Science.gov

Sample records for young chickens vaccinated

  1. EFFECTS OF LIVE ATTENUATED AND KILLED SALMONELLA VACCINES ON CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY AMONG VERY YOUNG CHICKENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to investigate the differential impact of live and killed Salmonella enteritidis (SE) vaccines on cell-mediated immunity of very young birds (2-5 weeks of age) as well as 16-week-old White Leghorn hens. The hens were vaccinated with the 2 vaccines, and two weeks later, CMI ...

  2. Efficacy, Safety, and Interactions of a Live Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Vaccine for Chickens Based on Strain IBD V877.

    PubMed

    Geerligs, Harm J; Ons, Ellen; Boelm, Gert Jan; Vancraeynest, Dieter

    2015-03-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is a highly contagious disease in young chickens which can result in high morbidity and mortality and also in great economic losses. The main target for the virus is the lymphoid tissue with a special predilection for the bursa of Fabricius. Several vaccines are available to control the disease. Intermediate plus vaccines are used in chickens with high maternal antibody titers which face high infection pressure. An example of an intermediate plus vaccine is a live vaccine based on IBD strain V877. The results of an efficacy study in commercial broilers with different levels of maternally derived antibodies (MDA) showed that the V877-based IBD vaccine can break through maternal antibody titers of higher than 1100 as determined by an IBD ELISA. The safety of the vaccine was demonstrated in a study in which specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens were vaccinated with a tenfold dose of the vaccine strain and a tenfold dose of the vaccine strain after five back passages in SPF chickens. The vaccine virus caused lesions, as could be expected for an intermediate plus vaccine, but the scores were not much higher than the maximal scores allowed for mild IBD vaccines in the European Pharmacopoeia, and reversion to virulence was absent. In studies in SPF chickens, there were no negative impacts by the IBD V877 vaccine on the efficacy of a live QX-like IB vaccine and a live Newcastle disease La Sota vaccine in vaccination challenge studies, although the IBD vaccine had a negative effect on the antibody response generated by the QX-like IB vaccine. It is concluded that the IBD V877 vaccine has the capacity to break through high levels of MDA, has a satisfactory safety profile, and interactions with other live vaccines are limited. In order to limit bursal lesions after vaccination it is recommended to confirm the presence of MDA before vaccinating with the V877 vaccine. PMID:26292544

  3. Transmission of virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) between unvaccinated, sub-optimally vaccinated, and well-vaccinated SPF chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the transmissibility of virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in vaccinated chickens. Chickens were vaccinated with live LaSota and challenged 21 days later with CA02. Two days after challenge, the vaccinated and infected chickens were moved into clean i...

  4. Effect of Salmonella Vaccination of Breeder Chickens on Contamination of Broiler Chicken Carcasses in Integrated Poultry Operations ? †

    PubMed Central

    Dórea, Fernanda C.; Cole, Dana J.; Hofacre, Charles; Zamperini, Katherine; Mathis, Demetrius; Doyle, Michael P.; Lee, Margie D.; Maurer, John J.

    2010-01-01

    While measures to control carcass contamination with Salmonella at the processing plant have been implemented with some success, on-farm interventions that reduce Salmonella prevalence in meat birds entering the processing plant have not translated well on a commercial scale. We determined the impact of Salmonella vaccination on commercial poultry operations by monitoring four vaccinated and four nonvaccinated breeder (parental) chicken flocks and comparing Salmonella prevalences in these flocks and their broiler, meat bird progeny. For one poultry company, their young breeders were vaccinated by using a live-attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine (Megan VAC-1) followed by a killed Salmonella bacterin consisting of S. enterica serovar Berta and S. enterica serovar Kentucky. The other participating poultry company did not vaccinate their breeders or broilers. The analysis revealed that vaccinated hens had a lower prevalence of Salmonella in the ceca (38.3% versus 64.2%; P < 0.001) and the reproductive tracts (14.22% versus 51.7%; P < 0.001). We also observed a lower Salmonella prevalence in broiler chicks (18.1% versus 33.5%; P < 0.001), acquired from vaccinated breeders, when placed at the broiler farms contracted with the poultry company. Broiler chicken farms populated with chicks from vaccinated breeders also tended to have fewer environmental samples containing Salmonella (14.4% versus 30.1%; P < 0.001). There was a lower Salmonella prevalence in broilers entering the processing plants (23.4% versus 33.5%; P < 0.001) for the poultry company that utilized this Salmonella vaccination program for its breeders. Investigation of other company-associated factors did not indicate that the difference between companies could be attributed to measures other than the vaccination program. PMID:20889797

  5. 75 FR 27288 - New Performance Standards for Salmonella and Campylobacter in Young Chicken and Turkey Slaughter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ...Standards for Salmonella and Campylobacter in Young Chicken and Turkey Slaughter Establishments...Salmonella and Campylobacter for use in young chicken and turkey slaughter establishments...Baseline Data Collection Programs: The Young Chicken Survey and the Young Turkey...

  6. 9 CFR 113.329 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...vaccine is safe for use in susceptible young chickens. Vaccines recommended for use in chickens 10 days of age or younger shall be tested in accordance with paragraphs...susceptible chickens, 5 days of age or younger, properly identified and...

  7. Vaccine Reduces HPV Infections in Young Men

    Cancer.gov

    An international randomized clinical trial has shown that the vaccine Gardasil can reduce the incidence of anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in young men 16 to 26 years of age at the time of vaccination.

  8. 76 FR 15282 - New Performance Standards for Salmonella and Campylobacter in Young Chicken and Turkey Slaughter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ...Standards for Salmonella and Campylobacter in Young Chicken and Turkey Slaughter Establishments...Campylobacter for chilled carcasses in young chicken (broiler) and turkey slaughter...Campylobacter performance standards for young chickens and turkeys will take effect...

  9. Avian influenza mucosal vaccination in chickens with replication-defective recombinant adenovirus vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated protection conferred by mucosal vaccination with replication competent adenovirus (RCA)-free recombinant adenovirus expressing a codon-optimized avian influenza (AI) H5 gene (AdTW68.H5ck). Commercial layer-type chicken groups were singly vaccinated ocularly at 5 days of age, or singly v...

  10. Effects of chicken intestinal antimicrobial peptides on humoral immunity of chickens and antibody titres after vaccination with infectious bursal disease virus vaccine in chicken.

    PubMed

    Yurong, Yang; Yibao, Jiang; Ruiping, She; Qingqiang, Yin; Kaisong, Peng; Huihui, Bao; Decheng, Wang; Tianlong, Liu; Xuemei, Zhou

    2006-10-01

    Sixty chickens were randomly divided into two groups (30 chickens in each group) to determine the effect of oral administration of chicken intestinal antimicrobial peptides (CIAMP) on the humoral immune response. Chickens of both groups were fed the same diet. In the treatment group chickens received drinking water supplemented with CIAMP (1 microg/ml) right after hatching. Samples of blood, bursa of Fabricus, spleen and intestine were taken at day 1, 4, 7, 10 and 17 of experiment. CIAMP supplementation enhanced the content of IgG and IgM in serum from day 4-10 and day 10-17, respectively, (p < 0.05), IgM-forming cells in bursa of Fabricus and spleen at the age of 7 days (p < 0.05) and IgG-forming cells in bursa of Fabricus at the age of 4 days (p < 0.05). In addition, CIAMP enhanced the IgA-forming cells in caecal tonsils diffuse area at day 4 (p < 0.05). Furthermore, CIAMP enhanced the antibody response to infectious bursal disease virus vaccine (IBDV) in chickens 21 days following IBDV vaccine administration (p < 0.05). These results suggested that CIAMP could modulate the humoral immune response of chickens and increased the antibody titres of infectious bursal disease virus vaccine. PMID:17036752

  11. 9 CFR 113.332 - Tenosynovitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...birds. Vaccines intended for use in very young chickens shall be administered to chickens of the youngest age for which the vaccine is recommended...For vaccines intended for use in very young chickens, each of 25 1-day-old...

  12. Mycoplasma synoviae infection on Newcastle disease vaccination of chickens

    PubMed Central

    de Cássia Figueira Silva, Rita; do Nascimento, Elmiro Rosendo; de Almeida Pereira, Virgínia Léo; Barreto, Maria Lúcia; do Nascimento, Maria da Graça Fichel

    2008-01-01

    Newcastle disease is characterized by respiratory manifestations in association with nervous and/or digestive symptoms. Its prevention is done by vaccination with live attenuated (lentogenic strains) and/or killed vaccines. The lentogenic strains can lead to strong post-vaccination reaction, principally due to the presence of other pathogenic agents. Among them, Mycoplasma synoviae is worldwide important, mainly in Brazil. The dissemination of this agent in poultry flocks has been achieved due to difficulties in diagnosis and disease reproduction, virulence variations among different M.synoviae strains, and attribution of typical M.synoviae disease manifestation to other disease agents. This experimental study in SPF chicks (Gallus gallus), previously infected by M.synoviae and thereafter vaccinated against Newcastle disease, was done with the objective of evaluating M.synoviae pathogenicity through assessment of post-vaccinal respiratory reactions and serologic responses to Newcastle disease virus vaccine in the absence of environmental factors. A total of 86 three days old chicks were used, being 57 infected by eye and nostril drop, with chicken activated M. synoviae strain WVU 1853. Seven days later, 21 mycoplasma infected birds plus 29 not mycoplasma infected ones were vaccinated against Newcastle disease. As results, the not infected and vaccinated birds yielded, significantly, higher and longer lasting serologic responses to Newcastle disease vaccine virus than those infected and vaccinated. Similarly, the infected and vaccinated birds yielded lower serologic reactions to M.synoviae than those only mycoplasma infected. No post-vaccinal respiratory reaction was observed in the vaccinated birds. PMID:24031234

  13. Protection of chickens against avian influenza with non-replicating adenovirus-vectored vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) virus was elicited in chickens by single-dose vaccination with a replication competent adenovirus (RCA) -free human adenovirus (Ad) vector encoding a H7 hemagglutinin gene from a low pathogenic North American isolate (AdChNY94.H7). Chickens vaccinate...

  14. 9 CFR 381.67 - Young chicken and squab slaughter inspection rate maximums under traditional inspection procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Young chicken and squab slaughter inspection...REGULATIONS Operating Procedures § 381.67 Young chicken and squab slaughter inspection...inspection procedure for the different young chicken and squab slaughter...

  15. Methylome Analysis in Chickens Immunized with Infectious Laryngotracheitis Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, José A.; He, Yanghua; Luo, Juan; Menendez, Kimberly R.; Tablante, Nathaniel L.; Zhao, Keji; Paulson, Joseph N.; Li, Bichun; Song, Jiuzhou

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the methylome of chickens immunized with Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) vaccine derived from chicken embryos. Methyl-CpG binding domain protein-enriched genome sequencing (MBD-Seq) method was employed in the detection of the 1,155 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) across the entire genome. After validation, we ascertained the genomic DMRs distribution and annotated them regarding genes, transcription start sites (TSS) and CpG islands. We found that global DNA methylation decreased in vaccinated birds, presenting 704 hypomethylated and 451 hypermethylated DMRs, respectively. Additionally, we performed an enrichment analysis detecting gene networks, in which cancer and RNA post-transcriptional modification appeared in the first place, followed by humoral immune response, immunological disease and inflammatory disease. The top four identified canonical pathways were EIF2 signaling, regulation of EIF4 and p70S6K signaling, axonal guidance signaling and mTOR signaling, providing new insight regarding the mechanisms of ILT etiology. Lastly, the association between DNA methylation and differentially expressed genes was examined, and detected negative correlation in seventeen of the eighteen genes. PMID:26107953

  16. Vaccination and acute phase mediator production in chickens challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus; novel markers for vaccine efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to determine vaccine efficacy of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) isolates are limited in poultry because experimental infections with LPAI virus in specific pathogen free chickens rarely causes clinical disease. The most commonly used method to compare LPAI vaccine efficacy is to quant...

  17. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: Vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibo...

  18. Young Hispanic Men and Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Choices

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Dionne P.; Johnson-Mallard, Versie; Higgins, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory descriptive study examined perceived vulnerabilities to HPV and the correlation to factors influencing vaccine beliefs and vaccine decision-making in young Hispanics males attending a large public urban university. Only 24% of participants believed the HPV vaccine could prevent future problems, and 53% said they would not be vaccinated. The best predictors of HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men were agreement with doctor recommendations and belief in the vaccine’s efficacy. Machismo cultural norms influence young Hispanic men’s HPV-related decision making, their perceptions of the vaccine, and how they attitudinally act upon what little HPV information they have access to. This study provides culturally relevant information for the development of targeted health education strategies aimed at increasing HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men. PMID:24841473

  19. Development of a subunit vaccine containing recombinant chicken anemia virus VP1 and pigeon IFN-?.

    PubMed

    Shen, Sin Ying; Chang, Wei Chun; Yi, Hsiang Heng; Tsai, Shinn-Shong; Liu, Hung Jen; Liao, Pei-Chun; Chuang, Kuo Pin

    2015-10-15

    Chicken anemia virus (CAV) is a severe threat to the chicken industry and causes heavy economic losses worldwide. In this study, we evaluated the immune response and protective efficacy provided by a subunit vaccine containing recombinant VP1 (rVP1) and pigeon interferon-? (rPiIFN-?). Results indicated that rPiIFN-? enhanced humoral immunity elicited by rVP1 as early as 10 day after primary immunization and reach the high titer after secondary immunization. When compared to chickens immunized with rVP1, inactivated vaccine, chickens immunized with rVP1+rPiIFN-? showed faster and higher levels (p<0.05) of antibody titer. The CAV challenge result showed that the rVP1+rPiIFN-? vaccine prevent the reducing of hematocrit values in comparison with the rVP1 or inactivated groups. The relative fold inductions of mRNA expression of Th1-type (IFN-?), but not Th2-type (IL-4) cytokines in splenocytes isolated from chickens immunized with rVP1+rPiIFN-? were significantly higher than those of the rVP1 or inactivated vaccine groups. In conclusion, our study found that rPiIFN-? can enhance both humoral and cellular immunity elicited by an rVP1 vaccine. The rVP1+rPiIFN-? vaccine may provide a new strategy vaccine against CAV in chicken. PMID:26315776

  20. Embryo vaccination of chickens using a novel adjuvant formulation stimulates protective immunity against Eimeria maxima infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our previous study demonstrated that chickens immunized subcutaneously with an Eimeria recombinant profilin protein vaccine emulsified in a Quil A/cholesterol/DDA/Carbopol (QCDC) adjuvant developed partial protection against experimental avian coccidiosis compared with animals immunized with profili...

  1. Characterization of recombinant Raccoonpox Vaccine Vectors in Chickens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hwa, S.-H.; Iams, K.P.; Hall, J.S.; Kingstad, B.A.; Osorio, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Raccoonpox virus (RCN) has been used as a recombinant vector against several mammalian pathogens but has not been tested in birds. The replication of RCN in chick embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) and chickens was studied with the use of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA) as a model antigen and luciferase (luc) as a reporter gene. Although RCN replicated to low levels in CEFs, it efficiently expressed recombinant proteins and, in vivo, elicited anti-HA immunoglobulin yolk (IgY) antibody responses comparable to inactivated influenza virus. Biophotonic in vivo imaging of 1-wk-old chicks with RCN-luc showed strong expression of the luc reporter gene lasting up to 3 days postinfection. These studies demonstrate the potential of RCN as a vaccine vector for avian influenza and other poultry pathogens. ?? American Association of Avian Pathologists 2010.

  2. PROTECTIVE EFFICACY OF INACTIVATED INFLUENZA VACCINES AGAINST HIGHLY PATHOGENIC ASIAN H5N1 AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUSES IN CHICKENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the efficacy of vaccines prepared from Asian and American avian influenza viruses (AIVs) to protect chickens from lethal challenge with highly pathogenic (HP) Asian H5N1 AIVs. Vaccination studies were conducted in two week old chickens using inactivated vaccines prepared from reverse ge...

  3. Presence of Virulent Newcastle Disease Virus in Vaccinated Chickens in Farms in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Wajid, Abdul; Bibi, Tasra; Nazir, Bushra; Mukhtar, Nadia; Hussain, Abid; Lone, Nazir Ahmad; Yaqub, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    One year after a virulent Newcastle disease virus (vNDV) outbreak in Pakistan, the causative strain was present in vaccinated chickens of multiple farms despite the existence of high-average NDV-specific antibody titers (>4.75 log2). The data suggest a possible role of vaccinated birds as reservoirs of vNDV. PMID:25694525

  4. Characterization of 10 adjuvants for inactivated avian influenza virus (AIV) vaccines against challenge with highly pathogenic AIV in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inactivated vaccines comprise 95% of all vaccine used for avian influenza virus (AIV) by dose. Optimizing the adjuvant is one way to improve vaccine efficacy. Inactivated vaccines were produced with beta-propiolactone inactivated A/chicken/BC/314514-1/2004 H7N3 low pathogenicity AIV and standardiz...

  5. Review of oral cholera vaccines: efficacy in young children

    PubMed Central

    Aumatell, Cristina Masuet; Torrell, JM Ramon; Zuckerman, Jane N

    2011-01-01

    Background: Young children are one of the most vulnerable groups who may be infected with cholera. The following literature review of the efficacy of the currently available cholera vaccines provides a clear evidence base for the clinical administration of cholera vaccine, particularly in an epidemic situation. Aim: To assess the efficacy of oral cholera vaccines in preventing cases of cholera in young children. Methods: A systematic literature review was undertaken for the period 1983 to 2011 using PubMed and the search terms “oral cholera vaccines,” “children,” and “efficacy,” limited to “clinical trials” and “human studies”. Results: Oral cholera vaccine provides an acceptable level of protection in young children, with the level of protection being greater at 12 or 24 months following immunization. Conclusions: Children exposed to a potential risk of cholera are recommended to be vaccinated with an oral cholera vaccine, irrespective of whether its constituents include the B subunit. PMID:22114507

  6. Differential genetic variation of chickens and MD vaccine protective efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccine protective efficacy is determined by multiple factors including host genetics, the type of vaccine, vaccine dosage, the virulence and dose of challenging viruses, and the interval between vaccination and viral challenge. Studies on human immune responses to vaccinations suggest host genetic...

  7. INFLUENCE OF B-HAPLOTYPE ON THE EFFICACY OF RECOMBINANT FOWLPOX VACCINE PROTECTION AGAINST MAREK'S DISEASE IN CHICKENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV) containing glycoprotein gB genes from three serotypes of Marek's disease virus (MDV) was used to study the influence of B-haplotype on vaccine responses in chickens. Sequence analysis of the gB gene from three serotypes showed 80% homology. Chickens were vaccinated ...

  8. Protective immune response of chickens to oral vaccination with thermostable live Fowlpox virus vaccine (strain TPV-1) coated on oiled rice.

    PubMed

    Wambura, Philemon N; Godfrey, S K

    2010-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop and evaluate a local vaccine (strain TPV-1) against Fowl pox (FP) in chickens. Two separate groups of chickens were vaccinated with FP vaccine through oral (coated on oiled rice) and wing web stab routes, respectively. The results showed that the haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibody titres in both vaccinated groups were comparable and significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the control chickens. It was further revealed that 14 days after vaccination HI GMT of > or =2 log(2) was recorded in chickens vaccinated by oral and wing web stab routes whereas 35 days after vaccination the HI antibody titres reached 5.6 log(2) and 6.3 log(2), respectively. Moreover, in both groups the birds showed 100% protection against challenge virus at 35 days after vaccination. The findings from the present study have shown that oral route is equally effective as wing web stab route for vaccination of chickens against FP. However, the oral route can be used in mass vaccination of birds thus avoid catching individual birds for vaccination. It was noteworthy that strain TPV-1 virus could be propagated by a simple allantoic cavity inoculation and harvesting of allantoic fluid where it survived exposure at 57 degrees C for 2 hours. If the oral vaccination technique is optimized it may be used in controlling FP in scavenging and feral chickens. In conclusion, the present study has shown that FP vaccine (strain TPV-1) was safe, thermostable, immunogenic and efficacious in vaccinated chickens. PMID:19714476

  9. Efficacy of chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria tenella 5401 and chicken IFN-? or IL-2 against coccidiosis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Huang, Xinmei; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-09-01

    Chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria tenella (E. tenella) surface antigen 5401 were constructed and their efficacies against E. tenella challenge were studied. The open reading frame (ORF) of 5401 was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T2 to express the recombinant protein and the expressed recombinant protein was identified by Western blot. The ORF of 5401 and chicken cytokine gene IFN-? or IL-2 were cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 consecutively to construct DNA vaccines pVAX-5401-IFN-?, pVAX-5401-IL-2 and pVAX-5401. The expression of aim genes in vivo was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Fourteen-day-old chickens were inoculated twice at an interval of 7 days with 100?µg of plasmids pVAX-5401, pVAX-5401-IFN-? and pVAX-5401-IL-2 or 200?µg of recombinant 5401 protein by leg intramuscular injection, respectively. Seven days after the second inoculation, all chickens except the unchallenged control group were challenged orally with 5?×?10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. tenella. Seven days after challenge, all chickens were weighted and slaughtered to determine the effects of immunization. The results showed the recombinant protein was about 90?kDa and reacted with antiserum against soluble sporozoites. The animal experiment showed that all the DNA vaccines pVAX-5401, pVAX-5401-IFN-? or pVAX-5401-IL-2 and the recombinant 5401 protein could obviously alleviate body weight loss and cecal lesions as compared with non-vaccinated challenged control and empty vector pVAX1control. Furthermore, pVAX-5401-IFN-? or pVAX-5401-IL-2 induced anti-coccidial index (ACI) of 180.01 or 177.24 which were significantly higher than that of pVAX-5401. The results suggested that 5401 was an effective candidate antigen for vaccine. This finding also suggested that chicken IFN-? or IL-2 could effectively improve the efficacies of DNA vaccines against avian coccidiosis. PMID:26008611

  10. Genome-wide host responses against infectious laryngotracheitis virus vaccine infection in chicken embryo lung cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV; gallid herpesvirus 1) infection causes high mortality and huge economic losses in the poultry industry. To protect chickens against ILTV infection, chicken-embryo origin (CEO) and tissue-culture origin (TCO) vaccines have been used. However, the transmission of vaccine ILTV from vaccinated- to unvaccinated chickens can cause severe respiratory disease. Previously, host cell responses against virulent ILTV infections were determined by microarray analysis. In this study, a microarray analysis was performed to understand host-vaccine ILTV interactions at the host gene transcription level. Results The 44 K chicken oligo microarrays were used, and the results were compared to those found in virulent ILTV infection. Total RNAs extracted from vaccine ILTV infected chicken embryo lung cells at 1, 2, 3 and 4 days post infection (dpi), compared to 0 dpi, were subjected to microarray assay using the two color hybridization method. Data analysis using JMP Genomics 5.0 and the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) program showed that 213 differentially expressed genes could be grouped into a number of functional categories including tissue development, cellular growth and proliferation, cellular movement, and inflammatory responses. Moreover, 10 possible gene networks were created by the IPA program to show intermolecular connections. Interestingly, of 213 differentially expressed genes, BMP2, C8orf79, F10, and NPY were expressed distinctly in vaccine ILTV infection when compared to virulent ILTV infection. Conclusions Comprehensive knowledge of gene expression and biological functionalities of host factors during vaccine ILTV infection can provide insight into host cellular defense mechanisms compared to those of virulent ILTV. PMID:22530940

  11. Expression of chicken parvovirus VP2 in chicken embryo fibroblasts requires codon optimization for production of naked DNA and vectored Meleagrid herpesvirus type 1 vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meleagrid herpesvirus type 1 (MeHV-1) is an ideal vector for the expression of antigens from pathogenic avian organisms in order to generate vaccines. Chicken parvovirus (ChPV) is a widespread infectious virus that causes serious disease in chickens. It is one of the etiological agents largely suspe...

  12. 9 CFR 381.67 - Young chicken and squab slaughter inspection rate maximums under traditional inspection procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Young chicken and squab slaughter... INSPECTION REGULATIONS Operating Procedures § 381.67 Young chicken and squab slaughter inspection rate... inspector per minute under the traditional inspection procedure for the different young chicken and...

  13. A Eukaryotic Expression Plasmid Carrying Chicken Interleukin-18 Enhances the Response to Newcastle Disease Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaokang; Zhang, Chunjie; Wu, Tingcai; Li, Yinju

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is an important cytokine involved in innate and acquired immunity. In this study, we cloned the full-length chicken IL-18 (ChIL-18) gene from specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chicken embryo spleen cells and provided evidence that the ChIL-18 gene in a recombinant plasmid was successfully expressed in chicken DT40 cells. ChIL-18 significantly enhanced gamma interferon (IFN-?) mRNA expression in chicken splenocytes, which increased IFN-?-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by macrophages. The potential genetic adjuvant activity of the ChIL-18 plasmid was examined in chickens by coinjecting ChIL-18 plasmid and inactivated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine. ChIL-18 markedly elevated serum hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers and anti-hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (anti-HN)-specific antibody levels, induced the secretion of both Th1- (IFN-?) and Th2- (interleukin-4) type cytokines, promoted the proliferation of T and B lymphocytes, and increased the populations of CD3+ T cells and their subsets, CD3+ CD4+ and CD3+ CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, a virus challenge revealed that ChIL-18 contributed to protection against Newcastle disease virus challenge. Taken together, our data indicate that the coadministration of ChIL-18 plasmid and NDV vaccine induces a strong immune response at both the humoral and cellular levels and that ChIL-18 is a novel immunoadjuvant suitable for NDV vaccination. PMID:25355794

  14. Vaccination of chickens decreased Newcastle disease virus contamination in eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease is an important health issue of poultry causing major economic losses and inhibits trade worldwide. Vaccination is used as a control measure, but it is unknown whether vaccination will prevent virus contamination of eggs. In this study, hens were sham-vaccinated or received one or ...

  15. Cellular and Cytokine Responses in Feathers of Chickens Vaccinated Against Marek's Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study was to characterize cellular and cytokine responses as indicators of cell-mediated immune response in feathers of chickens vaccinated against Marek’s disease (MD). Feathers constitute the site of virus shedding in the case of Marek’s disease virus (MDV). The feather sample...

  16. Vaccination prevents virus contamination inside of eggs laid by newcastle disease virus infected chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease causes a severe systemic disease in chickens with viremia and high mortality. The transmission of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) through the egg has been suggested, but definitive proof of virus passing through the egg is lacking. Furthermore, the role of vaccination to mitigate any...

  17. VACCINATION WITH ALPHAVIRUS-DERIVED NEURAMINIDASE PARTIALLY PROTECTS CHICKENS AGAINST AVIAN INFLUENZA CHALLENGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies produced against the influenza hemagglutinin protein protect against avian influenza (AI) infection, whereas the role of anti-neuraminidase (NA) antibodies is less clear. We hypothesized that primary response to NA vaccination was important in protection. Using chickens, we compared three...

  18. Future HIV Vaccine Acceptability among Young Adults in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayles, Jennifer N.; Macphail, Catherine L.; Newman, Peter A.; Cunningham, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Developing and disseminating a preventive HIV vaccine is a primary scientific and public health objective. However, little is known about HIV vaccine acceptability in the high-prevalence setting of South Africa--where young adults are likely to be targeted in early dissemination efforts. This study reports on six focus groups (n = 42) conducted in…

  19. Erythrocyte antinuclear antibodies in sera of chickens hyperimmunized with group A streptococcal vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Luster, M I; Leslie, G A

    1976-01-01

    Chickens hyperimmunized with group A streptococcal vaccine often synthesize high levels of antibody to group A streptococcal carbohydrate (SACHO). Indirect immunofluorescent analysis revealed that sera of these chickens also contain antinuclear antibodies capable of reacting with chicken erythrocyte nuclei (EANA) at titers up to 2,560. Removal of the anti-SACHO antibodies from hyperimmune serum did not significantly reduce EANA titers, indicating that anti-SACHO antibodies are not responsible for the EANA reactions. The time course for antibody development as well as the immunoglobulin class distribution of EANA and anti-SACHO antibodies were very similar. Localization of EANA activity to Fab fragments indicated that the immunfluorescent reaction represents an antigen-antibody reaction. Findings point out an important consequence of using chicken immunoglobulin Y in immunofluorescent assays. The purified Fc fragment of immunoglobulin Y is cytophilic for the substrate when tested at high concentrations, which suggests that some cytophilic immunoglobulins are involved in the reaction. PMID:773827

  20. Prevalence of amyloid deposition in mature healthy chickens in the flock that previously had outbreaks of vaccine-associated amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    IBI, Kanata; MURAKAMI, Tomoaki; GODA, Wael Mohamed; KOBAYASHI, Naoki; ISHIGURO, Naotaka; YANAI, Tokuma

    2015-01-01

    Avian amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is commonly observed in adult birds with chronic inflammation, such as that caused by bacterial infection. We previously described vaccine-associated AA amyloidosis in juvenile chickens. In this study, the prevalence of amyloid deposition was measured in mature healthy chickens that survived a previous outbreak of avian AA amyloidosis while they were juveniles. Herein, we analyzed the amyloid deposition in mature chickens and compared the prevalence of amyloid deposition with juvenile chickens obtained in our previous study (Murakami et al., 2013). We found that: 1) amyloid deposition in the liver was absent in mature chickens, while juvenile chickens had a rate of 24%; 2) amyloid deposition in the spleen was observed in 36% of juvenile chickens and in 40% of mature chickens; 3) amyloid deposition in the pectoral muscle of mature chickens (43.75%) was approximately half that of juvenile chickens (88%). These results suggest that additional amyloid deposition in chickens previously exposed to AA amyloidosis may not worsen with age. Further, amyloid deposition in chickens may tend to regress when causative factors, such as vaccinations and/or chronic inflammation, are absent. PMID:25985816

  1. Prevalence of amyloid deposition in mature healthy chickens in the flock that previously had outbreaks of vaccine-associated amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ibi, Kanata; Murakami, Tomoaki; Goda, Wael Mohamed; Kobayashi, Naoki; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Yanai, Tokuma

    2015-11-01

    Avian amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is commonly observed in adult birds with chronic inflammation, such as that caused by bacterial infection. We previously described vaccine-associated AA amyloidosis in juvenile chickens. In this study, the prevalence of amyloid deposition was measured in mature healthy chickens that survived a previous outbreak of avian AA amyloidosis while they were juveniles. Herein, we analyzed the amyloid deposition in mature chickens and compared the prevalence of amyloid deposition with juvenile chickens obtained in our previous study (Murakami et al., 2013). We found that: 1) amyloid deposition in the liver was absent in mature chickens, while juvenile chickens had a rate of 24%; 2) amyloid deposition in the spleen was observed in 36% of juvenile chickens and in 40% of mature chickens; 3) amyloid deposition in the pectoral muscle of mature chickens (43.75%) was approximately half that of juvenile chickens (88%). These results suggest that additional amyloid deposition in chickens previously exposed to AA amyloidosis may not worsen with age. Further, amyloid deposition in chickens may tend to regress when causative factors, such as vaccinations and/or chronic inflammation, are absent. PMID:25985816

  2. Effects of two infectious bursal disease vaccine virus strains on hepatic microsomal enzyme activities in chickens.

    PubMed

    Crni?, Andreja Prevendar; Sakar, D; Pompe-Gotal, Jelena; Bidin, Z; Lojki?, Ivana; Cajavec, S

    2006-06-01

    The influence of two infectious bursal disease vaccines on the activities of hepatic microsomal enzymes aniline hydroxylase, ethylmorphine N-demethylase, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase, aryl sulphotransferase and p-nitrophenol UDP-glucuronyltransferase was investigated in chickens. The vaccines contained attenuated Winterfield 2512 and VMG-91 strains, respectively. The activities of enzymes were determined on postvaccination days 0, 2, 5 and 7. At the same time, post-mitochondrial supernatant, cytosolic and microsomal pellet protein concentrations were determined. As expected, the antibody titres against infectious bursal disease virus in the serum were increased in both tested groups in relation to each administered vaccine. Using RT-PCR, the presence of the VP2 gene fragment of virus in the liver of chicken was demonstrated 4 and 6 h after vaccination. The results of this study suggest that the two commercial vaccines modulate the activities of five enzymes tested, and that the two attenuated vaccines applied triggered induction and/or inhibition of phases I and II of biotransformation enzyme activities. PMID:16841765

  3. INFLUENCE OF MAREK'S DISEASE VACCINES ON THE RESPONSE OF COMMERCIAL BROILER BREEDER CHICKENS TO INFECTION WITH SUBGROUP J AVIAN LEUKOSIS VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chickens of three commercial broiler breeder lines and two experimental lines were inoculated with strain ADOL-Hc1 of subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) at hatch; chickens were also vaccinated with serotype 1, 2 or 3 Marek's disease (MD) vaccines. Vaccinated and unvaccinated, ALV-J-infected chi...

  4. Efficacy of a DNA vaccine delivered in attenuated Salmonella typhimurium against Eimeria tenella infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Du, Aifang; Wang, Suhua

    2005-06-01

    The efficacy of an oral DNA vaccine carrying the Eimeria tenella 5401 antigen gene delivered by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium was examined in an experimental challenge study. The DNA vaccine preparation was made by transforming the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3-5401 into the attenuated S. typhimurium strain (Dam(-) and PhoP(-)) (designated hereafter as ZJ111/pcDNA3-5401). The chickens were randomly divided into six groups, 50 per group. Group A were given PBS as control. Chickens in group B were fed with 10(8) colony forming units (CFU) of attenuated S. typhimurium carrying pcDNA3. Group C were immunised with 100 microg of the recombinant 5401 protein via intramuscular injection. Groups D to F orally received ZJ111/pcDNA3-5401 at doses of 10(7), 10(8) and 10(9)CFU per chicken, respectively. All immunisations were boosted 2 weeks later. The immunised chickens were challenged with 6x10(4) homologous sporulated oocysts 14 days after the second immunisation. No significant differences in body weight were detected between the groups before immunisation and at week 4 after the booster immunisation. The ZJ111/pcDNA3-5401 was eventually eliminated from the spleen and liver on week 6 post-immunisation. The plasmid pcDNA3-5401 was stably maintained in over 80% of the attenuated S. typhimurium population after 100 generations of growth in antibiotic-free media. Oral immunisation of chickens with ZJ111/pcDNA3-5401 elicited specific humoral responses and stimulated proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The lymphocyte proliferation response was significantly higher in all vaccinated groups than in the control chickens. Antibody response was significantly lower in group C than in groups immunised with strain ZJ111/pcDNA3-5401. Vaccination with the strain ZJ111/pcDNA3-5401 at 10(8) (group E) and 10(9) (group F) CFU per chicken provided 55.0 and 57.5% protection against E. tenella challenge, respectively. These results have important implications for the development of DNA vaccines against avian coccidiosis by bacteria-vectored oral delivery system. PMID:15890351

  5. Presence of infectious bursal disease virus in chicken meat and effect of vaccination in decreasing the virus titers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide and impacts chicken meat importation in countries with self-declared freedom. This study sought to determine the presence of IBDV in chicken meat and the role of vaccination as a mitigation strategy. In...

  6. Evaluation of a multi-epitope subunit vaccine against avian leukosis virus subgroup J in chickens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingqing; Ma, Xingjiang; Wang, Fangkun; Li, Hongmei; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2015-12-01

    The intricate sequence and antigenic variability of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) have led to unprecedented difficulties in the development of vaccines. Much experimental evidence demonstrates that ALV-J mutants have caused immune evasion and pose a challenge for traditional efforts to develop effective vaccines. To investigate the potential of a multi-epitope vaccination strategy to prevent chickens against ALV-J infections, a recombinant chimeric multi-epitope protein X (rCMEPX) containing both immunodominant B and T epitope concentrated domains selected from the major structural protein of ALV-J using bioinformatics approach was expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3). Its immunogenicity and protective efficacy was studied in chickens. The results showed that rCMEPX could elicit neutralizing antibodies and cellular responses, and antibodies induced by rCMEPX could specifically recognize host cell naturally expressed ALV-J proteins, which indicated that the rCMEPX is a good immunogen. Challenge experiments showed 80% chickens that received rCMEPX were well protected against ALV-J challenge. This is the first report of a chimeric multi-epitope protein as a potential immunogen against ALV-J. PMID:26196055

  7. HPV Vaccine Information for Young Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the human papillomavirus (HPV) types that cause most cervical cancers as well as some cancers of the anus, ... Cervarix]. Should girls and women be screened for cervical cancer before getting vaccinated? Girls and women do not ...

  8. Immune Responses to Virulent and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Bronchitis Viruses in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Rajesh; Chantrey, Julian; Ganapathy, Kannan

    2015-11-01

    Infectious bronchitis (IB) is an acute and highly contagious chicken viral disease, causing severe economic losses to poultry producers worldwide. In the last few decades, infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) has been extensively studied, but knowledge of immune responses to virulent or vaccine strains of IBVs remains limited. This review focuses on fundamental aspects of immune responses against IBV, including the role of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in identification of conserved viral structures and the role of different components of innate immunity (e.g., heterophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, acute phase protein, and cytokines). Studies on adaptive immune activation and the role of humoral and cellular immunity in IBV clearance are also reviewed. Multiple interlinking immune responses are essential for protection against virulent IBVs, including passive, innate, adaptive, and effector T cells active at mucosal surfaces. Although the development of approaches for chicken transcriptome and proteome analyses have greatly helped the understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms for immunity, there are still major knowledge gaps, such as the role of mucosal and cellular responses to IBVs. In view of recent reports of emergent IBV variants in many countries, there is renewed interest in a more complete understanding of poultry immune responses to both virulent and vaccine strains of IBVs. This will be critical for developing new vaccine or vaccination strategies and other intervention programs. PMID:26301315

  9. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Dias de Oliveira, Barbara C. E. P.; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Maia de Souza, Yuli Rodrigues; Ferro, Jessica Maria dos Santos; da Silva, Igor José; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Guedes, Priscila Tavares; dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo Cunha; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system. PMID:26371874

  10. Positive regulation of humoral and innate immune responses induced by inactivated Avian Influenza Virus vaccine in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Fatma; Hassanin, Ola

    2015-12-01

    Avian Influenza (AI) vaccines are widely used for mammals and birds in a trial to eliminate the Avian Influenza virus (AIV) infection from the world. However and up till now the virus is still existed via modulation of its antigenic structure to evade the pressure of host immune responses. For a complete understanding of the immune responses following AI vaccination in chickens, the modulations of the chickens humoral immune responses and interferon-alpha signaling pathway, as a fundamental part of the innate immune responses, were investigated. In our study, we measured the humoral immune response using hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests. In addition, chicken interferon-alpha pathway components was measured at RNA levels using Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) following one dose of inactivated H5N1 influenza vaccine at 14 days of age. In this study, the protective levels of humoral antibody responses were observed at 14, 21 and 28 days following immunization with inactivated (Re-1/H5N1) AI vaccine. In the chicken spleen cells, up regulation in the chicken interferon-alpha pathway components (MX1 & IRF7) was existed as early as 48 h post vaccination and remained until 28 days post vaccination at the endogenous state. However, after the recall with ex-vivo stimulation, the up regulation was more pronounced in the transcriptional factor (IRF7) compared to the antiviral gene (MX1) at 28 days post vaccination. So far, from our results it appears that the inactivated H5N1 vaccine can trigger the chicken interferon-alpha signaling pathway as well as it can elicit protective humoral antibody responses. PMID:26329833

  11. Marek's disease vaccination, with turkey herpesvirus, and enrofloxacin modulate the activities of hepatic microsomal enzymes in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Sakar, D; Prukner-Radovci?, Estela; Prevendar Crni?, Andreja; Pompe-Gotal, Jelena; Ragland, W L; Mazija, H

    2004-01-01

    Chickens were vaccinated against Marek's disease intramuscularly at one day of age. Enrofloxacin was given ad libitum in the drinking water at concentrations of 50, 100 and 250 mg/L from 8 days to 13 days of age when the animals were killed and the activities of cytochrome P-450 enzymes in the liver were measured. Vaccinated non-treated chickens served as a positive control. A negative control group was neither vaccinated nor treated. Vaccination decreased the activity of aniline hydroxylase and ethylmorphine N-demethylase in the positive control group. Subsequent application of enrofloxacin in the lowest concentration (50 mg/L) decreased, while that given at the highest level (250 mg/L) significantly increased the activity of the same microsomal enzymes. Relative liver weights and concentrations of proteins in 9000 x g supernatant were not affected by vaccination or treatment. PMID:15168752

  12. Inactivated vaccine with adjuvants consisting of pattern recognition receptor agonists confers protection against avian influenza viruses in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yinghua; Lu, Jihu; Wu, Peipei; Liu, Zhenxing; Tian, Zhen; Zha, Guofei; Chen, Hui; Wang, Qiaochu; Wang, Qiaoxiu; Hou, Fengxiang; Kang, Sang-Moo; Hou, Jibo

    2014-01-01

    Use of adjuvant containing pathogen pattern recognition receptor agonists is one of the effective strategies to enhance the efficacy of licensed vaccines. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of avian influenza vaccines containing an adjuvant (CVCVA5) which was composed of polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic, resiquimod, imiquimod, muramyl dipeptide and levomisole. Avian influenza vaccines adjuvanted with CVCVA5 were found to induce significantly higher titers of hemagglutiniton inhibition antibodies (P ? 0.01) than those of commercial vaccines at 2-, 3- and 4-week post vaccination in both specific pathogen free (SPF) chickens and field application. Furthermore, virus shedding was reduced in SPF chickens immunized with H9-CVCVA5 vaccine after H9 subtype heterologous virus challenge. The ratios of both CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ lymphocytes were slowly elevated in chickens immunized with H9-CVCVA5 vaccine. Lymphocytes adoptive transfer study indicates that CD8+ T lymphocyte subpopulation might have contributed to improved protection against heterologous virus challenge. Results of this study suggest that the adjuvant CVCVA5 was capable of enhancing the potency of existing avian influenza vaccines by increasing humoral and cellular immune response. PMID:24894132

  13. Effects of Cytosine-phosphate-Guanosine Oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) on vaccination and immunization of neonatal chickens 

    E-print Network

    Barri, Adriana

    2005-02-17

    -1 EFFECTS OF CYTOSINE-PHOSPHATE-GUANOSINE OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDES (CPG-ODN) ON VACCINATION AND IMMUNIZATION OF NEONATAL CHICKENS A Thesis by ADRIANA BARRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... CHICKENS A Thesis by ADRIANA BARRI Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by...

  14. Cytokine Gene Expression in Lung Mononuclear Cells of Chickens Vaccinated with Herpesvirus of Turkeys and Infected with Marek's Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Payvand; Brisbin, Jennifer T; Read, Leah R; Sharif, Shayan

    2015-11-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) enters the chicken host through the respiratory system. However, little is known about the host immune responses induced by MDV in the lungs. To characterize these responses, chickens were vaccinated with herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT) and challenged with the RB1B strain of MDV via the respiratory route. Lung mononuclear cells of vaccinated only, challenged only, vaccinated and challenged, as well as age-matched controls were isolated at 4, 10, and 21 days post-infection. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the expression of various cytokines. There was significant upregulation of interferon (IFN)-? and interleukin (IL)-10 in lung mononuclear cells of HVT-vaccinated and RB1B challenged and unvaccinated and RB1B challenged chickens. However, in lung mononuclear cells isolated from chickens that were vaccinated with HVT but remained uninfected, there was an upregulation of IL-4 and IL-13. This study indicates that MDV- and HVT-associated cytokines expressed by lung mononuclear cells are temporally regulated and that these cytokines may be involved in immunity against the virus. PMID:26447971

  15. Protection Against Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens by Regulated Delayed Lysis Salmonella Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanlong; Mo, Hua; Willingham, Crystal; Wang, Shifeng; Park, Jie-Yeun; Kong, Wei; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy

    2015-12-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE), caused by Gram-positive Clostridium perfringens type A strains, has gained more attention in the broiler industry due to governmental restrictions affecting the use of growth-promoting antibiotics in feed. To date, there is only one commercial NE vaccine available, based on the C. perfringens alpha toxin. However, recent work has suggested that the NetB toxin, not alpha toxin, is the most critical virulence factor for causing NE. These findings notwithstanding, it is clear from prior research that immune responses against both toxins can provide some protection against NE. In this study, we delivered a carboxyl-terminal fragment of alpha toxin and a GST-NetB fusion protein using a novel attenuated Salmonella vaccine strain designed to lyse after 6-10 rounds of replication in the chicken host. We immunized birds with vaccine strains producing each protein individually, a mixture of the two strains, or with a single vaccine strain that produced both proteins. Immunization with strains producing either of the single proteins was not protective, but immunization with a mixture of the two or with a single strain producing both proteins resulted in protective immunity. The vaccine strain synthesizing both PlcC and GST-NetB was able to elicit strong production of intestinal IgA, IgY, and IgM antibodies and significantly protect broilers against C. perfringens challenge against both mild and severe challenges. Although not part of our experimental plan, the broiler chicks we obtained for these studies were apparently contaminated during transit from the hatchery with group D Salmonella. Despite this drawback, the vaccines worked well, indicating applicability to real-world conditions. PMID:26629620

  16. Avian CD154 enhances humoral and cellular immune responses induced by an adenovirus vector-based vaccine in chickens.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Ramos, Oliberto; González Pose, Alain; Gómez-Puerta, Silvia; Noda Gomez, Julia; Vega Redondo, Armando; Águila Benites, Julio César; Suárez Amarán, Lester; Parra, Natalie C; Toledo Alonso, Jorge R

    2011-05-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors have emerged as an attractive system for veterinary vaccines development. However, for poultry vaccination a very important criterion for an ideal vaccine is its low cost. The objective of this study was to test the ability of chicken CD154 to enhance the immunogenicity of an adenoviral vector-based vaccine against avian influenza virus in order to reduce the amount of antigen required to induce an effective immune response in avian. Chickens were vaccinated with three different doses of adenoviral vectors encoding either HA (AdHA), or HA fused to extracellular domain chicken's CD154 (AdHACD). Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay and relative quantification of IFN-? showed that the adenoviral vector encoding for the chimeric antigen is able to elicit an improved humoral and cellular immune response, which demonstrated that CD154 can be used as a molecular adjuvant allowing to reduce in about 50-fold the amount of adenoviral vector vaccine required to induce an effective immune response. PMID:21190734

  17. Adjuvant effects of Sijunzi decoction in chickens orally vaccinated with attenuated Newcastle-disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dianxin; Shi, Wanyu; Zhao, Yantao; Zhong, Xiuhui

    2012-01-01

    Many Chinese Herbal medicines (CHMs) and their components have been reported to enhance immunity. In this study, the capacity for the Chinese herbal medicine, oral administration Sijunzi Decoction (SJZD) in stimulating Newcastle disease virus(NDV) immunity in chickens was examined. Serum was sampled on days 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 and tissues were collected on days 20, 40 and 60, respectively. The immune responses were determined by means of hemagglutination inhibition test, immunohistochemistry examination and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that SJZD could increase the antibody titers and the area coefficient of IgA secreting cells, promote the expression of IL-2 mRNA in the whole immune period and IFN-? mRNA was increased in the initial stage. The SJZD used was safe with no adverse effects on chicken weight or survival, providing evidence for the use of SJZD as an oral adjuvant. PMID:23983329

  18. Comparison of live Eimeria vaccination with in-feed Salinomycin on growth and immune status in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coccidiosis vaccines and coccidiostat drugs are commonly used to control Eimeria infection during commercial poultry production. The present study was conducted to compare the relative effectiveness of these two disease control strategies in broiler chickens in an experimental research facility. B...

  19. Genomic sequence analysis of the United States infectious laryngotracheitis vaccine strains chicken embryo origin (CEO) and tissue culture origin (TCO)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomic sequences of low and high passages of U.S. infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) vaccine strains chicken embryo origin (CEO) and tissue culture origin (TCO) these strains were determined using hybrid next generation sequencing in order to define relevant genomic changes associated with att...

