this is a nice interactive resource for an introductory statistics course.

Duckworth, William

240

Ideotype Population Exploration: Growth, Photosynthesis, and Yield Components at Different Planting Densities in Winter Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.).  

PubMed

Rapeseed is one of the most important edible oil crops in the world and the seed yield has lagged behind the increasing demand driven by population growth. Winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is widely cultivated with relatively low yield in China, so it is necessary to find the strategies to improve the expression of yield potential. Planting density has great effects on seed yield of crops. Hence, field experiments were conducted in Wuhan in the Yangtze River basin with one conventional variety (Zhongshuang 11, ZS11) and one hybrid variety (Huayouza 9, HYZ9) at five planting densities (27.0×104, 37.5×104, 48.0×104, 58.5×104, 69.0×104 plants ha-1) during 2010-2012 to investigate the yield components. The physiological traits for high-yield and normal-yield populations were measured during 2011-2013. Our results indicated that planting densities of 58.5×104 plants ha-1 in ZS11 and 48.0×104 plants ha-1 in HYZ9 have significantly higher yield compared with the density of 27.0×104 plants ha-1for both varieties. The ideal silique numbers for ZS11 and HYZ9 were ?0.9×104 (n m-2) and ?1×104 (n m-2), respectively, and ideal primary branches for ZS11 and HYZ9 were ?250 (n m-2) and ?300 (n m-2), respectively. The highest leaf area index (LAI) and silique wall area index (SAI) was ?5.0 and 7.0, respectively. Moreover, higher leaf net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and water use efficiency (WUE) were observed in the high-yield populations. A significantly higher level of silique wall photosynthesis and rapid dry matter accumulation were supposed to result in the maximum seed yield. Our results suggest that increasing the planting density within certain range is a feasible approach for higher seed yield in winter rapeseed in China. PMID:25517990

Ma, Ni; Yuan, Jinzhan; Li, Ming; Li, Jun; Zhang, Liyan; Liu, Lixin; Naeem, Muhammad Shahbaz; Zhang, Chunlei

2014-01-01

241

Ideotype Population Exploration: Growth, Photosynthesis, and Yield Components at Different Planting Densities in Winter Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.)  

PubMed Central

Rapeseed is one of the most important edible oil crops in the world and the seed yield has lagged behind the increasing demand driven by population growth. Winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is widely cultivated with relatively low yield in China, so it is necessary to find the strategies to improve the expression of yield potential. Planting density has great effects on seed yield of crops. Hence, field experiments were conducted in Wuhan in the Yangtze River basin with one conventional variety (Zhongshuang 11, ZS11) and one hybrid variety (Huayouza 9, HYZ9) at five planting densities (27.0×104, 37.5×104, 48.0×104, 58.5×104, 69.0×104 plants ha–1) during 2010–2012 to investigate the yield components. The physiological traits for high-yield and normal-yield populations were measured during 2011–2013. Our results indicated that planting densities of 58.5×104 plants ha–1 in ZS11 and 48.0×104 plants ha–1 in HYZ9 have significantly higher yield compared with the density of 27.0×104 plants ha–1for both varieties. The ideal silique numbers for ZS11 and HYZ9 were ?0.9×104 (n m–2) and ?1×104 (n m-2), respectively, and ideal primary branches for ZS11 and HYZ9 were ?250 (n m–2) and ?300 (n m–2), respectively. The highest leaf area index (LAI) and silique wall area index (SAI) was ?5.0 and 7.0, respectively. Moreover, higher leaf net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and water use efficiency (WUE) were observed in the high-yield populations. A significantly higher level of silique wall photosynthesis and rapid dry matter accumulation were supposed to result in the maximum seed yield. Our results suggest that increasing the planting density within certain range is a feasible approach for higher seed yield in winter rapeseed in China. PMID:25517990

Ma, Ni; Yuan, Jinzhan; Li, Ming; Li, Jun; Zhang, Liyan; Liu, Lixin; Naeem, Muhammad Shahbaz; Zhang, Chunlei

2014-01-01

242

Significant Earthquake Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Significant Earthquake Database is a global digital database containing information on more than 5,000 destructive earthquakes from 2150 B.C. to the present. Users can access these data in two different ways: via a two-volume CD collection, or on-line. Users searching on-line can query the database via the following parameters: the year of the event, geographical coordinates (latitude and longitude), country, state or province, magnitude, intensity, focal depth, number of deaths, and damage amount. A list of applicable earthquakes is then displayed.

243

Sustainable management in crop monocultures: the impact of retaining forest on oil palm yield.  

PubMed

Tropical agriculture is expanding rapidly at the expense of forest, driving a global extinction crisis. How to create agricultural landscapes that minimise the clearance of forest and maximise sustainability is thus a key issue. One possibility is protecting natural forest within or adjacent to crop monocultures to harness important ecosystem services provided by biodiversity spill-over that may facilitate production. Yet this contrasts with the conflicting potential that the retention of forest exports dis-services, such as agricultural pests. We focus on oil palm and obtained yields from 499 plantation parcels spanning a total of ?23,000 ha of oil palm plantation in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. We investigate the relationship between the extent and proximity of both contiguous and fragmented dipterocarp forest cover and oil palm yield, controlling for variation in oil palm age and for environmental heterogeneity by incorporating proximity to non-native forestry plantations, other oil palm plantations, and large rivers, elevation and soil type in our models. The extent of forest cover and proximity to dipterocarp forest were not significant predictors of oil palm yield. Similarly, proximity to large rivers and other oil palm plantations, as well as soil type had no significant effect. Instead, lower elevation and closer proximity to forestry plantations had significant positive impacts on oil palm yield. These findings suggest that if dipterocarp forests are exporting ecosystem service benefits or ecosystem dis-services, that the net effect on yield is neutral. There is thus no evidence to support arguments that forest should be retained within or adjacent to oil palm monocultures for the provision of ecosystem services that benefit yield. We urge for more nuanced assessments of the impacts of forest and biodiversity on yields in crop monocultures to better understand their role in sustainable agriculture. PMID:24638038

Edwards, Felicity A; Edwards, David P; Sloan, Sean; Hamer, Keith C

2014-01-01

244

Sustainable Management in Crop Monocultures: The Impact of Retaining Forest on Oil Palm Yield  

PubMed Central

Tropical agriculture is expanding rapidly at the expense of forest, driving a global extinction crisis. How to create agricultural landscapes that minimise the clearance of forest and maximise sustainability is thus a key issue. One possibility is protecting natural forest within or adjacent to crop monocultures to harness important ecosystem services provided by biodiversity spill-over that may facilitate production. Yet this contrasts with the conflicting potential that the retention of forest exports dis-services, such as agricultural pests. We focus on oil palm and obtained yields from 499 plantation parcels spanning a total of ?23,000 ha of oil palm plantation in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. We investigate the relationship between the extent and proximity of both contiguous and fragmented dipterocarp forest cover and oil palm yield, controlling for variation in oil palm age and for environmental heterogeneity by incorporating proximity to non-native forestry plantations, other oil palm plantations, and large rivers, elevation and soil type in our models. The extent of forest cover and proximity to dipterocarp forest were not significant predictors of oil palm yield. Similarly, proximity to large rivers and other oil palm plantations, as well as soil type had no significant effect. Instead, lower elevation and closer proximity to forestry plantations had significant positive impacts on oil palm yield. These findings suggest that if dipterocarp forests are exporting ecosystem service benefits or ecosystem dis-services, that the net effect on yield is neutral. There is thus no evidence to support arguments that forest should be retained within or adjacent to oil palm monocultures for the provision of ecosystem services that benefit yield. We urge for more nuanced assessments of the impacts of forest and biodiversity on yields in crop monocultures to better understand their role in sustainable agriculture. PMID:24638038

Edwards, Felicity A.; Edwards, David P.; Sloan, Sean; Hamer, Keith C.

2014-01-01

245

Probing new physics in B{yields}f{sub 0}(980)K decays  

SciTech Connect

We study the hadronic decay modes B{sup {+-}}{sup (0)}{yields}f{sub 0}(980)K{sup {+-}}{sup (0)}, involving a scalar and a pseudoscalar meson in the final state. These decay modes are dominated by the loop induced b{yields}sqq(q=s,u,d) penguins along with a small b{yields}u tree level transition (for B{sup +}{yields}f{sub 0}K{sup +}) and annihilation diagrams. Therefore, the standard model expectation of direct CP violation is negligibly small and the mixing-induced CP violation parameter in the mode B{sup 0}{yields}f{sub 0}K{sub S} is expected to give the same value of sin(2{beta}), as extracted from B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub S} but with opposite sign. Using the generalized factorization approach we find the direct CP violation in the decay mode B{sup +}{yields}f{sub 0}K{sup +} to be of the order of few percent. We then study the effect of the R-parity violating supersymmetric model and show that the direct CP violating asymmetry in B{sup +}{yields}f{sub 0}(980)K{sup +} could be as large as {approx}80% and the mixing-induced CP asymmetry in B{sup 0}{yields}f{sub 0}K{sub S} (i.e., -S{sub f{sub 0}}{sub K{sub S}}) could deviate significantly from that of sin(2{beta}){sub J/{psi}}{sub K{sub S}}.

Giri, A. K. [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala-147002 (India); Mawlong, B.; Mohanta, R. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500 046 (India)

2006-12-01

246

Historical Significant Events Imagery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Historical Significant Events Imagery database (HSEI) is maintained by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). It contains hundreds of selected satellite images capturing some of the more important weather and environmental events over the last 30 years. One can search for images of a specific type of event or for a specific date range, go to a " What's New" section for images added in the past 7 days, or visit a "Most Popular" section for frequently-requested images. The images can be viewed on-line or downloaded for free, or one can order hardcopy matte or glossy finish prints for a small fee. Image dates range from 1960 (the first image from space) to present, and cover phenomena such as dust storms, fire, floods, hurricanes, snow cover, oil spills, severe weather and volcanoes.

247

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures.  

E-print Network

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures. Thanks to improvements in treatment and early detection, more and more women are surviving breast cancer. In fact, the five-year survival rate for women with breast cancer today is 90%, up from only 63% in the 1960s. While progress has clearly been

Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

248

Evidence for Ni-56 yields Co-56 yields Fe-56 decay in type Ia supernovae  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the prevailing picture of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), their explosive burning produces Ni-56, and the radioactive decay chain Ni-56 yields Co-56 yields Fe-56 powers the subsequent emission. We test a central feature of this theory by measuring the relative strengths of a (Co III) emission feature near 5900 A and a (Fe III) emission feature near 4700 A. We measure 38 spectra from 13 SN Ia ranging from 48 to 310 days after maximum light. When we compare the observations with a simple multilevel calculation, we find that the observed Fe/Co flux ratio evolves as expected when the Fe-56/Co-56 abundance ratio follows from Ni-56 yields Co-56 yields Fe-56 decay. From this agreement, we conclude that the cobalt and iron atoms we observe through SN Ia emission lines are produced by the radioactive decay of Ni-56, just as predicted by a wide range of models for SN Ia explosions.

Kuchner, Marc J.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Pinto, Philip A.; Leibundgut, Bruno

1994-01-01

249

The Effect of Sulphur on Yield of Certain Crops.  

E-print Network

1754 1870 1552 Bushels of corn Average 25.2 23.4 24.0 1925 34.3 33.8 37.4 1928 24.5 18.6 17.0 1926 23.5 25.2 21.7 1927 ----- 18.6 16.0 20.0 16 BULLETIN NO. 408, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION Yield of Cotton: In 1926... pounds more than the yield of the land which received no sulphur. Large yields resulted in 192'7, the untreated land producing the highest yield, 508 pounds of lint per acre, which is significantly larger than the yield of 451 pounds produced...

Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

1930-01-01

250

No steady state flows below the yield stress. A true yield stress at last?  

E-print Network

For more than 20 years it has been debated if yield stress fluids are solid below the yield stress or actually flow; whether true yield stress fluids exist or not. Advocates of the true yield stress picture have demonstrated that the effective viscosity increases very rapidly as the stress is decreased towards the yield stress. Opponents have shown that this viscosity increase levels off, and that the material behaves as a Newtonian fluid of very high viscosity below the yield stress. In this paper, we demonstrate experimentally (on four different materials, using three different rheometers, five different geometries, and two different measurement methods) that the low-stress Newtonian viscosity is an artifact that arises in non steady state experiments. For measurements as long as 10,000 seconds we find that the value of the 'Newtonian viscosity' increases indefinitely. This proves that the yield stress exists and marks a sharp transition between flowing states and states where the steady state viscosity is infinite -a solid!

Peder CF Moller; Abdoulaye Fall; Daniel Bonn

2009-04-09

251

Find a Plastic Surgeon  

MedlinePLUS

... Corporate Opportunities The PSF About Us Find a Plastic Surgeon Please provide search terms. ZIP or City, ... Procedure Do Your Homework Find a board-certified plastic surgeon you can trust The ASPS find a ...

252

Clinical significance of translocation.  

PubMed Central

The gastrointestinal tract, besides being the organ responsible for nutrient absorption, is also a metabolic and immunological system, functioning as an effective barrier against endotoxin and bacteria in the intestinal lumen. The passage of viable bacteria from the gastrointestinal tract through the epithelial mucosa is called bacterial translocation. Equally important may be the passage of bacterial endotoxin through the mucosal barrier. This article reviews the evidence that translocation of both endotoxin and bacteria is of clinical significance. It summarises recent published works indicating that translocation of endotoxin in minute amounts is a physiological important phenomenon to boost the reticuloendothelial system (RES), especially the Kupffer cells, in the liver. Breakdown of both the mucosal barrier and the RES capacity results in systemic endotoxaemia. Systemic endotoxaemia results in organ dysfunction, impairs the mucosal barrier, the clotting system, the immune system, and depresses Kupffer cell function. If natural defence mechanisms such as lipopolysaccharide binding protein, high density lipoprotein, in combination with the RES, do not respond properly, dysfunction of the gut barrier results in bacterial translocation. Extensive work on bacterial translocation has been performed in animal models and occurs notably in haemorrhagic shock, thermal injury, protein malnutrition, endotoxaemia, trauma, and intestinal obstruction. It is difficult to extrapolate these results to humans and its clinical significance is not clear. The available data show that the resultant infection remains important in the development of sepsis, especially in the critically ill patient. Uncontrolled infection is, however, neither necessary nor sufficient to account for the development of multiple organ failure. A more plausible sequelae is that bacterial translocation is a later phenomenon of multiple organ failure, and not its initiator. It is hypothesized that multiple organ failure is more probably triggered by the combination of tissue damage and systemic endotoxaemia. Endotoxaemia, as seen in trauma patients especially during the first 24 hours, in combination with tissue elicits a systemic inflammation, called Schwartzmann reaction. Interferon gamma, a T cell produced cytokine, is thought to play a pivotal part in the pathogenesis of this reaction. This reaction might occur only if the endotoxin induced cytokines like tumour necrosis factor and interleukin 1, act on target cells prepared by interferon gamma. After exposure to interferon gamma target cells become more sensitive to stimuli like endotoxin, thus boosting the inflammatory cycle. Clearly, following this line of reasoning, minor tissue damage or retroperitoneal haematoma combined with systemic endotoxaemia could elicit this reaction. The clinically observed failure of multiple organ systems might thus be explained by the interaction of tissue necrosis and high concentrations of endotoxin because of translocation. Future therapeutic strategies could therefore focus more on binding endotoxin in the gut before the triggering event, for example before major surgery. Such a strategy could be combined with the start of early enteral feeding, which has been shown in animal studies to have a beneficial effect on intestinal mucosal barrier function and in traumatized patients to reduce the incidence of septic complications. PMID:8125386

Van Leeuwen, P A; Boermeester, M A; Houdijk, A P; Ferwerda, C C; Cuesta, M A; Meyer, S; Wesdorp, R I

1994-01-01

253

Significant Radionuclides Determination  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

Jo A. Ziegler

2001-07-31

254

Significant Reading Experiences of Superior English Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Superior high school students (975 finalists in the NCTE Achievement Awards Program) were surveyed to find what one book was most significant to each of them in their high school experiences, and the reason for the significance. In response to questionnaires, the students cited 416 different titles, 72% of which were novels. The top 10 books were…

Whitman, Robert S.

1964-01-01

255

Evolution of the Significant Figure Rules  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today, almost all introductory physics textbooks include standardized "rules" on how to find the number of significant figures in a calculated value. And yet, 30 years ago these rules were almost nonexistent. Why have we increased the role of significant figures in introductory classes, and should we continue this trend? A look back at…

Carter, Ashley R.

2013-01-01

256

The Problem Multiple Yield Surfaces  

E-print Network

The Problem Multiple Yield Surfaces Examples Visit us at: "www-civil.eng.ox.ac.uk" G.T. Houlsby &&& A model is defined in terms of multiple yield surfaces. The inner surfaces can move around and exhibit an infinite number of yield surfaces. 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 0 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 Shear strain Shearstress 0 0

Houlsby, Guy T.

257

Observation of B{sup +{yields}}D*{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}and evidence for B{sup +{yields}}D{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}at Belle  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of B{sup +{yields}}D*{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}and B{sup +{yields}}D{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}decays in a data sample of 657x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We find 446{sub -56}{sup +58} B{sup +{yields}}D*{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}events with a significance of 8.1 standard deviations, and 146{sub -41}{sup +42} B{sup +{yields}}D{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}events with a significance of 3.5 standard deviations. The latter signal provides the first evidence for this decay mode. The measured branching fractions are B(B{sup +{yields}}D*{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}})=(2.12{sub -0.27}{sup +0.28}(stat){+-}0.29(syst))% and B(B{sup +{yields}}D{sup 0{tau}+{nu}}{sub {tau}})=(0.77{+-}0.22(stat){+-}0.12(syst))%.

Bozek, A.; Rozanska, M.; Kapusta, P.; Matyja, A.; Ostrowicz, W.; Stypula, J. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Adachi, I.; Higuchi, T.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Sakai, Y.; Schuemann, J.; Trabelsi, K.; Uehara, S.; Uno, S. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

2010-10-01

258

Acid rain and seed yields reductions in corn  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seed yields were significantly reduced on corn (Zea mays L.) plants where the silks had been exposed to an episode of simulated acid rain at pH 3.6 as compared with yields on plants with silks exposed to simulated rain of pH 5.6. The reduction in yield appeared related to a decrease in pollen germination and tube elongation associated with acidic

L. E. Craker; P. F. Waldron

2009-01-01

259

Groundwater subsidies and penalties to corn yield  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Proper water management is critical to closing yield gaps (observed yield below potential yield) as global populations continue to expand. However, the impacts of shallow groundwater on crop production and surface processes are poorly understood. The presence of groundwater within or just below the root zone has the potential to cause (via oxygen stress in poorly drained soils) or eliminate (via water supply in dry regions) yield gaps. The additional water use by a plant in the presence of shallow groundwater, compared to free drainage conditions, is called the groundwater subsidy; the depth at which the groundwater subsidy is greatest is the optimal depth to groundwater (DTGW). In wet years or under very shallow water table conditions, the groundwater subsidy is likely to be negative due to increased oxygen stress, and can be thought of as a groundwater penalty. Understanding the spatial dynamics of groundwater subsidies/penalties and how they interact with weather is critical to making sustainable agricultural and land-use decisions under a range of potential climates. Here, we examine patterns of groundwater subsidies and penalties in two commercial cornfields in the Yahara River Watershed, an urbanizing agricultural watershed in south-central Wisconsin. Water table levels are generally rising in the region due to a long-term trend of increasing precipitation over the last several decades. Biophysical indicators tracked throughout both the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons show a strong response to variable groundwater levels on a field scale. Sections of the field with optimal DTGW exhibit consistently higher stomatal conductance rates, taller canopies and higher leaf area index, higher ET rates, and higher pollination success rates. Patterns in these biophysical lines of evidence allow us to pinpoint specific periods within the growing season that plants were experiencing either oxygen or water stress. Most importantly, groundwater subsidies and penalties are directly related to year-end yield. During 2012 (a drier-than-normal growing season) corn in parts of the field with shallow groundwater had significantly higher yields than the rest of the field, indicating that groundwater can provide significant yield benefits during drought. In contrast, during 2013 (a wetter-than-normal growing season) areas with the shallowest groundwater experienced total yield losses due to early-season groundwater flooding and oxygen stress. This demonstrates that the optimal DTGW for agricultural production is variable and depends on growing season weather conditions. The presence or absence of shallow groundwater is an important and dynamic feature of many agroecosystems, and should be considered when making both field- and watershed-scale management decisions.

Zipper, S. C.; Booth, E.; Loheide, S. P.

2013-12-01

260

Brazil soybean yield covariance model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model based on multiple regression was developed to estimate soybean yields for the seven soybean-growing states of Brazil. The meteorological data of these seven states were pooled and the years 1975 to 1980 were used to model since there was no technological trend in the yields during these years. Predictor variables were derived from monthly total precipitation and monthly average temperature.

Callis, S. L.; Sakamoto, C.

