Science.gov

Sample records for zebrafish xenograft model

  1. Neutrophil-mediated experimental metastasis is enhanced by VEGFR inhibition in a zebrafish xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    He, Shuning; Lamers, Gerda EM; Beenakker, Jan-Willem M; Cui, Chao; Ghotra, Veerander PS; Danen, Erik HJ; Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of VEGF signalling effectively suppresses localized tumour growth but accelerates tumour invasiveness and micrometastasis by unknown mechanisms. To study the dynamic and reciprocal interactions between tumour cells and their microenvironment during these processes, we established a xenograft model by injecting tumour cells into the blood circulation of transparent zebrafish embryos. This reproducibly results in rapid simultaneous formation of a localized tumour and experimental micrometastasis, allowing time-resolved imaging of both processes at single-cell resolution within 1 week. The tumour vasculature was initiated de novo by remodelling of primitive endothelial cells into a functional network. Roles of myeloid cells in critical tumourigenesis steps such as vascularization and invasion were revealed by genetic and pharmaceutical approaches. We discovered that the physiological migration of neutrophils controlled tumour invasion by conditioning the collagen matrix and forming the metastatic niche, as detected by two-photon confocal microscopy and second harmonic generation. Administration of VEGFR inhibitors blocked tumour vascularization and a localized tumour growth but enhanced migration of neutrophils, which in turn promoted tumour invasion and formation of micrometastasis. This demonstrates the in vivo cooperation between VEGF signalling and myeloid cells in metastasis and provides a new mechanism underlying the recent findings that VEGFR targeting can promote tumour invasiveness. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22374800

  2. Zebrafish models of rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eleanor Y; Langenau, David M

    2011-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), an aggressive malignant neoplasm that shows features of skeletal muscle, is the most common soft tissue tumor of childhood. In children, the major subtypes are embryonal and alveolar. Although localized disease responds to a multimodal treatment, the prognosis for patients with high-risk features and metastasis remains dismal. Several in vivo models of RMS have been developed in mouse, human xenografts, zebrafish, and Drosophila to better understand the underlying mechanisms governing malignancy. The findings so far have indicated the potential role of skeletal muscle precursor cells in malignant transformation. To better understand histogenesis and different aspects of tumorigenesis in RMS, we have previously developed a robust zebrafish model of kRAS-induced RMS, which shares morphologic and immunophenotypic features with the human counterpart. Cross-species mircroarray comparisons confirm that conserved genetic pathways drive RMS growth. The ease for ex vivo manipulation allows the development of different transgenic and co-injection strategies to induce tumor formation in zebrafish. In contrast to other vertebrate model systems, the tumor onset in zebrafish is short, allowing for efficient study of different tumor processes including tumor growth, self-renewal, and maintenance. PMID:21951539

  3. Contributors Part I: Larval Zebrafish Models

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Contents Preface Contributors Part I: Larval Zebrafish Models Chapter 1. Measuring Larval Zebrafish for Larval Zebrafish Peter J. Steenbergen, Michael K. Richardson, and Danielle L. Champagne Chapter 3. Assessment of Thigmotaxis in Larval Zebrafish Stephanie J. Schnörr, Peter J. Steenbergen, Michael K

  4. The zebrafish/tumor xenograft angiogenesis assay as a tool for screening anti-angiogenic miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Chiavacci, Elena; Rizzo, Milena; Pitto, Letizia; Patella, Francesca; Evangelista, Monica; Mariani, Laura; Rainaldi, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    The zebrafish/tumor xenograft angiogenesis assay is used to approach tumor angiogenesis, a pivotal step in cancer progression and target for anti-tumor therapies. Here, we evaluated whether the assay could allow the identification of microRNAs having an anti-angiogenic potential. For that, we transfected DU-145 prostate cancer cells with four microRNAs (miR-125a, miR-320, miR-487b, miR-492) responsive to both anti- and pro-angiogenic stimuli applied to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. After transfection, DU-145 cells were injected close to the developing subintestinal vessels of transgenic Tg(Kdrl:eGFP)s843 zebrafish embryos that express green fluorescent protein under the control of Kdrl promoter. At 72 h post-fertilization, we observed that green fluorescent protein-positive neo-vessels infiltrated the graft of DU-145 transfected with miR-125a, miR-320, and miR-487b. Vice versa, neo-vessel formation and tumor cell infiltration were inhibited when DU-145 cells transfected with miR-492 were used. These results indicated that the zebrafish/tumor xenograft assay was adequate to identify microRNAs able to suppress the release of angiogenic growth factors by angiogenic tumor cells. PMID:24947063

  5. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas.

  6. Zebrafish as a disease model for studying human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Ho, Yi-Jung; Yang, Yi-Ju; Liao, Heng-An; Ciou, Shih-Ci; Lin, Liang-In; Ou, Da-Liang

    2015-11-14

    Liver cancer is one of the world's most common cancers and the second leading cause of cancer deaths. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a primary hepatic cancer, accounts for 90%-95% of liver cancer cases. The pathogenesis of HCC consists of a stepwise process of liver damage that extends over decades, due to hepatitis, fatty liver, fibrosis, and cirrhosis before developing fully into HCC. Multiple risk factors are highly correlated with HCC, including infection with the hepatitis B or C viruses, alcohol abuse, aflatoxin exposure, and metabolic diseases. Over the last decade, genetic alterations, which include the regulation of multiple oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes and the activation of tumorigenesis-related pathways, have also been identified as important factors in HCC. Recently, zebrafish have become an important living vertebrate model organism, especially for translational medical research. In studies focusing on the biology of cancer, carcinogen induced tumors in zebrafish were found to have many similarities to human tumors. Several zebrafish models have therefore been developed to provide insight into the pathogenesis of liver cancer and the related drug discovery and toxicology, and to enable the evaluation of novel small-molecule inhibitors. This review will focus on illustrative examples involving the application of zebrafish models to the study of human liver disease and HCC, through transgenesis, genome editing technology, xenografts, drug discovery, and drug-induced toxic liver injury. PMID:26576090

  7. Zebrafish as a disease model for studying human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Ho, Yi-Jung; Yang, Yi-Ju; Liao, Heng-An; Ciou, Shih-Ci; Lin, Liang-In; Ou, Da-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of the world’s most common cancers and the second leading cause of cancer deaths. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a primary hepatic cancer, accounts for 90%-95% of liver cancer cases. The pathogenesis of HCC consists of a stepwise process of liver damage that extends over decades, due to hepatitis, fatty liver, fibrosis, and cirrhosis before developing fully into HCC. Multiple risk factors are highly correlated with HCC, including infection with the hepatitis B or C viruses, alcohol abuse, aflatoxin exposure, and metabolic diseases. Over the last decade, genetic alterations, which include the regulation of multiple oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes and the activation of tumorigenesis-related pathways, have also been identified as important factors in HCC. Recently, zebrafish have become an important living vertebrate model organism, especially for translational medical research. In studies focusing on the biology of cancer, carcinogen induced tumors in zebrafish were found to have many similarities to human tumors. Several zebrafish models have therefore been developed to provide insight into the pathogenesis of liver cancer and the related drug discovery and toxicology, and to enable the evaluation of novel small-molecule inhibitors. This review will focus on illustrative examples involving the application of zebrafish models to the study of human liver disease and HCC, through transgenesis, genome editing technology, xenografts, drug discovery, and drug-induced toxic liver injury. PMID:26576090

  8. Zebrafish models of major depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Fonseka, Trehani M; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Foster, Jane A; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as a model species for translational research in various neuroscience areas, including depressive disorders. Because of their physiological (neuroanatomical, neuroendocrine, neurochemical) and genetic homology to mammals, robust phenotypes, and value in high-throughput genetic and chemical genetic screens, zebrafish are ideal for developing valid experimental models of major depression and discovering novel therapeutics. Behavioral testing approaches, such as approach-avoidance, cognitive, and social paradigms, are available in zebrafish and have utility in identifying depression-like indices in zebrafish in response to physiological, genetic, environmental, and/or psychopharmacological alterations. In addition, the high sensitivity of zebrafish to commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs supports the use of this model as an invaluable tool for pharmacological research and drug screening. This Review outlines the benefits of using the zebrafish model for depression studies and summarizes the current research in this field. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26452974

  9. Zebrafish as a Model for the Study of Human Myeloid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Hsieh, Meng-Shan; Liao, Heng-An; Yang, Yi-Ju; Ho, Yi-Jung; Lin, Liang-In

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid malignancies are heterogeneous disorders characterized by uncontrolled proliferation or/and blockage of differentiation of myeloid progenitor cells. Although a substantial number of gene alterations have been identified, the mechanism by which these abnormalities interact has yet to be elucidated. Over the past decades, zebrafish have become an important model organism, especially in biomedical research. Several zebrafish models have been developed to recapitulate the characteristics of specific myeloid malignancies that provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of these diseases and allow the evaluation of novel small molecule drugs. This report will focus on illustrative examples of applications of zebrafish models, including transgenesis, zebrafish xenograft models, and cell transplantation approaches, to the study of human myeloid malignancies. PMID:26064935

  10. Construction of orthotopic xenograft mouse models for human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    DAI, LEI; LU, CAIDE; YU, XI; DAI, LONG-JUN; ZHOU, JEFF X.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models are indispensable for the study of tumorigenesis and the development of anti-cancer drugs for human pancreatic cancer. In the present study, two orthotopic xenograft mouse models were developed. AsPC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells were stably labeled with red fluorescent protein (RFP) and injected subcutaneously into nude mice. For the orthotopic tumor mass model, the formed subcutaneous tumors were cut into blocks and implanted into the pancreas of nude mice via laparotomy. For the Matrigel™ tumor block model, solidified Matrigel containing RFP-labeled AsPC-1 cells was cut into blocks and implanted into the pancreas of nude mice. A subcutaneous tumor xenograft model was used as a control. Tumor growth and metastasis were assessed using an in vivo fluorescence imaging system. Thirty-six days after implantation, all mice from the two orthotopic xenograft models (n=20 per group) and 55% of the subcutaneous xenograft mice (n=20) developed tumors. The tumor growth rate was significantly higher in the orthotopic models than that in the subcutaneous model (P<0.01). Metastasis to organs such as the liver was observed in the orthotopic tumor models. Histological examination showed that the tumors were poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, two orthotopic xenograft mouse models of human pancreatic cancer were established; these exhibited greater tumor growth and metastasis than the subcutaneous xenograft mouse model.

  11. Zebrafish: Modeling for Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Thessicar Evadney; Jones, Kevin S.; Dale, Rodney M.; Shukla, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Abstract For many years, zebrafish have been the prototypical model for studies in developmental biology. In recent years, zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model system to study infectious diseases, including viral infections. Experiments conducted with herpes simplex virus type-1 in adult zebrafish or in embryo models are encouraging as they establish proof of concept with viral-host tropism and possible screening of antiviral compounds. In addition, the presence of human homologs of viral entry receptors in zebrafish such as 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate, nectins, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 14-like receptor bring strong rationale for virologists to test their in vivo significance in viral entry in a zebrafish model and compare the structure–function basis of virus zebrafish receptor interaction for viral entry. On the other end, a zebrafish model is already being used for studying inflammation and angiogenesis, with or without genetic manipulations, and therefore can be exploited to study viral infection-associated pathologies. The major advantage with zebrafish is low cost, easy breeding and maintenance, rapid lifecycle, and a transparent nature, which allows visualizing dissemination of fluorescently labeled virus infection in real time either at a localized region or the whole body. Further, the availability of multiple transgenic lines that express fluorescently tagged immune cells for in vivo imaging of virus infected animals is extremely attractive. In addition, a fully developed immune system and potential for receptor-specific knockouts further advocate the use of zebrafish as a new tool to study viral infections. In this review, we focus on expanding the potential of zebrafish model system in understanding human infectious diseases and future benefits. PMID:24266790

  12. Zebrafish Model Systems for Developmental Neurobehavioral Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Jordan; Oliveri, Anthony; Levin, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish offer many advantages that complement classic mammalian models for the study of normal development as well as for the teratogenic effects of exposure to hazardous compounds. The clear chorion and embryo of the zebrafish allow for continuous visualization of the anatomical changes associated with development, which, along with short maturation times and the capability of complex behavior, makes this model particularly useful for measuring changes to the developing nervous system. Moreover, the rich array of developmental, behavioral, and molecular benefits offered by the zebrafish have contributed to an increasing demand for the use of zebrafish in behavioral teratology. Essential for this endeavor has been the development of a battery of tests to evaluate a spectrum of behavior in zebrafish. Measures of sensorimotor plasticity, emotional function, cognition and social interaction have been used to characterize the persisting adverse effects of developmental exposure to a variety of chemicals including therapeutic drugs, drugs of abuse and environmental toxicants. In this review, we present and discuss such tests and data from a range of developmental neurobehavioral toxicology studies using zebrafish as a model. Zebrafish provide a key intermediate model between high throughput in vitro screens and the classic mammalian models as they have the accessibility of in vitro models and the complex functional capabilities of mammalian models. PMID:23723169

  13. Spermatogenesis in Ferret Testis Xenografts: A New Model

    PubMed Central

    Gourdon, Jim C; Travis, Alexander J

    2011-01-01

    Testis xenografting is both a promising tool to study spermatogenesis and a means to preserve the genetic information and reproductive potential of prepubertal male animals. The present study was conducted to evaluate this technique using testis tissue from domestic ferrets, an important biomedical model and a model for the conservation of small carnivore species. Fresh testis tissue from 8-wk-old ferrets was implanted ectopically under the skin on the backs of castrated nude mice and subsequently evaluated for testosterone production and establishment of spermatogenesis at 10, 20, 25, and 30 wk after xenografting. A total of 40% of fresh ferret xenografts were harvested. Seminal vesicles were collected from the recipient mice and weighed as an assay for bioactive testosterone. The weights of seminal vesicles from the mice showed no significant difference from those of uncastrated, control nude mice, indicating that the xenografts were producing physiologically relevant amounts of testosterone. The ferret testis xenografts produced differentiating germ cells and sperm at the same time as did testis from age-matched control ferrets. These data demonstrate the ability of Mustelidae testicular tissue to establish spermatogenesis in nude mice after testis xenografting. PMID:21535925

  14. Zebrafish models of cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Walcott, Brian P; Peterson, Randall T

    2014-01-01

    Perturbations in cerebral blood flow and abnormalities in blood vessel structure are the hallmarks of cerebrovascular disease. While there are many genetic and environmental factors that affect these entities through a heterogeneous group of disease processes, the ultimate final pathologic insult in humans is defined as a stroke, or damage to brain parenchyma. In the case of ischemic stroke, blood fails to reach its target destination whereas in hemorrhagic stroke, extravasation of blood occurs outside of the blood vessel lumen, resulting in direct damage to brain parenchyma. As these acute events can be neurologically devastating, if not fatal, development of novel therapeutics are urgently needed. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an attractive model for the study of cerebrovascular disease because of its morphological and physiological similarity to human cerebral vasculature, its ability to be genetically manipulated, and its fecundity allowing for large-scale, phenotype-based screens. PMID:24517974

  15. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick Ii, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990?s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26489395

  16. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J.; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick II, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B. Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990?s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26489395

  17. A xenograft animal model of human arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are a type of high-flow vascular malformations that most commonly occurs in the head and neck. They are present at birth but are usually clinically asymptomatic until later in life. The pathogenesis of AVMs remains unclear and therapeutic approaches to AVMs are unsatisfied. In order to provide a tool for studying the pathogenesis and therapies of this disease, we established and studied a xenograft animal model of human AVMs. Methods Fresh human AVMs specimens harvested from 4 patients were sectioned (5x5x5 mm) and xenografted subcutaneously in 5 immunologically naïve nude mice (Athymic Nude-Foxn1nu). Each mouse had four pieces specimens in four quadrants along the back. The grafts were observed weekly for volume, color and texture. The grafts were harvested at every 30 days intervals for histologic examination. All grafts (n?=?20) were sectioned and stained for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Comparative pathologic evaluation of the grafts and native AVMs were performed by two blinded pathologists. Immunohistochemical examination of human-specific nuclear antigen, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and Ki-67 was performed. Results Clinical characteristics and pathologic diagnosis of native human derived AVMs were confirmed. 85% (n?=?17) of AVM xenografts survived although the sizes decreased after implantation. Histological examination demonstrated numerous small and medium-size vessels and revealed structural characteristics matching the native AVMs tissue.76.5% (n?=?13) of the surviving xenografts were positive for Ki-67 and human-specific nuclear antigen suggesting survival of the human derived tissue, 52.9% (n?=?9) were positive for VEGFR-2. Conclusions This preliminary xenograft animal model suggests that AVMs can survive in the nude mouse. The presence of human-specific nuclear antigen, VEGFR-2, and Ki-67 demonstrates the stability of native tissue qualities within the xenografts. PMID:24377858

  18. Gaining translational momentum: more zebrafish models for neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Kalueff, Allan V; Echevarria, David J; Stewart, Adam Michael

    2014-12-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are rapidly becoming a popular model organism in translational neuroscience and biological psychiatry research. Here we discuss conceptual, practical and other related aspects of using zebrafish in this field ("from tank to bedside"), and critically evaluate both advantages and limitations of zebrafish models of human brain disorders. We emphasize the need to more actively develop zebrafish models for neuroscience research focusing on complex traits. PMID:24593944

  19. The zebrafish pronephros: A model to study nephron segmentation

    E-print Network

    Tank, Jennifer L.

    The zebrafish pronephros: A model to study nephron segmentation RA Wingert1 and AJ Davidson1,2 1 kidney development in zebrafish and Xenopus have recently demonstrated that the pronephric nephrons that retinoic acid signaling establishes proximodistal segment identities in the zebrafish pronephros

  20. Zebrafish as an emerging model for studying complex brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kalueff, Allan V.; Stewart, Adam Michael; Gerlai, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is rapidly becoming a popular model organism in pharmacogenetics and neuropharmacology. Both larval and adult zebrafish are currently used to increase our understanding of brain function, dysfunction, and their genetic and pharmacological modulation. Here we review the developing utility of zebrafish in the analysis of complex brain disorders (including, for example, depression, autism, psychoses, drug abuse and cognitive disorders), also covering zebrafish applications towards the goal of modeling major human neuropsychiatric and drug-induced syndromes. We argue that zebrafish models of complex brain disorders and drug-induced conditions have become a rapidly emerging critical field in translational neuropharmacology research. PMID:24412421

  1. A zebrafish model of inflammatory lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Kazuhide S.; Misa, June Pauline; Oehlers, Stefan H.; Hall, Christopher J.; Ellett, Felix; Alasmari, Sultan; Lieschke, Graham J.; Crosier, Kathryn E.; Crosier, Philip S.; Astin, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disabling chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. IBD patients have increased intestinal lymphatic vessel density and recent studies have shown that this may contribute to the resolution of IBD. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in IBD-associated lymphangiogenesis are still unclear. In this study, we established a novel inflammatory lymphangiogenesis model in zebrafish larvae involving colitogenic challenge stimulated by exposure to 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) or dextran sodium sulphate (DSS). Treatment with either TNBS or DSS resulted in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (Vegfr)-dependent lymphangiogenesis in the zebrafish intestine. Reduction of intestinal inflammation by the administration of the IBD therapeutic, 5-aminosalicylic acid, reduced intestinal lymphatic expansion. Zebrafish macrophages express vascular growth factors vegfaa, vegfc and vegfd and chemical ablation of these cells inhibits intestinal lymphatic expansion, suggesting that the recruitment of macrophages to the intestine upon colitogenic challenge is required for intestinal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. Importantly, this study highlights the potential of zebrafish as an inflammatory lymphangiogenesis model that can be used to investigate the role and mechanism of lymphangiogenesis in inflammatory diseases such as IBD. PMID:26369931

  2. The Zebrafish Information Network (ZFIN): the zebrafish model organism database

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Judy; Clements, Dave; Conlin, Tom; Edwards, Pat; Frazer, Ken; Schaper, Kevin; Segerdell, Erik; Song, Peiran; Sprunger, Brock; Westerfield, Monte

    2003-01-01

    The Zebrafish Information Network (ZFIN) is a web based community resource that serves as a centralized location for the curation and integration of zebrafish genetic, genomic and developmental data. ZFIN is publicly accessible at http://zfin.org. ZFIN provides an integrated representation of mutants, genes, genetic markers, mapping panels, publications and community contact data. Recent enhancements to ZFIN include: (i) an anatomical dictionary that provides a controlled vocabulary of anatomical terms, grouped by developmental stages, that may be used to annotate and query gene expression data; (ii) gene expression data; (iii) expanded support for genome sequence; (iv) gene annotation using the standardized vocabulary of Gene Ontology (GO) terms that can be used to elucidate relationships between gene products in zebrafish and other organisms; and (v) collaborations with other databases (NCBI, Sanger Institute and SWISS-PROT) to provide standardization and interconnections based on shared curation. PMID:12519991

  3. The Zebrafish Information Network: the zebrafish model organism database

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Judy; Bayraktaroglu, Leyla; Clements, Dave; Conlin, Tom; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Haendel, Melissa; Howe, Douglas G.; Mani, Prita; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Schaper, Kevin; Segerdell, Erik; Song, Peiran; Sprunger, Brock; Taylor, Sierra; Van Slyke, Ceri E.; Westerfield, Monte

    2006-01-01

    The Zebrafish Information Network (ZFIN; ) is a web based community resource that implements the curation of zebrafish genetic, genomic and developmental data. ZFIN provides an integrated representation of mutants, genes, genetic markers, mapping panels, publications and community resources such as meeting announcements and contact information. Recent enhancements to ZFIN include (i) comprehensive curation of gene expression data from the literature and from directly submitted data, (ii) increased support and annotation of the genome sequence, (iii) expanded use of ontologies to support curation and query forms, (iv) curation of morpholino data from the literature, and (v) increased versatility of gene pages, with new data types, links and analysis tools. PMID:16381936

  4. The Zebrafish Information Network: the zebrafish model organism database provides expanded support for genotypes and phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Judy; Bayraktaroglu, Leyla; Bradford, Yvonne; Conlin, Tom; Dunn, Nathan; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Haendel, Melissa; Howe, Douglas G.; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Moxon, Sierra A.T.; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Schaper, Kevin; Segerdell, Erik; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Song, Peiran; Sprunger, Brock; Van Slyke, Ceri E.; Westerfield, Monte

    2008-01-01

    The Zebrafish Information Network (ZFIN, http://zfin.org), the model organism database for zebrafish, provides the central location for curated zebrafish genetic, genomic and developmental data. Extensive data integration of mutant phenotypes, genes, expression patterns, sequences, genetic markers, morpholinos, map positions, publications and community resources facilitates the use of the zebrafish as a model for studying gene function, development, behavior and disease. Access to ZFIN data is provided via web-based query forms and through bulk data files. ZFIN is the definitive source for zebrafish gene and allele nomenclature, the zebrafish anatomical ontology (AO) and for zebrafish gene ontology (GO) annotations. ZFIN plays an active role in the development of cross-species ontologies such as the phenotypic quality ontology (PATO) and the gene ontology (GO). Recent enhancements to ZFIN include (i) a new home page and navigation bar, (ii) expanded support for genotypes and phenotypes, (iii) comprehensive phenotype annotations based on anatomical, phenotypic quality and gene ontologies, (iv) a BLAST server tightly integrated with the ZFIN database via ZFIN-specific datasets, (v) a global site search and (vi) help with hands-on resources. PMID:17991680

  5. Using the Zebrafish Model to Study T Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Wiest, David L

    2016-01-01

    While zebrafish have for some time been regarded as a powerful model organism with which to study early events in hematopoiesis, recent evidence suggests that it also ideal for unraveling the molecular requirements for T cell development in the thymus. Like mammals, zebrafish possess an adaptive immune system, comprising B lymphocytes as well as both the ?? and ?? lineages of T cells, which develop in the thymus. Moreover, the molecular processes underlying T cell development in zebrafish appear to be remarkably conserved. Thus, findings in the zebrafish model will be of high relevance to the equivalent processes in mammals. Finally, molecular processes can be interrogated in zebrafish far more rapidly than is possible in mammals because the zebrafish possesses many unique advantages. These unique attributes, and the methods by which they can be exploited to investigate the role of novel genes in T cell development, are described here. PMID:26294415

  6. Modeling anxiety using adult zebrafish: A conceptual review

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Kyzar, Evan; Green, Jeremy; Roth, Andrew; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are rapidly emerging as a useful animal model in neurobehavioral research. Mounting evidence shows the suitability of zebrafish to model various aspects of anxiety-related states. Here, we evaluate established and novel approaches to uncover the molecular substrates, genetic pathways and neural circuits of anxiety using adult zebrafish. Experimental approaches to modeling anxiety in zebrafish include novelty-based paradigms, pharmacological and genetic manipulations, as well as innovative video-tracking, 3D-reconstructions and bioinformatics-based searchable databases and omics-based tools. Complementing traditional rodent models of anxiety, we provide a conceptual framework for the wider application of zebrafish and other aquatic models in anxiety research. PMID:21843537

  7. A bioenergetic model for zebrafish Danio rerio (Hamilton)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, C.J.; Sharma, Bibek; Pope, K.L.; Patino, R.

    2008-01-01

    A bioenergetics model was developed from observed consumption, respiration and growth rates for zebrafish Danio rerio across a range (18-32?? C) of water temperatures, and evaluated with a 50 day laboratory trial at 28?? C. No significant bias in variable estimates was found during the validation trial; namely, predicted zebrafish mass generally agreed with observed mass. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  8. Zebrafish models for translational neuroscience research: from tank to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Braubach, Oliver; Spitsbergen, Jan; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is emerging as a new important species for studying mechanisms of brain function and dysfunction. Focusing on selected central nervous system (CNS) disorders (brain cancer, epilepsy, and anxiety) and using them as examples, we discuss the value of zebrafish models in translational neuroscience. We further evaluate the contribution of zebrafish to neuroimaging, circuit level, and drug discovery research. Outlining the role of zebrafish in modeling a wide range of human brain disorders, we also summarize recent applications and existing challenges in this field. Finally, we emphasize the potential of zebrafish models in behavioral phenomics and high-throughput genetic/small molecule screening, which is critical for CNS drug discovery and identifying novel candidate genes. PMID:24726051

  9. Sonodynamic therapy inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model

    E-print Network

    Cao, Wenwu

    Sonodynamic therapy inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model Zhongxiuzi proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube forma- tion. Furthermore, in a tumor xenograft mouse model, SDT was obtained from BD Biosci- ences. Rabbit anti-CD31 and mouse anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF

  10. Zebrafish: an animal model for research in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Nowik, N; Podlasz, P; Jakimiuk, A; Kasica, N; Sienkiewicz, W; Kaleczyc, J

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become known as an excellent model organism for studies of vertebrate biology, vertebrate genetics, embryonal development, diseases and drug screening. Nevertheless, there is still lack of detailed reports about usage of the zebrafish as a model in veterinary medicine. Comparing to other vertebrates, they can lay hundreds of eggs at weekly intervals, externally fertilized zebrafish embryos are accessible to observation and manipulation at all stages of their development, which makes possible to simplify the research techniques such as fate mapping, fluorescent tracer time-lapse lineage analysis and single cell transplantation. Although zebrafish are only 2.5 cm long, they are easy to maintain. Intraperitoneal and intracerebroventricular injections, blood sampling and measurement of food intake are possible to be carry out in adult zebrafish. Danio rerio is a useful animal model for neurobiology, developmental biology, drug research, virology, microbiology and genetics. A lot of diseases, for which the zebrafish is a perfect model organism, affect aquatic animals. For a part of them, like those caused by Mycobacterium marinum or Pseudoloma neutrophila, Danio rerio is a natural host, but the zebrafish is also susceptible to the most of fish diseases including Itch, Spring viraemia of carp and Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis. The zebrafish is commonly used in research of bacterial virulence. The zebrafish embryo allows for rapid, non-invasive and real time analysis of bacterial infections in a vertebrate host. Plenty of common pathogens can be examined using zebrafish model: Streptococcus iniae, Vibrio anguillarum or Listeria monocytogenes. The steps are taken to use the zebrafish also in fungal research, especially that dealing with Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Although, the zebrafish is used commonly as an animal model to study diseases caused by external agents, it is also useful in studies of metabolic disorders including fatty liver disease and diabetes. The zebrafish is also a valuable tool as a model in behavioral studies connected with feeding, predator evasion, habituation and memory or lateralized control of behavior. The aim of the present article is to familiarize the reader with the possibilities of Danio rerio as an experimental model for veterinary medicine. PMID:26618602

  11. Adult Zebrafish model of streptococcal infection

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Hilary A.; Runft, Donna L.

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcal pathogens cause a wide array of clinical syndromes in humans, including invasive systemic infections resulting in high mortality rates. Many of these pathogens are human specific, and therefore difficult to analyze in vivo using typical animal models, as these models rarely replicate what is observed in human infections. This unit describes the use of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an animal model for streptococcal infection to analyze multiple disease states. This model closely mimics the necrotizing fasciitis/myositis pathology observed in humans from a Streptococcus pyogenes infection. The use of a zoonotic pathogen, Streptococcus iniae, which replicates systemic infections caused by many streptococcal pathogens, including dissemination to the brain, is also described. Included protocols describe both intraperitoneal and intramuscular infections, as well as methods for histological and quantitative measurements of infection. PMID:19412913

  12. Teratogenic Potential of Antiepileptic Drugs in the Zebrafish Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Hak; Kang, Jung Won; Lin, Tao; Lee, Jae Eun; Jin, Dong Il

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish model is an attractive candidate for screening of developmental toxicity during early drug development. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) arouse concern for the risk of teratogenicity, but the data are limited. In this study, we evaluated the teratogenic potential of seven AEDs (carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETX), valproic acid (VPN), lamotrigine (LMT), lacosamide (LCM), levetiracetam (LVT), and topiramate (TPM)) in the zebrafish model. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to AEDs from initiation of gastrula (5.25 hours post-fertilization (hpf)) to termination of hatching (72?hpf) which mimic the mammalian teratogenic experimental design. The lethality and teratogenic index (TI) of AEDs were determined and the TI values of each drug were compared with the US FDA human pregnancy categories. Zebrafish model was useful screening model for teratogenic potential of antiepilepsy drugs and was in concordance with in vivo mammalian data and human clinical data. PMID:24324971

  13. Think Small: Zebrafish as a Model System of Human Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, J. R.; Jobin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Although human pathologies have mostly been modeled using higher mammal systems such as mice, the lower vertebrate zebrafish has gained tremendous attention as a model system. The advantages of zebrafish over classical vertebrate models are multifactorial and include high genetic and organ system homology to humans, high fecundity, external fertilization, ease of genetic manipulation, and transparency through early adulthood that enables powerful imaging modalities. This paper focuses on four areas of human pathology that were developed and/or advanced significantly in zebrafish in the last decade. These areas are (1) wound healing/restitution, (2) gastrointestinal diseases, (3) microbe-host interactions, and (4) genetic diseases and drug screens. Important biological processes and pathologies explored include wound-healing responses, pancreatic cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and mycobacterium infection. The utility of zebrafish in screening for novel genes important in various pathologies such as polycystic kidney disease is also discussed. PMID:22701308

  14. Think small: zebrafish as a model system of human pathology.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J R; Jobin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Although human pathologies have mostly been modeled using higher mammal systems such as mice, the lower vertebrate zebrafish has gained tremendous attention as a model system. The advantages of zebrafish over classical vertebrate models are multifactorial and include high genetic and organ system homology to humans, high fecundity, external fertilization, ease of genetic manipulation, and transparency through early adulthood that enables powerful imaging modalities. This paper focuses on four areas of human pathology that were developed and/or advanced significantly in zebrafish in the last decade. These areas are (1) wound healing/restitution, (2) gastrointestinal diseases, (3) microbe-host interactions, and (4) genetic diseases and drug screens. Important biological processes and pathologies explored include wound-healing responses, pancreatic cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and mycobacterium infection. The utility of zebrafish in screening for novel genes important in various pathologies such as polycystic kidney disease is also discussed. PMID:22701308

  15. The zebrafish as a model for complex tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gemberling, Matthew; Bailey, Travis J.; Hyde, David R.; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    For centuries, philosophers and scientists have been fascinated by the principles and implications of regeneration in lower vertebrate species. Two features have made zebrafish an informative model system for determining mechanisms of regenerative events. First, they are highly regenerative, able to regrow amputated fins, as well as a lesioned brain, retina, spinal cord, heart, and other tissues. Second, they are amenable to both forward and reverse genetic approaches, with a research toolset regularly updated by an expanding community of zebrafish researchers. Zebrafish studies have helped identify new mechanistic underpinnings of regeneration in multiple tissues, and in some cases have served as a guide for contemplating regenerative strategies in mammals. Here, we review the recent history of zebrafish as a genetic model system for understanding how and why tissue regeneration occurs. PMID:23927865

  16. The emerging use of zebrafish to model metabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Asha; Stemple, Derek L.; Barroso, Inês

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish research community is celebrating! The zebrafish genome has recently been sequenced, the Zebrafish Mutation Project (launched by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) has published the results of its first large-scale ethylnitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen, and a host of new techniques, such as the genome editing technologies TALEN and CRISPR-Cas, are enabling specific mutations to be created in model organisms and investigated in vivo. The zebrafish truly seems to be coming of age. These powerful resources invoke the question of whether zebrafish can be increasingly used to model human disease, particularly common, chronic diseases of metabolism such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In recent years, there has been considerable success, mainly from genomic approaches, in identifying genetic variants that are associated with these conditions in humans; however, mechanistic insights into the role of implicated disease loci are lacking. In this Review, we highlight some of the advantages and disadvantages of zebrafish to address the organism’s utility as a model system for human metabolic diseases. PMID:24046387

  17. Zebrafish as a model for the study of human cancer.

    PubMed

    Etchin, Julia; Kanki, John P; Look, A Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish provide an exciting animal model system for the study of human cancers. During the last few years many zebrafish models of cancer have been generated that recapitulate human hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Concurrent technological advances have significantly improved the genetic tractability and unique advantage of in vivo imaging in zebrafish, providing a means to dissect the molecular pathways underlying tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. Comparisons of cancer-associated gene expression profiles have demonstrated a high degree of similarity in the gene signatures of specific types of tumor cells in fish and humans, indicating that the contributing genetic pathways leading to cancer are evolutionarily conserved. Furthermore, the high fecundity, optical clarity and small embryo size of zebrafish continue to make it particularly amenable to performing whole-organism small molecule screens to identify targets for therapeutic development. This chapter reviews a wide array of these zebrafish cancer models and illustrates the advantages of the zebrafish system for exploring the molecular mechanisms governing cancer-related cellular processes. PMID:21951536

  18. ZFIN: enhancements and updates to the zebrafish model organism database

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Yvonne; Conlin, Tom; Dunn, Nathan; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G.; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A. T.; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruef, Barbara J.; Ruzicka, Leyla; Bauer Schaper, Holle; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Sprague, Judy; Sprunger, Brock; Van Slyke, Ceri; Westerfield, Monte

    2011-01-01

    ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database, http://zfin.org, serves as the central repository and web-based resource for zebrafish genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN manually curates comprehensive data for zebrafish genes, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expression, antibodies, anatomical structures and publications. A wide-ranging collection of web-based search forms and tools facilitates access to integrated views of these data promoting analysis and scientific discovery. Data represented in ZFIN are derived from three primary sources: curation of zebrafish publications, individual research laboratories and collaborations with bioinformatics organizations. Data formats include text, images and graphical representations. ZFIN is a dynamic resource with data added daily as part of our ongoing curation process. Software updates are frequent. Here, we describe recent additions to ZFIN including (i) enhanced access to images, (ii) genomic features, (iii) genome browser, (iv) transcripts, (v) antibodies and (vi) a community wiki for protocols and antibodies. PMID:21036866

  19. ZFIN: enhancements and updates to the Zebrafish Model Organism Database.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Yvonne; Conlin, Tom; Dunn, Nathan; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A T; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruef, Barbara J; Ruzicka, Leyla; Bauer Schaper, Holle; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Sprague, Judy; Sprunger, Brock; Van Slyke, Ceri; Westerfield, Monte

    2011-01-01

    ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database, http://zfin.org, serves as the central repository and web-based resource for zebrafish genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN manually curates comprehensive data for zebrafish genes, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expression, antibodies, anatomical structures and publications. A wide-ranging collection of web-based search forms and tools facilitates access to integrated views of these data promoting analysis and scientific discovery. Data represented in ZFIN are derived from three primary sources: curation of zebrafish publications, individual research laboratories and collaborations with bioinformatics organizations. Data formats include text, images and graphical representations. ZFIN is a dynamic resource with data added daily as part of our ongoing curation process. Software updates are frequent. Here, we describe recent additions to ZFIN including (i) enhanced access to images, (ii) genomic features, (iii) genome browser, (iv) transcripts, (v) antibodies and (vi) a community wiki for protocols and antibodies. PMID:21036866

  20. ZFIN, The zebrafish model organism database: Updates and new directions.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Leyla; Bradford, Yvonne M; Frazer, Ken; Howe, Douglas G; Paddock, Holly; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri E; Eagle, Anne E; Fashena, David; Kalita, Patrick; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A T; Pich, Christian; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Westerfield, Monte

    2015-08-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for genetic and genomic data from zebrafish (Danio rerio) research. ZFIN staff curate detailed information about genes, mutants, genotypes, reporter lines, sequences, constructs, antibodies, knockdown reagents, expression patterns, phenotypes, gene product function, and orthology from publications. Researchers can submit mutant, transgenic, expression, and phenotype data directly to ZFIN and use the ZFIN Community Wiki to share antibody and protocol information. Data can be accessed through topic-specific searches, a new site-wide search, and the data-mining resource ZebrafishMine (http://zebrafishmine.org). Data download and web service options are also available. ZFIN collaborates with major bioinformatics organizations to verify and integrate genomic sequence data, provide nomenclature support, establish reciprocal links, and participate in the development of standardized structured vocabularies (ontologies) used for data annotation and searching. ZFIN-curated gene, function, expression, and phenotype data are available for comparative exploration at several multi-species resources. The use of zebrafish as a model for human disease is increasing. ZFIN is supporting this growing area with three major projects: adding easy access to computed orthology data from gene pages, curating details of the gene expression pattern changes in mutant fish, and curating zebrafish models of human diseases. PMID:26097180

  1. Zebrafish in Context: Uses of a Laboratory Model in Comparative Studies

    E-print Network

    Metscher, Brian

    REVIEW Zebrafish in Context: Uses of a Laboratory Model in Comparative Studies Brian D. Metscher upon which we rely so heavily. In vertebrate biology the zebrafish Danio rerio has become models. We describe here the phylogenetic placement of zebrafish within the vertebrate world and discuss

  2. Aquatic blues: modeling depression and antidepressant action in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michael; Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2014-12-01

    Depression is a serious psychiatric condition affecting millions of patients worldwide. Unipolar depression is characterized by low mood, anhedonia, social withdrawal and other severely debilitating psychiatric symptoms. Bipolar disorder manifests in alternating depressed mood and 'hyperactive' manic/hypomanic states. Animal experimental models are an invaluable tool for research into the pathogenesis of bipolar/unipolar depression, and for the development of potential treatments. Due to their high throughput value, genetic tractability, low cost and quick reproductive cycle, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a promising new model species for studying brain disorders. Here, we discuss the developing utility of zebrafish for studying depression disorders, and outline future areas of research in this field. We argue that zebrafish represent a useful model organism for studying depression and its behavioral, genetic and physiological mechanisms, as well as for anti-depressant drug discovery. PMID:24657522

  3. Zebrafish: A Model for the Study of Addiction Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Klee, Eric W; Schneider, Henning; Clark, Karl; Cousin, Margot; Ebbert, Jon; Hooten, Michael; Karpyak, Victor; Warner, David; Ekker, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse and dependence are multifaceted disorders with complex genetic underpinnings. Identifying specific genetic correlates is challenging and may be more readily accomplished by defining endophenotypes specific for addictive disorders. Symptoms and syndromes, including acute drug response, consumption, preference, and withdrawal, are potential endophenotypes characterizing addiction that have been investigated using model organisms. We present a review of major genes involved in serotonergic, dopaminergic, GABAergic, and adrenoreceptor signaling that are considered to be directly involved in nicotine, opioid, cannabinoid, and ethanol use and dependence. The zebrafish genome encodes likely homologs of the vast majority of these loci. We also review the known expression patterns of these genes in zebrafish. The information presented in this review provides support for the use of zebrafish as a viable model for studying genetic factors related to drug addiction. Expansion of investigations into drug response using model organisms holds the potential to advance our understanding of drug response and addiction in humans. PMID:22207143

  4. Distinct phenotypes in zebrafish models of human startle disease?

    PubMed Central

    Ganser, Lisa R.; Yan, Qing; James, Victoria M.; Kozol, Robert; Topf, Maya; Harvey, Robert J.; Dallman, Julia E.

    2013-01-01

    Startle disease is an inherited neurological disorder that causes affected individuals to suffer noise- or touch-induced non-epileptic seizures, excessive muscle stiffness and neonatal apnea episodes. Mutations known to cause startle disease have been identified in glycine receptor subunit (GLRA1 and GLRB) and glycine transporter (SLC6A5) genes, which serve essential functions at glycinergic synapses. Despite the significant successes in identifying startle disease mutations, many idiopathic cases remain unresolved. Exome sequencing in these individuals will identify new candidate genes. To validate these candidate disease genes, zebrafish is an ideal choice due to rapid knockdown strategies, accessible embryonic stages, and stereotyped behaviors. The only existing zebrafish model of startle disease, bandoneon (beo), harbors point mutations in glrbb (one of two zebrafish orthologs of human GLRB) that cause compromised glycinergic transmission and touch-induced bilateral muscle contractions. In order to further develop zebrafish as a model for startle disease, we sought to identify common phenotypic outcomes of knocking down zebrafish orthologs of two known startle disease genes, GLRA1 and GLRB, using splice site-targeted morpholinos. Although both morphants were expected to result in phenotypes similar to the zebrafish beo mutant, our direct comparison demonstrated that while both glra1 and glrbb morphants exhibited embryonic spasticity, only glrbb morphants exhibited bilateral contractions characteristic of beo mutants. Likewise, zebrafish over-expressing a dominant startle disease mutation (GlyR ?1R271Q) exhibited spasticity but not bilateral contractions. Since GlyR ?b can interact with GlyR ? subunits 2–4 in addition to GlyR ?1, loss of the GlyR ?b subunit may produce more severe phenotypes by affecting multiple GlyR subtypes. Indeed, immunohistochemistry of glra1 morphants suggests that in zebrafish, alternate GlyR ? subunits can compensate for the loss of the GlyR ?1 subunit. To address the potential for interplay among GlyR subunits during development, we quantified the expression time-course for genes known to be critical to glycinergic synapse function. We found that GlyR ?2, ?3 and ?4a are expressed in the correct temporal pattern and could compensate for the loss of the GlyR ?1 subunit. Based on our findings, future studies that aim to model candidate startle disease genes in zebrafish should include measures of spasticity and synaptic development. PMID:24029548

  5. Establishment and characterization of a canine xenograft model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camacho, L; Peña, L; González Gil, A; Cáceres, S; Díez, L; Illera, J C

    2013-12-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) and human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) are the most aggressive form of mammary/breast cancer. Both species naturally develop it, sharing epidemiological, clinical and histological characteristics. Thus, IMC has been suggested as a model to study the human disease. We have developed the first IMC xenograft model in SCID mice. Xenografts reproduced the histological features from the primary tumor, were highly aggressive and showed dermal tumor emboli, distinctive hallmarks of IMC/IBC. This model was hormone receptors positive and HER2 negative. Our findings showed that estrogens and androgens are locally produced in tissues. Factors related to tumor vascularization showed positive expression and xenografts with the highest expression of all analyzed vascular factors had the highest rate of tumor proliferation. The role of steroid hormones and the angio/lymphangiogenic properties found in this model, provide additional knowledge for future interventions in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the disease. PMID:23972378

  6. montalcino, A zebrafish model for variegate porphyria Kimberly A. Dooleya,*, Paula G. Fraenkela,y

    E-print Network

    Tank, Jennifer L.

    montalcino, A zebrafish model for variegate porphyria Kimberly A. Dooleya,*, Paula G. Fraenkela screen for hematopoietic mutants, we isolated a zebrafish mutant, montalcino (mno), which displays hy and characterize the phenotype of the zebrafish mutant. Materials and Methods. Genetic linkage analysis

  7. Mutant and Transgenic Zebrafish in Modeling eurobehavioral Disorders Carisa L. Bergner1

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Mutant and Transgenic Zebrafish in Modeling eurobehavioral Disorders Carisa L. Bergner1 , Rupert J, USA Tel: (240) 899-9571 Email: avkalueff@gmail.com #12;Abstract Zebrafish have traditionally been used of zebrafish in biomedical research has been further expanded with the implementation of new genetic techniques

  8. Zebrafish Heart Regeneration as a Model for Cardiac Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Major, Robert J.; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2008-01-01

    Heart disease remains the leading cause of mortality throughout the world. Mammals have an extremely limited capacity to repair lost or damaged heart tissue, thus encouraging biologists to seek out models for heart regeneration. Zebrafish exhibit a robust regenerative capacity in a variety of tissues including the fin, spinal cord, retina, and heart, making it the sole regenerative vertebrate organism currently amenable to genetic manipulation. Future studies will utilize functional approaches to tease apart zebrafish heart regeneration in hopes of unlocking our own regenerative potential. PMID:19081827

  9. Zebrafish Egg Infection Model for Studying Candida albicans Adhesion Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yin-Zhi; Yang, Yun-Liang; Chu, Wen-Li; You, May-Su; Lo, Hsiu-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated candidiasis is associated with 30–40% mortality in severely immunocompromised patients. Among the causal agents, Candida albicans is the dominant one. Various animal models have been developed for investigating gene functions in C. albicans. Zebrafish injection models have increasingly been applied in elucidating C. albicans pathogenesis because of the conserved immunity, prolific fecundity of the zebrafish and the low costs of care systems. In this study, we established a simple, noninvasive zebrafish egg bath infection model, defined its optimal conditions, and evaluated the model with various C. albicans mutant strains. The deletion of SAP6 did not have significant effect on the virulence. By contrast, the deletion of BCR1, CPH1, EFG1, or TEC1 significantly reduced the virulence under current conditions. Furthermore, all embryos survived when co-incubated with bcr1/bcr1, cph1/cph1 efg1/efg1, efg1/efg1, or tec1/tec1 mutant cells. The results indicated that our novel zebrafish model is time-saving and cost effective. PMID:26569623

  10. Developing an Experimental Model of Vascular Toxicity in Embryonic Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing an Experimental Model of Vascular Toxicity in Embryonic Zebrafish Tamara Tal, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, U.S. EPA Background: There are tens of thousands of chemicals that have yet to be fully evaluated for their toxicity by validated in vivo testing ...

  11. The zebrafish as a model to study polycystic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tietz Bogert, Pamela S; Huang, Bing Q; Gradilone, Sergio A; Masyuk, Tetyana V; Moulder, Gary L; Ekker, Stephen C; Larusso, Nicholas F

    2013-06-01

    In the polycystic liver diseases (PLD), genetic defects initiate the formation of cysts in the liver and kidney. In rodent models of PLD (i.e., the PCK rat and Pkd2(WS25/-) mouse), we have studied hepatorenal cystic disease and therapeutic approaches. In this study, we employed zebrafish injected with morpholinos against genes involved in the PLD, including sec63, prkcsh, and pkd1a. We calculated the liver cystic area, and based on our rodent studies, we exposed the embryos to pasireotide [1??M] or vitamin K3 [100??M] and assessed the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cholangiocytes in embryos treated with 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA). Our results show that (a) morpholinos against sec63, prkcsh, and pkd1a eliminate expression of the respective proteins; (b) phenotypic body changes included curved tail and the formation of hepatic cysts in zebrafish larvae; (c) exposure of embryos to pasireotide inhibited hepatic cystogenesis in the zebrafish models; and (d) exposure of embryos to 4-PBA resulted in the ER in cholangiocytes resolving from a curved to a smooth appearance. Our results suggest that the zebrafish model of PLD may provide a means to screen drugs that could inhibit hepatic cystogenesis. PMID:23668934

  12. Modeling PTSD in the zebrafish: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Caramillo, Erika M; Khan, Kanza M; Collier, Adam D; Echevarria, David J

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder is an anxiety disorder that can develop following one or more traumatic events that threaten one's safety or make the victim feel helpless. Currently there are an increasing number of cases in the population in part due to the number of soldiers returning from combat. The disorder is characterized by symptoms that include hypervigilance, sleep disturbances, social and cognitive degradation, and memory flashbacks. Most of the research has been centered on the human and rodent as subjects but recently another viable contender has emerged - the zebrafish (Danio rerio). The zebrafish is a strong comparative model with the ability to exhibit a wide variety of behaviors, complex learning, and neurobiological changes that can be extrapolated to the human condition. The zebrafish is an ideal organism to study pharmacological treatments as well as the neurological underpinnings of the disorder. Here we review a sampling of the human and rodent model literature on post-traumatic stress disorder focusing on symptomology, current treatments, and stress paradigms. We also make the argument for the inclusion of the zebrafish model in future studies investigating the causes, symptoms, and treatments of post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:24821404

  13. A zebrafish model for subgenomic hepatitis C virus replication.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cun-Bao; Zhao, Ye; Zhang, Jing-Pu; Peng, Zong-Gen; Song, Dan-Qing; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2015-03-01

    Persistent infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major risk factor in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of HCV-associated liver disease is hampered by the absence of an appropriate small animal model. Zebrafish exhibits high genetic homology to mammals, and is easily manipulated experimentally. In this study, we describe the use of a zebrafish model for the analysis of HCV replication mechanisms. As the 5' untranslated region (UTR), the core protein, the non-structural protein 5B (NS5B) and the 3'UTR are essential for HCV replication, we constructed a HCV sub-replicon gene construct including the 4 gene sequences and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene; these genes were transcribed through the mouse hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (mHNF4) promoter. By microinjection of the subgenomic replicon vector into zebrafish larvae, the virus was easily detected by observing EGFP fluorescence in the liver. The positive core and NS5B signals showed positive expression of the HCV gene construct in zebrafish by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. Importantly, the negative strand sequence of the HCV subgenomic RNA was detected by RT-PCR and hybridization in situ, demonstrating that the HCV sub-replicon has positive replication activity. Furthermore, the hybridization signal mainly appeared in the liver region of larvae, as detected by the sense probe of the core protein or NS5B, which confirmed that the sub-replicon amplification occurred in the zebrafish liver. The amplification of the sub-replicon caused alterations in the expression of certain genes, which is similar to HCV infection in human liver cells. To verify the use of this zebrafish model in drug evaluation, two drugs against HCV used in clinical practice, ribavirin and oxymatrine, were tested and these drugs showed significant inhibition of replication of the HCV sub-replicon in the larvae. In conclusion, this zebrafish model of HCV may prove to be a novel and simple in vivo model for the study of the mechanisms of HCV replication and may also prove useful in the disovery of new anti-HCV drugs. PMID:25572289

  14. An Individual-Based Model of Zebrafish Population Dynamics Accounting for Energy Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Beaudouin, Rémy; Goussen, Benoit; Piccini, Benjamin; Augustine, Starrlight; Devillers, James; Brion, François; Péry, Alexandre R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Developing population dynamics models for zebrafish is crucial in order to extrapolate from toxicity data measured at the organism level to biological levels relevant to support and enhance ecological risk assessment. To achieve this, a dynamic energy budget for individual zebrafish (DEB model) was coupled to an individual based model of zebrafish population dynamics (IBM model). Next, we fitted the DEB model to new experimental data on zebrafish growth and reproduction thus improving existing models. We further analysed the DEB-model and DEB-IBM using a sensitivity analysis. Finally, the predictions of the DEB-IBM were compared to existing observations on natural zebrafish populations and the predicted population dynamics are realistic. While our zebrafish DEB-IBM model can still be improved by acquiring new experimental data on the most uncertain processes (e.g. survival or feeding), it can already serve to predict the impact of compounds at the population level. PMID:25938409

  15. The Developing Utility of Zebrafish Models for Cognitive Enhancers Research

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-01-01

    Whereas cognitive impairment is a common symptom in multiple brain disorders, predictive and high-throughput animal models of cognition and behavior are becoming increasingly important in the field of translational neuroscience research. In particular, reliable models of the cognitive deficits characteristic of numerous neurobehavioral disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia have become a significant focus of investigation. While rodents have traditionally been used to study cognitive phenotypes, zebrafish (Danio rerio) are gaining popularity as an excellent model to complement current translational neuroscience research. Here we discuss recent advances in pharmacological and genetic approaches using zebrafish models to study cognitive impairments and to discover novel cognitive enhancers and neuroprotective mechanisms. PMID:23449968

  16. Modelling stripe formation in zebrafish: an agent-based approach.

    PubMed

    Volkening, Alexandria; Sandstede, Björn

    2015-11-01

    Zebrafish have distinctive black stripes and yellow interstripes that form owing to the interaction of different pigment cells. We present a two-population agent-based model for the development and regeneration of these stripes and interstripes informed by recent experimental results. Our model describes stripe pattern formation, laser ablation and mutations. We find that fish growth shortens the necessary scale for long-range interactions and that iridophores, a third type of pigment cell, help align stripes and interstripes. PMID:26538560

  17. Zebrafish: a new companion for translational research in oncology.

    PubMed

    Barriuso, Jorge; Nagaraju, Raghavendar; Hurlstone, Adam

    2015-03-01

    In an era of high-throughput "omic" technologies, the unprecedented amount of data that can be generated presents a significant opportunity but simultaneously an even greater challenge for oncologists trying to provide personalized treatment. Classically, preclinical testing of new targets and identification of active compounds against those targets have entailed the extensive use of established human cell lines, as well as genetically modified mouse tumor models. Patient-derived xenografts in zebrafish may in the near future provide a platform for selecting an appropriate personalized therapy and together with zebrafish transgenic tumor models represent an alternative vehicle for drug development. The zebrafish is readily genetically modified. The transparency of zebrafish embryos and the recent development of pigment-deficient zebrafish afford researchers the valuable capacity to observe directly cancer formation and progression in a live vertebrate host. The zebrafish is amenable to transplantation assays that test the serial passage of fluorescently labeled tumor cells as well as their capacity to disseminate and/or metastasize. Progress achieved to date in genetic engineering and xenotransplantation will establish the zebrafish as one of the most versatile animal models for cancer research. A model organism that can be used in transgenesis, transplantation assays, single-cell functional assays, and in vivo imaging studies make zebrafish a natural companion for mice in translational oncology research. PMID:25573382

  18. Data-driven stochastic modelling of zebrafish locomotion.

    PubMed

    Zienkiewicz, Adam; Barton, David A W; Porfiri, Maurizio; di Bernardo, Mario

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we develop a data-driven modelling framework to reproduce the locomotion of fish in a confined environment. Specifically, we highlight the primary characteristics of the motion of individual zebrafish (Danio rerio), and study how these can be suitably encapsulated within a mathematical framework utilising a limited number of calibrated model parameters. Using data captured from individual zebrafish via automated visual tracking, we develop a model using stochastic differential equations and describe fish as a self propelled particle moving in a plane. Based on recent experimental evidence of the importance of speed regulation in social behaviour, we extend stochastic models of fish locomotion by introducing experimentally-derived processes describing dynamic speed regulation. Salient metrics are defined which are then used to calibrate key parameters of coupled stochastic differential equations, describing both speed and angular speed of swimming fish. The effects of external constraints are also included, based on experimentally observed responses. Understanding the spontaneous dynamics of zebrafish using a bottom-up, purely data-driven approach is expected to yield a modelling framework for quantitative investigation of individual behaviour in the presence of various external constraints or biological assays. PMID:25358499

  19. THE CORRELATION OF NEURAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOTYPES IN ZEBRAFISH MODELS OF STRESS

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    cortisol levels. To induce an anxiogenic response, zebrafish were subjected to a model of benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome. After chronic administration of the benzodiazepine diazepam, drug treatment was halted

  20. Human skeletal muscle xenograft as a new preclinical model for muscle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanfan; King, Oliver D.; Rahimov, Fedik; Jones, Takako I.; Ward, Christopher W.; Kerr, Jaclyn P.; Liu, Naili; Emerson, Charles P.; Kunkel, Louis M.; Partridge, Terence A.; Wagner, Kathryn R.

    2014-01-01

    Development of novel therapeutics requires good animal models of disease. Disorders for which good animal models do not exist have very few drugs in development or clinical trial. Even where there are accepted, albeit imperfect models, the leap from promising preclinical drug results to positive clinical trials commonly fails, including in disorders of skeletal muscle. The main alternative model for early drug development, tissue culture, lacks both the architecture and, usually, the metabolic fidelity of the normal tissue in vivo. Herein, we demonstrate the feasibility and validity of human to mouse xenografts as a preclinical model of myopathy. Human skeletal muscle biopsies transplanted into the anterior tibial compartment of the hindlimbs of NOD-Rag1null IL2r?null immunodeficient host mice regenerate new vascularized and innervated myofibers from human myogenic precursor cells. The grafts exhibit contractile and calcium release behavior, characteristic of functional muscle tissue. The validity of the human graft as a model of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is demonstrated in disease biomarker studies, showing that gene expression profiles of xenografts mirror those of the fresh donor biopsies. These findings illustrate the value of a new experimental model of muscle disease, the human muscle xenograft in mice, as a feasible and valid preclinical tool to better investigate the pathogenesis of human genetic myopathies and to more accurately predict their response to novel therapeutics. PMID:24452336

  1. A Zebrafish Model for Studies on Esophageal Epithelial Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Beasley, Andrea; Hu, Yuhui; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian esophagus exhibits a remarkable change in epithelial structure during the transition from embryo to adult. However, the molecular mechanisms of esophageal epithelial development are not well understood. Zebrafish (Danio rerio), a common model organism for vertebrate development and gene function, has not previously been characterized as a model system for esophageal epithelial development. In this study, we characterized a piece of non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium similar to human esophageal epithelium in the upper digestive tract of developing zebrafish. Under the microscope, this piece was detectable at 5dpf and became stratified at 7dpf. Expression of esophageal epithelial marker genes (Krt5, P63, Sox2 and Pax9) was detected by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Knockdown of P63, a gene known to be critical for esophageal epithelium, disrupted the development of this epithelium. With this model system, we found that Pax9 knockdown resulted in loss or disorganization of the squamous epithelium, as well as down-regulation of the differentiation markers Krt4 and Krt5. In summary, we characterized a region of stratified squamous epithelium in the zebrafish upper digestive tract which can be used for functional studies of candidate genes involved in esophageal epithelial biology. PMID:26630178

  2. Zebrafish as a new model for phenotype-based screening of positive inotropic agents.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chunlei; Xie, Desheng; Feng, Bainian

    2015-03-01

    The zebrafish-based assay is a widely used animal model system for cardiovascular research. In this study, we investigated the cardiac defects caused by terfenadine and tested the pharmacological response of digoxin to zebrafish with cardiac defects. The study suggested that zebrafish could be a suitable model for phenotype-based screening and evaluation of positive inotropic agents. This phenotype-based heart failure zebrafish model system was then utilized in in-house library screen. Some positive inotropic compound was discovered, which could attenuate the cardiac defects by increasing the flow velocity of caudal artery blood. PMID:24990095

  3. Recent findings on vertebrate developmental immunity using the zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Villegas, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    To grant survival against sterile or microbe induced inflammation, all animals rely on correct immune system functioning. The development of immunity occurs in vertebrates during embryogenesis in a process called hematopoiesis, which is characterized by the formation of blood cellular components such as embryonic erythrocytes and primitive macrophages. These cells are formed in a sterile environment from a rare subset of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) during a brief period of the primitive hematopoietic wave. Diverse signals, like Notch, are indispensable in HSC emergence and differentiation. However, to successfully replicate the process in vitro using pluripotent precursors, the full set of required signals is still a matter of debate. Among the latest findings, proinflammatory signals produced by transient primitive myelocites in zebrafish have been seen to act as essential mediators in establishing the HSC program of the adult vertebrate hematopoietic system. In this regard, the zebrafish immune model has emerged as a feasible live vertebrate model for examining developmental immunity and related host-microbe interactions, both at the molecular and cellular level. Thus, using the zebrafish embryo, this review summarizes recent findings, on the signals required for immune development and further maturation of the system, in a context where no adaptive immune response has yet been developed. PMID:26589453

  4. Zebrafish as a Natural Host Model for Vibrio cholerae Colonization and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Runft, Donna L.; Mitchell, Kristie C.; Abuaita, Basel H.; Allen, Jonathan P.; Bajer, Sarah; Ginsburg, Kevin; Neely, Melody N.

    2014-01-01

    The human diarrheal disease cholera is caused by the aquatic bacterium Vibrio cholerae. V. cholerae in the environment is associated with several varieties of aquatic life, including insect egg masses, shellfish, and vertebrate fish. Here we describe a novel animal model for V. cholerae, the zebrafish. Pandemic V. cholerae strains specifically colonize the zebrafish intestinal tract after exposure in water with no manipulation of the animal required. Colonization occurs in close contact with the intestinal epithelium and mimics colonization observed in mammals. Zebrafish that are colonized by V. cholerae transmit the bacteria to naive fish, which then become colonized. Striking differences in colonization between V. cholerae classical and El Tor biotypes were apparent. The zebrafish natural habitat in Asia heavily overlaps areas where cholera is endemic, suggesting that zebrafish and V. cholerae evolved in close contact with each other. Thus, the zebrafish provides a natural host model for the study of V. cholerae colonization, transmission, and environmental survival. PMID:24375135

  5. Generation and Characterisation of Novel Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Xenograft Models and Corresponding Primary Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wennerström, Anna B.; Lothe, Inger Marie Bowitz; Sandhu, Vandana; Kure, Elin H.; Myklebost, Ola; Munthe, Else

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most lethal cancer types, currently lacking efficient treatment. The heterogeneous nature of these tumours are poorly represented by the classical pancreatic cell lines, which have been through strong clonal selection in vitro, and are often derived from metastases. Here, we describe the establishment of novel pancreatic adenocarcinoma models, xenografts and corresponding in vitro cell lines, from primary pancreatic tumours. The morphology, differentiation grade and gene expression pattern of the xenografts resemble the original tumours well. The cell lines were analysed for colony forming capacity, tumourigenicity and expression of known cancer cell surface markers and cancer stem-like characteristics. These primary cell models will be valuable tools for biological and preclinical studies for this devastating disease. PMID:25148029

  6. Zebrafish as model organisms for studying drug-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Vliegenthart, A D Bastiaan; Tucker, Carl S; Del Pozo, Jorge; Dear, James W

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major challenge in clinical medicine and drug development. New models are needed for predicting which potential therapeutic compounds will cause DILI in humans, and new markers and mediators of DILI still need to be identified. This review highlights the strengths and weaknesses of using zebrafish as a high-throughput in vivo model for studying DILI. Although the zebrafish liver architecture is different from that of the mammalian liver, the main physiological processes remain similar. Zebrafish metabolize drugs using similar pathways to those in humans; they possess a wide range of cytochrome P450 enzymes that enable metabolic reactions including hydroxylation, conjugation, oxidation, demethylation and de-ethylation. Following exposure to a range of hepatotoxic drugs, the zebrafish liver develops histological patterns of injury comparable to those of mammalian liver, and biomarkers for liver injury can be quantified in the zebrafish circulation. The zebrafish immune system is similar to that of mammals, but the zebrafish inflammatory response to DILI is not yet defined. In order to quantify DILI in zebrafish, a wide variety of methods can be used, including visual assessment, quantification of serum enzymes and experimental serum biomarkers and scoring of histopathology. With further development, the zebrafish may be a model that complements rodents and may have value for the discovery of new disease pathways and translational biomarkers. PMID:24773296

  7. A two-scale model for correlation between B cell VDJ usage in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals for study of immunology. The dynamics of the adaptive immune system in zebrafish is similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a two-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in primary and secondary immune reactions in zebrafish and to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in distinct zebrafish. The first scale of the model consists of a generalized NK model to simulate the B cell maturation process in the 10-day primary immune response. The second scale uses a delay ordinary differential equation system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of zebrafish. The generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen mostly possess a single VDJ recombination. The probability that mature B cells in two zebrafish have the same VDJ recombination increases with the B cell population size or the B cell selection intensity and decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The ODE model shows a distribution of correlation in the VDJ usage of the B cell repertoires in two six-month-old zebrafish that is highly similar to that from experiment. This work presents a simple theory to explain the experimentally observed correlation in VDJ usage of distinct zebrafish B cell repertoires after an immune response.

  8. Patient Derived Xenograft Models: An Emerging Platform for Translational Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Manuel; Amant, Frederic; Biankin, Andrew V.; Budinská, Eva; Byrne, Annette T.; Caldas, Carlos; Clarke, Robert B.; de Jong, Steven; Jonkers, Jos; Mælandsmo, Gunhild Mari; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Seoane, Joan; Trusolino, Livio; Villanueva, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the development and characterization of patient derived tumor xenograft (PDX) models for cancer research. PDX models mostly retain the principal histological and genetic characteristics of their donor tumor and remain stable across passages. These models have been shown to be predictive of clinical outcomes and are being used for preclinical drug evaluation, biomarker identification, biological studies, and personalized medicine strategies. This paper summarizes the current state of the art in this field including methodological issues, available collections, practical applications, challenges and shortcoming, and future directions, and introduces a European consortium of PDX models. PMID:25185190

  9. The progress and promise of zebrafish as a model to study mast cells.

    PubMed

    Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Berman, Jason N

    2014-09-01

    Immunological and hematological research using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has significantly advanced our understanding of blood lineage ontology, cellular functions and mechanisms, and provided opportunities for disease modeling. Mast cells are an immunological cell type involved in innate and adaptive immune systems, hypersensitivity reactions and cancer progression. The application of zebrafish to study mast cell biology exploits the developmental and imaging opportunities inherent in this model system to enable detailed genetic and molecular studies of this lineage outside of traditional mammalian models. In this review, we first place the importance of mast cell research in zebrafish into the context of comparative studies of mast cells in other fish species and highlight its advantages due to superior experimental tractability and direct visualization in transparent embryos. We discuss current and future tools for mast cell research in zebrafish and the notable results of using zebrafish for understanding mast cell fate determination and our development of a systemic mastocytosis model. PMID:24508982

  10. Beyond the zebrafish: diverse fish species for modeling human disease

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, zebrafish, and to a lesser extent medaka, have become widely used small animal models for human diseases. These organisms have convincingly demonstrated the usefulness of fish for improving our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to pathological conditions, and for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Despite the usefulness of zebrafish and medaka in the investigation of a wide spectrum of traits, there is evidence to suggest that other fish species could be better suited for more targeted questions. With the emergence of new, improved sequencing technologies that enable genomic resources to be generated with increasing efficiency and speed, the potential of non-mainstream fish species as disease models can now be explored. A key feature of these fish species is that the pathological condition that they model is often related to specific evolutionary adaptations. By exploring these adaptations, new disease-causing and disease-modifier genes might be identified; thus, diverse fish species could be exploited to better understand the complexity of disease processes. In addition, non-mainstream fish models could allow us to study the impact of environmental factors, as well as genetic variation, on complex disease phenotypes. This Review will discuss the opportunities that such fish models offer for current and future biomedical research. PMID:24271780

  11. Zebrafish models of cardiovascular diseases and their applications in herbal medicine research.

    PubMed

    Seto, Sai-Wang; Kiat, Hosen; Lee, Simon M Y; Bensoussan, Alan; Sun, Yu-Ting; Hoi, Maggie P M; Chang, Dennis

    2015-12-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has recently become a powerful animal model for cardiovascular research and drug discovery due to its ease of maintenance, genetic manipulability and ability for high-throughput screening. Recent advances in imaging techniques and generation of transgenic zebrafish have greatly facilitated in vivo analysis of cellular events of cardiovascular development and pathogenesis. More importantly, recent studies have demonstrated the functional similarity of drug metabolism systems between zebrafish and humans, highlighting the clinical relevance of employing zebrafish in identifying lead compounds in Chinese herbal medicine with potential beneficial cardiovascular effects. This paper seeks to summarise the scope of zebrafish models employed in cardiovascular studies and the application of these research models in Chinese herbal medicine to date. PMID:26494630

  12. A multi-scale model for correlation in B cell VDJ usage of zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-10-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals used for the study of immunology because the dynamics in the adaptive immune system of zebrafish are similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a multi-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in the primary and secondary immune responses of zebrafish. We use this model to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in individual zebrafish. We use a delay ordinary differential equation (ODE) system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of a zebrafish. This mean field theory gives the number of high-affinity B cells as a function of time during an infection. The sequences of those B cells are then taken from a distribution calculated by a 'microscopic' random energy model. This generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen largely possess a single VDJ recombination. The model allows first-principle calculation of the probability, p, that two zebrafish responding to the same antigen will select the same VDJ recombination. This probability p increases with the B cell population size and the B cell selection intensity. The probability p decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The multi-scale model predicts correlations in the immune system of the zebrafish that are highly similar to that from experiment.