  20. A Novel Recombinant BCG Vaccine Encoding Eimeria tenella Rhomboid and Chicken IL-2 Induces Protective Immunity Against Coccidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiuyue; Chen, Lifeng; Zheng, Jun; Cai, Ning; Gong, Pengtao; Li, Shuhong; Li, He

    2014-01-01

    A novel recombinant Bacille Calmette-Guerin (rBCG) vaccine co-expressed Eimeria tenella rhomboid and cytokine chicken IL-2 (chIL-2) was constructed, and its efficacy against E. tenella challenge was observed. The rhomboid gene of E. tenella and chIL-2 gene were subcloned into integrative expression vector pMV361, producing vaccines rBCG pMV361-rho and pMV361-rho-IL2. Animal experiment via intranasal and subcutaneous route in chickens was carried out to evaluate the immune efficacy of the vaccines. The results indicated that these rBCG vaccines could obviously alleviate cacal lesions and oocyst output. Intranasal immunization with pMV361-rho and pMV361-rho-IL2 elicited better protective immunity against E. tenella than subcutaneous immunization. Splenocytes from chickens immunized with either rBCG pMV361-rho and pMV361-rho-IL2 had increased CD4+ and CD8+ cell production. Our data indicate recombinant BCG is able to impart partial protection against E. tenella challenge and co-expression of cytokine with antigen was an effective strategy to improve vaccine immunity. PMID:25031464

  1. Development of a DNA vaccine for chicken infectious anemia and its immunogenicity studies using high mobility group box 1 protein as a novel immunoadjuvant indicated induction of promising protective immune responses.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Pradeep Mahadev; Dhama, Kuldeep; Rawool, Deepak Bhiva; Wani, Mohd Yaqoob; Tiwari, Ruchi; Singh, Shambhu Dayal; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Chicken infectious anaemia (CIA) is an economically important and emerging poultry disease reported worldwide. Current CIA vaccines have limitations like, the inability of the virus to grow to high titres in embryos/cell cultures, possession of residual pathogenicity and a risk of reversion to virulence. In the present study, a DNA vaccine, encoding chicken infectious anaemia virus (CIAV) VP1 and VP2 genes, was developed and co-administered with truncated chicken high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1?C) protein in young chicks for the evaluation of vaccine immune response. CIAV VP1 and VP2 genes were cloned in pTARGET while HMGB1?C in PET32b vector. In vitro expression of these gene constructs was evaluated by Western blotting. Further, recombinant HMGB1?C was evaluated for its biological activity. The CIAV DNA vaccine administration in specific pathogen free chicks resulted in moderately protective ELISA antibody titres in the range of 4322.87 ± 359.72 to 8288.19 ± 136.38, increased CD8(+) cells, and a higher titre was observed by co-administration of novel adjuvant (HMGB1?C) and booster immunizations. The use of vaccine with adjuvant showed achieving antibody titres nearly 8500, titre considered as highly protective, which indicates that co-immunization of HMGB1?C may have a strong adjuvant activity on CIAV DNA vaccine induced immune responses. The able potential of HMGB1 protein holding strong adjuvant activity could be exploited further with trials with vaccines for other important pathogens for achieving the required protective immune responses. PMID:25448094

  2. Reactogenicity of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in young children: Pronounced reactions by previous successive vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Okada, Chika; Fujieda, Megumi; Fukushima, Wakaba; Ohfuji, Satoko; Kondo, Kyoko; Maeda, Akiko; Nakano, Takashi; Kaji, Masaro; Hirota, Yoshio

    2015-07-01

    In order to assess factors associated with reactogenicity of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) among young children, data on 1538 vaccinees aged 0-5 years in a previous vaccine effectiveness study were analyzed. The most frequent reaction was redness (19%), followed by induration, swelling, itching, and pain (6-12%); there were no serious adverse events. For some local reactions, multivariate analyses indicated associations of younger age, preschool attendance, presence of siblings, and allergy with lower risk, and use of thinner needles with higher risk. Most notably, administration of one or more IIV3 vaccines during the previous 3 seasons was positively associated with each local reaction (adjusted odds ratios: 3.6-5.4). For subjects aged ?3 years, prior successive annual vaccinations were associated with substantially increased local reactions, with clear dose-response relationships (P for trend: <0.001 for each); for example, an 9.8-fold greater risk of swelling following three successive annual vaccinations before the study season. PMID:26044492

  3. Vaccination of chickens against coccidiosis ameliorates drug resistance in commercial poultry production

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, H. David; Jeffers, Thomas K.

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is a problem wherever livestock are raised under intensive conditions and drugs are used to combat parasitic infections. This is particularly true for the anticoccidial agents used for the prevention of coccidiosis caused by protozoa of the apicomplexan genus Eimeria in poultry. Resistance has been documented for all the dozen or so drugs approved for use in chickens and varying levels of resistance is present for those currently employed. A possible solution may be the introduction of drug-sensitive parasites into the houses where poultry are raised so that they may replace such drug-resistant organisms. This can be achieved by utilizing live vaccines that contain strains of Eimeria that were isolated before most anticoccidial compounds were introduced. Such strains are inherently drug-sensitive. Practical proposals to achieve this objective involve the alternation of vaccination with medication (known as rotation programs) in successive flocks reared in the same poultry house. A proposal for a yearly broiler production cycle involving chemotherapy and vaccination is presented. There are few, if any, examples in veterinary parasitology where it has proved possible to restore sensitivity to drugs used to control a widespread parasite. Further research is necessary to ascertain whether this can result in sustainable and long-term control of Eimeria infections in poultry. PMID:25516830

  4. Persistence of the tissue culture origin vaccine for infectious laryngotracheitis virus in commercial chicken flocks in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Parra, Silvana H Santander; Nuñez, Luis F; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2015-11-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a respiratory disease of great importance that causes serious economic losses in the poultry industry. Its control is based on biosecurity procedures and vaccination programs that use live attenuated vaccines such as tissue culture origin (TCO), chicken embryo origin (CEO), and vectored vaccines. However, problems have been reported, such as the reversion of virulence, virus latency, and field virus outbreaks. Several molecular techniques have been developed to differentiate between the field and vaccine strains. This study was conducted to determine the presence of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) in Brazil from 2012 to 2014. PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) was used to detect and differentiate ILTV strains; DNA sequencing and predictive RFLP analysis were also used for this purpose. Molecular analysis detected the presence of ILTV in 15 samples that were characterized as strains of TCO vaccine origin. This study showed that the ILTV TCO vaccine strain has been circulating in commercial chicken flocks in Brazil since its introduction during the 2002 outbreak. PMID:26500264

  5. EFFICACY OF TWO H5N9 INACTIVATED VACCINES AGAINST CHALLENGE WITH A RECENT H5N1 HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA ISOLATED FROM A CHICKEN IN THAILAND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy of two avian influenza (AI) H5 inactivated vaccines containing either an American (A/turkey/Wisconsin/68 H5N9, H5N9-WI) or a Eurasian isolate (A/chicken/Italy/22A/98 H5N9 or H5N9-It). Three-week-old SPF chickens were vaccinated once and challeng...

  6. Design of a predicted MHC restricted short peptide immunodiagnostic and vaccine candidate for Fowl adenovirus C in chicken infection

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia-Olarte, Hugo; Requena, David; Ramirez, Manuel; Saravia, Luis E; Izquierdo, Ray; Falconi-Agapito, Francesca; Zavaleta, Milagros; Best, Iván; Fernández-Díaz, Manolo; Zimic, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Fowl adenoviruses (FAdVs) are the ethiologic agents of multiple pathologies in chicken. There are five different species of FAdVs grouped as FAdV-A, FAdV-B, FAdV-C, FAdV-D, and FAdV-E. It is of interest to develop immunodiagnostics and vaccine candidate for Peruvian FAdV-C in chicken infection using MHC restricted short peptide candidates. We sequenced the complete genome of one FAdV strain isolated from a chicken of a local farm. A total of 44 protein coding genes were identified in each genome. We sequenced twelve Cobb chicken MHC alleles from animals of different farms in the central coast of Peru, and subsequently determined three optimal human MHC-I and four optimal human MHC-II substitute alleles for MHC-peptide prediction. The potential MHC restricted short peptide epitope-like candidates were predicted using human specific (with determined suitable chicken substitutes) NetMHC MHC-peptide prediction model with web server features from all the FAdV genomes available. FAdV specific peptides with calculated binding values to known substituted chicken MHC-I and MHC-II were further filtered for diagnostics and potential vaccine epitopes. Promiscuity to the 3/4 optimal human MHC-I/II alleles and conservation among the available FAdV genomes was considered in this analysis. The localization on the surface of the protein was considered for class II predicted peptides. Thus, a set of class I and class II specific peptides from FAdV were reported in this study. Hence, a multiepitopic protein was built with these peptides, and subsequently tested to confirm the production of specific antibodies in chicken. PMID:26664030

  7. Vaccination with Recombinant RNA Replicon Particles Protects Chickens from H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Halbherr, Stefan J.; Brostoff, Terza; Tippenhauer, Merve; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Zimmer, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*?G(HA) was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×108 infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade). Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry. PMID:23762463

  8. Immunoreactivity and morphological changes of bursal follicles in chickens infected with vaccine or wild-type strains of the infectious bursal disease virus

    PubMed Central

    AIHARA, Naoyuki; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; HIKICHI, Nanase; OCHIAI, Mariko; HOSODA, Yuko; ISHIKAWA, Yoko; SHIMAZAKI, Yoko; OISHI, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is characterized by immunosuppression due to the depletion of lymphocytes in the atrophied bursa of Fabricius (BF). We have sometimes encountered contradictory findings: chickens infected with the vaccine IBD virus (IBDV) strain have sometimes exhibited a highly atrophied BF, but not immunosuppression. In this study, chickens administered vaccine or wild-type strains of IBDV were later vaccinated with the B1 strain of the Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Bursal changes were examined histologically with a focus on the bursal follicle. The immunoreactivity to NDV was also evaluated with the hemagglutination inhibition test. In gross examination, we observed a few chickens with a severely atrophied BF in vaccine strain-administered groups (vaccine groups), and the level of severity was the same as that in the wild-type strain-administered group (wild-type group). However, these chickens retained humoral antibody responses to NDV and were revealed to possess a higher number of bursal follicles than those of the wild-type group. These results indicated that macroscopic evaluation dose not accurately reflect the immunoreactivity and degree of bursal damage in IBDV-administered chickens. We also found non-immunosuppressed chickens in the wild-type group. These non-immunosuppressed chickens retained a significantly higher number of normal follicles and total follicles according to our statistical analysis. Furthermore, a high correlation coefficient between the NDV-HI titer and the number of normal follicles was found in the wild-type group. These results implied that the retained number of normal follicles is important for the immunoreactivity of chickens infected with IBDV. PMID:25866403

  9. Protective Efficacy of a Single Dose of Baculovirus Hemagglutinin-Based Vaccine in Chickens and Ducks Against Homologous and Heterologous H5N1 Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Hye; Song, Byung Min; Yum, Jung; Kim, Ji An; Oh, Seung Kyoo; Kim, Hyun Soo; Cho, Gil Jae

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Outbreaks of the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus in poultry and humans are ongoing. Vaccination is an efficient method for prevention of H5N1 infection. Using chickens and ducks, we assessed the efficacy of a vaccine comprising H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA) protein produced in a baculovirus expression system. The immunized chickens and ducks were protected against lethal infection by H5N1 in an antigen dose-dependent manner. Complete protection against homologous challenge and partial protection against heterologous challenge were achieved in chickens immunized with 5??g HA protein and in ducks immunized with 10??g HA protein. The IgG antibody subtype was mainly detected in the sera and tissues, including the lungs. The neuraminidase (NA) inhibition assay was negative in immunized chickens and ducks. Our results indicated that the expressed HA protein by baculovirus was immunogenic to both chickens and ducks, and the immunized chickens and ducks were protected from the lethal infections of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, though ducks required more HA protein than chickens to be protected. Also, baculovirus HA-vaccinated poultry can be differentiated from infected poultry by NA inhibition assay. PMID:25211640

  10. Improved immune responses to a bivalent vaccine of Newcastle disease and avian influenza in chickens by ginseng stem-leaf saponins.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Shi, F S; Hu, S

    2015-10-15

    Our previous investigation demonstrated that ginseng stem-leaf saponins (GSLS) derived from the stems and leaves of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer promoted humoral and gut mucosal immunity in chickens vaccinated with live infectious bursa disease vaccine. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of GSLS on the immune response to a bivalent inactive vaccine of Newcastle disease (ND) and avian influenza (AI) in chickens immunosuppressed by cyclophosphamide (Cy). One hundred and sixty-eight specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens were randomly divided into 7 groups, each containing 24 birds. Chickens in groups 3-7 received intramuscular injection of Cy at 100mg/kg BW for 3 days to induce immunosuppression. Groups 1 and 2 were injected with saline solution in the same way as groups 3-7. Following injection of Cy, groups 4-7 were orally administrated GSLS (2.5, 5 and 10mg/kg BW) or astragalus polysaccharide (APS) (200mg/L) in drinking water for 7 days; groups 1-3 were not medicated and served as control birds. After administration of GSLS or APS, groups 2-7 were subcutaneously injected with a bivalent inactive vaccine of ND and AI. After that, serum was sampled for detecting antibody titers by HI, spleen was collected for lymphocyte proliferation assay, and duodenum tissues were collected for measurement of IgA-secreting (IgA+) cells and intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (iIELs). The results showed that injection of Cy significantly suppressed immunity in chickens; oral administration of GSLS before immunization recovered splenocyte proliferation induced by ConA and LPS, and the numbers of IgA+ cells and iIELs as well as the specific antibody response to a bivalent inactive vaccine of ND and AIin immunosuppressed chickens treated with Cy. Therefore, GSLS may be the potential agent to improve vaccination in immunosuppressed chickens. PMID:26277227

  11. Improvements to the hemagglutination inhibition test for serological assessment of recombinant fowlpox-H5-avian-influenza vaccination in chickens and its use along with an agar gel immunodiffusion test for differentiating infected from noninfected vaccinated animals.

    PubMed

    Swayne, David E; Avellaneda, Gloria; Mickle, Thomas R; Pritchard, Nikki; Cruz, Julio; Bublot, Michel

    2007-09-01

    In general, avian influenza (AI) vaccines protect chickens from morbidity and mortality and reduce, but do not completely prevent, replication of wild AI viruses in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of vaccinated chickens. Therefore, surveillance programs based on serological testing must be developed to differentiate vaccinated flocks infected with wild strains of AI virus from noninfected vaccinated flocks in order to evaluate the success of vaccination in a control program and allow continuation of national and international commerce of poultry and poultry products. In this study, chickens were immunized with a commercial recombinant fowlpox virus vaccine containing an H5 hemagglutinin gene from A/turkey/Ireland/83 (H5N8) avian influenza (AI) virus (rFP-H5) and evaluated for correlation of immunological response by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) or agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) tests and determination of protection following challenge with a high pathogenicity AI (HPAI) virus. In two different trials, chickens immunized with the rFP-H5 vaccine did not develop AGID antibodies because the vaccine lacks AI nucleoprotein and matrix genes, but 0%-100% had HI antibodies, depending on the AI virus strain used in the HI test, the HI antigen inactivation procedure, and whether the birds had been preimmunized against fowlpox virus. The most consistent and highest HI titers were observed when using A/turkey/Ireland/83 (H5N8) HPAI virus strain as the beta-propiolactone (BPL)-inactivated HI test antigen, which matched the hemagglutinin gene insert in the rFP-H5 vaccine. In addition, higher HI titers were observed if ether or a combination of ether and BPL-inactivated virus was used in place of the BPL-inactivated virus. The rFP-H5 vaccinated chickens survived HPAI challenge and antibodies were detected by both AGID and HI tests. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the rFP-H5 vaccine allowed easy serological differentiation of infected from noninfected birds in vaccinated populations of chickens when using standard AGID and HI tests. PMID:17992929

  12. An infected chicken kidney cell co-culture ELISpot for enhanced detection of T cell responses to avian influenza and vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Peroval, Marylene; Boyd, Amy; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Smith, Adrian; Butter, Colin

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the immune responses of chickens to the influenza virus is essential for the development of new strategies of vaccination and control. We have developed a method incorporating infected chicken kidney cells (CKC) in culture with splenocytes in an IFN? ELISpot assay to enumerate ex vivo responses against influenza virus antigens. Splenocytes from birds challenged with influenza showed specific responses to the influenza virus, with responding cells being mainly CD8 positive. The utility of the assay was also demonstrated in the detection of an antigen specific enhancement of IFN? producing cells from birds vaccinated with recombinant Fowlpox vectored influenza nucleoprotein and matrix protein. PMID:25450002

  13. Different immune responses to three different vaccines following H6N1 low pathogenic avian influenza virus challenge in Taiwanese local chicken breeds

    E-print Network

    2011-06-03

    , and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background Since 1982, National Chung-Hsing University is maintain- ing six local chicken breeds: Hsin-Yi, Ju-Chi and Hua-Tung were collected from small villages in Taiwan, Quemoy... against Marek’s disease and ND. At two weeks of age, chicks were vaccinated against ND, IB, IBD, Fowl Pox and Avian Reovirus infec- tion. At four weeks of age, chickens were vaccinated against ND, IB, IBD and Infectious Laryngotracheitis. The H6N1 LPAIV (A...

  14. Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and cereals differently affect gut development in broiler chickens and young pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haoyu; Ivarsson, Emma; Lundh, Torbjörn; Lindberg, Jan Erik

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fiber, resistant to host-mediated digestion in the small intestine due to lack of endogenous enzymes, impacts many facets of animal health and is associated with gut development especially in young monogastrics. Furthermore, it can be used as in-feed antibiotic alternative. Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) forage with high content of pectin (uronic acids as building blocks) is a novel class of dietary fiber that is chemically different from cereal grains (with high content of arabinoxylans). In the present study, we investigated effects of dietary inclusion of chicory forage on digestibility, gut morphology and microbiota in broilers and young pigs. In the chicken experiment, 160 1-d old broiler chicks were fed 3 nutritionally balanced diets for 30 d including a cereal-based diet and 2 diets with part of the cereals substituted with 60 and 120 g/kg chicory forage (CF60 and CF120), whereas in the pig experiment, 18 seven-wk old Yorkshire pigs were fed 3 diets for 18 d including a cereal-based diet and 2 diets with 80 and 160 g/kg chicory forage inclusion (CF80 and CF160). Our results showed that young pigs were capable to utilize chicory forage well with higher total tract apparent digestibility (TTAD) of all fiber fractions, particularly uronic acid, compared with the control (P?chickens fed on diet CF120 (P?chickens. The alteration of cecal mucosal thickness was further positively correlated with TTAD of non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) and its constituent sugars (P?chickens. PMID:24341997

  15. Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and cereals differently affect gut development in broiler chickens and young pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fiber, resistant to host-mediated digestion in the small intestine due to lack of endogenous enzymes, impacts many facets of animal health and is associated with gut development especially in young monogastrics. Furthermore, it can be used as in-feed antibiotic alternative. Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) forage with high content of pectin (uronic acids as building blocks) is a novel class of dietary fiber that is chemically different from cereal grains (with high content of arabinoxylans). In the present study, we investigated effects of dietary inclusion of chicory forage on digestibility, gut morphology and microbiota in broilers and young pigs. In the chicken experiment, 160 1-d old broiler chicks were fed 3 nutritionally balanced diets for 30 d including a cereal-based diet and 2 diets with part of the cereals substituted with 60 and 120 g/kg chicory forage (CF60 and CF120), whereas in the pig experiment, 18 seven-wk old Yorkshire pigs were fed 3 diets for 18 d including a cereal-based diet and 2 diets with 80 and 160 g/kg chicory forage inclusion (CF80 and CF160). Our results showed that young pigs were capable to utilize chicory forage well with higher total tract apparent digestibility (TTAD) of all fiber fractions, particularly uronic acid, compared with the control (P?chickens fed on diet CF120 (P?chickens. The alteration of cecal mucosal thickness was further positively correlated with TTAD of non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) and its constituent sugars (P?chickens. PMID:24341997

  16. Uptake of Free HPV Vaccination among Young Women: A Comparison of Rural versus Urban Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Richard A.; Casey, Baretta R.; Vanderpool, Robin; Collins, Tom; Moore, Gregory R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To contrast rates of initial HPV vaccine uptake, offered at no cost, between a rural clinic, a rural community college, and an urban college clinic and to identify rural versus urban differences in uptake of free booster doses. Methods: Young rural women attending rural clinics (n = 246), young women attending a rural community college (n…

  17. Influenza vaccination coverage and effectiveness in young children in Thailand, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Kittikraisak, Wanitchaya; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; Levy, Jens; Fernandez, Stefan; Dawood, Fatimah S; Olsen, Sonja J; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee

    2015-01-01

    Background Since 2009, Thailand has recommended influenza vaccine for children aged 6 months through 2 years, but no estimates of influenza vaccine coverage or effectiveness are available for this target group. Methods During August 2011–May 2013, high-risk and healthy children aged ?36 months were enrolled in a 2-year prospective cohort study. Parents were contacted weekly about acute respiratory illness (ARI) in their child. Ill children had combined nasal and throat swabs tested for influenza viruses by real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Influenza vaccination status was verified with vaccination cards. The Cox proportional hazards approach was used to estimate hazard ratios. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was estimated as 100% x (1-hazard ratio). Results During 2011–2013, 968 children were enrolled (median age, 10·3 months); 948 (97·9%) had a vaccination record and were included. Of these, 394 (41·6%) had ?1 medical conditions. Vaccination coverage for the 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 seasons was 29·3% (93/317) and 30·0% (197/656), respectively. In 2011–2012, there were 213 ARI episodes, of which 10 (4·6%) were influenza positive (2·3 per 1000 vaccinated and 3·8 per 1000 unvaccinated child-weeks). The VE was 55% (95% confidence interval [CI], ?72, 88). In 2012–2013, there were 846 ARIs, of which 52 (6·2%) were influenza positive (1·8 per 1000 vaccinated and 4·5 per 1000 unvaccinated child-weeks). The VE was 64% (CI, 13%, 85%). Conclusion Influenza vaccination coverage among young children in Thailand was low, although vaccination was moderately effective. Continued efforts are needed to increase influenza vaccination coverage and evaluate VE among young children in Thailand. PMID:25557920

  18. Study of the genetic stability of measles virus CAM-70 vaccine strain after serial passages in chicken embryo fibroblasts primary cultures.

    PubMed

    Borges, Maria Beatriz; Caride, Elena; Jabor, Alfredo V; Malachias, José Marcus N; Freire, Marcos S; Homma, Akira; Galler, Ricardo

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate the genetic stability of the CAM-70 measles vaccine strain we have performed 10 serial passages of the seed lot virus FMS-7 in chicken embryo fibroblasts primary cultures (CEF) under production conditions. The nucleotide sequences of the seed lot virus, the virus from a vaccine vial (third passage) and from the 10th passage were determined and compared with each other and with sequences from other sources. The full genome analysis of the CAM-70 vaccine still considers it as the most divergent among all vaccine strains. The nucleotide sequence analyses of viral genomes from the three CAM-70 passage levels have demonstrated that they are identical. This study shows that the measles CAM-70 vaccine virus is highly adapted to its cultivation conditions and that its genetic stability contributes, in part, to the safety profile of the vaccine. PMID:18040767

  19. Are young injection drug users ready and willing to participate in preventive HCV vaccine trials?

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Vivian; Evans, Jennifer L.; Stein, Ellen S.; Davidson, Peter J.; Lum, Paula J.; Hahn, Judith A.; Page, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Trials to evaluate the efficacy of preventive HCV vaccines will need participation from high risk HCV seronegative injection drug users (IDUs). To guide trial planning, we assessed willingness of young IDU in San Francisco to participate in HCV vaccine efficacy trials and evaluate knowledge of vaccine trial concepts: placebo, randomization and blinding. During 2006 and 2007, a total of 67 participants completed the survey. A substantial proportion (88%) would definitely (44%) or probably (44%) be willing to participate in a randomized trial, but knowledge of vaccine trial concepts was low. Reported willingness to participate in an HCV vaccine trial decreased with increasing trial duration, with 67% of participants surveyed willing to participate in a trial of one year duration compared to 43% of participants willing to participate in a trial of 4 years duration. Willingness to enroll in HCV vaccine trials was higher in young IDU than reported by most at-risk populations in HIV vaccine trials. Educational strategies will be needed to ensure understanding of key concepts prior to implementing HCV vaccine trials. PMID:20638453

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of a novel therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen for rheumatoid arthritis in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Juan, Long; Xiao, Zhao; Song, Yun; Zhijian, Zhang; Jing, Jin; Kun, Yu; Yuna, Hao; Dongfa, Dai; Lili, Ding; Liuxin, Tan; Fei, Liang; Nan, Liu; Fang, Yuan; Yuying, Sun; Yongzhi, Xi

    2015-12-01

    Current clinically available treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fail to cure the disease or unsatisfactorily halt disease progression. To overcome these limitations, the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines and boosters may offer new promising strategies. Because type II collagen (CII) as a critical autoantigen in RA and native chicken type II collagen (nCCII) has been used to effectively treat RA, we previously developed a novel therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding CCII (pcDNA-CCOL2A1) with efficacy comparable to that of the current "gold standard", methotrexate(MTX). Here, we systemically evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine in normal Wistar rats. Group 1 received only a single intramuscular injection into the hind leg with pcDNA-CCOL2A1 at the maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg on day 0; Group 2 was injected with normal saline (NS) as a negative control. All rats were monitored daily for any systemic adverse events, reactions at the injection site, and changes in body weights. Plasma and tissues from all experimental rats were collected on day 14 for routine examinations of hematology and biochemistry parameters, anti-CII IgG antibody reactivity, and histopathology. Our results indicated clearly that at the maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg, the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine was safe and well-tolerated. No abnormal clinical signs or deaths occurred in the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 group compared with the NS group. Furthermore, no major alterations were observed in hematology, biochemistry, and histopathology, even at the maximum dose. In particularly, no anti-CII IgG antibodies were detected in vaccinated normal rats at 14 d after vaccination; this was relevant because we previously demonstrated that the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine, when administered at the therapeutic dosage of 300?g/kg alone, did not induce anti-CII IgG antibody production and significantly reduced levels of anti-CII IgG antibodies in the plasma of rats with established collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). This is the first study demonstrating the safety and immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine encoding CCII for treating RA in normal rats. These results may support the use of this novel therapeutic DNA vaccine for the treatment of RA in the future. PMID:26697972

  1. Vaccination with Clostridium perfringens recombinant proteins in combination with Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant increases protection against experimental necrotic enteritis in commercial broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was performed to compare four Clostridium perfringens recombinant proteins as vaccine candidates using the Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant in an experimental model of necrotic enteritis. Broiler chickens were immunized with clostridial recombinant proteins with ISA 71 VG, and intestinal le...

  2. Characterisation of genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from NDV vaccinated chickens, and the efficacy of LaSota and recombinant genotype VII vaccines against challenge with velogenic NDV.

    PubMed

    Roohani, Kiarash; Tan, Sheau Wei; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ideris, Aini; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2015-12-30

    A Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolate designated IBS002 was isolated from a commercial broiler farm in Malaysia. The virus was characterised as a virulent strain based on the multiple basic amino acid motif of the fusion (F) cleavage site (112)RRRKGF(117) and length of the C-terminus extension of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene. Furthermore, IBS002 was classified as a velogenic NDV with mean death time (MDT) of 51.2 h and intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI) of 1.76. A genetic distance analysis based on the full-length F and HN genes showed that both velogenic viruses used in this study, genotype VII NDV isolate IBS002 and genotype VIII NDV isolate AF2240-I, had high genetic variations with genotype II LaSota vaccine. In this study, the protection efficacy of the recombinant genotype VII NDV inactivated vaccine was also evaluated when added to an existing commercial vaccination program against challenge with velogenic NDV IBS002 and NDV AF2240-I in commercial broilers. The results indicated that both LaSota and recombinant genotype VII vaccines offered full protection against challenge with AF2240-I. However, the LaSota vaccine only conferred partial protection against IBS002. In addition, significantly reduced viral shedding was observed in the recombinant genotype VII-vaccinated chickens compared to LaSota-vaccinated chickens. PMID:25643805

  3. Trust versus concerns—how parents reason when they accept HPV vaccination for their young daughter

    PubMed Central

    Gottvall, Maria; Höglund, Anna T.; Larsson, Margareta; Stenhammar, Christina; Andrae, Bengt; Tydén, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Background. From spring of 2012, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine against cervical cancer is offered free of charge to all girls aged 10–12 years through a school-based vaccination programme in Sweden. The aim of this study was to explore how parents reason when they accept HPV vaccination for their young daughter and also their views on HPV-related information. Methods. Individual interviews with parents (n = 27) of 11–12-year-old girls. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using thematic content analysis. Results. Three themes emerged through the analysis: Trust versus concern, Responsibility to protect against severe disease, and Information about HPV and HPV vaccination is important. The parents expressed trust in recommendations from authorities and thought it was convenient with school-based vaccination. They believed that cervical cancer was a severe disease and felt a responsibility to protect their daughter from it. Some had certain concerns regarding side effects and vaccine safety, and wished for a dialogue with the school nurse to bridge the information gaps. Conclusions. Trust in the recommendations from authorities and a wish to protect their daughter from a severe disease outweighed concerns about side effects. A school-based vaccination programme is convenient for parents, and the school nurse has an important role in bridging information gaps. The findings from this qualitative study cannot be generalized; however, it can provide a better understanding of how parents might reason when they accept the HPV vaccination for their daughter. PMID:23777602

  4. Delivery cost of human papillomavirus vaccination of young adolescent girls in Peru, Uganda and Viet Nam

    PubMed Central

    Van Minh, Hoang; Odaga, John; Rout, Swampa Sarit; Ngoc, Diep Nguyen Thi; Menezes, Lysander; Araujo, Maria Ana Mendoza; LaMontagne, D Scott

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the incremental delivery cost of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of young adolescent girls in Peru, Uganda and Viet Nam. Methods Data were collected from a sample of facilities that participated in five demonstration projects for HPV vaccine delivery: school-based delivery was used in Peru, Uganda and Viet Nam; health-centre-based delivery was also used in Viet Nam; and integrated delivery, which involved existing health services, was also used in Uganda. Microcosting methods were used to guide data collection on the use of resources (i.e. staff, supplies and equipment) and data were obtained from government, demonstration project and health centre administrative records. Delivery costs were expressed in 2009 United States dollars (US$). Exclusively project-related expenses and the cost of the vaccine were excluded. Findings The economic delivery cost per vaccine dose ranged from US$ 1.44 for integrated outreach in Uganda to US$ 3.88 for school-based delivery in Peru. In Viet Nam, the lowest cost per dose was US$ 1.92 for health-centre-based delivery. Cost profiles revealed that, in general, the largest contributing factors were project start-up costs and recurrent personnel costs. The delivery cost of HPV vaccine was higher than published costs for traditional vaccines recommended by the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Conclusion The cost of delivering HPV vaccine to young adolescent girls in Peru, Uganda and Viet Nam was higher than that for vaccines currently in the EPI schedule. The cost per vaccine dose was lower when delivery was integrated into existing health services. PMID:23940406

  5. Vaccination of chickens against avian influenza using yeast cell surface display of H5 hemagglutinin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional vaccination methods for avian influenza (AI) require costly and time-consuming injection of individual birds, often multiple times, in order to produce protection. These vaccines are difficult to change quickly in response to new threats as manufacturing takes time. Yeast are an ideal ...

  6. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal antibodies (MAb) may interfere with avian influenza (AI) vaccination. MAb interference prevents an immune response by binding to the vaccine antigen. Once MAb titers are depleted, the chick is susceptible to a circulating AI virus. This study examined the affect of MAb on seroconversion ...

  7. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of the Biken acellular pertussis vaccine in young adults.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, H J; Mohnike, K; Zepp, F; Herden, P; Hosbach, P

    2000-10-15

    To assess the reactogenicity and immunogenicity of the Biken acellular pertussis vaccine (Pa) following administration of a single vaccine dose to young adults with or without a history of prior pertussis immunization, 104 healthy, male and female adults without primary pertussis immunization were enrolled in Mainz (former West Germany; "not previously pertussis vaccinated", N-PPV-group); in parallel, 103 adults with a history of having received >/=four doses of a combined diphtheria-, tetanus-toxoid, whole-cell pertussis vaccine (DTwP) were enrolled in Magdeburg (former East Germany; "previously pertussis-vaccinated", PPV-group). Large areas of redness (>20 mm) were seen in 2.9%/1.0% of subjects in the N-PPV/PPV group, and a large swelling was seen in 6.8%/1.0%, respectively. As compared to baseline concentrations, antibody titers to PT and FHA were 77-(PT)/64-(FHA) (N-PPV group) and 94-(PT)/126-(FHA) fold (PPV group) higher. The study vaccine was safe and induced infrequent and mostly mild, local and general symptoms that all resolved spontaneously; it was highly immunogenic in adults, whether or not they had been previously vaccinated with DTwP. PMID:11027800

  8. Evaluation of protective efficacy of live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum vaccine strains against fowl typhoid in chickens.

    PubMed

    Laniewski, Pawe?; Mitra, Arindam; Karaca, Kemal; Khan, Ayub; Prasad, Rajeev; Curtiss, Roy; Roland, Kenneth L

    2014-09-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum is the etiological agent of fowl typhoid, which constitutes a considerable economic problem for poultry growers in developing countries. The vaccination of chickens seems to be the most effective strategy to control the disease in those areas. We constructed S. Gallinarum strains with a deletion of the global regulatory gene fur and evaluated their virulence and protective efficacy in Rhode Island Red chicks and Brown Leghorn layers. The fur deletion mutant was avirulent and, when delivered orally to chicks, elicited excellent protection against lethal S. Gallinarum challenge. It was not as effective when given orally to older birds, although it was highly immunogenic when delivered by intramuscular injection. We also examined the effect of a pmi mutant and a combination of fur deletions with mutations in the pmi and rfaH genes, which affect O-antigen synthesis, and ansB, whose product inhibits host T-cell responses. The S. Gallinarum ?pmi mutant was only partially attenuated, and the ?ansB mutant was fully virulent. The ?fur ?pmi and ?fur ?ansB double mutants were attenuated but not protective when delivered orally to the chicks. However, a ?pmi ?fur strain was highly immunogenic when administered intramuscularly. All together, our results show that the fur gene is essential for the virulence of S. Gallinarum, and the fur mutant is effective as a live recombinant vaccine against fowl typhoid. PMID:24990908

  9. Safety of live attenuated influenza vaccine in young people with egg allergy: multicentre prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Southern, Jo; Andrews, Nick J; Miller, Elizabeth; Erlewyn-Lajeunesse, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Study question How safe is live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), which contains egg protein, in young people with egg allergy? Methods In this open label, phase IV intervention study, 779 young people (2-18 years) with egg allergy were recruited from 30 UK allergy centres and immunised with LAIV. The cohort included 270 (34.7%) young people with previous anaphylaxis to egg, of whom 157 (20.1%) had experienced respiratory and/or cardiovascular symptoms. 445 (57.1%) had doctor diagnosed asthma or recurrent wheeze. Participants were observed for at least 30 minutes after vaccination and followed-up by telephone 72 hours later. Participants with a history of recurrent wheeze or asthma underwent further follow-up four weeks later. The main outcome measure was incidence of an adverse event within two hours of vaccination in young people with egg allergy. Study answer and limitations No systemic allergic reactions occurred (upper 95% confidence interval for population 0.47% and in participants with anaphylaxis to egg 1.36%). Nine participants (1.2%, 95% CI 0.5% to 2.2%) experienced mild symptoms, potentially consistent with a local, IgE mediated allergic reaction. Delayed events potentially related to the vaccine were reported in 221 participants. 62 participants (8.1%, 95% CI for population 6.3% to 10.3%) experienced lower respiratory tract symptoms within 72 hours, including 29 with parent reported wheeze. No participants were admitted to hospital. No increase in lower respiratory tract symptoms occurred in the four weeks after vaccination (assessed with asthma control test). The study cohort may represent young people with more severe allergy requiring specialist input, since they were recruited from secondary and tertiary allergy centres. What this study adds LAIV is associated with a low risk of systemic allergic reactions in young people with egg allergy. The vaccine seems to be well tolerated in those with well controlled asthma or recurrent wheeze. Funding, competing interests, data sharing This report is independent research commissioned and funded by a Department of Health policy research programme grant to the National Vaccine Evaluation Consortium. Additional funding was provided by the NIHR Clinical Research Networks, Health Protection Scotland (Edinburgh site), and Health & Social Care Services in Northern Ireland (Belfast site). PJT and MEL had support from the Department of Health for the submitted work; PJT has received research grants from the Medical Research Council and NIHR. No additional data available. Study registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02111512) and the EU Clinical Trials Register EudraCT (2014-001537-92). PMID:26645895

  10. Response of layer and broiler strain chickens to parenteral administration of a live Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine.

    PubMed

    Groves, Peter J; Sharpe, Sue M; Cox, Julian M

    2015-07-01

    Responses to the parenteral administration of a live aroA deletion Salmonella serovar Typhimurium vaccine given to three brown egg layer strains and two broiler strains were studied. Twenty-five birds of each strain were reared together in floor pens to 6 weeks of age and then moved as individual strains to new floor pens and injected with 10(8) colony forming units (CFU) per bird of the vaccine bacteria intramuscularly or subcutaneously, 10(6) CFU per bird subcutaneously, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) subcutaneously as a vaccination control. Three birds of one layer strain were injected intramuscularly with 0.5mg/ bird S. Typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to evaluate whether response was similar for vaccine and endotoxin. Birds were weighed, and rectal temperatures recorded at the time of injection, then observed over 24 hours. Rectal temperatures were measured and blood samples collected for serum IL-6 assay at 3 hours post injection (PI). At 12 hours PI blood samples were drawn for analyses for plasma phosphorus (P), glucose (Glu), cholesterol (Cho), aspartate transaminase (AST), total protein (Ptn) and creatinine kinase (CK). Blood was sampled 14 days PI and tested for serum antibody to S. Typhimurium. Vaccination resulted in significant seroconversion by 14 days PI in all strains compared to the controls. The three layer strains exhibited a clinical malaise, evident within 90 minutes of injection, lasting for 12 hours, with complete recovery by 24 hours PI. Only the 10(8) CFU dose given subcutaneously produced an increase in rectal temperature 3 hours PI. Vaccination had no effect on IL-6 or Ptn. All vaccine doses increased P and the higher dose by either route decreased Cho in all bird strains. The 10(8) vaccine dose increased Glu and intramuscular injection markedly elevated CK only in the layer strains. The response was not completely congruous with that to LPS alone. The results highlight the need for consideration of differences in response of bird strain when consideration is given to the parenteral administration of live Salmonella vaccines. PMID:26009756

  11. Identification and characterization of a highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A virus during an outbreak in vaccinated chickens in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Amen, O; Vemula, S V; Zhao, J; Ibrahim, R; Hussein, A; Hewlett, I K; Moussa, S; Mittal, S K

    2015-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (HPAI) H5N1 viruses continue to be a major veterinary and public health problem in Egypt. Continued surveillance of these viruses is necessary to devise strategies to control the spread of the virus and to monitor its evolutionary patterns. This is a report of the identification of a variant strain of HPAI H5N1 virus during an outbreak in 2010 in vaccinated chicken flocks in a poultry farm in Assiut, Egypt. Vaccination of chickens with an oil-emulsified inactivated A/chicken/Mexico/232/94 (H5N2) vaccine induced high levels of hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers reaching up to 9 log2. However, all flocks irrespective of the number of vaccine doses and the resultant HI titer levels came down with severe influenza infections. The qRT-PCR and rapid antigen test confirmed the influenza virus to be from H5N1 subtype. Sequencing of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene fragment from ten independent samples demonstrated that a single H5N1 strain was involved. This strain belonged to clade 2.2.1 and had several mutations in the receptor-binding site of the HA protein, thereby producing a variant strain of HPAI H5N1 virus which was antigenically different from the parent clade 2.2.1 virus circulating in Egypt at that time. In order to define the variability in HPAI H5N1 viruses over time in Egypt, we sequenced another H5N1 virus that was causing infections in chickens in 2014. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that both viruses had further distanced from the parent virus circulating during 2010. This study highlights that the antigenic mutations in HPAI H5N1 viruses represent a definitive challenge for the development of an effective vaccine for poultry. Overall, the results emphasize the need for continued surveillance of H5N1 outbreaks and extensive characterization of virus isolates from vaccinated and non-vaccinated poultry populations to better understand genetic changes and their implications. PMID:26363196

  12. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. Maternal antibodies provide early protection from disease, but may interfere with the vaccination efficacy in the chick. MAb are thought to interfere wit...

  13. Presence of virulent Newcastle disease virus in vaccinated chickens in farms in Pakistan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sites where virulent Newcastle disease virus persists in endemic countries are unknown. Evidence presented here shows that the same strain that caused a previous outbreak was present in both apparently healthy and sick vaccinated birds from multiple farms that had high average specific antibody...

  14. Vaccinations

    MedlinePLUS

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  15. Supplemental dietary L-arginine attenuates intestinal mucosal disruption during a coccidial vaccine challenge in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianzhuang; Applegate, Todd J; Liu, Shasha; Guo, Yuming; Eicher, Susan D

    2014-10-14

    The present study investigated the effects of dietary arginine (Arg) supplementation on intestinal structure and functionality in broiler chickens subjected to coccidial challenge. The present study was a randomised complete block design employing a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement (n 8) with three dietary concentrations of Arg (11·1, 13·3 and 20·2 g/kg) with or without coccidial vaccine challenge (unchallenged and coccidial challenge). On day 14, birds were orally administered with coccidial vaccine or saline. On day 21, birds were killed to obtain jejunal tissue and mucosal samples for histological, gene expression and mucosal immunity measurements. Within 7 d of the challenge, there was a decrease in body-weight gain and feed intake, and an increase in the feed:gain ratio (P< 0·05). Jejunal inflammation was evidenced by villus damage, crypt dilation and goblet cell depletion. Coccidial challenge increased mucosal secretory IgA concentration and inflammatory gene (iNOS, IL-1?, IL-8 and MyD88) mRNA expression levels (P< 0·05), as well as reduced jejunal Mucin-2, IgA and IL-1RI mRNA expression levels (P< 0·05). Increasing Arg concentration (1) increased jejunal villus height (P< 0·05) and linearly increased jejunal crypt depth (P< 0·05); (2) quadratically increased mucosal maltase activity (P< 0·05) and linearly decreased mucosal secretory IgG concentration (P< 0·05) within the coccidiosis-challenged groups; and (3) linearly decreased jejunal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mRNA expression level (P< 0·05) within the coccidiosis-challenged groups. The mRNA expression of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 pathway genes (mTOR and RPS6KB1) and the anti-apoptosis gene Bcl-2 quadratically responded to increasing dietary Arg supplementation (P< 0·05). These results indicate that dietary Arg supplementation attenuates intestinal mucosal disruption in coccidiosis-challenged chickens probably through suppressing TLR4 and activating mTOR complex 1 pathways. PMID:25181320

  16. SAFETY EVALUATION IN CHICKENS OF CANDIDATE HUMAN VACCINES AGAINST POTENTIAL PANDEMIC STRAINS OF INFLUENZA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two candidate formalin-inactivated vaccines, derived from high-growth reassortant viruses with the HA and NA genes from avian viruses in a background of genes derived from A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8), were prepared against H5N1 and H9N2 subtypes (designated as H5N1/PR8 and H9N2/PR8 respectively). These...

  17. SAFETY EVALUATION IN CHICKENS OF CANDIDATE HUMAN VACCINES AGAINST POTENTIAL PANDEMIC STRAINS OF INFLUENZA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two candidate formalin-inactivated vaccines, made from high-growth reassortant viruses with the HA and NA genes from avian viruses in a background of genes derived from A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8), were prepared against H5N1 and H9N2 subtypes (designated as H5N1/PR8 and H9N2/PR8 respectively). These vi...

  18. Circulating CXCR5+PD-1+ response predicts influenza vaccine antibody responses in young adults but not elderly adults

    PubMed Central

    Herati, Ramin Sedaghat; Reuter, Morgan A.; Dolfi, Douglas V.; Mansfield, Kathleen D.; Aung, Htin; Badwan, Osama Z.; Kurupati, Raj K.; Kannan, Senthil; Ertl, Hildegund; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Betts, Michael R.; Canaday, David H.; Wherry, E. John

    2014-01-01

    Although influenza vaccination is recommended for all adults annually, the incidence of vaccine failure, defined as weak or absent increase in neutralizing antibody titers, is increased in the elderly compared to young adults. The T follicular helper subset of CD4 T cells (Tfh) provides B cell help in germinal centers and is necessary for class-switched antibody responses. Previous studies suggested a role for circulating T follicular helper cells (cTfh) following influenza vaccination in adults, but cTfh have not been studied in elderly adults where weak vaccine responses are often observed. Here, we studied cTfh expressing CXCR5 and Programmed Death 1 (PD-1). cTfh from elderly adults were present at reduced frequency, had decreased in vitro B cell help ability, and greater expression of inducible costimulator (ICOS) compared to young adults. At seven days after inactivated influenza vaccination, cTfh correlated with influenza vaccine-specific IgM and IgG responses in young adults but not in elderly adults. In sum, we have identified aging-related changes in cTfh that correlated with reduced influenza vaccine responses. Future rational vaccine design efforts should incorporate Tfh measurement as an immune correlate of protection, particularly in the setting of aging. PMID:25172499

  19. Vaccine potential of a nonflagellated, virulence-plasmid-cured (fliD-, pSEV?) mutant of Salmonella Enteritidis for chickens.

    PubMed

    Imre, Ariel; Szmolka, Ama; Olasz, Ferenc; Nagy, Béla

    2015-09-01

    The aim of these studies was to assess residual virulence and early protective capacity of a negatively markered live attenuated vaccine candidate Salmonella Enteritidis mutant against a highly virulent S. Enteritidis strain using a dayold chicken model. Nonflagellated FliD negative mutants of Salmonella Enteritidis 11 (SE11) with and without the virulence plasmid proved to be sufficiently attenuated (limited invasiveness in vitro/in vivo) without reduced ability to colonise chicken gut. The early protective activity of a nonflagellated, virulence-plasmidcured (fliD-, pSEV?) mutant against organ invasion, caecal colonisation and faecal shedding by the highly virulent challenge strain S. Enteritidis 147 Nal(R) proved to be effective and safe. The innate and adaptive immunity was demonstrable during the first four weeks of life, and the serological response was clearly distinguishable from the response induced by the wild parental strain. In conclusion, we provided data for the first time about a virulence-plasmid-cured, nonflagellated mutant of S. Enteritidis to serve as a basis for development of a negatively markered potential live oral vaccine against virulent S. Enteritidis in chicken. PMID:26551419

  20. Reduction of high pathogenicity avian influenza virus in eggs from chickens once or twice vaccinated with an oil-emulsified inactivated H5 avian influenza vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The negative impact of high pathogenicity avian influenza virus (HPAIV) infection on egg production and deposition of virus in eggs, as well as any protective effect of vaccination, is unknown. Individually housed non-vaccinated, sham-vaccinated and inactivated H5N9 vaccinated once or twice adult Wh...

