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1

Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 1990.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) is an epidemiologic surveillance system that was established recently by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to monitor the prevalence of youth behaviors that most influence health. The 1990 national s...

1990-01-01

2

Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 1990 (for Microcomputers).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 1990 national school-based Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) focuses on priority health-risk behaviors established during youth that result in the most significant mortality, morbidity, disability, and social problems during both youth and adulthood. ...

1990-01-01

3

Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 1993 (for Microcomputers).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) is an epidemiological surveillance system that was established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to monitor the prevalence of youth behaviors that most influence health. The 1991 na...

1995-01-01

4

Health Risk Behavior in Foster Youth  

PubMed Central

Problem Adolescent health problems are predominantly caused by risk behavior. Foster adolescents have disproportionately poor health; therefore identification of risk behavior is critical. Method A secondary analysis of data from a larger study investigated the health risk behavior of 56 foster youth using the CHIP-AE. Findings Foster youth had some increased risk behavior. Younger adolescents and those in kinship care had less risky behavior. Youth had more risk behavior when: in group homes, parental death, histories of physical or emotional abuse, or history of attempted suicide. Conclusions These results point to areas of strength and vulnerability in foster youth.

Gramkowski, Bridget; Kools, Susan; Paul, Steven; Boyer, Cherrie; Monasterio, Erica; Robbins, Nancy

2010-01-01

5

Nevada Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A relatively small number of preventable behaviors, such as drinking alcohol and driving, failing to wear seat belts, and engaging in unprotected intercourse, contribute greatly to morbidity and mortality among youth and young adults. An extensive survey of the risk behaviors of one state's youth is described here. A total of 1,538 responses from…

Adams, Ken; And Others

6

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance: United States, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examined national Youth Risk Behavior Survey data and state and local surveys of high school students to investigate behaviors contributing to unintentional injuries, violence, substance use, age at initiation of risk behaviors, substance abuse on school property, sexual behaviors contributing to pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases,…

Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Kann, Laura; Kinchen, Steven A.; Williams, Barbara; Ross, James G.; Lowry, Richard; Kolbe, Lloyd

2002-01-01

7

Wisconsin Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The 2001 Wisconsin Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was conducted as part of a national effort by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to monitor health-risk behaviors of the nations high school students. This report contains findings from the 2001 Wisconsin YRBS in eight priority areas: protective assets, unintentional injuries,…

Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

8

Wisconsin Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 2001 Wisconsin Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was conducted as part of a national effort by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to monitor health-risk behaviors of the nations high school students. This report contains findings from the 2001 Wisconsin YRBS in eight priority areas: protective assets, unintentional injuries,…

Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

9

Cumulative Environmental Risk and Youth Problem Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from Wave 1 (n=5,070) and Wave 2 (n=4,404) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we examined the relationship between cumulative risk exposure and youth problem behavior. Cross-sectional analyses revealed a positive, linear association between cumulative risk and problem behaviors. The association between cumulative…

Gerard, Jean M.; Buehler, Cheryl

2004-01-01

10

Youth risk behavior survey: Bangkok Thailand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract,Purpose: To identify the prevalence of risk behaviors and related risk factors in adolescents in Bangkok, Thailand. Methods: Youth risk behavior survey questionnaires were collected from 2311 adolescents in 8 schools, 13 communities and 2 Juvenile Home Institutions from January to February 2001. Their mean age was 15.5 1.8 years, and 59% were female. Risk factors of interest were gender,

Suwanna Ruangkanchanasetr; Adisak Plitponkarnpim; Priyasuda Hetrakul; Ronnachai Kongsakon

11

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance National Alternative High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey, United States, 1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The 1998 National Alternative High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey measured health risk behaviors at alternative high schools. Many alternative students engaged in behaviors that made them high-risk for serious problems (e.g., motor vehicle safety, violence, nutrition, sexuality, exercise, and substance abuse). Their prevalence of high risk

Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Kann, Laura; Kinchen, Steven A.; Ross, James G.; Gowda, Vani R.; Collins, Janet L.; Kolbe, Lloyd J.

2000-01-01

12

Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Survey 1995 Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is a national survey developed by the Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with 71 state and local departments of education and 19 federal agencies. The YRBS specifically investigates behaviors related to the leading causes of mortality,…

Schumacher, Catherine; And Others

13

Nevada Youth Risk Behavior Survey Report 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report discusses results of the Nevada Department of Education's fourth statewide administration of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 (N=2,702) from 75 public high schools participated in the study. Nevada high school students reported behaviors that equaled or exceeded goals established in the national…

Soule, Penelope P.; Sharp, Joyce

14

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance--National Alternative High School Risk Behavior Survey, United States, 1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Alternative High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey (ALT-YRBS) is one component of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS), which monitors six categories of health risk behaviors among youth and young adults. The 1998 ALT-YRBS measured priority health risk behaviors among students at alternative high schools. It used a three-stage…

Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Kann, Laura; Kinchen, Steven A.; Ross, James G.; Gowda, Vani R.; Collins, Janet L.; Kolbe, Lloyd J.

1999-01-01

15

Results Of The 2003 Wyoming Youth Risk Behavior Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to measure the major health risk behaviors performed by youth. These health risk behaviors include: behaviors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injuries; the use of tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs; sexual behaviors that contribute…

Engstrom, Martha C.; Parrie, Chelsey; Miller, Russell; Li, Yuan

2004-01-01

16

Comparing the Criminal Behavior of Youth Gangs and At-Risk Youths.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study explored the differences between the criminal behavior of youth gang members and non-gang, but similarly at-risk, youths. The research revealed that criminal behavior committed by gang members is extensive and significantly exceeds that committ...

C. R. Huff

1998-01-01

17

Special Report. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance--United States, 1997.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Summarizes results from the 1997 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System and trends from 1991 to 1997 in selected risk behaviors. Results indicate that many high school students still practice behaviors that place them at risk for serious health problems, with some behaviors more likely among particular subgroups. Some behaviors vary considerably…

Kann, Laura; Kinchen, Steven A.; Williams, Barbara I.; Ross, James G.; Lowry, Richard; Hill, Carl V.; Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Blumson, Pamela S.; Collins, Janet L.; Kolbe, Lloyd J.

1998-01-01

18

The Clustering of Risk Behaviors Among Caribbean Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the relationships among risk behaviors for Caribbean youth; and to determine the correlations between initiation of sexual activity and other risk behaviors. Methods: The associations between cigarette smoking, alcohol and marijuana use, early initiation of sexual intercourse, involvement in violence and delinquency were examined using odds ratios on data from the Caribbean Youth Health Survey (n =

Sally-Ann Ohene; Marjorie Ireland; Robert Wm Blum

2005-01-01

19

Special Report. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance. United States, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Summarizes results from 1999 national school-based surveys and trends during 1991-99 in selected youth risk behaviors as well as 33 state and 16 local school-based surveys. Prevalence of several injury-related behaviors and sexual behaviors have improved. Current smoking rates may be declining. Certain risk behaviors are more common among…

Kann, Laura; Kinchen, Steven A.; Williams, Barbara I.; Ross, James G.; Lowry, Richard; Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Kolbe, Lloyd J.

2000-01-01

20

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance--United States, 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors six categories of health-risk behaviors: injury-inviting behaviors, tobacco use, alcohol and other drug use, sexual behaviors, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity. This report summarizes results from the national survey, 35 state surveys, and 16 local surveys conducted among high…

Kann, Laura; And Others

1996-01-01

21

Cigarette taxes and youth smoking: New evidence from national, state, and local Youth Risk Behavior Surveys  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several studies have examined the effects of state cigarette tax increases on youth substance use over the 1990s, with most – but not all – finding that higher taxes reduce youth consumption of tobacco. We advance the literature by using data from the 1991 to 2005 waves of the national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS), providing information on over 100,000

Christopher Carpenter; Philip J. Cook

2008-01-01

22

Living on the edge -- risk, protection, behavior, and outcomes of Argentine youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Risk and protective factors influence behaviors and outcomes for youth. While risk factors expose youth to risk-taking behavior that compromises well-beingand hinders personal development, protective factors mediate risk and act as protective mechanisms that insulate youth from negative outcomes. This paper groups youth by risk levels using a cluster analysis methodology, and identifies the risk and protective factors that characterize

Michael Justesen

2008-01-01

23

HIV Risk Behaviors among African American Male Violent Youth Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bay City (pseudonym) is one of the nation's urban epicenters of the HIV epidemic. Although researchers have examined HIV risk behaviors among juvenile offenders detained in juvenile facilities, no study has examined these risk behaviors among youth offenders who have been waived to adult criminal court and detained in U.S. jails. In the present…

Richardson, Joseph B., Jr.; Brown, Jerry; Van Brakle, Mischelle; Godette, Dionne C.

2010-01-01

24

A Healthy Look at Idaho Youth: Results of the 1995 Idaho Youth Risk Behavior Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The results of one state's youth risk behavior survey are described here. The survey was administered to 2,726 students in grades 9 through 12 in 26 public schools. The school response rate was 65% and the student response rate was 87%. Results indicate that by the time youth enter the 9th grade, many have engaged in behaviors that put them at…

Idaho State Dept. of Health and Welfare, Boise.

25

Tribal Youth Victimization and Delinquency: Analysis of Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study details ethnic disparities that exist between American Indian\\/Alaska Native (AI\\/AN) youth and White, African American, and Hispanic\\/Latino youth based on secondary data analysis of Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey from surveys conducted in 2003, 2005, and 2007. Items were selected for secondary analysis based on their relevance to one of five categories including (a) Violence or delinquent behaviors,

Thomas W. Pavkov; Leah Travis; Kathleen A. Fox; Connie Bear King; Terry L. Cross

2010-01-01

26

Utah Youth Risk Behavior Survey Results, 1991, 1993 & 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report describes results from the 1995 Utah Youth Risk Behavior Survey of Utah's high school students and compares results to selected 1991 and 1993 results. The 76-item survey was identical to the national survey, though it omitted questions about sexual behavior. It examined unintentional and intentional injuries; tobacco, alcohol, and…

Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

27

Urban American Indian and Alaska Native Youth: Youth Risk Behavior Survey 1997–2003  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To examine the prevalence of health risk-behaviors among American Indian\\/Alaska Native (AI\\/AN) youth in urban areas. Methods Data from the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) for the years 1997–2003 were used for the analyses (Urban sample = 52,364).\\u000a The YRBS is a self-report questionnaire administered to a sample of 9th–12th grade students intended to monitor health risk-behaviors.\\u000a “Urban” is defined

Shira Rutman; Alice Park; Mei Castor; Maile Taualii; Ralph Forquera

2008-01-01

28

2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: Alternative Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior alternative school student frequency distributions. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 274 alternative school students in Montana during February of 2011. Frequency distributions may not total 274 due to nonresponse and percents may not total 100 percent due to…

Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

2011-01-01

29

2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: Students with Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey high school student frequency distributions for students with disabilities. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 1,672 high school students with disabilities in Montana during February of 2011. Frequency distributions may not total 1,672 due to nonresponse and…

Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

2011-01-01

30

Wisconsin Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Executive Summary and Report, 1997.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Part of a national survey effort by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) conducted in Wisconsin public schools in 1997 is presented. The core of the survey measures 16 objectives set by CDC as part of its Year 2000 initiative. Additional questions were added specifically for Wisconsin.…

Kadel, Ben

31

Brief Report: Behavioral Risk Factors for Youth Soccer (Football) Injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives By most reports, soccer (football) is among the most played and most popular sports in the world. This study prospectively examined behavioral risk factors for youth soccer injury. Method Sixty 11- and 12-year-old boys who played on six teams in a suburban recreational soccer league were followed over the course of a season. Six predictors were assessed prior to

David C. Schwebel; Mark M. Banaszek; McCall McDaniel

2006-01-01

32

2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: Nonpublic Accredited Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey high school student frequency distributions for nonpublic accredited schools. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 349 high school students in Nonpublic Region during February of 2011. Frequency distributions may not total 349 due to nonresponse and percents may…

Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

2011-01-01

33

Overweight, Obesity, Youth, and Health-Risk Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Background The prevalence and severity of obesity have increased among children and adolescents. While the medical and psychosocial consequences of youth obesity have been well-documented, less information exists on the association of overweight/obesity with health risk behaviors, which are considered to be a primary threat to adolescent health. Objectives This study examined the association of overweight and obesity with health-risk behaviors among U.S. youth. Methods Self-reported height and weight, substance use, violence and bullying were assessed in a nationally representative sample of students aged 11 to 17 years (N=7825) who participated in the 2005/6 Health Behaviors in School-Aged Children survey. Data were analyzed in 2009. Results Significant gender and age differences in the relationship of overweight/obesity with risk behaviors were observed. Overweight and obesity were significantly associated with substance use among girls only: frequent smoking and drinking were associated with overweight and obesity among younger girls, whereas they were associated with obesity among older girls. Frequent smoking and cannabis use were associated with overweight among younger girls only. Relationships between violent behavior and overweight/obesity were mainly observed among boys: Younger obese boys were more likely to be victims of bullying, whereas older obese boys were more likely to carry weapons, compared to boys of normal weight. Conclusions Overweight and obese youth are at risk of developing health compromising behaviors which may compound medical and social problems associated with excess weight.

Farhat, Tilda; Iannotti, Ronald J.; Simons-Morton, Bruce

2010-01-01

34

Physical Activity, TV Viewing, and Weight in U.S. Youth: 1999 Youth Risk Behavior Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the relationship between physical activity, TV watching, and weight in U.S. youth ages 14 to 18 years.Research Methods and Procedures: Data from a nationally representative sample of 15,143 U.S. high-school students participating in the 1999 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Youth Risk Behavior Survey were examined. Prevalence rates of participation in moderate physical activity (MPA),

Joey C. Eisenmann; R. Todd Bartee; Min Qi Wang

2002-01-01

35

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 53, No. SS-2, May 21, 2004. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance, United States, 2003.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Priority health-risk behaviors, which contribute to the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among youth and adults, often are established during youth, extend into adulthood, are interrelated, and are preventable. The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillanc...

J. Hawkins J. Ross J. A. Grunbaum L. Kann S. Kinchen

2004-01-01

36

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System: Selected 2011 National Health Risk Behaviors and Health Outcomes by Race/Ethnicity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) monitors priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults in the United States. The national YRBS is conducted every two years during the spring semester and provides data representative of 9th through 12th grade…

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

2011-01-01

37

Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey Report, 2005 for Montana High Schools: Statewide Analysis of Selected Behavior Risk Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) report is a continuation of the surveillance and reporting system for adolescent risk behaviors developed by the Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The purpose of the Youth

Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2005

2005-01-01

38

Idaho Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 1995. Summary Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Many of the health problems experienced by youth are caused by preventable behaviors, such as alcohol abuse and unprotected sexual intercourse. The increasing cost of health care demands that youth be taught to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors. School health programs are essential to attaining this goal. The results of the 1995 Idaho Youth

Idaho State Dept. of Health and Welfare, Boise. Div. of Consumer and Health Education.

39

Comparing the Criminal Behavior of Youth Gangs and At-Risk Youths. Research in Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study was conducted to compare the criminal behavior of gang members and nongang at-risk youths in four urban and suburban communities, Denver (Colorado), Aurora (Colorado), Broward County (Florida), and Cleveland (Ohio). The first three communities were emergent, rather than chronic, gang environments, but in Cleveland, information on gangs…

Huff, C. Ronald

40

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance--United States, 1993. CDC Surveillance Summaries.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Systems monitor six categories of priority health risk behaviors among youth and young adults: (1) behaviors that contribute to intentional or unintentional injuries; (2) tobacco use (3) alcohol and other drug use; (4) sexual behaviors that contribute to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases;…

Kann, Laura; And Others

1995-01-01

41

A Healthy Look at Idaho Youth: Results of the 1993 Idaho Youth Risk Behavior and 1992 School Health Education Surveys.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since many of the health problems experienced by young people are caused by preventable behaviors, such as alcohol abuse and unprotected sexual intercourse, it is important to know the extent of these behaviors among youth. The results of the 1993 Idaho Youth Risk Behavior Survey and 1992 Idaho School Health Education Survey are described in this…

Gray, Donald Z.; Walton, Deborah A.; Bosh, Teresa; Roberts, Dawn; Marriott, Sally

42

Problem Behaviors vs. the Situational Adversity Approach: HIV Risk Behaviors of Homeless Youth in Fort Lauderdale, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Problem behavior and situational adversity theories were used to investigate HIV risks among homeless youth. Problem behavior theory posits that youth with certain personality characteristics are more likely to engage in additional risk behaviors. Situational adversity warns against exposure to the social context of homelessness. We investigated the interaction between these concepts to explain two HIV-related risk behaviors: (1) non-condom

Melanie J. Simmons; Marlene LaLota

43

Youth Assets and Sexual Risk Behavior: Differences between Male and Female Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Youth internal assets and external resources are protective factors that can help youth avoid potentially harmful behaviors. This study investigates how the relationship between youth assets or resources and two sexual risk behaviors (ever had sex and birth control use) varied by gender. Data were collected through in-home interviews from…

Mueller, Trisha; Gavin, Lorrie; Oman, Roy; Vesely, Sara; Aspy, Cheryl; Tolma, Eleni; Rodine, Sharon

2010-01-01

44

Youth Assets and Sexual Risk Behavior: Differences between Male and Female Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Youth internal assets and external resources are protective factors that can help youth avoid potentially harmful behaviors. This study investigates how the relationship between youth assets or resources and two sexual risk behaviors (ever had sex and birth control use) varied by gender. Data were collected through in-home interviews from…

Mueller, Trisha; Gavin, Lorrie; Oman, Roy; Vesely, Sara; Aspy, Cheryl; Tolma, Eleni; Rodine, Sharon

2010-01-01

45

Metabolic Risk and Health Behaviors in Minority Youth at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of sex and race/ethnicity on metabolic risk and health behaviors in minority youth. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 173 seventh graders (46% male and 54% female; 49% Hispanic and 51% African American) with BMI ?85th percentile and a family history of diabetes were assessed with weight, height, BMI, percent body fat, and waist circumference measures. Laboratory indexes included 2-h oral glucose tolerance tests with insulin levels at 0 and 2 h, fasting A1C, and lipids. Insulin resistance was estimated by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). Youth also completed questionnaires evaluating health behaviors. RESULTS Average BMI (31.6 ± 6.4 kg/m2) and percent body fat (39.5 ± 10.6%) were high. All participants demonstrated insulin resistance with elevated HOMA-IR values (8.5 ± 5.2). Compared with African American youth, Hispanic youth had higher triglycerides and lower HDL cholesterol despite similar BMI. Hispanic youth reported lower self-efficacy for diet, less physical activity, and higher total fat intake. Male youth had higher glucose (0 and 2 h) and reported more physical activity, more healthy food choices, and higher calcium intake than female youth. CONCLUSIONS Screening high-risk youth for insulin resistance and lipid abnormalities is recommended. Promoting acceptable physical activities and healthy food choices may be especially important for Hispanic and female youth.

Holl, Marita G.; Jaser, Sarah S.; Womack, Julie A.; Jefferson, Vanessa L.; Grey, Margaret

2011-01-01

46

Using the Youth Risk Behavior Survey To Compare Risk Behaviors of Texas High School and College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using 1993 Youth Risk Behavior Survey data, this study assessed Texas high school (N=6,015) and college students' (N=1048) alcohol use, tobacco use, and sexual behavior. Results indicated that the high school students initiated risk behaviors at much earlier ages than the college students, but college students reported a higher incidence of the…

Wiley, David C.; And Others

1997-01-01

47

Predicting School Weapon Possession: A Secondary Analysis of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examines responses of 40,435 students from the "Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey" and uses student self-reported school risk behaviors to "predict" recent weapon possession at school. Although school risk behaviors were moderately correlated with school weapon possession, many frequent weapon carriers displayed zero school risks. Argues…

Furlong, Michael J.; Bates, Michael P.; Smith, Douglas C.

2001-01-01

48

Predicting School Weapon Possession: A Secondary Analysis of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines responses of 40,435 students from the "Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey" and uses student self-reported school risk behaviors to "predict" recent weapon possession at school. Although school risk behaviors were moderately correlated with school weapon possession, many frequent weapon carriers displayed zero school risks. Argues…

Furlong, Michael J.; Bates, Michael P.; Smith, Douglas C.

2001-01-01

49

Smokers Report: A Health Risk Behavior Comparison of Montana High School Students Based on Current Smoking. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is administered by the Montana Office of Public Instruction every two years to students in grades 7 through 12. The purpose of the survey is to help monitor the prevalence of behaviors that not only influence youth health, but also put youth at risk for the most significant health and social problems…

Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2013

2013-01-01

50

Sports Team Participation: A Risk Behavior Comparison of Montana High School Students Based on Sports Team Participation. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is administered by the Montana Office of Public Instruction every two years to students in grades 7 through 12. The purpose of the survey is to help monitor the prevalence of behaviors that not only influence youth health, but also put youth at risk for the most significant health and social problems…

Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2012

2012-01-01

51

Students with Special Needs: A Health Risk Behavior Comparison of Montana High School Students Based on Special Education Assistance. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is administered by the Montana Office of Public Instruction every two years to students in grades 7 through 12. The purpose of the survey is to help monitor the prevalence of behaviors that not only influence youth health, but also put youth at risk for the most significant health and social problems…

Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2012

2012-01-01

52

Suicide Report: A Health Risk Behavior Comparison of Montana High School Students Based on Attempted Suicide. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is administered by the Montana Office of Public Instruction every two years to students in grades 7 through 12. The purpose of the survey is to help monitor the prevalence of behaviors that not only influence youth health, but also put youth at risk for the most significant health and social problems…

Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2013

2013-01-01

53

Youth Risk Behavior Survey of High School Students Attending Bureau Funded Schools, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In spring 2001, 5,654 American Indian high school students attending schools funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) completed the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. The survey examined youth behaviors in the areas of motor vehicle safety, weapons, violence, suicide, current and lifetime tobacco use, current and lifetime drug and alcohol use,…

Shaughnessy, Lana; Branum, Cheryl; Everett-Jones, Sherry

54

High-Risk Behaviors among Youth and Their Reasons for Not Getting Tested for HIV  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Concerned about reports of a 15% decline in HIV testing among high-risk youth in an earlier study in Pittsburgh, this study was initiated to explore reasons why young people are not getting tested for HIV, while gathering data on their respective level of risk taking behaviors. A total of 580 surveys were collected from youth aged between 14 and…

Moyer, Matthew B.; Silvestre, Anthony J.; Lombardi, Emilia L.; Taylor, Christopher A.

2007-01-01

55

Youth at Risk: A Resource for Counselors, Teachers and Parents. Part 3. Working with Youth at Risk: Behavioral Issues and Interventions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document consists of Part 3 of a book of readings on at-risk youth designed to provide information and strategies for counselors, teachers, parents, administrators, social workers, and others who work with youth at risk. It includes six readings, each dealing with a specific behavior that places a young person at risk. "The Secret and…

Kempley, Frances A.; And Others

56

Untangling the impact of sexual abuse on HIV risk behaviors among youths in foster care.  

PubMed

This study investigates the interrelationships among childhood sexual abuse, other types of child maltreatment, emotional and behavioral problems, and HIV risk behaviors in a sample of 167 adolescents, aged 15-19, participating in an independent living preparation program in one midwestern county. Thirty-three percent of the youths identified as white and 67% as youths of color. The sample was almost evenly split by gender (51% male and 49% female). Thirty-five percent of the youths (n = 59) reported some form of sexual abuse; 21 reported unwanted touching, with no unwanted intercourse, and 38 reported unwanted intercourse. Multivariate analyses demonstrated a significant relationship between the severity of sexual abuse and youths' recent HIV risk behaviors, after accounting for the contribution of other childhood trauma and emotional and behavioral problems. The findings support the need for HIV prevention programs targeting sexually abused youths. PMID:11565596

Elze, D E; Auslander, W; McMillen, C; Edmond, T; Thompson, R

2001-08-01

57

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance. United States, 1999. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 49, No. SS-5, June 9, 2000. CDC Surveillance Summaries.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Priority health-risk behaviors, which contribute to the leading causes of mortality and morbidity among youth and adults, often are established during youth, extend into adulthood, are interrelated, and are preventable. The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillanc...

S. M. Hewitt

2000-01-01

58

Psychological Distress, Substance Use, and HIV\\/STI Risk Behaviors Among Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychological distress has been inconsistently associated with sexual risk behavior in youth, suggesting additional factors,\\u000a such as substance use, may explain this relationship. The mediating or moderating role of substance use on the relationship\\u000a between psychological distress and sexual risk behaviors was prospectively examined over the four high school years in a sample\\u000a of urban youth (N = 850; 80% African American;

Katherine S. Elkington; José A. Bauermeister; Marc A. Zimmerman

2010-01-01

59

Changes in Risk-Taking among High School Students, 1991-1997: Evidence from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveys.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using nationally representative data from students in grades 9 to 12 from the national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS) of 1991, 1993, 1995, and 1997, this study examined changes in high school students' participation in health risk behaviors. Ten specific health risk behaviors were identified, each of which poses potential immediate and…

Boggess, Scott; Lindberg, Laura Duberstein; Porter, Laura

60

Individual and Contextual Factors of Sexual Risk Behavior in Youth Perinatally Infected with HIV  

PubMed Central

Abstract This study prospectively examines the effects of maternal and child HIV infection on youth penetrative and unprotected penetrative sex, as well as the role of internal contextual, external contextual, social and self-regulatory factors in influencing the sexual behaviors of HIV?infected (PHIV+), HIV?affected (uninfected with an HIV+ caregiver), and HIV unaffected (uninfected with an HIV? caregiver) youth over time. Data (N=420) were drawn from two longitudinal studies focused on the effects of pediatric or maternal HIV on youth (51% female; 39% PHIV+) and their caregivers (92% female; 46% HIV+). PHIV+ youth were significantly less likely to engage in penetrative sex than HIV? youth at follow-up, after adjusting for contextual, social, and self-regulatory factors. Other individual- and contextual-level factors such as youth alcohol and marijuana use, residing with a biological parent, caregiver employment, caregiver marijuana use, and youth self-concept were also associated with penetrative sex. Youth who used alcohol were significantly more likely to engage in unprotected penetrative sex. Data suggest that, despite contextual, social, and self-regulatory risk factors, PHIV+ youth are less likely to engage in sexual behavior compared to HIV? youth from similar environments. Further research is required to understand delays in sexual activity in PHIV+ youth and also to understand potential factors that promote resiliency, particularly as they age into older adolescence and young adulthood.

Bauermeister, Jose A.; Robbins, Reuben N.; Gromadzka, Olga; Abrams, Elaine J.; Wiznia, Andrew; Bamji, Mahrukh; Mellins, Claude A.

2012-01-01

61

Psychological Distress, Substance Use, and HIV/STI Risk Behaviors among Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Psychological distress has been inconsistently associated with sexual risk behavior in youth, suggesting additional factors, such as substance use, may explain this relationship. The mediating or moderating role of substance use on the relationship between psychological distress and sexual risk behaviors was prospectively examined over the four…

Elkington, Katherine S.; Bauermeister, Jose A.; Zimmerman, Marc A.

2010-01-01

62

HIV/Sexually Transmitted Infection Risk Behaviors in Delinquent Youth with Psychiatric Disorders: A Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effect of psychiatric disorders on human immunodeficiency virus/sexually transmitted infection (HIV/STI) risk behaviors in juvenile justice youths is examined. Prevalence, persistence and prediction are addressed among four mutually exclusive diagnostic groups and results show a high prevalence rate of many HIV/STI sexual risk behaviors that…

Elkington, Katherine; Teplin, Linda A.; Mericle, Amy A.; Welty, Leah J.; Romero, Erin G.; Abram, Karen M.

2008-01-01

63

Familial backgrounds and risk behaviors of youth with thrownaway experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many homeless youth may also be considered “thrownaway” in that they have specifically been told to leave home. In this study, thrownaway experiences among homeless youth are examined in two national samples: (a) a nationally representative sample of youth residing in youth shelters, and (b) a purposive sample of street youth in 10 cities. Prevalence of thrownaway experiences for the

Christopher L Ringwalt; Jody M Greene; Marjorie J Robertson

1998-01-01

64

Wisconsin Youth Risk Behavior and HIV/AIDS Prevention Education: Survey Results, 1991. Bulletin No. 93253.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains data from the 1991 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, administered to 1,440 high school students throughout Wisconsin. Included are data on the prevalence of injuries; drug use; sexual behaviors; dietary behaviors; and physical activity. The results revealed that over 80% of students rarely or never wear bicycle helmets and 50%…

Wagener, Judy; Nehls-Lowe, Barbara

65

Online Social Networking Technologies, HIV Knowledge, and Sexual Risk and Testing Behaviors Among Homeless Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluates associations between online social networking and sexual health behaviors among homeless youth in Los\\u000a Angeles. We analyzed survey data from 201 homeless youth accessing services at a Los Angeles agency. Multivariate (regression\\u000a and logistic) models assessed whether use of (and topics discussed on) online social networking technologies affect HIV knowledge,\\u000a sexual risk behaviors, and testing for sexually

Sean D. Young; Eric Rice

2011-01-01

66

The Relationship Between Life Satisfaction, Risk-Taking Behaviors, and Youth Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study builds on existing criminological theories and examines the role of life satisfaction and self-control in explaining youth violence. Using data from a stratified cluster sample of 5,414 public high school students who responded to the South Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey, the study examines the relationship between adolescents'perceptions of life satisfaction, behavioral risky acts, and self-reported acts of

John M. MacDonald; Alex R. Piquero; Robert F. Valois; Keith J. Zullig

2005-01-01

67

The Influence of Knowing Someone with AIDS on Youth HIV Sexual Risk Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Research indicates that knowing someone with HIV/AIDS is associated with greater perceived risk of contracting HIV and changes in sexual risk behaviors. The current study with a sample of 1,172 examined whether knowing someone with HIV/AIDS influenced sexual risk communication and youth engagement in sexual intercourse using the Philadelphia…

Cederbaum, Julie A.; Marcus, Steven C.; Hutchinson, M. Katherine

2007-01-01

68

The Influence of Knowing Someone with AIDS on Youth HIV Sexual Risk Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research indicates that knowing someone with HIV/AIDS is associated with greater perceived risk of contracting HIV and changes in sexual risk behaviors. The current study with a sample of 1,172 examined whether knowing someone with HIV/AIDS influenced sexual risk communication and youth engagement in sexual intercourse using the Philadelphia…

Cederbaum, Julie A.; Marcus, Steven C.; Hutchinson, M. Katherine

2007-01-01

69

HIV/Sexually Transmitted Infection Risk Behaviors in Delinquent Youth With Psychiatric Disorders: A Longitudinal Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine the prevalence and persistence of 20 HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) sexual and drug use risk behaviors and to predict their occurrence in 4 mutually exclusive diagnostic groups of delinquent youth: (1) major mental disorders (MMD); (2) substance use disorders (SUD); (3) comorbid MMD and SUD (MMD+SUD); and (4) neither disorder. Methods At the baseline interview, HIV/STI risk behaviors were assessed in 800 juvenile detainees, aged 10 to 18 years; youth were reinterviewed approximately 3 years later. The final sample (n = 689) includes 298 females and 391 males. Results The prevalence and persistence of HIV/STI risk behaviors was high in all diagnostic groups. Youth with SUD at baseline were over 10 times more likely to be sexually active and to have vaginal sex at follow-up than youth with MMD+SUD (AOR=10.86, 95% CI=1.43–82.32; AOR=11.63, 95% CI=1.49–90.89, respectively) and four times more likely to be sexually active and to have vaginal sex than youth with neither disorder (AOR=4.20, 95% CI=1.06–16.62; AOR=4.73, 95% CI=1.21–18.50, respectively). Youth with MMD at baseline were less likely to have engaged in unprotected vaginal and oral sex at follow-up compared with youth with neither disorder (AOR=0.11, 95% CI=0.02–0.50; AOR=0.07, 95% CI=0.01–0.34, respectively), and with youth with SUD (AOR=0.10, 95% CI=0.02–0.50; OR=0.10, 95% CI=0.02–0.47, respectively). Youth with MMD+SUD were less likely (AOR=0.28, 95% CI=0.09–0.92) to engage in unprotected oral sex compared with those with neither disorder. Conclusions Irrespective of diagnostic group, delinquent youth are at great risk for HIV/STIs as they age into adulthood. SUD increases risk. Because detained youth are released after approximately 2 weeks, their risk behaviors become a community health problem. Pediatricians and child psychiatrists must collaborate with corrections professionals to develop HIV/STI interventions and ensure that programs started in detention centers continue after youth are released.

Elkington, Katherine S.; Teplin, Linda A.; Mericle, Amy A.; Welty, Leah J.; Romero, Erin G.; Abram, Karen M.

2009-01-01

70

Religious Involvement and Its Association to Risk Behaviors among Older Youth in Foster Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined religious involvement and its association to risk behaviors (sexual behavior, marijuana use, alcohol use, and cigarette use) among older youth in foster care (N=383). Three dimensions of religious involvement were assessed—church or religious service attendance, religious practices, and religious beliefs. Findings showed that gender, ethnic group membership, sexual abuse history, and placement type were significantly associated with

Lionel D. Scott Jr; Michelle R. Munson; J. Curtis McMillen; Marcia T. Ollie

2006-01-01

71

Youth Risk Behavior Survey of Middle School Students Attending Bureau Funded Schools, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This youth risk behavior survey was completed by 7,667 students at 127 Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) middle schools. The document is organized around the six categories of behavior that contribute substantially to the leading causes of death, illness, and social problems in the United States: unintentional and intentional injuries; tobacco use;…

Everett, Sherry; Sussman, Michele; Ranslow, Steve; Shaughnessy, Lana

72

Youth risk-taking behavior in Brazil : drug use and teenage pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using an extensive survey that addresses risk factors faced by the population in the shantytowns (favelas) of Fortaleza, Brazil, the aim of this paper is to study risk-taking behavior by youth, focusing on drug use and teenage pregnancy. The paper analyzes the impact of factors such as exposure to mass media, the existenceof support networks, self-esteem, and the occurrence of

Dorte Verner; Ana Rute Cardoso

2008-01-01

73

Mediating Effects of an Indicated Prevention Program for Reducing Youth Depression and Suicide Risk Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the intervention process of an indicated prevention program for high-risk youth (N=106). Results showed that there were direct and/or indirect effects of teacher and peer group support on personal control, depression, and suicide risk behaviors. The hypothesis that personal control mediates between support resources and reductions in…

Thompson, Elaine A.; Eggert, Leona L.; Herting, Jerald R.

2000-01-01

74

Youth with Runaway, Throwaway, and Homeless Experiences: Prevalence, Drug Use, and Other At-Risk Behaviors. Volume 1. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study is the first national study of substance use, suicide attempts, and other at-risk behaviors among youth with runaway, throwaway, or homelss experience. Information from four sources is included in the study: youth in shelters, youth on the stree...

C. L. Ringwalt J. E. Kelly J. M. Greene R. Iachan Z. Cohen

1995-01-01

75

Youth with Runaway, Throwaway, and Homeless Experiences: Prevalence, Drug Use, and Other At-Risk Behaviors. Volume 2. Appendices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study is the first national study of substance use, suicide attempts, and other at-risk behaviors among youth with runaway, throwaway, or homelss experience. Information from four sources is included in the study: youth in shelters, youth on the stree...

J. M. Greene C. L. Ringwalt J. E. Kelly R. Iachan Z. Cohen

1995-01-01

76

An Examination of the Reliability, Data Screening Procedures, and Extreme Response Patterns for the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores psychometric characteristics of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey (YRBS), one of the most widely used instruments to assess the prevalence of violent and other high-risk behaviors in secondary school settings. Response patterns were analyzed for a subset of 414 youths who indicated that they had carried a weapon to school six or more times during the

Michael J. Furlong; Jill D. Sharkey; Michael P. Bates; Douglas C. Smith

2004-01-01

77

A Meta-Analysis of Culturally Sensitive Interventions Designed to Reduce High-Risk Behaviors Among African American Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to determine the effectiveness of culturally sensitive interventions (CSIs) in reducing high risk behaviors with African American youth. A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effectiveness of CSIs across seven studies. African American youth who participated in CSIs were less likely to engage in high risk behaviors compared to those who did not participate. The effect size

Kelly F. Jackson; David R. Hodge; Michael G. Vaughn

2010-01-01

78

Sexually coercive behavior in male youth: population survey of general and specific risk factors.  

PubMed

Little is known about risk/protective factors for sexually coercive behavior in general population youth. We used a Swedish school-based population survey of sexual attitudes and experiences (response rate 77%) and investigated literature-based variables across sexually coercive (SEX), non-sexual conduct problem (CP), and normal control (NC) participants to identify general and specific risk/protective factors for sexual coercion. Among 1,933 male youth, 101 (5.2%) reported sexual coercion (ever talked or forced somebody into genital, oral, or anal sex) (SEX), 132 (6.8%) were classified as CP, and the remaining 1,700 (87.9%) as NC. Of 29 tested variables, 25 were more common in both SEX and CP compared to NC youth, including minority ethnicity, separated parents, vocational study program, risk-taking, aggressiveness, depressive symptoms, substance abuse, sexual victimization, extensive sexual experiences, and sexual preoccupation. When compared to CP youth only, SEX youth more often followed academic study programs, used less drugs and were less risk-taking. Further, SEX more frequently than CP youth reported gender stereotypic and pro-rape attitudes, sexual preoccupation, prostitution, and friends using violent porn. Finally, in a multivariate logistic regression, academic study program, pro-rape attitudes, sexual preoccupation, and less risk-taking independently remained more strongly associated with SEX compared to CP offending. In conclusion, several sociodemographic, family, and individual risk/protective factors were common to non-sexual and sexually coercive antisocial behavior in late adolescence. However, pro-rape cognitions, and sexual preoccupation, were sexuality-related, specific risk factors. The findings could inform preventive efforts and the assessment and treatment of sexually coercive male youth. PMID:19888644

Kjellgren, Cecilia; Priebe, Gisela; Svedin, Carl Göran; Långström, Niklas

2009-11-04

79

Perceptions of Social Support, Empowerment and Youth Risk Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined the association of perceived social support and community empowerment among urban middle-school students living in Matamoros, Mexico and the risk behaviors of fighting, alcohol and tobacco use, and sexual activity. Middle school students (n = 1,181) from 32 public and private Mexican schools were surveyed. Weighted multiple…

Reininger, Belinda M.; Perez, Adriana; Flores, Maria I. Aguirre; Chen, Zhongxue; Rahbar, Mohammad H.