  13. Antiangiogenic effects of pazopanib in xenograft hepatocellular carcinoma models: evaluation by quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Antiangiogenesis is a promising therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the effects are difficult to be evaluated. Pazopanib (GW786034B) is a pan-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor, the antitumor effects or antiangiogenic effects haven't been investigated in HCC. Methods In vitro direct effects of pazopanib on human HCC cell lines and endothelial cells were evaluated. In vivo antitumor effects were evaluated in three xenograft nude mice models. In the subcutaneous HCCLM3 model, intratumoral blood perfusion was detected by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS), and serial quantitative parameters were profiled from the time-intensity curves of ultrasonograms. Results In vitro proliferation of various HCC cell lines were not inhibited by pazopanib. Pazopanib inhibited migration and invasion and induced apoptosis significantly in two HCC cell lines, HCCLM3 and PLC/PRF/5. Proliferation, migration, and tubule formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were inhibited by pazopanib in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo tumor growth was significantly inhibited by pazopanib in HCCLM3, HepG2, and PLC/PRF/5 xenograft models. Various intratumoral perfusion parameters changed over time, and the signal intensity was significantly impaired in the treated tumors before the treatment efficacy on tumor size could be observed. Mean transit time of the contrast media in hotspot areas of the tumors was reversely correlated with intratumoral microvessel density. Conclusions Antitumor effects of pazopanib in HCC xenografts may owe to its antiangiogenic effects, and the in vivo antiangiogenic effects could be evaluated by quantitative CEUS. PMID:21251271

  14. Clinical, Molecular and Genetic Validation of a Murine Orthotopic Xenograft Model of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Using Fresh Human Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Sara J.; Stelow, Edward B.; Borgman, Cheryl A.; Lowrey, Bryce T.; Xin, Wenjun; Blais, Edik M.; Lee, Jae K.; Papin, Jason A.; Parsons, J. Thomas; Bauer, Todd W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Relevant preclinical models that recapitulate the key features of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are needed in order to provide biologically tractable models to probe disease progression and therapeutic responses and ultimately improve patient outcomes for this disease. Here, we describe the establishment and clinical, pathological, molecular and genetic validation of a murine, orthotopic xenograft model of PDAC. Methods Human PDACs were resected and orthotopically implanted and propagated in immunocompromised mice. Patient survival was correlated with xenograft growth and metastatic rate in mice. Human and mouse tumor pathology were compared. Tumors were analyzed for genetic mutations, gene expression, receptor tyrosine kinase activation, and cytokine expression. Results Fifteen human PDACs were propagated orthotopically in mice. Xenograft-bearing mice developed peritoneal and liver metastases. Time to tumor growth and metastatic efficiency in mice each correlated with patient survival. Tumor architecture, nuclear grade and stromal content were similar in patient and xenografted tumors. Propagated tumors closely exhibited the genetic and molecular features known to characterize pancreatic cancer (e.g. high rate of KRAS, P53, SMAD4 mutation and EGFR activation). The correlation coefficient of gene expression between patient tumors and xenografts propagated through multiple generations was 93 to 99%. Analysis of gene expression demonstrated distinct differences between xenografts from fresh patient tumors versus commercially available PDAC cell lines. Conclusions The orthotopic xenograft model derived from fresh human PDACs closely recapitulates the clinical, pathologic, genetic and molecular aspects of human disease. This model has resulted in the identification of rational therapeutic strategies to be tested in clinical trials and will permit additional therapeutic approaches and identification of biomarkers of response to therapy. PMID:24204737

  15. Evaluation of the Retinoids with Cisplatin and Vincristine in Xenograft Models of Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Robin E.; Nguyen, Vu T.; Adamson, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Retinoids have been studied for the treatment of children with neuroblastoma for more than 25 years. Post-transplant administration of isotretinoin is standard of care for children with high-risk neuroblastoma, while fenretinide remains investigational. Previous preclinical studies have evaluated the interaction of retinoids and cytotoxic agents with conflicting results. We evaluated the schedule dependent interaction of the cytotoxics, vincristine and cisplatin, with the retinoids, isotretinoin and fenretinide, in xenograft models of neuroblastoma. Concomitant administration of isotretinoin or fenretinide with the cytotoxics did not result in any clear potentiation of cytotoxicity. PMID:23669732

  16. The Visual System of Zebrafish and its Use to Model Human Ocular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gestri, Gaia; Link, Brian A; Neuhauss, Stephan CF

    2011-01-01

    Free swimming zebrafish larvae depend mainly on their sense of vision to evade predation and to catch prey. Hence there is strong selective pressure on the fast maturation of visual function and indeed the visual system already supports a number of visually-driven behaviors in the newly hatched larvae. The ability to exploit the genetic and embryonic accessibility of the zebrafish in combination with a behavioral assessment of visual system function has made the zebrafish a popular model to study vision and its diseases. Here, we review the anatomy, physiology and development of the zebrafish eye as the basis to relate the contributions of the zebrafish to our understanding of human ocular diseases. PMID:21595048

  17. Zebrafish stripes as a model for vertebrate colour pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2015-01-19

    Colour patterns are prominent features of many animals and have important functions in communication, such as camouflage, kin recognition and mate choice. As targets for natural as well as sexual selection, they are of high evolutionary significance. The molecular mechanisms underlying colour pattern formation in vertebrates are not well understood. Progress in transgenic tools, in vivo imaging and the availability of a large collection of mutants make the zebrafish (Danio rerio) an attractive model to study vertebrate colouration. Zebrafish display golden and blue horizontal stripes that form during metamorphosis as mosaics of yellow xanthophores, silvery or blue iridophores and black melanophores in the hypodermis. Lineage tracing revealed the origin of the adult pigment cells and their individual cellular behaviours during the formation of the striped pattern. Mutant analysis indicated that interactions between all three pigment cell types are required for the formation of the pattern, and a number of cell surface molecules and signalling systems have been identified as mediators of these interactions. The understanding of the mechanisms that underlie colour pattern formation is an important step towards deciphering the genetic basis of variation in evolution. PMID:25602311

  18. Development and rescue of human familial hypercholesterolaemia in a xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Wang, Lili; Legras, Xavier; Saha, Pradip K.; Chen, Leon; Bell, Peter; Pankowicz, Francis P.; Hill, Matthew C.; Barzi, Mercedes; Leyton, Claudia Kettlun; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Kruse, Robert L.; Himes, Ryan W.; Goss, John A.; Wilson, James M.; Chan, Lawrence; Lagor, William R.; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of lipid metabolism are a major cause of human morbidity, but no animal model entirely recapitulates human lipoprotein metabolism. Here we develop a xenograft mouse model using hepatocytes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolaemia caused by loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). Like familial hypercholesterolaemia patients, our familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice develop hypercholesterolaemia and a 'humanized‘ serum profile, including expression of the emerging drug targets cholesteryl ester transfer protein and apolipoprotein (a), for which no genes exist in mice. We go on to replace the missing LDLR in familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice using an adeno-associated virus 9-based gene therapy and restore normal lipoprotein profiles after administration of a single dose. Our study marks the first time a human metabolic disease is induced in an experimental animal model by human hepatocyte transplantation and treated by gene therapy. Such xenograft platforms offer the ability to validate human experimental therapies and may foster their rapid translation into the clinic. PMID:26081744

  19. Developmental Exposure to Estrogen Alters Differentiation and Epigenetic Programming in a Human Fetal Prostate Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Saffarini, Camelia M.; McDonnell-Clark, Elizabeth V.; Amin, Ali; Huse, Susan M.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent non-cutaneous malignancy in men. There is strong evidence in rodents that neonatal estrogen exposure plays a role in the development of this disease. However, there is little information regarding the effects of estrogen in human fetal prostate tissue. This study explored early life estrogen exposure, with and without a secondary estrogen and testosterone treatment in a human fetal prostate xenograft model. Histopathological lesions, proliferation, and serum hormone levels were evaluated at 7, 30, 90, and 200-day time-points after xenografting. The expression of 40 key genes involved in prostatic glandular and stromal growth, cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, hormone receptors and tumor suppressors was evaluated using a custom PCR array. Epigenome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was performed on whole tissue, and laser capture-microdissection (LCM) isolated epithelial and stromal compartments of 200-day prostate xenografts. Combined initial plus secondary estrogenic exposures had the most severe tissue changes as revealed by the presence of hyperplastic glands at day 200. Gene expression changes corresponded with the cellular events in the KEGG prostate cancer pathway, indicating that initial plus secondary exposure to estrogen altered the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, ultimately resulting in apoptosis inhibition and an increase in cell cycle progression. DNA methylation revealed that differentially methylated CpG sites significantly predominate in the stromal compartment as a result of estrogen-treatment, thereby providing new targets for future investigation. By using human fetal prostate tissue and eliminating the need for species extrapolation, this study provides novel insights into the gene expression and epigenetic effects related to prostate carcinogenesis following early life estrogen exposure. PMID:25799167

  20. Small-sample inference for incomplete longitudinal data with truncation and censoring in tumor xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming; Fang, Hong-Bin; Tian, Guo-Liang; Houghton, Peter J

    2002-09-01

    In cancer drug development, demonstrating activity in xenograft models, where mice are grafted with human cancer cells, is an important step in bringing a promising compound to humans. A key outcome variable is the tumor volume measured in a given period of time for groups of mice given different doses of a single or combination anticancer regimen. However, a mouse may die before the end of a study or may be sacrificed when its tumor volume quadruples, and its tumor may be suppressed for some time and then grow back. Thus, incomplete repeated measurements arise. The incompleteness or missingness is also caused by drastic tumor shrinkage (<0.01 cm3) or random truncation. Because of the small sample sizes in these models, asymptotic inferences are usually not appropriate. We propose two parametric test procedures based on the EM algorithm and the Bayesian method to compare treatment effects among different groups while accounting for informative censoring. A real xenograft study on a new antitumor agent, temozolomide, combined with irinotecan is analyzed using the proposed methods. PMID:12229996

  1. A murine xenograft model for a transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, A; Tovar, C; Obendorf, D L; Dun, K; Woods, G M

    2011-03-01

    The number of Tasmanian devils in the wild is rapidly declining owing to a transmissible cancer, devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). Although progress has been made to understand the spread of this disease, crucial research on the pathogenesis of DFTD has been limited because of the threatened status of the host species. Here, the authors describe the development of a NOD/SCID (nonobese diabetic / severe combined immunodeficiency) mouse model that reproduces DFTD and provides a much-needed model to undertake studies into this intriguing transmissible cancer. Histologically, the DFTD produced in NOD/SCID mice (xenografted DFTD) was indistinguishable from the DFTD identified in Tasmanian devils. At the protein level, all xenografted DFTD tumors expressed periaxin, a marker that confirmed the diagnosis of DFTD. The karyotype of DFTD in NOD/SCID mice reproduced similar chromosomal alterations as seen in diseased devils. Furthermore, each NOD/SCID mouse inoculated with cultured DFTD tumor cells developed tumors, whereas DFTD did not develop in any of the inoculated immune-competent BALB/c mice. PMID:20861503

  2. Quaternary and tertiary aldoxime antidotes for organophosphate exposure in a zebrafish model system.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hayden R; Radi?, Zoran; Taylor, Palmer; Fradinger, Erica A

    2015-04-15

    The zebrafish is rapidly becoming an important model system for screening of new therapeutics. Here we evaluated the zebrafish as a potential pharmacological model for screening novel oxime antidotes to organophosphate (OP)-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The ki values determined for chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) and dichlorvos (DDVP) showed that CPO was a more potent inhibitor of both human and zebrafish AChE, but overall zebrafish AChE was less sensitive to OP inhibition. In contrast, aldoxime antidotes, the quaternary ammonium 2-PAM and tertiary amine RS-194B, showed generally similar overall reactivation kinetics, kr, in both zebrafish and human AChE. However, differences between the Kox and k2 constants suggest that zebrafish AChE associates more tightly with oximes, but has a slower maximal reactivation rate than human AChE. Homology modeling suggests that these kinetic differences result from divergences in the amino acids lining the entrance to the active site gorge. Although 2-PAM had the more favorable in vitro reactivation kinetics, RS-194B was more effective antidote in vivo. In intact zebrafish embryos, antidotal treatment with RS-194B rescued embryos from OP toxicity, whereas 2-PAM had no effect. Dechorionation of the embryos prior to antidotal treatment allowed both 2-PAM and RS-194B to rescue zebrafish embryos from OP toxicity. Interestingly, RS-194B and 2-PAM alone increased cholinergic motor activity in dechorionated embryos possibly due to the reversible inhibition kinetics, Ki and ?Ki, of the oximes. Together these results demonstrate that the zebrafish at various developmental stages provides an excellent model for investigating membrane penetrant antidotes to OP exposure. PMID:25701203

  3. A zebrafish (Danio rerio) model of infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) infection

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaopeng; Zhang Lichun; Weng Shaoping; Huang Zhijian; Lu Jing; Lan Dongming; Zhong Xuejun; Yu Xiaoqiang; Xu Anlong He Jianguo

    2008-06-20

    Zebrafish is a model animal for studies of genetics, development, toxicology, oncology, and immunology. In this study, infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) was used to establish an infection in zebrafish, and the experimental conditions were established and characterized. Mortality of adult zebrafish infected with ISKNV by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection exceeded 60%. ISKNV can be passed stably in zebrafish for over ten passages. The ailing zebrafish displayed petechial hemorrhaging and scale protrusion. Histological analysis of moribund fish revealed necrosis of tissue and enlarged cells in kidney and spleen. The real-time RT-PCR analysis of mRNA level confirmed that ISKNV was replicated in zebrafish. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses further confirmed the presence of ISKNV-infected cells in almost all organs of the infected fish. Electron microscope analyses showed that the ISKNV particle was present in the infected tissues. The establishment of zebrafish infection model of ISKNV can offer a valuable tool for studying the interactions between ISKNV and its host.

  4. Liver tumor models in transgenic zebrafish: an alternative in vivo approach to study hepatocarcinogenes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoqian; Zhou, Li; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2012-01-01

    The small vertebrate, zebrafish, has generated a big wave in current biomedical research. In the early experiments of carcinogen treatment, it has been found that the induced tumors in the zebrafish share many similar features with those of humans. With the recent development in transgenic technology, we are able to control the expression of a specific oncogene in targeted organs for generation of different tissue tumor models in zebrafish. In particular, the fusion of an oncogene and a color reporter, such as the green fluorescent protein, allows us to conveniently monitor transgenic tumors for their initiation, progression, metastasis and transplantation in the transparent zebrafish embryos, as demonstrated in this article with our newly established liver cancer models. What does the future hold in this rapidly growing model organism? Other than understanding the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis, one obvious area will be the potential of these models for rapid and high-throughput screening for anticancer drugs. PMID:22149032

  5. Zebrafish – As an Integrative Model for Twenty-first Century Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The zebrafish embryo is a useful small model for investigating vertebrate development because of its transparency, low cost, transgenic and morpholino capabilities, conservation of cell signaling, and concordance with mammalian developmental phenotypes. From these advantages, the...

  6. Transcriptome analysis of Rpl11-deficient zebrafish model of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Jia, Haibo; Zhang, Qian; Wan, Yang; Song, Binfeng; Jia, Qiong; Liu, Hanzhi; Zhu, Xiaofan; Fang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    To comprehensively reflect the roles of Rpl11 on the transcriptome of zebrafish model of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA), we performed whole-genome transcriptome sequencing on the Illumina Hi-Seq 2000 sequencing platform. Two different transcriptomes of zebrafish Rpl11-deficient and control Morpholino (Mo) embryos were collected and analyzed. The experimental design and methods, including sample preparation, RNA-Seq data evaluation and treatment, were described in details so that representative high-throughput sequencing data were acquired for assessing the actual impacts of Rpl11 on zebrafish embryos. We provided the accession number GSE51326 for easy access to the database. PMID:26484089

  7. Transcriptome analysis of Rpl11-deficient zebrafish model of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Jia, Haibo; Zhang, Qian; Wan, Yang; Song, Binfeng; Jia, Qiong; Liu, Hanzhi; Zhu, Xiaofan; Fang, Xiangdong

    2014-12-01

    To comprehensively reflect the roles of Rpl11 on the transcriptome of zebrafish model of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA), we performed whole-genome transcriptome sequencing on the Illumina Hi-Seq 2000 sequencing platform. Two different transcriptomes of zebrafish Rpl11-deficient and control Morpholino (Mo) embryos were collected and analyzed. The experimental design and methods, including sample preparation, RNA-Seq data evaluation and treatment, were described in details so that representative high-throughput sequencing data were acquired for assessing the actual impacts of Rpl11 on zebrafish embryos. We provided the accession number GSE51326 for easy access to the database. PMID:26484089

  8. Zebrafish as a Model for Monocarboxyl Transporter 8-Deficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Vatine, Gad David; Zada, David; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Tovin, Adi; Malkinson, Guy; Yaniv, Karina; Appelbaum, Lior

    2013-01-01

    Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS) is a severe psychomotor retardation characterized by neurological impairment and abnormal thyroid hormone (TH) levels. Mutations in the TH transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), are associated with AHDS. MCT8 knock-out mice exhibit impaired TH levels; however, they lack neurological defects. Here, the zebrafish mct8 gene and promoter were isolated, and mct8 promoter-driven transgenic lines were used to show that, similar to humans, mct8 is primarily expressed in the nervous and vascular systems. Morpholino-based knockdown and rescue experiments revealed that MCT8 is strictly required for neural development in the brain and spinal cord. This study shows that MCT8 is a crucial regulator during embryonic development and establishes the first vertebrate model for MCT8 deficiency that exhibits a neurological phenotype. PMID:23161551

  9. Patient-Derived Xenografts as a Model System for Radiation Research.

    PubMed

    Willey, Christopher D; Gilbert, Ashley N; Anderson, Joshua C; Gillespie, George Yancey

    2015-10-01

    The cancer literature is filled with promising preclinical studies demonstrating impressive efficacy for new therapeutics, yet translation of these approaches into clinical successes has been rare, indicating that current methods used to predict efficacy are suboptimal. The most likely reason for the limitation of these studies is the disconnect between preclinical models and cancers treated in the clinic. Specifically, most preclinical models are poor representations of human disease. Immortalized cancer cell lines that dominate the cancer literature may be, in a sense, "paper tigers" that have been selected by decades of culture to be artificially driven by highly targetable proteins. Thus, although effective in treating these cell lines either in vitro or as artificial tumors transplanted from culture into experimental animals as xenografts, the identified therapies would likely underperform in a clinical setting. This inherent limitation applies not only to drug testing but also to experiments with radiation therapy. Indeed, traditional radiobiology methods rely on monolayer culture systems, with emphasis on colony formation and DNA damage assessment that may have limited clinical translation. As such, there has been keen interest in developing tumor explant systems in which patient tumors are directly transplanted into and solely maintained in vivo, using immunocompromised mice. These so-called patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) represent a robust model system that has been garnering support in academia and industry as a superior preclinical approach to drug testing. Likewise, PDX models have the potential to improve radiation research. In this review, we describe how PDX models are currently being used for both drug and radiation testing and how they can be incorporated into a translational research program. PMID:26384275

  10. Genomic characterization of a large panel of patient-derived hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft tumor models for preclinical development

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongye; Xu, Qiang; Tan, Yexiong; Wang, Guan; Luo, Qin; Xu, Weiguo; Yang, Shuqun; Li, Jian; Fu, Jing; Chen, Lei; Yuan, Shengxian; Liang, Guibai; Ji, Qunsheng; Chen, Shu-Hui; Chan, Chi-Chung; Zhou, Weiping; Xu, Xiaowei; Wang, Hongyang; Fang, Douglas D.

    2015-01-01

    Lack of clinically relevant tumor models dramatically hampers development of effective therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Establishment of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models that faithfully recapitulate the genetic and phenotypic features of HCC becomes important. In this study, we first established a cohort of 65 stable PDX models of HCC from corresponding Chinese patients. Then we showed that the histology and gene expression patterns of PDX models were highly consistent between xenografts and case-matched original tumors. Genetic alterations, including mutations and DNA copy number alterations (CNAs), of the xenografts correlated well with the published data of HCC patient specimens. Furthermore, differential responses to sorafenib, the standard-of-care agent, in randomly chosen xenografts were unveiled. Finally, in the models expressing high levels of FGFR1 gene according to the genomic data, FGFR1 inhibitor lenvatinib showed greater efficacy than sorafenib. Taken together, our data indicate that PDX models resemble histopathological and genomic characteristics of clinical HCC tumors, as well as recapitulate the differential responses of HCC patients to the standard-of-care treatment. Overall, this large collection of PDX models becomes a clinically relevant platform for drug screening, biomarker discovery and translational research in preclinical setting. PMID:26062443

  11. Zebrafish as a model to study cardiac development and human cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Bakkers, Jeroen

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, the zebrafish has entered the field of cardiovascular research as a new model organism. This is largely due to a number of highly successful small- and large-scale forward genetic screens, which have led to the identification of zebrafish mutants with cardiovascular defects. Genetic mapping and identification of the affected genes have resulted in novel insights into the molecular regulation of vertebrate cardiac development. More recently, the zebrafish has become an attractive model to study the effect of genetic variations identified in patients with cardiovascular defects by candidate gene or whole-genome-association studies. Thanks to an almost entirely sequenced genome and high conservation of gene function compared with humans, the zebrafish has proved highly informative to express and study human disease-related gene variants, providing novel insights into human cardiovascular disease mechanisms, and highlighting the suitability of the zebrafish as an excellent model to study human cardiovascular diseases. In this review, I discuss recent discoveries in the field of cardiac development and specific cases in which the zebrafish has been used to model human congenital and acquired cardiac diseases. PMID:21602174

  12. Utility of a human-mouse xenograft model and in vivo near-infrared fluorescent imaging for studying wound healing.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Tassi, Elena; Schmidt, Marcel O; McNish, Sean; Baker, Stephen; Attinger, Christopher; Wang, Hong; Shara, Nawar; Wellstein, Anton

    2015-12-01

    To study the complex cellular interactions involved in wound healing, it is essential to have an animal model that adequately mimics the human wound microenvironment. Currently available murine models are limited because wound contraction introduces bias into wound surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate utility of a human-mouse xenograft model for studying human wound healing. Normal human skin was harvested from elective abdominoplasty surgery, xenografted onto athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, and allowed to engraft for 3 months. The graft was then wounded using a 2-mm punch biopsy. Wounds were harvested on sequential days to allow tissue-based markers of wound healing to be followed sequentially. On the day of wound harvest, mice were injected with XenoLight RediJect cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) probe and imaged according to package instructions. Immunohistochemistry confirms that this human-mouse xenograft model is effective for studying human wound healing in vivo. Additionally, in vivo fluorescent imaging for inducible COX-2 demonstrated upregulation from baseline to day 4 (P = 0·03) with return to baseline levels by day 10, paralleling the reepithelialisation of the wound. This human-mouse xenograft model, combined with in vivo fluorescent imaging provides a useful mechanism for studying molecular pathways of human wound healing. PMID:24373153

  13. CysLT1R Antagonists Inhibit Tumor Growth in a Xenograft Model of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21WAF/Cip1 (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells. PMID:24039952

  14. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells. PMID:24039952

  15. Therapeutic efficiency of everolimus and lapatinib in xenograft model of human colorectal carcinoma with KRAS mutation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Céline; Noël-Hudson, Marie-Sophie; Boige, Valérie; Goéré, Diane; Marion, Sylvie; Polrot, Mélanie; Bigot, Ludovic; Gonin, Patrick; Farinotti, Robert; Bonhomme-Faivre, Laurence

    2013-08-01

    KRAS mutation is a negative predictive prognostic factor during metastatic colorectal cancer treatment with antiepidermal growth factor receptor antibodies. For affected patients, new therapeutics must be explored. Our objective was to study efficacy of two drugs with different mechanisms of action, everolimus (mTOR inhibitor) and lapatinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitor), in a mouse xenograft model. We chose a model obtained after engraftment of a tumor originating from a human tumor collection. The patient was affected by a metastasis colorectal carcinoma resistant to cetuximab with KRAS mutation. From a previous study in mice, we know that everolimus is a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate and that a lapatinib pretreatment increases significantly (2.6-fold) everolimus AUC by inhibiting its intestinal P-gp efflux. We hence tested the effect of these drugs alone or combined. Mice bearing the xenografts were divided in four groups: control, lapatinib, everolimus, and L/E group (L/E: 2?days of lapatinib 200?mg/kg and then 3?days of everolimus 1?mg/kg). Tumor volumes and treatment toxicities were evaluated. Sixteen days after treatment initiation, the group L/E was the first one in which tumor volume average was significantly lower than the one of control group (193?±?90 vs. 395?±?171?mm(3) ; P?=?0.0025). After 4?weeks of treatment, inhibition of tumor growth in lapatinib, everolimus, and L/E groups reached, respectively, 49, 53, and 57%. Each drug showed significant antitumor activity. Only moderate hematologic toxicity signs were observed. These results lead to new perspectives for new oral drugs in metastatic KRAS-mutated colorectal cancer resistant to standard chemotherapy. PMID:22458846

  16. Therapeutic Efficacy Assessment of CK6, a Monoclonal KIT Antibody, in a Panel of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Xenograft Models12

    PubMed Central

    Van Looy, Thomas; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Floris, Giuseppe; Li, Haifu; Wellens, Jasmien; Vanleeuw, Ulla; Sciot, Raf; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Schöffski, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of CK6, a KIT monoclonal antibody, in a panel of human gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) xenograft models. Nude mice were bilaterally transplanted with human GIST xenografts (four patient derived and two cell line derived), treated for 3 weeks, and grouped as follows: control (untreated); CK6 (40 mg/kg, 3 × weekly); imatinib (50 mg/kg, twice daily); sunitinib (40 mg/kg, once daily); imatinib + CK6; sunitinib + CK6 (same doses and schedules as in the single-agent treatments). Tumor volume assessment, Western blot analysis, and histopathology were used for evaluation of efficacy. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U (MWU) and Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests. CK6 as a single agent only reduced tumor growth rate in the UZLX-GIST3 model (P = .053, MWU compared to control), while in none of the other GIST models an effect on tumor growth rate was observed. CK6 did not result in significant anti-proliferative or pro-apoptotic effects in any of the GIST models, and moreover, CK6 did not induce a remarkable inhibition of KIT activation. Furthermore, no synergistic effect of combining CK6 with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) was observed. Conversely, in certain GIST xenografts, anti-tumor effects seemed to be inferior under combination treatment compared to single-agent TKI treatment. In the GIST xenografts tested, the anti-tumor efficacy of CK6 was limited. No synergy was observed on combination of CK6 with TKIs in these GIST models. Our findings highlight the importance of using relevant in vivo human tumor xenograft models in the preclinical assessment of drug combination strategies. PMID:25926077

  17. Patient-Derived Gastric Carcinoma Xenograft Mouse Models Faithfully Represent Human Tumor Molecular Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shuqiong; Zhang, Meizhuo; Fu, Haihua; Liu, Yuanjie; Yin, Xiaolu; Chen, Hao; Xie, Liang; Zhang, Jingchuan; Gavine, Paul R.; Gu, Yi; Ni, Xingzhi; Su, Xinying

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived cancer xenografts (PDCX) generally represent more reliable models of human disease in which to evaluate a potential drugs preclinical efficacy. However to date, only a few patient-derived gastric cancer xenograft (PDGCX) models have been reported. In this study, we aimed to establish additional PDGCX models and to evaluate whether these models accurately reflected the histological and genetic diversities of the corresponding patient tumors. By engrafting fresh patient gastric cancer (GC) tissues into immune-compromised mice (SCID and/or nude mice), thirty two PDGCX models were established. Histological features were assessed by a qualified pathologist based on H&E staining. Genomic comparison was performed for several biomarkers including ERBB1, ERBB2, ERBB3, FGFR2, MET and PTEN. These biomarkers were profiled to assess gene copy number by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). All 32 PDGCX models retained the histological features of the corresponding human tumors. Furthermore, among the 32 models, 78% (25/32) highly expressed ERBB1 (EGFR), 22% (7/32) were ERBB2 (HER2) positive, 78% (25/32) showed ERBB3 (HER3) high expression, 66% (21/32) lost PTEN expression, 3% (1/32) harbored FGFR2 amplification, 41% (13/32) were positive for MET expression and 16% (5/32) were MET gene amplified. Between the PDGCX models and their parental tumors, a high degree of similarity was observed for FGFR2 and MET gene amplification, and also for ERBB2 status (agreement rate = 94~100%; kappa value = 0.81~1). Protein expression of PTEN and MET also showed moderate agreement (agreement rate = 78%; kappa value = 0.46~0.56), while ERBB1 and ERBB3 expression showed slight agreement (agreement rate = 59~75%; kappa value = 0.18~0.19). ERBB2 positivity, FGFR2 or MET gene amplification was all maintained until passage 12 in mice. The stability of the molecular profiles observed across subsequent passages within the individual models provides confidence in the utility and translational significance of these models for in vivo testing of personalized therapies. PMID:26217940

  18. The Anti-Proliferative Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Yuki; Takai, Tomoaki; Ibuki, Naokazu; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kawabata, Shinji; Kiyama, Satoshi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiation treatment for tumors that preferentially accumulate drugs carrying the stable boron isotope, 10B. BNCT has been evaluated clinically as an alternative to conventional radiation therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and more recently, recurrent advanced head and neck cancer. Here we investigated the effect of BNCT on prostate cancer (PCa) using an in vivo mouse xenograft model that we have developed. Materials and Methods Mice bearing the xenotransplanted androgen-independent human PCa cell line, PC3, were divided into four groups: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: Boronophenylalanine (BPA); Group 3: neutron; Group 4: BPA-mediated BNCT. We compared xenograft growth among these groups, and the body weight and any motility disturbance were recorded. Immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the proliferation marker, Ki-67, and TUNEL staining were performed 9 weeks after treatment. Results The in vivo studies demonstrated that BPA-mediated BNCT significantly delayed tumor growth in comparison with the other groups, without any severe adverse events. There was a significant difference in the rate of freedom from gait abnormalities between the BPA-mediated BNCT group and the other groups. The IHC studies revealed that BNCT treatment significantly reduced the number of Ki-67-positive cells in comparison with the controls (mean±SD 6.9±1.5 vs 12.7±4.0, p<0.05), while there was no difference in the number of apoptotic cells, suggesting that BPA-mediated BNCT reduced PCa progression without affecting apoptosis at 9 weeks post-treatment. Conclusions This study has provided the first preclinical proof-of-principle data to indicate that BPA-mediated BNCT reduces the in vivo growth of PCa. Although further studies will be necessary, BNCT might be a novel potential treatment for PCa. PMID:26325195

  19. Survivin Antisense Oligonucleotides Effectively Radiosensitize Colorectal Cancer Cells in Both Tissue Culture and Murine Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Survivin shows a radiation resistance factor in colorectal cancer. In the present study, we determined whether survivin messenger RNA levels in patients with rectal cancer predict tumor response after neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and whether inhibition of survivin by the use of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) enhances radiation responses. Methods and Materials: SW480 colorectal carcinoma cells were transfected with survivin ASO (LY2181308) and irradiated with doses ranging from 0-8 Gy. Survivin expression, cell-cycle distribution, {gamma}H2AX fluorescence, and induction of apoptosis were monitored by means of immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and caspase 3/7 activity. Clonogenic survival was determined by using a colony-forming assay. An SW480 xenograft model was used to investigate the effect of survivin attenuation and irradiation on tumor growth. Furthermore, survivin messenger RNA levels were studied in patient biopsy specimens by using Affymetrix microarray analysis. Results: In the translational study of 20 patients with rectal cancer, increased survivin levels were associated with significantly greater risk of local tumor recurrence (p = 0.009). Treatment of SW480 cells with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in an increased percentage of apoptotic cells, caspase 3/7 activity, fraction of cells in the G{sub 2}/M phase, and H2AX phosphorylation. Clonogenic survival decreased compared with control-treated cells. Furthermore, treatment of SW480 xenografts with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in a significant delay in tumor growth. Conclusion: Survivin appears to be a molecular biomarker in patients with rectal cancer. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo data suggest a potential role of survivin as a molecular target to improve treatment response to radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

  20. Impaired neural development in a zebrafish model for Lowe syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Irene Barinaga-Rementeria; Pietka, Grzegorz; Jones, David R.; Divecha, Nullin; Alia, A.; Baraban, Scott C.; Hurlstone, Adam F. L.; Lowe, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Lowe syndrome, which is characterized by defects in the central nervous system, eyes and kidneys, is caused by mutation of the phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase OCRL1. The mechanisms by which loss of OCRL1 leads to the phenotypic manifestations of Lowe syndrome are currently unclear, in part, owing to the lack of an animal model that recapitulates the disease phenotype. Here, we describe a zebrafish model for Lowe syndrome using stable and transient suppression of OCRL1 expression. Deficiency of OCRL1, which is enriched in the brain, leads to neurological defects similar to those reported in Lowe syndrome patients, namely increased susceptibility to heat-induced seizures and cystic brain lesions. In OCRL1-deficient embryos, Akt signalling is reduced and there is both increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation, most strikingly in the neural tissue. Rescue experiments indicate that catalytic activity and binding to the vesicle coat protein clathrin are essential for OCRL1 function in these processes. Our results indicate a novel role for OCRL1 in neural development, and support a model whereby dysregulation of phosphoinositide metabolism and clathrin-mediated membrane traffic leads to the neurological symptoms of Lowe syndrome. PMID:22210625

  1. Fishing for Nature's Hits: Establishment of the Zebrafish as a Model for Screening Antidiabetic Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Nadia; Tai, Hongmei; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects millions of people worldwide and significantly impacts their quality of life. Moreover, life threatening diseases, such as myocardial infarction, blindness, and renal disorders, increase the morbidity rate associated with diabetes. Various natural products from medicinal plants have shown potential as antidiabetes agents in cell-based screening systems. However, many of these potential “hits” fail in mammalian tests, due to issues such as poor pharmacokinetics and/or toxic side effects. To address this problem, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) model has been developed as a “bridge” to provide an experimentally convenient animal-based screening system to identify drug candidates that are active in vivo. In this review, we discuss the application of zebrafish to drug screening technologies for diabetes research. Specifically, the discovery of natural product-based antidiabetes compounds using zebrafish will be described. For example, it has recently been demonstrated that antidiabetic natural compounds can be identified in zebrafish using activity guided fractionation of crude plant extracts. Moreover, the development of fluorescent-tagged glucose bioprobes has allowed the screening of natural product-based modulators of glucose homeostasis in zebrafish. We hope that the discussion of these advances will illustrate the value and simplicity of establishing zebrafish-based assays for antidiabetic compounds in natural products-based laboratories. PMID:26681965

  2. Development of novel combined anticalcification protocols including immunologic modification for prolonged durability of cardiac xenograft: preclinical study using large-animal long-term circulatory models.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hong-Gook; Jeong, Saeromi; Shin, Jun-Seop; Park, Chung-Gyu; Kim, Yong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac xenografts are conventionally cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GA) to impart tissue stability, reduce antigenicity, and maintain tissue sterility. However, GA-fixed xenografts are prone to calcification after long-term implantation in humans, because of phospholipids, free aldehyde groups, and residual antigenicity. We evaluated preclinical safety and efficacy using large-animal long-term circulatory models for our novel combined anticalcification protocol including immunological modification, which had been proven effective in small animal experiments. Bovine/porcine xenografts were treated with decellularization, immunological modification with ?-galactosidase, GA fixation with organic solvent, and detoxification with glycine. Valve conduits made of these xenografts were transplanted into the pulmonary root of goats, and hemodynamic, radiological, immunohistopathological, and biochemical results were obtained for 12 months after implantation. Evaluation of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization demonstrated good hemodynamic status and function of the pulmonary xenograft valves. Durability of the xenografts was well preserved without calcification by specimen radiography and immunohistopathological examination. The calcium concentrations of the explanted xenografts were lower than the control xenografts. This preclinical study using large-animal long-term circulatory models demonstrated that our synergistic and simultaneous employment of multiple anticalcification therapies and novel tissue treatments, including immunological modifications, have promising safety and efficacy and should be examined further in future clinical studies. PMID:25303800

  3. Recent advances using zebrafish animal models for muscle disease drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Maves, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Animal models have enabled great progress in the discovery and understanding of pharmacological approaches for treating muscle diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Areas covered With this article, the author provides the reader with a description of the zebrafish animal model, which has been employed to identify and study pharmacological approaches to muscle disease. In particular, the author focuses on how both large-scale chemical screens and targeted drug treatment studies have established zebrafish as an important model for muscle disease drug discovery. Expert opinion There are a number of opportunities arising for the use of zebrafish models for further developing pharmacological approaches to muscle diseases, including studying drug combination therapies and utilizing genome editing to engineer zebrafish muscle disease models. It is the author’s particular belief that the availability of a wide range of zebrafish transgenic strains for labeling immune cell types, combined with live imaging and drug treatment of muscle disease models, should allow for new elegant studies demonstrating how pharmacological approaches might influence inflammation and the immune response in muscle disease. PMID:24931439

  4. Intratumoral Heterogeneity of Breast Cancer Xenograft Models: Texture Analysis of Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Bo La; Li, Mulan; Jang, Min Hye; Park, So Yeon; Kang, Ho Chul; Kim, Bohyoung; Song, In Chan; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether there is a relationship between texture analysis parameters of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps and histopathologic features of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 xenograft models. Materials and Methods MCF-7 estradiol (+), MCF-7 estradiol (-), and MDA-MB-231 xenograft models were made with approval of the animal care committee. Twelve tumors of MCF-7 estradiol (+), 9 tumors of MCF-7 estradiol (-), and 6 tumors in MDA-MB-231 were included. Diffusion-weighted MR images were obtained on a 9.4-T system. An analysis of the first and second order texture analysis of ADC maps was performed. The texture analysis parameters and histopathologic features were compared among these groups by the analysis of variance test. Correlations between texture parameters and histopathologic features were analyzed. We also evaluated the intraobserver agreement in assessing the texture parameters. Results MCF-7 estradiol (+) showed a higher standard deviation, maximum, skewness, and kurtosis of ADC values than MCF-7 estradiol (-) and MDA-MB-231 (p < 0.01 for all). The contrast of the MCF-7 groups was higher than that of the MDA-MB-231 (p = 0.004). The correlation (COR) of the texture analysis of MCF-7 groups was lower than that of MDA-MB-231 (p < 0.001). The histopathologic analysis showed that Ki-67mean and Ki-67diff of MCF-7 estradiol (+) were higher than that of MCF-7 estradiol (-) or MDA-MB-231 (p < 0.05). The microvessel density (MVD)mean and MVDdiff of MDA-MB-231 were higher than those of MCF-7 groups (p < 0.001). A diffuse-multifocal necrosis was more frequently found in MDA-MB-231 (p < 0.001). The proportion of necrosis moderately correlated with the contrast (r = -0.438, p = 0.022) and strongly with COR (r = 0.540, p = 0.004). Standard deviation (r = 0.622, r = 0.437), skewness (r = 0.404, r = 0.484), and kurtosis (r = 0.408, r = 0.452) correlated with Ki-67mean and Ki-67diff (p < 0.05 for all). COR moderately correlated with Ki-67diff (r = -0.388, p = 0.045). Skewness (r = -0.643, r = -0.464), kurtosis (r = -0.581, r = -0.389), contrast (r = -0.473, r = -0.549) and COR (r = 0.588, r = 0.580) correlated with MVDmean and MVDdiff (p < 0.05 for all). Conclusion The texture analysis of ADC maps may help to determine the intratumoral spatial heterogeneity of necrosis patterns, amount of cellular proliferation and the vascularity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 xenograft breast cancer models. PMID:25246820

  5. Application of a Patient Derived Xenograft Model for Predicative Study of Uterine Fibroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gröticke, Ina; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Keator, Christopher S.; Koch, Markus; Slayden, Ov D.

    2015-01-01

    Human uterine fibroids, benign tumors derived from the smooth muscle layers of the uterus, impose a major health burden to up to 50% of premenopausal women in their daily life. To improve our understanding of this disease, we developed and characterized a patient-derived xenograft model by subcutaneous transplantation of pieces of human uterine fibroid tissue into three different strains of severe combined immunodeficient mice. Engrafted uterine fibroid tissue preserved the classical morphology with interwoven bundles of smooth muscle cells and an abundant deposition of collagenous matrix, similar to uterine fibroids in situ. The grafts expressed both estrogen receptor 1 and progesterone receptor. Additionally, both receptors were up-regulated by estrogen treatment. Growth of the fibroid grafts was dependent on 17?-estradiol and progesterone supplementation at levels similar to women with the disease and was studied for up to 60 days at maximum. Co-treatment with the antiprogestin mifepristone reduced graft growth (four independent donors, p<0.0001 two-sided t-test), as did treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin (three independent donors, p<0.0001 two-sided t-test). This in vivo animal model preserves the main histological and functional characteristics of human uterine fibroids, is amenable to intervention by pharmacological treatment, and can thus serve as an adequate model for the development of novel therapies. PMID:26588841

  6. Patient-Derived Xenograft Models to Improve Targeted Therapy in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Clare L.; Becker, Marc A.; Haluska, Paul; Samimi, Goli

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence that precision therapy targeted to the molecular drivers of a cancer has the potential to improve clinical outcomes, high-grade epithelial ovarian cancer (OC) patients are currently treated without consideration of molecular phenotype, and predictive biomarkers that could better inform treatment remain unknown. Delivery of precision therapy requires improved integration of laboratory-based models and cutting-edge clinical research, with pre-clinical models predicting patient subsets that will benefit from a particular targeted therapeutic. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are renewable tumor models engrafted in mice, generated from fresh human tumors without prior in vitro exposure. PDX models allow an invaluable assessment of tumor evolution and adaptive response to therapy. PDX models have been applied to pre-clinical drug testing and biomarker identification in a number of cancers including ovarian, pancreatic, breast, and prostate cancers. These models have been shown to be biologically stable and accurately reflect the patient tumor with regards to histopathology, gene expression, genetic mutations, and therapeutic response. However, pre-clinical analyses of molecularly annotated PDX models derived from high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HG-SOC) remain limited. In vivo response to conventional and/or targeted therapeutics has only been described for very small numbers of individual HG-SOC PDX in conjunction with sparse molecular annotation and patient outcome data. Recently, two consecutive panels of epithelial OC PDX correlate in vivo platinum response with molecular aberrations and source patient clinical outcomes. These studies underpin the value of PDX models to better direct chemotherapy and predict response to targeted therapy. Tumor heterogeneity, before and following treatment, as well as the importance of multiple molecular aberrations per individual tumor underscore some of the important issues addressed in PDX models. PMID:24363999

  7. Xenograft Models of Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia for the Development of Imaging Strategies and Evaluation of Novel Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Gelebart, Pascal; Popa, Mihaela; McCormack, Emmet

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous progress made in the comprehension of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) over the last 30 years most patients die from their disease. Our understanding of AML has relied on an intensive in-vitro research approach, based on AML cell lines as well as primary AML patient cells. However, experimental insight into the early events of AML leukemogenesis before they become clinically observable is not possible in humans. Thus, preclinical animal models have served the purpose to extend our knowledge of the disease as well as to develop innovative therapeutic strategies. Today, xenograft models using patient-derived neoplastic/leukemia cells represent the strategy of choice for preclinical studies of AML. These models exhibit several key advantages over AML cell lines. In fact, patientderived cells, in contrast to AML cell lines, encompass the entire complexity of AML disease and can therefore provide more trustworthy results on the efficacy outcome of novel therapies. One other important aspect in the development of xenograft models of AML is the possibility to use imaging techniques to monitor in-vivo the progression of the disease. Imaging techniques also authorize the evaluation of the efficacy of an experimental treatment on tumor growth. This review will focus on the description of xenograft models of AML and will provide researchers and clinicians an overview of how these models have been used for the development of new therapeutic options and new imaging approaches to study AML in-vivo. PMID:26278528

  8. Residual Disease in a Novel Xenograft Model of RUNX1-Mutated, Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanalingam, Umayal; Balys, Marlene; Eberhardt, Allison; Wang, Nancy; Myers, Jason R; Ashton, John M; Becker, Michael W; Calvi, Laura M; Mendler, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients harboring RUNX1 mutations have a dismal prognosis with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy. We aimed to develop an in vivo model of RUNX1-mutated, CN-AML in which the nature of residual disease in this molecular disease subset could be explored. We utilized a well-characterized patient-derived, RUNX1-mutated CN-AML line (CG-SH). Tail vein injection of CG-SH into NOD scid gamma mice led to leukemic engraftment in the bone marrow, spleen, and peripheral blood within 6 weeks. Treatment of leukemic mice with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy resulted in clearance of disease from the spleen and peripheral blood, but persistence of disease in the bone marrow as assessed by flow cytometry and secondary transplantation. Whole exome sequencing of CG-SH revealed mutations in ASXL1, CEBPA, GATA2, and SETBP1, not previously reported. We conclude that CG-SH xenografts are a robust, reproducible in vivo model of CN-AML in which to explore mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26177509

  9. Residual Disease in a Novel Xenograft Model of RUNX1-Mutated, Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sivagnanalingam, Umayal; Balys, Marlene; Eberhardt, Allison; Wang, Nancy; Myers, Jason R.; Ashton, John M.; Becker, Michael W.; Calvi, Laura M.; Mendler, Jason H.

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients harboring RUNX1 mutations have a dismal prognosis with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy. We aimed to develop an in vivo model of RUNX1-mutated, CN-AML in which the nature of residual disease in this molecular disease subset could be explored. We utilized a well-characterized patient-derived, RUNX1-mutated CN-AML line (CG-SH). Tail vein injection of CG-SH into NOD scid gamma mice led to leukemic engraftment in the bone marrow, spleen, and peripheral blood within 6 weeks. Treatment of leukemic mice with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy resulted in clearance of disease from the spleen and peripheral blood, but persistence of disease in the bone marrow as assessed by flow cytometry and secondary transplantation. Whole exome sequencing of CG-SH revealed mutations in ASXL1, CEBPA, GATA2, and SETBP1, not previously reported. We conclude that CG-SH xenografts are a robust, reproducible in vivo model of CN-AML in which to explore mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26177509

  10. A Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Parameningeal Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma for Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Jody E.; Cantor, Emma L.; Ehlen, Macgregor S.; Banerjee, Avirup; Malempati, Suman; Stenzel, Peter; Woltjer, Randy L.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Goodwin, Neal C.; Yang, Yan; Kaur, Pali; Bult, Carol J.; Airhart, Susan D.; Keller, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS) is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents. Parameningeal eRMS is a variant that is often more difficult to treat than eRMS occurring at other sites. A 14-year-old female with persistent headaches and rapid weight loss was diagnosed with parameningeal eRMS. She progressed and died despite chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide plus 50.4?Gy radiation therapy to the primary tumor site. Tumor specimens were acquired by rapid autopsy and tumor tissue was transplanted into immunodeficient mice to create a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) animal model. As autopsy specimens had an ALK R1181C mutation, PDX tumor bearing animals were treated with the pan-kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib but demonstrated no decrease in tumor growth, suggesting that single agent kinase inhibitor therapy may be insufficient in similar cases. This unique parameningeal eRMS PDX model is publicly available for preclinical study. PMID:26696773

  11. Imaging Tumor Variation in Response to Photodynamic Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Rizvi, Imran; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pereira, Stephen P.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: A treatment monitoring study investigated the differential effects of orthotopic pancreatic cancer models in response to interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT), and the validity of using magnetic resonance imaging as a surrogate measure of response was assessed. Methods and Materials: Different orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenograft models (AsPC-1 and Panc-1) were used to represent the range of pathophysiology observed in human beings. Identical dose escalation studies (10, 20, and 40J/cm) using interstitial verteporfin PDT were performed, and magnetic resonance imaging with T2-weighted and T1-weighted contrast were used to monitor the total tumor volume and the vascular perfusion volume, respectively. Results: There was a significant amount of necrosis in the slower-growing Panc-1 tumor using high light dose, although complete necrosis was not observed. Lower doses were required for the same level of tumor kill in the faster-growing AsPC-1 cell line. Conclusions: The tumor growth rate and vascular pattern of the tumor affect the optimal PDT treatment regimen, with faster-growing tumors being relatively easier to treat. This highlights the fact that therapy in human beings shows a heterogeneous range of outcomes, and suggests a need for careful individualized treatment outcomes assessment in clinical work.

  12. Development of an Animal Model for Alcoholic Liver Disease in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiun-Nong; Chang, Lin-Li; Lai, Chung-Hsu; Lin, Kai-Jen; Lin, Mei-Fang; Yang, Chih-Hui; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2015-08-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) continues to be a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. To date, no zebrafish animal model has demonstrated the characteristic manifestations of ALD in the setting of chronic alcohol exposure. The aim of this study was to develop a zebrafish animal model for ALD. Male adult zebrafish were housed in a 1% (v/v) ethanol solution up to 3 months. A histopathological study showed the characteristic features of alcoholic liver steatosis and steatohepatitis in the early stages of alcohol exposure, including fat droplet accumulation, ballooning degeneration of the hepatocytes, and Mallory body formation. As the exposure time increased, collagen deposition in the extracellular matrix was observed by Sirius red staining and immunofluorescence staining. Finally, anaplastic hepatocytes with pleomorphic nuclei were arranged in trabecular patterns and formed nodules in the zebrafish liver. Over the time course of 1% ethanol exposure, upregulations of lipogenesis, fibrosis, and tumor-related genes were also revealed by semiquantitative and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. As these data reflect characteristic liver damage by alcohol in humans, this zebrafish animal model may serve as a powerful tool to study the pathogenesis and treatment of ALD and its related disorders in humans. PMID:25923904

  13. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Developed as an Alternative Animal Model for Focal Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinge; Li, Yang V

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic cerebral ischemia is one of the leading causes of mortality and chronic disability. Animal models provide an essential tool for understanding the complex cellular and molecular pathophysiology of ischemia and for improving treatment and testing novel neuroprotective drugs in the preclinical setting. In this study, we tested zebrafish as a novel model for thrombotic ischemic brain damage. Zebrafish were intraperitoneally injected with Rose Bengal and light exposure was directed onto the optic tectum region of the brain to induce photothrombosis. After full recovery from anesthesia, zebrafish consistently exhibited abnormal swimming patterns, indicating brain injury from the procedure. The staining of 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) 24 h after the treatment showed lack of staining of the exposed area of the brain, which further confirmed the ischemic injury. Application of Activase®-tPA improved viability of the brain. The tPA treatment also reduced the occurrence of moving disability as well as the mortality rate, demonstrating that the zebrafish model not only showed focal ischemic injury but also responded well to tPA therapy. Our results suggest that the current photothrombotic method induced focal ischemia in zebrafish and produced consistent brain damage that can be measured by behavioral changes and quantified by histological staining. PMID:26463933

  14. Protective effect of fucoidan against AAPH-induced oxidative stress in zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-A; Lee, Seung-Hong; Ko, Chang-ik; Cha, Seon-Heui; Kang, Min-Cheol; Kang, Sung-Myung; Ko, Seok-Chun; Lee, Won-Woo; Ko, Ju-Young; Lee, Ji-Hyeok; Kang, Nalae; Oh, Jae-Young; Ahn, Ginnae; Jee, Young Heun; Jeon, You-Jin

    2014-02-15

    Fucoidan, extracted from Ecklonia cava, has been extensively studied because of its wide biological activities. However, antioxidative activities have not been yet examined. Therefore we evaluated in vitro and in vivo studies on antioxidative activities of E. cava fucoidan (ECF). ECF exhibited more prominent effects in peroxyl radical scavenging activity, compared to the other scavenging activities. Thus, ECF was further evaluated for its protective ability against 2,2'-azobis dihydrochloride induced oxidative stress in Vero cells and ECF strongly reduced the AAPH-induced oxidative damage through scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, we evaluated protective effect of ECF against AAPH-induced oxidative stress in zebrafish model. ECF significantly reduced ROS generation, lipid peroxidation and cell death in zebrafish model. These findings indicate that ECF has antioxidant activities in vitro Vero cells and in vivo zebrafish model, even though ECF is not a polyphenol or flavonoid compound and does not contain benzene rings or conjugated structures. PMID:24507271

  15. Dietary Strontium Increases Bone Mineral Density in Intact Zebrafish (Danio rerio): A Potential Model System for Bone Research

    PubMed Central

    Padgett-Vasquez, Steve; Garris, Heath W.; Nagy, Tim R.; D'Abramo, Louis R.; Watts, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Zebrafish (Danio rerio) skeletal bone possesses properties similar to human bone, which suggests that they may be used as a model to study mineralization characteristics of the human Haversian system, as well as human bone diseases. One prerequisite for the use of zebrafish as an alternative osteoporotic bone model is to determine whether their bone displays functional plasticity similar to that observed in other bone models. Strontium citrate was supplemented into a laboratory-prepared diet (45% crude protein) to produce dietary strontium levels of 0%, 0.63%, 1.26%, 1.89%, and 2.43% and fed ad libitum twice daily for 12 weeks to 28-day-old intact zebrafish. Length was determined at 4-week intervals, and both weight and length were recorded at 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, seven zebrafish from each dietary level were analyzed for total bone mineral density by microcomputed tomography. Dietary strontium citrate supplementation significantly (p?zebrafish whole-body and spinal column bone mineral density. In addition, trace amounts of strontium were incorporated into the scale matrix in those zebrafish that consumed strontium-supplemented diets. These findings suggest that zebrafish bone displays plasticity similar to that reported for other bone models (i.e., rat, mouse, and monkey) that received supplements of strontium compounds and zebrafish should be viewed as an increasingly valuable bone model. PMID:20874492

  16. A post-developmental genetic screen for zebrafish models of inherited liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Hyung; Wu, Shu-Yu; Baek, Jeong-In; Choi, Soo Young; Su, Yanhui; Flynn, Charles R; Gamse, Joshua T; Ess, Kevin C; Hardiman, Gary; Lipschutz, Joshua H; Abumrad, Naji N; Rockey, Don C

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease such as simple steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and fibrosis. However, the molecular pathogenesis and genetic variations causing NAFLD are poorly understood. The high prevalence and incidence of NAFLD suggests that genetic variations on a large number of genes might be involved in NAFLD. To identify genetic variants causing inherited liver disease, we used zebrafish as a model system for a large-scale mutant screen, and adopted a whole genome sequencing approach for rapid identification of mutated genes found in our screen. Here, we report on a forward genetic screen of ENU mutagenized zebrafish. From 250 F2 lines of ENU mutagenized zebrafish during post-developmental stages (5 to 8 days post fertilization), we identified 19 unique mutant zebrafish lines displaying visual evidence of hepatomegaly and/or steatosis with no developmental defects. Histological analysis of mutants revealed several specific phenotypes, including common steatosis, micro/macrovesicular steatosis, hepatomegaly, ballooning, and acute hepatocellular necrosis. This work has identified multiple post-developmental mutants and establishes zebrafish as a novel animal model for post-developmental inherited liver disease. PMID:25950913

  17. ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database: increased support for mutants and transgenics.

    PubMed

    Howe, Douglas G; Bradford, Yvonne M; Conlin, Tom; Eagle, Anne E; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Knight, Jonathan; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra A Taylor; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruef, Barbara J; Ruzicka, Leyla; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Sprunger, Brock; Van Slyke, Ceri E; Westerfield, Monte

    2013-01-01

    ZFIN, the Zebrafish Model Organism Database (http://zfin.org), is the central resource for zebrafish genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN curators manually curate and integrate comprehensive data involving zebrafish genes, mutants, transgenics, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expressions, morpholinos, antibodies, anatomical structures and publications. Integrated views of these data, as well as data gathered through collaborations and data exchanges, are provided through a wide selection of web-based search forms. Among the vertebrate model organisms, zebrafish are uniquely well suited for rapid and targeted generation of mutant lines. The recent rapid production of mutants and transgenic zebrafish is making management of data associated with these resources particularly important to the research community. Here, we describe recent enhancements to ZFIN aimed at improving our support for mutant and transgenic lines, including (i) enhanced mutant/transgenic search functionality; (ii) more expressive phenotype curation methods; (iii) new downloads files and archival data access; (iv) incorporation of new data loads from laboratories undertaking large-scale generation of mutant or transgenic lines and (v) new GBrowse tracks for transgenic insertions, genes with antibodies and morpholinos. PMID:23074187

  18. Novel use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model to screen radiation protectors and sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, Mary Frances . E-mail: adam.dicker@mail.tju.edu; Davidson, Christian; Davidson, William Robert; Yentzer, Brad; Farber, Steven A.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Dicker, Adam P.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos provide a unique vertebrate model to screen therapeutic agents easily and rapidly because of their relatively close genetic relationship to humans, ready abundance and accessibility, short embryonal development, and optical clarity. To validate zebrafish embryos as a screen for radiation modifiers, we evaluated the effects of ionizing radiation in combination with a known radioprotector (free radical scavenger Amifostine) or radiosensitizing agent (tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478). Methods and materials: Viable zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0-10 Gy single-fraction 250 kVp X-rays with or without either Amifostine (0-4 mM) or AG1478 (0-10 {mu}M) at defined developmental stages from 1-24 h postfertilization (hpf). Embryos were examined for morphologic abnormalities and viability until 144 hpf. Results: Radiation alone produced a time- and dose-dependent perturbation of normal embryonic development and survival with maximal sensitivity at doses {>=}4 Gy delivered before 4 hpf. Amifostine markedly attenuated this effect, whereas AG1478 enhanced teratogenicity and lethality, particularly at therapeutically relevant (2-6 Gy) radiation doses. Conclusions: Collectively, these data validate the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model to assess the effect of radiation alone or with radiation response modulators. Zebrafish embryos may thus provide a rapid, facile system to screen novel agents ultimately intended for human use in the context of therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure.

  19. A Post-Developmental Genetic Screen for Zebrafish Models of Inherited Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Hyung; Wu, Shu-Yu; Baek, Jeong-In; Choi, Soo Young; Su, Yanhui; Flynn, Charles R.; Gamse, Joshua T.; Ess, Kevin C.; Hardiman, Gary; Lipschutz, Joshua H.; Abumrad, Naji N.; Rockey, Don C.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease such as simple steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and fibrosis. However, the molecular pathogenesis and genetic variations causing NAFLD are poorly understood. The high prevalence and incidence of NAFLD suggests that genetic variations on a large number of genes might be involved in NAFLD. To identify genetic variants causing inherited liver disease, we used zebrafish as a model system for a large-scale mutant screen, and adopted a whole genome sequencing approach for rapid identification of mutated genes found in our screen. Here, we report on a forward genetic screen of ENU mutagenized zebrafish. From 250 F2 lines of ENU mutagenized zebrafish during post-developmental stages (5 to 8 days post fertilization), we identified 19 unique mutant zebrafish lines displaying visual evidence of hepatomegaly and/or steatosis with no developmental defects. Histological analysis of mutants revealed several specific phenotypes, including common steatosis, micro/macrovesicular steatosis, hepatomegaly, ballooning, and acute hepatocellular necrosis. This work has identified multiple post-developmental mutants and establishes zebrafish as a novel animal model for post-developmental inherited liver disease. PMID:25950913

  20. Strigolactone analogs act as new anti-cancer agents in inhibition of breast cancer in xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Mayzlish-Gati, Einav; Laufer, Dana; Grivas, Christopher F; Shaknof, Julia; Sananes, Amiram; Bier, Ariel; Ben-Harosh, Shani; Belausov, Eduard; Johnson, Michael D; Artuso, Emma; Levi, Oshrat; Genin, Ola; Prandi, Cristina; Khalaila, Isam; Pines, Mark; Yarden, Ronit I; Kapulnik, Yoram; Koltai, Hinanit

    2015-10-30

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a novel class of plant hormones. Previously, we found that analogs of SLs induce growth arrest and apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. These compounds also inhibited the growth of breast cancer stem cell enriched-mammospheres with increased potency. Furthermore, strigolactone analogs inhibited growth and survival of colon, lung, prostate, melanoma, osteosarcoma and leukemia cancer cell lines. To further examine the anti-cancer activity of SLs in vivo, we have examined their effects on growth and viability of MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts model either alone or in combination with paclitaxel. We show that strigolactone act as new anti-cancer agents in inhibition of breast cancer in xenograft model. In addition we show that SLs affect the integrity of the microtubule network and therefore may inhibit the migratory phenotype of the highly invasive breast cancer cell lines that were examined. PMID:26192476

  1. Monitoring breast tumor progression by photoacoustic measurements: a xenograft mice model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, Mallika; Satish Rao, Bola Sadashiva; Chandra, Subhash; Datta, Anirbit; Nayak, Subramanya G.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2015-10-01

    The current study reports the photoacoustic spectroscopy-based assessment of breast tumor progression in a nude mice xenograft model. The tumor was induced through subcutaneous injection of MCF-7 cells in female nude mice and was monitored for 20 days until the tumor volume reached 1000 mm3. The tumor tissues were extracted at three different time points (days 10, 15, and 20) after tumor inoculation and subjected to photoacoustic spectral recordings in time domain ex vivo at 281 nm pulsed laser excitations. The spectra were converted into the frequency domain using the fast Fourier transformed tools of MATLAB® algorithms and further utilized to extract seven statistical features (mean, median, area under the curve, variance and standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis) from each time point sample to assess the tumor growth with wavelet principal component analysis based logistic regression analysis performed on the data. The prediction accuracies of the analysis for day 10 versus day 15, day 15 versus day 20, and day 10 versus day 20 were found to be 92.31, 87.5, and 95.2%, respectively. Also, receiver operator characteristics area under the curve analysis for day 10 versus day 15, day 15 versus day 20, and day 10 versus day 20 were found to be 0.95, 0.85, and 0.93, respectively. The ability of photoacoustic measurements in the objective assessment of tumor progression has been clearly demonstrated, indicating its clinical potential.

  2. Application of a patient-derived xenograft model in cytolytic viral activation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Kuo, Yung-Chia; Huang, Yenlin; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Lui, Kar-Wai; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lin, Tung-Liang; Fan, Hsien-Chi; Lin, An-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Lee, Li-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Li, Hsin-Pai; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2015-10-13

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-related malignancy in which the tumor microenvironment plays a pivotal role in tumor progression. Here, we developed two patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse lines from engrafted NPC metastatic tumors. Positive staining for EBV-encoded small RNAs confirmed that these tumors harbored EBV, and gene expression profile analyses further showed that the PDX was highly similar to the primary parent tumor. In vivo drug screening using the PDX system demonstrated that gemcitabine had the best antitumor effect among the tested drugs. The donor of this PDX also showed excellent responsiveness to gemcitabine treatment. The combination of gemcitabine and valproic acid exerted synergistic antitumor effects. Further addition of ganciclovir to this two-drug combination regimen enhanced cytolytic viral activation, yielding the best antitumor response among tested regimens. Treatment with this three-drug combination regimen decreased plasma EBV-DNA load, tumor viral concentration, and the number of viable tumor cells to a greater extent than the two-drug gemcitabine and valproic acid combination. These results highlight the value of PDX models in the development of EBV-targeted strategies to treat NPC. PMID:26416517

  3. Monitoring the development of xenograft triple negative breast cancer models using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Renu M; Pagel, Mark D; Brown, Kathy; Baker, Amanda F; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Gillies, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Evaluations of tumor growth rates and molecular biomarkers are traditionally used to assess new mouse models of human breast cancers. This study investigated the utility of diffusion weighted (DW)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating cellular proliferation of new tumor models of triple negative breast cancer, which may augment traditional analysis methods. Eleven human breast cancer cell lines were used to develop xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient mice, with two of these cell lines exhibiting sufficient growth to be serially passaged. DW-MRI was performed to measure the distributions of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in these two tumor xenograft models, which showed a correlation with tumor growth rates and doubling times during each passage. The distributions of the ADC values were also correlated with expression of Ki67, a biomarker of cell proliferation, and HIF-1? and VEGFR2 that are essential proteins involved in regulating aerobic glycolysis and angiogenesis that support tumor cell proliferation. Although PTEN levels were different between the two xenograft models, AKT levels did not differ nor did they correlate with tumor growth. This last result demonstrates the complexity of signaling protein pathways and the difficulty in interpreting the effects of protein expression on tumor cell proliferation. In contrast, DW-MRI may be a more direct assessment of tumor growth and cancer cell proliferation. PMID:23239438

  4. Characterization of the role of the photosensitizer, deuteporfin, in the detection of lymphatic metastases in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    YU, XINZHE; LI, HENGCHAO; FU, DELIANG; JIN, CHEN; LI, JI

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the use of photosensitizers as tracer agents to detect lymphatic metastases is a developing area of study in the field of pancreatic cancer treatment. In the present study, deuteporfin, a novel photosensitizer, was used as a tracer agent to detect lymphatic metastases in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of deuteporfin, following intravenous administration and injection of deuteporfin into the left rear footpad, were investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats. The increased difference in deuteporfin concentration between the cancerous and normal tissues was directly observed through the application of a Wood's lamp. In addition, the highly lymphatic BxPC-3-LN5 human metastatic pancreatic cancer cell line was generated from BxPC-3 cells using a continuous screening and seeding method in vivo. A xenograft model of the BxPC-3-LN5 human pancreatic cancer cell line transplanted into the left rear footpad of nude mice, was established. The effects of deuteporfin as a tracer agent in the detection of lymphatic metastases were then characterized in the pancreatic cancer xenograft model. Following intravenous administration, deuteporfin was rapidly enriched in the pancreas and popliteal fossa lymph nodes compared with that of the left rear footpad administration group. In addition, deuteporfin appeared to be selectively enriched in the cancerous pancreatic lymph nodes of the pancreatic cancer xenograft model. These results indicated that deuteporfin may be developed as a novel photosensitizer tracer agent for the detection of lymphatic metastases in pancreatic cancer. The advantages of deuteporfin are that it has a selective tumor-targeting effect due to high tissue uptake, and that it may be administered intravenously and is therefore suitable for surgery.

  5. A new model system swims into focus: using the zebrafish to visualize intestinal metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Carten, Juliana D; Farber, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    Many fundamental questions remain regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of digestive lipid metabolism. One major impediment to answering important questions in the field has been the lack of a tractable and sufficiently complex model system. Until recently, most studies of lipid metabolism have been performed in vitro or in mice, yet each approach possesses certain limitations. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) offers an excellent model system in which to study lipid metabolism in vivo, owing to its small size, genetic tractability and optical clarity. Fluorescent lipid dyes and optical reporters of lipid-modifying enzymes are now being used in live zebrafish to generate visible readouts of digestive physiology. Here we review recent advances in visualizing intestinal lipid metabolism in live larval zebrafish. PMID:20174460

  6. Zebrafish models in cardiac development and congenital heart birth defects

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shu; Chi, Neil C.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish has become an ideal vertebrate animal system for investigating cardiac development due to its genetic tractability, external fertilization, early optical clarity and ability to survive without a functional cardiovascular system during development. In particular, recent advances in imaging techniques and the creation of zebrafish transgenics now permit the in vivo analysis of the dynamic cellular events that transpire during cardiac morphogenesis. As a result, the combination of these salient features provides detailed insight as to how specific genes may influence cardiac development at the cellular level. In this review, we will highlight how the zebrafish has been utilized to elucidate not only the underlying mechanisms of cardiac development and human congenital heart diseases (CHDs), but also potential pathways that may modulate cardiac regeneration. Thus, we have organized this review based on the major categories of CHDs – structural heart, functional heart, and vascular/great vessel defects, and will conclude with how the zebrafish may be further used to contribute to our understanding of specific human CHDs in the future. PMID:22704690

  7. Establishment of a neuroblastoma mouse model by subcutaneous xenograft transplantation and its use to study metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Q; Chen, C F; Dong, Q; Hou, L; Chen, X; Zhi, Y L; Li, X; Lu, H T; Zhang, H Y

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a metastatic human neuroblastoma (NB) mouse model by xenograft in order to study the metastatic mechanisms of NB. A human NB cell line was obtained from a 5-year-old patient and cultured in vitro. A suspension of these cells was subcutaneously inoculated into nude mice at the right flank next to the forelimb. The biological characteristics of the developed subcutaneous and metastatic tumors were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The expression of the tumor marker neuron-specific enolase was determined by immunohistochemistry, and the invasive ability of metastatic tumors was examined by a Matrigel invasion assay. DNA microarray analyses were performed to examine the metastasis-related gene expression. Our results showed that tumors grew in 75% of the mice injected with NB cells and the rate of metastasis was 21%. The xenograft tumors retained the morphological and biological characteristics of the NB specimen from the pediatric patient. Neuron-specific enolase was highly expressed in both subcutaneous and metastatic tumors. The metastatic tumor cells possessed a higher invasive capability than the primary NB cells. The expression of 25 metastasis-related genes was found to be significantly altered in metastatic tumors compared to primary tumors, including RECK, MMP2, VEGF, MMP3, and CXCL12. In conclusion, we successfully established a human NB xenograft model with high tumor-bearing and metastatic rates in nude mice, providing an ideal animal model for the in vivo study of NB. PMID:26662423

  8. The State of the Art of the Zebrafish Model for Toxicology and Toxicologic Pathology Research—Advantages and Current Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Kent, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is now the pre-eminent vertebrate model system for clarification of the roles of specific genes and signaling pathways in development. The zebrafish genome will be completely sequenced within the next 1–2 years. Together with the substantial historical database regarding basic developmental biology, toxicology, and gene transfer, the rich foundation of molecular genetic and genomic data makes zebrafish a powerful model system for clarifying mechanisms in toxicity. In contrast to the highly advanced knowledge base on molecular developmental genetics in zebrafish, our database regarding infectious and noninfectious diseases and pathologic lesions in zebrafish lags far behind the information available on most other domestic mammalian and avian species, particularly rodents. Currently, minimal data are available regarding spontaneous neoplasm rates or spontaneous aging lesions in any of the commonly used wild-type or mutant lines of zebrafish. Therefore, to fully utilize the potential of zebrafish as an animal model for understanding human development, disease, and toxicology we must greatly advance our knowledge on zebrafish diseases and pathology. PMID:12597434

  9. Developmental nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid in a zebrafish model

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yu-Ju; Chen, Yau-Hung

    2012-05-15

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a component of Aristolochia plant extracts which is used as a treatment for different pathologies and their toxicological effects have not been sufficiently studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate AA-induced nephrotoxicity in zebrafish embryos. After soaking zebrafish embryos in AA, the embryos displayed malformed kidney phenotypes, such as curved, cystic pronephric tubes, pronephric ducts, and cases of atrophic glomeruli. The percentages of embryos with malformed kidney phenotypes increased as the exposure dosages of AA increased. Furthermore, AA-treated embryos exhibited significantly reduced glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) in comparison with mock-control littermates (mock-control: 100 ± 2.24% vs. 10 ppm AA treatment for 3–5 h: 71.48 ± 18.84% ? 39.41 ± 15.88%), indicating that AA treatment not only caused morphological kidney changes but also induced renal failure. In addition to kidney malformations, AA-treated zebrafish embryos also exhibited deformed hearts, swollen pericardiums, impaired blood circulation and the accumulation(s) of red blood cells. Whole-mount in situ hybridization studies using cmlc2 and wt1b as riboprobes indicated that the kidney is more sensitive than the heart to AA damage. Real-time PCR showed that AA can up-regulate the expression of proinflammatory genes like TNF?, cox2 and mpo. These results support the following conclusions: (1) AA-induced renal failure is mediated by inflammation, which causes circulation dysfunction followed by serious heart malformation; and (2) the kidney is more sensitive than the heart to AA injury. -- Highlights: ? Zebrafish were used to evaluate aristolochic acid (AA)-induced nephrotoxicity. ? AA-treated zebrafish embryos exhibited deformed heart as well as malformed kidney. ? Kidney is more sensitive to AA injury than the heart.