  1. Genomic and Phylogenetic Characterization of Novel, Recombinant H5N2 Avian Influenza Virus Strains Isolated from Vaccinated Chickens with Clinical Symptoms in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huaiying; Meng, Fang; Huang, Dihai; Sheng, Xiaodan; Wang, Youling; Zhang, Wei; Chang, Weishan; Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming

    2015-01-01

    Infection of poultry with diverse lineages of H5N2 avian influenza viruses has been documented for over three decades in different parts of the world, with limited outbreaks caused by this highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. In the present study, three avian H5N2 influenza viruses, A/chicken/Shijiazhuang/1209/2013, A/chicken/Chiping/0321/2014, and A/chicken/Laiwu/0313/2014, were isolated from chickens with clinical symptoms of avian influenza. Complete genomic and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that all three isolates are novel recombinant viruses with hemagglutinin (HA) and matrix (M) genes derived from H5N1, and remaining genes derived from H9N2-like viruses. The HA cleavage motif in all three strains (PQIEGRRRKR/GL) is characteristic of a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus strain. These results indicate the occurrence of H5N2 recombination and highlight the importance of continued surveillance of the H5N2 subtype virus and reformulation of vaccine strains. PMID:25723387

  2. Neuraminidase-specific antibody responses to inactivated influenza virus vaccine in young and elderly adults.

    PubMed Central

    Powers, D C; Kilbourne, E D; Johansson, B E

    1996-01-01

    Little information is available on the potential role of antibody to influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) in vaccine-induced immunity. In the present study, serologic responses to the N1Texas/91 and N2Beijing/92 NA components of trivalent inactivated influenza virus vaccine were measured by NA inhibition (NI) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the results for adults aged 18 to 45 (young) or > or = 65 (elderly) years were compared. The two age groups had comparable rates (32 to 50%) of NI response. In contrast, ELISA immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses to N1 and N2 NAs occurred in 70 to 71 and 67 to 83%, respectively, of young subjects but in only 3 to 18 and 18 to 35%, respectively, of elderly subjects. prevaccination mean ELISA IgG and IgA NA antibody titers were generally lower for the young adults than they were for the elderly, whereas the corresponding NI titers were comparable. In young adults, plaque size-reducing NA antibody increases were positively associated with ELISA but not with NI antibody increases. There were no apparent age-related differences in the immunoglobulin isotype distribution of the anti-NA response, with IgG being the dominant class and IgG1 the dominant subclass of serum antibody. Anti-hemagglutinin antibody responses to H1Texas/91 and H3Beijing/92 were greater in magnitude and frequency than the corresponding NA-specific responses to N1Texas/91 and N2Beijing/92 when measured by hemagglutination inhibition and NI, respectively, but not when measured by ELISA. The discordance between NI and ELISA for measurement of NA-specific vaccine responses may reflect the relative insensitivity of NI in discriminating differences when initial antibody titers are low. PMID:8877127

  3. High yield expression in a recombinant E. coli of a codon optimized chicken anemia virus capsid protein VP1 useful for vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chicken anemia virus (CAV), the causative agent chicken anemia, is the only member of the genus Gyrovirus of the Circoviridae family. CAV is an immune suppressive virus and causes anemia, lymph organ atrophy and immunodeficiency. The production and biochemical characterization of VP1 protein and its use in a subunit vaccine or as part of a diagnostic kit would be useful to CAV infection prevention. Results Significantly increased expression of the recombinant full-length VP1 capsid protein from chicken anemia virus was demonstrated using an E. coli expression system. The VP1 gene was cloned into various different expression vectors and then these were expressed in a number of different E. coli strains. The expression of CAV VP1 in E. coli was significantly increased when VP1 was fused with GST protein rather than a His-tag. By optimizing the various rare amino acid codons within the N-terminus of the VP1 protein, the expression level of the VP1 protein in E. coli BL21(DE3)-pLysS was further increased significantly. The highest protein expression level obtained was 17.5 g/L per liter of bacterial culture after induction with 0.1 mM IPTG for 2 h. After purification by GST affinity chromatography, the purified full-length VP1 protein produced in this way was demonstrated to have good antigenicity and was able to be recognized by CAV-positive chicken serum in an ELISA assay. Conclusions Purified recombinant VP1 protein with the gene's codons optimized in the N-terminal region has potential as chimeric protein that, when expressed in E. coli, may be useful in the future for the development of subunit vaccines and diagnostic tests. PMID:21781331

  4. Vaccines

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  5. Modulation of systemic and mucosal immunity against an inactivated vaccine of Newcastle disease virus by oral co-administration of live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chicken interleukin-18 and interferon-?

    PubMed Central

    RAHMAN, Md. Masudur; UYANGAA, Erdenebelig; HAN, Young Woo; HUR, Jin; PARK, Sang-Youel; LEE, John Hwa; KIM, Koanhoi; EO, Seong Kug

    2014-01-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is a highly contagious disease of chickens causing significant economic losses worldwide. Due to limitations in the efficacy against currently circulating ND viruses, existing vaccination strategies require improvements, and incorporating immunomodulatory cytokines with existing vaccines might be a novel approach. Here, we investigated the systemic and mucosal immunomodulatory properties of oral co-administration of chicken interleukin-18 (chIL-18) and chicken interferon-? (chIFN-?) using attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on an inactivated ND vaccine. Our results demonstrate that oral administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIL-18 or chIFN-? provided enhanced systemic and mucosal immune responses, as determined by serum hemagglutination inhibition antibody and NDV Ag-specific IgG as well as NDV Ag-specific IgA in lung and duodenal lavages of chickens immunized with inactivated ND vaccine via the intramuscular or intranasal route. Notably, combined oral administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIL-18 and chIFN-? significantly enhanced systemic and mucosal immunity in ND-vaccinated chickens, compared to single administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIL-18 or chIFN-?. In addition, oral co-administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIL-18 and chIFN-? provided enhanced NDV Ag-specific proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and Th1-biased cell-mediated immunity, compared to single administration of either construct. Therefore, our results provide valuable insight into the modulation of systemic and mucosal immunity by incorporation of immunomodulatory chIL-18 and chIFN-? using Salmonella vaccines into existing ND vaccines. PMID:25502364

  6. Administration of Poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)phosphazene] (PCEP) and Avian Beta Defensin as Adjuvants in Inactivated Inclusion Body Hepatitis Virus and its Hexon Protein-Based Experimental Vaccine Formulations in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Dar, Arshud; Tipu, Masroor; Townsend, Hugh; Potter, Andy; Gerdts, Volker; Tikoo, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    Inclusion body hepatitis (IBH) is one of the major infectious diseases adversely affecting the poultry industry of the United States and Canada. Currently, no effective and safe vaccine is available for the control of IBH virus (IBHV) infection in chickens. However, based on the excellent safety and immunogenic profiles of experimental veterinary vaccines developed with the use of new generation adjuvants, we hypothesized that characterization of vaccine formulations containing inactivated IBHV or its capsid protein hexon as antigens, along with poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)phosphazene] (PCEP) and avian beta defensin 2 (ABD2) as vaccine adjuvants, will be helpful in development of an effective and safe vaccine formulation for IBH. Our data demonstrated that experimental administration of vaccine formulations containing inactivated IBHV and a mixture of PCEP with or without ABD2 as an adjuvant induced significantly higher antibody responses compared with other vaccine formulations, while hexon protein-based vaccine formulations showed relatively lower levels of antibody responses. Thus, a vaccine formulation containing inactivated IBHV with PCEP or a mixture of PCEP and ABD2 (with a reduced dosage of PCEP) as an adjuvant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate. However, in order to overcome the risks associated with whole virus inactivated vaccines, characterization of additional viral capsid proteins, including fiber protein and penton of IBHV along with hexon protein in combination with more new generation adjuvants, will be helpful in further improvements of vaccines against IBHV infection. PMID:26629626

  7. Development, characterization and optimization of a new suspension chicken-induced pluripotent cell line for the production of Newcastle disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Shittu, Ismaila; Zhu, Ziying; Lu, Yangqing; Hutcheson, Jessica M; Stice, Steven L; West, Franklin D; Donadeu, Meritxell; Dungu, Baptiste; Fadly, Aly M; Zavala, Guillermo; Ferguson-Noel, Naola; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, substrates for production of viral poultry vaccines have been embryonated eggs or adherent primary cell cultures. The difficulties and cost involved in scaling up these substrates in cases of increased demand have been a limitation for vaccine production. Here, we assess the ability of a newly developed chicken-induced pluripotent cell line, BA3, to support replication and growth of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota vaccine strain. The characteristics and growth profile of the cells were also investigated. BA3 cells could grow in suspension in different media to a high density of up to 7.0 × 10(6) cells/mL and showed rapid proliferation with doubling time of 21 h. Upon infection, a high virus titer of 1.02 × 10(8) EID50/mL was obtained at 24 h post infection using a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 5. In addition, the cell line was shown to be free of endogenous and exogenous Avian Leukosis viruses, Reticuloendotheliosis virus, Fowl Adenovirus, Marek's disease virus, and several Mycoplasma species. In conclusion, BA3 cell line is potentially an excellent candidate for vaccine production due to its highly desirable industrially friendly characteristics of growing to high cell density and capability of growth in serum free medium. PMID:26586283

  8. Antigenic cartography of H9N2 virus and its impact on the vaccine efficacy in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The H9 subtype of avian influenza virus (AIV) is wide-spread in Asia and the Middle East. The efficacy of vaccines is enhanced by the antigenic match of the hemagglutinin protein (HA) between the vaccine and the field strain. To determine how antigenic variations affect the vaccine efficacy, speci...

  9. Effects of in ovo vaccination and anticoccidials on the distribution of Eimeria spp. in poultry litter and serum antibody titers against coccidia in broiler chickens raised on the used litters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study reports the effects of various field anticoccidial programs on the distribution of Eimeria spp. in poultry litter and serum antibody titers against coccidia in broiler chickens raised on the used litters. The programs included in ovo vaccination and various medications with either ...

  10. Characteristics Associated With Initiation of the HPV Vaccine Among a National Sample of Male and Female Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bernat, Debra H.; Gerend, Mary A.; Chevallier, Kenya; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Bauermeister, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To examine rates of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine initiation, and characteristics associated with initiation, among a national sample of male and female young adults. Methods Participants (n=3,448; 48% female) were recruited using a web-based respondent driven sampling strategy and completed a web-based survey between October and December 2010. Results Forty-five percent of females and four percent of males initiated the vaccine. Females who were younger, never married, in school, attended religious services less than once a month, sexually active, reported a greater number of lifetime sex partners, and who had been tested for HIV were more likely to report initiation. Males who were African American, attended religious services less than once a month, reported a greater number of sex partners in their lifetime and who had been tested for HIV were more likely to report initiation. Conclusions Factors associated with HPV vaccine initiation may differ for males and females. Further research, with larger samples of males, is needed to fully understand characteristics associated with male initiation. Regardless of gender, however, the majority of young adults who have not initiated sexual activity have not received the vaccine. Further research is needed to examine how to increase vaccination rates among this population, as they may benefit most from vaccination. PMID:24138764

  11. Development of a high throughput TaqMan assay for the detection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus in vector vaccinated chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) causes an acute, highly contagious upper-respiratory disease of chickens. Sensitive detection of the causative alphaherpesvirus is important in clinical investigations and experimental studies. In particular, it is essential to quantify the viral genome co...

  12. A case study: lessons learned from human papillomavirus vaccine development: approval of a vaccine for use in children and young adolescents for prevention of an adult disease.

    PubMed

    Garner, Elizabeth I O

    2010-07-01

    This article presents the adolescent clinical trials program for the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (Merck and Co, Inc, Whitehouse Station, NJ) as a case study of the development of a preventive intervention for use in young adolescents to protect against a future sexually transmitted infection and its associated diseases. In light of similarities in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and HIV with regard to sexual transmission and the associated social and ethical issues related to prevention trial development, lessons learned from the approach taken to the inclusion of adolescents in the quadrivalent HPV vaccine program have potential relevance to future HIV prevention trials. Epidemiologic support for HPV vaccination in adolescents and a regulatory-approved approach to immunogenicity studies for bridging of efficacy from adults formed the basis for including young adolescents in the HPV program. The successful achievement of regulatory approval for use of this prophylactic intervention in young adolescents for prevention of a sexually transmitted infection that is most frequently not acquired before mid to late adolescence required understanding of the particular challenges of studying the vulnerable adolescent population with respect to issues such as federal regulations, the role of parents, confidentiality, empowerment, and retention, and awareness of the social and political context within which prevention interventions are introduced. PMID:20571424

  13. Barriers and facilitators to HPV vaccination of young women in high-income countries: a qualitative systematic review and evidence synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccination against Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is recommended for adolescent young women prior to sexual debut to reduce cervical cancer related mortality and morbidity. Understanding factors affecting decision-making of HPV vaccination of young women is important so that effective interventions can be developed which address barriers to uptake in population groups less likely to receive the HPV vaccine. Methods We undertook a qualitative systematic review and evidence synthesis to examine decision-making relating to the HPV vaccination of young women in high-income countries. A comprehensive search of databases from inception to March 2012 was undertaken to identify eligible studies reporting the perspectives of key stakeholders including policy makers, professionals involved in programme, parents, and young women. Factors affecting uptake of the vaccine were examined at different levels of the socio-ecological model (policy, community, organisational, interpersonal and intrapersonal). Results Forty-one studies were included. Whether young women receive the HPV vaccine is strongly governed by the decisions of policy makers, healthcare professionals, and parents. These decisions are shaped by: financial considerations; social norms and values relating to sexual activity, and; trust in vaccination programmes and healthcare providers. Financial constraints may be overcome through universal healthcare systems offering the HPV vaccine free at the point of delivery. In the healthcare setting, judgements by healthcare professionals about whether to recommend the vaccine may restrict a young woman’s access to the vaccine irrespective of her own beliefs and preferences. Parents may decide not to allow their daughters to be vaccinated, based on cultural or religious perceptions about sexual activity. Conclusions Barriers to the uptake of the HPV vaccine have implications for young women’s future sexual, physical and reproductive health. Interventions to address barriers to uptake of the vaccine should target appropriate, and multiple, levels of the socio-ecological model. Issues of trust require clear, accessible, and sometimes culturally appropriate, information about the HPV vaccination programme. Although young women are central to the HPV vaccination programme, their views are underrepresented in the qualitative literature. Future research should consider young women’s perceptions of, and involvement in, consent and decision-making. PMID:25004868

  14. Lymphatic involution and early mortality in the young chicken produced by 2.2 GeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montour, J. L.; Shellabarger, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Young single-comb white Leghorn cockerels were subjected to single acute doses of either 2.2 GeV protons or 250 kVp X-rays. Since young chickens exposed in the lethal range die within 48 hours of exposure, an hourly tabulation of deaths was recorded for this length of time after exposure. Animals which were exposed to sublethal doses were killed five days after exposure and their major lymphatic organs, (thymus, bursa, and spleen), removed and weighed. In the lethal range, animals exposed to 2.2 GeV protons died sooner than those receiving similar doses of X-rays, but total mortality was similar in each case at similar dose levels. The 48 hour LD sub 50 was determined to be 710 rad. Measured five days after exposure, 50% depression ED sub 50 for lymphatic organs occurred as follows: (1) thymus, 350 rad; (2) pursa, 500 rad, and (3) spleen, 450 rad. In all case R.B.E. values were not different from unity.

  15. Seropositivity among Korean Young Adults Approximately 2 Years after a Single-Dose Vaccination against Hepatitis A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woong-Sub; Sohn, Haesook; Lee, Moo-Sik; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Chun-Bae; Kim, Hwasung; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Ki, Moran

    2015-01-01

    We previously observed 80.7% seropositivity and a significant interaction between gender and hepatitis A virus (HAV) vaccine type (Havrix vs. Epaxal) on the seropositivity approximately 11 months after single-dose HAV vaccinations in Korean young adults. Our objective was to evaluate seropositivity approximately 2 years after a single-dose HAV vaccination and the influence of demographic characteristics on seropositivity, including the interaction between gender and vaccine type. Seronegative medical school students were randomly vaccinated with Havrix or Epaxal. Based on a total serum anti-HAV antibody titer cutoff of 20 IU/mL, 338 participants (76.0%) of the 445 vaccinees were seropositive 20–25 months after a single-dose HAV vaccination. The seropositive rates were similar after vaccination with Havrix (77.0%) and Epaxal (74.9%). Univariate analysis indicated that female (p = 0.052) and less obese (p < 0.001) participants had a higher seropositive rate, whereas other characteristics such as age, alcohol use, smoking history, vaccine type, and follow-up duration were not associated with seropositivity. Multivariate analysis indicated that women (p = 0.026) and participants with moderate alcohol use (p < 0.001) showed significantly higher seropositive rates than men and participants with no or low alcohol use, respectively. The seropositive rates after vaccination with Havrix and Epaxal were 70.9% and 67.5% in men and 87.7% and 91.3% in women, respectively (p for interaction = 0.304). Compared with the seropositive rate approximately 11 months after vaccination, the seropositive rate decreased substantially only in men in the Havrix group (11.0% points), and consequently, the interaction between gender and vaccine type disappeared while seropositivity remained high (87.7% and 91.3% in Havrix and Epaxal groups, respectively) among women approximately 2 years after vaccination. Further studies are needed to assess whether the seropositive rate would be maintained in all groups more than 2 years after a single-dose HAV vaccination. PMID:26540392

  16. Two decades after vaccine license: hepatitis B immunization and infection among young men who have sex with men.

    PubMed Central

    MacKellar, D A; Valleroy, L A; Secura, G M; McFarland, W; Shehan, D; Ford, W; LaLota, M; Celentano, D D; Koblin, B A; Torian, L V; Thiede, H; Janssen, R S

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated hepatitis B immunization coverage and the extent of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among young men who have sex with men (MSM), a group for whom hepatitis B vaccine has been recommended since 1982. METHODS: We analyzed data from 3432 MSM, aged 15 to 22 years, randomly sampled at 194 gay-identified venues in 7 US metropolitan areas from 1994 through 1998. Participants were interviewed, counseled, and tested for serologic markers of HBV infection. RESULTS: Immunization coverage was 9% and the prevalence of markers of HBV infection was 11%. HBV infection ranged from 2% among 15-year-olds to 17% among 22-year-olds. Among participants susceptible to HBV infection, 96% used a regular source of health care or accessed the health care system for HIV or sexually transmitted disease testing. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the availability of an effective vaccine for nearly 2 decades, our findings suggest that few adolescent and young adult MSM in the United States are vaccinated against hepatitis B. Health care providers should intensify their efforts to identify and vaccinate young MSM who are susceptible to HBV. PMID:11392942

  17. The impact of H9N2 avian influenza virus vaccine antigenic variation on virus infectious dose in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The H9 subtype of avian influenza virus is wide-spread in the areas of Asia and Middle East. Selection of effective vaccines that provide effective protection mainly depends on the antigenic match of the hemagglutinin protein (HA), between the vaccine and the field strain. To determine how the ant...

  18. Effects of different vaccine combinations against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the internal egg and eggshell characteristics of commercial layer chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Live F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) vaccines are presently being used to help control field strain MG outbreaks. However, they may exert some adverse effects on egg production. Live strains of MG of lesser virulence as well as killed vaccines have little or no effect on egg production, bu...

  19. A Single Electroporation Delivery of a DNA Vaccine Containing the Hemagglutinin Gene of Asian H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Generated a Protective Antibody Response in Chickens against a North American Virus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Pasick, John; Kobinger, Gary P.; Hannaman, Drew; Berhane, Yohannes; Clavijo, Alfonso; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Protection against the avian influenza (AI) H5N1 virus is suspected to be mainly conferred by the presence of antibodies directed against the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of the virus. A single electroporation delivery of 100 or 250 ?g of a DNA vaccine construct, pCAG-HA, carrying the HA gene of strain A/Hanoi/30408/2005 (H5N1), in chickens led to the development of anti-HA antibody response in 16 of 17 immunized birds, as measured by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test, competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA), and an indirect ELISA. Birds vaccinated by electroporation (n = 11) were protected from experimental AI challenge with strain A/chicken/Pennsylvania/1370/1/1983 (H5N2) as judged by low viral load, absence of clinical symptoms, and absence of mortality (n = 11). In contrast, only two out of 10 birds vaccinated with the same vaccine dose (100 or 250 ?g) but without electroporation developed antibodies. These birds showed high viral loads and significant morbidity and mortality after the challenge. Seroconversion was reduced in birds electroporated with a low vaccine dose (10 ?g), but the antibody-positive birds were protected against virus challenge. Nonelectroporation delivery of a low-dose vaccine did not result in seroconversion, and the birds were as susceptible as those in the control groups that received the control pCAG vector. Electroporation delivery of the DNA vaccine led to enhanced antibody responses and to protection against the AI virus challenge. The HI test, cELISA, or indirect ELISA for anti-H5 antibodies might serve as a good predictor of the potency and efficacy of a DNA immunization strategy against AI in chickens. PMID:23365205

  20. Newcastle Disease Virus-Vectored H7 and H5 Live Vaccines Protect Chickens from Challenge with H7N9 or H5N1 Avian Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qinfang; Mena, Ignacio; Ma, Jingjiao; Bawa, Bhupinder; Krammer, Florian; Lyoo, Young S; Lang, Yuekun; Morozov, Igor; Mahardika, Gusti Ngurah; Ma, Wenjun; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Richt, Juergen A

    2015-07-01

    Sporadic human infections by a novel H7N9 virus occurred over a large geographic region in China. In this study, we show that Newcastle disease virus (NDV)-vectored H7 (NDV-H7) and NDV-H5 vaccines are able to induce antibodies with high hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers and completely protect chickens from challenge with the novel H7N9 or highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses, respectively. Notably, a baculovirus-expressed H7 protein failed to protect chickens from H7N9 virus infection. PMID:25926639

  1. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...shall be conducted using susceptible chicken embryos: Provided, That, if a non-embryo adapted virus is used for vaccine production...conducted in susceptible chickens. (i) Chicken Embryo Test. Each of 15 or more AE susceptible...

  2. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...shall be conducted using susceptible chicken embryos: Provided, That, if a non-embryo adapted virus is used for vaccine production...conducted in susceptible chickens. (i) Chicken Embryo Test. Each of 15 or more AE susceptible...

  3. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...shall be conducted using susceptible chicken embryos: Provided, That, if a non-embryo adapted virus is used for vaccine production...conducted in susceptible chickens. (i) Chicken Embryo Test. Each of 15 or more AE susceptible...

  4. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...shall be conducted using susceptible chicken embryos: Provided, That, if a non-embryo adapted virus is used for vaccine production...conducted in susceptible chickens. (i) Chicken Embryo Test. Each of 15 or more AE susceptible...

  5. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...shall be conducted using susceptible chicken embryos: Provided, That, if a non-embryo adapted virus is used for vaccine production...conducted in susceptible chickens. (i) Chicken Embryo Test. Each of 15 or more AE susceptible...

  6. Supplemental dietary L-arginine attenuates intestinal mucosal disruption during a coccidial vaccine challenge in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigated the effects of dietary arginine (Arg) supplementation on intestinal barrier integrity in broiler chickens undergoing coccidial challenge. The design of this study was a randomized complete block employing a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement (n = 8) with 3 level of Arg (1.11,...

  7. HPV vaccination among lesbian and bisexual women: Findings from a national survey of young adults

    PubMed Central

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Katz, Mira L.; Paskett, Electra D.; Reiter, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and associated cervical disease are common among all women, regardless of sexual identity, yet limited research has examined HPV vaccination among lesbian and bisexual women. Methods A national sample of lesbian and bisexual women ages 18-26 (n=543) completed our online survey during Fall 2013. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify correlates of HPV vaccine initiation (receipt of at least 1 dose) and completion (receipt of all 3 recommended doses among initiators). Results Overall, 45% of respondents had initiated HPV vaccine, and 70% of initiators reported completing the series. HPV vaccine initiation was higher among respondents who: were students, had received a healthcare provider's recommendation, perceived greater positive social vaccination norms, or anticipated greater regret if they did not get vaccinated and later got HPV. Initiation was lower among those who perceived greater HPV vaccine harms or greater barriers to getting the vaccine (all p<.05). HPV vaccine completion was higher among initiators who had a college degree while it was lower among those who perceived a greater likelihood of acquiring HPV or who anticipated greater regret if they got the vaccine and fainted (all p<.05). Among HPV vaccine initiators who had not yet completed the series, about half (47%) intended to get the remaining doses. Conclusions Many lesbian and bisexual women are not getting vaccinated against HPV. Healthcare provider recommendations and women's health beliefs may be important leverage points for increasing vaccination among this population. PMID:25038312

  8. Health care use and opportunities for human papillomavirus vaccination among young men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Meites, Elissa; Krishna, Nevin K; Markowitz, Lauri E; Oster, Alexandra M

    2013-02-01

    We studied 2941 young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men using National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System data. Within the past 12 months, 88.9% used health care, suggesting many opportunities for recommended care including human papillomavirus vaccination. However, only 61.3% disclosed male-male sexual attraction/behavior to a provider, which may result in some opportunities being missed. PMID:23321994

  9. Vaccine protection of chickens against the 2012 mexican H7N3 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In June of 2012, an outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H7N3 was reported poultry in Jalisco, Mexico. Since that time the virus has spread to many surrounding States and new outbreaks continue to be reported. Vaccine trials were performed to determine protective efficacy of an inact...

  10. Effects of live and killed vaccines against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the performance characteristics of commercial layer chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major and economically significant pathogen of avian species. Different strains of MG have been used as vaccines in multiple-age commercial layer farms in an effort to protect the birds against more virulent field strains. The lower level of protection afforded b...

  11. Motivation for HPV Vaccination Among Young Adult Men: Validation of TTM Decisional Balance and Self-Efficacy Constructs.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Anne C; Amoyal, Nicole R; Paiva, Andrea L; Prochaska, James O

    2016-01-01

    Purpose . In the United States, 36% of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers occur among men. HPV vaccination can substantially reduce the risk of HPV infection; however, the vast majority of men are unvaccinated. This study developed and validated transtheoretical model-based measures for HPV vaccination in young adult men. Design . Cross-sectional measurement development. Setting . Online survey of young adult men. Subjects . Three hundred twenty-nine mostly college-attending men, ages 18 to 26. Measures . Stage of change, decisional balance (pros/cons), and self-efficacy. Analysis . The sample was randomly split into halves for exploratory principal components analysis (PCA), followed by confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) to test measurement models. Multivariate analyses examined relationships between scales. Results . For decisional balance, PCA revealed two uncorrelated five-item factors (pros ? = .78; cons ? = .83). For the self-efficacy scale, PCA revealed a single-factor solution (? = .83). CFA confirmed that the two-factor uncorrelated model for decisional balance and a single-factor model for self-efficacy. Follow-up analyses of variance supported the theoretically predicted relationships between stage of change, pros, and self-efficacy. Conclusion . This study resulted in reliable and valid measures of pros and self-efficacy for HPV vaccination that can be used in future clinical research. PMID:25806567

  12. Yellow Fever Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cover most of your body, using an effective insect repellent, such as those containing DEET. ... allergy to any component of the vaccine, including eggs, chicken proteins, or gelatin, or who has had ...

  13. An observational study of the temporal and spatial patterns of Marek's-disease-associated leukosis condemnation of young chickens in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David A; Dunn, John R; Dunn, Patricia A; Read, Andrew F

    2015-07-01

    Marek's disease, a disease primarily affecting immature chickens, is a worldwide problem that has on at least three occasions threatened the poultry industry in the United States. A rich dataset to study the epidemiology of this disease is available because the United States Department of Agriculture has required mandatory inspections of all commercially sold poultry of significant scale since the mid-20th century with over 99% of all chickens inspected. This dataset includes monthly totals aggregated by state since 1961 of the number of "young chickens" inspected and the number with "leukosis", a condemnation category that is almost always associated with Marek's disease in this category of birds. The objective of this study was to analyze temporal and spatial patterns in this condemnation data to gain insight into the ecology and epidemiology of the causative virus. We extracted visual patterns in the data using seasonal trend decomposition, and we tested for statistical significance using extended linear modeling techniques. The analysis confirmed previous findings that there are differences in leukosis condemnation rates between states, across years, and within years. The analysis also revealed several patterns not previously highlighted, including spatial and temporal autocorrelations in leukosis condemnation, changes to the amplitude of seasonality over time, and increasing within-year variation in condemnation rate over time. These patterns suggest that locally shared farm practices, virus transmission between farms, or viral persistence may be important to understanding the dynamics of the disease. We also discuss the plausibility of other potential explanations for these patterns. PMID:25998661

  14. Safety and efficacy of a thymidine kinase negative equine herpesvirus-1 vaccine in young horses.

    PubMed Central

    Cornick, J; Martens, J; Martens, R; Crandell, R; McConnell, S; Kit, S

    1990-01-01

    A drug induced equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) mutant lacking thymidine kinase inducing activity was developed and evaluated as a vaccine. The safety and effectiveness of the vaccine to protect against experimentally induced EHV-1 respiratory disease were evaluated in weanling horses free of EHV-1 neutralizing antibody. The vaccine was safe when administered either intramuscularly or intravenously, and EHV-1 was not shed intranasally during the 12 days following administration. Intranasal challenge with virulent EHV-1 was used to evaluate vaccine efficacy. Following challenge, there was a significantly (p less than 0.05) greater increase in peak body temperatures and duration of nasal virus shedding in the nonvaccinates, and a significant (p less than 0.05) increase in serum neutralizing antibody titers in the vaccinates. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2162730

  15. Pneumococcal Tricuspid Valve Endocarditis in a Young African American: A Case for Inclusion of African Americans in Pneumococcal Vaccine Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Odiete, Oghenerukevwe; Akinwande, Olagoke; Murray, John J.; Akamah, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Following the development of penicillin, complications from streptococcus pneumonia such as endocarditis have become rare. However, certain independent risk factors such as cigarette smoking and being of African-American (AA) decent have been associated with a higher incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease, but only cigarette smoking has been targeted by current recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunological Practices (ACIPs). We report a case of a young AA smoker, who developed an isolated tricuspid valve pneumococcal endocarditis. This case will illustrate the high susceptibility for invasive pneumococcus sequelae in AA, thereby raising the argument for the consideration of AA in the Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV) criteria, regardless of smoking history. PMID:20885942

  16. Antigenic evolution of H9N2 chicken influenza viruses isolated in China during 2009-2013 and selection of a candidate vaccine strain with broad cross-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yandi; Xu, Guanlong; Zhang, Guozhong; Wen, Chu; Anwar, Furkat; Wang, Shuoguo; Lemmon, Gordon; Wang, Jinliang; Carter, Robert; Wang, Min; Sun, Honglei; Sun, Yipeng; Zhao, Jixun; Wu, Gang; Webster, Robert G; Liu, Jinhua; Pu, Juan

    2016-01-15

    We previously demonstrated that H9N2 subtype avian influenza viruses (AIVs) isolated from 1994 to 2008 evolved into distinct antigenic groups (C, D, and E) and then underwent antigenic drift from commercial vaccines, causing a country-wide outbreak during 2010-2013. In this study, H9N2 AIVs isolated from chickens during 2009-2013 were antigenically analyzed by performing hemagglutination inhibition and neutralization assays using a panel of polyclonal antibodies. Our findings confirmed the antigenic drift of recent H9N2 viruses from the commercial vaccine and showed that most of these antigenic variants form a novel HI antigenic group, F, with a few belonging to groups D and E. Slight antigenic variation was observed in group F viruses. Genetic analysis of amino acid sequences deduced from hemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences indicated that 9 of 15 mutations predominant in the 2009-2013 viruses can be mapped to known antigenic sites, which might be responsible for the novel antigenicity of group F. These antigenic changes make it necessary to modify the influenza vaccine to ensure efficient protection. A vaccine candidate, Ck/HeB/YT/10, was selected and provided significant protection against viruses from different antigenic groups in terms of reduction in virus shedding, suggesting broad cross-reactivity. Taken together, our results indicate that the H9N2 chicken influenza viruses in China have evolved from distinct antigenic groups into a novel group F that became dominant during the country-wide outbreak and now seems to be undergoing new antigenic divergence. Systematic surveillance and timely updating of vaccine strains are important for viral prevention and control in the future. PMID:26711021

  17. CD4+ T-cell responses among adults and young children in response to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae vaccine candidate protein antigens.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sharad K; Roumanes, David; Almudevar, Anthony; Mosmann, Tim R; Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-06-26

    We characterized cytokine profiles of CD4(+) T-helper (h) cells in adults and young children to ascertain if responses occur to next-generation candidate vaccine antigens PspA, PcpA, PhtD, PhtE, Ply, LytB of Streptococcus pneumonia (Spn) and protein D and OMP26 of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Adults had vaccine antigen-specific Th1 and Th2 cells responsive to all antigens evaluated whereas young children had significant numbers of vaccine antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells producing IL-2, (p=0.004). Vaccine antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cell populations in adults were largely of effector (TEM) and/or central memory (TCM) phenotypes as defined by CD45RA(-)CCR7(+) or CD45RA(-)CCR7(-) respectively; however among young children antigen-specific IL-2 producing CD4(+) T cells demonstrated CD45RA(+) expression (non-memory cells). We conclude that adults have circulating memory CD4(+) T cells (CD45RA(-)) that can be stimulated by all the tested Spn and NTHi protein vaccine candidate antigens, whereas young children have a more limited response. PMID:23632305

  18. Rotavirus Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    Why get vaccinated?Rotavirus is a virus that causes diarrhea, mostly in babies and young children. The diarrhea can be severe, and lead ... and fever are also common in babies with rotavirus.Before rotavirus vaccine, rotavirus disease was a common ...

  19. Young Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Post HPV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ports, Katie A.; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L; Mosavel, Maghboeba; Murithi, Lydia Karuta

    2014-01-01

    In the present study the authors sought to explore, in greater depth, the impact that HPV vaccination has on college-aged women’s reproductive and sexual health. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 HPV-vaccinated, college women and analyzed for reoccurring themes. Although findings revealed that women’s HPV-related knowledge was suboptimal, most women correctly believed that they were still at risk for HPV after having received the vaccination. Women indicated that having the HPV vaccine made them more aware of sexually transmitted infections and prompted them to continue to take care of their sexual health. Women reported that having the HPV vaccine did not influence their condom use or birth control choices, and they believed that obtaining Pap smears was still important. These results help us to understand the impact of HPV vaccination on women’s reproductive and sexual health. These findings are promising and reinforce the importance of educating women about behaviors that will help them maintain reproductive and sexually healthy lives. PMID:24910854

  20. Pneumonia hospitalizations among young children before and after introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine--United States, 1997-2006.

    PubMed

    2009-01-16

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading bacterial cause of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations and an important cause of bacteremia and meningitis, especially among young children and older adults. A 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was licensed and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices formulated recommendations for its use in infants and children in February 2000. Vaccination coverage rapidly increased during the second half of 2000, in part through funding by CDC's Vaccines for Children program. Subsequently, active population- and laboratory-based surveillance demonstrated substantial reductions in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children and adults. In addition, decreases in hospitalizations and ambulatory-care visits for all-cause pneumonia also were reported. To gauge whether the effects of PCV7 on reducing pneumonia continue, CDC is monitoring pneumonia hospitalizations by using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. This report provides an update for 2005 and 2006, the most recent years for which information is available. In 2005 and 2006, the incidence rates for all-cause pneumonia hospitalizations among children aged <2 years were 9.1 per 1,000 and 8.1 per 1,000, respectively. In 2006, the rate for all-cause pneumonia among children aged <2 years was approximately 35% lower than during 1997--1999. Most of this decrease occurred soon after the vaccine was licensed in 2000, and the rates have remained relatively stable since then. The rate for all-cause pneumonia among children aged 2--4 years did not change after PCV7 licensure and has remained stable. Continued monitoring of pneumonia-related hospitalizations among children is needed to track the effects of pneumococcal immunization programs. PMID:19145219

  1. A Mumps Outbreak in Vojvodina, Serbia, in 2012 Underlines the Need for Additional Vaccination Opportunities for Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Nedeljkovi?, Jasminka; Kova?evi?-Jovanovi?, Vesna; Miloševi?, Vesna; Šeguljev, Zorica; Petrovic, Vladimir; Muller, Claude P; Hübschen, Judith M

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, mumps was introduced from Bosnia and Herzegovina to Vojvodina, causing an outbreak with 335 reported cases. The present manuscript analyses the epidemiological and laboratory characteristics of this outbreak, identifies its main causes and suggests potential future preventive measures. Sera of 133 patients were tested for mumps-specific antibodies by ELISA and 15 nose/throat swabs were investigated for mumps virus RNA by RT-PCR. IgG antibodies were found in 127 patients (95.5%). Mumps infection was laboratory-confirmed in 53 patients, including 44 IgM and 9 PCR positive cases. All other 282 cases were classified as epidemiologically-confirmed. More than half of the patients (n = 181, 54%) were 20-29 years old, followed by the 15-19 age bracket (n = 95, 28.4%). Twice as many males as females were affected (67% versus 33%). Disease complications were reported in 13 cases (3.9%), including 9 patients with orchitis and 4 with pancreatitis. According to medical records or anamnestic data, 190 patients (56.7%) were immunized with two doses and 35 (10.4%) with one dose of mumps-containing vaccine. The Serbian sequences corresponded to a minor genotype G variant detected during the 2011/2012 mumps outbreak in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Vaccine failures, the initial one-dose immunization policy and a vaccine shortage between 1999 and 2002 contributed to the outbreak. Additional vaccination opportunities should be offered to young adults during transition periods in their life trajectories. PMID:26496490

  2. A Mumps Outbreak in Vojvodina, Serbia, in 2012 Underlines the Need for Additional Vaccination Opportunities for Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nedeljkovi?, Jasminka; Kova?evi?-Jovanovi?, Vesna; Miloševi?, Vesna; Šeguljev, Zorica; Petrovic, Vladimir; Muller, Claude P.; Hübschen, Judith M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, mumps was introduced from Bosnia and Herzegovina to Vojvodina, causing an outbreak with 335 reported cases. The present manuscript analyses the epidemiological and laboratory characteristics of this outbreak, identifies its main causes and suggests potential future preventive measures. Sera of 133 patients were tested for mumps-specific antibodies by ELISA and 15 nose/throat swabs were investigated for mumps virus RNA by RT-PCR. IgG antibodies were found in 127 patients (95.5%). Mumps infection was laboratory-confirmed in 53 patients, including 44 IgM and 9 PCR positive cases. All other 282 cases were classified as epidemiologically-confirmed. More than half of the patients (n = 181, 54%) were 20–29 years old, followed by the 15–19 age bracket (n = 95, 28.4%). Twice as many males as females were affected (67% versus 33%). Disease complications were reported in 13 cases (3.9%), including 9 patients with orchitis and 4 with pancreatitis. According to medical records or anamnestic data, 190 patients (56.7%) were immunized with two doses and 35 (10.4%) with one dose of mumps-containing vaccine. The Serbian sequences corresponded to a minor genotype G variant detected during the 2011/2012 mumps outbreak in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Vaccine failures, the initial one-dose immunization policy and a vaccine shortage between 1999 and 2002 contributed to the outbreak. Additional vaccination opportunities should be offered to young adults during transition periods in their life trajectories. PMID:26496490

  3. Protective efficacy of reverse genetics based on inactivated American and Asian neuraminidase DIVA marker vaccines against highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza has become endemic in several countries, and vaccination is commonly being used. Vaccination can affect surveillance, and therefore there is considerable interest in DIVA (differentiate infected from vaccinated animals) vaccine strategies. Using reverse...

  4. RECOMBINANT PARAMYXOVIRUS TYPE 1-AVIAN INFLUENZA-H7 VIRUS AS A VACCINE FOR PROTECTION OF CHICKENS AGAINST INFLUENZA AND NEWCASTLE DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current vaccines to prevent avian influenza rely upon labor-intensive parenteral injection. A more advantageous vaccine would be capable of administration by mass immunization methods such as spray or water vaccination. A recombinant vaccine (rNDV-AIV-H7) was constructed by using a lentogenic Paramy...

  5. Health-Related Behaviors and Effectiveness of Trivalent Inactivated versus Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine in Preventing Influenza-Like Illness among Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sevick, Carter; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.; Blair, Patrick J.; Faix, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccination is the preferred preventive strategy against influenza. Though health behaviors are known to affect immunity and vaccine delivery modes utilize different immune processes, data regarding the preferred influenza vaccine type among adults endorsing specific health-related behaviors (alcohol use, tobacco use, and exercise level) are limited. Methods The relative effectiveness of two currently available influenza vaccines were compared for prevention of influenza-like illness during 2 well-matched influenza seasons (2006/2007, 2008/2009) among US military personnel aged 18–49 years. Relative vaccine effectiveness was compared between those self-reporting and not reporting recent smoking history and potential alcohol problem, and by exercise level using Cox proportional hazard modeling adjusted for sociodemographic and military factors, geographic area, and other health behaviors. Results 28,929 vaccination events and 3936 influenza-like illness events over both influenza seasons were studied. Of subjects, 27.5% were smokers, 7.7% had a potential alcohol-related problem, 10.5% reported minimal exercise, and 4.4% reported high exercise levels. Overall, the risk of influenza-like illness did not significantly differ between live attenuated and trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine recipients (hazard ratio, 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.90–1.06). In the final adjusted model, the relative effectiveness of the 2 vaccine types did not differ by smoking status (p?=?0.10), alcohol status (p?=?0.21), or activity level (p?=?0.11). Conclusions Live attenuated and trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines were similarly effective in preventing influenza-like illness among young adults and did not differ by health-related behavior status. Influenza vaccine efforts should continue to focus simply on delivering vaccine. PMID:25013931

  6. Virus-specific antibodies interfere with avian influenza infection in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes from young or aged chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) infection was examined in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocyte cultures (PBMC) that were collected from 1-day-old chicks or from 52-week-old chickens. Virus-specific antibodies were incubated with AIV to model maternal antibody interference in vitro. Interferon-alpha (I...

  7. An observational study of the temporal and spatial patterns of Marek’s-disease-associated leukosis condemnation of young chickens in the United States of America

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, John R.; Dunn, Patricia A.; Read, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Marek’s disease, a disease primarily affecting immature chickens, is a worldwide problem that has on at least three occasions threatened the poultry industry in the United States. A rich dataset to study the epidemiology of this disease is available because the United States Department of Agriculture has required mandatory inspections of all commercially sold poultry of significant scale since the mid-20th century with over 99% of all chickens inspected. This dataset includes monthly totals aggregated by state since 1961 of the number of “young chickens” inspected and the number with “leukosis”, a condemnation category that is almost always associated with Marek’s disease in this category of birds. The objective of this study was to analyze temporal and spatial patterns in this condemnation data to gain insight into the ecology and epidemiology of the causative virus. We extracted visual patterns in the data using seasonal trend decomposition, and we tested for statistical significance using extended linear modeling techniques. The analysis confirmed previous findings that there are differences in leukosis condemnation rates between states, across years, and within years. The analysis also revealed several patterns not previously highlighted, including spatial and temporal autocorrelations in leukosis condemnation, changes to the amplitude of seasonality over time, and increasing within-year variation in condemnation rate over time. These patterns suggest that locally shared farm practices, virus transmission between farms, or viral persistence may be important to understanding the dynamics of the disease. We also discuss the plausibility of other potential explanations for these patterns. PMID:25998661

  8. Protection against H7N3 high pathogenicity avian influenza in chickens immunized with a recombinant fowlpox and an inactivated avian influenza vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beginning on June 2012, an H7N3 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) epizootic was reported in the State of Jalisco (Mexico), with some 22.4 million chickens that died, were slaughtered on affected farms or were preemptively culled on neighboring farms. In the current study, layer chickens were ...

  9. Vaccination of SPF chickens with recombinant HVT expressing the HA from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza protects against lethal challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccination is an important tool in the protection of poultry against avian influenza (AI). For field use, the overwhelming majority of AI vaccines produced are inactivated whole virus formulated into an oil emulsion and to a lesser degree recombinant vectored vaccines (e.g. virus expressing AI gen...

  10. A heterologous neuraminidase subtype strategy for the differentiation of vaccinated and infected animals (DIVA) strategy for avian influenza virus using a more flexible neuraminidase inhibition test in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The option of vaccinating poultry against avian influenza (AI) as a control tool is gaining greater acceptance by the government and poultry industry world-wide. One reservation about vaccination with killed whole virus vaccines is the loss of the ability to use serologic surveillance to identify i...

  11. 9 CFR 113.331 - Bursal Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine. 113.331... Virus Vaccines § 113.331 Bursal Disease Vaccine. Bursal Disease Vaccine shall be prepared from virus...-five 1-day-old bursal disease susceptible chickens (vaccinates) shall be injected subcutaneously...

  12. 9 CFR 113.331 - Bursal Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine. 113.331... Virus Vaccines § 113.331 Bursal Disease Vaccine. Bursal Disease Vaccine shall be prepared from virus...-five 1-day-old bursal disease susceptible chickens (vaccinates) shall be injected subcutaneously...

  13. 9 CFR 113.331 - Bursal Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine. 113.331... Virus Vaccines § 113.331 Bursal Disease Vaccine. Bursal Disease Vaccine shall be prepared from virus...-five 1-day-old bursal disease susceptible chickens (vaccinates) shall be injected subcutaneously...

  14. 9 CFR 113.331 - Bursal Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine. 113.331... Virus Vaccines § 113.331 Bursal Disease Vaccine. Bursal Disease Vaccine shall be prepared from virus...-five 1-day-old bursal disease susceptible chickens (vaccinates) shall be injected subcutaneously...

  15. 9 CFR 113.331 - Bursal Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine. 113.331... Virus Vaccines § 113.331 Bursal Disease Vaccine. Bursal Disease Vaccine shall be prepared from virus...-five 1-day-old bursal disease susceptible chickens (vaccinates) shall be injected subcutaneously...

  16. Vaccination of young lambs against infection with Nematodirus battus using gamma irradiated larvae.

    PubMed

    Winter, M D; Wright, C; Lee, D L

    2000-10-01

    Helminthologically naIve 6-week-old Suffolk lambs were given 1-3 doses of 20000 gamma-irradiated infective larvae (L3) of the nematode Nematodirus battus at weekly intervals. Following an anthelmintic drench they were challenged with 50000 viable L3 at 10 weeks of age. Nematode worm burdens 14 days post-challenge showed a significant (P<0.01) 66% reduction in the single vaccine dose group. The two and three dose groups had mean worm burdens which were 30 and 42% lower than controls, respectively, although these were not statistically significant. There was little measurable stimulation of the immune system in the vaccinated lambs, suggesting that the repeatedly dosed animals may have developed immunological unresponsiveness to the parasite. PMID:11027783

  17. Cardiac Safety of Modified Vaccinia Ankara for Vaccination against Smallpox in a Young, Healthy Study Population

    PubMed Central

    Zitzmann-Roth, Eva-Maria; von Sonnenburg, Frank; de la Motte, Stephan; Arndtz-Wiedemann, Nathaly; von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Uebler, Nadine; Vollmar, Jens; Virgin, Garth; Chaplin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Conventional smallpox vaccines based on replicating vaccinia virus (VV) strains (e.g. Lister Elstree, NYCBOH) are associated with a high incidence of myo-/pericarditis, a severe inflammatory cardiac complication. A new smallpox vaccine candidate based on a non-replicating Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) poxvirus has been assessed for cardiac safety in a large placebo-controlled clinical trial. Methods Cardiac safety of one and two doses of MVA compared to placebo was assessed in 745 healthy subjects. Vaccinia-naïve subjects received either one dose of MVA and one dose of placebo, two doses of MVA, or two doses of placebo by subcutaneous injection four weeks apart; vaccinia-experienced subjects received a single dose of MVA. Solicited and unsolicited adverse events (AE) and cardiac safety parameters (recorded as Adverse Events of Special Interest, AESI) were monitored after each injection. Results A total of 5 possibly related AESI (3 cases of palpitations, 2 of tachycardia) were reported during the study. No case of myo- or pericarditis occurred. One possibly related serious AE (SAE) was reported during the 6-month follow-up period (sarcoidosis). The most frequently observed AEs were injection site reactions. Conclusions Vaccination with MVA was safe and well tolerated and did not increase the risk for development of myo-/pericarditis. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00316524 PMID:25879867

  18. Characterization of the 2012 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H7N3 Virus Isolated from Poultry in an Outbreak in Mexico: Pathobiology and Vaccine Protection

    PubMed Central

    Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Guzman, Sofia G.; Ricardez, Yadira; Spackman, Erica; Bertran, Kateri; Suarez, David L.; Swayne, David E.