1984-01-01

261

Effect of agricultural drought on wheat yields in two selected districts located in the Czech Republic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Except for some areas located in Southern Moravia, the Czech Republic is not usually considered as an agricultural drought vulnerable area. This contribution presents an analysis of drought spells influence on wheat yields in two districts (located in the inner part of Bohemia) where a significant relation between yields and drought was found. Due to high spatial variability of drought, relatively small scale of district was selected. For the influence of drought on yields assessment, the following five indexes were tested: 1) Palmer Z-index, 2) precipitation-temperature ratio (P-T index), 3) precipitation-evapotranspiration ratio (P-E index), 4) soil storage calculated using hydrological balance model BILAN, and 5) available soil water for plants calculated using another simple balance model. For analysis of drought spells and yield relationship, different aggregation periods of input parameters were used for calculations of these indexes. According to observed data analysis, yields of wheat and the tested drought indexes are significantly correlated (p ? 0.05) in districts Louny and Rakovník. The highest correlations were found for monthly sums of P-T and P-E indexes in May in periods 1970-1980 and 1996 -2006. For these indexes, two-week step data aggregation led to lower correlation than monthly aggregation step. Two-week aggregations show also high values of correlation. Simply P-E and P-T indexes exhibit higher correlations with yields than other tested indexes. More complicated Palmer Z-index, soil storage or available soil water for plant need more input parameters for calculations and these indexes contain higher uncertainty in calculations. Despite the above findings, all tested indexes (usually calculated for May aggregations) showed high correlations with wheat yields. The P-E and P-T indexes in monthly step seem to be appropriate for the prediction of the potentially reduced wheat yields in tested districts. Maximum year-on-year decrease in wheat yield (probably caused primarily by drought in May) was approx. 1000 kg.ha-1 (decrease of 26 %) in Rakovník district (year 1976); and approx. 1300 kg.ha-1(decrease of 36 %), resp. 1550 kg.ha-1(39 %) in Louny district in 1976, resp. 1998. The research is supported by the Ministry of the Interior of the Czech Republic, project No. VG20102014038. Keywords: Available soil water, Central part of Bohemia, different drought indexes, decrease in crop yields, risk analysis

Ja?ka, Lukáš; Pavlásek, Jirka; Bašta, Petr

2014-05-01

262

Global Agriculture Yields and Conflict under Future Climate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aspects of climate have been shown to correlate significantly with conflict. We investigate a possible pathway for these effects through changes in agriculture yields, as predicted by field crop models (FAO's AquaCrop and DSSAT). Using satellite and station weather data, and surveyed data for soil and management, we simulate major crop yields across all countries between 1961 and 2008, and compare these to FAO and USDA reported yields. Correlations vary by country and by crop, from approximately .8 to -.5. Some of this range in crop model performance is explained by crop varieties, data quality, and other natural, economic, and political features. We also quantify the ability of AquaCrop and DSSAT to simulate yields under past cycles of ENSO as a proxy for their performance under changes in climate. We then describe two statistical models which relate crop yields to conflict events from the UCDP/PRIO Armed Conflict dataset. The first relates several preceding years of predicted yields of the major grain in each country to any conflict involving that country. The second uses the GREG ethnic group maps to identify differences in predicted yields between neighboring regions. By using variation in predicted yields to explain conflict, rather than actual yields, we can identify the exogenous effects of weather on conflict. Finally, we apply precipitation and temperature time-series under IPCC's A1B scenario to the statistical models. This allows us to estimate the scale of the impact of future yields on future conflict. Centroids of the major growing regions for each country's primary crop, based on USDA FAS consumption. Correlations between simulated yields and reported yields, for AquaCrop and DSSAT, under the assumption that no irrigation, fertilization, or pest control is used. Reported yields are the average of FAO yields and USDA FAS yields, where both are available.

Rising, J.; Cane, M. A.

2013-12-01

263

USING REMOTE SENSING TO IMPROVE OUR UNDERSTANDING OG YIELD VARIABILITY  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The increased availability of yield monitor data has demonstrated that crop production can vary significantly within a single field; however, identifying the source(s) of this variability is often a challenge. One noted advantage of remotely sensed data over yield-monitor mapping is that patterns in...

264

7 CFR 760.811 - Rates and yields; calculating payments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...FSA that show there is a significant difference in yield or value based on a distinct...use of the crop. Despite potential differences in yield or values, separate rates...established for crops with different cultural practices, such as those grown...

2014-01-01

265

7 CFR 760.811 - Rates and yields; calculating payments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...FSA that show there is a significant difference in yield or value based on a distinct...use of the crop. Despite potential differences in yield or values, separate rates...established for crops with different cultural practices, such as those grown...

2012-01-01

266

7 CFR 760.811 - Rates and yields; calculating payments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...FSA that show there is a significant difference in yield or value based on a distinct...use of the crop. Despite potential differences in yield or values, separate rates...established for crops with different cultural practices, such as those grown...

2010-01-01

267

7 CFR 760.811 - Rates and yields; calculating payments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...FSA that show there is a significant difference in yield or value based on a distinct...use of the crop. Despite potential differences in yield or values, separate rates...established for crops with different cultural practices, such as those grown...

2013-01-01

268

7 CFR 760.811 - Rates and yields; calculating payments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...FSA that show there is a significant difference in yield or value based on a distinct...use of the crop. Despite potential differences in yield or values, separate rates...established for crops with different cultural practices, such as those grown...

2011-01-01

269

TOWARDS STANDARDIZATION OF CSP YIELD ASSESSMENTS Richard Meyer  

E-print Network

. Three main fields are identified, which have significant impact on accuracy of potential electricity are relevant for energy yields. This includes the definition of appropriate rules for plant operation. A quasi-static of electricity yields ­ in contrast to the fossil power sector ­ still is challenging. For the more established

Heinemann, Detlev

270

Bioactive compounds, antioxidant and binding activities and spear yield of Asparagus officinalis L.  

PubMed

The aim of this investigation was to find a proper harvesting period and establishing fern number, which effects the spear yield, bioactive compounds and antioxidant activities of Asparagus officinalis L. Spears were harvested at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after sprouting. Control for comparison was used without harvest. Spears and total yield increased with prolonged spear harvest period. In harvest of 6 weeks long optimum spear yield was the highest and fern numbers were 5?~?8. Bioactive compounds (polyphenols, flavonoids, flavanols, tannins and ascorbic acid) and the levels of antioxidant activities by ferric-reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) and cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) assays in asparagus ethanol extracts significantly differed in the investigated samples and were the highest at 6 weeks harvest period (P?significantly increased with the increase of catalase (CAT). It was interesting to investigate in vitro how human serum albumin (HSA) interacts with polyphenols extracted from investigated vegetables. Therefore the functional properties of asparagus were studied by the interaction of polyphenol ethanol extracts with HSA, using 3D- FL. In conclusion, antioxidant status (bioactive compounds, binding and antioxidant activities) improved with the harvesting period and the first segment from spear tip. Appropriate harvesting is effective for higher asparagus yield and its bioactivity. PMID:24793354

Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yu, In Ho; Gorinstein, Shela; Bae, Jong Hyang; Ku, Yang Gyu

2014-06-01

271

Effect of damping and yielding on the seismic response of 3D steel buildings with PMRF.  

PubMed

The effect of viscous damping and yielding, on the reduction of the seismic responses of steel buildings modeled as three-dimensional (3D) complex multidegree of freedom (MDOF) systems, is studied. The reduction produced by damping may be larger or smaller than that of yielding. This reduction can significantly vary from one structural idealization to another and is smaller for global than for local response parameters, which in turn depends on the particular local response parameter. The uncertainty in the estimation is significantly larger for local response parameter and decreases as damping increases. The results show the limitations of the commonly used static equivalent lateral force procedure where local and global response parameters are reduced in the same proportion. It is concluded that estimating the effect of damping and yielding on the seismic response of steel buildings by using simplified models may be a very crude approximation. Moreover, the effect of yielding should be explicitly calculated by using complex 3D MDOF models instead of estimating it in terms of equivalent viscous damping. The findings of this paper are for the particular models used in the study. Much more research is needed to reach more general conclusions. PMID:25097892

Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Haldar, Achintya; Rodelo-López, Ramon Eduardo; Bojórquez, Eden

2014-01-01

272

Effect of Damping and Yielding on the Seismic Response of 3D Steel Buildings with PMRF  

PubMed Central

The effect of viscous damping and yielding, on the reduction of the seismic responses of steel buildings modeled as three-dimensional (3D) complex multidegree of freedom (MDOF) systems, is studied. The reduction produced by damping may be larger or smaller than that of yielding. This reduction can significantly vary from one structural idealization to another and is smaller for global than for local response parameters, which in turn depends on the particular local response parameter. The uncertainty in the estimation is significantly larger for local response parameter and decreases as damping increases. The results show the limitations of the commonly used static equivalent lateral force procedure where local and global response parameters are reduced in the same proportion. It is concluded that estimating the effect of damping and yielding on the seismic response of steel buildings by using simplified models may be a very crude approximation. Moreover, the effect of yielding should be explicitly calculated by using complex 3D MDOF models instead of estimating it in terms of equivalent viscous damping. The findings of this paper are for the particular models used in the study. Much more research is needed to reach more general conclusions. PMID:25097892

Haldar, Achintya; Rodelo-López, Ramon Eduardo; Bojórquez, Eden

2014-01-01

273

Designing a high-yielding maize ideotype for a changing climate in Lombardy plain (northern Italy).  

PubMed

The expected climate change will affect the maize yields in view of air temperature increase and scarce water availability. The application of biophysical models offers the chance to design a drought-resistant ideotype and to assist plant breeders and agronomists in the assessment of its suitability in future scenarios. The aim of the present work was to perform a model-based estimation of the yields of two hybrids, current vs ideotype, under future climate scenarios (2030-2060 and 2070-2100) in Lombardy (northern Italy), testing two options of irrigation (small amount at fixed dates vs optimal water supply), nitrogen (N) fertilization (300 vs 400 kg N ha(-1)), and crop cycle durations (current vs extended). For the designing of the ideotype we set several parameters of the ARMOSA process-based crop model: the root elongation rate and maximum depth, stomatal resistance, four stage-specific crop coefficients for the actual transpiration estimation, and drought tolerance factor. The work findings indicated that the current hybrid ensures good production only with high irrigation amount (245-565 mm y(-1)). With respect to the current hybrid, the ideotype will require less irrigation water (-13%, p<0.01) and it resulted in significantly higher yield under water stress condition (+15%, p<0.01) and optimal water supply (+2%, p<0.05). The elongated cycle has a positive effect on yield under any combination of options. Moreover, higher yields projected for the ideotype implicate more crop residues to be incorporated into the soil, which are positively correlated with the SOC sequestration and negatively with N leaching. The crop N uptake is expected to be adequate in view of higher rate of soil mineralization; the N fertilization rate of 400 kg N ha(-1) will involve significant increasing of grain yield, and it is expected to involve a higher rate of SOC sequestration. PMID:24913890

Perego, Alessia; Sanna, Mattia; Giussani, Andrea; Chiodini, Marcello Ermido; Fumagalli, Mattia; Pilu, Salvatore Roberto; Bindi, Marco; Moriondo, Marco; Acutis, Marco

2014-11-15

274

[Influence of fertilizers on yield and yield components of opium from Papaver somniferum Linn].  

PubMed

The effect of fertilizer on the yield and yield components of opium from Papaver somniferum L.cv.Ikkanshu were investigated from 1993 to 1995. The weight of opium per one capsule was tendency to increase in the order of peat moss > pulverized charcoal > compound fertilizer, but the differences among the results were not significant. Furthermore, no difference in the capsule weight per 100 m2 and the yields of opium and alkaloids per 100 m2 were detected. The significant difference was only observed when the data were compared among the weights and yields of different years. The difference among the yield of opium was mainly due to the weight of opium per one capsule. The weight of opium per one capsule showed a high correlation with capsule husk weight. The alkaloids contents in opium obtained with a different fertilizer application showed no difference. Morphine content at the first lancing was about 11%, and the value decreased with the order of lancing. On the contrary, the codeine and the thebaine content did not change during lancing and the value were 6-7% and 3%, respectively. The papaverine and the noscapine content decreased in the order of lancing. PMID:14740399

Kumagai, Takeo; Hatakeyama, Yoshio; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Shimomura, Koichiro

2003-01-01

275

Supplementary Materials for Reckoning wheat yield trends  

E-print Network

Supplementary Materials for Reckoning wheat yield trends Marena Lin and Peter Huybers Department decomposition of wheat yields 5 4.1 U.S. county-level wheat yields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4.2 French departmental wheat yields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5

Huybers, Peter

276

Find a Plume, Find a Vent  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This classroom activity gives students an appreciation for the difficulties deep sea researchers must face in order to find hydrothermal vents. Working in small groups, students can complete this Web investigation in a single class period. The printable handout includes a series of inquiry-based questions that prompt students to use what they already know about mid-ocean ridges to hypothesize about how scientists locate deep sea vents, detailed directions for a Web research project that takes them on a virtual deep sea journey investigating hydrothermal vents, and a worksheet that helps students apply their building knowledge to locate a vent in the northern Pacific Ocean.

277

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the  

E-print Network

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared See Also: Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, & Swan River Valleys Appendix 29 #12;Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared

278

Brazil wheat yield covariance model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model based on multiple regression was developed to estimate wheat yields for the wheat growing states of Rio Grande do Sul, Parana, and Santa Catarina in Brazil. The meteorological data of these three states were pooled and the years 1972 to 1979 were used to develop the model since there was no technological trend in the yields during these years. Predictor variables were derived from monthly total precipitation, average monthly mean temperature, and average monthly maximum temperature.

Callis, S. L.; Sakamoto, C.

1984-01-01

279

Climate variation explains a third of global crop yield variability  

PubMed Central

Many studies have examined the role of mean climate change in agriculture, but an understanding of the influence of inter-annual climate variations on crop yields in different regions remains elusive. We use detailed crop statistics time series for ~13,500 political units to examine how recent climate variability led to variations in maize, rice, wheat and soybean crop yields worldwide. While some areas show no significant influence of climate variability, in substantial areas of the global breadbaskets, >60% of the yield variability can be explained by climate variability. Globally, climate variability accounts for roughly a third (~32–39%) of the observed yield variability. Our study uniquely illustrates spatial patterns in the relationship between climate variability and crop yield variability, highlighting where variations in temperature, precipitation or their interaction explain yield variability. We discuss key drivers for the observed variations to target further research and policy interventions geared towards buffering future crop production from climate variability. PMID:25609225

Ray, Deepak K.; Gerber, James S.; MacDonald, Graham K.; West, Paul C.

2015-01-01

280

Climate variation explains a third of global crop yield variability.  

PubMed

Many studies have examined the role of mean climate change in agriculture, but an understanding of the influence of inter-annual climate variations on crop yields in different regions remains elusive. We use detailed crop statistics time series for ~13,500 political units to examine how recent climate variability led to variations in maize, rice, wheat and soybean crop yields worldwide. While some areas show no significant influence of climate variability, in substantial areas of the global breadbaskets, >60% of the yield variability can be explained by climate variability. Globally, climate variability accounts for roughly a third (~32-39%) of the observed yield variability. Our study uniquely illustrates spatial patterns in the relationship between climate variability and crop yield variability, highlighting where variations in temperature, precipitation or their interaction explain yield variability. We discuss key drivers for the observed variations to target further research and policy interventions geared towards buffering future crop production from climate variability. PMID:25609225

Ray, Deepak K; Gerber, James S; MacDonald, Graham K; West, Paul C

2015-01-01

281

Climate variation explains a third of global crop yield variability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many studies have examined the role of mean climate change in agriculture, but an understanding of the influence of inter-annual climate variations on crop yields in different regions remains elusive. We use detailed crop statistics time series for ~13,500 political units to examine how recent climate variability led to variations in maize, rice, wheat and soybean crop yields worldwide. While some areas show no significant influence of climate variability, in substantial areas of the global breadbaskets, >60% of the yield variability can be explained by climate variability. Globally, climate variability accounts for roughly a third (~32–39%) of the observed yield variability. Our study uniquely illustrates spatial patterns in the relationship between climate variability and crop yield variability, highlighting where variations in temperature, precipitation or their interaction explain yield variability. We discuss key drivers for the observed variations to target further research and policy interventions geared towards buffering future crop production from climate variability.

Ray, Deepak K.; Gerber, James S.; MacDonald, Graham K.; West, Paul C.

2015-01-01

282

FindSounds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

FindSounds.com is new search engine devoted to finding sample sounds and sound effects on the Web. The easy-to-use search feature offers variables including the file formats AIFF, .wav, and .au; mono or stereo; resolution; sample rate; and maximum file size up to two megabytes; as well as simply the subject of the sound. For those who might feel overwhelmed, there is also a partial directory of sounds in order to help users get started. After users find the sound-types they are looking for, they may also choose the Find Sounds Like This One button, which will find up to 100 audio files on the Web that most closely match the given file. For users aiming to find their own matches on the Web, the free downloadable Comparisonics Audio Player shows a colored sound wave image of the sound file. All or part of this soundwave may be highlighted and searched on the Web for matches.

283

Cotton Response to 1-Methylcyclopropene Under Different Light Regimes and Growth Stages: Lint Yield and Yield Components  

E-print Network

imposed at four developmental stages of growth: pinhead square (PHS), first flower (FF), peak flower (PF), and boll development (BD). Data pooled over both years indicated that there were no significant differences in yield for 1-MCP treatments; however...

Carden, Charles Warren

2010-10-12

284

Find a Partner  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Add the math of measurement to the tasks of lining up or finding a partner for an activity. Find a partner with the same length index finger as yours. Or, find a partner with the same arm span as yours. Everyone pairs up. Then, talk about how you found your partner: How did you line up your feet to see if they were the same size? Show everyone how you measured. Available as a web page and downloadable PDF.

2010-01-01

285

Climatic and technological ceilings for Chinese rice stagnation based on yield gaps and yield trend pattern analysis.  

PubMed

Climatic or technological ceilings could cause yield stagnation. Thus, identifying the principal reasons for yield stagnation within the context of the local climate and socio-economic conditions are essential for informing regional agricultural policies. In this study, we identified the climatic and technological ceilings for seven rice-production regions in China based on yield gaps and on a yield trend pattern analysis for the period 1980-2010. The results indicate that 54.9% of the counties sampled experienced yield stagnation since the 1980. The potential yield ceilings in northern and eastern China decreased to a greater extent than in other regions due to the accompanying climate effects of increases in temperature and decreases in radiation. This may be associated with yield stagnation and halt occurring in approximately 49.8-57.0% of the sampled counties in these areas. South-western China exhibited a promising scope for yield improvement, showing the greatest yield gap (30.6%), whereas the yields were stagnant in 58.4% of the sampled counties. This finding suggests that efforts to overcome the technological ceiling must be given priority so that the available exploitable yield gap can be achieved. North-eastern China, however, represents a noteworthy exception. In the north-central area of this region, climate change has increased the yield potential ceiling, and this increase has been accompanied by the most rapid increase in actual yield: 1.02 ton ha(-1) per decade. Therefore, north-eastern China shows a great potential for rice production, which is favoured by the current climate conditions and available technology level. Additional environmentally friendly economic incentives might be considered in this region. PMID:24130084

Zhang, Tianyi; Yang, Xiaoguang; Wang, Hesong; Li, Yong; Ye, Qing

2014-04-01

286

High-biomass sorghum yield estimate with aerial imagery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To reach the goals laid out by the U.S. Government for displacing fossil fuels with biofuels, high-biomass sorghum is well-suited to achieving this goal because it requires less water per unit dry biomass and can produce very high biomass yields. In order to make biofuels economically competitive with fossil fuels it is essential to maximize production efficiency throughout the system. The goal of this study was to use remote sensing technologies to optimize the yield and harvest logistics of high-biomass sorghum with respect to production costs based on spatial variability within and among fields. Specific objectives were to compare yield to aerial multispectral imagery and develop predictive relationships. A 19.2-ha high-biomass sorghum field was selected as a study site and aerial multispectral images were acquired with a four-camera imaging system on July 17, 2009. Sorghum plant samples were collected at predetermined geographic coordinates to determine biomass yield. Aerial images were processed to find relationships between image reflectance and yield of the biomass sorghum. Results showed that sorghum biomass yield in early August was closely related (R2 = 0.76) to spectral reflectance. However, in the late season the correlations between the biomass yield and spectral reflectance were not as positive as in the early season. The eventual outcome of this work could lead to predicted-yield maps based on remotely sensed images, which could be used in developing field management practices to optimize yield and harvest logistics.

Sui, Ruixiu; Hartley, Brandon E.; Gibson, John M.; Yang, Chenghai; Thomasson, J. Alex; Searcy, Stephen W.