  10. A tissue-engineered humanized xenograft model of human breast cancer metastasis to bone.

    PubMed

    Thibaudeau, Laure; Taubenberger, Anna V; Holzapfel, Boris M; Quent, Verena M; Fuehrmann, Tobias; Hesami, Parisa; Brown, Toby D; Dalton, Paul D; Power, Carl A; Hollier, Brett G; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2014-02-01

    The skeleton is a preferred homing site for breast cancer metastasis. To date, treatment options for patients with bone metastases are mostly palliative and the disease is still incurable. Indeed, key mechanisms involved in breast cancer osteotropism are still only partially understood due to the lack of suitable animal models to mimic metastasis of human tumor cells to a human bone microenvironment. In the presented study, we investigate the use of a human tissue-engineered bone construct to develop a humanized xenograft model of breast cancer-induced bone metastasis in a murine host. Primary human osteoblastic cell-seeded melt electrospun scaffolds in combination with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 7 were implanted subcutaneously in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice. The tissue-engineered constructs led to the formation of a morphologically intact 'organ' bone incorporating a high amount of mineralized tissue, live osteocytes and bone marrow spaces. The newly formed bone was largely humanized, as indicated by the incorporation of human bone cells and human-derived matrix proteins. After intracardiac injection, the dissemination of luciferase-expressing human breast cancer cell lines to the humanized bone ossicles was detected by bioluminescent imaging. Histological analysis revealed the presence of metastases with clear osteolysis in the newly formed bone. Thus, human tissue-engineered bone constructs can be applied efficiently as a target tissue for human breast cancer cells injected into the blood circulation and replicate the osteolytic phenotype associated with breast cancer-induced bone lesions. In conclusion, we have developed an appropriate model for investigation of species-specific mechanisms of human breast cancer-related bone metastasis in vivo. PMID:24713276

  11. Validation of the zebrafish pentylenetetrazol seizure model: locomotor versus electrographic responses to antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Afrikanova, Tatiana; Serruys, Ann-Sophie K; Buenafe, Olivia E M; Clinckers, Ralph; Smolders, Ilse; de Witte, Peter A M; Crawford, Alexander D; Esguerra, Camila V

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish have recently emerged as an attractive in vivo model for epilepsy. Seven-day-old zebrafish larvae exposed to the GABA(A) antagonist pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) exhibit increased locomotor activity, seizure-like behavior, and epileptiform electrographic activity. A previous study showed that 12 out of 13 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) suppressed PTZ-mediated increases in larval movement, indicating the potential utility of zebrafish as a high-throughput in vivo model for AED discovery. However, a question remained as to whether an AED-induced decrease in locomotion is truly indicative of anticonvulsant activity, as some drugs may impair larval movement through other mechanisms such as general toxicity or sedation. We therefore carried out a study in PTZ-treated zebrafish larvae, to directly compare the ability of AEDs to inhibit seizure-like behavioral manifestations with their capacity to suppress epileptiform electrographic activity. We re-tested the 13 AEDs of which 12 were previously reported to inhibit convulsions in the larval movement tracking assay, administering concentrations that did not, on their own, impair locomotion. In parallel, we carried out open-field recordings on larval brains after treatment with each AED. For the majority of AEDs we obtained the same response in both the behavioral and electrographic assays. Overall our data correlate well with those reported in the literature for acute rodent PTZ tests, indicating that the larval zebrafish brain is more discriminatory than previously thought in its response to AEDs with different modes of action. Our results underscore the validity of using the zebrafish larval locomotor assay as a rapid first-pass screening tool in assessing the anticonvulsant and/or proconvulsant activity of compounds, but also highlight the importance of performing adequate validation when using in vivo models. PMID:23342097

  12. Combination of Vandetanib, Radiotherapy, and Irinotecan in the LoVo Human Colorectal Cancer Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsberger, Phyllis; Burd, Randy; Ryan, Anderson; Daskalakis, Constantine; Dicker, Adam P.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: The tumor growth kinetics of the human LoVo colorectal xenograft model was assessed in response to vandetanib, an orally available receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, radiotherapy (RT), or irinotecan (CPT-11), as single therapies and in combination. Methods and Materials: LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the right hind limb (5x10{sup 6} cells in 100muL phosphate-buffered saline) of athymic NCR NUM mice and tumors were grown to a volume of 200-300 mm{sup 3} before treatment. Vandetanib was administered at 50 mg/kg daily orally for 14 days starting on Day 1. RT was given as three fractions (3x3 Gy) on Days 1, 2, and 3. CPT-11 was given at 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally on Days 1 and 3. Tumor volumes were measured on a daily basis and calculated by measuring tumor diameters with digital calipers in two orthogonal dimensions. Results: All three single treatments (vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation) significantly slowed LoVo colorectal tumor growth. Vandetanib significantly increased the antitumor effects of CPT-11 and radiation when given in combination with either of these treatments. These treatment combinations resulted in a slow tumor growth rate during the 2 weeks of vandetanib administration. The triple combination of vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation produced the most marked improvement in response as observed by measurable shrinkage of tumors during the first week of treatment. Conclusions: The tumor growth delay kinetics observed in this study of the LoVo colorectal model suggest concurrent and sustained post-sequencing of vandetanib with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial in tumors of this type.

  13. Using visual lateralization to model learning and memory in zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Madelene Åberg; Ek, Fredrik; Olsson, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Impaired learning and memory are common symptoms of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. Present, there are several behavioural test employed to assess cognitive functions in animal models, including the frequently used novel object recognition (NOR) test. However, although atypical functional brain lateralization has been associated with neuropsychiatric conditions, spanning from schizophrenia to autism, few animal models are available to study this phenomenon in learning and memory deficits. Here we present a visual lateralization NOR model (VLNOR) in zebrafish larvae as an assay that combines brain lateralization and NOR. In zebrafish larvae, learning and memory are generally assessed by habituation, sensitization, or conditioning paradigms, which are all representatives of nondeclarative memory. The VLNOR is the first model for zebrafish larvae that studies a memory similar to the declarative memory described for mammals. We demonstrate that VLNOR can be used to study memory formation, storage, and recall of novel objects, both short and long term, in 10-day-old zebrafish. Furthermore we show that the VLNOR model can be used to study chemical modulation of memory formation and maintenance using dizocilpine (MK-801), a frequently used non-competitive antagonist of the NMDA receptor, used to test putative antipsychotics in animal models. PMID:25727677

  14. Effect of Curcumin on Pro-angiogenic Factors in the Xenograft Model of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Livia Carvalho; Arbab, Ali S; Jardim-Perassi, Bruna Victorasso; Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Varma, Nadimpalli Rs; Iskander, Asm; Shankar, Adarsh; Ali, Meser M; de Campos Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a new blood vessel is stimulated by angiogenic factors. Curcumin, which is the active ingredient of the spice plant Curcuma longa L and is used as food and traditional medicine, has shown anticancer effects against different types of cancers. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on angiogenesis/pro-angiogenic factors in a mouse model of human breast cancer. Cell viability was measured by the MTT assay after curcumin treatment in triple-negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). For the in vivo study, human breast cancer was induced in athymic mice and treated with 300 mg/kg/day of curcumin administered intraperitoneally. Tumor size was measured weekly, and the animals underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanning with Tc-99m tagged VEGF-c to detect the in vivo expression of VEGFR2/3. In addition, the expression of proangiogenic/ growth factors in the tumor extracts was evaluated by a membrane antibody array. Histological analysis was performed to confirm the effect of curcumin on neovascularization. The MTT assay showed that curcumin significantly reduced the cell viability of MDA-MB-231 cells. In breast cancer xenografts, curcumin treatment led to a decrease in tumor volume and cell proliferation (Ki-67) compared with the vehicle treated group. Tc-99m-HYNIC-VEGF-c-SPECT imaging showed decreased uptake to the tumor, which may indicate a lower expression of VEGFR2/3 in curcumin treated tumors; however, a statistically significant difference was not achieved (p>0.05). Additionally, curcumin treatment showed a significantly low level of expression of pro-angiogenic factors (p<0.05) and a decrease in micro-vessel density (vWF) in animals compared with that of vehicle treated tumors. In conclusion, curcumin treatment showed effectiveness in reducing tumor growth and cell proliferation, as well as in the inhibition of angiogenesis. PMID:25991545

  15. Modeling stripe formation in zebrafish: an agent-based approach Alexandria Volkening*

    E-print Network

    Sandstede, Björn

    of vertebrate development [1]. Individual pigment cells are discernible on zebrafish skin, making pigment cells. We present a comprehensive agent-based model for the development and regeneration the necessary scale for long-range interactions and that iridophores, a third type of pigment cell, help align

  16. Evaluation of zebrafish as a model to study the pathogenesis of the opportunistic pathogen Cronobacter turicensis

    PubMed Central

    Fehr, Alexander; Eshwar, Athmanya K; Neuhauss, Stephan CF; Ruetten, Maja; Lehner, Angelika; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Cronobacter spp. have been recognized as causative agents of life-threatening systemic infections, primarily in premature, low-birth weight and/or immune-compromised neonates. Knowledge remains scarce regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms of disease development. In this study, we evaluated the use of a zebrafish model to study the pathogenesis of Cronobacter turicensis LMG 23827T, a clinical isolate responsible for two fatal sepsis cases in neonates. Here, the microinjection of approximately 50 colony forming units (CFUs) into the yolk sac resulted in the rapid multiplication of bacteria and dissemination into the blood stream at 24 h post infection (hpi), followed by the development of a severe bacteremia and larval death within 3 days. In contrast, the innate immune response of the embryos was sufficiently developed to control infection after the intravenous injection of up to 104 CFUs of bacteria. Infection studies using an isogenic mutant devoid of surviving and replicating in human macrophages (?fkpA) showed that this strain was highly attenuated in its ability to kill the larvae. In addition, the suitability of the zebrafish model system to study the effectiveness of antibiotics to treat Cronobacter infections in zebrafish embryos was examined. Our data indicate that the zebrafish model represents an excellent vertebrate model to study virulence-related aspects of this opportunistic pathogen in vivo. PMID:26060602

  17. Assessing teratogenic changes in a zebrafish model of fetal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Evyn; Ahlgren, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a severe manifestation of embryonic exposure to ethanol. It presents with characteristic defects to the face and organs, including mental retardation due to disordered and damaged brain development. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a term used to cover a continuum of birth defects that occur due to maternal alcohol consumption, and occurs in approximately 4% of children born in the United States. With 50% of child-bearing age women reporting consumption of alcohol, and half of all pregnancies being unplanned, unintentional exposure is a continuing issue. In order to best understand the damage produced by ethanol, plus produce a model with which to test potential interventions, we developed a model of developmental ethanol exposure using the zebrafish embryo. Zebrafish are ideal for this kind of teratogen study. Each pair lays hundreds of eggs, which can then be collected without harming the adult fish. The zebrafish embryo is transparent and can be readily imaged with any number of stains. Analysis of these embryos after exposure to ethanol at different doses and times of duration and application shows that the gross developmental defects produced by ethanol are consistent with the human birth defect. Described here are the basic techniques used to study and manipulate the zebrafish FAS model. PMID:22453686

  18. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; et al

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targetingmore »either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in these human lymphoma xenograft models.« less

  19. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibody-streptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTA-biotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in these human lymphoma xenograft models. PMID:25785845

  20. Appropriateness of Using Patient-Derived Xenograft Models for Pharmacologic Evaluation of Novel Therapies for Esophageal/Gastro-Esophageal Junction Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dodbiba, Lorin; Teichman, Jennifer; Fleet, Andrew; Thai, Henry; Starmans, Maud H. W.; Navab, Roya; Chen, Zhuo; Girgis, Hala; Eng, Lawson; Espin-Garcia, Osvaldo; Shen, Xiaowei; Bandarchi, Bizhan; Schwock, Joerg; Tsao, Ming-Sound; El-Zimaity, Hala; Der, Sandy D.; Xu, Wei; Bristow, Robert G.; Darling, Gail E.; Boutros, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The high morbidity and mortality of patients with esophageal (E) and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancers, warrants new pre-clinical models for drug testing. The utility of primary tumor xenografts (PTXGs) as pre-clinical models was assessed. Clinicopathological, immunohistochemical markers (p53, p16, Ki-67, Her-2/neu and EGFR), and global mRNA abundance profiles were evaluated to determine selection biases of samples implanted or engrafted, compared with the underlying population. Nine primary E/GEJ adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were further characterized for the spectrum and stability of gene/protein expression over passages. Seven primary esophageal adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were treated with individual or combination chemotherapy. Tumors that were implanted (n=55) in NOD/SCID mice had features suggestive of more aggressive biology than tumors that were never implanted (n=32). Of those implanted, 21/55 engrafted; engraftment was associated with poorly differentiated tumors (p=0.04) and older patients (p=0.01). Expression of immunohistochemical markers were similar between patient sample and corresponding xenograft. mRNA differences observed between patient tumors and first passage xenografts were largely due to loss of human stroma in xenografts. mRNA patterns of early vs late passage xenografts and of small vs large tumors of the same passage were similar. Complete resistance was present in 2/7 xenografts while the remaining tumors showed varying degrees of sensitivity, that remained constant across passages. Because of their ability to recapitulate primary tumor characteristics during engraftment and across serial passaging, PTXGs can be useful clinical systems for assessment of drug sensitivity of human E/GEJ cancers. PMID:25826681

  1. An orthotopic xenograft model with survival hindlimb amputation allows investigation of the effect of tumor microenvironment on sarcoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Seth D; Hayashi, Masanori; Albert, Catherine M; Jackson, Kyle W; Loeb, David M

    2015-10-01

    Overall survival rates for pediatric high-grade sarcoma have improved greatly in the past few decades, but prevention and treatment of distant metastasis remain the most compelling problems facing these patients. Traditional preclinical mouse models have not proven adequate to study the biology and treatment of spontaneous distant sarcoma metastasis. To address this deficit, we developed an orthotopic implantation/amputation model in which patient-derived sarcoma xenografts are surgically implanted into mouse hindlimbs, allowed to grow, then subsequently amputated and the animals observed for development of metastases. NOD/SCID/IL-2R?-null mice were implanted with either histologically intact high grade sarcoma patient-derived xenografts or cell lines in the pretibial space and affected limbs were amputated after tumor growth. In contrast to subcutaneous flank tumors, we were able to consistently detect spontaneous distant spread of the tumors using our model. Metastases were seen in 27-90 % of animals, depending on the xenograft, and were repeatable and predictable. We also demonstrate the utility of this model for studying the biology of metastasis and present preliminary new insights suggesting the role of arginine metabolism and macrophage phenotype polarization in creating a tumor microenvironment that facilitates metastasis. Subcutaneous tumors express more arginase than inducible nitric oxide synthase and demonstrate significant macrophage infiltration, whereas orthotopic tumors express similar amounts of inducible nitric oxide synthase and arginase and have only a scant macrophage infiltrate. Thus, we present a model of spontaneous distant sarcoma metastasis that mimics the clinical situation and is amenable to studying the biology of the entire metastatic cascade. PMID:26278104

  2. Modeling mixtures of thyroid gland function disruptors in a vertebrate alternative model, the zebrafish eleutheroembryo

    SciTech Connect

    Thienpont, Benedicte; Barata, Carlos; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2013-06-01

    Maternal thyroxine (T4) plays an essential role in fetal brain development, and even mild and transitory deficits in free-T4 in pregnant women can produce irreversible neurological effects in their offspring. Women of childbearing age are daily exposed to mixtures of chemicals disrupting the thyroid gland function (TGFDs) through the diet, drinking water, air and pharmaceuticals, which has raised the highest concern for the potential additive or synergic effects on the development of mild hypothyroxinemia during early pregnancy. Recently we demonstrated that zebrafish eleutheroembryos provide a suitable alternative model for screening chemicals impairing the thyroid hormone synthesis. The present study used the intrafollicular T4-content (IT4C) of zebrafish eleutheroembryos as integrative endpoint for testing the hypotheses that the effect of mixtures of TGFDs with a similar mode of action [inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO)] was well predicted by a concentration addition concept (CA) model, whereas the response addition concept (RA) model predicted better the effect of dissimilarly acting binary mixtures of TGFDs [TPO-inhibitors and sodium-iodide symporter (NIS)-inhibitors]. However, CA model provided better prediction of joint effects than RA in five out of the six tested mixtures. The exception being the mixture MMI (TPO-inhibitor)-KClO{sub 4} (NIS-inhibitor) dosed at a fixed ratio of EC{sub 10} that provided similar CA and RA predictions and hence it was difficult to get any conclusive result. There results support the phenomenological similarity criterion stating that the concept of concentration addition could be extended to mixture constituents having common apical endpoints or common adverse outcomes. - Highlights: • Potential synergic or additive effect of mixtures of chemicals on thyroid function. • Zebrafish as alternative model for testing the effect of mixtures of goitrogens. • Concentration addition seems to predict better the effect of mixtures of goitrogens.

  3. The zebrafish as a gerontology model in nervous system aging, disease, and repair.

    PubMed

    Van Houcke, Jessie; De Groef, Lies; Dekeyster, Eline; Moons, Lieve

    2015-11-01

    Considering the increasing number of elderly in the world's population today, developing effective treatments for age-related pathologies is one of the biggest challenges in modern medical research. Age-related neurodegeneration, in particular, significantly impacts important sensory, motor, and cognitive functions, seriously constraining life quality of many patients. Although our understanding of the causal mechanisms of aging has greatly improved in recent years, animal model systems still have much to tell us about this complex process. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have gained enormous popularity for this research topic over the past decade, since their life span is relatively short but, like humans, they are still subject to gradual aging. In addition, the extensive characterization of its well-conserved molecular and cellular physiology makes the zebrafish an excellent model to unravel the underlying mechanisms of aging, disease, and repair. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the progress made in zebrafish gerontology, with special emphasis on nervous system aging. We review the evidence that classic hallmarks of aging can also be recognized within this small vertebrate, both at the molecular and cellular level. Moreover, we illustrate the high level of similarity with age-associated human pathologies through a survey of the functional deficits that arise as zebrafish age. PMID:26538520

  4. Power and challenges of using zebrafish as a model for skeletal tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Bruneel, Bart; Witten, Paul Eckhard

    2015-04-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is now a widely used model organism in biomedical research. The species is also increasingly used for studying skeletal development and regeneration and for understanding human skeletal diseases. The small size of this model organism is an advantage and an extreme challenge for visualizing and diagnosing the animals' skeleton. This applies especially to early stages of skeletal development. Similar challenges arise for the analysis of the skeleton of other small fish species, such as medaka (Oryzias latipes). High quality histological preparations and knowledge about the special quality of the zebrafish skeleton remain prerequisites for a correct analysis. In addition, new methods for fast and high-resolution 2D and 3D skeletal tissue screening are required for a maximal understanding of skeletal development. We, in this study, review advantages and limitations of adapting current visualization techniques for zebrafish skeletal research. We discuss the methods for in toto visualization, such as X-raying, micro-CT, Alizarin red staining and optical projection tomography. Techniques for in vivo imaging, such as second harmonic generation microscopy and two-photon excitation fluorescence, are also discussed. Finally, we explore the possibilities of light-sheet microscopy for the analysis of the zebrafish skeleton. PMID:25689092

  5. Zebrafish as a model system for the study of hemostasis and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Angela C.; Shavit, Jordan A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Although the zebrafish has been established as a research tool over the past 2–3 decades, in hematology it has primarily been used to investigate areas distinct from coagulation. Advantages of this vertebrate model include high fecundity, rapid and external development, and conservation of virtually all clotting factors in the zebrafish genomic sequence. Here we summarize the growing application of this technology to the study of hemostasis and thrombosis. Recent findings Loss of function studies have demonstrated conservation of function for a number of zebrafish coagulation factors. These include positive and negative regulators of coagulation, as well as key components of the thrombus itself, such as von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, and thrombocytes. Such analyses have also been leveraged to aid in the understanding of human variation and disease, as well as perform in vivo structure/function experiments. Summary The zebrafish is an organism that lends itself to a number of unique and powerful approaches not possible in mammals. This review demonstrates that there is a high degree of genetic and functional conservation of coagulation, portending future insights into hemostasis and thrombosis through use of this model. PMID:25054910

  6. The behavioral space of zebrafish locomotion and its neural network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdhar, Kiran; Benitez-Jones, Maria; Thi, Ha Pham; Nelson, Mark; Gruebele, Martin; Chemla, Yann

    2014-03-01

    How does one describe quantitatively the complex motion of vertebrates? To answer this question, we investigated a model system for vertebrate locomotion: zebrafish swimming. We performed a quantitative analysis of all stereotyped behavioral swimming patterns of zebrafish larvae: spontaneous swimming, escape response to stimulus, and prey tracking. Previous attempts to analyze zebrafish swimming motion quantitatively have imposed many arbitrary parameters. Here, we instead used a parameter-independent method that produces an orthogonal set of ``eigen-shapes'' of fish backbones to describe swimming motion in a low-dimensional space. We show that a linear combination of only three such ``eigen-shapes'' is sufficient to describe 97% of zebrafish shapes. Moreover, stereotyped swimming behaviors fall on two low-dimensional attractors embedded in this three dimensional behavioral space. We also show using a two-dimensional correlation analysis that ``scoots'' and ``R-turns,'' which were previously described as discrete behavioral states, in fact represent extrema in a continuum in this low-dimensional behavioral space. To understand the neural basis of the behavior, we have also developed a neural network model of spontaneous swimming of fish larvae. We present a set of neural parameters such as synaptic conductance, stimulus amplitude that produces swimming behavior and reconstructed the low-dimensional behavioral space obtained from experimental results.

  7. New Model Systems to Illuminate Thyroid Organogenesis. Part I: An Update on the Zebrafish Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Robert; Antonica, Francesco; Costagliola, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid dysgenesis (TD) resulting from defects during embryonic thyroid development represents a major cause of congenital hypothyroidism. The pathogenetic mechanisms of TD in human newborns, however, are still poorly understood and disease-causing genetic variants have been identified in only a small percentage of TD cases. This limited understanding of the pathogenesis of TD is partly due to a lack of knowledge on how intrinsic factors and extrinsic signalling cues orchestrate the differentiation of thyroid follicular cells and the morphogenesis of thyroid tissue. Recently, embryonic stem cells and zebrafish embryos emerged as novel model systems that allow for innovative experimental approaches in order to decipher cellular and molecular mechanisms of thyroid development and to unravel pathogenic mechanisms of TD. Zebrafish embryos offer several salient properties for studies on thyroid organogenesis including rapid and external development, optical transparency, ease of breeding, relative short generation time and amenability for genome editing. In this review, we will highlight recent advances in the zebrafish toolkit to visualize cellular dynamics of organ development and discuss specific prospects of the zebrafish model for studies on vertebrate thyroid development and human congenital thyroid diseases. PMID:24783054

  8. Efficacy of an Fc-modified anti-CD123 antibody (CSL362) combined with chemotherapy in xenograft models of acute myelogenous leukemia in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Erwin M.; Yee, Dean; Busfield, Samantha J.; McManus, Julie F.; Cummings, Nik; Vairo, Gino; Wei, Andrew; Ramshaw, Hayley S.; Powell, Jason A.; Lopez, Angel F.; Lewis, Ian D.; McCall, Martin N.; Lock, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of older patients with acute myelogenous leukemia is generally poor. The interleukin-3 receptor ?-chain (CD123) is highly expressed on the surface of acute leukemia cells compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. CSL362 is a fully humanized, CD123-neutralizing monoclonal antibody containing a modified Fc structure, which enhances human natural killer cell antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Six continuous acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts established from patient explants and characterized by cell and molecular criteria, produced progressively lethal disease 42-202 days after transplantation. CSL362 alone reduced engraftment of one of four and three of four acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts in the bone marrow and peripheral organs, respectively. A cytarabine and daunorubicin regimen was optimized using this model to identify potentially synergistic interactions with CSL362. Cytarabine/daunorubicin improved the survival of mice engrafted with four of four acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts by 31–41 days. Moreover, CSL362 extended the survival of cytarabine/daunorubicin-treated mice for two of two acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts, while augmentation of natural killer cell-deficient NSG mice with adoptively transferred human natural killer cells improved survival against a single xenograft. Interestingly, this enhanced CSL362 efficacy was lost in the absence of chemotherapy. This study shows that acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts provide a platform for the evaluation of new therapeutics, simulating complex in vivo interactions, and that the in vivo efficacy of CSL362 supports continued clinical development of this drug. PMID:26130514

  9. NAD+ biosynthesis ameliorates a zebrafish model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Goody, Michelle F; Kelly, Meghan W; Reynolds, Christine J; Khalil, Andre; Crawford, Bryan D; Henry, Clarissa A

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex- or integrin alpha7-deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction with integrin alpha6 to reduce muscle degeneration. Taken together, these results define a novel cell adhesion pathway that may have future therapeutic relevance for a broad spectrum of muscular dystrophies. PMID:23109907

  10. The common neural parasite Pseudoloma neurophilia is associated with altered startle response habituation in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio): Implications for the zebrafish as a model organism.

    PubMed

    Spagnoli, Sean; Xue, Lan; Kent, Michael L

    2015-09-15

    The zebrafish's potential as a model for human neurobehavioral research appears nearly limitless despite its relatively recent emergence as an experimental organism. Since the zebrafish has only been part of the research community for a handful of decades, pathogens from its commercial origins continue to plague laboratory stocks. One such pathogen is Pseudoloma neurophilia, a common microparasite in zebrafish laboratories world-wide that generally produces subclinical infections. Given its high prevalence, its predilection for the host's brain and spinal cord, and the delicate nature of neurobehavioral research, the behavioral consequences of subclinical P. neurophilia infection must be explored. Fish infected via cohabitation were tested for startle response habituation in parallel with controls in a device that administered ten taps over 10 min along with taps at 18 and 60 min to evaluate habituation extinction. After testing, fish were euthanized and evaluated for infection via histopathology. Infected fish had a significantly smaller reduction in startle velocity during habituation compared to uninfected tankmates and controls. Habituation was eliminated in infected and control fish at 18 min, whereas exposed negative fish retained partial habituation at 18 min. Infection was also associated with enhanced capture evasion: Despite the absence of external symptoms, infected fish tended to be caught later than uninfected fish netted from the same tank. The combination of decreased overall habituation, early extinction of habituation compared to uninfected cohorts, and enhanced netting evasion indicates that P. neurophilia infection is associated with a behavioral phenotype distinct from that of controls and uninfected cohorts. Because of its prevalence in zebrafish facilities, P. neurophilia has the potential to insidiously influence a wide range of neurobehavioral studies if these associations are causative. Rigorous health screening is therefore vital to the improvement of the zebrafish as a translational model for human behavior. PMID:26028515

  11. Use of Reporter Genes to Analyze Estrogen Response: The Transgenic Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Daniel A; Pinto, Caroline Lucia; Hao, Ruixin; Bondesson, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In vivo models to detect estrogenic compounds are very valuable for screening for endocrine disruptors. Here we describe the use of transgenic estrogen reporter zebrafish as an in vivo model for identification of estrogenic properties of compounds. Live imaging of these transgenic fish provides knowledge of estrogen receptor specificity of different ligands as well as dynamics of estrogen signaling. Coupled to image analysis, the model can provide quantitative dose-response information on estrogenic activity of chemical compounds. PMID:26585145

  12. A robust and rapid xenograft model to assess efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents for human acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Saland, E; Boutzen, H; Castellano, R; Pouyet, L; Griessinger, E; Larrue, C; de Toni, F; Scotland, S; David, M; Danet-Desnoyers, G; Vergez, F; Barreira, Y; Collette, Y; Récher, C; Sarry, J-E

    2015-01-01

    Relevant preclinical mouse models are crucial to screen new therapeutic agents for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Current in vivo models based on the use of patient samples are not easy to establish and manipulate in the laboratory. Our objective was to develop robust xenograft models of human AML using well-characterized cell lines as a more accessible and faster alternative to those incorporating the use of patient-derived AML cells. Five widely used AML cell lines representing various AML subtypes were transplanted and expanded into highly immunodeficient non-obese diabetic/LtSz-severe combined immunodeficiency IL2R?cnull mice (for example, cell line-derived xenografts). We show here that bone marrow sublethal conditioning with busulfan or irradiation has equal efficiency for the xenotransplantation of AML cell lines. Although higher number of injected AML cells did not change tumor engraftment in bone marrow and spleen, it significantly reduced the overall survival in mice for all tested AML cell lines. On the basis of AML cell characteristics, these models also exhibited a broad range of overall mouse survival, engraftment, tissue infiltration and aggressiveness. Thus, we have established a robust, rapid and straightforward in vivo model based on engraftment behavior of AML cell lines, all vital prerequisites for testing new therapeutic agents in preclinical studies. PMID:25794133

  13. Zebrafish forebrain and temporal conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ruey-Kuang; Jesuthasan, Suresh J.; Penney, Trevor B.

    2014-01-01

    The rise of zebrafish as a neuroscience research model organism, in conjunction with recent progress in single-cell resolution whole-brain imaging of larval zebrafish, opens a new window of opportunity for research on interval timing. In this article, we review zebrafish neuroanatomy and neuromodulatory systems, with particular focus on identifying homologies between the zebrafish forebrain and the mammalian forebrain. The neuroanatomical and neurochemical basis of interval timing is summarized with emphasis on the potential of using zebrafish to reveal the neural circuits for interval timing. The behavioural repertoire of larval zebrafish is reviewed and we demonstrate that larval zebrafish are capable of expecting a stimulus at a precise time point with minimal training. In conclusion, we propose that interval timing research using zebrafish and whole-brain calcium imaging at single-cell resolution will contribute to our understanding of how timing and time perception originate in the vertebrate brain from the level of single cells to circuits. PMID:24446496

  14. Fasted zebrafish mimic genetic and physiological responses in mammals: a model for obesity and diabetes?

    PubMed

    Craig, Paul M; Moon, Thomas W

    2011-09-01

    With worldwide rates of obesity and type-II diabetes increasing, it is essential to identify and understand the mechanisms involved during nutrient absorption and fuel allocation. Recent studies demonstrate that nutrients (e.g., lipids and carbohydrates) play a major regulatory role in gene transcription of glycolytic and lipogenic enzymes in addition to hormones, including insulin and glucagon. These nutrients generally exert their effects through key cellular nutrient/energy receptors. Fasting was used to identify these nutrient/energy receptors known from mammalian studies to ascertain if zebrafish (Danio rerio) are a suitable model for the study of metabolic disorders. Zebrafish were subjected to a fasting/re-feeding regime for 3 weeks, and gene expression of sterol responsive binding protein 1 and 2 (SREBP), the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), cAMP response element binding protein 3-like 3 (CREB3l3), and AMP-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPK?) was assessed. Fasted zebrafish lost ?10% of their body mass over the 3-week experiment, with an associated depression in oxygen consumption. Increases in liver AMPK? and CREB3l3 mRNA transcript level were noted, concurrent with increases in the activities of the ?-oxidation and gluconeogenic markers ?-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, respectively. Conversely, a depression in liver mTOR and SREBP1 and 2 expression was noted, with a decrease in pyruvate kinase and alanine aminotransferase activities and decreases in liver lipid and glycogen contents. Twenty-four hours after re-feeding, zebrafish rapidly recover, and the majority of parameters return to control values. Taken together, these data suggest adult zebrafish are an appropriate model for the further study of human metabolic disorders. PMID:21854210

  15. Pseudotyped AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Transfer in a Human Fetal Trachea Xenograft Model: Implications for In Utero Gene Therapy for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alice; Katz, Anna B.; Lim, Foong-Yen; Habli, Mounira; Jones, Helen N.; Wilson, James M.; Crombleholme, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung disease including airway infection and inflammation currently causes the majority of morbidities and mortalities associated with cystic fibrosis (CF), making the airway epithelium and the submucosal glands (SMG) novel target cells for gene therapy in CF. These target cells are relatively inaccessible to postnatal gene transfer limiting the success of gene therapy. Our previous work in a human-fetal trachea xenograft model suggests the potential benefit for treating CF in utero. In this study, we aim to validate adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model and to compare transduction efficiencies of pseudotyping AAV2 vectors in fetal xenografts and postnatal xenograft controls. Methodology/Principal Findings Human fetal trachea or postnatal bronchus controls were xenografted onto immunocompromised SCID mice for a four-week engraftment period. After injection of AAV2/2, 2/1, 2/5, 2/7 or 2/8 with a LacZ reporter into both types of xenografts, we analyzed for transgene expression in the respiratory epithelium and SMGs. At 1 month, transduction by AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 in respiratory epithelium and SMG cells was significantly greater than that of AAV2/1, 2/5, and 2/7 in xenograft tracheas. Efficiency in SMG transduction was significantly greater in AAV2/8 than AAV2/2. At 3 months, AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 transgene expression was >99% of respiratory epithelium and SMG. At 1 month, transduction efficiency of AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 was significantly less in adult postnatal bronchial xenografts than in fetal tracheal xenografts. Conclusions/Significance Based on the effectiveness of AAV vectors in SMG transduction, our findings suggest the potential utility of pseudotyped AAV vectors for treatment of cystic fibrosis. The human fetal trachea xenograft model may serve as an effective tool for further development of fetal gene therapy strategies for the in utero treatment of cystic fibrosis. PMID:22937069

  16. Molecular psychiatry of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Ullmann, Jeremy F.P.; Norton, William H.J.; Brennan, Caroline H.; Parker, Matthew O.; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their well-characterized neural development and high genetic homology to mammals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a powerful model organism in the field of biological psychiatry. Here, we discuss the molecular psychiatry of zebrafish, and its implications for translational neuroscience research and modeling CNS disorders. In particular, we outline recent genetic and technological developments allowing for in-vivo examinations, high-throughput screening and whole-brain analyses in larval and adult zebrafish. We also summarize the application of these molecular techniques to the understanding of neuropsychiatric disease, outlining the potential of zebrafish for modeling complex brain disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), aggression, post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Critically evaluating the advantages and limitations of larval and adult fish tests, we suggest that zebrafish models become a rapidly emerging new field in modern biological psychiatry research. PMID:25349164

  17. Identification of a Heritable Model of Testicular Germ Cell Tumor in the Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Joanie C.; Dovey, Jennifer Shepard; Chandler, Garvin L.; Carbajal, Liliana

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Germ cell tumors (GCTs) affect infants, children, and adults and are the most common cancer type in young men. Progress in understanding the molecular basis of GCTs has been hampered by a lack of suitable animal models. Here we report the identification of a zebrafish model of highly penetrant, heritable testicular GCT isolated as part of a forward genetic screen for cancer susceptibility genes. The mutant line develops spontaneous testicular tumors at a median age of 7 months, and pedigree analysis indicates dominant inheritance of the GCT susceptibility trait. The zebrafish model exhibits disruption of testicular tissue architecture and the accumulation of primitive, spermatogonial-like cells with loss of spermatocytic differentiation. Radiation treatment leads to apoptosis of the tumor cells and tumor regression. The GCT-susceptible line can serve as a model for understanding the mechanisms regulating germ cells in normal development and disease and as a platform investigating new therapeutic approaches for GCTs. PMID:20047465

  18. Zebrafish as a model for studying the developmental neurotoxicity of propofol.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peipei; Huang, Zhibin; Tao, Tao; Chen, Xiaohui; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Yiyue; Lin, Chunshui

    2015-12-01

    Anesthetics can cause widespread apoptotic neurodegeneration and adverse effects on synaptogenesis during early postnatal life. Synaptogenesis correlates with several proteins, including myelin basic protein (MBP). However, little is known about the adverse effects of exposure to propofol on MBP, particularly during embryonic development. Our goal was to use zebrafish to explore the effect of propofol on embryonic development, apoptosis and MBP expression. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to propofol at defined doses and stages from 6 to 48 h postfertilization by immersion. The survival rate, hatchability, aberration rate, cell apoptosis and gene expression were analyzed at defined stages. Analysis revealed that doses of 1, 2 and 3 µg ml(-1) propofol were reasonable anesthetic concentrations for zebrafish embryos. These doses of propofol caused a significant decrease in hatchability and an increase in aberration rate. Moreover, 6 days postfertilization (dpf) larvae are anesthetized by immersion into water containing 1, 2 or 3 µg ml(-1) of propofol. The number of apoptotic cells in the head of propofol-treated 36 h postfertilization embryos were significantly increased, and the expression of caspases-3, -8 and -9 were upregulated. Apoptosis was also induced in the brain of 3 dpf larvae exposed to propofol. However, propofol caused a decrease in mbp gene and protein (dose-dependent) expression levels in the central nervous system of 3 dpf zebrafish. These data show that embryonic exposure to propofol is neurotoxic, causing increased apoptosis and decreased MBP expression. We believe zebrafish can be used as a novel model to explore the mechanisms of propofol neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26103940

  19. A tale of two models: mouse and zebrafish as complementary models for lymphatic studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Dae; Jin, Suk-Won

    2014-07-01

    Lymphatic vessels provide essential roles in maintaining fluid homeostasis and lipid absorption. Dysfunctions of the lymphatic vessels lead to debilitating pathological conditions, collectively known as lymphedema. In addition, lymphatic vessels are a critical moderator for the onset and progression of diverse human diseases including metastatic cancer and obesity. Despite their clinical importance, there is no currently effective pharmacological therapy to regulate functions of lymphatic vessels. Recent efforts to manipulate the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-C (VEGFC) pathway, which is arguably the most important signaling pathway regulating lymphatic endothelial cells, to alleviate lymphedema yielded largely mixed results, necessitating identification of new targetable signaling pathways for therapeutic intervention for lymphedema. Zebrafish, a relatively new model system to investigate lymphatic biology, appears to be an ideal model to identify novel therapeutic targets for lymphatic biology. In this review, we will provide an overview of our current understanding of the lymphatic vessels in vertebrates, and discuss zebrafish as a promising in vivo model to study lymphatic vessels. PMID:24854860

  20. Human primary ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) subtype-specific pathology is preserved in a mouse intraductal (MIND) xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Kelli Elizabeth; Fan, Fang; Smith, William; Allred, D Craig; Medina, Daniel; Behbod, Fariba

    2011-12-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-obligate precursor of invasive breast cancer. The current recognition that DCIS lesions exhibit inter- and intra-lesion diversity suggests that the process of evolution to invasive breast cancer is more complex than previously recognized. Here we demonstrate the reproducible growth of primary DCIS cells derived from patient's surgical and biopsy samples by the mouse intraductal (MIND) model. MIND involves injection of cells into the NOD-SCID IL2Rgamma$^{{\\rm{null}}}$ (NSG) mouse mammary ducts. Twelve (eight unique and four repeats) DCIS and two atypical hyperplasia specimens, heterogeneous with respect to biomarker expression and histology, were injected into 48 mouse mammary glands and analysed for successful xenotransplantation. Overall, 14/34 and 11/14 MIND xenotransplanted glands contained human DCIS and atypical hyperplastic cells, respectively, after 8 weeks, which formed single and multi-layered epithelium inside the ducts, and were heterogeneous with respect to expression of human cytokeratins, oestrogen receptor ? (ER), and HER2. ER protein expression was recapitulated in MIND xenografts at ratios similar to the corresponding patient biopsies. In both patient biopsies and corresponding MIND xenografts, HER2 protein expression and nuclear HER2 gene overexpression were restricted to the DCIS lesions and were not found in the surrounding stroma or normal ducts. The xenografted DCIS lesions recapitulate the pathology and heterogeneity of human disease, thus providing a powerful tool for the characterization of the distinct cellular and molecular basis of inter- and intra-tumoural heterogeneity and the processes of DCIS to early invasive breast cancer progression. PMID:22025213

  1. Human primary ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) subtype-specific pathology is preserved in a mouse intraductal (MIND) xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Kelli Elizabeth; Fang, Fan; Smith, William; Allred, D. Craig; Medina, Daniel; Behbod, Fariba

    2012-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-obligate precursor of invasive breast cancer. The current recognition that DCIS lesions exhibit inter- and intra-lesion diversity suggests that the process of evolution to invasive breast cancer is more complex than previously recognized. Here we demonstrate the reproducible growth of primary DCIS cells derived from patient’s surgical and biopsy samples by the mouse intraductal (MIND) model. MIND involves injection of cells into the NOD-SCID IL2Rgammanull (NSG) mouse mammary ducts. Twelve (8 unique and 4 repeats) DCIS and 2 atypical hyperplasia specimens, heterogeneous with respect to biomarker expression and histology, were injected into 48 mouse mammary glands and analyzed for successful xenotransplantation. Overall, 14/34 and 11/14 of MIND xenotransplanted glands contained human DCIS and atypical hyperplastic cells, respectively, after 8 weeks, which formed single and multi-layered epithelium inside the ducts, and were heterogeneous with respect to expression of human cytokeratins, estrogen receptor ? (ER), and HER2. ER protein expression was recapitulated in MIND xenografts at ratios similar to the corresponding patient biopsies. In both patient biopsies and corresponding MIND xenografts HER2 protein expression and nuclear HER2 gene over-expression was restricted to the DCIS lesions and were not found in the surrounding stroma or normal ducts. The xenografted DCIS lesions recapitulate the pathology and heterogeneity of human disease thus providing a powerful tool for the characterization of the distinct cellular and molecular basis of inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity and the processes of DCIS to early invasive breast cancer progression. PMID:22025213

  2. Cryoinjury as a myocardial infarction model for the study of cardiac regeneration in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    González-Rosa, Juan Manuel; Mercader, Nadia

    2012-04-01

    The zebrafish heart has the capacity to regenerate after ventricular resection. Although this regeneration model has proved useful for the elucidation of certain regeneration mechanisms, it is based on the removal of heart tissue rather than on tissue damage. We recently characterized the cellular response and regenerative capacity of the zebrafish heart after cryoinjury (CI), an alternative procedure that more closely models the pathophysiological process undergone by the human heart after myocardial infarction (MI). After anesthesia, localized CI with a liquid nitrogen-cooled copper probe induced damage in 25% of the ventricle, in a procedure requiring <5 min. Here we present a detailed description of the technique, which provides a valuable system for the study of the mechanisms of heart regeneration and scar removal after MI in a versatile vertebrate model. PMID:22461067

  3. Zebrafish collective behaviour in heterogeneous environment modeled by a stochastic model based on visual perception

    E-print Network

    Collignon, Bertrand; Halloy, José

    2015-01-01

    Collective motion is one of the most ubiquitous behaviours displayed by social organisms and has led to the development of numerous models. Recent advances in the understanding of sensory system and information processing by animals impel to revise classical assumptions made in decisional algorithms. In this context, we present a new model describing the three dimensional visual sensory system of fish that adjust their trajectory according to their perception field. Furthermore, we introduce a new stochastic process based on a probability distribution function to move in targeted directions rather than on a summation of influential vectors as it is classically assumed by most models. We show that this model can spontaneously transits from consensus to choice. In parallel, we present experimental results of zebrafish (alone or in group of 10) swimming in both homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. We use these experimental data to set the parameter values of our model and show that this perception-based a...

  4. Activin type IB receptor signaling in prostate cancer cells promotes lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Kimitaka; Wang, Lixiang; Goto, Yutaka; Mukasa, Chizu; Ashida, Kenji; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ActRIB signaling induces Snail and S100A4 expressions in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prostate cancer cell lines expressing an active form of ActRIB were established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ActRIB signaling promotes EMT and lymph node metastasis in xenograft model. -- Abstract: Activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-{beta} family, has been known to be a growth and differentiating factor. Despite its pluripotent effects, the roles of activin signaling in prostate cancer pathogenesis are still unclear. In this study, we established several cell lines that express a constitutive active form of activin type IB receptor (ActRIBCA) in human prostate cancer cells, ALVA41 (ALVA-ActRIBCA). There was no apparent change in the proliferation of ALVA-ActRIBCA cells in vitro; however, their migratory ability was significantly enhanced. In a xenograft model, histological analysis revealed that the expression of Snail, a cell-adhesion-suppressing transcription factor, was dramatically increased in ALVA-ActRIBCA tumors, indicating epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Finally, mice bearing ALVA-ActRIBCA cells developed multiple lymph node metastases. In this study, we demonstrated that ActRIBCA signaling can promote cell migration in prostate cancer cells via a network of signaling molecules that work together to trigger the process of EMT, and thereby aid in the aggressiveness and progression of prostate cancers.

  5. Model organisms in the fight against muscular dystrophy: lessons from drosophila and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Plantié, Emilie; Migocka-Patrza?ek, Marta; Daczewska, Ma?gorzata; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that cause muscle weakness, abnormal contractions and muscle wasting, often leading to premature death. More than 30 types of MD have been described so far; those most thoroughly studied are Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and congenital MDs. Structurally, physiologically and biochemically, MDs affect different types of muscles and cause individual symptoms such that genetic and molecular pathways underlying their pathogenesis thus remain poorly understood. To improve our knowledge of how MD-caused muscle defects arise and to find efficacious therapeutic treatments, different animal models have been generated and applied. Among these, simple non-mammalian Drosophila and zebrafish models have proved most useful. This review discusses how zebrafish and Drosophila MD have helped to identify genetic determinants of MDs and design innovative therapeutic strategies with a special focus on DMD, DM1 and congenital MDs. PMID:25859781

  6. Zebrafish as a Model to Study the Role of Peroxisome Proliferating-Activated Receptors in Adipogenesis and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Den Broeder, Marjo J.; Kopylova, Victoria A.; Kamminga, Leonie M.; Legler, Juliette

    2015-01-01

    The Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) PPARA and PPARD are regulators of lipid metabolism with important roles in energy release through lipid breakdown, while PPARG plays a key role in lipid storage and adipogenesis. The aim of this review is to describe the role of PPARs in lipid metabolism, adipogenesis, and obesity and evaluate the zebrafish as an emerging vertebrate model to study the function of PPARs. Zebrafish are an appropriate model to study human diseases, including obesity and related metabolic diseases, as pathways important for adipogenesis and lipid metabolism which are conserved between mammals and fish. This review synthesizes knowledge on the role of PPARs in zebrafish and focuses on the putative function of PPARs in zebrafish adipogenesis. Using in silico analysis, we confirm the presence of five PPARs (pparaa, pparab, pparda, ppardb, and pparg) in the zebrafish genome with 67–74% identity to human and mouse PPARs. During development, pparda/b paralogs and pparg show mRNA expression around the swim bladder and pancreas, the region where adipocytes first develop, whereas pparg is detectable in adipocytes at 15 days post fertilization (dpf). This review indicates that the zebrafish is a promising model to investigate the specific functions of PPARs in adipogenesis and obesity. PMID:26697060

  7. How mitochondrial dysfunction affects zebrafish development and cardiovascular function: an in vivo model for testing mitochondria-targeted drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Brígida R; Santos, Miguel M; Fonseca-Silva, Anabela; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Oliveira, Jorge M A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mitochondria are a drug target in mitochondrial dysfunction diseases and in antiparasitic chemotherapy. While zebrafish is increasingly used as a biomedical model, its potential for mitochondrial research remains relatively unexplored. Here, we perform the first systematic analysis of how mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors affect zebrafish development and cardiovascular function, and assess multiple quinones, including ubiquinone mimetics idebenone and decylubiquinone, and the antimalarial atovaquone. Experimental Approach Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were chronically and acutely exposed to mitochondrial inhibitors and quinone analogues. Concentration-response curves, developmental and cardiovascular phenotyping were performed together with sequence analysis of inhibitor-binding mitochondrial subunits in zebrafish versus mouse, human and parasites. Phenotype rescuing was assessed in co-exposure assays. Key Results Complex I and II inhibitors induced developmental abnormalities, but their submaximal toxicity was not additive, suggesting active alternative pathways for complex III feeding. Complex III inhibitors evoked a direct normal-to-dead transition. ATP synthase inhibition arrested gastrulation. Menadione induced hypochromic anaemia when transiently present following primitive erythropoiesis. Atovaquone was over 1000-fold less lethal in zebrafish than reported for Plasmodium falciparum, and its toxicity partly rescued by the ubiquinone precursor 4-hydroxybenzoate. Idebenone and decylubiquinone delayed rotenone- but not myxothiazol- or antimycin-evoked cardiac dysfunction. Conclusion and Implications This study characterizes pharmacologically induced mitochondrial dysfunction phenotypes in zebrafish, laying the foundation for comparison with future studies addressing mitochondrial dysfunction in this model organism. It has relevant implications for interpreting zebrafish disease models linked to complex I/II inhibition. Further, it evidences zebrafish's potential for in vivo efficacy or toxicity screening of ubiquinone analogues or antiparasitic mitochondria-targeted drugs. PMID:23758163

  8. Zebrafish as an alternative model for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinge; Li, Yang V

    2011-01-01

    Acute cerebral ischemia is one of the leading causes of mortality and chronic disability. Animal models provide an essential tool for understanding the complex cellular and molecular pathophysiology of hypoxic-ischemia and for testing novel neuroprotective drugs in the pre-clinical setting. In this study we tested zebrafish as a novel model for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. We built an air-proof chamber where water inside had a low oxygen concentration (0.6-0.8 mg/L) proximate to complete hypoxia. Each zebrafish was placed individually in the hypoxia chamber and was subjected to hypoxia treatment until it became motionless, lying on its side on the bottom of the chamber (time to hypoxia = 679.52 ± 90 seconds, mean ± SD, n =23), followed by transferring into a recovery beaker. Overall, 60.87% of subjects did not recover from hypoxia while 39% survived. The size and distribution of brain injury were determined by triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. Bilateral, moderate to complete TTC decoloration or demarcation of the infarct after 10 minutes of hypoxic treatment was clearly visible in the optic tectum of the optic lobe. The size of the infarct expanded to the deep structure of the optic lobe with longer hypoxic treatments. The zebrafish that survived hypoxia experienced initial twitching followed by unbalanced erratic movements until they regained coordinated, balanced swimming ability. These data indicate that zebrafish are susceptible to hypoxic attack and suggest that the model we present in this study can be used as an alternative model to evaluate hypoxia-induced brain damage. PMID:21760967

  9. Upregulated stromal EGFR and vascular remodeling in mouse xenograft models of angiogenesis inhibitor-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Tina; Herynk, Matthew H; Xu, Li; Du, Zhiqiang; Kadara, Humam; Nilsson, Monique B; Oborn, Carol J; Park, Yun-Yong; Erez, Baruch; Jacoby, Jörg J; Lee, Ju-Seog; Lin, Heather Y; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Herbst, Roy S; Langley, Robert R; Heymach, John V

    2011-04-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for tumor growth and metastasis, and several inhibitors of angiogenesis are currently in clinical use for the treatment of cancer. However, not all patients benefit from antiangiogenic therapy, and those tumors that initially respond to treatment ultimately become resistant. The mechanisms underlying this, and the relative contributions of tumor cells and stroma to resistance, are not completely understood. Here, using species-specific profiling of mouse xenograft models of human lung adenocarcinoma, we have shown that gene expression changes associated with acquired resistance to the VEGF inhibitor bevacizumab occurred predominantly in stromal and not tumor cells. In particular, components of the EGFR and FGFR pathways were upregulated in stroma, but not in tumor cells. Increased activated EGFR was detected on pericytes of xenografts that acquired resistance and on endothelium of tumors with relative primary resistance. Acquired resistance was associated with a pattern of pericyte-covered, normalized revascularization, whereas tortuous, uncovered vessels were observed in relative primary resistance. Importantly, dual targeting of the VEGF and EGFR pathways reduced pericyte coverage and increased progression-free survival. These findings demonstrated that alterations in tumor stromal pathways, including the EGFR and FGFR pathways, are associated with, and may contribute to, resistance to VEGF inhibitors and that targeting these pathways may improve therapeutic efficacy. Understanding stromal signaling may be critical for developing biomarkers for angiogenesis inhibitors and improving combination regimens. PMID:21436589

  10. Perspectives on Zebrafish Models of Hallucinogenic Drugs and Related Psychotropic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Among different classes of psychotropic drugs, hallucinogenic agents exert one of the most prominent effects on human and animal behaviors, markedly altering sensory, motor, affective, and cognitive responses. The growing clinical and preclinical interest in psychedelic, dissociative, and deliriant hallucinogens necessitates novel translational, sensitive, and high-throughput in vivo models and screens. Primate and rodent models have been traditionally used to study cellular mechanisms and neural circuits of hallucinogenic drugs’ action. The utility of zebrafish (Danio rerio) in neuroscience research is rapidly growing due to their high physiological and genetic homology to humans, ease of genetic manipulation, robust behaviors, and cost effectiveness. Possessing a fully characterized genome, both adult and larval zebrafish are currently widely used for in vivo screening of various psychotropic compounds, including hallucinogens and related drugs. Recognizing the growing importance of hallucinogens in biological psychiatry, here we discuss hallucinogenic-induced phenotypes in zebrafish and evaluate their potential as efficient preclinical models of drug-induced states in humans. PMID:23883191

  11. Anti-inflammatory effect of fucoidan extracted from Ecklonia cava in zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hong; Ko, Chang-Ik; Jee, Youngheun; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Kim, Misook; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeon, You-Jin

    2013-01-30

    Fucoidan extracted from Ecklonia cava had strong anti-inflammatory activities. However, the direct effects of fucoidan of E. cava on anti-inflammatory activities in vivo model remained to be determined. Therefore, the present study was designed to assess in vivo anti-inflammatory effect of fucoidan extracted from E. cava (ECF) using tail-cutting-induced and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated zebrafish model. Treating zebrafish model with tail-cutting and LPS-treatment significantly increased the ROS and NO level. However, ECF inhibited this tail-cutting-induced and LPS-stimulated ROS and NO generation. These results show that ECF alleviated inflammation by inhibiting the ROS and NO generation induced by tail-cutting and LPS-treatment. In addition, ECF has a protective effect against the toxicity induced by LPS exposure in zebrafish embryos. This outcome could explain the potential anti-inflammatory activity of ECF, which might have a beneficial effect during the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23218269

  12. Perspectives on zebrafish models of hallucinogenic drugs and related psychotropic compounds.

    PubMed

    Neelkantan, Nikhil; Mikhaylova, Alina; Stewart, Adam Michael; Arnold, Raymond; Gjeloshi, Visar; Kondaveeti, Divya; Poudel, Manoj K; Kalueff, Allan V

    2013-08-21

    Among different classes of psychotropic drugs, hallucinogenic agents exert one of the most prominent effects on human and animal behaviors, markedly altering sensory, motor, affective, and cognitive responses. The growing clinical and preclinical interest in psychedelic, dissociative, and deliriant hallucinogens necessitates novel translational, sensitive, and high-throughput in vivo models and screens. Primate and rodent models have been traditionally used to study cellular mechanisms and neural circuits of hallucinogenic drugs' action. The utility of zebrafish ( Danio rerio ) in neuroscience research is rapidly growing due to their high physiological and genetic homology to humans, ease of genetic manipulation, robust behaviors, and cost effectiveness. Possessing a fully characterized genome, both adult and larval zebrafish are currently widely used for in vivo screening of various psychotropic compounds, including hallucinogens and related drugs. Recognizing the growing importance of hallucinogens in biological psychiatry, here we discuss hallucinogenic-induced phenotypes in zebrafish and evaluate their potential as efficient preclinical models of drug-induced states in humans. PMID:23883191

  13. Apoc2 loss-of-function zebrafish mutant as a genetic model of hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Gates, Keith P.; Fang, Longhou; Amar, Marcelo J.; Schneider, Dina A.; Geng, Honglian; Huang, Wei; Kim, Jungsu; Pattison, Jennifer; Zhang, Jian; Witztum, Joseph L.; Remaley, Alan T.; Dong, P. Duc; Miller, Yury I.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2) is an obligatory activator of lipoprotein lipase. Human patients with APOC2 deficiency display severe hypertriglyceridemia while consuming a normal diet, often manifesting xanthomas, lipemia retinalis and pancreatitis. Hypertriglyceridemia is also an important risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Animal models to study hypertriglyceridemia are limited, with no Apoc2-knockout mouse reported. To develop a genetic model of hypertriglyceridemia, we generated an apoc2 mutant zebrafish characterized by the loss of Apoc2 function. apoc2 mutants show decreased plasma lipase activity and display chylomicronemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia, which closely resemble the phenotype observed in human patients with APOC2 deficiency. The hypertriglyceridemia in apoc2 mutants is rescued by injection of plasma from wild-type zebrafish or by injection of a human APOC2 mimetic peptide. Consistent with a previous report of a transient apoc2 knockdown, apoc2 mutant larvae have a minor delay in yolk consumption and angiogenesis. Furthermore, apoc2 mutants fed a normal diet accumulate lipid and lipid-laden macrophages in the vasculature, which resemble early events in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, apoc2 mutant embryos show ectopic overgrowth of pancreas. Taken together, our data suggest that the apoc2 mutant zebrafish is a robust and versatile animal model to study hypertriglyceridemia and the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of associated human diseases. PMID:26044956

  14. Zebrafish as a new model for phenotype-based screening of melanogenic regulatory compounds.

    PubMed

    Choi, Tae-Young; Kim, Jin-Hwa; Ko, Dong Han; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Hwang, Jae-Sung; Ahn, Soomi; Kim, Sun Yeou; Kim, Chang-Deok; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Yoon, Tae-Jin

    2007-04-01

    Although many hypo-pigmenting agents are currently available, the demand for novel whitening agents is increasing, in part due to the weak effectiveness and unwanted side effects of currently available compounds. To screen for novel hypo-pigmenting agents, many methodologies such as cell culture and enzymatic assays are routinely used. However, these models have disadvantages in terms of physiological and economic relevance. In this study, we validated zebrafish as a whole-animal model for phenotype-based screening of melanogenic inhibitors or stimulators. We used both the well-known melanogenic inhibitors (1-phenyl-2-thiourea, arbutin, kojic acid, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole) and newly developed small molecule compounds (haginin, YT16i). All the tested compounds produced inhibitory effects on the pigmentation of zebrafish, most likely due to their inhibitory potential on tyrosinase activity. In simultaneous in vivo toxicity tests, a newly developed melanogenic inhibitor YT16i showed massive abnormalities in terms of deformed morphologies and cardiac function. Together, these results provide a rationale in screening and evaluating the putative melanogenic regulatory compounds. We suggest that the zebrafish system is a novel alternative to mammalian models, with several advantages including the rapidity, cost-effectiveness, and physiological relevance. PMID:17371438

  15. Use of TSH?:EGFP transgenic zebrafish as a rapid in vivo model for assessing thyroid-disrupting chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Cheng; Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing ; Jin, Xia; He, Jiangyan; Yin, Zhan

    2012-07-15

    Accumulating evidence indicates that a wide range of chemicals have the ability to interfere with the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid (HPT) axis. Novel endpoints should be evaluated in addition to existing methods in order to effectively assess the effects of these chemicals on the HPT axis. Thyroid-stimulating hormone subunit ? (TSH?) plays central regulatory roles in the HPT system. We identified the regulatory region that determines the expression level of zebrafish TSH? in the anterior pituitary. In the transgenic zebrafish with EGFP driven by the TSH? promoter, the similar responsive patterns between the expression levels of TSH?:EGFP and endogenous TSH? mRNA in the pituitary are observed following treatments with goitrogen chemicals and exogenous thyroid hormones (THs). These results suggest that the TSH?:EGFP transgenic reporter zebrafish may be a useful alternative in vivo model for the assessment of chemicals interfering with the HPT system. Highlights: ? The promoter of zebrafish TSH? gene has been identified. ? The stable TSH?:EGFP transgenic zebrafish reporter germline has been generated. ? The EGFP in the transgenic fish recapitulated the pattern of pituitary TSH? mRNA. ? The transgenic zebrafish may be an in vivo model for EDC assessment.