    2013-01-01

    In June of 2012, an H7N3 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus was identified as the cause of a severe disease outbreak in commercial laying chicken farms in Mexico. The purpose of this study was to characterize the Mexican 2012 H7N3 HPAI virus (A/chicken/Jalisco/CPA1/2012) and determine the protection against the virus conferred by different H7 inactivated vaccines in chickens. Both adult and young chickens intranasally inoculated with the virus became infected and died at between 2 and 4 days postinoculation (p.i.). High virus titers and viral replication in many tissues were demonstrated at 2 days p.i. in infected birds. The virus from Jalisco, Mexico, had high sequence similarity of greater than 97% to the sequences of wild bird viruses from North America in all eight gene segments. The hemagglutinin gene of the virus contained a 24-nucleotide insert at the hemagglutinin cleavage site which had 100% sequence identity to chicken 28S rRNA, suggesting that the insert was the result of nonhomologous recombination with the host genome. For vaccine protection studies, both U.S. H7 low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses and a 2006 Mexican H7 LPAI virus were tested as antigens in experimental oil emulsion vaccines and injected into chickens 3 weeks prior to challenge. All H7 vaccines tested provided ?90% protection against clinical disease after challenge and decreased the number of birds shedding virus and the titers of virus shed. This study demonstrates the pathological consequences of the infection of chickens with the 2012 Mexican lineage H7N3 HPAI virus and provides support for effective programs of vaccination against this virus in poultry. PMID:23760232

  19. Long-term persistence of systemic and mucosal immune response to HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine in preteen/adolescent girls and young women.

    PubMed

    Petäjä, Tiina; Pedersen, Court; Poder, Airi; Strauss, Gitte; Catteau, Gregory; Thomas, Florence; Lehtinen, Matti; Descamps, Dominique

    2011-11-01

    Vaccination against oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types is one key intervention for cervical cancer prevention. This follow-up study assessed the persistence of the systemic and mucosal immune responses together with the safety profile of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered to young women aged 10-25 years. Serum and cervicovaginal secretion (CVS) samples were collected at prespecified time-points during the 48-month follow-up period. Anti-HPV-16/18 antibody levels in serum and CVS were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). At Month 48, all subjects remained seropositive for serum anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies. As previously observed, anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies levels (ELISA Units/mL) were higher in subjects vaccinated at the age of 10-14 years (2862.2 and 940.8) compared to subjects vaccinated at the age of 15-25 years (1186.2 and 469.8). Moreover, anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies in CVS were still detectable for subjects aged 15-25 years (84.1% and 69.7%, respectively). There was a strong correlation between serum and CVS anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies levels (correlation coefficients = 0.84 and 0.90 at Month 48, respectively) supporting the hypothesis of transudation or exudation of serum immunoglobulin G antibodies through the cervical epithelium. The HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine had a clinically acceptable safety profile. In conclusion, this follow-up study shows that the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered to preteen/adolescents girls and young women induces long-term systemic and mucosal immune response and has a clinically acceptable safety profile up to 4 years after the first vaccine dose. PMID:21190190

  20. Vaccine protection of chickens against antigenically diverse H5 highly pathogenic avian influenza isolates with a live HVT vector vaccine expressing the influenza hemagglutinin gene derived from a clade 2.2 avian influenza vi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccination is an important tool in the protection of poultry against avian influenza (AI). For field use, the overwhelming majority of AI vaccines produced are inactivated whole virus formulated into an oil emulsion. However, recombinant vectored vaccines are gaining use for their ability to induce...

  1. Chicken anaemia virus infection: molecular basis of pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Noteborn, M H; Koch, G

    1995-03-01

    Chicken anaemia virus (CAV) is a small virus of a unique type with a particle diameter of 23 to 25 nm and a genome consisting of a circular single-stranded (minus-strand) DNA. This DNA multiplies in infected cells via a circular double-stranded replicative intermediate, which was recently cloned. DNA analysis of CAV strains isolated in different continents revealed only minor differences among the various isolates. Apparently, all CAV isolates belong to a single serotype. CAV is not related to other known animal single-stranded circular-DNA viruses, such as porcine circovirus and psittacine beak-and-feather-disease virus. The major transcript from the CAV genome is an unspliced polycistronic mRNA of about 2100 nucleotides encoding three proteins of 51.6 kDa (VP1), 24.0 kDa (VP2) and 13.6 kDa (VP3 or apoptin). All three predicted CAV proteins are synthesized in CAV-infected cells. Immunization with (recombinant) VP1 and VP2 synchronously synthesized in the same cells elicits a protective response and can be used as subunit vaccine against chicken infectious anaemia. CAV causes clinical and subclinical disease in chickens, and is recognized as an important avian pathogen worldwide. In young chickens, CAV causes a transient severe anaemia due to destruction of erythroblastoid cells in the bone marrow and immunodeficiency due to depletion of cortical thymocytes. The depletion of the cortical thymocytes is considered to cause a (transient) immunodeficiency resulting in enhanced concurrent infections and to vaccination failures. The depletion of thymocytes and most likely also of erythroblastoid cells occurs via CAV-induced apoptosis. The CAV-encoded protein apoptin is the main inducer of this phenomenon. PMID:18645763

  2. Information Vaccine: Using Graphic Novels as an HIV/AIDS Prevention Resource for Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Kendra S.; Gavigan, Karen

    2014-01-01

    HIV/AIDS infections are growing at an alarming rate for young adults. In 2009, youth, ages 13-29, accounted for 39% of all new HIV infections in the U.S. (Division of HIV/ AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 2011). South Carolina ranks eighth in the nation for new HIV cases, while the capital city of Columbia ranks seventh…

  3. Human papillomavirus knowledge, vaccine acceptance, and vaccine series completion among female entertainment and sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia: the Young Women's Health Study.

    PubMed

    Wadhera, Priya; Evans, Jennifer L; Stein, Ellen; Gandhi, Monica; Couture, Marie-Claude; Sansothy, Neth; Sichan, Keo; Maher, Lisa; Kaldor, John; Page, Kimberly; Kaldor, John; Kien, Serey Phal; Page, Kimberly; Palefsky, Joel M; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Vun, Mean Chhi

    2015-10-01

    SummaryHuman papillomavirus is a common sexually transmitted infection and the causative agent for cervical cancer, a frequently occurring malignant disease among women in developing countries. We assessed human papillomavirus awareness prior to the delivery of a brief information and education intervention, and human papillomavirus vaccine provision to female entertainment and sex workers (N?=?220). At baseline, only 23.6% of women had heard of human papillomavirus. Following the educational intervention, 90% answered all the human papillomavirus knowledge questions correctly. Of 192 participants attending the first quarterly cohort visit where vaccine was offered, 149 (78%) were eligible for vaccination; HIV-positive (n?=?32) and pregnant (n?=?11) women were excluded. Acceptance of vaccine among eligible women was universal, and 79.2% completed the three-dose vaccination series. Women who reported use of amphetamine-type stimulants had significantly and independently lower odds of vaccine completion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.24; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.08, 0.69). New pregnancies also had an impact on vaccine completion: 5.4% (8/149 5.4%) who started the series had to stop due to new pregnancy. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of a simple education intervention designed to increase human papillomavirus knowledge and the feasibility of successful human papillomavirus vaccine in a population that is often difficult to engage in preventive health care. PMID:25505042

  4. HPV knowledge, vaccine acceptance, and vaccine series completion among female entertainment and sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia: the Young Women's Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Wadhera, Priya; Evans, Jennifer L; Stein, Ellen; Gandhi, Monica; Couture, Marie-Claude; Sansothy, Neth; Sichan, Keo; Maher, Lisa; Kaldor, John; Page, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) and the causative agent for cervical cancer, a frequently occurring malignant disease among women in developing countries. We assessed HPV awareness prior to the delivery of a brief information and education intervention, and HPV vaccine provision to female entertainment and sex workers (N=220). At baseline, only 23.6% of women had heard of HPV. Following the educational intervention, 90% answered all the HPV knowledge questions correctly. Of 192 participants attending the first quarterly cohort visit where vaccine was offered, 149 (78%) were eligible for vaccination; HIV-positive (n=32) and pregnant (n=11) women were excluded. Acceptance of vaccine among eligible women was universal, and 79.2% completed the three-dose vaccination series. Women who reported use of amphetamine type stimulants (ATS) had significantly and independently lower odds of vaccine completion (Adjusted OR 0.24; 95% CI 0.08, 0.69). New pregnancies also had an impact on vaccine completion: 5.4% (8/149 5.4%) who started the series had to stop due to new pregnancy. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of a simple education intervention designed to increase HPV knowledge and the feasibility of successful HPV vaccine in a population that is often difficult to engage in preventive health care. PMID:25505042

  5. Infectious laryngotracheitis virus in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Shan-Chia; Giambrone, Joseph J

    2012-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an important respiratory disease of chickens and annually causes significant economic losses in the poultry industry world-wide. ILT virus (ILTV) belongs to alphaherpesvirinae and the Gallid herpesvirus 1 species. The transmission of ILTV is via respiratory and ocular routes. Clinical and post-mortem signs of ILT can be separated into two forms according to its virulence. The characteristic of the severe form is bloody mucus in the trachea with high mortality. The mild form causes nasal discharge, conjunctivitis, and reduced weight gain and egg production. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nested PCR, real-time PCR, and loop-mediated isothermal amplification were developed to detect ILTV samples from natural or experimentally infected birds. The PCR combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) can separate ILTVs into several genetic groups. These groups can separate vaccine from wild type field viruses. Vaccination is a common method to prevent ILT. However, field isolates and vaccine viruses can establish latent infected carriers. According to PCR-RFLP results, virulent field ILTVs can be derived from modified-live vaccines. Therefore, modified-live vaccine reversion provides a source for ILT outbreaks on chicken farms. Two recently licensed commercial recombinant ILT vaccines are also in use. Other recombinant and gene-deficient vaccine candidates are in the developmental stages. They offer additional hope for the control of this disease. However, in ILT endemic regions, improved biosecurity and management practices are critical for improved ILT control. PMID:24175219

  6. Effects of increased dosages of the Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine MYCOVAC-L® in layer chickens subsequently challenged with virulent M. gallisepticum: egg production and serologic response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten wk old Hy-Line Commercial W-36 pullets were spray vaccinated with MYCOVAC-L® at the manufacturer’s recommended dosage (1X) or at fifteen-times (15X) that rate. At 22 or 45 wks of age, subsets of 1X and 15X vaccinated pullets were challenged via intraocular inoculation with the virulent Mycoplas...

  7. Immunogenicity and efficacy of fowlpox-vectored and inactivated avian influenza vaccines alone or in a prime-boost schedule in chickens with maternal antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inactivated and fowlpox (FP)-vectored vaccines have been used to control avian influenza (AI) in poultry. In endemic countries, breeder flocks are vaccinated and therefore, maternally-derived antibodies (MDA) are transferred to their progeny. Results of several immunogenicity and efficacy studies ...

  8. Parents' Knowledge, Risk Perception and Willingness to Allow Young Males to Receive Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Muhwezi, Wilson Winstons; Banura, Cecily; Turiho, Andrew Kampikaho; Mirembe, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The Ministry of Health in Uganda in collaboration with the Program for Appropriate Technology for Health (PATH) supported by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in 2008–2009 vaccinated approximately 10,000 girls with the bivalent humanpapilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. We assessed parent's knowledge, risk perception and willingness to allow son(s) to receive HPV vaccines in future through a cross-sectional survey of secondary school boys aged 10–23 years in 4 districts. 377 questionnaires were distributed per district and 870 were used in analysis. Parents that had ever heard about cervical cancer and HPV vaccines; those who would allow daughter(s) to be given the vaccine and those who thought that HPV infection was associated with genital warts were more willing to allow son(s) to receive the HPV vaccine. Unwilling parents considered HPV vaccination of boys unimportant (p?=?0.003), believed that only females should receive the vaccine (p?=?0.006), thought their son(s) couldn't contract HPV (p?=?0.010), didn't know about HPV sexual transmissibility (p?=?0.002), knew that males could not acquire HPV (p?=?0.000) and never believed that the HPV vaccines could protect against HPV (p?=?0.000). Acceptance of HPV vaccination of daughters and likelihood of recommending HPV vaccines to son(s) of friends and relatives predicted parental willingness to allow sons to receive HPV vaccines. Probable HPV vaccination of boys is a viable complement to that of girls. Successfulness of HPV vaccination relies on parental acceptability and sustained sensitization about usefulness of HPV vaccines even for boys is vital. PMID:25203053

  9. Nasal vaccination of young rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) against infectious hematopoietic necrosis and enteric red mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Salinas, I; LaPatra, S E; Erhardt, E B

    2015-11-01

    Determining the earliest age at which farmed fish can be successfully vaccinated is a very important question for fish farmers. Nasal vaccines are novel mucosal vaccines that prevent aquatic infectious diseases of finfish. The present study investigates the ontogeny of the olfactory organ of rainbow trout by histology and aims to establish the earliest age for vaccination against infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) and enteric red mouth (ERM) disease using the nasal route. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were vaccinated intranasally (I.N) at three different ages: 1050° days (DD) (group A); 450 DD (group B); and 360 DD (group C), or 70, 30 and 24 days post-hatch (dph), respectively. The mean weights of groups A, B and C were 4.69 g, 2.9 g and 2.37 g, respectively. Fish received either a live attenuated IHN virus vaccine, ERM formalin killed bacterin or saline (mock vaccinated). Fish were challenged to the corresponding live pathogen 28 days post-vaccination. IHN vaccine delivery at 360 DD resulted in 40% mortality likely due to residual virulence of the vaccine. No mortality was observed in the ERM nasal delivery groups. Following challenge, very high protection rates against IHN virus were recorded in all three age groups with survivals of 95%, 100% and 97.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively. Survival against ERM was 82.5%, 87.5% and 77.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively. Survival rates did not differ among ages for either vaccine. Our results indicate the feasibility and effectiveness of nasal vaccination as early as 360 DD and vaccination-related mortalities when a live attenuated viral vaccine was used in the youngest fish. PMID:26111996

  10. A mutation in the NLRC5 promoter limits NF-?B signaling after Salmonella Enteritidis infection in the spleen of young chickens.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guobin; Liu, Xiangping; Ma, Teng; Xu, Lu; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Zhiteng; Guo, Xiaomin; Xu, Qi; Chen, Guohong

    2015-09-01

    To date, the functions of the NLRC5 in chickens remain undefined. In the current study, chicken NLRC5 was cloned and an A1017G mutation was detected in its promoter region. The relative expression levels of the NLRC5 and key NF-?B pathway genes, IKK?, IKK?, NF-?B, IL-6, IL-1? and IFN-?, in the spleens of wild and mutant type birds, AA and GG, were determined using FQ-PCR at 7 day post-infection (DPI) with Salmonella Enteritidis. Additionally, the bacterial burden in the caecum and various immune response parameters were measured to evaluate immune responses. All of the examined immune response parameters were significantly different between the AA chickens and the GG chickens. Specifically, the mRNA expression levels of IKK?, NF-?B, IL-6, IL-1? and IFN-? were higher in AA chickens than those in GG chickens, while the mRNA expression levels of NLRC5 were lower in AA chickens than those in GG chickens (P<0.05). Moreover, the mRNA expression levels of TLR4 and MyD88 were not affected in either group. Collectively, considering former NLRC5 functional study in vitro, the wild genotype birds presented with better resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis through the actions of the NLRC5 and subsequent inhibition of the NF-?B pathway in chickens. PMID:25979675

  11. ACUTE PHASE IMMUNE GENE PROFILING OF SPLEEN AND PEYER’S PATCH IN NAÏVE AND VACCINATED CHICKENS FOLLOWING AVIAN INFLUENZA A (H5N1) VIRUS INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we applied functional genomics tools to investigate the early immunological response of chickens to highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza virus (AIV). Infection with HPAIV usually results in the rapid death of poultry. The aim of this study was to identify host immune genes which a...

  12. ACUTE PHASE IMMUNE GENE PROFILING OF SPLEEN AND PEYER’S PATCH IN NAÏVE AND VACCINATED CHICKENS FOLLOWING AVIAN INFLUENZA A (H5N1) VIRUS INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in immunogenomic and proteomic tools are facilitating the characterization of complex host-pathogen immunobiology. In this study, we applied functional genomics tools to investigate the early immunological response of chickens to highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza virus (AIV). ...

  13. Expression of H5 hemagglutinin vaccine antigen in common duckweed (Lemna minor) protects against H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus challenge in immunized chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A synthetic hemagglutinin (HA) gene from the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/chicken/Indonesia/7/2003 (H5N1) (Indo/03) was expressed in aquatic plant Lemna minor (rLemna-HA). In Experiment 1, efficacy of rLemna-HA was tested on specific pathogen free (SPF) birds immunized with 0.2 ...

  14. CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSES VACCINATED WITH SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS BACTERIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of Salmonella enteritidis vaccination on the host cellular immune response was evaluated. Chickens were vaccinated subcutaneously with killed S. enteritidis vaccine at the ages of 3 and 5 weeks. After vaccination, serum samples were collected for 3 weeks for the evaluation of IFN- and I...

  15. 9 CFR 113.329 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Newcastle Disease Vaccine. 113.329... Virus Vaccines § 113.329 Newcastle Disease Vaccine. Newcastle Disease Vaccine shall be prepared from...) Newcastle Disease susceptible chickens, all of the same age and from the same source, shall be used....

  16. 9 CFR 113.329 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Newcastle Disease Vaccine. 113.329... Virus Vaccines § 113.329 Newcastle Disease Vaccine. Newcastle Disease Vaccine shall be prepared from...) Newcastle Disease susceptible chickens, all of the same age and from the same source, shall be used....

  17. 9 CFR 113.329 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Newcastle Disease Vaccine. 113.329... Virus Vaccines § 113.329 Newcastle Disease Vaccine. Newcastle Disease Vaccine shall be prepared from...) Newcastle Disease susceptible chickens, all of the same age and from the same source, shall be used....

  18. 9 CFR 113.329 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Newcastle Disease Vaccine. 113.329... Virus Vaccines § 113.329 Newcastle Disease Vaccine. Newcastle Disease Vaccine shall be prepared from...) Newcastle Disease susceptible chickens, all of the same age and from the same source, shall be used....

  19. 9 CFR 113.329 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Newcastle Disease Vaccine. 113.329... Virus Vaccines § 113.329 Newcastle Disease Vaccine. Newcastle Disease Vaccine shall be prepared from...) Newcastle Disease susceptible chickens, all of the same age and from the same source, shall be used....

  20. Evaluation of inactivated avian influenza H7 vaccines for protection of chickens against a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H7N3 isolated from chickens in Jalisco, Mexico, during 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H7N3 was reported poultry in Jalisco, Mexico, beginning in June of 2012. To date more than 11 million birds have died or been slaughtered in an effort to stop the spread of disease. In response to the outbreak, vaccine efficacy trials wer...

  1. Rotavirus vaccine: a review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Goel Manish; Arun, Kumar; Bilas, Jain Ram; Ruchi, Jain; Pardeep, Khanna; Pradeep, Siwach

    2012-12-01

    Worldwide, large proportion i.e., 37% of deaths due to diarrhea in young children is attributed to rotavirus. A monovalent P1A[8] G1 vaccine and a pentavalent bovine-human reassortant vaccine human rotavirus vaccine had shown good clinical efficacy without any increase in intussusception among vaccine recipients. WHO recommends that the first dose of rotavirus vaccine should be administered to infants up to age of 6-15 weeks irrespective of the prior history of rotavirus infection and the maximum age for administering the last dose of the vaccine should be 32 weeks. Booster doses are not recommended. The current update reviews the issues related to rotavirus vaccines and their usages like milestones in the development of rotavirus vaccines, concerns regarding their efficacy and cost-effectiveness, immunity after natural infection, potential for changes in virus strains, current recommendations, post marketing surveillance, and future challenges and scope for further research regarding rotavirus vaccines. PMID:25145068

  2. Efficacy of a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against anal HPV16/18 infection among young women: a nested analysis within the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Gonzalèz, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Struijk, Linda; Quint, Wim; Chen, Sabrina; Wacholder, Sholom; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando

    2011-01-01

    Background Anal cancer remains rare (incidence of ?1.5 per 100,000 women annually) but rates are increasing in many countries. Human papillomavirus-16 (HPV16) infection causes most cases. We evaluated vaccine efficacy (VE) of an ASO4-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccine against anal HPV16/18 infection. Methods In a randomized double-blind controlled trial designed to evaluate VE against persistent cervical HPV16/18 infections and associated precancerous lesions in Costa Rica, 4210 healthy women underwent anal specimen collection (4224 of 5968= 70.8% of eligible women) at the final blinded study visit 4 years after vaccination to evaluate anal HPV16/18 VE. Cervical HPV16/18 VE among the same women at the same visit was calculated as a comparator. For this ancillary work, analyses were conducted in a restricted cohort of women both cervical HPV16/18 DNA negative and HPV 16/18 seronegative prior at enrollment (N=1989), and in the full cohort (all women with an anal specimen). Findings In the restricted cohort, VE against prevalent HPV16/18 anal infection measured one-time, four-years post-vaccination was 83.6% (95%CI 66.7% to 92.8%), which was comparable to cervical HPV16/18 VE (87.9%, 95%CI 77.4% to 94.0%). In the full cohort, HPV16/18 VE was statistically lower at the anus (62.0%, 95%CI 47.1% to 73.1%) compared to the cervix (76.4%, 95%CI 67.0% to 83.5%) (p for anatomic-site interaction =0.03). Significant and comparable VE estimates against a composite endpoint of HPV31/33/45 (i.e.: cross-protection) was observed at the anus and cervix. Interpretation The ASO4-adjuvanted vaccine affords strong protection against anal HPV, particularly among women more likely to be HPV naïve at vaccination. Funding. The Costa Rica HPV Vaccine Trial is sponsored and funded by the NCI (contract N01-CP-11005), with funding support from the National Institutes of Health Office of Research on Women's Health, and conducted with support from the Ministry of Health of Costa Rica. Vaccine was provided for our trial by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals (GSK), under a Clinical Trials Agreement with the NCI. PMID:21865087

  3. Chicken Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how a visit from a flock of chickens provided inspiration for the children's chicken art. The gentle clucking of the hens, the rooster crowing, and the softness of the feathers all provided rich aural, tactile, visual, and emotional experiences. The experience affirms the importance and value of direct…

  4. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... conducted using susceptible chicken embryos: Provided, That, if a non-embryo adapted virus is used for vaccine production, the test shall be conducted in susceptible chickens. (i) Chicken Embryo Test. Each of 15 or more AE susceptible 5 or 6 day old embryos shall be injected in the yolk sac with 0.2 ml of...

  5. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... conducted using susceptible chicken embryos: Provided, That, if a non-embryo adapted virus is used for vaccine production, the test shall be conducted in susceptible chickens. (i) Chicken Embryo Test. Each of 15 or more AE susceptible 5 or 6 day old embryos shall be injected in the yolk sac with 0.2 ml of...

  6. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... conducted using susceptible chicken embryos: Provided, That, if a non-embryo adapted virus is used for vaccine production, the test shall be conducted in susceptible chickens. (i) Chicken Embryo Test. Each of 15 or more AE susceptible 5 or 6 day old embryos shall be injected in the yolk sac with 0.2 ml of...

  7. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... conducted using susceptible chicken embryos: Provided, That, if a non-embryo adapted virus is used for vaccine production, the test shall be conducted in susceptible chickens. (i) Chicken Embryo Test. Each of 15 or more AE susceptible 5 or 6 day old embryos shall be injected in the yolk sac with 0.2 ml of...

  8. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... conducted using susceptible chicken embryos: Provided, That, if a non-embryo adapted virus is used for vaccine production, the test shall be conducted in susceptible chickens. (i) Chicken Embryo Test. Each of 15 or more AE susceptible 5 or 6 day old embryos shall be injected in the yolk sac with 0.2 ml of...

  9. Hepatitis A vaccination among young African American men who have sex with men in the deep south: psychosocial predictors.

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Scott D.; Yee, Leland J.; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.

    2003-01-01

    Despite recommendations for vaccination against hepatitis A (HAV) of men who have sex with men (MSM), most remain unvaccinated. This study was designed to identify attitudes and beliefs associated with vaccination against HAV using a conventional outreach sample of African American MSM in Birmingham, Alabama. Of 107 participants, nearly 34% reported being vaccinated against HAV. Over half of the participants reported 10 or more different lifetime male sexual partners, and a third reported having had intercourse with females, as well as, males within the past 5 years. About 10% of the participants reported condom use over half of the time during oral intercourse, and 50% of the participants reported using a condom over half the time during anal intercourse. In multivariable analysis, predictors of HAV vaccination were a decreased perception of the practical barriers to HAV vaccination (odds ratio [OR], 0.05; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.01-0.18, P = 0.002); increased health provider communication (OR, 9.89; 95% CI: 2.74-35.65, P = 0.02); and increased perceived personal self-efficacy to complete the two-dose series (OR, 7.31; 95% CI: 2.38-22.45, P = 0.02). Our findings underscore the need to increase vaccination through innovative approaches to reduce perceived barriers to vaccination while increasing provider-patient communication and self-efficacy to complete the vaccine series. PMID:12749607

  10. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...prescribed in this paragraph. However, products of chicken embryo origin recommended for administration other than by parenteral...Bacteria is unsatisfactory. (e) Live viral vaccines of chicken embryo origin recommended for administration other than by...

  11. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...prescribed in this paragraph. However, products of chicken embryo origin recommended for administration other than by parenteral...Bacteria is unsatisfactory. (e) Live viral vaccines of chicken embryo origin recommended for administration other than by...

  12. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...prescribed in this paragraph. However, products of chicken embryo origin recommended for administration other than by parenteral...Bacteria is unsatisfactory. (e) Live viral vaccines of chicken embryo origin recommended for administration other than by...

  13. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...prescribed in this paragraph. However, products of chicken embryo origin recommended for administration other than by parenteral...Bacteria is unsatisfactory. (e) Live viral vaccines of chicken embryo origin recommended for administration other than by...

  14. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...prescribed in this paragraph. However, products of chicken embryo origin recommended for administration other than by parenteral...Bacteria is unsatisfactory. (e) Live viral vaccines of chicken embryo origin recommended for administration other than by...

  15. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... shall be tested for purity as prescribed in this paragraph. However, products of chicken embryo origin... Bacteria is unsatisfactory. (e) Live viral vaccines of chicken embryo origin recommended for...

  16. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... shall be tested for purity as prescribed in this paragraph. However, products of chicken embryo origin... Bacteria is unsatisfactory. (e) Live viral vaccines of chicken embryo origin recommended for...

  17. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... shall be tested for purity as prescribed in this paragraph. However, products of chicken embryo origin... Bacteria is unsatisfactory. (e) Live viral vaccines of chicken embryo origin recommended for...

  18. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... shall be tested for purity as prescribed in this paragraph. However, products of chicken embryo origin... Bacteria is unsatisfactory. (e) Live viral vaccines of chicken embryo origin recommended for...

  19. Characterization of the live LaSota-vaccine strain-induced protection in chickens upon early challenge with a virulent Newcastle disease virus of heterologous genotype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease (ND) is a major threat to the international poultry industry, causing bird mortality, reduction in growth and egg production and trade restrictions. The primary strategy available to the poultry industry to control Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the causative agent of ND, is vaccin...

  20. Variation in protection by seven inactivated H5 vaccine strains against eight H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza viruses in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus (HPAIV) is an important pathogen for poultry. Vaccines have assisted in control for poultry, and for human pandemic preparedness. However the genetic diversity and rapid antigenic drifting of the field viruses have led to inadequate protection. This s...

  1. PRINCIPLES FOR VACCINE PROTECTION IN CHICKENS AND DOMESTIC WATERFOWL AGAINST AVIAN INFLUENZA: EMPHASIS ON ASIAN H5N1 HIGH PATHOGENICITY AVIAN INFLUENZA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The H5N1 highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza (AI) epizootic began with reports of mortality from China in 1996 and has since caused outbreaks of disease in nine Asian countries, affecting or resulting in culling of over 200 million birds. Vaccines can be used in programs to prevent, manage or era...

  2. A computationally optimized broadly reactive H5 hemagglutinin vaccine provides protection against homologous and heterologous H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since its emergence in 1996 in China, H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus has continuously evolved into different genetic clades that have created challenges to maintaining antigenically relevant H5N1 vaccine seeds. Therefore, a universal (multi-hemagglutinin [HA] subtype) or more c...

  3. Vaccination and early protection against non-host-specific Salmonella serotypes in poultry: exploitation of innate immunity and microbial activity.

    PubMed Central

    Van Immerseel, F.; Methner, U.; Rychlik, I.; Nagy, B.; Velge, P.; Martin, G.; Foster, N.; Ducatelle, R.; Barrow, P. A.

    2005-01-01

    A recent European Union Directive required member states to put monitoring and control programmes in place, of which vaccination is a central component. Live Salmonella vaccines generally confer better protection than killed vaccines, because the former stimulate both cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Administering Salmonella bacteria orally to newly hatched chickens results in extensive gut colonization and a strong adaptive immune stimulus but broiler chickens are immunologically immature. However, colonization exerts a variety of rapid (within 24 h) protective effects. These include specific colonization-inhibition (competitive exclusion) in which the protective bacteria exert a profound resistance to establishment and colonization by other related bacteria. This is thought to be primarily a metabolic attribute of the vaccinating bacteria but may also involve competition for attachment sites. The presence of large numbers of bacteria originating from a live Salmonella vaccine in the intestine can also induce infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells into the intestinal wall, which confers resistance to invasion and systemic spread by virulent Salmonella strains. This opens new perspectives for vaccine usage in broilers, layers and breeding poultry but also in other animals which show increased susceptibility to infection because of their young age or for other reasons, such as oral chemoprophylaxis or chemotherapy, where the lack of established normal gut flora is an issue. We recommend that all live vaccines considered for oral administration should be tested for their ability to induce the two protective effects described above. Further developments in live Salmonella vaccines are, however, currently hindered by fears associated with the use and release of live vaccines which may be genetically modified. PMID:16274493

  4. Cattle Vaccines 

    E-print Network

    Faries Jr., Floron C.

    2005-11-11

    Vaccines deliver antigens that stimulate the body's production of antibodies in response to disease. Cattle can be vaccinated with noninfectious or infectious vaccines. The types of vaccine products, proper handling of vaccines, and vaccination...

  5. Safety of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Modified Live Virus (MLV) vaccine strains in a young pig infection model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the safety of all modified live virus vaccines commercially available in Europe against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) under the same experimental conditions. For this purpose, one hundred and twenty three-week-old piglets, divided into five groups, were used. On day 0 of the experiment, nine pigs per group were removed and the remaining fifteen were vaccinated with the commercial vaccines Ingelvac PRRS MLV, Amervac PRRS, Pyrsvac-183 and Porcilis PRRS by the IM route or were mock vaccinated and used as controls. On day 3, the nine unvaccinated pigs were re-introduced into their respective groups and served as sentinel pigs. Clinical signs were recorded daily and lung lesions were determined on days 7, 14 and 21, when 5 vaccinated pigs per group were euthanized. Blood samples and swabs were taken every three days and different organs were collected at necropsy to determine the presence of PRRSV. None of the vaccines studied caused detectable clinical signs in vaccinated pigs although lung lesions were found. Altogether, these results indicate that all vaccines can be considered clinically safe. However, some differences were found in virological parameters. Thus, neither Pyrsvac-183 nor Porcilis PRRS could be detected in porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM) cultures or in lung sections used to determine PRRSV by immunohistochemistry, indicating that these viruses might have lost their ability to replicate in PAM. This inability to replicate in PAM might be related to the lower transmission rate and the delay in the onset of viremia observed in these groups PMID:24308693

  6. Studies of infectious laryngotracheitis vaccines: immunity in layers.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, J R; Glisson, J R; Goodwin, M A; Resurreccion, R S; Villegas, P; Brown, J

    1989-01-01

    Ten-week-old layer chickens obtained from a commercial source were eye-drop vaccinated with chicken-embryo-origin (CEO) or tissue-culture-origin (TCO) vaccines for infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT). Controls were not vaccinated. Approximately one-third of the layers were challenged with virulent ILT virus at 21, 40, or 60 weeks of age. Serum samples taken from the layers before challenge were used in a virus neutralization (VN) test to determine vaccination titers at those three ages. Both vaccines induced low VN titers (geometric mean titer [GMT] less than 6). At 21 weeks of age, the titers produced by the two vaccines were not significantly different, but at 40 and 60 weeks of age the VN GMT of the CEO-vaccinated group was significantly greater than that of the TCO-vaccinated group. The VN GMTs did not drop over time in either group and actually rose between 21 and 60 weeks of age in the CEO group. Both vaccines protected layers against severe challenge with virulent ILT virus, neither being significantly better than the other under these experimental conditions. Unvaccinated sentinel chickens were maintained in contact with the vaccinated layers during three intervals between 1 day and 6 weeks post-vaccination. Diagnostic tests performed on the sentinels to detect lateral spread of vaccine virus from vaccinated to unvaccinated chickens showed scattered positive results. PMID:2549940

  7. Serological examination of sera from hyperimmunized chickens and turkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection of avian influenza (AI) H5 and H7 antibody in commercial poultry is a World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) notifiable event and impacts trade. Chickens and turkeys which had been vaccinated with an oil-emulsion H1N1/H3N2 influenza autogenous vaccine were inoculated with inactivated ...

  8. Seasonal Flu Vaccine Safety and Pregnant Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... found at " Thimerosal and Flu Vaccines" Can a breastfeeding women get a flu vaccine? Yes. Breastfeeding women should get the flu vaccine to protect ... they are too young to be vaccinated themselves. Breastfeeding women can get either a flu shot or ...

  9. Practical aspects of vaccination of poultry against avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although little has changed in vaccine technology for avian influenza virus (AIV) in the past 20 years, the approach to vaccination of poultry (chickens, turkeys and ducks) for avian influenza has evolved as highly pathogenic (HP) AIV has become endemic in several regions of the world. Vaccination f...

  10. Recent Advances in Mycoplasma gallisepticum Vaccine Administration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of live Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines to layer chickens generally occurs at 9 to 10 weeks of age. Mycoplasma organisms are extremely fastidious in the laboratory and difficult to grow. Very little attention has been accorded to optimizing parameters for vaccine administration in th...

  11. How to Inform: Comparing Written and Video Education Interventions to Increase Human Papillomavirus Knowledge and Vaccination Intentions in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krawczyk, Andrea; Lau, Elsa; Perez, Samara; Delisle, Vanessa; Amsel, Rhonda; Rosberger, Zeev

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of 2 human papillomavirus (HPV) educational interventions on increasing HPV knowledge and vaccination intentions in college students. Participants: Male (n = 60) and female (n = 140) undergraduates (M[subscript age] = 20.4, SD = 2.3) recruited from a university in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, from October 2009 to…

  12. An observational study of the temporal and spatial patterns of Marek's-disease-associated leukosis condemnation of young chickens in the United States of America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease, a disease primarily affecting immature chickens, is a worldwide problem that has on at least three occasions threatened the poultry industry in the United States. A rich dataset to study the epidemiology of this disease is available because the United States Department of Agricultu...

  13. VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Meningococcal Vaccines

    E-print Network

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Meningococcal Vaccines What You Need to Know Many Vaccine of meningococcal vaccine is important for people at highest risk. 2 Meningococcal vaccine There are two kinds of meningococcal vaccine in the U.S.: · Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) is the preferred vaccine for people

  14. Chicken Feet

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi

    2009-09-02

    that imports are NOT blocked, according to US exporters, Beijing has launched a preemptive poultry strike and halted imports of US chicken. The feet, which are called Golden Phoenix Claws at dim sum establishments are popular in stews and snacks and, we’re told...

  15. Efficacy of Pneumococcal Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae Protein D Conjugate Vaccine (PHiD-CV) in Young Latin American Children: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tregnaghi, Miguel W.; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; López, Pio; Abate, Hector; Smith, Enrique; Pósleman, Adriana; Calvo, Arlene; Wong, Digna; Cortes-Barbosa, Carlos; Ceballos, Ana; Tregnaghi, Marcelo; Sierra, Alexandra; Rodriguez, Mirna; Troitiño, Marisol; Carabajal, Carlos; Falaschi, Andrea; Leandro, Ana; Castrejón, Maria Mercedes; Lepetic, Alejandro; Lommel, Patricia; Hausdorff, William P.; Borys, Dorota; Guiñazú, Javier Ruiz; Ortega-Barría, Eduardo; Yarzábal, Juan P.; Schuerman, Lode

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between pneumococcal conjugate vaccine–induced antibody responses and protection against community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and acute otitis media (AOM) is unclear. This study assessed the impact of the ten-valent pneumococcal nontypable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) on these end points. The primary objective was to demonstrate vaccine efficacy (VE) in a per-protocol analysis against likely bacterial CAP (B-CAP: radiologically confirmed CAP with alveolar consolidation/pleural effusion on chest X-ray, or non-alveolar infiltrates and C-reactive protein ? 40 µg/ml); other protocol-specified outcomes were also assessed. Methods and Findings This phase III double-blind randomized controlled study was conducted between 28 June 2007 and 28 July 2011 in Argentine, Panamanian, and Colombian populations with good access to health care. Approximately 24,000 infants received PHiD-CV or hepatitis control vaccine (hepatitis B for primary vaccination, hepatitis A at booster) at 2, 4, 6, and 15–18 mo of age. Interim analysis of the primary end point was planned when 535 first B-CAP episodes, occurring ?2 wk after dose 3, were identified in the per-protocol cohort. After a mean follow-up of 23 mo (PHiD-CV, n?=?10,295; control, n?=?10,201), per-protocol VE was 22.0% (95% CI: 7.7, 34.2; one-sided p?=?0.002) against B-CAP (conclusive for primary objective) and 25.7% (95% CI: 8.4%, 39.6%) against World Health Organization–defined consolidated CAP. Intent-to-treat VE was 18.2% (95% CI: 5.5%, 29.1%) against B-CAP and 23.4% (95% CI: 8.8%, 35.7%) against consolidated CAP. End-of-study per-protocol analyses were performed after a mean follow-up of 28–30 mo for CAP and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) (PHiD-CV, n?=?10,211; control, n?=?10,140) and AOM (n?=?3,010 and 2,979, respectively). Per-protocol VE was 16.1% (95% CI: ?1.1%, 30.4%; one-sided p?=?0.032) against clinically confirmed AOM, 67.1% (95% CI: 17.0%, 86.9%) against vaccine serotype clinically confirmed AOM, 100% (95% CI: 74.3%, 100%) against vaccine serotype IPD, and 65.0% (95% CI: 11.1%, 86.2%) against any IPD. Results were consistent between intent-to-treat and per-protocol analyses. Serious adverse events were reported for 21.5% (95% CI: 20.7%, 22.2%) and 22.6% (95% CI: 21.9%, 23.4%) of PHiD-CV and control recipients, respectively. There were 19 deaths (n?=?11,798; 0.16%) in the PHiD-CV group and 26 deaths (n?=?11,799; 0.22%) in the control group. A significant study limitation was the lower than expected number of captured AOM cases. Conclusions Efficacy was demonstrated against a broad range of pneumococcal diseases commonly encountered in young children in clinical practice. Trial registration www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00466947 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:24892763

  16. Virulence determinants of Salmonella Gallinarum biovar Pullorum identified by PCR signature-tagged mutagenesis and the spiC mutant as a candidate live attenuated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shizhong; Jiao, Xinan; Barrow, Paul; Pan, Zhiming; Chen, Xiang

    2014-01-31

    Salmonella Gallinarum biovar Pullorum (S. Gallinarum biovar Pullorum) is the causative agent of pullorum disease (PD) in chickens which results in considerable economic losses to the poultry industries in developing countries. PCR-Signature Tagged Mutagenesis was used to identify virulence determinants of S. Gallinarum biovar Pullorum and novel attenuated live vaccine candidates for use against this disease. A library of 1800 signature-tagged S. Gallinarum biovar Pullorum mutants was constructed and screened for virulence-associated genes in chickens. The attenuation of 10 mutants was confirmed by in vivo and in vitro competitive index (CI) studies. The transposons were found to be located in SPI-1 (2/10 mutants), SPI-2 (3/10), the virulence plasmid (1/10) and non-SPI genes (4/10). One highly attenuated spiC mutant persisted in spleen and liver for less than 10 days and induced high levels of circulating antibody and protective immunity against oral challenge in young broiler chickens. The spiC mutant is a potential new vaccine candidate for use with chickens against this disease. PMID:24355532

  17. Probable Congenital Transmission of Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Caused by Vaccination with Contaminated Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shufen; Guo, Wenlong; Sheng, Pengcheng; Wang, Zunmin; Zhao, Changliang; Zhao, Qingyou; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2012-01-01

    Contaminated vaccine is one unexpected and potential origin of virus infection. In order to investigate the most likely cause of disease in a broiler breeder company of Shandong Province, all 17 batches of live-virus vaccines used in the affected flocks and 478 tissue samples were tested by dot-blot hybridization, nested PCR, and IFA. The results suggested the outbreak of disease was most probably due to the vaccination of REV-contaminated MD-CVI988/Rispens vaccines and ND-LaSota+IB-H120 vaccines. Furthermore, the REV was probably transmitted to the commercial chickens through congenital transmission. PMID:22912872

  18. Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cover most of your body, • using an effective insect repellent, such as those containing DEET. 3 Yellow ... allergy to any component of the vaccine, including eggs, chicken proteins, or gelatin, or who has had ...

  19. Comparative efficacy of North American and antigenically matched reverse genetics derived H5N9 DIVA marker vaccines against highly pathogenic Asian H5N1 avian influenza in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Highly pathogenic (HP) H5N1 avian influenza has become endemic in several countries in Asia and Africa, and vaccination is being widely used as a control tool. However, there is a need for efficacious vaccines preferably utilizing a DIVA (differentiate infected from vaccinated animals) marker strat...

  20. 9 CFR 113.328 - Fowl Laryngotracheitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...be tested for pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113...dilutions shall be used for vaccine of chicken embryo origin and the test conducted as follows...For each dilution, inject at least five embryos, 9 to 11 days old, on the...

  1. 9 CFR 113.328 - Fowl Laryngotracheitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...be tested for pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113...dilutions shall be used for vaccine of chicken embryo origin and the test conducted as follows...For each dilution, inject at least five embryos, 9 to 11 days old, on the...

  2. 9 CFR 113.328 - Fowl Laryngotracheitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...be tested for pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113...dilutions shall be used for vaccine of chicken embryo origin and the test conducted as follows...For each dilution, inject at least five embryos, 9 to 11 days old, on the...

  3. 9 CFR 113.328 - Fowl Laryngotracheitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...be tested for pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113...dilutions shall be used for vaccine of chicken embryo origin and the test conducted as follows...For each dilution, inject at least five embryos, 9 to 11 days old, on the...

  4. 9 CFR 113.328 - Fowl Laryngotracheitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...be tested for pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113...dilutions shall be used for vaccine of chicken embryo origin and the test conducted as follows...For each dilution, inject at least five embryos, 9 to 11 days old, on the...

  5. 9 CFR 113.328 - Fowl Laryngotracheitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113.37, except that, if the test is...) dilutions shall be used for vaccine of chicken embryo origin and the test conducted as follows: (i) For each dilution, inject at least five embryos, 9 to 11 days old, on the chorioallantoic membrane with 0.2 ml...

  6. 9 CFR 113.328 - Fowl Laryngotracheitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113.37, except that, if the test is...) dilutions shall be used for vaccine of chicken embryo origin and the test conducted as follows: (i) For each dilution, inject at least five embryos, 9 to 11 days old, on the chorioallantoic membrane with 0.2 ml...

  7. 9 CFR 113.328 - Fowl Laryngotracheitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113.37, except that, if the test is...) dilutions shall be used for vaccine of chicken embryo origin and the test conducted as follows: (i) For each dilution, inject at least five embryos, 9 to 11 days old, on the chorioallantoic membrane with 0.2 ml...

  8. 9 CFR 113.328 - Fowl Laryngotracheitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113.37, except that, if the test is...) dilutions shall be used for vaccine of chicken embryo origin and the test conducted as follows: (i) For each dilution, inject at least five embryos, 9 to 11 days old, on the chorioallantoic membrane with 0.2 ml...

  9. 9 CFR 113.328 - Fowl Laryngotracheitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113.37, except that, if the test is...) dilutions shall be used for vaccine of chicken embryo origin and the test conducted as follows: (i) For each dilution, inject at least five embryos, 9 to 11 days old, on the chorioallantoic membrane with 0.2 ml...

  10. Comparison of the effectiveness of rHVT-H5, inactivated H5 and rHVT-H5 with inactivated H5 prime/boost vaccination regimes in commercial broiler chickens carrying MDAs against HPAI H5N1 clade 2.2.1 virus.

    PubMed

    Kilany, Walid H; Hassan, Mohammed K; Safwat, Marwa; Mohammed, Sami; Selim, Abdullah; VonDobschuetz, Sophie; Dauphin, Gwenaelle; Lubroth, Juan; Jobre, Yilma

    2015-10-01

    Vaccination is the main tool implemented in Egypt since 2007 to control H5N1 avian influenza. The present study aimed at comparing the effectiveness of three avian influenza vaccination regimes in commercial broiler chickens carrying high levels of maternally derived antibodies (MDAs). Day-old chicks were divided into four experimental groups. Group I received only the rHVT-H5 vaccine (recombinant turkey herpesvirus (HVT) which carries a H5 clade 2.2 insert) administered at D1. Group II received only the KV-H5 (an oil emulsion killed vaccine prepared from reassortant HPAI virus (A/duck/Anhui/1/06)) vaccine (inactivated reverse genetic H5N1 clade 2.3.4 virus) administered at D8. Group III received rHVT-H5 and KV-H5 as prime/boost. Group IV served as unvaccinated control. Weekly serological monitoring was conducted using the haemagglutination inhibition test. Two challenge experiments were conducted at D28 and D35 using HPAI H5N1 clade 2.2.1 virus. Birds were monitored daily 14 days post-challenge for morbidity and mortality, and oropharyngeal swabs were collected for virological monitoring. Initially, day-old chicks had high mean MDA titres (9?+?0.9 log2). The MDA half-life was >7 and <7 days, respectively, for unvaccinated and vaccinated birds. Group III showed the highest post-vaccination humoral immune response and seroconversion rate. The highest protection rate against morbidity (80-90%) and mortality (90-90%) was obtained in Group III after challenge at D28 and D35, respectively, as compared to Group I (70-70%) and (80-90%) and Group II (0-0%) and (30-30%). Groups I and III had lower number of shedder birds. The vaccination regime with prime/boost conferred the highest and earliest protection, and can hence be recommended for the broiler production sector in endemic and high HPAI H5N1 challenge areas. PMID:26023824

  11. Prevalence and cross-immunity of Eimeria species on Korean chicken farms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The epidemiology of Eimeria species in poultry flocks is important to increase the effectiveness of vaccinations and prophylactic strategies on chicken farms. In this study, fecal samples from 356 chicken farms were collected randomly and examined for the prevalence of Eimeria species. Through micro...

  12. Identification of specific long noncoding RNA profiles in chicken with different susceptibility to Marek's disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is an avian herpesvirus-induced lymphoma in chicken, which causes more than $1 billion economic loss in poultry industry worldwide. Breeding of genetically resistant chickens has become an important measure in MD control to augment vaccination. Evidently, a better understanding ...