2012-01-01

80

Perceptions of Social Support, Empowerment and Youth Risk Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the association of perceived social support and community empowerment among urban middle-school students living in Matamoros, Mexico and the risk behaviors of fighting, alcohol and tobacco use, and sexual activity. Middle school students (n = 1,181) from 32 public and private Mexican schools were surveyed. Weighted multiple…

Reininger, Belinda M.; Perez, Adriana; Flores, Maria I. Aguirre; Chen, Zhongxue; Rahbar, Mohammad H.

2012-01-01

81

Risk Behaviors of Youth Living With HIV: Pre- and Post-HAART  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To examine the transmission behavior among youth living with HIV (YLH), pre- and post-HAART. Methods: Two cohorts were recruited: (1) 349 YLH during 1994 to 1996 and (2) 175 YLH during 1999 to 2000, after the wide availability of HAART. Differences in sexual and substance-use risk acts and quality of life were examined. Results:…

Lightfoot, Marguerita; Swendeman, Dallas; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Comulada, W. Scott; Weiss, Robert

2005-01-01

82

Factors Associated With Motivation to Change HIV Risk and Substance Use Behaviors Among Homeless Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to identify and compare variables associated with motivation to change alcohol, drug use, and HIV risk behaviors among a sample of homeless youths. More frequent alcohol use, older age, and childhood sexual abuse were associated with greater motivation to change alcohol use; higher reported negative consequences of substance use were associated with higher motivation to reduce illicit

Jennifer Collins; Natasha Slesnick

2011-01-01

83

Youth Risk Behavior Survey of Middle School Students Attending Bureau Funded Schools, 1997.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report presents findings from a spring 1997 survey of all middle-school students (grades 6-8) enrolled in schools funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The Centers for Disease Control Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was completed by 6,990 students in 115 of the 122 BIA-funded middle schools; the overall response rate was 74…

Shaughnessy, Lana; Everett, Sherry; Ranslow, Steve

84

2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: American Indian Students on or near a Reservation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey high school student frequency distributions for American Indian students on or near a reservation. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 720 high school American Indian students on or near a reservation in Montana during February of 2011. Frequency distributions…

Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

2011-01-01

85

2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: American Indian Students in Urban Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey high school student frequency distributions for American Indian students in urban schools. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 808 high school American Indian students in urban schools during February of 2011. Frequency distributions may not total 808 due to…

Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

2011-01-01

86

Tobacco use among High School Athletes and Nonathletes: Results of the 1997 Youth Risk Behavior Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Data from the 1997 Youth Risk Behavior Survey was used to compare use of tobacco between athletes and nonathletes. Both female and male athletes were less likely to have smoked, which was truer for the more involved athletes. Both female and male athletes were more likely to have tried smokeless tobacco, with the effect greater for more involved…

Melnick, Merrill J.; Miller, Kathleen E.; Sabo, Donald F.; Farrell, Michael P.; Barnes, Grace M.

2001-01-01

87

Early Initiation of Sexual Intercourse and Its Co-Occurrence with Other Health-Risk Behaviors in High School Students: The 1993 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined relationships between high school students' early sexual intercourse and selected risky and preventive behaviors as a function of race and gender. North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey data indicated that several health-risk behaviors significantly associated with early onset of sexual intercourse, with both racial and…

Parrillo, Anthony V.; And Others

1997-01-01

88

Sexually Coercive Behavior in Male Youth: Population Survey of General and Specific Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about risk\\/protective factors for sexually coercive behavior in general population youth. We used a Swedish\\u000a school-based population survey of sexual attitudes and experiences (response rate 77%) and investigated literature-based variables\\u000a across sexually coercive (SEX), non-sexual conduct problem (CP), and normal control (NC) participants to identify general\\u000a and specific risk\\/protective factors for sexual coercion. Among 1,933 male youth,

Cecilia Kjellgren; Gisela Priebe; Carl Göran Svedin; Niklas Långström

2010-01-01

89

Factors Associated with Motivation to Change HIV Risk and Substance Use Behaviors among Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

This study sought to identify and compare variables associated with motivation to change alcohol, drug use, and HIV risk behaviors among a sample of homeless youths. More frequent alcohol use, older age, and childhood sexual abuse was associated with greater motivation to change alcohol use; higher reported negative consequences of substance use was associated with higher motivation to reduce illicit drug use. Shorter periods of current homelessness predicted higher motivation to change HIV risk behaviors. Findings suggest these areas might be fruitful targets of intervention efforts to enhance motivation to reduce alcohol and illicit drug use and HIV risk behaviors.

Collins, Jennifer; Slesnick, Natasha

2011-01-01

90

APPLYING A COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL MODEL OF HIV RISK TO YOUTHS IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE  

PubMed Central

This study examined the utility of cognitive and behavioral constructs (AIDS information, motivation, and behavioral skills) in explaining sexual risk taking among 172 12–20–year-old ethnically diverse urban youths in outpatient psychiatric care. Structural equation modeling revealed only moderate support for the model, explaining low to moderate levels of variance in global sexual risk taking. The amount of explained variance improved when age was included as a predictor in the model. Findings shed light on the contribution of AIDS information, motivation, and behavioral skills to risky sexual behavior among teens receiving outpatient psychiatric care. Results suggest that cognitive and behavioral factors alone may not explain sexual risk taking among teens whose cognitive and emotional deficits (e.g., impaired judgment, poor reality testing, affect dysregulation) interfere with HIV preventive behavior. The most powerful explanatory model will likely include a combination of cognitive, behavioral, developmental, social (e.g., family), and personal (e.g., psychopathology) risk mechanisms.

Donenberg, Geri R.; Schwartz, Rebecca Moss; Emerson, Erin; Wilson, Helen W.; Bryant, Fred B.; Coleman, Gloria

2005-01-01

91

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance--United States, 2005. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Surveillance Summaries. Volume 55, Number SS-5  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Problem: Priority health-risk behaviors, which contribute to the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among youth and adults, often are established during childhood and adolescence, extend into adulthood, are interrelated, and are preventable. Reporting Period Covered: October 2004-January 2006. Description of the System: The Youth Risk

Eaton, Danice K.; Kann, Laura; Kinchen, Steve; Ross, James; Hawkins, Joseph; Harris, William A.; Lowry, Richard; McManus, Tim; Chyen, David; Shanklin, Shari; Lim, Connie; Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Wechsler, Howell

2006-01-01

92

Continuities in Problem Behavior among High Risk Youths  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We report the results of a test of a structural model reflecting the longitudinal relationships of psychosocial problems among youths involved in a Center for Substance Abuse Treatment funded clinical trial for juveniles that participated in a diversion program. The project is evaluating the efficacy of an intensive 16-week case management…

Dembo, Richard; Wareham, Jennifer; Poythress, Norman; Meyers, Kathleen; Cook, Brittany; Schmeidler, James

2007-01-01

93

Drug Use and Delinquent Behavior among High Risk Youths.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports the results of a study of substance use (measured by self-reports and hair test results) and delinquency among arrested youths entering a service intervention program. Results highlight important relationships between alcohol and other drug use and involvement in delinquency in the year prior to the interviews. (Author/RJM)

Dembo, Richard; Pacheco, Kimberly; Schmeidler, James; Fisher, Lori; Cooper, Sheila

1997-01-01

94

Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey Report, 2005 for American Indian Students on Montana Reservations: Statewide Analysis of Selected Behavior Risk Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) report is a continuation of the surveillance and reporting system for adolescent risk behaviors developed by the Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The purpose of the YRBS is…

Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2005

2005-01-01

95

Putting in Work: Qualitative Research on Substance Use and Other Risk Behaviors Among Gang Youth in Los Angeles  

PubMed Central

Gang youth are notoriously difficult to access for research purposes. Despite this difficulty, qualitative research about substance use among gang youth is important because research indicates that such youth use more substances than their nongang peers. This manuscript discusses how a small sample of gang youth (n = 60) in Los Angeles was accessed and interviewed during a National Institute of Drug Abuse-funded pilot study on substance use and other risk behaviors. Topics discussed include the rationale and operationalization of the research methodology, working with community-based organizations, and the recruitment of different gang youth with varying levels of substance use.

Sanders, Bill; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Jackson-Bloom, Jennifer

2011-01-01

96

Latent Class Analysis of Lifestyle Characteristics and Health Risk Behaviors among College Youth  

PubMed Central

Few studies have examined the context of a wide range of risk behaviors among emerging adults (ages 18–25 years), approximately half of whom in the USA enroll in post-secondary educational institutions. The objective of this research was to examine behavioral patterning in weight behaviors (diet and physical activity), substance use, sexual behavior, stress, and sleep among undergraduate students. Health survey data were collected among undergraduates attending a large, public US university (n=2,026). Latent class analysis was used to identify homogeneous, mutually exclusive “classes” (patterns) of ten leading risk behaviors. Resulting classes differed for males and females. Female classes were defined as: (1) poor lifestyle (diet, physical activity, sleep), yet low-risk behaviors (e.g., smoking, binge drinking, sexual risk, drunk driving; 40.0% of females), (2) high risk (high substance use, intoxicated sex, drunk driving, poor diet, inadequate sleep) (24.3%), (3) moderate lifestyle, few risk behaviors (20.4%), (4) “health conscious” (favorable diet/physical activity with some unhealthy weight control; 15.4%). Male classes were: (1) poor lifestyle, low risk (with notably high stress, insufficient sleep, 9.2% of males), (2) high risk (33.6% of males, similar to class 2 in females), (3) moderate lifestyle, low risk (51.0%), and (4) “classic jocks” (high physical activity, binge drinking, 6.2%). To our knowledge, this is among the first research to examine complex lifestyle patterning among college youth, particularly with emphasis on the role of weight-related behaviors. These findings have important implications for targeting much needed health promotion strategies among emerging adults and college youth.

Pasch, Keryn E.; Lust, Katherine; Story, Mary; Ehlinger, Ed

2010-01-01

97

Suicidal Behavior among Latino Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the scientific literature related to suicidal behavior among Latino youth. Discusses the conceptualizations of culture, and how culture may influence behavior and psychopathology, in particular, suicidal behavior. Reviews the literature that discusses rates of suicidal behavior, risk, and protective factors associated with this behavior

Canino, Glorisa; Roberts, Robert E.

2001-01-01

98

The impact of an integrated treatment on HIV risk behavior among homeless youth: a randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

While many studies provide useful information on the risk behaviors in which homeless youth engage, few prior studies evaluate\\u000a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) risk related reduction strategies. In this study, homeless youth (n = 180) were recruited from a drop-in center and randomly assigned to one of two conditions, either an integrated individual\\u000a cognitive-behavioral treatment and HIV prevention intervention that focused on

Natasha Slesnick; Min Ju Kang

2008-01-01

99

Risk of Behavioral and Adaptive Functioning Difficulties in Youth with Previous and Current Sleep Disordered Breathing  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To examine the rates of behavioral and adaptive functioning difficulties among youth who never had sleep disordered breathing (SDB), had remitted SDB, had incident SDB, or had persistent SDB; and to determine if there were increased odds of behavioral difficulties among youth with varying SDB histories relative to those who never had SDB. Methods: 263 youth had valid polysomnography and neurobehavioral data at two time points approximately 5 years apart from the prospective Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea study. Primary outcomes were the Behavior Assessment Scale for Children-2nd Edition Parent Report Form (BASC-PRF) and Self-Report of Personality (SRP), and the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-2nd Edition (ABAS-2). Results: Compared to those who never had SDB, individuals with persistent SDB had significant odds and met more cutoff scores on the BASC-2-PRF Externalizing Problems Composite (odds ratio [OR] 3.29; 8.92% vs. 35.3%), Behavioral Symptoms Index (OR 6.82; 7.4% vs. 35.3%) and Hyperactivity subscale (OR 6.82; 11.1% vs. 41.2%). Similarly, greater difficulties was seen for the group with persistent SDB (relative to never) on the ABAS-2 Social Domain (OR 3.39; 22% vs. 50%), and Communication (OR 4.26; 15% vs. 42.9%) and Self-Care subscales (OR = 2.97; 25.2% vs. 50%). Relative to youth who never had SDB, youth who developed SDB at Time 2 had compromised adaptive skills as evidenced by the BASC-2 PRF Adaptive Behavior Composite (OR 3.34; 15.6% vs. 38.1%) and the ABAS-2 General Adaptive Composite (OR 2.83; 20.5% vs. 42.1%). Conclusions: Youth with current SDB exhibited hyperactivity, attention problems, aggressivity, lower social competency, poorer communication, and/or diminished adaptive skills. Citation: Perfect MM; Archbold K; Goodwin JL; Levine-Donnerstein D; Quan SF. Risk of behavioral and adaptive functioning difficulties in youth with previous and current sleep disordered breathing. SLEEP 2013;36(4):517-525.

Perfect, Michelle M.; Archbold, Kristen; Goodwin, James L.; Levine-Donnerstein, Deborah; Quan, Stuart F.

2013-01-01

100

An Empirical Test of Ecodevelopmental Theory in Predicting HIV Risk Behaviors Among Hispanic Youth  

PubMed Central

Ecodevelopmental theory is a theoretical framework used to explain the interplay among risk and protective processes associated with HIV risk behaviors among adolescents. Although ecodevelopmentally based interventions have been found to be efficacious in preventing HIV risk behaviors among Hispanic youth, this theory has not yet been directly empirically tested through a basic research study in this population. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to empirically evaluate an ecodevelopmentally based model using structural equation modeling, with substance use and early sex initiation as the two outcomes of the ecodevelopmental chain of relationships. The sample consisted of 586 Hispanic youth (M age = 13.6; SD = 0.75) and their primary caregivers living in Miami, Florida. Adolescent, parent, and teacher reports were used. The results provided strong support for the theoretical model. More specifically, the parent–adolescent acculturation gap is indirectly related both to early sex initiation and to adolescent substance use through family functioning, academic functioning, perceived peer sexual behavior, and perceived peer substance use. Additionally, parent’s U.S. orientation is associated with adolescent substance use and adolescent sex initiation through social support for parents, parental stressors, family functioning, academic functioning, and perceived peer sexual behavior and substance use. These findings suggest that HIV risk behaviors may best be understood as associated with multiple and interrelated ecological determinants.

Prado, Guillermo; Huang, Shi; Maldonado-Molina, Mildred; Bandiera, Frank; Schwartz, Seth J.; de la Vega, Pura; Brown, C. Hendricks; Pantin, Hilda

2013-01-01

101

Online Social Networking Technologies, HIV Knowledge, and Sexual Risk and Testing Behaviors Among Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

This study evaluates associations between online social networking and sexual health behaviors among homeless youth in Los Angeles. We analyzed survey data from 201 homeless youth accessing services at a Los Angeles agency. Multivariate (regression and logistic) models assessed whether use of (and topics discussed on) online social networking technologies affect HIV knowledge, sexual risk behaviors, and testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). One set of results suggests that using online social networks for partner seeking (compared to not using the networks for seeking partners) is associated with increased sexual risk behaviors. Supporting data suggest that (1) using online social networks to talk about safe sex is associated with an increased likelihood of having met a recent sex partner online, and (2) having online sex partners and talking to friends on online social networks about drugs and partying is associated with increased exchange sex. However, results also suggest that online social network usage is associated with increased knowledge and HIV/STI prevention among homeless youth: (1) using online social networks to talk about love and safe sex is associated with increased knowledge about HIV, (2) using the networks to talk about love is associated with decreased exchange sex, and (3) merely being a member of an online social network is associated with increased likelihood of having previously tested for STIs. Taken together, this study suggests that online social networking and the topics discussed on these networks can potentially increase and decrease sexual risk behaviors depending on how the networks are used. Developing sexual health services and interventions on online social networks could reduce sexual risk behaviors.

Rice, Eric

2010-01-01

102

Nigeria's youth at risk.  

PubMed

Improved family and community support would prevent many youth in Nigeria from risk behavior including drinking alcohol, smoking, and using illicit drugs. In Rivers State, 70% of secondary students have had at least 1 alcoholic drink. Further, in Bendel State, 13% of 15-19 year olds in the coastal region drink alcohol compared with 75% of those in the hinterland. Since alcohol affects good judgment skills, this behavior is especially risky during rituals and social activities and causes accidents. Youth who drink are likely to have unplanned and unprotected sexual intercourse. Drinking during pregnancy is associated with miscarriages, low birth weight, and birth defects. Despite the problems with youth and drinking, Nigeria does not have law restricting sales of alcohol to youth. In Nigeria smoking was once predominantly a male habit but is now increasing quickly among women. Most smokers 1st begin their habit when 18 years old. Even thought he Nigerian government has restricted smoking in public places, it has not yet been effective. Smoking has numerous negative effects such as lung cancer, other cancers, shorter life spans, low birth weight, prematurity, higher perinatal mortality, and more labor complications. Moreover the tobacco and alcohol companies advertise widely using ingenious and persuasive promotions. Youth are especially vulnerable to these slick promotions. Cannabis remains the most common illegal drug. Heroin use is growing among urban adolescents in Nigeria, however. Nigeria also serves as a transhipment point for drugs to the US as well as a consumption point. Drug use results in rising numbers of patients in mental hospitals and treatment centers. A particular concern of drug use is transmission of HIV and hepatitis B via needles. Smokers and alcohol drinkers are likely to also be drug users. Families, government, and community organizations need to collaborate to prevent these risk behaviors among youth. PMID:12317498

Igwe, S A

1992-05-01

103

Actual versus perceived peer sexual risk behavior in online youth social networks.  

PubMed

Perception of peer behaviors is an important predictor of actual risk behaviors among youth. However, we lack understanding of peer influence through social media and of actual and perceived peer behavior concordance. The purpose of this research is to document the relationship between individual perception of and actual peer sexual risk behavior using online social networks. The data are a result of a secondary analysis of baseline self-reported and peer-reported sexual risk behavior from a cluster randomized trial including 1,029 persons from 162 virtual networks. Individuals (seeds) recruited up to three friends who then recruited additional friends, extending three waves from the seed. ANOVA models compared network means of actual participant behavior across categories of perceived behavior. Concordance varied between reported and perceived behavior, with higher concordance between perceived and reported condom use, multiple partners, concurrent partners, sexual pressure, and drug and alcohol use during sex. Individuals significantly over-reported risk and under-reported protective peer behaviors related to sex. PMID:24073183

Black, Sandra R; Schmiege, Sarah; Bull, Sheana

2013-09-01

104

Uses of Youth Risk Behavior Survey and School Health Profiles Data: Applications for Improving Adolescent and School Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: To monitor priority health risk behaviors and school health policies and practices, respectively, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) and the School Health Profiles (Profiles). CDC is often asked about the use and application of these survey data to improve…

Foti, Kathryn; Balaji, Alexandra; Shanklin, Shari

2011-01-01

105

Heterogeneity in Patterns of Sexual Risk Behaviors among African-American Youth: Associations with General and Race-Specific Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This descriptive study employed a within-groups analytic approach to examine patterns of sexual risk behavior and co-occurring general and race/ethnicity-specific risk and protective factors in a community sample of African-American youth (n = 436). Cluster analysis was used to classify young adults by levels of self-reported past year sexual risk

Burrow, Anthony L.; Tubman, Jonathan G.; Gil, Andres G.

2007-01-01

106

Individual- and Family-Level Psychosocial Correlates of HIV Risk Behavior Among Youth in Rural Kenya  

PubMed Central

Associations between individual- and family-level psychosocial factors and sexual behavior were examined among 325 adolescents ages 10–18 in rural Kenya. History of sexual activity was reported by 51% of males and 30% of females. Among those reporting sex within the past year, 64% of males and 32% of females had multiple partners; 85% of males and 54% of females reported not using a condom at last sex. Multivariate logistic regression modeling demonstrated sexually active adolescents were significantly more likely to be older, male, more accepting of risky behavior, and have greater perceived HIV risk, caregiver social support, social support related to HIV, and emotional problems. Youths reporting high-risk behavior (unprotected sex or multiple partners) were significantly more likely to be younger, male, and have lower sex-related self-efficacy, lower caregiver monitoring, and more externalizing problems. Future studies should evaluate HIV prevention interventions targeting improvements in mental health and family relationships.

Puffer, Eve S.; Meade, Christina S.; Drabkin, Anya S.; Broverman, Sherryl A.; Ogwang-Odhiambo, Rose A.; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

2012-01-01

107

Health and risk behaviors over time among youth living with HIV.  

PubMed

Health practices and transmission behaviors were examined over time among 25 disabled youth living with HIV (YLH) living in a comprehensive residential care program. YLH were aged 19-24 years (M=23.4 years); 89 per cent of males were gay, bisexual, or transgendered (60% Caucasian); all had physical and mental health problems, as well as substance abuse disorders. YLH were assessed at least four times at 3-month intervals and reported high lifetime rates of sexual and substance-use risk acts. Over four assessments, YLH improved their nutrition and hygiene and decreased their worry about their health status. YLH evidenced no decrease in the frequency of substance use and sexual risk. Depression, self-esteem, and health status also were stable over time. YLH who have a lifetime history of multiple problem behaviors are likely to change slowly over time, even when receiving comprehensive residential care. PMID:11790058

Rotheram-Borus, M J; Murphy, D A; Kennedy, M; Stanton, A; Kuklinski, M

2001-12-01

108

Behavioral Interventions and Cardiovascular Risk in Obese Youth: Current Findings and Future Directions.  

PubMed

The identification and early intervention of pediatric obesity is critical to reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Family-based behavioral interventions have consistently demonstrated efficacy in reducing adiposity and CVD risk factors (i.e., blood pressure, cholesterol, fasting glucose levels, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome). Even modest weight loss in severely obese youth can lead to sustained improvement in CVD risk factors. However, weight regain following treatment cessation remains a challenge in the contemporary obesogenic environment. Intensive family-based interventions spanning socioenvironmental contexts (i.e., home, peer, community) show promise in sustaining weight loss in the long-term. Despite having effective treatments for pediatric obesity and CVD risk factors, families rarely have access to these programs and so increasing the role of healthcare providers in screening and referral efforts is imperative. Moving forward, it is also essential to establish communication and cooperative networks across sectors build sustainable prevention and intervention programs and to provide cohesive health messages. PMID:23336013

Vannucci, Anna; Wilfley, Denise E

2012-12-01

109

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance--United States, 2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Surveillance Summaries. Volume 61, Number 4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Problem: Priority health-risk behaviors, which are behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among youth and adults, often are established during childhood and adolescence, extend into adulthood, and are interrelated and preventable. Reporting Period Covered: September 2010-December 2011. Description of the…

Eaton, Danice K.; Kann, Laura; Kinchen, Steve; Shanklin, Shari; Flint, Katherine H.; Hawkins, Joseph; Harris, William A.; Lowry, Richard; McManus, Tim; Chyen, David; Whittle, Lisa; Lim, Connie; Wechsler, Howell

2012-01-01

110

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance--United States, 2007. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Surveillance Summaries. Volume 57, Number SS-4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Problem: Priority health-risk behaviors, which are behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among youth and adults, often are established during childhood and adolescence, extend into adulthood, are interrelated, and are preventable. Reporting Period Covered: January-December 2007. Description of the System: The…

Eaton, Danice K.; Kann, Laura; Kinchen, Steve; Shanklin, Shari; Ross, James; Hawkins, Joseph; Harris, William A.; Lowry, Richard; McManus, Tim; Chyen, David; Lim, Connie; Brener, Nancy D.; Wechsler, Howell

2008-01-01

111

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance--United States, 2009. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Surveillance Summaries. Volume 59, Number SS-5  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Problem: Priority health-risk behaviors, which are behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among youth and adults, often are established during childhood and adolescence, extend into adulthood, and are interrelated and preventable. Reporting Period Covered: September 2008-December 2009. Description of the…

Eaton, Danice K.; Kann, Laura; Kinchen, Steve; Shanklin, Shari; Ross, James; Hawkins, Joseph; Harris, William A.; Lowry, Richard; McManus, Tim; Chyen, David; Lim, Connie; Whittle, Lisa; Brener, Nancy D.; Wechsler, Howell

2010-01-01

112

Violence and Drug Use in Rural Teens: National Prevalence Estimates from the 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare national estimates of drug use and exposure to violence between rural and urban teens. Methods: Twenty-eight dependent variables from the 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Survey were used to compare violent activities, victimization, suicidal behavior, tobacco use, alcohol use, and illegal drug use…

Johnson, Andrew O.; Mink, Michael D.; Harun, Nusrat; Moore, Charity G.; Martin, Amy B.; Bennett, Kevin J.

2008-01-01

113

The built environment & the impact of neighborhood characteristics on youth sexual risk behavior in Cape Town, South Africa  

PubMed Central

Youth sexual risk behavior is often described in social terms, and there has been limited attention to date on how measures of the built environment, including access to municipal services, impact sexual risk behavior, particularly in resource-limited countries. Using the Cape Area Panel Study, we assessed the impact of neighborhood conditions (six single items and a built environment index (BEI)), net of individual socio-demographic factors. The results suggest that built environment factors are associated with sexual risk behavior. Also, the magnitude of associations between built environment factors and sexual risk behavior was more pronounced for females than for males.

Burns, Paul A.; Snow, Rachel C.

2012-01-01

114

A Multimodal Behavioral Intervention to Impact Adherence and Risk Behavior among Perinatally and Behaviorally HIV-Infected Youth: Description, Delivery, and Receptivity of Adolescent Impact  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Secondary prevention programs are needed to help HIV-positive youth reduce risk behavior and improve adherence to HIV medications. This article provides an overview of Adolescent Impact, a secondary HIV prevention intervention, including its description, delivery, and receptivity among the two unique groups of participants. Adolescent Impact, a…

Chandwani, Sulachni; Abramowitz, Susan; Koenig, Linda J.; Barnes, William; D'Angelo, Lawrence

2011-01-01

115

Developmental risk factors for youth violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To replicate earlier research findings on risk factors for youth violence and to explore the effects on violent behavior of constructs shown to increase risk for other problem behaviors, within a developmental frame.Methods: Data were from the Seattle Social Development Project (SSDP), a prospective study involving a panel of youths followed since 1985. Potential risk factors for violence at

Todd I Herrenkohl; Eugene Maguin; Karl G Hill; J. David Hawkins; Robert D Abbott; Richard F Catalano

2000-01-01

116

Motivational interviewing targeting risk behaviors for youth living with HIV in Thailand.  

PubMed

Healthy Choices, a four-session motivational interviewing-based intervention, reduces risk behaviors among US youth living with HIV (YLWH). We randomized 110 Thai YLWH (16-25 years) to receive either Healthy Choices or time-matched health education (Control) over 12 weeks. Risk behaviors were assessed at baseline, 1, and 6 months post-session. The pilot study was not powered for between-group differences; there were no statistical differences in sexual risks, alcohol use, and antiretroviral adherence between the two groups at any visit. In within-group analyses, Healthy Choices group demonstrated decreases in the proportion of HIV-negative partners (20 vs 8.2%, P = 0.03) and HIV sexual risk scores (4.3 vs 3.3, P = 0.04), and increased trends in the proportion of protected sex (57 vs 76.3%, P = 0.07) from baseline to 1 month post-session. These changes were not sustained 6 months later. No changes were observed in Control group. Healthy Choices has potential to improve sexual risks among Thai YLWH. PMID:23325376

Rongkavilit, Chokechai; Naar-King, Sylvie; Wang, Bo; Panthong, Apirudee; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Phonphithak, Supalak; Koken, Juline A; Saengcharnchai, Pichai; Phanuphak, Praphan

2013-07-01

117

The Relationship Between Sexual Abuse and Sexual Risk Among High School Students: Findings from the 1997 Massachusetts Youth Risk Behavior Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess whether adolescents with a history of sexual abuse were more likely than those with no such history to engage in sexual risk behaviors. Methods: Data for this study were obtained through the 1997 Massachusetts Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a self-report questionnaire administered to a representative sample of 9th through 12th graders (N = 4014) to assess a

Anita Raj; Jay G. Silverman; Hortensia Amaro

2000-01-01

118

Transgender Youth and Life-Threatening Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Sexual minority status is a key risk factor for suicide among lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth; however, it has not been studied among transgender youth. Fifty-five transgender youth reported on their life-threatening behaviors. Nearly half of the sample reported having seriously thought about taking their lives and one quarter reported suicide…

Grossman, Arnold H.; D'Augelli, Anthony R.

2007-01-01

119

Substance abuse and high-risk needle-related behaviors among homeless youth in Minneapolis: implications for prevention.  

PubMed

Homeless and runaway youth face a variety of health risks, including those related to substance abuse and use of unsterile needles. During 1998-1999, we recruited 201 Minneapolis homeless youths aged 15-22 years; these youths were interviewed by experienced street outreach workers from settings where street youth were known to congregate. Respondents spent a median of 6 months in the previous year living on the streets or "couch hopping." There were 37% who reported having 15 or more alcoholic drinks per week, 41% smoked 1 pack or more of cigarettes per day, and 37% used marijuana 3 or more times a week; 15% reported lifetime injection drug use, including 6% who used injection drugs within the previous month. Twenty percent had received a tattoo, and 18% body piercing with a needle that had not been sterilized or had been used by someone else. There were 68% who had been tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 52% for hepatitis B, and 25% for hepatitis C. There were 44% who said they did not have enough information about hepatitis B and C. Less than half (43%) received hepatitis B vaccine; however, 51% of unvaccinated youths indicated that they would receive vaccination if offered. These Midwestern homeless youths face multiple health risks, including those related to substance use and exposure to unsterile needles. Despite unsafe behaviors, many of these youths were interested in methods to protect their health, including education, knowing their HIV or viral hepatitis serostatus, and obtaining hepatitis B immunization. PMID:11796815

Lifson, A R; Halcón, L L

2001-12-01

120

Victimization by Bullying and Harassment in High School: Findings from the 2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey in a Southwestern State  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study analyzed data on victimization by bullying and harassment on school property in a large, diverse, random sample of high school students in Arizona using data from the 2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. No gender differences in frequency of victimization were detected, but differences by grade, Body Mass Index category, academic…

Bauman, Sheri

2008-01-01

121

Programs-That-Work: CDC's Guide to Effective Programs that Reduce Health-Risk Behavior of Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiated "Programs-That-Work" (PTW) in 1992 to identify health education programs with credible evidence of effectiveness and disseminate them to schools and youth agencies. Two tobacco use reduction programs and eight sexual risk behavior reduction programs were identified. This paper describes…

Collins, Janet; Robin, Leah; Wooley, Susan; Fenley, Dean; Hunt, Peter; Taylor, Julie; Haber, Deborah; Kolbe, Lloyd

2002-01-01

122

Victimization by Bullying and Harassment in High School: Findings from the 2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey in a Southwestern State  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study analyzed data on victimization by bullying and harassment on school property in a large, diverse, random sample of high school students in Arizona using data from the 2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. No gender differences in frequency of victimization were detected, but differences by grade, Body Mass Index category, academic performance, depressive symptoms, suicidal thoughts and actions, and

Sheri Bauman

2008-01-01

123

Neighborhood Structural Inequality, Collective Efficacy, and Sexual Risk Behavior among Urban Youth  

PubMed Central

We draw on collective efficacy theory to extend a contextual model of early adolescent sexual behavior. Specifically, we hypothesize that neighborhood structural disadvantage—as measured by levels of concentrated poverty, residential instability, and aspects of immigrant concentration—and diminished collective efficacy have consequences for the prevalence of early adolescent multiple sexual partnering. Findings from random effects multinomial logistic regression models of the number of sexual partners among a sample of youth, age 11 to 16, from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (N = 768) reveal evidence of neighborhood effects on adolescent higher-risk sexual activity. Collective efficacy is negatively associated with having two or more sexual partners versus one (but not zero versus one) sexual partner. The effect of collective efficacy is dependent upon age: The regulatory effect of collective efficacy increases for older adolescents.

BROWNING, CHRISTOPHER R.; BURRINGTON, LORI A.; LEVENTHAL, TAMA; BROOKS-GUNN, JEANNE

2011-01-01

124

Multi-Domain Risk and Protective Factor Predictors of Violent Behavior among At-risk Youth  

PubMed Central

This study extends prior examination of adolescent violence etiology, drawing on an ethnically diverse, community accessed, yet emotionally vulnerable sample (N = 849) of adolescents at-risk for school drop-out. A balanced risk and protective factor framework captured theorized dimensions of strain, coping, and support resources. We tested the combined and unique contribution of risk and protective components spanning individual, peer/school, and family predictor domains, including victimization histories. Hierarchical regressions yielded significant overall explanation of violent behaviors as well as unique predictors within each of the three domains. Tests for sex differences and moderating effects suggested that levels of risk and protective factors differed for males and females, although the functional relationships to violence were the same for both sexes. Results are discussed relative to prevention and early intervention programs; particularly the importance of understanding adolescent violent behaviors within a context that addresses stress and distress.

Logan-Greene, Patricia; Nurius, Paula S.; Herting, Jerald R.; Hooven, Carole L.; Walsh, Elaine; Thompson, Elaine Adams

2011-01-01

125

COMT Val158Met Genotype as a Risk Factor for Problem Behaviors in Youth  

PubMed Central

Objective To test the association between the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism and both aggressive behavior and attention problems in youth. We hypothesized that youth carrying a Met allele would have greater average aggressive behavior scores, and youth exhibiting Val-homozygosity would have greater average attention problems scores. Method Complete data on maternal-rated Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) measures of aggressive behavior (AGG) and attention problems (AP), COMT polymorphism data, demographics and maternal parenting quality were available for 149 youth (6 to 18 years old). Multivariable linear regression models were used to test the degree to which youth COMT Val158Met genotype was associated with AGG and AP while statistically controlling for age, gender, parental socioeconomic status (SES), and maternal parenting quality from the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire. Results Mothers of Met-carriers rated their children higher on average AGG scores when compared to mothers of Val-homozygotes (p = .016). Further analyses revealed that this association was even more robust for maternal ratings of direct aggression (p = .007). The hypothesized association between Val-homozygosity and higher average AP scores relative to average AP scores of Met-carriers did not quite reach statistical significance (p = .062). Conclusions After controlling for demographics, SES, and maternal parenting quality as confounders, there remains a strong association between youth carrying a Met allele and higher average AGG scores relative to Val-homozygotes.

Albaugh, Matthew D.; Harder, Valerie S.; Althoff, Robert R.; Rettew, David C.; Ehli, Erik A.; Lengyel-Nelson, Timea; Davies, Gareth E.; Ayer, Lynsay; Sulman, Julie; Stanger, Catherine; Hudziak, James J.

2011-01-01

126

Using Surveillance of Mental Health to Increase Understanding of Youth Involvement in High-Risk Behaviors: A Value-Added Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the potential utility of adding items that assessed youths' emotional and behavioral disorders to a commonly used surveillance survey. The goal was to evaluate whether the added items could enhance understanding of youths' involvement in high-risk behaviors. A sample of 3,331 adolescents in Grades 8, 10, and 12 from four…

Dowdy, Erin; Furlong, Michael J.; Sharkey, Jill D.

2013-01-01

127

Using Surveillance of Mental Health to Increase Understanding of Youth Involvement in High-Risk Behaviors: A Value-Added Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined the potential utility of adding items that assessed youths' emotional and behavioral disorders to a commonly used surveillance survey. The goal was to evaluate whether the added items could enhance understanding of youths' involvement in high-risk behaviors. A sample of 3,331 adolescents in Grades 8, 10, and 12 from four…

Dowdy, Erin; Furlong, Michael J.; Sharkey, Jill D.

2013-01-01

128

Truth or Consequences: The Intertemporal Consistency of Adolescent Self-report on the Youth Risk Behavior Survey  

PubMed Central

Surveys are the primary information source about adolescents’ health risk behaviors, but adolescents may not report their behaviors accurately. Survey data are used for formulating adolescent health policy, and inaccurate data can cause mistakes in policy creation and evaluation. The author used test-retest data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (United States, 2000) to compare adolescents’ responses to 72 questions about their risk behaviors at a 2-week interval. Each question was evaluated for prevalence change and 3 measures of unreliability: inconsistency (retraction and apparent initiation), agreement measured as tetrachoric correlation, and estimated error due to inconsistency assessed with a Bayesian method. Results showed that adolescents report their sex, drug, alcohol, and tobacco histories more consistently than other risk behaviors in a 2-week period, opposite their tendency over longer intervals. Compared with other Youth Risk Behavior Survey topics, most sex, drug, alcohol, and tobacco items had stable prevalence estimates, higher average agreement, and lower estimated measurement error. Adolescents reported their weight control behaviors more unreliably than other behaviors, particularly problematic because of the increased investment in adolescent obesity research and reliance on annual surveys for surveillance and policy evaluation. Most weight control items had unstable prevalence estimates, lower average agreement, and greater estimated measurement error than other topics.