  16. Whole plant based treatment of hypercholesterolemia with Crataegus laevigata in a zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Consumers are increasingly turning to plant-based complementary and alternative medicines to treat hypercholesterolemia. Many of these treatments are untested and their efficacy is unknown. This multitude of potential remedies necessitates a model system amenable to testing large numbers of organisms that maintains similarity to humans in both mode of drug administration and overall physiology. Here we develop the larval zebrafish (4–30?days post fertilization) as a vertebrate model of dietary plant-based treatment of hypercholesterolemia and test the effects of Crataegus laevigata in this model. Methods Larval zebrafish were fed high cholesterol diets infused with fluorescent sterols and phytomedicines. Plants were ground with mortar and pestle into a fine powder before addition to food. Fluorescent sterols were utilized to optically quantify relative difference in intravascular cholesterol levels between groups of fish. We utilized the Zeiss 7-Live Duo high-speed confocal platform in order to both quantify intravascular sterol fluorescence and to capture video of the heart beat for determination of cardiac output. Results In this investigation we developed and utilized a larval zebrafish model to investigate dietary plant-based intervention of the pathophysiology of hypercholesterolemia. We found BODIPY-cholesterol effectively labels diet-introduced intravascular cholesterol levels (P?zebrafish cardiac output declines as cholesterol dose increases (difference between 0.1% and 8% (w/w) high cholesterol diet-treated cardiac output significant at P?model, we found hawthorn leaves and flowers significantly reduce intravascular cholesterol levels (P?zebrafish has the potential to become a powerful model to test plant based dietary intervention of hypercholesterolemia. Using this model we have shown that hawthorn leaves and flowers have the potential to affect cardiac output as well as intravascular cholesterol levels. Further, our observation that hawthorn leaves and flowers interact with cholesterol to impact cardiac output indicates that the physiological effects of hawthorn may depend on diet. PMID:22824306

  17. Macrophage-pathogen interactions in infectious diseases: new therapeutic insights from the zebrafish host model.

    PubMed

    Torraca, Vincenzo; Masud, Samrah; Spaink, Herman P; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2014-07-01

    Studying macrophage biology in the context of a whole living organism provides unique possibilities to understand the contribution of this extremely dynamic cell subset in the reaction to infections, and has revealed the relevance of cellular and molecular processes that are fundamental to the cell-mediated innate immune response. In particular, various recently established zebrafish infectious disease models are contributing substantially to our understanding of the mechanisms by which different pathogens interact with macrophages and evade host innate immunity. Transgenic zebrafish lines with fluorescently labeled macrophages and other leukocyte populations enable non-invasive imaging at the optically transparent early life stages. Furthermore, there is a continuously expanding availability of vital reporters for subcellular compartments and for probing activation of immune defense mechanisms. These are powerful tools to visualize the activity of phagocytic cells in real time and shed light on the intriguing paradoxical roles of these cells in both limiting infection and supporting the dissemination of intracellular pathogens. This Review will discuss how several bacterial and fungal infection models in zebrafish embryos have led to new insights into the dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms at play when pathogens encounter host macrophages. We also describe how these insights are inspiring novel therapeutic strategies for infectious disease treatment. PMID:24973749

  18. Whole Exome Sequencing of Rapid Autopsy Tumors and Xenograft Models Reveals Possible Driver Mutations Underlying Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Tao; Musteanu, Monica; Lopez-Casas, Pedro P.; Shields, David J.; Olson, Peter; Rejto, Paul A.; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly lethal malignancy due to its propensity to invade and rapidly metastasize and remains very difficult to manage clinically. One major hindrance towards a better understanding of PDAC is the lack of molecular data sets and models representative of end stage disease. Moreover, it remains unclear how molecularly similar patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models are to the primary tumor from which they were derived. To identify potential molecular drivers in metastatic pancreatic cancer progression, we obtained matched primary tumor, metastases and normal (peripheral blood) samples under a rapid autopsy program and performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on tumor as well as normal samples. PDX models were also generated, sequenced and compared to tumors. Across the matched data sets generated for three patients, there were on average approximately 160 single-nucleotide mutations in each sample. The majority of mutations in each patient were shared among the primary and metastatic samples and, importantly, were largely retained in the xenograft models. Based on the mutation prevalence in the primary and metastatic sites, we proposed possible clonal evolution patterns marked by functional mutations affecting cancer genes such as KRAS, TP53 and SMAD4 that may play an important role in tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. These results add to our understanding of pancreatic tumor biology, and demonstrate that PDX models derived from advanced or end-stage likely closely approximate the genetics of the disease in the clinic and thus represent a biologically and clinically relevant pre-clinical platform that may enable the development of effective targeted therapies for PDAC. PMID:26555578

  19. Antitumor activity of motesanib alone and in combination with cisplatin or docetaxel in multiple human non–small-cell lung cancer xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is categorized into various histologic subtypes that play an important role in prognosis and treatment outcome. We investigated the antitumor activity of motesanib, a selective antagonist of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) 1, 2, and 3, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and Kit, alone and combined with chemotherapy in five human NSCLC xenograft models (A549, Calu-6, NCI-H358, NCI-H1299, and NCI-H1650) containing diverse genetic mutations. Results Motesanib as a single agent dose-dependently inhibited tumor xenograft growth compared with vehicle in all five of the models (P?xenografts compared with either single agent alone (P?xenografts compared with either single agent alone (P?xenografts, motesanib with and without cisplatin significantly decreased tumor blood vessel area (P?xenograft models containing diverse genetic mutations, and that it had enhanced activity when combined with cisplatin or docetaxel. These effects appeared to be mediated primarily by antiangiogenic mechanisms. PMID:22992329

  20. A TALEN-Exon Skipping Design for a Bethlem Myopathy Model in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Elipot, Yannick; Bretaud, Sandrine; Arnould, Sylvain; Duchateau, Philippe; Ruggiero, Florence; Joly, Jean-Stéphane; Sohm, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Presently, human collagen VI-related diseases such as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM) remain incurable, emphasizing the need to unravel their etiology and improve their treatments. In UCMD, symptom onset occurs early, and both diseases aggravate with ageing. In zebrafish fry, morpholinos reproduced early UCMD and BM symptoms but did not allow to study the late phenotype. Here, we produced the first zebrafish line with the human mutation frequently found in collagen VI-related disorders such as UCMD and BM. We used a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) to design the col6a1ama605003-line with a mutation within an essential splice donor site, in intron 14 of the col6a1 gene, which provoke an in-frame skipping of exon 14 in the processed mRNA. This mutation at a splice donor site is the first example of a template-independent modification of splicing induced in zebrafish using a targetable nuclease. This technique is readily expandable to other organisms and can be instrumental in other disease studies. Histological and ultrastructural analyzes of homozygous and heterozygous mutant fry and 3 months post-fertilization (mpf) fish revealed co-dominantly inherited abnormal myofibers with disorganized myofibrils, enlarged sarcoplasmic reticulum, altered mitochondria and misaligned sarcomeres. Locomotion analyzes showed hypoxia-response behavior in 9 mpf col6a1 mutant unseen in 3 mpf fish. These symptoms worsened with ageing as described in patients with collagen VI deficiency. Thus, the col6a1ama605003-line is the first adult zebrafish model of collagen VI-related diseases; it will be instrumental both for basic research and drug discovery assays focusing on this type of disorders. PMID:26221953

  1. Zebrafish as a useful model for zoonotic Vibrio parahaemolyticus pathogenicity in fish and human.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; Dong, Xuehong; Chen, Biao; Zhang, Yonghua; Zu, Yao; Li, Weiming

    2016-02-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important aquatic zoonotic pathogen worldwide that causes vibriosis in many marine fish, and sepsis, gastroenteritis and wound infection in humans. However, the pathogenesis of different sources of V. parahaemolyticus is not fully understood. Here, we examined the pathogenicity and histopathology of fish (V. parahaemolyticus 1.2164) and human (V. parahaemolyticus 17) strains in a zebrafish (Danio rerio). We found that different infection routes resulted in different mortality in zebrafish. Moreover, death due to V. parahaemolyticus 1.2164 infection occurred quicker than that caused by V. parahaemolyticus 17 infection. Hematoxylin-eosin staining of liver, kidney and intestine sections showed histological lesions in all three organs after infection with either strain. V. parahaemolyticus 1.2164 caused more severe damage than V. parahaemolyticus 17. In particular, V. parahaemolyticus 1.2164 treatment induced more serious hydropic degeneration and venous sinus necrosis in the liver than V. parahaemolyticus 17 treatment. The expression levels of three proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin 1? (il1?), interferon phi 1 (ifn?1) and tumor necrosis factor ? (tnf?), as determined by quantitative real-time PCR, were upregulated in all examined tissues of infected fish. Notably, the peak levels of tnf? were significantly higher than those of il1? and ifn?1, suggesting, together with pathological results, that tnf? and il1? play an important role in acute sepsis. High amounts of tnf? may be related to acute liver necrosis, while ifn?1 may respond to V. parahaemolyticus and play an antibacterial role for chronically infected adult zebrafish. Taken together, our results suggest that the zebrafish model of V. parahaemolyticus infection is useful for studying strain differences in V. parahaemolyticus pathogenesis. PMID:26519599

  2. Embryonic alcohol exposure: Towards the development of a zebrafish model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Gerlai, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a devastating disease of the brain caused by exposure to alcohol during prenatal development. Its prevalence exceeds 1%. The majority of FASD cases represent the milder forms of the disease which often remain undiagnosed, and even when diagnosed treatment options for the patient are limited due to lack of information about the mechanisms that underlie the disease. The zebrafish has been proposed as a model organism for exploring the mechanisms of FASD. Our laboratory has been studying the effects of low doses of alcohol during embryonic development in the zebrafish. This review discusses the methods of alcohol exposure, its effects on behavioral performance including social behavior and learning, and the potential underlying biological mechanisms in zebrafish. It is based upon a recent keynote address delivered by the author, and it focuses on findings obtained mainly in his own laboratory. It paints a promising future of this small vertebrate in FASD research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 57: 787-798, 2015. PMID:26079519

  3. Tanshinone IIA Exhibits Anticonvulsant Activity in Zebrafish and Mouse Seizure Models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Danshen or Chinese red sage (Salvia miltiorrhiza, Bunge) is used by traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) practitioners to treat neurological, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular disorders and is included in some TCM formulations to control epileptic seizures. In this study, acetonic crude extracts of danshen inhibited pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizure activity in zebrafish larvae. Subsequent zebrafish bioassay-guided fractionation of the extract resulted in the isolation of four major tanshinones, which suppressed PTZ-induced activity to varying degrees. One of the active tanshinones, tanshinone IIA, also reduced c-fos expression in the brains of PTZ-exposed zebrafish larvae. In rodent seizure models, tanshinone IIA showed anticonvulsive activity in the mouse 6-Hz psychomotor seizure test in a biphasic manner and modified seizure thresholds in a complex manner for the mouse i.v. PTZ seizure assay. Interestingly, tanshinone IIA is used as a prescription drug in China to address cerebral ischemia in patients. Here, we provide the first in vivo evidence demonstrating that tanshinone IIA has anticonvulsant properties as well. PMID:23937066

  4. Zebrafish as a model organism to study host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Medina, Carlos; Royo, Jose Luis

    2013-08-15

    Zebrafish have been extensively used in biomedical research as a model to study vertebrate development but it is only recently that it has also been adopted into varied fields such as immunology and host-pathogen interactions. Zebrafish have a rapid life cycle, small size and the adults exhibit no territorial behavior in relatively dense cages. Under standard conditions each female lays an average of a hundred eggs per clutch, providing a large number of larvae per week. Their transparency during early life stages allows real time visualization of the different organs, which makes them especially suitable for the study of bacterial host-pathogen interactions. Traditionally, these studies have been technically challenging in higher organisms, given the loss of control over the bacteria once the pathogen infects its host. Here we describe an emerging approach to monitor Salmonella typhimurium infection progression using in vivo fluorescence upon parenteral infection. We have engineered Salmonella with the Cascade expression system; an efficient method to voluntarily activate bacterial heterologous gene expression at any point during infection once inside the Zebrafish macrophages, using a non-toxic inducer. PMID:23619567

  5. Zebrafish eleutheroembryos provide a suitable vertebrate model for screening chemicals that impair thyroid hormone synthesis.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, Benedicte; Tingaud-Sequeira, Angèle; Prats, Eva; Barata, Carlos; Babin, Patrick J; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2011-09-01

    Thyroxine-immunofluorescence quantitative disruption test (TIQDT) was designed to provide a simple, rapid, alternative bioassay for assessing the potential of chemical pollutants and drugs to disrupt thyroid gland function. This study demonstrated that zebrafish eleutheroembryos provided a suitable vertebrate model, not only for screening the potential thyroid disrupting effect of molecules, but also for estimating the potential hazards associated with exposure to chemicals directly impairing thyroxine (T4) synthesis. Amitrole, potassium perchlorate, potassium thiocyanate, methimazole (MMI), phloroglucinol, 6-propyl-2-thiouracil, ethylenethiourea, benzophenone-2, resorcinol, pyrazole, sulfamethoxazole, sodium bromide, mancozeb, and genistein were classified as thyroid gland function disruptors. Concordance between TIQDT on zebrafish and mammalian published data was very high and the physiological relevance of T4-intrafollicular content was clearly higher than regulation at the transcriptional level of tg or slc5a5. Moreover, concentration-response analysis provided information about the thyroid disrupting potency and hazard of selected positive compounds. Finally, the effect of perchlorate, but not MMI, was completely rescued by low-micromolar amounts of iodide. TIQDT performed on zebrafish eleutheroembryos is an alternative whole-organism screening assay that provides relevant information for environmental and human risk assessments. PMID:21800831

  6. Mind the fish: zebrafish as a model in cognitive social neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Rui F.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how the brain implements social behavior on one hand, and how social processes feedback on the brain to promote fine-tuning of behavioral output according to changes in the social environment is a major challenge in contemporary neuroscience. A critical step to take this challenge successfully is finding the appropriate level of analysis when relating social to biological phenomena. Given the enormous complexity of both the neural networks of the brain and social systems, the use of a cognitive level of analysis (in an information processing perspective) is proposed here as an explanatory interface between brain and behavior. A conceptual framework for a cognitive approach to comparative social neuroscience is proposed, consisting of the following steps to be taken across different species with varying social systems: (1) identification of the functional building blocks of social skills; (2) identification of the cognitive mechanisms underlying the previously identified social skills; and (3) mapping these information processing mechanisms onto the brain. Teleost fish are presented here as a group of choice to develop this approach, given the diversity of social systems present in closely related species that allows for planned phylogenetic comparisons, and the availability of neurogenetic tools that allows the visualization and manipulation of selected neural circuits in model species such as the zebrafish. Finally, the state-of-the art of zebrafish social cognition and of the tools available to map social cognitive abilities to neural circuits in zebrafish are reviewed. PMID:23964204

  7. Mind the fish: zebrafish as a model in cognitive social neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rui F

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how the brain implements social behavior on one hand, and how social processes feedback on the brain to promote fine-tuning of behavioral output according to changes in the social environment is a major challenge in contemporary neuroscience. A critical step to take this challenge successfully is finding the appropriate level of analysis when relating social to biological phenomena. Given the enormous complexity of both the neural networks of the brain and social systems, the use of a cognitive level of analysis (in an information processing perspective) is proposed here as an explanatory interface between brain and behavior. A conceptual framework for a cognitive approach to comparative social neuroscience is proposed, consisting of the following steps to be taken across different species with varying social systems: (1) identification of the functional building blocks of social skills; (2) identification of the cognitive mechanisms underlying the previously identified social skills; and (3) mapping these information processing mechanisms onto the brain. Teleost fish are presented here as a group of choice to develop this approach, given the diversity of social systems present in closely related species that allows for planned phylogenetic comparisons, and the availability of neurogenetic tools that allows the visualization and manipulation of selected neural circuits in model species such as the zebrafish. Finally, the state-of-the art of zebrafish social cognition and of the tools available to map social cognitive abilities to neural circuits in zebrafish are reviewed. PMID:23964204

  8. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in adult zebrafish red cells.

    PubMed

    Trompouki, Eirini; Bowman, Teresa V; Dibiase, Anthony; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish has been used for many years as a model to study development and disease. The ability of zebrafish to produce thousand of embryos in a synchronous manner has made zebrafish an invaluable tool for genetic and chemical screens. Since its emergence as an important model organism the molecular tools for studying zebrafish have been limited. In this chapter, we describe a simple method to identify DNA binding sites and chromatin architecture in erythrocytes from adult zebrafish using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with next generation sequencing. This technique has been used extensively and successfully in other systems and it will be a useful tool for studying epigenetics in zebrafish. PMID:21924172

  9. Antitumor Effects of Flavopiridol on Human Uterine Leiomyoma In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Gyo; Baek, Jong-Woo; Shin, So-Jin; Kwon, Sang-Hoon; Cha, Soon-Do; Park, Won-Jin; Chung, Rosa; Choi, Eun-Som; Lee, Gun-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are considered a potential target for cancer therapy. Flavopiridol is a potent CDK inhibitor. In this study, the antiproliferative effect of the flavonoid compound flavopiridol and its mechanism in human uterine leiomyoma cells were investigated. The present study focused on the effect of flavopiridol in cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in primary cultured human uterine leiomyoma cells. Cell viability and cell proliferation assays were conducted. Flow cytometry was performed to determine the effect of flavopiridol on cell cycle. The expression of cell cycle regulatory-related proteins was evaluated by Western blotting. Cell viability and proliferation of uterine leiomyoma cells were significantly reduced by flavopiridol treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry results showed that flavopiridol induced G1 phase arrest. Flavopiridol-induced growth inhibition in uterine leiomyoma cells was associated with increased expression of p21cip/wafl and p27kip1 in a dose-dependent manner. Downregulation of CDK2/4 and Cyclin A with a concomitant increase in dephosphorylation of retinoblastoma was observed. This study demonstrates that flavopiridol inhibits cell proliferation by initiating G1 cell cycle arrest in human uterine leiomyoma. We also found that flavopiridol is effective in inhibiting xenografted human uterine leiomyoma growth. These results indicate that flavopiridol could prove to be a promising chemopreventive and therapeutic agent for human uterine leiomyoma. PMID:24572052

  10. Anticancer Activity of Apaziquone in Oral Cancer Cells and Xenograft Model: Implications for Oral Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Gunjan; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Walfish, Paul G.; Ralhan, Ranju

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients diagnosed in late stages have limited chemotherapeutic options underscoring the great need for development of new anticancer agents for more effective disease management. We aimed to investigate the anticancer potential of Apaziquone, [EOquin, USAN, E09, 3-hydroxy-5- aziridinyl-1-methyl-2(1H-indole-4,7-dione)–prop-?-en-?-ol], a pro-drug belonging to a class of anti-cancer agents called bioreductive alkylating agents, for OSCC. Apaziquone treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in OSCC cells in vitro. Apaziquone treated OSCC cells showed increased activation of Caspase 9 and Caspase 3, and Poly (ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage suggesting induction of apoptosis by apaziquone in oral cancer cells. Importantly, apaziquone treatment significantly reduced oral tumor xenograft volume in immunocompromised NOD/SCID/Crl mice without causing apparent toxicity to normal tissues. In conclusion, our in vitro and in vivo studies identified and demonstrated the pre-clinical efficacy of Apaziquone, as a potential novel anti-cancer therapeutic candidate for oral cancer management. PMID:26208303

  11. Nanoparticles functionalized with collagenase exhibit improved tumor accumulation in a murine xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Murty, Surya; Gilliland, Taylor; Qiao, Peter; Tabtieng, Tate; Higbee, Elizabeth; Al Zaki, Ajlan; Puré, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have garnered widespread interest for both the imaging and treatment of cancer due to their unique and tunable pharmacokinetics and their ability to carry a high payload of diverse compounds. However, despite these favorable attributes, the extent of tumor accumulation can be severely restricted due to the dense stroma surrounding the often-permeable blood vessel wall and high intratumoral pressure. In this study, we investigated whether modifying the surface of pegylated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with collagenase could improve the accumulation of nanoparticles within a murine tumor xenograft. It was determined that collagenase remains active after surface conjugation and the presence of collagenase has no measureable effect on cell proliferation in vitro. Following intravenous injection, the largest fractions of collagenase-labeled AuNPs were found in the liver and spleen. Histological analysis revealed no signs of toxicity in either of these organs. Blood chemistry revealed normal levels of liver enzymes, but a slightly elevated level of total bilirubin. Within the tumor, AuNPs labeled with collagenase exhibited a 35% increase in accumulation compared with unlabeled AuNPs. Therefore, these studies provide preliminary evidence that the functionalization of nanoparticles with collagenase represent an effective and safe approach to improve tumor accumulation. PMID:26380538

  12. A Novel Synthetic Smoothened Antagonist Transiently Inhibits Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Xenografts in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Martin F.; Wilson, Steven R.; Dembinski, Jennifer L.; Holsworth, Daniel D.; Khvat, Alexander; Okun, Ilya; Petersen, Dirk; Krauss, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Background Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is over-activated in several solid tumors where it plays a central role in cell growth, stroma recruitment and tumor progression. In the Hh signaling pathway, the Smoothened (SMO) receptor comprises a primary drug target with experimental small molecule SMO antagonists currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Principal Findings Using Shh-Light II (Shh-L2) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) based screening formats on a “focused diversity” library we identified a novel small molecule inhibitor of the Hh pathway, MS-0022 (2-bromo-N-(4-(8-methylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-yl)phenyl)benzamide). MS-0022 showed effective Hh signaling pathway inhibition at the level of SMO in the low nM range, and Hh pathway inhibition downstream of Suppressor of fused (SUFU) in the low µM range. MS-0022 reduced growth in the tumor cell lines PANC-1, SUIT-2, PC-3 and FEMX in vitro. MS-0022 treatment led to a transient delay of tumor growth that correlated with a reduction of stromal Gli1 levels in SUIT-2 xenografts in vivo. Significance We document the in vitro and in vivo efficacy and bioavailability of a novel small molecule SMO antagonist, MS-0022. Although MS-0022 primarily interferes with Hh signaling at the level of SMO, it also has a downstream inhibitory effect and leads to a stronger reduction of growth in several tumor cell lines when compared to related SMO antagonists. PMID:21698280

  13. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  14. Dual mTORC1/2 inhibition in a preclinical xenograft tumor model of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Korets, Sharmilee Bansal; Musa, Fernanda; Curtin, John; Blank, Stephanie V.; Schneider, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Up to 70% of endometrioid endometrial cancers carry PTEN gene deletions that can upregulate mTOR activity. Investigational mTOR kinase inhibitors may provide a novel therapeutic approach for these tumors. Using a xenograft tumor model of endometrial cancer, we assessed the activity of mTOR and downstream effector proteins in the mTOR translational control pathway after treatment with a dual mTOR Complex 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2) catalytic inhibitor (PP242) compared to that of an allosteric mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor (everolimus, RAD001). Methods Grade 3 endometrioid endometrial cancer cells (AN3CA) were xenografted into nude mice. Animals were treated with PP242; PP242 and carboplatin; carboplatin; RAD001; RAD001 and carboplatin. Mean tumor volume was compared across groups by ANOVA. Immunoblot analysis was performed to assess mTORC1/2 activity using P-Akt, P-S6 and P-4E-BP1. Results The mean tumor volume of PP242 + carboplatin was significantly lower than in all other treatment groups, P<0.001 (89% smaller). The RAD001 + carboplatin group was also smaller, but this did not reach statistical significance (P=0.097). Immunoblot analysis of tumor lysates treated with PP242 demonstrated inhibition of activated P-Akt. Conclusions Catalytic mTORC1/2 inhibition demonstrates clear efficacy in tumor growth control that is enhanced by the addition of a DNA damage agent, carboplatin. Targeting mTORC1/2 leads to inhibition of Akt activation and strong downregulation of effectors of mTORC1, resulting in downregulation of protein synthesis. Based on this study, mTORC1/2 kinase inhibitors warrant further investigation as a potential treatment for endometrial cancer. PMID:24316308

  15. Zebrafish Heart Failure Models for the Evaluation of Chemical Probes and Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Monte, Aaron; Cook, James M.; Kabir, Mohd Shahjahan; Peterson, Karl P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heart failure is a complex disease that involves genetic, environmental, and physiological factors. As a result, current medication and treatment for heart failure produces limited efficacy, and better medication is in demand. Although mammalian models exist, simple and low-cost models will be more beneficial for drug discovery and mechanistic studies of heart failure. We previously reported that aristolochic acid (AA) caused cardiac defects in zebrafish embryos that resemble heart failure. Here, we showed that cardiac troponin T and atrial natriuretic peptide were expressed at significantly higher levels in AA-treated embryos, presumably due to cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, several human heart failure drugs could moderately attenuate the AA-induced heart failure by 10%–40%, further verifying the model for drug discovery. We then developed a drug screening assay using the AA-treated zebrafish embryos and identified three compounds. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor (MEK-I), an inhibitor for the MEK-1/2 known to be involved in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, showed nearly 60% heart failure attenuation. C25, a chalcone derivative, and A11, a phenolic compound, showed around 80% and 90% attenuation, respectively. Time course experiments revealed that, to obtain 50% efficacy, these compounds were required within different hours of AA treatment. Furthermore, quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that C25, not MEK-I or A11, strongly suppressed inflammation. Finally, C25 and MEK-I, but not A11, could also rescue the doxorubicin-induced heart failure in zebrafish embryos. In summary, we have established two tractable heart failure models for drug discovery and three potential drugs have been identified that seem to attenuate heart failure by different mechanisms. PMID:24351044

  16. FL118, a novel camptothecin analogue, overcomes irinotecan and topotecan resistance in human tumor xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiang; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhong, Kai; Smith, Nicholas; Prey, Joshua; Li, Fengzhi

    2015-01-01

    Irinotecan and topotecan are the only camptothecin analogues approved by the FDA for cancer treatment. However, inherent and/or acquired irinotecan and topotecan resistance is a challenging issue in clinical practice. In this report, we showed that FL118, a novel camptothecin analogue, effectively obliterated human xenograft tumors that acquire irinotecan and topotecan resistance. Consistent with this finding, Pharmacokinetics studies indicated that FL118 rapidly clears from circulation, while effectively accumulating in tumors with a long elimination half-life. Consistent with our previous studies on irinotecan, FL118 exhibited ?25 fold more effectiveness than topotecan at inhibiting cancer cell growth and colony formation; we further showed that although topotecan can inhibit the expression of survivin, Mcl-1, XIAP or cIAP2, its effectiveness is about 10-100 fold weaker than FL118. Lastly, in contrast to both SN-38 (active metabolite of irinotecan) and topotecan are substrates of the efflux pump proteins P-gp/MDR1 and ABCG2/BCRP, FL118 is not a substrate of P-gp and ABCG2. Consistently, sildenafil, a multiple efflux pump inhibitor, sensitized SN-38 much more than these of the ABCG2-selective inhibitor KO143 in growth inhibition of SW620 and HCT-8 cells. In contrast, both inhibitors showed no effect on FL118 efficacy. Given that both P-gp and ABCG2 express in SW620 and HCT-8 cells and FL118 is not a substrate for P-gp and ABCG2, this suggests that FL118 appears to bypass multiple efflux pump protein-induced resistance, which may contribute to FL118 overcoming irinotecan and topotecan resistance in vivo. These new findings provide renewed perspectives for further development of FL118 for clinical applications. PMID:26692923

  17. Chick embryo xenograft model reveals a novel perineural niche for human adipose-derived stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Ingrid R.; Lopes, Daiana V.; Abreu, José G.; Carneiro, Katia; Rossi, Maria I. D.; Brito, José M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSC) are a heterogeneous cell population that contains adult multipotent stem cells. Although it is well established that hADSC have skeletal potential in vivo in adult organisms, in vitro assays suggest further differentiation capacity, such as into glia. Thus, we propose that grafting hADSC into the embryo can provide them with a much more instructive microenvironment, allowing the human cells to adopt diverse fates or niches. Here, hADSC spheroids were grafted into either the presumptive presomitic mesoderm or the first branchial arch (BA1) regions of chick embryos. Cells were identified without previous manipulations via human-specific Alu probes, which allows efficient long-term tracing of heterogeneous primary cultures. When grafted into the trunk, in contrast to previous studies, hADSC were not found in chondrogenic or osteogenic territories up to E8. Surprisingly, 82.5% of the hADSC were associated with HNK1+ tissues, such as peripheral nerves. Human skin fibroblasts showed a smaller tropism for nerves. In line with other studies, hADSC also adopted perivascular locations. When grafted into the presumptive BA1, 74.6% of the cells were in the outflow tract, the final goal of cardiac neural crest cells, and were also associated with peripheral nerves. This is the first study showing that hADSC could adopt a perineural niche in vivo and were able to recognize cues for neural crest cell migration of the host. Therefore, we propose that xenografts of human cells into chick embryos can reveal novel behaviors of heterogeneous cell populations, such as response to migration cues. PMID:26319582

  18. The Zebrafish Brain in Research and Teaching: A Simple in Vivo and in Vitro Model for the Study of Spontaneous Neural Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, R.; Johannesdottir, I. P.; Sigurgeirsson, B.; Porsteinsson, H.; Karlsson, K. AE.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the zebrafish ("Danio rerio") has been established as a key animal model in neuroscience. Behavioral, genetic, and immunohistochemical techniques have been used to describe the connectivity of diverse neural circuits. However, few studies have used zebrafish to understand the function of cerebral structures or to study neural circuits.…

  19. A method for establishing a patient-derived xenograft model to explore new therapeutic strategies for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanan; Wu, Qiong; Yang, Xiawen; Zhao, Jimin; Jin, Yuxi; Li, Ke; Ma, Yihui; Chen, Xinhuan; Tian, Fang; Zhao, Song; Xu, Jinglong; Lu, Jing; Yin, Xueshan; Liu, Kangdong; Dong, Ziming

    2016-02-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant histological type of esophageal carcinoma in China. The overall 5-year survival rate of ESCC patients is in the low range of 15-25%. One important reason for the poor prognosis is that the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Furthermore, the development of effective therapeutic strategies to improve patient outcome is needed. Animal models can be beneficial to analyze the molecular mechanisms as well as specific clinical therapeutic strategies for esophageal cancer. In recent years, patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) have been widely used in numerous types of cancers to investigate the basic mechanisms and to conduct preclinical research. Accumulating evidence indicates that the PDX model is an important tool for basic and clinical research. Herein, we successfully established 14 ESCC PDXs. These PDX models preserved the patient pathological characteristics and effectively reflected the patient biological heterogeneity. Cancers exhibit diverse growth rates and tumor texture, even more, they have different signaling pathways. The PDX model is a superior strategy for understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of ESCC and for screening new therapeutic strategies for ESCC patients. PMID:26718633

  20. A zebrafish model of manganism reveals reversible and treatable symptoms that are independent of neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bakthavatsalam, Subha; Das Sharma, Shreya; Sonawane, Mahendra; Thirumalai, Vatsala; Datta, Ankona

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (manganese ion; referred to as Mn) is essential for neuronal function, yet it is toxic at high concentrations. Environmental and occupational exposure to high concentrations of Mn causes manganism, a well-defined movement disorder in humans, with symptoms resembling Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, manganism is distinct from PD and the neural basis of its pathology is poorly understood. To address this issue, we generated a zebrafish model of manganism by incubating larvae in rearing medium containing Mn. We find that Mn-treated zebrafish larvae exhibit specific postural and locomotor defects. Larvae begin to float on their sides, show a curved spine and swim in circles. We discovered that treatment with Mn causes postural defects by interfering with mechanotransduction at the neuromasts. Furthermore, we find that the circling locomotion could be caused by long-duration bursting in the motor neurons, which can lead to long-duration tail bends in the Mn-treated larvae. Mn-treated larvae also exhibited fewer startle movements. Additionally, we show that the intensity of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity is reversibly reduced after Mn-treatment. This led us to propose that reduced dopamine neuromodulation drives the changes in startle movements. To test this, when we supplied an external source of dopamine to Mn-treated larvae, the larvae exhibited a normal number of startle swims. Taken together, these results indicate that Mn interferes with neuronal function at the sensory, motor and modulatory levels, and open avenues for therapeutically targeted studies on the zebrafish model of manganism. PMID:25261567

  1. Prolonged sulforaphane treatment does not enhance tumorigenesis in oncogenic K-ras and xenograft mouse models of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kombairaju, Ponvijay; Ma, Jinfang; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K; Yan, Shengbin G; Gabrielson, Edward; Singh, Anju; Biswal, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sulforaphane (SFN), an activator of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a promising chemopreventive agent which is undergoing clinical trial for several diseases. Studies have indicated that there is gain of Nrf2 function in lung cancer and other solid tumors because of mutations in the inhibitor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1). More recently, several oncogenes have been shown to activate Nrf2 signaling as the main prosurvival pathway mediating ROS detoxification, senescence evasion, and neoplastic transformation. Thus, it is important to determine if there is any risk of enhanced lung tumorigenesis associated with prolonged administration of SFN using mouse models of cancer. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the effect of prolonged SFN treatment on oncogenic K-ras (K-rasLSL-G12D)-driven lung tumorigenesis. One week post mutant-K-ras expression, mice were treated with SFN (0.5 mg, 5 d/wk) for 3 months by means of a nebulizer. Fourteen weeks after mutant K-ras expression (K-rasLSL-G12D), mice were sacrificed, and lung sections were screened for neoplastic foci. Expression of Nrf2-dependent genes was measured using real time RT-PCR. We also determined the effect of prolonged SFN treatment on the growth of preclinical xenograft models using human A549 (with mutant K-ras and Keap1 allele) and H1975 [with mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) allele] nonsmall cell lung cancer cells. Results: Systemic SFN administration did not promote the growth of K-rasLSL-G12D-induced lung tumors and had no significant effect on the growth of A549 and H1975 established tumor xenografts in nude mice. Interestingly, localized delivery of SFN significantly attenuated the growth of A549 tumors in nude mice, suggesting an Nrf2-independent antitumorigenic activity of SFN. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that prolonged SFN treatment does not promote lung tumorigenesis in various mouse models of lung cancer. PMID:22919281

  2. Xenograft and Transgenic Mouse Models of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and Non Invasive Imaging Modalities to Monitor Ovarian Tumor Growth In situ -Applications in Evaluating Novel Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Denise C.; Hensley, Harvey H.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most commonly fatal gynecologic malignancy in developed countries. Most EOC patients are diagnosed at advanced stage when disease has spread beyond the ovary. While many patients initially respond to surgery and chemotherapy, the long term prognosis is generally unfavorable, with recurrence and development of drug resistant disease. There is a critical need to identify new therapeutic agents that prolong disease-free intervals and effectively manage recurrent disease. Murine models of ovarian carcinoma are excellent models to study tumor biology in the search for new treatments for EOC. Described in this unit are methods for establishing xenograft or allograft models of EOC using ovarian carcinoma cell lines, in vivo imaging strategies for detection and quantification of EOC in transgenic and in xenograft/allograft models, and procedures for necropsy and pathological evaluation of experimental animals. PMID:20634901

  3. The Fimbriae of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli Induce Epithelial Inflammation In Vitro and in a Human Intestinal Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Erik J.; Struve, Carsten; Sander, Anja; Demma, Zachary; Nataro, James P.; McCormick, Beth A.; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background.Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) are increasingly recognized as an important agent of inflammatory and often persistent diarrhea. Although previous studies report on the inflammatory aspects of EAEC pathogenesis, the mechanisms by which EAEC trigger these events are not well understood. Methods.EAEC strains harboring mutations in known EAEC virulence determinants were tested in an in vitro model of transepithelial migration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and in human intestinal xenografts in severe-combined immunodeficient (SCID-HU-INT) mice, a novel model for studying EAEC disease in vivo. Results.Expression of aggregative adherence fimbriae (AAFs), the principal adhesins of EAEC, was required for EAEC-induced PMN transepithelial migration in vitro. Moreover, constructed plasmids encoding AAF gene clusters demonstrated that the AAF adhesins are sufficient for triggering this event in a nonpathogenic E. coli background. Furthermore, with use of the SCID-HU-INT mouse model, severe tissue damage and infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed in the human tissue after EAEC infection. These pathological marks were strongly related to AAF expression, thus clearly confirming our in vitro findings. Conclusions.The present work establishes EAEC as an important inflammatory pathogen and the AAF adhesins as inducers of potentially detrimental immune responses. PMID:22723643

  4. Comprehensive characterization of chemotherapeutic efficacy on metastases in the established gastric neuroendocrine cancer patient derived xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dawei; Pang, Liang; Guo, Sheng; Cai, Jie; Wery, Jean-Pierre; Li, Linda; Li, Henry Qixiang; Lin, Peter Ping

    2015-01-01

    The HuPrime® human gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma derived xenograft model GA0087 was established in this study. GA0087 PDX model showed high gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF)-A and B, and high potential of lung metastasis. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) with either large or small size, circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) and lung metastatic lesions were detected in GA0087 PDX mice. The number of CTC correlated to the number of metastatic nodules in lung. Both primary tumor growth and metastasis in terms of the number of dynamically monitored CTCs and metastatic nodules were effectively suppressed by Cisplatin. Diverse subtypes of CTCs in the context of sensitivity to Cisplatin were specifically identified by subtraction enrichment (SE) integrated with in situ Phenotyping of cytokeratin 18 (CK18) and Karyotyping of chromosome 8 (in situ PK CTC by CK-iFISH). All the CK18-/diploid and majority of CK18+/diploid CTC subtypes were chemosensitive, whereas a higher percentage of CK18+/multiploid subtype of CTC were Cisplatin-insensitive. Combined histopathological examination of metastatic lesion and in situ PK CTC in a metastatic PDX (mPDX) tumor model are of particular significance, and may provide an unique and robust platform for cancer research as well as pre-clinical evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:25909226

  5. Micrometam C Protects against Oxidative Stress in Inflammation Models in Zebrafish and RAW264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Ge, Hui; Chen, Zhi-Bin; Luo, Xiong-Ming; Su, Feng-Juan; Liang, Yan-Bing; Li, Zhen-Yu; Wu, Jing-Guo; Yang, Qing; Zeng, Li-Jin; Ma, Zhong-Fu

    2015-09-01

    Micrometam C is a core of novel marine compound isolated from the mangrove associates Micromelum falcatum. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of micrometam C in inflammation models in the transgenic zebrafish line Tg (corola: eGFP) and RAW264.7 macrophages. We found that micrometam C significantly suppressed the migration of immune cells in tail-cutting-induced inflammation in transgenic zebrafish and reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both zebrafish and macrophages. In addition, micrometam C also restored LPS-induced reduction of endogenous antioxidants, such as catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). The protective effects of micrometam C were in parallel to its inhibition of NADPH oxidase and nuclear factor-kappa-binding (NF-?B) activity. Thus, the present results demonstrate that micrometam C protects against LPS-induced inflammation possibly through its antioxidant property. PMID:26343688

  6. Micrometam C Protects against Oxidative Stress in Inflammation Models in Zebrafish and RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hao; Ge, Hui; Chen, Zhi-Bin; Luo, Xiong-Ming; Su, Feng-Juan; Liang, Yan-Bing; Li, Zhen-Yu; Wu, Jing-Guo; Yang, Qing; Zeng, Li-Jin; Ma, Zhong-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Micrometam C is a core of novel marine compound isolated from the mangrove associates Micromelum falcatum. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of micrometam C in inflammation models in the transgenic zebrafish line Tg (corola: eGFP) and RAW264.7 macrophages. We found that micrometam C significantly suppressed the migration of immune cells in tail-cutting-induced inflammation in transgenic zebrafish and reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both zebrafish and macrophages. In addition, micrometam C also restored LPS-induced reduction of endogenous antioxidants, such as catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). The protective effects of micrometam C were in parallel to its inhibition of NADPH oxidase and nuclear factor-kappa-binding (NF-?B) activity. Thus, the present results demonstrate that micrometam C protects against LPS-induced inflammation possibly through its antioxidant property. PMID:26343688

  7. Use of the Zebrafish Larvae as a Model to Study Cigarette Smoke Condensate Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Lee D.; Soo, Evelyn C.; Achenbach, John C.; Morash, Michael G.; Soanes, Kelly H.

    2014-01-01

    The smoking of tobacco continues to be the leading cause of premature death worldwide and is linked to the development of a number of serious illnesses including heart disease, respiratory diseases, stroke and cancer. Currently, cell line based toxicity assays are typically used to gain information on the general toxicity of cigarettes and other tobacco products. However, they provide little information regarding the complex disease-related changes that have been linked to smoking. The ethical concerns and high cost associated with mammalian studies have limited their widespread use for in vivo toxicological studies of tobacco. The zebrafish has emerged as a low-cost, high-throughput, in vivo model in the study of toxicology. In this study, smoke condensates from 2 reference cigarettes and 6 Canadian brands of cigarettes with different design features were assessed for acute, developmental, cardiac, and behavioural toxicity (neurotoxicity) in zebrafish larvae. By making use of this multifaceted approach we have developed an in vivo model with which to compare the toxicity profiles of smoke condensates from cigarettes with different design features. This model system may provide insights into the development of smoking related disease and could provide a cost-effective, high-throughput platform for the future evaluation of tobacco products. PMID:25526262

  8. Defining hepatic dysfunction parameters in two models of fatty liver disease in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Deanna L; Yin, Chunyue; Yeh, Karen; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2013-06-01

    Fatty liver disease in humans can progress from steatosis to hepatocellular injury, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. We developed a series of straightforward assays to determine whether zebrafish larvae with either tunicamycin- or ethanol-induced steatosis develop hepatic dysfunction. We found altered expression of genes involved in acute phase response and hepatic function, and impaired hepatocyte secretion and disruption of canaliculi in both models, but glycogen deficiency in hepatocytes and dilation of hepatic vasculature occurred only in ethanol-treated larvae. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) become activated during liver injury and HSC numbers increased in both models. Whether the excess lipids in hepatocytes are a direct cause of hepatocyte dysfunction in fatty liver disease has not been defined. We prevented ethanol-induced steatosis by blocking activation of the sterol response element binding proteins (Srebps) using gonzo(mbtps1) mutants and scap morphants and found that hepatocyte dysfunction persisted even in the absence of lipid accumulation. This suggests that lipotoxicity is not the primary cause of hepatic injury in these models of fatty liver disease. This study provides a panel of parameters to assess liver disease that can be easily applied to zebrafish mutants, transgenics, and for drug screening in which liver function is an important consideration. PMID:23697887

  9. Defining Hepatic Dysfunction Parameters in Two Models of Fatty Liver Disease in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Deanna L.; Yin, Chunyue; Yeh, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fatty liver disease in humans can progress from steatosis to hepatocellular injury, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. We developed a series of straightforward assays to determine whether zebrafish larvae with either tunicamycin- or ethanol-induced steatosis develop hepatic dysfunction. We found altered expression of genes involved in acute phase response and hepatic function, and impaired hepatocyte secretion and disruption of canaliculi in both models, but glycogen deficiency in hepatocytes and dilation of hepatic vasculature occurred only in ethanol-treated larvae. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) become activated during liver injury and HSC numbers increased in both models. Whether the excess lipids in hepatocytes are a direct cause of hepatocyte dysfunction in fatty liver disease has not been defined. We prevented ethanol-induced steatosis by blocking activation of the sterol response element binding proteins (Srebps) using gonzombtps1 mutants and scap morphants and found that hepatocyte dysfunction persisted even in the absence of lipid accumulation. This suggests that lipotoxicity is not the primary cause of hepatic injury in these models of fatty liver disease. This study provides a panel of parameters to assess liver disease that can be easily applied to zebrafish mutants, transgenics, and for drug screening in which liver function is an important consideration. PMID:23697887

  10. Zebrafish and conditioned place preference: a translational model of drug reward.

    PubMed

    Collier, Adam D; Khan, Kanza M; Caramillo, Erika M; Mohn, Richard S; Echevarria, David J

    2014-12-01

    Addiction and substance abuse are found ubiquitously throughout human society. In the United States, these disorders are responsible for amassing hundreds of billions of dollars in annual costs associated with healthcare, crime and lost productivity. Efficacious treatments remain few in number, the development of which will be facilitated by comprehension of environmental, genetic, pharmacological and neurobiological mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of addiction. Animal models such as the zebrafish (Danio rerio) have gained momentum within various domains of translational research, and as a model of complex brain disorders (e.g., drug abuse). Behavioral quantification within the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm serves as a measure of the rewarding qualities of a given substance. If the animal develops an increase in preference for the drug paired environment, it is inferred that the drug has positive-reinforcing properties. This paper discusses the utility of the zebrafish model in conjunction with the CPP paradigm and reports CPP behavior following acute exposure to 0.0%, 0.25%, 0.50%, and 1.00% alcohol, and 0 mg/L, 50 mg/L, 100 mg/L and 150 mg/L caffeine. PMID:24887295

  11. Hypoxia-Induced Retinal Neovascularization in Zebrafish Embryos: A Potential Model of Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Alex; Hsi, Brian; Lee, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Yau-Hung; Wang, I-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity, formerly known as a retrolental fibroplasia, is a leading cause of infantile blindness worldwide. Retinopathy of prematurity is caused by the failure of central retinal vessels to reach the retinal periphery, creating a nonperfused peripheral retina, resulting in retinal hypoxia, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, vitreoretinal fibrosis, and loss of vision. We established a potential retinopathy of prematurity model by using a green fluorescent vascular endothelium zebrafish transgenic line treated with cobalt chloride (a hypoxia-inducing agent), followed by GS4012 (a vascular endothelial growth factor inducer) at 24 hours postfertilization, and observed that the number of vascular branches and sprouts significantly increased in the central retinal vascular trunks 2–4 days after treatment. We created an angiography method by using tetramethylrhodamine dextran, which exhibited severe vascular leakage through the vessel wall into the surrounding retinal tissues. The quantification of mRNA extracted from the heads of the larvae by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed a twofold increase in vegfaa and vegfr2 expression compared with the control group, indicating increased vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in the hypoxic condition. In addition, we demonstrated that the hypoxic insult could be effectively rescued by several antivascular endothelial growth factor agents such as SU5416, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab. In conclusion, we provide a simple, highly reproducible, and clinically relevant retinopathy of prematurity model based on zebrafish embryos; this model may serve as a useful platform for clarifying the mechanisms of human retinopathy of prematurity and its progression. PMID:25978439

  12. Development of a transgenic zebrafish model expressing GFP in the notochord, somite and liver directed by the hfe2 gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yue-Hong; Xu, Cheng; Li, Junling; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Hongwei; Du, Shao Jun

    2011-08-01

    Hemojuvelin, also known as RGMc, is encoded by hfe2 gene that plays an important role in iron homeostasis. hfe2 is specifically expressed in the notochord, developing somite and skeletal muscles during development. The molecular regulation of hfe2 expression is, however, not clear. We reported here the characterization of hfe2 gene expression and the regulation of its tissue-specific expression in zebrafish embryos. We demonstrated that the 6 kb 5'-flanking sequence upstream of the ATG start codon in the zebrafish hfe2 gene could direct GFP specific expression in the notochord, somites, and skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos, recapitulating the expression pattern of the endogenous gene. However, the Tg(hfe2:gfp) transgene is also expressed in the liver of fish embryos, which did not mimic the expression of the endogenous hfe2 at the early stage. Nevertheless, the Tg(hfe2:gfp) transgenic zebrafish provides a useful model to study liver development. Treating Tg(hfe2:gfp) transgenic zebrafish embryos with valproic acid, a liver development inhibitor, significantly inhibited GFP expression in zebrafish. Together, these data indicate that the tissue specific expression of hfe2 in the notochord, somites and muscles is regulated by regulatory elements within the 6 kb 5'-flanking sequence of the hfe2 gene. Moreover, the Tg(hfe2:gfp) transgenic zebrafish line provides a useful model system for analyzing liver development in zebrafish. PMID:21113736

  13. Polyethylene glycol modification decreases the cardiac toxicity of carbonaceous dots in mouse and zebrafish models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-tao; Sun, Hua-qin; Wang, Wei-liang; Xu, Wen-ming; He, Qin; Shen, Shun; Qian, Jun; Gao, Hui-le

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Carbonaceous dots (CDs), which have been used for diagnosis, drug delivery and gene delivery, are accumulated in heart at high concentrations. To improve their biocompatibility, polyethylene glycol-modified CDs (PEG-CDs) were prepared. In this study we compared the cardiac toxicity of CDs and PEG-CDs in mouse and zebrafish models. Methods: Mice were intravenously treated with CDs (size: 4.9 nm, 5 mg·kg?1·d?1) or PEG-CDs (size: 8.3 nm, 5 mg·kg?1·d?1) for 21 d. Their blood biochemistry indices, ECG, and histological examination were examined for evaluation of cardiac toxicity. CDs or PEG-CDs was added in incubator of cmlc2 transgenic Zebrafish embryos at 6 hpf, and the shape and size of embryos' hearts were observed at 48 hpf using a fluorescent microscope. Furthermore, whole-mount in situ hybridization was used to examine the expression of early cardiac marker gene (clml2) at 48 hpf. Results: Administration of CDs or PEG-CDs in mice caused mild, but statistically insignificant reduction in serum creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels detected at 7 d, which were returned to the respective control levels at 21 d. Neither CDs nor PEG-CDs caused significant changes in the morphology of heart cells. Administration of CDs, but not PEG-CDs, in mice caused marked increase of heart rate. Both CDs and PEG-CDs did not affect other ECG parameters. In the zebrafish embryos, addition of CDs (20 ?g/mL) caused heart development delay, whereas addition of CDs (80 ?g/mL) led to heart malformation. In contrast, PEG-CDs caused considerably small changes in heart development, which was consistent with the results from the in situ hybridization experiments. Conclusion: CDs causes greater cardiac toxicity, especially regarding heart development. Polyethylene glycol modification can attenuate the cardiac toxicity of CDs. PMID:26456589

  14. A zebrafish model for uremic toxicity: role of the complement pathway.

    PubMed

    Berman, Nathaniel; Lectura, Melisa; Thurman, Joshua M; Reinecke, James; Raff, Amanda C; Melamed, Michal L; Quan, Zhe; Evans, Todd; Meyer, Timothy W; Hostetter, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    Many organic solutes accumulate in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and some are poorly removed with urea-based prescriptions for hemodialysis. However, their toxicities have been difficult to assess. We have employed an animal model, the zebrafish embryo, to test the toxicity of uremic serum compared to control. Serum was obtained from stable ESRD patients predialysis or from normal subjects. Zebrafish embryos 24 h postfertilization were exposed to experimental media at a water:human serum ratio of 3:1. Those exposed to serum from uremic subjects had significantly reduced survival at 8 h (19 ± 18 vs. 94 ± 6%, p < 0.05, uremic serum vs. control, respectively). Embryos exposed to serum from ESRD subjects fractionated at 50 kDa showed significantly greater toxicity with the larger molecular weight fraction (83 ± 11 vs. 7 ± 17% survival, p < 0.05, <50 vs. >50 kDa, respectively). Heating serum abrogated its toxicity. EDTA, a potent inhibitor of complement by virtue of calcium chelation, reduced the toxicity of uremic serum compared to untreated uremic serum (96 ± 5 vs. 28 ± 20% survival, p < 0.016, chelated vs. nonchelated serum, respectively). Anti-factor B, a specific inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, reduced the toxicity of uremic serum, compared to untreated uremic serum (98 ± 6 vs. 3 ± 9% survival, p < 0.016, anti-factor B treated vs. nontreated, respectively). Uremic serum is thus more toxic to zebrafish embryos than normal serum. Furthermore, this toxicity is associated with a fraction of large size, is inactivated by heat, and is reduced by both specific and nonspecific inhibitors of complement activation. Together these data lend support to the hypothesis that at least some uremic toxicities may be mediated by complement. PMID:23689420

  15. Metallofullerene-based Nanoplatform for Brain Tumor Brachytherapy and Longitudinal Imaging in a Murine Orthotopic Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Michael D.; Wilson, John D.; Fuller, Christine E.; Zhang, Jianyuan; Dorn, Harry C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate in an orthotopic xenograft brain tumor model that a functionalized metallofullerene (f-Gd3N@C80) can enable longitudinal tumor imaging and, when radiolabeled with lutetium 177 (177Lu) and tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid (DOTA) (177Lu-DOTA-f-Gd3N@C80), provide an anchor to deliver effective brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: All experiments involving the use of mice were carried out in accordance with protocols approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Human glioblastoma U87MG cells were implanted by using stereotactic procedures into the brains of 37 female athymic nude-Foxn1nu mice and allowed to develop into a tumor for 8 days. T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in five mice. Biodistribution studies were performed in 12 mice at four time points over 7 days to evaluate gadolinium content. Survival studies involved 20 mice that received infusion of a nanoplatform by means of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) 8 days after tumor implantation. Mice in survival studies were divided into two groups: one comprised untreated mice that received f-Gd3N@C80 alone and the other comprised mice treated with brachytherapy that received 1.11 MBq of 177Lu-DOTA-f-Gd3N@C80. Survival data were evaluated by using Kaplan-Meier statistical methods. Results: MR imaging showed extended tumor retention (25.6% ± 1.2 of the infused dose at 52 days, confirmed with biodistribution studies) of the f-Gd3N@C80 nanoplatform, which enabled longitudinal imaging. Successful coupling of 177Lu to the f-Gd3N@C80 surface was achieved by using a bifunctional macrocyclic chelator. The extended tumor retention allowed for effective brachytherapy, as indicated by extended survival time (>2.5 times that of the untreated group) and histologic signs of radiation-induced tumor damage. Conclusion: The authors have developed a multimodal nanoplatform and have demonstrated longitudinal tumor imaging, prolonged intratumoral probe retention, biodistribution, and extended survival in an orthotopic xenograft brain tumor model. © RSNA, 2011 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11102569/-/DC1 PMID:21813738

  16. The isothiocyanate erucin abrogates telomerase in hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic xenograft tumour model of HCC

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Corinna; Hertrampf, Anke; Zimmermann, Stefan; Stetter, Nadine; Wagner, Meike; Kleinhans, Claudia; Erlacher, Miriam; Schüler, Julia; Platz, Stefanie; Rohn, Sascha; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker; Lamy, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to cancer cells, most normal human cells have no or low telomerase levels which makes it an attractive target for anti-cancer drugs. The small molecule sulforaphane from broccoli is known for its cancer therapeutic potential in vitro and in vivo. In animals and humans it was found to be quickly metabolized into 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC, erucin) which we recently identified as strong selective apoptosis inducer in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Here, we investigated the relevance of telomerase abrogation for cytotoxic efficacy of MTBITC against HCC. The drug was effective against telomerase, independent from TP53 and MTBITC also blocked telomerase in chemoresistant subpopulations. By using an orthotopic human liver cancer xenograft model, we give first evidence that MTBITC at 50 mg/KG b.w./d significantly decreased telomerase activity in vivo without affecting enzyme activity of adjacent normal tissue. Upon drug exposure, telomerase decrease was consistent with a dose-dependent switch to anti-survival, cell arrest and apoptosis in our in vitro HCC models. Blocking telomerase by the specific inhibitor TMPyP4 further sensitized cancer cells to MTBITC-mediated cytotoxicity. Overexpression of hTERT, but not enzyme activity deficient DNhTERT, protected against apoptosis; neither DNA damage nor cytostasis induction by MTBITC was prevented by hTERT overexpression. These findings imply that telomerase enzyme activity does not protect against MTBITC-induced DNA damage but impacts signalling processes upstream of apoptosis execution level. PMID:25256442

  17. Sabutoclax, a Mcl-1 Antagonist, Inhibits Tumorigenesis in Transgenic Mouse and Human Xenograft Models of Prostate Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Roger S; Placzek, William; Fernandez, Ana; Ziaee, Shabnam; Chu, Chia-Yi; Wei, Jun; Stebbins, John; Kitada, Shinichi; Fritz, Gloria; Reed, John C; Chung, Leland W; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Bhowmick, Neil A

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to available therapeutic agents has been a common problem thwarting progress in treatment of castrate-resistant and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). Overexpression of the Bcl-2 family members, including Mcl-1, in PCa cells is known to inhibit intracellular mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis. Here we report the development of a novel transgenic mouse model that spontaneously develops prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma by the inducible, conditional knockout of transforming growth factor ? receptor type II in stromal fibroblastic cells (Tgfbr2ColTKO). The Tgfbr2ColTKO prostate epithelia demonstrated down-regulation of luminal and basal differentiation markers, as well as Pten expression and up-regulation of Mcl-1. However, unlike in men, Tgfbr2ColTKO prostates exhibited no regression acutely after castration. The administration of Sabutoclax (BI-97C1), a pan-active Bcl-2 protein family antagonist mediated apoptosis in castrate-resistant PCa cells of Tgfbr2ColTKO mice and human subcutaneous, orthotopic, and intratibial xenograft PCa models. Interestingly, Sabutoclax had little apoptotic effect on benign prostate tissue in Tgfbr2ColTKO and wild-type mice. Sabutoclax was able to block c-Met activation, a critical axis in PCa metastatic progression. Further, Sabutoclax synergistically sensitized PC-3 cells to the cytotoxic effects of docetaxel (Taxotere). Together, these data suggest that Sabutoclax inhibits castrate-resistant PCa alone at the primary and bone metastatic site as well as support sensitivity to docetaxel treatment. PMID:22904682

  18. Polymethoxy-1-alkenes from Aphanizomenon ovalisporum Inhibit Vertebrate Development in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryo Model

    PubMed Central

    Jaja-Chimedza, Asha; Gantar, Miroslav; Gibbs, Patrick D. L.; Schmale, Michael C.; Berry, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are recognized producers of a wide array of toxic or otherwise bioactive secondary metabolites. The present study utilized the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo as an aquatic animal model of vertebrate development to identify, purify and characterize lipophilic inhibitors of development (i.e., developmental toxins) from an isolate of the freshwater cyanobacterial species, Aphanizomenon ovalisporum.Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the purification, and subsequent chemical characterization, of an apparent homologous series of isotactic polymethoxy-1-alkenes (1–6), including three congeners (4–6) previously identified from the strain, and two variants previously identified from other species (2 and 3), as well as one apparently novel member of the series (1). Five of the PMAs in the series (1–5) were purified in sufficient quantity for comparative toxicological characterization, and toxicity in the zebrafish embryo model was found to generally correlate with relative chain length and/or methoxylation. Moreover, exposure of embryos to a combination of variants indicates an apparent synergistic interaction between the congeners. Although PMAs have been identified previously in cyanobacteria, this is the first report of their apparent toxicity. These results, along with the previously reported presence of the PMAs from several cyanobacterial species, suggest a possibly widespread distribution of the PMAs as toxic secondary metabolites and warrants further chemical and toxicological investigation. PMID:23170087

  19. Fluoxetine prevents dystrophic changes in a zebrafish model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Trent A.; Horstick, Eric; Hur, Junguk; Jackson, Samuel W.; Davidson, Ann E.; Li, Xingli; Dowling, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common and relentlessly progressive muscle disease. Some interventions have been identified that modestly slow progression and prolong survival, but more meaningful therapies are lacking. The goal of this study is to identify new therapeutic pathways for DMD using a zebrafish model of the disease. To accomplish this, we performed a non-biased drug screen in sapje, a zebrafish line with a recessive nonsense mutation in dystrophin. We identified 6 positive hits (out of 640 total drugs tested) by their ability to prevent abnormal birefringence in sapje. Follow-up analyses demonstrated that fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), provided the most substantial benefit. Morpholino-based experimentation confirmed that modulation of the serotonin pathway alone can prevent the dystrophic phenotype, and transcriptomic analysis revealed changes in calcium homeostasis as a potential mechanism. In all, we demonstrate that monoamine agonists can prevent disease in a vertebrate model of DMD. Given the safe and widespread use of SSRIs in clinical practice, our study identifies an attractive target pathway for therapy development. PMID:24760771

  20. Zebrafish as a Model System for Environmental Health Studies in the Grade 9–12 Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Hesselbach, Renee; Carvan, Michael John; Goldberg, Barbara; Berg, Craig A.; Petering, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Developing zebrafish embryos were used as a model system for high school students to conduct scientific investigations that reveal features of normal development and to test how different environmental toxicants impact the developmental process. The primary goal of the module was to engage students from a wide range of socio-economic backgrounds, with particular focus on underserved inner-city high schools, in inquiry-based learning and hands-on experimentation. In addition, the module served as a platform for both teachers and students to design additional inquiry-based experiments. In this module, students spawned adult zebrafish to generate developing embryos, exposed the embryos to various toxicants, then gathered, and analyzed data obtained from control and experimental embryos. The module provided a flexible, experimental framework for students to test the effects of numerous environmental toxicants, such as ethanol, caffeine, and nicotine, on the development of a model vertebrate organism. Students also observed the effects of dose on experimental outcomes. From observations of the effects of the chemical agents on vertebrate embryos, students drew conclusions on how these chemicals could impact human development and health. Results of pre-tests and post-tests completed by participating students indicate statistically significant changes in awareness of the impact of environmental agents on fish and human beings In addition, the program's evaluator concluded that participation in the module resulted in significant changes in the attitude of students and teachers toward science in general and environmental health in particular. PMID:24941301

  1. RAP-011 improves erythropoiesis in zebrafish model of Diamond-Blackfan anemia through antagonizing lefty1.

    PubMed

    Ear, Jason; Huang, Haigen; Wilson, Tianna; Tehrani, Zahra; Lindgren, Anne; Sung, Victoria; Laadem, Abderrahmane; Daniel, Thomas O; Chopra, Rajesh; Lin, Shuo

    2015-08-13

    Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a bone marrow failure disorder characterized by low red blood cell count. Mutations in ribosomal protein genes have been identified in approximately half of all DBA cases. Corticosteriod therapy and bone marrow transplantation are common treatment options for patients; however, significant risks and complications are associated with these treatment options. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches are needed for treating DBA. Sotatercept (ACE-011, and its murine ortholog RAP-011) acts as an activin receptor type IIA ligand trap, increasing hemoglobin and hematocrit in pharmacologic models, in healthy volunteers, and in patients with ?-thalassemia, by expanding late-stage erythroblasts through a mechanism distinct from erythropoietin. Here, we evaluated the effects of RAP-011 in zebrafish models of RPL11 ribosome deficiency. Treatment with RAP-011 dramatically restored hemoglobin levels caused by ribosome stress. In zebrafish embryos, RAP-011 likely stimulates erythropoietic activity by sequestering lefty1 from erythroid cells. These findings identify lefty1 as a signaling component in the development of erythroid cells and rationalize the use of sotatercept in DBA patients. PMID:26109203

  2. Modeling Nociception in Zebrafish: A Way Forward for Unbiased Analgesic Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Curtright, Andrew; Rosser, Micaela; Goh, Shamii; Keown, Bailey; Wagner, Erinn; Sharifi, Jasmine; Raible, David W.; Dhaka, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic pain conditions are often debilitating, inflicting severe physiological, emotional and economic costs and affect a large percentage of the global population. However, the development of therapeutic analgesic agents based primarily on targeted drug development has been largely ineffective. An alternative approach to analgesic development would be to develop low cost, high throughput, untargeted animal based behavioral screens that model complex nociceptive behaviors in which to screen for analgesic compounds. Here we describe the development of a behavioral based assay in zebrafish larvae that is effective in identifying small molecule compounds with analgesic properties. In a place aversion assay, which likely utilizes supraspinal neuronal circuitry, individually arrayed zebrafish larvae show temperature-dependent aversion to increasing and decreasing temperatures deviating from rearing temperature. Modeling thermal hyperalgesia, the addition of the noxious inflammatory compound and TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate sensitized heat aversion and reversed cool aversion leading larvae to avoid rearing temperature in favor of otherwise acutely aversive cooler temperatures. We show that small molecules with known analgesic properties are able to inhibit acute and/or sensitized temperature aversion. PMID:25587718

  3. Prediction of drug distribution in subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines and healthy tissues in mouse: application of the tissue composition-based model to antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Ding, Xiao; Gould, Stephen E; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Messick, Kirsten; Oeh, Jason; Liederer, Bianca M

    2015-04-01

    Advanced tissue composition-based models can predict the tissue-plasma partition coefficient (Kp ) values of drugs under in vivo conditions on the basis of in vitro and physiological input data. These models, however, focus on healthy tissues and do not incorporate data from tumors. The objective of this study was to apply a tissue composition-based model to six marketed antineoplastic drugs (docetaxel, DOC; doxorubicin, DOX; gemcitabine, GEM; methotrexate, MTX; topotecan, TOP; and fluorouracil, 5-FU) to predict their Kp values in three human tumor xenografts (HCT-116, H2122, and PC3) as well as in healthy tissues (brain, muscle, lung, and liver) under steady-state in vivo conditions in female NCR nude mice. The mechanisms considered in the tissue/tumor composition-based model are the binding to lipids and to plasma proteins, but the transporter effect was also investigated. The method consisted of analyzing tissue composition, performing the pharmacokinetics studies in mice, and calculating the corresponding in vivo Kp values. Analyses of tumor composition indicated that the tumor xenografts contained no or low amounts of common transporters by contrast to lipids. The predicted Kp values were within twofold and threefold of the measured values in 77% and 93% of cases, respectively. However, predictions for brain for each drug, for liver for MTX, and for each tumor xenograft for GEM were disparate from the observed values, and, therefore, not well served by the model. Overall, this study is the first step toward the mechanism-based prediction of Kp values of small molecules in healthy and tumor tissues in mouse when no transporter and permeation limitation effect is evident. This approach will be useful in selecting compounds based on their abilities to penetrate human cancer xenografts with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, thereby increasing therapeutic index for chemotherapy in oncology study. PMID:25615572

  4. Characterization of Antiestrogenic Activity of the Chinese Herb, Prunella vulgaris, Using In Vitro and In Vivo (Mouse Xenograft) Models1

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Nancy H.; Lessey, Elizabeth C.; DuSell, Carolyn D.; McDonnell, Donald P.; Fowler, Lindsay; Palomino, Wilder A.; Illera, Maria J.; Yu, Xianzhong; Mo, Bilan; Houwing, Angela M.; Lessey, Bruce A.

    2008-01-01

    Prunella vulgaris (PV), a commonly used Chinese herb, also known as Self-heal, has a wide range of reported medicinal activities. By screening multiple herbs using the endometrial cancer cell line, ECC-1, and an alkaline phosphatase detection assay, we found that PV displayed significant antiestrogenic activity. We investigated the possible usefulness of antiestrogenic activity using both in vitro and in vivo models of endometrial function. Using the well-differentiated, hormone-responsive endometrial cell line, ECC-1, PV extract, at concentrations that were not toxic to the cells, significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and cell proliferation in response to estrogen in a dose-dependent manner. The expression of CYR61, an estrogen-induced protein, was blocked in ECC-1 cells by both the antiestrogen ICI 182?780 and PV extract. Interestingly, PV extract did not appear to directly inhibit estrogen signaling. Rather, we found that its activities were probably related to an ability to function as an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonist in ECC-1 cells. In support of this hypothesis, we noted that PV induced CYP1A1, CYP1B1, and AHR repressor expression in a dose-dependent manner—responses that were blocked by small interfering RNA treatment to reduce AHR and specific AHR antagonists. Ovariectomized immunodeficient RAG-2/gamma(c) knockout mice implanted with human endometrial xenografts developed implants only when treated with estrogen. Mice treated with estrogen and PV tea in their drinking water had fewer and smaller xenograft implants compared with their estrogen-treated counterparts that drank only water (P < 0.05). Analysis of the resulting implants by immunohistochemistry demonstrated persistent estrogen receptor (ER), but reduced proliferation and CYR61 expression. Mouse uterine tissue weight in PV-treated mice was not different from controls, and cycle fecundity of intact C57 female mice was unaffected by PV tea treatment. PV, or Self-heal, exhibits significant antiestrogenic properties, both in vitro and in vivo. This activity is likely due to the ability of PV-activated AHR to interfere with estrogen. This herb may be useful as an adjunct for the treatment of estrogen-dependent processes like endometriosis and breast and uterine cancers. Full characterization of this herb will likely provide new insights into the crosstalk between AHR and ESR1, with potential for therapeutic applications in women. PMID:18923163

  5. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Patient-derived xenografts of triple-negative breast

    E-print Network

    Matin, A.C.

    xenografts were compared by histology, immunohistochemistry, array comparative genomic hybridization (a and doxorubicin in our TNBC xenografts. Results: Patient-derived xenografts recapitulated histology, biomarker of patient-derived xenograft models covering a spectrum of TNBC subtypes was generated that histologically

  6. INDUCED AND SPONTANEOUS NEOPLASIA IN ZEBRAFISH.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address the potential of zebrafish as a cancer model, it is important to determine the susceptibility of zebrafish to tumors, and to compare zebrafish tumors with human tumors. To determine whether the commonly-used germ line mutagen, ethylnitrosourea (ENU) induces tumors, we ...

  7. [Anna Tien] Zebrafish Stress Responses to

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    2009 [Anna Tien] [5/8/2009] Zebrafish Stress Responses to Alarm Pheromone #12;2 Introduction Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have served as animal models in behavioral neuroscience and behavior genetics for the past three decades. The zebrafish has all the neurotransmitters that humans possess (Shin and Fishman

  8. The lateral line of zebrafish: a model system for the analysis of morphogenesis and neural development in vertebrates

    E-print Network

    Montpellier II, Université

    productive model system: 1) it comprises a set of discrete sense organs (neuromasts) arranged in a defined The lateral line of the zebrafish has many of the advantages that made the sensory organs of Drosophila a very, species-specific pattern, such that each organ can be individually recognized; 2) the neuromasts

  9. The Addition of A Pregnenolone Pendant Group Enhances the Anticancer Properties of Titanocene Dichloride in a MCF-7 Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Gladiany; Loperena, Yaliz; Ortiz, Giovanni; Reyes, Fiorella; Szeto, Ada; Vera, Jose; Velez, Javier; Morales, Jessica; Morrero, Deborah; Castillo, Linnette; Dharmawardhane, Surangani; Melendez, Enrique; Washington, A. Valance

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim Titanocene dichloride held great promise as a chemotherapeutic compound in preclinical studies. However, subsequent clinical trials revealed hepatoxicity and nephrotoxicity, which limited its use in clinical applications. Therefore, we used steroid pendant groups to improve the targeting of titanocene in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, and demonstrated a 10-fold lower effective dose compared to titanocene in in vitro assays. The aim of the present study was to test the efficacy of a titanocene functionalized with pregnenolone (Ti-Preg) in an in vivo breast cancer model. Materials and Methods Xenografts from the MCF7 breast cancer cell line were implanted into athymic nu/nu mice to evaluate the potential of Ti-Preg as an anti-breast cancer agent. Results Ti-Preg demonstrated a significant inhibition of MCF-7 tumor growth when compared to vehicle and to titanocene controls. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate the potential of steroid pendent groups for targeting chemotherapeutics to steroid hormone-dependent cancer. PMID:24692689

  10. Survivin-targeting Artificial MicroRNAs Mediated by Adenovirus Suppress Tumor Activity in Cancer Cells and Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yudan; Wang, Xiang; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Chao; Ertl, Hildegund C J; Zhou, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Survivin is highly expressed in most human tumors and fetal tissue, and absent in terminally differentiated cells. It promotes tumor cell proliferation by negatively regulating cell apoptosis and facilitating cell division. Survivin's selective expression pattern suggests that it might be a suitable target for cancer therapy, which would promote death of transformed but not normal cells. This was tested using artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) targeting survivin. After screening, two effective amiRNAs, which knocked down survivin expression, were identified and cloned into a replication-defective adenoviral vector. Tumor cells infected with the recombinant vector downregulated expression of survivin and underwent apoptotic cell death. Further studies showed that apoptosis was associated with increases in caspase 3 and cleaved Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, and activation of the p53 signaling pathway. Furthermore, amiRNA treatment caused blockade of mitosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. In vivo, survivin-targeting amiRNAs expressed by adenoviral vectors effectively delayed growth of hepatocellular and cervical carcinomas in mouse xenograft models. These results indicate that silencing of survivin by amiRNA has potential for treatment of cancer. PMID:25368912

  11. Antibodies targeting human IL1RAP (IL1R3) show therapeutic effects in xenograft models of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ågerstam, Helena; Karlsson, Christine; Hansen, Nils; Sandén, Carl; Askmyr, Maria; von Palffy, Sofia; Högberg, Carl; Rissler, Marianne; Wunderlich, Mark; Juliusson, Gunnar; Richter, Johan; Sjöström, Kjell; Bhatia, Ravi; Mulloy, James C.; Järås, Marcus; Fioretos, Thoas

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with a poor survival rate, and there is an urgent need for novel and more efficient therapies, ideally targeting AML stem cells that are essential for maintaining the disease. The interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP; IL1R3) is expressed on candidate leukemic stem cells in the majority of AML patients, but not on normal hematopoietic stem cells. We show here that monoclonal antibodies targeting IL1RAP have strong antileukemic effects in xenograft models of human AML. We demonstrate that effector-cell–mediated killing is essential for the observed therapeutic effects and that natural killer cells constitute a critical human effector cell type. Because IL-1 signaling is important for the growth of AML cells, we generated an IL1RAP-targeting antibody capable of blocking IL-1 signaling and show that this antibody suppresses the proliferation of primary human AML cells. Hence, IL1RAP can be efficiently targeted with an anti-IL1RAP antibody capable of both achieving antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and blocking of IL-1 signaling as modes of action. Collectively, these results provide important evidence in support of IL1RAP as a target for antibody-based treatment of AML. PMID:26261316

  12. Zoledronic acid reduces bone loss and tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft model of osteolytic oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Chelsea K; Werbeck, Jillian L.; Thudi, Nanda K.; Lanigan, Lisa G.; Wolfe, Tobie D.; Toribio, Ramiro E.; Rosol, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common form of oral cancer. Destruction and invasion of mandibular and maxillary bone frequently occurs and contributes to morbidity and mortalilty. We hypothesized that the bisphosphonate drug zoledronic acid (ZOL) would inhibit tumor-induced osteolysis and reduce tumor growth and invasion in a murine xenograft model of bone-invasive oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) derived from an osteolytic feline OSCC. Luciferase-expressing OSCC cells (SCCF2Luc) were injected into the perimaxillary subgingiva of nude mice which were then treated with 100 ?g/kg ZOL or vehicle. ZOL treatment reduced tumor growth and prevented loss of bone volume and surface area, but had no effect on tumor invasion. Effects on bone were associated with reduced osteolysis and increased periosteal new bone formation. ZOL-mediated inhibition of tumor-induced osteolysis was characterized by reduced numbers of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts at the tumor-bone interface, where it was associated with osteoclast vacuolar degeneration. The ratio of eroded to total bone surface was not affected by treatment, arguing that ZOL-mediated inhibition of osteolysis was independent of effects on osteoclast activation or initiation of bone resorption. In summary, our results establish that ZOL can reduce OSCC-induced osteolysis and my be valuable as an adjuvant therapy in OSCC to preserve mandibular and maxillary bone volume and function. PMID:20959474

  13. Selective In Vivo Targeting of Human Liver Tumors by Optimized AAV3 Vectors in a Murine Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Yuanhui; Ejjigani, Anila; Yin, Zifei; Lu, Yuan; Wang, Lina; Wang, Meng; Li, Jun; Hu, Zhongbo; Aslanidi, George V.; Zhong, Li; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Current challenges for recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector–based cancer treatment include the low efficiency and the lack of specificity in vivo. rAAV serotype 3 (rAAV3) vectors have previously been shown to be ineffective in normal mouse tissues following systemic administration. In the present study, we report that rAAV3 vectors can efficiently target and transduce various human liver cancer cells in vivo. Elimination of specific surface-exposed serine and threonine residues on rAAV3 capsids results in further augmentation in the transduction efficiency of these vectors, without any change in the viral tropism and cellular receptor interactions. In addition, we have identified a potential chemotherapy drug, shikonin, as a multifunctional compound to inhibit liver tumor growth as well as to significantly enhance the efficacy of rAAV vector-based gene therapy in vivo. Furthermore, we also document that suppression of tumorigenesis in a human liver cancer xenograft model can be achieved through systemic administration of the optimized rAAV3 vectors carrying a therapeutic gene, and shikonin at a dose that does not lead to liver damage. Our research provides a novel means to achieve not only targeted delivery but also the potential for gene therapy of human liver cancer. PMID:25296041

  14. Zebrafish and Streptococcal Infections.

    PubMed

    Saralahti, A; Rämet, M

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcal bacteria are a versatile group of gram-positive bacteria capable of infecting several host organisms, including humans and fish. Streptococcal species are common colonizers of the human respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, but they also cause some of the most common life-threatening, invasive infections in humans and aquaculture. With its unique characteristics and efficient tools for genetic and imaging applications, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as a powerful vertebrate model for infectious diseases. Several zebrafish models introduced so far have shown that zebrafish are suitable models for both zoonotic and human-specific infections. Recently, several zebrafish models mimicking human streptococcal infections have also been developed. These models show great potential in providing novel information about the pathogenic mechanisms and host responses associated with human streptococcal infections. Here, we review the zebrafish infection models for the most relevant streptococcal species: the human-specific Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes, and the zoonotic Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae. The recent success and the future potential of these models for the study of host-pathogen interactions in streptococcal infections are also discussed. PMID:26095827

  15. Promotion of Remyelination by Sulfasalazine in a Transgenic Zebrafish Model of Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suhyun; Lee, Yun-Il; Chang, Ki-Young; Lee, Dong-Won; Cho, Sung Chun; Ha, Young Wan; Na, Ji Eun; Rhyu, Im Joo; Park, Sang Chul; Park, Hae-Chul

    2015-11-30

    Most of the axons in the vertebrate nervous system are surrounded by a lipid-rich membrane called myelin, which promotes rapid conduction of nerve impulses and protects the axon from being damaged. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of the CNS characterized by infiltration of immune cells and progressive damage to myelin and axons. One potential way to treat MS is to enhance the endogenous remyelination process, but at present there are no available treatments to promote remyelination in patients with demyelinating diseases. Sulfasalazine is an anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating drug that is used in rheumatology and inflammatory bowel disease. Its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties prompted us to test the ability of sulfasalazine to promote remyelination. In this study, we found that sulfasalazine promotes remyelination in the CNS of a transgenic zebrafish model of NTR/MTZ-induced demyelination. We also found that sulfasalazine treatment reduced the number of macrophages/microglia in the CNS of demyelinated zebrafish larvae, suggesting that the acceleration of remyelination is mediated by the immunomodulatory function of sulfasalazine. Our data suggest that temporal modulation of the immune response by sulfasalazine can be used to overcome MS by enhancing myelin repair and remyelination in the CNS. PMID:26549504

  16. Promotion of Remyelination by Sulfasalazine in a Transgenic Zebrafish Model of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suhyun; Lee, Yun-Il; Chang, Ki-Young; Lee, Dong-Won; Cho, Sung Chun; Ha, Young Wan; Na, Ji Eun; Rhyu, Im Joo; Park, Sang Chul; Park, Hae-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Most of the axons in the vertebrate nervous system are surrounded by a lipid-rich membrane called myelin, which promotes rapid conduction of nerve impulses and protects the axon from being damaged. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of the CNS characterized by infiltration of immune cells and progressive damage to myelin and axons. One potential way to treat MS is to enhance the endogenous remyelination process, but at present there are no available treatments to promote remyelination in patients with demyelinating diseases. Sulfasalazine is an anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating drug that is used in rheumatology and inflammatory bowel disease. Its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties prompted us to test the ability of sulfasalazine to promote remyelination. In this study, we found that sulfasalazine promotes remyelination in the CNS of a transgenic zebrafish model of NTR/MTZ-induced demyelination. We also found that sulfasalazine treatment reduced the number of macrophages/microglia in the CNS of demyelinated zebrafish larvae, suggesting that the acceleration of remyelination is mediated by the immunomodulatory function of sulfasalazine. Our data suggest that temporal modulation of the immune response by sulfasalazine can be used to overcome MS by enhancing myelin repair and remyelination in the CNS. PMID:26549504

  17. Heritable T Cell Malignancy Models Established in a Zebrafish Phenotypic Screen

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, J. Kimble; Meeker, Nathan; Rudner, Lynnie; Bradley, Diana F.; Smith, Alexandra C. H.; Demarest, Bradley; Joshi, Deepa; Locke, Erin E.; Hutchinson, Sarah A.; Tripp, Sheryl; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Trede, Nikolaus S.