2011-01-01

287

Find a Plume, Find a Vent  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This classroom activity will give students an appreciation for the difficulties deep sea researchers must face in order to find hydrothermal vents. Working in small groups, students can complete this Web investigation in a single class period. The printable six-page handout includes a series of inquiry-based questions that prompt students to use what they already know about mid-ocean ridges to hypothesize about how scientists locate deep sea vents. In addition, it has detailed directions for a Web research project that takes them on a virtual deep sea journey, investigating hydrothermal vents and a worksheet that helps students apply their knowledge to locate a vent in the northern Pacific Ocean.

288

"Clinical" Significance: "Clinical" Significance and "Practical" Significance are NOT the Same Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Clinical significance is an important concept in research, particularly in education and the social sciences. The present article first compares clinical significance to other measures of "significance" in statistics. The major methods used to determine clinical significance are explained and the strengths and weaknesses of clinical significance

Peterson, Lisa S.

2008-01-01

289

Trading forests for yields in the Peruvian Amazon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our knowledge of how agriculture expands, and the types of land it replaces, is remarkably limited across the tropics. Most remote-sensing studies focus on the net gains and losses in forests and agricultural land rather than the land-use transition pathways (Gibbs et al 2010). Only a handful of studies identify land sources for new croplands or plantations, and then only for farming systems aggregated together (e.g., Koh and Wilcove 2008, Morton et al 2006, Gibbs et al 2010). Gutiérrez-Vélez et al (2011), however, have taken a leap forward by tracking the different expansion pathways for smallholder and industrial oil palm plantations. Using a combination of Landsat, MODIS and field surveys, they investigate whether higher yields in new agricultural lands spare forests in the Peruvian Amazon and in a smaller focus area in the Ucayali region. Across the Peruvian Amazon, they show that between 2000 and 2010, new high-yield oil palm plantations replaced forests 72% of the time and accounted for 1.3% of total deforestation, with most expansion occurring after 2006. Gutiérrez-Vélez et al went further in the Ucayali region and compared land sources for new high-yield and low-yield plantations. Expansion of higher-yield agricultural lands should logically reduce the total area needed for production, thus potentially sparing forests. In the Ucayali focus area, expansion of high-yield oil palm did convert less total land area but more forest was cleared than with low-yield expansion. Smaller-scale plantations tended to expand into already cleared areas while industrial-scale plantations traded their greater yields for forests, leading to higher land-clearing carbon emissions per production unit (Gibbs et al 2008). Gutiérrez-Vélez et al show that higher yields may require less land for production but more forest may be lost in the process, and they emphasize the need for stronger incentives for land sparing. The potential land-saving nature of these high-yield plantations could be further analyzed by considering whether they help depress global prices, reducing incentives to expand elsewhere (Angelsen and Kaimowitz 2001). The significance of the study goes well beyond the bounds of Ucayli, and highlights risks to Amazonian forests from oil palm expansion (Butler and Laurance 2010). Oil palm is an astoundingly profitable and productive crop, with typical oil yields more than ten times that of soy. Some have even argued that oil palm is innately land sparing because it would take substantially more land for all other oil-bearing crops to provide the same output. However, most production gains from oil palm have occurred through increased area rather than increased yield, and in many cases expansion has been through forest clearing (Koh and Wilcove 2008, Gibbs et al 2010). The findings of Gutiérrez-Vélez et al (2011) are particularly significant considering that the booming palm oil sectors in Indonesia and Malaysia, which currently produce over 80% of the world's product, are facing a host of pressures that constrain future area expansion. Malaysia has little remaining land suited for plantations and Indonesia faces intensifying international scrutiny over the future of their forestlands. Consequently, the Amazon basin is widely considered the new frontier, with more than half of its forest area suitable for palm oil cultivation (Butler and Laurance 2010) and growing incentives from Brazil's Program for the Sustainable Production of Oil Palm, which aims to utilize degraded lands and spur reforestation efforts. Their results also illuminate another key issue, namely the constraints faced by large-scale producers when they seek to expand plantation area. Emerging demand-side conservation efforts, such as the Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), assume that already cleared and non-forested lands are freely available. Gutiérrez-Vélez et al (2011) hint at the obstacles to using such cleared lands, which is that they are inhabited and often have contested land tenure. We must carefully consider our consumption of these c

Gibbs, Holly

2012-03-01

290

Africa Region: Findings  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

_Findings_ reports on ongoing operational, economic, and sector work carried out by the World Bank and its member governments in the Africa Region. Currently, issues of agricultural extension in Madagascar, drought and Sub-Saharan African economies, and gender issues in Ethiopia are discussed in four Findings articles (Nos. 117-119).

291

Recent patterns of crop yield growth and stagnation.  

PubMed

In the coming decades, continued population growth, rising meat and dairy consumption and expanding biofuel use will dramatically increase the pressure on global agriculture. Even as we face these future burdens, there have been scattered reports of yield stagnation in the world's major cereal crops, including maize, rice and wheat. Here we study data from ?2.5 million census observations across the globe extending over the period 1961-2008. We examined the trends in crop yields for four key global crops: maize, rice, wheat and soybeans. Although yields continue to increase in many areas, we find that across 24-39% of maize-, rice-, wheat- and soybean-growing areas, yields either never improve, stagnate or collapse. This result underscores the challenge of meeting increasing global agricultural demands. New investments in underperforming regions, as well as strategies to continue increasing yields in the high-performing areas, are required. PMID:23250423

Ray, Deepak K; Ramankutty, Navin; Mueller, Nathaniel D; West, Paul C; Foley, Jonathan A

2012-01-01

292

Regressions by leaps and bounds and biased estimation techniques in yield modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. It was observed that OLS was not adequate as an estimation procedure when the independent or regressor variables were involved in multicollinearities. This was shown to cause the presence of small eigenvalues of the extended correlation matrix A'A. It was demonstrated that the biased estimation techniques and the all-possible subset regression could help in finding a suitable model for predicting yield. Latent root regression was an excellent tool that found how many predictive and nonpredictive multicollinearities there were.

Marquina, N. E. (principal investigator)

1979-01-01

293

Scintillation efficiency and ionization yield of liquid xenon for mono-energetic nuclear recoils down to 4 keV  

E-print Network

Liquid Xenon (LXe) is an excellent material for experiments designed to detect dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). A low energy detection threshold is essential for a sensitive WIMP search. The understanding of the relative scintillation efficiency (Leff) and ionization yield of low energy nuclear recoils in LXe is limited for energies below 10 keV. In this paper, we present new measurements that extend the energy down to 4 keV, finding that Leff decreases with decreasing energy. We also measure the quenching of scintillation efficiency due to the electric field in LXe, finding no significant field dependence.

A. Manzur; A. Curioni; L. Kastens; D. N. McKinsey; K. Ni; T. Wongjirad

2010-01-18

294

Down-regulation of Glucan, Water-Dikinase activity in wheat endosperm increases vegetative biomass and yield.  

PubMed

A novel mechanism for increasing vegetative biomass and grain yield has been identified in wheat (Triticum aestivum). RNAi-mediated down-regulation of Glucan, Water-Dikinase (GWD), the primary enzyme required for starch phosphorylation, under the control of an endosperm-specific promoter, resulted in a decrease in starch phosphate content and an increase in grain size. Unexpectedly, consistent increases in vegetative biomass and grain yield were observed in subsequent generations. In lines where GWD expression was decreased, germination rate was slightly reduced. However, significant increases in vegetative growth from the two leaf stage were observed. In glasshouse pot trials, down-regulation of GWD led to a 29% increase in grain yield while in glasshouse tub trials simulating field row spacing and canopy development, GWD down-regulation resulted in a grain yield increase of 26%. The enhanced yield resulted from a combination of increases in seed weight, tiller number, spikelets per head and seed number per spike. In field trials, all vegetative phenotypes were reproduced with the exception of increased tiller number. The expression of the transgene and suppression of endogenous GWD RNA levels were demonstrated to be grain specific. In addition to the direct effects of GWD down-regulation, an increased level of ?-amylase activity was present in the aleurone layer during grain maturation. These findings provide a potentially important novel mechanism to increase biomass and grain yield in crop improvement programmes. PMID:22672098

Ral, Jean-Philippe; Bowerman, Andrew F; Li, Zhongyi; Sirault, Xavier; Furbank, Robert; Pritchard, Jenifer R; Bloemsma, Marianne; Cavanagh, Colin R; Howitt, Crispin A; Morell, Matthew K

2012-09-01

295

Defining and managing sustainable yield.  

PubMed

Ground water resource management programs are paying increasing attention to the integration of ground water and surface water in the planning process. Many plans, however, show a sophistication in approach and presentation that masks a fundamental weakness in the overall analysis. The plans usually discuss issues of demand and yield, yet never directly address a fundamental issue behind the plan--how to define sustainable yield of an aquifer system. This paper points out a number of considerations that must be addressed in defining sustainable yield in order to make the definition more useful in practical water resource planning studies. These include consideration for the spatial and temporal aspects of the problem, the development of a conceptual water balance, the influence of boundaries and changes in technology on the definition, the need to examine water demand as well as available supply, the need for stakeholder involvement, and the issue of uncertainty in our understanding of the components of the hydrologic system. PMID:15584295

Maimone, Mark

2004-01-01

296

Stellar Yields and Chemical Evolution  

E-print Network

Several speakers at IAU Symposium #187 (Cosmic Chemical Evolution) alluded to the zeroth-order agreement between Type II supernovae (SNe) stellar yield compilations, as predicted by the models of those most responsible for driving progress in the field - i.e., Arnett (1991,1996); Maeder (1992); Woosley & Weaver (1995); Langer & Henkel (1995); Thielemann et al. (1996). It is important though for those entering (or indeed, already involved in!) the chemical evolution field to be cognizant of the fact that there are important first- and second-order differences between these compilations. In the next few pages, I provide a qualitative comparison of the currently available Type II SNe yield grids. The strengths and weaknesses of a given grid, demonstrated by comparing against relevant observations, are noted. Some simple chemical evolution models are shown which graphically demonstrate the effect of yield grid selection.

Brad K. Gibson

1997-12-31

297

Global crop yield losses from recent warming  

SciTech Connect

Global yields of the world-s six most widely grown crops--wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, sorghum--have increased since 1961. Year-to-year variations in growing season minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation explain 30% or more of the variations in yield. Since 1991, climate trends have significantly decreased yield trends in all crops but rice, leading to foregone production since 1981 of about 12 million tons per year of wheat or maize, representing an annual economic loss of $1.2 to $1.7 billion. At the global scale, negative impacts of climate trends on crop yields are already apparent. Annual global temperatures have increased by {approx}0.4 C since 1980, with even larger changes observed in several regions (1). While many studies have considered the impacts of future climate changes on food production (2-5), the effects of these past changes on agriculture remain unclear. It is likely that warming has improved yields in some areas, reduced them in others, and had negligible impacts in still others; the relative balance of these effects at the global scale is unknown. An understanding of this balance would help to anticipate impacts of future climate changes, as well as to more accurately assess recent (and thereby project future) technologically driven yield progress. Separating the contribution of climate from concurrent changes in other factors--such as crop cultivars, management practices, soil quality, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels--requires models that describe the response of yields to climate. Studies of future global impacts of climate change have typically relied on a bottom-up approach, whereby field scale, process-based models are applied to hundreds of representative sites and then averaged (e.g., ref 2). Such approaches require input data on soil and management conditions, which are often difficult to obtain. Limitations on data quality or quantity can thus limit the utility of this approach, especially at the local scale (6-8). At the global scale, however, many of the processes and impacts captured by field scale models will tend to cancel out, and therefore simpler empirical/statistical models with fewer input requirements may be as accurate (8, 9). Empirical/statistical models also allow the effects of poorly modeled processes (e.g., pest dynamics) to be captured and uncertainties to be readily quantified (10). Here we develop new, empirical/statistical models of global yield responses to climate using datasets on broad-scale yields, crop locations, and climate variability. We focus on global average yields for the six most widely grown crops in the world: wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, and sorghum. Production of these crops accounts for over 40% of global cropland area (11). 55% of non-meat calories, and over 70% of animal feed (12).

Lobell, D; Field, C

2006-06-02

298

The Air-Fluorescence Yield  

E-print Network

Detection of the air-fluorescence radiation induced by the charged particles of extensive air showers is a well-established technique for the study of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Fluorescence telescopes provide a nearly calorimetric measure of the primary energy. Presently the main source of systematic uncertainties comes from our limited accuracy in the fluorescence yield, that is, the number of fluorescence photons emitted per unit of energy deposited in the atmosphere by the shower particles. In this paper the current status of our knowledge on the fluorescence yield both experimental an theoretical will be discussed.

F. Arqueros; F. Blanco; D. Garcia-Pinto; M. Ortiz; J. Rosado

2008-07-30

299

Find a Free Clinic  

MedlinePLUS

... FIND A CLINIC DONATE NOW CONTACT - VOLUNTEER Mailing List Join Our Email List for Free NAFC Newsletters * Leave this field blank ... Issues Resources Clinic Resources Infographic Job Listings Journal List Partners About Us About the NAFC What is ...

300

Find a Cancer Center  

Cancer.gov

Find the locations of NCI-designated cancer centers by area, region, state, or name that includes contact information to help health care providers and cancer patients with referrals to clinical trials.

301

Find a Dentist  

MedlinePLUS

... information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Wednesday, April 01, 2015 About | Contact Find an ... more. Disclaimer of Liabilities The Academy of General Dentistry's (AGD) Web site provides a listing of members ...

302

Lasers, Let's Find 'Em!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students research particular types of lasers and find examples of how they are used in technology today. Teams present their findings by means of PowerPoint presentations, videos or brochures. The class takes notes on the presentations using a provided handout. This activity prepares students for the "go public" phase of the legacy cycle in which they solve the grand challenge by designing and producing a laser-based security system.

VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering,

303

ChemTeacher: Significant Figures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Significant Figures page includes resources for teaching students about understanding and using significant figures in calculations.

2012-07-19

304

Small Bowel Endoscopy Diagnostic Yield and Reasons of Obscure GI Bleeding in Chinese Patients  

PubMed Central

Aim. To investigate the diagnostic yield and etiologies of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) using capsule endoscopy (CE) or double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). Method. We studied the data of 532 consecutive patients with OGIB that were referred to Xinqiao Hospital in Chongqing from December 2005 to January 2012. A lesion that was believed to be the source of the bleeding (ulceration, mass lesion, vascular lesion, visible blood, inflammation, or others) was considered to be a positive finding. We analyzed the diagnostic yield of CE and SBE and the etiologies of OGIB. Result. CE and SBE have similar diagnostic yields, at 71.9% (196/231) and 71.8% (251/304), respectively. The most common etiology was erosions/ulceration (27.1%) followed by mass lesion (19.4%) and angiodysplastic/vascular lesions (13.9%). By stratified analysis, we found that erosions/ulceration (27.1%) was the most common etiology for the 21–40-year age group. Mass lesion was the most common etiology in the 41–60-year age group. However, in the >60 years age group, angiodysplastic/vascular lesions were significantly increased compared with the other groups, even though erosions/ulceration was most common. Conclusion. In this study, we found that CE and SBE have similar diagnostic yields and erosions/ulceration was the most common reason for OGIB, followed by mass lesion and angiodysplasias. PMID:25183969

He, Ya-Fei; Hao, Ning-Bo; Yang, Wu-Chen; Yang, Li; Liao, Zhong-Li; Fan, Chao-Qiang; Yu, Jin; Bai, Jian-Ying; Yang, Shi-Ming; Guo, Hong

2014-01-01

305

Search for new physics in B{yields}D*{tau}nu-bar {sub {tau}} decay  

SciTech Connect

B physics offers important tests of the Standard Model at low energies. Recently, BaBar observed significant deviations from the Standard Model expectations in the semileptonic B{yields}D{sup (*)}{tau}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays. Interestingly, the measured leptonic B{yields}{tau}{nu} branching fraction also deviates from CKM unitarity predictions. Motivated by these results we investigate the most general set of lowest dimensional effective operators leading to modifications of b{yields}c(u) (semi)tauonic transitions. Allowing for general flavor violation, we find that among possible operator structures, new contributions from right-right vector and right-left scalar quark currents provide viable explanations of the anomalies. In addition, we identify a number of B{yields}D*{tau}{nu}{sub {tau}} transition observables with the power to discriminate among the various effective operators' contributions. They are the differential decay rate, longitudinal D* polarization fraction, D*-{tau} opening angle asymmetry and the {tau} helicity asymmetry.

Fajfer, Svjetlana; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Nisandzic, Ivan [Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P. O. Box 3000, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia) and Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); J. Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P. O. Box 3000, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2012-10-23

306

Evaluation of a cotton stripper yield monitor  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The objective of this work was to evaluate the accuracy of a microwave sensor based yield monitor for measuring yield on a cotton stripper harvester and determine if the yield monitor can discriminate differences in yield to the same level as a reference scale system. A new yield monitor was instal...

307

Yield Analysis and Optimization Puneet Gupta  

E-print Network

Yield Analysis and Optimization Puneet Gupta Blaze DFM Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA puneet@watson.ibm.com In this chapter, we are going to discuss yield loss mechanisms, yield analysis and common physical design methods to improve yield. Yield is defined as the ratio of the number of products that can be sold to the number

Papadopoulou, Evanthia

308

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Western's Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II (Double-Circuiting a Portion of the Hoover-Mead No.5 and No.7 230-kV Transmission Lines with the Henderson-Mead No.1 230-kV Transmission Line, Clark County, Nevada)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Highway 93 (U.S. 93) Hoover Dam Bypass Project calls for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Western Area Power Administration (Western) to remove its Arizona and Nevada (A&N) Switchyard. As a result of this action, Western must reconfigure its existing electrical transmission system in the Hoover Dam area. Western proposes to double-circuit a portion of the Hoover-Mead No.5 and No.7 230-kV Transmission Lines with the Henderson-Mead No.1 Transmission Line (see Figure 1-1). Double-circuiting is the placement of two separate electrical circuits, typically in the form of three separate conductors or bundles of conductors, on the same set of transmission line structures. The old Henderson-Hoover 230-kV Transmission Line would become the new Henderson-Mead No.1 and would extend approximately eight miles to connect with the Mead Substation. Western owns, operates, and maintains the Hoover-Mead No.5 and No.7, and Henderson-Hoover electrical power transmission lines. Additionally, approximately 0.25 miles of new right-of-way (ROW) would be needed for the Henderson-Mead No.1 when it transfers from double-circuiting with the Hoover-Mead No.7 to the Hoover-Mead No.5 at the Boulder City Tap. The proposed project would also involve a new transmission line ROW and structures where the Henderson-Mead No.1 will split from the Hoover-Mead No.5 and enter the northeast corner of the Mead Substation. Lastly, Western has proposed adding fiber optic overhead ground wire from the Hoover Power Plant to the Mead Substation on to the Henderson-Mead No.1, Hoover-Mead No.5 and No.7 Transmission Lines. The proposed project includes replacing existing transmission line tower structures, installing new structures, and adding new electrical conductors and fiber optic cables. As a consequence of these activities, ground disturbance may result from grading areas for structure placement, constructing new roads, improving existing roads for vehicle and equipment access, and from installing structures, conductors, and fiber optic cables. Project construction activities would be conducted within the existing 200-foot transmission line ROW and 50-foot access road ROW, although new spur access roads could occur outside of existing ROWs. As lead Federal agency for this action under National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Western must ensure that adverse environmental effects on Federal and non-Federal lands and resources are avoided or minimized. This Environmental Assessment (EA) is intended to be a concise public document that assesses the probable and known impacts to the environment from Western's Proposed Action and alternatives, and reaches a conclusion about the significance of the impacts. This EA was prepared in compliance with NEPA regulations published by the Council on Environmental Quality (40 CFR 1500-1508) and implementing procedures of the Department of Energy (10 CFR 1021).

N /A

2003-10-27

309

Numerical Modeling for Yield Pillar Design: A Case Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two single-entry gateroad systems employing a yield pillar for bump control in a Chinese coal mine were introduced. The overburden depth of the longwall panels was approximately 390 m. When the width/height (W/H) ratio of the yield pillar was 2.67, coal bumps in the tailgate occurred in front of the longwall retreating face. However, in another panel, the coal bump was eliminated because the W/H ratio was reduced to 1.67. Under this condition, instrumentation results indicated that the roof-to-floor and rib-to-rib convergences reached 1,050 and 790 mm, respectively, during longwall retreat. The numerical model was used to back-analyze the two cases of yield pillar application in the hope to find the principle for yield pillar design. In order to improve the reliability of the numerical model, the strain-hardening gob and strain-softening pillar materials were meticulously calibrated, and the coal/rock interface strength was determined by laboratory direct shear tests. The results of the validated model indicate that if the W/H ratio of the yield pillar equals 1.67, the peak vertical stress in the panel rib (37.7 MPa) is much larger than that in the yield pillar (21.1 MPa); however, the peak vertical stress in the panel rib (30.87 MPa) is smaller than that in the yield pillar (36 MPa) when the W/H ratio of yield pillar is 2.67. These findings may be helpful to the design of yield pillars for bump control.