2009-01-01

129

Truth or consequences: the intertemporal consistency of adolescent self-report on the Youth Risk Behavior Survey.  

PubMed

Surveys are the primary information source about adolescents' health risk behaviors, but adolescents may not report their behaviors accurately. Survey data are used for formulating adolescent health policy, and inaccurate data can cause mistakes in policy creation and evaluation. The author used test-retest data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (United States, 2000) to compare adolescents' responses to 72 questions about their risk behaviors at a 2-week interval. Each question was evaluated for prevalence change and 3 measures of unreliability: inconsistency (retraction and apparent initiation), agreement measured as tetrachoric correlation, and estimated error due to inconsistency assessed with a Bayesian method. Results showed that adolescents report their sex, drug, alcohol, and tobacco histories more consistently than other risk behaviors in a 2-week period, opposite their tendency over longer intervals. Compared with other Youth Risk Behavior Survey topics, most sex, drug, alcohol, and tobacco items had stable prevalence estimates, higher average agreement, and lower estimated measurement error. Adolescents reported their weight control behaviors more unreliably than other behaviors, particularly problematic because of the increased investment in adolescent obesity research and reliance on annual surveys for surveillance and policy evaluation. Most weight control items had unstable prevalence estimates, lower average agreement, and greater estimated measurement error than other topics. PMID:19363096

Rosenbaum, Janet E

2009-04-10

130

A comparison of drug use and risk behavior profiles among younger and older street youth.  

PubMed

Among 559 street youth recruited between 2005 and 2007 in Vancouver, Canada, young drug users (<21 years of age) were compared with older drug users (?21 years) with regard to recent drug use and sexual practices using multiple logistic regression. Older youth were more likely to be male and of Aboriginal ancestry, to have more significant depressive symptoms, to have recently engaged in crack smoking, and to have had a recent history of injection drug use. Young drug users, by contrast, were more likely to have engaged in recent binge alcohol use. Efforts to reduce drug use-related harm among street youth may be improved by considering the highly prevalent use of "harder" drugs and risk for depression among older youth. PMID:21417557

Hadland, Scott E; Marshall, Brandon D L; Kerr, Thomas; Zhang, Ruth; Montaner, Julio S; Wood, Evan

2011-03-21

131

A Prospective Study of the Onset of Sexual Behavior and Sexual Risk in Youth Perinatally Infected With HIV  

PubMed Central

Perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) youth are surviving into adolescence and young adulthood. Understanding the sexual development of PHIV+ youth is vital to providing them with developmentally appropriate HIV prevention programs. Using pooled data (N = 417) from two longitudinal studies focused on HIV among youth (51% female; 39% HIV+) and their caregivers (92% female; 46% HIV+), we compared the rate of sexual onset during adolescence across four youth-caregiver combinations: PHIV+ youth with HIV+ caregivers (12%); PHIV+ youth with HIV? caregivers (27%); HIV? youth with HIV+ caregivers (34%); and HIV? youth with HIV-caregivers (27%). Youth with HIV? caregivers were more likely than other youth-caregiver groups to have had their sexual onset. Youth with HIV+ caregivers reported a slower rate of onset of penetrative sex across the adolescent years. We discuss our findings by highlighting the role that both youth and caregiver HIV status play in the onset of sexual behavior across adolescence.

Bauermeister, Jose A.; Elkington, Katherine S.; Robbins, Reuben N.; Kang, Ezer; Mellins, Claude A.

2011-01-01

132

Parental Investment, Club Membership, and Youth Sexual Risk Behavior in Cape Town  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines whether parental investment and membership in social clubs are associated with safer sexual behaviors among South African youth. Participants comprised 4,800 randomly selected adolescents age 14 to 22 living in the Cape Town area in 2002. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between measures of parental…

Camlin, Carol S.; Snow, Rachel C.

2008-01-01

133

Cocaine Use and Delinquent Behavior among High-Risk Youths: A Growth Model of Parallel Processes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We report the results of a parallel-process, latent growth model analysis examining the relationships between cocaine use and delinquent behavior among youths. The study examined a sample of 278 justice-involved juveniles completing at least one of three follow-up interviews as part of a National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded study. The results…

Dembo, Richard; Sullivan, Christopher

2009-01-01

134

Sexual risk behaviors among youth heads of household in Gikongoro, south province of Rwanda  

PubMed Central

Background As a result of the 1994 genocide and AIDS, Rwanda has a crisis of orphans. In 2005, the Ministry of Local Governance and Social Affairs of Rwanda has reported one million vulnerable children. Many of these are not only orphans but also youth heads of households (YHH). The purpose of this study was to: (a) identify risk behaviors that expose YHH to HIV infection, (b) determine gender-specific high risk profiles and, (c) determine predictors of sexual onset. Methods A household survey was conducted among 692 YHH, aged 12-24, all beneficiaries of a World Vision basic needs program in Gikongoro, Rwanda, from January to March 2004. Participants were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Data was collected on socio-demographic variables, HIV/AIDS prevention knowledge and sexual risk behaviors. Bivariate analyses of the study variables were performed to examine differences between males and females. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to analyze factors that were independently associated with the debut of having sex. Results Forty-one percent of respondents reported sexual onset before age 15. Males were more likely to start earlier than females (50.4% versus 26.7%) but females reported more sexual onset with an older partner. Fifty-eight percent of females had their first intercourse with a partner who was four or more years older than themselves. While sexual activity was low (1.75 mean lifetime sexual partner, 0.45 mean sexual partner last twelve months), sexual experience was related to less social connectedness and use of drugs. Having a close friend also appeared to be protective for sexual debut. The analysis also found that although YHH were aware of some prevention measures against HIV/AIDS, there was low (19.8%) knowledge of the "ABC" prevention program promoted by the government. In addition, despite 85% of respondents knowing someone who had died of AIDS, only 31% perceived themselves at risk of HIV infection, and there was very low (13.2%) condom use among the sexually experienced. Conclusions Results suggest the urgent need of HIV prevention programs tailored to YHH that provide knowledge, enhance negotiations skills, and increase the perception of HIV infection risk among YHH in Rwanda.

2012-01-01

135

Reassessing the Assessment of Change in At-Risk Youth: Conflict and Coherence in Overall Versus Contextual Assessments of Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examined how a contextual approach to personality assessment can reveal change processes that are obscured by\\u000a measures of overall behavior frequencies. Using field observations of 336 children from three summers at a program for at-risk\\u000a youth, we illustrate how children’s social experiences change over time, how their reactions to these experiences change,\\u000a and how both processes contribute to

Jack C. Wright; Audrey L. Zakriski; Anselma G. Hartley; Harry W. Parad

2011-01-01

136

Health and risk behaviors over time among youth living with HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health practices and transmission behaviors were examined over time among 25 disabled youth living with HIV (YLH) living in a comprehensive residential care program. YLH were aged 19–24 years (M=23·4 years); 89 per cent of males were gay, bisexual, or transgendered (60% Caucasian); all had physical and mental health problems, as well as substance abuse disorders. YLH were assessed at

MARY JANE ROTHERAM-BORUS; DEBRA A. MURPHY; MICHAEL KENNEDY; ANNE STANTON; MARK KUKLINSKI

2001-01-01

137

Motivating Youth at Risk.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph provides home economics educators with a resource that contains an overview of youth at risk, reviews motivation theory as a basis for educational decision making, and provides practical teaching suggestions that will help home economics teachers reach and teach these students. The guide is organized in five sections. Following a…

Redick, Sharon S.; Vail, Ann

138

Multi-domain risk and protective factor predictors of violent behavior among at-risk youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study extends prior examination of adolescent violence etiology, drawing on an ethnically diverse, community accessed, yet emotionally vulnerable sample (N=849) of adolescents at-risk for school dropout. A balanced risk and protective factor framework captured theorized dimensions of strain, coping, and support resources. We tested the combined and unique contribution of risk and protective components spanning individual, peer\\/school, and family

Patricia Logan-Greene; Paula S. Nurius; Jerald R. Herting; Carole L. Hooven; Elaine Walsh; Elaine Adams Thompson

2011-01-01

139

Multi-Domain Risk and Protective Factor Predictors of Violent Behavior among At-Risk Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study extends prior examination of adolescent violence etiology, drawing on an ethnically diverse, community accessed, yet emotionally vulnerable sample (N = 849) of adolescents at-risk for school dropout. A balanced risk and protective factor framework captured theorized dimensions of strain, coping, and support resources. We tested the…

Logan-Greene, Patricia; Nurius, Paula S.; Herting, Jerald R.; Hooven, Carole L.; Walsh, Elaine; Thompson, Elaine Adams

2011-01-01

140

Substance abuse and high-risk needle-related behaviors among homeless youth in minneapolis: Implications for prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homeless and runaway youth face a variety of health, risks, including those related to substance abuse and use of unsterile\\u000a needles. During 1998–1999, we recruited 201 Minneapolis homeless youths aged 15–22 years; these youths were interviewed by\\u000a experienced street outreach workers from settings where street youth were known to congregate. Respondents spent a median\\u000a of 6 months in the previous

Alan R. Lifson; Linda L. Halcón

2001-01-01

141

Transgender youth and life-threatening behaviors.  

PubMed

Sexual minority status is a key risk factor for suicide among lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth; however, it has not been studied among transgender youth. Fifty-five transgender youth reported on their life-threatening behaviors. Nearly half of the sample reported having seriously thought about taking their lives and one quarter reported suicide attempts. Factors significantly related to having made a suicide attempt included suicidal ideation related to transgender identity; experiences of past parental verbal and physical abuse; and lower body esteem, especially weight satisfaction and thoughts of how others evaluate the youths' bodies. Sexual minority status is a key risk factor for life-threatening behaviors among transgender youth. PMID:17967119

Grossman, Arnold H; D'Augelli, Anthony R

2007-10-01

142

A Longitudinal Study of the Prevalence, Development, and Persistence of HIV/STI Risk Behaviors in Delinquent Youth: Implications for Health Care in the Community  

PubMed Central

Objective . To examine the prevalence, development, and persistence of sex and drug behaviors that place delinquent youth at risk for human immunodeficiency virus and other sexually transmitted infections (HIV/STI). Methods At the baseline interview, HIV/STI drug and sex risk behaviors were assessed in a stratified random sample of 800 juvenile detainees, aged 10 to 18 years. Participants were re-interviewed approximately 3 years later (mean [SD] follow-up, 3.2 [0.3] years; median follow-up, 3.1 years). The final sample in these analyses (n = 724) includes 316 females and 408 males, 393 African Americans, 198 Hispanics, 131 non-Hispanic whites, and 2 participants who self-identified as “other.” Results Nearly three quarters of youth engaged in one or more unprotected sexual risk behaviors at follow-up. Over 60% had engaged in 10 or more risk behaviors at their baseline interview, and nearly two thirds of them persisted in 10 or more risk behaviors at follow-up. Among youth living in the community, many behaviors were more prevalent at follow-up than at baseline. Among incarcerated youth, the opposite pattern prevailed. Development and persistence of HIV/STI risk behaviors differed by gender, race/ethnicity, and age, even after adjusting for incarceration status. Compared with females, males had higher prevalence rates of many HIV/STI risk behaviors and were more likely to persist in some behaviors and develop new ones. Yet, injection risk behaviors were more prevalent among females than males and were also more likely to develop and persist. Compared with persons younger than 18, persons 18 and older had higher prevalence rates of many HIV/STI risk behaviors at follow-up. Overall, there were few racial and ethnic differences in patterns of HIV/STI risk behaviors; most involved the initiation and persistence of substance use among non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics. Conclusions Because detained youth have a median stay of only 2 weeks, HIV/STI risk behaviors in delinquent youth are a community public health problem, not just a problem for the juvenile justice system. Improving the coordination among systems that provide HIV/STI interventions to youth – primary care, education, mental health, and juvenile justice – can reduce the prevalence of risk behaviors and substantially reduce the spread of HIV/STI in young people.

Romero, Erin Gregory; Teplin, Linda A.; McClelland, Gary M.; Abram, Karen M.; Welty, Leah J.; Washburn, Jason J.

2009-01-01

143

Ohio Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 1993: When, Why, and What Was Discovered.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report summarizes the survey answers Ohio high school students (N=2,314) reported about alcohol, tobacco, and other health risk behaviors. The survey contains questions relating to: (1) behaviors that result in intentional and non-intentional injuries; (2) tobacco use; (3) alcohol and other drug use; (4) sexual behaviors that result in HIV…

Ohio State Dept. of Health, Columbus.

144

Use of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey to Monitor Trends for Nutrition and Physical Activity in a Midwest City School District  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was used by a city school district (approximately 11,000 students) in the upper Midwest to monitor trends for nutrition and physical activity (PA) behaviors both within and between years and to compare with national 2003 data. Methods: Independent random samples were obtained in 1999 (387 middle…

Edwards, Jane U.; Magel, Rhonda

2007-01-01

145

Countervailing Social Network Influences on Problem Behaviors among Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The impact of countervailing social network influences (i.e., pro-social, anti-social or HIV risk peers) on problem behaviors (i.e., HIV drug risk, HIV sex risk or anti-social behaviors) among 696 homeless youth was assessed using structural equation modeling. Results revealed that older youth were less likely to report having pro-social peers…

Rice, Eric; Stein, Judith A.; Milburn, Norweeta

2008-01-01

146

Countervailing Social Network Influences on Problem Behaviors among Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The impact of countervailing social network influences (i.e., pro-social, anti-social or HIV risk peers) on problem behaviors (i.e., HIV drug risk, HIV sex risk or anti-social behaviors) among 696 homeless youth was assessed using structural equation modeling. Results revealed that older youth were less likely to report having pro-social peers and…

Rice, Eric; Stein, Judith A.; Milburn, Norweeta

2008-01-01

147

Screening for Alcohol Risk in Predominantly Hispanic Youths: Positive Rates and Behavioral Consequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined relationships between CAGE alcohol risk scores and predisposing factors for alcohol use, current alcohol use, and behavioral consequences in a large sample of secondary students. Students completed the CAGE, measures of demographics, potential predisposing factors, and consequences of alcohol use. More than 18% of students screened positive for potential alcohol risk using traditional CAGE criteria, and

Joe Tomaka; Rebekah A. Salaiz; Stormy Morales-Monks; Sharon Thompson; Sarah McKinnon; Kathleen ORourke

2012-01-01

148

Maltreatment, Psychiatric Symptoms and Human Immunodeficiency Virus\\/Sexual Transmitted Infection Risk Behavior Among Youth with Alcohol and Other Drug Use Problems: A Person-Centered Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multi-problem youth undergoing treatment for substance use problems are at high behavioral risk for exposure to sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Specific risk factors include childhood adversities such as maltreatment experiences and subsequent forms of psychopathology. The current study used a person-centered analytical approach to examine how childhood maltreatment experiences were related to patterns of psychiatric

Assaf Oshri

2009-01-01

149

Maltreatment, psychiatric symptoms and human immunodeficiency virus\\/sexual transmitted infection risk behavior among youth with alcohol and other drug use problems: A person-centered analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multi-problem youth undergoing treatment for substance use problems are at high behavioral risk for exposure to sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Specific risk factors include childhood adversities such as maltreatment experiences and subsequent forms of psychopathology. The current study used a person-centered analytical approach to examine how childhood maltreatment experiences were related to patterns of psychiatric

Assaf Oshri

2009-01-01

150

Prevention Effects Moderate the Association of 5-HTTLPR and Youth Risk Behavior Initiation: Gene x Environment Hypotheses Tested via a Randomized Prevention Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A randomized prevention design was used to investigate a moderation effect in the association between a polymorphism in the "SCL6A4"("5HTT") gene at 5-HTTLPR and increases in youths' risk behavior initiation. Participation in the Strong African American Families (SAAF) program was hypothesized to attenuate the link between 5-HTTLPR status and risk

Brody, Gene H.; Beach, Steven R. H.; Philibert, Robert A.; Chen, Yi-Fu; Murry, Velma McBride

2009-01-01

151

Epidemiology of Youth Suicide and Suicidal Behavior  

PubMed Central

Purpose of Review Suicide is the third leading cause of death among young people in the U.S. and represents a significant public health problem worldwide. This review focuses on recent developments in our understanding of the epidemiology and risk factors for adolescent suicide and suicidal behavior. Recent Findings The suicide rate among children and adolescents in the U.S. has increased dramatically in recent years and has been accompanied by substantial changes in the leading methods of youth suicide, especially among young girls. Much work is currently underway to elucidate the relationships between psychopathology, substance use, child abuse, bullying, internet use, and youth suicidal behavior. Recent evidence also suggests sex-specific and moderating roles of gender in influencing risk for suicide and suicidal behavior. Summary Empirical research into the causal mechanisms underlying youth suicide and suicidal behavior is needed to inform early identification and prevention efforts.

Cash, Scottye J.; Bridge, Jeffrey A.

2010-01-01

152

Trajectories of HIV Risk Behavior from Age 15 to 25 in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study utilized data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to investigate youth risk trajectories for HIV and factors associated with different trajectories. The sample (N = 8,208) was 49.2% female, with a mean age of 14.31 (SD = 1.48). A group-based trajectory model was applied, which identified four distinct trajectories for both…

Murphy, Debra A.; Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Herbeck, Diane M.; Huang, David

2009-01-01

153

Relation of Maternal Responsiveness During Infancy to the Development of Behavior Problems in High-Risk Youths  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although problematic parenting has been consistently associated with behavior problems in youths, prospective links between early parenting and childhood behavior problems are less well established. This study examined the association of maternal responsiveness (MRes) during infancy and behavior problems in middle childhood (N = 77). MRes was significantly associated with disruptive behavior problems but was unrelated to attention problems. Absence

Lauren S. Wakschlag; Sydney L. Hans

1999-01-01

154

Screening for Alcohol Risk in Predominantly Hispanic Youths: Positive Rates and Behavioral Consequences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examined relationships between CAGE alcohol risk scores and predisposing factors for alcohol use, current alcohol use, and behavioral consequences in a large sample of secondary students. Students completed the CAGE, measures of demographics, potential predisposing factors, and consequences of alcohol use. More than 18% of…

Tomaka, Joe; Salaiz, Rebekah A.; Morales-Monks, Stormy; Thompson, Sharon; McKinnon, Sarah; O'Rourke, Kathleen

2012-01-01

155

HIV Risk Behavior among Youth in the Dominican Republic: The Role of Alcohol and Other Drugs  

PubMed Central

Existing literature related to HIV in the Dominican Republic has tended to neglect the unique role of tourism areas as distinct ecologies facilitative of sexual risk behavior, particularly HIV vulnerability and transmission. Furthermore, limited attention has focused on Dominican adolescents living in close proximity to tourism areas who have become increasingly exposed to alcohol due to the expanding tourism industry in the Dominican Republic. While most previous analyses of the effects of alcohol on adolescent sexual risk behavior have focused on the transient effects of alcohol on judgment and decision making, the effects of chronic alcohol use on sexual behavior has been a neglected area of research. Our study explores the relationship between chronic alcohol use, the parent–adolescent relationship, affective factors such as self-esteem, and intentions to engage in sex. We examine the above factors within the context of tourism areas which represent a unique ecology of alcohol availability and consumption and HIV risk. We discuss implications for developing applied family-based programs to target Dominican adolescent alcohol use and sexual risk behavior in tourism areas of high alcohol exposure.

Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Jaccard, James; Lushin, Vincent; Martinez, Roberto; Gonzalez, Bernardo; McCarthy, Katharine

2012-01-01

156

Screening for Alcohol Risk in Predominantly Hispanic Youths: Positive Rates and Behavioral Consequences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The present study examined relationships between CAGE alcohol risk scores and predisposing factors for alcohol use, current alcohol use, and behavioral consequences in a large sample of secondary students. Students completed the CAGE, measures of demographics, potential predisposing factors, and consequences of alcohol use. More than 18% of…

Tomaka, Joe; Salaiz, Rebekah A.; Morales-Monks, Stormy; Thompson, Sharon; McKinnon, Sarah; O'Rourke, Kathleen

2012-01-01

157

Adolescent Nutrition and Physical Fitness. Selected Indicators. Findings for 9th-12th Grade Students from the 1993 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A survey of 2,439 high school students (the 1993 Youth Risk Behavior Survey) in North Carolina found that students present a mixed picture of healthy and risky physical, nutritional, and weight management practices. The survey examined perception of body weight; weight control by gender; method of weight control; consumption of fruit or fruit…

Mikow, Victoria A.

158

A Cross-National Comparison of Youth Risk Behaviors in Latino Secondary School Students Living in El Salvador and the USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. As Latin Americans' exposure to the USA increases through migration patterns and US political and economic ties to their countries of origin, they become susceptible to adopting not only the cultural expressions of the USA such as fashion, but also the health-related behaviors of the US population. In assessing potential health risks for Salvadoran youth that may result from

Andrew Springer; Steve Kelder; Pamela Orpinas; Elizabeth Baumler

2007-01-01

159

Is This the Place...for Healthy Kids? Results of the 1991 Utah Youth Risk Behavior and School Health Education Surveys.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report describes the results of two statewide surveys conducted during Spring, 1991: the 1992 Utah Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) and the 1991 Utah School Health Education Survey (SHES). Sixty-three schools were randomly selected to participate in the state-level YRBS, and all 311 public and private schools with students in grades 7…

Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

160

Kids, Schools, & Health: Where Do We Stand? Results of the 1993 New Mexico Youth Risk Behavior Survey of Native American Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report summarizes the major results of a youth risk behavior survey administered to 1,549 students (grades 9-12) in 14 New Mexico schools identified as predominantly "Native American." The purpose of this report is to stimulate useful discussions into ways to increase informed support for effective, school-based comprehensive health…

Utah Univ., Salt Lake City. Health Education Dept.

161

Sadness, Suicide, and Their Association with Video Game and Internet Overuse among Teens: Results from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey 2007 and 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We investigated the association between excessive video game/Internet use and teen suicidality. Data were obtained from the 2007 and 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), a high school-based, nationally representative survey (N = 14,041 and N = 16,410, respectively). Teens who reported 5 hours or more of video games/Internet daily use, in the…

Messias, Erick; Castro, Juan; Saini, Anil; Usman, Manzoor; Peeples, Dale

2011-01-01

162

Sexual Risk-Taking by Muscovite Youth Attending School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sexual behavioral risk factors were studied in 1,090 youth (mean age 14 years) in Moscow (Russia) using the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance survey. Only 26.3% of youth reported being taught about HIV/AIDS infection in school, and just 41.7% indicated discussion of HIV/AIDS with parents or other familial adults. Condoms were used in 41.7% of…

Westhoff, Wayne W.; And Others

1996-01-01

163

Countervailing social network influences on problem behaviors among homeless youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of countervailing social network influences (i.e., pro-social, anti-social or HIV risk peers) on problem behaviors (i.e., HIV drug risk, HIV sex risk or anti-social behaviors) among 696 homeless youth was assessed using structural equation modeling. Results revealed that older youth were less likely to report having pro-social peers and were more likely to have HIV risk and anti-social

Eric Rice; Judith A. Stein; Norweeta Milburn

2008-01-01

164

Youth Risk Assessment in Complex Agency Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Advancements in the delivery of community-based services and tight utilization management of high-cost treatment options result in youths with serious behavior problems receiving intervention in lower levels of care than was true ten or fifteen years ago. This shift in where services tend to be delivered necessitates enhancement of risk

Groner, Mark R.; Solomon, Jean

2007-01-01

165

Youth Risk Assessment in Complex Agency Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advancements in the delivery of community-based services and tight utilization management of high-cost treatment options result in youths with serious behavior problems receiving intervention in lower levels of care than was true ten or fifteen years ago. This shift in where services tend to be delivered necessitates enhancement of risk assessment…

Groner, Mark R.; Solomon, Jean

2007-01-01

166

HIV risk behavior in treatment-seeking opioid-dependent youth: Results from a NIDA Clinical Trials Network multi-site study  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess baseline rates of and changes in HIV drug and sexual risk behavior as a function of gender and treatment in opioid-dependent youth. Methods 150 participants were randomly assigned to extended buprenorphine/naloxone therapy for 12 weeks (BUP) or detoxification for 2 weeks (DETOX); all received drug counseling for 12 weeks. HIV risk was assessed at baseline and 4-, 8-, and 12-week follow-ups. Behavioral change was examined using generalized estimating equations. Results Baseline rates of past-month HIV risk for females/males were 51%/45% for injection drug use (IDU) (ns), 77%/35% for injection risk (p<.001), 82%/74% for sexual activity (ns), 14%/24% for multiple partners (ns), and 68%/65% for unprotected intercourse (ns). IDU decreased over time (p<.001), with greater decreases in BUP versus DETOX (p<.001) and females versus males in BUP (p<.05). Injection risk did not change for persistent injectors. Sexual activity decreased in both genders and conditions (p<.01), but sexual risk did not. Conclusions Overall IDU and sexual activity decreased markedly, particularly in BUP patients and females, but injection and sexual risk behaviors persisted. While extended buprenorphine/naloxone therapy appears to have favorable effects on HIV risk behavior in opioid-dependent youth, risk reduction counseling may be necessary to extend its benefits.

Meade, Christina S.; Weiss, Roger D.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Poole, Sabrina A.; Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Connery, Hilary S.; Woody, George E.

2011-01-01

167

Changes in Risk-Taking among High School Students, 1991-1997: Evidence from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveys  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Drawing on data from three major national surveys of teenagers's risk-taking behavior conducted by the US government and University-based social scientists, in June 2000 the Urban Institute released this report assessing the levels of teenagers's involvement in one or more identified risk-taking behaviors. These behaviors include "regular alcohol use, binge drinking, regular tobacco use, marijuana use, other illegal drug use, fighting, weapon carrying, suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, and risky sexual activity." The report indicates that risk-taking behavior has actually declined overall among adolescents from 1990 to 1997. However, for one demographic group, Hispanics, the levels have almost doubled. The reports also analyze teenagers's participation in "desirable family, school, or community activities" and conclude that "many risk-taking teens earn good grades, go to church, play sports, or spend quality time with their parents," suggesting, according to the researchers, that a more complicated understanding of vulnerable teens is required than the typical good/bad stereotypes often circulated.

Lindberg, Laura D.; Boggess, Scott.; Porter, Laura.

2000-01-01

168

Trajectories of HIV Risk Behavior from Age 15 to 25 in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Sample  

PubMed Central

This study utilized data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to investigate youth risk trajectories for HIV and factors associated with different trajectories. The sample (N = 8,208) was 49.2% female, with a mean age of 14.31 (SD = 1.48). A group-based trajectory model was applied, which identified four distinct trajectories for both males and females: (1) consistently higher sexual risk levels, increasing to early adulthood followed by some decrease (“high”); (2) a short period of increase to late teens, followed by a longer period of decrease (“decreased”); (3) an initially slow increase, with the increase accelerating by late teens, and a slight decline beginning in early adulthood (“increased”); and (4) consistently lowest levels of sexual risk (“low”). More African Americans were found among the decreased trajectory group; among the low risk group a higher number of youth came from families with parents who spoke a language other than English. The high-risk group had a higher percentage of subjects in non-metropolitan areas and highest alcohol use. Among males, being employed and being in the military were associated with inclusion in the high-risk group. Results have implications for specializing prevention strategies for youth with different patterns of sexual risk.

Murphy, Debra A.; Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Herbeck, Diane M.; Huang, David

2008-01-01

169

Relationships between Youth Sport Participation and Selected Health Risk Behaviors from 1999 to 2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: How adolescents spend their out-of-school time represents one of the most important factors for predicting positive youth development. Sport participation relates to many beneficial outcomes. However, current economic conditions threaten high school sport programs around the United States. This investigation examined relationships by…

Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Donovan, Kristine A.

2010-01-01

170

Relationships between Youth Sport Participation and Selected Health Risk Behaviors from 1999 to 2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: How adolescents spend their out-of-school time represents one of the most important factors for predicting positive youth development. Sport participation relates to many beneficial outcomes. However, current economic conditions threaten high school sport programs around the United States. This investigation examined relationships by…

Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Donovan, Kristine A.

2010-01-01

171

Identification of Potential Aggressive Behavior in Rural At-Risk Minority Youth: A Community Response.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|New Mexico ranks high in youth violence, substance abuse, poverty, teen pregnancies, and school dropout rates. In response, Western New Mexico University developed a special master's program in bilingual special education, attended primarily by minority-group school personnel, and implemented a program to address the cycle of poverty by training…

French, Laurence Armand; Rodriguez, Richard F.

1998-01-01

172

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance: United States, 2011. Morbidity and Mortality Surveillance Summaries, Vol. 61, No. 4.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the United States, 72% of all deaths among youth and young adults aged 10-24 years result from four causes: motor vehicle crashes (26%), other unintentional injuries (17%), homicide (16%), and suicide (13%). Substantial morbidity and social problems al...

2012-01-01

173

Reliability and Validity of the Youth Version of the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART-Y) in the Assessment of Risk-Taking Behavior among Inner-City Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined the reliability and validity of the youth version of the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART-Y) for assessing adolescent risk behaviors among a sample of 98 inner-city African American adolescents (M age = 14.8, SD = 1.5). In addition to a relation with sensation seeking, BART-Y responding evidenced a significant relation with a…

Lejuez, C. W.; Aklin, Will; Daughters, Stacey; Zvolensky, Michael; Kahler, Christopher; Gwadz, Marya

2007-01-01

174

Victimization and Health Risk Factors among Weapon-Carrying Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To compare health risks of 2 subgroups of weapon carriers: victimized and nonvictimized youth. Methods: 2003-2007 NYC Youth Risk Behavior Surveys were analyzed using bivariate analyses and multinomial logistic regression. Results: Among NYC teens, 7.5% reported weapon carrying without victimization; 6.9% reported it with victimization.…

Stayton, Catherine; McVeigh, Katharine H.; Olson, E. Carolyn; Perkins, Krystal; Kerker, Bonnie D.

2011-01-01

175

A prospective study of youth gambling behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about the course and outcomes of adolescent gambling. This prospective study describes findings from a 3-wave (Time 1 (T1), Time 2 (T2), and Time 3 (T3)) assessment of gambling behaviors among youth (N 305). Stable rates of any gambling and regular gambling (weekly or daily) were observed across T1, T2, and T3. The rate of at-risk gambling

Ken C. Winters; Randy D. Stinchfield; Andria Botzet; Nicole Anderson

2002-01-01

176

Risk Comparison among Youth Who Report Sex with Same-Sex versus Both-Sex Partners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines risk behavior among youth attending support groups for sexual minority youth in Richmond, Virginia, using a structured survey, with particular attention to partner selection and its relationship to risk. Within this generally high-risk group, youth reporting sex partners of both sexes had significantly higher risk profiles,…

Moon, Martha W.; Fornili, Katherine; O'Briant, Amanda L.

2007-01-01

177

Risk Comparison among Youth Who Report Sex with Same-Sex versus Both-Sex Partners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article examines risk behavior among youth attending support groups for sexual minority youth in Richmond, Virginia, using a structured survey, with particular attention to partner selection and its relationship to risk. Within this generally high-risk group, youth reporting sex partners of both sexes had significantly higher risk profiles,…

Moon, Martha W.; Fornili, Katherine; O'Briant, Amanda L.

2007-01-01

178

Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions Targeting Personality Risk Factors for Youth Alcohol Misuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Sensation seeking, anxiety sensitivity, and hopelessness are personality risk factors for alcohol use disorders, each associated with specific risky drinking motives in adolescents. We developed a set of interventions and manuals that were designed to intervene at the level of personality risk and associated maladaptive coping strategies,…

Conrod, Patricia J.; Stewart, Sherry H.; Comeau, Nancy; Maclean, A. Michael

2006-01-01

179

Youth at Risk: Is Technology the Answer?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses youth at-risk in Australia and describes a small research project on youth at risk and technology. The project investigated if and how computers were being used in youth-at-risk programs in New South Wales. (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse for ESL Literacy Education) (Author/VWL)

McGuirk, Jenny

2001-01-01

180

Early Initiation of Alcohol Drinking, Cigarette Smoking, and Sexual Intercourse Linked to Suicidal Ideation and Attempts: Findings from the 2006 Korean Youth Risk Behavior Survey  

PubMed Central

Purpose This study examined the association between early initiation of problem behaviors (alcohol drinking, cigarette smoking, and sexual intercourse) and suicidal behaviors (suicidal ideation and suicide attempts), and explored the effect of concurrent participation in these problem behaviors on suicidal behaviors among Korean adolescent males and females. Materials and Methods Data were obtained from the 2006 Korean Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a nationally representative sample of middle and high school students (32,417 males and 31,467 females) in grades seven through twelve. Bivariate and multivariate logistic analyses were conducted. Several important covariates, such as age, family living structure, household economic status, academic performance, current alcohol drinking, current cigarette smoking, current butane gas or glue sniffing, perceived body weight, unhealthy weight control behaviors, subjective sleep evaluation, and depressed mood were included in the analyses. Results Both male and female preteen initiators of each problem behavior were at greater risk for suicidal behaviors than non-initiators, even after controlling for covariates. More numerous concurrent problematic behaviors were correlated with greater likelihood of seriously considering or attempting suicide among both males and females. This pattern was more clearly observed in preteen than in teen initiators although the former and latter were engaged in the same frequency of problem behavior. Conclusion Early initiation of alcohol drinking, cigarette smoking, and sexual intercourse, particularly among preteens, represented an important predictor of later suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in both genders. Thus, early preventive intervention programs should be developed and may reduce the potential risks for subsequent suicidal behaviors.

Kim, Hyun-Sun

2010-01-01

181

Maternal Influence on Adolescent Self-Esteem, Ethnic Pride and Intentions to Engage in Risk Behavior in Latino Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between ethnic pride, self-esteem and adolescent intentions to smoke cigarettes and engage\\u000a in sexual intercourse. It also explored the influence of maternal levels of ethnic pride and self-esteem as indirect predictors\\u000a of adolescent risk intentions. Middle school youth were randomly selected from six schools in the Bronx, NY. A total of 1,538\\u000a adolescents and their

Vincent Guilamo-Ramos

2009-01-01

182

Multiple Risk Factors in the Family Environment and Youth Problem Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Findings support the pattern of independent, additive effects of individual family stressors. There was no evidence that the effects of poor parenting, overt interparental conflict, and family economic hardship exacerbate one another, or that the converse serve as buffers. This model explains more variance in externalizing problem behavior for…

Gerard, Jean M.; Buehler, Cheryl

1999-01-01

183

Discotheques and the Risk of Hearing Loss among Youth: Risky Listening Behavior and Its Psychosocial Correlates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|There is an increasing population at risk of hearing loss and tinnitus due to increasing high-volume music listening. To inform prevention strategies and interventions, this study aimed to identify important protection motivation theory-based constructs as well as the constructs "consideration of future consequences" and "habit strength" as…

Vogel, Ineke; Brug, Johannes; Van Der Ploeg, Catharina P. B.; Raat, Hein

2010-01-01

184

Individual and Family-Level Psychosocial Correlates of HIV Risk Behavior Among Youth in Rural Kenya  

Microsoft Academic Search

Associations between individual- and family-level psychosocial factors and sexual behavior were examined among 325 adolescents\\u000a ages 10–18 in rural Kenya. History of sexual activity was reported by 51% of males and 30% of females. Among those reporting\\u000a sex within the past year, 64% of males and 32% of females had multiple partners; 85% of males and 54% of females reported

Eve S. Puffer; Christina S. Meade; Anya S. Drabkin; Sherryl A. Broverman; Rose A. Ogwang-Odhiambo; Kathleen J. Sikkema

2011-01-01

185

Providing Physical Fitness Programs to At-Risk Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physical fitness programs can meet many needs of at-risk youth. The application of structured physical training programs has been shown to positively affect many risk factors for serious problem behaviors of at-risk youth, such as increased self-esteem, increased well-being, increased acquisition of “life skills” like goal-setting and planning, increased values development, and lowered depression and anxiety. In turn, fitness programs

Thomas R. Collingwood

1997-01-01

186

How Do High-Risk Youth Use the Internet? Characteristics and Implications for Prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using data from the Second Youth Internet Safety Survey, a nationally representative telephone survey of 1,500 youth Internet users (ages 10 to 17), this study explores differences in Internet use characteristics between high risk youth and other Internet users. Those youth who engaged in aggressive behavior online and those who used the Internet on a cell phone were about twice

Melissa Wells; Kimberly J. Mitchell

2008-01-01

187

Risk behavior of runaways who return home  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Few studies have examined the risk behaviors of youth who run away and return home. Most studies have focused on youth who end up as chronic runaways or become homeless for whom the expected trajectory is a path filled with numerous negative outcomes.Methods: Using data from a multisite phone survey of a random sample of youth aged 16–20 years

Elizabeth Mayfield Arnold; Eun-Young Song; Claudine Legault; Mark Wolfson

2012-01-01

188

Does the Duration and Time of Sleep Increase the Risk of Allergic Rhinitis? Results of the 6-Year Nationwide Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey  

PubMed Central

Allergic rhinitis (AR) is the most common chronic disorder in the pediatric population. Although several studies have investigated the correlation between AR and sleep-related issues, the association between the duration and time of sleep and AR has not been analyzed in long-term national data. This study investigated the relationship between sleep time and duration and AR risk in middle- and high-school students (adolescents aged 12–18). We analyzed national data from the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2007–2012. The sample size was 274,480, with an average response rate of 96.2%. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between sleep and AR risk. Furthermore, to determine the best-fitted model among independent variables such as sleep duration, sleep time, and the combination of sleep duration and sleep time, we used Akaike Information Criteria (AIC) to compare models. A total of 43,337 boys and 41,665 girls reported a diagnosis of AR at baseline. The odds ratio increased with age and with higher education and economic status of the parents. Further, students in mid-sized and large cities had stronger relationships to AR than those in small cities. In both genders, AR was associated with depression and suicidal ideation. In the analysis of sleep duration and sleep time, the odds ratio increased in both genders when sleep duration was <7 hours, and when the time of sleep was later than 24?00 hours. Our results indicate an association between sleep time and duration and AR. This study is the first to focus on the relationship between sleep duration and time and AR in national survey data collected over 6 years.