    2009-01-01

    T cell neoplasias are common in pediatric oncology, and include acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL). These cancers have worse prognoses than their B cell counterparts, and their treatments carry significant morbidity. While many pediatric malignancies have characteristic translocations, most T lymphocyte-derived diseases lack cytogenetic hallmarks. Lacking these informative lesions, insight into their molecular pathogenesis is less complete. Although dysregulation of the NOTCH1 pathway occurs in a substantial fraction of cases, many other genetic lesions of T cell malignancy have not yet been determined. To address this deficiency, we pioneered a phenotype-driven forward-genetic screen in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Using transgenic fish with T lymphocyte-specific expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), we performed chemical mutagenesis, screened animals for GFP+ tumors, and identified multiple lines with a heritable predisposition to T cell malignancy. In each line, patterns of infiltration and morphologic appearance resembled human T-ALL and T-LBL. T cell receptor analyses confirmed their clonality. Malignancies were transplantable and contained leukemia-initiating cells (LIC), like their human correlates. In summary, we have identified multiple zebrafish mutants that recapitulate human T cell neoplasia and show heritable transmission. These vertebrate models provide new genetic platforms for the study of these important human cancers. PMID:19516274

  18. Zebrafish as a model to study live mucus physiology

    E-print Network

    Jevtov, Irena

    Dysfunctional mucus barriers can result in important pulmonary and gastrointestinal conditions, but model systems to study the underlying causes are largely missing. We identified and characterized five mucin homologues ...

  19. Zebrafish Facility Work at UMassZebrafish Facility Work at UMass Ensure proper environmental conditions including a wall

    E-print Network

    Siegelmann , Hava T

    Zebrafish Facility Work at UMassZebrafish Facility Work at UMass Ensure proper environmental and healthy! Regular feedings 7 days a week - fish don't celebrate holidays! #12;Intro to the the zebrafish the zebrafish as a model system. #12;Karlstrom Lab: Forebrain development and axon guidanceKarlstrom Lab

  20. Towards a comprehensive eye model for zebrafish retinal imaging using full range spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Weber, Anke; Cimalla, Peter; Köttig, Felix; Brand, Michael; Koch, Edmund

    2014-03-01

    In regenerative medicine, the zebrafish is a prominent animal model for studying degeneration and regeneration processes, e.g. of photoreceptor cells in the retina. By means of optical coherence tomography (OCT), these studies can be conducted over weeks using the same individual and hence reducing the variability of the results. To allow an improvement of zebrafish retinal OCT imaging by suitable optics, we developed a zebrafish eye model using geometrical data obtained by in vivo dispersion encoded full range OCT as well as a dispersion comprising gradient index (GRIN) lens model based on refractive index data found in the literature. Using non-sequential ray tracing, the focal length of the spherical GRIN lens (diameter of 0.96 mm) was determined to be 1.22 mm at 800 nm wavelength giving a Matheissen's ratio (ratio of focal length to radius of the lens) of 2.54, which fits well into the range between 2.19 and 2.82, found for various fish lenses. Additionally, a mean refractive index of 1.64 at 800 nm could be retrieved for the lens to yield the same focal position as found for the GRIN condition. With the aid of the zebrafish eye model, the optics of the OCT scanner head were adjusted to provide high-resolution retinal images with a field of view of 30° x 30°. The introduced model therefore provides the basis for improved retinal imaging with OCT and can be further used to study the image formation within the zebrafish eye.

  1. [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography of LAPC4-CR Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model in Soft Tissue Compartments1

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Keisha C.; Cheng, Su-Chun; Huang, Ying; Kohl, Nancy E.; Tupper, Tanya; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Sweeney, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical xenograft models have contributed to advancing our understanding of the molecular basis of prostate cancer and to the development of targeted therapy. However, traditional preclinical in vivo techniques using caliper measurements and survival analysis evaluate the macroscopic tumor behavior, whereas tissue sampling disrupts the microenvironment and cannot be used for longitudinal studies in the same animal. Herein, we present an in vivo study of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) designed to evaluate the metabolism within the microenvironment of LAPC4-CR, a unique murine model of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Mice bearing LAPC4-CR subcutaneous tumors were administered [18F]-FDG via intravenous injection. After a 60-minute distribution phase, the mice were imaged on a PET/CT scanner with submillimeter resolution; and the fused PET/CT images were analyzed to evaluate tumor size, location, and metabolism across the cohort of mice. The xenograft tumors showed [18F]-FDG uptake that was independent of tumor size and was significantly greater than uptake in skeletal muscle and liver in mice (Wilcoxon signed-rank P values of .0002 and .0002, respectively). [18F]-FDG metabolism of the LAPC4-CR tumors was 2.1 ± 0.8 ID/cm3*wt, with tumor to muscle ratio of 7.4 ± 4.7 and tumor to liver background ratio of 6.7 ± 2.3. Noninvasive molecular imaging techniques such as PET/CT can be used to probe the microenvironment of tumors in vivo. This study showed that [18F]-FDG-PET/CT could be used to image and assess glucose metabolism of LAPC4-CR xenografts in vivo. Further work can investigate the use of PET/CT to quantify the metabolic response of LAPC4-CR to novel agents and combination therapies using soft tissue and possibly bone compartment xenograft models. PMID:26055171

  2. An inducible transgene reports activation of macrophages in live zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Leslie E; Chien, An-Tzu; Astin, Jonathan W; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S; Hall, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are the most functionally heterogenous cells of the hematopoietic system. Given many diseases are underpinned by inappropriate macrophage activation, macrophages have emerged as a therapeutic target to treat disease. A thorough understanding of what controls macrophage activation will likely reveal new pathways that can be manipulated for therapeutic benefit. Live imaging fluorescent macrophages within transgenic zebrafish larvae has provided a valuable window to investigate macrophage behavior in vivo. Here we describe the first transgenic zebrafish line that reports macrophage activation, as evidenced by induced expression of an immunoresponsive gene 1(irg1):EGFP transgene. When combined with existing reporter lines that constitutively mark macrophages, we reveal this unique transgenic line can be used to live image macrophage activation in response to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide and xenografted human cancer cells. We anticipate the Tg(irg1:EGFP) line will provide a valuable tool to explore macrophage activation and plasticity in the context of different disease models. PMID:26123890

  3. ptk7 mutant zebrafish models of congenital and idiopathic scoliosis implicate dysregulated Wnt signalling in disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Madeline; Gao, Xiaochong; Yu, Lisa X; Paria, Nandina; Henkelman, R. Mark; Wise, Carol A.; Ciruna, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Scoliosis is a complex genetic disorder of the musculoskeletal system, characterized by three-dimensional rotation of the spine. Curvatures caused by malformed vertebrae (congenital scoliosis (CS)) are apparent at birth. Spinal curvatures with no underlying vertebral abnormality (idiopathic scoliosis (IS)) most commonly manifest during adolescence. The genetic and biological mechanisms responsible for IS remain poorly understood due largely to limited experimental models. Here we describe zygotic ptk7 (Zptk7) mutant zebrafish, deficient in a critical regulator of Wnt signalling, as the first genetically defined developmental model of IS. We identify a novel sequence variant within a single IS patient that disrupts PTK7 function, consistent with a role for dysregulated Wnt activity in disease pathogenesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that embryonic loss-of-gene function in maternal-zygotic ptk7 mutants (MZptk7) leads to vertebral anomalies associated with CS. Our data suggest novel molecular origins of, and genetic links between, congenital and idiopathic forms of disease. PMID:25182715

  4. RAD1901: a novel, orally bioavailable selective estrogen receptor degrader that demonstrates antitumor activity in breast cancer xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Garner, Fiona; Shomali, Maysoun; Paquin, Dotty; Lyttle, C Richard; Hattersley, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Agents that inhibit estrogen production, such as aromatase inhibitors or those that directly block estrogen receptor (ER) activity, such as selective estrogen receptor modulators and selective estrogen receptor degraders, are routinely used in the treatment of ER-positive breast cancers. However, although initial treatment with these agents is often successful, many women eventually relapse with drug-resistant breast cancers. To overcome some of the challenges associated with current endocrine therapies and to combat the development of resistance, there is a need for more durable and more effective ER-targeted therapies. Here we describe and characterize a novel, orally bioavailable small-molecule selective estrogen receptor degrader, RAD1901, and evaluate its therapeutic potential for the treatment of breast cancer. RAD1901 selectively binds to and degrades the ER and is a potent antagonist of ER-positive breast cancer cell proliferation. Importantly, RAD1901 produced a robust and profound inhibition of tumor growth in MCF-7 xenograft models. In an intracranial MCF-7 model, RAD1901-treated animals survived longer than those treated with either control or fulvestrant, suggesting the potential benefit of RAD1901 in the treatment of ER-positive breast cancer that has metastasized to the brain. Finally, RAD1901 preserved ovariectomy-induced bone loss and prevented the uterotropic effects of E2, suggesting that it may act selectively as an agonist in bone but as an antagonist in breast and uterine tissues. RAD1901 is currently under clinical study in postmenopausal women with ER-positive advanced breast cancer. PMID:26164151

  5. Identification of transaldolase as a novel serum biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis using xenografted mouse model and clinic samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cun; Guo, Kun; Gao, Dongmei; Kang, Xiaonan; Jiang, Kai; Li, Yan; Sun, Lu; Zhang, Shu; Sun, Chun; Liu, Xiaohui; Wu, Weizhong; Yang, Pengyuan; Liu, Yinkun

    2011-12-27

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of serious disorders with the highest morbidities and mortalities worldwide. Metastasis is the major concern that causes death in HCC. The goal of this study was to screen and identify potential serum proteins indicating HCC metastasis. Serum samples collected from control and HCCLM3-R metastatic HCC tumor model at specific stages of metastasis (1 wk, 3 wks and 6 wks) were subjected to iTRAQ labeling followed by 2DLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. A total of 554 proteins were identified and 80 proteins were differential expressed at least between one adjacent time points. Among them, expression level of transaldolase (TALDO) was validated in mouse and human serum. The level of TALDO protein was found to be higher in metastatic mice serum compared to that of non-metastatic mice. Human specific TALDO was then identified in mouse serum through human specific peptides. Immunohistochemical and western blot analysis showed that the expression of TALDO in human HCC tissues and HCC cell lines was associated with its metastatic behavior. Subsequent screening of TALDO expression in 72 clinical serum samples (comprising 36 non-metastatic HCC and 36 metastatic HCC samples) revealed higher TALDO level in the serum of metastatic HCC patients. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve estimated a maximal sensitivity of 77.8% and 86.1% specificity for TALDO in detection of HCC metastasis. The present results demonstrated that the nude mouse xenograft model is an efficient system for performing metastasis-related biomarker discovery. TALDO may be useful biomarkers for the detection of HCC metastasis. PMID:22023829

  6. RAD1901: a novel, orally bioavailable selective estrogen receptor degrader that demonstrates antitumor activity in breast cancer xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Shomali, Maysoun; Paquin, Dotty; Lyttle, C. Richard; Hattersley, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Agents that inhibit estrogen production, such as aromatase inhibitors or those that directly block estrogen receptor (ER) activity, such as selective estrogen receptor modulators and selective estrogen receptor degraders, are routinely used in the treatment of ER-positive breast cancers. However, although initial treatment with these agents is often successful, many women eventually relapse with drug-resistant breast cancers. To overcome some of the challenges associated with current endocrine therapies and to combat the development of resistance, there is a need for more durable and more effective ER-targeted therapies. Here we describe and characterize a novel, orally bioavailable small-molecule selective estrogen receptor degrader, RAD1901, and evaluate its therapeutic potential for the treatment of breast cancer. RAD1901 selectively binds to and degrades the ER and is a potent antagonist of ER-positive breast cancer cell proliferation. Importantly, RAD1901 produced a robust and profound inhibition of tumor growth in MCF-7 xenograft models. In an intracranial MCF-7 model, RAD1901-treated animals survived longer than those treated with either control or fulvestrant, suggesting the potential benefit of RAD1901 in the treatment of ER-positive breast cancer that has metastasized to the brain. Finally, RAD1901 preserved ovariectomy-induced bone loss and prevented the uterotropic effects of E2, suggesting that it may act selectively as an agonist in bone but as an antagonist in breast and uterine tissues. RAD1901 is currently under clinical study in postmenopausal women with ER-positive advanced breast cancer. PMID:26164151

  7. Emerging applications of zebrafish as a model organism to study oxidative mechanisms and their role in inflammation and vascular accumulation of oxidized lipids

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Longhou; Miller, Yury I.

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering, zebrafish (Danio rerio) were recognized as an attractive model organism to study many biological processes. Remarkably, the small size and optical transparency of zebrafish larvae enable high-resolution imaging of live animals. Zebrafish respond to various environmental and pathological factors with robust oxidative stress. In this article, we provide an overview of molecular mechanisms involved in oxidative stress and antioxidant response in zebrafish. Existing applications of generically-encoded fluorescent sensors allow imaging, in real time, production of H2O2 and studying its involvement in inflammatory responses, as well as activation of oxidation-sensitive transcription factors HIF and NRF2. Oxidative stress, combined with hypelipidemia, leads to oxidation of lipoproteins, the process that contributes significantly to development of human atherosclerosis. Recent work found that feeding zebrafish a high-cholesterol diet results in hypercholesterolemia, vascular lipid accumulation and extreme lipoprotein oxidation. Generation of a transgenic zebrafish expressing a GFP-tagged human antibody to malondialdehyde (MDA)-modified LDL makes possible in vivo visualization of MDA epitopes in the vascular wall and testing the efficacy of antioxidants and dietary interventions. Thus, using zebrafish as a model organism provides important advantages in studying the role of ROS and lipid oxidation in basic biologic and pathologic processes. PMID:22906686

  8. Large-Scale Phenotype-Based Antiepileptic Drug Screening in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Dinday, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in a voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) result in Dravet Syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy. Zebrafish with a mutation in scn1Lab recapitulate salient phenotypes associated with DS, including seizures, early fatality, and resistance to antiepileptic drugs. To discover new drug candidates for the treatment of DS, we screened a chemical library of ?1000 compounds and identified 4 compounds that rescued the behavioral seizure component, including 1 compound (dimethadione) that suppressed associated electrographic seizure activity. Fenfluramine, but not huperzine A, also showed antiepileptic activity in our zebrafish assays. The effectiveness of compounds that block neuronal calcium current (dimethadione) or enhance serotonin signaling (fenfluramine) in our zebrafish model suggests that these may be important therapeutic targets in patients with DS. Over 150 compounds resulting in fatality were also identified. We conclude that the combination of behavioral and electrophysiological assays provide a convenient, sensitive, and rapid basis for phenotype-based drug screening in zebrafish mimicking a genetic form of epilepsy. PMID:26465006

  9. Obligate anaerobic Salmonella typhimurium strain YB1 treatment on xenograft tumor in immunocompetent mouse model

    PubMed Central

    YU, BIN; SHI, LEI; ZHANG, BAO-ZHONG; ZHANG, KE; PENG, XIAO; NIU, HAN-BEN; QU, JUN-LE

    2015-01-01

    The present authors have previously reported a novel approach to genetically engineer Salmonella typhimurium for the medically important therapeutic strategy of using bacterial agents to target malignant tumors in a breast cancer tumor-bearing nude mouse model. However, studying an immunocompromised mouse model for cancer therapy is insufficient, as certain crucial information about the influence of the immune system may be missing. In the present study, inoculation of the Salmonella strain, YB1, into a colon cancer tumor-bearing immunocompetent mouse model was investigated. The present study determined the tumor targeting efficiency, antitumor potential, the effects of multiple treatments and the systemic toxicity. Intravenous inoculation of YB1 in BALB/c mice exhibited high antitumor effects and also greatly increased the tumor targeting ability and safety compared with the previously-reported nude mouse model. In addition, repeated administration of YB1 further enhanced this effect. Furthermore, no marked toxicity was observed with YB1 treatment, while the VNP20009 and SL7207 strains demonstrated certain adverse effects. The findings of the present study indicate that the YB1 strain is effective and safe in targeting a colon cancer tumor in an immunocompetent mouse model.

  10. Prediction of acute toxicity of cadmium and lead to zebrafish larvae by using a refined toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongfei; Feng, Jianfeng; Zhu, Lin

    2015-12-01

    The biotic ligand model (BLM) and the toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic (TK-TD) model are essential in predicting the acute toxicity of metals in various species and exposure conditions; however, these models are usually separately utilized. In this study, a mechanistic TK-TD model was developed to predict the acute toxicity of 10(-6)M Cd and 10(-6)M Pb to zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. The novel approach links the BLM with relevant TK processes to simulate the bioaccumulation processes of Cd or Pb as a function of the maximum uptake rate of each metal, the affinity constants, and the concentrations of free metal ions and H(+) in test solutions. Results showed that the refined TK-TD model can accurately predict the accumulation and acute toxicity of Cd and Pb to zebrafish larvae at pH 5.5, 6.5, and 7.0. PMID:26513221

  11. Carbamate nerve agent prophylatics exhibit distinct toxicological effects in the zebrafish embryo model.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Audrey; Wolman, Marc; Granato, Michael; Parsons, Michael; McCallion, Andrew S; Proescher, Jody; English, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Pyridostigmine bromide (PB) is an FDA-approved drug for the treatment of myasthenia gravis and a prophylactic pre-treatment for organophosphate nerve agent poisoning. Current methods for evaluating nerve agent treatments include enzymatic studies and mammalian models. Rapid whole animal screening tools for assessing the effects of nerve agent pre-treatment and post-exposure drugs represent an underdeveloped area of research. We used zebrafish as a model for acute and chronic developmental exposure to PB and two related carbamate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, neostigmine bromide (NB) and physostigmine (PS). Lethal doses and gross morphological phenotypes resulting from exposure to sub-lethal doses of these compounds were determined. Quantitative analyses of motility impairment and AChE enzyme inhibition were used to determine optimal dosing conditions for evaluation of the effects of carbamate exposures on neuronal development; ~50% impairment of response to startle stimuli and >50% inhibition of AChE activity were observed at 80 mMPB, 20 mM NB and 0.1 mM PS. PB induced stunted somite length, but no other phenotypic effects were observed. In contrast, NB and PS induced more severe phenotypic morphological defects than PB as well as neurite outgrowth mislocalization. Additionally, NB induced mislocalization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, resulting in impaired synapse formation. Taken together, these data suggest that altered patterns of neuronal connectivity contribute to the developmental neurotoxicity of carbamates and demonstrate the utility of the zebrafish model for distinguishing subtle structure-based differential effects of AChE inhibitors, which include nerve agents, pesticides and drugs. PMID:25968237

  12. Identification, Modeling and Ligand Affinity of Early Deuterostome CYP51s, and Functional Characterization of Recombinant Zebrafish Sterol 14?-Demethylase

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Ann Michelle Stanley; Goldstone, Jared V.; Lamb, David C.; Kubota, Akira; Lemaire, Benjamin; Stegeman, John. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sterol 14?-demethylase (cytochrome P450 51, CYP51, P45014DM) is a microsomal enzyme that in eukaryotes catalyzes formation of sterols essential for cell membrane function and as precursors in biosynthesis of steroid hormones. Functional properties of CYP51s are unknown in non-mammalian deuterostomes. Methods PCR-cloning and sequencing and computational analyses (homology modeling and docking) addressed CYP51 in zebrafish Danio rerio, the reef fish sergeant major Abudefduf saxatilis, and the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Following N-terminal amino acid modification, zebrafish CYP51 was expressed in Escherichia coli, and lanosterol 14?-demethylase activity and azole inhibition of CYP51 activity were characterized using GC/MS. Results Molecular phylogeny positioned S. purpuratus CYP51 at the base of the deuterostome clade. In zebrafish, CYP51 is expressed in all organs examined, most strongly in intestine. The recombinant protein bound lanosterol and catalyzed 14?-demethylase activity, at 3.2 nmol/min/nmol CYP51. The binding of azoles to zebrafish CYP51 gave KS (dissociation constant) values of 0.26 ?M for ketoconazole and 0.64 ?M for propiconazole. Displacement of carbon monoxide also indicated zebrafish CYP51 has greater affinity for ketoconazole. Docking to homology models showed that lanosterol docks in fish and sea urchin CYP51s with an orientation essentially the same as in mammalian CYP51. Docking of ketoconazole indicates it would inhibit fish and sea urchin CYP51s. Conclusions Biochemical and computational analyses are consistent with lanosterol being a substrate for early deuterostome CYP51s. General Significance The results expand the phylogenetic view of animal CYP51, with evolutionary, environmental and therapeutic implications. PMID:24361620

  13. Naltrindole inhibits human multiple myeloma cell proliferation in vitro and in a murine xenograft model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mundra, Jyoti Joshi; Terskiy, Alexandra; Howells, Richard D

    2012-08-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that immune cell activation and proliferation were sensitive to the effects of naltrindole, a nonpeptidic ?-opioid receptor-selective antagonist; therefore, we hypothesized that human multiple myeloma (MM) would be a valuable model for studying potential antineoplastic properties of naltrindole. [(3)H]naltrindole exhibited saturable, low-affinity binding to intact human MM cells; however, the pharmacological profile of the binding site differed considerably from the properties of ?-, ?-, and ?-opioid receptors, and opioid receptor mRNA was not detected in MM cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Naltrindole inhibited the proliferation of cultured human U266 MM cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner with an EC(50) of 16 ?M. The naltrindole-induced inhibition of U266 cell proliferation was not blocked by a 10-fold molar excess of naltrexone, a nonselective opioid antagonist. Additive inhibition of MM cell proliferation was observed when using a combination of naltrindole with the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium valproate, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, the glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone, and the HMG CoA reductase inhibitor simvastatin. Treatment of U266 cells with naltrindole significantly decreased the level of the active, phosphorylated form of the kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt, which may be related to its antiproliferative activity. The antiproliferative activity of naltrindole toward MM cells was maintained in cocultures of MM and bone marrow-derived stromal cells, mimicking the bone marrow microenvironment. In vivo, naltrindole significantly decreased tumor cell volumes in human MM cell xenografts in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We hypothesize that naltrindole inhibits the proliferation of MM cells through a nonopioid receptor-dependent mechanism. PMID:22537770

  14. Anti-tumor activity of oridonin on SNU-5 subcutaneous xenograft model via regulation of c-Met pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua; Qian, Changlin; Shen, Zhiyong

    2014-09-01

    Gastric cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Oridonin, a diterpenoid isolated from Rabdosia rubescens, has attracted considerable attention as a potential treatment for gastric cancer based on its anti-tumor effects in many tumor cell lines. However, detailed anti-tumor mechanisms of oridonin remain a matter of speculation. In the present study, a gastric carcinoma cell line harboring c-Met gene amplification SNU-5 was used to investigate the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that in vitro, oridonin potently inhibited c-Met phosphorylation and c-Met-dependent cell proliferation (IC50 value, 36.8 ?M), meanwhile down-regulated the expression of the downstream signaling molecules including phospho-c-Raf, phospho-Erk, and phospho-Akt. In vivo, oridonin showed efficacy at well-tolerated doses, including marked cytoreductive anti-tumor activity in SNU-5 subcutaneous xenograft model. The anti-tumor efficacy of oridonin was dose-dependent and showed strong inhibition of c-Met phosphorylation. Additional mechanism of action studies showed dose-dependent inhibition of c-Met-dependent signal transduction, tumor cell proliferation (Ki67), and reduction of microvessel density (CD31). These results suggested that the anti-tumor activity of oridonin may be mediated by direct effects on tumor cell growth or survival as well as anti-angiogenic mechanisms. In summary, the results indicated that oridonin exerted anti-tumor growth on human gastric cancer SNU-5 in vitro and in vivo by direct regulation of c-Met signaling pathway and the anti-tumor effects was mainly based on its anti-proliferation and anti-angiogenesis. PMID:24916572

  15. Neurochemical measurements in the zebrafish brain

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lauren J.; McCutcheon, James E.; Young, Andrew M. J.; Norton, William H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is an ideal model organism for behavioral genetics and neuroscience. The high conservation of genes and neurotransmitter pathways between zebrafish and other vertebrates permits the translation of research between species. Zebrafish behavior can be studied at both larval and adult stages and recent research has begun to establish zebrafish models for human disease. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique that permits the detection of neurotransmitter release and reuptake. In this study we have used in vitro FSCV to measure the release of analytes in the adult zebrafish telencephalon. We compare different stimulation methods and present a characterization of neurochemical changes in the wild-type zebrafish brain. This study represents the first FSCV recordings in zebrafish, thus paving the way for neurochemical analysis of the fish brain. PMID:26441575

  16. In-vivo xenograft murine human uveal melanoma model develops hepatic micrometastases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Fang, Guofu; Huang, Xinping; Yu, Jie; Hsieh, Chia-Ling; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop a mouse ocular melanoma model with human uveal melanoma cells that forms hepatic micrometastases. Human uveal melanoma Mel290 cells were transfected with a lentiviral-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression vector. Proliferation assays were performed by comparing Mel290-EGFP and Mel290 cells. After stable expression of EGFP and proliferation was ascertained, 1 × 106 Mel290-EGFP cells were introduced into NU/NU mice by posterior compartment (PC) inoculation or tail vein injection. Control groups were inoculated or injected with Mel290 cells. Ocular and hepatic frozen sections were examined by fluorescence microscopy, and the number of hepatic micrometastases was determined. EGFP expression was observed at 24 h after transfection. At 72 h after transfection, more than 70% of Mel290 cells expressed EGFP. At 45 days (six passages), 90% of Mel290 cells stably expressed EGFP. Histologic examination showed that Mel290-EGFP cells formed hepatic micrometastases after either PC inoculation or tail vein injection. A significant difference in the number of hepatic micrometastases between PC inoculation and tail vein injection (P<0.01) was observed. Mel290-EGFP cells stably expressed green fluorescent protein in vitro at 45 days (six passages). These cells formed hepatic micrometastases in NU/NU mice after PC inoculation or tail vein injection, with significantly more micrometastases developing in the PC inoculation model than after tail vein injection. PMID:18337645

  17. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    PubMed

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-05-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts and established that IL-8 production can occur at sites distal to areas of intestinal mucosal damage. These results demonstrate that human intestinal epithelial cells can produce inflammatory cytokines in response to infection in vivo and establish the SCID-HU-INT model as a system for studying the interactions between E. histolytica and human intestine. PMID:9125540

  18. Establishment of a Zebrafish Infection Model for the Study of Wild-Type and Recombinant European Sheatfish Virus.

    PubMed

    Martín, Verónica; Mavian, Carla; López Bueno, Alberto; de Molina, Antonio; Díaz, Eduardo; Andrés, Germán; Alcami, Antonio; Alejo, Alí

    2015-10-01

    Amphibian-like ranaviruses include pathogens of fish, amphibians, and reptiles that have recently evolved from a fish-infecting ancestor. The molecular determinants of host range and virulence in this group are largely unknown, and currently fish infection models are lacking. We show that European sheatfish virus (ESV) can productively infect zebrafish, causing a lethal pathology, and describe a method for the generation of recombinant ESV, establishing a useful model for the study of fish ranavirus infections. PMID:26246565

  19. Cold exposure down-regulates zebrafish pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Kulkeaw, Kasem; Ishitani, Tohru; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Ivanovski, Ognen; Nakagawa, Midori; Mizuochi, Chiyo; Horio, Yuka; Sugiyama, Daisuke

    2011-04-01

    Vertebrates use adaptive mechanisms when exposed to physiologic stresses. However, the mechanisms of pigmentation regulation in response to physiologic stresses largely remain unclear. To address this issue, we developed a novel pigmentation model in adult zebrafish using coldwater exposure (cold zebrafish). When zebrafish were maintained at 17 °C, the pigmentation of their pigment stripes was reduced compared with zebrafish at 26.5 °C (normal zebrafish). In cold zebrafish, gene expression levels of tyrosinase and dopachrome tautomerase, which encode enzymes involved in melanogenesis, were down-regulated, suggesting that either down-regulation of melanin synthesis occurred or the number of melanophores decreased. Both regular and electron microscopic observation of zebrafish skin showed that the number of melanophores decreased, whereas aggregation of melanosomes was not changed in cold zebrafish compared with normal zebrafish. Taken together, we here show that cold exposure down-regulated adult zebrafish pigmentation through decreasing the number of melanophores and propose that the cold zebrafish model is a powerful tool for pigmentation research. PMID:21392186

  20. Uptake of verteporfin by orthotopic xenograft pancreas models with different levels of aggression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Julia; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Hoopes, P. Jack; Rizvi, Imran; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis, usually treated with chemoradiation therapy. Interstitial photodynamic therapy is a potentially effective adjuvant treatment that is under development. In the current study, two orthotopic pancreatic cancer models (AsPC-1 and Panc-1), have been characterized with respect to growth rates, morphology and liposomal drug (Verteporfin) uptake and distribution in SCID mice. Fluorescence of Verteporfin was measured in liver and tumor in vivo using a PDT fluorescence dosimeter with measurements taken before and up to one hour after tail vein injection. Fluorescence reached a plateau by about 15 minutes and did not decrease over the first hour. At time points from 15 minutes to 24 hrs, the internal organs (kidney, spleen, pancreas, tumor, muscle, lung, liver, and skin were excised and scanned on a Typhoon imager. The ratio of fluorescence in tumor versus normal tissues was analyzed with image processing, calculated at each time point and compared to in vivo results. Tissue distribution of Verteporfin in relation to functional vasculature marked by DiOc7 was carried out on frozen sections. Final analysis will result in determination of the ideal time point to administer light to achieve maximum tumor destruction while preserving normal tissue.

  1. Raloxifene inhibits tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model of metastatic mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The effects of raloxifene, a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator, were studied in a mouse metastatic mammary cancer model expressing cytoplasmic ER?. Methods Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of syngeneic BALB/c mice with BJMC3879luc2 cells, were subsequently treated with raloxifene at 0, 18 and 27 mg/kg/day using mini-osmotic pumps. Results In vitro study demonstrated that the ER? in BJMC3879luc2 cells was smaller (between 50 and 64 kDa) than the normal-sized ER? (66 kDa) and showed cytoplasmic localization. A statistically significant but weak estradiol response was observed in this cell line. When BJMC3879luc2 tumors were implanted into mice, the ER? mRNA levels were significantly higher in females than in males. In vitro studies showed that raloxifene induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in the G1-phase and a decrease in the cell population in the S-phase. In animal experiments, tumor volumes were significantly suppressed in the raloxifene-treated groups. The multiplicity of lymph node metastasis was significantly decreased in the 27 mg/kg group. Levels of apoptosis were significantly increased in the raloxifene-treated groups, whereas the levels of DNA synthesis were significantly decreased in these groups. No differences in microvessel density in tumors were observed between the control and raloxifene-treated groups. The numbers of dilated lymphatic vessels containing intraluminal tumor cells were significantly reduced in mammary tumors in the raloxifene-treated groups. The levels of ER? mRNA in mammary tumors tended to be decreased in the raloxifene-treated groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the antimetastatic activity of raloxifene in mammary cancer expressing cytoplasmic ER? may be a crucial finding with clinical applications and that raloxifene may be useful as an adjuvant therapy and for the chemoprevention of breast cancer development. PMID:20958960

  2. Measuring zebrafish turning rate.

    PubMed

    Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; di Bernardo, Mario; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a popular animal model in preclinical research, and zebrafish turning rate has been proposed for the analysis of activity in several domains. The turning rate is often estimated from the trajectory of the fish centroid that is output by commercial or custom-made target tracking software run on overhead videos of fish swimming. However, the accuracy of such indirect methods with respect to the turning rate associated with changes in heading during zebrafish locomotion is largely untested. Here, we compare two indirect methods for the turning rate estimation using the centroid velocity or position data, with full shape tracking for three different video sampling rates. We use tracking data from the overhead video recorded at 60, 30, and 15 frames per second of zebrafish swimming in a shallow water tank. Statistical comparisons of absolute turning rate across methods and sampling rates indicate that, while indirect methods are indistinguishable from full shape tracking, the video sampling rate significantly influences the turning rate measurement. The results of this study can aid in the selection of the video capture frame rate, an experimental design parameter in zebrafish behavioral experiments where activity is an important measure. PMID:25844837

  3. Analysis of RNAseq datasets from a comparative infectious disease zebrafish model using GeneTiles bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Veneman, Wouter J; de Sonneville, Jan; van der Kolk, Kees-Jan; Ordas, Anita; Al-Ars, Zaid; Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P

    2015-03-01

    We present a RNA deep sequencing (RNAseq) analysis of a comparison of the transcriptome responses to infection of zebrafish larvae with Staphylococcus epidermidis and Mycobacterium marinum bacteria. We show how our developed GeneTiles software can improve RNAseq analysis approaches by more confidently identifying a large set of markers upon infection with these bacteria. For analysis of RNAseq data currently, software programs such as Bowtie2 and Samtools are indispensable. However, these programs that are designed for a LINUX environment require some dedicated programming skills and have no options for visualisation of the resulting mapped sequence reads. Especially with large data sets, this makes the analysis time consuming and difficult for non-expert users. We have applied the GeneTiles software to the analysis of previously published and newly obtained RNAseq datasets of our zebrafish infection model, and we have shown the applicability of this approach also to published RNAseq datasets of other organisms by comparing our data with a published mammalian infection study. In addition, we have implemented the DEXSeq module in the GeneTiles software to identify genes, such as glucagon A, that are differentially spliced under infection conditions. In the analysis of our RNAseq data, this has led to the possibility to improve the size of data sets that could be efficiently compared without using problem-dedicated programs, leading to a quick identification of marker sets. Therefore, this approach will also be highly useful for transcriptome analyses of other organisms for which well-characterised genomes are available. PMID:25503064

  4. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.; Afrin, Farhat

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in these human lymphoma xenograft models.

  5. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schall, K A; Holoyda, K A; Grant, C N; Levin, D E; Torres, E R; Maxwell, A; Pollack, H A; Moats, R A; Frey, M R; Darehzereshki, A; Al Alam, D; Lien, C; Grikscheit, T C

    2015-08-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation. PMID:26089336

  6. Evaluation of Trastuzumab Anti-Tumor Efficacy and its Correlation with HER-2 Status in Patient-Derived Gastric Adenocarcinoma Xenograft Models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Ye, Qingqing; Lv, Jing; Ye, Peng; Sun, Yun; Fan, Shuqiong; Su, Xinying; Gavine, Paul; Yin, Xiaolu

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate trastuzumab anti-tumor efficacy and its correlation with HER-2 status in primary xenograft models derived from Chinese patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. Patient-derived gastric adenocarcinoma xenograft (PDGAX) mouse models were firstly generated by implanting gastric adenocarcinoma tissues from patients into immune deficient mice. A high degree of histological and molecular similarity between the PDGAX mouse models and their corresponding patients' gastric adenocarcinoma tissues was shown by pathological observation, HER-2 expression, HER-2 gene copy number, and mutation detection. Based on Hoffmann's criteria in gastric cancer, three models (PDGAX001, PDGAX003 and PDGAX005) were defined as HER-2 positive with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) amplification or immunohistochemistry (IHC) 2+/ 3+, while two models (PDGAX002, PDGAX004) were defined as HER-2 negative. Upon trastuzumab treatment, significant tumor regression (105 % TGI) was observed in model PDGAX005 (TP53 wt), while moderate sensitivity (26 % TGI) was observed in PDGAX003, and resistance was observed in PDGAX001, 002 and 004. A significant increase in HER-2 gene copy number was only observed in PDGAX005 (TP53 wt). Interestingly, trastuzumab showed no efficacy in PDGAX001 (HER2 IHC 3+ and FISH amplification, but with mutant TP53). Consistent with this finding, phosphor-HER2 modulation by trastuzumab was observed in model PDGAX005, but not in PDGAX001. PMID:25749810

  7. Rapamycin targeting mTOR and hedgehog signaling pathways blocks human rhabdomyosarcoma growth in xenograft murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaylani, Samer Z.; Xu, Jianmin; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Kopelovich, Levy; Pressey, Joseph G.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: Intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by rapamycin: In poorly differentiated RMS, rapamycin blocks mTOR and Hh signaling pathways concomitantly. This leads to dampening in cell cycle regulation and induction of apoptosis. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by treating patients with rapamycin alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. -- Highlights: •Rapamycin abrogates RMS tumor growth by modulating proliferation and apoptosis. •Co-targeting mTOR/Hh pathways underlie the molecular basis of effectiveness. •Reduction in mTOR/Hh pathways diminish EMT leading to reduced invasiveness. -- Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) represent the most common childhood soft-tissue sarcoma. Over the past few decades outcomes for low and intermediate risk RMS patients have slowly improved while patients with metastatic or relapsed RMS still face a grim prognosis. New chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of chemotherapies have largely failed to improve the outcome. Based on the identification of novel molecular targets, potential therapeutic approaches in RMS may offer a decreased reliance on conventional chemotherapy. Thus, identification of effective therapeutic agents that specifically target relevant pathways may be particularly beneficial for patients with metastatic and refractory RMS. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been found to be a potentially attractive target in RMS therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that rapamycin (sirolimus) abrogates growth of RMS development in a RMS xenograft mouse model. As compared to a vehicle-treated control group, more than 95% inhibition in tumor growth was observed in mice receiving parenteral administration of rapamycin. The residual tumors in rapamycin-treated group showed significant reduction in the expression of biomarkers indicative of proliferation and tumor invasiveness. These tumors also showed enhanced apoptosis. Interestingly, the mechanism by which rapamycin diminished RMS tumor growth involved simultaneous inhibition of mTOR and hedgehog (Hh) pathways. Diminution in these pathways in this model of RMS also inhibited epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) which then dampened the invasiveness of these tumors. Our data provide bases for using rapamycin either alone or in combination with traditional chemotherapeutic drugs to block the pathogenesis of high risk RMS.

  8. Inhibition of angiogenic and non-angiogenic targets by sorafenib in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in a RCC xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, J S P; Sim, M Y; Siml, H G; Chong, T W; Lau, W K O; Cheng, C W S; Huynh, H

    2011-01-01

    Background: It is widely recognised that sorafenib inhibits a range of molecular targets in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In this study, we aim to use patient-derived RCC xenografts to delineate the angiogenic and non-angiogenic molecular targets of sorafenib therapy for advanced RCC (aRCC). Methods: We successfully generated three patient RCC-derived xenografts in severe combined immunodeficient mice, consisting of three different RCC histological subtypes: conventional clear cell, poorly differentiated clear cell RCC with sarcomatoid changes, and papillary RCC. This study also used clear cell RCC cells (786-0/EV) harbouring mutant VHL to investigate the clonogenic survival of cells transfected with survivin sense and antisense oligonucleotides. Results: All three xenografts retain their original histological characteristics. We reported that sorafenib inhibited all three RCC xenograft lines regardless of histological subtypes in a dose-dependant manner. Sorafenib-induced growth suppression was associated with not only inhibition of angiogenic targets p-PDGFR-?, p-VEGFR-2, and their downstream signalling pathways p-Akt and p-ERK, cell cycle, and anti-apoptotic proteins that include cyclin D1, cyclin B1, and survivin but also upregulation of proapoptotic Bim. Survivin knockdown by survivin-specific antisense-oligonucleotides inhibited colony formation and induced cell death in clear cell RCC cells. Conclusion: This study has shed light on the molecular mechanisms of sorafenib in RCC. Inhibition of non-angiogenic molecules by sorafenib could contribute in part to its anti-tumour activities observed in vivo, in addition to its anti-angiogenic effects. PMID:21407223

  9. A zebrafish larval model reveals early tissue-specific innate immune responses to Mucor circinelloides

    PubMed Central

    Voelz, Kerstin; Gratacap, Remi L.; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucormycosis is an emerging fungal infection that is clinically difficult to manage, with increasing incidence and extremely high mortality rates. Individuals with diabetes, suppressed immunity or traumatic injury are at increased risk of developing disease. These individuals often present with defects in phagocytic effector cell function. Research using mammalian models and phagocytic effector cell lines has attempted to decipher the importance of the innate immune system in host defence against mucormycosis. However, these model systems have not been satisfactory for direct analysis of the interaction between innate immune effector cells and infectious sporangiospores in vivo. Here, we report the first real-time in vivo analysis of the early innate immune response to mucormycete infection using a whole-animal zebrafish larval model system. We identified differential host susceptibility, dependent on the site of infection (hindbrain ventricle and swim bladder), as well as differential functions of the two major phagocyte effector cell types in response to viable and non-viable spores. Larval susceptibility to mucormycete spore infection was increased upon immunosuppressant treatment. We showed for the first time that macrophages and neutrophils were readily recruited in vivo to the site of infection in an intact host and that spore phagocytosis can be observed in real-time in vivo. While exploring innate immune effector recruitment dynamics, we discovered the formation of phagocyte clusters in response to fungal spores that potentially play a role in fungal spore dissemination. Spores failed to activate pro-inflammatory gene expression by 6 h post-infection in both infection models. After 24?h, induction of a pro-inflammatory response was observed only in hindbrain ventricle infections. Only a weak pro-inflammatory response was initiated after spore injection into the swim bladder during the same time frame. In the future, the zebrafish larva as a live whole-animal model system will contribute greatly to the study of molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction of the host innate immune system with fungal spores during mucormycosis. PMID:26398938

  10. A zebrafish larval model reveals early tissue-specific innate immune responses to Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Voelz, Kerstin; Gratacap, Remi L; Wheeler, Robert T

    2015-11-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging fungal infection that is clinically difficult to manage, with increasing incidence and extremely high mortality rates. Individuals with diabetes, suppressed immunity or traumatic injury are at increased risk of developing disease. These individuals often present with defects in phagocytic effector cell function. Research using mammalian models and phagocytic effector cell lines has attempted to decipher the importance of the innate immune system in host defence against mucormycosis. However, these model systems have not been satisfactory for direct analysis of the interaction between innate immune effector cells and infectious sporangiospores in vivo. Here, we report the first real-time in vivo analysis of the early innate immune response to mucormycete infection using a whole-animal zebrafish larval model system. We identified differential host susceptibility, dependent on the site of infection (hindbrain ventricle and swim bladder), as well as differential functions of the two major phagocyte effector cell types in response to viable and non-viable spores. Larval susceptibility to mucormycete spore infection was increased upon immunosuppressant treatment. We showed for the first time that macrophages and neutrophils were readily recruited in vivo to the site of infection in an intact host and that spore phagocytosis can be observed in real-time in vivo. While exploring innate immune effector recruitment dynamics, we discovered the formation of phagocyte clusters in response to fungal spores that potentially play a role in fungal spore dissemination. Spores failed to activate pro-inflammatory gene expression by 6 h post-infection in both infection models. After 24?h, induction of a pro-inflammatory response was observed only in hindbrain ventricle infections. Only a weak pro-inflammatory response was initiated after spore injection into the swim bladder during the same time frame. In the future, the zebrafish larva as a live whole-animal model system will contribute greatly to the study of molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction of the host innate immune system with fungal spores during mucormycosis. PMID:26398938

  11. Exploring the HIFs, buts and maybes of hypoxia signalling in disease: lessons from zebrafish models

    PubMed Central

    Elks, Philip M.; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Meijer, Annemarie H.; Walmsley, Sarah R.; van Eeden, Fredericus J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A low level of tissue oxygen (hypoxia) is a physiological feature of a wide range of diseases, from cancer to infection. Cellular hypoxia is sensed by oxygen-sensitive hydroxylase enzymes, which regulate the protein stability of hypoxia-inducible factor ? (HIF-?) transcription factors. When stabilised, HIF-? binds with its cofactors to HIF-responsive elements (HREs) in the promoters of target genes to coordinate a wide-ranging transcriptional programme in response to the hypoxic environment. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the discovery of the HIF-1? transcription factor, and in recent years the HIF-mediated hypoxia response is being increasingly recognised as an important process in determining the outcome of diseases such as cancer, inflammatory disease and bacterial infections. Animal models have shed light on the roles of HIF in disease and have uncovered intricate control mechanisms that involve multiple cell types, observations that might have been missed in simpler in vitro systems. These findings highlight the need for new whole-organism models of disease to elucidate these complex regulatory mechanisms. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of hypoxia and HIFs in disease that have emerged from studies of zebrafish disease models. Findings from such models identify HIF as an integral player in the disease processes. They also highlight HIF pathway components and their targets as potential therapeutic targets against conditions that range from cancers to infectious disease. PMID:26512123

  12. Carbon Quantum Dots for Zebrafish Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Li, Yu-Hao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Xu, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Mi; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are becoming a desirable alternative to metal-based QDs and dye probes owing to their high biocompatibility, low toxicity, ease of preparation, and unique photophysical properties. Herein, we describe fluorescence bioimaging of zebrafish using C-QDs as probe in terms of the preparation of C-QDs, zebrafish husbandry, embryo harvesting, and introduction of C-QDs into embryos and larvae by soaking and microinjection. The multicolor of C-QDs was validated with their imaging for zebrafish embryo. The distribution of C-QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae were successfully observed from their fluorescence emission. the bio-toxicity of C-QDs was tested with zebrafish as model and C-QDs do not interfere to the development of zebrafish embryo. All of the results confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of C-QDs as imaging probe. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion route (ADME) of C-QDs in zebrafish was revealed by their distribution. Our work provides the useful information for the researchers interested in studying with zebrafish as a model and the applications of C-QDs. The operations related zebrafish are suitable for the study of the toxicity, adverse effects, transport, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials as well as for drug screening with zebrafish as model. PMID:26135470

  13. Carbon Quantum Dots for Zebrafish Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Li, Yu-Hao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Xu, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Mi; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are becoming a desirable alternative to metal-based QDs and dye probes owing to their high biocompatibility, low toxicity, ease of preparation, and unique photophysical properties. Herein, we describe fluorescence bioimaging of zebrafish using C-QDs as probe in terms of the preparation of C-QDs, zebrafish husbandry, embryo harvesting, and introduction of C-QDs into embryos and larvae by soaking and microinjection. The multicolor of C-QDs was validated with their imaging for zebrafish embryo. The distribution of C-QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae were successfully observed from their fluorescence emission. the bio-toxicity of C-QDs was tested with zebrafish as model and C-QDs do not interfere to the development of zebrafish embryo. All of the results confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of C-QDs as imaging probe. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion route (ADME) of C-QDs in zebrafish was revealed by their distribution. Our work provides the useful information for the researchers interested in studying with zebrafish as a model and the applications of C-QDs. The operations related zebrafish are suitable for the study of the toxicity, adverse effects, transport, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials as well as for drug screening with zebrafish as model. PMID:26135470

  14. Carbon Quantum Dots for Zebrafish Fluorescence Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Li, Yu-Hao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Xu, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Mi; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are becoming a desirable alternative to metal-based QDs and dye probes owing to their high biocompatibility, low toxicity, ease of preparation, and unique photophysical properties. Herein, we describe fluorescence bioimaging of zebrafish using C-QDs as probe in terms of the preparation of C-QDs, zebrafish husbandry, embryo harvesting, and introduction of C-QDs into embryos and larvae by soaking and microinjection. The multicolor of C-QDs was validated with their imaging for zebrafish embryo. The distribution of C-QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae were successfully observed from their fluorescence emission. the bio-toxicity of C-QDs was tested with zebrafish as model and C-QDs do not interfere to the development of zebrafish embryo. All of the results confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of C-QDs as imaging probe. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion route (ADME) of C-QDs in zebrafish was revealed by their distribution. Our work provides the useful information for the researchers interested in studying with zebrafish as a model and the applications of C-QDs. The operations related zebrafish are suitable for the study of the toxicity, adverse effects, transport, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials as well as for drug screening with zebrafish as model.

  15. Protective effect of dieckol isolated from Ecklonia cava against ethanol caused damage in vitro and in zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Cheol; Kim, Kil-Nam; Kang, Sung-Myung; Yang, Xiudong; Kim, Eun-A; Song, Choon Bok; Nah, Jae-Woon; Jang, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Jung-Suck; Jung, Won-Kyo; Jeon, You-Jin

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, the protective effects of phlorotannins isolated from Ecklonia cava against ethanol-induced cell damage and apoptosis were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Three phlorotannin compounds, namely phloroglucinol, eckol and dieckol, were successively isolated and identified from the extract. Dieckol showed the strongest protective effect against ethanol-induced cell apoptosis in Chang liver cells, with the lowest cytotoxicity. It was observed that dieckol reduced cell apoptosis through activation of Bcl-xL and PARP, and down-regulation of Bax and caspase-3 in Western blot analyses. In the in vivo study, the protective effect of ethanol induced by dieckol was investigated in a zebrafish model. The dieckol treated group scavenged intracellural reactive oxygen species and prevented lipid peroxidation and ethanol induced cell death in the zebrafish embryo. In conclusion, dieckol isolated from E. cava might possess a potential protective effect against ethanol-induced liver diseases. PMID:24189014

  16. Modulatory neurotransmitter systems and behavior: towards zebrafish models of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Panula, Pertti; Sallinen, Ville; Sundvik, Maria; Kolehmainen, Juha; Torkko, Veera; Tiittula, Anu; Moshnyakov, Maxim; Podlasz, Piotr

    2006-01-01

    The modulatory aminergic neurotransmitters are involved in practically all important physiological systems in the brain, and many of them are also involved in human central nervous system diseases, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and depression. The zebrafish brain aminergic systems share many structural properties with the mammalian systems. The noradrenergic, serotonergic, and histaminergic systems are highly similar. The dopaminergic systems also show similarities with the major difference being the lack of dopaminergic neurons in zebrafish mesencephalon. Development of automated quantitative behavioral analysis methods for zebrafish and imaging systems of complete brain neurotransmitter networks have enabled comprehensive studies on these systems in normal and pathological conditions. It is possible to visualize complete neurotransmitter systems in the whole zebrafish brain at an age when the fish already displays all major vital behaviors except reproduction. Alterations of brain dopaminergic systems with MPTP, the neurotoxin that in humans and rodents induces Parkinson's disease, induces both changes in zebrafish dopaminergic system and quantifiable abnormalities in motor behavior. Chemically-induced brain histamine deficiency causes an identifiable alteration in histaminergic neurons and terminal networks, and a clear change in swimming behavior and long-term memory. Combining the imaging techniques and behavioral methods with zebrafish genetics is likely to help reveal how the modulatory transmitter systems interact to produce important behaviors, and how they are regulated in pathophysiological conditions and diseases. PMID:18248264

  17. Zebrafish Models for Ectopic Mineralization Disorders: Practical Issues from Morpholino Design to Post-Injection Observations

    PubMed Central

    Hosen, Mohammad Jakir; Vanakker, Olivier M.; Willaert, Andy; Huysseune, Ann; Coucke, Paul; De Paepe, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish (ZF, Danio rerio) has emerged as an important and popular model species to study different human diseases. Key regulators of skeletal development and calcium metabolism are highly conserved between mammals and ZF. The corresponding orthologs share significant sequence similarities and an overlap in expression patterns when compared to mammals, making ZF a potential model for the study of mineralization-related disorders and soft tissue mineralization. To characterize the function of early mineralization-related genes in ZF, these genes can be knocked down by injecting morpholinos into early stage embryos. Validation of the morpholino needs to be performed and the concern of aspecific effects can be addressed by applying one or more independent techniques to knock down the gene of interest. Post-injection assessment of early mineralization defects can be done using general light microscopy, calcein staining, Alizarin red staining, Alizarin red-Alcian blue double staining, and by the use of transgenic lines. Examination of general molecular defects can be done by performing protein and gene expression analysis, and more specific processes can be explored by investigating ectopic mineralization-related mechanisms such as apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. In this paper, we will discuss all details about the aforementioned techniques; shared knowledge will be very useful for the future investigation of ZF models for ectopic mineralization disorders and to understand the underlying pathways involved in soft tissue calcification. PMID:23760765

  18. Pharmacological HIF2? inhibition improves VHL disease–associated phenotypes in zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Metelo, Ana Martins; Noonan, Haley R.; Li, Xiang; Jin, Youngnam; Baker, Rania; Kamentsky, Lee; Zhang, Yiyun; van Rooijen, Ellen; Shin, Jordan; Carpenter, Anne E.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey; Peterson, Randall T.; Iliopoulos, Othon

    2015-01-01

    Patients with a germline mutation in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) develop renal cell cancers and hypervascular tumors of the brain, adrenal glands, and pancreas as well as erythrocytosis. These phenotypes are driven by aberrant expression of HIF2?, which induces expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and red blood cell production. Currently, there are no effective treatments available for VHL disease. Here, using an animal model of VHL, we report a marked improvement of VHL-associated phenotypes following treatment with HIF2? inhibitors. Inactivation of vhl in zebrafish led to constitutive activation of HIF2? orthologs and modeled several aspects of the human disease, including erythrocytosis, pathologic angiogenesis in the brain and retina, and aberrant kidney and liver proliferation. Treatment of vhl–/– mutant embryos with HIF2?-specific inhibitors downregulated Hif target gene expression in a dose-dependent manner, improved abnormal hematopoiesis, and substantially suppressed erythrocytosis and angiogenic sprouting. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of HIF2? reversed the compromised cardiac contractility of vhl–/– embryos and partially rescued early lethality. This study demonstrates that small-molecule targeting of HIF2? improves VHL-related phenotypes in a vertebrate animal model and supports further exploration of this strategy for treating VHL disease. PMID:25866969

  19. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 ?M) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ? Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ? Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ? Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ? Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  20. Decorin Protein Core Affects the Global Gene Expression Profile of the Tumor Microenvironment in a Triple-Negative Orthotopic Breast Carcinoma Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Rick T.; Iniguez, Leonardo A.; Purkins, George; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Evans, Barry; Schaefer, Liliana; Peiper, Stephen C.; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Iozzo, Renato V.

    2012-01-01

    Decorin, a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan gene family, exists and functions wholly within the tumor microenvironment to suppress tumorigenesis by directly targeting and antagonizing multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the EGFR and Met. This leads to potent and sustained signal attenuation, growth arrest, and angiostasis. We thus sought to evaluate the tumoricidal benefits of systemic decorin on a triple-negative orthotopic breast carcinoma xenograft model. To this end, we employed a novel high-density mixed expression array capable of differentiating and simultaneously measuring gene signatures of both Mus musculus (stromal) and Homo sapiens (epithelial) tissue origins. We found that decorin protein core modulated the differential expression of 374 genes within the stromal compartment of the tumor xenograft. Further, our top gene ontology classes strongly suggests an unexpected and preferential role for decorin protein core to inhibit genes necessary for immunomodulatory responses while simultaneously inducing expression of those possessing cellular adhesion and tumor suppressive gene properties. Rigorous verification of the top scoring candidates led to the discovery of three genes heretofore unlinked to malignant breast cancer that were reproducibly found to be induced in several models of tumor stroma. Collectively, our data provide highly novel and unexpected stromal gene signatures as a direct function of systemic administration of decorin protein core and reveals a fundamental basis of action for decorin to modulate the tumor stroma as a biological mechanism for the ascribed anti-tumorigenic properties. PMID:23029096

  1. A Novel Eg5 Inhibitor (LY2523355) Causes Mitotic Arrest and Apoptosis in Cancer Cells and Shows Potent Antitumor Activity in Xenograft Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiang S; Fan, Li; Van Horn, Robert D; Nakai, Ryuichiro; Ohta, Yoshihisa; Akinaga, Shiro; Murakata, Chikara; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Yin, Tinggui; Credille, Kelly M; Donoho, Gregory P; Merzoug, Farhana F; Li, Heng; Aggarwal, Amit; Blanchard, Kerry; Westin, Eric H

    2015-11-01

    Intervention of cancer cell mitosis by antitubulin drugs is among the most effective cancer chemotherapies. However, antitubulin drugs have dose-limiting side effects due to important functions of microtubules in resting normal cells and are often rendered ineffective by rapid emergence of resistance. Antimitotic agents with different mechanisms of action and improved safety profiles are needed as new treatment options. Mitosis-specific kinesin Eg5 represents an attractive anticancer target for discovering such new antimitotic agents, because Eg5 is essential only in mitotic progression and has no roles in resting, nondividing cells. Here, we show that a novel selective Eg5 inhibitor, LY2523355, has broad target-mediated anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. LY2523355 arrests cancer cells at mitosis and causes rapid cell death that requires sustained spindle-assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation with a required threshold concentration. In vivo efficacy of LY2523355 is highly dose/schedule-dependent, achieving complete remission in a number of xenograft tumor models, including patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models. We further establish that histone-H3 phosphorylation of tumor and proliferating skin cells is a promising pharmacodynamic biomarker for in vivo anticancer activity of LY2523355. Mol Cancer Ther; 14(11); 2463-72. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26304237

  2. 5?-reductase Inhibition Coupled with Short Off Cycles Increases Survival in the LNCaP Xenograft Prostate Tumor Model on Intermittent Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Laura E.; Masoodi, Khalid Z.; O’Malley, Katherine J.; Shevrin, Daniel; Gingrich, Jeffrey R.; Parikh, Rahul A.; Wang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Intermittent androgen deprivation therapy (IADT) for patients with PSA progression after treatment for localized prostate cancer is an alternative to the standard continuous ADT. IADT allows for the recovery of testosterone during off-cycles to stimulate regrowth and differentiation of the regressed prostate tumor in order to lessen the side effects of continuous ADT and potentially prolong survival. Previously, IADT coupled with finasteride was shown to prolong survival of animals bearing androgen-sensitive prostate tumors when off-cycle duration was not prolonged and fixed at 10–14 days. Regressed prostate tumor xenografts with testosterone replacement were initially responsive to 5?-reductase inhibition, but resumed growth after several days in the animal models. 5?-reductase inhibition in shorter off-cycles of testosterone recovery could maximize tumor growth inhibition during IADT and perhaps increase survival. Materials and Methods The LNCaP xenograft tumor model was utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of short off-cycles of 4 days coupled with 5?-reductase inhibition on IADT on survival and tumor regrowth. Results Dutasteride inhibited initial testosterone-induced tumor regrowth during both the first and second off-cycle and significantly increased survival. Conclusions These results further support the potential for IADT combined with 5?-reductase inhibition to improve survival in prostate cancer patients when off cycle durations are short or very short. PMID:25444984

  3. Encapsulation in a rapid-release liposomal formulation enhances the anti-tumor efficacy of pemetrexed in a murine solid mesothelioma-xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Eldin, Noha Essam; Abu Lila, Amr S; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Elnahas, Hanan M; Mahdy, Mahmoud A; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a PEG-coated liposome encapsulating the anti-folate drug pemetrexed (PMX). Such liposomal formulations have shown potent cytotoxic effects against malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cells in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics, bio-distribution and in vivo anti-tumor efficacy of two liposomal PMX formulations with different drug release rates in a murine mesothelioma-xenograft model. Liposomes with different PMX release rates were prepared via manipulating liposomal membrane fluidity through incorporating either a solid-phase (HSPC) or a fluid-phase (POPC) phospholipid. Both liposomal PMX formulations showed prolonged plasma pharmacokinetics and were accumulated to a similar extent in tumors and other tissues, presumably, due to surface modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG). In a murine mesothelioma-xenograft model, interestingly, PMX encapsulated in a fast-release POPC liposome produced superior tumor growth suppression compared with either free PMX or PMX encapsulated in a slow-release HSPC liposome. Such in vivo anti-tumor efficacy was accomplished mainly by a potent induction of apoptosis within tumor tissue by the released PMX from POPC liposomes. Our results clearly emphasize the therapeutic efficacy of liposomal PMX over free PMX in conquering aggressive solid tumors such as malignant mesothelioma. A guarantee of the targeted delivery of PMX to tumor cells helps overcome some of the major shortcomings encountered with the use of free PMX. PMID:26415830

  4. Anti-CD45 pretargeted radioimmunotherapy using bismuth-213: high rates of complete remission and long-term survival in a mouse myeloid leukemia xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Bäck, Tom; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Park, Steven I.; Frayo, Shani; Axtman, Amanda; Orgun, Nural; Orozco, Johnnie; Shenoi, Jaideep; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, Ajay K.; Green, Damian J.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2011-01-01

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) using an anti-CD45 antibody (Ab)–streptavidin (SA) conjugate and DOTA-biotin labeled with ?-emitting radionuclides has been explored as a strategy to decrease relapse and toxicity. ?-emitting radionuclides exhibit high cytotoxicity coupled with a short path length, potentially increasing the therapeutic index and making them an attractive alternative to ?-emitting radionuclides for patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Accordingly, we have used 213Bi in mice with human leukemia xenografts. Results demonstrated excellent localization of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin to tumors with minimal uptake into normal organs. After 10 minutes, 4.5% ± 1.1% of the injected dose of 213Bi was delivered per gram of tumor. ?-imaging demonstrated uniform radionuclide distribution within tumor tissue 45 minutes after 213Bi-DOTA-biotin injection. Radiation absorbed doses were similar to those observed using a ?-emitting radionuclide (90Y) in the same model. We conducted therapy experiments in a xenograft model using a single-dose of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin given 24 hours after anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate. Among mice treated with anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate followed by 800 ?Ci of 213Bi- or 90Y-DOTA-biotin, 80% and 20%, respectively, survived leukemia-free for more than 100 days with minimal toxicity. These data suggest that anti-CD45 PRIT using an ?-emitting radionuclide may be highly effective and minimally toxic for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:21613259

  5. Decorin protein core affects the global gene expression profile of the tumor microenvironment in a triple-negative orthotopic breast carcinoma xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Buraschi, Simone; Neill, Thomas; Owens, Rick T; Iniguez, Leonardo A; Purkins, George; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Evans, Barry; Schaefer, Liliana; Peiper, Stephen C; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Iozzo, Renato V

    2012-01-01

    Decorin, a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan gene family, exists and functions wholly within the tumor microenvironment to suppress tumorigenesis by directly targeting and antagonizing multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the EGFR and Met. This leads to potent and sustained signal attenuation, growth arrest, and angiostasis. We thus sought to evaluate the tumoricidal benefits of systemic decorin on a triple-negative orthotopic breast carcinoma xenograft model. To this end, we employed a novel high-density mixed expression array capable of differentiating and simultaneously measuring gene signatures of both Mus musculus (stromal) and Homo sapiens (epithelial) tissue origins. We found that decorin protein core modulated the differential expression of 374 genes within the stromal compartment of the tumor xenograft. Further, our top gene ontology classes strongly suggests an unexpected and preferential role for decorin protein core to inhibit genes necessary for immunomodulatory responses while simultaneously inducing expression of those possessing cellular adhesion and tumor suppressive gene properties. Rigorous verification of the top scoring candidates led to the discovery of three genes heretofore unlinked to malignant breast cancer that were reproducibly found to be induced in several models of tumor stroma. Collectively, our data provide highly novel and unexpected stromal gene signatures as a direct function of systemic administration of decorin protein core and reveals a fundamental basis of action for decorin to modulate the tumor stroma as a biological mechanism for the ascribed anti-tumorigenic properties. PMID:23029096

  6. Zebrafish neurobehavioral phenomics for aquatic neuropharmacology and toxicology research.

    PubMed

    Kalueff, Allan V; Echevarria, David J; Homechaudhuri, Sumit; Stewart, Adam Michael; Collier, Adam D; Kaluyeva, Aleksandra A; Li, Shaomin; Liu, Yingcong; Chen, Peirong; Wang, JiaJia; Yang, Lei; Mitra, Anisa; Pal, Subharthi; Chaudhuri, Adwitiya; Roy, Anwesha; Biswas, Missidona; Roy, Dola; Podder, Anupam; Poudel, Manoj K; Katare, Deepshikha P; Mani, Ruchi J; Kyzar, Evan J; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Nguyen, Michael; Song, Cai

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are rapidly emerging as an important model organism for aquatic neuropharmacology and toxicology research. The behavioral/phenotypic complexity of zebrafish allows for thorough dissection of complex human brain disorders and drug-evoked pathological states. As numerous zebrafish models become available with a wide spectrum of behavioral, genetic, and environmental methods to test novel drugs, here we discuss recent zebrafish phenomics methods to facilitate drug discovery, particularly in the field of biological psychiatry. Additionally, behavioral, neurological, and endocrine endpoints are becoming increasingly well-characterized in zebrafish, making them an inexpensive, robust and effective model for toxicology research and pharmacological screening. We also discuss zebrafish behavioral phenotypes, experimental considerations, pharmacological candidates and relevance of zebrafish neurophenomics to other 'omics' (e.g., genomic, proteomic) approaches. Finally, we critically evaluate the limitations of utilizing this model organism, and outline future strategies of research in the field of zebrafish phenomics. PMID:26372090

  7. Live Imaging of Host-Parasite Interactions in a Zebrafish Infection Model Reveals Cryptococcal Determinants of Virulence and Central Nervous System Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Tenor, Jennifer L.; Oehlers, Stefan H.; Yang, Jialu L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is capable of infecting a broad range of hosts, from invertebrates like amoebas and nematodes to standard vertebrate models such as mice and rabbits. Here we have taken advantage of a zebrafish model to investigate host-pathogen interactions of Cryptococcus with the zebrafish innate immune system, which shares a highly conserved framework with that of mammals. Through live-imaging observations and genetic knockdown, we establish that macrophages are the primary immune cells responsible for responding to and containing acute cryptococcal infections. By interrogating survival and cryptococcal burden following infection with a panel of Cryptococcus mutants, we find that virulence factors initially identified as important in causing disease in mice are also necessary for pathogenesis in zebrafish larvae. Live imaging of the cranial blood vessels of infected larvae reveals that C. neoformans is able to penetrate the zebrafish brain following intravenous infection. By studying a C. neoformans FNX1 gene mutant, we find that blood-brain barrier invasion is dependent on a known cryptococcal invasion-promoting pathway previously identified in a murine model of central nervous system invasion. The zebrafish-C. neoformans platform provides a visually and genetically accessible vertebrate model system for cryptococcal pathogenesis with many of the advantages of small invertebrates. This model is well suited for higher-throughput screening of mutants, mechanistic dissection of cryptococcal pathogenesis in live animals, and use in the evaluation of therapeutic agents. PMID:26419880

  8. Indole Alkaloids from Fischerella Inhibit Vertebrate Development in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryo Model

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Katherine; Gantar, Miroslav; Gibbs, Patrick D. L.; Schmale, Michael C.; Berry, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are recognized producers of toxic or otherwise bioactive metabolite associated, in particular, with so-called “harmful algal blooms” (HABs) and eutrophication of freshwater systems. In the present study, two apparently teratogenic indole alkaloids from a freshwater strain of the widespread cyanobacterial genus, Fischerella (Stigonemataceae), were isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation, specifically using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo, as a model of vertebrate development. The two alkaloids include the previously known 12-epi-hapalindole H isonitrile (1), and a new nitrile-containing variant, 12-epi-ambiguine B nitrile (2). Although both compounds were toxic to developing embryos, the former compound was shown to be relatively more potent, and to correlate best with the observed embryo toxicity. Related indole alkaloids from Fischerella, and other genera in the Stigonemataceae, have been widely reported as antimicrobial compounds, specifically in association with apparent allelopathy. However, this is the first report of their vertebrate toxicity, and the observed teratogenicity of these alkaloids supports a possible contribution to the toxicity of this widespread cyanobacterial family, particularly in relation to freshwater HABs and eutrophication. PMID:25533520

  9. Neural and Synaptic Defects in slytherin a Zebrafish Model for Human Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Y Song; J Willer; P Scherer; J Panzer; A Kugath; E Skordalakes; R Gregg; G Willer; R Balice-Gordon

    2011-12-31

    Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIc (CDG IIc) is characterized by mental retardation, slowed growth and severe immunodeficiency, attributed to the lack of fucosylated glycoproteins. While impaired Notch signaling has been implicated in some aspects of CDG IIc pathogenesis, the molecular and cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have identified a zebrafish mutant slytherin (srn), which harbors a missense point mutation in GDP-mannose 4,6 dehydratase (GMDS), the rate-limiting enzyme in protein fucosylation, including that of Notch. Here we report that some of the mechanisms underlying the neural phenotypes in srn and in CGD IIc are Notch-dependent, while others are Notch-independent. We show, for the first time in a vertebrate in vivo, that defects in protein fucosylation leads to defects in neuronal differentiation, maintenance, axon branching, and synapse formation. Srn is thus a useful and important vertebrate model for human CDG IIc that has provided new insights into the neural phenotypes that are hallmarks of the human disorder and has also highlighted the role of protein fucosylation in neural development.