Li, Wenfeng; Bai, Jianbiao; Peng, Syd; Wang, Xiangyu; Xu, Ying

2015-01-01

310

Closing yield gaps through nutrient and water management.  

PubMed

In the coming decades, a crucial challenge for humanity will be meeting future food demands without undermining further the integrity of the Earth's environmental systems. Agricultural systems are already major forces of global environmental degradation, but population growth and increasing consumption of calorie- and meat-intensive diets are expected to roughly double human food demand by 2050 (ref. 3). Responding to these pressures, there is increasing focus on 'sustainable intensification' as a means to increase yields on underperforming landscapes while simultaneously decreasing the environmental impacts of agricultural systems. However, it is unclear what such efforts might entail for the future of global agricultural landscapes. Here we present a global-scale assessment of intensification prospects from closing 'yield gaps' (differences between observed yields and those attainable in a given region), the spatial patterns of agricultural management practices and yield limitation, and the management changes that may be necessary to achieve increased yields. We find that global yield variability is heavily controlled by fertilizer use, irrigation and climate. Large production increases (45% to 70% for most crops) are possible from closing yield gaps to 100% of attainable yields, and the changes to management practices that are needed to close yield gaps vary considerably by region and current intensity. Furthermore, we find that there are large opportunities to reduce the environmental impact of agriculture by eliminating nutrient overuse, while still allowing an approximately 30% increase in production of major cereals (maize, wheat and rice). Meeting the food security and sustainability challenges of the coming decades is possible, but will require considerable changes in nutrient and water management. PMID:22932270

Mueller, Nathaniel D; Gerber, James S; Johnston, Matt; Ray, Deepak K; Ramankutty, Navin; Foley, Jonathan A

2012-10-11

311

Over-reporting significant figures—a significant problem?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundExcessive use of significant figures in numerical data gives a spurious impression of laboratory imprecision to clinicians. We describe reporting practices in 24 Asia-Pacific laboratories, assess whether these reporting formats and those used in the literature can be justified based on actual laboratory performance and outline how to choose the appropriate number of significant places.

Robert C. Hawkins; Tony Badrick; Peter E. Hickman

2007-01-01

312

Natural variation in photosynthetic capacity, growth, and yield in 64 field-grown wheat genotypes  

PubMed Central

Increasing photosynthesis in wheat has been identified as an approach to enhance crop yield, with manipulation of key genes involved in electron transport and the Calvin cycle as one avenue currently being explored. However, natural variation in photosynthetic capacity is a currently unexploited genetic resource for potential crop improvement. Using gas-exchange analysis and protein analysis, the existing natural variation in photosynthetic capacity in a diverse panel of 64 elite wheat cultivars grown in the field was examined relative to growth traits, including biomass and harvest index. Significant variations in photosynthetic capacity, biomass, and yield were observed, although no consistent correlation was found between photosynthetic capacity of the flag leaf and grain yield when all cultivars were compared. The majority of the variation in photosynthesis could be explained by components related to maximum capacity and operational rates of CO2 assimilation, and to CO2 diffusion. Cluster analysis revealed that cultivars may have been bred unintentionally for desirable traits at the expense of photosynthetic capacity. These findings suggest that there is significant underutilized photosynthetic capacity among existing wheat varieties. Our observations are discussed in the context of exploiting existing natural variation in physiological processes for the improvement of photosynthesis in wheat. PMID:24963002

Driever, S. M.; Lawson, T.; Andralojc, P. J.; Raines, C. A.; Parry, M. A. J.

2014-01-01

313

Dawn: Find a Meteorite  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity introduces the importance of meteorites to the understanding of the origin of the Solar System. Finding meteorites can be difficult because most meteorites look like Earth rocks to the casual or untrained eye. Even to the trained eye, recognizing meteorites can be difficult. Since scientists believe that some meteorites are pieces of the asteroid Vesta, they may be very old remnants of the Solar System in its earliest stages. This activity provides information and insight that allows participants to share scientists' expectations, based on meteoritic samples, of what we will find when the NASA's Dawn Mission visits Vesta and Ceres.

John Risvey

2005-01-01

314

FindTutorials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

FindTutorials offers hundreds of tutorials and professional online IT and Softskills training courses that are available for a variety of disciplines and skill levels. In addition, it offers an online e-mail system, an IT job database with thousands of daily updated positions, and a host of additional resources on internet training skills. With simple to use navigational tools and a "sophisticated in-house developed site search", finding information to meet your requirements merely takes the click of a button.

315

Hydrostatic Stress Effect On the Yield Behavior of Inconel 100  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic stress has no effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Recent reexaminations of classical theory have revealed a significant effect of hydrostatic stress on the yield behavior of notched geometries. New experiments and nonlinear finite element analyses (FEA) of Inconel 100 (IN 100) equal-arm bend and double-edge notch tension (DENT) test specimens have revealed the effect of internal hydrostatic tensile stresses on yielding. Nonlinear FEA using the von Mises (yielding is independent of hydrostatic stress) and the Drucker-Prager (yielding is linearly dependent on hydrostatic stress) yield functions was performed. In all test cases, the von Mises constitutive model, which is independent of hydrostatic pressure, overestimated the load for a given displacement or strain. Considering the failure displacements or strains, the Drucker-Prager FEMs predicted loads that were 3% to 5% lower than the von Mises values. For the failure loads, the Drucker Prager FEMs predicted strains that were 20% to 35% greater than the von Mises values. The Drucker-Prager yield function seems to more accurately predict the overall specimen response of geometries with significant internal hydrostatic stress influence.

Allen, Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

2002-01-01

316

Finding Celebrities in Video  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT We present a system for finding celebrities in videos that uses face information in conjunction with text or speech. We achieve an approximate tripling of precision for searches over the use of transcripts or speech alone. Our work is motivated by the recent growth of personal video record- ing devices such as TiVo, which makes watching television more like

Nazli Ikizler; Jai Vasanth; Linus Wong; David Forsyth

2006-01-01

317

Finding Funding Opportunities  

E-print Network

Finding Funding Opportunities Using InfoEd's SPIN / SMARTS / GENIUS #12;Presented by ResearchEd Help Desk Administrator Ph: 212-342-0266 jp2473@columbia.edu #12;AGENDA What is GENIUS, SPIN and SMARTS General info on locating collaborators #12;What is GENIUS? Stands for Global Enterprise Network

Champagne, Frances A.

318

Finding Those Missing Links  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author stresses not to give up on a site when a URL returns an error message. Many web sites can be found by using strategies such as URL trimming, searching cached sites, site searching and searching the WayBack Machine. Methods and tips for finding web sites are contained within this article.

Gunn, Holly

2004-01-01

319

Shaky Word Find  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This student worksheet provides a word find puzzle as a review of scientific terms associated with tectonic activity. The resource is part of the teacher's guide accompanying the video, NASA SCI Files: The Case of the Shaky Quake. Lesson objectives supported by the video, additional resources, teaching tips and an answer sheet are included in the teacher's guide.

2012-08-03

320

Everybody Find a Rock  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, younger students will learn to recognize the properties of selected rocks. After participating in a read-aloud, the students will examine a variety of polished rocks, and take a walk outside to find their own rocks. As a closure activity, they are directed to explore other unique rocks at home and bring them in for class discussion and sorting.

321

Find International Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Find International Clinical Trials Search for Clinical Trials Search NCI's list of 8,000+ clinical trials now accepting participants, or use more search options to search the set of 19,000+ clinical trials that are no longer recruiting. Search Tip:The

322

Find far fish fast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Science author Nicholas Makris from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology helped to create the new fish finding tool. He says that the fish finder will help scientists better understand how fish behave. It will also let scientists calculate the number of fish in different parts of the ocean â?? a task that is incredibly difficult using current methods for fish counting.

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS; )

2006-02-02

323

Finding the Sweet Spot  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners will discover how to find the "sweet spots" on a baseball bat. Whenever an object is struck, it vibrates in response. These vibrations travel in waves up and down the length of the object. At one point, called "the node," the waves always cancel each other out. The "sweet spot" is actually a node!

2012-06-26

324

Computational Gene Finding  

E-print Network

Computational Gene Finding Dong Xu Digital Biology Laboratory Computer Science Department://digbio.missouri.edu #12; Protein-encoding genes and gene structures Computational models for coding regions;What Is a Gene? Definition: A gene is the nucleotide sequence that stores the information which

Cheng, Jianlin Jack

325

Increasing Crop Diversity Mitigates Weather Variations and Improves Yield Stability  

PubMed Central

Cropping sequence diversification provides a systems approach to reduce yield variations and improve resilience to multiple environmental stresses. Yield advantages of more diverse crop rotations and their synergistic effects with reduced tillage are well documented, but few studies have quantified the impact of these management practices on yields and their stability when soil moisture is limiting or in excess. Using yield and weather data obtained from a 31-year long term rotation and tillage trial in Ontario, we tested whether crop rotation diversity is associated with greater yield stability when abnormal weather conditions occur. We used parametric and non-parametric approaches to quantify the impact of rotation diversity (monocrop, 2-crops, 3-crops without or with one or two legume cover crops) and tillage (conventional or reduced tillage) on yield probabilities and the benefits of crop diversity under different soil moisture and temperature scenarios. Although the magnitude of rotation benefits varied with crops, weather patterns and tillage, yield stability significantly increased when corn and soybean were integrated into more diverse rotations. Introducing small grains into short corn-soybean rotation was enough to provide substantial benefits on long-term soybean yields and their stability while the effects on corn were mostly associated with the temporal niche provided by small grains for underseeded red clover or alfalfa. Crop diversification strategies increased the probability of harnessing favorable growing conditions while decreasing the risk of crop failure. In hot and dry years, diversification of corn-soybean rotations and reduced tillage increased yield by 7% and 22% for corn and soybean respectively. Given the additional advantages associated with cropping system diversification, such a strategy provides a more comprehensive approach to lowering yield variability and improving the resilience of cropping systems to multiple environmental stresses. This could help to sustain future yield levels in challenging production environments. PMID:25658914

Gaudin, Amélie C. M.; Tolhurst, Tor N.; Ker, Alan P.; Janovicek, Ken; Tortora, Cristina; Martin, Ralph C.; Deen, William

2015-01-01

326

Astrobiological Significance of Microbial Extremophiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The microflora of the cryosphere of planet Earth provides the best analogs for life forms that might be found in the permafrost or polar ice caps of Mars, near the surface of the cometary nuclei, or in the liquid water beneath and the ice crusts of icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. The importance of study alkaliphilic microorganisms for astrobiology was enhanced by the findings of abundant carbonates and carbonate globules rimmed with possibly biogenic magnetites in association with the putative microfossils in the ALH84001 meteorite. Although the ALH84001 "nanofossils" were to small and simple to be unambiguously recognized as biogenic, they stimulated Astrobiology research and studies of microbial extremophiles and biomarkers in ancient rocks and meteorites. Recent studies of CI and CM carbonaceous meteorites have resulted in the detection of the well-preserved mineralized remains of coccoidal and filamentous microorganisms in cyanobacterial mats. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis has shown anomalous biogenic element ratios clearly indicating they are not recent biological contaminants. This paper reviews microbial extremophiles in context of their significance to Astrobiology. The study of halophilic microorganisms was started from work with saline soils and lakes, and one of the record of good growth for Haloferax mediterranei was shown at 30 percent NaC1. Although alkali-tolerant nitrifying bacteria had previously been reported, the first described alkaliphilic microorganism was the bacterium Streptococcus faecalis. Halophilic and alkaliphilic forms are relevant to conditions that might be found in closed impact basins and craters on Mars filled with evaporite deposits. The first obligately acidophilic bacterium described was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxydans (formally Thiobacillus ferrooxidans). Later thermophilic lithotrophic acidophiles were found, and the hyperacidophilic moderately thermophilic species of the genus Picrophilus were found to grow at negative pH. The epoch of study of thermophilic microorganisms starts with the discovery of Thermus aquaticus, and presently the maximum temperature for growth at 113 C was found for Pyrolobus fumarii. The microorganisms capable of growth at high temperatures and in hyperacidic environments on Earth are good analogs for life that might be able to survive in hot acidic droplets in the upper regimes of the atmosphere of Venus. The study of barophiles was made possible by engineering achievements leading to the development of the submersible crafts used to study the Black Smokers of the Deep-sea Hydrothermal vents. The first described radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans can survive ionizing irradiation and other DNA-damaging assaults at doses that are lethal to all other organisms. These microbes are models for life that might endure high radiation environments in the ice near the surface of comets or on the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn and in the seafloor deep beneath icy crusts Europa and Enceladus. This paper presents ESEM and FESEM images showing intact microbes preserved in the deep ice cores extracted from just above Lake Vostok, Antarctica that are considered analogs for life forms that might survive on comets and icy moons.

Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

2007-01-01

327

Yield strength of zirconia and glass fibre-reinforced posts.  

PubMed

The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the yield strengths of glass fibre-reinforced composite (FRC) posts and zirconia dioxide ceramic (ZDC) posts. Tapered glass FRC posts (DentinPost) and ZDC posts (Cerapost) of three sizes in diameter (ISO 50, 90, 110) were used for bending tests. Conventional prefabricated titanium posts of the same sizes served as control groups. The 0.2% yield strengths (R(0.2)) were tested on a universal testing machine. As zirconia posts fractured before they were yielded 0.2%, the fracture strength instead of the yield strength was recorded for these posts. One-way and two-way anova and Bonferroni-Dunn's multiple comparison tests were performed for the statistical analysis. The mean 0.2% yield strengths of the posts were 27 +/- 1 N for glass fibre-reinforced posts and 58 +/- 4 N for zirconia posts of ISO 50 (control group: 54 +/- 3 N). For ISO 90 yield strengths of 52 +/- 4 N for glass fibre-reinforced posts, 117 +/- 20 N for zirconia posts and 117 +/- 11 N for the control group were obtained. For ISO 110 mean yield strengths amounted to 73 +/- 5 N for glass fibre-reinforced posts, 166 +/- 23 N for zirconia posts and 141 +/- 12 N for the control group. Significantly higher yield strength was recorded for the zirconia and the titanium posts compared with the glass fibre-reinforced posts for the tested ISO sizes. PMID:16409520

Pfeiffer, P; Schulz, A; Nergiz, I; Schmage, P

2006-01-01

328

Adaptive Significance of Floral Movement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since Darwin observed the reconfiguration of pollinia in orchards and referred to it as a function to reduce self-pollination, diverse floral movements have been investigated and various hypotheses have been proposed to explain their adaptive significance. However, adaptive significance of floral movement in some species has yet to be fully explained. Increasing evidence suggests that some floral movements, which have

Cheng-Jiang Ruan

2011-01-01

329

P Values and Statistical Significance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource, created by author Will G. Hopkins, defines what a p-value is, why .05 is significant, and when to use it. It also covers related topics such as one-tailed/two-tailed tests and hypothesis testing. Overall, this is a wonderful resource for students wanting to learn more about statistics, and more specially, significant testing.

Hopkins, Will G.

330

Significant Scales in Community Structure  

PubMed Central

Many complex networks show signs of modular structure, uncovered by community detection. Although many methods succeed in revealing various partitions, it remains difficult to detect at what scale some partition is significant. This problem shows foremost in multi-resolution methods. We here introduce an efficient method for scanning for resolutions in one such method. Additionally, we introduce the notion of “significance” of a partition, based on subgraph probabilities. Significance is independent of the exact method used, so could also be applied in other methods, and can be interpreted as the gain in encoding a graph by making use of a partition. Using significance, we can determine “good” resolution parameters, which we demonstrate on benchmark networks. Moreover, optimizing significance itself also shows excellent performance. We demonstrate our method on voting data from the European Parliament. Our analysis suggests the European Parliament has become increasingly ideologically divided and that nationality plays no role. PMID:24121597

Traag, V. A.; Krings, G.; Van Dooren, P.

2013-01-01

331

Pulmonary radiological findings in hepatoma.  

PubMed

Pulmonary radiological features of 27 patients with a diagnosis of hepatoma were reviewed and compared with 64 controls. Coin shadows, nodular, lymphangitic or hilar node metastases were observed in 50% of the hepatoma cases. Other radiological pulmonary findings in hepatoma included statistically significant elevation of the right hemidiaphragm, double contour of the diaphragmatic silhouette and discoid atelectasis. Left hemidiaphragm changes may occur with left lobe involvement. Double contour of the crest of the diaphragm appeared to be specific and common in hepatoma in this African population. Doming of the diaphragm was not specific to hepatoma. PMID:6317274

Amene, P C; Mbonu, O O; Umerah, B C

1984-01-01

332

An evolutionary yield function based on Barlat 2000 yield function for the superconducting niobium sheet  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities are widely used in high-energy physics to accelerate particle beams in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities is affected by the microstructure and purity of the niobium sheet, surface quality, geometry, etc. Following optimum strain paths in the forming of these cavities can significantly control these parameters. To select these strain paths, however, information about the mechanical behavior, microstructure, and formability of the niobium sheet is required. In this study the Barlat 2000 yield function has been used as a yield function for high purity niobium. Results from this study showed that, due to intrinsic behavior, it is necessary to evolve the anisotropic coefficients of Barlat's yield function in order to properly model the plastic behavior of the niobium sheet. The accuracy of the newly developed evolutionary yield function was verified by applying it to the modeling of the hydrostatic bulging of the niobium sheet. Also, in a separate attempt crystal plasticity finite element method was use to model the behavior of the polycrystalline niobium sheet with a particular initial texture.

Darbandi, Payam; Pourboghrat, Farhang [Mechanical Engineering Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

2011-08-22

333

Yield Performance of Oyster Mushroom on Different Substrates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Investigations on the cultivation of oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus (local & exotic strains) and P. sajarcaju were conducted to find out the growth and yield performance on different substrates. Results regarding the time required for completion of spawn running, formation of pin-heads and maturation of fruiting bodies on different substrates showed that in all the three cases, they appeared earlier

MUHAMMAD IQBAL; C. H. ABDUL RAUF; M. IQBAL SHEIKH

334

Predicting Sustainable Retirement Withdrawal Rates Using Valuation and Yield Measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study attempts to quantify whether a 4 percent withdrawal rate can still be considered as safe for U.S. retirees in recent years when earnings valuations have been at historical highs and the dividend yield has been at historical lows. We find that the traditional 4 percent withdrawal rule is likely to fail for recent retirees. The maximum sustainable withdrawal

Wade Donald Pfau

2010-01-01

335

The effect of subsoiling on soil resistance and cotton yield  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soil compaction occurs due to heavy wheeling or repetitive tillage in the field. Soil compaction changes the soil physical parameters and water infiltration that cause reduction in the crop yield. Proper subsoiling alleviates the negative effect of soil compaction. The objectives of the research was to examine the effects of subsoiling on the resistance of the soil and to find

Ibrahim Akinci; Engin Cakir; Mehmet Topakci; Murad Canakci; Onal Inan

2004-01-01

336

Temporal associations between low body condition, lameness and milk yield in a UK dairy herd.  

PubMed

Previous work has hypothesised that cows in low body condition become lame. We tested this in a prospective longitudinal study. Body condition score (BCS), causes of lameness and milk yield were collected from a 600-cow herd over 44-months. Mixed effect binomial models and a continuous outcome model were used to investigate the associations between lameness, BCS and milk yield. In total, 14,320 risk periods were obtained from 1137 cows. There were 1510 lameness treatments: the most common causes of lameness were sole ulcer (SU) (39%), sole haemorrhage (SH) (13%), digital dermatitis (DD) (10%) and white line disease (WLD) (8%). These varied by year and year quarter. Body condition was scored at 60-day intervals. BCS ranged from 1 to 5 with a mean of 2.5, scores were higher in very early lactation but varied widely throughout lactation; approximately 45% of scores were <2.5. The key finding was that BCS<2.5 was associated with an increased risk of treatment for lameness in the following 0-2 months and >2-4 months for all causes of lameness and also specifically for SU/WLD lameness. BCS<2.5 was associated with an increased risk of treatment for SH in the following 0-2 months but not >2-4 months. There was no such association with DD. All lameness, SU/WLD, SH and DD were significantly more likely to occur in cows that had been lame previously, but the effect of BCS was present even when all repeat cases of lameness were excluded from the analysis. Milk yield was significantly higher and fell in the month before treatment in cows lame with SU/WLD but it was not significantly higher for cows that were treated for DD compared with non-lame cows. These findings support the hypothesis that low BCS contributes to the development of horn related claw lameness but not infectious claw diseases in dairy cows. One link between low BCS and lameness is a thin digital cushion which has been proposed as a trigger for claw horn disease. Cows with BCS 2 produced more milk than cows with BCS 2.5, however, this was only approximately 100 kg difference in yield over a 305-day lactation. Given the increased risk of lameness in cows with BCS 2, the direct costs of lameness and the small variability in milk yield by BCS, preventing cows from falling to BCS<2.5 would improve cow welfare and be economically beneficial. PMID:24183787

Green, L E; Huxley, J N; Banks, C; Green, M J

2014-01-01

337

59 FR- Environmental Assessment: Finding of No Significant Impact and Notice of Opportunity for Hearing...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Game and Fish Research Laboratory in Laramie. The research facility is capable of supporting parasite, disease, nutrition, anatomy, physiology, ecology, management, research technique, and toxicology projects. All of these areas are important in...