Kwon, Jeoung A.; Lee, Minjee; Yoo, Ki-Bong; Park, Eun-Cheol

2013-01-01

189

Does the duration and time of sleep increase the risk of allergic rhinitis? Results of the 6-year nationwide Korea youth risk behavior web-based survey.  

PubMed

Allergic rhinitis (AR) is the most common chronic disorder in the pediatric population. Although several studies have investigated the correlation between AR and sleep-related issues, the association between the duration and time of sleep and AR has not been analyzed in long-term national data. This study investigated the relationship between sleep time and duration and AR risk in middle- and high-school students (adolescents aged 12-18). We analyzed national data from the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2007-2012. The sample size was 274,480, with an average response rate of 96.2%. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between sleep and AR risk. Furthermore, to determine the best-fitted model among independent variables such as sleep duration, sleep time, and the combination of sleep duration and sleep time, we used Akaike Information Criteria (AIC) to compare models. A total of 43,337 boys and 41,665 girls reported a diagnosis of AR at baseline. The odds ratio increased with age and with higher education and economic status of the parents. Further, students in mid-sized and large cities had stronger relationships to AR than those in small cities. In both genders, AR was associated with depression and suicidal ideation. In the analysis of sleep duration and sleep time, the odds ratio increased in both genders when sleep duration was <7 hours, and when the time of sleep was later than 24?00 hours. Our results indicate an association between sleep time and duration and AR. This study is the first to focus on the relationship between sleep duration and time and AR in national survey data collected over 6 years. PMID:24015253

Kwon, Jeoung A; Lee, Minjee; Yoo, Ki-Bong; Park, Eun-Cheol

2013-08-27

190

Serving At-Risk Youth: One Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Camping Unlimited for at-risk youth, which originally ran from 1969-76, was recently revived at Blue Star Camps (Hendersonville, North Carolina) with 150 youth from southern Florida. The one-week stay, funded by several partnerships and organized by youth programs in the home county, included all regular camp activities. Increased staff and…

Becker, William A.; Popkin, Rodger

1998-01-01

191

Psychiatric symptom typology in a sample of youth receiving substance abuse treatment services: associations with self-reported child maltreatment and sexual risk behaviors.  

PubMed

Latent profile analysis (LPA) was used to classify 394 adolescents undergoing substance use treatment, based on past year psychiatric symptoms. Relations between profile membership and (a) self-reported childhood maltreatment experiences and (b) current sexual risk behavior were examined. LPA generated three psychiatric symptom profiles: Low-, High- Alcohol-, and High- Internalizing Symptoms profiles. Analyses identified significant associations between profile membership and childhood sexual abuse and emotional neglect ratings, as well as co-occurring sex with substance use and unprotected intercourse. Profiles with elevated psychiatric symptom scores (e.g., internalizing problems, alcohol abuse and dependence symptoms) and more severe maltreatment histories reported higher scores for behavioral risk factors for HIV/STI exposure. Heterogeneity in psychiatric symptom patterns among youth receiving substance use treatment services, and prior histories of childhood maltreatment, have significant implications for the design and delivery of HIV/STI prevention programs to this population. PMID:21301951

Oshri, Assaf; Tubman, Jonathan G; Jaccard, James

2011-11-01

192

Behavior-oriented approaches to reducing youth gun violence.  

PubMed

Advocacy groups on both sides of the guns issue frequently point to changing personal behavior--of both parents and children--as a key element in reducing gun violence among youth. Efforts to bring about these changes range from community-based campaigns, to laws and programs that encourage parents to store their guns safely, to educational initiatives that focus on keeping young children away from guns and encouraging youth to resolve disputes without violence. Unfortunately, these behavior-oriented programs have not shown great success in reducing youth gun violence. This article reviews the research surrounding behavioral approaches to gun violence prevention and highlights obstacles that hamper the effectiveness of these programs. Supportive communities can play a key role in protecting youth from violence in general, but the few community-based violence prevention programs that focus on youth have not been shown to decrease youth access to or use of guns. By and large, behavioral programs and legal interventions aimed at parents have not been proven to reduce youth gun violence. This may be due in part to parental misperceptions about children's risk of injury and ability to protect themselves. Children and youth are particularly difficult targets for behavioral change programs. Cognitive immaturity among younger children and perceptions of invulnerability among adolescents may be part of the reason. Most programs that seek to persuade youth to stay away from guns have not been proven effective. The author concludes that, although behavioral programs could be improved, overall they hold only limited promise for reducing youth gun violence. PMID:12194605

Hardy, Marjorie S

193

A descriptive study of youth risk behavior in urban and rural secondary school students in El Salvador  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Adolescence is an important stage of life for establishing healthy behaviors, attitudes, and lifestyles that contribute to current and future health. Health risk behavior is one indicator of health of young people that may serve both as a measure of health over time as well as a target for health policies and programs. This study examined the prevalence and

Andrew E Springer; BJ Selwyn; Steven H Kelder

2006-01-01

194

Youth Suicide Risk and Sexual Orientation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Study examines the relationship between sexual orientation and youth suicide risk. The suicide risk demonstrated by sexual minorities in this study was no greater than that of their heterosexual peers. Youth who reported more external support demonstrated lower overall suicide risk and, specifically, lower levels of hostility, hopelessness, and…

Rutter, Philip A.; Soucar, Emil

2002-01-01

195

Adolescent Inpatient Behavioral Health Clients: Risk Factors and Methods of Preventing an Increase in HIV Infection among Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There has been a surge in the rates of adolescents who are becoming infected with HIV. This study of 214 at risk clients being treated on an inpatient psychiatric hospitalization basis examines why such clients continue to engage in high-risk behaviors. Results and suggestions for a psychoeducational curriculum for professionals are included.…

Hackerman, Ann E.

2002-01-01

196

Socioeconomic status, urbanicity and risk behaviors in Mexican youth: an analysis of three cross-sectional surveys  

PubMed Central

Background The relationship between urbanicity and adolescent health is a critical issue for which little empirical evidence has been reported. Although an association has been suggested, a dichotomous rural versus urban comparison may not succeed in identifying differences between adolescent contexts. This study aims to assess the influence of locality size on risk behaviors in a national sample of young Mexicans living in low-income households, while considering the moderating effect of socioeconomic status (SES). Methods This is a secondary analysis of three national surveys of low-income households in Mexico in different settings: rural, semi-urban and urban areas. We analyzed risk behaviors in 15-21-year-olds and their potential relation to urbanicity. The risk behaviors explored were: tobacco and alcohol consumption, sexual initiation and condom use. The adolescents' localities of residence were classified according to the number of inhabitants in each locality. We used a logistical model to identify an association between locality size and risk behaviors, including an interaction term with SES. Results The final sample included 17,974 adolescents from 704 localities in Mexico. Locality size was associated with tobacco and alcohol consumption, showing a similar effect throughout all SES levels: the larger the size of the locality, the lower the risk of consuming tobacco or alcohol compared with rural settings. The effect of locality size on sexual behavior was more complex. The odds of adolescent condom use were higher in larger localities only among adolescents in the lowest SES levels. We found no statically significant association between locality size and sexual initiation. Conclusions The results suggest that in this sample of adolescents from low-income areas in Mexico, risk behaviors are related to locality size (number of inhabitants). Furthermore, for condom use, this relation is moderated by SES. Such heterogeneity suggests the need for more detailed analyses of both the effects of urbanicity on behavior, and the responses--which are also heterogeneous--required to address this situation.

2011-01-01

197

Testing a Longitudinal Model of the Influence of Family Problem Factors on High Risk Youths' Troubled Behavior: A Replication and Update.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data collected from arrested youth who entered a home based family intervention project, model of relationships between youths' family problems (including abuse experiences) and drug use and delinquent behavior was tested. Data supported hypothesized model, involving both self-reports of physical/sexual abuse and official records of…

Dembo, Richard; Wothke, Werner; Shemwell, Marina; Pacheco, Kimberly; Seeberger, William; Rollie, Matthew; Schmeidler, James; Klein, Laine; Hartsfield, Amy; Livingston, Stephen

2000-01-01

198

Adolescent Risk Behaviors and Religion: Findings from a National Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Too few studies have assessed the relationship between youth risk behaviors and religiosity using measures which captured the varied extent to which youth are engaged in religion. This study applied three measures of religiosity and risk behaviors. In addition, this study ascertained information about youths' participation in religious activities…

Sinha, Jill W.; Cnaan, Ram A.; Gelles, Richard J.

2007-01-01

199

Adolescent risk behaviors and religion: Findings from a national study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Too few studies have assessed the relationship between youth risk behaviors and religiosity using measures which captured the varied extent to which youth are engaged in religion. This study applied three measures of religiosity and risk behaviors. In addition, this study ascertained information about youths’ participation in religious activities from a parent or caretaker. Based on a national random sample

Jill W. Sinha; Ram A. Cnaan; Richard J. Gelles

2007-01-01

200

Beyond Risk: Resilience in the Lives of Sexual Minority Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Several decades of research tell us that sexual minority youth are among those most at risk for the negative outcomes of frequent concern in the lives of young people: academic failure, emotional distress, compromised relationships, risk behavior, and suicidality. We know much less about resilience, the characteristics and factors that explain or…

Russell, Stephen T.

2005-01-01

201

Response to trauma in Haitian youth at risk.  

PubMed

In order to characterize undesirable behavior (drug use, fighting, criminal activity) among Haitian youth at risk and determine the relationship between traumatic experience and that kind of behavior, investigators recruited 292 Haitian youths via networks of informal social relations in two zones of Miami/Dade County strongly identified with Haitian ethnicity. Each recruit responded to an interview schedule eliciting sociodemographic information and self-reported activities, including involvement in youth-dominated groups. They also reported traumatic experience. Clinicians administered CAPS to a subset of those respondents who self reported traumatic experience. Staff ethnographers selected respondents for in-depth interviews and family studies to provide contextual depth for findings of the interview schedule and the CAPS assessments. Although traumatic experience may still play a role in mental health outcomes among children, childhood victimization among Haitian children does not appear to be related to the drug use and undesirable behaviors associated with unsupervised youth, including formation of gangs. PMID:16275637

Douyon, Richard; Herns Marcelin, Louis; Jean-Gilles, Michèle; Page, J Bryan

2005-01-01

202

Social and Emotional Learning: A Framework for Promoting Mental Health and Reducing Risk Behavior in Children and Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes selection criteria based on theory, research, and best educational practice that identify key social and emotional learning (SEL) competencies and program features for promoting students' mental health and reducing risk behaviors. Program features critical to the success of school-based SEL programs emphasize curriculum design,…

Payton, John W.; Wardlaw, Dana M.; Graczyk, Patricia A.; Bloodworth, Michelle R.; Tompsett, Carolyn J.; Weissberg, Roger P.

2000-01-01

203

A Prospective Study of the Onset of Sexual Behavior and Sexual Risk in Youth Perinatally Infected with HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) youth are surviving into adolescence and young adulthood. Understanding the sexual development of PHIV+ youth is vital to providing them with developmentally appropriate HIV-prevention programs. Using pooled data (N = 417) from two longitudinal studies focused on HIV among youth (51% female; 39% HIV+) and their caregivers (92% female; 46% HIV+), the rate of sexual onset during adolescence across

José A. Bauermeister; Katherine S. Elkington; Reuben N. Robbins; Ezer Kang; Claude A. Mellins

2011-01-01

204

A Prospective Study of the Onset of Sexual Behavior and Sexual Risk in Youth Perinatally Infected with HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) youth are surviving into adolescence and young adulthood. Understanding the sexual development of PHIV+ youth is vital to providing them with developmentally appropriate HIV-prevention programs. Using pooled data (N = 417) from two longitudinal studies focused on HIV among youth (51% female; 39% HIV+) and their caregivers (92% female; 46% HIV+), the rate of sexual onset during adolescence across

José A. Bauermeister; Katherine S. Elkington; Reuben N. Robbins; Ezer Kang; Claude A. Mellins

2012-01-01

205

Sexual and Drug Use Behavior in Perinatal HIV-Infected Youth: Mental Health and Family Influences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study found that youth and caregiver mental health problem have greater impact than key environmental factors and family functioning on sex and drug use risk behaviors in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (PHIV+) and PHIV- youths. No differences in the rates of sexual risk behavior and substance use were observed between…

Mellins, Claude A.; Elkington, Katherine S.; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Bauermeister, Jose A.; Dolezal, Curtis; McKay, Mary; Wiznia, Andrew; Bamji, Mahrukh; Abrams, Elaine J.

2009-01-01

206

VIOLENT AND CRIMINAL BEHAVIORS IN RURAL AND NON-RURAL AFRICAN AMERICAN YOUTH: A RISK-PROTECTIVE FACTOR APPROACH  

Microsoft Academic Search

Once believed to be a poor inner city neighborhood characteristic, youth violence and crime are now recognized as problems in rural areas as well (Osgood and Chambers 2000). Studies on their etiology remain scarce, particularly with a focus on minority youth. Given the importance of individual characteristics and a positive future orientation (educational aspirations) during adolescence, the current study tested

ELIZABETH TREJOS-CASTILLO; ALEXANDER T. VAZSONYI; DUSTY D. JENKINS

2008-01-01

207

Correlates of Depressive Symptoms in Urban Youth at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: Rates of overweight in youth have increased at an alarming rate, particularly in minority youth, and depressive symptoms may affect the ability of youth to engage in healthy lifestyle behaviors to manage weight and reduce their risk for health problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between depressive…

Jaser, Sarah S.; Holl, Marita G.; Jefferson, Vanessa; Grey, Margaret

2009-01-01

208

Youth gambling behaviors: an examination of the role of resilience.  

PubMed

The study of resilient children has overturned many deficit-focused models concerning the ontogenesis of children raised in adversity. This study explored the relationship between risk and protective factors, resilience, and youth gambling behavior. More specifically, this study examined the relative contribution of various risk and protective domains in relation to problem gambling behavior and examined whether youth identified as resilient (high risk exposure-high internalized protection) were as likely as those identified as vulnerable (high risk exposure-low internalized protection) to engage in excessive gambling behavior. The sample consisted of 1,273 students ages 12 to 19. The findings demonstrated that risk and protective factors each provide a unique contribution to the prediction model of gambling problems. Resilient and vulnerable youth differed significantly in their self-reported gambling severity. As well, resilient youth were not statistically distinguishable from low-risk exposure groups in terms of their gambling severity. Findings are interpreted with respect to resilience and prevention research. PMID:17563136

Lussier, Isabelle; Derevensky, Jeffrey L; Gupta, Rina; Bergevin, Tanya; Ellenbogen, Stephen

2007-06-01

209

Using the Information-Motivation Behavioral Model to Predict Sexual Behavior among Underserved Minority Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: Testing, refining, and tailoring theoretical approaches that are hypothesized to reduce sexual risk behaviors among adolescent subpopulations is an important task. Relatively little is known about the relationship between components of the information-motivation-behavior (IMB) model and sexual behaviors among underage minority youth.…

Bazargan, Mohsen; Stein, Judith A.; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Hindman, David W.

2010-01-01

210

Youth health risk behavior assessment in Fiji: The reliability of Global School-based Health Survey content adapted for ethnic Fijian girls  

PubMed Central

Objective The Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS) is an assessment for adolescent health risk behaviors and exposures, supported by the World Health Organization. Although already widely implemented—and intended for youth assessment across diverse ethnic and national contexts—no reliability data have yet been reported for GSHS-based assessment in any ethnicity or country-specific population. This study reports test-retest reliability for GSHS content adapted for a female adolescent ethnic Fijian study sample in Fiji. Design We adapted and translated GSHS content to assess health risk behaviors as part of a larger study investigating the impact of social transition on ethnic Fijian secondary schoolgirls in Fiji. In order to evaluate the performance of this measure for our ethnic Fijian study sample (n=523), we examined its test-retest reliability with kappa coefficients, % agreement, and prevalence estimates in a sub-sample (n=81). Reliability among strata defined by topic, age, and language was also examined. Results Average agreement between test and retest was 77%, and average Cohen's kappa was 0.47. Mean kappas for questions from core modules about alcohol use, tobacco use, and sexual behavior were substantial, and higher than those for modules relating to other risk behaviors. Conclusions Although test-retest reliability of responses within this country-specific version of GSHS content was substantial in several topical domains for this ethnic Fijian sample, only fair reliability for the module assessing dietary behaviors and other individual items suggests that population-specific psychometric evaluation is essential to interpreting language and country-specific GSHS data.

Becker, Anne E.; Roberts, Andrea L.; Perloe, Alexandra; Bainivualiku, Asenaca; Richards, Lauren K.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.

2010-01-01

211

Risk behaviors in maltreated youth placed in foster care: a longitudinal study of protective and vulnerability factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Few studies have examined the impact of placement in foster care prospectively to determine what early responses might predict later functioning. The current study examined protective and vulnerability factors in a longitudinal study of youth placed in foster care.Methodology: A cohort of 214 ethnically-diverse youth, ages 7–12, who entered foster care between May 1990 and October 1991 were recruited

Heather N Taussig

2002-01-01

212

Report of the Secretary's Task Force on Youth Suicide. Volume 2: Risk Factors for Youth Suicide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Commissioned papers by a work group on risk factors for youth suicide, which examined environmental, behavioral, socio-cultural, biological, and psychological factors associated with an increased likelihood of suicide among young people are presented in this document. The following papers are presented: (1) "Sociodemographic, Epidemiologic, and…

Davidson, Lucy, Ed.; Linnoila, Markku, Ed.

213

Middle School Risk Behavior 1995 Survey Results.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) Middle School Questionnaire, produced by the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was administered for the first time in North Carolina in 1995. The survey monitored high-priority health-risk behaviors, including: (1) weapons and violence; (2) suicide-related behaviors; (3) vehicle safety; (4)…

North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Accountability Services/Research.

214

Integrating Technology into the Curriculum for "At-Risk" Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Independent Learning Project (ILP) discusses the best practices in educational technology to improve the behavior, instruction, and learning of at-risk youth, for whom technology offers unique opportunities. Research is compiled from numerous scholarly print and online sources. A guide for teachers provides detailed strategies, software…

McCall, Denise

2009-01-01

215

Models to Guide System Reform for At-Risk Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Policy reform for at-risk youth is complicated by involvement of various service sectors. Issues related to coordinating systems of care in a dynamic policy environment are not new, but surprisingly little has been written to guide practitioners and policymakers in addressing them (Friedman in "Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders"…

McCarter, Susan A.; Haber, Mason G.; Kazemi, Donna

2010-01-01

216

Models to Guide System Reform for At-Risk Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Policy reform for at-risk youth is complicated by involvement of various service sectors. Issues related to coordinating systems of care in a dynamic policy environment are not new, but surprisingly little has been written to guide practitioners and policymakers in addressing them (Friedman in "Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders"…

McCarter, Susan A.; Haber, Mason G.; Kazemi, Donna

2010-01-01

217

Adolescents At Risk: Causes of Youth Suicide in New Zealand.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores causes of the high teenage suicide rate in New Zealand by looking at environmental-social factors. Examines the problems these youth face, such as depression and alcohol use, and discusses their risk-taking behaviors. Findings are linked to current theory on adolescent suicide. Prevention, intervention, and treatment strategies are…

Drummond, Wilhelmina J.

1997-01-01

218

Epidemiology of HIV Infection and Risk in Adolescents and Youth  

PubMed Central

Adolescents and youth ages 15–24 are one of the populations most impacted by the global HIV epidemic with an estimated 50% of new infections occurring in this age group. They are thus one of the prime populations for targeting behavioral and biomedical preventions. However, the dynamics of the HIV epidemic in youth vary widely by geographic region as well as risk behavior profiles. There are also biological and neurodevelopmental considerations that must be considered in the development, testing and ultimate dissemination of HIV prevention interventions. These concepts are broadly discussed here.

Wilson, Craig M.; Wright, Peter F.; Safrit, Jeffrey T.; Rudy, Bret

2010-01-01

219

Risky Sexual Behaviors in First and Second Generation Hispanic Immigrant Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Though official data document that Hispanic youth are at a great risk for early sexual intercourse, STDs, and teen pregnancy, only few etiological studies have been conducted on Hispanic youth; almost no work has examined potential generational differences in these behaviors, and thus, these behaviors may have been mistakenly attributed to…

Trejos-Castillo, Elizabeth; Vazsonyi, Alexander T.

2009-01-01

220

Population Density and Youth Antisocial Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Theoretical models concerning how neighborhood contexts adversely influence juvenile antisocial behavior frequently focus on urban neighborhoods; however, previous studies comparing urban and rural areas on the prevalence of youth antisocial behavior have yielded mixed results. The current study uses longitudinal data on the offspring of a…

Harden, K. Paige; D'Onofrio, Brian M.; Van Hulle, Carol; Turkheimer, Eric; Rodgers, Joseph L.; Waldman, Irwin D.; Lahey, Benjamin B.

2009-01-01

221

Neighborhood Context and Youth Cardiovascular Health Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. This study sought to determine the relationships between race\\/ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), and cardiovascular health behaviors among youths and whether neighborhood characteristics are associated with such behaviors independently of individual characteristics. Methods. Linear models determined the effects of individual and neighborhood characteristics (SES, social disorganization, racial\\/ethnic minority concentration, urbanization) on dietary habits, physical ac- tivity, and smoking among 8165

Rebecca E. Lee; Catherine Cubbin

2002-01-01

222

Service Use by At-Risk Youths after School-Based Suicide Screening  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: We sought to examine follow-up service use by students identified at risk for suicidal behavior in a school-based screening program and assess barriers to seeking services as perceived by youths and parents. Method: We conducted a longitudinal study of 317 at-risk youths identified by a school-based suicide screening in six high…

Gould, Madelyn S.; Marrocco, Frank A.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Kleinman, Marjorie; Amakawa, Lia; Altschuler, Elizabeth

2009-01-01

223

Psychosocial Functioning Problems over Time among High-Risk Youths: A Latent Class Transition Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors report the results of latent class analyses and latent class transition analyses of antisocial behavior risk factors among 137 youths participating in a juvenile diversion program. The study examined the youths' latent classifications using baseline and 1-year follow-up measures of family, peer, education, and mental health risk

Dembo, Richard; Wareham, Jennifer; Poythress, Norman; Meyers, Kathleen; Schmeidler, James

2008-01-01

224

Psychosocial Functioning Problems Over Time Among High-Risk YouthsA Latent Class Transition Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors report the results of latent class analyses and latent class transition analyses of antisocial behavior risk factors among 137 youths participating in a juvenile diversion program. The study examined the youths' latent classifications using baseline and 1-year follow-up measures of family, peer, education, and mental health risk factors. Latent class transition analyses were conducted to determine the stability

Richard Dembo; Jennifer Wareham; Norman Poythress; Kathleen Meyers; James Schmeidler

2008-01-01

225

Emotional and Behavior Problems in Urban and Rural Adjudicated Males: Differences in Risk and Protective Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional and behavior problems in rural adjudicated youth have received scant research attention. The association of risk and protective factors with emotional and behavioral problems were examined in samples of urban and rural adjudicated youth. Urban youth had higher levels of personal and peer risk. For both samples, family and community risk were strong risk factors. The effects of family

D. Margo Nelson; Daniel Coleman; Kevin Corcoran

2010-01-01

226

HIV Risk Profile and Prostitution Among Female Street Youths  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to compare human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk factors among female street youths involved in prostitution and those with no history of prostitution. Youths aged 14 to 25 years were recruited into the Montreal Street Youth Cohort. Semiannually, youths completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Statistical analyses comparing characteristics and HIV risk factors for girls involved in

Amy E. Weber; Jean-Francois Boivin; Lucie Blais; Nancy Haley; Elise Roy

2002-01-01

227

Youth often risk unsafe abortions.  

PubMed

The topic of this article is the use of unsafe abortion for unwanted pregnancies among adolescents. The significance of unsafe abortion is identified as a high risk of serious health problems, such as infection, hemorrhage, infertility, and mortality, and as a strain on emergency room services. The World Health Organization estimates that at least 33% of all women seeking hospital care for abortion complications are aged under 20 years. 50 million abortions are estimated to be induced annually, of which 33% are illegal and almost 50% are performed outside the health care system. Complications are identified as occurring due to the procedure itself (perforation of the uterus, cervical lacerations, or hemorrhage) and due to incomplete abortion or introduction of bacteria into the uterus. Long-term complications include an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy, chronic pelvic infection, and infertility. Mortality from unsafe abortion is estimated at 1000/100,000 procedures. Safe abortion mortality is estimated at 0.6/100,000. When infertility results, some cultures ascribe an outcast status or marriages are prevented or prostitution is assured. The risk of complications is considered higher for adolescents. Adolescents tend to delay seeking an abortion, lack knowledge on where to go for a safe procedure, and delay seeking help for complications. Peer advice may be limited or inadequate knowledge. Five studies are cited that illustrate the impact of unsafe abortion on individuals and health care systems. Abortions may be desired due to fear of parental disapproval of the pregnancy, abandonment by the father, financial and emotional responsibilities of child rearing, expulsion from school, or inability to marry if the child is out of wedlock. Medical, legal, and social barriers may prevent women and girls from obtaining safe abortion. Parental permission is sometimes a requirement for safe abortion. Fears of judgmental or callous health personnel may be barriers to seeking safe abortion. Some countries lack adequately trained medical personnel and supplies. Mortality and morbidity declines are considered possible with legalization, more trained health personnel, and family planning programs for youth and education for parents. PMID:12287144

Barnett, B

1993-10-01

228

Prevalence and Predictors of Sexual Risks Among Homeless Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined prevalence of sexual risks among homeless adolescents and described factors associated with those risks. Community-based outreach methods were used successfully to access this difficult-to-reach population. The sample included 203 homeless youth aged 15–22 recruited from community sites. Questionnaire items addressed demographics, sexual behaviors, alcohol\\/drug use, STI history and testing, and pregnancy history. In cross-sectional analysis, 58.7% of

Linda L. Halcón; Alan R. Lifson

2004-01-01

229

Supporting Transition-Age Youth with and at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders at the Secondary Level: A Need for Further Inquiry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Although the task of intervening with transition-age youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) may be daunting, this area of inquiry is sorely needed. In this introductory article, the authors discuss the scarcity of available research involving students with EBD at the secondary level and the importance of meeting these students'…

Lane, Kathleen L.; Carter, Erik W.

2006-01-01

230

Cultivating Trust among Urban Youth at Risk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By examining data from interviews with students in the Upward Bound program (a federally sponsored program that provides academic support to students at risk who are preparing for college entrance), this study seeks to strengthen an understanding of the role of trust among urban youth at risk in the educational organizations that serve them. This…

Owens, Michael A.; Johnson, Bob L., Jr.

2008-01-01

231

The Role of Anxiety\\/Depression in the Development of Youth High Risk Behaviors: An Examination of Two Competing Hypotheses in a Sample of African-American, Single Mother Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of anxiety\\/depression in the progression of youth externalizing problems to future high risk behaviors has been disputed\\u000a in the literature. Mixed support exists for a multiple problem hypothesis (i.e., co-occurring anxiety\\/depression leads to\\u000a more high risk behaviors) and a protective hypothesis (i.e., anxiety\\/depression buffers this progression). The present study\\u000a compared these two hypotheses in a sample of 124

Emily P. Garai; Rex Forehand; Christina J. M. Colletti; Aaron Rakow

2009-01-01

232

Risk Behaviors Associated with Cigarette Use Among Asian American Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Asian Americans are one of the fastest growing minority groups in the United States. This study examined the association between several common youth risk behaviors, including cigarette use among Asian American adolescents, using data (N=408) from the 2001 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS). The weighted univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed with Survey Data Analysis (SUDAAN) to adjust

Harry T. Kwon; Min Qi Wang; Lillian L. Valmidiano

233

Risk Behaviors Associated with Cigarette Use among Asian American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Asian Americans are one of the fastest growing minority groups in the United States. This study examined the association between several common youth risk behaviors, including cigarette use among Asian American adolescents, using data (N=408) from the 2001 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS). The weighted univariate and multivariate logistic…

Kwon, Harry T.; Wang, Min Qi; Valmidiano, Lillian L.

2005-01-01

234

Adapting the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model: Predicting HIV-Related Sexual Risk among Sexual Minority Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young sexual minority males are among those at highest risk for HIV infection, yet we know relatively little about the impact of sexual identity development on HIV risk. This study used cross-sectional data to investigate factors associated with HIV-related sexual risk among a sample of sexual minority males (n = 156), ages 14 to 21 years, using…

Fisher, Colleen M.

2012-01-01

235

Protective and risk factors associated with drug use among Hispanic youth.  

PubMed

Analysis of data from a nationally representative sample of Hispanic youths age 12-17 and their parents was done to investigate the impact of a number of variables on youths' drug-using behavior. The significance of youth, household, and parental characteristics were tested using measures of youth drug use as dependent variables in regression models. Parents' attitudes and use of licit and illicit drugs were found to play an important role in their children's drug use behavior. The results also provide some support for the hypothesis that Hispanic children whose parents are more acculturated into American society are at higher risk of using drugs. Youths of Mexican origin, youths living outside large metropolitan areas, and females were found to be more likely to use drugs. The results provide supportive evidence that for drug prevention education programs to be effective with Hispanic youths, they must be family oriented. PMID:8476945

Gfroerer, J; De La Rosa, M

1993-01-01

236

Case Management as a Significant Component of Usual Care Psychotherapy for Youth with Disruptive Behavior Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Youth with disruptive behavior problems (DBPs) represent the majority of youth served in usual care (UC) psychotherapy, and are at high risk for maladaptive outcomes. Little is known about UC psychotherapeutic strategies utilized with this population. Researchers and clinicians suggest that case management (CM) is a major activity occurring in…

Zoffness, Rachel; Garland, Ann; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Roesch, Scott

2009-01-01

237

Choking Game: CDC's Findings on a Risky Youth Behavior  

MedlinePLUS

... Media Publications Injury Center Research Update The Choking Game: CDC´s Findings on a Risky Youth Behavior Centers ... and Prevention. Unintentional Strangulation Deaths from "The Choking Game" Among Youths Aged 6 - 19 Years – United States, ...

238

Population density and youth antisocial behavior  

PubMed Central

Theoretical models concerning how neighborhood contexts adversely influence juvenile antisocial behavior frequently focus on urban neighborhoods; however, previous studies comparing urban and rural areas on the prevalence of youth antisocial behavior have yielded mixed results. The current study uses longitudinal data on the offspring of a nationally representative sample of mothers (N = 4,886) in the US. There was no relation between density and mother-reported child conduct problems across ages 4–13 years, but youth living in areas of greater population density exhibited more youth self-reported delinquency across 10–17 years. Families often moved to counties with greater or lesser population density, but longitudinal analyses treating population density as a time-varying covariate did not support the hypothesis that living in densely populated counties influenced youth delinquency. Rather, the association between population density and delinquency appears to be due to unmeasured selection variables that differ between families who live in more or less densely populated counties.

Harden, K. Paige; D'Onofrio, Brian M.; Van Hulle, Carol; Turkheimer, Eric; Rodgers, Joseph L.; Waldman, Irwin D.; Lahey, Benjamin B.

2010-01-01

239

Risky Business: Exploring Adolescent Risk-Taking Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Ongoing behavioral research has documented the growing prevalence of adolescent health risk behaviors, such as tobacco use, sexual activity, alcohol and other substance use, nutritional behavior, physical inactivity, and intentional injury. Newer youth risk behaviors, such as pathological gambling, are emerging as threats to public health. Risk,…

Wyatt, Tammy Jordan; Peterson, Fred L.

2005-01-01

240

Models to Guide System Reform for At-Risk Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Policy reform for at-risk youth is complicated by involvement of various service sectors. Issues related to coordinating systems\\u000a of care in a dynamic policy environment are not new, but surprisingly little has been written to guide practitioners and policymakers\\u000a in addressing them (Friedman in Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders 11:11–18, 2003). To that end, a social worker, community psychologist,

Susan A. McCarterMason; Mason G. Haber; Donna Kazemi

2010-01-01

241

The Role of Families and Care Givers as Risk and Protective Factors in Preventing Youth Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews research which discusses the risk and protective functions that families and other caregivers provide in influencing the development of aggressive behavior in youth. Currently, there is an emphasis on providing violence prevention programs in the school environment, typically with little parental or caregiver involvement. By enhancing the role of families and caregivers in youth violence prevention programs,

Le'Roy E. Reese; Elizabeth M. Vera; Thomas R. Simon; Robin M. Ikeda

2000-01-01

242

A Risk Profile Comparison of Runaway and Non-Runaway Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examination of data from 1985 visits by 110 runaway and 655 non-runaway youth to an outpatient medical clinic reveals that runaway youth are at greater risk for a wide variety of medical problems and of health-compromising behaviors including suicide, depression, prostitution, and drug use. (Author/BJV)

Yates, Gary L.; And Others

1988-01-01

243

Examining the Developmental Process of Risk for Exposure to Community Violence Among Urban Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considerable research has documented the effects of community violence exposure on adolescents' behavior and mental health functioning, yet there has been less research on the process by which early risks increase the likelihood that youth will be exposed to community violence. The current study used data from a community epidemiologically defined sample of 623 urban youth followed from 1st grade

Sharon F. Lambert; Catherine P. Bradshaw; Nicole L. Cammack; Nicholas S. Ialongo

2011-01-01

244

Caregiver Depression and Youth Disruptive Behavior Difficulties  

PubMed Central

This study examines the rates of depressive symptoms and service use among caregivers whose children receive treatment for disruptive behavior disorders. Descriptive analyses examined preliminary baseline data from the Family Groups for Urban Youth with Disruptive Behaviors study for 212 caregivers to determine rates of caregiver depressive symptoms and lifetime mental health service use. Findings indicate that caregivers manifest substantially higher rates of depressive symptoms compared to national norms. Of those caregivers with clinically significant depressive symptoms, less than half reported ever receiving mental health services. Findings suggest that greater attention should be paid to identifying and treating caregiver depression among children receiving treatment for disruptive behavior disorders.

Gopalan, Geetha; Dean-Assael, Kara; Klingenstein, Kathryn; Chacko, Anil; McKay, Mary M.

2011-01-01

245

Risk and Protective Profiles Among Never Exposed, Single Form, and Multiple Form Violence Exposed Youth  

PubMed Central

This investigation integrated violence exposure with critical risk and protective factors linked to healthy adolescent adaptation and transition into early adulthood. A racially diverse sample of 848 adolescents identified as at-risk for school drop-out were assessed for no, single, or multiple forms of violence exposure. MANOVA tests revealed that youth with single form victimization fared more poorly than never-exposed youth, and that multiple-form victimization held the greatest jeopardy to development. Youth with multiple-form victimization reported significantly elevated risk factors (emotional distress, life stress, suicide risk, risky behaviors) and lower protective factors (social support, school engagement, family structure) than both single-form and never-exposed youth. Implications are discussed for preventive and early intervention programming and for examining the transition of at-risk youth into young adulthood.

Nurius, Paula S.; Russell, Patricia L.; Herting, Jerald R.; Hooven, Carole; Thompson, Elaine A.

2010-01-01

246

African-American Youth and AIDS High-Risk Behavior: The Social Context and Barriers to Prevention.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Uses an ethnographic study of the largest African-American community in San Francisco and a survey of Black adolescent crack users to describe how drug addiction and accompanying increased sexual activity increase the risk of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Discusses social barriers to AIDS prevention. (FMW)|

Bowser, Benjamin P.; And Others

1990-01-01

247

Education and Training Needs of School Staff Relevant to Preventing Risk Behaviors and Promoting Health Behaviors among Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Questioning Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A national-level needs assessment of high school psychologists, social workers, counselors, and nurses was conducted to identify training and educational resource material needs of these staff relevant to providing health and mental health services to gay, lesbian, bisexual, and questioning (GLBQ) youth. Systematic sampling procedures were…

Sawyer, Richard J.; Porter, J. Davidson; Lehman, Thomas C.; Anderson, Clinton; Anderson, Karen M.

2006-01-01

248

Gang involvement: psychological and behavioral characteristics of gang members, peripheral youth, and nongang youth.  