  10. Rev. Neurosci., Vol. 22(1): 95105, 2011 Copyright by Walter de Gruyter Berlin New York. DOI 10.1515/RNS.2011.011 Zebrafish models to study drug abuse-related phenotypes

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    . DOI 10.1515/RNS.2011.011 Zebrafish models to study drug abuse-related phenotypes Adam Stewarta , Keith and addiction research. Modeling drug abuse-related behavior in both adult and lar- val zebrafish produced a wealth of clinically translatable data, also demonstrating their sensitivity to various drugs of abuse

  11. Metformin impairs Rho GTPase signaling to induce apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells and inhibits growth of tumors in the xenograft mouse model of neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ambrish; Al-Sammarraie, Nadia; DiPette, Donald J.; Singh, Ugra S.

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in xenograft rodent models of adult cancers, and various human clinical trials are in progress. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of metformin action are largely unknown. In the present study we examined the anti-tumor activity of metformin against neuroblastoma, and determined the underlying signaling mechanisms. Using human neuroblastoma xenograft mice, we demonstrated that oral administration of metformin (100 and 250 mg/kg body weight) significantly inhibited the growth of tumors. The interference of metformin in spheroid formation further confirmed the anti-tumor activity of metformin. In tumors, the activation of Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) and Cdc42 (GTP-Cdc42) was increased while RhoA activation (GTP-RhoA) was decreased by metformin. It also induced phosphorylation of JNK and inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting p38 MAP Kinase. Infection of cells by adenoviruses expressing dominant negative Rac1 (Rac1-N17), Cdc42 (Cdc42-N17) or constitutively active RhoA (RhoA-V14), or incubation of cells with pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 (NSC23766) or Cdc42 (ML141) significantly protected neuroblastoma cells from metformin-induced apoptosis. Additionally, inhibition of JNK activity along with Rac1 or Cdc42 attenuated cytotoxic effects of metformin. These studies demonstrated that metformin impairs Rho GTPases signaling to induce apoptosis via JNK pathway. PMID:25365944

  12. Functional activity of the membrane-associated complement inhibitor CD59 in a pig-to-human in vitro model for hyperacute xenograft rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Heckl-Ostreicher, B; Binder, R; Kirschfink, M

    1995-01-01

    Hyperacute rejection triggered by activation of the recipient's complement system represents the major barrier to successful xenotransplantation. Transfer of human membrane-associated complement regulators to donor organs has been suggested as one strategy to interfere with complement-mediated hyperacute xenograft rejection. Pigs are discussed as potential organ donors. We therefore investigated a putative protective function of the membrane-bound complement inhibitor CD59 in a pig-to-human in vitro model of hyperacute xenograft rejection. Aortic porcine endothelial cells were transfected with human CD59 cDNA. Expression of human CD59 was demonstrated by cytofluorimetric and RNA analysis. Removal of CD59 from the cell surface by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) demonstrated its production as a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein. Functional activity of the transfected CD59 was tested by a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay for complement-mediated lysis. Porcine endothelial cells expressing human CD59 were significantly protected from lysis by human serum complement compared with CD59- cells. The protective effect was abolished by preincubating the cells with anti-CD59 antibodies or PI-PLC. We calculated by Scatchard analysis that the established CD59+ cell line expressed a CD59 level comparable to that of human endothelial cells. Our results recommend the production of pigs transgenic for CD59. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8536377

  13. Novel Vitamin K analogs suppress seizures in zebrafish and mouse models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rahn, J J; Bestman, J E; Josey, B J; Inks, E S; Stackley, K D; Rogers, C E; Chou, C J; Chan, S S L

    2014-02-14

    Epilepsy is a debilitating disease affecting 1-2% of the world's population. Despite this high prevalence, 30% of patients suffering from epilepsy are not successfully managed by current medication suggesting a critical need for new anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). In an effort to discover new therapeutics for the management of epilepsy, we began our study by screening drugs that, like some currently used AEDs, inhibit histone deacetylases (HDACs) using a well-established larval zebrafish model. In this model, 7-day post fertilization (dpf) larvae are treated with the widely used seizure-inducing compound pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) which stimulates a rapid increase in swimming behavior previously determined to be a measurable manifestation of seizures. In our first screen, we tested a number of different HDAC inhibitors and found that one, 2-benzamido-1 4-naphthoquinone (NQN1), significantly decreased swim activity to levels equal to that of valproic acid, 2-n-propylpentanoic acid (VPA). We continued to screen structurally related compounds including Vitamin K3 (VK3) and a number of novel Vitamin K (VK) analogs. We found that VK3 was a robust inhibitor of the PTZ-induced swim activity, as were several of our novel compounds. Three of these compounds were subsequently tested on mouse seizure models at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Anticonvulsant Screening Program. Compound 2h reduced seizures particularly well in the minimal clonic seizure (6Hz) and corneal-kindled mouse models of epilepsy, with no observable toxicity. As VK3 affects mitochondrial function, we tested the effects of our compounds on mitochondrial respiration and ATP production in a mouse hippocampal cell line. We demonstrate that these compounds affect ATP metabolism and increase total cellular ATP. Our data indicate the potential utility of these and other VK analogs for the prevention of seizures and suggest the potential mechanism for this protection may lie in the ability of these compounds to affect energy production. PMID:24291671

  14. Anesthesia and euthanasia in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Monte; Varga, Zoltán M

    2012-01-01

    Because of the relative ease of embryonic manipulation and observation, the ability to produce a great number of genetic mutations, efficient screening methods, and the continued advance of molecular genetic tools, such as the progress in sequencing and mapping of the zebrafish genome, the use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a biomedical model organism continues to expand. However, studies involving zebrafish husbandry and veterinary care struggle to keep pace with scientific progress. This article outlines some of the current, acceptable methods for providing anesthesia and euthanasia and provides some examples of how performance-based approaches can be used to advance the relatively limited number of anesthetic and euthanizing techniques available for zebrafish. PMID:23382350

  15. Host immune response and acute disease in a zebrafish model of francisella pathogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vojtech, L.N.; Sanders, G.E.; Conway, C.; Ostland, V.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Francisella are highly virulent and infectious pathogens. New models to study Francisella pathogenesis in evolutionarily distinct species are needed to provide comparative insight, as the mechanisms of host resistance and pathogen virulence are not well understood. We took advantage of the recent discovery of a novel species of Francisella to establish a zebrafish/Francisella comparative model of pathogenesis and host immune response. Adult zebraflsh were susceptible to acute Francisella-induced disease and suffered mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we localized bacterial antigens primarily to lymphoid tissues and livers of zebraflsh following infection by intraperitoneal injection, which corresponded to regions of local cellular necrosis. Francisella sp. bacteria replicated rapidly in these tissues beginning 12 h postinfection, and bacterial titers rose steadily, leveled off, and then decreased by 7 days postinfection. Zebraflsh mounted a significant tissue-specific proinflammatory response to infection as measured by the upregulation of interleukin-l?? (IL-1??), gamma interferon, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA beginning by 6 h postinfection and persisting for up to 7 days postinfection. In addition, exposure of zebraflsh to heat-killed bacteria demonstrated that the significant induction of IL-?? was highly specific to live bacteria. Taken together, the pathology and immune response to acute Francisella infection in zebraflsh share many features with those in mammals, highlighting the usefulness of this new model system for addressing both general and specific questions about Francisella host-pathogen interactions via an evolutionary approach. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Lenvatinib, an angiogenesis inhibitor targeting VEGFR/FGFR, shows broad antitumor activity in human tumor xenograft models associated with microvessel density and pericyte coverage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lenvatinib is an oral inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR1-3), fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR1-4), platelet growth factor receptor ? (PDGFR ?), RET and KIT. Antiangiogenesis activity of lenvatinib in VEGF- and FGF-driven angiogenesis models in both in vitro and in vivo was determined. Roles of tumor vasculature (microvessel density (MVD) and pericyte coverage) as biomarkers for lenvatinib were also examined in this study. Method We evaluated antiangiogenesis activity of lenvatinib against VEGF- and FGF-driven proliferation and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. Effects of lenvatinib on in vivo angiogenesis, which was enhanced by overexpressed VEGF or FGF in human pancreatic cancer KP-1 cells, were examined in the mouse dorsal air sac assay. We determined antitumor activity of lenvatinib in a broad panel of human tumor xenograft models to test if vascular score, which consisted of high MVD and low pericyte coverage, was associated with sensitivity to lenvatinib treatment. Vascular score was also analyzed using human tumor specimens with 18 different types of human primary tumors. Result Lenvatinib inhibited VEGF- and FGF-driven proliferation and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. In vivo angiogenesis induced by overexpressed VEGF (KP-1/VEGF transfectants) or FGF (KP-1/FGF transfectants) was significantly suppressed with oral treatments of lenvatinib. Lenvatinib showed significant antitumor activity in KP-1/VEGF and five 5 of 7 different types of human tumor xenograft models at between 1 to 100?mg/kg. We divided 19 human tumor xenograft models into lenvatinib-sensitive (tumor-shrinkage) and relatively resistant (slow-growth) subgroups based on sensitivity to lenvatinib treatments at 100?mg/kg. IHC analysis showed that vascular score was significantly higher in sensitive subgroup than relatively resistant subgroup (p?

  17. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sophia; Frayo, Shani; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Back, Tom; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-01

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice.

  18. ?-Mangostin: A Dietary Antioxidant Derived from the Pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. Inhibits Pancreatic Tumor Growth in Xenograft Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ala; Fischer, Joseph W.; Singh, Ashok; Zhong, Weixiong; Shekhani, Mohammed Ozair; Meske, Louise; Havighurst, Thomas; Kim, KyungMann; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most aggressive malignant disease, ranking as the fourth most leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in the United States. In this study, we provide evidence of chemotherapeutic effects of ?-mangostin, a dietary antioxidant isolated from the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. against human PC. Results: The chemotherapeutic effect of ?-mangostin was determined using four human PC cells (PL-45, PANC1, BxPC3, and ASPC1). ?-Mangostin resulted in a significant inhibition of PC cells viability without having any effects on normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. ?-Mangostin showed a dose-dependent increase of apoptosis in PC cells. Also, ?-mangostin inhibited the expression levels of pNF-?B/p65Ser552, pStat3Ser727, and pStat3Tyr705. ?-Mangostin inhibited DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) and signal transducer and activator 3 (Stat3). ?-Mangostin inhibited the expression levels of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), cyclin D1, and gp130; however, increased expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) was observed in PC cells. In addition, i.p. administration of ?-mangostin (6?mg/kg body weight, 5 days a week) resulted in a significant inhibition of both primary (PL-45) and secondary (ASPC1) human PC cell-derived orthotopic and ectopic xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice. No sign of toxicity was observed in any of the mice administered with ?-mangostin. ?-Mangostin treatment inhibited the biomarkers of cell proliferation (Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA]) in the xenograft tumor tissues. Innovation: We present, for the first time, that dietary antioxidant ?-mangostin inhibits the growth of PC cells in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: These results suggest the potential therapeutic efficacy of ?-mangostin against human PC. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 682–699. PMID:24295217

  19. Viral diseases in zebrafish: what is known and unknown.

    PubMed

    Crim, Marcus J; Riley, Lela K

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring viral infections have the potential to introduce confounding variability that leads to invalid and misinterpreted data. Whereas the viral diseases of research rodents are well characterized and closely monitored, no naturally occurring viral infections have been characterized for the laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio), an increasingly important biomedical research model. Despite the ignorance about naturally occurring zebrafish viruses, zebrafish models are rapidly expanding in areas of biomedical research where the confounding effects of unknown infectious agents present a serious concern. In addition, many zebrafish research colonies remain linked to the ornamental (pet) zebrafish trade, which can contribute to the introduction of new pathogens into research colonies, whereas mice used for research are purpose bred, with no introduction of new mice from the pet industry. Identification, characterization, and monitoring of naturally occurring viruses in zebrafish are crucial to the improvement of zebrafish health, the reduction of unwanted variability, and the continued development of the zebrafish as a model organism. This article addresses the importance of identifying and characterizing the viral diseases of zebrafish as the scope of zebrafish models expands into new research areas and also briefly addresses zebrafish susceptibility to experimental viral infection and the utility of the zebrafish as an infection and immunology model. PMID:23382345

  20. [Two-dimensional zebrafish model combined with hyphenated chromatographic techniques for evaluation anti-osteoporosis activity of epimendin A and its metabolite baohuoside I].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yang; Wei, Ying-Jie; Sun, E; Xu, Feng-Juan; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2014-06-01

    This article firstly established a new efficient method for screening anti-osteoporosis ingredients, which used two-dimensional zebrafish model combined with hyphenated chromatographic techniques to evaluate anti-osteoporosis activities of epimedin A and its metabolite baohuoside I. Adult zebrafish was used for metabolism of epimedin A in 0.5% DMSO, and LC-MS was used for analysis of the metabolite, which was captured by HPLC, and prednisolone-induced osteoporosis model of zebrafish was used to evaluate the anti-osteoporotic activities of trace amounts of epimedin A and baohuoside I. The results indicated that epimedin A and baohuoside I can prevent prednisolone-induced osteoporosis in zebrafish. The developed method in this paper enables the separation, enrichment and analysis of micro-amount metabolite of epimedin A, and anti-osteoporosis activities in vivo of epimedin A and baohuoside I was simple and efficient screening resorting to zebrafish osteoporosis mode. This paper would provide new ideas and methods for a rapid and early discovery of anti-osteoporosis activities of micro-ingredients and its metabolite of traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:25212043

  1. Zebrafish xenotransplantation as a tool for in vivo cancer study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Beibei; Xuan, Chao; Ji, Yunxi; Zhang, Weiming; Wang, Daogang

    2015-09-01

    Zebrafish represents a powerful model for cancer research. Particularly, the xenotransplantation of human cancer cells into zebrafish has enormous potential for further evaluation of cancer progression and drug discovery. Various cancer models have been established in adults, juveniles and embryos of zebrafish. This xenotransplantation zebrafish model provides a unique opportunity to monitor cancer proliferation, tumor angiogenesis, metastasis, self-renewal of cancer stem cells, and drug response in real time in vivo. This review summarizes the use of zebrafish as a model for cancer xenotransplantation, and highlights its advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25860646

  2. l-leucine partially rescues translational and developmental defects associated with zebrafish models of Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Baoshan; Sowa, Nenja; Cardenas, Maria E.; Gerton, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Cohesinopathies are human genetic disorders that include Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and Roberts syndrome (RBS) and are characterized by defects in limb and craniofacial development as well as mental retardation. The developmental phenotypes of CdLS and other cohesinopathies suggest that mutations in the structure and regulation of the cohesin complex during embryogenesis interfere with gene regulation. In a previous project, we showed that RBS was associated with highly fragmented nucleoli and defects in both ribosome biogenesis and protein translation. l-leucine stimulation of the mTOR pathway partially rescued translation in human RBS cells and development in zebrafish models of RBS. In this study, we investigate protein translation in zebrafish models of CdLS. Our results show that phosphorylation of RPS6 as well as 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) was reduced in nipbla/b, rad21 and smc3-morphant embryos, a pattern indicating reduced translation. Moreover, protein biosynthesis and rRNA production were decreased in the cohesin morphant embryo cells. l-leucine partly rescued protein synthesis and rRNA production in the cohesin morphants and partially restored phosphorylation of RPS6 and 4EBP1. Concomitantly, l-leucine treatment partially improved cohesinopathy embryo development including the formation of craniofacial cartilage. Interestingly, we observed that alpha-ketoisocaproate (?-KIC), which is a keto derivative of leucine, also partially rescued the development of rad21 and nipbla/b morphants by boosting mTOR-dependent translation. In summary, our results suggest that cohesinopathies are caused in part by defective protein synthesis, and stimulation of the mTOR pathway through l-leucine or its metabolite ?-KIC can partially rescue development in zebrafish models for CdLS. PMID:25378554

  3. Predator-Induced Stress and Anxiety in Zebrafish

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Page | 1 4/30/2009 1 2009 Predator-Induced Stress and Anxiety in Zebrafish [ S O P A N M O H N O T ] #12;Page | 2 I. Introduction Zebrafish have been widely used as a model for genetic, behavioral, and physiological research. Zebrafish mutant phenotypes in genetic screens correlate to pathophysiology

  4. INTRODUCTION Zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton 1822), have become a valuable

    E-print Network

    Sisneros, Joseph A.

    3504 INTRODUCTION Zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton 1822), have become a valuable model, 2005). The early development of the zebrafish inner ear is similar to that of other vertebrates (Bang are homologous to those found in mammals (Coffin et al., 2004). Over 50 genes are known to impact the zebrafish

  5. Zebrafish Neurobiology: From Development to Circuit Function and Behaviour

    E-print Network

    Engert, Florian

    Zebrafish Neurobiology: From Development to Circuit Function and Behaviour This special issue of neuroscience in which research using zebrafish is currently having a major impact. Since the early days of using zebrafish as an experimental model, nervous system development has been a major focus for research

  6. Brief Communications Cerebellar-Dependent Learning in Larval Zebrafish

    E-print Network

    Schuman, Erin M.

    Brief Communications Cerebellar-Dependent Learning in Larval Zebrafish Mark Aizenberg1,2 and Erin M ability to monitor the activity of neuronal populations in vivo. The developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an animal model that circumvents these problems, because zebrafish larvae possess a rich behavioral

  7. Prostate cancer xenografts engineered from 3D precision-porous poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogels as models for tumorigenesis and dormancy escape

    PubMed Central

    Long, Thomas J.; Sprenger, Cynthia C.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Ratner, Buddy D.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biomaterial scaffolds show promise for in vitro and in vivo 3D cancer models. Tumors engineered in biomaterial scaffolds have shown evidence of being more physiologically relevant than some traditional preclinical model systems, and synthetic biomaterials provide the added benefit of defined and consistent microenvironmental control. Here, we examine sphere-templated poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) scaffolds as the basis for engineering xenografts from multiple human prostate cancer cell lines. pHEMA scaffolds seeded and pre-cultured with tumorigenic M12 cells prior to implantation generated tumors in athymic nude mice, demonstrating the ability of the scaffolds to be used as a synthetic vehicle for xenograft generation. pHEMA scaffolds seeded with LNCaP C4-2 cells, which require Matrigel or stromal cell support for tumor formation, were poorly tumorigenic up to twelve weeks after implantation even when Matrigel was infused into the scaffold, demonstrating a lack of necessary pro-tumorigenic signaling within the scaffolds. Finally, M12mac25 cells, which are ordinarily rendered non-tumorigenic through the expression of the tumor suppressor insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), displayed a tumorigenic response when implanted within porous pHEMA scaffolds. These M12mac25 tumors showed a significantly higher macrophage infiltration within the scaffolds driven by the foreign body response to the materials. These findings show the potential for this biomaterials-based model system to be used in the study of prostate cancer tumorigenesis and dormancy escape. PMID:24942815

  8. Modeling Stress and Anxiety in Zebrafish Jonathan M. Cachat, Peter R. Canavello, Marco F. Elegante,

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    strongly with behavioral endpoints. These fish are also highly sensitive to various environmental to the study of fear and anxiety-related states. 2. The Novel Tank Diving Paradigm: A Fish "Open Field-evoked anxiety. When a zebrafish is exposed to a novel (potentially dangerous) environment, it initially dives

  9. Liver immune responses to inflammatory stimuli in a diet-induced obesity model of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Varela, Monica; Fernández-Rodríguez, Conrado M; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2015-02-01

    Obesity- and metabolic syndrome-related diseases are becoming important medical challenges for the western world. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a manifestation of these altered conditions in the liver, and inflammation appears to be a factor that is tightly connected to its evolution. In this study, we used a diet-induced obesity approach in zebrafish (Danio rerio) based on overfeeding to analyze liver transcriptomic modulation in the disease and to determine how obesity affects the immune response against an acute inflammatory stimulus such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Overfed zebrafish developed an obese phenotype, showed signs of liver steatosis, and its modulation profile resembled that observed in humans, with overexpression of tac4, col4a3, col4a5, lysyl oxidases, and genes involved in retinoid metabolism. In response to LPS, healthy fish exhibited a typical host defense reaction comparable to that which occurs in mammals, whereas there was no significant gene modulation when comparing expression in the liver of LPS-stimulated and non-stimulated obese zebrafish at the same statistical level. The stimulation of obese fish represents a double-hit to the already damaged liver and can help understand the evolution of the disease. Finally, a comparison of the differential gene activation between stimulated healthy and obese zebrafish revealed the expected difference in the metabolic state between healthy and diseased liver. The differentially modulated genes are currently being studied as putative new pathological markers in NAFLD-stimulated liver in humans. PMID:25371540

  10. The Zebrafish Neurophenome Database (ZND): A Dynamic Open-Access Resource

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    The Zebrafish Neurophenome Database (ZND): A Dynamic Open-Access Resource for Zebrafish Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are widely used in neuroscience research, where their utility as a model organism zebrafish a valuable tool for high-throughput studies in biomedicine. To complement the available

  11. The Zebrafish Neurophenome Database (ZND): A Dynamic Open-Access Resource

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    The Zebrafish Neurophenome Database (ZND): A Dynamic Open-Access Resource for Zebrafish Abstract Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are widely used in neuroscience research, where their utility as a model complexity make zebrafish a valuable tool for high-throughput studies in biomedicine. To complement

  12. Functional Ginger Extracts from Supercritical Fluid Carbon Dioxide Extraction via In Vitro and In Vivo Assays: Antioxidation, Antimicroorganism, and Mice Xenografts Models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Chen; Chiou, Li-Yu; Wang, Jheng-Yang; Chou, Sin-You; Lan, John Chi-Wei; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Huang, Kuo-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction technology was developed to gain the active components from a Taiwan native plant, Zingiber officinale (ginger). We studied the biological effects of ginger extracts via multiple assays and demonstrated the biofunctions in each platform. Investigations of ginger extracts indicated antioxidative properties in dose-dependant manners on radical scavenging activities, reducing powers and metal chelating powers. We found that ginger extracts processed moderate scavenging values, middle metal chelating levels, and slight ferric reducing powers. The antibacterial susceptibility of ginger extracts on Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sobrinus, S. mutans, and Escherichia coli was determined with the broth microdilution method technique. The ginger extracts had operative antimicroorganism potentials against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We further discovered the strong inhibitions of ginger extracts on lethal carcinogenic melanoma through in vivo xenograft model. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agents, pharmaceutical antibiotics, and food supplements. PMID:23983624

  13. An Orally Bioavailable, Indole-3-glyoxylamide Based Series of Tubulin Polymerization Inhibitors Showing Tumor Growth Inhibition in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Colley, Helen E; Muthana, Munitta; Danson, Sarah J; Jackson, Lucinda V; Brett, Matthew L; Harrison, Joanne; Coole, Sean F; Mason, Daniel P; Jennings, Luke R; Wong, Melanie; Tulasi, Vamshi; Norman, Dennis; Lockey, Peter M; Williams, Lynne; Dossetter, Alexander G; Griffen, Edward J; Thompson, Mark J

    2015-12-10

    A number of indole-3-glyoxylamides have previously been reported as tubulin polymerization inhibitors, although none has yet been successfully developed clinically. We report here a new series of related compounds, modified according to a strategy of reducing aromatic ring count and introducing a greater degree of saturation, which retain potent tubulin polymerization activity but with a distinct SAR from previously documented libraries. A subset of active compounds from the reported series is shown to interact with tubulin at the colchicine binding site, disrupt the cellular microtubule network, and exert a cytotoxic effect against multiple cancer cell lines. Two compounds demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibition in a mouse xenograft model of head and neck cancer, a type of the disease which often proves resistant to chemotherapy, supporting further development of the current series as potential new therapeutics. PMID:26580420

  14. Excessive activity of cathepsin K is associated with cartilage defects in a zebrafish model of mucolipidosis II

    PubMed Central

    Petrey, Aaron C.; Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Johnson, Steven; Fan, Xiang; De la Rosa, Mitche; Haskins, Mark E.; Nairn, Alison V.; Moremen, Kelley W.; Steet, Richard

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The severe pediatric disorder mucolipidosis II (ML-II; also known as I-cell disease) is caused by defects in mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) biosynthesis. Patients with ML-II exhibit multiple developmental defects, including skeletal, craniofacial and joint abnormalities. To date, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these clinical manifestations are poorly understood. Taking advantage of a zebrafish model of ML-II, we previously showed that the cartilage morphogenesis defects in this model are associated with altered chondrocyte differentiation and excessive deposition of type II collagen, indicating that aspects of development that rely on proper extracellular matrix homeostasis are sensitive to decreases in Man-6-P biosynthesis. To further investigate the molecular bases for the cartilage phenotypes, we analyzed the transcript abundance of several genes in chondrocyte-enriched cell populations isolated from wild-type and ML-II zebrafish embryos. Increased levels of cathepsin and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) transcripts were noted in ML-II cell populations. This increase in transcript abundance corresponded with elevated and sustained activity of several cathepsins (K, L and S) and MMP-13 during early development. Unlike MMP-13, for which higher levels of protein were detected, the sustained activity of cathepsin K at later stages seemed to result from its abnormal processing and activation. Inhibition of cathepsin K activity by pharmacological or genetic means not only reduced the activity of this enzyme but led to a broad reduction in additional protease activity, significant correction of the cartilage morphogenesis phenotype and reduced type II collagen staining in ML-II embryos. Our findings suggest a central role for excessive cathepsin K activity in the developmental aspects of ML-II cartilage pathogenesis and highlight the utility of the zebrafish system to address the biochemical underpinnings of metabolic disease. PMID:22046029

  15. A genetic screen in zebrafish identifies the mutants vps18, nf2 and foie gras as models of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Kirsten C; Amsterdam, Adam; Soroka, Carol; Boyer, James; Hopkins, Nancy

    2005-08-01

    Hepatomegaly is a sign of many liver disorders. To identify zebrafish mutants to serve as models for hepatic pathologies, we screened for hepatomegaly at day 5 of embryogenesis in 297 zebrafish lines bearing mutations in genes that are essential for embryonic development. Seven mutants were identified, and three have phenotypes resembling different liver diseases. Mutation of the class C vacuolar protein sorting gene vps18 results in hepatomegaly associated with large, vesicle-filled hepatocytes, which we attribute to the failure of endosomal-lysosomal trafficking. Additionally, these mutants develop defects in the bile canaliculi and have marked biliary paucity, suggesting that vps18 also functions to traffic vesicles to the hepatocyte apical membrane and may play a role in the development of the intrahepatic biliary tree. Similar findings have been reported for individuals with arthrogryposis-renal dysfunction-cholestasis (ARC) syndrome, which is due to mutation of another class C vps gene. A second mutant, resulting from disruption of the tumor suppressor gene nf2, develops extrahepatic choledochal cysts in the common bile duct, suggesting that this gene regulates division of biliary cells during development and that nf2 may play a role in the hyperplastic tendencies observed in biliary cells in individuals with choledochal cysts. The third mutant is in the novel gene foie gras, which develops large, lipid-filled hepatocytes, resembling those in individuals with fatty liver disease. These mutants illustrate the utility of zebrafish as a model for studying liver development and disease, and provide valuable tools for investigating the molecular pathogenesis of congenital biliary disorders and fatty liver disease. PMID:16000385

  16. Antitumor activity of (R,R’)-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol in a rat C6 glioma xenograft model in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Dossou, Katina S S; Wnorowski, Artur; Ramamoorthy, Anuradha; Paris, Arnaud; Moaddel, Ruin; Cloix, Jean-François; Wainer, Irving W

    2013-01-01

    (R,R’)-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol (MNF) inhibits cancer cell proliferation in vitro through cell-type specific modulation of ?2-adrenergic receptor and/or cannabinoid receptor function. Here, we report an investigation into antitumor activity of MNF in rat C6 glioma cells. The potent antiproliferative action of MNF in these cells (IC50 of ?1 nmol/L) was refractory to pharmacological inhibition of ?2-adrenergic receptor while a synthetic inverse agonist of cannabinoid receptor 1 significantly blocked MNF activity. The antitumor activity of MNF was then assessed in a C6 glioblastoma xenograft model in mice. Three days after subcutaneous implantation of C6 cells into the lower flank of nude mice, these animals were subjected to i.p. injections of saline or MNF (2 mg/kg) for 19 days and tumor volumes were measured over the course of the experiment. Gene expression analysis, quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot assays were performed on the tumors after treatment. Significant reduction in mean tumor volumes was observed in mice receiving MNF when compared with the saline-treated group. We identified clusters in expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation, as well as molecular markers for glioblastoma that were significantly downregulated in tumors of MNF-treated mice as compared to saline-injected controls. The efficacy of MNF against C6 glioma cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro was accompanied by marked reduction in the expression of cell cycle regulator proteins. This study is the first demonstration of MNF-dependent chemoprevention of a glioblastoma xenograft model and may offer a potential mechanism for its anticancer action in vivo. PMID:25505565

  17. Optimizing the transduction efficiency of human hematopoietic stem cells using capsid-modified AAV6 vectors in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Song, Liujiang; Kauss, M. Ariel; Kopin, Etana; Chandra, Manasa; Ul-Hasan, Taihra; Miller, Erin; Jayandharan, Giridhara R.; Rivers, Angela E.; Aslanidi, George V.; Ling, Chen; Li, Baozheng; Ma, Wenqin; Li, Xiaomiao; Andino, Lourdes M.; Zhong, Li; Tarantal, Alice F.; Yoder, Mervin C.; Wong, Kamehameha K.; Tan, Mengqun; Chatterjee, Saswati; Srivastava, Arun

    2013-01-01

    Background Although recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vectors have gained attention owing to their safety and efficacy in number of Phase I/II clinical trials, their transduction efficiency in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has been reported to be low. Only a handful of additional AAV serotype vectors have been evaluated, and comparative analyses of their transduction efficiency in HSCs from different species have not been performed. Methods Here, we evaluated the transduction efficiency of all available AAV serotype vectors (AAV1 through AAV10) in primary mouse, cynomolgus monkey, and human HSCs, respectively. The transduction efficiency of the optimized AAV vectors was also evaluated in human HSCs in a murine xenograft model in vivo. Results We observed that although there are only six amino acid differences between AAV1 and AAV6, AAV1, but not AAV6, transduce mouse HSCs cells well, whereas AAV6, but not AAV1, transduce human HSCs well. None of the 10 serotypes transduce cynomolgus monkey HSCs in vitro. We also evaluated the transduction efficiency of AAV6 vectors containing mutations in surface-exposed tyrosine residues, and observed that tyrosine (Y) to phenylalanine (F) point mutations in residues 445, 705, and 731, led to a significant increase in transgene expression in human HSCs in vitro and in a mouse xenograft model in vivo. Discussion These studies suggest that the tyrosine-mutant AAV6 serotype vectors are the most promising vectors for transducing human HSCs, and that it is possible to further increase the transduction efficiency of these vectors for their potential use in HSC-based gene therapy in humans. PMID:23830234

  18. Restriction of dietary protein decreases mTORC1 in tumors and somatic tissues of a tumor-bearing mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Lamming, Dudley W; Cummings, Nicole E; Rastelli, Antonella L; Gao, Feng; Cava, Edda; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Spelta, Francesco; Pili, Roberto; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-10-13

    Reduced dietary protein intake and intermittent fasting (IF) are both linked to healthy longevity in rodents, and are effective in inhibiting cancer growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chronic protein restriction (PR) and IF are unclear, but may be mediated in part by a down-regulation of the IGF/mTOR pathway. In this study we compared the effects of PR and IF on tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. We also investigated the effects of PR and IF on the mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, inhibition of which extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. The mTOR protein kinase is found in two distinct complexes, of which mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is responsive to acute treatment with amino acids in cell culture and in vivo. We found that both PR and IF inhibit tumor growth and mTORC1 phosphorylation in tumor xenografts. In somatic tissues, we found that PR, but not IF, selectively inhibits the activity of the amino acid sensitive mTORC1, while the activity of the second mTOR complex, mTORC2, was relatively unaffected by PR. In contrast, IF resulted in increased S6 phosphorylation in multiple metabolic tissues. Our work represents the first finding that PR may reduce mTORC1 activity in tumors and multiple somatic tissues, and suggest that PR may represent a highly translatable option for the treatment not only of cancer, but also other age-related diseases. PMID:26378060

  19. Anti-CD45 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy using Bismuth-213: High Rates of Complete Remission and Long-Term Survival in a Mouse Myeloid Leukemia Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Back, Tom; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Park, Steven I.; Frayo, Shani; Axtman, Amanda; Orgun, Nural; Orozoco, Johnnie; Shenoi, Jaideep; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, Ajay K.; Green, Damian J.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2011-07-21

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) using an anti-CD45 antibody (Ab)-streptavidin (SA) conjugate and DOTA-biotin labeled with beta-emitting radionuclides has been explored as a strategy to decrease relapse and toxicity. Alpha-emitting radionuclides exhibit high cytotoxicity coupled with a short path-length, potentially increasing the therapeutic index and making them an attractive alternative to beta-emitting radionuclides for patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Accordingly, we have used 213Bi in mice with human leukemia xenografts. Results demonstrated excellent localization of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin to tumors with minimal uptake into normal organs. After 10 minutes, 4.5 ± 1.1% of the injected dose of 213Bi was delivered per gram of tumor. Alpha imaging demonstrated uniform radionuclide distribution within tumor tissue 45 minutes after 213Bi-DOTA-biotin injection. Radiation absorbed doses were similar to those observed using a beta-emitting radionuclide (90Y) in the same model. We conducted therapy experiments in a xenograft model using a single-dose of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin given 24 hours after anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate. Among mice treated with anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate followed by 800 ?Ci of 213Bi- or 90Y-DOTA-biotin, 80% and 20%, respectively, survived leukemia-free for >100 days with minimal toxicity. These data suggest that anti-CD45 PRIT using an alpha-emitting radionuclide may be highly effective and minimally toxic for treatment of AML.

  20. The antiangiogenic activity in xenograft models of brivanib, a dual inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 kinases.

    PubMed

    Bhide, Rajeev S; Lombardo, Louis J; Hunt, John T; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Barrish, Joel C; Galbraith, Susan; Jeyaseelan, Robert; Mortillo, Steven; Wautlet, Barri S; Krishnan, Bala; Kukral, Daniel; Malone, Harold; Lewin, Anne C; Henley, Benjamin J; Fargnoli, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is a complex and tightly regulated network mediated by various proangiogenic factors. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family of growth factors, and associated tyrosine kinase receptors have a major influence in tumor growth and dissemination and may work synergistically to promote angiogenesis. Brivanib alaninate is the orally active prodrug of brivanib, a selective dual inhibitor of FGF and VEGF signaling. Here, we show that brivanib demonstrates antitumor activity in a broad range of xenograft models over multiple dose levels and that brivanib alaninate shows dose-dependent efficacy equivalent to brivanib in L2987 human tumor xenografts. Brivanib alaninate (107 mg/kg) reduced tumor cell proliferation as determined by a 76% reduction in Ki-67 staining and reduced tumor vascular density as determined by a 76% reduction in anti-CD34 endothelial cell staining. Furthermore, Matrigel plug assays in athymic mice showed that brivanib alaninate inhibited angiogenesis driven by VEGF or basic FGF alone, or combined. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, used to assess the effects of brivanib alaninate on tumor microcirculation, showed a marked decrease in gadopentetate dimeglumine contrast agent uptake at 107 mg/kg dose, with a reduction in area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to 60 minutes at 24 and 48 hours of 54% and 64%, respectively. These results show that brivanib alaninate is an effective antitumor agent in preclinical models across a range of doses, and that efficacy is accompanied by changes in cellular and vascular activities. PMID:20103604

  1. Low-dose mistletoe lectin-I reduces melanoma growth and spread in a scid mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Thies, A; Dautel, P; Meyer, A; Pfüller, U; Schumacher, U

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of mistletoe lectin-I (ML-I) on melanoma growth and spread in vivo. The human melanoma cell line MV3 was xenografted into severe combined immunodeficient mice and vehicle solution or purified ML-I was administered at 30, 150 and 500?ng per kg body weight (20 mice per group) daily. After 19 days, mice were killed, primary tumours (PTs) and lungs were dissected out, and tumour weights, number of lung metastases (LMs), number of tumour-infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs), and apoptosis rates in the melanoma cells and in the DCs were assessed. A 35% reduction of PT weight (P=0.03) and a 55% decrease in number of LMs (P=0.016) were evident for low-dose ML-I (30?ng?kg?1) treatment but not for higher doses. Mistletoe lectin-I increased apoptosis rates in the melanoma cells of PTs at all doses, while no induction of apoptosis was noted in the LMs. Low-dose ML-I significantly increased the number of DCs infiltrating the PTs (P<0.0001) and protected DCs against apoptosis, while higher doses induced apoptosis in the DCs (P<0.01). Our results demonstrate that low-dose ML-I reduced melanoma growth and number of metastases in vivo, primarily due to immunomodulatory effects. PMID:18026191

  2. Silencing of APE1 enhances sensitivity of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to radiotherapy in vitro and in a xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Cun, Yanping; Dai, Nan; Xiong, Chengjie; Li, Mengxia; Sui, Jiangdong; Qian, Chengyuan; Li, Zheng; Wang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to radiotherapy is a key limitation for the treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To overcome this problem, we investigated the correlation between radioresistance and the human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), a bifunctional protein, which plays an important role in DNA repair and redox regulation activity of transcription factors. In the present study, we examined the radiosensitivity profiles of three human HCC cell lines, HepG2, Hep3B, and MHCC97L, using the adenoviral vector Ad5/F35-mediated APE1 siRNA (Ad5/F35-siAPE1). The p53 mutant cell lines MHCC97L showed radioresistance, compared with HepG2 and Hep3B cells. APE1 was strongly expressed in MHCC97L cells and was induced by irradiation in a dose-dependent manner, and Ad5/F35-siAPE1 effectively inhibited irradiation-induced APE1 and p53 expression. Moreover, silencing of APE1 significantly potentiated the growth inhibition and apoptosis induction by irradiation in all tested human HCC cell lines. In addition, Ad5/F35-siAPE1 significantly enhanced inhibition of tumor growth and potentiated cell apoptosis by irradiation both in HepG2 and MHCC97L xenografts. In conclusion, down regulation of APE1 could enhance sensitivity of human HCC cells to radiotherapy in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23418439

  3. Tumor priming by Apo2L/TRAIL reduces interstitial fluid pressure and enhances efficacy of liposomal gemcitabine in a patient derived xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Hylander, Bonnie L; Sen, Arindam; Beachy, Sarah H; Pitoniak, Rose; Ullas, Soumya; Gibbs, John F; Qiu, Jingxin; Prey, Joshua D; Fetterly, Gerald J; Repasky, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-10

    Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is elevated in tumors and high IFP, a negative cancer prognosticator, is known to limit the uptake and efficacy of anti-tumor therapeutics. Approaches that alter the tumor microenvironment and enhance uptake of therapeutics are collectively referred to as tumor "priming". Here we show that the cytotoxic biological therapy Apo2L/TRAIL can prime the tumor microenvironment and significantly lower IFP in three different human tumor xenograft models (Colo205, MiaPaca-2 and a patient gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma tumor xenograft). We found that a single dose of Apo2L/TRAIL resulted in a wave of apoptosis which reached a maximum at 8h post-treatment. Apoptotic debris subsequently disappeared concurrent with an increase in macrophage infiltration. By 24h post-treatment, treated tumors appeared less condensed with widening of the stromal areas which increased at 48 and 72h. Analysis of tumor vasculature demonstrated a significant increase in overall vessel size at 48 and 72h although the number of vessels did not change. Notably, IFP was significantly reduced in these tumors by 48h after Apo2L/TRAIL treatment. Administration of gemcitabine at this time resulted in increased tumor uptake of both gemcitabine and liposomal gemcitabine and significantly improved anti-tumor efficacy of liposomal gemcitabine. These results suggest that Apo2L/TRAIL has a potential as a tumor priming agent and provides a rationale for developing a sequencing schema for combination therapy such that an initial dose of Apo2L/TRAIL would precede administration of gemcitabine or other therapies. PMID:26342663

  4. Metabonomic studies of pancreatic cancer response to radiotherapy in a mouse xenograft model using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and principal components analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin-Hong; Li, Wen-Tao; Gu, Ya-Jia; Yang, Bao-Feng; Deng, Hui-Wen; Yu, Yi-Hua; Peng, Wei-Jun

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the metabolic profiles of xenograft pancreatic cancer before and after radiotherapy by high-resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HRMAS 1H NMR) combined with principal components analysis (PCA) and evaluate the radiotherapeutic effect. METHODS: The nude mouse xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer was established by injecting human pancreatic cancer cell SW1990 subcutaneously into the nude mice. When the tumors volume reached 800 mm3, the mice received various radiation doses. Two weeks later, tumor tissue sections were prepared for running the NMR measurements. 1H NMR and PCA were used to determine the changes in the metabolic profiles of tumor tissues after radiotherapy. Metabolic profiles of normal pancreas, pancreatic tumor tissues, and radiation- treated pancreatic tumor tissues were compared. RESULTS: Compared with 1H NMR spectra of the normal nude mouse pancreas, the levels of choline, taurine, alanine, isoleucine, leucine, valine, lactate, and glutamic acid of the pancreatic cancer group were increased, whereas an opposite trend for phosphocholine, glycerophosphocholine, and betaine was observed. The ratio of phosphocholine to creatine, and glycerophosphocholine to creatine showed noticeable decrease in the pancreatic cancer group. After further evaluation of the tissue metabolic profile after treatment with three different radiation doses, no significant change in metabolites was observed in the 1H NMR spectra, while the inhibition of tumor growth was in proportion to the radiation doses. However, PCA results showed that the levels of choline and betaine were decreased with the increased radiation dose, and conversely, the level of acetic acid was dramatically increased. CONCLUSION: The combined methods were demonstrated to have the potential for allowing early diagnosis and assessment of pancreatic cancer response to radiotherapy. PMID:23864784

  5. Zebrafish Thrombocytes: Functions and Origins

    PubMed Central

    Khandekar, Gauri; Kim, Seongcheol; Jagadeeswaran, Pudur

    2012-01-01

    Platelets play an important role in mammalian hemostasis. Thrombocytes of early vertebrates are functionally equivalent to mammalian platelets. A substantial amount of research has been done to study platelet function in humans as well as in animal models. However, to date only limited functional genomic studies of platelets have been performed but are low throughput and are not cost-effective. Keeping this in mind we introduced zebrafish, a vertebrate genetic model to study platelet function. We characterized zebrafish thrombocytes and established functional assays study not only their hemostatic function but to also their production. We identified a few genes which play a role in their function and production. Since we introduced the zebrafish model for the study of hemostasis and thrombosis, other groups have adapted this model to study genes that are associated with thrombocyte function and a few novel genes have also been identified. Furthermore, transgenic zebrafish with GFP-tagged thrombocytes have been developed which helped to study the production of thrombocytes and their precursors as well as their functional roles not only in hemostasis but also hematopoiesis. This paper integrates the information available on zebrafish thrombocyte function and its formation. PMID:22778746

  6. Meta-[{sup 211}At]astatobenzylguanidine (MABG): In vivo evaluation in an athymic mouse human neuroblastoma xenograft model

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidyanathan, G.; Friedman, H.S.; Keir, S.T.

    1996-05-01

    Because of the short range and high linear energy transfer of {sup 211}At {alpha}-particles, the MIBG analogue MABG might be useful for the therapy of micrometastatic neuroblastoma and previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that under single-cell conditions, the cytotoxicity of MABG is > 1000 times higher than [{sup 131}I]MIBG. A paired label protocol was used to compare the tissue distribution of MABG and [{sup 131}I]MIBG in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma xenografts from 1-24 hr after injection. In tumor, significantly higher (p < 0.05) uptake was observed for MABG (3.8 {plus_minus} 0.8%ID/g vs 3.1 {plus_minus} 0.7%ID/g at 8 hr). Pretreatment with desipramine reduced tumor uptake of MABG by 43%, suggesting that accumulation was related to the uptake-1 mechanism. Significantly higher uptake of MABG also was observed in normal tissue targets. For example, at 8 hr, heart uptake of MABG was 6.0 {plus_minus} 0.9 % ID/g compared with 4.5 {plus_minus} 0.8%ID/g for [{sup 131}I]MIBG. Two strategies were investigated to increase the tumor-to-hear uptake ratio. Pretreatment of mice with unlabeled MIBG (4 mg/kg) increased MABG tumor uptake by 1.5-fold while reducing uptake in several normal tissues including heart. The vesicular uptake blocker tetrabenazine (TBZ; 20 mg/kg), reduced MABG hear uptake by 30% of control values with not significant decrease in tumor levels. We conclude that MABG deserves further evaluation as a potential agent for the treatment of neuroblastoma, particularly in combination with strategies to minimize radiation dose to normal target tissues.

  7. Utility of 3’-[18F]fluoro-3’-deoxythymidine as a PET tracer to monitor response to gene therapy in a xenograft model of head and neck carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Neale S; Lopresti, Brian J; Ruszkiewicz, James; Dong, Xinxin; Joyce, Sonali; Leef, George; Sen, Malabika; Wahed, Abdus S; Mathis, Chester A; Grandis, Jennifer R; Thomas, Sufi M

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging methodologies are needed to assess treatment responses to novel molecular targeting approaches for the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging do not effectively distinguish tumors from fibrotic tissue commonly associated with SCCHN tumors. Positron emission tomography (PET) offers functional non-invasive imaging of tumors. We determined the uptake of the PET tracers 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) and 3’-[18F]Fluoro-3’-deoxythymidine ([18F]FLT) in several SCCHN xenograft models. In addition, we evaluated the utility of [18F]FLT microPET imaging in monitoring treatment response to an EGFR antisense approach targeted therapy that has shown safety and efficacy in a phase I trial. Two of the 3 SCCHN xenograft models tested demonstrated no appreciable uptake or retention of [18F]FDG, but consistent accumulation of [18F]FLT. The third tumor xenograft SCCHN model (Cal33) demonstrated variable uptake of both tracers. SCCHN xenografts (1483) treated with EGFR antisense gene therapy decreased tumor volumes in 4/6 mice. Reduced uptake of [18F]FLT was observed in tumors that responded to epidermal growth factor antisense (EGFRAS) gene therapy compared to non-responding tumors or tumors treated with control sense plasmid DNA. These findings indicate that [18F]FLT PET imaging may be useful in monitoring SCCHN response to molecular targeted therapies, while [18F]FDG uptake in SCCHN xenografts may not be reflective of the level of metabolic activity characteristic of human SCCHN tumors. PMID:23342298

  8. A 3D in vitro model of patient-derived prostate cancer xenograft for controlled interrogation of in vivo tumor-stromal interactions.

    PubMed

    Fong, Eliza L S; Wan, Xinhai; Yang, Jun; Morgado, Micaela; Mikos, Antonios G; Harrington, Daniel A; Navone, Nora M; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models better represent human cancer than traditional cell lines. However, the complex in vivo environment makes it challenging to employ PDX models to investigate tumor-stromal interactions, such as those that mediate prostate cancer (PCa) bone metastasis. Thus, we engineered a defined three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel system capable of supporting the co-culture of PCa PDX cells and osteoblastic cells to recapitulate the PCa-osteoblast unit within the bone metastatic microenvironment in vitro. Our 3D model not only maintained cell viability but also preserved the typical osteogenic phenotype of PCa PDX cells. Additionally, co-culture cellularity was maintained over that of either cell type cultured alone, suggesting that the PCa-osteoblast cross-talk supports PCa progression in bone, as is hypothesized to occur in patients with prostatic bone metastasis. Strikingly, osteoblastic cells co-cultured with PCa PDX tumoroids organized around the tumoroids, closely mimicking the architecture of PCa metastases in bone. Finally, tumor-stromal signaling mediated by the fibroblast growth factor axis tightly paralleled that in the in vivo counterpart. Together, these findings indicate that this 3D PCa PDX model recapitulates important pathological properties of PCa bone metastasis, and validate the use of this model for controlled and systematic interrogation of complex in vivo tumor-stromal interactions. PMID:26599623

  9. Characterization and assessment of the sensitivity and resistance of a newly established human gastrointestinal stromal tumour xenograft model to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) is most commonly caused by secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations. In this study we characterize a newly established GIST xenograft model, UZLX-GIST9, and evaluate the in vivo response of the model to standard TKIs (imatinib, sunitinib, and regorafenib). Methods Tumour fragments from a metastatic lesion of a GIST patient clinically progressing after treatment with imatinib, sunitinib and regorafenib were engrafted in a nude, immunodeficient mouse. Upon sequential passaging from mouse to mouse, tumour fragments were collected for histopathological and molecular characterization. The sensitivity of the model to treatment with TKIs was evaluated in 28 mice [passage 2 (n?=?8), passage 4 (n?=?20), 41 tumours]. Mice were grouped as follows: control (untreated), imatinib (50 mg/kg/BID), imatinib (100 mg/kg/BID), sunitinib (40 mg/kg/QD), and regorafenib (30 mg/kg/QD). After three weeks of oral treatment, tumours were collected for subsequent analysis. The efficacy of treatment was assessed by tumour volume, histopathology and Western immunoblotting. Results UZLX-GIST9 maintains the same typical morphological features and immunohistochemical characteristics as the original patient biopsy and expresses CD117 and DOG1. The KIT mutational profile (p.P577del + W557LfsX5+ D820G) remains the same as the original tissue sample originating from an intraspinal metastatic site. Three week treatment with different TKIs showed that the model is resistant to imatinib. Sunitinib induces tumour growth delay and regorafenib reduces the tumour burden by 30% as compared to control animals. While none of the TKIs had a significant effect on cell proliferation or cell survival, a remarkable increase of necrosis and significant reduction of microvessel density was observed under sunitinib and regorafenib. Western immunoblotting showed a mild reduction in KIT and AKT activation only in regorafenib treated tumours. Conclusions We established a novel human GIST xenograft, UZLX-GIST9, harbouring KIT exon 11 and 17 mutations and maintaining the pheno-and genotype of the original tumour. UZLX-GIST9 shows different levels of response to standard TKIs. This model will help to study TKI resistance and to explore novel treatment approaches for patients with TKI-resistant GIST. PMID:25132955

  10. Cell Fate of Müller Cells During Photoreceptor Regeneration in an N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea-Induced Retinal Degeneration Model of Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ogai, Kazuhiro; Hisano, Suguru; Sugitani, Kayo; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Kato, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish can regenerate several organs such as the tail fin, heart, central nervous system, and photoreceptors. Very recently, a study has demonstrated the photoreceptor regeneration in the alkylating agent N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced retinal degeneration (RD) zebrafish model, in which whole photoreceptors are lost within a week after MNU treatment and then regenerated within a month. The research has also shown massive proliferation of Müller cells within a week. To address the question of whether proliferating Müller cells are the source of regenerating photoreceptors, which remains unknown in the MNU-induced zebrafish RD model, we employed a BrdU pulse-chase technique to label the proliferating cells within a week after MNU treatment. As a result of the BrdU pulse-chase technique, a number of BrdU(+) cells were observed in the outer nuclear layer as well as the inner nuclear layer. This implies that regenerating photoreceptors are derived from proliferating Müller cells in the zebrafish MNU-induced RD model. PMID:26427476

  11. Immunocytochemistry to study myogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bird, Nathan C; Windner, Stefanie E; Devoto, Stephen H

    2012-01-01

    During myogenesis, cells gradually transition from mesodermal precursors to myoblasts, myocytes, and then to muscle fibers. The molecular characterization of this process requires the ability to identify each of these cell types and the factors that regulate the transitions between them. The most versatile technique for assaying cell identities in situ is immunocytochemistry, because multiple independent molecular markers of differentiation can be assayed simultaneously. The zebrafish has developed into a popular model for the study of myogenesis, and immunocytochemical techniques have been critical. We have adapted existing protocols to optimize immunocytochemistry in zebrafish, and have tested many antibodies developed against mouse, chick, and frog muscle antigens for their cross-reactivity in zebrafish. Here, we present protocols for whole mount immunocytochemistry on both formaldehyde and Carnoy's fixed embryos as well as on sectioned zebrafish tissue. We include a table of antibodies useful for experiments on the molecular biology of myogenesis in zebrafish. PMID:22130836

  12. Longitudinal evaluation of the metabolic response of a tumor xenograft model to single fraction radiation therapy using magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessier, A. G.; Yahya, A.; Larocque, M. P.; Fallone, B. G.; Syme, A.

    2014-09-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to evaluate the metabolic profile of human glioblastoma multiform brain tumors grown as xenografts in nude mice before, and at multiple time points after single fraction radiation therapy. Tumors were grown over the thigh in 16 mice in this study, of which 5 served as untreated controls and 11 had their tumors treated to 800?cGy with 200?kVp x-rays. Spectra were acquired within 24?h pre-treatment, and then at 3, 7 and 14?d post-treatment using a 9.4?T animal magnetic resonance (MR) system. For the untreated control tumors, spectra (1-2 per mouse) were acquired at different stages of tumor growth. Spectra were obtained with the PRESS pulse sequence using a 3? × ?3 × 3?mm3 voxel. Analysis was performed with the LCModel software platform. Six metabolites were profiled for this analysis: alanine (Ala), myo-inositol (Ins), taurine (Tau), creatine and phosphocreatine (Cr + PCr), glutamine and glutamate (Glu + Gln), and total choline (glycerophosphocholine + phosphocholine) (GPC + PCh). For the treated cohort, most metabolite/water concentration ratios were found to decrease in the short term at 3 and 7?d post-treatment, followed by an increase at 14?d post-treatment toward pre-treatment values. The lowest concentrations were observed at 7?d post-treatment, with magnitudes (relative to pre-treatment concentration ratios) of: 0.42? ± ?24.6% (Ala), 0.43? ± ?15.3% (Ins), 0.68? ± ?27.9% (Tau), 0.52? ± ?14.6% (GPC+PCh), 0.49? ± ?21.0% (Cr + PCr) and 0.78? ± ?24.5% (Glu + Gln). Control animals did not demonstrate any significant correlation between tumor volume and metabolite concentration, indicating that the observed kinetics were the result of the therapeutic intervention. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using MRS to follow multiple metabolic markers over time for the purpose of evaluating therapeutic response of tumors to radiation therapy. This study provides supporting evidence that metabolite/water concentration ratios have the potential to be used as biomarkers for the assessment of the response to therapy.

  13. Rapamycin enhances docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity in a androgen-independent prostate cancer xenograft model by survivin downregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Hidekazu; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kazuto; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapamycin (RPM) enhances the susceptibility of PC3 cells to docetaxel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-dosage of docetaxel (DTX) did not reduce survivin expression levels in PC3 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination treatment of RPM with DTX suppressed the expression of surviving. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiRNA against survivin enhanced the susceptibility of PC3 cells to DTX. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RPM and DTX cotreatment inhibited PC3 cell growth and decreased surviving in vivo. -- Abstract: Background: Docetaxel is a first-line treatment choice in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the management of CRPC remains an important challenge in oncology. There have been many reports on the effects of rapamycin, which is an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in the treatment of carcinogenesis. We assessed the cytotoxic effects of the combination treatment of docetaxel and rapamycin in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the relationship between these treatments and survivin, which is a member of the inhibitory apoptosis family. Methods: Prostate cancer cells were cultured and treated with docetaxel and rapamycin. The effects on proliferation were evaluated with the MTS assay. In addition, we evaluated the effect on proliferation of the combination treatment induced knockdown of survivin expression by small interfering RNA transfection and docetaxel. Protein expression levels were assayed using western blotting. PC3 cells and xenograft growth in nude mice were used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of docetaxel and its combination with rapamycin. Results: In vitro and in vivo, the combination of rapamycin with docetaxel resulted in a greater inhibition of proliferation than treatment with rapamycin or docetaxel alone. In addition, in vitro and in vivo, rapamycin decreased basal surviving levels, and cotreatment with docetaxel further decreased these levels. Transfection siRNA against survivin enhanced the cytotoxicity of docetaxel in PC3 cells. Conclusion: The rapamycin-dependent enhancement of the cytotoxic effects of docetaxel was associated with the downregulation of survivin expression. Our results suggest that the combination of docetaxel and rapamycin is a candidate for the improved treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  14. Abundance of the Quorum-Sensing Factor Ax21 in Four Strains of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Correlates with Mortality Rate in a New Zebrafish Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yero, Daniel; Mongiardini, Elías; Torrent, Gerard; Huedo, Pol; Martínez, Paula; Roher, Nerea; Mackenzie, Simon; Gibert, Isidre; Daura, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a Gram-negative pathogen with emerging nosocomial incidence. Little is known about its pathogenesis and the genomic diversity exhibited by clinical isolates complicates the study of pathogenicity and virulence factors. Here, we present a strategy to identify such factors in new clinical isolates of S. maltophilia, incorporating an adult-zebrafish model of S. maltophilia infection to evaluate relative virulence coupled to 2D difference gel electrophoresis to explore underlying differences in protein expression. In this study we report upon three recent clinical isolates and use the collection strain ATCC13637 as a reference. The adult-zebrafish model shows discrimination capacity, i.e. from very low to very high mortality rates, with clinical symptoms very similar to those observed in natural S. maltophilia infections in fish. Strain virulence correlates with resistance to human serum, in agreement with previous studies in mouse and rat and therefore supporting zebrafish as a replacement model. Despite its clinical origin, the collection strain ATCC13637 showed obvious signs of attenuation in zebrafish, with null mortality. Multilocus-sequence-typing analysis revealed that the most virulent strains, UV74 and M30, exhibit the strongest genetic similitude. Differential proteomic analysis led to the identification of 38 proteins with significantly different abundance in the three clinical strains relative to the reference strain. Orthologs of several of these proteins have been already reported to have a role in pathogenesis, virulence or resistance mechanisms thus supporting our strategy. Proof of concept is further provided by protein Ax21, whose abundance is shown here to be directly proportional to mortality in the zebrafish infection model. Indeed, recent studies have demonstrated that this protein is a quorum-sensing-related virulence factor. PMID:23840626

  15. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Methods Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0–2 h, Fraction II at 8–10 h, and Fraction III at 11–12 h). Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11–12 h (Fraction IV). Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS); and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous) human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, in frankincense essential oil fraactions. Human pancreatic cancer cells were sensitive to Fractions III and IV (containing higher molecular weight compounds) treatment with suppressed cell viability and increased cell death. Essential oil activated the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway, induced a rapid and transient activation of Akt and Erk1/2, and suppressed levels of cyclin D1 cdk4 expression in cultured pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, Boswellia sacra essential oil Fraction IV exhibited anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities against pancreatic tumors in the heterotopic xenograft mouse model. Conclusion All fractions of frankincense essential oil from Boswellia sacra are capable of suppressing viability and inducing apoptosis of a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Potency of essential oil-suppressed tumor cell viability may be associated with the greater abundance of high molecular weight compounds in Fractions III and IV. Although chemical component(s) responsible for tumor cell cytotoxicity remains undefined, crude essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins might be a useful alternative therapeutic agent for treating patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis. PMID:23237355

  16. Superior antitumor activity of trastuzumab combined with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin in a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive human gastric cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    HARADA, SUGURU; YANAGISAWA, MIEKO; KANEKO, SAORI; YOROZU, KEIGO; YAMAMOTO, KANAME; MORIYA, YOICHIRO; HARADA, NAOKI

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer, it has been reported that the combination of trastuzumab with capecitabine plus cisplatin, or with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) plus cisplatin, significantly increased overall survival compared with chemotherapy alone (ToGA trial). In addition, adjuvant therapy with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) improved the survival of patients who received curative D2 gastrectomy (CLASSIC trial). However, the efficacy of the combination of trastuzumab with XELOX for patients with HER2-positive gastric cancer remains unknown. The aim of this study, was to investigate the efficacy of the combination of trastuzumab with XELOX in a HER2-positive human gastric cancer xenograft model. Combination treatment with these three agents (trastuzumab 20 mg/kg, capecitabine 359 mg/kg and oxaliplatin 10 mg/kg), was found to exhibit a significantly stronger antitumor activity in NCI-N87 xenografts compared with either trastuzumab or XELOX alone. In this model, treatment with trastuzumab alone or trastuzumab plus oxaliplatin enhanced the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), a key enzyme in the generation of 5-FU from capecitabine in tumor tissues. In in vitro experiments, trastuzumab induced TP mRNA expression in NCI-N87 cells. In addition, NCI-N87 cells co-cultured with the natural killer (NK) cell line CD16(158V)/NK-92 exhibited increased expression of TP mRNA. When NCI-N87 cells were cultured with CD16(158V)/NK-92 cells in the presence of trastuzumab, the mRNA expression of cytokines reported to have the ability to induce TP was upregulated in tumor cells. Furthermore, a medium conditioned by CD16(158V)/NK-92 cells also upregulated the expression of TP mRNA in NCI-N87 cells. These results suggest that trastuzumab promotes TP expression, either by acting directly on NCI-N87 cells, or indirectly via a mechanism that includes trastuzumab-mediated interactions between NK and NCI-N87 cells. Therefore, the combination of trastuzumab with XELOX may be a potent therapy for HER2-positive gastric cancer. PMID:26623038

  17. A novel type of cellular senescence that can be enhanced in mouse models and human tumor xenografts to suppress prostate tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Alimonti, Andrea; Nardella, Caterina; Chen, Zhenbang; Clohessy, John G; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Trotman, Lloyd C; Cheng, Ke; Varmeh, Shohreh; Kozma, Sara C; Thomas, George; Rosivatz, Erika; Woscholski, Rudiger; Cognetti, Francesco; Scher, Howard I; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-03-01

    Irreversible cell growth arrest, a process termed cellular senescence, is emerging as an intrinsic tumor suppressive mechanism. Oncogene-induced senescence is thought to be invariably preceded by hyperproliferation, aberrant replication, and activation of a DNA damage checkpoint response (DDR), rendering therapeutic enhancement of this process unsuitable for cancer treatment. We previously demonstrated in a mouse model of prostate cancer that inactivation of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (Pten) elicits a senescence response that opposes tumorigenesis. Here, we show that Pten-loss-induced cellular senescence (PICS) represents a senescence response that is distinct from oncogene-induced senescence and can be targeted for cancer therapy. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we determined that PICS occurs rapidly after Pten inactivation, in the absence of cellular proliferation and DDR. Further, we found that PICS is associated with enhanced p53 translation. Consistent with these data, we showed that in mice p53-stabilizing drugs potentiated PICS and its tumor suppressive potential. Importantly, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of PTEN drives senescence and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo in a human xenograft model of prostate cancer. Taken together, our data identify a type of cellular senescence that can be triggered in nonproliferating cells in the absence of DNA damage, which we believe will be useful for developing a "pro-senescence" approach for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:20197621

  18. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are becoming a popular model in behavioral neuroscience. Their behavior is robustly observed and easily quantified,

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    manipulations. We examined the behavioral and physiological endpoints of ethanol, diazepam, morphine, caffeine prior to testing. Morphine withdrawal: Zebrafish were exposed to morphine (1.5 mg/L) chronically for 1 cortisol assessment. Repeated Ethanol & Morphine withdrawal: After 1 week of chronic treatment, zebrafish

  19. Targeted Mutagenesis in Zebrafish by TALENs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Xiao, An; Tong, Xiangjun; Lin, Shuo; Zhang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish is a valuable model organism to study vertebrate development, organ regeneration and to generate human disease models. As an important member of the arsenal of genome editing, TALE nucleases (TALENs) have implicated in broad applications in zebrafish reverse genetic studies. In this chapter, we describe the detailed protocols of TALEN-mediated genome manipulations in zebrafish, including targeted gene disruption by indel mutations, deletion of large genomic regions by using two pairs of TALENs, and precise genome modification by homologous recombination (HR). PMID:26443223

  20. Zebrafish: gaining popularity in lipid research.

    PubMed

    Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Salo, Veijo T V; Nyberg, Lena; Brackmann, Christian; Enejder, Annika; Panula, Pertti; Ikonen, Elina

    2010-07-15

    Zebrafish are an increasingly popular vertebrate model organism in which to study biological phenomena. It has been widely used, especially in developmental biology and neurobiology, and many aspects of its development and physiology are similar to those of mammals. The popularity of zebrafish relies on its relatively low cost, rapid development and ease of genetic manipulation. Moreover, the optical transparency of the developing fish together with novel imaging techniques enable the direct visualization of complex phenomena at the level of the entire organism. This potential is now also being increasingly appreciated by the lipid research community. In the present review we summarize basic information on the lipid composition and distribution in zebrafish tissues, including lipoprotein metabolism, intestinal lipid absorption, the yolk lipids and their mobilization, as well as lipids in the nervous system. We also discuss studies in which zebrafish have been employed for the visualization of whole-body lipid distribution and trafficking. Finally, recent advances in using zebrafish as a model for lipid-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, obesity, diabetes and hepatic steatosis are highlighted. As the insights into zebrafish lipid metabolism increase, it is likely that zebrafish as a model organism will become an increasingly powerful tool in lipid research. PMID:20578994

  1. C7a, a Biphosphinic Cyclopalladated Compound, Efficiently Controls the Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Adult T Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes-Correa, Ana B.; Crawford, Lindsey B.; Figueiredo, Carlos R.; Gimenes, Karina P.; Pinto, Lorena A.; Rios Grassi, Maria Fernanda; Feuer, Gerold; Travassos, Luiz R.; Caires, Antonio C.F.; Rodrigues, Elaine G.; Marriott, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a highly aggressive disease that occurs in individuals infected with the human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Patients with aggressive ATLL have a poor prognosis because the leukemic cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapy. We have investigated the therapeutic efficacy of a biphosphinic cyclopalladated complex {Pd2 [S(?)C2, N-dmpa]2 (?-dppe)Cl2}, termed C7a, in a patient-derived xenograft model of ATLL, and investigated the mechanism of C7a action in HTLV-1-positive and negative transformed T cell lines in vitro. In vivo survival studies in immunocompromised mice inoculated with human RV-ATL cells and intraperitoneally treated with C7a led to significantly increased survival of the treated mice. We investigated the mechanism of C7a activity in vitro and found that it induced mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, caspase activation, nuclear condensation and DNA degradation. These results suggest that C7a triggers apoptotic cell death in both HTLV-1 infected and uninfected human transformed T-cell lines. Significantly, C7a was not cytotoxic to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors and HTLV-1-infected individuals. C7a inhibited more than 60% of the ex vivo spontaneous proliferation of PBMC from HTLV-1-infected individuals. These results support a potential therapeutic role for C7a in both ATLL and HTLV-1-negative T-cell lymphomas. PMID:21994769

  2. Efficacy and toxicity of a CD22-targeted antibody-saporin conjugate in a xenograft model of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Jason; O’Donnell, Robert T.; Abuhay, Mastewal; Tuscano, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) can deliver potent drugs to cancer cells by employing the specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). ADCs have demonstrated significant anticancer activity and, in 2011, brentuximab vedotin has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of Hodgkin's and anaplastic large cell lymphomas. CD22 is an ideal target for ADC against B-cell malignancies because of its lineage-specific expression and rapid internalization upon antibody binding. In this study, we evaluated the anti-CD22 mAb HB22.7 as a vehicle for the targeted delivery of the potent toxin saporin (SAP). In vitro, HB22.7-SAP was cytotoxic against a panel of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cell lines representing the most common types of the disease. Moreover, in a xenograft model of NHL, HB22.7-SAP significantly inhibited the growth of established lesions and completely prevented tumor development when treatment was initiated within 24 h from tumor-cell inoculation. HB22.7-SAP had no significant in vivo toxicity. In conclusion, HB22.7 constitutes a potential platform for CD22-targeted ADCs. PMID:23264893

  3. TGF-? can suppress tumorigenesis through effects on the putative cancer stem or early progenitor cell and committed progeny in a breast cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Binwu; Yoo, Naomi; Vu, Mary; Mamura, Mizuko; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Ooshima, Akira; Du, Zhijun; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Anver, Miriam R.; Michalowska, Aleksandra M.; Shih, Joanna; Parks, W. Tony; Wakefield, Lalage M.