1994-02-10

338

77 FR 76050 - Draft Environmental Assessment and Preliminary Finding of No Significant Impact Concerning a...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...support of a new animal drug application (NADA) concerning a genetically engineered...draft EA prepared by FDA in support of an NADA associated with AQUADVANTAGE Salmon, a...facilities specified in the sponsor's NADA. To encourage public participation...

2012-12-26

339

77 FR 41774 - Notice of Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...storage building at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Kesselring...platforms are located at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Kesselring...Temporary Radiological Work Structure Alternative 3--Continue...Temporary Radiological Work Structure, and a No Action...

2012-07-16

340

MD Anderson study finds tamoxifen causes significant side effects in male breast cancer patients:  

Cancer.gov

About half of male breast cancer patients who take the drug tamoxifen to prevent their disease from returning report side effects such as weight gain and sexual dysfunction, which prompts more than 20 percent of them to discontinue treatment, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

341

76 FR 65541 - Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Related to Exemption From Certain...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...NRC-2011-0244] Environmental Assessment...Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Environmental assessment...Materials and Environmental Management...Nuclear Regulatory...

2011-10-21

342

10 CFR 51.119 - Publication of finding of no significant impact; distribution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Section 51.119 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING AND RELATED REGULATORY FUNCTIONS National Environmental Policy Act-Regulations...

2010-01-01

343

10 CFR 51.33 - Draft finding of no significant impact; distribution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Section 51.33 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING AND RELATED REGULATORY FUNCTIONS National Environmental Policy Act-Regulations...

2010-01-01

344

7 CFR Exhibit I to Subpart G of... - Finding of No Significant Environmental Impact  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...under Public Law 103-354 environmental reviewer. After reviewing...Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not necessary. I also...status of compliance with the environmental laws and requirements...

2014-01-01

345

75 FR 76496 - Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc.; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Exemption From a Requirement To Measure the Uranium Element and Isotopic Content of Special...exemption from a requirement to measure the uranium element and isotopic content of certain...is authorized to blend highly enriched uranium with natural uranium and manufacture...

2010-12-08

346

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact - Mckay Bypass Canal Extension  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1262) to extend the McKay Bypass Canal on the east side of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), located north of Golden, Colorado. The McKay Bypass Canal Extension (Extension) is needed to route water from the existing canal around the Walnut Creek drainage, thus preventing potential co-mingling of Broomfield city water (collected from the Coal Creek drainage) with Site runoff water. The EA describes and analyzes the environmental effects of the Proposed Action (using a buried pipeline for the extension), and the alternatives of taking no action, using an open ditch for the extension, and using an aboveground pipeline for the extension. The EA was the subject of a public comment period from July 22 to August 6, 1998. Written comments regarding the EA were received from the City of Broomfield and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

N /A

1998-09-01

347

A Visitor's Guide to Effect Sizes – Statistical Significance Versus Practical (Clinical) Importance of Research Findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effect Sizes (ES) are an increasingly important index used toquantify the degree of practical significanceof study results. This paper gives anintroduction to the computation andinterpretation of effect sizes from theperspective of the consumer of the researchliterature. The key points made are:1. ES is a useful indicator of the practical(clinical) importance of research resultsthat can be operationally defined frombeing ``negligible'' to

Mohammadreza Hojat; Gang Xu

2004-01-01

348

Intriguingly, they find that flow beneath the Mediterranean region is significantly affected  

E-print Network

-mail: wortel@geo.uu.nl 1. Faccenna, C. & Becker, T. W. Nature465,602­605 (2010). 2. Nolet, G. ABreviaryofSeismicTomography:Imagingthe InterioroftheEarthandSun(Cambridge Univ. Press, 2008). 3. Bijwaard, H., Spakman, W. & Engdahl, E. R. J (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1999). 5. Wortel, M. J. R. & Spakman, W. Science 290, 1910­1917 (2000). 6. Lithgow

Kravtsov, Andrey

349

76 FR 80366 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Elimination System (NPDES) General Permit for Discharges...associated with stormwater runoff from construction...and to provide permit coverage to eligible...where EPA is the NPDES permitting authority...System general permit for stormwater discharges...

2011-12-23

350

75 FR 43225 - Finding of No Significant Impact: San Diego-Tijuana Airport Cross Border Facility  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...requires a Presidential permit under Executive Order...amended Presidential Permit and additional NEPA...that receive on-site stormwater runoff and direct it...Elimination System (NPDES), Clean Water Act...issuance of a Presidential permit authorizing the...

2010-07-23

351

75 FR 63519 - Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Assessment and Draft Finding of No Significant...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Category I nuclear fuel fabrication facility...and any reasonable alternatives. Based on the Draft...production of reactor fuel for government operations...staff analyzed two alternatives: (1) The no-action...NFS's nuclear fuel fabrication facility...proposed action and its alternatives. Based on...

2010-10-15

352

75 FR 34151 - Availability: Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact; Modoc...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Migratory Bird Conservation Act (16...fish and wildlife- oriented...and for the conservation of endangered...analysis of impacts on the human environment...National Wildlife Refuge System...management, conservation, legal...

2010-06-16

353

78 FR 28873 - Availability of Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the Proposed Modification of the Bayonne Bridge Across the Kill Van Kull Between Bayonne...proposed modification of the historic Bayonne Bridge across the Kill Van Kull between Bayonne...Impact (FONSI). Because the Bayonne Bridge is a structure over navigable waters...

2013-05-16

354

Finding of no significant impact for the State Energy Conservation Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA), DOE/EA 1068, to assess the environmental impacts associated with the State Energy Conservation Program (SECP). DOE previously funded SECP projects under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA). The State Energy Efficiency Programs Improvements Act of 1990 (SEEPIA) and the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) amended EPCA to broaden the range of state initiatives qualifying for Federal assistance under the SECP. The PEA presents a general analysis of the potential environmental effects associated with broad types of projects that can be funded under the SECP. It does not analyze specific environmental effects or alternatives associated with individual energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy projects. Individual actions are to be evaluated in detail on a project-by-project basis to determine whether their impacts fall within the bounding analysis of the impacts analyzed in the SECP PEA.

NONE

1996-10-01

355

Protected Area Reconfiguration Project. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact  

SciTech Connect

DOE has decided to consolidate, process, and store Category I and II Special Nuclear Material (SNM) in Building 371 at Rocky Flats, in order to improve safeguards and security and to reduce baseline facility and personnel costs. Once all SNM in consolidated into this building, maintaining the full 200-acre protected area would no longer be necessary, and the protected area (PA) could be reconfigured to include only the protection requirements necessary for Building 371. DOE Environmental Assessment 1132 has been written to evaluate options for reconfiguration of the PA; it addressed potential environmental impacts resulting from construction of fence alternatives. Possible routes for the new fence section were examined for environmental impact, feasibility, cost, and complexity. A number of the alternatives, including the proposed action, would impact wetlands.

NONE

1995-12-01

356

Environmental assessment, finding of no significant impact, and response to comments. Radioactive waste storage  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site), formerly known as the Rocky Flats Plant, has generated radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste (waste with both radioactive and hazardous constituents) since it began operations in 1952. Such wastes were the byproducts of the Site`s original mission to produce nuclear weapons components. Since 1989, when weapons component production ceased, waste has been generated as a result of the Site`s new mission of environmental restoration and deactivation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of buildings. It is anticipated that the existing onsite waste storage capacity, which meets the criteria for low-level waste (LL), low-level mixed waste (LLM), transuranic (TRU) waste, and TRU mixed waste (TRUM) would be completely filled in early 1997. At that time, either waste generating activities must cease, waste must be shipped offsite, or new waste storage capacity must be developed.

NONE

1996-04-01

357

76 FR 74069 - Central Utah Project Completion Act; Finding of No Significant Impact Associated With the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...operation of a temporary water- delivery system in the...emergency that affects the water supply to the Jordanelle Special...District (JSSD) Keetley Water Treatment Plant at Jordanelle...Director, Central Utah Project Completion Act,...

2011-11-30

358

75 FR 63518 - Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...License Amendment No. 61 for Rio Algom Mining LLC, Ambrosia Lake, NM--SUA-1473...License SUA-1473 issued to Rio Algom Mining LLC (Rio Algom, or the Licensee) to...Management System (ADAMS), which provides text and image files of NRC's public...

2010-10-15

359

76 FR 65753 - Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Related to Exemption of Material...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Regarding this material, WEC seeks approval...former fuel cycle facility located in Festus...the site. The facility is now referred...Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C disposal facility located near...special nuclear material it seeks to...

2011-10-24

360

76 FR 30639 - Final Environmental Assessment and Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact; Giant Miscanthus...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...pests and diseases; seed sterility; species of...protected species; water quality; and water use. The...membership through the Ohio Seed Improvement Association's Quality Assurance program. Initiate a seed sampling program to...

2011-05-26

361

76 FR 66334 - Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed License...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...store, use, and ship special nuclear material enriched up to 100...SMALL. Accidents. Waste Management...SMALL to MODERATE. Accidents. Waste Management...of October, 2011. For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission....

2011-10-26

362

Venous Ultrasound Testing for Suspected Thrombosis: Incidence of Significant Non-Thrombotic findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Duplex ultrasound (US) is used to “rule out” deep venous thrombosis (DVT), but can also diagnose other causes of leg pain or swelling in Emergency Department (ED) patients. Recent literature suggests that US imaging is unnecessary among patients with low or moderate clinical probability of DVT with a normal D-dimer. We attempted to determine the incidence of clinically important incidental

Mark E. Sutter; Samuel D. Turnipseed; Deborah B. Diercks; Peter Samuel; Richard H. White

2009-01-01

363

77 FR 25131 - Turning Point Solar LLC: Notice of Finding of No Significant Impact  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...INFORMATION: Turning Point Solar proposes to construct a 49.9 MW solar generating facility in Brookfield...photovoltaic panels mounted on fixed solar racking equipment and the construction...land owned by Columbus Southern Power Company and Ohio Power...

2012-04-27

364

76 FR 187 - Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Final Finding of No Significant Impact for Exemptions...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...No. 2 Hope Creek Generating Station, Unit Nos. 1 and 2 Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit Nos. 1, 2 and 3 James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Plant Joseph M. Farley Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 Millstone Power Station, Unit Nos. 1, 2, and 3...

2011-01-03

365

78 FR 17383 - Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment and Draft Finding of No Significant Impact...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...no-action alternative. Based on the...the EA, DLA Energy has determined...of the EA. Alternatives Considered: The EA for DLA Energy's Mobility...market, and DLA Energy's continued...and approve alternative fuels,...

2013-03-21

366

76 FR 60557 - Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for a License Amendment to...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Materials License No. SNM-33; Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, Hematite Decommissioning...number SNM-33, issued to Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC (WEC) to authorize decommissioning...radioactively contaminated material by rail car to an offsite facility located in...

2011-09-29

367

78 FR 4134 - Availability of the Draft Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Programmatic Environmental...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...and reorganize remaining BCTs by adding an additional combat maneuver battalion and other units. The PEA also analyzes a No Action...also restructure remaining BCTs by adding an additional combat maneuver battalion and/or an engineer battalion. Force...

2013-01-18

368

78 FR 75370 - Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for Flood...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Control Improvements to the Rio Grande Canalization Project in Vado, New Mexico; Notice...Control Improvements to the Rio Grande Canalization Project in Vado, New Mexico are available...the Rio Grande river channel in the Canalization Project Levee System in a 1.08...

2013-12-11

369

76 FR 19794 - Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...tritium) and carbon-14 by incineration. The licensee also disposed of wastes containing phosphorus-32, sulfur-35, and iodine-125 via incinerator after the radioisotopes were allowed to decay in storage. The licensee's submittal included...

2011-04-08

370

77 FR 49457 - Availability of the Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...form and function of the Rio Grande floodplain that...tracts of federal lands (25.85 ac USIBWC and 5...RIPARIAN HABITATS ALONG THE RIO GRANDE LEAD AGENCY United...Tamarix chinensis) on a 25.85 acre parcel of USIBWC land along the Rio Grande in Selden...

2012-08-16

371

78 FR 21919 - Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment for Army 2020...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Environmental Assessment for Army 2020 Force Structure Realignment AGENCY...FNSI) for implementation of force structure realignment to reduce...Environmental Assessment for Army 2020 Force Structure Realignment (PEA...Chief of Staff of the Army, G-3/5/7 has signed the...

2013-04-12

372

78 FR 50026 - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Loan Program Finding of No Significant Impact  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...7 CFR part 1710 by adding a new subpart H entitled ``Energy Efficiency and Conservation...procedures specific to loans for a new Energy Efficiency and Conservation...persons in a rural area. Certain financing actions taken by RUS are...

2013-08-16

373

21 CFR 25.51 - Environmental assessments and findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the EA to the extent possible. (b) FONSI's and EA's will be available to the...state that no EIS is necessary and that the FONSI and the EA are available for public...state that no EIS is necessary and that the FONSI and the EA are available upon request...

2010-04-01

374

21 CFR 25.51 - Environmental assessments and findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...the EA to the extent possible. (b) FONSI's and EA's will be available to the...state that no EIS is necessary and that the FONSI and the EA are available for public...state that no EIS is necessary and that the FONSI and the EA are available upon request...

2012-04-01

375

21 CFR 25.51 - Environmental assessments and findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the EA to the extent possible. (b) FONSI's and EA's will be available to the...state that no EIS is necessary and that the FONSI and the EA are available for public...state that no EIS is necessary and that the FONSI and the EA are available upon request...

2013-04-01

376

21 CFR 25.51 - Environmental assessments and findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...the EA to the extent possible. (b) FONSI's and EA's will be available to the...state that no EIS is necessary and that the FONSI and the EA are available for public...state that no EIS is necessary and that the FONSI and the EA are available upon request...

2014-04-01

377

21 CFR 25.51 - Environmental assessments and findings of no significant impact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...the EA to the extent possible. (b) FONSI's and EA's will be available to the...state that no EIS is necessary and that the FONSI and the EA are available for public...state that no EIS is necessary and that the FONSI and the EA are available upon request...

2011-04-01

378

Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

1996-08-01

379

78 FR 70529 - Notice of Availability for the Final Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding No Significant...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Research Service Notice of Availability for the...Impact (FONSI) for the Cotton Quality Research Station Land Transfer AGENCY: Agricultural Research Service, USDA. ACTION:...

2013-11-26

380

78 FR 65607 - Availability of the Final Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Research Service Availability of the Final Environmental...FONSI) of the Kika de la Garza Subtropical Research Center (KSARC) AGENCY: Agricultural Research Service, USDA. ACTION:...

2013-11-01

381

75 FR 6067 - Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Impact for License Amendment for Revised Groundwater Protection Standards, Western Nuclear...Inc. (WNI), to authorize revised groundwater protection standards for its facility...license amendment request for revised groundwater protection standards. On [[Page...

2010-02-05

382

77 FR 48131 - Draft Finding of No Significant Impact and Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Limiting the consumption of freshwater resources and returning water back to the same watershed so as not to deplete the groundwater and surface water resources of that region in quantity or quality; and (3) Reducing, reusing, and recovering waste...

2012-08-13

383

Kalispell Maintenance Headquarters Project : Environmental Assessment and Findings of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect

The facilities needed to maintain and repair Bonneville Power Administration (BPA`s) electrical equipment in northwest Montana are currently in two locations: A maintenance headquarters at the Kalispell Substation, and a temporary leased facility south of Kalispell. The present situation is not efficient. There is not enough space to accommodate the equipment needed at each site, and coordination and communication between the two sites is difficult. Also, two sites means duplication of equipment and facilities. BPA needs a single, centralized facility that would efficiently accommodate all the area`s maintenance activities and equipment. BPA proposes to build a maintenance headquarters facility consisting of 2 to 4 single-story buildings totaling about 35,000 square feet (office spaces and workshop areas); an open-ended vehicle storage building (carport style); a fenced-in storage year; a storage building for flammables, herbicides, and hazardous wastes; and a parking lot. The facility would require developing about 6 to 10 acres of land. Two sites are being considered for the proposed project (see the attached map for locations). This report is the environmental assessment of the two options.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-12-01

384

Finding a Needle in a Haystack: Pinpointing Significant BGP Routing Changes in an IP Network  

E-print Network

, generate a large number of up- date messages, affect changes that affect how traffic trav- els to destinations in other Autonomous Systems (ASes). Despite data is very large and extract- ing the important information is challenging. In this pa- per, we

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

385

75 FR 81316 - Detroit Edison Company; FERMI 2; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...swept across the Fermi 2 property. At 0253 hours, the Shift Manager declared an Unusual Event based on reports...buildings or the site property. Therefore, no changes...System (ADAMS) Public Electronic Reading Room on the...

2010-12-27

386

77 FR 25209 - Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for Exemption Request for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Exemption Request for Franciscan St. Anthony Health--Crown Point, Crown Point, IN AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission...13-15933-01 issued to Franciscan St. Anthony Health--Crown Point, Crown Point, Indiana. The license...

2012-04-27

387

76 FR 71619 - Availability of the Final Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...for an experimental permit from Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX...Program Lead, Office of Commercial Space Transportation, Federal Aviation...Glenn H. Rizner, Deputy Manager, Space Transportation Development...

2011-11-18

388

75 FR 69138 - Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Related to Exemption of Material...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...for the Humboldt Bay Power Plant, Unit No. 3, License...Assessment (EA) has been developed in accordance with the...1976, Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 was shut...Exemption of Humboldt Bay Power Plant Waste for Disposal...

2010-11-10

389

77 FR 71198 - Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Related to Exemption From the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...for the Humboldt Bay Power Plant, Unit No. 3, License...Assessment (EA) has been developed in accordance with the...1976, Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 was shut...2012, ``Humboldt Bay Power Plant Unit 3 Request for...

2012-11-29

390

??????????????????????Dating the Houma Covenant Texts: The Significance of Recent Findings From the Wenxian Covenant Texts  

E-print Network

the dating of these texts in an article first published in 1998.4 In this article Li discussed the evidence for two of the suggested dates for the Houma covenant tablets: the early fifth-century B.C.E. date, and another suggested dating of 424 B... 1973.3,185-91. For the fourth- century B.C.E. suggestion see Guo Moruo FL^^R, "Houma mengshu shitan" §§ U S ® , Wenwu 1966.2, 4-6; and Guo Moruo, "Chutu wenwu er-san shi" ftllEJ, Wenwu 1972.3,2-10. 2. Unless otherwise stated, extrapolated B...

Williams, Crispin; ???

2013-01-01

391

77 FR 8903 - Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact; Carolina Power and Light Company...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Acceptance Criteria for Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Light-Water Nuclear Power Reactors...50, appendix K, ``ECCS [Emergency Core Cooling System] Evaluation...issued to Carolina Power and Light Company (the...

2012-02-15

392

78 FR 77722 - Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Related to an Alternative Disposal...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Festus, Missouri authorizing alternative disposal of soil and soil-like wastes at the US Ecology Idaho, Inc. (USEI...of an additional 22,000 m\\3\\ (cubic meters) of soil and soil-like material containing NRC-licensed...

2013-12-24

393

Fluid-electrolyte responses during prolonged space flight: A review and interpretation of significant findings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The most important results of the Skylab studies related to fluid-electrolyte regulation are summarized. These data are the starting point of a systems analysis to study adaptation to the weightlessness environment. A summary of the systems analysis study, including an interpretation of Skylab results, is included.

Leonard, J. I.

1985-01-01

394

75 FR 11575 - James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Plant Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Plant (JAFNPP) located in Oswego County...position on the use of operator manual actions as part of a compliance...III.G.2. The NRC requires plants which credit manual actions for 10 CFR Part 50,...

2010-03-11

395

77 FR 21594 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact, Oconee...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...described in the NRC approved topical reports, BAW-2308, Revisions 1-A and 2-A, for...NRC-approved topical reports (TRs), BAW-2308, ``Initial RT NDT of Linde...described in the NRC approved topical reports BAW-2308, Revisions 1-A and 2-A for...

2012-04-10

396

76 FR 31379 - Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...would allow ABB to complete the remaining Facility remediation and decommissioning activities, thereby reducing residual radioactivity at the Facility to a level that permits release of the entire property for unrestricted use and termination of the...

2011-05-31

397

76 FR 44374 - Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for License Amendment to Source...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...determined the maximum amount of residual radioactivity on building surfaces, equipment...exposure principally caused by residual radioactivity in soil; impacts to people working...exposure principally caused by residual radioactivity on building surfaces impacts;...

2011-07-25

398

75 FR 34774 - Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...1402. These DCGLs define the maximum amount of residual radioactivity on building surfaces, equipment, and materials, and in...review, the staff considered the impact of the residual radioactivity at the Facility and concluded that the proposed action...