PubMed

Research has noted the existence of a loose and dynamic gang structure. However, the psychological processes that underpin gang membership have only begun to be addressed. This study examined gang members, peripheral youth, and nongang youth across measures of criminal activity, the importance they attach to status, their levels of moral disengagement, their perceptions of out-group threat, and their attitudes toward authority. Of the 798 high school students who participated in this study, 59 were identified as gang members, 75 as peripheral youth, and 664 as nongang youth. Gang members and peripheral youth were more delinquent than nongang youth overall; however, gang members committed more minor offenses than nongang youth and peripheral youth committed more violent offenses than nongang youth. Gang members were more anti-authority than nongang youth, and both gang and peripheral youth valued social status more than nongang youth. Gang members were also more likely to blame their victims for their actions and use euphemisms to sanitize their behavior than nongang youth, whereas peripheral youth were more likely than nongang youth to displace responsibility onto their superiors. These findings are discussed as they highlight the importance of examining individual differences in the cognitive processes that relate to gang involvement. PMID:20718002

Alleyne, Emma; Wood, Jane L

249

Risk factors for methamphetamine use in youth: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Methamphetamine (MA) is a potent stimulant that is readily available. Its effects are similar to cocaine, but the drug has a profile associated with increased acute and chronic toxicities. The objective of this systematic review was to identify and synthesize literature on risk factors that are associated with MA use among youth. More than 40 electronic databases, websites, and key journals/meeting abstracts were searched. We included studies that compared children and adolescents (? 18 years) who used MA to those who did not. One reviewer extracted the data and a second checked for completeness and accuracy. For discrete risk factors, odds ratios (OR) were calculated and when appropriate, a pooled OR with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) was calculated. For continuous risk factors, mean difference and 95% CI were calculated and when appropriate, a weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% CI was calculated. Results were presented separately by comparison group: low-risk (no previous drug abuse) and high-risk children (reported previous drug abuse or were recruited from a juvenile detention center). Results Twelve studies were included. Among low-risk youth, factors associated with MA use were: history of heroin/opiate use (OR = 29.3; 95% CI: 9.8–87.8), family history of drug use (OR = 4.7; 95% CI: 2.8–7.9), risky sexual behavior (OR = 2.79; 95% CI: 2.25, 3.46) and some psychiatric disorders. History of alcohol use and smoking were also significantly associated with MA use. Among high-risk youth, factors associated with MA use were: family history of crime (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.2–3.3), family history of drug use (OR = 4.7; 95% CI: 2.8–7.9), family history of alcohol abuse (OR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.8–5.6), and psychiatric treatment (OR = 6.8; 95% CI: 3.6–12.9). Female sex was also significantly associated with MA use. Conclusion Among low-risk youth, a history of engaging in a variety of risky behaviors was significantly associated with MA use. A history of a psychiatric disorder was a risk factor for MA for both low- and high-risk youth. Family environment was also associated with MA use. Many of the included studies were cross-sectional making it difficult to assess causation. Future research should utilize prospective study designs so that temporal relationships between risk factors and MA use can be established.

Russell, Kelly; Dryden, Donna M; Liang, Yuanyuan; Friesen, Carol; O'Gorman, Kathleen; Durec, Tamara; Wild, T Cameron; Klassen, Terry P

2008-01-01

250

At-Risk Youth Appearance and Job Performance Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this study was to identify the relationship of at-risk youth workplace appearance to other job performance criteria. Employers (n = 30; each employing from 1 to 17 youths) evaluated 178 at-risk high school youths who completed a paid summer employment experience. Appearance evaluations were significantly correlated with evaluations of…

Freeburg, Beth Winfrey; Workman, Jane E.

2008-01-01

251

Youth aggressive/disruptive behavior trajectories and subsequent gambling among urban male youth.  

PubMed

This study examines the association between aggressive/disruptive behavior development in two distinct developmental periods-childhood (i.e., Grades 1-3) and early adolescence (i.e., Grades 6-10)-and subsequent gambling behavior in late adolescence up to age 20. The sample consists of 310 urban males of predominately minority and low socioeconomic status followed from first grade to late adolescence. Separate general growth mixture models were estimated to explore the heterogeneity in aggressive/disruptive behavior development in the aforementioned two periods. Three distinct behavior trajectories were identified for each period: a chronic high, a moderate increasing, and a low increasing class for childhood, and a chronic high, a moderate increasing, followed by decreasing and a low stable class for early adolescence. There was no association between childhood behavior trajectories and gambling involvement. Males with a moderate behavior trajectory in adolescence where two times more likely to gamble compared to those in the low stable class (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.11, 3.24). Those with chronic high trajectories during either childhood or early adolescence (OR = 2.60, 95% CI = 1.06, 6.38; OR = 3.19, 95% CI = 1.18, 8.64, respectively) were more likely to be at-risk/problem gamblers than those in the low class. Aggressive/disruptive behavior development in childhood and early adolescence is associated with gambling and gambling problems in late adolescence among urban male youth. Preventing childhood and youth aggressive/disruptive behavior may be effective to prevent youth problem gambling. PMID:23410188

Martins, Silvia S; Liu, Weiwei; Hedden, Sarra L; Goldweber, Asha; Storr, Carla L; Derevensky, Jeffrey L; Stinchfield, Randy; Ialongo, Nicholas S; Petras, Hanno

2013-02-14

252

Multiple identification and risks: examination of peer factors across multiracial and single-race youth.  

PubMed

Multiracial youth are thought to be more vulnerable to peer-related risk factors than are single-race youth. However, there have been surprisingly few well-designed studies on this topic. This study empirically investigated the extent to which multiracial youth are at higher risk for peer influenced problem behavior. Data are from a representative and longitudinal sample of youth from Washington State (N = 1,760, mean age = 14.13, 50.9% girls). Of those in the sample, 225 youth self-identified as multiracial (12.8%), 1,259 as White (71.5%), 152 as Latino (8.6%), and 124 as Asian American (7.1%). Results show that multiracial youth have higher rates of violence and alcohol use than Whites and more marijuana use than Asian Americans. Higher levels of socioeconomic disadvantage and single-parent family status partly explained the higher rates of problem behaviors among multiracial youth. Peer risk factors of substance-using or antisocial friends were higher for multiracial youth than Whites, even after socioeconomic variables were accounted for, demonstrating a higher rate of peer risks among multiracial youth. The number of substance-using friends was the most consistently significant correlate and predictor of problems and was highest among multiracial youth. However, interaction tests did not provide consistent evidence of a stronger influence of peer risks among multiracial youth. Findings underscore the importance of a differentiated understanding of vulnerability in order to better target prevention and intervention efforts as well as the need for further research that can help identify and explain the unique experiences and vulnerabilities of multiracial youth. PMID:22395776

Choi, Yoonsun; He, Michael; Herrenkohl, Todd I; Catalano, Richard F; Toumbourou, John W

2012-03-07

253

Bridging Positive Youth Development and Mental Health Services for Youth with Serious Behavior Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Youth development approaches have grown in popularity, yet the appropriateness of these strategies for adolescents with serious behavior problems has rarely been addressed. Life-course research examining the onset and developmental course of problem behaviors suggests that youth with different patterns of behavior problems may not equally benefit…

Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Brown, Jennifer S.; Hamilton, Stephen F.

2008-01-01

254

Externalizing symptomatology among adoptive youth: prevalence and preadoption risk factors.  

PubMed

The extent of symptomatology related to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) was examined in a statewide sample of adopted youth, aged 4-18 years (n = 808). The use of normed questionnaires in a nonclinical sample decreased biases associated with past research on adopted children. According to parental report, a striking number of the youth qualified as manifesting significant symptom levels of externalizing behavior problems: 21% met symptom cutoffs for ADHD (with or without ODD) and 20% met criteria for ODD (with or without ADHD), for a combined total of 29% of the sample. A number of parent-reported, preadoptive risk factors distinguished these groups from one another and from the nonexternalizing youth. The clearest associated factors included histories of preadoption abuse/neglect, later age of adoption, prenatal drug exposure, and placement in multiple foster homes prior to adoption. We discuss implications regarding both etiology and current controversies surrounding the disproportionate levels of behavioral difficulties in adopted youth. PMID:11316335

Simmel, C; Brooks, D; Barth, R P; Hinshaw, S P

2001-02-01

255

Risky Behavior in Affluent Youth: Examining the Co-occurrence and Consequences of Multiple Problem Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Children of affluent parents are often excluded in psychological research as they are considered to be at “low risk”; however, research is beginning to suggest that this previously under-studied population may be at risk for developing multiple problem behaviors, including substance use and externalizing problems. The current study aimed to extend the application of Problem Behavior Theory (PBT) to a sample of affluent adolescents by examining the extent to which these behaviors co-occurred and were associated with negative outcomes. Data were collected from 1,147 high school students living in an affluent community via anonymous questionnaires regarding their engagement in various problem behaviors. PBT was supported in this sample, and youth who engaged in multiple problem behaviors reported experiencing more negative outcomes than youth who did not engage in these behaviors. The findings of this study support the generalizability of PBT and also highlight the importance of continuing to study affluent youth in addition to traditionally high-risk populations.

McMahon, Robert J.; Luthar, Suniya S.

2012-01-01

256

Health Risk Behavior of Rural Secondary School Students in Zimbabwe  

Microsoft Academic Search

A socioculturally appropriate health risk behavior instrument, modeled after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), was administered to 717 secondary school students in a rural area of Zimbabwe. Comparisons of risk behaviors by gender and school grade were made using univariate procedures and multiple logistic regression. Males were significantly more likely than females

Clement K. Gwede; Robert J. McDermott; Wayne W. Westhoff; Moses Mushore; Tsungai Mushore; Elijah Chitsika; Charles S. Majange; Peter Chauke

2001-01-01

257

Gender Differences in Drug Use, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Risky Sexual Behavior among Arrested Youths*  

PubMed Central

Data were collected on arrested youths processed at a centralized intake facility, including youths released back to the community and those placed in secure detention. This paper reports the results of a test of a structural model involving newly arrested male and female youths’ sexually transmitted diseases (STD) test results, urine analysis results for recent cocaine and marijuana use, and self-reported engaging in risky sexual behavior. The across gender, multiple group model involved: (1) a confirmatory factor analysis of these variables, reflecting a latent variable labeled Risk, (2) a regression of Risk on the youths’ age, and (3) an examination of the covariance between Risk and the youths’ race and seriousness of arrest charge. Results indicate the youths’ STD status, drug use, and reported risky sexual behavior are interrelated phenomena, similarly experienced across gender. Age was the only correlate of Risk status that demonstrated a significant gender group difference. The youths’ race and seriousness of arrest charges did not significantly affect Risk, regardless of gender. Research and policy implications of the findings are discussed.

Dembo, Richard; Belenko, Steven; Childs, Kristina; Greenbaum, Paul E.; Wareham, Jennifer

2009-01-01

258

Risky decision-making: An fMRI study of youth at high risk for alcoholism  

PubMed Central

Background Adolescents with a family history of alcoholism (FHP) are at risk for developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD), and some studies indicate that FHP individuals show deficits in executive functioning. The ability to make adaptive decisions is one aspect of successful executive functioning that is often measured during risk-taking tasks; however, this behavior has not been examined in FHP youth. Since impaired decision-making could predispose FHP youth to make poor choices related to alcohol use, the current study examined the neural substrates of risk-taking in FHP adolescents and their family history negative (FHN) peers. Methods Thirty-one (18 FHP, 13 FHN) youth between 13-15 years old were included in this study. All youth had used little to no alcohol prior to study involvement. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine the neural substrates of risk-taking during the Wheel of Fortune (WOF) decision-making task (Ernst et al., 2004) in FHP and FHN youth. Results FHP youth did not differ from FHN youth in risk-taking behavior, but showed less brain response during risky decision-making in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right cerebellar regions compared to FHN peers. Conclusions Despite no behavioral differences on the WOF decision-making task, FHP youth exhibited atypical neural response during risk-taking compared to FHN peers. Atypical brain activity, in regions implicated in executive functioning could lead to reduced cognitive control, which may result in risky choices regarding alcohol use. This could help explain the higher rates of AUDs seen in FHP adolescents. Further examination of risky behavior and associated brain response over the course of adolescence is necessary to characterize the vulnerabilities of FHP youth in the absence of alcohol abuse.

Cservenka, Anita; Nagel, Bonnie J.

2011-01-01

259

Delay discounting behavior and white matter microstructure abnormalities in youth with a family history of alcoholism  

PubMed Central

Background Youth with family history of alcohol abuse have a greater risk of developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD). Brain and behavior differences may underlie this increased vulnerability. The current study examined delay discounting behavior and white matter microstructure in youth at high-risk for alcohol abuse, as determined by a family history of alcoholism (FH+), and youth without such family history (FH?). Methods Thirty-three healthy youth (FH+ = 15, FH? = 18), ages 11 to 15 years, completed a delay discounting task and underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Tract Based Spatial Statistics (Smith et al., 2006), as well as follow-up region-of-interest analyses, were performed in order to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) between FH+ and FH? youth. Results FH+ youth showed a trend toward increased discounting behavior and had significantly slower reaction times on the delay discounting paradigm compared to FH? youth. Group differences in FA were seen in several white matter tracts. Furthermore, lower FA in the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus and the right optic radiation statistically mediated the relationship between FH status and slower reaction times on the delay discounting task. Conclusion Youth with a family history of substance abuse have disrupted white matter microstructure, which likely contributes to less efficient cortical processing, and may act as an intrinsic risk-factor contributing to an increased susceptibility of developing AUD. In addition, FHP youth showed a trend toward greater impulsive decision making, possibly representing an inherent personal characteristic that may facilitate substance use onset and abuse in high-risk youth.

Herting, Megan M.; Schwartz, Daniel; Mitchell, Suzanne H.; Nagel, Bonnie J.

2011-01-01

260

Positive Support: Mentoring and Depression among High-Risk Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"Positive Support" examines potential benefits of matching high-risk youth with faith-based mentors. Drawing on surveys and interviews with young people who participated in the National Faith-Based Initiative, we found that mentored youth were less likely to show signs of depression than the youth who were not matched with a mentor. This in turn…

Bauldry, Shawn

2006-01-01

261

Combined influence of physical activity and television viewing on the risk of overweight in US youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:The purpose of this study was to examine the combined influence of physical activity (PA) and television viewing (TV) on the risk of overweight in US youth ages 14–18 years.Research design and methods:Cross-sectional data from a nationally representative sample of approximately 13 600 US high school students participating in the 2001 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Youth Risk Behavior

J C Eisenmann; R T Bartee; D T Smith; G J Welk; Q Fu

2008-01-01

262

Health Risk Behaviors among California College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health risk behaviors among students attending 4-year colleges in California were examined. The Youth Risk Behavior Survey for College Students was administered in a two-stage (29 universities, 5,652 students) random sample. All campuses and 3,810 (69%) students participated in the survey. In the 30 days preceding the survey, 36.7% of the students had binged at least once while drinking; 25.3%

Kevin Patrick; Jennifer R. Covin; Mark Fulop; Karen Calfas; Chris Lovato

1997-01-01

263

Reinforcement Sensitivity and Risk for Psychopathology Following Exposure to Violence: A Vulnerability-Specificity Model in Latino Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Urban Latino youth are exposed to high rates of violence, which increases risk for diverse forms of psychopathology. The current study aims to increase specificity in predicting responses by testing the hypothesis that youths' reinforcement sensitivity--behavioral inhibition (BIS) and behavioral approach (BAS)--is associated with specific…

Gudino, Omar G.; Nadeem, Erum; Kataoka, Sheryl H.; Lau, Anna S.

2012-01-01

264

Gaps between Adolescent Risk Behaviors and Disclosure during Outpatient Visits  

PubMed Central

Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the gaps between disclosed high-risk behaviors in low-income, mainly Hispanic youth and the identification of these risks by health care providers. Methods. This cross-sectional study included youth 13–19 years old who participated in a study on latent tuberculosis treatment. Youth were interviewed at baseline by bilingual research assistants; the provider visit was assessed by the chart review. Results. Of 221 youth, the majority (96%) were identified as Hispanic, 45% were foreign-born, and 46% were male. A total of 399 risk behaviors were revealed to research staff by the participants; only 24 risk behaviors were revealed to providers. Conclusions. The majority of risk behaviors based on the chart review were neither queried nor disclosed to the physicians. Physicians providing care to adolescents should consider strategies to improve disclosure as a necessary precursor to interventions.

Hill, Linda L.; Hovell, Melbourne; Kelley, Norma; Baird, Sara; Sipan, Carol; Schmitz, Katharine; Friedman, Lawrence

2013-01-01

265

Review of Educational Programs Designed to Reduce Sexual Risk-Taking Behaviors among School-Aged Youth in the United States.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Executive Summary; Introduction to this Monograph; Adolescent Sexual Risk-Taking Behavior and its Consequences--STDS, HIV, AIDS, Pregnancies and Births; Programs to Reduce Unprotected Sexual Intercourse; Methods Used to Evaluate the Impact of Pr...

D. Kirby

1995-01-01

266

Risk factors for hepatitis C virus infection among street youths  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The relative contributions to risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection resulting from unsafe sexual behaviours and exposures to blood (e.g., tattooing, body piercing and injection drug use) among youths at risk are not well known. We interviewed street youths about risk factors for HCV infection and docu- mented their HCV antibody status. Methods: From December 1995 to September

Élise Roy; Nancy Haley; Pascale Leclerc; Jean-François Boivin; Lyne Cédras; Jean Vincelette

267

Kids Speak: Preferred Parental Behavior at Youth Sport Events  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|News reports (e.g., Abrams, 2008) and scholarly research (e.g., Wiersma & Fifer, 2005) have indicated increasing concern that parent-spectator behavior at youth sport events may be problematic. Multiple strategies have been used to influence spectator behavior in youth sport contexts (e.g., "Silent Sundays"). However, it is unlikely that…

Omli, Jens; Wiese-Bjornstal, Diane M.

2011-01-01

268

The Relationship Between Program Restrictiveness and Youth Behavior Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

A key concept in the continuum-of-care model is matching the restrictiveness of treatment to the level of youth behavior problems. Restrictiveness refers to the degree that treatment and setting constrains choices and limits freedoms of patients. Only a few investigators have examined this relationship, and the findings have been equivocal. Extending our initial study of the relationship between youth behavior

Michael L. Handwerk; Patrick C. Friman; Mariam A. Mott; Jayne M. Stairs

1998-01-01

269

Kids Speak: Preferred Parental Behavior at Youth Sport Events  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

News reports (e.g., Abrams, 2008) and scholarly research (e.g., Wiersma & Fifer, 2005) have indicated increasing concern that parent-spectator behavior at youth sport events may be problematic. Multiple strategies have been used to influence spectator behavior in youth sport contexts (e.g., "Silent Sundays"). However, it is unlikely that…

Omli, Jens; Wiese-Bjornstal, Diane M.

2011-01-01

270

Corporal Punishment and Youth Externalizing Behavior in Santiago, Chile  

PubMed Central

Objectives Corporal punishment is still widely practiced around the globe, despite the large body of child development research that substantiates its short- and long-term consequences. Within this context, this paper examined the relationship between parental use of corporal punishment and youth externalizing behavior with a Chilean sample to add to the growing empirical evidence concerning the potential relationship between increased corporal punishment and undesirable youth outcomes across cultures. Methods Analysis was based on 919 adolescents in Santiago, Chile. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the extent to which parents’ use of corporal punishment and positive family measures were associated with youth externalizing behavior. Furthermore, the associations between self-reported externalizing behavior and infrequent, as well as frequent, use of corporal punishment were investigated to contribute to understanding how varying levels of parental use of corporal punishment were differently related to youth outcomes. Results Both mother’s and father’s use of corporal punishment were associated with greater youth externalizing behavior. Additionally, increases in positive parenting practices, such as parental warmth and family involvement, were met with decreases in youth externalizing behavior when controlling for youth demographics, family socioeconomic status, and parents’ use of corporal punishment. Finally, both infrequent and frequent use of corporal punishment were positively associated with higher youth problem behaviors, though frequent corporal punishment had a stronger relationship with externalizing behavior than did infrequent corporal punishment. Conclusions Parental use of corporal punishment, even on an occasional basis, is associated with greater externalizing behavior for youth while a warm and involving family environment may protect youth from serious problem behaviors. Therefore, findings of this study add to the growing evidence concerning the negative consequences of corporal punishment for youth outcomes.

Ma, Julie; Han, Yoonsun; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Delva, Jorge; Castillo, Marcela

2012-01-01

271

Premarital sex behaviors among college youths of kathmandu, Nepal.  

PubMed

Backgroud Unhealthy premarital sex behavior leads to several health problems namely; sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Human Immune Virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS), unwanted pregnancies, abortions and maternal deaths. Unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions are rampant in Nepal despite introduction of legal provision for safe abortion since 2003. Lately, unsafe sex and sex without condoms and drinking before sex is increasing in trend in youth population. The primary aim of this study was to explore the factors associated with premarital sex behaviors. Objectives The main objective of the study was to identify the premarital sex behaviors and related factors among college youths in Kathmandu, Nepal. Methods Descriptive and explorative study of size 230 college youths aged between 18- 24 years. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaire from February 26 to March 15, 2012. The reliability of the questionnaire was ensured by using Cronbach's alpha. Results Late youths of age 20-24 were more likely to experience premarital sex than early youths of age 18-19 years old. Urban youths were less involved in premarital sex behavior than rural youth. Youths having negative attitudes towards premarital sex were more likely to experience premarital sex than a positive attitude. Youths who had good relationship with their parents had less premarital sex experience than youths having poor relationship with their parents. Conclusion One fifth of college youth had premarital sex experience where alcohol drinker had higher premarital sex experience than non-drinker. Youths having good peer norms were significantly less likely to experience premarital sex behaviors than youths having poor peer norms. PMID:23774409

Bc, G B; Basel, P L

272

Cumulative Environmental Risk and Youth Maladjustment: The Role of Youth Attributes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from 5,070 youth ages 11 to 18 years old who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, concurrent and longitudinal associations among cumulative risk, protective factors, and youth maladjustment were examined. Cumulative risk was associated with concurrent conduct problems and depressed mood. For conduct…

Gerard, Jean M.; Buehler, Cheryl

2004-01-01

273

Modeling HIV Risk in Highly Vulnerable Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the structure of several HIV risk behaviors in an ethnically and geographically diverse sample of 8,251 clients from 10 innovative demonstration projects intended for adolescents living with, or at risk for, HIV. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified 2 risk factors for men (sexual intercourse with men and a…

Huba, G. J.; Panter, A. T.; Melchior, Lisa A.; Trevithick, Lee; Woods, Elizabeth R.; Wright, Eric; Feudo, Rudy; Tierney, Steven; Schneir, Arlene; Tenner, Adam; Remafedi, Gary; Greenberg, Brian; Sturdevant, Marsha; Goodman, Elizabeth; Hodgins, Antigone; Wallace, Michael; Brady, Russell E.; Singer, Barney; Marconi, Katherine

2003-01-01

274

Promoting healthy outcomes among youth with multiple risks: innovative approaches.  

PubMed

Adolescent behavior problems such as substance use, antisocial behavior problems, and mental health problems have extremely high social costs and lead to overburdened mental health and juvenile justice systems in the United States and Europe. The prevalence of these problems is substantial, and at-risk youth often present with a combination of concerns. An understanding of risk and protective factors at multiple levels, including the child, family, peer, school, and community, has influenced intervention development. At the individual and family levels, the most effective and cost-effective programs work intensively with youth and their families or use individual and group cognitive-behavioral approaches. However, there is a paucity of careful studies of effective policies and programs in the juvenile justice system. Research is needed that focuses on adoption, financing, implementation, and sustainable use of evidence-based programs in public service systems. In addition, the field needs to understand better for whom current programs are most effective to create the next generation of more effective and efficient programs. PMID:23297659

Greenberg, Mark T; Lippold, Melissa A

2013-01-07

275

Risk Factor Analysis and the Youth Question  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is concerned with exploring how in late modernity the "youth question" is being addressed by public policy and what impact this is having on understandings of childhood and youth. Historically the youth question has been shaped by adult anxieties over youth delinquency and their problems of social integration. In late modernity, this is…

France, Alan

2008-01-01

276

Increasing the on-Task Homework Behavior of Youth with Behavior Disorders Using Functional Behavioral Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Research has shown a positive correlation between time spent on homework and learning. However, students often engage in off-task behaviors to escape the demands of homework. Youth with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) are especially likely to engage in off-task behaviors. Effective interventions to increase on-task behavior during…

Hawkins, Renee O.; Axelrod, Michael I.

2008-01-01

277

New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey (YRRS). 2005 Report of State Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the fall of 2005, the New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey (NM YRRS) was conducted in New Mexico public high schools, with 5,679 students in grades nine through twelve participating from 20 public high schools in the state. The NM YRRS is a tool that can assist administrators and policy makers in identifying health risk behaviors among…

Green, Dan; Penaloza, Linda J.; Chrisp, Eric; Dillon, Mary; Cassell, Carol M.; Tsinajinnie, Eugene; Rinehart, Judith; Ortega, Willa

2006-01-01

278

Hurricane Katrina and Youth Anxiety: The Role of Parental Anxiety, Parental and Youth Attachment Beliefs, and Parenting Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of Hurricane Katrina on youth anxiety and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder symptoms (PTSD symptoms) by examining the roles of pre Katrina youth anxiety, parental anxiety, parental and youth attachment beliefs, and parenting behaviors. Seventy-four youth (ages 6 to 17, mean age: 11.34 years) and their parents were recruited for

Natalie Costa

2007-01-01

279

Association between drug use patterns and HIV risks among homeless, runaway, and street youth in Northern California  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined relationships between drug use patterns and HIV risk behaviors among 1121 street-recruited homeless, runaway, and `street youth' in Northern California. Comparisons demonstrated that youth using any heroin, methamphetamine, or cocaine exhibited more sexual risks than non-users, while primary stimulant and combined heroin\\/stimulant users showed greatest sexual risk. Combined heroin\\/stimulant injectors showed higher risk injection practices than primary heroin

Alice A. Gleghorn; Rani Marx; Eric Vittinghoff; Mitchell H. Katz

1998-01-01

280

Behaviors of Youth Involved in the Child Welfare System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: Using data from a nationally representative panel study, the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW), we address the following questions: (a) What are the youth, family, community, and child welfare system risk factors that place youth (ages 11-14 years) living at home, who are referred for maltreatment, at increased…

Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Ruffolo, Mary C.; Ortega, Robert M.; Clarke, Jenell

2008-01-01

281

Are Youth at Risk? Reevaluating the Deficit Model of Youth Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Puts the label "at risk" in perspective as it relates to youth. Points out that today's adolescents have lower rates of suicide, unwed pregnancy, drug abuse, smoking, and drunk driving than young and middle-aged adults. Suggests that extension youth education moves toward a condition-focused, resiliency model that recognizes the vitality and…

Astroth, Kirk A.

1993-01-01

282

Designing health promotion approaches to high-risk adolescents through formative research with youth and parents.  

PubMed Central

Young people who engage in multiple health risk behaviors such as alcohol and other drug use, unprotected sexual activity, smoking, and violence, are a serious public health concern. To help identify potential strategies for influencing these behaviors, focus groups were conducted with 160 youth ages 10-18 years. For additional insights, focus groups also were held subsequently with 70 parents and grandparents of youth of similar ages. The youth participants were well-informed about most of the risky behaviors and their health consequences. Safe sex practices and the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were the exceptions. Despite this understanding, participants spoke of engaging in these behaviors as part of a lifestyle common to the high-risk environments where they live. The youth said that knowing why these practices were harmful was not enough to help them change the behavior. The need for skills building and support systems to reinforce their generally high level of awareness was evident. Love, home, family, and safety were cited as very important. Many participants said they wanted to talk to someone they could trust, who knew what they were going through. The groups of parents and grandparents were concerned about the physical dangers facing their adolescents and about peer influence. They also acknowledged their own mixed messages to their youth. The focus group findings suggest that health promotion strategies for high-risk youth should be comprehensive rather than categorical, with nonjudgmental, interpersonal communication integrated into community-based programs. To be relevant, program strategies must reach outside the usual channels and incorporate the high-risk environment where these youth live.

1993-01-01

283

Tracking Procedures for Locating High-Risk Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few published works are available that provide a comprehensive description of tracking procedures. This article describes the data collection tracking protocol that was used in Project Towards No Drug Abuse (Project TND), to follow high-risk youth over a 5 1\\/2 year period. Youth were followed from 1994 through 2000. A total of 35% of these youth were assessed 5 1\\/2

William J. McCuller; Steve Sussman; Karen Holiday; Sande Craig; Clyde W. Dent

2002-01-01

284

Intervention for homeless and at-risk youth: Assessing youth and staff perspectives on service provision, satisfaction and quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study applies a developmental framework to examining service provision within an agency servicing homeless and at-risk youth. Forty-five youth and 30 staff provided quantitative ratings and qualitative description of five core dimensions of service delivery informed by research on youth development within community agencies and studies of service utilization within homeless youth populations; namely, program rules and organization, safety,

Hillary J. Heinze; Debra M. Hernandez Jozefowicz-Simbeni

2009-01-01

285

Taking the youth perspective: Assessment of program characteristics that promote positive development in homeless and at-risk youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study extends research on contextual characteristics associated with positive outcomes within traditional youth settings to examine program characteristics, resources and positive development opportunities that exist within programs for homeless youth and youth at risk for homelessness. One hundred and thirty-three youth (42 boys and young men; 91 girls and young women) from six community agencies completed questionnaires created to

Hillary J. Heinze; Debra M. Hernandez Jozefowicz; Paul A. Toro

2010-01-01

286

Reductions in HIV Risk Among Runaway Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Runaway youth are 6–12 times more likely to become infected with HIV than other youth. Using a quasi-experimental design, the efficacy of an HIV prevention program was evaluated over 2 years among 2 groups of runaways: (1) those at 2 shelters who received Street Smart, an intensive HIV intervention program, and (2) youth at 2 control shelters. Street Smart provided

Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus; Juwon Song; Marya Gwadz; Martha Lee; Ronan Van Rossem; Cheryl Koopman

2003-01-01

287

Youth with Runaway, Throwaway, and Homeless Experiences...Prevalence, Drug Use, and Other At-Risk Behaviors. A FYSB Research Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Professionals who work with runaway, throwaway, and homeless youth have long known that many of these young people leave home to escape abusive and/or destructive family situations. This update presents the findings of a national study on such children. Results of the study, "Youth with Runaway, Throwaway, and Homeless Experiences: Prevalence,…

Johnson, Bassin, and Shaw, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

288

Youth Gambling Problems: Examining Risk and Protective Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between several pre-examined risk factors for youth problem gambling, a number of potential protective factors for youth problem gambling, and the development of adolescent problem gambling. The sample consisted of 2179 students, ages 11–19. The results of analyses of variance revealed that lower family and school connectedness are associated with adolescent problem gambling. Further, an

LAURIE DICKSON; JEFFREY L. DEREVENSKY; RINA GUPTA

2008-01-01

289

Mass Media as an HIV-Prevention Strategy: Using Culturally Sensitive Messages to Reduce HIV-Associated Sexual Behavior of At-Risk African American Youth  

PubMed Central

The evidence base and theoretical frameworks for mass media HIV-prevention campaigns in the United States are not well-developed. We describe an intervention approach using culturally sensitive mass media messages to enhance protective beliefs and behavior of African American adolescents at risk for HIV. This approach exploits the potential that mass media messages have, not only to reach a large segment of the adolescent population and thereby support normative change, but also to engage the most vulnerable segments of this audience to reduce HIV-associated risk behaviors. The results from an ongoing HIV-prevention trial implemented in 2 medium-sized cities in the United States illustrate the effectiveness of this intervention approach.

Sznitman, Sharon; DiClemente, Ralph; Salazar, Laura F.; Vanable, Peter A.; Carey, Michael P.; Hennessy, Michael; Brown, Larry K.; Valois, Robert F.; Stanton, Bonita F.; Fortune, Thierry; Juzang, Ivan

2009-01-01

290

Overlooked, misunderstood and at-risk: Exploring the lives and HIV risk of ethnic minority male-to-female transgender youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To describe the real life challenges and HIV-risk behaviors of male-to-female (MTF) transgender youth from communities of color. Methods: A convenience sample (n 51) of ethnic-minority MTF transgender youth aged 16 -25 years completed an anonymous questionnaire including demographics, psychosocial measures, and participation in substance use and sexual risk behaviors. Descriptive analyses and analyses of association were used to

Robert Garofalo; Joanne Deleon; Elizabeth Osmer; Mary Doll; Gary W. Harper

2006-01-01

291

Psychiatric Symptom Typology in a Sample of Youth Receiving Substance Abuse Treatment Services: Associations with Self-Reported Child Maltreatment and Sexual Risk Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Latent profile analysis (LPA) was used to classify 394 adolescents undergoing substance use treatment, based on past year\\u000a psychiatric symptoms. Relations between profile membership and (a) self-reported childhood maltreatment experiences and (b)\\u000a current sexual risk behavior were examined. LPA generated three psychiatric symptom profiles: Low-, High- Alcohol-, and High-\\u000a Internalizing Symptoms profiles. Analyses identified significant associations between profile membership and

Assaf OshriJonathan; Jonathan G. Tubman; James Jaccard

292

Reinforcement Sensitivity and Risk for Psychopathology Following Exposure to Violence: A Vulnerability-Specificity Model in Latino Youth  

PubMed Central

Urban Latino youth are exposed to high rates of violence, which increases risk for diverse forms of psychopathology. To current study aims to increase specificity in predicting responses by testing the hypothesis that youths’ reinforcement sensitivity–behavioral inhibition (BIS) and behavioral approach (BAS)–is associated with specific clinical outcomes and increases risk for the development of such problems following exposure to violence. Utilizing a short-term longitudinal design, Latino youth (N=168) provided reports of BIS/BAS and emotional/behavioral problems at Time 1, exposure to violence between Time 1 and Time 2, and clinical symptoms at Time 2. Results suggested that reinforcement sensitivity moderated the relation between violence exposure and psychopathology, such that increasing levels of BIS were associated with elevated risk for internalizing and posttraumatic stress symptoms following exposure to violence whereas BAS increased risk for externalizing problems. The importance of building on existing knowledge to understand minority youth psychopathology is discussed.

Gudino, Omar G.; Nadeem, Erum; Kataoka, Sheryl H.; Lau, Anna S.

2013-01-01

293

Reinforcement sensitivity and risk for psychopathology following exposure to violence: a vulnerability-specificity model in Latino youth.  

PubMed

Urban Latino youth are exposed to high rates of violence, which increases risk for diverse forms of psychopathology. The current study aims to increase specificity in predicting responses by testing the hypothesis that youths' reinforcement sensitivity-behavioral inhibition (BIS) and behavioral approach (BAS)-is associated with specific clinical outcomes and increases risk for the development of such problems following exposure to violence. Utilizing a short-term longitudinal design, Latino youth (N = 168) provided reports of BIS/BAS and emotional/behavioral problems at Time 1, exposure to violence between Time 1 and Time 2, and clinical symptoms at Time 2. Results suggested that reinforcement sensitivity moderated the relation between violence exposure and psychopathology, such that increasing levels of BIS were associated with elevated risk for internalizing and posttraumatic stress symptoms following exposure to violence whereas BAS increased risk for externalizing problems. The importance of building on existing knowledge to understand minority youth psychopathology is discussed. PMID:22080366

Gudiño, Omar G; Nadeem, Erum; Kataoka, Sheryl H; Lau, Anna S

2012-04-01

294

[Risks of energy drinks in youths].  

PubMed

The market value for energy drinks is continually growing and the annual worldwide energy drink consumption is increasing. However, issues related to energy drink ingredients and the potential for adverse health consequences remain to be elucidated. This aim of the present paper is to review the current knowledge on putative adverse effects of energy drinks, especially in youths. There are many energy drink brands in the worldwide market, even if only few brands are available in France. Although the energy drink content varies, these beverages often contain taurine, caffeine, vitamins B and carbohydrates. These drinks vary widely in both caffeine content (80 to 141 mg per can) and caffeine concentration. Except caffeine, the effects of energy drink ingredients on physical and cognitive performances remain controversial. Researchers identified moderate positive effects of energy drinks on performances, whereas others found contrary results. The adverse effects of energy drink can be related to either the toxicity of ingredients or specific situations in which energy drinks are used such as ingestion in combination with alcohol. Although the issue of taurine-induced toxic encephalopathy has been addressed, it is likely that the risk of taurine toxicity after energy drink consumption remains low. However, whether the prolonged use of energy drinks providing more than 3g taurine daily remains to be examined in the future. The consumption of energy drinks may increase the risk for caffeine overdose and toxicity in children and teenagers. The practice of consuming great amounts of energy drink with alcohol is considered by many teenagers and students a primary locus to socialize and to meet people. This pattern of energy drink consumption explains the enhanced risk of both caffeine and alcohol toxicity in youths. Twenty five to 40% of young people report consumption of energy drink with alcohol while partying. Consumption of energy drinks with alcohol during heavy episodic drinking is at risk of serious injury, sexual assault, drunk driving, and death. However, even after adjusting for alcohol consumption, students who consume alcohol mixed with energy drinks had dramatically higher rates of serious alcohol-related consequences. It has been reported that the subjective perceptions of some symptoms of alcohol intoxication are less intense after the combined ingestion of the alcohol plus energy drink; however, these effects are not detected in objective measures of motor coordination and visual reaction time. PMID:20926266

Bigard, A-X

2010-11-01

295

Marijuana Use and Delinquent Behaviors among Youths.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

More than 5 million youths (21 percent) engaged in serious fighting at school or work, and almost 4 million (16 percent) took part in a group-againstgroup fight in the past year. In 2002, 4 million youths (16 percent of those aged 12 to 17) used marijuana...

2004-01-01

296

Kids speak: preferred parental behavior at youth sport events.  