    2008-01-01

    The TGF-? pathway has tumor suppressor activity in many epithelial tissues. Since TGF-? is a potent inhibitor of epithelial cell proliferation, it has been widely assumed that this property underlies the tumor suppressor effect. Here we have used a xenograft model of breast cancer to show that endogenous TGF-? has the potential to suppress tumorigenesis through a novel mechanism, involving effects at two distinct levels in the hierarchy of cellular progeny that make up the epithelial component of the tumor. Firstly TGF-? reduces the size of the putative cancer stem or early progenitor cell population, and secondly it promotes differentiation of a more committed, but highly proliferative, progenitor cell population to an intrinsically less proliferative state. We further show that reduced expression of the type II TGF-? receptor correlates with loss of luminal differentiation in a clinical breast cancer cohort, suggesting that this mechanism may be clinically relevant. At a molecular level, the induction of differentiation by TGF-? involves down-regulation of Id1, and forced overexpression of Id1 can promote tumorigenesis despite persistence of the anti-proliferative effect of TGF-?. These data suggest new roles for the TGF-? pathway in regulating tumor cell dynamics that are independent of direct effects on proliferation. PMID:17875704

  4. Systemic siRNA Delivery via Peptide-Tagged Polymeric Nanoparticles, Targeting PLK1 Gene in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Meenakshi; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Prakash, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles were developed from a series of chemical reactions using chitosan, polyethylene glycol, and a cell-targeting peptide (CP15). The nanoparticles were complexed with PLK1-siRNA. The optimal siRNA loading was achieved at an N?:?P ratio of 129.2 yielding a nanoparticle size of >200?nm. These nanoparticles were delivered intraperitoneally and tested for efficient delivery, cytotoxicity, and biodistribution in a mouse xenograft model of colorectal cancer. Both unmodified and modified chitosan nanoparticles showed enhanced accumulation at the tumor site. However, the modified chitosan nanoparticles showed considerably, less distribution in other organs. The relative gene expression as evaluated showed efficient delivery of PLK1-siRNA (0.5?mg/kg) with 50.7 ± 19.5% knockdown (P = 0.031) of PLK1 gene. The in vivo data reveals no systemic toxicity in the animals, when tested for systemic inflammation and liver toxicity. These results indicate a potential of using peptide-tagged nanoparticles for systemic delivery of siRNA at the targeted tumor site. PMID:24159333

  5. Molecular analysis of placodal development in zebrafish 

    E-print Network

    Phillips, Bryan T.

    2006-04-12

    probing questions about the molecular nature of placodal development. In this dissertation I largely focus on development of the otic placode. I utilize loss-of-function techniques available in the zebrafish model system to demonstrate that two members...

  6. Differentiation of xenografted human fetal lung parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Jelena; Floros, Joanna; Phelps, David S.; Wigdahl, Brian; Welsh, Patricia; Weisz, Judith; Shearer, Debra A.; Pree, Alphonse Leure du; Myers, Roland; Howett, Mary K.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize xenografted human fetal lung tissue with respect to developmental stage-specific cytodifferentiation. Human fetal lung tissue (pseudoglandular stage) was grafted either beneath the renal capsule or the skin of athymic mice (NCr-nu). Tissues were analyzed from 3 to 42 days post-engraftment for morphological alterations by light and electron microscopy (EM), and for surfactant protein mRNA and protein by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry (ICC), respectively. The changes observed resemble those seen in human lung development in utero in many respects, including the differentiation of epithelium to the saccular stage. Each stage occurred over approximately one week in the graft in contrast to the eight weeks of normal in utero development. At all time points examined, all four surfactant proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D) were detected in the epithelium by ICC. Lamellar bodies were first identified by EM in 14 day xenografts. By day 21, a significant increase in lamellar body expression was observed. Cellular proliferation, as marked by PCNA ICC and elastic fiber deposition resembled those of canalicular and saccular in utero development. This model in which xenografted lung tissue in different stages of development is available may facilitate the study of human fetal lung development and the impact of various pharmacological agents on this process. PMID:17555893

  7. Total lymphoid irradiation and discordant cardiac xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, E.; Dresdale, A.R.; Diehl, J.T.; Katzen, N.A.; Aronovitz, M.J.; Konstam, M.A.; Payne, D.D.; Cleveland, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation can prolong concordant cardiac xenografts. The effects of total lymphoid irradiation in a discordant xenograft model (guinea pig to rat) were studied with and without adjuvant pharmacologic immunosuppression. Inbred Lewis rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups. Group 1 (n = 6) served as a control group and rats received no immunosuppression. Group 2 (n = 5) received triple-drug therapy that consisted of intraperitoneal azathioprine (2 mg/kg), cyclosporine (20 mg/kg), and methylprednisolone (1 mg/kg) for 1 week before transplantation. Group 3 animals (n = 5) received 15 Gy of total lymphoid irradiation in 12 divided doses over a 3-week period. Group 4 (n = 6) received both triple-drug therapy and total lymphoid irradiation as described for groups 2 and 3. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay was performed to determine if a correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and rejection-free interval existed. Rejection was defined as cessation of graft pulsation and was confirmed by histologic test results. Only groups 1 and 2 showed a difference in survival (group 1, 6.9 +/- 1.0 minutes; group 2, 14.2 +/- 2.7 minutes, p = 0.02). Although total lymphoid irradiation did decrease complement-dependent cytotoxicity, linear regression revealed no correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and graft survival (coefficient of correlation, 0.30). Unlike concordant cardiac xenografts, total lymphoid irradiation with or without triple-drug therapy does not prolong graft survival.

  8. Use of zebrafish as a model to investigate the role of epigenetics in propagating the secondary complications observed in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sarras, Michael P; Leontovich, Alexey A; Intine, Robert V

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is classified as a disease of metabolic dysregulation predicted to affect over 400 million individuals world-wide by 2030. The debilitating aspects of this disease are the long term complications involving microvascular and macrovascular pathologies. These long term complications are related to the clinical phenomenon of metabolic memory (MM) that is defined as the persistence of diabetic complications even after glycemic control has been pharmacologically achieved. The persistent nature of MM has invoked involvement of epigenetic processes. Current research with the DM/MM zebrafish model as described in this review as well as human and mammalian studies has established that changes in DNA methylation patterns appear to contribute to tissue dysfunctions associated with DM. This review will describe studies on an adult zebrafish model of type I diabetes mellitus that allows analysis of both the hyperglycemic (HG or DM) phase and MM phase of the disease. The review will discuss the model in regards to: 1) its hyperglycemic phase, 2) its MM phase, 3) biochemical õpathways underlying changes in DNA methylation patterns observed in the model, 4) loci specific changes in DNA methylation patterns, and 5) strengths of the adult zebrafish model as compared to other MM animal models. PMID:26165618

  9. Toxicity to embryo and adult zebrafish of copper complexes with two malonic acids as models for dissolved organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, F.B.; Evans, C.W.; Butler, C.A.; Timperley, M.H.

    1998-08-01

    The toxicity to embryo and adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) of Cu complexes with two substituted malonic acids, benzyl- and n-hexadecyl-, chosen as models for low-molecular-weight natural dissolved organic matter, were investigated. Toxicity test solutions at pH 6.5 {+-} 0.1 with the required Cu ion-specific electrode. In the absence of malonic acids, concentrations of Cu{sup 2+} up to 1.13 {mu}mol/L increased the embryo hatching time from approx. 2 d in control solutions (no Cu or malonic acid) and solutions containing malonic acids without Cu to approx. 8 d. The Cu-benzylmalonic acid complex in the presence of inorganic Cu species did not delay hatching beyond that attributable to Cu{sup 2+}. In contrast, 0.60 {mu}mol/L Cu-n-hexadecylmalonic complexes delayed hatching by 5.5 d in excess of that attributable to 1.13 {mu}mol/L Cu{sup 2+}, assuming that the hatching delays caused by the different Cu species were additive, possibly because of Cu entry into the embryo as the lipophilic Cu-n-hexadecylmalonic complex. None of the Cu-malonic acid complexes was acutely toxic to adult zebrafish at concentrations up to 1.4 {mu}mol/L, possibly because Cu was removed from the Cu-malonic acid complexes by stronger chelating groups at the gill surface. Substituted malonic acids with similar proton and Cu association constants can be readily prepared with a variety of simple substituents, radiolabeled if required. Their results show that these acids could be useful ligands for investigating intracellular transport and metabolism of metal-organic complexes.

  10. Zebrafish as a model for apolipoprotein biology: comprehensive expression analysis and a role for ApoA-IV in regulating food intake.

    PubMed

    Otis, Jessica P; Zeituni, Erin M; Thierer, James H; Anderson, Jennifer L; Brown, Alexandria C; Boehm, Erica D; Cerchione, Derek M; Ceasrine, Alexis M; Avraham-Davidi, Inbal; Tempelhof, Hanoch; Yaniv, Karina; Farber, Steven A

    2015-03-01

    Improved understanding of lipoproteins, particles that transport lipids throughout the circulation, is vital to developing new treatments for the dyslipidemias associated with metabolic syndrome. Apolipoproteins are a key component of lipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are proteins that structure lipoproteins and regulate lipid metabolism through control of cellular lipid exchange. Constraints of cell culture and mouse models mean that there is a need for a complementary model that can replicate the complex in vivo milieu that regulates apolipoprotein and lipoprotein biology. Here, we further establish the utility of the genetically tractable and optically clear larval zebrafish as a model of apolipoprotein biology. Gene ancestry analyses were implemented to determine the closest human orthologs of the zebrafish apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), apoB, apoE and apoA-IV genes and therefore ensure that they have been correctly named. Their expression patterns throughout development were also analyzed, by whole-mount mRNA in situ hybridization (ISH). The ISH results emphasized the importance of apolipoproteins in transporting yolk and dietary lipids: mRNA expression of all apolipoproteins was observed in the yolk syncytial layer, and intestinal and liver expression was observed from 4-6 days post-fertilization (dpf). Furthermore, real-time PCR confirmed that transcription of three of the four zebrafish apoA-IV genes was increased 4 hours after the onset of a 1-hour high-fat feed. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that zebrafish ApoA-IV performs a conserved role to that in rat in the regulation of food intake by transiently overexpressing ApoA-IVb.1 in transgenic larvae and quantifying ingestion of co-fed fluorescently labeled fatty acid during a high-fat meal as an indicator of food intake. Indeed, ApoA-IVb.1 overexpression decreased food intake by approximately one-third. This study comprehensively describes the expression and function of eleven zebrafish apolipoproteins and serves as a springboard for future investigations to elucidate their roles in development and disease in the larval zebrafish model. PMID:25633982

  11. Zebrafish as a model for apolipoprotein biology: comprehensive expression analysis and a role for ApoA-IV in regulating food intake

    PubMed Central

    Otis, Jessica P.; Zeituni, Erin M.; Thierer, James H.; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Brown, Alexandria C.; Boehm, Erica D.; Cerchione, Derek M.; Ceasrine, Alexis M.; Avraham-Davidi, Inbal; Tempelhof, Hanoch; Yaniv, Karina; Farber, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Improved understanding of lipoproteins, particles that transport lipids throughout the circulation, is vital to developing new treatments for the dyslipidemias associated with metabolic syndrome. Apolipoproteins are a key component of lipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are proteins that structure lipoproteins and regulate lipid metabolism through control of cellular lipid exchange. Constraints of cell culture and mouse models mean that there is a need for a complementary model that can replicate the complex in vivo milieu that regulates apolipoprotein and lipoprotein biology. Here, we further establish the utility of the genetically tractable and optically clear larval zebrafish as a model of apolipoprotein biology. Gene ancestry analyses were implemented to determine the closest human orthologs of the zebrafish apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), apoB, apoE and apoA-IV genes and therefore ensure that they have been correctly named. Their expression patterns throughout development were also analyzed, by whole-mount mRNA in situ hybridization (ISH). The ISH results emphasized the importance of apolipoproteins in transporting yolk and dietary lipids: mRNA expression of all apolipoproteins was observed in the yolk syncytial layer, and intestinal and liver expression was observed from 4–6 days post-fertilization (dpf). Furthermore, real-time PCR confirmed that transcription of three of the four zebrafish apoA-IV genes was increased 4 hours after the onset of a 1-hour high-fat feed. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that zebrafish ApoA-IV performs a conserved role to that in rat in the regulation of food intake by transiently overexpressing ApoA-IVb.1 in transgenic larvae and quantifying ingestion of co-fed fluorescently labeled fatty acid during a high-fat meal as an indicator of food intake. Indeed, ApoA-IVb.1 overexpression decreased food intake by approximately one-third. This study comprehensively describes the expression and function of eleven zebrafish apolipoproteins and serves as a springboard for future investigations to elucidate their roles in development and disease in the larval zebrafish model. PMID:25633982

  12. Anti-CCR7 therapy exerts a potent anti-tumor activity in a xenograft model of human mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The chemokine receptor CCR7 mediates lymphoid dissemination of many cancers, including lymphomas and epithelial carcinomas, thus representing an attractive therapeutic target. Previous results have highlighted the potential of the anti-CCR7 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit migration in transwell assays. The present study aimed to evaluate the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of an anti-CCR7 antibody in a xenografted human mantle cell lymphoma model. Methods NOD/SCID mice were either subcutaneously or intravenously inoculated with Granta-519 cells, a human cell line derived from a leukemic mantle cell lymphoma. The anti-CCR7 mAb treatment (3 × 200 ?g) was started on day 2 or 7 to target lymphoma cells in either a peri-implantation or a post-implantation stage, respectively. Results The anti-CCR7 therapy significantly delayed the tumor appearance and also reduced the volumes of tumors in the subcutaneous model. Moreover, an increased number of apoptotic tumor cells was detected in mice treated with the anti-CCR7 mAb compared to the untreated animals. In addition, significantly reduced number of Granta-519 cells migrated from subcutaneous tumors to distant lymphoid organs, such as bone marrow and spleen in the anti-CCR7 treated mice. In the intravenous models, the anti-CCR7 mAb drastically increased survival of the mice. Accordingly, dissemination and infiltration of tumor cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, including lungs and central nervous system, was almost abrogated. Conclusions The anti-CCR7 mAb exerts a potent anti-tumor activity and might represent an interesting therapeutic alternative to conventional therapies. PMID:24305507

  13. Arsenic transport by zebrafish aquaglyceroporins

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Arsenic is one of the most ubiquitous toxins and endangers the health of tens of millions of humans worldwide. It is a mainly a water-borne contaminant. Inorganic trivalent arsenic (AsIII) is one of the major species that exists environmentally. The transport of AsIII has been studied in microbes, plants and mammals. Members of the aquaglyceroporin family have been shown to actively conduct AsIII and its organic metabolite, monomethylarsenite (MAsIII). However, the transport of AsIII and MAsIII in in any fish species has not been characterized. Results In this study, five members of the aquaglyceroporin family from zebrafish (Danio rerio) were cloned, and their ability to transport water, glycerol, and trivalent arsenicals (AsIII and MAsIII) and antimonite (SbIII) was investigated. Genes for at least seven aquaglyceroporins have been annotated in the zebrafish genome project. Here, five genes which are close homologues to human AQP3, AQP9 and AQP10 were cloned from a zebrafish cDNA preparation. These genes were named aqp3, aqp3l, aqp9a, aqp9b and aqp10 according to their similarities to the corresponding human AQPs. Expression of aqp9a, aqp9b, aqp3, aqp3l and aqp10 in multiple zebrafish organs were examined by RT-PCR. Our results demonstrated that these aquaglyceroporins exhibited different tissue expression. They are all detected in more than one tissue. The ability of these five aquaglyceroporins to transport water, glycerol and the metalloids arsenic and antimony was examined following expression in oocytes from Xenopus leavis. Each of these channels showed substantial glycerol transport at equivalent rates. These aquaglyceroporins also facilitate uptake of inorganic AsIII, MAsIII and SbIII. Arsenic accumulation in fish larvae and in different tissues from adult zebrafish was studied following short-term arsenic exposure. The results showed that liver is the major organ of arsenic accumulation; other tissues such as gill, eye, heart, intestine muscle and skin also exhibited significant ability to accumulate arsenic. The zebrafish larvae also accumulate considerable amounts of arsenic. Conclusion This is the first molecular identification of fish arsenite transport systems and we propose that the extensive expression of the fish aquaglyceroporins and their ability to transport metalloids suggests that aquaglyceroporins are the major pathways for arsenic accumulation in a variety of zebrafish tissues. Uptake is one important step of arsenic metabolism. Our results will contribute to a new understanding of aquatic arsenic metabolism and will support the use of zebrafish as a new model system to study arsenic associated human diseases. PMID:19939263

  14. Current status of sperm cryopreservation in biomedical research fish models: zebrafish, medaka, and Xiphophorus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiping; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2009-03-01

    Aquarium fishes are becoming increasingly important because of their value in biomedical research and the ornamental fish trade, and because many have become threatened or endangered in the wild. This review summarizes the current status of sperm cryopreservation in three fishes widely used in biomedical research: zebrafish, medaka, and live-bearing fishes of the genus Xiphophorus, and will focus on the needs and opportunities for future research and application of cryopreservation in aquarium fish. First, we summarize the basic biological characteristics regarding natural habitat, testis structure, spermatogenesis, sperm morphology, and sperm physiology. Second, we compare protocol development of sperm cryopreservation. Third, we emphasize the importance of artificial fertilization in sperm cryopreservation to evaluate the viability of thawed sperm. We conclude with a look to future research directions for sperm cryopreservation and the application of this technique in aquarium species. PMID:18691673

  15. Hemodynamics and Ventricular Function in a Zebrafish Model of Injury and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juhyun; Cao, Hung; Kang, Bong Jin; Jen, Nelson; Yu, Fei; Lee, Chia-An; Fei, Peng; Park, Jinhyoung; Bohlool, Shadi; Lash-Rosenberg, Lian; Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Myocardial infarction results in scar tissue and irreversible loss of ventricular function. Unlike humans, zebrafish has the capacity to remove scar tissue after injury. To assess ventricular function during repair, we synchronized microelectrocardiogram (?ECG) signals with a high-frequency ultrasound pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler to interrogate cardiac hemodynamics. ?ECG signals allowed for identification of PW Doppler signals for passive (early [E]-wave velocity) and active ventricular filling (atrial [A]-wave velocity) during diastole. The A wave (9.0±1.2?cm·s?1) is greater than the E wave (1.1±0.4?cm·s?1), resulting in an E/A ratio <1 (0.12±0.05, n=6). In response to cryocauterization to the ventricular epicardium, the E-wave velocity increased, accompanied by a rise in the E/A ratio at 3 days postcryocauterization (dpc) (0.55±0.13, n=6, p<0.001 vs. sham). The E waves normalize toward the baseline, along with a reduction in the E/A ratio at 35 dpc (0.36±0.06, n=6, p<0.001 vs. sham) and 65 dpc (0.2±0.16, n=6, p<0.001 vs. sham). In zebrafish, E/A<1 at baseline is observed, suggesting the distinct two-chamber system in which the pressure gradient across the atrioventricular valve is higher compared with the ventriculobulbar valve. The initial rise and subsequent normalization of E/A ratios support recovery in the ventricular diastolic function. PMID:25237983

  16. The vascular disrupting agent ombrabulin (AVE8062) enhances the efficacy of standard therapies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Clémenson, Céline; Jouannot, Erwan; Merino-Trigo, Ana; Rubin-Carrez, Chantal; Deutsch, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Targeting tumor vasculature is an emerging strategy in cancer treatment. Promising results have been shown in preclinical studies when vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) are used in combination with other anticancer therapies. Because radiation therapy with concurrent cisplatin or cetuximab has become standard treatment for patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), we investigated whether the VDA ombrabulin (AVE8062) could improve the antitumor activity of radiation plus cisplatin and radiation plus cetuximab combinations. HNSCC HEP2 or FaDu tumor bearing mice were treated with ombrabulin, cisplatin, cetuximab, local radiation therapy or combinations of these treatments. Ombrabulin attenuated tumor growth of HEP2 and FaDu xenografts compared to control tumors. A more pronounced tumor growth delay and tumor regression were induced when ombrabulin was added to local irradiation, cisplatin or cetuximab in FaDu tumors compared to single agent treatments. Finally, triple agent therapies combining ombrabulin, irradiation, and either cisplatin or cetuximab were more effective than double combination treatment regimens and increased tumor growth delay in both HEP2 and FaDu tumor models. Of note, complete tumor regression was achieved in FaDu tumor model for the triple combination including platinum. Immunohistochemistry on FaDu tumors demonstrated a specificity of ombrabulin towards intratumoral vessels, in contrast to peritumoral vasculature. Our results provide a rationale for the use of ombrabulin in combination with two standard treatment regimens that are concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiation and cetuximab plus ionizing radiation therapies, for the treatment of HNSCC. PMID:22810221

  17. Effect of a platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist on hyperacute xenograft rejection; evaluation in a pig kidney–human blood xenoperfusion model

    PubMed Central

    Cruzado, J M; Torras, J; Riera, M; Lloberas, N; Herrero, I; Condom, E; Martorell, J; Alsina, J; Grinyó, J M

    1998-01-01

    In pig to human discordant xenotransplantation, PAF may contribute to the pathogenesis of hyperacute xenograft rejection (HXR). We examined the release of PAF and the effect of a PAF receptor antagonist (BN 52021) on HXR in a pig kidney–human blood xenoperfusion model. Pig kidneys were perfused with porcine blood (AUTO group, n = 5), human blood (HETER group, n = 6) or human blood plus BN 52021 (BN group, n = 4), respectively. In contrast to HETER kidneys that never produced urine and were rejected in 15–30 min, the administration of BN 52021 induced a partial recovery of glomerular filtration rate and allowed kidneys to function until the end of the study. The release of PAF and soluble P-selectin, as well as endothelial P-selectin expression and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO), were much higher in the HETER than in the AUTO group. HETER and BN kidneys displayed similar natural xenoantibody titres, CH50, PAF, soluble P-selectin as well as renal immunoglobulin (IgM, IgG, IgA) and complement (C3, C1q) deposition. However, HETER kidneys displayed a full histologic picture of HXR (mainly interstitial haemorrhage and vascular microthrombi) and BN kidneys had only endothelial cell swelling. Also, BN 52021 administration attenuated glomerular and vascular P-selectin expression and renal tissue MPO activity. We conclude that in the pig kidney–human blood xenoperfusion model, PAF is produced in higher amounts than in the pig kidney–pig blood autologous combination. The administration of BN 52021 exerts a protective effect by means of attenuating the acute inflammatory response and blocking vascular microthrombi formation. PMID:9697996

  18. Prognostic and functional importance of the engraftment-associated genes in the patient-derived xenograft models of triple-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Oh, Keunhee; Lee, Jiwoo; Lee, Minju; Kim, Ju-Yeon; Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Seo, Myung Won; Park, Ae Kyung; Ryu, Han Suk; Jung, Eun-Jung; Kim, Namshin; Jeong, Seongmun; Han, Wonshik; Lee, Dong-Sup; Noh, Dong-Young

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to identify the factors affecting the successful tumor engraftment in breast cancer patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. Further, we investigated the prognostic significance and the functional importance of the PDX engraftment-related genes in triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). The clinico-pathologic features of 81 breast cancer patients whose tissues were used for PDX transplantation were analyzed to identify the factors affecting the PDX engraftment. A gene signature associated with the PDX engraftment was discovered and its clinical importance was tested in a publicly available dataset and in vitro assays. Nineteen out of 81 (23.4 %) transplanted tumors were successfully engrafted into the PDX models. The engraftment rate was highest in TNBC when compared to other subtypes (p = 0.001) and in recurrent or chemotherapy-resistant tumors compared to newly diagnosed primary tumors (p = 0.024). PDX tumors originated from the TNBC cases showed more rapid tumor growth in mice. Gene expression profiling showed that down-regulation of genes involved in the tumor-immune interaction was significantly associated with the successful PDX engraftment. The engraftment gene signature was associated with worse survival outcome when tested in publicly available mRNA datasets of TNBC cases. Among the engraftment-related genes, PHLDA2, TKT, and P4HA2 showed high expression in triple-negative breast cancer cell lines, and siRNA-based gene silencing resulted in reduced cell invasion and proliferation in vitro. Our results show that the PDX engraftment may reflect the aggressive phenotype in breast cancer. Genes associated with the PDX engraftment may provide a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic targets in TNBC. PMID:26438141

  19. Defects of protein production in erythroid cells revealed in a zebrafish Diamond-Blackfan anemia model for mutation in RPS19.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Ear, J; Yang, Z; Morimoto, K; Zhang, B; Lin, S

    2014-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare congenital red cell aplasia that classically presents during early infancy in DBA patients. Approximately, 25% of patients carry a mutation in the ribosomal protein (RP) S19 gene; mutations in RPS24, RPS17, RPL35A, RPL11, and RPL5 have been reported. How ribosome protein deficiency causes defects specifically to red blood cells in DBA has not been well elucidated. To genetically model the predominant ribosome defect in DBA, we generated an rps19 null mutant through the use of TALEN-mediated gene targeting in zebrafish. Molecular characterization of this mutant line demonstrated that rps19 deficiency reproduced the erythroid defects of DBA, including a lack of mature red blood cells and p53 activation. Notably, we found that rps19 mutants' production of globin proteins was significantly inhibited; however, globin transcript level was either increased or unaffected in rps19 mutant embryos. This dissociation of RNA/protein levels of globin genes was confirmed in another zebrafish DBA model with defects in rpl11. Using transgenic zebrafish with specific expression of mCherry in erythroid cells, we showed that protein production in erythroid cells was decreased when either rps19 or rpl11 was mutated. L-Leucine treatment alleviated the defects of protein production in erythroid cells and partially rescued the anemic phenotype in both rps19 and rpl11 mutants. Analysis of this model suggests that the decreased protein production in erythroid cells likely contributes to the blood-specific phenotype of DBA. Furthermore, the newly generated rps19 zebrafish mutant should serve as a useful animal model to study DBA. Our in vivo findings may provide clues for the future therapy strategy for DBA. PMID:25058426

  20. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Baker, Nathan A.; Tang, Kaizhi; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lins, Roberto D.; Harper, Stacey

    2015-06-04

    The integration of rapid assays, large data sets, informatics and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a predictive model of nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both core composition and outermost surface chemistry of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a predictive model of gold nanoparticle toxicity to embryonic zebrafish. In addition, our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. These findings reveal the need to expeditiously increase the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard and broaden the sharing of that data and knowledge to support predictive modeling. In addition, research should continue to focus on methodologies for developing predictive models of nanomaterial hazard based on sub-lethal responses to low dose exposures.

  1. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Baker, Nathan A.; Tang, Kaizhi; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lins, Roberto D.; Harper, Stacey

    2015-06-04

    The integration of rapid assays, large data sets, informatics and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a predictive model of nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both core composition and outermost surface chemistrymore »of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a predictive model of gold nanoparticle toxicity to embryonic zebrafish. In addition, our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. These findings reveal the need to expeditiously increase the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard and broaden the sharing of that data and knowledge to support predictive modeling. In addition, research should continue to focus on methodologies for developing predictive models of nanomaterial hazard based on sub-lethal responses to low dose exposures.« less

  2. Molecular control of neurogenesis in the regenerating central nervous system of the adult zebrafish 

    E-print Network

    Dias, Tatyana Beverly

    2012-11-30

    In contrast to mammals, adult zebrafish display cellular regeneration of lost motor neurons and achieve functional recovery following a complete spinal cord transection. Using adult zebrafish as a model to study how key ...

  3. Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Growth of Pancreatic Cancer by Silencing of Carbohydrate Sulfotransferase 15 In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Shibazaki, Yuichiro; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Masato; Hashiguchi, Taishi; Ito, Zensho; Kajihara, Mikio; Misawa, Takeyuki; Homma, Sadamu; Ohkusa, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E), a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan, is known to promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Because the presence of CS-E is detected in both tumor and stromal cells in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), multistage involvement of CS-E in the development of PDAC has been considered. However, its involvement in the early stage of PDAC progression is still not fully understood. In this study, to clarify the direct role of CS-E in tumor, but not stromal, cells of PDAC, we focused on carbohydrate sulfotransferase 15 (CHST15), a specific enzyme that biosynthesizes CS-E, and investigated the effects of the CHST15 siRNA on tumor cell proliferation in vitro and growth in vivo. CHST15 mRNA is highly expressed in the human pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, Capan-1 and Capan-2. CHST15 siRNA significantly inhibited the expression of CHST15 mRNA in these four cells in vitro. Silencing of the CHST15 gene in the cells was associated with significant reduction of proliferation and up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor-related gene p21CIP1/WAF1. In a subcutaneous xenograft tumor model of PANC-1 in nude mice, a single intratumoral injection of CHST15 siRNA almost completely suppressed tumor growth. Reduced CHST15 protein signals associated with tumor necrosis were observed with the treatment with CHST15 siRNA. These results provide evidence of the direct action of CHST15 on the proliferation of pancreatic tumor cells partly through the p21CIP1/WAF1 pathway. Thus, CHST15-CS-E axis-mediated tumor cell proliferation could be a novel therapeutic target in the early stage of PDAC progression. PMID:26642349

  4. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides induce apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells and inhibits prostate cancer growth in a xenograft mouse model of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiong; Li, Zhuoneng; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Fan; Xu, Ruo-Jun; Cai, Yi-Zhong

    2009-08-01

    Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBPs) are important functional constituents in red-colored fruits of L. barbarum (Guo Qi Zi, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal plant commonly known as Goji berry or wolfberry). The influence of LBP on human prostate cancer cells was systematically investigated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro effects of LBP on two cell lines (PC-3 and DU-145) were examined by using trypan blue exclusion staining, single-cell gel electrophoresis, flow cytometry, terminal dUTP nick-end labeling assay, and immunohistochemical assay (assessment of Bcl-2 and Bax expression). The in vivo effect of LBP on PC-3 cells was assessed in the nude mouse xenograft tumor model. The in vitro results showed that LBP can dose- and time-dependently inhibit the growth of both PC-3 and DU-145 cells. LBP caused the breakage of DNA strands of PC-3 and DU-145 cells; the tail frequency and tail length were significantly higher than that of control cells. LBP also markedly induced PC-3 and DU-145 cell apoptosis, with the highest apoptosis rates at 41.5% and 35.5%, respectively. The ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein expression following LBP treatments decreased significantly with a dose-effect relationship, which suggested that LBP can regulate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax to induce apoptosis of PC-3 and DU-145 cells. The in vivo experimental results indicate that LBP might significantly inhibit PC-3 tumor growth in nude mice. Both the tumor volume and weight of the LBP treatment group were significantly lower than those of the control group. PMID:19735167

  5. Enhanced antitumor activity and mechanism of biodegradable polymeric micelles-encapsulated chetomin in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Li, Guoyou; Deng, Senyi; Ouyang, Liang; Li, Ling; Liu, Lei; Luo, Na; Song, Xiangrong; He, Gu; Gong, Changyang; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-09-01

    Chetomin is a promising molecule with anti-tumor activities in the epipolythiodioxopiperazine family of fungal secondary metabolites; however, strong hydrophobicity has limited its further applications. In this work, chetomin was encapsulated into polymeric micelles to obtain an aqueous formulation, and the chetomin loaded micelles (Che-M) exhibited small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency. When the concentration of copolymer was higher than the critical gelation concentration, the Che-M could form a thermosensitive hydrogel (Che-H), which was free-flowing sol at ambient temperature and converted into a non-flowing gel at body temperature. The molecular modeling study has indicated that chetomin interacted with PCL as a core, which was embraced by PEG as a shell. Che-M showed equal cytotoxicity with free chetomin, but the apoptosis inducing effects of Che-M were more significant. Besides, Che-M could increase the GSSG level, decrease the GSH level, and increase the ROS in CT26 cells. Furthermore, stronger inhibitory effects of Che-M were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis and tumor growth in transgenic zebrafish models. In addition, Che-M was effective in inhibiting tumor growth and prolonging survival in a subcutaneous CT26 tumor model. In a colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis model, both Che-M and Che-H showed excellent therapeutic effects, but Che-H was more effective. In conclusion, Che-M and Che-H may serve as candidates for cancer therapy.

  6. Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the therapeutic efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 in human tumor xenograft models

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Toshiaki; Ozaki, Kei-ichi; Fujio, Kohsuke; Kajikawa, Shu-hei; Uesato, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Kazushi; Tanimura, Susumu; Koji, Takehiko; Kohno, Michiaki; Proubase Technology Inc., Kanagawa 211-0063; Kyoto University Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto 606-8501

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the anticancer efficacy of HDAC inhibitors. •MEK inhibitors sensitize human tumor xenografts to HDAC inhibitor cytotoxicity. •Such the enhanced efficacy is achieved by a transient blockade of the ERK pathway. •This drug combination provides a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer patients. -- Abstract: The ERK pathway is up-regulated in various human cancers and represents a prime target for mechanism-based approaches to cancer treatment. Specific blockade of the ERK pathway alone induces mostly cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects, however, resulting in a limited therapeutic efficacy of the ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. We previously showed that MEK inhibitors markedly enhance the ability of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to induce apoptosis in tumor cells with constitutive ERK pathway activation in vitro. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of such drug combinations, we administered the MEK inhibitor PD184352 or AZD6244 together with the HDAC inhibitor MS-275 in nude mice harboring HT-29 or H1650 xenografts. Co-administration of the MEK inhibitor markedly sensitized the human xenografts to MS-275 cytotoxicity. A dose of MS-275 that alone showed only moderate cytotoxicity thus suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts almost completely as well as induced a marked reduction in tumor cellularity when administered with PD184352 or AZD6244. The combination of the two types of inhibitor also induced marked oxidative stress, which appeared to result in DNA damage and massive cell death, specifically in the tumor xenografts. The enhanced therapeutic efficacy of the drug combination was achieved by a relatively transient blockade of the ERK pathway. Administration of both MEK and HDAC inhibitors represents a promising chemotherapeutic strategy with improved safety for cancer patients.

  7. Mini-review Embryos of the zebrafish Danio rerio in studies of non-targeted effects

    E-print Network

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Mini-review Embryos of the zebrafish Danio rerio in studies of non-targeted effects of ionizing of embryos of the zebrafish Danio rerio as an in vivo tumor model for studying non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation was reviewed. The zebrafish embryo is an animal model, which enables con- venient

  8. Timing and plasticity of shoaling behaviour in the zebrafish, Danio rerio

    E-print Network

    Ryan, Michael J.

    Timing and plasticity of shoaling behaviour in the zebrafish, Danio rerio RAYMOND E. ENGESZER; MS. number: A10613R) The zebrafish has become a major model system for biomedical research and is an emerging model for the study of behaviour. Although adult zebrafish express a visually mediated shoaling

  9. A new ATL xenograft model and evaluation of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate as a potential ATL therapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Kuroki, Ayako; Hachiman, Miho; Kamada, Yuhei; Ezinne, Chibueze C; Arai, Akihiko; Inoue, Hirosaka; Hamada, Heiichirou; Hayashida, Maiko; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Fujino, Satoshi; Arima, Naosuke; Arima, Mamiko; Tabuchi, Tomohisa; Okada, Seiji; Arima, Naomichi

    2015-11-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is caused by human T-lymphotrophic virus type 1 infection and is one of the most refractory malignant T-cell lymphomas. Improvement of ATL therapy options requires the establishment of appropriate ATL animal models. In this study, we successfully generated an ATL mouse model by xenotransplantation of primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from ATL patients (ATL cells) into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency/Jak3-null mice (NOJ mice). To generate the model, the ATL S1T cell line was subcutaneously injected into mice. Primary ATL cells were then transplanted subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or intravenously. ATL cells infiltrated multiple organs, and elevated human soluble interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) levels were detected in peripheral blood. Injection of one million primary ATL cells was needed for successful engraftment into host mice. Thawed cells, frozen long-term in liquid nitrogen, could also be transplanted; however, more cells were required to achieve similar results. The median mouse survival time was proportional to the number of cells injected. Successful secondary transplantation of ATL cells from one NOJ mouse into another was achieved and confirmed by T-cell receptor analysis. Finally, we examined the effects of the antioxide pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) as an antitumor agent in vivo. PDTC administration inhibited the increase of soluble IL-2R and improved mouse survival, suggesting that this compound has potential as an anti-ATL agent. We demonstrated that ATL cells could be stably xenotransplanted into NOJ mice using primary cells. This model will be useful in the establishment of novel therapies to treat ATL. PMID:26169955

  10. Allan V. Kalueff and Adam Michael Stewart (eds.), Zebrafish Protocols for Neurobehavioral Research, Neuromethods, vol. 66, DOI 10.1007/978-1-61779-597-8_21, Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Allan V. Kalueff and Adam Michael Stewart (eds.), Zebrafish Protocols for Neurobehavioral Research Chapter 21 Assessing Habituation Phenotypes in Adult Zebrafish: Intra- and Inter-Trial Habituation adult zebrafish are increasingly utilized as a model organism in neurobehavioral research

  11. Sunitinib malate (SU-11248) reduces tumour burden and lung metastasis in an intratibial human xenograft osteosarcoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ram Mohan Ram; Arlt, Matthias JE; Kuzmanov, Aleksandar; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a rare type of cancer that commonly occurs as a primary bone tumour in children and adolescents and is associated with a poor clinical outcome. Despite complex treatment protocols, including chemotherapy combined with surgical resection, the prognosis for patients with osteosarcoma and metastases remains poor and more effective therapies are required. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of sunitinib malate, a wide-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in a preclinical mouse model of osteosarcoma. Sunitinib significantly inhibited proliferation, provoked apoptosis and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in the human osteosarcoma cell lines SaOS-2 and 143B in vitro. Importantly, sunitinib treatment significantly reduced tumour burden, microvessel density and suppressed pulmonary metastasis in a 143B cell-derived intratibial osteosarcoma model in SCID mice. Sunitinib significantly decreased primary tumor tissue proliferation and reduced tumor vasculature. Our study indicates that sunitinib has potential for effective treatment of metastasizing osteosarcoma and provides the framework for future clinical trials with sunitinib alone or in combination with conventional and other novel therapeutics aiming at increased treatment efficacy and improved patient outcome. PMID:26328246

  12. Understanding the transformation, speciation, and hazard potential of copper particles in a model septic tank system using zebrafish to monitor the effluent.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sijie; Taylor, Alicia A; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Kinsinger, Nichola M; Ueng, William; Walker, Sharon L; Nel, André E

    2015-02-24

    Although copper-containing nanoparticles are used in commercial products such as fungicides and bactericides, we presently do not understand the environmental impact on other organisms that may be inadvertently exposed. In this study, we used the zebrafish embryo as a screening tool to study the potential impact of two nano Cu-based materials, CuPRO and Kocide, in comparison to nanosized and micron-sized Cu and CuO particles in their pristine form (0-10 ppm) as well as following their transformation in an experimental wastewater treatment system. This was accomplished by construction of a modeled domestic septic tank system from which effluents could be retrieved at different stages following particle introduction (10 ppm). The Cu speciation in the effluent was identified as nondissolvable inorganic Cu(H2PO2)2 and nondiffusible organic Cu by X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT), and Visual MINTEQ software. While the nanoscale materials, including the commercial particles, were clearly more potent (showing 50% hatching interference above 0.5 ppm) than the micron-scale particulates with no effect on hatching up to 10 ppm, the Cu released from the particles in the septic tank underwent transformation into nonbioavailable species that failed to interfere with the function of the zebrafish embryo hatching enzyme. Moreover, we demonstrate that the addition of humic acid, as an organic carbon component, could lead to a dose-dependent decrease in Cu toxicity in our high content zebrafish embryo screening assay. Thus, the use of zebrafish embryo screening, in combination with the effluents obtained from a modeled exposure environment, enables a bioassay approach to follow the change in the speciation and hazard potential of Cu particles instead of difficult-to-perform direct particle tracking. PMID:25625504

  13. Microbead Implantation in the Zebrafish Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Gary F.; Morales, Elvin E.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as a valuable genetic model system for the study of developmental biology and disease. Zebrafish share a high degree of genomic conservation, as well as similarities in cellular, molecular, and physiological processes, with other vertebrates including humans. During early ontogeny, zebrafish embryos are optically transparent, allowing researchers to visualize the dynamics of organogenesis using a simple stereomicroscope. Microbead implantation is a method that enables tissue manipulation through the alteration of factors in local environments. This allows researchers to assay the effects of any number of signaling molecules of interest, such as secreted peptides, at specific spatial and temporal points within the developing embryo. Here, we detail a protocol for how to manipulate and implant beads during early zebrafish development. PMID:26274386

  14. Telomerase Is Essential for Zebrafish Heart Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Dorota; González-Rosa, Juan Manuel; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Óscar; Aguado, Tania; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlota; Marques, Inês João; Galardi-Castilla, María; de Diego, Irene; Gómez, Manuel José; Cortés, Alfonso; Zapata, Agustín; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; Mercader, Nadia; Flores, Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    After myocardial infarction in humans, lost cardiomyocytes are replaced by an irreversible fibrotic scar. In contrast, zebrafish hearts efficiently regenerate after injury. Complete regeneration of the zebrafish heart is driven by the strong proliferation response of its cardiomyocytes to injury. Here we show that, after cardiac injury in zebrafish, telomerase becomes hyperactivated, and telomeres elongate transiently, preceding a peak of cardiomyocyte proliferation and full organ recovery. Using a telomerase-mutant zebrafish model, we found that telomerase loss drastically decreases cardiomyocyte proliferation and fibrotic tissue regression after cryoinjury and that cardiac function does not recover. The impaired cardiomyocyte proliferation response is accompanied by the absence of cardiomyocytes with long telomeres and an increased proportion of cardiomyocytes showing DNA damage and senescence characteristics. These findings demonstrate the importance of telomerase function in heart regeneration and highlight the potential of telomerase therapy as a means of stimulating cell proliferation upon myocardial infarction. PMID:26321646

  15. Advances in zebrafish chemical screening technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Jonathan R; Saxena, Meera T; Mumm, Jeff S

    2013-01-01

    Due to several inherent advantages, zebrafish are being utilized in increasingly sophisticated screens to assess the physiological effects of chemical compounds directly in living vertebrate organisms. Diverse screening platforms showcase these advantages. Morphological assays encompassing basic qualitative observations to automated imaging, manipulation, and data-processing systems provide whole organism to subcellular levels of detail. Behavioral screens extend chemical screening to the level of complex systems. In addition, zebrafish-based disease models provide a means of identifying new potential therapeutic strategies. Automated systems for handling/sorting, high-resolution imaging and quantitative data collection have significantly increased throughput in recent years. These advances will make it easier to capture multiple streams of information from a given sample and facilitate integration of zebrafish at the earliest stages of the drug-discovery process, providing potential solutions to current drug-development bottlenecks. Here we outline advances that have been made within the growing field of zebrafish chemical screening. PMID:23043478

  16. Sunitinib Combined with Angiotensin-2 Type-1 Receptor Antagonists Induces More Necrosis: A Murine Xenograft Model of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Verhoest, Grégory; Dolley-Hitze, Thibault; Jouan, Florence; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Oger, Emmanuel; Bensalah, Karim; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick; Collet, Nicolas; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Vigneau, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin-2 type-1 receptor antagonists not are only antihypertensive drugs but also can inhibit VEGF production. We hypothesised that adding telmisartan to sunitinib could potentiate the antiangiogenic effects. Material and Methods. 786-O cell lines were injected in nude mice. After tumor development, mice were divided into 4 groups: the first was the control group (DMSO), the second group was treated with sunitinib alone, the third group was treated with telmisartan alone, and the fourth group was treated with the combination. Drugs were orally administered every day for four weeks. Animals were sacrificed after treatment. Blood and tumor tissues were collected for analysis by immunohistochemistry, Western Blot, and ELISA methods. Results. All animals developed a ccRCC and ten in each group were treated. Using a kinetic model, tumors tended to grow slower in the combination group compared to others (P = 0.06). Compared to sunitinib alone, the addition of telmisartan significantly increased tissue necrosis (P = 0.038). Central microvascular density decreased (P = 0.0038) as well as circulating VEGF (P = 0.003). There was no significant variation in proliferation or apoptosis markers. Conclusion. The combination of sunitinib and telmisartan revealed an enhancement of the blockage of the VEGF pathway on renal tumor resulting in a decrease in neoangiogenesis and an increase in necrosis. PMID:24967411

  17. In vivo sampling of Verteporfin uptake in pancreas cancer xenograft models: comparison of surface, oral, and interstitial measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isabelle, Martin; O'Hara, Julia A.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Mosse, Sandy; Pereira, Stephen; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with Verteporfin is being investigated as a pancreatic cancer treatment in the cases for non-surgical candidates. Tissue response to PDT is based on a number of parameters including photosensitizer (PS) dose, light dose and time interval between light application and PS injection. In this study, PS uptake and distribution in animal leg muscle, oral cavity tissues, pancreas and tumor was measured in vivo using light-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) via an Aurora Optics Inc. PDT fluorescence dosimeter. An orthotopic pancreatic cancer model (AsPC-1) was implanted in SCID mice and treated with the PS. Probe measurements were made using a surface probe and an interstitial needle probe before and up to one hour after intravenous tail vein injection of the PS. The study demonstrated that it is possible to correlate in-vivo LIFS measurements of the PS uptake in the pancreas with measurements taken from the oral cavity indicating that light dosimetry of PDT of the pancreas can be ascertained from the LIFS measurements in the oral cavity. These results emphasize the importance of light dosimetry in improving the therapeutic outcome of PDT through light dose adaptation to the relative in situ tissue PS concentration.

  18. Combining CXCL10 gene therapy and radiotherapy improved therapeutic efficacy in cervical cancer HeLa cell xenograft tumor models

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, MING; MA, QIAN; XU, JINHUI; FU, SHAOZHI; CHEN, LANLAN; WANG, BIQIONG; WU, JINGBO; YANG, LINGLIN

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important treatment method for cervical cancer, but the efficacy requires improvement. Therefore, novel methods of treatment are required. Previous data have demonstrated that the CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) inhibits angiogenesis, induces apoptosis and causes avoidance of the S phase of the cell cycle in cervical cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of radiotherapy combined with CXCL10 gene therapy. Mouse models of cervical carcinoma were created by inoculation with HeLa cells, and were treated by combining intravenously administered plasmid-encoding CXCL10, administered 5 times (days 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24 following inoculation), with direct radiation (20 Gy/5 fractions) administered on 5 consecutive days (~day 27 after inoculation). The vessel density and tumor cell proliferation were observed by immunostaining, and apoptosis was determined using a TUNEL assay. The results revealed a significant increase in the inhibition of tumor growth, reduced vessel density, decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in the tumor cells of the combination therapy group. Overall, these findings resulted in the conclusion that CXCL10 gene therapy in combination with radiotherapy is a novel effective therapeutic strategy for cervical cancer.

  19. Probiotic treatment reduces appetite and glucose level in the zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Falcinelli, Silvia; Rodiles, Ana; Unniappan, Suraj; Picchietti, Simona; Gioacchini, Giorgia; Merrifield, Daniel Lee; Carnevali, Oliana

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota regulates metabolic pathways that modulate the physiological state of hunger or satiety. Nutrients in the gut stimulate the release of several appetite modulators acting at central and peripheral levels to mediate appetite and glucose metabolism. After an eight-day exposure of zebrafish larvae to probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus, high-throughput sequence analysis evidenced the ability of the probiotic to modulate the microbial composition of the gastrointestinal tract. These changes were associated with a down-regulation and up-regulation of larval orexigenic and anorexigenic genes, respectively, an up-regulation of genes related to glucose level reduction and concomitantly reduced appetite and body glucose level. BODIPY-FL-pentanoic-acid staining revealed higher short chain fatty acids levels in the intestine of treated larvae. These results underline the capability of the probiotic to modulate the gut microbiota community and provides insight into how the probiotic interacts to regulate a novel gene network involved in glucose metabolism and appetite control, suggesting a possible role for L. rhamnosus in the treatment of impaired glucose tolerance and food intake disorders by gut microbiota manipulation. PMID:26727958

  20. River waters induced neurotoxicity in an embryo-larval zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    García-Cambero, Jesús Pablo; Catalá, Myriam; Valcárcel, Yolanda

    2012-10-01

    Some investigations have revealed an increased release of psychoactive drugs into the aquatic environments near big cities. However, despite the alert generated by the presence of such neurotoxic compounds, there is a lack of studies evaluating the impact on living organisms. One solution consists in the development of bioassays able to address specific risks, such as neurotoxicity, but on the other hand suitable to assess complex matrices like river samples. The objective of this work was to assess surface water toxicity by means of a zebrafish embryo-larval combined toxicity assay, which is based on a variety of toxicological endpoints, especially those related to neurodevelopment. For such a purpose, we selected the Tagus River in which a previous monitoring study revealed the presence of psychoactive drugs. Results showed that most of the toxicological endpoints evaluated remained unaltered in the exposed embryos, except for the tail length that was larger in the exposed larvae, and the locomotor activity in the 6-day larvae, which was decreased in four groups of exposure (n=5 sampling points). In the absence of systemic toxicity, changes in larval locomotion are indicative of neurotoxicity. This result suggests that the Tagus River can convey neurotoxic compounds at levels that may represent an early and specific threat over the aquatic species of vertebrates, what can have dramatic consequences under the ecological point of view. PMID:22906717

  1. A zebrafish model of Poikiloderma with Neutropenia recapitulates the human syndrome hallmarks and traces back neutropenia to the myeloid progenitor.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Elisa A; Carra, Silvia; Fontana, Laura; Bresciani, Erica; Cotelli, Franco; Larizza, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Poikiloderma with Neutropenia (PN) is an autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by early-onset poikiloderma, pachyonychia, hyperkeratosis, bone anomalies and neutropenia, predisposing to myelodysplasia. The causative C16orf57/USB1 gene encodes a conserved phosphodiesterase that regulates the stability of spliceosomal U6-RNA. The involvement of USB1 in splicing has not yet allowed to unveil the pathogenesis of PN and how the gene defects impact on skin and bone tissues besides than on the haematological compartment. We established a zebrafish model of PN using a morpholino-knockdown approach with two different splicing morpholinos. Both usb1-depleted embryos displayed developmental abnormalities recapitulating the signs of the human syndrome. Besides the pigmentation and osteochondral defects, usb1-knockdown caused defects in circulation, manifested by a reduced number of circulating cells. The overall morphant phenotype was also obtained by co-injecting sub-phenotypic dosages of the two morpholinos and could be rescued by human USB1 RNA. Integrated in situ and real-time expression analyses of stage-specific markers highlighted defects of primitive haematopoiesis and traced back the dramatic reduction in neutrophil myeloperoxidase to the myeloid progenitors showing down-regulated pu.1 expression. Our vertebrate model of PN demonstrates the intrinsic requirement of usb1 in haematopoiesis and highlights PN as a disorder of myeloid progenitors associated with bone marrow dysfunction. PMID:26522474

  2. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated quercetin suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Deng, Senyi; Li, Ling; Sun, Lu; Yang, Xi; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Lei; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2013-11-01

    Quercetin (Que) loaded polymeric micelles were prepared to obtain an aqueous formulation of Que with enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activities. A simple solid dispersion method was used, and the obtained Que micelles had a small particle size (about 31 nm), high drug loading, and high encapsulation efficiency. Que micelles showed improved cellular uptake, an enhanced apoptosis induction effect, and stronger inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration, and invasion of 4T1 cells than free Que. The enhanced in vitro antiangiogenesis effects of Que micelles were proved by the results that Que micelles significantly suppressed proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Subsequently, transgenic zebrafish models were employed to investigate anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of Que micelles, in which stronger inhibitory effects of Que micelles were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor growth, and tumor metastasis. Furthermore, in a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor model, Que micelles were more effective in suppressing tumor growth and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Besides, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays suggested that tumors in the Que micelle-treated group showed more apoptosis, fewer microvessels, and fewer proliferation-positive cells. In conclusion, Que micelles, which are synthesized as an aqueous formulation of Que, possess enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity, which can serve as potential candidates for cancer therapy.

  3. A zebrafish model of Poikiloderma with Neutropenia recapitulates the human syndrome hallmarks and traces back neutropenia to the myeloid progenitor

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Elisa A.; Carra, Silvia; Fontana, Laura; Bresciani, Erica; Cotelli, Franco; Larizza, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Poikiloderma with Neutropenia (PN) is an autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by early-onset poikiloderma, pachyonychia, hyperkeratosis, bone anomalies and neutropenia, predisposing to myelodysplasia. The causative C16orf57/USB1 gene encodes a conserved phosphodiesterase that regulates the stability of spliceosomal U6-RNA. The involvement of USB1 in splicing has not yet allowed to unveil the pathogenesis of PN and how the gene defects impact on skin and bone tissues besides than on the haematological compartment. We established a zebrafish model of PN using a morpholino-knockdown approach with two different splicing morpholinos. Both usb1-depleted embryos displayed developmental abnormalities recapitulating the signs of the human syndrome. Besides the pigmentation and osteochondral defects, usb1-knockdown caused defects in circulation, manifested by a reduced number of circulating cells. The overall morphant phenotype was also obtained by co-injecting sub-phenotypic dosages of the two morpholinos and could be rescued by human USB1 RNA. Integrated in situ and real-time expression analyses of stage-specific markers highlighted defects of primitive haematopoiesis and traced back the dramatic reduction in neutrophil myeloperoxidase to the myeloid progenitors showing down-regulated pu.1 expression. Our vertebrate model of PN demonstrates the intrinsic requirement of usb1 in haematopoiesis and highlights PN as a disorder of myeloid progenitors associated with bone marrow dysfunction. PMID:26522474

  4. Co-Treatment with Panitumumab and Trastuzumab Augments Response to the MEK Inhibitor Trametinib in a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Pancreatic Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, James M.; Newhook, Timothy E.; Adair, Sara J.; Walters, Dustin M.; Kim, Alison J.; Stelow, Edward B.; Parsons, J. Thomas; Bauer, Todd W.

    2014-01-01

    Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family signaling are drivers of tumorigenesis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Previous studies have demonstrated that combinatorial treatment of PDAC xenografts with the mitogen-activated protein kinase–extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor trametinib and the dual EGFR/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) inhibitor lapatinib provided more effective inhibition than either treatment alone. In this study, we have used the therapeutic antibodies, panitumumab (specific for EGFR) and trastuzumab (specific for HER2), to probe the role of EGFR and HER2 signaling in the proliferation of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors. We show that dual anti-EGFR and anti-HER2 therapy significantly augmented the growth inhibitory effects of the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib in three different PDX tumors. While significant growth inhibition was observed in both KRAS mutant xenograft groups receiving trametinib and dual antibody therapy (tumors 366 and 608), tumor regression was observed in the KRAS wild-type xenografts (tumor 738) treated in the same manner. Dual antibody therapy in conjunction with trametinib was equally or more effective at inhibiting tumor growth and with lower apparent toxicity than trametinib plus lapatinib. Together, these studies provide further support for a role for EGFR and HER2 in pancreatic cancer proliferation and underscore the importance of therapeutic intervention in both the KRAS–rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma kinase (RAF)–MEK–ERK and EGFR-HER2 pathways to achieve maximal therapeutic efficacy in patients. PMID:25117978

  5. Fighting Zebrafish: Characterization of Aggressive Behavior and WinnerLoser Effects

    E-print Network

    Fighting Zebrafish: Characterization of Aggressive Behavior and Winner­Loser Effects Rui F in zebrafish make this species a promising vertebrate neurogenetic model for the study of neural circuits that reliably elicits the expression of fighting behavior in zebrafish dyads and characterized it. The agonistic

  6. New tides: using zebrafish to study renal regeneration KRISTEN K. MCCAMPBELL, and REBECCA A. WINGERT

    E-print Network

    Tank, Jennifer L.

    New tides: using zebrafish to study renal regeneration KRISTEN K. MCCAMPBELL, and REBECCA A. WINGERT NOTRE DAME, IND Over the past several decades, the zebrafish has become one of the major verte- brate model organisms used in biomedical research. In this arena, the zebrafish has emerged

  7. Zebrafish nephrogenesis is regulated by interactions between retinoic acid, mecom, and Notch signaling$

    E-print Network

    Tank, Jennifer L.

    Zebrafish nephrogenesis is regulated by interactions between retinoic acid, mecom, and Notch acid mecom Notch a b s t r a c t The zebrafish pronephros provides a conserved model to study kidney and cell type choice are established. Zebrafish nephrons are divided into distinct epithelial regions

  8. Video-aided analysis of zebrafish locomotion and anxiety-related behavioral responses

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    1 Video-aided analysis of zebrafish locomotion and anxiety-related behavioral responses Peter R and anatomical similarities to other vertebrates, zebrafish are becoming a widely used model in neurobehavioral research. With the growing popularity of zebrafish as experimental subjects, it is important to develop

  9. Abstract--Biological inferences about the toxicity of chemicals reached during experiments on the zebrafish

    E-print Network

    Kakadiaris, Ioannis

    on the zebrafish Dharma embryo can be greatly affected by the analysis of the time-lapse microscopy images conditions, the use of zebrafish embryos as a model system can serve as an excellent way forward that additionally make it cost-effective [5]: Zebrafish are small in size and can produce hundreds of embryos per

  10. Video-Aided Analysis of Zebrafish Locomotion and Anxiety-Related Behavioral Responses

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Chapter 1 Video-Aided Analysis of Zebrafish Locomotion and Anxiety-Related Behavioral Responses vertebrates, zebrafish are becoming a widely used model in neurobehavioral research. With the growing popularity of zebrafish as experimental sub- jects, it is important to develop tools that accurately record

  11. Conserved synteny and the zebrafish genome.

    PubMed

    Catchen, Julian M; Braasch, Ingo; Postlethwait, John H

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish offers significant opportunities for the investigation of vertebrate development, evolution, physiology, and behavior and provides numerous models of human disease. Connecting zebrafish phenogenetic biology to that of humans and other vertebrates, however, requires the proper assignment of gene orthologies. Orthology assignments by phylogenetic analysis or by reciprocal best sequence similarity searches can lead to errors, especially in cases of gene duplication followed by gene loss or rapid lineage-specific gene evolution. Conserved synteny analysis provides a method that helps overcome such problems. Here we describe conserved synteny analysis for zebrafish genes and discuss the Synteny Database, a website specifically designed to identify conserved syntenies for zebrafish that takes into account the teleost genome duplication (TGD). We utilize the Synteny Database to demonstrate its power to resolve our understanding of the evolution of nerve growth factor receptor related genes, including Ngfr and the enigmatic Nradd. Finally, we compare conserved syntenies between zebrafish, stickleback, spotted gar, and human to understand the timing of chromosome rearrangements in teleost genome evolution. An improved understanding of gene histories that comes from the application of tools provided by the Synteny Database can facilitate the connectivity of zebrafish and human genomes. PMID:21924168

  12. Impairment of social behaviour persists two years after embryonic alcohol exposure in zebrafish: A model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Yohaan; Rampersad, Mindy; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Zebrafish naturally form social groups called shoals. Previously, we have shown that submerging zebrafish eggs into low concentrations of alcohol (0.00, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 vol/vol% external bath concentration) during development (24h post-fertilization) for two hours resulted in impaired shoaling response in seven month old young adult zebrafish. Here we investigate whether this embryonic alcohol exposure induced behavioural deficit persists to older age. Zebrafish embryos were exposed either to fresh system water (control) or to 1% alcohol for two hours, 24h after fertilization, and were raised in a high-density tank system. Social behaviour was tested by presenting the experimental fish with a computer animated group of zebrafish images, while automated tracking software measured their behaviour. Control fish were found to respond strongly to animated conspecific images by reducing their distanceand remaining close to the images during image presentation, embryonic alcohol treated fish did not. Our results suggest that the impaired shoaling response of the alcohol exposed fish was not due to altered motor function or visual perception, but likely to a central nervous system alteration affecting social behaviour itself. We found the effects of embryonic alcohol exposure on social behaviour not to diminish with age, a result that demonstrates the deleterious and potentially life-long consequences of exposure to even small amount of alcohol during embryonic development in vertebrates. PMID:26097005

  13. Efficacy of a Non-Hypercalcemic Vitamin-D2 Derived Anti-Cancer Agent (MT19c) and Inhibition of Fatty Acid Synthesis in an Ovarian Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Richard G.; Lange, Thilo S.; Robinson, Katina; Kim, Kyu K.; Uzun, Alper; Horan, Timothy C.; Kawar, Nada; Yano, Naohiro; Chu, Sharon R.; Mao, Quanfu; Brard, Laurent; DePaepe, Monique E.; Padbury, James F.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Brodsky, Alexander; Shen, Tun-Li; Singh, Rakesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous vitamin-D analogs exhibited poor response rates, high systemic toxicities and hypercalcemia in human trials to treat cancer. We identified the first non-hypercalcemic anti-cancer vitamin D analog MT19c by altering the A-ring of ergocalciferol. This study describes the therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of action of MT19c in both in vitro and in vivo models. Methodology/Principal Finding Antitumor efficacy of MT19c was evaluated in ovarian cancer cell (SKOV-3) xenografts in nude mice and a syngenic rat ovarian cancer model. Serum calcium levels of MT19c or calcitriol treated animals were measured. In-silico molecular docking simulation and a cell based VDR reporter assay revealed MT19c–VDR interaction. Genomewide mRNA analysis of MT19c treated tumors identified drug targets which were verified by immunoblotting and microscopy. Quantification of cellular malonyl CoA was carried out by HPLC-MS. A binding study with PPAR-Y receptor was performed. MT19c reduced ovarian cancer growth in xenograft and syngeneic animal models without causing hypercalcemia or acute toxicity. MT19c is a weak vitamin-D receptor (VDR) antagonist that disrupted the interaction between VDR and coactivator SRC2-3. Genome-wide mRNA analysis and western blot and microscopy of MT19c treated xenograft tumors showed inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN) activity. MT19c reduced cellular levels of malonyl CoA in SKOV-3 cells and inhibited EGFR/phosphoinositol-3kinase (PI-3K) activity independently of PPAR-gamma protein. Significance Antitumor effects of non-hypercalcemic agent MT19c provide a new approach to the design of vitamin-D based anticancer molecules and a rationale for developing MT19c as a therapeutic agent for malignant ovarian tumors by targeting oncogenic de novo lipogenesis. PMID:22509304

  14. Ontogeny and nutritional control of adipogenesis in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Edward J.; Trent, Chad M.; Rawls, John F.

    2009-01-01

    The global obesity epidemic demands an improved understanding of the developmental and environmental factors regulating fat storage. Adipocytes serve as major sites of fat storage and as regulators of energy balance and inflammation. The optical transparency of developing zebrafish provides new opportunities to investigate mechanisms governing adipocyte biology, however zebrafish adipocytes remain uncharacterized. We have developed methods for visualizing zebrafish adipocytes in vivo by labeling neutral lipid droplets with Nile Red. Our results establish that neutral lipid droplets first accumulate in visceral adipocytes during larval stages and increase in number and distribution as zebrafish grow. We show that the cellular anatomy of zebrafish adipocytes is similar to mammalian white adipocytes and identify peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor ? and fatty acid binding protein 11a as markers of the zebrafish adipocyte lineage. By monitoring adipocyte development prior to neutral lipid deposition, we find that the first visceral preadipocytes appear in association with the pancreas shortly after initiation of exogenous nutrition. Zebrafish reared in the absence of food fail to form visceral preadipocytes, indicating that exogenous nutrition is required for adipocyte development. These results reveal homologies between zebrafish and mammalian adipocytes and establish the zebrafish as a new model for adipocyte research. PMID:19366995

  15. Identifying Structural Alerts Based on Zebrafish Developmental Morphological Toxicity (TDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zebrafish constitute a powerful alternative animal model for chemical hazard evaluation. To provide an in vivo complement to high-throughput screening data from the ToxCast program, zebrafish developmental toxicity screens were conducted on the ToxCast Phase I (Padilla et al., 20...

  16. Stressing Zebrafish for Behavioral Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Karl J.; Boczek, Nicole J.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The stress response is a normal reaction to a real or perceived threat. However, stress response systems that are overwhelmed or out of balance can increase both the incidence and severity of diseases including addiction and mood and anxiety disorders. Using an animal model with both genetic diversity and large family size can help discover the specific genetic and environmental contributions to these behavioral diseases. The stress response has been studied extensively in teleosts because of their importance in food production. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a major model organism with a strong record for use in developmental biology, genetic screening, and genomic studies. More recently, the stress response of larval and adult zebrafish has been documented. High-throughput automated tracking systems make possible behavioral readouts of the stress response in zebrafish. This non-invasive measure of the stress response can be combined with mutagenesis methods to dissect the genes involved in complex stress response behaviors in vertebrates. Understanding the genetic and epigenetic basis for the stress response in vertebrates will help to develop advanced screening and therapies for stress-aggravated diseases like addiction and mood and anxiety disorders. PMID:21615261

  17. Host-microbe interactions in the developing zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kanther, Michelle; Rawls, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary of recent advances The amenability of the zebrafish to in vivo imaging and genetic analysis has fueled expanded use of this vertebrate model to investigate the molecular and cellular foundations of host-microbe relationships. Study of microbial encounters in zebrafish hosts has concentrated on developing embryonic and larval stages, when the advantages of the zebrafish model are maximized. A comprehensive understanding of these host-microbe interactions requires appreciation of the developmental context into which a microbe is introduced, as well as the effects of that microbial challenge on host ontogeny. In this review, we discuss how in vivo imaging and genetic analysis in zebrafish has advanced our knowledge of host-microbe interactions in the context of a developing vertebrate host. We focus on recent insights into immune cell ontogeny and function, commensal microbial relationships in the intestine, and microbial pathogenesis in zebrafish hosts. PMID:20153622

  18. A bone to pick with zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Eirinn W; Apschner, Alexander; Schulte-Merker, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The development of high-throughput sequencing and genome-wide association studies allows us to deduce the genetic factors underlying diseases much more rapidly than possible through classical genetics, but a true understanding of the molecular mechanisms of these diseases still relies on integrated approaches including in vitro and in vivo model systems. One such model that is particularly suitable for studying bone diseases is the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small fresh-water teleost that is highly amenable to genetic manipulation and in vivo imaging. Zebrafish physiology and genome organization are in many aspects similar to those of humans, and the skeleton and mineralizing tissues are no exception. In this review, we highlight some of the contributions that have been made through the study of mutant zebrafish that feature bone and/or mineralization disorders homologous to human diseases, including osteogenesis imperfecta, fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva and generalized arterial calcification of infancy. The genomic and phenotypic similarities between the zebrafish and human cases are illustrated. We show that, despite some systemic physiological differences between mammals and teleosts, and a relative lack of a history as a model for bone research, the zebrafish represents a useful complement to mouse and tissue culture systems in the investigation of genetic bone disorders. PMID:24422140

  19. MicroRNA 19a replacement partially rescues fin and cardiac defects in zebrafish model of Holt Oram syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chiavacci, Elena; D'Aurizio, Romina; Guzzolino, Elena; Russo, Francesco; Baumgart, Mario; Groth, Marco; Mariani, Laura; D'Onofrio, Mara; Arisi, Ivan; Pellegrini, Marco; Cellerino, Alessandro; Cremisi, Federico; Pitto, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    Holt-Oram Syndrome (HOS) is an autosomal dominant heart-hand syndrome caused by mutations in the TBX5 gene, a transcription factor capable of regulating hundreds of cardiac-specific genes through complex transcriptional networks. Here we show that, in zebrafish, modulation of a single miRNA is sufficient to rescue the morphogenetic defects generated by HOS. The analysis of miRNA-seq profiling revealed a decreased expression of miR-19a in Tbx5-depleted zebrafish embryos compared to the wild type. We revealed that the transcription of the miR-17-92 cluster, which harbors miR-19a, is induced by Tbx5 and that a defined dosage of miR-19a is essential for the correct development of the heart. Importantly, we highlighted that miR-19a replacement is able to rescue cardiac and pectoral fin defects and to increase the viability of HOS zebrafish embryos. We further observed that miR-19a replacement shifts the global gene expression profile of HOS-like zebrafish embryos towards the wild type condition, confirming the ability of miR-19a to rescue the Tbx5 phenotype. In conclusion our data demonstrate the importance of Tbx5/miR-19a regulatory circuit in heart development and provide a proof of principle that morphogenetic defects associated with HOS can be rescued by transient miRNA modulation. PMID:26657204

  20. MicroRNA 19a replacement partially rescues fin and cardiac defects in zebrafish model of Holt Oram syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chiavacci, Elena; D’Aurizio, Romina; Guzzolino, Elena; Russo, Francesco; Baumgart, Mario; Groth, Marco; Mariani, Laura; D’Onofrio, Mara; Arisi, Ivan; Pellegrini, Marco; Cellerino, Alessandro; Cremisi, Federico; Pitto, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    Holt-Oram Syndrome (HOS) is an autosomal dominant heart-hand syndrome caused by mutations in the TBX5 gene, a transcription factor capable of regulating hundreds of cardiac-specific genes through complex transcriptional networks. Here we show that, in zebrafish, modulation of a single miRNA is sufficient to rescue the morphogenetic defects generated by HOS. The analysis of miRNA-seq profiling revealed a decreased expression of miR-19a in Tbx5-depleted zebrafish embryos compared to the wild type. We revealed that the transcription of the miR-17-92 cluster, which harbors miR-19a, is induced by Tbx5 and that a defined dosage of miR-19a is essential for the correct development of the heart. Importantly, we highlighted that miR-19a replacement is able to rescue cardiac and pectoral fin defects and to increase the viability of HOS zebrafish embryos. We further observed that miR-19a replacement shifts the global gene expression profile of HOS-like zebrafish embryos towards the wild type condition, confirming the ability of miR-19a to rescue the Tbx5 phenotype. In conclusion our data demonstrate the importance of Tbx5/miR-19a regulatory circuit in heart development and provide a proof of principle that morphogenetic defects associated with HOS can be rescued by transient miRNA modulation. PMID:26657204

  1. Co-factors of LIM-HD transcription factors in neural development and axon pathfinding in zebrafish 

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Zhen

    2012-06-22

    The zebrafish neuromuscular system is an elegant model to study neural development. To reveal a specific programme for zebrafish motor axon pathfinding I established a method to selectively block motor axon pathfinding ...