2010-06-18

399

76 FR 8382 - Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact For...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Licensee thus determined the maximum amount of residual radioactivity on building surfaces, equipment, materials and soils that...review, the staff considered the impact of the residual radioactivity at the Facility and concluded that the proposed action...

2011-02-14

400

77 FR 77118 - Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Beltsville, Maryland, so that the residual radioactivity at the site can be reduced to a level...decommissioning of the Site so that the residual radioactivity at the Site can be reduced to a level...millirem per year and the residual radioactivity has been reduced to levels that...

2012-12-31

401

Total radical yields from tropospheric ethene ozonolysis.  

PubMed

The gas-phase reactions of ozone with alkenes can be significant sources of free radicals (OH, HO(2) and RO(2)) in the Earth's atmosphere. In this study the total radical production and degradation products from ethene ozonolysis have been measured, under conditions relevant to the troposphere, during a series of detailed simulation chamber experiments. Experiments were carried out in the European photoreactor EUPHORE (Valencia, Spain), utilising various instrumentation including a chemical-ionisation-reaction time-of-flight mass-spectrometer (CIR-TOF-MS) measuring volatile organic compounds/oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs/OVOCs), a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system for measuring HO(2) radical products and a peroxy radical chemical amplification (PERCA) instrument measuring HO(2) + ?RO(2). The ethene + ozone reaction system was investigated with and without an OH radical scavenger, in order to suppress side reactions. Radical concentrations were measured under dry and humid conditions and interpreted through detailed chemical chamber box modelling, incorporating the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCMv3.1) degradation scheme for ethene, which was updated to include a more explicit representation of the ethene-ozone reaction mechanism.The rate coefficient for the ethene + ozone reaction was measured to be (1.45 ± 0.25) × 10(-18) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) at 298 K, and a stabilised Criegee intermediate yield of 0.54 ± 0.12 was determined from excess CO scavenger experiments. An OH radical yield of 0.17 ± 0.09 was determined using a cyclohexane scavenger approach, by monitoring the formation of the OH-initiated cyclohexane oxidation products and HO(2). The results highlight the importance of knowing the [HO(2)] (particularly under alkene limited conditions and high [O(3)]) and scavenger chemistry when deriving radical yields. An averaged HO(2) yield of 0.27 ± 0.07 was determined by LIF/model fitting. The observed yields are interpreted in terms of branching ratios for each channel within the postulated ethene ozonolysis mechanism. PMID:21487601

Alam, Mohammed S; Camredon, Marie; Rickard, Andrew R; Carr, Timo; Wyche, Kevin P; Hornsby, Karen E; Monks, Paul S; Bloss, William J

2011-06-21

402

Acrocallosal syndrome: new findings.  

PubMed

We describe a 21-month-old girl with typical manifestations of the acrocallosal syndrome of craniofacial anomalies, agenesis of the corpus callosum, hallucal duplication, severe hypotonia, and psychomotor retardation. Our patient also had the Dandy-Walker malformation, imperforate anus with rectovaginal fistula, hypothalamic dysfunction with hypothyroidism and diabetes insipidus, thick, dysplastic pulmonic valve leaflets, central and obstructive apnea, and pulmonary hypertension. These findings add to the delineation of this syndrome. PMID:2729349

Moeschler, J B; Pober, B R; Holmes, L B; Graham, J M

1989-03-01

403

Finding the Balance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson,students participate in activities in which they focus on patterns and relations that can be developed from the exploration of balance, mass, length of the mass arm, and the position of the fulcrum. Given a ruler placed on a large crayon, two small paper cups, and paper clips, students try to locate the center of balance of the ruler. After finding various positions for balancing the ruler, students discuss in class the patterns and relations found.

NCTM Illuminations

2000-01-01

404

Finding Monster Waves  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students learn about the varying sizes of ocean waves, what causes such variation, and where to find giant waves. Students will learn the parts of a wave, and discuss wave height, wavelength, and wave period. They will explore variables that influence wave size through scientific visualizations. They will then experiment with creating waves on the National Geographic Wave Simulator and discuss how geography affects waves.

405

The Great Fossil Find  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On an imaginary fossil hunt, learners "find" (remove from envelope) paper "fossils" of some unknown creature, only a few at a time. Each time, they attempt to reconstruct the creature, and each time their interpretation tends to change as new pieces are "found." Use this as an introduction to the nature of science inquiry -- scientists don't always have all the information, scientists must form interpretations of the information, scientists must work together to come to consensus about interpretations.

Steve Rendak

1999-01-01

406

Post-wildfire recovery of water yield in the Sydney Basin water supply catchments: An assessment of the 2001/2002 wildfires  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wildfire is a recurring event which has been acknowledged by the literature to impact the hydrological cycle of a catchment. Hence, wildfire may have a significant impact on water yield levels within a catchment. In Australia, studies of the effect of fire on water yield have been limited to obligate seeder vegetation communities. These communities regenerate from seed banks in the ground or within woody fruits and are generally activated by fire. In contrast, the Sydney Basin is dominated by obligate resprouter communities. These communities regenerate from fire resistant buds found on the plant and are generally found in regions where wildfire is a regular occurrence. The 2001/2002 wildfires in the Sydney Basin provided an opportunity to investigate the impacts of wildfire on water yield in a number of catchments dominated by obligate resprouting communities. The overall aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a difference in water yield post-wildfire. Four burnt subcatchments and 3 control subcatchments were assessed. A general additive model was calibrated using pre-wildfire data and then used to predict post-wildfire water yield using post-wildfire data. The model errors were analysed and it was found that the errors for all subcatchments showed similar trends for the post-wildfire period. This finding demonstrates that wildfires within the Sydney Basin have no significant medium-term impact on water yield.

Heath, J. T.; Chafer, C. J.; van Ogtrop, F. F.; Bishop, T. F. A.

2014-11-01

407

SIGNIFICANT NATURAL HERITAGE AREAS (NC)  

EPA Science Inventory

The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Parks and Recreation, Natural Heritage Program in cooperation with the NC Center for Geographic Information & Analysis, developed the Significant Natural Heritage Areas digital data to determine the a...

408

Interactive effect of rhizotrophic microorganisms on yield and nutrient uptake of chickpea ( Cicer arietinum L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interactive effect of rhizotrophic microorganisms on the yield and nutrient uptake of chickpea plants and soil was determined in a sandy clay loam soil, deficient in available phosphorus (P). Plant yield and nutrient uptake were significantly enhanced as a result of inoculation with Rhizobium sp. and phosphate solubilising microorganisms (PSM), Pseudomonas striata or Penicillium variable. Plant yield and nutrient

Almas Zaidi

2003-01-01

409

Yield response of spring wheat to increasing densities of spring oats and various forms  

E-print Network

Agronomy Yield response of spring wheat to increasing densities of spring oats and various forms; accepted 11 August 1993) Summary — Reductions in the yields of spring wheat (cv Bastion) caused for each of the 3 experimental years. Wheat yield losses were significantly greater on oat-infested plots

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

410

Yield Enhancement of Digital Microfluidics-Based Biochips Using Space Redundancy and Local Reconfiguration*  

E-print Network

Yield Enhancement of Digital Microfluidics-Based Biochips Using Space Redundancy and Local to avoid faulty elements. Digital microfluidics- based biochips are also amenable to redundancy-based yield. As microfluidics-based biochips become more complex, manufacturing yield will have significant influence

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

411

Machine milkability as related to dairy yield and its fractions in dairy ewes (1)  

E-print Network

Machine milkability as related to dairy yield and its fractions in dairy ewes (1) O. JATSCH R. SAGI and adaptation to machine milking were evaluated by determining milk yield fractions for Awassi and Assaf dairy conformation significantly affected milk yield and adaptation to machine milking, while breed, rearing methods

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

412

Electron-Yield Enhancement in a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator Driven by Asymmetric Laser Pulses  

E-print Network

Electron-Yield Enhancement in a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator Driven by Asymmetric Laser Pulses W. P on electron yield from a laser wakefield accelerator has been experimentally studied using > 1019 cmÿ3 plasmas to significantly enhance the electron yield compared to pulses with a gentle rise and negative chirp. Theory

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

413

Influence of Soil Sodicity on the Growth, Alkaloid Yield, and Cation Accumulation of Catharanthus roseus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of soil sodicity (exchangeable sodium percentage, or ESP) on the growth, alkaloid yield, and cation accumulation of two cultivars of Catharanthus roseus (Nirmal and Dhawal) was studied in a pot experiment. The leaves and stem yield of C. roseus significantly increased with an increase in soil ESP from 4.3 (control) to 16.9, but thereafter yield decreased with further

Arun Prasad; Amitabha Chattopadhyay; Sukhmal Chand; Raj Kumari; Karuna Shankar

2010-01-01

414

Muon Yield Comparisons for Different ICOOL  

E-print Network

1 Muon Yield Comparisons for Different ICOOL Versions and Lattices X. Ding Front End, Nov. 23, 2010 of Running MARS #12;4 Muon Yield from Different Versions of ICOOL with ST2a-BNL Input Deck #12;5 Muon Yield from Different Versions of ICOOL with ST2a-ISS Input Deck #12;6 Muon Yield from Different Versions

McDonald, Kirk

415

Incorporating Yield Enhancement into the Floorplanning Process  

E-print Network

Incorporating Yield Enhancement into the Floorplanning Process Israel Koren, Fellow, IEEE the yield of the chip as well. Consequently, it becomes desirable to consider the expected yield the two seemingly unrelated, and often conflicting, objectives of yield enhancement and routing complexity

Koren, Israel

416

Significant Conversations and Significant Networks--Exploring the Backstage of the Teaching Arena  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an inquiry into conversations that academic teachers have about teaching. The authors investigated to whom they talk and the forms that these conversations take. The findings indicate that most teachers rely on a small number of significant others for conversations that are characterised by their privacy, by mutual trust and…

Roxa, Torgny; Martensson, Katarina

2009-01-01

417

Atomistic simulations of the yielding of gold nanowires.  

SciTech Connect

We performed atomistic simulations to study the effect of free surfaces on the yielding of gold nanowires. Tensile surface stresses on the surfaces of the nanowires cause them to contract along the length with respect to the bulk face-centered cubic lattice and induce compressive stress in the interior. When the cross-sectional area of a (100) nanowire is less than 2.45 nm x 2.45 nm, the wire yields under its surface stresses. Under external forces and surface stresses, nanowires yield via the nucleation and propagation of the {l_brace}111{r_brace}<112> partial dislocations. The magnitudes of the tensile and compressive yield stress of (100) nanowires increase and decrease, respectively, with a decrease of the wire width. The magnitude of the tensile yield stress is much larger than that of the compressive yield stress for small (100) nanowires, while for small <111> nanowires, tensile and compressive yield stresses have similar magnitudes. The critical resolved shear stress (RSS) by external forces depends on wire width, orientation and loading condition (tension vs. compression). However, the critical RSS in the interior of the nanowires, which is exerted by both the external force and the surface-stress-induced compressive stress, does not change significantly with wire width for same orientation and same loading condition, and can thus serve as a 'local' criterion. This local criterion is invoked to explain the observed size dependence of yield behavior and tensile/compressive yield stress asymmetry, considering surface stress effects and different slip systems active in tensile and compressive yielding.

Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Dunn, Martin L. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Diao, Jiankuai (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Gall, Ken (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO)

2004-07-01

418

Statistical Significance vs. Practical Significance: An Exploration through Health Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences between statistical and practical significance, including strengths and criticisms of both methods, as well as provide information surrounding the application of various effect sizes and confidence intervals within health education research. Provided are recommendations, explanations and…

Rosen, Brittany L.; DeMaria, Andrea L.

2012-01-01

419

Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE). Feasibility of assessing crop condition and yield from LANDSAT data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Yield modelling for crop production estimation derived a means of predicting the within-a-year yield and the year-to-year variability of yield over some fixed or randomly located unit of area. Preliminary studies indicated that the requirements for interpreting LANDSAT data for yield may be sufficiently similar to those of signature extension that it is feasible to investigate the automated estimation of production. The concept of an advanced yield model consisting of both spectral and meteorological components was endorsed. Rationale for using meteorological parameters originated from known between season and near harvest dynamics in crop environmental-condition-yield relationships.

1978-01-01

420

Cosmic Ray Albedo Proton Yield Correlated with Lunar Elemental Abundances  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High energy cosmic rays constantly bombard the lunar regolith, producing secondary "albedo" or "splash" particles like protons and neutrons, some of which escape back to space. Two lunar missions, Lunar Prospector and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have shown that the energy distribution of albedo neutrons is modulated by the elemental composition of the lunar regolith[1-4], with reduced neutron fluxes near the lunar poles being the result of collisions with hydrogen nuclei in ice deposits[5] in permanently shadowed craters. Here we investigate an analogous phenomenon with high energy (~100 MeV) lunar albedo protons. LRO has been observing the surface and environment of the Moon since June of 2009. The CRaTER instrument (Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation) on LRO is designed to characterize the lunar radiation environment and its effects on simulated human tissue. CRaTER's multiple solid-state detectors can discriminate the different elements in the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) population above ~10 MeV/nucleon, and can also distinguish between primary GCR protons arriving from deep space and albedo particles propagating up from the lunar surface. We use albedo protons with energies greater than 60 MeV to construct a cosmic ray albedo proton map of the Moon. The yield of albedo protons is proportional to the rate of lunar proton detections divided by the rate of incoming GCR detections. The map accounts for time variation in the albedo particles driven by time variations in the primary GCR population, thus revealing any true spatial variation of the albedo proton yield. Our current map is a significant improvement over the proof-of-concept map of Wilson et al.[6]. In addition to including twelve more months of CRaTER data here, we use more numerous minimum ionizing GCR protons for normalization, and we make use of all six of CRaTER's detectors to reduce contamination from spurious non-proton events in the data stream. We find find that the flux of lunar albedo protons is correlated with elemental abundances at the lunar surface. In general the yield of albedo protons from the maria is 1.1% ± 0.4% higher than the flux from the highlands. In addition there appear to be localized peaks in the albedo proton yield that are co-located with peaks in trace elemental abundances as measured by the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer. References: [1] Feldman W. C. et al. (1998) Sci-ence, 281, 1496-1500. [2] Gasnault, O. et al. (2001) GRL, 28, 3797-3800. [3] Maurice, S. et al. (2004) JGR, 109, E07S04. [4] Mitrofanov I. G. et al. (2010) Science, 330, 483-486. [5] Feldman W. C. et al. (1997) JGR, 102, 25565-25574. [6] Wilson, J. K. et al. (2012) JGR, 117, E00H23.

Wilson, J. K.; Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Blake, J. B.; Golightly, M. J.; Kasper, J. C.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Schwadron, N. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C. J.

2012-12-01

421

Significance Analysis of Prognostic Signatures  

PubMed Central

A major goal in translational cancer research is to identify biological signatures driving cancer progression and metastasis. A common technique applied in genomics research is to cluster patients using gene expression data from a candidate prognostic gene set, and if the resulting clusters show statistically significant outcome stratification, to associate the gene set with prognosis, suggesting its biological and clinical importance. Recent work has questioned the validity of this approach by showing in several breast cancer data sets that “random” gene sets tend to cluster patients into prognostically variable subgroups. This work suggests that new rigorous statistical methods are needed to identify biologically informative prognostic gene sets. To address this problem, we developed Significance Analysis of Prognostic Signatures (SAPS) which integrates standard prognostic tests with a new prognostic significance test based on stratifying patients into prognostic subtypes with random gene sets. SAPS ensures that a significant gene set is not only able to stratify patients into prognostically variable groups, but is also enriched for genes showing strong univariate associations with patient prognosis, and performs significantly better than random gene sets. We use SAPS to perform a large meta-analysis (the largest completed to date) of prognostic pathways in breast and ovarian cancer and their molecular subtypes. Our analyses show that only a small subset of the gene sets found statistically significant using standard measures achieve significance by SAPS. We identify new prognostic signatures in breast and ovarian cancer and their corresponding molecular subtypes, and we show that prognostic signatures in ER negative breast cancer are more similar to prognostic signatures in ovarian cancer than to prognostic signatures in ER positive breast cancer. SAPS is a powerful new method for deriving robust prognostic biological signatures from clinically annotated genomic datasets. PMID:23365551

Beck, Andrew H.; Knoblauch, Nicholas W.; Hefti, Marco M.; Kaplan, Jennifer; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Culhane, Aedin C.; Schroeder, Markus S.; Risch, Thomas; Quackenbush, John; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin

2013-01-01

422

Correlation and periodicity analysis between herbage yields and climatic factors in the Tianshan Mountain,China in 22 year periods.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To analyze the relationship between herbage yields and climatic factors, 22 years of herbage yields and climate data were collected on the northern slope of the Tianshan Mountains region of western China. Using multiple regression analysis, maximum entropy spectrum analysis and cross spectrum analysis, it was clarified that fluctuation of climatic factors affected herbage yields and their periodical variation. The herbage yields were correlated significantly to the four climate factors including annual precipitation, annual means of relative humidity, absolute humidity and percentage of sunshine, but unrelated to the trend variable (the former year yield has little effects on the later) and other climatic factors. These clarified that long term variation of grassland productivity responded directly to changes of some climate factors in typical zone of arid continental climate. The results in co-spectrum and quadrature spectrum analysis revealed that the herbage yields had 4-year period similar to some moisture factors, and with 1/4 period delay. These findings demonstrated further that the fluctuation of some climatic elements (precipitation particularly) was the crucial factor affecting the variations of herbage yields of natural grassland in arid and semiarid ecosystem. The periodical change of vegetation and correlation with climate provide us a way to predict the herbage production according to the climate change, and it was important for the herdsmen to arrange predictively their animal production including rectifying their livestock population in natural grazing land and storing up the supply of forage timely for livestock use in cold season. Our finding in periodical variation of climatic element and plant yield further demonstrated the crucial driver of some climate factors on formation of herbage yields. The same or similar quasi-4-year period in climatic element and vegetation was due to that periodical variation of climatic element (especially precipitation) directly led to the annual periodical variation of herbage yields. These were almost the same as the second period (3-4 years) of meteorological period, which was obvious in ENSO (El Nino and Southern Oscillation) (Chao, 1979; French, 1979; Huang and Li, 1992; Webb and Lauenroth, 1993; Li and Bai, 1996). These results also were supported by our long term observation (Li and Xu, 1993). Therefore, it could be concluded that under certain meteorological conditions, herbage yields of natural grasslands had the same variation periods, which resulted from climatic factors, especially periodical precipitation. The finding that ecological response of herbage yields to climatic change usually delayed by 1/4 period was important phenomena. The results were accordant with the biological principle and ecological characteristics of variation of plant growth and yields formation (French, 1979; White and Neild, 1982; Li and Xu, 1993; Webb and Lauenroth, 1993; Espigares and Peco, 1995; Li and Bai, 1996). Keywords: herbage yield; climatic factor; variation periodicity; maximum entropy spectrum analysis; cross spectrum analysis; multiple regression analysis; Tianshan Mountains.

Jianlong, L.

2009-04-01

423

Attribution of maize yield increase in China to climate change and technological advancement between 1980 and 2010  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Crop yields are affected by climate change and technological advancement. Objectively and quantitatively evaluating the attribution of crop yield change to climate change and technological advancement will ensure sustainable development of agriculture under climate change. In this study, daily climate variables obtained from 553 meteorological stations in China for the period 1961-2010, detailed observations of maize from 653 agricultural meteorological stations for the period 1981-2010, and results using an Agro-Ecological Zones (AEZ) model, are used to explore the attribution of maize (Zea mays L.) yield change to climate change and technological advancement. In the AEZ model, the climatic potential productivity is examined through three step-by-step levels: photosynthetic potential productivity, photosynthetic thermal potential productivity, and climatic potential productivity. The relative impacts of different climate variables on climatic potential productivity of maize from 1961 to 2010 in China are then evaluated. Combined with the observations of maize, the contributions of climate change and technological advancement to maize yield from 1981 to 2010 in China are separated. The results show that, from 1961 to 2010, climate change had a significant adverse impact on the climatic potential productivity of maize in China. Decreased radiation and increased temperature were the main factors leading to the decrease of climatic potential productivity. However, changes in precipitation had only a small effect. The maize yields of the 14 main planting provinces in China increased obviously over the past 30 years, which was opposite to the decreasing trends of climatic potential productivity. This suggests that technological advancement has offset the negative effects of climate change on maize yield. Technological advancement contributed to maize yield increases by 99.6%-141.6%, while climate change contribution was from -41.4% to 0.4%. In particular, the actual maize yields in Shandong, Henan, Jilin, and Inner Mongolia increased by 98.4, 90.4, 98.7, and 121.5 kg hm-2 yr-1 over the past 30 years, respectively. Correspondingly, the maize yields affected by technological advancement increased by 113.7, 97.9, 111.5, and 124.8 kg hm-2 yr-1, respectively. On the contrary, maize yields reduced markedly under climate change, with an average reduction of -9.0 kg hm-2 yr-1. Our findings highlight that agronomic technological advancement has contributed dominantly to maize yield increases in China in the past three decades.