  13. Accuracy of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube for diagnosing tuberculosis in a young pediatric population previously vaccinated with Bacille Calmette-Guérin

    PubMed Central

    Vallada, Marcelo Genofre; Okay, Thelma Suely; Del Negro, Gilda Maria B.; Antonio, Claudio Amaral; Yamamoto, Lidia; Ramos, Sonia Regina T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of an interferongamma release assay (QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube) for diagnosing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a young pediatric population. Methods: 195 children previously vaccinated with BCG were evaluated, being 184 healthy individuals with no clinical or epidemiological evidence of mycobacterial infection, and 11 with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, according to clinical, radiological, and laboratory parameters. A blood sample was obtained from each child and processed according to the manufacturer's instructions. The assay performance was evaluated by a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. Results: In the group of 184 non-infected children, 130 (70.6%) were under the age of four years (mean age of 35 months). In this group, 177 children (96.2%) had negative test results, six (3.2%) had indeterminate results, and one (0.5%) had a positive result. In the group of 11 infected children, the mean age was 58.5 months, and two of them (18%) had negative results. The ROC curve had an area under the curve of 0.88 (95%CI 0.82-0.92; p<0.001), disclosing a predictive positive value of 81.8% for the test (95%CI 46.3-97.4). The assay sensitivity was 81.8% (95%CI 48.2-97.2) and the specificity was 98.8% (95%CI 96-99.8). Conclusions: In the present study, the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube performance for diagnosing M. tuberculosis infection was appropriate in a young pediatric population. PMID:24676183

  14. INITIAL PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED PROTEINS FROM MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM VACCINE STRAINS TS-11 AND F DETECTED BY WESTERN BLOTTING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) reduces the number of eggs produced by layer chickens. Three live MG vaccine strains are available for use in layer chickens and include F, ts-11 and 6/85. The MG vaccine strains ts-11 and 6/85 are safer than F and they have little or no potential of spreading from bi...

  15. Reducing Campylobacter jejuni Colonization of Poultry via Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Neal-McKinney, Jason M.; Samuelson, Derrick R.; Eucker, Tyson P.; Nissen, Mark S.; Crespo, Rocio; Konkel, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading bacterial cause of human gastrointestinal disease worldwide. While C. jejuni is a commensal organism in chickens, case-studies have demonstrated a link between infection with C. jejuni and the consumption of foods that have been cross-contaminated with raw or undercooked poultry. We hypothesized that vaccination of chickens with C. jejuni surface-exposed colonization proteins (SECPs) would reduce the ability of C. jejuni to colonize chickens, thereby reducing the contamination of poultry products at the retail level and potentially providing a safer food product for consumers. To test our hypothesis, we injected chickens with recombinant C. jejuni peptides from CadF, FlaA, FlpA, CmeC, and a CadF-FlaA-FlpA fusion protein. Seven days following challenge, chickens were necropsied and cecal contents were serially diluted and plated to determine the number of C. jejuni per gram of material. The sera from the chickens were also analyzed to determine the concentration and specificity of antibodies reactive against the C. jejuni SECPs. Vaccination of chickens with the CadF, FlaA, and FlpA peptides resulted in a reduction in the number of C. jejuni in the ceca compared to the non-vaccinated C. jejuni-challenged group. The greatest reduction in C. jejuni colonization was observed in chickens injected with the FlaA, FlpA, or CadF-FlaA-FlpA fusion proteins. Vaccination of chickens with different SECPs resulted in the production of C. jejuni-specific IgY antibodies. In summary, we show that the vaccination of poultry with individual C. jejuni SECPs or a combination of SECPs provides protection of chickens from C. jejuni colonization. PMID:25474206

  16. Disparities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Completion Among Vaccine Initiators

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Betty; Krill, Lauren S.; Horton, Bernice B.; Barat, Christopher E.; Trimble, Cornelia L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate rates of completing the full three-dose prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination regimen in patients who initiated the series and to identify variables associated with not completing vaccination. Methods This single-institution review identified all patients initiating HPV vaccination at one of four affiliated clinics between January 2007 and June 2008. Vaccination “completers” were defined as patients who had completed all three vaccinations within 12 months of initiating the vaccination series. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with vaccine completion. Variables analyzed included age, type of insurance (private compared with public), practice location (urban compared with suburban), practice type (pediatrics, gynecology, or family practice), and race or ethnicity (white or African American and Hispanic). Results Of the 1,413 girls and young women who initiated HPV vaccination, 469 (33.2%) completed the vaccine series. Overall, private insurances (odds ratio 1.87, 95% confidence interval 1.26–2.76) and suburban practice locations (odds ratio 1.44, 95% confidence interval 1.04–1.98) were associated with higher vaccine completion rates. African American race was associated with lower completion rates (odds ratio 0.50, 95% confidence interval 0.38–0.65). In multivariable analyses, the combination of younger age (11–17 years) and urban practice location was associated with very low likelihood of completing HPV vaccination (22%; P=.023). Conclusion The HPV vaccine completion rate is low. When resources are limited, disparities in HPV vaccine completion should be considered when developing programs to improve vaccine utilization. Urban girls and young women should be targeted as an at-risk population. PMID:21691158

  17. Introduction of an update system for vaccine strains of veterinary influenza vaccines in Japan.

    PubMed

    Gamoh, Koichiro; Nakamura, Shigeyuki

    2015-03-01

    The basic countermeasures used to control highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) are early detection procedures and the culling of affected chickens. However, if successive HPAI outbreaks occur, the vaccination may be an option for controlling HPAI. Therefore, avian influenza (AI) vaccines are stocked by the Japanese government. By contrast, equine influenza (EI) vaccine is an effective tool for preventing or controlling EI. Because antigenic drifts affect the efficacy of AI and EI vaccines, the vaccine strains should be updated rapidly. However, the development and registration of veterinary vaccines usually takes several years. In response to this issue, the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries (MAFF) established a system that allows AI and EI vaccine strains to be updated rapidly. National Veterinary Assay Laboratory, MAFF, established a vaccine strains selection committee for veterinary influenza vaccine. The main agendas involve determining whether the current vaccine strains need to be updated and selecting the most appropriate vaccine strains. The committee concluded that A/duck/Hokkaido/Vac-3/2007(H5N1) was added to the strains of stockpiled AI vaccines and that the EI vaccine strains did not need to be changed, but that the clade 2 viruses of the Florida sub-lineage strain, A/equine/Yokohama/aq13/2010(H3N8) was added to the EI vaccine strain. PMID:25614371

  18. Protein carriers of conjugate vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    The immunogenicity of polysaccharides as human vaccines was enhanced by coupling to protein carriers. Conjugation transformed the T cell-independent polysaccharide vaccines of the past to T cell-dependent antigenic vaccines that were much more immunogenic and launched a renaissance in vaccinology. This review discusses the conjugate vaccines for prevention of infections caused by Hemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis. Specifically, the characteristics of the proteins used in the construction of the vaccines including CRM, tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid, Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane complex, and Hemophilus influenzae protein D are discussed. The studies that established differences among and key features of conjugate vaccines including immunologic memory induction, reduction of nasopharyngeal colonization and herd immunity, and antibody avidity and avidity maturation are presented. Studies of dose, schedule, response to boosters, of single protein carriers with single and multiple polysaccharides, of multiple protein carriers with multiple polysaccharides and conjugate vaccines administered concurrently with other vaccines are discussed along with undesirable consequences of conjugate vaccines. The clear benefits of conjugate vaccines in improving the protective responses of the immature immune systems of young infants and the senescent immune systems of the elderly have been made clear and opened the way to development of additional vaccines using this technology for future vaccine products. PMID:23955057

  19. Typhoid Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... million people a year around the world and kills about 200,000. 2 Typhoid vaccines Typhoid vaccine can prevent typhoid. There are two vaccines to prevent typhoid. One is an inactivated (killed) vaccine gotten as a shot. The other is a live, attenuated (weakened) vaccine which is taken orally (by ...

  20. Development and evaluation of a Salmonella typhimurium flagellin based chimeric DNA vaccine against infectious bursal disease of poultry.

    PubMed

    Deb, Rajib; Dey, Sohini; Madhan Mohan, C; Gaikwad, Satish; Kamble, Nitin; Khulape, Sagar A; Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Maity, Hemanta Kumar; Pathak, Dinesh Chandra

    2015-10-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute immunosuppressive disease of young chicks, caused by a double-stranded RNA virus. VP2 being the major capsid protein of the virus is an ideal vaccine candidate possessing the neutralizing epitopes. The present study involves the use of flagellin (fliC) as a genetic adjuvant to improve the immune response of VP2 based DNA vaccine against IBD. Our findings revealed that birds immunized with plasmid pCIVP2fliC showed robust immune response than pCIVP2 immunized groups. Further, challenge study proved that genetic fusion of fliC and VP2 can provide a comparatively higher level of protection against vvIBDV challenge in chickens than VP2 alone. These results thus indicate that Salmonella flagellin could enhance the immune responses and protection efficacy of a DNA vaccine candidate against IBDV infection in chickens, highlighting the potential of flagellin as a genetic adjuvant in the prevention of vvIBDV infection. PMID:26412511

  1. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer ... of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Committee Opinion No. 588: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination. Obstet Gynecol . 2014;123:712-8. American ...

  2. Polio Vaccination

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Polio Vaccination for Travel to and from Countries Affected by Wild Poliovirus , MMWR, July 7, 2014 Polio Vaccine Timeline Source: History of Vaccines Top of Page Beliefs & Concerns Debunked: ...

  3. 75 FR 27579 - Bison Brucellosis Remote Vaccination, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ...will be considered including no-action, hand and remote delivery vaccination of young non- pregnant bison, and hand and remote delivery vaccination of young and adult female bison. The no action alternative is to continue the currently...

  4. Protection from clinical disease against three highly virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus after in ovo application of an antibody-antigen complex vaccine in maternal antibody-positive chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Worldwide, Newcastle disease virus (NDV) remains one of the most economically important diseases of poultry. Current vaccination strategies for commercial poultry include the use of inactivated and live NDV vaccines that typically induce protection against less virulent field viruses. The value of...

  5. Chicken soup and sickness

    MedlinePLUS

    Chicken soup, a popular home remedy for the common cold since at least the 12th century, may really ... chicken soup reduce the inflammation associated with the common cold, thus providing some relief of symptoms. Although researchers ...

  6. Vaccine acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Ford, John A; Mahgoub, Hamid; Shankar, Ananda Giri

    2013-01-01

    The United Kingdom has had a long history with vaccine acceptability dating back to Edward Jenner’s theory of small pox vaccination. More recently, the discredited, Wakefield study published in 1998 continues to cause MMR skepticism. In pregnant women pertussis vaccination has been considerably more successful than influenza vaccination. Influenza vaccine uptake in healthcare workers remains poor. The media, politicians, and health reforms have contributed to the mixed coverage for these vaccines. In this article we examine vaccine acceptability from a UK perspective, and consider the future impact this is likely to have on the introduction of rotavirus and shingles vaccine in the UK in 2013. PMID:24025731

  7. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact. PMID:26541249

  8. Aging and Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Gravekamp, Claudia; Chandra, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Cancer vaccination is less effective at old than at young age, due to T cell unresponsiveness. This is caused by age-related changes of the immune system. Major immune defects at older age are lack of naïve T cells, impaired activation pathways of T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC), and age-related changes in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Also innate immune responses are affected by aging, but this seems less abundant than adaptive immune responses. In this review we compared various cancer vaccine studies at young and old age, demonstrating the importance of both innate and adaptive immune responses for cancer immunotherapy. Moreover, we found suggestive evidence that innate immune responses could help improve adaptive immune responses through cancer vaccination in old age. PMID:24579737

  9. What About Vaccinating Newborns?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this review, results from studies evaluating immune competency of the pre-ruminant calf are discussed. It has been believed that vaccination of the young calf is not effective. Recent studies, however, have revealed that certain aspects of the neonatal calf’s immune system are fully intact or e...

  10. CONSERVATION NOTES WILD CHICKENS

    E-print Network

    ^-^ CONSERVATION NOTES AMERICA'S WILD CHICKENS Most natural environments in the United States once had at least one kind of Nature's wild chickens, the upland game birds. Just as there are many kinds NOTES ^^ AMERICA'S WILD CHICKENS ^UUOS HOl£, Most natural environments in the United States once had

  11. Studies of infectious laryngotracheitis vaccines: immunity in broilers.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, J R; Glisson, J R; Goodwin, M A; Resurreccion, R S; Villegas, P; Brown, J

    1989-01-01

    Broiler chickens were vaccinated at 18 days of age against infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) using chicken-embryo-origin (CEO) and tissue-culture-origin (TCO) vaccines, each vaccine given either by drinking water, spray, or eyedrop. Controls were not vaccinated. The broilers were challenged 3 weeks later with virulent ILT virus (USDA challenge strain). Serum samples taken before challenge were analyzed by a virus neutralization (VN) test to determine titers due to vaccination. Both vaccines, regardless of route of administration, produced low VN titers, geometric mean titer (GMT) being less than 4.0 in all vaccinated groups. When administered by the same route, the CEO vaccine produced higher titers than the TCO vaccine. Titers following drinking-water or eyedrop administration of vaccines were higher than titers following spray vaccination. There was an inverse relationship between pre-challenge VN titers of groups of birds and the percentage of birds in the groups dying from ILT virus challenge. The drinking-water route of vaccination provided the most protection, while the spray provided the least. PMID:2549939

  12. Glycomics-based analysis of chicken red blood cells provides insight into the selectivity of the viral agglutination assay

    E-print Network

    Aich, Udayanath

    Agglutination of red blood cells (RBCs), including chicken RBCs (cRBCs), has been used extensively to estimate viral titer, to screen glycan-receptor binding preference, and to assess the protective response of vaccines. ...

  13. Efficacy of human papillomavirus 16 and 18 (HPV-16/18) AS04-adjuvanted vaccine against cervical infection and precancer in young women: final event-driven analysis of the randomized, double-blind PATRICIA trial.

    PubMed

    Apter, Dan; Wheeler, Cosette M; Paavonen, Jorma; Castellsagué, Xavier; Garland, Suzanne M; Skinner, S Rachel; Naud, Paulo; Salmerón, Jorge; Chow, Song-Nan; Kitchener, Henry C; Teixeira, Julio C; Jaisamrarn, Unnop; Limson, Genara; Szarewski, Anne; Romanowski, Barbara; Aoki, Fred Y; Schwarz, Tino F; Poppe, Willy A J; Bosch, F Xavier; Mindel, Adrian; de Sutter, Philippe; Hardt, Karin; Zahaf, Toufik; Descamps, Dominique; Struyf, Frank; Lehtinen, Matti; Dubin, Gary

    2015-04-01

    We report final event-driven analysis data on the immunogenicity and efficacy of the human papillomavirus 16 and 18 ((HPV-16/18) AS04-adjuvanted vaccine in young women aged 15 to 25 years from the PApilloma TRIal against Cancer In young Adults (PATRICIA). The total vaccinated cohort (TVC) included all randomized participants who received at least one vaccine dose (vaccine, n = 9,319; control, n = 9,325) at months 0, 1, and/or 6. The TVC-naive (vaccine, n = 5,822; control, n = 5,819) had no evidence of high-risk HPV infection at baseline, approximating adolescent girls targeted by most HPV vaccination programs. Mean follow-up was approximately 39 months after the first vaccine dose in each cohort. At baseline, 26% of women in the TVC had evidence of past and/or current HPV-16/18 infection. HPV-16 and HPV-18 antibody titers postvaccination tended to be higher among 15- to 17-year-olds than among 18- to 25-year-olds. In the TVC, vaccine efficacy (VE) against cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 or greater (CIN1+), CIN2+, and CIN3+ associated with HPV-16/18 was 55.5% (96.1% confidence interval [CI], 43.2, 65.3), 52.8% (37.5, 64.7), and 33.6% (-1.1, 56.9). VE against CIN1+, CIN2+, and CIN3+ irrespective of HPV DNA was 21.7% (10.7, 31.4), 30.4% (16.4, 42.1), and 33.4% (9.1, 51.5) and was consistently significant only in 15- to 17-year-old women (27.4% [10.8, 40.9], 41.8% [22.3, 56.7], and 55.8% [19.2, 76.9]). In the TVC-naive, VE against CIN1+, CIN2+, and CIN3+ associated with HPV-16/18 was 96.5% (89.0, 99.4), 98.4% (90.4, 100), and 100% (64.7, 100), and irrespective of HPV DNA it was 50.1% (35.9, 61.4), 70.2% (54.7, 80.9), and 87.0% (54.9, 97.7). VE against 12-month persistent infection with HPV-16/18 was 89.9% (84.0, 94.0), and that against HPV-31/33/45/51 was 49.0% (34.7, 60.3). In conclusion, vaccinating adolescents before sexual debut has a substantial impact on the overall incidence of high-grade cervical abnormalities, and catch-up vaccination up to 18 years of age is most likely effective. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT001226810.). PMID:25651922

  14. Efficacy of Human Papillomavirus 16 and 18 (HPV-16/18) AS04-Adjuvanted Vaccine against Cervical Infection and Precancer in Young Women: Final Event-Driven Analysis of the Randomized, Double-Blind PATRICIA Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Cosette M.; Paavonen, Jorma; Castellsagué, Xavier; Garland, Suzanne M.; Skinner, S. Rachel; Naud, Paulo; Salmerón, Jorge; Chow, Song-Nan; Kitchener, Henry C.; Teixeira, Julio C.; Jaisamrarn, Unnop; Limson, Genara; Szarewski, Anne; Romanowski, Barbara; Aoki, Fred Y.; Schwarz, Tino F.; Poppe, Willy A. J.; Bosch, F. Xavier; Mindel, Adrian; de Sutter, Philippe; Hardt, Karin; Zahaf, Toufik; Descamps, Dominique; Struyf, Frank; Lehtinen, Matti; Dubin, Gary

    2015-01-01

    We report final event-driven analysis data on the immunogenicity and efficacy of the human papillomavirus 16 and 18 ((HPV-16/18) AS04-adjuvanted vaccine in young women aged 15 to 25 years from the PApilloma TRIal against Cancer In young Adults (PATRICIA). The total vaccinated cohort (TVC) included all randomized participants who received at least one vaccine dose (vaccine, n = 9,319; control, n = 9,325) at months 0, 1, and/or 6. The TVC-naive (vaccine, n = 5,822; control, n = 5,819) had no evidence of high-risk HPV infection at baseline, approximating adolescent girls targeted by most HPV vaccination programs. Mean follow-up was approximately 39 months after the first vaccine dose in each cohort. At baseline, 26% of women in the TVC had evidence of past and/or current HPV-16/18 infection. HPV-16 and HPV-18 antibody titers postvaccination tended to be higher among 15- to 17-year-olds than among 18- to 25-year-olds. In the TVC, vaccine efficacy (VE) against cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 or greater (CIN1+), CIN2+, and CIN3+ associated with HPV-16/18 was 55.5% (96.1% confidence interval [CI], 43.2, 65.3), 52.8% (37.5, 64.7), and 33.6% (?1.1, 56.9). VE against CIN1+, CIN2+, and CIN3+ irrespective of HPV DNA was 21.7% (10.7, 31.4), 30.4% (16.4, 42.1), and 33.4% (9.1, 51.5) and was consistently significant only in 15- to 17-year-old women (27.4% [10.8, 40.9], 41.8% [22.3, 56.7], and 55.8% [19.2, 76.9]). In the TVC-naive, VE against CIN1+, CIN2+, and CIN3+ associated with HPV-16/18 was 96.5% (89.0, 99.4), 98.4% (90.4, 100), and 100% (64.7, 100), and irrespective of HPV DNA it was 50.1% (35.9, 61.4), 70.2% (54.7, 80.9), and 87.0% (54.9, 97.7). VE against 12-month persistent infection with HPV-16/18 was 89.9% (84.0, 94.0), and that against HPV-31/33/45/51 was 49.0% (34.7, 60.3). In conclusion, vaccinating adolescents before sexual debut has a substantial impact on the overall incidence of high-grade cervical abnormalities, and catch-up vaccination up to 18 years of age is most likely effective. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT001226810.) PMID:25651922

  15. Haemophilus influenzae Type b Carriage among Young Children in Metropolitan Atlanta in the Context of Vaccine Shortage and Booster Dose Deferral ?

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jennifer Dolan; Jackson, Michael L.; Sharma, Dolly; Mair, Raydel; Bach, Michelle C.; Castillo, Dana; Ejigiri, O. Grace; Satola, Sarah; Cohn, Amanda C.; Jerris, Robert; Jain, Shabnam; Farley, Monica M.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Messonnier, Nancy E.

    2011-01-01

    Short-term deferral of the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine booster dose during a recent U.S. Hib vaccine shortage did not result in widespread Hib carriage in Atlanta, as the Hib carriage rate was found to be 0.3% (1/342). Hib colonization was significantly more common among males and day care attendees. PMID:22012977

  16. Influenza Vaccination Strategies: Comparing Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Saranya; Brokstad, Karl A.; Cox, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a major respiratory pathogen causing annual outbreaks and occasional pandemics. Influenza vaccination is the major method of prophylaxis. Currently annual influenza vaccination is recommended for groups at high risk of complications from influenza infection such as pregnant women, young children, people with underlying disease and the elderly, along with occupational groups such a healthcare workers and farm workers. There are two main types of vaccines available: the parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine and the intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccine. The inactivated vaccines are licensed from 6 months of age and have been used for more than 50 years with a good safety profile. Inactivated vaccines are standardized according to the presence of the viral major surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and protection is mediated by the induction of vaccine strain specific antibody responses. In contrast, the live attenuated vaccines are licensed in Europe for children from 2–17 years of age and provide a multifaceted immune response with local and systemic antibody and T cell responses but with no clear correlate of protection. Here we discuss the immunological immune responses elicited by the two vaccines and discuss future work to better define correlates of protection. PMID:26343192

  17. Impact of vaccination on infection with Vietnam H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus in hens and the eggs they lay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High pathogenicity avian influenza virus (HPAIV) infections in chickens decrease egg production and eggs that are laid contain HPAIV. Vaccination once or twice was examined as a way to protect chickens from Vietnamese H5N1 HPAIV. Eighty-three percent of hens without vaccination died within 3 days ...

  18. Pathogenesis and protective efficacy of attenuated Meq null rMd5 virus in maternal antibody negative and commercial chickens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A serotype 1 Marek’s disease Meq null virus (rMd5'Meq) has been shown to be an excellent vaccine in maternal antibody positive (MAb+) chickens. The only drawback of this non-oncogenic virus is that, like parental rMd5, it retains the ability to induce bursa and thymus atrophy (BTA) in MAb- chickens....

  19. Efficacy and Safety of the RTS,S/AS01 Malaria Vaccine during 18 Months after Vaccination: A Phase 3 Randomized, Controlled Trial in Children and Young Infants at 11 African Sites

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A malaria vaccine could be an important addition to current control strategies. We report the safety and vaccine efficacy (VE) of the RTS,S/AS01 vaccine during 18 mo following vaccination at 11 African sites with varying malaria transmission. Methods and Findings 6,537 infants aged 6–12 wk and 8,923 children aged 5–17 mo were randomized to receive three doses of RTS,S/AS01 or comparator vaccine. VE against clinical malaria in children during the 18 mo after vaccine dose 3 (per protocol) was 46% (95% CI 42% to 50%) (range 40% to 77%; VE, p<0.01 across all sites). VE during the 20 mo after vaccine dose 1 (intention to treat [ITT]) was 45% (95% CI 41% to 49%). VE against severe malaria, malaria hospitalization, and all-cause hospitalization was 34% (95% CI 15% to 48%), 41% (95% CI 30% to 50%), and 19% (95% CI 11% to 27%), respectively (ITT). VE against clinical malaria in infants was 27% (95% CI 20% to 32%, per protocol; 27% [95% CI 21% to 33%], ITT), with no significant protection against severe malaria, malaria hospitalization, or all-cause hospitalization. Post-vaccination anti-circumsporozoite antibody geometric mean titer varied from 348 to 787 EU/ml across sites in children and from 117 to 335 EU/ml in infants (per protocol). VE waned over time in both age categories (Schoenfeld residuals p<0.001). The number of clinical and severe malaria cases averted per 1,000 children vaccinated ranged across sites from 37 to 2,365 and from ?1 to 49, respectively; corresponding ranges among infants were ?10 to 1,402 and ?13 to 37, respectively (ITT). Meningitis was reported as a serious adverse event in 16/5,949 and 1/2,974 children and in 9/4,358 and 3/2,179 infants in the RTS,S/AS01 and control groups, respectively. Conclusions RTS,S/AS01 prevented many cases of clinical and severe malaria over the 18 mo after vaccine dose 3, with the highest impact in areas with the greatest malaria incidence. VE was higher in children than in infants, but even at modest levels of VE, the number of malaria cases averted was substantial. RTS,S/AS01 could be an important addition to current malaria control in Africa. Trial registration www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00866619 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:25072396

  20. Current status of vaccines against infectious bursal disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Hermann; Mundt, Egbert; Eterradossi, Nicolas; Islam, M Rafiqul

    2012-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is the aetiological agent of the acute and highly contagious infectious bursal disease (IBD) or "Gumboro disease". IBD is one of the economically most important diseases that affects commercially produced chickens worldwide. Along with strict hygiene management of poultry farms, vaccination programmes with inactivated and live attenuated viruses have been used to prevent IBD. Live vaccines show a different degree of attenuation; many of them may cause bursal atrophy and thus immunosuppression with poor immune response to vaccination against other pathogens and an increase in vulnerability to various types of infections as possible consequences. Depending on their intrinsic characteristics or on the vaccination procedures, some of the vaccines may not induce full protection against the very virulent IBDV strains and antigenic variants observed in the last three decades. As chickens are most susceptible to IBDV in their first weeks of life, active immunity to the virus has to be induced early after hatching. However, maternally derived IBDV-specific antibodies may interfere with early vaccination with live vaccines. Thus new technologies and second-generation vaccines including rationally designed and subunit vaccines have been developed. Recently, live viral vector vaccines have been licensed in several countries and are reaching the market. Here, the current status of IBD vaccines is discussed. PMID:22515532

  1. DETECTION OF AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS IN OIL EMULSION VACCINES BY REAL-TIME RT-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of poultry vaccines with adventitious agents (i.e. reticuloendotheliosis virus, chicken anemia virus) has been previously reported. Contaminating agents may be introduced at various stages during production, whether through propagation systems or shared equipment. Contamination of ina...

  2. VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Hepatitis B Vaccine

    E-print Network

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Hepatitis B Vaccine What You Need to Know Many Vaccine Information stuck with a used needle. Hepatitis B vaccine: Why get 2 vaccinated? Hepatitis B vaccine can prevent. Hepatitis B vaccine may be given by itself or in the same shot with other vaccines. Routine hepatitis B

  3. Modeling the effects of annual influenza vaccination

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.; Ackley, D.H.; Forrest, S.; Perelson, A.S.

    1998-12-31

    Although influenza vaccine efficacy is 70--90% in young healthy first-time vaccinees, the efficacy in repeat vaccinees has varied considerably. In some studies, vaccine efficacy in repeat vaccinees was higher than in first-time vaccinees, whereas in other studies vaccine efficacy in repeat vaccinees was significantly lower than in first-time vaccinees and sometimes no higher than in unvaccinated controls. It is known that the closeness of the antigenic match between the vaccine strain and the epidemic virus is important for vaccine effectiveness. In this study the authors show that the antigenic differences between a first vaccine strain and a second vaccine strain, and between the first vaccine strain and the epidemic strain, might account for the observed variation in attack rate among two-time vaccinees.

  4. Immunization of chickens with VP2 protein of infectious bursal disease virus expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Singh, Narendra K; Locy, Robert D; Scissum-Gunn, K; Giambrone, Joseph J

    2004-09-01

    Transgenic plants represent a safe, effective, and inexpensive way to produce vaccines. The immunogenicity of VP2 protein of an infectious bursal disease (IBD) virus variant E isolate expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana was compared with a commercial vaccine in specific-pathogen-free broiler chickens. The VP2 coding sequence was isolated and integrated into A. thaliana genome by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Soluble VP2 expressed in transgenic plants was used to immunize chickens. Chickens receiving oral immunization with plant-derived VP2 at 1 and 3 wk of age had an antibody response using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and 80% protection against challenge infection at 4 wk. Chickens primed with a commercial vaccine at 1 wk followed by an oral booster with VP2 expressed in plants at 3 wk of age showed 90% protection. Chickens immunized with a commercial vaccine at 1 and 3 wk showed 78% protection. Results supported the efficacy of plant-produced VP2 as a vaccine against IBD. PMID:15529992

  5. DNA vaccination of poultry: The current status in 2015.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Marine; Chemaly, Marianne; Dory, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a promising alternative strategy for developing new human and animal vaccines. The massive efforts made these past 25 years to increase the immunizing potential of this kind of vaccine are still ongoing. A relatively small number of studies concerning poultry have been published. Even though there is a need for new poultry vaccines, five parameters must nevertheless be taken into account for their development: the vaccine has to be very effective, safe, inexpensive, suitable for mass vaccination and able to induce immune responses in the presence of maternal antibodies (when appropriate). DNA vaccination should meet these requirements. This review describes studies in this field performed exclusively on birds (chickens, ducks and turkeys). No evaluations of avian DNA vaccine efficacy performed on mice as preliminary tests have been taken into consideration. The review first describes the state of the art for DNA vaccination in poultry: pathogens targeted, plasmids used and different routes of vaccine administration. Second, it presents strategies designed to improve DNA vaccine efficacy: influence of the route of administration, plasmid dose and age of birds on their first inoculation; increasing plasmid uptake by host cells; addition of immunomodulators; optimization of plasmid backbones and codon usage; association of vaccine antigens and finally, heterologous prime-boost regimens. The final part will indicate additional properties of DNA vaccines in poultry: fate of the plasmids upon inoculation, immunological considerations and the use of DNA vaccines for purposes other than preventing infectious diseases. PMID:26620840

  6. Vaccination of 1-Day-Old Turkey Poults with Fowlpox Vaccine by Subcutaneous Route.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Girish; Kersting, Barry A; Spina, Gary

    2015-09-01

    In high-challenge areas, 1-day-old chicks are often vaccinated with fowlpox vaccine to provide early protection against the disease. However, we were unable to find any information in the published literature on the safety and efficacy of live fowlpox virus vaccine in 1-day-old turkeys. In this study, we evaluated a freeze-dried chicken-embryo-origin live fowlpox virus vaccine for its safety and efficacy in 1-day-old turkey poults by administering the vaccine subcutaneously in the upper back of the neck. Following vaccination, the turkeys were observed for 3 wk for vaccine-associated mortality and adverse reactions. Efficacy was evaluated by challenging the turkeys against a standard challenge strain of fowlpox virus. The results of this study indicated that the vaccine was safe and efficacious for subcutaneous administration in 1-day-old turkeys. None of the vaccinated turkeys revealed any adverse reactions or mortality associated with the vaccine. The vaccine protected more than 98% of the turkeys against fowlpox virus challenge. PMID:26478161

  7. EFFICACY OF TWO INACTIVATED VACCINES AGAINST AN ASIAN HPAI H5N1 CHALLENGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy of inactivated vaccines containing either an American isolate (A/turkey/Wisconsin/68 H5N9; GALLIMUNE FLU H5N9 or H5N9-WI) or an Eurasian isolate (A/chicken/Italy/22A/98 H5N9 or H5N9-It). Three weeks-old SPF chickens were vaccinated and challeng...

  8. Understanding Vaccines: A Public Imperative

    PubMed Central

    Federman, Ross S.

    2014-01-01

    Though once a discovery greatly celebrated by the nation, the vaccine has come under fire in recent decades from skeptics, critics, and a movement set into motion by fraudulent scientists and fueled by frustrated parents looking for answers to the autism conundrum. There is enough denialist resistance to vaccination to bring upon renewed fear of young children and infants becoming infected with diseases, the threats of which had been functionally eradicated from the United States. In more recent years, the surge in independent online journalism and blogging has invited many to rapidly share their opinions with millions of readers and, importantly, has appeared to open the door for opinion to be portrayed as fact. As a result, many parents are inundated with horror stories of vaccine dangers, all designed to eat away at them emotionally while the medical and scientific communities have mounted their characteristic response by sharing the facts, the data, and all of the reliable peer-reviewed and well-cited research to show that vaccines are safe and effective. It has become clear to me that facts are no match for emotion, but perhaps an understanding behind vaccine methodology will help parents overcome these fears of vaccinating. By helping those who doubt vaccines better understand what vaccines really are and how they work in such an incredibly engineered fashion, we may have a stronger weapon than we realize in battling the emotional arsenal that comes from the fear and skepticism of vaccinating. PMID:25506276

  9. Understanding vaccines: a public imperative.

    PubMed

    Federman, Ross S

    2014-12-01

    Though once a discovery greatly celebrated by the nation, the vaccine has come under fire in recent decades from skeptics, critics, and a movement set into motion by fraudulent scientists and fueled by frustrated parents looking for answers to the autism conundrum. There is enough denialist resistance to vaccination to bring upon renewed fear of young children and infants becoming infected with diseases, the threats of which had been functionally eradicated from the United States. In more recent years, the surge in independent online journalism and blogging has invited many to rapidly share their opinions with millions of readers and, importantly, has appeared to open the door for opinion to be portrayed as fact. As a result, many parents are inundated with horror stories of vaccine dangers, all designed to eat away at them emotionally while the medical and scientific communities have mounted their characteristic response by sharing the facts, the data, and all of the reliable peer-reviewed and well-cited research to show that vaccines are safe and effective. It has become clear to me that facts are no match for emotion, but perhaps an understanding behind vaccine methodology will help parents overcome these fears of vaccinating. By helping those who doubt vaccines better understand what vaccines really are and how they work in such an incredibly engineered fashion, we may have a stronger weapon than we realize in battling the emotional arsenal that comes from the fear and skepticism of vaccinating. PMID:25506276

  10. Vaccine Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vaccine Safety Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Back to School: Vaccines for Preteens Learn about the safety of Tdap, ...

  11. Effects of various field coccidiosis control programs on host innate and adaptive immunity in commercial broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coccidiosis control programs such as vaccines or in-feed anticoccidials are commonly practiced in poultry industry to improve growth performance and health of commercial broiler chickens. In this study, we assessed the effects of various coccidiosis control programs (e.g., in ovo vaccination, synth...

  12. Matrix and Backstage: Cellular Substrates for Viral Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Ingo; Sandig, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines are complex products that are manufactured in highly dynamic processes. Cellular substrates are one critical component that can have an enormous impact on reactogenicity of the final preparation, level of attenuation of a live virus, yield of infectious units or antigens, and cost per vaccine dose. Such parameters contribute to feasibility and affordability of vaccine programs both in industrialized countries and developing regions. This review summarizes the diversity of cellular substrates for propagation of viral vaccines from primary tissue explants and embryonated chicken eggs to designed continuous cell lines of human and avian origin. PMID:24732259

  13. Vaccination Mathematics

    E-print Network

    Meade, Douglas B.

    Vaccination Strategies for Epidemic Models Douglas B. Meade Department of Mathematics University://www.math.sc.edu/~meade/ 27 May 1999 #12; May 1999 IMA Mathematical Biology Seminar 0 Vaccination Strategies for Epidemic and natural death -- no death from infection -- no vaccination Ref: Shulgin, Stone, and Agur, Bull Math Bio

  14. Differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) using recombinant fowlpox-H5 Avian-Influenza vaccine and standard serological tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) vaccines protect chickens from morbidity and mortality and reduce, but do not completely prevent, respiratory and intestinal replication of an AI challenge virus. Therefore, surveillance programs must be developed to differentiate infected from non-infected flocks of vaccinated ...

  15. CHICKEN COOP AND BROAD LEAF MAPLE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. Three chicken ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CHICKEN COOP AND BROAD LEAF MAPLE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. Three chicken coops on the farm were used by both chickens and turkeys. The yards around the buildings were once fenced in to give the poultry brooding space. - Kineth Farm, Chicken Coop, 19162 STATE ROUTE 20, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  16. VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Hepatitis A Vaccine

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Hepatitis A Vaccine What You Need to Know Many Vaccine Information 1,000 cases). Hepatitis A vaccine can prevent hepatitis A. 2 Who should get hepatitis A vaccine and when? WHO? Some people should be routinely vaccinated with hepatitis A vaccine: · All children between

  17. An Age-Structured Model for Pneumococcal Infection with Vaccination

    E-print Network

    An Age-Structured Model for Pneumococcal Infection with Vaccination Karyn L. Sutton1,2,3 , H. T the young and the old. The development of an effective vaccine against these infections, especially the younger ages, has not been successful despite the licensing of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7

  18. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  19. Enteric vaccines.

    PubMed

    Edelman, R; Levine, M M

    1991-03-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the past decade in developing vaccines against the most important bacterial and viral infections of the gastrointestinal tract. Members of the Division of Geographic Medicine in the Center for Vaccine Development have played a prominent role in the laboratory development and clinical testing of these vaccines. A new oral typhoid vaccine, Ty21a, has been licensed in the United States. A genetically engineered live oral cholera vaccine developed in the CVD is undergoing clinical trials in cholera-endemic areas. Multiple vaccine candidates against Shigella, enterotoxigenic E. coli, and rotavirus are in clinical trial in the United States or overseas. Rapid advances in molecular biology, together with new knowledge of mucosal and cellular immunity, will produce more vaccine candidates in the future. The CVD intends to be in the forefront of these developments. PMID:2008164

  20. Evaluation of the Acceptability and Feasibility of a Computer-Tailored Intervention to Increase Human Papillomavirus Vaccination among Young Adult Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paiva, Andrea L.; Lipschitz, Jessica M.; Fernandez, Anne C.; Redding, Colleen A.; Prochaska, James O.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine acceptability and feasibility of a Transtheoretical Model (TTM)-based computer-tailored intervention (CTI) for increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in college-aged women. Participants: Two hundred forty-three women aged 18-26 were recruited between February and May of 2011. Methods: Participants completed the…

  1. Molecular Characterization of Chicken Anemia Virus Circulating in Chicken Flocks in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    AboElkhair, Mohammed; Abd El-Razak, Alaa G.; Metwally, Abd Elnaby Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Although many previous studies reported detection of chicken anemia virus (CAV) in Egypt since 1990, genomic characterization of this circulating CAV has not been published. In the present study, four nucleotide sequences of detected CAV were genetically characterized. Methods. These nucleotide sequences were obtained from commercial chicken flocks in two different locations of Egypt during 2010. The target region for sequencing was 675?bp nucleotide of partial coding region of VP1 protein. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the detected CAV were aligned and compared to worldwide CAV isolates including commonly used vaccine strains. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences was also carried out. Results. Our results showed that all the Egyptian CAV sequences were grouped in one group with viruses from diverse geographic regions. This group is characterized by amino acids profile 75I, 97L, 139Q, and 144Q in VP1. The phylogenetic and amino acid analyses of deduced amino acid indicated that the detected CAV sequences differ from CAV vaccine strains. Conclusion. This is the first report that describes molecular characterization of circulating CAV in Egypt. The study showed that the detected CAV, in Egypt are field viruses and unrelated to vaccine strains. PMID:25302064

  2. Attenuation, transmission, and immunogenicity of an ORF-C gene deleted strain of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) in specific pathogen free chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a very serious and widespread respiratory disease of chickens caused by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Conventional attenuated ILT vaccines, obtained by continuous passages in chicken embryos and tissue culture, had been the main tools utilized by th...

  3. Environmental and management factors influencing BVDV antibody levels and response to vaccination in weanling calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccination has many benefits for disease prevention and overall health status of animals. Not all animals respond equally to vaccinations. A number of factors can be shown to influence a young animal’s response to vaccination. Calves with more maternal antibodies at the time of vaccination have poo...

  4. Disparities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Literacy and Vaccine Completion among Asian American Pacific Islander Undergraduates: Implications for Cancer Health Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hee Yun; Kwon, Melissa; Vang, Suzanne; DeWolfe, Jessica; Kim, Nam Keol; Lee, Do Kyung; Yeung, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Low rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among young Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women need to be addressed, particularly given the high incidence of cervical cancer in this population. The current study aims to investigate predictors of HPV vaccination in young AAPI and non-Latina white (NLW) women. Methods: A…

  5. Impact of Feeding Systems and Vaccination Programs on Salmonella Enteritidis Colonization and Clearance of E. Coli In Broiler Broiler Breeders Pullets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broiler breeder pullets from a single grandparent flock were in ovo-vaccinated with Marek's vaccines herpesvirus of turkey (HVT) + chicken herpesvirus (SB1) or a vector HVT + Infectious bursal disease (IBD) vaccine+SB1. The chicks were placed in an experimental broiler breeder facility at the Univer...

  6. Adjuvant effects of chitosan and calcium phosphate particles in an inactivated Newcastle disease vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adjuvant activity of chitosan and calcium phosphate-particles (CAP) was studied following intranasal coadministration of commercial chickens with inactivated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine. After three vaccinations with inactivated NDV in combination with chitosan or CAP an increase in an...

  7. VACCINATION AGAINST RESPIRATORY DISEASES OF POULTRY: AVIAN INFLUENZA AND NEWCASTLE DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the USA each year, 8.2 billion commercial chickens are vaccinated against common respiratory pathogens such as Newcastle disease (ND) virus, a paramyxovirus type 1, and infectious bronchitis virus, a coronavirus. Most commercial poultry are vaccinated through mass immunization programs utilizing ...

  8. Immunoenhancing effects of MontanideTM ISA oil-based adjuvants on recombinant coccidia antigen vaccination against Eimeria acervulina infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current study was conducted to investigate the immunoenhancing effects of Montanide' adjuvants on protein subunit vaccination against avian coccidiosis. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with a purified Eimeria acervulina recombinant profilin protein, either alone or mixed with one ...

  9. Vaccines.gov

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Vaccines Features: News & Video Free Resources HPV Vaccine is Cancer Prevention HPV vaccination protects against several ... flu isn’t part of your travel plans. Vaccines: A Strong Record of Safety Vaccines to prevent ...

  10. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  11. 7 CFR 65.160 - Ground chicken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.160 Ground chicken. Ground chicken means comminuted chicken of...

  12. 7 CFR 65.160 - Ground chicken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.160 Ground chicken. Ground chicken means comminuted chicken of...

  13. 7 CFR 65.160 - Ground chicken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.160 Ground chicken. Ground chicken means comminuted chicken of...

  14. 7 CFR 65.160 - Ground chicken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.160 Ground chicken. Ground chicken means comminuted chicken of...

  15. 7 CFR 65.160 - Ground chicken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.160 Ground chicken. Ground chicken means comminuted chicken of...

  16. Progress and pitfalls in Shigella vaccine research

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Eileen M.; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Fasano, Alessio; Kotloff, Karen L.; Levine, Myron M.

    2013-01-01

    Renewed awareness of the significant morbidity and mortality that Shigella causes among young children in developing countries combined with technological innovations in vaccinology has led to the development of novel vaccine strategies in the past five years. Along with advancement of classical vaccines in clinical trials and new sophisticated measurements of immunological responses, much new data has been produced lending promise to the potential for production of safe and effective Shigella vaccines. Herein we review the recent progress in Shigella vaccine development within the framework of persistent obstacles. PMID:23419287

  17. VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT HPV Vaccine Cervarix

    E-print Network

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT HPV Vaccine Cervarix® What You Need to Know (Human Papillomavirus) Many Vaccine Information Statements are available in Spanish and other languages. See www, but some of the problems it causes can be treated. 2 HPV vaccine: Why get vaccinated? HPV vaccine

  18. Bioactivities of chicken essence.

    PubMed

    Li, Y F; He, R R; Tsoi, B; Kurihara, H

    2012-04-01

    The special flavor and health effects of chicken essence are being widely accepted by people. Scientific researches are revealing its truth as a tonic food in traditional health preservation. Chicken essence has been found to possess many bioactivities including relief of stress and fatigue, amelioration of anxiety, promotion of metabolisms and post-partum lactation, improvement on hyperglycemia and hypertension, enhancement of immune, and so on. These activities of chicken essence are suggested to be related with its active components, including proteins, dipeptides (such as carnosine and anserine), polypeptides, minerals, trace elements, and multiple amino acids, and so on. Underlying mechanisms responsible for the bioactivities of chicken essence are mainly related with anti-stress, anti-oxidant, and neural regulation effects. However, the mechanisms are complicated and may be mediated via the combined actions of many active components, more than the action of 1 or 2 components alone. PMID:22432477

  19. Eggcited about Chickens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Carolyn; Brown, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe St Peter's Primary School's and Honiton Primary School's experiences of keeping chickens. The authors also describe the benefits they bring and the reactions of the children. (Contains 5 figures.)