PubMed

News reports (e.g., Abrams, 2008) and scholarly research (e.g., Wiersma & Fife, 2005) have indicated increasing concern that parent-spectator behavior at youth sport events may be problematic. Multiple strategies have been used to influence spectator behavior in youth sport contexts (e.g., "Silent Sundays"). However it is unlikely that interventions aimed at changing parent-spectator behaviors have adequately considered young athletes' perspectives, because little is known about how children want parents to behave during youth sport events. Therefore, children (ages 7-14 years) were asked to describe how parents actually behaved at youth sport events and how they wanted parents to behave. Through grounded theory analysis (Charmaz, 2000), three parent "roles" emerged from the data-supportive parent, demanding coach, and crazed fan. PMID:22276412

Omli, Jens; Wiese-Bjornstal, Diane M

2011-12-01

297

A conceptual framework for reducing risky teen driving behaviors among minority youth  

PubMed Central

Teenage drivers, especially males, have higher rates of motor vehicle crashes and engage in riskier driving behavior than adults. Motor vehicle deaths disproportionately impact youth from poor and minority communities and in many communities there are higher rates of risky behaviors among minority youth. In this paper, the authors review the data on teens, risky driving behaviors, and morbidity and mortality. They identify areas in which known disparities exist, and examine strategies for changing teen driving behavior, identifying what has worked for improving the use of seat belts and for reducing other risky behaviors. A multifaceted, multilevel model based on ecological theory is proposed for understanding how teens make choices about driving behaviors, and to understand the array of factors that can influence these choices. The model is used to create recommendations for comprehensive intervention strategies that can be used in minority communities to reduce disparities in risk behaviors, injury, disability, and death.

Juarez, P; Schlundt, D G; Goldzweig, I; Stinson, N

2006-01-01

298

Diversity within: Subgroup Differences of Youth Problem Behaviors among Asian Pacific Islander American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study compares problem behaviors across a range of adolescent Asian Pacific Islander (API) subgroups using the Add Health data, and controlling for parental education or immigrant status. The study finds that Filipino, "other" API, and multiethnic API American youth are at higher risk for poorer outcomes than Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese…

Choi, Yoonsun

2008-01-01

299

Prevalence of youth access to alcohol, guns, illegal drugs, or cigarettes in the home and association with health-risk behaviors.  

PubMed

PURPOSE: To describe the prevalence of access to alcohol, guns, drugs, or cigarettes in the home and its association with related health-risk behaviors among adolescents.METHODS: We analyzed cross-sectional data from the 1995 in-home survey of the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health which used a nationally representative school-based sample (N = 6,504) of adolescents in grades 7-12. We used logistic regression analysis, adjusted for gender, race/ethnicity and age, to examine the associations between access to alcohol, guns, drugs, and cigarettes in the home and the practice of risk behaviors involving those variables.RESULTS: Overall, 1,817 (28%) adolescents reported having easy access to alcohol in the home, 1,616 (25%) had access to a gun, 189 (3%) had access to drugs, and 2,067 (32%) had access to cigarettes. Associations were found between easy home access to alcohol and drinking during the past 12 months (Adj. OR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.89-2.47), ever being drunk at school (Adj. OR = 2.33, 95% CI = 1.85-2.95, and ever driving drunk (Adj. OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.29-2.09). Access to a gun at home was associated with carrying a gun to school (Adj. OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.40-4.64). Associations were also found between access to drugs and cigarettes in the home and ever using drugs and smoking regularly.CONCLUSIONS: Easy access to alcohol, guns, and cigarettes in the home is prevalent among adolescents and may increase involvement in risky behaviors. Limiting access therefore is important in order to reduce the occurrence of health-risk behaviors associated with substance use, deliquency and injury among adolescents. PMID:11018352

Swahn; Hammig

2000-10-01

300

The 1993 Iowa Youth Survey: Normative and Trend Data.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study of youths and high-risk behavior was designed to explore four issues: (1) the status of substance use and other at-risk behaviors among Iowa youth; (2) important trends in youth substance use and non-use behaviors; (3) major factors involved in encouraging non-use and health-promoting behaviors among Iowa youth; and (4) what the…

Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines.

301

Attempted Suicide and Associated Health Risk Behaviors among Native American High School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Suicide represents the second-leading cause of death among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth aged 15-24 years. Data from the 2001 Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Youth Risk Behavior Survey were used to examine the association between attempted suicide among high school students and unintentional injury and violence behaviors, sexual risk

Shaughnessy, Lana; Doshi, Sonal R.; Jones, Sherry Everett

2004-01-01

302

Do Parents and Peers Matter? A Prospective Socio-ecological Examination of Substance Use and Sexual Risk among African American Youth  

PubMed Central

We examined the direct contribution of parent and peer risk and promotive factors on youth condom use trajectories, in addition to the indirect influence of these factors via youth’s substance use over four years in a sample of urban, African American youth (N=679; 51% female; M = 14.86 years; SD=.65). Growth curve modeling was used to estimate changes in substance use and sexual risk across adolescence and test their association with parent and peer factors. Parent and peer risk factors were strongly associated with increasing substance use as youth aged. Substance use and condom use were interrelated. Parent and peer risk factors were indirectly associated with youth condom use; parent and peer promotive factors were directly associated with condom use, after accounting for substance use. Findings suggest the value of considering multiple influences on youth risk behavior.

Elkington, Katherine S.; Bauermeister, Jose A.; Zimmerman, Marc A.

2010-01-01

303

Parental knowledge and youth risky behavior: a person oriented approach.  

PubMed

Most studies isolate the effects of one knowledge-related behavior on youth outcomes. This study explores the relationship between subgroups of mother-youth dyads that use specific combinations of parental knowledge-related behaviors and youth risky behavior. Using a sample of 796 rural 6th graders (53 % female), we assessed mother and youth reports of maternal knowledge, active parent monitoring efforts, youth disclosure, parental supervision, and the amount of parent-youth communication to identify five knowledge latent classes: High-Monitors, Maternal Over-Estimators, Low-Monitors, Communication-Focused, and Supervision-Focused. Delinquency, antisocial peers, and substance use were associated with increased odds of membership in the Supervision-Focused class, relative to the High Monitors. Membership in the Low Monitors and Maternal Over-Estimators classes was associated with unhealthy attitudes towards substances and for Low Monitors, substance use. The discussion focuses on the value of using a person-oriented approach to understand parental knowledge and risky behavior during early adolescence and intervention implications. PMID:23269564

Lippold, Melissa A; Greenberg, Mark T; Collins, Linda M

2012-12-27

304

Risk and protective factors for urban African-American youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated risk and resilience processes in a sample of urban African-American youth. Risk and protective\\u000a factors were assessed across ecological levels including individual, family and community. Both externalizing and internalizing\\u000a symptomatology were included as measures of child adjustment. Youth and parental reports as well as various methods, such\\u000a as the Experience Sampling Method, were used to capture

Susan Tinsley Li; Karin M. Nussbaum; Maryse H. Richards

2007-01-01

305

Increased Substance Use and Risky Sexual Behavior Among Migratory Homeless Youth: Exploring the Role of Social Network Composition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Travelers are a migratory subgroup of homeless youth who may be especially prone to engaging in risky behavior. This study\\u000a compared the substance use and sexual behavior of young homeless travelers and non-travelers to evaluate the extent and possible\\u000a sources of travelers’ increased risk. Data came from face-to-face interviews with 419 homeless youth (36.6% female, 34.0%\\u000a white, 23.9% African American,

Steven C. MartinoJoan; Joan S. Tucker; Gery Ryan; Suzanne L. Wenzel; Daniela Golinelli; Brett Munjas

306

Substance Abuse Problems among High-Risk Youth and Potential Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although drug use among teenagers has declined significantly over the past decade, adolescents raised in impoverished urban communities continue to be at high risk for involvement in drug use and sales and for serious delinquency. Such youth often exhibit behavioral problems at school, associate with delinquent peers, have inadequate supervision at home, and are typically not helped by regular school-based

Peter W. Greenwood

1992-01-01

307

Offsetting Risks: High School Gay-Straight Alliances and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are at risk for engaging in negative health behaviors and for experiencing at-school victimization. Specific benefits of attending a high school with a gay-straight alliance (GSA), including lower levels of suicidality, have been published; however, it is unclear whether GSAs are related to…

Heck, Nicholas C.; Flentje, Annesa; Cochran, Bryan N.

2011-01-01

308

Understanding the Downward Extension of Psychopathy to Youth: Implications for Risk Assessment and Juvenile Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychopathy is an important construct in adult risk assessment resulting from strong associations to antisocial behavior and criminal recidivism. A recent trend is the downward extension of psychopathic traits to explain juvenile violence. Applying the concept of psychopathy to youthful offenders has great potential; however, its application to adolescence is fraught with uncertainty. This article discusses how the search for

Michael J. Vitacco; Gina M. Vincent

2006-01-01

309

Interventions to modify sexual risk behaviours for preventing HIV in homeless youth  

PubMed Central

Background Homeless youth are at high risk for HIV infection as a consequence of risky sexual behavior. Interventions in homeless youth are challenging. Assessment of the effectiveness of interventions to modify sexual risk behaviours for preventing HIV in homeless youth is needed. Objectives To evaluate and summarize the effectiveness of interventions for modifying sexual risk behaviours and preventing transmission of HIV among homeless youth. Search methods We searched electronic databases (CENTRAL, Medline, EMBASE, AIDSearch, Gateway, PsycInfo, LILACS), reference lists of eligible articles, international health agency publication lists, and clinical trial registries. The search was updated January 2010. We contacted authors of published reports and other key role players. Selection criteria Randomized studies of interventions to modify sexual risk behavior (biological, self-report sexual-risk behavior or health seeking behavior) in homeless youth (12–24 years). Data collection and analysis Data from eligible studies were extracted by two reviewers. We assessed risk of bias per the Cochrane Collaborations tool. None of the eligible studies reported any primary biological outcomes for this review and the reporting of self-report sexual risk behavior outcomes was highly variable across studies precluding calculation of summary measures of effect; we present the outcomes descriptively for each study. We contacted authors for missing or ambiguous data. Results We identified three eligible studies after screening a total of 255 unique records. All three were performed in the United States of America and recruited substance-abusing male and female adolescents (total N=615) through homeless shelters into randomised controlled trials of independent and non-overlapping behavioural interventions. The three trials differed in theoretical background, delivery method, dosage (number of sessions,) content and outcome assessments. Overall, the variability in delivery and outcomes precluded estimation of summary of effect measures. We assessed the risk of bias to be high for each of the studies. Whilst some effect of the interventions on outcome measures were reported, heterogeneity and lack of robustness in these studies necessitate caution in interpreting the effectiveness of these interventions. Authors’ conclusions The body of evidence does not permit conclusions on the impact of interventions to modify sexual risk behaviour in homeless youth. More research is required. While the psychosocial and contextual factors that fuel sexual risk behaviours among homeless youth challenge stringent methodologies of RCT’s, novel ways for program delivery and trial retention are in need of development. Future trials should endeavour to comply with rigorous methodology in design, delivery, outcome measurement and reporting.

Naranbhai, Vivek; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Meyer-Weitz, Anna

2013-01-01

310

Differences in Motivations of Cutting Behavior Among Sexual Minority Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This aim of this study is to examine predictors of specific motivations for engaging in cutting behavior among a community\\u000a sample of sexual minority youth. The study involved secondary analysis of data collected by a community-based organization\\u000a serving lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth and their allies. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses\\u000a were conducted using a final sample of

Sarah J. NickelsN; N. Eugene Walls; Julie Anne Laser; Hope Wisneski

311

Paternal, Perceived Maternal, and Youth Risk Factors as Predictors of Youth Stage of Substance Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

This longitudinal study examined paternal, perceived maternal, and youth risk factors at Time 1 (T1) (e.g., substance use, violent victimization, parental rules) as predictors of the stage of substance use in the adolescent child at Time 2 (T2). Participants (N = 296) consisted of drug-abusing fathers and one of their adolescent children, aged 12 to 20 years. Fathers and youths

Felipe González Castro; Judith S. Brook; David W. Brook; Elizabeth Rubenstone

2006-01-01

312

Brief Report: Parents Matter in HIV-Risk Among Probation Youth  

PubMed Central

We investigated the relationship between parenting practices (i.e., parental monitoring, parent permissiveness, and parent-teen communication), and probation youth’s HIV-related sexual risk behavior (i.e., ever having sex, condom use, alcohol and marijuana use before sex). Participants were 61 male and female juvenile offenders, ages 13–17, on probation and awaiting sentencing. Results indicated different relationships between parenting and HIV-related sexual risk behavior for probation boys and girls. Parental monitoring, parenting permissiveness, and parent-teen communication were collectively related to whether girls’ ever had sex and with boys’ use of alcohol and marijuana use before last sex. Findings underscore the important role of parenting on probation teens’ HIV risk behaviors.

Udell, Wadiya; Donenberg, Geri; Emerson, Erin

2013-01-01

313

Suicidal Ideation and Behaviors among Youths in Juvenile Detention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|An epidemiological study used data from the Northwestern Juvenile Project to examine the association between psychiatric diagnosis and suicide risk among newly detained youths in the US juvenile system. Results concluded that psychiatric disorders were associated with suicide attempts, and females were found at a higher risk than males.|

Abram, Karen M.; Choe, Jeanne Y.; Washburn, Jason J.; Teplin, Linda A.; King, Devon C.; Dulcan, Mina K.

2008-01-01

314

Intrapersonal, behavioral, and environmental factors associated with meeting recommended physical activity among rural Latino youth.  

PubMed

This study aimed to identify intrapersonal, behavioral, and environmental factors associated with engaging in recommended levels of physical activity among rural Latino middle school youth. Data were from an anonymous survey of 773 Latino youth (51% female) about level of and barriers and motivators to physical activity, risk behaviors, and park use. Logistic regression models identified factors correlated with meeting recommended levels of physical activity (5 days or more 3 60 min/day). Thirty-four percent of girls and 41% of boys reported meeting this physical activity recommendation. Participation in an organized after school activity (p < .001) and in physical education (PE) classes 5 days a week (p < .001) were strongly associated with meeting recommended physical activity level. Making PE available 5 days a week and creating opportunities for organized after school physical activity programs may increase the number of rural Latino middle school youth who meet recommended physical activity level. PMID:22109778

Perry, Cynthia K; Saelens, Brian E; Thompson, Beti

2011-11-01

315

Intrapersonal, Behavioral, and Environmental Factors Associated With Meeting Recommended Physical Activity Among Rural Latino Youth  

PubMed Central

This study aimed to identify intrapersonal, behavioral, and environmental factors associated with engaging in recommended levels of physical activity among rural Latino middle school youth. Data were from an anonymous survey of 773 Latino youth (51% female) about level of and barriers and motivators to physical activity, risk behaviors, and park use. Logistic regression models identified factors correlated with meeting recommended levels of physical activity (5 days or more 360 min/day). Thirty-four percent of girls and 41% of boys reported meeting this physical activity recommendation. Participation in an organized after school activity (p < .001) and in physical education (PE) classes 5 days a week (p < .001) were strongly associated with meeting recommended physical activity level. Making PE available 5 days a week and creating opportunities for organized after school physical activity programs may increase the number of rural Latino middle school youth who meet recommended physical activity level.

Perry, Cynthia K.; Saelens, Brian E.; Thompson, Beti

2013-01-01

316

Predicting youth access to tobacco: the role of youth versus store-clerk behavior and issues of ecological validity.  

PubMed

Twenty-one 15- to 17-year-olds attempted to purchase cigarettes in 232 stores in the manner that confederates typically do in access studies, as well as in the manipulative ways (e.g., lying about their ages) that youth smokers do, thereby modeling youth access to tobacco within versus outside of studies, respectively. Youth typical-research versus manipulative behavior was contrasted with clerk behavior (requests for youth ID cards) to examine the relative contributions of both to youth access to tobacco for the 1st time. Results revealed that clerk behavior was the strongest predictor of cigarette sales to youth and hence underscore the need for interventions with merchants. Sales nonetheless were higher under youth-manipulative conditions and thereby highlight the low ecological validity of access research. PMID:15367071

Klonoff, Elizabeth A; Landrine, Hope

2004-09-01

317

Lowering the Risk of Secondary HIV Transmission: Insights From HIV-Positive Youth and Health Care Providers  

PubMed Central

CONTEXT Both perinatally and behaviorally infected HIV-positive youth engage in sexually risky behaviors, and a better understanding of the perceptions of these youth and of health care providers regarding disclosure of HIV status and risk reduction would aid in the development of behavioral interventions for such youth. METHODS In spring 2007, some 20 HIV-positive inner-city youth (aged 13–24) and 15 health care providers who work with HIV-infected youth participated in in-depth, semistructured interviews. Youth were recruited at an HIV clinic, AIDS clinics and an AIDS service organization, and had received care from participating providers. Detailed contextual and thematic discourse analysis was performed on interview transcriptions. RESULTS Eighteen of the 20 youth had disclosed their HIV status to another individual at least once. Eleven reported being sexually active, and three of these had been perinatally infected. Qualitative analysis revealed four subthemes related to disclosure: stigma and emotions, trust issues, reasons for disclosing and strategies for addressing disclosure. Five subthemes were identifi ed related to sexual risk reduction: dating challenges, attitudes toward condom use, self-effi cacy for condom use negotiation, pregnancy attitudes and sexual risk reduction strategies. Providers reported that access to more engaging and interactive educational tools within the clinic setting could enhance their risk reduction counseling with HIV-positive youth. CONCLUSIONS HIV-positive youth experience multiple challenges regarding disclosure and sexual risk reduction, and health care providers need innovative tools that can be used in clinic settings to improve adolescents’ skills in reducing risky sexual behavior.

Markham, Christine M.; Bui, Thanh; Shegog, Ross; Paul, Mary E.

2011-01-01

318

Youth Living with HIV and Partner-specific Risk for the Secondary Transmission of HIV  

PubMed Central

Summary A comparison of risks for the secondary transmission of HIV between young HIV-infected women-who-have-sex-with-men (WSM) and men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) found that recent partner-specific sexual risk behaviors are high among both populations. However, differences in the specific behaviors between WSM and MSM support population-specific interventions to reduce the secondary transmission of HIV. Background Secondary transmission remains a significant concern among HIV-infected youth. Little is known, however, about how partner-specific sexual risk behaviors for the secondary transmission of HIV may differ between the two largest subgroups of HIV positive youth, women-who-have-sex-with-men (WSM) and men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM), Methods During 2003-2004, a convenience sample of HIV-infected youth, 13-24 years of age, were recruited from 15 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network clinical sites. Approximately 10-15 youth were recruited at each site. Participants completed an ACASI survey including questions about sex partners in the past year. Cross-sectional data analyses, including bivariate and multivariable regressions using generalized estimating equations, were conducted during 2008 to compare recent partner-specific sexual risk behaviors between WSM and MSM. Results Of 409 participants, 91% (371) were included in this analysis, including 176 WSM and 195 MSM. Ninety-two percent (163 WSM, 177 MSM) provided information on characteristics of their sexual partners. There were significant differences between the two groups in recent partner-specific sexual risk behaviors including: lower rates of condom use at last sex among WSM (61% WSM vs. 78% MSM; p=0.0011); a larger proportion of the sex partners of MSM reported as concurrent (56% MSM vs. 36% WSM; p=0.0001); and greater use of hard drugs at last sex by MSM and/or their partner (18% MSM vs. 4% WSM; p=0.0008). When measuring risk as a composite measure of sexual risk behaviors known to be associated with HIV transmission, both groups had high rates of risky behaviors, 74.7% among young MSM compared to 68.1% of WSM. Conclusions These data suggest that recent partner-specific sexual risk behaviors for HIV transmission are high among young infected MSM and WSM. These findings suggest the need to offer interventions to reduce the secondary transmission of HIV to all HIV-positive youth in care. However, differences in risk behaviors between young MSM and WSM supports population-specific interventions.

Jennings, Jacky M.; Ellen, Jonathan M.; Deeds, Bethany Griffin; Harris, D. Robert; Muenz, Larry R.; Barnes, William; Lee, Sonia; Auerswald, Colette L.

2009-01-01

319

Minority Youth: \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cigarette smoking and other forms of tobacco use typically begin during adolescence. According to the 2001 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 33.9% of youth in grades 9 through 12 report recent tobacco use. The tobacco industry spends $9.7 billion annually on marketing. This paper addresses the influence of tobacco marketing, methods to counter the receptivity of tobacco marketing, outcome indicators of

Suzanne M. Perry-Casler; Apurva Shah; CHES Ercilia; Rodriguez Westhoff; Robert J. McDermott

320

A Classification of High-Risk Youths  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors report the results of developing and evaluating a classification of 315 arrested youths processed at the Hillsborough County Juvenile Assessment Center in Tampa, Florida. Cluster analysis of summary measures of nine baseline alcoholother drug use and self-reported delinquency variables identified four groups of youths: (a) low-level delinquents and drug users, (b) high-level delinquents, (c) hair-test-identified marijuana and cocaine

Richard Dembo; James Schmeidler

2003-01-01

321

The Contingent Effects of Risk Perception on Risk-Taking Behavior: Adolescent Participative Orientation and Marijuana Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Viewing marijuana use as a risk-taking behavior, we find that the perception of high risk related to regular use of marijuana has no simple direct effect on that risk-taking behavior. Rather, the effect of risk perception is contingent upon the extent of youth participation in activities such as going to parties, going to bars, attending concerts and visiting friends. The

Che-Fu Lee; Yang Su; Barbara P. Hazard

1998-01-01

322

A Brief Screening Measure of Adolescent Risk Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the factor structure and reliability of a brief but comprehensive measure, the adolescent risk inventory\\u000a (ARI), designed to assess adolescent risk behaviors and attitudes. Measures assessing demographics and risk behaviors were\\u000a administered to 134 youth (ages 12–19) in psychiatric treatment. A confirmatory factor analysis of the four attitude scales\\u000a (HIV Anxiety, HIV Prevention Self-Efficacy, General Distress, and

Celia M. Lescano; Wendy S. Hadley; Nancy I. Beausoleil; Larry K. Brown; Domenic D’eramo; Abigail Zimskind

2007-01-01

323

Early Adolescent Predictors of Youth Violence as Mediators of Childhood Risks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analyses were conducted to assess whether risk factors for youth violence measured at 10 years of age influenced later violence directly or indirectly through predictors measured in early adolescence (14 years of age). Analyses revealed that many childhood risks—which included teacher-rated hyperactivity\\/low attention, teacher-rated antisocial behavior, parental attitudes favorable to violence, involvement with antisocial peers, low family income, and availability

Todd I. Herrenkohl; Jie Guo; Rick Kosterman; J. David Hawkins; Richard F. Catalano; Brian H. Smith

2001-01-01

324

DIVERSITY WITHIN: SUBGROUP DIFFERENCES OF YOUTH PROBLEM BEHAVIORS AMONG ASIAN PACIFIC ISLANDER AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS  

PubMed Central

This study compares problem behaviors across a range of adolescent Asian Pacific Islander (API) subgroups using the Add Health data, and controlling for parental education or immigrant status. The study finds that Filipino, “other” API, and multiethnic API American youth are at higher risk for poorer outcomes than Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese American counterparts. Many of these differences remained after adjusting for parental education. Controlling for immigrant status explained only some of the subgroup differences. The results suggest several shortcomings to the “model minority” stereotype that is often applied to API American youth. Research and practice should not overlook the higher risk for problem behaviors among certain API American subgroups. The findings highlight the need for more resources for API Americans, especially for the API subgroups facing higher risks.

Choi, Yoonsun

2008-01-01

325

A Systematic Review of Evidence-Based Behavioral Interventions for African American Youth at Risk for HIV\\/STI Infection, 1988–2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In the United States, African American youth are disproportionally affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually\\u000a transmitted infections (STIs). An estimated 1.2 million people are living with HIV\\/AIDS (Glynn & Rhodes, 2005). Data from\\u000a 33 states in the United States with confidential name-based reporting show that in 2006 African Americans of all ages represented\\u000a 49% of HIV\\/AIDS diagnosis, although

Khiya Marshall; Nicole Crepaz; Ann O’Leary

326

America's Shame, America's Hope: Twelve Million Youth at Risk.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The undereducation of at-risk youth is a critical issue overlooked by the education reform movement of the 1980s, as represented by the report, "A Nation At Risk." This group, whose members are predominantly economically, culturally, racially, and ethnically disadvantaged, is leaving school unprepared for further education or available work.…

Smith, R. C.; Lincoln, Carol A.

327

Positive Support: Mentoring and Depression Among High-Risk Youth.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

At the time that the National Faith-Based Initiative for High-Risk Youth (NFBI) began in 1998, little evidence existed about the effectiveness of mentoring programs for high-risk young people. Two out of three significant studies evaluating the effect of ...

2006-01-01

328

Alcohol Use and HIV Risk Behaviors among Rural Adolescents in Khanh Hoa Province Viet Nam  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Research suggests that youth are consuming more alcohol and at younger ages than in the past. Data also indicate that alcohol consumption is associated with participation in other risk behaviors including aggression and sexual behaviors. As part of a randomized control effectiveness trial for an HIV prevention program, 480 Vietnamese youth (15-20…

Kaljee, L. M.; Genberg, B. L.; Minh, T. T.; Tho, L. H.; Thoa, L. T. K.; Stanton, B.

2005-01-01

329

Underdiagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder in at risk youth.  

PubMed

Three studies examined the diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in agencies treating at risk youth. Studies 1 and 2 (1999) found that baseline PTSD diagnosis was rare in a residential and an outpatient agency (2.3% and 5.4%, respectively) whereas trauma-focused interviews identified PTSD in 47.7% and 44.6% of these clients. Subsequent training efforts increased awareness of PTSD and recognition of unique issues in assessing at risk youth. Study 3 (2009) reexamined PTSD diagnosis rates in these agencies 10 years later and found that the residential agency had an increased rate of PTSD diagnosis (10.8%), whereas PTSD diagnosis remained rare in the outpatient agency (4.0%). Suggestions are offered for increased accuracy in the diagnosis of PTSD and complex PTSD with at risk youth. PMID:20931661

Miele, Drew; O'Brien, Edward J

2010-10-01

330

Racial\\/Ethnic Differences in Caregiver Strain and Perceived Social Support Among Parents of Youth with Emotional and Behavioral Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined several hypotheses related to racial\\/ethnic variations in caregiver strain and perceived social support among parents caring for children with emotional\\/behavioral problems. A subsample of youth from the Patterns of Care (POC) study, which drew a stratified random sample of high-risk youth active to 1 of 5 public sectors of care, was used to test these hypotheses. When

Kristen M. McCabe; May Yeh; Anna Lau; Ann Garland; Richard Hough

2003-01-01

331

Antisocial Male Youth: Considering Patterns of Vulnerability and Problem Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document contains presentation slides from a study on antisocial male youth. The study sought to identify an antisocial taxon, and to demonstrate that taxon membership would possess external validity and predict antisocial behavior correlates (low school achievement, poor family relations, and internalizing problems). The results revealed 9…

Wekerle, Chris; Skilling, Tracey; Adlaf, Edward; Paglia, Angela; Leung, Eman

332

Social Skills Training for Youth with Behavior Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study conducted a descriptive analysis of the research literature on teaching social skills to youth with behavioral disorders. Analysis focused on studies which used a single-subject research design. The 22 articles, representing 38 separate studies, were analyzed in terms of: (1) nature of independent variables; (2) distribution of…

Schnacker, Lance

333

A Study of Behavior and Body Type in Troubled Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the relationship of selected physiological and morphological variables of male youth experiencing persistent and inappropriate behaviors in the home, school, and/or community, and a control group. The results tend to support differences between the groups in body type, percent of body fat, and strength. (Author)

Shasby, Gregory; Kingsley, Ronald F.

1978-01-01

334

Statistical Analysis of Friendship Patterns and Bullying Behaviors among Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|During adolescence, friendship affiliations and groups provide companionship and social and emotional support, and they afford opportunities for intimate self-disclosure and reflection. Friendships often promote positive psychosocial development, but some youth learn and adopt antisocial attitudes and deviant behaviors through their friendships.…

Espelage, Dorothy L.; Green, Harold D., Jr.; Wasserman, Stanley

2007-01-01

335

Corporal Punishment and Youth Externalizing Behavior in Santiago, Chile  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: Corporal punishment is still widely practiced around the globe, despite the large body of child development research that substantiates its short- and long-term consequences. Within this context, this paper examined the relationship between parental use of corporal punishment and youth externalizing behavior with a Chilean sample to…

Ma, Julie; Han, Yoonsun; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Delva, Jorge; Castillo, Marcela

2012-01-01

336

Acculturation and delinquent behavior —?The case of Korean American youths  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to see the relationship between the modes of acculturation and delinquent behavior among Korean American youths in the United States. A self?reported survey was administered to a total of 400 elementary to high school students with Korean ethnicity at 20 randomly drawn Korean churches nationwide. A total of 129 questionnaires were returned and subjected for further

Yoon Ho Lee

1998-01-01

337

Muscle strength in youth and cardiovascular risk in young adulthood (the European Youth Heart Study).  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Whether muscle strength in youth is related to cardiovascular risk later in life independent of cardiorespiratory fitness is unclear. METHODS: We examined the independent association of isometric muscle strength in youth with cardiovascular risk factors in young adulthood using data from the Danish European Youth Heart Study; a population-based prospective cohort study among boys and girls (n=332) followed for up to 12 years. In youth maximal voluntary contractions during isometric back extension and abdominal flexion were determined using a strain-gauge dynamometer and cardiorespiratory fitness was obtained from a maximal cycle ergometer test. Cardiovascular risk factors were obtained in youth and in young adulthood. Associations were examined using multivariable-adjusted regression models including major confounding factors. RESULTS: Each 1 SD difference in isometric muscle strength in youth (0.17 N/kg) was inversely associated with body mass index (BMI; -0.60 kg/m(2), 95% CI -0.97 to -0.22), triglyceride (-0.09 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.16 to -0.02), diastolic blood pressure (BP) (-1.22 mm Hg, 95% CI -2.15 to -0.29) and a composite cardiovascular risk factor score (-0.61 SD, 95% CI -1.03 to -0.20) in young adulthood in multivariable-adjusted analyses including fitness. Associations to triglyceride, diastolic BP and the cardiovascular risk factor score remained with additional adjustment for waist circumference or BMI. Each 1 SD difference in isometric muscle strength in youth was significantly associated with 0.59 (95% CI 0.40 to 0.87) lower odds of general overweight/obesity in young adulthood (p=0.007) and was marginally associated with incident raised BP, raised triglyceride and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that greater isometric muscle strength in youth is associated with lower levels of cardiovascular risk factors in young adulthood independent of fitness, adiposity and other confounding factors. PMID:23525553

Grøntved, Anders; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Møller, Niels Christian; Kristensen, Peter Lund; Froberg, Karsten; Brage, Søren; Andersen, Lars Bo

2013-03-23

338

Adolescents Engaging in Risky Sexual Behavior: Sexual Activity and Associated Behavioral Risk Factors in Bolivian Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study describes the prevalence of risky sexual activities among Bolivian adolescents within the context of other behavioral factors that contribute to compromised health outcomes, unintended pregnancies, and sexually transmitted infections including HIV\\/AIDS. Data was collected from 576 adolescents, 13-18 years of age, from six schools in La Paz, Bolivia, using the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey. Findings indicate that

M. Lelinneth; B. Novilla; Kirk A. Dearden; Benjamin T. Crookston; Scott B. Torres

2006-01-01

339

Transition age youth in publicly funded systems: identifying high-risk youth for policy planning and improved service delivery.  

PubMed

Youth with Serious Emotional Disturbances (SED) face many challenges as they approach the transition to adulthood and adult services. This study examines publicly funded transition-age youth in order to describe the numbers and type of youth in need of policy and service planning in one state. Using Medicaid enrollment and claims/encounter data, youth with high risk of transition difficulties were identified in the following groups: SED, state custody/foster care or risk of custody, users of intensive or frequent mental health services, or having diagnoses of major mental disorders, conduct disorders, or developmental disabilities. Almost one quarter of all enrolled 14 to 17-year olds met criteria for at least one of the high risk groups, and three-quarters of these were youth with SED. High risk youth are described, with greater detail on those with SED, and implications for policy, services, and research are discussed. PMID:17187298

Heflinger, Craig Anne; Hoffman, Cheri

2006-12-23

340

Adolescents engaging in unhealthy weight control behaviors: are they at risk for other health-compromising behaviors?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to determine whether adolescents engaging in weight control behaviors are at increased risk for tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use; suicide ideation and attempts; and unprotected sexual activity. METHODS: Data were collected on a nationally representative sample of 16,296 adolescents taking part in the 1993 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. RESULTS: Adolescents using extreme weight control behaviors were at increased risk for health-compromising behaviors, while associations with other weight control behaviors were weak and inconsistent. CONCLUSIONS: The findings have relevance to clinical work with youth, provide a better understanding of disordered eating, and open up a number of opportunities for future research.

Neumark-Sztainer, D; Story, M; Dixon, L B; Murray, D M

1998-01-01

341

Internalizing Symptoms Linking Youths' Maltreatment and Delinquent Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examines internalizing mental health symptoms (depression and posttraumatic stress disorder) as potential intervening factors in the relationship between maltreatment and delinquency using data from the National Survey for Child and Adolescent Well-Being (N = 1,179). Significant mediating effects indicated that youth at greater risk of…

Bender, Kimberly; Postlewait, Ariana W.; Thompson, Sanna J.; Springer, David W.

2011-01-01

342

Covariations of Adolescent Weight-Control, Health-Risk and Health-Promoting Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Assessed the prevalence of dieting, investigating clusters of risk behaviors among adolescents. Data from the 1999 South Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey indicated that weight control behaviors related to several other important health behaviors. Differences existed between adolescents who used extreme weight loss measures and moderate dieters…

Rafiroiu, Anca Codruta; Sargent, Roger G.; Parra-Medina, Deborah; Drane, Wanzer J.; Valois, Robert F.

2003-01-01

343

Views on Parent-Child Connectedness among English- and Spanish-Speaking Parents of High-Risk Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study highlights findings from focus groups on parent-child connectedness conducted with English- and Spanish-speaking parents of high-risk youth in the southern United States. The primary aim of the study was to extend research on parent-child connectedness, a broad protective factor for adolescent risk behavior. In addition to describing…

Scarborough, Megan; Kulkarni, Shanti; Lewis, Carol M.; Palen, Lori-Ann; Wade, Emily; Pierce, Amy

2011-01-01

344

Effects of Familial Attachment, Social Support, Involvement, and Self-Esteem on Youth Substance Use and Sexual Risk Taking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of protective factors against substance use and sexual risk taking was conducted among 610 high-poverty urban youth. Higher levels of family attachment, social support, involvement, and self-esteem were associated with lower levels of risk behaviors. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

Peterson, Christina Hamme; Buser, Trevor J.; Westburg, Nancy G.

2010-01-01

345

Protective and Risk Factors Associated with Drug Use Among Hispanic Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of data from a nationally representative sample of Hispanic youths age 12-17 and their parents was done to investigate the impact of a number of variables on youths' drug-using behavior. The significance of youth, household, and parental characteristics were tested using measures of youth drug use as dependent variables in regression models. Parents' attitudes and use of licit and

Joseph Gfroerer; Mario De la Rosa

1993-01-01

346

Testing the Model Minority Stereotype: Youth Behaviors across Racial and Ethnic Groups  

PubMed Central

Using data from a large nationally representative sample of adolescents attending school, this study tests the stereotype that youth of Asian Pacific Islander ethnicity (API) are the model minority. The results suggest that, except for substance use, API American youth do not report fewer delinquent behaviors than white youth; in fact, API American youth report slightly higher numbers of aggressive offenses than white youth, and female API American youth report greater numbers of nonaggressive offenses than white female youth. Also, API American youth report higher rates of nonaggressive offenses and substance use than do black youth. The mental health and social service needs of API American youth are thus at least as great as those of white youth. The need for such services increases with the length of residency in the United States.

Choi, Yoonsun; Lahey, Benjamin B.

2011-01-01

347

Correlates of Externalizing Behavior Symptoms Among Youth Within Two Impoverished, Urban Communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines whether risk factors associated with child externalizing behavior symptoms differ between two similar low-income, urban communities, using baseline parent data of 154 African American youth (ages 9–15) participating in the Collaborative HIV-Prevention and Adolescent Mental Health Project (CHAMP) family program. Separate multiple regression analyses of each city sample indicated that greater child externalizing symptoms were associated with

Geetha Gopalan; Mary A. Cavaleri; William M. Bannon; Mary M. McKay

2010-01-01

348

Risk, Vulnerability, and Resilience among Youth: In Search of a Conceptual Framework.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Most youth in America have a good chance of becoming productive members of adult society. However, for a particular group of young people, at-risk youth, the probability of maturing into responsible adulthood is less certain. "At-risk youth" is a term commonly used to describe those adolescents for whom there is a high probability (risk) of…

Sugland, Barbara W.; Zaslow, Martha; Nord, Christine Winquist

349

The challenge of changing drug and sex risk behaviors of runaway and homeless adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess HIV-related drug and sex risk behaviors and evaluate factors associated with change in risk behaviors among runaway and homeless adolescents, 244 street youth were recruited from a community drop-in center serving high-risk youth.Method: Using a cross-sectional design, approximately half of study participants received training in a peer-based intervention that included principles derived from the health belief model,

Robert E. Booth; Yiming Zhang; Carol F. Kwiatkowski

1999-01-01

350

The training and validation of youth-preferred social behaviors of child-care personnel1  

PubMed Central

This research sought to identify, train, and validate social behaviors preferred by youths to be used by youth-care personnel (called teaching-parents). With training, consistent increases in seven preferred behaviors were observed for the six teaching-parent trainees. These behaviors included offering to help, “getting to the point”, giving reasons why a behavior is important to a youth, providing descriptions of alternative behaviors, positive feedback, smiling, and positive motivational incentives (i.e., points for task mastery exchanged for tangible reinforcers). Increases in these behaviors correlated with increases in the youths' ratings of the quality of the trainees' interactions. Posttraining levels of preferred social behavior and youth ratings for trainees also compared favorably with levels for successful professional teaching-parents. These results suggest that teaching-parents can be successfully trained to interact with youths in ways that are preferred by the youths.