Guo, Jianping; Zhao, Junfang; Wu, Dingrong; Mu, Jia; Xu, Yanhong

2014-12-01

424

Yield learning model for integrated circuit package  

E-print Network

from chronic yield loss. . 5 Yield due to chronic yield loss. . 6 Time series model. . 7 Estimation of regression coefficients. . . 14 . 16 . 17 . 18 8 Impact of excursions. . . . 19 9 Effect of volume in line. . . . . . 20 10 Impact... of experience level. 11 Final spreadsheet model. . 12 Values for factors. . 21 . . . . 22 . . . . . 23 13 Final yield. . . . . . 24 14 Predicted yield - chronic and excursions. . . 25 15 Percentage rating for PQFP - absolute metric model. . . . . 16...

Balasubramaniam, Gaurishankar

1996-01-01

425

Finding Space Weather Events  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an activity about searching online data archives for solar wind events. Learners will find at least three episodes of increased solar wind activity impacting Earth using direct measurements of solar wind velocity and density. Then, they will characterize each events by its rise time, the time it takes for the solar wind speed to rise from normal levels to the peak speed of the event, and the percentage increase in solar wind velocity. This is Activity 11 of the Space Weather Forecast curriculum.

2013-02-15

426

Finding the Pole Star  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan is part of a high school course on astronomy, Newtonian mechanics and spaceflight and provides a closer look at the pole star and the neighboring constellations, especially the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia. One objective is for the student to know the constellations of the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia, and their use in finding the Pole Star. The student will also realize that other celestial objects - Sun, Moon and planets - share the rotation (and hence rise and set), even though their positions among the stars slowly change.

David Stern

427

Find-It! Consumer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From the Washington State Library, Find-It! Consumer provides links to and information about over 100 consumer safety and protection Websites. Annotated Websites concerning Washington State or the entire United States may be searched by keyword or browsed by topic. The librarians have included a wonderful section on Top Searches, which gives guides to information and resources on a broad range of subjects, from insecticide in food to choosing an Internet service provider. Up-to-date recalls and new consumer information are also highlighted.

428

Crop Diversity for Yield Increase  

PubMed Central

Traditional farming practices suggest that cultivation of a mixture of crop species in the same field through temporal and spatial management may be advantageous in boosting yields and preventing disease, but evidence from large-scale field testing is limited. Increasing crop diversity through intercropping addresses the problem of increasing land utilization and crop productivity. In collaboration with farmers and extension personnel, we tested intercropping of tobacco, maize, sugarcane, potato, wheat and broad bean – either by relay cropping or by mixing crop species based on differences in their heights, and practiced these patterns on 15,302 hectares in ten counties in Yunnan Province, China. The results of observation plots within these areas showed that some combinations increased crop yields for the same season between 33.2 and 84.7% and reached a land equivalent ratio (LER) of between 1.31 and 1.84. This approach can be easily applied in developing countries, which is crucial in face of dwindling arable land and increasing food demand. PMID:19956624

Li, Chengyun; He, Xiahong; Zhu, Shusheng; Zhou, Huiping; Wang, Yunyue; Li, Yan; Yang, Jing; Fan, Jinxiang; Yang, Jincheng; Wang, Guibin; Long, Yunfu; Xu, Jiayou; Tang, Yongsheng; Zhao, Gaohui; Yang, Jianrong; Liu, Lin; Sun, Yan; Xie, Yong; Wang, Haining; Zhu, Youyong

2009-01-01

429

Phosphorus, zinc, and boron influence yield components in Earliglow strawberry  

SciTech Connect

The main effects and interactions of soil-applied P, B, and Zn on yield and its components were examined in the field at two pH levels with Earliglow' strawberries (Fragaria ananassa Duch.). Applied nutrients had significant effects on several yield components, but responses depended on the levels of other nutrients or the soil pH. At a soil pH of 5.5, yield responded linearly to B and quadratically to P. At pH 6.5, P interacted with B and Zn. Fruit count per inflorescence was the yield component most strongly associated with yield, followed by individual fruit weight. However, these two yield components responded differently to soil-applied nutrients. Foliar nutrient levels generally did not increase with the amount of applied nutrient, but often an applied nutrient had a strong effect on the level of another nutrient. Leaf nutrient levels were often correlated with fruit levels, but foliar and fruit levels at harvest were not related to reproductive performance. The study identifies some of the problems inherent in using foliar nutrient levels to predict a yield response and demonstrates how plant responses to single nutrients depend on soil chemistry and the presence of other nutrients.

May, G.M.; Pritts, M.P. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Fruit and Vegetable Science)

1993-01-01

430

Hydrostatic Stress Effect on the Yield Behavior of Inconel 100  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic stress has negligible effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Recent reexaminations of classical theory have revealed a significant effect of hydrostatic stress on the yield behavior of various geometries. Fatigue tests and nonlinear finite element analyses (FEA) of Inconel 100 (IN100) equal-arm bend specimens and new monotonic tests and nonlinear finite element analyses of IN100 smooth tension, smooth compression, and double-edge notch tension (DENT) test specimens have revealed the effect of internal hydrostatic tensile stresses on yielding. Nonlinear FEA using the von Mises (yielding is independent of hydrostatic stress) and the Drucker-Prager (yielding is linearly dependent on hydrostatic stress) yield functions were performed. A new FEA constitutive model was developed that incorporates a pressure-dependent yield function with combined multilinear kinematic and multilinear isotropic hardening using the ABAQUS user subroutine (UMAT) utility. In all monotonic tensile test cases, the von Mises constitutive model, overestimated the load for a given displacement or strain. Considering the failure displacements or strains for the DENT specimen, the Drucker-Prager FEM s predicted loads that were approximately 3% lower than the von Mises values. For the failure loads, the Drucker Prager FEM s predicted strains that were up to 35% greater than the von Mises values. Both the Drucker-Prager model and the von Mises model performed equally-well in simulating the equal-arm bend fatigue test.

Allen, Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

2003-01-01

431

Significant potential for lower costs.  

PubMed

Switching to LED lighting has, specialist supplier of such technology, Exled maintains, 'proven to be one of the most significant cost-saving activities hospitals can undertake'. Alongside the financial gains, other benefits include higher levels of patient satisfaction with lighting 'quality' and ambience, and improved environmental credentials. Here Exled MD, Michael Renecle, discusses LED lighting in healthcare in some detail, offers useful pointers on specification, examines some of the 'significant savings and environmental improvements' available to those 'making the switch', and considers the positive experiences of a number of NHS Trusts who have done so. PMID:25282981

Renecle, Michael

2014-09-01

432

Aluminum Yield Strength on Quasi-isentropes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advances in the functionally graded density impactors (FGDI) have made it possible to carry out dynamic experiments at previously inaccessible regions of the phase diagram. We employed these advances in recent tailored dynamic experiments to gain insight into the yield strength of aluminum along ``hot'' quasi-isentropes. The impactor was specifically designed to deliver a triangular compression wave into a sample where the strain rates on the compression and release isentropes were nearly identical. The aluminum samples were initially shocked to a fixed state on the Hugoniot, then quasi-isentropically compressed, and finally allowed to release isentropically. Here, we will discuss the details of the experiments and error analysis in deriving the yield strength of aluminum on a ``hot'' quasi-isentrope. We will also discuss recent advances in the FGDI technology that made these experiments possible with significantly reduced uncertainties. Methods to characterize these advances will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in part under Contract W-7405-Eng-48 and in part under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

Nguyen, Jeffrey H.; Reed Patterson, J.; Orlikowski, Daniel; Martin, L. Peter; Krone, Ryan; Minich, Roger; Holmes, Neil C.

2008-03-01

433

High pressure intensification of cassava resistant starch (RS3) yields.  

PubMed

Cassava starch, typically, has resistant starch type 3 (RS3) content of 2.4%. This paper shows that the RS3 yields can be substantially enhanced by debranching cassava starch using pullulanase followed by high pressure or cyclic high-pressure annealing. RS3 yield of 41.3% was obtained when annealing was carried out at 400MPa/60°C for 15min, whereas it took nearly 8h to obtain the same yield under conventional atmospheric annealing at 60°C. The yield of RS3 could be further significantly increased by annealing under 400MPa/60°C pressure for 15min followed by resting at atmospheric pressure for 3h 45min, and repeating this cycle for up to six times. Microstructural surface analysis of the product under a scanning electron microscope showed an increasingly rigid density of the crystalline structure formed, confirming higher RS3 content. PMID:25794725

Lertwanawatana, Proyphon; Frazier, Richard A; Niranjan, Keshavan

2015-08-15

434

Meaning reconstruction in bereavement: sense and significance.  

PubMed

Recently there has been growing empirical and theoretical attention to the role of meaning in grief along with increased recognition of the need for more sophisticated definitions of meaning. The present article highlights philosophical issues inherent in the study of meaning and grief reviews the place of meaning in current theories of grief and provides a brief overview of the ways that meaning has been operationalized by grief researchers, including sense-making, benefit finding, identity change, and purpose in life. It is argued that, in our focus on the ways mourners make sense of loss, we have neglected an important aspect of meaning: life significance. Life significance is the felt perception that some aspect of one's life experience "matters." The construct is explored as a potentially important outcome of bereavement; mourners may lose life significance along with their lost loved one, or they may develop new avenues to life significance as they confront mortality and rebuild shattered worldviews. Related literature, such as appreciation of life as a facet of posttraumatic growth, is surveyed for clues as to the role of life significance in grief. Suggestions for future study are offered. PMID:24520967

Hibberd, Rachel

2013-08-01

435

A Case Study: Significance, Epidemiology, and Management of Hop Viruses.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Hop latent carlavirus (HpLV), Hop mosaic carlavirus (HpMV), and Apple mosaic ilarvirus (ApMV) are viruses that have been shown to have deleterious effects on cone yield and brewing organic acids in several cultivars in Australian hop gardens, and pose a significant threat to the continued production...

436

Significant Figures in Speed Records  

Microsoft Academic Search

I HAD hoped that someone more competent than myself would have replied to Col. O'Gorman's letter, in which, in NATURE of Mar. 30, he offered an apologia for recording Sir Henry Segrave's speed to 8 significant figures, but probably most readers of this journal do not consider that motor speed records form a subject with which they are intimately concerned.

J. S. Dines

1929-01-01

437

Statistical significance for genomewide studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the increase in genomewide experiments and the sequencing of multiple genomes, the analysis of large data sets has become commonplace in biology. It is often the case that thousands of features in a genomewide data set are tested against some null hypothesis, where a number of features are expected to be significant. Here we propose an approach to measuring

John D. Storey; Robert Tibshirani

2003-01-01

438

[Silicosis: computed tomography findings].  

PubMed

Silicosis is an occupational lung disease, which is caused by the inhalation of silica and affects a wide range of jobs. There are many clinical forms of silicosis: acute silicosis, results from exposure to very large amounts of silica dust over a period of less than 2 years. Simple chronic silicosis, the most common type that we see today, results from exposure to low amounts of silica between 2 and 10 years. Chronic silicosis complicated, with silicotic conglomerates. In many cases the diagnosis of silicosis is made according to epidemiological and radiological data, without a histological confirmation. It is important to know the various radiological manifestations of silicosis to differentiate it from other lung diseases and to recognize their complications. The objective of this work is to describe typical and atypical radiological findings of silicosis and their complications in helical and high resolution (HRCT) thorax CT. PMID:22884889

González Vázquez, M; Trinidad López, C; Castellón Plaza, D; Calatayud Moscoso Del Prado, J; Tardáguila Montero, F

2013-01-01

439

Executive Summary High-Yield Scenario Workshop Series Report  

SciTech Connect

To get a collective sense of the impact of research and development (R&D) on biomass resource availability, and to determine the feasibility that yields higher than baseline assumptions used for past assessments could be achieved to support U.S. energy independence, an alternate “High-Yield Scenario” (HYS) concept was presented to industry experts at a series of workshops held in December 2009. The workshops explored future production of corn/agricultural crop residues, herbaceous energy crops (HECs), and woody energy crops (WECs). This executive summary reports the findings of that workshop.

Leslie Park Ovard; Thomas H. Ulrich; David J. Muth Jr.; J. Richard Hess; Steven Thomas; Bryce Stokes

2009-12-01

440

Bs {yields} {mu}+{mu}- and Detection of Neutralino WIMP  

SciTech Connect

We consider direct detection of neutralino WIMP and the upward-going muon flux due to the WIMP annihilations in the cores of the sun and the earth, including the upper bound on the branching ratio for Bs {yields} {mu}+{mu}- decay. We find that the constraint from Bs {yields} {mu}+{mu}- is very strong in most parameter space, and excludes substantial part of the supergravity parameter space regions where the direct detection rates are within current experimental sensitivities and the expected upward-going muon fluxes are within the expected reach of IceCube.

Kim, Yeong Gyun [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2005-12-02

441

High-Yield Hydrogen Production from Starch and Water by a Synthetic Enzymatic Pathway  

PubMed Central

Background The future hydrogen economy offers a compelling energy vision, but there are four main obstacles: hydrogen production, storage, and distribution, as well as fuel cells. Hydrogen production from inexpensive abundant renewable biomass can produce cheaper hydrogen, decrease reliance on fossil fuels, and achieve zero net greenhouse gas emissions, but current chemical and biological means suffer from low hydrogen yields and/or severe reaction conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we demonstrate a synthetic enzymatic pathway consisting of 13 enzymes for producing hydrogen from starch and water. The stoichiometric reaction is C6H10O5 (l)+7 H2O (l)?12 H2 (g)+6 CO2 (g). The overall process is spontaneous and unidirectional because of a negative Gibbs free energy and separation of the gaseous products with the aqueous reactants. Conclusions Enzymatic hydrogen production from starch and water mediated by 13 enzymes occurred at 30°C as expected, and the hydrogen yields were much higher than the theoretical limit (4 H2/glucose) of anaerobic fermentations. Significance The unique features, such as mild reaction conditions (30°C and atmospheric pressure), high hydrogen yields, likely low production costs ($?2/kg H2), and a high energy-density carrier starch (14.8 H2-based mass%), provide great potential for mobile applications. With technology improvements and integration with fuel cells, this technology also solves the challenges associated with hydrogen storage, distribution, and infrastructure in the hydrogen economy. PMID:17520015

Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Evans, Barbara R.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Adams, Michael W.W.

2007-01-01

442

Soil erosion and sediment yield and their relationships with vegetation cover in upper stream of the Yellow River.  

PubMed

Soil erosion is a significant concern when considering regional environmental protection, especially in the Yellow River Basin in China. This study evaluated the temporal-spatial interaction of land cover status with soil erosion characteristics in the Longliu Catchment of China, using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. SWAT is a physical hydrological model which uses the RUSLE equation as a sediment algorithm. Considering the spatial and temporal scale of the relationship between soil erosion and sediment yield, simulations were undertaken at monthly and annual temporal scales and basin and sub-basin spatial scales. The corresponding temporal and spatial Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) information was summarized from MODIS data, which can integrate regional land cover and climatic features. The SWAT simulation revealed that the annual soil erosion and sediment yield showed similar spatial distribution patterns, but the monthly variation fluctuated significantly. The monthly basin soil erosion varied from almost no erosion load to 3.92 t/ha and the maximum monthly sediment yield was 47,540 tones. The inter-annual simulation focused on the spatial difference and relationship with the corresponding vegetation NDVI value for every sub-basin. It is concluded that, for this continental monsoon climate basin, the higher NDVI vegetation zones prevented sediment transport, but at the same time they also contributed considerable soil erosion. The monthly basin soil erosion and sediment yield both correlated with NDVI, and the determination coefficients of their exponential correlation model were 0.446 and 0.426, respectively. The relationships between soil erosion and sediment yield with vegetation NDVI indicated that the vegetation status has a significant impact on sediment formation and transport. The findings can be used to develop soil erosion conservation programs for the study area. PMID:21071065

Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Skidmore, Andrew K; Toxopeus, A G

2010-12-15

443

Finding a Niche  

PubMed Central

Although I always knew I wanted to be a scientist, I didn't know I would become a cell biologist. Events in life that you would never have predicted can greatly impact your career trajectory. I have learned to let those events take me in new directions. Following a desire to investigate an understudied area of cell biology, I have found a niche. In this area, my lab is poised to contribute significantly toward understanding the fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying polarized plant cell growth. PMID:21079002

2010-01-01

444

Influence of surface morphology on sputtering yields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the variation of sputtering yields with surface morphologies under the assumption of a specially prescribed surface shape. Compared with a flat surface, we show that surface morphology can cause a decrease in the sputtering yield and an increase in the incident angle where sputtering yield is maximum. Based on Sigmund's theory, an analytical formula for the morphology dependent sputtering yield is developed by averaging the curvature dependent sputtering yield. The predicted dependence of sputtering yield on surface morphology is in good agreement with experimental observations.

Wei, Qiangmin; Eddy, Michaela; Li, Kun-Dar; Wang, Lumin

2009-08-01

445

Effect of a short dry period on milk yield and content, colostrum quality, fertility, and metabolic status of Holstein cows.  

PubMed

We evaluated the effect of shortening the dry period (DP) on milk and energy-corrected milk (ECM) yields, milk components, colostrum quality, metabolic status, and reproductive parameters. Primiparous (n=372) and multiparous (n=400) Israeli Holstein cows from 5 commercial dairy herds were subjected to a 60-d or 40-d DP. Cows within each herd were paired according to milk production, age, days in milk, and expected calving. Analysis of the data from all cows, irrespective of age, revealed significant differences in milk and ECM yields that favored the 60-d DP, with a prominent effect in 2 of 5 examined herds. In primiparous cows, milk and ECM yields were similar between groups in 4 of 5 farms. In multiparous cows undergoing a 60-d (vs. 40-d) DP, milk and ECM yields were higher in 3 herds. These differences could not be explained by milk and ECM yields in cows diagnosed with metritis, ketosis, and mastitis (defined by a somatic cell count threshold of 250,000 cell/mL), distribution of infected and noninfected cows, or new infections during DP and after calving. Including the milk and ECM yields from an average of 19.55 d from the previous lactation revealed higher milk and ECM yields for 40-d (vs. 60-d) DP cows in all herds. Analyzing 2 consecutive lactations revealed similar milk and ECM yields between groups in 4 out of 5 herds. In 1 herd, yields were higher in the 40-d compared with the 60-d DP group. One week after calving, the nonesterified fatty acid concentrations of 40-d DP cows were significantly lower than those of 60-d DP cows, indicating better postpartum energy balance. Colostrum quality, measured as IgG concentration, did not differ between the 2 DP groups. Cows assigned to 40-d DP had better reproductive performance, as reflected by fewer days to first insemination, a lower proportion with >90 d to first insemination, and fewer days to pregnancy. With respect to primiparous cows, a short DP increased conception rate after first artificial insemination and decreased the proportion of nonpregnant cows after 150 d in milk. In light of these findings, we suggest that a short DP be applied for its economic and physiological benefits. This is highly relevant to dairy herds located in regions such as Israel, Spain, and Florida that suffer from reduced milk production during the hot season. PMID:24630671

Shoshani, E; Rozen, S; Doekes, J J

2014-05-01

446

Yield EnhancementYield Enhancement Sai N. LwinSai N. Lwin  

E-print Network

ITRSITRS Yield EnhancementYield Enhancement ByBy Sai N. LwinSai N. Lwin #12;What is [Process] Yield?What is [Process] Yield? The fraction (or percentage) of acceptableThe fraction (or percentage) of acceptable parts per wafer is called wafer yieldwafer yield.. Y = (1 + Ad/Y = (1 + Ad/))-- A = area of the chipA = area

Patel, Chintan

447

Yield surface approximation for lower and upper bound yield design of 3D composite frame structures  

E-print Network

Yield surface approximation for lower and upper bound yield design of 3D composite frame structures of composite beams. The resolution of an auxiliary yield design problem leads to the determination of a yield the numerically computed yield surface by a sum of several ellipsoids is developed. The so-obtained analytical

Boyer, Edmond

448

Colored plastic mulch microclimates affect strawberry fruit yield and quality.  

PubMed

Significant reduction of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa, Duch.) fruit yield and quality, as a consequence of conventional cultivation method, is common in the Caspian Sea region, Iran. Recently, growers started using plastic mulches to overcome these shortcomings. Plastic mulches have different thermal and radiation properties and could affect strawberry fruit yield and quality. In the present study, the effect of different colored plastic mulches (black, red, and white) along with conventional practice was tested on yield and quality of strawberry Camarosa cultivar, in a completely randomized block design. Colored plastic mulches had highly significant effect on fruit weight, size, and phytochemical contents. In the most harvest times, mean fruit weight was significantly higher in red plastic relative to white and control treatments. Total fruit weight of plastic mulches was not significantly different, while all were statistically higher than that of control. Fruit size significantly increased over red plastic mulch. Total fruit numbers over plastic mulches were significantly higher than that of control treatment. The content of phenolic compounds was similar between treatments, while anthocyanin content, IC50 value, and flavonoid content significantly were affected by colored plastics. In conclusion, colored plastic mulches could affect strawberry fruit weight and quality through altering strawberry thermal and radiation environment. PMID:25348886

Shiukhy, Saeid; Raeini-Sarjaz, Mahmoud; Chalavi, Vida

2014-10-28

449

Effect of potato virus Y on yield of a clonal selection of Russet Norkotah  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Successful selection of Russet Norkotah lines have produced larger, more vigorous vines and higher yields than the standard Russet Norkotah (RN). A significant disease, Potato Virus Y (PVY), while producing mild or “latent” symptom in this cultivar, has been shown to be significantly reduce yields....