  20. Clinical experience with respiratory syncytial virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Pedro A

    2003-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is at times associated with life-threatening lower respiratory tract illness in infancy. Severe infection during the first year of life may be an important risk factor or indicator for the development of asthma in early childhood. Severe infections primarily occur in healthy infants, and young infants and children with specific risk factors. However, RSV causes respiratory infections in all age groups. Indeed it is now recognized that RSV disease is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in the geriatric population. RSV infection remains difficult to treat, and prevention is a worldwide goal. For this reason there has been an intensive effort to develop an effective and safe RSV vaccine. Initial infection with RSV affords limited protection to reinfection, yet repeated episodes decrease the risk for lower respiratory tract illness. In the 20 years from 1960 to 1980, trials of several candidate RSV vaccines failed to attain the desired safety and protection against natural infection. Some vaccine types either failed to elicit immunogenicity, as with the live subcutaneous vaccine, or resulted in exaggerated disease on natural exposure to the virus, as with the formalin-inactivated (FI) type. Currently vaccine candidates are being developed based on the molecular virology of RSV. Recent formulations of candidate RSV vaccines have focused on subunit vaccines [such as purified fusion protein (PFP)], subunit vaccines combined with nonspecific immune activating adjuvants, live attenuated vaccines (including cold passaged, temperature-sensitive or cpts mutants), genetically engineered live attenuated vaccines and polypeptide vaccines. PMID:12671459

  1. Vaccine Hesitancy: Causes, Consequences, and a Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Daniel A; Dudley, Matthew Z; Glanz, Jason M; Omer, Saad B

    2015-12-01

    Vaccine hesitancy reflects concerns about the decision to vaccinate oneself or one's children. There is a broad range of factors contributing to vaccine hesitancy, including the compulsory nature of vaccines, their coincidental temporal relationships to adverse health outcomes, unfamiliarity with vaccine-preventable diseases, and lack of trust in corporations and public health agencies. Although vaccination is a norm in the U.S. and the majority of parents vaccinate their children, many do so amid concerns. The proportion of parents claiming non-medical exemptions to school immunization requirements has been increasing over the past decade. Vaccine refusal has been associated with outbreaks of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b disease, varicella, pneumococcal disease, measles, and pertussis, resulting in the unnecessary suffering of young children and waste of limited public health resources. Vaccine hesitancy is an extremely important issue that needs to be addressed because effective control of vaccine-preventable diseases generally requires indefinite maintenance of extremely high rates of timely vaccination. The multifactorial and complex causes of vaccine hesitancy require a broad range of approaches on the individual, provider, health system, and national levels. These include standardized measurement tools to quantify and locate clustering of vaccine hesitancy and better understand issues of trust; rapid, independent, and transparent review of an enhanced and appropriately funded vaccine safety system; adequate reimbursement for vaccine risk communication in doctors' offices; and individually tailored messages for parents who have vaccine concerns, especially first-time pregnant women. The potential of vaccines to prevent illness and save lives has never been greater. Yet, that potential is directly dependent on parental acceptance of vaccines, which requires confidence in vaccines, healthcare providers who recommend and administer vaccines, and the systems to make sure vaccines are safe. PMID:26337116

  2. Review of enterovirus 71 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chong, Pele; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chou, Ai-Hsiang; Klein, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackieviruses are the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) outbreaks worldwide and have a significant socioeconomic impact, particularly in Asia. Formalin-inactivated (FI) EV71 vaccines evaluated in human clinical trials in China, Taiwan, and Singapore were found to be safe and to elicit strong neutralizing antibody responses against EV71 currently circulating in Asia. The results from 3 different phase 3 clinical trials performed in young children (6-60 months) indicate that the efficacy of FI-EV71 vaccines is >90% against EV71-related HFMDs and >80% against EV71-associated serious diseases, but the vaccines did not protect against coxsackievirus A16 infections. Here we discuss the critical factors affecting EV71 vaccine product registration, including clinical epidemiology, antigenic shift issues in cross-protection and vaccine strain selection, standardized animal models for potency testing, and cost-effective manufacturing processes for potential incorporation of FI-EV71 vaccine into Expanded Programme on Immunization vaccines. PMID:25352588

  3. Tailored Vaccines Targeting the Elderly Using Whole Inactivated Influenza Vaccines Bearing Cytokine Immunomodulators

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tila; Heffron, Connie L.; High, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza and its complications disproportionately affect the elderly, leading to high morbidity and mortality in this ever-increasing population. Despite widespread vaccination efforts, the current influenza vaccines are less effective in the elderly; hence newer vaccine strategies are needed to improve their efficacy in this age group. We have previously shown that co-presentation of cytokines on the surface of inactivated influenza virus particles affords better protection from lethal homotypic viral challenge in young adult mice than conventional non-adjuvanted whole inactivated vaccine. Here, we determined the efficacy of these vaccine formulations in Balb/c mice “aged” to 17 months (“aged mice”) along with the addition of a membrane-bound interleukin-12 (IL-12) vaccine formulation. Our investigations found that a single low-dose intramuscular vaccination with inactivated whole influenza vaccine co-presenting IL-12 was sufficient to provide enhanced protection from subsequent influenza challenge as compared with non-adjuvanted whole inactivated vaccine. Our results indicate that incorporation of cytokines such as IL-12 in a membrane-bound formulation in whole inactivated vaccine may provide a means to lower the vaccine dose while eliciting enhanced protective responses in the elderly, an age group that responds poorly to current vaccination regimens. PMID:24102577

  4. Evaluation of the Efficacy of an Attenuated Live Vaccine against Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus in Young Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Xue; Li, Zhenguang; Xia, Mingqi; He, Yanliang

    2012-01-01

    Highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) is characterized by high fever and high mortality in pigs of all ages and has severely affected the pork industry of China in the last few years. An attenuated HP-PRRSV strain, TJM, was obtained by passaging HP-PRRSV strain TJ on MARC-145 cells for 92 passages. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)- and antibody-free pigs were inoculated intramuscularly with TJM (105.0 50% tissue culture infective doses [TCID50]) and challenged at 28, 60, 120, and 180 days postimmunization (dpi). The results showed that 5/5, 5/5, 5/5, and 4/5 immunized pigs were protected from the lethal challenge and did not develop fever and clinical diseases at each challenge, respectively. Compared to control pigs, vaccinated pigs showed much milder pathological lesions and gained significantly more weight (P < 0.01). Sequence analysis of different passages of strain TJ showed that the attenuation resulted in a deletion of a continuous 120 amino acids (aa), in addition to the discontinuous 30-aa deletion in the nsp2 region. The analysis also demonstrated that the 120-aa deletion was genetically stable in vivo. These results suggested that HP-PRRSV TJM was efficacious against a lethal challenge with a virulent HP-PRRSV strain, and effective protection could last at least 4 months. Therefore, strain TJM is a good candidate for an efficacious modified live virus vaccine as well as a useful molecular marker vaccine against HP-PRRSV. PMID:22695163

  5. The ERA Strain of Rabies Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, K. F.; Crawley, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    An antigenic extinction trial in cats showed that the ERA rabies vaccine had superior antigenic properties over Flury H.E.P. C.E.O. and killed tissue culture rabies vaccine. Dogs and cats on a duration of immunity study of ERA rabies vaccine were challenged with fox salivary gland “street” rabies virus. The results of this challenge show a duration of immunity of five years in dogs and four years in cats. Vaccination of dams in late pregnancy with ERA rabies vaccine resulted in transference of maternal antibody to the newborn, in both cattle and dogs. This maternally derived antibody interfered with the successful active immunization of the young calf. Calves free of antibodies for rabies could be successfully vaccinated as early as 17 days of age and were able to withstand a challenge with virulent “street” rabies virus two years later. PMID:4263912

  6. Pertussis vaccination during pregnancy in Vietnam: Results of a randomized controlled trial Pertussis vaccination during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ha Thi Thu; Leuridan, Elke; Maertens, Kirsten; Nguyen, Trung Dac; Hens, Niel; Vu, Ngoc Ha; Caboré, Raissa Nadège; Duong, Hong Thi; Huygen, Kris; Van Damme, Pierre; Dang, Anh Duc

    2016-01-01

    A pertussis vaccination during pregnancy has recently been adopted in several countries to indirectly protect young infants. This study assessed the effect of adding a pertussis component to the tetanus vaccination, in the pregnancy immunization program in Vietnam. A randomized controlled trial was performed. Pregnant women received either a Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria acellular pertussis) vaccine or a tetanus only vaccine between 19 and 35 weeks' gestational age. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) against tetanus (TT), diphtheria (DT), pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous hemaglutinin (FHA) and pertactin (Prn) were measured using commercial ELISA tests, at baseline, 1 month after maternal vaccination, at delivery, and in infants from cord blood and before and after the primary series (EPI: month 2-3-4) of a pertussis containing vaccine. Significantly higher geometric mean concentrations (GMC) were observed for all 3 measured pertussis antigens in the offspring of the Tdap group, up to 2 months of age. One month after completion of the primary infant vaccination schedule, anti-Prn GMC, but not anti-PT and anti-FHA GMCs, was significantly (p=0.006) higher in the control group. Maternal antibodies induced by vaccination during pregnancy close the susceptibility gap for pertussis in young infants. Limited interference with the infant vaccine responses was observed. Whether this interference effect disappears with the administration of a fourth vaccine dose is further studied. PMID:26529073

  7. Ethical considerations of universal vaccination against human papilloma virus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background From an epidemiological perspective, the practice of universal vaccination of girls and young women in order to prevent human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and potential development of cervical cancer is widely accepted even though it may lead to the neglect of other preventive strategies against cervical cancer. Discussion It is argued that removing the deterrent effect – the fear of developing cancer – could encourage teenage sex. This paper reflects on the ethical legitimacy of the universal vaccination of girls and young women against HPV infection, especially regarding safety issues, the need to vaccinate people who have opted to abstain from sex, the presumption of early onset of sexual relations, the commercial interests of the companies that manufacture the vaccine, and the recommendation of universal vaccination in males. Summary Based on the aforementioned information, we believe that the universal vaccination against HPV in young women is acceptable from an ethical point of view, given the medical advantages it presents. PMID:24708813

  8. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) recombinants expressing infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) glycoproteins gB and gD protect chickens against ILTV and NDV challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious acute respiratory disease of chickens caused by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). The disease is mainly controlled through biosecurity and vaccination with live-attenuated strains of the virus and vectored vaccines based on turkey he...

  9. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...applicable requirements prescribed in § 113.200. (b) Each lot of Master Seed shall be tested for pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113.37, except that, if the test is inconclusive because of a vaccine virus...

  10. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...applicable requirements prescribed in § 113.200. (b) Each lot of Master Seed shall be tested for pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113.37, except that, if the test is inconclusive because of a vaccine virus...

  11. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...applicable requirements prescribed in § 113.200. (b) Each lot of Master Seed shall be tested for pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113.37, except that, if the test is inconclusive because of a vaccine virus...

  12. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...applicable requirements prescribed in § 113.200. (b) Each lot of Master Seed shall be tested for pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test prescribed in § 113.37, except that, if the test is inconclusive because of a vaccine virus...

  13. In ovo treatment with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides decreases colonization of Salmonella enteriditis in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, K M; He, H; Swaggerty, C L; McReynolds, J L; Genovese, K J; Duke, S E; Nerren, J R; Kogut, M H

    2009-02-15

    Induction of the innate immune response in newly hatched chickens is important for limiting infections with bacteria, such as Salmonella enterica serovar Enteriditis (SE). CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) can stimulate the innate immune response of young chickens. Therefore, we examined the effectiveness of CpG-ODN administered in ovo on intestinal colonization by SE and the ability to modulate the function of heterophils in young chickens. Heterophils were isolated from 2-day-old chickens and were stimulated with heat-killed SE (HK-SE) or PMA for oxidative burst and HK-SE or live SE for degranulation assays. CpG-ODN treatment had no effect on heterophil oxidative burst when stimulated with HK-SE or PMA. However, HK-SE and live SE increased degranulation (P<0.01) in heterophils from CpG-ODN-treated birds compared to PBS-treated controls. In a second experiment, chickens were orally infected with SE on day 10 post-hatch and cecal contents were collected 6 days later for assessment of SE intestinal colonization. CpG-ODN treatment reduced SE colonization by greater than 10-fold (P<0.001) compared to PBS-injected control birds. Overall, we show for the first time that CpG-ODN given in ovo stimulates innate immune responsiveness of chicken heterophils and increases resistance of young chickens to SE colonization. PMID:19019459

  14. RESEARCH UPDATE ON H7N2 AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS IN TURKEYS AND CHICKENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The outbreak of H7N2 low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) in Virginia during 2002 raised questions about the susceptibility of turkeys verses chickens to the virus and the potential of vaccines to provide protection. The virus A/turkey/Virginia/158512/02 (H7N2) replicated from day 2 through 7 po...

  15. Cholera vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ryan, E T; Calderwood, S B

    2000-08-01

    Cholera causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. For travelers, the risk of developing cholera per month of stay in a developing country is approximately 0.001%-0.01%, and cholera may present as traveler's diarrhea. In the United States, only a poorly tolerated, marginally effective, parenterally administered, phenol-inactivated vaccine is available. Outside the United States, 2 additional vaccines are commercially available: an oral killed whole cell-cholera toxin recombinant B subunit vaccine (WC-rBS) and an oral live attenuated Vibrio cholerae vaccine (CVD 103-HgR). These oral vaccines are well tolerated. In field trials, WC-rBS provides 80%-85% protection from cholera caused by V. cholerae serogroup O1 for at least 6 months. In volunteer studies, CVD 103-HgR provides 62%-100% protection against cholera caused by V. cholerae for at least 6 months. No commercially available cholera vaccine protects against disease caused by V. cholerae serogroup O139. New cholera vaccines are being developed. PMID:10987721

  16. Rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G

    1998-01-01

    Encouraging results have been reported from several large trials of tetravalent rhesus rotavirus vaccine, with efficacy of 70-80% against severe disease. A recent Venezuelan study showed similar results to trials in USA and Europe. The vaccine may soon be licensed in USA. It provides the exciting prospect of a strategy to prevent one of the world's major child killers. Other candidate vaccines are under development including human-bovine reassortants, neonatal strains, non-replicating rotaviruses, vector vaccines and other genetically engineered products. Second and third generation rotavirus vaccines are on the horizon. The need for a rotavirus vaccine is well accepted by paediatricians, but public health authorities need to be lobbied. Other issues which need to be addressed include relative importance of non-group A rotaviruses, possible administration with OPV, the influence of breast feeding, and most importantly, cost. It is essential that rotavirus vaccine is somehow made available to all of the world's children, not just those in developed countries. PMID:9553287

  17. [Human papillomavirus vaccine. Efficacy and safety].

    PubMed

    Bruni, Laia; Serrano, Beatriz; Bosch, Xavier; Castellsagué, Xavier

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prophylactic vaccines have been recognized as the most effective intervention to control for HPV-related diseases. This article reviews the major phaseii/iii trials of the bivalent (HPVs16/18), quadrivalent (HPVs6/11/16/18), and the recently approved 9-valent vaccine (HPVs6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58). Large trials have been conducted showing the safety, immunogenicity and high efficacy of the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines in the prevention of pre-invasive lesions and infection, especially when administered at young ages before exposure to HPV. Trials of the 9-valent vaccine have also demonstrated the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of the vaccine in the prevention of infection and disease associated with the vaccine types, and its potential to substantially increase the overall prevention of HPV-related diseases. Post-licensure country reports have shown the recent and early impact of these vaccines at population level after the implementation of established HPV vaccination programs, including decreases in the prevalence of vaccine HPV types, the incidence of genital warts, and the incidence of high-grade cervical abnormalities. If widely implemented, current HPV vaccines may drastically reduce the incidence of cervical cancer and other HPV-related cancers and diseases. PMID:25937455

  18. Human papillomavirus vaccination in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Russell, Michelle; Raheja, Vinita; Jaiyesimi, Rotimi

    2013-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common female cancer worldwide. It remains the highest ranking preventable cancer affecting women in developing countries. Cervical cancer is caused by sexual transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV). It is estimated that more than 80% of sexually active women will be infected with HPV in their lifetime, usually in their mid to late teens, 20s and early 30s. Persistence of high-risk oncogenic subtypes can lead to the development of precancerous change (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)), which can ultimately lead to cervical cancer. Progression from CIN to cancer is slow in most cases, and it is believed that progression from CIN 3 to cancer at 10, 20 and 30 years is 16%, 25% and 31.3%, respectively. The cervical screening programme has been successful in reducing the incidence of cervical cancer by recognising early precancerous changes and treating them. A promising advance in women's health has been the development of a vaccine targeting high-risk oncogenic subtypes 16 and 18, which are responsible for 70% of all cervical cancers. Two HPV vaccines are available: Merck & Co.'s Gardasil(®) and GlaxoSmithKline's Cervarix(®). The aim of this programme is to provide three doses prior to sexual debut with the hope that it will reduce the rates of cervical cancer in the future. Women who are already sexually active can still be vaccinated, but, the vaccine has been shown to be less effective in them. Uptake remains a challenge for public health, and efforts should focus on educating parents about the association between HPV and cervical cancer. Routine vaccination of young men is a debatable issue and has been found to be less cost-effective, as the burden of disease such as anal and penile cancers in males is less than cervical cancers in women. Current evidence suggests that the HPV vaccination programme should focus on increasing and maintaining high coverage of vaccination in girls. There may, however, be some benefit in vaccinating young men in areas where the uptake of vaccination in women in less than 70%. A school-based vaccination programme has been shown to be effective, with an uptake rate in England of 76% for 2009/2010, but this has implications for the role of school nurses in the delivery of other services. This article explores the health benefits of the HPV vaccine, the impact of attitudes, cost-effectiveness and the involvement of school nurses in programme delivery. PMID:24006173

  19. Comparison of a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit with a commercial vaccine for efficacy of protection against internal egg contamination by Salmonella in hens.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Rahul M; Eo, Seong Kug; Park, Sang Youel; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-07-01

    This study compared a new live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (SE-LTB) with a commercial Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine for efficacy of protection against SE infection in laying hens. Chickens were divided into 3 groups of 20 each. Group A chickens were inoculated orally with phosphate-buffered saline and served as controls, group B chickens were inoculated orally with the vaccine candidate, and group C chickens were inoculated intramuscularly with a commercial vaccine, the primary inoculation in groups B and C being at 10 wk of age and the booster at 16 wk. Groups B and C showed significantly higher titers of plasma immunoglobulin G, intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A, and egg yolk immunoglobulin Y antibodies compared with the control group, and both vaccinated groups showed a significantly elevated cellular immune response. After virulent challenge, group B had significantly lower production of thin-shelled and/or malformed eggs and a significantly lower rate of SE contamination of eggs compared with the control group. Furthermore, the challenge strain was detected significantly less in all of the examined organs of group B compared with the control group. Group C had lower gross lesion scores only in the spleen and had lower bacterial counts only in the spleen, ceca, and ovary. These findings indicate that vaccination with the SE-LTB vaccine candidate can efficiently reduce internal egg and internal organ contamination by Salmonella and has advantages over the commercial vaccine. PMID:26130857

  20. Comparison of a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit with a commercial vaccine for efficacy of protection against internal egg contamination by Salmonella in hens

    PubMed Central

    Nandre, Rahul M.; Eo, Seong Kug; Park, Sang Youel; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-01-01

    This study compared a new live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (SE-LTB) with a commercial Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine for efficacy of protection against SE infection in laying hens. Chickens were divided into 3 groups of 20 each. Group A chickens were inoculated orally with phosphate-buffered saline and served as controls, group B chickens were inoculated orally with the vaccine candidate, and group C chickens were inoculated intramuscularly with a commercial vaccine, the primary inoculation in groups B and C being at 10 wk of age and the booster at 16 wk. Groups B and C showed significantly higher titers of plasma immunoglobulin G, intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A, and egg yolk immunoglobulin Y antibodies compared with the control group, and both vaccinated groups showed a significantly elevated cellular immune response. After virulent challenge, group B had significantly lower production of thin-shelled and/or malformed eggs and a significantly lower rate of SE contamination of eggs compared with the control group. Furthermore, the challenge strain was detected significantly less in all of the examined organs of group B compared with the control group. Group C had lower gross lesion scores only in the spleen and had lower bacterial counts only in the spleen, ceca, and ovary. These findings indicate that vaccination with the SE-LTB vaccine candidate can efficiently reduce internal egg and internal organ contamination by Salmonella and has advantages over the commercial vaccine. PMID:26130857

  1. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A CHALLENGE MODEL FOR MEASURING EFFICACY OF VACCINES AGAINST MILDLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluation of vaccine efficacy for mildly pathogenic (MP) avian influenza viruses (AIV) is difficult since such viruses usually do not cause illness or death in experimentally infected poultry. In a series of experimental trials, vaccinated chickens were evaluated for morbidity rates, mortality rat...

  2. Anthrax Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 1-800-822-7967. VAERS does not provide medical advice. ... Injury compensationA Federal program, the Countermeasures Injury Compensation ... who have a serious reaction to this vaccine.If you have a reaction ...

  3. Pertussis Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further co-develop vaccines against pertussis.

  4. Typhoid Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... serious disease. It is caused by bacteria called Salmonella Typhi. Typhoid causes a high fever, fatigue, weakness, ... a typhoid carrier. Laboratory workers who work with Salmonella Typhi bacteria. Inactivated typhoid vaccine (shot)One dose ...

  5. Prediction and identification of novel IBV S1 protein derived CTL epitopes in chicken.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Liao, Ying; Fan, Jin; Zhang, Yuqiang; Mao, Xiang; Sun, Yingjie; Song, Cuiping; Qiu, Xusheng; Meng, Chunchun; Ding, Chan

    2016-01-12

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a major pathogen common in the poultry industry. Broad cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response against IBV is one of the crucial factors that help to control viral replication. Spike glycoproteins on the surface of the IBV virion harbor major T cell epitopes. In this study, based on the peptide-binding motifs of chicken MHC I molecules for the BF2*4, BF2*12, BF2*15, and BF2*19 haplotypes, potential CTL epitopes were predicted using S1 proteins from different IBV strains. Twenty-one peptides were predicted to be potential CTL epitopes; they were manually synthesized and the CTL responses to them tested in vitro. Spleen lymphocytes were collected from specific-pathogen free (SPF) chicken that had been immunized with the S1 protein expression plasmid, pV-S1, and were stimulated by the synthesized peptides. IFN-? secretion and CD8(+) T cell proliferation in chickens were tested by ELISpot array and flow cytometry, respectively. Four epitopes (P8SRIQTATDP, P9SRNATGSQP, P18GAYAVVNV, and P19SRIQTATQP) were identified to stimulate CD8(+) T cell proliferation and IFN-? secretion, indicating their efficacy as CTL epitopes in chicken. Poly-CTL-epitope DNA vaccine (pV-S1T) was constructed by inserting nucleotide sequences encoding the P8, P9, P18, and P19 CTL epitopes into the pVAX1 vector. Chickens were vaccinated with either pV-S1, pV-S1T, or pVAX1 and the protection efficacy was analyzed, revealing that ninety percent of chickens immunized with pV-S1T were protected after challenge with 10(6) ELD50 of IBV, demonstrating that these novel CTL epitopes were effective against IBV challenge. This study provides a new method to screen virus CTL epitopes in chicken and to develop poly-CTL-epitope DNA vaccines. PMID:26620841

  6. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The flu vaccine is an example. Toxoid vaccines contain a toxin or chemical made by the bacteria ... are the diphtheria and tetanus vaccines. Biosynthetic vaccines contain manmade substances that are very similar to pieces ...

  7. Vaccination Records for Kids

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vaccines Home For Parents: Vaccines for Your Children Vaccination Records for Kids On this Page Recording Immunizations ... for your college-age child. Many colleges provide vaccinations, especially those required for enrollment. Contact your college's ...

  8. Preteen and Teen Vaccines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Preteen or Teen Vaccinated? Which Vaccines Do Preteens and Teens Need, and When? All preteens (age ... Adult Vaccine Quiz . How Can I Get My Preteen or Teen Vaccinated? Preteens and teens typically see ...

  9. Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Index SMALLPOX FACT SHEET The Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine The vaccinia virus is the "live virus" used ... cannot cause smallpox. What is a "live virus" vaccine? A "live virus" vaccine is a vaccine that ...

  10. Imperfect Vaccination Can Enhance the Transmission of Highly Virulent Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Read, Andrew F; Baigent, Susan J; Powers, Claire; Kgosana, Lydia B; Blackwell, Luke; Smith, Lorraine P; Kennedy, David A; Walkden-Brown, Stephen W; Nair, Venugopal K

    2015-07-01

    Could some vaccines drive the evolution of more virulent pathogens? Conventional wisdom is that natural selection will remove highly lethal pathogens if host death greatly reduces transmission. Vaccines that keep hosts alive but still allow transmission could thus allow very virulent strains to circulate in a population. Here we show experimentally that immunization of chickens against Marek's disease virus enhances the fitness of more virulent strains, making it possible for hyperpathogenic strains to transmit. Immunity elicited by direct vaccination or by maternal vaccination prolongs host survival but does not prevent infection, viral replication or transmission, thus extending the infectious periods of strains otherwise too lethal to persist. Our data show that anti-disease vaccines that do not prevent transmission can create conditions that promote the emergence of pathogen strains that cause more severe disease in unvaccinated hosts. PMID:26214839

  11. Imperfect Vaccination Can Enhance the Transmission of Highly Virulent Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Read, Andrew F.; Baigent, Susan J.; Powers, Claire; Kgosana, Lydia B.; Blackwell, Luke; Smith, Lorraine P.; Kennedy, David A.; Walkden-Brown, Stephen W.; Nair, Venugopal K.

    2015-01-01

    Could some vaccines drive the evolution of more virulent pathogens? Conventional wisdom is that natural selection will remove highly lethal pathogens if host death greatly reduces transmission. Vaccines that keep hosts alive but still allow transmission could thus allow very virulent strains to circulate in a population. Here we show experimentally that immunization of chickens against Marek's disease virus enhances the fitness of more virulent strains, making it possible for hyperpathogenic strains to transmit. Immunity elicited by direct vaccination or by maternal vaccination prolongs host survival but does not prevent infection, viral replication or transmission, thus extending the infectious periods of strains otherwise too lethal to persist. Our data show that anti-disease vaccines that do not prevent transmission can create conditions that promote the emergence of pathogen strains that cause more severe disease in unvaccinated hosts. PMID:26214839

  12. Construction of Recombinant Baculoviruses Expressing Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Main Protective Antigen and Their Immune Effects on Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shanshan; Gao, Dongni; Ping, Wenxiang

    2015-01-01

    In order to overcome the limitations of conventional vaccines for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), we constructed recombinant dual expression system baculoviruses with VP2 and VP2/4/3, the main protective antigens of IBDV. We compared the immune effects of the baculoviruses in avian cells and detected their control effects on chickens with infectious bursal disease. We used Western blot analysis to measure VP2 protein and VP2/4/3 polyprotein expression in avian cells infected using the Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system. The recombinant baculoviruses were used to vaccinate specific pathogen-free chickens, which produced specific protective antibodies and strong cellular immune responses. The results of the virus challenge experiment revealed that the protective efficiency of VP2 and VP2/4/3 virus vaccines were 95.8% and 100%, respectively, both of which were higher than the vaccine group (87.5%), and significantly higher than the control group (50%). The results demonstrated that the immune effect of BV-S-ITRs-VP2/4/3 was superior to that of BV-S-ITRs-VP2. Compared with traditional attenuated vaccine and genetically engineered live vector vaccine, the dual expression viral vector vaccine has good bio-safety. The results of this study provide a foundation for the further development of poultry vaccines, in addition to providing a useful reference for developing non-replicating live vaccines against other viral diseases. PMID:26167907

  13. Respiratory cryptosporidiosis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, M A; Latimer, K S; Brown, J; Steffens, W L; Martin, P W; Resurreccion, R S; Smeltzer, M A; Dickson, T G

    1988-12-01

    In order to better characterize spontaneous respiratory cryptosporidiosis in chickens, a retrospective examination of histopathology reports from the Georgia Poultry Laboratories for an 18-mo period (4/1/86 to 9/30/87) was made; 12 cases were found. Collected data were analyzed and certain epidemiologic and histologic features were identified. Eleven of the 12 cases involved broiler type chickens. The ages of chickens with respiratory cryptosporidiosis were evenly distributed between 17 and 52 days of age. The infected birds were always clinically ill. Viruses or bacteria or both often accompanied respiratory Cryptosporidium sp. infections. Histologic lesions (including those of ciliary-adherent bacteria) are described. As the inflammatory response in infected organs became progressively nonpurulent (lymphocytes and plasma cells predominate), numbers of Cryptosporidium diminished. Cytologic preparations were useful for making diagnoses of respiratory cryptosporidiosis in chickens. Identification of epidemiologic features of respiratory cryptosporidiosis, and improved ability to make accurate and prompt diagnoses of Cryptosporidium sp. infection, are vital for a more complete understanding of the impact of this disease on poultry health. PMID:3241775

  14. Chicken skin virome analyzed by high-throughput sequencing shows a composition highly different from human skin.

    PubMed

    Denesvre, Caroline; Dumarest, Marine; Rémy, Sylvie; Gourichon, David; Eloit, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies show that human skin at homeostasis is a complex ecosystem whose virome include circular DNA viruses, especially papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. To determine the chicken skin virome in comparison with human skin virome, a chicken swabs pool sample from fifteen indoor healthy chickens of five genetic backgrounds was examined for the presence of DNA viruses by high-throughput sequencing (HTS). The results indicate a predominance of herpesviruses from the Mardivirus genus, coming from either vaccinal origin or presumably asymptomatic infection. Despite the high sensitivity of the HTS method used herein to detect small circular DNA viruses, we did not detect any papillomaviruses, polyomaviruses, or circoviruses, indicating that these viruses may not be resident of the chicken skin. The results suggest that the turkey herpesvirus is a resident of chicken skin in vaccinated chickens. This study indicates major differences between the skin viromes of chickens and humans. The origin of this difference remains to be further studied in relation with skin physiology, environment, or virus population dynamics. PMID:26223320

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Julia L

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract viral disease in infants and young children. Presently, there are no explicit recommendations for RSV treatment apart from supportive care. The virus is therefore responsible for an estimated 160,000 deaths per year worldwide. Despite half a century of dedicated research, there remains no licensed vaccine product. Herein are described past and current efforts to harness innate and adaptive immune potentials to combat RSV. A plethora of candidate vaccine products and strategies are reviewed. The development of a successful RSV vaccine may ultimately stem from attention to historical lessons, in concert with an integral partnering of immunology and virology research fields. PMID:21988307

  16. Vibrio cholerae: lessons for mucosal vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Anne L; Camilli, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Vibrio cholerae to persist in bodies of water will continue to confound our ability to eradicate cholera through improvements to infrastructure, and thus cholera vaccines are needed. We aim for an inexpensive vaccine that can provide long-lasting protection from all epidemic cholera infections, currently caused by O1 or O139 serogroups. Recent insights into correlates of protection, epidemiology and pathogenesis may help us design improved vaccines. This notwithstanding, we have come to appreciate that even marginally protective vaccines, such as oral whole-cell killed vaccines, if widely distributed, can provide significant protection, owing to herd immunity. Further efforts are still required to provide more effective protection of young children. PMID:21162623

  17. Alternative dosage schedules with HPV VLP vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Margaret A.; Sudenga, Staci L.; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines can prevent multiple cancers in women and men. Difficulties in the cost and completion of the three-dose vaccine series have led to considerations of alternative dose schedules. In clinical trials, three doses given within a 12-month period versus the standard six-month period yielded comparable results, and immunogenicity appears comparable with two doses in adolescent females compared to the three-dose series in adult females. While the data are generally supportive of moving to a two-dose vaccine schedule among young female adolescents, the adoption of a two-dose vaccine schedule still poses a potential risk to the strength and longevity of the immune response. Public health authorities implementing a two-dose vaccine schedule should devise risk management strategies to minimize the potential impact on cancer prevention. PMID:25001893

  18. 7 CFR 65.120 - Chicken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.120 Chicken. Chicken has the meaning given the term in 9 CFR...

  19. 7 CFR 65.120 - Chicken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.120 Chicken. Chicken has the meaning given the term in 9 CFR...

  20. 7 CFR 65.120 - Chicken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.120 Chicken. Chicken has the meaning given the term in 9 CFR...

  1. 7 CFR 65.120 - Chicken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.120 Chicken. Chicken has the meaning given the term in 9 CFR...

  2. 7 CFR 65.120 - Chicken.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.120 Chicken. Chicken has the meaning given the term in 9 CFR...

  3. Evaluation of Xpert® MTB/RIF Assay in Induced Sputum and Gastric Lavage Samples from Young Children with Suspected Tuberculosis from the MVA85A TB Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Geldenhuys, Hennie; Schmidt, Bey-Marrie; Luabeya, Angelique Kany Kany; Mulenga, Humphrey; Scriba, Thomas J.; Hanekom, Willem A.; Mahomed, Hassan; McShane, Helen; Hatherill, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diagnosis of childhood tuberculosis is limited by the paucibacillary respiratory samples obtained from young children with pulmonary disease. We aimed to compare accuracy of the Xpert® MTB/RIF assay, an automated nucleic acid amplification test, between induced sputum and gastric lavage samples from young children in a tuberculosis endemic setting. Methods We analyzed standardized diagnostic data from HIV negative children younger than four years of age who were investigated for tuberculosis disease near Cape Town, South Africa [2009–2012]. Two paired, consecutive induced sputa and early morning gastric lavage samples were obtained from children with suspected tuberculosis. Samples underwent Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube [MGIT] culture and Xpert MTB/RIF assay. We compared diagnostic yield across samples using the two-sample test of proportions and McNemar’s ?2 test; and Wilson’s score method to calculate sensitivity and specificity. Results 1,020 children were evaluated for tuberculosis during 1,214 admission episodes. Not all children had 4 samples collected. 57 of 4,463[1.3%] and 26 of 4,606[0.6%] samples tested positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis on MGIT culture and Xpert MTB/RIF assay respectively. 27 of 2,198[1.2%] and 40 of 2,183[1.8%] samples tested positive [on either Xpert MTB/RIF assay or MGIT culture] on induced sputum and gastric lavage samples, respectively. 19/1,028[1.8%] and 33/1,017[3.2%] admission episodes yielded a positive MGIT culture or Xpert MTB/RIF assay from induced sputum and gastric lavage, respectively. Sensitivity of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 8/30[26.7%; 95% CI: 14.2–44.4] for two induced sputum samples and 7/31[22.6%; 11.4–39.8] [p = 0.711] for two gastric lavage samples. Corresponding specificity was 893/893[100%;99.6–100] and 885/890[99.4%;98.7–99.8] respectively [p = 0.025]. Conclusion Sensitivity of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was low, compared to MGIT culture, but diagnostic performance of Xpert MTB/RIF did not differ sufficiently between induced sputum and gastric lavage to justify selection of one sampling method over the other, in young children with suspected pulmonary TB. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00953927 PMID:26554383

  4. Antibody Titer Has Positive Predictive Value for Vaccine Protection against Challenge with Natural Antigenic-Drift Variants of H5N1 High-Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Viruses from Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, David L.; Spackman, Erica; Jadhao, Samadhan; Dauphin, Gwenaelle; Kim-Torchetti, Mia; McGrane, James; Weaver, John; Daniels, Peter; Wong, Frank; Selleck, Paul; Wiyono, Agus; Indriani, Risa; Yupiana, Yuni; Sawitri Siregar, Elly; Prajitno, Teguh; Smith, Derek; Fouchier, Ron

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccines are used in integrated control strategies to protect poultry against H5N1 high-pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI). H5N1 HPAI was first reported in Indonesia in 2003, and vaccination was initiated in 2004, but reports of vaccine failures began to emerge in mid-2005. This study investigated the role of Indonesian licensed vaccines, specific vaccine seed strains, and emerging variant field viruses as causes of vaccine failures. Eleven of 14 licensed vaccines contained the manufacturer's listed vaccine seed strains, but 3 vaccines contained a seed strain different from that listed on the label. Vaccines containing A/turkey/Wisconsin/1968 (WI/68), A/chicken/Mexico/28159-232/1994 (Mex/94), and A/turkey/England/N28/1973 seed strains had high serological potency in chickens (geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition [HI] titers, ?1:169), but vaccines containing strain A/chicken/Guangdong/1/1996 generated by reverse genetics (rg; rgGD/96), A/chicken/Legok/2003 (Legok/03), A/chicken/Vietnam/C57/2004 generated by rg (rgVN/04), or A/chicken/Legok/2003 generated by rg (rgLegok/03) had lower serological potency (geometric mean HI titers, ?1:95). In challenge studies, chickens immunized with any of the H5 avian influenza vaccines were protected against A/chicken/West Java/SMI-HAMD/2006 (SMI-HAMD/06) and were partially protected against A/chicken/Papua/TA5/2006 (Papua/06) but were not protected against A/chicken/West Java/PWT-WIJ/2006 (PWT/06). Experimental inactivated vaccines made with PWT/06 HPAI virus or rg-generated PWT/06 low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus seed strains protected chickens from lethal challenge, as did a combination of a commercially available live fowl poxvirus vaccine expressing the H5 influenza virus gene and inactivated Legok/03 vaccine. These studies indicate that antigenic variants did emerge in Indonesia following widespread H5 avian influenza vaccine usage, and efficacious inactivated vaccines can be developed using antigenic variant wild-type viruses or rg-generated LPAI virus seed strains containing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of wild-type viruses. IMPORTANCE H5N1 high-pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus has become endemic in Indonesian poultry, and such poultry are the source of virus for birds and mammals, including humans. Vaccination has become a part of the poultry control strategy, but vaccine failures have occurred in the field. This study identified possible causes of vaccine failure, which included the use of an unlicensed virus seed strain and induction of low levels of protective antibody because of an insufficient quantity of vaccine antigen. However, the most important cause of vaccine failure was the appearance of drift variant field viruses that partially or completely overcame commercial vaccine-induced immunity. Furthermore, experimental vaccines using inactivated wild-type virus or reverse genetics-generated vaccines containing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of wild-type drift variant field viruses were protective. These studies indicate the need for surveillance to identify drift variant viruses in the field and update licensed vaccines when such variants appear. PMID:25609805

  5. [The current status of research on a cholera vaccine].

    PubMed

    Fournier, J M

    1998-01-01

    Cholera remains today a major health problem in most developing countries. The long-term control of cholera depends on the improvement of hygiene but this is a distant goal for many countries. The availability of an effective cholera vaccine is thus important for the prevention of cholera in such countries. More than a century after the first attempt to vaccinate against cholera by Ferran in Spain, there is still no truly effective cholera vaccine. A bacterial fraction vaccine, referred to as CH1 +2 was prepared by Professor A. Dodin. A field trial of this vaccine was carried out in Zaire in 1983. Significant protection was observed but this vaccine was not evaluated in additional trials. Two other oral cholera vaccines, developed in Sweden and in the USA, were widely experimented on human beings: a combination of cholera toxin B-subunit and inactivated bacterial cells, and a live attenuated vaccine containing the genetically manipulated Vibrio cholerae O1 strain CVD 103-HgR. Despite their efficiency as evaluated in field trials (inactivated vaccine) or on volunteers (live vaccine), these vaccines have drawbacks that may limit their usefulness as practical vaccines. Protection induced by the inactivated vaccine was transient in young children, lasting only approximately for six months. One of the safety concerns associated with live vaccines is a possible reversion to virulence. Efforts should be continued to find a better cholera vaccine. A new vaccine development program based upon the hypothesis that immunoglobulin G directed to the O-specific polysaccharide of Vibrio cholerae O1 could confer protective immunity to cholera. This program may lead to the development of a cholera conjugate vaccine to elicit protection in infants. PMID:10078377

  6. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Increases High-Risk Sexual Behaviors: A Myth or Valid Concern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasiripong, Nop T.

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the first human pappilomavirus (HPV) vaccine was approved for females aged 9 to 26. However, the national HPV vaccination rate among young women has been low. Public concerns were raised in regard to the fact that HPV vaccination might encourage unsafe sex. This cross-sectional study examined the differences in sexual practices between…

  7. Replicating vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early work on fish immunology and disease resistance demonstrated fish (like animals and humans) that survived infection were typically resistant to re-infection with the same pathogen. The concepts of resistance upon reinfection lead to the research and development of replicating (live) vaccines in...

  8. AIDS Vaccines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Thomas J.; Bolognesi, Dani P.

    1988-01-01

    Reveals that success of discovering vaccines is far from being assured although several candidates are being tested. States that the devious nature of the virus, the lack of a good animal model for the disease, and the difficulties of clinical trials inhibit the efforts of researchers. (RT)

  9. Vexing Vaccines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    Schools play a key role in ensuring that children are being immunized against diseases, but conflicting research is making enforcement difficult. This article discusses a growing trend of vaccine avoidance and the endless supply of conflicting information and research about immunization safety. Despite the controversy, many people appear to accept…

  10. Valuing vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E.; Cafiero-Fonseca, Elizabeth T.; O’Brien, Jennifer Carroll

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination has led to remarkable health gains over the last century. However, large coverage gaps remain, which will require significant financial resources and political will to address. In recent years, a compelling line of inquiry has established the economic benefits of health, at both the individual and aggregate levels. Most existing economic evaluations of particular health interventions fail to account for this new research, leading to potentially sizable undervaluation of those interventions. In line with this new research, we set forth a framework for conceptualizing the full benefits of vaccination, including avoided medical care costs, outcome-related productivity gains, behavior-related productivity gains, community health externalities, community economic externalities, and the value of risk reduction and pure health gains. We also review literature highlighting the magnitude of these sources of benefit for different vaccinations. Finally, we outline the steps that need to be taken to implement a broad-approach economic evaluation and discuss the implications of this work for research, policy, and resource allocation for vaccine development and delivery. PMID:25136129

  11. Polio Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of polio vaccination in the U.S. and other countries has sparked a world-wide effort to eliminate polio.Today: Polio has ... person infected with polio virus coming from another country to bring the disease ... the disease from the world is successful, some day we won't need ...

  12. Protein carriers of conjugate vaccines: characteristics, development, and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-12-01

    The immunogenicity of polysaccharides as human vaccines was enhanced by coupling to protein carriers. Conjugation transformed the T cell-independent polysaccharide vaccines of the past to T cell-dependent antigenic vaccines that were much more immunogenic and launched a renaissance in vaccinology. This review discusses the conjugate vaccines for prevention of infections caused by Hemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis. Specifically, the characteristics of the proteins used in the construction of the vaccines including CRM, tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid, Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane complex, and Hemophilus influenzae protein D are discussed. The studies that established differences among and key features of conjugate vaccines including immunologic memory induction, reduction of nasopharyngeal colonization and herd immunity, and antibody avidity and avidity maturation are presented. Studies of dose, schedule, response to boosters, of single protein carriers with single and multiple polysaccharides, of multiple protein carriers with multiple polysaccharides and conjugate vaccines administered concurrently with other vaccines are discussed along with undesirable consequences of conjugate vaccines. The clear benefits of conjugate vaccines in improving the protective responses of the immature immune systems of young infants and the senescent immune systems of the elderly have been made clear and opened the way to development of additional vaccines using this technology for future vaccine products. PMID:23955057

  13. Detection of lymphoid leukosis tumors in white leghorn chickens of line ALV6 that is resistant to subgroups A and E avian leukosis virus and maintained under specific pathogen-free conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chickens from Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory (ADOL) line alv6 that is known to be resistant to infection with subgroups A and E avian leukosis virus (ALV) were vaccinated at hatch with a Marek’s disease (MD) vaccine containing serotypes 1, 2 and 3 MD viruses, and were maintained under specifi...

  14. A comparative evaluation of the protective efficacy of rMd5-delta-Meq and CV1988/Rispens against a vv+ strain of Marek's disease virus infection in a series of recombinant congenic strains of white leghorn chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens caused by a highly infectious, oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus known as Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MD is presently controlled by vaccination. Current MD vaccines include attenuated serotype 1 strains (e.g. CVI988/Rispens), avir...

  15. Immunity to viruses: learning from successful human vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pulendran, Bali; Oh, Jason Z.; Nakaya, Helder; Ravindran, Rajesh; Kazmin, Dmitri A.

    2013-01-01

    For more than a century immunologists and vaccinologists have existed in parallel universes. Immunologists have for long reveled in using “model antigens,” such as chicken egg ovalbumin or nitrophenyl haptens to study immune responses in model organisms such as mice. Such studies have yielded many seminal insights about the mechanisms of immune regulation, but their relevance to humans has been questioned. In another universe, vaccinologists have relied on human clinical trials to assess vaccine efficacy, but have done little to take advantage of such trials for studying the nature of immune responses to vaccination. The human model provides a nexus between these two universes, and recent studies have begun to use this model to study the molecular profile of innate and adaptive responses to vaccination. Such “systems vaccinology” studies are beginning to provide mechanistic insights about innate and adaptive immunity in humans. Here we present an overview of such studies, with particular examples from studies with the yellow fever and the seasonal influenza vaccines. Vaccination with the yellow fever vaccine causes a systemic acute viral infection and thus provides an attractive model to study innate and adaptive responses to a primary viral challenge. Vaccination with the live attenuated influenza vaccine causes a localized acute viral infection in mucosal tissues, and induces a recall response since most vaccinees have had prior exposure to influenza, and thus provides a unique opportunity to study innate and antigen-specific memory responses in mucosal tissues and in the blood. Vaccination with the inactivated influenza vaccine offers a model to study immune responses to an inactivated immunogen. Studies with these and other vaccines are beginning to reunite the estranged fields of immunology and vaccinology, and yielding unexpected insights about mechanisms of viral immunity. Therefore, vaccines that have been proven to be of immense benefit in saving lives offer us a new fringe benefit: lessons in viral immunology. PMID:23947360

  16. Fish Vaccines in Aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccination is a proven, cost-effective method to prevent infectious diseases in animals. Current fish vaccines can be categorized as killed fish vaccines or modified live vaccines. The major advantage of live vaccine is their ability to stimulate both cell-mediated and humoral immune responses for ...

  17. [Susceptibility of birds other than chickens to infectious laryngotracheitis].

    PubMed

    Hilbink, F W

    1985-06-01

    Susceptibility to infectious laryngotracheitis virus was studied in peafowl (Pavo cristatus), various species of pheasant (Phasianus colchicus, Lophura swinhoeii, Lophophorus impejanus), guinea-fowl (Numida meleagris), canaries (Serinus canaria), budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnic japonica). Apart from clinical observations, experiments were evaluated in terms of histopathology, immunofluorescence, serology and recovery of virus. Only peafowl and pheasants were found to be susceptible, pheasants responding more strongly than chickens to ocular vaccination and intratracheal inoculation. The other species were found to be refractory. PMID:2990066

  18. VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT MMR Vaccine(Measles, Mumps,

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT MMR Vaccine(Measles, Mumps, & Rubella) What You Need to Know Many Vaccine Information get vaccinated? Measles, mumps, and rubella are serious diseases. Before vaccines they were very

  19. Whooping cough, twenty years from acellular vaccines introduction.

    PubMed

    Greco, D; Esposito, S; Tozzi, A; Pandolfi, E; Icardi, G; Giammanco, A

    2015-01-01

    Clinical pertussis resulting from infection with B. pertussis is a significant medical and public health problem, despite the huge success of vaccination that has greatly reduced its incidence. The whole cell vaccine had an undeniable success over the last 50 years, but its acceptance was strongly inhibited by fear, only partially justified, of severe side effects, but also, in the Western world, by the difficulty to enter in combination with other vaccines: today multi-vaccine formulations are essential to maintain a high vaccination coverage. The advent of acellular vaccines was greeted with enthusiasm by the public health world: in the Nineties, several controlled vaccine trials were carried out: they demonstrated a high safety and good efficacy of new vaccines. In fact, in the Western world, the acellular vaccines completely replaced the whole cells ones. In the last years, ample evidence on the variety of protection of these vaccines linked to the presence of different antigens of Bordetella pertussis was collected. It also became clear that the protection provided, on average around 80%, leaves every year a significant cohort of vaccinated susceptible even in countries with a vaccination coverage of 95%, such as Italy. Finally, it was shown that, as for the pertussis disease, protection decreases over time, to leave a proportion of adolescents and adults unprotected. Waiting for improved pertussis vaccines, the disease control today requires a different strategy that includes a booster at 5 years for infants, but also boosters for teenagers and young adults, re-vaccination of health care personnel, and possibly of pregnant women and of those who are in contact with infants (cocooning). Finally, the quest for better vaccines inevitably tends towards pertussis acellular vaccines with at least three components, which have demonstrated superior effectiveness and have been largely in use in Italy for fifteen years. PMID:26051141

  20. Determination of efficacious vaccine seed strains for use against Egyptian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses through antigenic cartography and in vivo challenge studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 2006, there have been reported outbreaks of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in vaccinated chickens in Africa and Asia. This study provides experimental data for selection of efficacious H5N1 vaccine seed strains against recently circulating strains of H5N1 HPAI viruses in Egypt....

  1. Salmonella vaccines in poultry: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Desin, Taseen S; Köster, Wolfgang; Potter, Andrew A

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella species are important zoonotic pathogens that cause gastrointestinal disease in humans and animals. Poultry products contaminated with these pathogens are one of the major sources of human Salmonella infections. Vaccination of chickens, along with other intervention measures, is an important strategy that is currently being used to reduce the levels of Salmonella in poultry flocks, which will ultimately lead to lower rates of human Salmonella infections. However, despite numerous studies that have been performed, there is still a need for safer, well-defined Salmonella vaccines. This review examines the different classes of Salmonella vaccines that have been tested, highlighting the merits and problems of each, and provides an insight into the future of Salmonella vaccines and the platforms that can be used for delivery. PMID:23256741

  2. Immune interference after sequential alphavirus vaccine vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Phillip R; Liu, Ching-Tong; Cannon, Timothy L; Mangiafico, Joseph A; Gibbs, Paul H

    2009-08-01

    We compared the effect of order of administration of investigational alphavirus vaccines on neutralizing antibody response. Volunteers who received the inactivated eastern and western equine encephalitis (EEE and WEE) vaccines before live attenuated Venezuelan (VEE) vaccine had significantly lower rates of antibody response than those receiving VEE vaccine before EEE and WEE vaccines (66.7% vs. 80.6%; p=0.026). The odds of having a VEE antibody non-response among those initially receiving EEE and WEE vaccines, adjusted for gender, were significant (odds ratio [OR]=2.20; 95% CI=1.2-4.1 [p=0.0145]) as were the odds of non-response among females adjusted for group (OR=1.81; 95% CI=1.2-2.7 [p=0.0037]). Antibody interference and gender effect have major implications for vaccine strategy among those receiving multiple alphavirus vaccines and those developing next generation vaccines for these threats. PMID:19576665

  3. Who Needs Chickenpox Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vaccines and Immunizations Share Compartir Who Needs Chickenpox Vaccine For Public Children under age 13 years should ... who have never had chickenpox or received chickenpox vaccine should get two doses, at least 28 days ...

  4. Your Baby's First Vaccines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Barcodes Related Link Vaccines & Immunizations Your Child's First Vaccines Format: Select one PDF [338 KB] RTF [260 ... child will get one or more of these vaccines today: DTaP Hib Hepatitis B Polio PCV13 Why ...

  5. Vaccines Stop Illness

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  6. Vaccinations and HIV

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Do not measure your viral load within 4 weeks of any vaccination. Flu shots have been studied ... live” vaccination in the past 2 or 3 weeks. Still, the “MMR” vaccine against measles, mumps and ...

  7. Vaccines and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    Vaccines and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having ... advice from your health care provider. What are vaccines? Vaccines are given to help protect you from ...

  8. Novel Vaccine Adjuvants

    E-print Network

    Agrawal, Anshu; Owais, Mohammad; Singh, Udai P

    2013-01-01

    vaccines that nonspecifically stim- ulate the immune system,immune system cells, to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccines.vaccine may require a combination of adjuvants which can activate different parts of the immune system.