Willner, Alan G.; Braukmann, Curtis J.; Kirigin, Kathryn A.; Fixsen, Dean L.; Phillips, Elery L.; Wolf, Montrose M.

1977-01-01

351

Lowering Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in High-Risk Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Among children and youth who develop type 2 diabetes (T2DM) there are a number of genetic and environmental factors that lead to a combination of insulin resistance and relative-cell secretory failure of the pancreas. These factors include ethnicity (highest in American Indian youth), obesity, sedentary behavior, family history of T2DM, puberty,…

Bobo, Nichole; Schantz, Shirley; Kaufman, Francine R.; Kollipara, Sobha

2009-01-01

352

Adolescent Female Athletes' Sexual Risk-Taking Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 1993 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance (YRBS) of a sample of U.S. female adolescents (N = 7839) were compared to a cohort of 9th through 12th grade high performance female athletes (N = 141) with regard to risk-taking behavior on eight items related to sexual activity (i.e., ever engaged in sexual

Michael P. Savage; Derek R. Holcomb

1999-01-01

353

Predictors of violence and delinquency among high risk youth and youth gang members in San Salvador, El Salvador  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low future orientation, low empathy, educational difficulty, school expulsion, delinquent peers, gang membership, and low social support were found to be significant risk factors for violence and delinquency among a sample (N = 174) of high risk youth and youth gang members in San Salvador, El Salvador.

René Olate; Christopher Salas-Wright; Michael G. Vaughn

2012-01-01

354

Psychological Control Associated with Youth Adjustment and Risky Behavior in African American Single Mother Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A distinction between parental behavioral control and psychological control has been elucidated in the literature, yet far less is known about the role of psychological control in youth adjustment broadly or risky behavior in particular. We examined the interrelationship of maternal psychological control, youth psychosocial adjustment, and youth

Kincaid, Carlye; Jones, Deborah J.; Cuellar, Jessica; Gonzalez, Michelle

2011-01-01

355

Hurricane Katrina and youth anxiety: The role of perceived attachment beliefs and parenting behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to examine the role of attachment beliefs and parenting behaviors on youth's anxious response to disaster by testing a theoretical model which posits youths’ perceptions of attachment beliefs and parenting behaviors as moderators of the relation between pre and post disaster anxiety symptoms. Seventy-four youth (ages 6–17 years) and their parents exposed to Hurricane Katrina participated in

Natalie M. Costa; Carl F. Weems; Armando A. Pina

2009-01-01

356

THE INFLUENCE OF FAMILY BEHAVIORS ON METABOLOIC CONTROL OF YOUTH WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

There has been a significant increase in the numbers of youth with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Little is known about how family behaviors influence metabolic control among youth with T2DM. This study evaluated a 23-item family behavior scale composed of items from two scales developed for youth with typ...

357

Latent Classes of Externalizing Behaviors in Youth with Early Maltreatment Histories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Latent class analyses were used to identify subsets of 217 12-year-old youth with early maltreatment histories based on youth and caregiver reports of externalizing behavior problems. The identified classes were validated using symptom counts and diagnoses for disruptive behavior disorders collected from youth and caregiver reports 2 years later.…

Villodas, Miguel T.; Litrownik, Alan J.; Roesch, Scott C.

2012-01-01

358

Multiple risk behaviors and suicidal ideation and behavior among Israeli and Palestinian adolescents.  

PubMed

Based conceptually on Problem Behavior Theory, Normalization Theory and theories of adolescent ethnic identity formation this study explores relationships between individual and cumulative multiple risk behaviors and suicidal ideation and behavior among mid-adolescents in three different populations in the Middle East. Data from the 2004 Health Behavior in School-Aged Children in the Middle-East (HBSC-ME) study included 8345 10th-grade pupils in three populations: Jewish Israelis (1770), Arab Israelis (2185), and Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank (4390). We considered risk behaviors and factors including tobacco use, bullying, medically-attended injuries, excessive time with friends, parental disconnectedness, negative school experience, truancy and poor academic performance. Substantial population differences for suicidal tendency and risk behaviors were observed, with notably high levels of suicidal ideation and behavior among Arab-Israeli youth and higher levels of risk behaviors among the Jewish and Arab-Israeli youth. For all populations suicidal tendency was at least 4 times higher among adolescents reporting 4+ risk behaviors, suggesting that similar psychosocial determinants affect patterns of risk behaviors and suicidal tendency. Results highlight the importance of understanding cultural contexts of risk behaviors and suicidal ideation and behavior. PMID:22497848

Harel-Fisch, Yossi; Abdeen, Ziad; Walsh, Sophie D; Radwan, Qasrowi; Fogel-Grinvald, Haya

2012-04-02

359

Trends in the Prevalence of Selected Risk Behaviors and Obesity for All Students. National YRBS: 1991-2011  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) monitors priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults in the United States. The national YRBS is conducted every two years during the spring semester and provides data representative of 9th through 12th grade…

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

2011-01-01

360

Trends in the Prevalence of Selected Risk Behaviors and Obesity for White Students. National YRBS: 1991-2011  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) monitors priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults in the United States. The national YRBS is conducted every two years during the spring semester and provides data representative of 9th through 12th grade…

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

2011-01-01

361

Trends in the Prevalence of Selected Risk Behaviors and Obesity for Hispanic Students. National YRBS: 1991-2011  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) monitors priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults in the United States. The national YRBS is conducted every two years during the spring semester and provides data representative of 9th through 12th grade…

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

2011-01-01

362

Trends in the Prevalence of Selected Risk Behaviors and Obesity for Black Students. National YRBS: 1991-2011  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) monitors priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults in the United States. The national YRBS is conducted every two years during the spring semester and provides data representative of 9th through 12th grade…

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

2011-01-01

363

Severe Behavior Disorders of Children and Youth. Monograph in Behavioral Disorders. Summer, 1980.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The monograph on severe behavior disorders of children and youth presents 23 papers on juvenile delinquency, behavior disorders at the secondary level, and self control instruction. Some of the papers included are: "A Comparison of Varied Teacher-to-Child Ratio on the Adaptive and Attending Behaviors of Two Autistic Children" (M. Zener, et al.);…

Rutherford, Robert B., Jr., Ed.; And Others

364

Severe Behavior Disorders of Children and Youth. Monograph in Behavioral Disorders. Summer, 1980.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The monograph on severe behavior disorders of children and youth presents 23 papers on juvenile delinquency, behavior disorders at the secondary level, and self control instruction. Some of the papers included are: "A Comparison of Varied Teacher-to-Child Ratio on the Adaptive and Attending Behaviors of Two Autistic Children" (M. Zener, et al.);…

Rutherford, Robert B., Jr., Ed.; And Others

365

Youth at Risk: In Search of a Definition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reviews the definitions of the term "youth at risk" and their perspectives on predisposing conditions. Discusses implications for counseling. Asserts that the sound diagnosis and treatment of adolescents' problems involves careful identification of predisposing conditions and negative outcomes. Includes 16 citations. (Author/CRR)|

Tidwell, Romeria; Garrett, Susan Corona

1994-01-01

366

Risk factors for methamphetamine use in youth: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Methamphetamine (MA) is a potent stimulant that is readily available. Its effects are similar to cocaine, but the drug has a profile associated with increased acute and chronic toxicities. The objective of this systematic review was to identify and synthesize literature on risk factors that are associated with MA use among youth. More than 40 electronic databases, websites, and

Kelly Russell; Donna M Dryden; Yuanyuan Liang; Carol Friesen; Kathleen O'Gorman; Tamara Durec; T Cameron Wild; Terry P Klassen

2008-01-01

367

The construction and production of youth ‘at risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper looks at policy discourse around ‘youth at risk’ (YAR) by asking two questions: First, how have problems and solutions related to YAR been constructed by Governments? And second, how do particular technologies of Government (differentiation of schools, programmes, and course streams, and the funding and identification of students with special needs) work to produce YAR? Interviews with educators

Diane Wishart; Alison Taylor; Lynette Shultz

2006-01-01

368

Partners in Growth: Elder Mentors and At-Risk Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the relationships developed between elder mentors and at-risk youth in the following exemplary intergenerational programs: (1) IUE/The Work Connection (Saugus, Massachusetts); (2) Teen Moms (Portland, Maine); (3) School Volunteers for Boston (Massachusetts); (4) Teenage Parent Alternative Program (Lincoln Park, Michigan); and…

Freedman, Marc

369

Art as Agency: Exploring Empowerment of At-Risk Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes an art-based intervention program with at-risk youth that was inspired by the Project Self-Discovery model (Milkman, Wanberg, & Robinson, 1996). Twelve middle-school students from a small city in a mid-Atlantic state participated in the program. The program goals included making art in order to empower the participants…

Wallace-DiGarbo, Anne; Hill, David C.

2006-01-01

370

Exploring Dreamspace through Video Art with At-Risk Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This thesis is an art-based research video demonstration of an alternate medium for art therapy. It postulates the value and validity of media arts as a therapeutic modality by way of adopting the major motion picture green screening technique for therapy with an at-risk youth population. Four male participants, raging from 16 to 19 years of age,…

Ehinger, Jon

2009-01-01

371

The Monetary Value of Saving a High-Risk Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Programs targeted at high-risk youth are designed to prevent high-school dropout, crime, drug abuse, and other forms of delinquency. Even if shown to be successful in reducing one or more social ill, a key policy question is whether the cost to society from that intervention program exceeds its benefits. Although the costs of intervention programs are often available, the benefits

Mark A. Cohen

1998-01-01

372

Toward Predicting Youth Resistance to Internet Risk Prevention Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Strategies to protect youth from potentially problematic online experiences may be met with considerable resistance as young people may not be ready or willing to accept such interventions. This study seeks to identify specific Internet risk prevention strategies that are likely to be met with resistance from children and adolescents. It aims to advance the ability to predict when parents

Sahara Byrne; Theodore Lee

2011-01-01

373

At-Risk Youth: A Compilation of Counseling Technique Papers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of papers by masters degree students that concern counseling techniques for at-risk youth. The following papers included are: (1) "Adolescent Depression: Its Diagnosis and Treatment" (Bruce Bowers); (2) "Counseling the Bereaved Child: A School Counselor's Perspective" (David Boyle); (3) "Adolescents of Divorce: An Overview…

Gray, Lizbeth A., Ed.

374

Methamphetamine Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors in U.S. High School Students: Findings from a National Risk Behavior Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Methamphetamine use is associated with numerous adverse physical and mental health outcomes. This study investigated the\\u000a prevalence and distribution of lifetime methamphetamine use (MU) as well as the association between methamphetamine use and\\u000a engagement in sexual risk behaviors among a nationally representative sample of U.S. high school students. Methods: A secondary analysis of the 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Survey

Andrew E. Springer; Ronald J. Peters; Ross Shegog; Donna L. White; Steven H. Kelder

2007-01-01

375

Risk behaviors in high school and college sport.  

PubMed

Athletes have traditionally been considered greater risk takers than their peers. Some research suggests that athletic participation is associated with increased risk behaviors in males but may be protective in females. Still there is significant intersport variability, and some "nonathlete" risk behaviors exceed those of athletes. Motor vehicle accidents, sensation-seeking behaviors that contribute to unintentional injury and violence, alcohol, illicit drug and tobacco use, sexual misadventure, unhealthy dietary habits, and physical inactivity and obesity are major health risk considerations. There is new focus upon the negative health-related consequences of other risk behaviors such as gambling, sleep apnea and obesity, inappropriate medication, energy drink or contaminated supplement use, and depression/suicide. While it is important to look at the prevalence of "risk behaviors in sport," our cautions regarding these behaviors need to be shared with all youth regardless of athletic disposition. PMID:19005360

Bovard, Ralph S

376

Marginalization of immigrant youth and risk factors in their everyday lives: The european experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article the marginalization of immigrant youth in Europe and the risk factors they face in daily life are described.\\u000a We conclude that immigrant youth are more at risk than native youth, but that there is considerable variation among immigrant\\u000a groups with Maghrebian youth running the highest risks of becoming marginalized. The article depicts the problems immigrant\\u000a families in

Lotty Eldering; Erik J. Knorth

1998-01-01

377

Best self visualization method with high-risk youth.  

PubMed

The healing process of the Best Self Visualization Method (BSM) is described within the framework of meditation, neuroscience, and psychodynamic theory. Cases are drawn from the treatment of high-risk youth, who have histories of poverty, survival of sexual and physical abuse, and/or current risk for perpetrating abuse. Clinical use of BSM is demonstrated in two case illustrations, one of group psychotherapy and another of individual therapy. PMID:23775428

Schussel, Lorne; Miller, Lisa

2013-06-17

378

Exploring Risk in Early Adolescent African American Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies were conducted to explore the degree to which single- and multiple-risk profiles were evident in samples of African American early adolescents in low-income inner-city, rural, and suburban schools. Study 1 examined early adolescent risk status (i.e., single, multiple) in relation to later adjustment in a representative sample (70% European American, 30% African American). Youth who experienced a single

Thomas W. Farmer; LeShawndra N. Price; Keri K. O'Neal; Man-Chi Leung; Jennifer B. Goforth; Beverley D. Cairns; Le'Roy E. Reese

2004-01-01

379

Youth Depression and Future Criminal Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

While the contemporaneous association between mental health problems and criminal behavior has been explored in the literature, the long-term consequences of such problems, depression in particular, have received much less attention. In this paper, we examine the effect of depression during adolescence on the probability of engaging in a number of criminal behaviors using data from the National Longitudinal Study

D. Mark Anderson; Resul Cesur; Erdal Tekin

2012-01-01

380

Coaching Behavior of Girls Youth Softball Coaches.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined coaches' behavior and classified the types and rates of coaches' behavior by time of athletic season (early or late), win/loss record, and throughout the time frame within a single contest. Subjects included all the volunteer coaches in a 13 team, softball program for 10-12 year old girls. The season consisted of a double…

Rupnow, Allan; Stotlar, David

381

The Continuing Challenge of Reducing HIV Risk among Haitian Youth: The Need for Intervention.  

PubMed

There is a dire need for interventions that will address the multiple factors-poverty, substance use, early sexual debut, and violence-that influence Haitian youth's engagement in risky behaviors. The deteriorating socioeconomic and political state of the country has had a deleterious effect on the sociocultural milieu and on the boundaries that have heretofore kept risky behaviors in check. Historically, the lakou system, a community-based approach that supports the family unit, has disintegrated, leading to the disruption of traditional parenting patterns. The unstable economic system has also led to the increasing use of children from poor families, who through the restavek system, are sent to work as servants in other households. The breakdown of traditional systems, coupled with the increasing economic and political instability, has had a significant effect on Haitian adolescents. Among boys, increased levels of substance use have been associated with multiple sex partnerships and very early sexual debut. Among girls, extremely high rates of sexual abuse and forced sex have led to relatively high levels of HIV. While the majority of them have been exposed to behavior change messages, behavior change itself has lagged because many adolescents do not accurately perceive their risk exposure. This review explores the risks of HIV transmission among Haitian youth, with a focus on vulnerability factors, including substance use, culture, and the socioeconomic context, and provides recommendations for intervention. An ecosystemic approach, designed specifically for Haitian youth and that takes environmental context and culture into account, is needed. PMID:23535173

Dévieux, Jessy G; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Saint-Jean, Gilbert; Bryant, Vaughn E; Malow, Robert M

2013-03-27

382

Pathways to Drug and Sexual Risk Behaviors among Detained Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study recruited 559 youths from detention centers (mean age was 15.4 years; 50.1% of detainees were girls) to investigate pathways that link witnessing community violence in the 12 months before detainment to drug and sexual risk behaviors in the two months preceding detainment. Through the use of audio-computer-assisted technology, data…

Voisin, Dexter R.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Salazar, Laura F.; Crosby, Richard; DiClemente, Ralph J.

2008-01-01

383

Developmental Trajectories of Childhood Obesity and Risk Behaviors in Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using group-based trajectory modeling, this study examined 5156 adolescents from the child sample of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to identify developmental trajectories of obesity from ages 6-18 and evaluate associations of such trajectories with risk behaviors and psychosocial health in adolescence. Four distinctive obesity…

Huang, David Y. C.; Lanza, H. Isabella; Wright-Volel, Kynna; Anglin, M. Douglas

2013-01-01

384

Feasibility of Adapting Multisystemic Therapy to Improve Illness Management Behaviors and Reduce Asthma Morbidity in High Risk African American Youth: A Case Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

African-American adolescents have the highest rates of asthma morbidity and mortality, yet there are few successful behavioral interventions to improve illness management for this group. Mental health providers have an opportunity to expand their services and impact by targeting adolescents with poor asthma management. We describe the adaptation…

Naar-King, Sylvie; Ellis, Deborah; Kolmodin, Karen; Cunningham, Phillippe; Secord, Elizabeth

2009-01-01

385

Negative Body Image and Disordered Eating Behavior in Children and Adolescents: What Places Youth at Risk and How Can These Problems be Prevented?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this review, we examine the prevalence of negative body image and disordered eating behaviors (i.e., excessive dieting, binge eating, inappropriate weight loss techniques) in children and adolescents. We also explore correlates and predictors of the development of these problems, including individual, familial, and social factors, as well as discuss factors that may serve a protective function. In addition, we

Heather L. Littleton; Thomas Ollendick

2003-01-01

386

Building Protective Factors to Offset Sexually Risky Behaviors among Black Youths  

PubMed Central

Objectives To test the effectiveness of the CHAMP among black South Africans in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods A randomized control trial was conducted in KwaDedangendlale, South Africa, among youths (ages 9-13) and their families (245 intervention families rearing 281 children and 233 control families rearing 298 children). The CHAMPSA intervention targeted HIV risk behaviors by strengthening family relationship processes as well as targeting peer influences through enhancing social problem solving and peer negotiation skills for youths. Results Among caregivers in the control and experimental conditions, significant intervention group differences were revealed regarding HIV transmission knowledge, less stigma toward HIV-infected people, caregiver monitoring—family rules, caregiver communication comfort, caregiver communication frequency and social networks. Among youths, data revealed that control and experimental groups were significantly different for children in AIDS transmission knowledge and less stigma toward HIV-infected people. Conclusions CHAMPSA enhances a significant number individual, family and community protective factors that can help youths avoid risky behaviors leading to HIV-positive status.

Bell, Carl C.; Bhana, Arvin; Petersen, Inge; McKay, Mary M.; Gibbons, Robert; Bannon, William; Amatya, Anup

2008-01-01

387

Young People in Risk Society: The Restructuring of Youth Identities and Transitions in Late Modernity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Drawing on empirical research and theoretical writings, this book examines how concepts such as risk society and individualization may be used in the field of youth studies. It explores young peoples' identities, youth cultures, and a multiplicity of ways in which risk can be understood and influence youth policy agendas in the future. Chapter 1,…

Cieslik, Mark, Ed.; Pollock, Gary, Ed.

388

Empowering Youth-At-Risk with Skills for School and Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book contains papers from a conference on at-risk youth that focused on building strengths and empowering youth by giving them skills for school and life. Following an introduction titled "Motivational Strategies for Empowering Youth-At-Risk" by Dan Rea and Robert Warkentin, the papers are: (1) "The Role of Learning Environments: Social…

Rea, Dan, Ed.; Warkentin, Robert, Ed.

389

Coping behaviors among sexual minority female youth.  

PubMed

This article summarizes data from a qualitative study investigating the ways in which female youth perceive and respond to challenges related to the interplay of late adolescence and a minority sexual orientation. Fifteen sexual minority females in late adolescence were interviewed individually and in focus groups. The interviews focused on participants' perceptions of challenges, the impact those stressors have in their lives, and methods they utilize to cope with them. The most common negative experiences reported were isolation, lack of acceptance, harassment, and violence. Sub-themes include: hearing negative messages about gender and sexual orientation, pressures to conform to a variety of cultural norms including gender norms, fears of future violence, and pressure to identify sexual orientation. Collectively, the participants described these negative consequences of experiences of heterosexism, sexism, and racism as their most difficult experiences. The most common responses to these stressors reported by participants were finding support in relationships, engaging in coping responses, pursuing education and activism, rebellion and resistance, and avoidance and deferment. PMID:20077261

Pendragon, Diane K

2010-01-01

390

Protective factors associated with fewer multiple problem behaviors among homeless/runaway youth.  

PubMed

Although homeless youth exhibit numerous problem behaviors, protective factors that can be targeted and modified by prevention programs to decrease the likelihood of involvement in risky behaviors are less apparent. The current study tested a model of protective factors for multiple problem behavior in a sample of 474 homeless youth (42% girls; 83% minority) ages 12 to 24 years. Higher levels of problem solving and planning skills were strongly related to lower levels of multiple problem behaviors in homeless youth, suggesting both the positive impact of preexisting personal assets of these youth and important programmatic targets for further building their resilience and decreasing problem behaviors. Indirect relationships between the background factors of self-esteem and social support and multiple problem behaviors were significantly mediated through protective skills. The model suggests that helping youth enhance their skills in goal setting, decision making, and self-reliant coping could lessen a variety of problem behaviors commonly found among homeless youth. PMID:22023279

Lightfoot, Marguerita; Stein, Judith A; Tevendale, Heather; Preston, Kathleen

2011-01-01

391

Potential pathways from stigmatization and externalizing behavior to anger and dating aggression in sexually abused youth.  

PubMed

Although experiencing childhood sexual abuse (CSA) puts youth at risk for involvement in relationship violence, research is limited on the potential pathways from CSA to subsequent dating aggression. The current study examined prospective pathways from externalizing behavior problems and stigmatization (abuse-specific shame and self-blame attributions) to anger and dating aggression. One hundred sixty youth (73% female, 69% ethnic/racial minorities) with confirmed CSA histories were interviewed at the time of abuse discovery (T1, when they were 8-15 years of age), and again 1 and 6 years later (T2 and T3). Externalizing behavior and abuse-specific stigmatization were assessed at T1 and T2. Anger and dating aggression were assessed at T3. The structural equation model findings supported the proposed relations from stigmatization following the abuse to subsequent dating aggression through anger. Only externalizing behavior at T1 was related to later dating aggression, and externalizing was not related to subsequent anger. This longitudinal research suggests that clinical interventions for victims of CSA be sensitive to the different pathways by which youth come to experience destructive conflict behavior in their romantic relationships. PMID:23148553

Feiring, Candice; Simon, Valerie A; Cleland, Charles M; Barrett, Ellen P

2012-11-13

392

Health risk behaviors in relation to making a smoking quit attempt among adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary aim of this study was to examine youth risk behaviors in relation to: (a) making a smoking quit attempt, and (b)\\u000a successful cessation among adolescent smokers. Data were analyzed from the public use dataset of the 2003 national school-based\\u000a Youth Risk Behavior Survey. The sample consisted of 2,033 students (weighted mean age of 16.3 years, 49.8% female, 73.6% White)

Ana M. Abrantes; Christina S. Lee; Laura MacPherson; David R. Strong; Belinda Borrelli; Richard A. Brown

2009-01-01

393

Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior to healthy eating behaviors in urban Native American youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: To investigate the efficacy of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to predict healthy eating behavior in a group of urban Native American youth. METHODS: Native American boys and girls (n = 139), ages 9–18 years old, were given a self-administered survey to assess eating behavior using the TBP constructs (intention, attitude, subjective norm, barriers, self-efficacy, and perceived behavioral

Stefanie A Fila; Chery Smith

2006-01-01

394

Innovativeness\\/Novelty-Seeking Behavior as Determinants of Online Shopping Behavior Among Indian Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between innovativeness\\/novelty-seeking behavior of Indian youth and their online shopping behavior. Three hundred students studying in universities in the northern region of India between the ages of 18 and 24 years participated in the survey. The research findings show a positive relationship between innovativeness\\/novelty-seeking behavior and online shopping behavior. The

Arpita Khare; Shveta Singh; Anshuman Khare

2010-01-01

395

Quality of Parent Communication about Sex and Its Relationship to Risky Sexual Behavior among Youth in Psychiatric Care: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: The number of HIV infections among adolescents is increasing, and youth in psychiatric care are at particular risk because of their high rates of risky sexual behavior. Methods: As part of a larger longitudinal study examining AIDS-risk behavior among adolescents in psychiatric care, this pilot study investigated the relationship…

Wilson, Helen W.; Donenberg, Geri

2004-01-01

396

Positive and Negative Reinforcement Underlying Risk Behavior in Early Adolescents  

PubMed Central

The goal of the current study was to examine the combined influence of positive reinforcement processes using a behavioral task measuring risk taking propensity (RTP) and negative reinforcement processes using a behavioral task measuring deficits in distress tolerance (DT) on a range of risk taking behaviors among early adolescents. Participants included a community sample of 230 early adolescents (aged 9–13) who completed two behavioral tasks assessing reinforcement processes as well as reported on past year risk behavior involvement as assessed by items from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System at a baseline and a 1-year follow-up assessment. Data indicated that at the Wave 2 assessment, RTP was positively related to number of risk-taking behaviors in the past year but only for those with low DT, with this finding persisting after controlling for the significant influence of male gender and higher sensation seeking. Results of the present study highlight the importance of considering both positive and negative reinforcement processes in combination when investigating vulnerability factors for early risk behavior engagement in youth.

Reynolds, Elizabeth K.; Daughters, Stacey B.; Wang, Frances; Cassidy, Jude; Mayes, Linda C.; Lejuez, C. W.

2011-01-01

397

Suicidal Behavior Among Gay Male Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Suicide has been purported to be a major problem among gays and lesbians in general, and rates of suicidal behavior (suicide attempts and ideation) are said to be even higher among adolescent samples. While most studies have consistently found rates of suicide attempts among gay and lesbian adolescent populations to be two to three times higher than their heterosexual peers,

Stephen C. Halpert

2002-01-01

398

Adapting to aging out: profiles of risk and resilience among emancipated foster youth.  

PubMed

This investigation employed latent profile analysis to identify distinct patterns of multiform competence among 164 emancipated foster youth (Mage = 19.67 years, SD = 1.12; 64% female). Fit indices and conceptual interpretation converged on a four-profile solution. A subset of emancipated youth evidenced a maladaptive profile (16.5%; n = 27), which was characterized by low educational competence, low occupational competence, low civic engagement, problematic interpersonal relationships, low self-esteem, and high depressive symptoms. However, the largest group of emancipated youth exhibited a resilient profile in which they were faring reasonably well in all domains despite marked adversity (47%; n = 77). Two additional groups evidenced discordant adjustment patterns wherein they exhibited high levels of psychological competence despite behavioral difficulties (i.e., internally resilient; 30%; n = 49) or significant emotional difficulties despite manifest competence (i.e., externally resilient; 6.5%; n = 11). The obtained profiles were validated against independent measures of behavioral and socioemotional adjustment. Exploratory analyses examined etiological differences across profiles with respect to child welfare variables, such as age at entry into care, placement disruption, reason for placement, and severity of child maltreatment. The findings highlight the need for multidimensional models of risk and resilience and illustrate the importance of heretofore underappreciated heterogeneity in the adaptive outcomes of emancipated foster youth. PMID:22559125

Yates, Tuppett M; Grey, Izabela K

2012-05-01

399

Correlates of Cutting Behavior among Sexual Minority Youths and Young Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using secondary analyses of data from a sample of 265 sexual minority youths, the authors examined correlates of cutting behavior to determine whether patterns are similar to those found in studies of self-injury with community samples of predominately heterosexual youths. The sample consisted of youths who received services at an urban social…

Walls, N. Eugene; Laser, Julie; Nickels, Sarah J.; Wisneski, Hope

2010-01-01

400

Influence of Caring Youth Sport Contexts on Efficacy-Related Beliefs and Social Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Understanding what factors influence positive youth development has been advocated by youth development researchers (P. L. Benson, 2006; J. S. Eccles & J. A. Gootman, 2002). Consequently, the purpose of this study was to examine whether perceptions of a caring youth sport context influenced prosocial and antisocial behavior through…

Gano-Overway, Lori A.; Newton, Maria; Magyar, T. Michelle; Fry, Mary D.; Kim, Mi-Sook; Guivernau, Marta R.

2009-01-01

401

Neighborhood Structure, Parenting Processes, and the Development of Youths' Externalizing Behaviors: A Multilevel Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Associations among neighborhood structure, parenting processes, and the development of externalizing behavior problems were investigated in a longitudinal sample of early adolescents (from age 11 to 13). Mothers' reports of parental monitoring (at age 11), mothers' and youths' reports of the amount of youths' unsupervised time (at age 11), and youths' reports of positive parental involvement (at age 12) were

Jennifer M. Beyers; John E. Bates; Gregory S. Pettit; Kenneth A. Dodge

2003-01-01

402

The generation gap in numbers: parent-child disagreement on youth’s emotional and behavioral problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  To evaluate discrepancies between parent and child reports on youth’s emotional and behavioral problems in a representative,\\u000a community based sample of Greek 18-year-olds, and to identify associated factors.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A total of 2,927 completed pairs of parent-child questionnaires were studied, including the child behavior checklist (CBCL)\\u000a and the youth self-report (YSR). Linear regression analysis was used to identify both child and

Ippolyti Vassi; Alexandra Veltsista; Evangelia Lagona; Artemis Gika; George Kavadias; Chryssa Bakoula

2008-01-01

403

Synthesis of Research and Resources to Support at-Risk Youth. Administration for Children and Families (ACF) Youth Demonstration Development Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report provides a synthesis of research and existing Administration for Children and Families (ACF) resources for serving at-risk youth. It describes what we know from research about at-risk youth. It then describes how at-risk youth are currently be...

A. Gothro A. Sworsky A. E. Manning C. Herrera D. Korom-Djakovic H. Koball J. Lansing M. Bardos M. Stagner R. Dion

2011-01-01

404

Differential Effectiveness of Behavioral Parent-Training and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Antisocial Youth: A Meta-Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Extended the findings from previous meta-analytic work by comparing the effectiveness of behavioral parent-training (BPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for youth with antisocial behavior problems. Youth demographic variables were also examined as potential moderators of the effectiveness of these 2 types of interventions. Thirty BPT…

McCart, Michael R.; Priester, Paul E.; Davies, W. Hobard; Azen, Razia

2006-01-01

405

The Youth Form of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To develop a youth form of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory (MB-HSBI--Youth) for use in identifying self-reported motivators of and barriers to the following health-promoting behaviors (called "health-smart" behaviors): eating a healthy breakfast, eating healthy foods and snacks, drinking healthy…

Tucker, Carolyn M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Desmond, Frederic F.; Hou, Wei; Kaye, Lillian B.; Smith, Tasia M.

2012-01-01

406

The Youth Form of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To develop a youth form of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory (MB-HSBI--Youth) for use in identifying self-reported motivators of and barriers to the following health-promoting behaviors (called "health-smart" behaviors): eating a healthy breakfast, eating healthy foods and snacks, drinking healthy…

Tucker, Carolyn M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Desmond, Frederic F.; Hou, Wei; Kaye, Lillian B.; Smith, Tasia M.

2012-01-01

407

Behavioral adaptation among youth exposed to community violence: a longitudinal multidisciplinary study of family, peer and neighborhood-level protective factors.  

PubMed

Several studies across fields have documented the detrimental effects of exposure to violence and, separately, the power of developmental assets to promote positive youth development. However, few have examined the lives of youth exposed to violence who demonstrate resilience (that is, positive adjustment despite risk), and hardly any have examined how developmental assets may shape resilient trajectories into adulthood for youth exposed to violence. What are these resources and relationships that high-risk youth can leverage to tip the balance from vulnerability in favor of resilience? We used generalized estimating equations to examine multilevel longitudinal data from 1,114 youth of ages 11-16 from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Behavioral adaptation was a dynamic process that varied over time and by level of violence exposure. In the short term, being a victim was associated with increased aggression and delinquency. In the long term though, both victims and witnesses to violence had higher odds of behavioral adaptation. Baseline family support and family boundaries, friend support, neighborhood support, and collective efficacy had positive main effects for all youth. Additionally, having family support, positive peers, and meaningful opportunities for participation modified the effect of exposure to violence and increased odds of behavioral adaptation over time. Policies, systems, and programs across sectors should focus on building caring relationships/supports with family members and friends, positive peers, and meaningful opportunities especially for witnesses and victims of violence, to promote behavioral resilience and related outcomes into adulthood for high-risk youth. PMID:23404664

Jain, Sonia; Cohen, Alison Klebanoff

2013-12-01

408

Identification of Suicide Risk Among Rural Youth: Implications for the Use of HEADSS  

PubMed Central

Introduction Nurse practitioners have the power to detect suicide risk and prevent suicide, a problem plaguing rural areas of the United States. Suicide risk assessment can be completed using the HEADSS (Home, Education, Activities, Drug use and abuse, Sexual behavior, and Suicidality and depression) interview instrument. The purpose of this study was to determine if HEADSS is appropriate for guiding suicide risk assessment of rural adolescents. Method High school students in Southwestern Pennsylvania completed qualitative questions from the Child Behavior Checklist and Coping Response Inventory as part of the Intervention to Promote Mental Health in Rural Youth. Qualitative content analysis was performed. Results Prominent themes identified by participants included academic performance, relationships, dislikes about school, friends, death, mental health, and the future. Several minor themes concerned safety. Most known risk factors for suicide were concerns of participants. Discussion The expansion of HEADSS to include death and safety should be considered. The modified version—HEADDSSS— can be used to guide suicide risk assessment of youth in rural Pennsylvania, ensuring both thoroughness of assessment and safety.

Biddle, Virginia Sue; Sekula, L. Kathleen; Zoucha, Rick; Puskar, Kathryn R.

2009-01-01

409

Risk factors for homelessness among lesbian, gay, and bisexual youths: A developmental milestone approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths are over-represented in the homeless population. To examine why some LGB youths become homeless, this report compares homeless and non-homeless LGB youths. Of the 156 LGB youths, 48% reported ever being homeless (i.e., running away or being evicted from home). Results indicate that sexual orientation awareness and the initiation of sexual behavior occurred earlier

Margaret Rosario; Eric W. Schrimshaw; Joyce Hunter

410

Governing individualized risk biographies: new class intellectuals and the problem of youth at?risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

An apparent crisis of youth at?risk is a key marker in contemporary debates about young people among a range of intellectuals, social commentators and experts in various domains and centres of expertise. Drawing on aspects of the reflexive modernization, governmentality and feminist literatures, this paper explores how risk discourses emerge as a means for rendering reality knowable—a technique that facilitates

Peter Kelly

2007-01-01

411

Psychosocial Factors and Substance Use in High Risk Youth Living with HIV: A Multisite Study  

PubMed Central

The purpose of the study was to test relationships between psychosocial factors and alcohol and illicit drug use among high risk youth living with HIV. 186 high risk youth with HIV (defined as those with a substance use problem, sexual risk problem OR medication adherence problem) were enrolled across 5 cities (ages 16 to 24). Alcohol and illicit drug use was measured with the ASSIST and a timeline follow-back interview. Questionnaires assessed constructs from the adapted TTM including a continuous measure of motivational readiness in response to criticisms of the stage component. Path analysis was utilized to fit cross-sectional data collected via Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (baseline data from intervention study). Separate models were fit for each commonly used substance. In the previous month, 47% used alcohol, 37% used cannabis, and 9% used other illicit drugs. Path models fit the data well and accounted for 30% of the variance in alcohol use and 47% in cannabis use. Higher self-efficacy predicted lower alcohol and cannabis use, but motivational readiness was only directly related to cannabis use. A reduction in pros of substance use was indirectly related to use. Social support and psychological distress were associated with TTM constructs. Interventions focusing on improving motivation and self-efficacy for healthy behaviors may reduce substance use in youth living with HIV.