450

Endoscopic findings in uninvestigated dyspepsia  

PubMed Central

Background It is important to know the causes of dyspepsia to establish the therapeutic approach. Dyspepsia is a frequent syndrome in our country, where there are restrictions to endoscopy and high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. This study aimed to assess the endoscopic findings of the syndrome, in an outpatient screening clinic of a tertiary hospital in São Paulo. Methods Outpatients with uninvestigated dyspepsia, according to Rome III criteria, answered a dyspepsia questionnaire and underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The Rapid Urease Test was applied to fragments of the antral mucosa and epidemiological data were collected from the studied population. Organic dyspepsia findings were analyzed with different variables to verify statistically significant associations. Results Three hundred and six patients were included and 282 were analyzed in the study. The mean age was 44 years and women comprised 65% of the sample. Forty-five percent of the patients reported alarm symptoms. Functional dyspepsia was found in 66% of the patients (20% with normal endoscopy results and 46% with gastritis), 18% had GERD and 13% had ulcers (duodenal in 9% and gastric in 4%). Four cases of gastric adenocarcinoma were identified (1.4%), one without alarm characteristics, 1 case of adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus and 1 case of gastric lymphoma. The prevalence of H. pylori was 54% and infection, age and smoking status were associated with organic dyspepsia. The age of 48 years was indicative of alarm signs. Conclusions The endoscopic diagnosis of uninvestigated dyspepsia in our setting showed a predominance of functional disease, whereas cancer was an uncommon finding, despite the high prevalence of H. pylori. Organic dyspepsia was associated with infection, age and smoking status. PMID:24499444

2014-01-01

451

Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields.  

E-print Network

A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

Harper, Thomas Lawrence

1969-01-01

452

Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields  

E-print Network

A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

Harper, Thomas Lawrence

1969-01-01

453

7 CFR 1437.102 - Yield determinations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.102 Yield determinations...Will be used in the actual production history base period when less than four consecutive...calculated, in the actual production history base period when the producer...

2011-01-01

454

7 CFR 1437.102 - Yield determinations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.102 Yield determinations...Will be used in the actual production history base period when less than four consecutive...calculated, in the actual production history base period when the producer...

2012-01-01

455

7 CFR 1437.102 - Yield determinations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.102 Yield determinations...Will be used in the actual production history base period when less than four consecutive...calculated, in the actual production history base period when the producer...

2010-01-01

456

7 CFR 1437.102 - Yield determinations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.102 Yield determinations...Will be used in the actual production history base period when less than four consecutive...calculated, in the actual production history base period when the producer...

2014-01-01

457

7 CFR 1437.102 - Yield determinations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.102 Yield determinations...Will be used in the actual production history base period when less than four consecutive...calculated, in the actual production history base period when the producer...

2013-01-01

458

Pulmonary talcosis: imaging findings.  

PubMed

Talc is a mineral widely used in the ceramic, paper, plastics, rubber, paint, and cosmetic industries. Four distinct forms of pulmonary disease caused by talc have been defined. Three of them (talcosilicosis, talcoasbestosis, and pure talcosis) are associated with aspiration and differ in the composition of the inhaled substance. The fourth form, a result of intravenous administration of talc, is seen in drug users who inject medications intended for oral use. The disease most commonly affects men, with a mean age in the fourth decade of life. Presentation of patients with talc granulomatosis can range from asymptomatic to fulminant disease. Symptomatic patients typically present with nonspecific complaints, including progressive exertional dyspnea, and cough. Late complications include chronic respiratory failure, emphysema, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and cor pulmonale. History of occupational exposure or of drug addiction is the major clue to the diagnosis. The high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) finding of small centrilobular nodules associated with heterogeneous conglomerate masses containing high-density amorphous areas, with or without panlobular emphysema in the lower lobes, is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis. The characteristic histopathologic feature in talc pneumoconiosis is the striking appearance of birefringent, needle-shaped particles of talc seen within the giant cells and in the areas of pulmonary fibrosis with the use of polarized light. In conclusion, computed tomography can play an important role in the diagnosis of pulmonary talcosis, since suggestive patterns may be observed. The presence of these patterns in drug abusers or in patients with an occupational history of exposure to talc is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis. PMID:20155272

Marchiori, Edson; Lourenço, Sílvia; Gasparetto, Taisa Davaus; Zanetti, Gláucia; Mano, Cláudia Mauro; Nobre, Luiz Felipe

2010-04-01

459

Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ? 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

2014-01-01

460

Yield model development project implementation plan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tasks remaining to be completed are summarized for the following major project elements: (1) evaluation of crop yield models; (2) crop yield model research and development; (3) data acquisition processing, and storage; (4) related yield research: defining spectral and/or remote sensing data requirements; developing input for driving and testing crop growth/yield models; real time testing of wheat plant process models) and (5) project management and support.

Ambroziak, R. A.

1982-01-01

461

GGE Biplot Analysis of Oil Yield in Lemongrass (Cymbopogon spp.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Six varieties\\/strains belonging to three species of Cymbopogon, viz., C. flexuosus, C. khasianus and C. pendulus, or their hybrids, were evaluated for oil yield across four years (1997-98-2000-01) as very limited information is available on variety-by-environment interaction from multi-environment trials. The main effects, varieties and years, were significant, but variety-by-year interaction was not significant. Log-transformation of data reduced coefficients of

M. K. Bhan; S. Pal; B. L. Rao; A. K. Dhar; M. S. Kang

2005-01-01

462

Stability of toroidal droplets inside yield stress materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the stability of toroidal droplets inside a yield stress material. Similar to toroidal droplets in a viscous liquid, the slenderness of the torus controls whether it breaks into spherical droplets or grows thicker towards its center to coalesce onto itself and form a single spherical droplet. However, unlike tori generated in a viscous liquid, the elasticity of the outer medium can prevent either or both of these instabilities; this depends on the slenderness of the torus. Interestingly, we find that the value of the tube radius needed to prevent breakup is always larger than the value of the radius of the handle to prevent growth. This reflects the different deformations experienced by the yield stress material in either process. A simple model balancing the surface tension stress, which drives the evolution of the torus, and the yield stress, which favors its stability, accounts for all of our observations.

Pairam, E.; Le, H.; Fernández-Nieves, A.

2014-08-01

463

Stability of toroidal droplets inside yield stress materials.  

PubMed

We study the stability of toroidal droplets inside a yield stress material. Similar to toroidal droplets in a viscous liquid, the slenderness of the torus controls whether it breaks into spherical droplets or grows thicker towards its center to coalesce onto itself and form a single spherical droplet. However, unlike tori generated in a viscous liquid, the elasticity of the outer medium can prevent either or both of these instabilities; this depends on the slenderness of the torus. Interestingly, we find that the value of the tube radius needed to prevent breakup is always larger than the value of the radius of the handle to prevent growth. This reflects the different deformations experienced by the yield stress material in either process. A simple model balancing the surface tension stress, which drives the evolution of the torus, and the yield stress, which favors its stability, accounts for all of our observations. PMID:25215681

Pairam, E; Le, H; Fernández-Nieves, A

2014-08-01

464

Public Health Significance of Neuroticism  

PubMed Central

The personality trait of neuroticism refers to relatively stable tendencies to respond with negative emotions to threat, frustration, or loss. Individuals in the population vary markedly on this trait, ranging from frequent and intense emotional reactions to minor challenges to little emotional reaction even in the face of significant difficulties. Although not widely appreciated, there is growing evidence that neuroticism is a psychological trait of profound public health significance. Neuroticism is a robust correlate and predictor of many different mental and physical disorders, comorbidity among them, and the frequency of mental and general health service use. Indeed, neuroticism apparently is a predictor of the quality and longevity of our lives. Achieving a full understanding of the nature and origins of neuroticism, and the mechanisms through which neuroticism is linked to mental and physical disorders, should be a top priority for research. Knowing why neuroticism predicts such a wide variety of seemingly diverse outcomes should lead to improved understanding of commonalities among those outcomes and improved strategies for preventing them. PMID:19449983

Lahey, Benjamin B.

2009-01-01

465

Modeling the Yield Curve Statistics Department, Wharton  

E-print Network

Modeling the Yield Curve Bob Stine Statistics Department, Wharton Choong Tze Chua, Singapore Mgmt Univ Krishna Ramaswamy, Finance Department #12;Plan for Talk Background What is the yield curve? What among products 2 #12;Background #12;What is the yield curve? Interest rates earned on treasury bills

Stine, Robert A.

466

Yield, the Control Operator Exploring Session Types  

E-print Network

Yield, the Control Operator Exploring Session Types Roshan P. James and Amr Sabry Indiana, Bloomington)Yield, the Control Operator Exploring Session TypesCW -- September 24, 2011 1 / 28 #12 it is interacting. Roshan P. James and Amr Sabry (Indiana University, Bloomington)Yield, the Control Operator

Sabry, Amr

467

MARS Target Yield Studies University of Warwick  

E-print Network

1 MARS Target Yield Studies John Back University of Warwick 1st May 2008 John Back Oxford target yields · 10 GeV parabolic proton beam hitting cylindrical tungsten rod in 20 T field ­ Rod lengths: 15 to estimate particle acceptance in cooling channel: K.E. yields in ISS analysis) · Hg

McDonald, Kirk

468

Consistent Yield Curve Prediction Josef Teichmann  

E-print Network

Consistent Yield Curve Prediction Josef Teichmann Mario V. W¨uthrich February 6, 2013 Abstract We present an arbitrage-free, non-parametric yield curve prediction model which takes the full discretized yield curve data as input state variable. The absence of arbitrage is a particular important model

Wüthrich, Mario

469

FOREST TREATMENT EFFECTS ON WATER YIELD  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results are reported for thirty-nine studies of the effect of altering forest cover on water yield. Taken collectively, these studies reveal that forest reduction increases water yield, and that reforestation de- creases water yield. Results of individual treatments vary widely and for the most part are unpredictable. First-year response to complete forest reduction varies from 34 mm to more than

ALDEN R. HIBBERT

470

7, 1792717965, 2007 SOA yield from  

E-print Network

ACPD 7, 17927­17965, 2007 SOA yield from -pinene ozonolysis J. E. Shilling et al. Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Particle mass yield in secondary organic aerosol formed by the dark yield from -pinene ozonolysis J. E. Shilling et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

471

Yield function development for aluminum alloy sheets  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, yield surfaces were measured for binary aluminum-magnesium sheet samples which were fabricated by different processing paths to obtain different microstructures. The yielding behavior was measured using biaxial compression tests on cubic specimens made from laminated sheet samples. The yield surfaces were also predicted from a polycrystal model using crystallographic texture data as input and from a phenomenological

F. Barlat; Y. Maeda; K. Chung; M. Yanagawa; J. C. Brem; Y. Hayashida; D. J. Lege; K. Matsui; S. J. Murtha; S. Hattori; R. C. Becker; S. Makosey

1997-01-01

472

Yielding description for solution strengthened aluminum alloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, yield surfaces were measured for binary aluminum-magnesium sheet samples which were fabricated by different processing paths to obtain different microstructures. The yielding behavior was measured using biaxial compression tests on cubic specimens made from laminated sheet samples. The yield surfaces were also predicted from a polycrystal model using crystallographic texture data as input and from a phenomenological

F. Barlat; R. C. Becker; Y. Hayashida; Y. Maeda; M. Yanagawa; K. Chung; J. C. Brem; D. J. Lege; K. Matsui; S. J. Murtha; S. Hattori

1997-01-01

473

Data Mining Soil Characteristics Affecting Corn Yield  

E-print Network

Data Mining Soil Characteristics Affecting Corn Yield William F. Christensen and Di Cook Department and corn yield were measured in a field located in southeastern Boone County, Iowa. Measurements were made an understanding of the relationship between the soil characteristics and corn yield. Finally, spatial factor

Cook, Di

474

Data Mining Soil Characteristics Affecting Corn Yield  

E-print Network

Data Mining Soil Characteristics Affecting Corn Yield William F. Christensen and Di Cook Department and corn yield were measured in a field located in southeastern Boone County, Iowa. Measurements were made an understanding of the relationship between the soil characteristics and corn yield. 1 Introduction

Cook, Di

475

SOME QUESTIONS OF EVALUATION OF YIELD MAPS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The ultimate goal for the application of yield maps is to provide profitable crop output in farming systems. Recently, several methods and tools have been developed for the evaluation of yield maps. It is based on crisp and fuzzy modeling. However, the process of evaluation of yield maps is full o...

476

Heterois in Switchgrass: Biomass Yield in Swards  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Improving the biomass yield of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) will improve its utility as a dedicated energy crop by increasing energy yield per acre. In a previous space-transplanted study, mid-parent heterosis for biomass yield was reported for population and specific F1 hybrids of the lowland-...

477

Yield estimation and mantle Q  

SciTech Connect

Spectral analysis of P waves crossing the mantle under various test sites has revealed considerable variations in the attenuative properties of the mantle which must be considered when computing yields of nuclear explosions. The t* bias between the NTS and Kazakh test sites must be in the range 0.2 to .3 sec. There are indications of anomalous zones of attenuation under the French test sites in the Sahara and near some suspected nuclear explosions in the Baykal area. Mantle attenuation under the Sahara test sites appears to be intermediate between a shield and the western United States. Other test sites for which we have relevant results seem to be in areas of low mantle attenuation. Patterns of attenuation found by analyses of nuclear explosion data fit roughly in the worldwide patterns found in more general studies of plate tectonics. No test sites are located in areas of extremely low Q zones in the mantle, such as those found under some back-arc basins. Empirical analyses and synthetic simulations give the formula: delta m(sub b) = approx. 1.35 delta t*(sub p) for deriving the m(sub b) bias from a t* differential. Regional patterns of lateral Q variations found by spectral analyses are well correlated with several other relevant geophysical parameters, such as P (sub n) velocities, travel time variations of P and S waves, heat flow, and upper mantle conductivity.

Der, Z.A.

1983-04-29

478

Hydrated electron yields in the heavy ion radiolysis of water.  

PubMed

Experimental measurements coupled with Monte Carlo track simulations have been used to examine the yields of hydrated electrons in the radiolysis of water with protons, helium ions, and carbon ions. Glycylglycine, in concentrations ranging from 10(-4) to 1 M, was employed as a scavenger and the production of the ammonium cation used as a probe of hydrated electron yields from about 2 ns to 20 mus. Monte Carlo track simulations employing diffusion-kinetic calculations of product yields are found to reproduce experimental observations satisfactorily. Model details are used to elucidate the heavy ion track physics and chemistry. Comparison of the heavy ion results with those found in gamma radiolysis shows intratrack reactions are significant on the nanosecond to microsecond time scale as the ion track relaxes, and that a constant (escape) yield is never attained on this time scale. Numerical interpolation techniques are used to obtain both track average and track segment yields for use in practical applications or comparison with other models. The model results give the first hints that initial ( approximately 5 ps) hydrated electron yields, and possibly other water decomposition products, are dependent on the type and energy of the incident radiation. PMID:16866387

Laverne, Jay A; Stefani?, Igor; Pimblott, Simon M

2005-10-27

479

Global sources and significance of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), formed in the atmospheric oxidation of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) serves as a thermally unstable reservoir for nitrogen oxide radicals (NO and NO2, collectively termed NOx). PAN permits NOx to impact the global distribution of the two most important atmospheric oxidants, ozone (O3) and the OH radical. PAN is also a critical channel through which climate-driven changes to the biosphere will affect atmospheric composition, notably through biogenic NMVOC emissions and fires. We use a 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) constrained by a global suite of observations to evaluate the sources and significance of PAN. We quantify individual NMVOC and NOX contributions to PAN formation, and we identify where PAN has a significant impact on remote O3, OH and nitrogen deposition. We find that a simulation with improved budgets for key NMVOCs (ethane, acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetone and select aromatic species) is able to reproduce the main features of the global PAN distribution. We also show that the treatment of PAN formation in fires plays an important role in determining the global impact of this PAN source. The contributions of acetaldehyde, acetone and methylglyoxal to PAN formation reflect the sources and lifetimes of these immediate precursors. Acetaldehyde, which is emitted directly from biogenic sources and formed via hydrocarbon oxidation, is the most important peroxyacetyl radical precursor globally. Methylglyoxal, an oxidation product of both isoprene and aromatic species, is responsible for about a third of peroxyactyl radical formation in the lower troposphere. Isoprene oxidation products, other than methylglyoxal, are also significant for the global PAN budget. With updated (lower) photolysis yields, acetone is less important for PAN formation than previously thought. It is responsible for less peroxyactyl radical formation globally than each of the other immediate precursors below 200 hPa. Lightning contributes to a uniform upper tropospheric PAN distribution in the southern hemisphere tropics where it is the most important NOx source for PAN formation. We estimate that PAN acts to increase lower tropospheric summertime O3 over the remote oceans by ~15% at mid-latitudes. The impact of PAN on remote OH is complex. The direction and magnitude of the impact varies geographically and vertically.

Fischer, E. V.; Jacob, D. J.; Yantosca, R. M.; Payer, M.

2012-12-01

480

Yawning and its physiological significance  

PubMed Central

Although yawning is a commonly witnessed human behavior, yet it has not been taught in much detail in medical schools because, until the date, no particular physiological significance has been associated with it. It is characterized by opening up of mouth which is accompanied by a long inspiration, with a brief interruption of ventilation and followed by a short expiration. Since time immemorial, yawning has been associated with drowsiness and boredom. However, this age old belief is all set to change as the results of some newer studies have pointed out that yawning might be a way by which our body is trying to accomplish some more meaningful goals. In this review, we have tried to put together some of the important functions that have been proposed by a few authors, with the hope that this article will stimulate the interest of newer researchers in this hitherto unexplored field. PMID:23776833

Gupta, Sharat; Mittal, Shallu

2013-01-01

481

Yield drag in a two-dimensional foam flow around a circular obstacle: Effect of liquid fraction  

E-print Network

Yield drag in a two-dimensional foam flow around a circular obstacle: Effect of liquid fraction, and determine the yield drag of the foam, that is, the force exerted on the obstacle by the foam flowing at very low velocity. We find that the yield drag is linear over a large range of the ratio of obstacle

Cox, Simon

482

Xenon Sputter Yield Measurements for Ion Thruster Materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper, we describe a technique that was used to measure total and differential sputter yields of materials important to high specific impulse ion thrusters. The heart of the technique is a quartz crystal monitor that is swept at constant radial distance from a small target region where a high current density xenon ion beam is aimed. Differential sputtering yields were generally measured over a full 180 deg arc in a plane that included the beam centerline and the normal vector to the target surface. Sputter yield results are presented for a xenon ion energy range from 0.5 to 10 keV and an angle of incidence range from 0 deg to 70 deg from the target surface normal direction for targets consisting of molybdenum, titanium, solid (Poco) graphite, and flexible graphite (grafoil). Total sputter yields are calculated using a simple integration procedure and comparisons are made to sputter yields obtained from the literature. In general, the agreement between the available data is good. As expected for heavy xenon ions, the differential and total sputter yields are found to be strong functions of angle of incidence. Significant under- and over-cosine behavior is observed at low- and high-ion energies, respectively. In addition, strong differences in differential yield behavior are observed between low-Z targets (C and Ti) and high-Z targets (Mo). Curve fits to the differential sputter yield data are provided. They should prove useful to analysts interested in predicting the erosion profiles of ion thruster components and determining where the erosion products re-deposit.

Williams, John D.; Gardner, Michael M.; Johnson, Mark L.; Wilbur, Paul J.

2003-01-01

483

42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...or findings suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other...was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other...

2010-10-01

484

42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...or findings suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other...was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other...

2011-10-01

485

Capillary rise of yield-stress fluids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this letter the capillary rise of yield-stress fluids is investigated experimentally. Contrary to the case of simple fluids, the final height reached by yield-stress fluids weakly depends on the gap and is strongly affected by the yield stress and the hydrodynamic boundary conditions. Such dependences suggest that the capillary rise of yield-stress fluids results from a dynamical arrest rather than from a thermodynamic equilibrium. To rationalize these results, we propose and validate an extension of Jurin's law to such complex systems. Finally we show that measuring the final height allows for the determination of both the surface tension and the yield stress.

Géraud, Baudouin; Jørgensen, Loren; Petit, Laure; Delanoë-Ayari, Hélène; Jop, P