  9. Diphtheria Vaccination: Who Needs It?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC.gov . Vaccines and Immunizations Share Compartir Diphtheria Vaccination: Who Needs It? On this Page Vaccine Who ... Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) See also: Healthcare Personnel Vaccination Recommendations [1 page] July 2008 Top of Page ...

  10. Evaluation of the Salmonella enterica Serovar Pullorum Pathogenicity Island 2 Mutant as a Candidate Live Attenuated Oral Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yin, Junlei; Cheng, Zhao; Wang, Xiaochun; Xu, Lijuan; Li, Qiuchun; Geng, Shizhong; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum (S. Pullorum) is a highly adapted pathogen that causes pullorum disease (PD), an important systemic disease of poultry that causes severe economic losses in developing countries. In the interests of developing a safe and immunogenic oral vaccine, the efficacy of a Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2)-deleted mutant of S. Pullorum (S06004?SPI2) was evaluated in chickens. S06004?SPI2 was severely less virulent than the parental wild-type strain S06004 as determined by the 50% lethal dose (LD50) for 3-day-old chickens when injected intramuscularly. Two-day-old chickens immunized with a single oral dose of S06004?SPI2 showed no differences in body weight or clinical symptoms compared with those in the negative-control group. S06004?SPI2 bacteria were not isolated from livers or spleens of immunized chickens after a short period of time, and specific humoral and cellular immune responses were significantly induced. Immunized chickens were challenged with S. Pullorum strain S06004 and Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (S. Gallinarum) strain SG9 at 10 days postimmunization (dpi), and efficient protection against the challenges was observed. None of the immunized chickens died, the clinical symptoms were slight and temporary following challenge in immunized chickens compared with those in the control group, and these chickens recovered by 3 to 5 dpi. Overall, these results demonstrate that S06004?SPI2 can be used as a live attenuated oral vaccine. PMID:25924763

  11. Engineered human vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. . Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  12. Seasonal split influenza vaccine induced IgE sensitization against influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo; Kumagai, Takuji; Nishimura, Naoko; Ozaki, Takao; Okafuji, Teruo; Suzuki, Eitaro; Miyata, Akiko; Okada, Kenji; Ihara, Toshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Although anaphylaxis is an extremely rare vaccine-associated adverse event, it occurred in young children following administration of the 2011/12 seasonal split influenza vaccine, which contained 2-phenoxyethanol as the preservative. These children had high levels of IgE antibodies against influenza vaccine components. We herein investigated why these children were sensitized. One hundred and seventeen series of serum samples were obtained immediately before, and one month after the first and second immunizations with the HA split vaccine of 2011/12. Forty-two sequential serum samples were collected in the acute and convalescent phases (2 and 4 weeks) after natural infection with H1N1 Pdm in 2009. IgE antibodies developed following the vaccination of young children with seasonal split vaccines, whereas no significant IgE response was observed following natural infection with H1N1 Pdm 2009. The prevalence of IgE antibodies was not influenced by outbreaks of H1N1 Pdm. Repeated immunization with the HA split vaccine induced IgE sensitization against the influenza vaccine irrespective of the H1N1, H3N2, or B influenza subtypes. The reasons why anaphylaxis only occurred in recipients of the influenza vaccine containing 2-phenoxyethanol are still being investigated, and the size distribution of antigen particles may have shifted to a slightly larger size. Since the fundamental reason was IgE sensitization, current split formulation for the seasonal influenza vaccine needs to be reconsidered to prevent the induction of IgE sensitization. PMID:26188254

  13. [Poliovirus vaccine].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2012-06-01

    To avoid the risk of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) and polio outbreaks due to circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses, an inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) was introduced for routine immunization in a number of countries with a low risk of polio outbreaks. Currently, production and marketing of a standalone conventional IPV and two diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus-IPV (Sabin-derived IPV; sIPV) products have been submitted, and it is expected that the IPV products will be introduced in Japan in the autumn of 2012. At the same time, a decline in the OPV immunization rate became apparent in Japan due to serious public concerns about a remaining risk of VAPP and introduction of IPV in the near future. Therefore, the recent development of polio immunity gaps should be carefully monitored, and surveillance of suspected polio cases and laboratory diagnosis of polioviruses have to be intensified for the transition period from OPV to IPV in Japan. The development of sIPV is one of the most realistic options to introduce affordable IPV to developing countries. In this regard, further clinical studies on its efficacy, safety, and interchangeability of sIPV will be needed after the introduction of the sIPV products, which will be licensed in Japan for the first time in the world. PMID:23189825

  14. Full genome sequences of two reticuloendotheliosis viruses contaminating commercial vaccines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qinfang; Zhao, Jixun; Su, Jingliang; Pu, Juan; Zhang, Guozhong; Liu, Jinhua

    2009-09-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) fragments are a common contaminant in some commercial vaccines such as fowl poxvirus (FPV) and Marek's disease virus. However, only those strains integrating or containing a near-intact REV provirus are more likely to cause problems in the field. We confirm here, by PCR assays and animal experiments, that vaccines against FPV and herpes virus of turkeys were contaminated with full genome sequences of REV. Further, we determined the complete proviral sequence of two REV isolates from contaminated vaccines. Two REV isolates (REV-99 and REV-06) present in the vaccines were both replication competent, and their proviral genome was 8286 nucleotides in length with two identical long terminal repeats (LTR). The complete genome in these two REV isolates shared 99.8% identity to APC-566 and fowl poxvirus REV proviral inserts (FPV-REV). REV-99 and REV-06 LTR showed over 99% identity to chicken syncytial virus (CSV), but an identity of only 75.8% and 78.0%, respectively, to SNV. Alignments with other available REV gag, pol, and env sequences revealed high similarity at the nucleotide level. The results further indicated that the prototype CSV may be the most-important REV contaminant in the commercial vaccines, and distinct genotypes of REVs may cocirculate in chicken flocks of China at the present time. PMID:19848070

  15. Vaccines for Farrowing Operations 

    E-print Network

    Lawhorn, D. Bruce

    1999-02-15

    Routine vaccination is necessary to control economically important swine diseases such as erysipelas, leptospirosis, parvovirus and colibacillosis. The symptoms and specific vaccines for these diseases are discussed....

  16. Progress and hurdles in the development of influenza virus-like particle vaccines for veterinary use

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs), which resemble infectious virus particles in structure and morphology, have been proposed to provide a new generation of vaccine candidates against various viral infections. As effective immunogens, characterized by high immunogenicity and safety, VLPs have been employed in the development of human influenza vaccines. Recently, several influenza VLP vaccines have been developed for veterinary use and successfully evaluated in swine, canine, duck, and chicken models. These VLP vaccine candidates induced protective immune responses and enabled serological differentiation between vaccinated and infected animals in conjunction with a diagnostic test. Here, we review the current progress of influenza VLP development as a next-generation vaccine technology in the veterinary field and discuss the challenges and future direction of this technology. PMID:25003086

  17. HPV Vaccine Effective at Multiple Anatomic Sites

    Cancer.gov

    A new study from NCI researchers finds that the HPV vaccine protects young women from infection with high-risk HPV types at the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed at l

  18. [Preventing papillomavirus infectious and herpes zoster: new vaccines].

    PubMed

    Silbermann, Benjamin; Launay, Odile

    2007-04-01

    Two new vaccines have been recently licensed : a quadrivalent vaccine against Human papillomavirus infections (HPV) 6, 11, 16 and 18, recommended to children from 9 years old and to young adults under the age of 26 years, and a vaccine against herpes zoster for adults from 60 years old onwards. A bivalent vaccine against HPV 16 and 18 will be shortly available. HPV vaccines are composed of the L1 structural proteins of 2 or 4 HPV genotypes, produced by genetic engineering and self-assembled. These inert vaccines are devoid of genetic materials and mimic the viral particle (virus-like particle, VLP). They allow, as suggested by the 4.5 to 5 years follow-up, to prevent HPV infections and the onset of pre-cancerous lesions associated with genotypes contained within the vaccine. They represent a major overhang in the vaccinology field, and, as anti-hepatitis B vaccine, will probably be effective in cancer prevention. Their use must be associated with the continued detection of cervix cancer by smears and also with the prevention of other sexually transmitted diseases. The herpes zoster vaccine is a living attenuated vaccine produced from the OKA/Merck strain already used in the vaccine against varicella. Its safety is good among persons 50 years old and over and its efficiency on lowering herpes zoster incidence, on the burden of illness and on post-herpetic neuralgia has been demonstrated in persons over 60 years old. PMID:17433234

  19. The challenges of RSV vaccines. Where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Fretzayas, Andrew; Moustaki, Maria

    2010-06-01

    The most realistic way to control RSV infection would be the development of an effective and safe vaccine. A formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine was evaluated in infants and children in the 1960's which disappointingly was linked with aggravation of RSV disease following the natural infection. Two candidate vaccines with purified protein F, have been tested, in humans and have been considered safe and somewhat immunogenic in seropositive persons providing different levels of protection against RSV re-infection. Live attenuated RSV vaccines induce local and systemic immunity without producing enhanced disease upon exposure of the vaccinee to the wild virus. Plasmid DNA vaccines were also evaluated in mice and elicited balanced systemic and pulmonary Th1/Th2 response without inducing an atypical pulmonary inflammatory reaction following the RSV challenge in cotton rats. Gene gun vaccination, a method to overcome the problem of DNA quantity, has been associated with a Th-2 biased response. Recent patents, such as plant vaccines, combined vaccines, attempted to invent new techniques for the generation of safe and effective vaccines. The new RSV vaccines should overcome many obstacles before being established as effective vaccines for the control of RSV infections especially for the young infants who are more susceptible to the virus. PMID:20156180

  20. [Vaccination against Newcastle disease with variants and differentiation between post-vaccinal and post-infectious antibodies].

    PubMed

    Jestin, V; Cherbonnel, M; Bennejan, G

    1991-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibody (anti-HN Mab 3115) resistant variants of the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) La Sota strain, were selected (a25, b23, a16); once cloned and shown by haemagglutination inhibition, ELISA and Western blot, not to bind to Mab 3115 they were used as experimental vaccines for chicken. The intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI) of a25 and b23 variants was low (0.2 and 0.0 respectively). Three to 4 weeks post-administration of alive variants or inactivated b23, respectively administered via eye drop and subcutaneously, the protection against a challenge was not different from that following La Sota vaccination. Antibody titers induced by a25 and b23, as measured by 2 ELISA blocking tests (the first employing a NDV specific Mab 2114, the second employing Mab 3115), were significantly lower (P less than 0.001) than post-challenge antibody titers. On the contrary, the difference between post-La Sota vaccination antibodies and post challenge antibodies was weak (P less than 0.02). Following 3 successive exposures by contact of chickens to live b23 variant, no variation in antibody titers was observed as measured by ELISA employing Mab 3115. This constituted a necessary criterion, but insufficient to test the stability of the b23 variant. At the same time, the latter exhibited poor ability to diffuse. Vaccination with these variants should be considered in differentiating post-vaccinal from post-infectious antibodies. PMID:2042904

  1. A review of clinical trials of human papillomavirus prophylactic vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schiller, John T; Castellsagué, Xavier; Garland, Suzanne M

    2012-11-20

    End of study analyses of the phase III trials of prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines in young women are now largely completed. Two distinct vaccines were evaluated, Gardasil(®) (Merck & Co., Whitehouse Station, NJ USA) a quadrivalent vaccine containing VLPs of types 6, 11, 16 and 18 and Cervarix(®) (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Rixensart, Belgium), a bivalent vaccine containing VLPs of types 16 and 18. Both vaccines exhibited excellent safety and immunogenicity profiles. The vaccines also demonstrated remarkably high and similar efficacy against the vaccine-targeted types for a range of cervical endpoints from persistent infection to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3) in women naïve to the corresponding type at the time of vaccination. However, protection from incident infection or disease from non-vaccine types was restricted, and the vaccines had no effect on prevalent infection or disease. Gardasil(®) also demonstrated strong protection against genital warts and vulvar/vaginal neoplasia associated with the vaccine types. In other trials, Gardasil(®) protected mid-adult women from incident infection and CIN caused by the vaccine types and protected men for incident infection, genital warts and anal intraepithelial neoplasia by the vaccine types. Cervarix(®) protected against vaccine-targeted anal infections in women in an end of study evaluation. For practical reasons, efficacy studies have not been conducted in the primary target populations of current vaccination programs, adolescent girls and boys. However, immunogenicity bridging studies demonstrating excellent safety and strong immune responses in adolescence, coupled with the documentation of durable antibody responses and protection in young adults, leads to an optimistic projection of the effectiveness of the vaccines in adolescent vaccination programs. Taken together, the excellent clinical trial results strongly support the potential of the vaccines as high value public health interventions and justify their widespread implementation to prevent anogenital HPV infections and their associated neoplasia. This article forms part of a special supplement entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012. PMID:23199956

  2. Characterization of reticuloendotheliosis virus isolates obtained from chickens, turkeys and prairie chickens in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) isolates obtained from chickens, turkeys and prairie chickens in the United States were characterized using ploymerase chain reaction (PCR) and indirect immunofluoresence (IFA) assays. This study included five REV isolates from Prairie chickens in Texas, two ...

  3. Oral and parenteral immunization of chickens (Gallus gallus) against West Nile virus with recombinant envelope protein

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fassbinder-Orth, C. A.; Hofmeister, E.K.; Weeks-Levy, C.; Karasov, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes morbidity and mortality in humans, horses, and in more than 315 bird species in North America. Currently approved WNV vaccines are designed for parenteral administration and, as yet, no effective oral WNV vaccines have been developed. WNV envelope (E) protein is a highly antigenic protein that elicits the majority of virus-neutralizing antibodies during a WNV immune response. Leghorn chickens were given three vaccinations (each 2 wk apart) of E protein orally (20 ??g or 100 ??g/dose), of E protein intramuscularly (IM, 20 ??g/dose), or of adjuvant only (control group) followed by a WNV challenge. Viremias were measured post-WNV infection, and three new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were developed for quantifying IgM, IgY, and IgA-mediated immune response of birds following WNV infection. WNV viremia levels were significantly lower in the IM group than in both oral groups and the control group. Total WNV E protein-specific IgY production was significantly greater, and WNV nonstructural 1-specific IgY was significantly less, in the IM group compared to all other treatment groups. The results of this study indicate that IM vaccination of chickens with E protein is protective against WNV infection and results in a significantly different antibody production profile as compared to both orally vaccinated and nonvaccinated birds. ?? 2009 American Association of Avian Pathologists.

  4. Husbandry and trade of indigenous chickens in Myanmar--results of a participatory rural appraisal in the Yangon and the Mandalay divisions.

    PubMed

    Henning, J; Khin, A; Hla, T; Meers, J

    2006-01-01

    There is a variety of professions working with village chickens in developing countries, including farmers, veterinarians and chicken traders. People from all these occupations were involved in a participatory rural appraisal to investigate husbandry practices and trade of village chickens in Myanmar. Data were collected in two climatically different regions of the country, in the Yangon and in the Mandalay divisions. The breeding and training of fighting cocks was practised only in the Mandalay division, with well-trained birds sold for very high prices. Apart from this, chickens were raised in both regions mainly for small disposable income and were generally sold when money was needed, in particular during religious festivals. Chicken traders on bicycles, often called 'middle men', usually purchase birds from farmers in about 10 villages per day. Several 'middle men' supply birds to wealthier chicken merchants, who sell these birds at larger chicken markets. There is in general limited knowledge among farmers about the prevention of Newcastle disease via vaccination. Commercial indigenous chicken production is practised in Myanmar, but family poultry farming dominates indigenous chicken production in the country. PMID:17265778

  5. Indirect cohort analysis of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine effectiveness against vaccine-type and vaccine-related invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; Domingues, Carla Magda A Santos; Moraes, José Cassio de

    2015-11-17

    We applied the indirect cohort method to estimate effectiveness of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) among young children in Brazil. Cases of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), i.e., Streptococcus pneumoniae, detected in normally sterile fluid identified through laboratory-based surveillance and previously enrolled in a matched case-control effectiveness study are included. We estimated PCV10 effectiveness using multivariable logistic regression comparing PCV10 vaccination among children with vaccine-type or vaccine-related IPD vs. children with non-vaccine-type disease. The adjusted effectiveness of ?1 doses against vaccine-type (72.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] [44.1, 86.7]) and vaccine-related (61.3%, 95%CI [14.5, 82.5]) IPD were similar to the effectiveness observed in the original case-control study (which required enrollment >1200 controls). We also found significant protection of ?1 dose against individual vaccine serotypes (14, 6B, 23F, 18C) and against vaccine-related serotype 19A. The indirect cohort methods leverages existing surveillance is a feasible approach for evaluating pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, particularly in resource-limited settings. PMID:26469718

  6. Developing vaccines for an aging population.

    PubMed

    Black, Steven; De Gregorio, Ennio; Rappuoli, Rino

    2015-04-01

    The demographics of the world's population are changing, with many adults now surviving into their 80s. With this change comes the need to protect the aging and other underserved populations not only against infectious diseases but also against cancer and other chronic conditions. New technologies derived from recent advances in the fields of immunology, structural biology, synthetic biology, and genomics have brought a revolution in the vaccine field. Among them, vaccine adjuvants have the potential to harness the immune system to provide protection against new types of diseases, improve protection in young children, and expand this protection to adults and the elderly. However, in order to do so we need also to overcome the nontechnical challenges that could limit the implementation of innovative vaccines, including controversies regarding the safety of adjuvants, increasing regulatory complexity, the inadequate methods used to assess the value of novel vaccines, and the resulting industry alienation from future investment. This Perspective summarizes the outcome of a recent multidisciplinary symposium entitled "Enhancing Vaccine Immunity and Value," held in Siena, Italy, in July 2014, that addressed two related questions: how to improve vaccine efficacy by using breakthrough technologies and how to capture the full potential of novel vaccines. PMID:25834107

  7. Production of adenovirus vectors and their use as a delivery system for influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Sai V.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2010-01-01

    IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD With the emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses that have crossed species barriers and are responsible for lethal infections in humans in many countries, there is an urgent need for the development of effective vaccines which can be produced in large quantities at a short notice and confer broad protection against these H5N1 variants. In order to meet the potential global vaccine demand in a pandemic scenario, new vaccine-production strategies must be explored in addition to the currently used egg-based technology for seasonal influenza. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW Adenovirus (Ad) based influenza vaccines represent an attractive alternative/supplement to the currently licensed egg-based influenza vaccines. Ad-based vaccines are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, and their production process does not require either chicken eggs or labor intensive and time-consuming processes necessitating enhanced biosafety facilities. Most importantly, in a pandemic situation, this vaccine strategy could offer a stockpiling option to reduce the response time before a strain-matched vaccine could be developed. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN This review discusses Ad-vector technology and the current progress in the development of Ad-based influenza vaccines. TAKE HOME MESSAGE Ad vector-based influenza vaccines for pandemic preparedness are under development to meet the global vaccine demand. PMID:20822477

  8. Human papillomavirus vaccine introduction--the first five years.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Lauri E; Tsu, Vivien; Deeks, Shelley L; Cubie, Heather; Wang, Susan A; Vicari, Andrea S; Brotherton, Julia M L

    2012-11-20

    The availability of prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines has provided powerful tools for primary prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-associated diseases. Since 2006, the quadrivalent and bivalent vaccines have each been licensed in over 100 countries. By the beginning of 2012, HPV vaccine had been introduced into national immunization programs in at least 40 countries. Australia, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Canada were among the first countries to introduce HPV vaccination. In Europe, the number of countries having introduced vaccine increased from 3 in 2007 to 22 at the beginning of 2012. While all country programs target young adolescent girls, specific target age groups vary as do catch-up recommendations. Different health care systems and infrastructure have resulted in varied implementation strategies, with some countries delivering vaccine in schools and others through health centers or primary care providers. Within the first 5 years after vaccines became available, few low- or middle-income countries had introduced HPV vaccine. The main reason was budgetary constraints due to the high vaccine cost. Bhutan and Rwanda implemented national immunization after receiving vaccine through donation programs in 2010 and 2011, respectively. The GAVI Alliance decision in 2011 to support HPV vaccination should increase implementation in low-income countries. Evaluation of vaccination programs includes monitoring of coverage, safety, and impact. Vaccine safety monitoring is part of routine activities in many countries. Safety evaluations are important and communication about vaccine safety is critical, as events temporally associated with vaccination can be falsely attributed to vaccination. Anti-vaccination efforts, in part related to concerns about safety, have been mounted in several countries. In the 5 years since HPV vaccines were licensed, there have been successes as well as challenges with vaccine introduction and implementation. Further progress is anticipated in the coming years, especially in low- and middle-income countries where the need for vaccine is greatest. This article forms part of a special supplement entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012. PMID:23199957

  9. The influence of phytoncides on the immune system of broiler chickens and turkeys

    PubMed Central

    ?mia?ek, Marcin; Tyka?owski, Bart?omiej; Pestka, Daria; Stenzel, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of adiSalmoSOL PF dietary supplement, given for 3 days in drinking water, on selected parameters of cell-mediated (Experiment I) and humoral (Experiment II) immunity in chicken and turkey broilers. In Experiment I, birds were randomly divided into two groups of 10 birds each. Group 1 comprised control turkeys or chickens, whereas group 2 birds were administered adiSalmoSOLPF. In Experiment II, a total of 69 chickens were divided into three groups (1-3) of 23 birds each. At the age of 25 days, group 1 was given adiSalmoSOLPF. Birds from groups 1-3 were vaccinated at 28 days of age. Group 2 was given adiSalmoSOLPF after vaccination. In Experiment I, a significant increase in percentages of CD4 + T lymphocytes in the bursa of Fabricius, cecal tonsils and spleen, CD8 + T lymphocytes in the thymus and spleen, CD4 + CD8 + T lymphocytes in the bursa of Fabricius and ileal mucosa and IgM + B lymphocyte in the ileal mucosa were observed in group 2 chickens. In Experiment I, a significant increase in percentages of CD4 + T lymphocytes in the thymus and spleen, CD8+ T lymphocytes in the cecal tonsils and blood, and CD4 + CD8 + T lymphocytes in the thymus and ileal mucosa was recorded in group 2 turkeys. No differences in percentages of IgM + B lymphocytes were observed between turkey groups. In Experiment II, the highest post-vaccination titers of anti-IB antibodies were observed in group 2, but it was not statistically significant. The results of our study indicate that adiSalmoSOLPF showed immunomodulatory activity in chickens and turkeys. PMID:26648771

  10. Characteristics of Nasal-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (NALT) and Nasal Absorption Capacity in Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Haihong; Yan, Mengfei; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    As the main mucosal immune inductive site of nasal cavity, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) plays an important role in both antigen recognition and immune activation after intranasal immunization. However, the efficiency of intranasal vaccines is commonly restricted by the insufficient intake of antigen by the nasal mucosa, resulting from the nasal mucosal barrier and the nasal mucociliary clearance. The distribution of NALT and the characteristic of nasal cavity have already been described in humans and many laboratory rodents, while data about poultry are scarce. For this purpose, histological sections of the chicken nasal cavities were used to examine the anatomical structure and histological characteristics of nasal cavity. Besides, the absorptive capacity of chicken nasal mucosa was also studied using the materials with different particle size. Results showed that the NALT of chicken was located on the bottom of nasal septum and both sides of choanal cleft, which mainly consisted of second lymphoid follicle. A large number of lymphocytes were distributed under the mucosal epithelium of inferior nasal meatus. In addition, there were also diffuse lymphoid tissues located under the epithelium of the concha nasalis media and the walls of nasal cavity. The results of absorption experiment showed that the chicken nasal mucosa was capable to absorb trypan blue, OVA, and fluorescent latex particles. Inactivated avian influenza virus (IAIV) could be taken up by chicken nasal mucosa except for the stratified squamous epithelium sites located on the forepart of nasal cavity. The intake of IAIV by NALT was greater than that of the nasal mucosa covering on non-lymphoid tissue, which could be further enhanced after intranasal inoculation combined with sodium cholate or CpG DNA. The study on NALT and nasal absorptive capacity will be benefit for further understanding of immune mechanisms after nasal vaccination and development of nasal vaccines for poultry. PMID:24391892

  11. Avian influenza vaccines and vaccination for poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines against avian influenza (AI) have had more limited use in poultry than vaccines against other poultry diseases such as Newcastle disease (ND) and infectious bronchitis, and have been used more commonly in the developing world. Over the past 40 years, AI vaccines have been primarily based o...

  12. Proof of principle for epitope-focused vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Bruno E.; Bates, John T.; Loomis, Rebecca J.; Baneyx, Gretchen; Carrico, Christopher; Jardine, Joseph G.; Rupert, Peter; Correnti, Colin; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Vittal, Vinayak; Connell, Mary J.; Stevens, Eric; Schroeter, Alexandria; Chen, Man; MacPherson, Skye; Serra, Andreia M.; Adachi, Yumiko; Holmes, Margaret A.; Li, Yuxing; Klevit, Rachel E.; Graham, Barney S.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Crowe, James E.; Johnson, Philip R.; Schief, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vaccines prevent infectious disease largely by inducing protective neutralizing antibodies against vulnerable epitopes. Multiple major pathogens have resisted traditional vaccine development, although vulnerable epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies have been identified for several such cases. Hence, new vaccine design methods to induce epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies are needed. Here we show, with a neutralization epitope from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), that computational protein design can generate small, thermally and conformationally stable protein scaffolds that accurately mimic the viral epitope structure and induce potent neutralizing antibodies. These scaffolds represent promising leads for research and development of a human RSV vaccine needed to protect infants, young children and the elderly. More generally, the results provide proof of principle for epitope-focused and scaffold-based vaccine design, and encourage the evaluation and further development of these strategies for a variety of other vaccine targets including antigenically highly variable pathogens such as HIV and influenza. PMID:24499818

  13. Epidemiological consequences of an ineffective Bordetella pertussis vaccine

    E-print Network

    Althouse, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    The recent increase in Bordetella pertussis incidence (whooping cough) presents a challenge to global health. Recent studies have called into question the effectiveness of acellular B. pertussis vaccination in reducing transmission. Here we examine the epidemiological consequences of an ineffective B. pertussis vaccine. Using a dynamic transmission model, we find that: 1) an ineffective vaccine can account for the observed increase in B. pertussis incidence; 2) asymptomatic infections can bias surveillance and upset situational awareness of B. pertussis; and 3) vaccinating individuals in close contact with infants too young to receive vaccine (so called "cocooning" unvaccinated children) may be ineffective. Our results have important implications for B. pertussis vaccination policy and paint a complicated picture for achieving herd immunity and possible B. pertussis eradication.

  14. Proof of principle for epitope-focused vaccine design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Bruno E.; Bates, John T.; Loomis, Rebecca J.; Baneyx, Gretchen; Carrico, Chris; Jardine, Joseph G.; Rupert, Peter; Correnti, Colin; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Vittal, Vinayak; Connell, Mary J.; Stevens, Eric; Schroeter, Alexandria; Chen, Man; MacPherson, Skye; Serra, Andreia M.; Adachi, Yumiko; Holmes, Margaret A.; Li, Yuxing; Klevit, Rachel E.; Graham, Barney S.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Crowe, James E.; Johnson, Philip R.; Schief, William R.

    2014-03-01

    Vaccines prevent infectious disease largely by inducing protective neutralizing antibodies against vulnerable epitopes. Several major pathogens have resisted traditional vaccine development, although vulnerable epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies have been identified for several such cases. Hence, new vaccine design methods to induce epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies are needed. Here we show, with a neutralization epitope from respiratory syncytial virus, that computational protein design can generate small, thermally and conformationally stable protein scaffolds that accurately mimic the viral epitope structure and induce potent neutralizing antibodies. These scaffolds represent promising leads for the research and development of a human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine needed to protect infants, young children and the elderly. More generally, the results provide proof of principle for epitope-focused and scaffold-based vaccine design, and encourage the evaluation and further development of these strategies for a variety of other vaccine targets, including antigenically highly variable pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and influenza.

  15. Effects of dietary selenium on host response to necrotic enteritis in young broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of dietary supplementation of young broiler chickens with a new organic selenium (Se) formulation, B-Traxim Se, on the host response to experimental necrotic enteritis (NE) were studied. Broiler chickens treated with three Se doses (0.25, 0.50, 1.00 mg/kg) from hatch were orally challeng...

  16. Characterization of the Meq oncoproteins of Marek's disease virus vaccine strain CVI988/Rispens 

    E-print Network

    Ajithdoss, Dharani K.

    2010-07-14

    Marek?s disease virus serotype-1 (MDV-1) causes T cell lymphomas in chickens. Vaccines prepared from attenuated CVI988/Rispens MDV-1 strain currently offer the best protection. Although attenuated CVI988 is non-oncogenic, it codes for two forms...

  17. Evaluation of Sindbis-M2e Virus Vector as a Universal Influenza A Vaccine 

    E-print Network

    Vuong, Christine

    2012-10-19

    chicken production, causing a loss in profits and accumulation of unexpected expenses. Because it is impossible to know which of many virus subtypes will cause an outbreak, it is not feasible for the U.S. to stockpile vaccines against all possible avian...

  18. In vitro characterization of the Meq proteins of Marek's disease virus vaccine strain CV1988

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gallid herpesvirus 2 (GaHV-2), commonly known as Marek’s disease virus serotype-1 (MDV-1), causes T cell lymphoma in chickens. Vaccines prepared from the CVI988/Rispens MDV-1 strain currently offers the best protection. Although, CVI988 is non-oncogenic, it codes for at least two forms of the MDV on...

  19. Comparative genomic sequence analysis of the Marek’s disease vaccine strain SB-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is one of the most oncogenic herpesviruses known and induces a rapid onset T-cell lymphoma and demyelinating disease in chickens. Since the 1970s the disease has been controlled through mass vaccination with meleagrid herpesvirus type 1 (MeHV-1). Over time the efficacy of...

  20. VACCINATION OF POULTRY: THE SPECIAL CASE OF MAREK'S DISEASE HERPESVIRUS-INDUCED LYMPHOMAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines are the cornerstone of programs to control infectious diseases in chickens. Marek's disease (MD) is caused by a cell-associated alpha herpesvirus and is characterized by lymphomas, neurological disease and immunosuppression. The disease has a rapid onset and can result in up to 100% mortal...

  1. Comparative genomic sequence analysis of the Marek’s disease vaccine SB-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is one of the most oncogenic herpesviruses known and induces a rapid onset T-cell lymphoma and demyelinating disease in chickens. Since the 1970s the disease has been controlled through mass vaccination with the meleagrid herpesvirus type 1 (MeHV-1). Since then the effica...

  2. Comparative genomic sequence analysis of the Marek’s disease vaccine strain SB-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is one of the most oncogenic herpesviruses known and induces a rapid onset T-cell lymphoma and demyelinating disease in chickens. Since the 1970s, the disease has been controlled through mass vaccination with meleagrid herpesvirus type 1 (MeHV-1). Over time the efficacy o...

  3. Avian influenza vaccine development: Application technology platforms, field use and predictors of protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines against avian influenza (AI) began over 100 years ago as experimentally produced products, but commercial application did not occur until: 1) a reliable method was developed to grow and titer the virus (i.e. embryonating chicken eggs), 2) an efficient and predictable method was developed to...

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A VIROSOME VACCINE FOR NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS THAT PROTECTS AGAINST LETHAL CHALLENGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an effort to protect chickens against Newcastle disease (ND), a non-replicating virosome-vaccine was produced by solubilization of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with Triton X-100 followed by detergent removal with SM2 Bio-Beads. Biochemical analysis indicated that the NDV virosomes had similar c...

  5. History of vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before. PMID:25136134

  6. Understanding How Vaccines Work

    E-print Network

    Noble, William Stafford

    Understanding How Vaccines Work Last reviewed February 2013 Diseases that vaccines prevent can be dangerous, or even deadly. Vaccines greatly reduce the risk of infection by working with the body's natural and how vaccines work to protect people by producing immunity. The Immune System-- The Body's Defense

  7. [Recommendations of the Vaccine Advisory Committee of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics: influenza vaccination campaign 2006-2007].

    PubMed

    Pineda Solas, A; Bernaola Iturbe, E; Martinón-Torres, F; Baca Cots, M; de Juan Martín, F; Gómez Campderá, J A; Díaz Domingo, J; Garcés Sánchez, M; Giménez Sánchez, F; Picazo, J

    2006-09-01

    The recommendations of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics on influenza vaccination in the pediatric age group for the 2006-2007 season are presented. Influenza has special characteristics in children due to the high morbidity it carries. Moreover, children constitute the most frequent source of transmission. The risk factors supporting influenza vaccination in children and the need for immunization in persons living with high-risk children are discussed. The advisability of extending vaccination in health workers, and specifically to pediatricians and medical personnel in contact with sick children is stressed. The composition of the vaccine for the 2006-2007 seasons, the schedules and dosages in children depending on age, and the contraindications to vaccination are specified. Finally, the premises required to recommend universal vaccination in young children in Spain as a strategy to reduce morbidity due to this epidemic in children and adults are discussed. PMID:16956504

  8. Chews Like Chicken Animal Ambulation

    E-print Network

    Glaser, Rainer

    Stories: Chews Like Chicken Animal Ambulation Going Negative Novel Reaction The Smart Set Copper of the strands to unravel and reform during cell division. The malfunction damages cells and could even cause

  9. Chicken from Farm to Table

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Forms Standard Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District ... Inspected for wholesomeness by the U.S. Department of Agriculture" seal ensures that the chicken is free from ...

  10. Immune gene expression in the spleen of chickens experimentally infected with Ascaridia galli.

    PubMed

    Dalgaard, Tina S; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Norup, Liselotte R; Pleidrup, Janne; Permin, Anders; Schou, Torben W; Vadekær, Dorte F; Jungersen, Gregers; Juul-Madsen, Helle R

    2015-03-15

    Ascaridia galli is a gastrointestinal nematode infecting chickens. Chickens kept in alternative rearing systems or at free-range experience increased risk for infection with resulting high prevalences. A. galli infection causes reduced weight gain, decreased egg production and in severe cases increased mortality. More importantly, the parasitised chickens are more susceptible to secondary infections and their ability to develop vaccine-induced protective immunity against other diseases may be compromised. Detailed information about the immune response to the natural infection may be exploited to enable future vaccine development. In the present study, expression of immune genes in the chicken spleen during an experimental infection with A. galli was investigated using the Fluidigm(®) BioMark™ microfluidic qPCR platform which combines automatic high-throughput with attractive low sample and reagent consumption. Spleenic transcription of immunological genes was compared between infected chickens and non-infected controls at week 2, 6, and 9 p.i. corresponding to different stages of parasite development/maturation. At week 2 p.i. increased expression of IL-13 was observed in infected chickens. Increased expression of MBL, CRP, IFN-?, IL-1?, IL-8, IL-12? and IL-18 followed at week 6 p.i. and at both week 6 and 9 p.i. expression of DEF?1 was highly increased in infected chickens. In summary, apart from also earlier reported increased expression of the Th2 signature cytokine IL-13 we observed only few differentially expressed genes at week 2 p.i. which corresponds to the larvae histotrophic phase. In contrast, we observed increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and acute phase proteins in infected chickens, by week 6 p.i. where the larvae re-enter the intestinal lumen. Increased expression of DEF?1 was observed in infected chickens at week 6 p.i. but also at week 9 p.i. which corresponds to a matured stage where adult worms are present in the intestinal lumen. PMID:25649508

  11. Vaccines today, vaccines tomorrow: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines are considered as one of the major contributions of the 20th century and one of the most cost effective public health interventions. The International Vaccine Institute has as a mission to discover, develop and deliver new and improved vaccines against infectious diseases that affects developing nations. If Louis Pasteur is known across the globe, vaccinologists like Maurice Hilleman, Jonas Salk and Charles Mérieux are known among experts only despite their contribution to global health. Thanks to a vaccine, smallpox has been eradicated, polio has nearly disappeared, Haemophilus influenzae B, measles and more recently meningitis A are controlled in many countries. While a malaria vaccine is undergoing phase 3, International Vaccine Institute, in collaboration with an Indian manufacturer has brought an oral inactivated cholera vaccine to pre-qualification. The field of vaccinology has undergone major changes thanks to philanthropists such as Bill and Melinda Gates, initiatives like the Decade of Vaccines and public private partnerships. Current researches on vaccines have more challenging targets like the dengue viruses, malaria, human immunodeficiency virus, the respiratory syncytial virus and nosocomial diseases. Exciting research is taking place on new adjuvants, nanoparticles, virus like particles and new route of administration. An overcrowded infant immunization program, anti-vaccine groups, immunizing a growing number of elderlies and delivering vaccines to difficult places are among challenges faced by vaccinologists and global health experts. PMID:23596584

  12. Vaccines today, vaccines tomorrow: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Loucq, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines are considered as one of the major contributions of the 20th century and one of the most cost effective public health interventions. The International Vaccine Institute has as a mission to discover, develop and deliver new and improved vaccines against infectious diseases that affects developing nations. If Louis Pasteur is known across the globe, vaccinologists like Maurice Hilleman, Jonas Salk and Charles Mérieux are known among experts only despite their contribution to global health. Thanks to a vaccine, smallpox has been eradicated, polio has nearly disappeared, Haemophilus influenzae B, measles and more recently meningitis A are controlled in many countries. While a malaria vaccine is undergoing phase 3, International Vaccine Institute, in collaboration with an Indian manufacturer has brought an oral inactivated cholera vaccine to pre-qualification. The field of vaccinology has undergone major changes thanks to philanthropists such as Bill and Melinda Gates, initiatives like the Decade of Vaccines and public private partnerships. Current researches on vaccines have more challenging targets like the dengue viruses, malaria, human immunodeficiency virus, the respiratory syncytial virus and nosocomial diseases. Exciting research is taking place on new adjuvants, nanoparticles, virus like particles and new route of administration. An overcrowded infant immunization program, anti-vaccine groups, immunizing a growing number of elderlies and delivering vaccines to difficult places are among challenges faced by vaccinologists and global health experts. PMID:23596584

  13. Carotenoid absorption in chicken intestine.

    PubMed

    Gómez, R; Alonso, A; Martín, M

    1978-09-01

    The powdered flowers of marigold (Tagetes erecta) are used as a cheap source of carotenoids in avicultura. Lutein (3,3'-dyhydroxi-alpha-carotene) constitutes up to 85 to 90% of marigold carotenoids. In the plant, lutein is found esterified to palmitic or estearic acid. In chicken, carotenoid is hydrolized in the first portion of the small intestine, and absorbed as free lutein. After the absorption, lutein is not re-esterified in the different chicken tissues. PMID:725226

  14. 9 CFR 113.36 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...,000 doses. (b) At least 25 healthy susceptible young chickens, properly identified and obtained from... diseases, respiratory diseases, or other pathologic conditions. (f) If the controls remain healthy and... unsatisfactory. If the controls do not remain healthy or if unfavorable reactions not attributable to the...

  15. 9 CFR 113.36 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...,000 doses. (b) At least 25 healthy susceptible young chickens, properly identified and obtained from... diseases, respiratory diseases, or other pathologic conditions. (f) If the controls remain healthy and... unsatisfactory. If the controls do not remain healthy or if unfavorable reactions not attributable to the...

  16. 9 CFR 113.36 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...,000 doses. (b) At least 25 healthy susceptible young chickens, properly identified and obtained from... diseases, respiratory diseases, or other pathologic conditions. (f) If the controls remain healthy and... unsatisfactory. If the controls do not remain healthy or if unfavorable reactions not attributable to the...

  17. Existing antiviral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ravanfar, Parisa; Satyaprakash, Anita; Creed, Rosella; Mendoza, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The innovation of vaccines has allowed for one of the greatest advancements in the history of public health. The first of the vaccines have been the antiviral vaccines, in particular the smallpox vaccine that was first developed by Edward Jenner in 1796. This article will review vaccination for the following viral diseases: measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, influenza, rotavirus, rabies, monkeypox, smallpox, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever. PMID:19335723

  18. Immune responses to oral vaccination with Salmonella-delivered avian pathogenic Escherichia coli antigens and protective efficacy against colibacillosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, John Hwa; Chaudhari, Atul A; Oh, In Gyoung; Eo, Seong Kug; Park, Sang-Youel; Jawale, Chetan V

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the immune responses to and protective efficacy of a live attenuated Salmonella-delivered vaccine candidate secreting the papA, papG, iutA, and clpG antigens of Escherichia coli were evaluated against infection with avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) in layer chickens. Primary vaccination was done at age 7 d and booster vaccination at age 5 wk. The levels of intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A specific to the 4 antigens were significantly higher in the vaccinated group than in the control group. A potent lymphocyte-proliferation response and increased levels of interferon-?, interleukin-2, and interleukin-6 in the plasma and in culture supernatants of antigen-stimulated lymphocytes from the vaccinated group suggested significant induction of the cell-mediated immune response in this group compared with the control group. Upon challenge with a virulent APEC strain at 8 wk of age, the vaccinated group had no deaths, whereas the control group had a 15% mortality rate. In addition, the morbidity rate was significantly higher in the control group (55%) than in the vaccinated group (15%). Thus, giving primary and booster vaccination with the Salmonella-delivered APEC vaccine candidate significantly elevated both mucosal and cellular immune responses, which protected the chickens against colibacillosis. PMID:26130856

  19. [Latest progress on the chicken genome project].

    PubMed

    Mu, Yan-Shuang; Li, Hui

    2006-05-01

    The publication of draft sequence of the chicken genome in early 2004 marks expressly the start of functional genomics of poultry. Chicken is not only a widely raised economic farm animal, but also a valuable model organism for the study of life sciences. The draft sequence of the chicken genome has significant impact on both animal breeding and basic biological research. The current progress of the chicken genome research is reviewed in this paper, which includes data from the chicken genome, its physical map, genetic linkage map and comparative genome map, as well as expressed sequence tags and bioinformatics. Potential applications of chicken genome research are also envisaged. PMID:16735245

  20. Vaccines against malaria

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2011-01-01

    There is no licenced vaccine against any human parasitic disease and Plasmodium falciparum malaria, a major cause of infectious mortality, presents a great challenge to vaccine developers. This has led to the assessment of a wide variety of approaches to malaria vaccine design and development, assisted by the availability of a safe challenge model for small-scale efficacy testing of vaccine candidates. Malaria vaccine development has been at the forefront of assessing many new vaccine technologies including novel adjuvants, vectored prime-boost regimes and the concept of community vaccination to block malaria transmission. Most current vaccine candidates target a single stage of the parasite's life cycle and vaccines against the early pre-erythrocytic stages have shown most success. A protein in adjuvant vaccine, working through antibodies against sporozoites, and viral vector vaccines targeting the intracellular liver-stage parasite with cellular immunity show partial efficacy in humans, and the anti-sporozoite vaccine is currently in phase III trials. However, a more effective malaria vaccine suitable for widespread cost-effective deployment is likely to require a multi-component vaccine targeting more than one life cycle stage. The most attractive near-term approach to develop such a product is to combine existing partially effective pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidates. PMID:21893544

  1. Who Should Not Get Vaccinated with These Vaccines?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to be updated.) Top of Page HPV-Cervarix (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine Some people should not get HPV vaccine ... be updated.) Top of Page HPV-Gardasil-9 (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine Some people should not get HPV vaccine. ...

  2. Vaccine Effectiveness - How Well Does the Seasonal Flu Vaccine Work?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vaccine Effectiveness - How Well Does the Flu Vaccine Work? Questions & Answers Language: English Español Recommend on ... are factors that influenza how well the vaccine works? How well the flu vaccine works (or its ...

  3. Research Article Theme: Emerging Concepts for Vaccine Development and Vaccination

    E-print Network

    Feng, Zhilan

    Research Article Theme: Emerging Concepts for Vaccine Development and Vaccination Guest Editors: Stanley Hem, Craig Svensson, and Harm Hogenesch Modeling the Effects of Vaccination and Treatment the effectiveness of various control programs via vaccination and antiviral treatment. We use susceptible

  4. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57 Section 410.57 Public Health ...Other Health Services § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays...

  5. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57 Section 410.57 Public Health ...Other Health Services § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays...

  6. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57 Section 410.57 Public Health ...Other Health Services § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays...

  7. Eggs: the uncracked potential for improving maternal and young child nutrition among the world's poor.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Lora L; Lutter, Chessa K; Bunn, David A; Stewart, Christine P

    2014-06-01

    Eggs have been consumed throughout human history, though the full potential of this nutritionally complete food has yet to be realized in many resource-poor settings around the world. Eggs provide essential fatty acids, proteins, choline, vitamins A and B12 , selenium, and other critical nutrients at levels above or comparable to those found in other animal-source foods, but they are relatively more affordable. Cultural beliefs about the digestibility and cleanliness of eggs, as well as environmental concerns arising from hygiene practices and toxin exposures, remain as barriers to widespread egg consumption. There is also regional variability in egg intake levels. In Latin American countries, on average, greater proportions of young children consume eggs than in Asian or African countries. In China and Indonesia, nutrition education and social marketing have been associated with greater amounts of eggs in the diets of young children, though generally, evidence from interventions is minimal. Homestead chicken-and-egg production with appropriate vaccination, extension service, and other supports can simultaneously address poverty and nutrition in very poor rural households. With undernutrition remaining a significant problem in many parts of the world, eggs may be an uncracked part of the solution. PMID:24807641

  8. Cross-protection against Salmonella Typhimurium infection conferred by a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Nandre, Rahul M.; Lee, Dajeong; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a genetically engineered live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine was evaluated for its ability to protect against Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) infection in chickens. The birds were orally primed with the vaccine on the 1st day of life and given an oral booster at 5 wk of age. Control birds were orally inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline. Both groups of birds were orally challenged with a virulent ST strain at 9 wk of age. Compared with the control chickens, the vaccinated chickens had significantly higher levels of systemic IgG and mucosal IgA against specific ST antigens and a significantly greater lymphoproliferative response to ST antigens. The excretion of ST into the feces was significantly lower in the vaccinated group than in the control group on days 9 and 13 d after challenge. In addition, the vaccinated group had significantly fewer pronounced gross lesions in the liver and spleen and lower bacterial counts in the internal organs than the control group after challenge. These data indicate that genetically engineered live attenuated SE may induce humoral and cellular immune responses against ST antigens and may confer protection against virulent ST challenge. PMID:25673904

  9. Adolescent Premature Ovarian Insufficiency Following Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Harvey Rodrick Grenville

    2014-01-01

    Three young women who developed premature ovarian insufficiency following quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination presented to a general practitioner in rural New South Wales, Australia. The unrelated girls were aged 16, 16, and 18 years at diagnosis. Each had received HPV vaccinations prior to the onset of ovarian decline. Vaccinations had been administered in different regions of the state of New South Wales and the 3 girls lived in different towns in that state. Each had been prescribed the oral contraceptive pill to treat menstrual cycle abnormalities prior to investigation and diagnosis. Vaccine research does not present an ovary histology report of tested rats but does present a testicular histology report. Enduring ovarian capacity and duration of function following vaccination is unresearched in preclinical studies, clinical and postlicensure studies. Postmarketing surveillance does not accurately represent diagnoses in adverse event notifications and can neither represent unnotified cases nor compare incident statistics with vaccine course administration rates. The potential significance of a case series of adolescents with idiopathic premature ovarian insufficiency following HPV vaccination presenting to a general practice warrants further research. Preservation of reproductive health is a primary concern in the recipient target group. Since this group includes all prepubertal and pubertal young women, demonstration of ongoing, uncompromised safety for the ovary is urgently required. This matter needs to be resolved for the purposes of population health and public vaccine confidence. PMID:26425627

  10. Immunization of Broiler Chickens against Clostridium perfringens-Induced Necrotic Enteritis?

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, R. R.; Parreira, V. R.; Sharif, S.; Prescott, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) in broiler chickens is caused by Clostridium perfringens. Currently, no vaccine against NE is available and immunity to NE is not well characterized. Our previous studies showed that immunity to NE followed oral infection by virulent rather than avirulent C. perfringens strains and identified immunogenic secreted proteins apparently uniquely produced by virulent C. perfringens isolates. These proteins were alpha-toxin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), fructose 1,6-biphosphate aldolase, and a hypothetical protein (HP). The current study investigated the role of each of these proteins in conferring protection to broiler chickens against oral infection challenges of different severities with virulent C. perfringens. The genes encoding these proteins were cloned and purified as histidine-tagged recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli and were used to immunize broiler chickens intramuscularly. Serum and intestinal antibody responses were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All proteins significantly protected broiler chickens against a relatively mild challenge. In addition, immunization with alpha-toxin, HP, and PFOR also offered significant protection against a more severe challenge. When the birds were primed with alpha-toxoid and boosted with active toxin, birds immunized with alpha-toxin were provided with the greatest protection against a severe challenge. The serum and intestinal washings from protected birds had high antigen-specific antibody titers. Thus, we conclude that there are certain secreted proteins, in addition to alpha-toxin, that are involved in immunity to NE in broiler chickens. PMID:17634510

  11. Addition of a UL5 helicase-primase subunit point mutation eliminates bursal-thymic atrophy of Marek’s disease virus delta-Meq recombinant virus but reduces vaccinal protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus and the causative agent of Marek’s disease (MD), a T-cell lymphoma of chickens. Despite widespread usage of vaccines since the 1970’s to control MD, more virulent field strains of MDV have emerged that overcome vaccinal protection, necessi...