Naar-King, Sylvie; Kolmodin, Karen; Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Murphy, Debra

2010-01-01

412

Youth from Distressed Neighborhoods. Vulnerable Youth and the Transition to Adulthood. ASPE Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The transition to adulthood can be particularly challenging for youth growing up in distressed neighborhoods. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this fact sheet compares the adolescent risk behaviors and young adult outcomes of youth from distressed neighborhoods with those of youth from non-distressed neighborhoods. All…

Johnson, Heidi

2009-01-01

413

Road Trauma in Teenage Male Youth with Childhood Disruptive Behavior Disorders: A Population Based Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Teenage male drivers contribute to a large number of serious road crashes despite low rates of driving and excellent physical health. We examined the amount of road trauma involving teenage male youth that might be explained by prior disruptive behavior disorders (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder). Methods and Findings We conducted a population-based case-control study of consecutive male youth between age 16 and 19 years hospitalized for road trauma (cases) or appendicitis (controls) in Ontario, Canada over 7 years (April 1, 2002 through March 31, 2009). Using universal health care databases, we identified prior psychiatric diagnoses for each individual during the decade before admission. Overall, a total of 3,421 patients were admitted for road trauma (cases) and 3,812 for appendicitis (controls). A history of disruptive behavior disorders was significantly more frequent among trauma patients than controls (767 of 3,421 versus 664 of 3,812), equal to a one-third increase in the relative risk of road trauma (odds ratio ?=? 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.22–1.54, p<0.001). The risk was evident over a range of settings and after adjustment for measured confounders (odds ratio 1.38, 95% confidence interval 1.21–1.56, p<0.001). The risk explained about one-in-20 crashes, was apparent years before the event, extended to those who died, and persisted among those involved as pedestrians. Conclusions Disruptive behavior disorders explain a significant amount of road trauma in teenage male youth. Programs addressing such disorders should be considered to prevent injuries. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

Redelmeier, Donald A.; Chan, William K.; Lu, Hong

2010-01-01

414

Therapist Adherence and Organizational Effects on Change in Youth Behavior Problems One Year After Multisystemic Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study investigated the relations among therapist adherence to an evidence-based treatment for youth with serious\\u000a antisocial behavior (i.e., Multisystemic Therapy), organizational climate and structure, and improvement in youth behavior\\u000a problems one-year post treatment. Participants were 1979 youth and families treated by 429 therapists across 45 provider organizations\\u000a in North America. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) results showed therapist adherence

Sonja K. Schoenwald; Rickey E. Carter; Jason E. Chapman; Ashli J. Sheidow

2008-01-01

415

Changing AIDS-Risk Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article contains a comprehensive, critical review of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-risk-reduction literature on interventions that have targeted risky sexual behavior and intravenous drug use practices. A conceptually based, highly generalizable model for promoting and evaluating AIDS-risk behavior change in any population of interest is then proposed. The model holds that AIDS-risk reduction is a function of people's information

Jeffrey D. Fisher; William A. Fisher

1992-01-01

416

Parallel Development of Risk Behaviors in Adolescence: Potential Pathways to Co-Occurrence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study used data from 5,382 adolescents from the 1997 United States (US) National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) to investigate developmental pathways of alcohol use, marijuana use, sexual risk behaviors, and delinquency across ages 14 to 20; examine interrelationships among these risk behaviors across adolescence; and evaluate…

Huang, David Y. C.; Lanza, H. Isabella; Murphy, Debra A.; Hser, Yih-Ing

2012-01-01

417

Prevalence of health risk behaviors among Asian American\\/Pacific Islander high school students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To compare the prevalence of selected risk behaviors among Asian American\\/Pacific Islander (AAPI) students and white, black, and Hispanic high school students in the United States.Methods: The national Youth Risk Behavior Survey conducted in 1991, 1993, 1995, and 1997 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention produced nationally representative samples of students in grades 9 through 12 in

Jo Anne Grunbaum; Richard Lowry; Laura Kann; Beth Pateman

2000-01-01

418

Associations Between Risk Behaviors and Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempts: Do Racial\\/Ethnic Variations in Associations Account for Increased Risk of Suicidal Behaviors Among Hispanic\\/Latina 9th- to 12th-Grade Female Students?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to identify factors that may account for the disproportionately high prevalence of suicidal behaviors among Hispanic\\/Latina youth by examining whether associations of health risk behaviors with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts vary by race\\/ethnicity among female students. Data from the school-based 2007 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey were analyzed. Analyses were conducted among female

Danice K. Eaton; Kathryn Foti; Nancy D. Brener; Alex E. Crosby; Glenn Flores; Laura Kann

2011-01-01

419

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for youth with body dysmorphic disorder: current status and future directions.  

PubMed

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) usually begins during early adolescence and appears to be common in youth. BDD is characterized by substantial impairment in psychosocial functioning and high rates of suicidality. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) tailored to BDD is the best tested and most promising psychosocial treatment for adults. CBT has been used for youth with BDD, but has not been systematically developed for or tested in youth. This article focuses on CBT for BDD in adults and youth; possible adaptations and the need for treatment research in youth; and prevalence, clinical features, diagnosis, recommended pharmacotherapy, and treatments that are not recommended. PMID:21440856

Phillips, Katharine A; Rogers, Jamison

2011-04-01

420

Associations of Dating Violence Victimization with Lifetime Participation, Co-Occurrence, and Early Initiation of Risk Behaviors among U.S. High School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined the association of victimization in a physically violent dating relationship with risk behaviors, age of risk behavior initiation, and co-occurrence of risk behaviors among students in grades 9 through 12 in the United States. Data were from the 2003 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS). Nearly 9% of students reported…

Eaton, Danice K.; Davis, Kristen S.; Barrios, Lisa; Brener, Nancy D.; Noonan, Rita K.

2007-01-01

421

Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions, Dropout, and Youth with Disabilities: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The relationship between cognitive-behavioral interventions and therapies on the one hand and school dropout outcomes and violent verbal or physical aggression on the other hand for secondary-age youth with disabilities was explored in a systematic review. A total of 16 studies intervening with 791 youth with behavioral disorders,…

Cobb, Brian; Sample, Pat L.; Alwell, Morgen; Johns, Nikole R.

2006-01-01

422

A Systematic Review of Environmental Correlates of Obesity-Related Dietary Behaviors in Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is increasing interest in the role the environment plays in shaping the dietary behavior of youth, particularly in the context of obesity prevention. An overview of environmental factors associated with obesity-related dietary behaviors among youth is needed to inform the development of interventions. A systematic review of observational…

van der Horst, Klazine; Oenema, A.; Ferreira, I.; Wendel-Vos, W.; Giskes, K.; van Lenthe, F.; Brug, J.

2007-01-01

423

Bullies and victims in rural African American youth: behavioral characteristics and social network placement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bullying and victimization are serious problems for youth of many ages and from a variety of backgrounds. These behaviors have not, however, been widely studied in rural minorities. The current work examined behavioral and social correlates of bullying and victimization in a sample of rural African American youth. Incidence rates of bullying, victimization, and aggressive victimization parallel those in other

David B. Estell; Thomas W. Farmer; Beverley D. Cairns

2007-01-01

424

Predicting Residential Treatment Outcomes for Emotionally and Behaviorally Disordered Youth: The Role of Pretreatment Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined outcomes with 170 children and youth admitted to residential treatment with complex mental health problems. Overall, outcomes at 2 years post-treatment was predicted by children and youth's behavioral pretreatment status reflected in lower internalizing and externalizing behavior at admission. These findings recognize a…

den Dunnen, Wendy; St. Pierre, Jeff; Stewart, Shannon L.; Johnson, Andrew; Cook, Steven; Leschied, Alan W.

2012-01-01

425

A Systematic Review of Environmental Correlates of Obesity-Related Dietary Behaviors in Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|There is increasing interest in the role the environment plays in shaping the dietary behavior of youth, particularly in the context of obesity prevention. An overview of environmental factors associated with obesity-related dietary behaviors among youth is needed to inform the development of interventions. A systematic review of observational…

van der Horst, Klazine; Oenema, A.; Ferreira, I.; Wendel-Vos, W.; Giskes, K.; van Lenthe, F.; Brug, J.

2007-01-01

426

Profiles in the development of behavior disorders among youths with family maltreatment histories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Violent conduct by youths ranks among the types of inappropriate behavior generally originating in difficult family and social contexts. A proper understanding of the development of violent conduct must consider the situation taken as a whole. This article documents the results of a qualitative study which aimed to determine the psychosocial profiles and needs of youths with serious behavior problems

Nadia Desbiens

2007-01-01

427

Proposing a Theoretical Framework for Digital Age Youth Information Behavior Building upon Radical Change Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contemporary young people are engaged in a variety of information behaviors, such as information seeking, using, sharing, and creating. The ways youth interact with information have transformed in the shifting digital information environment; however, relatively little empirical research exists and no theoretical framework adequately explains digital age youth information behaviors from a holistic perspective. In order to bridge the empirical

Kyungwon Koh

2011-01-01

428

Predicting the Onset of Sexual and Drug Risk Behaviors in HIV-Negative Youths with HIV-Positive Mothers: The Role of Contextual, Self-Regulation, and Social-Interaction Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

HIV-negative, inner-city adolescents with HIV-infected parents are considered to be at high risk for acquiring HIV themselves.\\u000a Using a modified theory of health behavior, this study examined the effects of maternal HIV infection and psychosocial variables\\u000a on the onset of sexual and drug risk behavior in 144 HIV-negative adolescents with and without HIV-positive mothers. Adolescents\\u000a and their mothers were interviewed

Claude A. Mellins; Curtis Dolezal; Elizabeth Brackis-Cott; Ouzama Nicholson; Patricia Warne; Heino F. L. Meyer-Bahlburg

2007-01-01

429

Risk Factors for Homelessness Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youths: A Developmental Milestone Approach.  

PubMed

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths are over-represented in the homeless population. To examine why some LGB youths become homeless, this report compares homeless and non-homeless LGB youths. Of the 156 LGB youths, 48% reported ever being homeless (i.e., running away or being evicted from home). Results indicate that sexual orientation awareness and the initiation of sexual behavior occurred earlier in homeless than in non-homeless LGB youths and predated the first homeless episode. Substance use was more frequent and first occurred at an earlier age in homeless as compared to non-homeless LGB youths; however, substance use occurred subsequent to first homelessness. Childhood sexual abuse was associated with homelessness; and, early sexual orientation development was related to homelessness among youths without a history of sexual abuse. Findings suggest that interventions should help youths cope with their unfolding sexual orientation and work to prevent or address the consequences of sexual abuse. PMID:22347763

Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W; Hunter, Joyce

2012-01-01

430

Recognition for positive behavior as a critical youth development construct: conceptual bases and implications on youth service development.  

PubMed

Recognition for positive behavior is an appropriate response of the social environment to elicit desirable external behavior among the youth. Such positive responses, rendered from various social systems, include tangible and intangible reinforcements. The following theories are used to explain the importance of recognizing positive behavior: operational conditioning, observational learning, self-determination, and humanistic perspective. In the current work, culturally and socially desirable behaviors are discussed in detail with reference to Chinese adolescents. Positive behavior recognition is especially important to adolescent development because it promotes identity formation as well as cultivates moral reasoning and social perspective thinking from various social systems. The significance of recognizing positive behavior is illustrated through the support, tutorage, invitation, and subsidy provided by Hong Kong's social systems in recognition of adolescent volunteerism. The practical implications of positive behavior recognition on youth development programs are also discussed in this work. PMID:22666155

Law, Ben M F; Siu, Andrew M H; Shek, Daniel T L

2012-05-01

431

Africentric youth and family rites of passage program: promoting resilience among at-risk African American youths.  

PubMed

This article examines the effects of an Africentric youth and family rites of passage program on at-risk African American youths and their parents. Data were obtained from a three-year evaluation of a youth rites of passage demonstration project using therapeutic interventions based on Africentric principles. At-risk African American boys between ages 11.5 and 14.5 years with no history of substance abuse were referred from the criminal justice system, diversion programs, and local schools. The evaluation revealed that participating youths exhibited gains in self-esteem and accurate knowledge of the dangers of drug abuse. Although the differences were not statistically significant, parents demonstrated improvements in parenting skills, racial identity, cultural awareness, and community involvement. Evidence from interviews and focus groups suggests that the program's holistic, family-oriented, Africentric, strengths-based approach and indigenous staff contributed to its success. PMID:14964519

Harvey, Aminifu R; Hill, Robert B

2004-01-01

432

Young Parents’ Relationship Characteristics, Shared Sexual Behaviors, Perception of Partner Risks, and Dyadic Influences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rising rates of heterosexually transmitted HIV among youth and young adults, particularly from ethnic minorities, create an urgent need to understand risk factors and perceptions of risk within the context of couple relationships. This study examined reports of young mothers and fathers (predominantly Latino) about background characteristics, relationship quality and length, HIV-related risk factors, and perceptions of partners’ behaviors and

Deborah Koniak-Griffin; Rong Huang; Janna Lesser; Evelyn González-Figueroa; Sumiko Takayanagi; William G. Cumberland

2009-01-01

433

On the Association between Sexual Attraction and Adolescent Risk Behavior Involvement: Examining Mediation and Moderation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On the basis of a large-scale survey of high-school youth, the authors compared adolescents reporting exclusively heterosexual, mostly heterosexual, bisexual, and predominately same-sex attraction based on high-risk involvement across a range of risk behaviors. Bisexual and same-sex attracted groups were characterized by heightened high-risk

Busseri, Michael A.; Willoughby, Teena; Chalmers, Heather; Bogaert, Anthony F.

2008-01-01

434

Youth Depression in the Family Context: Familial Risk Factors and Models of Treatment  

PubMed Central

Research on parent risk factors, family environment, and familial involvement in the treatment of depression in children and adolescents is integrated, providing an update to prior reviews on the topic. First, the psychosocial parent and family factors associated with youth depression are examined. The literature indicates that a broad array of parent and family factors is associated with youth risk for depression, ranging from parental pathology to parental cognitive style to family emotional climate. Next, treatment approaches for youth depression that have been empirically tested are described and then summarized in terms of their level of parent inclusion, including cognitive–behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, and family systems approaches. Families have mostly not been incorporated into clinical treatment research with depressed adolescents, with only 32% of treatments including parents in treatment in any capacity. Nonetheless, the overall effectiveness of treatments that involve children and adolescents exclusively is very similar to that of treatments that include parents as agents or facilitators of change. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of these findings and directions for further research.

Sander, Janay B.; McCarty, Carolyn A.

2006-01-01

435

Attempted suicide and associated risk factors among youth in urban Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Suicide is a major social and health issue in Japan. We assessed prevalence of attempted suicide and explored individual,\\u000a interpersonal, behavioral, and psychological risk factors associated with attempted suicide in a general community sample\\u000a of youth in a metropolitan Japanese city.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  Survey of 2,095 participants age between 15 and 24 who were recruited using street-intercept techniques.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Overall, 6% of males

Yasuharu Hidaka; Don Operario; Mie Takenaka; Sachiko Omori; Seiichi Ichikawa; Takuma Shirasaka

2008-01-01

436

Probation officers' perceptions of youths' risk of reoffending and use of risk assessment in case management.  

PubMed

Juvenile probation officers (JPOs) are required to make numerous decisions about the case management of young offenders on a daily basis. This multi-site study examined JPOs' (N=64) perceptions of the typical youth's risk of reoffending before implementation of a risk/needs assessment (RNA) tool, and their self-reported, case management decision-making after implementation of an RNA tool. Results indicated that JPOs tended to overestimate the likely base rates of reoffending while RNA tool estimates were more accurate. Further, most JPOs appeared to be making service referral and placement decisions commensurate with youths' risk levels, regardless of whether they claimed to use the RNA tool in their decisions. Variability in application of risk to case management practices was more a function of the probation office than of the specific JPO. Implications for use of risk assessment in juvenile probation are discussed. PMID:22740174

Perrault, Rachael T; Paiva-Salisbury, Melissa; Vincent, Gina M

2012-06-28

437

Supportive social relationships and adolescent health risk behavior among secondary school students in El Salvador.  

PubMed

An increasing number of studies suggest that supportive social relationships in the family and school may exert a protective effect against a number of youth health risk behaviors. This study examines the association between perceived parental social support and perceived social cohesion at school with selected youth risk behavior outcomes (physical fighting, victimization, suicidal ideation, substance use, and sexual intercourse) among 930 female and male public secondary school students studying in the central region of El Salvador. The study questionnaire comprised closed-ended items of parent/school relationships and risk behaviors based on the United States Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Youth Risk Behavior Survey. In regression analyses, female students who perceived low parental social support were significantly more likely to report engaging in all risk behaviors examined, and female students with perceptions of low school social cohesion were more likely to report suicidal ideation, binge drinking, and drug use. Perceptions of parental social support and school social cohesion held fewer but still significant associations across risk behaviors for male students. Male students who reported low parental social support were significantly more likely to report suicidal ideation, drug use and physical fighting, while male students with low perceived school social cohesion were more likely to report physical fighting but less likely to report binge drinking. This study lends support to the importance of supportive social relationships for understanding youth risk behavior and suggests that supportive families and schools may operate differently for female and male students living in El Salvador. PMID:16169644

Springer, Andrew; Parcel, Guy; Baumler, Elizabeth; Ross, Michael

2005-09-19

438

HIV risk behavior, street outreach, and condom use in eight high-risk populations.  

PubMed

In this paper we examine risk behavior, exposure to street outreach, and condom use in samples of injecting drug users (IDUs) and high-risk youth. We used systematic sampling methods to produce representative samples of injecting drug users IDUs (five sites) and high-risk youth (three sites). The populations surveyed engaged in high levels of sexual risk behavior: 20% to 46% reported two or more sex partners in the last month. The majority (62% to 97%) knew someone infected with HIV. Condom use rates approached national health promotion goals for nonsteady partners but not for steady or main partners. Having a condom at time of interview was the most consistent predictor of condom use at last intercourse. Many of the respondents have been in contact with street outreach programs and many acknowledged some personal risk for HIV infection. However, most of the injecting drug users and high-risk youth interviewed (and their sex partners) were still at risk through unprotected sex. PMID:8806949

Anderson, J E; Cheney, R; Clatts, M; Faruque, S; Kipke, M; Long, A; Mills, S; Toomey, K; Wiebel, W

1996-06-01

439

Patterns of HIV risk and preventive behaviors among teenage men.  

PubMed Central

Analyses of the 1988 National Survey of Adolescent Males indicate the prevalence of risk behaviors related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, including sexual, contraceptive, and drug use behaviors, among 15- to 19-year-old men. About three-fifths had sexual intercourse, indicating that a majority of teenage men have at least some potential exposure to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or sexually transmitted disease. From a behavioral perspective, the average sexually active teenage man used a condom more than half the time in the 12 months before the interview. Those with most experience with sexual intercourse, however, used condoms least frequently. More important from an epidemiologic perspective, a third of all acts of intercourse in the prior year were protected using condoms. Further, behaviors with the greatest direct risks for HIV infection, such as homosexual intercourse, use of intravenous drugs, and sex with intravenous drug users or prostitutes, appear to be relatively uncommon. Teenage men who demonstrate high-risk behavior, including both sexual and substance abuse, compound their risks, because risks generally are correlated. Condom use is a preventive behavior that is negatively correlated with most risk behaviors; those who have multiple partners, or who are substance abusers, tend to use condoms least. The convergence of risks for multi-problem teenage men indicates the relevance of interventions directed to high-risk youths.

Ku, L; Sonenstein, F L; Pleck, J H

1992-01-01

440

Suicide Attempts among Norwegian Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual YouthsGeneral and Specific Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the study was to identify the specific factors that affect the risk of attempted suicide in Norwegian gay, lesbian and bisexual (GLB) youths beyond the effect of general risk factors presumed to be of importance irrespective of sexual orientation. The national non-probability sample included 407 GLB youths aged between 16 and 25 years of age, among whom

Kristinn Hegna; Lars Wichstrøm

2007-01-01

441

America's Shame, America's Hope: Twelve Million Youth at Risk. Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is an executive summary of a report asserting that the under-education of a body of students, known as "at-risk" youth, presents a crisis in American public education that has been overlooked by the educational reform movement of the 1980s. These youth are referred to as "at-risk" because they leave school unprepared for either…

Smith, R. C.; Lincoln, Carol A.

442

Who's Looking Out for At-Risk Youth: The States' Excellence in Education Commissions. A Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of state commissions concerned with educational excellence showed that the majority of these commissions are not involved with the problems of at-risk youth. The definition of at-risk youth includes the following: (1) young people from poor families of all races, including minorities and immigrants, who face discriminatory policies and…

MDC, Inc., Chapel Hill, NC.

443

Alternatives for Youth-At-Risk: Outdoor Experiences for a Special Population. An Occasional Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Camping or other outdoor experience is seen as an alternative to incarceration for youth-at-risk, matching the excitement of the street-gang society or peer group, while simultaneously giving youth-at-risk a sense of the reason for teamwork, adherence to a group-respected value system, regard for skills and abilities of others, plus a…

Lingle, Kendall I.

1980-01-01

444

Suicide Protective and Risk Factors for Sexual Minority Youth: Applying the Cumulative Factor Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report explores suicide protective and risk factors for lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) youth and offers a Cumulative Factor Model constructed from these factors. Numerous studies to date have concluded that a youth's sexual minority identity is a key risk factor for suicide. Few studies however have explored the internal and external protective factors that may cumulate to increase

Philip A. Rutter

2008-01-01

445

Alternatives for Youth-At-Risk: Outdoor Experiences for a Special Population. An Occasional Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Camping or other outdoor experience is seen as an alternative to incarceration for youth-at-risk, matching the excitement of the street-gang society or peer group, while simultaneously giving youth-at-risk a sense of the reason for teamwork, adherence to a group-respected value system, regard for skills and abilities of others, plus a…

Lingle, Kendall I.

1980-01-01

446

Psychosocial Functioning in Youths at High Risk to Develop Major Depressive Disorder.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To compare the psychosocial functioning of children and adolescents at high risk of major depressive disorder with youths with acute major depressive disorder and healthy controls. Method: High-risk (n = 57), major depressive disorder (n = 71), and healthy control (n = 48) youths and their families were recruited from 1987 to 1996 and…

Birmaher, Boris; Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Williamson, Douglas E.; Brent, David A.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Axelson, David A.; Dorn, Lorah D.; Ryan, Neal D.

2004-01-01

447

Youth Depression in the Family Context: Familial Risk Factors and Models of Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on parent risk factors, family environment, and familial involvement in the treatment of depression in children and adolescents is integrated, providing an update to prior reviews on the topic. First, the psychosocial parent and family factors associated with youth depression are examined. The literature indicates that a broad array of parent and family factors is associated with youth risk

Janay B. Sander; Carolyn A. McCarty

2005-01-01

448

Amygdala Hyperactivation During Face Emotion Processing in Unaffected Youth at Risk for Bipolar Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: Youth at familial risk for bipolar disorder (BD) show deficits in face emotion processing, but the neural correlates of these deficits have not been examined. This preliminary study tests the hypothesis that, relative to healthy comparison (HC) subjects, both BD subjects and youth at risk for BD (i.e., those with a first-degree BD…

Olsavsky, Aviva K.; Brotman, Melissa A.; Rutenberg, Julia G.; Muhrer, Eli J.; Deveney, Christen M.; Fromm, Stephen J.; Towbin, Kenneth; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen

2012-01-01

449

Risk Factors for Sexual Victimization Among Male and Female Homeless and Runaway Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Risk factors associated with the likelihood of being sexually victimized by a stranger or friend/acquaintance since being on the street was examined among 372 homeless and runaway youth. Young people were interviewed on the streets and in shelters by outreach workers using a systematic sampling strategy. Youth who engaged in more high-risk

Tyler, Kimberly A.; Whitbeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Dan R.; Cauce, Ana Mari

2004-01-01

450

Homeless Youth: Drug Use Patterns and HIV Risk Profiles According to Peer Group Affiliation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research was conducted to identify subcultural peer groups within a homeless youth population and determine whether these groups differ with respect to drug use patterns and HIV risk. Using systematic sampling methods, 309 homeless youth (ages 13–23 years) were recruited from street and service sites. Drug use patterns and HIV risk profiles were found to vary according to group affiliation.

Michele D. Kipke; Susanne B. Montgomery; Thomas R. Simon; Jennifer B. Unger; Christine J. Johnson

1997-01-01

451

Early psychosocial intervention for youth at risk for bipolar I or II disorder: a one-year treatment development trial  

PubMed Central

Objectives Previous studies have identified behavioral phenotypes that predispose genetically vulnerable youth to a later onset of bipolar I or II disorder, but few studies have examined whether early psychosocial intervention can reduce risk of syndromal conversion. In a one-year open trial, we tested a version of family-focused treatment adapted for youth at high risk for bipolar disorder (FFT-HR). Methods A referred sample of 13 children (mean 13.4 ± 2.69 years; 4 boys, 9 girls) who had a parent with bipolar I or II disorder participated at one of two outpatient specialty clinics. Youth met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder (n = 8), cyclothymic disorder (n = 1), or bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (n = 4), with active mood symptoms in the past month. Participants were offered FFT-HR (12 sessions in four months) with their parents, plus psychotropic medications as needed. Independent evaluators assessed depressive symptoms, hypomanic symptoms, and global functioning at baseline and then every four months for one year, with retrospective severity and impairment ratings made for each week of the follow-up interval. Results Families were mostly adherent to the treatment protocol (85% retention), and therapists administered the FFT-HR manual with high levels of fidelity. Youth showed significant improvements in depression, hypomania, and psychosocial functioning scores on the Adolescent Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. They also showed significant improvements in Young Mania Rating Scale and Children’s Depression Rating Scale scores. Conclusions FFT-HR is a promising intervention for youth at high risk for BD. Larger-scale randomized trials that follow youth into young adulthood will be necessary to determine whether early psychosocial intervention can reduce the probability of developing bipolar I or II disorder among genetically vulnerable youth.

Miklowitz, David J; Chang, Kiki D; Taylor, Dawn O; George, Elizabeth L; Singh, Manpreet K; Schneck, Christopher D; Dickinson, L Miriam; Howe, Meghan E; Garber, Judy

2011-01-01

452

Suicidal Ideation and Behaviors Among Youth in Juvenile Detention  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, lethality of suicide attempts, and the relationship between psychiatric disorder and recent attempts in newly detained juveniles. Methods The sample included 1829 juveniles, aged 10 to 18 years, sampled after intake to a detention center in Chicago, IL. Interviewers administered the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC) to assess for thoughts of death, suicidal ideation, suicide plans, lifetime suicide attempts, number of attempts, age at first attempt, attempts within the last 6 months, method of suicide attempts, and psychiatric disorder. Results More than one-third of juvenile detainees and nearly half of females had felt hopeless or thought about death in the 6 months prior to detention. Approximately 1 of 10 (10.3%, CI: 7.7% – 12.8%) juvenile detainees had thought about committing suicide in the past 6 months, and 1 of 10 (11.0%, CI: 8.3% – 13.7%) had ever attempted suicide. Recent suicide attempts were most prevalent in females and youth with major depression and generalized anxiety disorder. Conclusions Fewer than half of detainees with recent thoughts of suicide had told anyone about their ideation. Identifying youth at risk for suicide -- especially those suffering from depressive and anxiety disorders -- is a crucial step to preventing suicide.

Abram, Karen M.; Choe, Jeanne Y.; Washburn, Jason J.; Teplin, Linda A.; King, Devon C.; Dulcan, Mina K.

2010-01-01

453

Sexting behaviors among young Hispanic women: incidence and association with other high-risk sexual behaviors.  

PubMed

Several legal cases in the United States in which adolescents were charged with child pornography distribution after sharing nude photographs of themselves with romantic partners or others have highlighted the issue of sexting behaviors among youth. Although policy makers, mental health workers, educators and parents have all expressed concern regarding the potential harm of sexting behaviors, little to no research has examined this phenomenon empirically. The current study presents some preliminary data on the incidence of sexting behavior and associated high risk sexual behaviors in a sample of 207 predominantly Hispanic young women age 16-25. Approximately 20% of young women reported engaging in sexting behavior. Sexting behaviors were not associated with most other high-risk sexual behaviors, but were slightly more common in women who found sex to be highly pleasurable or who displayed histrionic personality traits. PMID:21153441

Ferguson, Christopher J

2011-09-01

454

EXPOSURE-BASED COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL TREATMENT OF ANXIETY IN YOUTH: AN EMERGING CULTURALLY-PRESCRIPTIVE FRAMEWORK  

Microsoft Academic Search

This invited article presents a brief overview of the status of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for anxiety disorders in mainstream and\\/or Caucasian youth relative to the little data that has accumulated about psychosocial treatments for anxiety disorders in Latino youth. The article describes an emerging culturally prescriptive framework for working with minority youth and a corresponding exposure-based cognitive behavioral treatment program

Armando A. Pin; Ian K. Villalta; Argero A. Zerr

2009-01-01

455

Differential Effectiveness of Behavioral Parent-Training and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Antisocial Youth: A Meta-Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extended the findings from previous meta-analytic work by comparing the effectiveness of behavioral parent-training (BPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for youth with antisocial behavior problems. Youth demographic variables were also examined as potential moderators of the effectiveness of these 2 types of interventions. Thirty BPT studies and 41 CBT studies met inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis. The weighted mean effect

Michael R. McCart; Paul E. Priester; W. Hobart Davies; Razia Azen

2006-01-01

456

Beyond Youth: Cigarette taxes and young adult smoking behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

While the relationship between youth smoking and cigarette excise taxes receives considerable attention, much less is paid to a more fundamental question: Why do we care about youth smoking? The most obvious answer is that we care about youth smoking since it is a pathway to whether an individual will become a long-term or lifetime smoker. Indeed, as noted by

Philip DeCicca; Donald Kenkel; Feng Liu

2010-01-01

457

Preventing Adolescent Risk Behavior in the Rural Context: An Integrative Analysis of Adolescent, Parent, and Provider Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Adolescent risk behavior remains prevalent and contributes to numerous social problems and growing health care costs. Contrary to popular perception, adolescents in rural areas engage in risky behaviors at least as much as youth from urban or suburban settings. Little research, however, focuses on risk behavior prevention in the rural context.…

Rishel, Carrie W.; Cottrell, Lesley; Kingery, Tricia

2012-01-01

458

Health risk behaviors in urban and rural Guatemalan adolescents.  

PubMed

Adolescence is an important stage of life when health behaviors and attitudes are established. The purpose of this research was to assess health risk behaviors among Guatemalan students in both an urban and rural school. Items were adapted from the Global School-based Student Health Survey and were used to measure and compare the prevalence of risk behaviors between these two demographically and culturally distant school-based samples. In general, the prevalence of adolescent health risk behaviors in both schools was lower than other Latin American countries. Many health risk behaviors were associated with location (urban vs. rural settings) and/or gender. Tobacco use, alcohol use, and sexual activity were higher among urban students. Boys were more likely than girls to use alcohol, use tobacco, and be sexually active. In addition, the prevalence of mental health problems was higher among girls and rural students. These findings imply that measures should be taken to design effective and appropriate health strategies for adolescents attending these schools. Health promotion programs in schools and communities should assist the youth in developing positive health behaviors and cultivating healthy lifestyles in an effort to reduce risk behaviors among adolescent populations. Further research is needed to extend our understanding of risk factors of health behavior in these adolescent populations and to identify effective preventative approaches and strategies that specifically cater to the location and culture of the students. PMID:23314522

Foulger, Lauren; Page, Randy M; Hall, P Cougar; Crookston, Benjamin T; West, Joshua H

2013-01-01

459

Using the Primary Socialization Theory to Predict Substance Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors Between Black and White Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Using the Primary Socialization Theory (PST), we examined substance use and sexual risk-taking behaviors between Black (N = 1,464) and White (N = 3,946) adolescents in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, Wave 1, public use (Add Health). Self-reported substance use and sexual risk-taking behaviors, PST constructs, and covariates were assessed using regression modeling techniques. Black youth were more likely to initiate sex, while White youth were more likely to report lifetime alcohol use. The PST predicted risk for White but not Black youth. The study’s limitations are noted, and implications for future research are discussed.

Francis, Shelley A.; Thorpe, Roland J.

2011-01-01

460

The Challenges of Gangs and Youth Violence in the Schools. Fourth CCBD Mini-Library Series: Addressing the Diverse Needs of Children and Youth with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders--Programs That Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Review of the current knowledge concerning youth violence and gang behavior considers risk factors for violence and gang formation, functions served by violence and gang membership, and strategies that have been empirically validated to be either beneficial or ineffective. Following an introductory chapter, the first chapter looks at the nature…

Grant, Sharon H.; Van Acker, Richard

461

Trends in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Risk Behaviors among High School Students--United States, 1991-2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examined changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related risk behaviors among high school students in the United States during 1991-2005. Data from 8 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys conducted during that period were analyzed. During 1991-2005, the percentage of US high school students engaging in HIV-related sexual risk

Brener, Nancy; Kann, Laura; Lowry, Richard; Wechsler, Howell; Romero, Lisa

2006-01-01

462

Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors among Youth in an Underserved Area of the Southern United States: Exploring the Moderating Roles of Gender, Racial/Ethnic Background, and School-Level  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the clinical relevance of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (SITB) among youth, little is known about the subset of youth most at-risk for SITB. This study examined the moderating roles of gender, racial/ethnic background, and school-level (and their interactions) on rates of SITB within a large (N = 2638, 52.2% female),…

Latzman, Robert D.; Gratz, Kim L.; Young, John; Heiden, Laurie J.; Damon, John D.; Hight, Terry L.

2010-01-01

463

Trauma Resilience among Youth in Substitute Care Demonstrating Sexual Behavior Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The purpose of this longitudinal study was to examine the relationship between several proposed protective factors and trauma symptoms among highly vulnerable youth in the child welfare system. Methods: Participants were 142 youth identified with a sexual behavior problem and their caregivers. Two waves of data were collected for each…

Leon, Scott C.; Ragsdale, Brian; Miller, Steven A.; Spacarelli, Steven

2008-01-01

464

A systematic review of environmental correlates of obesity-related dietary behaviors in youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is increasing interest in the role the environment plays in shaping the dietary be- havior of youth, particularly in the context of obesity prevention. An overview of environ- mental factors associated with obesity-related dietary behaviors among youth is needed to inform the development of interventions. A systematic review of observational studies on environmental correlates of energy, fat, fruit\\/ vegetable,

Klazine van der Horst; A. Oenema; I. Ferreira; W. Wendel-Vos; K. Giskes; F. van Lenthe; J. Brug

2006-01-01

465

When There Is Conflict: Interparental Conflict, Parent-Child Conflict, and Youth Problem Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined direct and indirect associations between overt and covert interparental conflict (IPC), parent-child conflict, and their links to youth problem behaviors. Data were collected from a sample of 641 school-age youth, ages 12 to 18 years, using a school-based survey. Analyses yielded direct positive linkages from overt IPC to…

Bradford, Kay; Vaughn, LaToya Burns; Barber, Brian K.

2008-01-01

466

A Pilot Study Connecting Youth with Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties to Summer Work Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the potential contributions of adolescent employment to postschool success, many youth who experience emotional and behavioral difficulties (EBD) do not access these opportunities. This intervention study examined the effects of a package of strategies designed to increase access to summer work experiences. Fifty-seven youth with EBD from…

Carter, Erik W.; Trainor, Audrey A.; Ditchman, Nicole; Owens, Laura

2011-01-01

467

THE PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF ANTI-SOCIAL BEHAVIOR OF YOUTH.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|THE IN-SERVICE TRAINING GUIDE FOR YOUTH SERVICES PERSONNEL WAS DESIGNED TO AID PERSONNEL IN THE PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF ANTI-SOCIAL YOUTH BEHAVIOR. THIS PRACTICAL GUIDE AND TRAINING MANUAL PRESENTS A COMPENDIUM OF IDEAS, SUGGESTIONS, AND TECHNIQUES. THE INTRODUCTION PRESENTS THE BACKGROUND AND PROCEDURES OF THE GUIDE'S PUBLICATION AND…

PELEGRINO, DONALD A.; AND OTHERS

468

An Analysis of the Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors of Traumatized Urban Youth With and Without PTSD  

Microsoft Academic Search

To test the differential validity of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) classification, 3 groups of youths (PTSD, traumatized PTSD negatives, and controls) were examined. Youth with major comorbid disorders were excluded. On the basis of an analysis of parent-derived Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) ratings, significant variations in CBCL scores were associated with PTSD but not with exposure to exceptional stress

Philip A. Saigh; Anastasia E. Yasik; Richard A. Oberfield; Phill V. Halamandaris; Margaret McHugh

2002-01-01

469

The Antisocial and Delictive Behavior Prediction in Youths Based on Human Values  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increase of the violence among the youths has been getting the specialists' attention in the search of answers for that phenomenon, especially, for the youths of the middle class and high. A theoretical construct that comes contributing a lot in the prediction of the human behaviors it is the human values. The objective of this study is to evaluate

Nilton Soares Formiga; Valdiney V. Gouveia

470

Case Study of the Assessment and Treatment of a Youth With Multifunction School Refusal Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

School refusal behavior is a common problem among children and adolescents and can lead to serious short- and long-term consequences if not addressed. Although recent treatment outcome studies have targeted youth who refuse to go to school for one specific reason (e.g., anxiety, attention), very little information is available on youth who refuse school for two reasons, and no information

Christopher A. Kearney

2002-01-01

471

The Integration of Research and Practice in the Prevention of Youth Problem Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevention of youth problem behaviors is increasingly guided by science. Sound epidemiological research is coming to guide preventive efforts. Valid methods of monitoring the incidence and prevalence of youth problems increasingly shape preventive practice. The identification of empirically supported prevention interventions is becoming more sophisticated, and numerous scientific organizations have begun to engage in dissemination activities. These trends will

Anthony Biglan; Patricia J. Mrazek; Douglas Carnine; Brian R. Flay

2003-01-01

472

Culturally Sensitive Interventions and Health and Behavioral Health Youth Outcomes: A Meta-Analytic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite Census Bureau projections that youth from minority cultures will comprise the majority of the nation's youth in approximately a decade, little research has been conducted on culturally sensitive interventions (CSIs). Accordingly, this study sought to determine: (1) the effectiveness of CSIs designed to address health and behavioral health outcomes, (2) whether effectiveness varies depending on the class or type

David R. Hodge; Kelly F. Jackson; Michael G. Vaughn

2010-01-01

473

Parent-Adolescent Violence and Later Behavioral Health Problems Among Homeless and Housed Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parent-adolescent violence (i.e., violence between parents and adolescents) is an important pathway to homelessness and predicts poor behavioral health outcomes among youth. However, few studies have examined links between parent violence and outcomes among youth who are homeless. Existing research has also tended to ignore adolescent violence toward parents, despite evidence that mutual violence is common. The current study examines

Mason G. Haber

2009-01-01

474

Changes in Emotion Regulation Following Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxious Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined emotion-related functioning following cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) with 37 youth with anxiety disorders (22 boys, 15 girls) ranging in age from 7 to 15 with a principal diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder (n = 27), separation anxiety disorder (n = 12), and/or social phobia (n = 13). Treated youth exhibited a…

Suveg, Cynthia; Sood, Erica; Comer, Jonathan S.; Kendall, Philip C.