  12. THE TRUTH ABOUT CHICKENS AND BATS RUNNING HEAD: THE TRUTH ABOUT CHICKENS AND BATS

    E-print Network

    THE TRUTH ABOUT CHICKENS AND BATS 1 RUNNING HEAD: THE TRUTH ABOUT CHICKENS AND BATS The Truth about Chickens and Bats: Ambiguity Avoidance Distinguishes Types of Polysemy. Hugh Rabagliati@wjh.harvard.edu #12;THE TRUTH ABOUT CHICKENS AND BATS 2 Abstract Words mean different things in different

  13. Oral cholera vaccines: use in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Hill, David R; Ford, Lisa; Lalloo, David G

    2006-06-01

    Cholera continues to occur globally, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Oral cholera vaccines have been developed and have now been used for several years, primarily in traveller populations. The licensure in the European Union of a killed whole cell cholera vaccine combined with the recombinant B subunit of cholera toxin (rCTB-WC) has stimulated interest in protection against cholera. Because of the similarity between cholera toxin and the heat-labile toxin of Escherichia coli, a cause of travellers' diarrhoea, it has been proposed that the rCTB-WC vaccine may be used against travellers' diarrhoea. An analysis of trials of this vaccine against cholera (serotype O1) shows that for 4-6 months it will protect 61-86% of people living in cholera-endemic regions; lower levels of protection continue for 3 years. Protection wanes rapidly in young children. Because the risk of cholera for most travellers is extremely low, vaccination should be considered only for those working in relief or refugee settings or for those who will be travelling in cholera-epidemic areas and who will be unable to obtain prompt medical care. The vaccine can be expected to prevent 7% or less of cases of travellers' diarrhoea and should not be used for this purpose. PMID:16728322

  14. Vaccination: An Act of Love

    MedlinePLUS

    ... benefits of vaccines. For this reason, we created Vaccination Week in the Americas to get vaccines to ... and no one gets left behind. Help the vaccination teams when they come to your town, your ...

  15. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePLUS

    ... against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and tetanus Pneumococcal vaccine to protect against pneumonia ... against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and tetanus Pneumococcal vaccine to protect against pneumonia ...

  16. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  17. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  18. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  19. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  20. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  1. Vaccines against poverty

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, Calman A.; Saul, Allan

    2014-01-01

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented. PMID:25136089

  2. Vaccines against poverty.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan

    2014-08-26

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented. PMID:25136089

  3. Applied andrology in chickens and turkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The theories and practices of applied andrology in commercial poultry species (turkey, layer chicken and broiler chicken) are reviewed. Poultry male reproductive biology, including reproductive anatomy and spermatogenesis, is compared with mammalian livestock species. A detailed description of pou...

  4. HPV vaccination and sexual behavior in a community college sample.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Erica; Glenn, Beth A; Bastani, Roshan

    2013-12-01

    Many US parents are concerned that vaccinating daughters against human papillomavirus (HPV) will communicate implicit approval for sexual activity and be associated with early or risky sexual behavior (Scarinci et al. in J Womens Health 16(8):1224-1233, 2007; Schuler et al. in Sex Transm Infect 87:349-353, 2011). The aims of this study were to understand (a) whether the HPV vaccine was associated with risky sexual behavior among a diverse sample of female adolescents and young adults, and (b) to better understand the chronology of HPV vaccination and sexual behavior. An anonymous web-based survey was used to collect data from 114 female community college students. T test and Chi square analyses were used to compare vaccinated and unvaccinated groups on age at first intercourse and proportion who had ever had sexual intercourse. Linear multiple regression was used to predict frequency of condom use and number of sexual partners in the past year, using vaccination status and demographic factors as predictors. About 38% reported receiving at least one dose of the HPV vaccine. Many of those vaccinated (45%) received the vaccine after having initiated sexual activity. The proportion of women who were sexually experienced did not differ by HPV vaccine status, nor did age at first intercourse, number of partners in the past year, or frequency of condom use. Current findings suggest that HPV vaccination is not associated with riskier sexual activity for the young women in this sample. Adolescents and their parents may benefit from education about the need to receive the HPV vaccine before onset of sexual activity. PMID:23728823

  5. All-time Favorites: Chicken Turkey. 

    E-print Network

    Miller, Marshall; Reasonover, Frances

    1967-01-01

    CHICKEN Metal Wing Clips All classes of chickens and turkeys may be uti- lized for roasting and stewing. However, difference in required cooking time may be considerable. Generally, the older or heavier the bird, the longer the cooking time required..." F. 10 to 15 minutes or until breasts are golden brown. SPP. es 6. MARINATED CHICKEN WINGS 2 pounds chicken wings 1 teaspoon meat sauce 11, cup melted butter or -. 1 teaspoon grated onion rnorgarine :. 1 haspoon salt I/, cup lemon /vice 2...

  6. Development of high-yield influenza A virus vaccine viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J.S.; Nidom, Chairul A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Macken, Catherine A.; Fitch, Adam; Imai, Masaki; Maher, Eileen A.; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective ways to prevent infection. Influenza vaccines propagated in cultured cells are approved for use in humans, but their yields are often suboptimal. Here, we screened A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus mutant libraries to develop vaccine backbones (defined here as the six viral RNA segments not encoding haemagglutinin and neuraminidase) that support high yield in cell culture. We also tested mutations in the coding and regulatory regions of the virus, and chimeric haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. A combination of high-yield mutations from these screens led to a PR8 backbone that improved the titres of H1N1, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine viruses in African green monkey kidney and Madin–Darby canine kidney cells. This PR8 backbone also improves titres in embryonated chicken eggs, a common propagation system for influenza viruses. This PR8 vaccine backbone thus represents an advance in seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine development. PMID:26334134

  7. Development of high-yield influenza A virus vaccine viruses.

    PubMed

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J S; Nidom, Chairul A; Ghedin, Elodie; Macken, Catherine A; Fitch, Adam; Imai, Masaki; Maher, Eileen A; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective ways to prevent infection. Influenza vaccines propagated in cultured cells are approved for use in humans, but their yields are often suboptimal. Here, we screened A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus mutant libraries to develop vaccine backbones (defined here as the six viral RNA segments not encoding haemagglutinin and neuraminidase) that support high yield in cell culture. We also tested mutations in the coding and regulatory regions of the virus, and chimeric haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. A combination of high-yield mutations from these screens led to a PR8 backbone that improved the titres of H1N1, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine viruses in African green monkey kidney and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. This PR8 backbone also improves titres in embryonated chicken eggs, a common propagation system for influenza viruses. This PR8 vaccine backbone thus represents an advance in seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine development. PMID:26334134

  8. Allele-specific expression analysis reveals CD79B has a cis-acting regulatory element that responds to Marek's disease virus infection in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a T cell lymphoma disease of domestic chickens induced by the Marek’s disease virus (MDV), a highly infectious and oncogenic, cell-associated alphaherpesvirus. Enhancing genetic resistance to MD in poultry is an attractive method to augment MD vaccines, which protect against ...

  9. Allele-Specific Expression Screening Demonstrates that Variation in Genetic Resistance to Marek’s Disease in Chicken is Mainly Controlled at the Transcriptional Level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a T cell lymphoma disease of chickens induced by the Marek’s disease virus (MDV). Selecting for increased genetic resistance to MD is a control strategy that can augment MD vaccinal protection. To identify genetic markers and gain a better biological understanding, RNA sequen...

  10. The protective efficacy of rMd5deltaMeq against challenge with a very virulent plus strain of MDV in relatively resistant lines of chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a T-cell lymphoma of domestic chickens induced by MD virus (MDV), a naturally oncogenic and highly contagious cell-associated alpha-herpesvirus. A recombinant MDV lacking both copies of Meq oncogene, rMd5deltaMeq, was tested as a candidate vaccine against MD in a series of 19...

  11. A Live Salmonella Gallinarum Vaccine Candidate Secreting an Adjuvant Protein Confers Enhanced Safety and Protection Against Fowl Typhoid.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, Muhammad Hassan; Kamble, Nitin M; Kim, Tae Hoon; Choi, Yoonyoung; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-12-01

    Live attenuated vaccines are used for effective protection against fowl typhoid (FT) in domestic poultry. In this study, a lon/cpxR/asd deletion mutant of Salmonella Gallinarum expressing the B subunit of a heat labile toxin (LTB) from Escherichia coli, a known adjuvant, was cloned in a recombinant p15A ori plasmid, JOL1355, and evaluated as a vaccine candidate in chickens. The plasmid was shown to be stable inside the attenuated Salmonella Gallinarum cell after three successive generations. Moreover, from an environmental safety point of view, apart from day 1 the JOL1355 strain was not detected in feces through day 21 postinoculation. For the efficacy of JOL1355, a total of 100 chickens were equally divided into two groups. Group A (control) chickens were intramuscularly inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline at 4 and 8 wk of age. Group B chickens were primed and boosted via the intramuscular route with 200 ?L of a bacterial suspension of JOL1355 containing 1 × 10(8) colony forming units. All the chickens in Group A and B were challenged at 3 wk postbooster by oral inoculation with a wild-type Salmonella Gallinarum strain, JOL420. The JOL1355-immunized group showed significant protection and survival against the virulent challenge compared to the nonimmunized group. In addition, Group B exhibited a significantly higher humoral immune response, and the chickens remained healthy without any symptoms of anorexia, diarrhea, or depression. Group B also exhibited a significantly lower mortality rate of 4% compared to the 46% of the control group, which can be attributed to higher immunogenicity and better protection. The Group B chickens had significantly lower lesion scores for affected organs, such as the liver and spleen, compared to those of the control chickens (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that JOL1355 is a promising candidate for a safe and highly immunogenic vaccine against FT. PMID:26629629

  12. A chicken homologue of nectin-4 functions as a measles virus receptor.

    PubMed

    Seki, Fumio; Someya, Kenji; Komase, Katsuhiro; Takeda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) vaccine strains use CD46, signaling lymphocyte activation molecule, and nectin-4 in human cells as receptors. Meanwhile, many of them are propagated in primary chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs). Our data revealed that CEFs express a nectin-4 homologous molecule (CEF nectin-4) containing well-conserved motifs in the FG and BC loops, but not in the C'C? loop. MV infected CHO cells expressing CEF nectin-4 and induced syncytia in these cells, confirming that CEF nectin-4 functions as an MV receptor and that the C'C? loop is not critical for this function. Nectin-4-blind mutations in MV H protein reduced the infectivity of MV in CEF nectin-4-expressing cells. Infection of CEFs with the MV vaccine AIK-C strain was partially blocked by an anti-nectin-4 antibody, indicating that CEF nectin-4 plays a role for propagation of MV vaccines in CEFs. PMID:26549360

  13. Pathogenicity and Immunogenicity of a Mutant Strain of Listeria monocytogenes in the Chicken Infection Model?

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuelan; Tian, Debin; Jiao, Hongmei; Zhang, Chenju; Pan, Zhiming; Zhang, Xiaoming; Wang, Xiaobo; Jiao, Xinan

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has been exploited as a vaccine carrier based upon its ability to induce a strong cell-mediated immune response. At present, the safety of live, attenuated L. monocytogenes vaccines in patients is being studied in clinical trials. L. monocytogenes is also an attractive vaccine vector for use in poultry; however, the pathogenicity and immunogenicity of this organism in poultry remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the pathogenicity and immunogenicity of an actA- and plcB-deficient L. monocytogenes strain, yzuLM4?actA/plcB, and its wild-type parent strain, yzuLM4, in an avian infection model. The results showed that the wild-type strain could infect ISA brown chickens, causing serious tissue disruptions, including various degrees of degeneration, necrotic lesions, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver, spleen, heart, and kidney. However, the mutant strain showed reduced virulence in embryonated eggs compared with that of the parent strain (the 50% lethal dose [LD50] was 3 logs higher). The mutant strain also showed low virulence in chickens and was rapidly eliminated by the host. There were no obvious pathological changes in tissue sections, but the mutant strain still retained the ability to stimulate high levels of antibody against the protein listeriolysin O (LLO). Booster immunization with the mutant strain led to rapid bacterial clearance from the livers and spleens of chickens challenged by the intramuscular route or the oral route. Collectively, our data suggest that the wild-type serotype 1/2a L. monocytogenes strain can cause serious disease in chickens but the mutant strain with a deletion of the actA and plcB genes is less virulent but induces a strong immune response. This mutant strain of L. monocytogenes is therefore a promising candidate as a safe and effective vector for the delivery of heterologous antigens to prevent zoonosis and infectious disease in poultry. PMID:21228136

  14. The potential impact of vaccination on the prevalence of gonorrhea.

    PubMed

    Craig, Andrew P; Gray, Richard T; Edwards, Jennifer L; Apicella, Michael A; Jennings, Michael P; Wilson, David P; Seib, Kate L

    2015-08-26

    Gonorrhea, one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide, can lead to serious sequelae, including infertility and increased HIV transmission. Recently, untreatable, multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains have been reported. In the absence of new antibiotics, and given the speed with which resistance has emerged to all previously used antibiotics, development of a vaccine would be the ideal solution to this public health emergency. Understanding the desired characteristics, target population, and expected impact of an anti-gonococcal vaccine is essential to facilitate vaccine design, assessment and implementation. The modeling presented herein aims to fill these conceptual gaps, and inform future gonococcal vaccine development. Using an individual-based, epidemiological simulation model, gonococcal prevalence was simulated in a heterosexual population of 100,000 individuals after the introduction of vaccines with varied efficacy (10-100%) and duration of protection (2.5-20 years). Model simulations predict that gonococcal prevalence could be reduced by at least 90% after 20 years, if all 13-year-olds were given a non-waning vaccine with 50% efficacy, or a vaccine with 100% efficacy that wanes after 7.5 years. A 40% reduction in prevalence is achievable with a non-waning vaccine of only 20% efficacy. We conclude that a vaccine of moderate efficacy and duration could have a substantive impact on gonococcal prevalence, and disease sequelae, if coverage is high and protection lasts over the highest risk period (i.e., most sexual partner change) among young people. PMID:26192351

  15. Chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria acervulina macrophage migration inhibitory factor (E.MIF) induce partial protection against experimental Eimeria infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Zhang, Ruirui; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-09-01

    Chimeric DNA vaccines co-expressing Eimeria acervulina macrophage migration inhibitory factor (E.MIF) and chicken IL-2 (IL-2) or interferon-? (IFN-?) were constructed and their efficacies against E. acervulina were evaluated. The open reading frame (ORF) of E.MIF was cloned from E. acervulina merozoites and subcloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 with chicken cytokine gene IFN-? or IL-2 to construct the DNA vaccines pVAX-E.MIF-IFN-?, pVAX-E.MIF-IL-2 and pVAX-E.MIF. The in vivo transfection of the target genes was detected by use of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Immunizations were carried out by vaccinating chickens twice with a dose rate of 100 ?g intramuscularly. Seven days post second immunization, all chickens except the unchallenged control group were challenged orally with 1 × 105 sporulated oocysts of E. acervulina. Seven days later, the duodenum was collected. The results showed that the target genes were expressed effectively in vivo. DNA vaccines and the recombinant E.MIF protein could alleviate body weight loss and duodenal lesions significantly compared to the control groups. Furthermore, pVAX-E.MIF-IL-2 and pVAX-E.MIF-IFN-? induced anticoccidial indexs (ACIs) of 179.12 and 170, respectively, which were significantly higher than that of pVAX-E.MIF (ACI = 162.31). Our results demonstrated that E.MIF is a potential vaccine candidate against E. acervulina and chicken IFN-? or IL- 2 may be used as genetic adjuvants to improve the efficacies of DNA vaccines against avian coccidiosis. PMID:26204190

  16. Vaccine Safety Datalink

    Cancer.gov

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink is part of the National Immunization Program within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and was started in recognition of gaps in the scientific knowledge of rare vaccine side effects.

  17. Clinical vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is regarded as one of the biggest triumphs in the history of medicine. We are living in the most successful period of vaccine development. The accumulation of multidisciplinary knowledge and the investment of massive funding have enabled the development of vaccines against many infectious diseases as well as other diseases including malignant tumors. The paradigm of clinical vaccine evaluation and licensure has also been modernized based on scientific improvements and historical experience. However, there remain a number of hurdles to overcome. Continuous efforts are focused on increasing the efficacy and reducing the risks related to vaccine use. Cutting-edge knowledge about immunology and microbiology is being rapidly translated to vaccine development. Thus, physicians and others involved in the clinical development of vaccines should have sufficient understanding of the recent developmental trends in vaccination and the diseases of interest. PMID:25648742

  18. Vaccinations during Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... other vaccinations during pregnancy. These include: Anthrax Japanese encephalitis Polio Rabies Vaccinia (for smallpox) Yellow fever What ... other vaccinations during pregnancy. These include: Anthrax Japanese encephalitis Polio Rabies Vaccinia (for smallpox) Yellow fever What ...

  19. Anthrax Vaccine Approval Expanded

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155893.html Anthrax Vaccine Approval Expanded Now sanctioned for adults 18 to ... and Drug Administration approval for the BioThrax anthrax vaccine has been expanded to include adults aged 18 ...

  20. Vaccine Working Group

    Cancer.gov

    Brainstorming, cross-fertilization, and idea sharing within the NCI vaccine community. Consensus on issues, such as identification of tumor antigens and determination of relevant and effective assays for evaluating immunologic responses to cancer vaccines

  1. Vaccine Working Group

    Cancer.gov

    Mission The Vaccine Working Group enhances the research efforts within the NCI intramural program toward developing novel vaccines for cancer immunotherapy and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The group brings together members from throughout the Insti

  2. Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the time the procedure takes place. To ensure immunity, it is important for individuals to complete the ... great majority of those vaccinated will devel- op immunity to the hepatitis B virus. The vaccine causes ...

  3. The Economics of Vaccination

    E-print Network

    Chen, Frederick; Toxvaerd, Flavio

    2014-08-09

    The market for vaccinations is widely believed to be characterized by market failures, because individuals do not internalize the positive externalities that their vaccination decisions may confer on other individuals. Francis (1997) provided a set...

  4. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis B?Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. ...

  5. Tetanus, Diphtheria (Td) Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Tetanus-causing bacteria enter the body through cuts, scratches, or wounds.TETANUS (Lockjaw) causes painful muscle tightening ... Vaccine Injury Compensation ProgramThe National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) is a federal program that was created ...

  6. National Vaccine Program Office

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Plan Resources Text Size: A A A National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO) NVPO provides leadership and coordination ... to carry out the goals of the National Vaccine Plan. Follow our roadmap for the 21 st ...

  7. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News media ... who suffer from the most common type of ear infection, called middle ear infection or otitis media ( ...

  8. Hepatitis A Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    Twinrix® (as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis A?Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is found in ...

  9. Your baby's first vaccines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... substance. Some of these vaccines contain neomycin, streptomycin, yeast, lactose, sucrose, or latex. Tell your doctor if ... if your child has a severe allergy to yeast. PCV13 vaccine , if your child has a severe ...

  10. Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    MedlinePLUS

    ... vaccine (three doses)— Hib Protects against illnesses like meningitis, pneumonia, and infections of the blood, bones, and ... infections such as pneumonia, blood infections, and bacterial meningitis Rotavirus vaccine (three doses)— RV Protects against severe ...

  11. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... been vaccinated still need to be screened for cervical cancer? How much do these vaccines cost, and will ... High-risk HPVs cause several types of cancer. Cervical cancer : Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused ...

  12. Smallpox Vaccine Overview

    MedlinePLUS

    ... every 1 million people vaccinated for the first time experienced reactions that, while not life-threatening, were serious. These ... every 1 million people vaccinated for the first time experienced potentially life-threatening reactions to the vaccine. Based on past experience, it ...

  13. Vaccines in dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Magel, G D; Mendoza, N; Digiorgio, C M; Haitz, K A; Lapolla, W J; Tyring, S K

    2011-06-01

    Vaccines have been a cornerstone in medicine and public health since their inception in the 18th century by Edward Jenner. Today, greater than 20 vaccines are used worldwide for the prevention of both viral and bacterial diseases. This article will review the vaccines used for the following dermatological diseases: smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, shingles, and human papillomavirus. PMID:21566552

  14. Vaccines in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mitali M; Shah, Aishani C; Mahajan, Rashmi S; Bilimoria, Freny E

    2015-01-01

    A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a specific disease. More than two centuries have passed since the first successful vaccine for smallpox was developed. We've come a long way since. Today's vaccines are among the 21(st) century's most successful and cost-effective public health tools for preventing diseases. PMID:26120155

  15. Improving newcastle disease vaccination with homologous vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs) belong to a single serotype; however, current vaccine strains display important amino acid differences at the F and HN protein compared with virulent outbreak strains (vNDV). Previous studies have shown decreased viral shedding after challenge when vaccines were...

  16. The Impact of Aging on Cancer Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Gravekamp, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Cancer vaccination is less effective at old than at young age, due to T cell unresponsiveness, caused by various age-related changes of the immune system. This includes lack of naïve T cells, defects in activation pathways of T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC), and age-related changes in the tumor microenvironment. Although evidence exists that also natural killer (NK) and natural killer T (NKT) cells of the innate immune system change with age, comparison of various studies involving adaptive and innate immune responses in elderly and cancer patients, as well as cancer vaccination at young and old age in this review, indicates that also innate immune responses should be tested as a potential candidate to improve immunotherapy against cancer at older age. PMID:21763118

  17. Histomonosis - an existing problem in chicken flocks in Poland.

    PubMed

    Dolka, Beata; ?bikowski, Artur; Dolka, Izabella; Szeleszczuk, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Histomonosis (histomoniasis, blackhead), beside coccidiosis, belongs to the most important parasitic protozoan diseases in poultry. So far Histomonas meleagridis infections with varied mortality rates have been mainly diagnosed in young turkeys. Recently an increasing number of cases have been reported in chicken flocks in Europe resulting in economic losses. It is thought that this situation is predominantly caused by a complete withdrawal of the effective antihistomonals in the EU. Authors listed the selected outbreaks of histomonosis in 10 chicken flocks originated from different farms of 4 regions in Poland: 8 broiler breeder flocks (at mean age of 33 weeks) and 2 commercial layers flocks (at mean age of 38 weeks). This study reported here naturally occurring case of H.meleagridis infection in commercial broiler breeder (BB) flock line ROSS 308 at the age of 16 weeks. We showed acute form of infection with characteristic necrotic foci in the liver, and ulcerative typhilitis. Beside the liver and caeca, the multiple histomonads, lymphoid tissue depletion and heavy destruction in the bursa of Fabricius were observed. Additionally, the absence of systemic diffuse histomonads and lack of Heterakis gallinarum, caecal worm eggs in faecal samples were noted. PCR technique enabled to detect the presence of H.meleagridis genetic material in the investigated tissue samples. Authors indicate that histomonosis can be considered as re-emerging infectious diseases in chicken flocks of intensive production system. PMID:25976057

  18. Evaluation of Montanide™ ISA 71 VG Adjuvant during Profilin Vaccination against Experimental Coccidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Lillehoj, Hyun S.; Lee, Sung Hyen; Lee, Kyung Woo; Bertrand, François; Dupuis, Laurent; Deville, Sébastien; Ben Arous, Juliette; Lillehoj, Erik P.

    2013-01-01

    Chickens were immunized subcutaneously with an Eimeria recombinant profilin protein plus Montanide™ ISA 70 VG (ISA 70) or Montanide™ ISA 71 VG (ISA 71) water-in-oil adjuvants, or with profilin alone, and comparative RNA microarray hybridizations were performed to ascertain global transcriptome changes induced by profilin/ISA 70 vs. profilin alone and by profilin/ISA 71 vs. profilin alone. While immunization with profilin/ISA 70 vs. profilin alone altered the levels of more total transcripts compared with profilin/ISA 71 vs. profilin alone (509 vs. 296), the latter was associated with a greater number of unique biological functions, and a larger number of genes within these functions, compared with the former. Further, canonical pathway analysis identified 10 pathways that were associated with genes encoding the altered transcripts in animals immunized with profilin/ISA 71 vs. profilin alone, compared with only 2 pathways in profilin/ISA 70 vs. profilin alone. Therefore, ISA 71 was selected as a candidate adjuvant in conjunction with profilin vaccination for in vivo disease protection studies. Vaccination with profilin/ISA 71 was associated with greater body weight gain following E. acervulina infection, and decreased parasite fecal shedding after E. maxima infection, compared with profilin alone. Anti-profilin antibody levels were higher in sera of E. maxima- and E. tenella-infected chickens vaccinated with profilin/ISA 71 compared with profilin alone. Finally, the levels of transcripts encoding interferon-?, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10, and IL-17A were increased in intestinal lymphocytes from E. acervulina-, E. maxima-, and/or E. tenella-infected chickens vaccinated with profilin/ISA 71 compared with profilin alone. None of these effects were seen in chickens injected with ISA 71 alone indicating that the adjuvant was not conferring non-specific immune stimulation. These results suggest that profilin plus ISA 71 augments protective immunity against selective Eimeria species in chickens. PMID:23593150

  19. Exchange of Newcastle disease virus fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase genes into a vaccine backbone: effects on virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) is the causative agent of Newcastle disease (ND), a very important infection that causes significant economic losses to the poultry industry. Currently, viruses of genotypes V, VI, and VII circulate worldwide causing significant mortality in poorly vaccinated chickens....

  20. AGE DIFFERENCE IN LYMPHOCYTE PROLIFERATION AND IL-12 AND IFN-Y PRODUCTION FOLLOWING SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS VACCINATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of age on cell-mediated immune responses to different antigens from Salmonella serovar Enteritidis (SE) following vaccination with the commercially available heat-the killed bacterin. Eight-month- and 4-week-old chickens were given two subcu...

  1. Immunoresponse induced by Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine vectors in commercial chicks in the presence of NDV maternal antibody

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To address the concern that Newcastle disease virus (NDV) maternal antibody (Mab) in chicks may suppress the immunoresponse to the NDV vectored vaccines, we evaluated the replication and immunogenicity of the LaSota and PHY LMV42 strain-based vectors in chickens which had naturally acquired NDV mate...

  2. Detection and differentiation of CVI988 (Rispens vaccine) from other serotype 1 Marek’s disease viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The serotype 1 Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is the causative agent for Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens of great concern to the poultry industry. CVI988, an attenuated serotype 1 MDV, is currently the most efficacious commercially available vaccine for preventing MD. Ho...

  3. Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics: News

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    Agenus brain cancer vaccine improves survival in phase 2 trial Meningococcal meningitis cases fall 94% following vaccine introduction Most vaccines are safe during breastfeeding Promising phase 1 results for Genocea’s herpes simplex virus vaccine Delayed vaccinations clearly increase risk of whooping cough Positive news from early-stage HIV vaccines Sanofi’s H7N9 vaccine trial with MF59 and AS03 PMID:24192581

  4. Transgenic Eimeria mitis expressing chicken interleukin 2 stimulated higher cellular immune response in chickens compared with the wild-type parasites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuoran; Tang, Xinming; Suo, Jingxia; Qin, Mei; Yin, Guangwen; Liu, Xianyong; Suo, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Chicken coccidiosis, caused by Eimeria sp., occurs in almost all poultry farms and causes huge economic losses in the poultry industry. Although this disease could be controlled by vaccination, the reduced feed conservation ratio limits the widespread application of anticoccidial vaccines in broilers because some intermediate and/or low immunogenic Eimeria sp. only elicit partial protection. It is of importance to enhance the immunogenicity of these Eimeria sp. by adjuvants for more effective prevention of coccidiosis. Cytokines have remarkable effects on the immunogenicity of antigens. Interleukin 2 (IL-2), for example, significantly stimulates the activation of CD8+ T cells and other immune cells. In this study, we constructed a transgenic Eimeria mitis line (EmiChIL-2) expressing chicken IL-2 (ChIL-2) to investigate the adjuvant effect of ChIL-2 to enhance the immunogenicity of E. mitis against its infection. Stable transfected EmiChIL-2 population was obtained by pyrimethamine selection and verified by PCR, genome walking, western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence assay. Cellular immune response, E. mitis-specific IFN-? secretion lymphocytes in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells, stimulated by EmiChIL-2 was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT). The results showed that EmiChIL-2 stimulated a higher cellular immune response compared with that of the wild-type parasite infection in chickens. Moreover, after the immunization with EmiChIL-2, elevated cellular immune response as well as reduced oocyst output were observed These results indicated that ChIL-2 expressed by Eimeria sp. functions as adjuvant and IL-2 expressing Eimeria parasites are valuable vaccine strains against coccidiosis. PMID:26082759

  5. Innocuity and immune response to Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine in camels (Camelus dromedarius)

    PubMed Central

    Benkirane, A.; Idrissi, A.H. El; Doumbia, A.; de Balogh, K.

    2014-01-01

    A field trial was conducted in a camel brucellosis-free herd to evaluate antibody response to the Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine in camels and assess shedding of the vaccine strain in milk. Twenty eight camels were divided into four groups according to their age and vaccination route. Groups A (n=3) and B (n=3) consisted of non-pregnant lactating female camels, vaccinated through subcutaneous and conjunctival routes, respectively. Groups C (n=10) consisted of 8-11 months old calves vaccinated through conjunctival route. The rest of the herd (n=12) composed of female and young camels were not vaccinated and were considered as the control group. Each animal from groups A, B and C was given the recommended dose of 2 × 109 colony forming units of Rev.1 vaccine irrespective of age or route of vaccination. Blood samples were collected from all the animals at the time of vaccination and at weekly, bi-weekly and monthly interval until 32 weeks post vaccination and from controls at weeks 8 and 24. The serological tests used were modified Rose Bengal Test, sero-agglutination test, and an indirect Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Milk samples were collected from all vaccinated female camels and tested for the presence of Rev.1 vaccine strain. Most vaccinated animals started to show an antibody response at week 2 and remained positive until week 16. By week 20 post-vaccination all animals in the three groups were tested negative for Brucella antibodies. Bacteriological analysis of milk samples did not allow any isolation of Brucella melitensis. All samples were found Brucella negative in PCR analysis. The results of this study indicate that the Rev.1 vaccine induces seroconversion in camels. Rev.1 vaccine strain is not excreted in the milk of camels. These findings are promising as to the safe use of the Rev.1 vaccine in camels.

  6. Acceptability of HPV Vaccine for Males and Preferences for Future Education Programs Among Appalachian Residents

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Paul L.; Oldach, Benjamin R.; Randle, Katherine E.; Katz, Mira L.

    2014-01-01

    Appalachia is a geographic region with several disparities related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, yet little is known about acceptability of HPV vaccine for males among Appalachian residents. HPV vaccine acceptability and preferences for future HPV vaccine education programs were examined among residents of Appalachian Ohio. Focus groups and in-depth interviews were conducted with Appalachian Ohio residents between July and October 2011. Participants (n = 102 from 24 focus groups and 5 in-depth interviews) included four key stakeholder groups: health care providers, community leaders, parents with adolescent sons, and young adult men ages 18 to 26 years. Support for vaccinating males against HPV was high among participants, despite low awareness and knowledge about HPV vaccine for males. Participants reported three categories of potential barriers to vaccinating males against HPV: concerns about vaccine safety and side effects, access to care and vaccination logistics, and gender and cultural issues. Participants reported that HPV vaccine was viewed as being only for females in their communities and that receiving the vaccine may be emasculating or embarrassing to males. Participants suggested that future HPV vaccine education programs mainly target parents, include basic information about HPV-related diseases and HPV vaccine (e.g., number of doses, cost), and present the vaccine as having the potential to prevent cancer (as opposed to preventing genital warts). Acceptability of HPV vaccine for males was high among residents of Appalachian Ohio. Future HPV vaccine education programs in Appalachia should address common potential barriers to vaccination and help destigmatize vaccination among males. PMID:24085197

  7. The Evidence for Efficacy of HPV Vaccines: Investigations in Categorical Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Alison L.; Goossens, Emery T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent approval of HPV vaccines and their widespread provision to young women provide an interesting context to gain experience with the application of statistical methods in current research. We demonstrate how we have used data extracted from a meta-analysis examining the efficacy of HPV vaccines in clinical trials with students in applied…

  8. Emerging Vaccine Informatics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongqun; Rappuoli, Rino; De Groot, Anne S.; Chen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Vaccine informatics is an emerging research area that focuses on development and applications of bioinformatics methods that can be used to facilitate every aspect of the preclinical, clinical, and postlicensure vaccine enterprises. Many immunoinformatics algorithms and resources have been developed to predict T- and B-cell immune epitopes for epitope vaccine development and protective immunity analysis. Vaccine protein candidates are predictable in silico from genome sequences using reverse vaccinology. Systematic transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression analyses facilitate rational vaccine design and identification of gene responses that are correlates of protection in vivo. Mathematical simulations have been used to model host-pathogen interactions and improve vaccine production and vaccination protocols. Computational methods have also been used for development of immunization registries or immunization information systems, assessment of vaccine safety and efficacy, and immunization modeling. Computational literature mining and databases effectively process, mine, and store large amounts of vaccine literature and data. Vaccine Ontology (VO) has been initiated to integrate various vaccine data and support automated reasoning. PMID:21772787

  9. Carbon Microtubes from Chicken Feathers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Melissa M.; Wool, Richard P.

    2007-03-01

    Chicken feathers, an agricultural waste problem, are a promising bio-based alternative to composite reinforcement. Approximately 5 billion pounds of chicken feathers are produced per year in the United States poultry industry alone. Containing 47.83% carbon, chicken feathers are hollow and strong in nature due to the 91% keratin content. Carbonized chicken feather (CCF) fibers are produced by heating to 220 C for 26 hours to optimize the crosslinking of the amino acids (predominantly cysteine). The feathers are then heated at 450 C for an additional two hours to reduce the content to mainly carbon. Wide angle xray scattering shows a structural change in the carbonized fiber from an interplanar spacing of 4.4 å (d200) in the raw feather to 3.36å in the CCF, resembling 3.43 å of commercial fiber. Scanning electron microscopy confirms that the hollow structure is kept intact. Dynamic mechanical analysis shows a 194% increase in the storage modulus of the composite from 0.730 GPa to 2.145 GPa at 35 C with the addition of only 3.45 wt% CCF mat. Assuming a density of 1 g/cm^3 the upper limit of the fiber modulus is approximately 40 GPa, compared to 3 GPa for the natural keratin fiber. The low cost carbon microtubes are being explored for polymer composite reinforcement and Hydrogen Storage substrates. Supported by USDA-NRI.

  10. Serotonin and Aggressiveness in Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin (5-HT) regulates aggressive behavior in animals. This study examined if 5-HT regulation of aggressiveness is gene-dependent. Chickens from two divergently selected lines KGB and MBB (Kind Gentle Birds and Mean Bad Birds displaying low and high aggressiveness, respectively) and DXL (Dekalb ...

  11. RNA Interference in Chicken Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hateren, Nick J.; Jones, Rachel S.; Wilson, Stuart A.

    The chicken has played an important role in biological discoveries since the 17th century (Stern, 2005). Many investigations into vertebrate development have utilized the chicken due to the accessibility of the chick embryo and its ease of manipulation (Brown et al., 2003). However, the lack of genetic resources has often handicapped these studies and so the chick is frequently overlooked as a model organism for the analysis of vertebrate gene function in favor of mice or zebrafish. In the past six years this situation has altered dramatically with the generation of over half a million expressed sequence tags and >20,000 fully sequenced chicken cDNAs (Boardman et al. 2002; Caldwell et al., 2005; Hubbard et al., 2005) together with a 6X coverage genome sequence (Hillier et al., 2004). These resources have created a comprehensive catalogue of chicken genes with readily accessible cDNA and EST resources available via ARK-GENOMICS (www.ark-genomics.org) for the functional analysis of vertebrate gene function.

  12. phoP, SPI1, SPI2 and aroA mutants of Salmonella Enteritidis induce a different immune response in chickens.

    PubMed

    Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Varmuzova, Karolina; Kyrova, Kamila; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rahman, Masudur; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Poultry is the most frequent reservoir of non-typhoid Salmonella enterica for humans. Understanding the interactions between chickens and S. enterica is therefore important for vaccine design and subsequent decrease in the incidence of human salmonellosis. In this study we therefore characterized the interactions between chickens and phoP, aroA, SPI1 and SPI2 mutants of S. Enteritidis. First we tested the response of HD11 chicken macrophage-like cell line to S. Enteritidis infection monitoring the transcription of 36 genes related to immune response. All the mutants and the wild type strain induced inflammatory signaling in the HD11 cell line though the response to SPI1 mutant infection was different from the rest of the mutants. When newly hatched chickens were inoculated, the phoP as well as the SPI1 mutant did not induce an expression of any of the tested genes in the cecum. Despite this, such chickens were protected against challenge with wild-type S. Enteritidis. On the other hand, inoculation of chickens with the aroA or SPI2 mutant induced expression of 27 and 18 genes, respectively, including genes encoding immunoglobulins. Challenge of chickens inoculated with these two mutants resulted in repeated induction of 11 and 13 tested genes, respectively, including the genes encoding immunoglobulins. In conclusion, SPI1 and phoP mutants induced protective immunity without inducing an inflammatory response and antibody production. Inoculation of chickens with the SPI2 and aroA mutants also led to protective immunity but was associated with inflammation and antibody production. The differences in interaction between the mutants and chicken host can be used for a more detailed understanding of the chicken immune system. PMID:26380970

  13. [New human vaccines].

    PubMed

    Grimprel, Emmanuel

    2012-03-01

    Proteinaceous meningococcal B vaccines are under development, and the most advanced, Bexsero, is currently being evaluated by the European Medicines Agency. Approval, if granted, will be based on safety, immunogenicity, and theoretical strain coverage established in vitro. Clinical effectiveness will only be determined after market release. New, more effective influenza vaccines are also being developed. A trivalent attenuated nasal influenza vaccine (Fluenz) shows better efficacy in children than the classic trivalent seasonal inactivated vaccine, but its use is restricted to children over 2 years of age because of safety and efficacy considerations. The more potent trivalent (MF59) adjuvated inactivated influenza vaccine (Fluad), licensed for adults over 65 years of age, is being evaluated through a pediatric investigation plan. This vaccine could be useful for infants in whom unadjuvated inactivated vaccines are poorly protective, but its safety must first be fully established. PMID:23472347

  14. Immunology of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Beverley, P C L

    2002-01-01

    An ideal vaccine is relatively easy to define, but few real vaccines approach the ideal and no vaccines exist for many organisms, for which a vaccine is the only realistic protective strategy in the foreseeable future. Many difficulties account for the failure to produce these vaccines. All micro-organisms deploy evasion mechanisms that interfere with effective immune responses and, for many organisms, it is not clear which immune responses provide effective protection. However, recent advances in methods for studying immune response to pathogens have provided a better understanding of immune mechanisms, including immunological memory, and led to the realisation that the initiation of immune responses is a key event requiring triggering through 'danger' signals. Based on these findings, the development of novel adjuvants, vectors and vaccine formulations allowing stimulation of optimal and prolonged protective immunity should lead to the introduction of vaccines for previously resistant organisms. PMID:12176847

  15. Vaccine 21 (2003) 10441047 MMR vaccination advice over the Internet

    E-print Network

    Colquhoun, David

    2003-01-01

    Vaccine 21 (2003) 1044­1047 MMR vaccination advice over the Internet Katja Schmidt, Edzard Ernst vaccination programme (MMR) vaccination via the Internet. Online referral directories listing e-mail addresses vaccination. After sending a follow-up letter explaining the nature and aim of this project and offering

  16. Vaccinations Etes-vous jour dans vos vaccinations ?

    E-print Network

    Di Girolami, Cristina

    Vaccinations Etes-vous à jour dans vos vaccinations ? * Nous réalisons gratuitement les vaccins suivants : DT Polio, Hépatite B, DTP +Coqueluche Les autres vaccins peuvent être prescrits par les médecins'infirmière. * Venez vous informer sur les vaccins : hépatite B, papillomavirus (prévention du cancer du col de l

  17. Isolation, identification, and whole genome sequencing of reticuloendotheliosis virus from a vaccine against Marek's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Junping; Dong, Xuan; Yang, Chenghuai; Li, Qihong; Cui, Zhizhong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Yu, Kangzhen; Yang, Hanchun

    2015-04-01

    According to the requirements of the Ministry of Agriculture of China, all vaccines must be screened for exogenous virus contamination before commercialization. A freeze-dried vaccine against Marek's disease was used to inoculate specific pathogen-free chickens, from which serum samples were collected after 42 days. The results were positive for reticuloendotheliosis virus antibody, which was indicative of reticuloendotheliosis virus contamination. After neutralization with serum positive for Marek's disease virus, chicken embryo fibroblasts were inoculated with the vaccine. Afterward, viral isolation and identification were performed. One reticuloendotheliosis virus strain (MD-2) was isolated and verified using an immunofluorescence assay. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the provirus MD-2 genome was performed using seven overlapping fragments as primers. The amplified products were sequenced and spliced to obtain the whole MD-2 genome sequence. The full genome length of MD-2 was 8,284 bp, which had an identity greater than 99% with the prairie chicken isolate APC-566 from the US, the goose-derived isolate 3410/06 from Taiwan, and the chicken-derived reticuloendotheliosis virus isolate HLJR0901 from Heilongjiang Province, China. The MD-2 was phylogenetically close to these isolates. The identity with REV isolate HA9901 from Jiangsu Province of China was 96.7%. The MD-2 had the lowest identity with duck-derived Sin Nombre virus from the United States, with the value of only 93.5%. The main difference lay in the U3 region of the long terminal repeat. The present research indicated that some vaccines produced during specific periods in China might be contaminated by reticuloendotheliosis virus. The reticuloendotheliosis virus strain isolated from the vaccine was phylogenetically close to the prevalent strain, with only minor variations. PMID:25725074

  18. A molecular survey of Eimeria in chickens across Australia.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Rosamond M; Morgan, Jess A T

    2015-11-30

    Coccidiosis is a costly enteric disease of chickens caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Eimeria. Disease diagnosis and management is complicated since there are multiple Eimeria species infecting chickens and mixed species infections are common. Current control measures are only partially effective and this, combined with concerns over vaccine efficacy and increasing drug resistance, demonstrates a need for improved coccidiosis diagnosis and control. Before improvements can be made, it is important to understand the species commonly infecting poultry flocks in both backyard and commercial enterprises. The aim of this project was to conduct a survey and assessment of poultry Eimeria across Australia using genetic markers, and create a collection of isolates for each Eimeria species. A total of 260 samples (faecal or caecal) was obtained, and survey results showed that Eimeria taxa were present in 98% of commercial and 81% of backyard flocks. The distribution of each Eimeria species was widespread across Australia, with representatives of all species being found in every state and territory, and the Eimeria species predominating in commercial flocks differed from those in backyard flocks. Three operational taxonomic units also occurred frequently in commercial flocks highlighting the need to understand the impact of these uncharacterised species on poultry production. As Eimeria infections were also frequent in backyard flocks, there is a potential for backyard flocks to act as reservoirs for disease, especially as the industry moves towards free range production systems. This Eimeria collection will be an important genetic resource which is the crucial first step in the development of more sophisticated diagnostic tools and the development of new live vaccines which ultimately will provide savings to the industry in terms of more efficient coccidiosis management. PMID:26467277

  19. Superoxide dismutase SodB is a protective antigen against Campylobacter jejuni colonisation in chickens.

    PubMed

    Chintoan-Uta, Cosmin; Cassady-Cain, Robin L; Al-Haideri, Halah; Watson, Eleanor; Kelly, David J; Smith, David G E; Sparks, Nick H C; Kaiser, Pete; Stevens, Mark P

    2015-11-17

    Campylobacter is the leading cause of foodborne diarrhoeal illness in the developed world and consumption or handling of contaminated poultry meat is the principal source of infection. Strategies to control Campylobacter in broilers prior to slaughter are urgently required and are predicted to limit the incidence of human campylobacteriosis. Towards this aim, a purified recombinant subunit vaccine based on the superoxide dismutase (SodB) protein of C. jejuni M1 was developed and tested in White Leghorn birds. Birds were vaccinated on the day of hatch and 14 days later with SodB fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST) or purified GST alone. Birds were challenged with C. jejuni M1 at 28 days of age and caecal Campylobacter counts determined at weekly intervals. Across three independent trials, the vaccine induced a statistically significant 1 log10 reduction in caecal Campylobacter numbers in vaccinated birds compared to age-matched GST-vaccinated controls. Significant induction of antigen-specific serum IgY was detected in all vaccinated birds, however the magnitude and timing of SodB-specific IgY did not correlate with lower numbers of C. jejuni. Antibodies from SodB-vaccinated chickens detected the protein in the periplasm and not membrane fractions or on the bacterial surface, suggesting that the protection observed may not be strictly antibody-mediated. SodB may be useful as a constituent of vaccines for control of C. jejuni infection in broiler birds, however modest protection was observed late relative to the life of broiler birds and further studies are required to potentiate the magnitude and timing of protection. PMID:26458797

  20. Superoxide dismutase SodB is a protective antigen against Campylobacter jejuni colonisation in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Chintoan-Uta, Cosmin; Cassady-Cain, Robin L.; Al-Haideri, Halah; Watson, Eleanor; Kelly, David J.; Smith, David G.E.; Sparks, Nick H.C.; Kaiser, Pete; Stevens, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter is the leading cause of foodborne diarrhoeal illness in the developed world and consumption or handling of contaminated poultry meat is the principal source of infection. Strategies to control Campylobacter in broilers prior to slaughter are urgently required and are predicted to limit the incidence of human campylobacteriosis. Towards this aim, a purified recombinant subunit vaccine based on the superoxide dismutase (SodB) protein of C. jejuni M1 was developed and tested in White Leghorn birds. Birds were vaccinated on the day of hatch and 14 days later with SodB fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST) or purified GST alone. Birds were challenged with C. jejuni M1 at 28 days of age and caecal Campylobacter counts determined at weekly intervals. Across three independent trials, the vaccine induced a statistically significant 1 log10 reduction in caecal Campylobacter numbers in vaccinated birds compared to age-matched GST-vaccinated controls. Significant induction of antigen-specific serum IgY was detected in all vaccinated birds, however the magnitude and timing of SodB-specific IgY did not correlate with lower numbers of C. jejuni. Antibodies from SodB-vaccinated chickens detected the protein in the periplasm and not membrane fractions or on the bacterial surface, suggesting that the protection observed may not be strictly antibody-mediated. SodB may be useful as a constituent of vaccines for control of C. jejuni infection in broiler birds, however modest protection was observed late relative to the life of broiler birds and further studies are required to potentiate the magnitude and timing of protection. PMID:26458797