  2. Integrated genomics of ovarian xenograft tumor progression and chemotherapy response

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological cancer with a very poor prognosis. Xenograft mouse models have proven to be one very useful tool in testing candidate therapeutic agents and gene function in vivo. In this study we identify genes and gene networks important for the efficacy of a pre-clinical anti-tumor therapeutic, MT19c. Methods In order to understand how ovarian xenograft tumors may be growing and responding to anti-tumor therapeutics, we used genome-wide mRNA expression and DNA copy number measurements to identify key genes and pathways that may be critical for SKOV-3 xenograft tumor progression. We compared SKOV-3 xenografts treated with the ergocalciferol derived, MT19c, to untreated tumors collected at multiple time points. Cell viability assays were used to test the function of the PPAR? agonist, Rosiglitazone, on SKOV-3 cell growth. Results These data indicate that a number of known survival and growth pathways including Notch signaling and general apoptosis factors are differentially expressed in treated vs. untreated xenografts. As tumors grow, cell cycle and DNA replication genes show increased expression, consistent with faster growth. The steroid nuclear receptor, PPAR?, was significantly up-regulated in MT19c treated xenografts. Surprisingly, stimulation of PPAR? with Rosiglitazone reduced the efficacy of MT19c and cisplatin suggesting that PPAR? is regulating a survival pathway in SKOV-3 cells. To identify which genes may be important for tumor growth and treatment response, we observed that MT19c down-regulates some high copy number genes and stimulates expression of some low copy number genes suggesting that these genes are particularly important for SKOV-3 xenograft growth and survival. Conclusions We have characterized the time dependent responses of ovarian xenograft tumors to the vitamin D analog, MT19c. Our results suggest that PPAR? promotes survival for some ovarian tumor cells. We propose that a combination of regulated expression and copy number can identify genes that are likely important for chemotherapy response. Our findings suggest a new approach to identify candidate genes that are critical for anti-tumor therapy. PMID:21781307

  3. Anti-inflammatory effect of enzymatic hydrolysates from Styela clava flesh tissue in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and in vivo zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seok-Chun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES In this study, potential anti-inflammatory effect of enzymatic hydrolysates from Styela clava flesh tissue was assessed via nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccahride (LPS) induced RAW 264.7 macrophages and in vivo zebrafish model. MATERIALS/METHODS We investigated the ability of enzymatic hydrolysates from Styela clava flesh tissue to inhibit LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in RAW 264.7 macrophages, and the molecular mechanism through which this inhibition occurred. In addition, we evaluated anti-inflammatory effect of enzymatic hydrolysates against a LPS-exposed in in vivo zebrafish model. RESULTS Among the enzymatic hydrolysates, Protamex-proteolytic hydrolysate exhibited the highest NO inhibitory effect and was fractionated into three ranges of molecular weight by using ultrafiltration (UF) membranes (MWCO 5 kDa and 10 kDa). The above 10 kDa fraction down-regulated LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), thereby reducing production of NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The above 10 kDa fraction suppressed LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?. In addition, the above 10 kDa fraction inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. Furthermore, NO production in live zebrafish induced by LPS was reduced by addition of the above 10 kDa fraction from S. clava enzymatic hydrolysate. CONCLUSION The results of this study suggested that hydrolysates derived from S. clava flesh tissue would be new anti-inflammation materials in functional resources. PMID:26060532

  4. Zebrafish ( Danio rerio) as a model for investigating the safety of GM feed ingredients (soya and maize); performance, stress response and uptake of dietary DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sissener, Nini H; Johannessen, Lene E; Hevrøy, Ernst M; Wiik-Nielsen, Christer R; Berdal, Knut G; Nordgreen, Andreas; Hemre, Gro-Ingunn

    2010-01-01

    A 20-d zebrafish (Danio rerio) feeding trial, in which a near doubling of fish weight was achieved, was conducted with GM feed ingredients to evaluate feed intake, growth, stress response and uptake of dietary DNA. A partial aim of the study was to assess zebrafish as a model organism in GM safety assessments. Roundup Ready soya (RRS), YieldGard Bt maize (MON810) and their non-modified, maternal, near-isogenic lines were used in a 2 x 2 factorial design. Soya variety and maize variety were the main factors, both with two levels; non-GM and GM. Compared with fish fed non-GM maize, those fed GM maize exhibited significantly better growth, had lower mRNA transcription levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1 and a tendency (non-significant) towards lower transcription of heat shock protein 70 in liver. Sex of the fish and soya variety had significant interaction effects on total RNA yield from the whole liver and transcription of SOD-1, suggesting that some diet component affecting males and females differently was present in different levels in the GM and the non-GM soya used in the present study. Dietary DNA sequences were detected in all of the organs analysed, but not all of the samples. Soya and maize rubisco (non-transgenic, multicopy genes) were most frequently detected, while MON810 transgenic DNA fragments were detected in some samples and RRS fragments were not detected. In conclusion, zebrafish shows promise as a model for this application. PMID:19706208

  5. Use of a Conformational Switching Aptamer for Rapid and Specific Ex Vivo Identification of Central Nervous System Lymphoma in a Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Eschbacher, Jennifer; Nichols, Joshua; Mooney, Michael A.; Joy, Anna; Spetzler, Robert F.; Feuerstein, Burt G.; Preul, Mark C.; Anderson, Trent; Yan, Hao; Nakaji, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Improved tools for providing specific intraoperative diagnoses could improve patient care. In neurosurgery, intraoperatively differentiating non-operative lesions such as CNS B-cell lymphoma from operative lesions can be challenging, often necessitating immunohistochemical (IHC) procedures which require up to 24-48 hours. Here, we evaluate the feasibility of generating rapid ex vivo specific labeling using a novel lymphoma-specific fluorescent switchable aptamer. Our B-cell lymphoma-specific switchable aptamer produced only low-level fluorescence in its unbound conformation and generated an 8-fold increase in fluorescence once bound to its target on CD20-positive lymphoma cells. The aptamer demonstrated strong binding to B-cell lymphoma cells within 15 minutes of incubation as observed by flow cytometry. We applied the switchable aptamer to ex vivo xenograft tissue harboring B-cell lymphoma and astrocytoma, and within one hour specific visual identification of lymphoma was routinely possible. In this proof-of-concept study in human cell culture and orthotopic xenografts, we conclude that a fluorescent switchable aptamer can provide rapid and specific labeling of B-cell lymphoma, and that developing aptamer-based labeling approaches could simplify tissue staining and drastically reduce time to histopathological diagnoses compared with IHC-based methods. We propose that switchable aptamers could enhance expeditious, accurate intraoperative decision-making. PMID:25876071

  6. Artesunate suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis through the modulation of multiple oncogenic cascades in a chronic myeloid leukemia xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chulwon; Lee, Jong Hyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Sethi, Gautam; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, is one of the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Also, ART possesses anticancer potential albeit through incompletely understood molecular mechanism(s). Here, the effect of ART on various protein kinases, associated gene products, cellular response, and apoptosis was investigated. The in vivo effect of ART on the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu mice was also examined. In our preliminary experiments, we first observed that phosphorylation of p38, ERK, CREB, Chk-2, STAT5, and RSK proteins were suppressed upon ART exposure. Interestingly, ART induced the expression of SOCS-1 protein and depletion of SOCS-1 using siRNA abrogated the STAT5 inhibitory effect of the drug. Also various dephosphorylations caused by ART led to the suppression of various survival gene products and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation. Moreover, ART also substantially potentiated the apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents. Finally, when administered intraperitoneally, ART inhibited p38, ERK, STAT5, and CREB activation in tumor tissues and the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in mice without exhibiting any significant adverse effects. Overall, our results suggest that ART exerts its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects through suppression of multiple signaling cascades in CML both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25738364

  7. The zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle as a model system for the molecular mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to stimulation of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Roxo-Rosa, Mónica; Jacinto, Raquel; Sampaio, Pedro; Lopes, Susana Santos

    2015-01-01

    In autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), cyst inflation and continuous enlargement are associated with marked transepithelial ion and fluid secretion into the cyst lumen via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Indeed, the inhibition or degradation of CFTR prevents the fluid accumulation within cysts. The in vivo mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to CFTR stimulation are an outstanding challenge in ADPKD research and may bring important biomarkers for the disease. However, hampering their study, the available ADPKD in vitro cellular models lack the three-dimensional architecture of renal cysts and the ADPKD mouse models offer limited access for live-imaging experiments in embryonic kidneys. Here, we tested the zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle (KV) as an alternative model-organ. KV is a fluid-filled vesicular organ, lined by epithelial cells that express both CFTR and Polycystin-2 endogenously, being each of them easily knocked-down. Our data on the intracellular distribution of Polycystin-2 support its involvement in the KV fluid-flow induced Ca(2+)-signalling. Mirroring kidney cysts, the KV lumen inflation is dependent on CFTR activity and, as we clearly show, the knockdown of Polycystin-2 results in larger KV lumens through overstimulation of CFTR. In conclusion, we propose the zebrafish KV as a model organ to study the renal cyst inflation. Favouring its use, KV volume can be easily determined by in vivo imaging offering a live readout for screening compounds and genes that may prevent cyst enlargement through CFTR inhibition. PMID:26432887

  8. Structural Models of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT Domains Suggest Differential ATP Binding Orientations: Insights from Computational Modeling, Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Jitendra; Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Bej, Aritra; Sahoo, Jyoti Ranjan; Dehury, Budheswar; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Martha, Sushma Rani; Balabantray, Sucharita; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Behera, Bijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio) using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, ?-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved ‘Lysine’ at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) and Aspartic acid (Walker B) formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. ‘Proline’ of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2) interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with ?-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2. PMID:25811192

  9. Recent advances in the study of zebrafish extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Jason R

    2015-05-01

    The zebrafish extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and pleomorphic structure consisting of numerous proteins that together regulate a variety of cellular and morphogenetic events beginning as early as gastrulation. The zebrafish genome encodes a similar complement of ECM proteins as found in other vertebrate organisms including glycoproteins, fibrous proteins, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and interacting or modifying proteins such as integrins and matrix metalloproteinases. As a genetic model system combined with its amenability to high-resolution microscopic imaging, the zebrafish allows interrogation of ECM protein structure and function in both the embryo and adult. Accumulating data have identified important roles for zebrafish ECM proteins in processes as diverse as cell polarity, migration, tissue mechanics, organ laterality, muscle contraction, and regeneration. In this review, I highlight recently published data on these topics that demonstrate how the ECM proteins fibronectin, laminin, and collagen contribute to zebrafish development and adult homeostasis. PMID:25553981

  10. Development of sensory systems in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorman, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    Zebrafish possess all of the classic sensory modalities: taste, tactile, smell, balance, vision, and hearing. For each sensory system, this article provides a brief overview of the system in the adult zebrafish followed by a more detailed overview of the development of the system. By far the majority of studies performed in each of the sensory systems of the zebrafish have involved some aspect of molecular biology or genetics. Although molecular biology and genetics are not major foci of the paper, brief discussions of some of the mutant strains of zebrafish that have developmental defects in each specific sensory system are included. The development of the sensory systems is only a small sampling of the work being done using zebrafish and provides a mere glimpse of the potential of this model for the study of vertebrate development, physiology, and human disease.

  11. Benzo[e]isoindole-1,3-diones as potential inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). Synthesis, kinase inhibitory activity, zebrafish phenotype, and modeling of binding mode.

    PubMed

    Zou, Haixia; Zhou, Liyan; Li, Yuanzhen; Cui, Yi; Zhong, Hanbing; Pan, Zhengying; Yang, Zhen; Quan, Junmin

    2010-02-11

    Benzo[e]isoindole-1,3-dione derivatives were synthesized, and the effects on GSK-3beta activity and zebrafish embryo growth were evaluated. A series of derivatives show obvious inhibitory activity against GSK-3beta. The most potent inhibitor, 7,8-dimethoxy-5-methylbenzo[e]isoindole-1,3-dione (8a), shows nanomolar IC(50) and obvious phenotype on zebrafish embryo growth associated with the inhibition of GSK-3beta at low micromolar concentration. The interaction mode between 8a and GSK-3beta was characterized by computational modeling. PMID:20030405

  12. Methods for generating and colonizing gnotobiotic zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Linh N.; Kanther, Michelle; Semova, Ivana; Rawls, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrates are colonized at birth by complex and dynamic communities of microorganisms that can contribute significantly to host health and disease. The ability to raise animals in the absence of microorganisms has been a powerful tool for elucidating the relationships between animal hosts and their microbial residents. The optical transparency of the developing zebrafish and relative ease of generating germ-free zebrafish makes it an attractive model organism for gnotobiotic research. Here we provide a protocol for: generating zebrafish embryos; deriving and rearing germ-free zebrafish; and colonizing zebrafish with microorganisms. Using these methods, we typically obtain 80–90% sterility rates in our germ-free derivations with 90% survival in germ-free animals and 50–90% survival in colonized animals through larval stages. Obtaining embryos for derivation requires approximately 1–2 hours with a 3–8 hour incubation period prior to derivation. Derivation of germ-free animals takes 1–1.5 hours, and daily maintenance requires 1–2 hours. PMID:19008873

  13. Characterization of snakehead rhabdovirus infection in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Phelan, Peter E; Pressley, Meagan E; Witten, P Eckhard; Mellon, Mark T; Blake, Sharon; Kim, Carol H

    2005-02-01

    The zebrafish, Danio rerio, has become recognized as a valuable model for the study of development, genetics, and toxicology. Recently, the zebrafish has been recognized as a useful model for infectious disease and immunity. In this study, the pathogenesis and antiviral immune response of zebrafish to experimental snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV) infection was characterized. Zebrafish 24 h postfertilization to 30 days postfertilization were susceptible to infection by immersion in 10(6) 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of SHRV/ml, and adult zebrafish were susceptible to infection by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 10(5) TCID50 of SHRV/ml. Mortalities exceeded 40% in infected fish, and clinical presentation of infection included petechial hemorrhaging, redness of the abdomen, and erratic swim behavior. Virus reisolation and reverse transcription-PCR analysis of the viral nucleocapsid gene confirmed the presence of SHRV. Histological sections of moribund embryonic and juvenile fish revealed necrosis of the pharyngeal epithelium and liver, in addition to congestion of the swim bladder by cell debris. Histopathology in adult fish injected i.p. was confined to the site of injection. The antiviral response in zebrafish was monitored by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of zebrafish interferon (IFN) and Mx expression. IFN and Mx levels were elevated in zebrafish exposed to SHRV, although expression and intensity differed with age and route of infection. This study is the first to examine the pathogenesis of SHRV infection in zebrafish. Furthermore, this study is the first to describe experimental infection of zebrafish embryos with a viral pathogen, which will be important for future experiments involving targeted gene disruption and forward genetic screens. PMID:15650208

  14. Comprehensive analysis of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) entry mediated by zebrafish 3-O-Sulfotransferase isoforms: implications for the development of a zebrafish model of HSV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Yakoub, Abraam M; Rawal, Nistha; Maus, Erika; Baldwin, John; Shukla, Deepak; Tiwari, Vaibhav

    2014-11-01

    Binding of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) envelope glycoprotein D (gD) to the receptor 3-O-sulfated heparan sulfate (3-OS HS) mediates viral entry. 3-O-Sulfation of HS is catalyzed by the 3-O-sulfotransferase (3-OST) enzyme. Multiple isoforms of 3-OST are differentially expressed in tissues of zebrafish (ZF) embryos. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the role of ZF 3-OST isoforms (3-OST-1, 3-OST-5, 3-OST-6, and 3-OST-7) in HSV-1 entry. We found that a group of 3-OST gene family isoforms (3-OST-2, -3, -4, and -6) with conserved catalytic and substrate-binding residues of the enzyme mediates HSV-1 entry and spread, while the other group (3-OST-1, -5, and -7) lacks these properties. These results demonstrate that HSV-1 entry can be recapitulated by certain ZF 3-OST enzymes, a significant step toward the establishment of a ZF model of HSV-1 infection and tissue-specific tropism. PMID:25142596

  15. Comprehensive Analysis of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Entry Mediated by Zebrafish 3-O-Sulfotransferase Isoforms: Implications for the Development of a Zebrafish Model of HSV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yakoub, Abraam M.; Rawal, Nistha; Maus, Erika; Baldwin, John; Shukla, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Binding of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) envelope glycoprotein D (gD) to the receptor 3-O-sulfated heparan sulfate (3-OS HS) mediates viral entry. 3-O-Sulfation of HS is catalyzed by the 3-O-sulfotransferase (3-OST) enzyme. Multiple isoforms of 3-OST are differentially expressed in tissues of zebrafish (ZF) embryos. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the role of ZF 3-OST isoforms (3-OST-1, 3-OST-5, 3-OST-6, and 3-OST-7) in HSV-1 entry. We found that a group of 3-OST gene family isoforms (3-OST-2, -3, -4, and -6) with conserved catalytic and substrate-binding residues of the enzyme mediates HSV-1 entry and spread, while the other group (3-OST-1, -5, and -7) lacks these properties. These results demonstrate that HSV-1 entry can be recapitulated by certain ZF 3-OST enzymes, a significant step toward the establishment of a ZF model of HSV-1 infection and tissue-specific tropism. PMID:25142596

  16. Discovery of Quinoline-Derived Trifluoromethyl Alcohols, Determination of Their in vivo Toxicity and Anticancer Activity in a Zebrafish Embryo Model.

    PubMed

    Sittaramane, Vinoth; Padgett, Jihan; Salter, Philip; Williams, Ashley; Luke, Shauntelle; McCall, Rebecca; Arambula, Jonathan F; Graves, Vincent B; Blocker, Mark; Van Leuven, David; Bowe, Keturah; Heimberger, Julia; Cade, Hannah C; Immaneni, Supriya; Shaikh, Abid

    2015-11-01

    In this study the rational design, synthesis, and anticancer activity of quinoline-derived trifluoromethyl alcohols were evaluated. Members of this novel class of trifluoromethyl alcohols were identified as potent growth inhibitors in a zebrafish embryo model. Synthesis of these compounds was carried out with an sp(3) -C-H functionalization strategy of methyl quinolines with trifluoromethyl ketones. A zebrafish embryo model was also used to explore the toxicity of ethyl 4,4,4-trifluoro-3-hydroxy-3-(quinolin-2-ylmethyl)butanoate (1), 2-benzyl-1,1,1-trifluoro-3-(quinolin-2-yl)propan-2-ol (2), and trifluoro-3-(isoquinolin-1-yl)-2-(thiophen-2-yl)propan-2-ol (3). Compounds 2 and 3 were found to be more toxic than compound 1; apoptotic staining assays indicated that compound 3 causes increased cell death. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that compound 2, with an LC50 value of 14.14??m, has more potent anticancer activity than cisplatin. This novel class of inhibitors provides a new direction in the discovery of effective anticancer agents. PMID:26388134

  17. MR diffusion-weighted imaging-based subcutaneous tumour volumetry in a xenografted nude mouse model using 3D Slicer: an accurate and repeatable method

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zelan; Chen, Xin; Huang, Yanqi; He, Lan; Liang, Cuishan; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and repeatable measurement of the gross tumour volume(GTV) of subcutaneous xenografts is crucial in the evaluation of anti-tumour therapy. Formula and image-based manual segmentation methods are commonly used for GTV measurement but are hindered by low accuracy and reproducibility. 3D Slicer is open-source software that provides semiautomatic segmentation for GTV measurements. In our study, subcutaneous GTVs from nude mouse xenografts were measured by semiautomatic segmentation with 3D Slicer based on morphological magnetic resonance imaging(mMRI) or diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI)(b?=?0,20,800?s/mm2) . These GTVs were then compared with those obtained via the formula and image-based manual segmentation methods with ITK software using the true tumour volume as the standard reference. The effects of tumour size and shape on GTVs measurements were also investigated. Our results showed that, when compared with the true tumour volume, segmentation for DWI(P?=?0.060–0.671) resulted in better accuracy than that mMRI(P?

  18. MR diffusion-weighted imaging-based subcutaneous tumour volumetry in a xenografted nude mouse model using 3D Slicer: an accurate and repeatable method.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zelan; Chen, Xin; Huang, Yanqi; He, Lan; Liang, Cuishan; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and repeatable measurement of the gross tumour volume(GTV) of subcutaneous xenografts is crucial in the evaluation of anti-tumour therapy. Formula and image-based manual segmentation methods are commonly used for GTV measurement but are hindered by low accuracy and reproducibility. 3D Slicer is open-source software that provides semiautomatic segmentation for GTV measurements. In our study, subcutaneous GTVs from nude mouse xenografts were measured by semiautomatic segmentation with 3D Slicer based on morphological magnetic resonance imaging(mMRI) or diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI)(b?=?0,20,800?s/mm(2)) . These GTVs were then compared with those obtained via the formula and image-based manual segmentation methods with ITK software using the true tumour volume as the standard reference. The effects of tumour size and shape on GTVs measurements were also investigated. Our results showed that, when compared with the true tumour volume, segmentation for DWI(P?=?0.060-0.671) resulted in better accuracy than that mMRI(P?

  19. The basal function of teleost prolactin as a key regulator on ion uptake identified with zebrafish knockout models.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yuqin; Lou, Qiyong; Dai, Ziru; Dai, Xiangyan; He, Jiangyan; Hu, Wei; Yin, Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is an anterior pituitary hormone with a broad range of functions. Its ability to stimulate lactogenesis, maternal behavior, growth and development, osmoregulation, and epithelial ion transport has been reported in many vertebrates. In our present study, we have targeted the zebrafish prl locus via transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). Two independent targeted mutant lines with premature termination of the putative sequence of PRL peptides were generated. All prl-deficient zebrafish progeny died at 6-16 days post-fertilization stage (dpf) in egg water. However, the prl-deficient larvae thrived and survived through adulthood in brackish water (5175?mg/L ocean salts), without obvious defects in somatic growth or reproduction. When raised in egg water, the expression levels of certain key Na(+)/Cl(-) cotransporters in the gills and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase subunits, Na(+)/H(+) exchangers and Na(+)/Cl(-) transporters in the pronephros of prl-deficient larvae were down-regulated at 5?dpf, which caused Na(+)/K(+)/Cl(-) uptake defects in the mutant fish at 6?dpf. Our present results demonstrate that the primary function of zebrafish prl is osmoregulation via governing the uptake and homeostasis of Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-). Our study provides valuable evidence to understand the mechanisms of PRL function better through both phylogenetic and physiological perspectives. PMID:26726070

  20. Sun light mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles as carrier for 6-mercaptopurine: Preparation, characterization and toxicity studies in zebrafish embryo model

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeshkumar, Moorthy; Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara; Sathish Kumar, Muniram; Dinesh, Murugan Girija; Kannappan, Sudalyandi; Suguna, Lonchin

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ? Gold nanoparticles prepared using eco-friendly method with good in vitro stability. ? Can be used as drug delivery system. ? Did not show any toxicity in zebrafish embryo. ? More toxic to cancer cells when compared to N-Au-Mp and Mp. -- Abstract: The objective of this study is to synthesize green chemistry based gold nanoparticles by sun light irradiation method. The prepared gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were modified using folic acid and then coupled with 6-mercaptopurine. These modified nanoparticles were used as a tool for targeted drug delivery to treat laryngeal cancer. In the present study, novel bionanocomposites containing nutrient agar coated gold nano particles (N-AuNPs) coupled with 6-mercaptopurine (drug) (N-AuNPs-Mp), folic acid (ligand) (N-AuNPs-Mp-Fa) and rhodamine (dye) (N-AuNPs-Rd), a fluorescent agent, were prepared and characterized by IR, UV, TEM, Particle size analysis and in vitro stability. The toxicity and fluorescence of N-Au was studied using zebrafish embryo model. The in vitro cytotoxicity of free Mp, N-Au-Mp and N-Au-Mp-Fa against HEp-2 cells was compared and found that the amount of Mp required to achieve 50% of growth of inhibition (IC{sub 50}) was much lower in N-Au-Mp-Fa than in free Mp and N-Au-Mp.

  1. Analyzing Zebrafish Stress-Related

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Page | 1 Analyzing Zebrafish Stress-Related Behaviors Using CleverSys Video- Tracking System David Tien 5/8/2009 #12;Page | 2 Introduction Zebrafish are becoming a commonly used experimental organism researchers to explore the pathways and mechanisms of the Zebrafish, and see how it can be related to humans

  2. Melanoma patient derived xenografts acquire distinct Vemurafenib resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Monsma, David J; Cherba, David M; Eugster, Emily E; Dylewski, Dawna L; Davidson, Paula T; Peterson, Chelsea A; Borgman, Andrew S; Winn, Mary E; Dykema, Karl J; Webb, Craig P; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P; Duesbery, Nicholas S; Nickoloff, Brian J; Monks, Noel R

    2015-01-01

    Variable clinical responses, tumor heterogeneity, and drug resistance reduce long-term survival outcomes for metastatic melanoma patients. To guide and accelerate drug development, we characterized tumor responses for five melanoma patient derived xenograft models treated with Vemurafenib. Three BRAFV600E models showed acquired drug resistance, one BRAFV600E model had a complete and durable response, and a BRAFV600V model was expectedly unresponsive. In progressing tumors, a variety of resistance mechanisms to BRAF inhibition were uncovered, including mutant BRAF alternative splicing, NRAS mutation, COT (MAP3K8) overexpression, and increased mutant BRAF gene amplification and copy number. The resistance mechanisms among the patient derived xenograft models were similar to the resistance pathways identified in clinical specimens from patients progressing on BRAF inhibitor therapy. In addition, there was both inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity in resistance mechanisms, accompanied by heterogeneous pERK expression immunostaining profiles. MEK monotherapy of Vemurafenib-resistant tumors caused toxicity and acquired drug resistance. However, tumors were eradicated when Vemurafenib was combined the MEK inhibitor. The diversity of drug responses among the xenograft models; the distinct mechanisms of resistance; and the ability to overcome resistance by the addition of a MEK inhibitor provide a scheduling rationale for clinical trials of next-generation drug combinations. PMID:26101714

  3. Zebrafish as a model to study the role of DNA methylation in environmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, Jorke H; Aleström, Peter; Kooter, Jan M; Legler, Juliette

    2015-11-01

    Environmental epigenetics is a rapidly growing field which studies the effects of environmental factors such as nutrition, stress, and exposure to compounds on epigenetic gene regulation. Recent studies have shown that exposure to toxicants in vertebrates is associated with changes in DNA methylation, a major epigenetic mechanism affecting gene transcription. Zebra fish, a well-known model in toxicology and developmental biology, are emerging as a model species in environmental epigenetics despite their evolutionary distance to rodents and humans. In this review, recent insights in DNA methylation during zebra fish development are discussed and compared to mammalian models in order to evaluate zebra fish as a model to study the role of DNA methylation in environmental toxicology. Differences exist in DNA methylation reprogramming during early development, whereas in later developmental stages, tissue distribution of both 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine seems more conserved between species, as well as basic DNA (de)methylation mechanisms. All DNA methyl transferases identified so far in mammals are present in zebra fish, as well as a number of major demethylation pathways. However, zebra fish appear to lack some methylation pathways present in mammals, such as parental imprinting. Several studies report effects on DNA methylation in zebra fish following exposure to environmental contaminants, such as arsenic, benzo[a]pyrene, and tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate. Though more research is needed to examine heritable effects of contaminant exposure on DNA methylation, recent data suggests the usefulness of the zebra fish as a model in environmental epigenetics. PMID:25172464

  4. Towards a Comprehensive Catalog of Zebrafish Behavior 1.0 and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardt, Michael; Stewart, Adam Michael; Cachat, Jonathan M.; Brimmer, Mallorie; Chawla, Jonathan S.; Craddock, Cassandra; Kyzar, Evan J.; Roth, Andrew; Landsman, Samuel; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Robinson, Kyle; Baatrup, Erik; Tierney, Keith; Shamchuk, Angela; Norton, William; Miller, Noam; Nicolson, Teresa; Braubach, Oliver; Gilman, Charles P.; Pittman, Julian; Rosemberg, Denis B.; Gerlai, Robert; Echevarria, David; Lamb, Elisabeth; Neuhauss, Stephan C.F.; Weng, Wei; Bally-Cuif, Laure; Schneider, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are rapidly gaining popularity in translational neuroscience and behavioral research. Physiological similarity to mammals, ease of genetic manipulations, sensitivity to pharmacological and genetic factors, robust behavior, low cost, and potential for high-throughput screening contribute to the growing utility of zebrafish models in this field. Understanding zebrafish behavioral phenotypes provides important insights into neural pathways, physiological biomarkers, and genetic underpinnings of normal and pathological brain function. Novel zebrafish paradigms continue to appear with an encouraging pace, thus necessitating a consistent terminology and improved understanding of the behavioral repertoire. What can zebrafish ‘do’, and how does their altered brain function translate into behavioral actions? To help address these questions, we have developed a detailed catalog of zebrafish behaviors (Zebrafish Behavior Catalog, ZBC) that covers both larval and adult models. Representing a beginning of creating a more comprehensive ethogram of zebrafish behavior, this effort will improve interpretation of published findings, foster cross-species behavioral modeling, and encourage new groups to apply zebrafish neurobehavioral paradigms in their research. In addition, this glossary creates a framework for developing a zebrafish neurobehavioral ontology, ultimately to become part of a unified animal neurobehavioral ontology, which collectively will contribute to better integration of biological data within and across species. PMID:23590400

  5. Culturable Gut Microbiota Diversity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Sørby, Jan Roger Torp; Aleström, Peter; Sørum, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an increasingly used laboratory animal model in basic biology and biomedicine, novel drug development, and toxicology. The wide use has increased the demand for optimized husbandry protocols to ensure animal health care and welfare. The knowledge about the correlation between culturable zebrafish intestinal microbiota and health in relation to environmental factors and management procedures is very limited. A semi-quantitative level of growth of individual types of bacteria was determined and associated with sampling points. A total of 72 TAB line zebrafish from four laboratories (Labs A–D) in the Zebrafish Network Norway were used. Diagnostic was based on traditional bacterial culture methods and biochemical characterization using commercial kits, followed by 16S rDNA gene sequencing from pure subcultures. Also selected Gram-negative isolates were analyzed for antibiotic susceptibility to 8 different antibiotics. A total of 13 morphologically different bacterial species were the most prevalent: Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas sobria, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Photobacterium damselae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas luteola, Comamonas testosteroni, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Staphylococcus cohnii, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus capitis, and Staphylococcus warneri. Only Lab B had significantly higher levels of total bacterial growth (OR=2.03), whereas numbers from Lab C (OR=1.01) and Lab D (OR=1.12) were found to be similar to the baseline Lab A. Sexually immature individuals had a significantly higher level of harvested total bacterial growth than mature fish (OR=0.82), no statistically significant differences were found between male and female fish (OR=1.01), and the posterior intestinal segment demonstrated a higher degree of culturable bacteria than the anterior segment (OR=4.1). Multiple antibiotic (>3) resistance was observed in 17% of the strains. We propose that a rapid conventional diagnostic bacteriological assay on the culturable microbiota profiles can be designed and used as quality measure of the husbandry routines of a zebrafish facility to ensure a bacterial standard safeguarding the zebrafish health and welfare. PMID:22428747

  6. Characterization of zebrafish dysferlin by morpholino knockdown

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Genri; Serafini, Peter R.; Myers, Jennifer A.; Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, MA; The Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research, Children's Hospital Boston, MA ; Alexander, Matthew S.; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} cDNAs of zebrafish dysferlin were cloned (6.3 kb). {yields} The dysferlin expression was detected in skeletal muscle, heart and eye. {yields} Injection of antisense morpholinos to dysferlin caused marked muscle disorganization. {yields} Zebrafish dysferlin expression may be involved in stabilizing muscle structures. -- Abstract: Mutations in the gene encoding dysferlin cause two distinct muscular dystrophy phenotypes: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD-2B) and Miyoshi myopathy (MM). Dysferlin is a large transmembrane protein involved in myoblast fusion and membrane resealing. Zebrafish represent an ideal animal model to use for studying muscle disease including abnormalities of dysferlin. cDNAs of zebrafish dysferlin were cloned (6.3 kb) and the predicted amino acid sequences, showed 68% similarity to predicted amino acid sequences of mammalian dysferlin. The expression of dysferlin was mainly in skeletal muscle, heart and eye, and the expression could be detected as early as 11 h post fertilization (hpf). Three different antisense oligonucleotide morpholinos were targeted to inhibit translation of this dysferlin mRNA and the morpholino-injected fish showed marked muscle disorganization which could be detected by birefringence assay. Western blot analysis using dysferlin antibodies showed that the expression of dysferlin was reduced in each of the three morphants. Dysferlin expression was shown to be reduced at the myosepta of zebrafish muscle using immunohistochemistry, although the expression of other muscle membrane components, dystrophin, laminin, {beta}-dystroglycan were detected normally. Our data suggest that zebrafish dysferlin expression is involved in stabilizing muscle structures and its downregulation causes muscle disorganization.

  7. Behavorial assessments of larval zebrafish neurotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fishes have long been a popular organism in ecotoxicology research, and are increasingly used in human health research as an alternative animal model for chemical screening. Our laboratory incorporates a zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo/larval assay to screen chemicals for developm...

  8. Hooking the big one: the potential of zebrafish xenotransplantation to reform cancer drug screening in the genomic era.

    PubMed

    Veinotte, Chansey J; Dellaire, Graham; Berman, Jason N

    2014-07-01

    The current preclinical pipeline for drug discovery can be cumbersome and costly, which limits the number of compounds that can effectively be transitioned to use as therapies. Chemical screens in zebrafish have uncovered new uses for existing drugs and identified promising new compounds from large libraries. Xenotransplantation of human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos builds on this work and enables direct evaluation of patient-derived tumor specimens in vivo in a rapid and cost-effective manner. The short time frame needed for xenotransplantation studies means that the zebrafish can serve as an early preclinical drug screening tool and can also help personalize cancer therapy by providing real-time data on the response of the human cells to treatment. In this Review, we summarize the use of zebrafish embryos in drug screening and highlight the potential for xenotransplantation approaches to be adopted as a preclinical tool to identify and prioritize therapies for further clinical evaluation. We also discuss some of the limitations of using zebrafish xenografts and the benefits of using them in concert with murine xenografts in drug optimization. PMID:24973744

  9. FOXG1 expression shows correlation with neuronal differentiation in cerebellar development, aggressive phenotype in medulloblastomas, and survival in a xenograft model of medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Adesina, Adekunle M; Veo, Bethany L; Courteau, Girard; Mehta, Vidya; Wu, Xuli; Pang, Kaifang; Liu, Zhandong; Li, Xiao-Nan; Peters, Lori

    2015-12-01

    FOXG1 is a transcription factor that interacts with multiple signaling pathways and modulates neuronal differentiation in the telencephalon. Dysregulation of FOXG1 expression has been previously reported in medulloblastoma. In this study, we demonstrate a regional specific expression of FOXG1 and its colocalization with Nestin expression in the premigratory mitotically active (outer) layer of the external granular layer of the cerebellum. An inverse expression of the granular precursor cell markers, Math1 and Musashi1, in the inner nonmitotic migratory layer of the external granular layer and in the internal granular layer was observed. Furthermore, modulation of FOXG1 in the medulloblastoma cell line, DAOY, was associated with the induction of neuronal differentiation markers and significant changes in multiple signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Additionally, we observed enhanced survival in intracerebellar mice xenografts injected with DAOY cells bearing shFOXG1 constructs versus shLuciferase construct. Overall, these findings suggest that down-modulation of FOXG1 is a prerequisite for the onset of neuronal differentiation during cerebellar development and that a decrease of FOXG1 in medulloblastoma cells offers a survival advantage in mice. We propose that the disruption of signaling pathways that promote mature neuronal differentiation by overexpressed FOXG1 is a contributing event in the neoplastic transformation of cerebellar stem cells. PMID:26433703

  10. Optimized S-Trityl-l-cysteine-Based Inhibitors of Kinesin Spindle Protein with Potent in Vivo Antitumor Activity in Lung Cancer Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The mitotic kinesin Eg5 is critical for the assembly of the mitotic spindle and is a promising chemotherapy target. Previously, we identified S-trityl-l-cysteine as a selective inhibitor of Eg5 and developed triphenylbutanamine analogues with improved potency, favorable drug-like properties, but moderate in vivo activity. We report here their further optimization to produce extremely potent inhibitors of Eg5 (Kiapp < 10 nM) with broad-spectrum activity against cancer cell lines comparable to the Phase II drug candidates ispinesib and SB-743921. They have good oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetics and induced complete tumor regression in nude mice explanted with lung cancer patient xenografts. Furthermore, they display fewer liabilities with CYP-metabolizing enzymes and hERG compared with ispinesib and SB-743921, which is important given the likely application of Eg5 inhibitors in combination therapies. We present the case for this preclinical series to be investigated in single and combination chemotherapies, especially targeting hematological malignancies. PMID:23394180

  11. Anticancer activity of pyrithione zinc in oral cancer cells identified in small molecule screens and xenograft model: Implications for oral cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Gunjan; Matta, Ajay; Fu, Guodong; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Datti, Alessandro; Walfish, Paul G; Ralhan, Ranju

    2015-10-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients diagnosed in late stages have limited chemotherapeutic options, underscoring the great need for development of new anticancer agents for more effective disease management. We aimed to identify novel anticancer agents for OSCC using quantitative high throughput assays for screening six chemical libraries consisting of 5170 small molecule inhibitors. In depth characterization resulted in identification of pyrithione zinc (PYZ) as the most effective cytotoxic agent inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in OSCC cells in vitro. Further, treatment with PYZ reduced colony forming, migration and invasion potential of oral cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. PYZ treatment also led to altered expression of several key components of the major signaling pathways including PI3K/AKT/mTOR and WNT/?-catenin in OSCC cells. In addition, treatment with PYZ also reduced expression of 14-3-3?, 14-3-3?, cyclin D1, c-Myc and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), proteins identified in our earlier studies to be involved in development and progression of OSCCs. Importantly, PYZ treatment significantly reduced tumor xenograft volume in immunocompromised NOD/SCID/Crl mice without causing apparent toxicity to normal tissues. Taken together, we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo efficacy of PYZ in OSCC. In conclusion, we identified PYZ in HTS assays and demonstrated in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical efficacy of PYZ as a novel anticancer therapeutic candidate in OSCC. PMID:26115765

  12. High-speed confocal imaging of zebrafish heart development.

    PubMed

    Hove, Jay R; Craig, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Due to its optical clarity and rudimentary heart structure (i.e., single atrium and ventricle), the zebrafish provides an excellent model for studying the genetic, morphological, and functional basis of normal and pathophysiological heart development in vivo. Recent advances in high-speed confocal imaging have made it possible to capture 2D zebrafish heart wall motions with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to characterize the highly dynamic intravital flow-structure environment. We have optimized protocols for introducing fluorescent tracer particles into the zebrafish cardiovasculature, imaging intravital heart wall motion, and performing high-resolution blood flow mapping that will be broadly useful in elucidating flow-structure relationships. PMID:22222541

  13. King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase induces apoptosis in PC-3 cells and suppresses PC-3 solid tumor growth in a tumor xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mui Li; Fung, Shin Yee; Chung, Ivy; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Cheah, Swee Hung; Tan, Nget Hong

    2014-01-01

    King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase (OH-LAAO), a heat stable enzyme, has been shown to exhibit very potent anti-proliferative activity against human breast and lung tumorigenic cells but not in their non-tumorigenic counterparts. We further examine its in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity in a human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC-3) model. OH-LAAO demonstrated potent cytotoxicity against PC-3 cells with IC50 of 0.05 µg/mL after 72 h incubation in vitro. It induced apoptosis as evidenced with an increase in caspase-3/7 cleavages and an increase in annexin V-stained cells. To examine its in vivo anti-tumor activity, we treated PC-3 tumor xenograft implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient NU/NU (nude) mice with 1 µg/g OH-LAAO given intraperitoneally (i.p.). After 8 weeks of treatment, OH-LAAO treated PC-3 tumors were markedly inhibited, when compared to the control group (P <0.05). TUNEL staining analysis on the tumor sections showed a significantly increase of apoptotic cells in the LAAO-treated animals. Histological examinations of the vital organs in these two groups showed no significant differences with normal tissues, indicating no obvious tissue damage. The treatment also did not cause any significant changes on the body weight of the mice during the duration of the study. These observations suggest that OH-LAAO cytotoxic effects may be specific to tumor xenografts and less to normal organs. Given its potent anti-tumor activities shown in vitro as well as in vivo, the king cobra venom LAAO can potentially be developed to treat prostate cancer and other solid tumors. PMID:24782648

  14. Preclinical evaluation of 4-[3,5-bis(2-chlorobenzylidene)-4-oxo-piperidine-1-yl]-4-oxo-2-butenoic acid, in a mouse model of lung cancer xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Vivek R; Sahoo, Kaustuv; Awasthi, Vibhudutta

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE 4-[3,5-Bis(2-chlorobenzylidene)-4-oxo-piperidine-1-yl]-4-oxo-2-butenoic acid CLEFMA is a new anti-cancer molecule. Here, we investigated changes in apoptosis and inflammatory markers during CLEFMA-induced tumour suppression. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Lung adenocarcinoma H441 and A549, and normal lung fibroblast CCL151 cell lines were used, along with a xenograft model of H441 cells implanted in mice. Tumour tissues were analysed by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and/or biochemical assays. The ex vivo results were confirmed by performing selected assays in cultured cells. KEY RESULTS CLEFMA-induced cell death was associated with cleavage of caspases 3/9 and PARP. In vivo,?CLEFMA treatment resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of tumour growth and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in tumours, along with a reduction in the expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67. In tumour tissue homogenates, the anti-apoptotic markers (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1(cIAP1), Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and survivin) were inhibited and the pro-apoptotic Bax and BID were up-regulated. Further, CLEFMA decreased translocation of phospho-p65–NF-?B into the nucleus. In vitro, it inhibited the DNA-binding and transcriptional activity of NF-?B. It also reduced the expression of COX-2 in tumours and significantly depressed serum TNF-? and IL-6 levels. These effects of CLEFMA were accompanied by a reduced transcription and/or translation of the invasion markers VEGF, MMP9, MMP10, Cyclin D1 and ICAM-1. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Overall, CLEFMA inhibited growth of lung cancer xenografts and this tumour suppression was associated with NF-?B-regulated anti-inflammatory and anti-metastatic effects. PMID:24102070

  15. Evaluation of Protein Profiles From Treated Xenograft Tumor Models Identifies an Antibody Panel for Formalin-fixed and Paraffin-embedded (FFPE) Tissue Analysis by Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA).

    PubMed

    Bader, Sabine; Zajac, Magdalena; Friess, Thomas; Ruge, Elisabeth; Rieder, Natascha; Gierke, Berthold; Heubach, Yvonne; Thomas, Marlene; Pawlak, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) are an established tool for measuring the expression and activation status of multiple proteins in parallel using only very small amounts of tissue. Several studies have demonstrated the value of this technique for signaling pathway analysis using proteins extracted from fresh frozen (FF) tissue in line with validated antibodies for this tissue type; however, formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE) is the standard method for tissue preservation in the clinical setting. Hence, we performed RPPA to measure profiles for a set of 300 protein markers using matched FF and FFPE tissue specimens to identify which markers performed similarly using the RPPA technique in fixed and unfixed tissues. Protein lysates were prepared from matched FF and FFPE tissue specimens of individual tumors taken from three different xenograft models of human cancer. Materials from both untreated mice and mice treated with either anti-HER3 or bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR monoclonal antibodies were analyzed. Correlations between signals from FF and FFPE tissue samples were investigated. Overall, 60 markers were identified that produced comparable profiles between FF and FFPE tissues, demonstrating significant correlation between the two sample types. The top 25 markers also showed significance after correction for multiple testing. The panel of markers covered several clinically relevant tumor signaling pathways and both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated proteins were represented. Biologically relevant changes in marker expression were noted when RPPA profiles from treated and untreated xenografts were compared. These data demonstrate that, using appropriately selected antibodies, RPPA analysis from FFPE tissue is well feasible and generates biologically meaningful information. The identified panel of markers that generate similar profiles in matched fixed and unfixed tissue samples may be clinically useful for pharmacodynamic studies of drug effect using FFPE tissues. PMID:26106084

  16. Effectiveness of recommended euthanasia methods in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Strykowski, Jennifer L; Schech, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of zebrafish and its use as a model organism in biomedical research including genetics, development, and toxicology, has increased over the past 20 y and continues to grow. However, guidelines for euthanasia remain vague, and the responsibility of creating appropriate euthanasia protocols essentially falls on individual facilities. To reduce variation in experimental results among labs, a standard method of euthanasia for zebrafish would be useful. Although various euthanasia methods have been compared, few studies focus on the effectiveness of euthanasia methods for larval zebrafish. In this study, we exposed larval zebrafish to each of 3 euthanasia agents (MS222, eugenol, and hypothermic shock) and assessed the recovery rate. Hypothermic shock appeared to be the most effective method for euthanizing zebrafish at 14 d after fertilization; however, this method may not be considered an efficient method for large numbers of larval zebrafish. Exposure to chemicals, such as MS222 and eugenol, were ineffective methods for euthanasia at this stage of development. When these agents are used, secondary measures should be taken to ensure death. Choosing a euthanasia method that is effective, efficient, and humane can be challenging. Determining a method of euthanasia that is suitable for fish of all stages will bring the zebrafish community closer to meeting this challenge. PMID:25651096

  17. Effectiveness of Recommended Euthanasia Methods in Larval Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Strykowski, Jennifer L; Schech, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of zebrafish and its use as a model organism in biomedical research including genetics, development, and toxicology, has increased over the past 20 y and continues to grow. However, guidelines for euthanasia remain vague, and the responsibility of creating appropriate euthanasia protocols essentially falls on individual facilities. To reduce variation in experimental results among labs, a standard method of euthanasia for zebrafish would be useful. Although various euthanasia methods have been compared, few studies focus on the effectiveness of euthanasia methods for larval zebrafish. In this study, we exposed larval zebrafish to each of 3 euthanasia agents (MS222, eugenol, and hypothermic shock) and assessed the recovery rate. Hypothermic shock appeared to be the most effective method for euthanizing zebrafish at 14 d after fertilization; however, this method may not be considered an efficient method for large numbers of larval zebrafish. Exposure to chemicals, such as MS222 and eugenol, were ineffective methods for euthanasia at this stage of development. When these agents are used, secondary measures should be taken to ensure death. Choosing a euthanasia method that is effective, efficient, and humane can be challenging. Determining a method of euthanasia that is suitable for fish of all stages will bring the zebrafish community closer to meeting this challenge. PMID:25651095

  18. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model

    SciTech Connect

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Copperman, Jeremy; Taber, Alex; Reister, Emily E.; Sharma, Kush; Todd, Peter K.; Guenza, Marina G.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2014-10-10

    In this study, CUG repeat expansions in the 3' UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein–RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (?) and 2'-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with ? or 2'-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamics and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for ?-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. ? modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases.

  19. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Copperman, Jeremy; Taber, Alex; Reister, Emily E.; Sharma, Kush; Todd, Peter K.; Guenza, Marina G.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2014-10-10

    In this study, CUG repeat expansions in the 3' UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein–RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (?) and 2'-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with ? or 2'-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamicsmore »and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for ?-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. ? modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases.« less

  20. Turning Rate Dynamics of Zebrafish Exposed to Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice in alcohol-related pharmacological studies. In these studies, zebrafish are often exposed to acute ethanol treatments and their activity scored during behavioral assays. Computational modeling of zebrafish behavior is expected to positively impact these efforts by offering a predictive toolbox to plan hypothesis-driven studies, reduce the number of subjects, perform pilot trials, and refine behavioral screening. In this work, we demonstrate the use of the recently proposed jump persistent turning walker to model the turning rate dynamics of zebrafish exposed to acute ethanol administration. This modeling framework is based on a stochastic mean reverting jump process to capture the sudden and large changes in orientation of swimming zebrafish. The model is calibrated on an available experimental dataset of 40 subjects, tested at different ethanol concentrations. We demonstrate that model parameters are modulated by ethanol administration, whereby both the relaxation rate and jump frequency of the turning rate dynamics are influenced by ethanol concentration. This effort offers a first evidence for the possibility of complementing zebrafish pharmacological research with computational modeling of animal behavior.

  1. Reduced 64Cu Uptake and Tumor Growth Inhibition by Knockdown of Human Copper Transporter 1 in Xenograft Mouse Model of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Huawei; Wu, Jiu-sheng; Muzik, Otto; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Lee, Robert J.; Peng, Fangyu

    2015-01-01

    Copper is an element required for cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Human prostate cancer xenografts with increased 64Cu radioactivity were visualized previously by PET using 64CuCl2 as a radiotracer (64CuCl2 PET). This study aimed to determine whether the increased tumor 64Cu radioactivity was due to increased cellular uptake of 64Cu mediated by human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) or simply due to nonspecific binding of ionic 64CuCl2 to tumor tissue. In addition, the functional role of hCtr1 in proliferation of prostate cancer cells and tumor growth was also assessed. Methods A lentiviral vector encoding short-hairpin RNA specific for hCtr1 (Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA) was constructed for RNA interference–mediated knockdown of hCtr1 expression in prostate cancer cells. The degree of hCtr1 knockdown was determined by Western blot, and the effect of hCtr1 knockdown on copper uptake and proliferation were examined in vitro by cellular 64Cu uptake and cell proliferation assays. The effects of hCtr1 knockdown on tumor uptake of 64Cu were determined by PET quantification and tissue radioactivity assay. The effects of hCtr1 knockdown on tumor growth were assessed by PET/CT and tumor size measurement with a caliper. Results RNA interference–mediated knockdown of hCtr1 was associated with the reduced cellular uptake of 64Cu and the suppression of prostate cancer cell proliferation in vitro. At 24 h after intravenous injection of the tracer 64CuCl2, the 64Cu uptake by the tumors with knockdown of hCtr1 (4.02 ± 0.31 percentage injected dose per gram [%ID/g] in Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-PC-3 and 2.30 ± 0.59 %ID/g in Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-DU-145) was significantly lower than the 64Cu uptake by the control tumors without knockdown of hCtr1 (7.21 ± 1.48 %ID/g in Lenti-SCR-shRNA-PC-3 and 5.57 ± 1.20 % ID/g in Lenti-SCR-shRNA-DU-145, P < 0.001) by PET quantification. Moreover, the volumes of prostate cancer xenograft tumors with knockdown of hCtr1 (179 ± 111 mm3 for Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-PC-3 or 39 ± 22 mm3 for Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-DU-145) were significantly smaller than those without knockdown of hCtr1 (536 ± 191 mm3 for Lenti-SCR-shRNA-PC-3 or 208 ± 104 mm3 for Lenti-SCR-shRNA-DU-145, P < 0.01). Conclusion Overall, data indicated that hCtr1 is a promising theranostic target, which can be further developed for metabolic imaging of prostate cancer using 64CuCl2 PET/CT and personalized cancer therapy targeting copper metabolism. PMID:24639459

  2. PATTERNS & PHENOTYPES Zebrafish Nephrogenesis Involves Dynamic

    E-print Network

    Tank, Jennifer L.

    a PATTERNS & PHENOTYPES Zebrafish Nephrogenesis Involves Dynamic Spatiotemporal Expression Changes progenitors are poorly understood. Here, we used the zebrafish pronephros to study nephron segmentation. We found that zebrafish nephron progenitors undergo elaborate spatiotemporal expression changes of many

  3. Establishing Prostate Cancer Patient Derived Xenografts: Lessons Learned From Older Studies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Pamela J; Russell, Peter; Rudduck, Christina; Tse, Brian W-C; Williams, Elizabeth D; Raghavan, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding the progression of prostate cancer to androgen-independence/castrate resistance and development of preclinical testing models are important for developing new prostate cancer therapies. This report describes studies performed 30 years ago, which demonstrate utility and shortfalls of xenografting to preclinical modeling. Methods We subcutaneously implanted male nude mice with small prostate cancer fragments from transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) from 29 patients. Successful xenografts were passaged into new host mice. They were characterized using histology, immunohistochemistry for marker expression, flow cytometry for ploidy status, and in some cases by electron microscopy and response to testosterone. Two xenografts were karyotyped by G-banding. Results Tissues from 3/29 donors (10%) gave rise to xenografts that were successfully serially passaged in vivo. Two, (UCRU-PR-1, which subsequently was replaced by a mouse fibrosarcoma, and UCRU-PR-2, which combined epithelial and neuroendocrine features) have been described. UCRU-PR-4 line was a poorly differentiated prostatic adenocarcinoma derived from a patient who had undergone estrogen therapy and bilateral castration after his cancer relapsed. Histologically, this comprised diffusely infiltrating small acinar cell carcinoma with more solid aggregates of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The xenografted line showed histology consistent with a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and stained positively for prostatic acid phosphatase (PAcP), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and the cytokeratin cocktail, CAM5.2, with weak staining for prostate specific antigen (PSA). The line failed to grow in female nude mice. Castration of three male nude mice after xenograft establishment resulted in cessation of growth in one, growth regression in another and transient growth in another, suggesting that some cells had retained androgen sensitivity. The karyotype (from passage 1) was 43–46, XY, dic(1;12)(p11;p11), der(3)t(3:?5)(q13;q13), -5, inv(7)(p15q35) x2, +add(7)(p13), add(8)(p22), add(11)(p14), add(13)(p11), add(20)(p12), -22, +r4[cp8]. Conclusions Xenografts provide a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer, although establishing serially transplantable prostate cancer patient derived xenografts is challenging and requires rigorous characterization and high quality starting material. Xenografting from advanced prostate cancer is more likely to succeed, as xenografting from well differentiated, localized disease has not been achieved in our experience. Strong translational correlations can be demonstrated between the clinical disease state and the xenograft model. Prostate 75: 628–636, 2015. © The Authors. The Prostate published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25560784

  4. Using the Larval Zebrafish Locomotor Asssay in Functional Neurotoxicity Screening: Light Brightness and the Order of Stimulus Presentation Affect the Outcome

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are evaluating methods to screen/prioritize large numbers of chemicals using 6 day old zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an alternative model for detecting neurotoxic effects. Our behavioral testing paradigm simultaneously tests individual larval zebrafish under sequential light and...

  5. Malignant transformation of host stromal ?broblasts derived from the bone marrow traced in a dual-color fluorescence xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xingliang; Chen, Hua; Chen, Yanming; Wu, Jinding; Wang, Haiyang; Shi, Jia; Fei, Xifeng; Wang, Zhimin; Wang, Aidong; Dong, Jun; Lan, Qing; Huang, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    Solid tumors are abnormal tissues containing tumor and non-tumor cells, also known as tumor stromal cells. However, the malignant potential of tumor stromal cells remains largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the malignant potential of host bone marrow?derived stroma cells in transplanted subcutaneous tumors of the glioma stem/progenitor cells (GSPCs) labeled using the dual-color fluorescent tracer technique. The previously established human glioma stem/progenitor cell line SU3 was transfected with red fluorescence protein (SU3-RFP) and transplanted subcutaneously into green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic nude mice and chimeric mice in which GFP was only expressed by bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs). The xenograft tumors were subcultured in vitro and two immortalized GFP-expressing stromal cell lines were cloned from the transplanted tumors. The two cloned cell lines showed an accelerated growth rate, loss of cell contact inhibition, high cloning efficiency, and high DNA content and telocentric (murine) chromosomes with heteroploid characteristics. The tumorigenesis rate (10/10, 1x106) of these host stromal cells was further evidence of malignant transformation. Immunofluorescence assay of the two host cell lines showed that they expressed fibroblast markers such as FAP, S100A4 and ?-SMA, as well as mesenchymal cell markers such as CD44 and CD105. In conclusion, bone marrow-derived stromal ?broblasts recruited to tumors have the potential for malignant transformation induced by the tumor microenvironment, which provides new evidence for the role of the stroma in malignant transformation. PMID:26397840

  6. Study of Host–Microbe Interactions in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Milligan-Myhre, Kathryn; Charette, Jeremy R.; Phennicie, Ryan T.; Stephens, W. Zac; Rawls, John F.; Guillemin, Karen; Kim, Carol H.

    2015-01-01

    All animals are ecosystems, home to diverse microbial populations. Animal-associated microbes play important roles in the normal development and physiology of their hosts, but can also be agents of infectious disease. Traditionally, mice have been used to study pathogenic and beneficial associations between microbes and vertebrate animals. The zebrafish is emerging as a valuable new model system for host-microbe interaction studies, affording researchers with the opportunity to survey large populations of hosts and to visualize microbe-host associations at a cellular level in living animals. This chapter provides detailed protocols for the analysis of zebrafish-associated microbial communities, the derivation and husbandry of germ-free zebrafish, and the modeling of infectious disease in different stages of zebrafish development via different routes of inoculation. These protocols offer a starting point for researchers to address a multitude of questions about animals’ coexistence with microorganisms. PMID:21951527

  7. Mutational Landscapes of Sequential Prostate Metastases and Matched Patient Derived Xenografts during Enzalutamide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Manish; Wang, Liguo; Xie, Fang; Sicotte, Hugues; Yin, Ping; Dehm, Scott M.; Hart, Steven N.; Vedell, Peter T.; Barman, Poulami; Qin, Rui; Mahoney, Douglas W.; Carlson, Rachel E.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Atwell, Thomas D.; Eiken, Patrick W.; McMenomy, Brendan P.; Wieben, Eric D.; Jha, Gautam; Jimenez, Rafael E.; Weinshilboum, Richard; Wang, Liewei

    2015-01-01

    Developing patient derived models from individual tumors that capture the biological heterogeneity and mutation landscape in advanced prostate cancer is challenging, but essential for understanding tumor progression and delivery of personalized therapy in metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer stage. To demonstrate the feasibility of developing patient derived xenograft models in this stage, we present a case study wherein xenografts were derived from cancer metastases in a patient progressing on androgen deprivation therapy and prior to initiating pre-chemotherapy enzalutamide treatment. Tissue biopsies from a metastatic rib lesion were obtained for sequencing before and after initiating enzalutamide treatment over a twelve-week period and also implanted subcutaneously as well as under the renal capsule in immuno-deficient mice. The genome and transcriptome landscapes of xenografts and the original patient tumor tissues were compared by performing whole exome and transcriptome sequencing of the metastatic tumor tissues and the xenografts at both time points. After comparing the somatic mutations, copy number variations, gene fusions and gene expression we found that the patient’s genomic and transcriptomic alterations were preserved in the patient derived xenografts with high fidelity. These xenograft models provide an opportunity for predicting efficacy of existing and potentially novel drugs that is based on individual metastatic tumor expression signature and molecular pharmacology for delivery of precision medicine. PMID:26695660

  8. Fundamental Approaches to the Study of Zebrafish Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Stephen A.; Powell, Mickie; D’Abramo, Louis R.

    2014-01-01

    The value of the zebrafish model has been well established. However, culture variability within and among laboratories remains a concern, particularly as it relates to nutrition. Investigators using rodent models addressed this concern several decades ago and have developed strict nutritional regimes to which their models adhere. These investigators decreased the variability associated with nutrition in most studies by developing standardized reference and open formulation diets. Zebrafish investigators have not embraced this approach. In this article, we address the problems associated with the lack of nutritional information and standardization in the zebrafish research community. Based on the knowledge gained from studies of other animals, including traditional research models, other fish species, domesticated and companion animals, and humans, we have proposed an approach that seeks to standardize nutrition research in zebrafish. We have identified a number of factors for consideration in zebrafish nutrition studies and have suggested a number of proposed outcomes. The long term-goal of nutrition research will be to identify the daily nutritional requirements of the zebrafish and to develop appropriate standardized reference and open formulation diets. PMID:23382346

  9. Inducible podocyte injury and proteinuria in transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weibin; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2012-06-01

    Damage or loss of podocytes causes glomerulosclerosis in murine models, and mutations in podocyte-specific genes cause nephrotic syndrome in humans. Zebrafish provide a valuable model for kidney research, but disruption of pronephroi leads to death within a few days, thereby preventing the study of CKD. In this study, we generated an inducible model of podocyte injury in zebrafish (pod::NTR-mCherry) by expressing a bacterial nitroreductase, which converts metronidazole to a cytotoxin, specifically in podocytes under the control of the zebrafish nphs2/podocin promoter. Application of the prodrug metronidazole to the transgenic fish induces acute damage to the podocytes in pronephroi of larval zebrafish and the mesonephroi of adult zebrafish, resulting in foot-process effacement and podocyte loss. We also developed a functional assay of the glomerular filtration barrier by creating transgenic zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged vitamin D-binding protein (VDBP) as a tracer for proteinuria. In the VDBP-GFP and pod::NTR-mCherry double-transgenic fish, induction of podocyte damage led to whole-body edema, and the proximal tubules reabsorbed and accumulated VDBP-GFP that leaked through the glomeruli, mimicking the phenotype of human nephrotic syndrome. Moreover, expression of wt1b::GFP, a marker for the developing nephron, extended into the Bowman capsule in response to podocyte injury, suggesting that zebrafish have a podocyte-specific repair process known to occur in mammalian metanephros. These data support the use of these transgenic zebrafish as a model system for studies of glomerular pathogenesis and podocyte regeneration. PMID:22440901

  10. Quantification of birefringence readily measures the level of muscle damage in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Joachim; Sztal, Tamar; Currie, Peter D.

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Report of an unbiased quantification of the birefringence of muscle of fish larvae. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantification method readily identifies level of overall muscle damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compare zebrafish muscle mutants for level of phenotype severity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proposed tool to survey treatments that aim to ameliorate muscular dystrophy. -- Abstract: Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that progressively weaken and degenerate muscle. Many zebrafish models for human muscular dystrophies have been generated and analysed, including dystrophin-deficient zebrafish mutants dmd that model Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Under polarised light the zebrafish muscle can be detected as a bright area in an otherwise dark background. This light effect, called birefringence, results from the diffraction of polarised light through the pseudo-crystalline array of the muscle sarcomeres. Muscle damage, as seen in zebrafish models for muscular dystrophies, can readily be detected by a reduction in the birefringence. Therefore, birefringence is a very sensitive indicator of overall muscle integrity within larval zebrafish. Unbiased documentation of the birefringence followed by densitometric measurement enables the quantification of the birefringence of zebrafish larvae. Thereby, the overall level of muscle integrity can be detected, allowing the identification and categorisation of zebrafish muscle mutants. In addition, we propose that the establish protocol can be used to analyse treatments aimed at ameliorating dystrophic zebrafish models.

  11. Improving In Vivo High-Resolution CT Imaging of the Tumour Vasculature in Xenograft Mouse Models through Reduction of Motion and Bone-Streak Artefacts

    PubMed Central

    Kersemans, Veerle; Kannan, Pavitra; Beech, John S.; Bates, Russell; Irving, Benjamin; Gilchrist, Stuart; Allen, Philip D.; Thompson, James; Kinchesh, Paul; Casteleyn, Christophe; Schnabel, Julia; Partridge, Mike; Muschel, Ruth J.; Smart, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Preclinical in vivo CT is commonly used to visualise vessels at a macroscopic scale. However, it is prone to many artefacts which can degrade the quality of CT images significantly. Although some artefacts can be partially corrected for during image processing, they are best avoided during acquisition. Here, a novel imaging cradle and tumour holder was designed to maximise CT resolution. This approach was used to improve preclinical in vivo imaging of the tumour vasculature. Procedures A custom built cradle containing a tumour holder was developed and fix-mounted to the CT system gantry to avoid artefacts arising from scanner vibrations and out-of-field sample positioning. The tumour holder separated the tumour from bones along the axis of rotation of the CT scanner to avoid bone-streaking. It also kept the tumour stationary and insensitive to respiratory motion. System performance was evaluated in terms of tumour immobilisation and reduction of motion and bone artefacts. Pre- and post-contrast CT followed by sequential DCE-MRI of the tumour vasculature in xenograft transplanted mice was performed to confirm vessel patency and demonstrate the multimodal capacity of the new cradle. Vessel characteristics such as diameter, and branching were quantified. Results Image artefacts originating from bones and out-of-field sample positioning were avoided whilst those resulting from motions were reduced significantly, thereby maximising the resolution that can be achieved with CT imaging in vivo. Tumour vessels ? 77 ?m could be resolved and blood flow to the tumour remained functional. The diameter of each tumour vessel was determined and plotted as histograms and vessel branching maps were created. Multimodal imaging using this cradle assembly was preserved and demonstrated. Conclusions The presented imaging workflow minimised image artefacts arising from scanner induced vibrations, respiratory motion and radiopaque structures and enabled in vivo CT imaging and quantitative analysis of the tumour vasculature at higher resolution than was possible before. Moreover, it can be applied in a multimodal setting, therefore combining anatomical and dynamic information. PMID:26046526

  12. Building Zebrafish Neurobehavioral Phenomics: Effects of Common Environmental Factors on Anxiety and Locomotor Activity.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Kaluyeva, Alexandra A; Poudel, Manoj K; Nguyen, Michael; Song, Cai; Kalueff, Allan V

    2015-10-01

    Zebrafish are emerging as an important model organism for neurobehavioral phenomics research. Given the likely variation of zebrafish behavioral phenotypes between and within laboratories, in this study, we examine the influence and variability of several common environmental modifiers on adult zebrafish anxiety and locomotor activity. Utilizing the novel tank paradigm, this study assessed the role of various laboratory factors, including experimenter/handling, testing time and days, batch, and the order of testing, on the behavior of a large population of experimentally naive control fish. Although time of the day, experimenter identity, and order of testing had little effect on zebrafish anxiety and locomotor activity levels, subtle differences were found for testing days and batches. Our study establishes how zebrafish behaviors are modulated by common environmental/laboratory factors and outlines several implications for zebrafish neurobehavioral phenomics research. PMID:26244595

  13. Zebrafish in the wild: a review of natural history and new notes from the field.

    PubMed

    Engeszer, Raymond E; Patterson, Larissa B; Rao, Andrew A; Parichy, David M

    2007-01-01

    The zebrafish, Danio rerio, has emerged as a major model organism for biomedical research, yet little is known about its natural history. We review the literature pertaining to the geographic range, biotic and abiotic habitats, and life cycle of the zebrafish. We also report our own field study to document several aspects of zebrafish natural history across sites in northeast India. We found zebrafish particularly abundant in silt-bottomed, well-vegetated pools and rice paddies adjacent to slow moving streams at a range of elevations. We further identified co-occurring fishes likely to be zebrafish competitors and predators. Finally, we present observations that indicate substantial habitat degradation and loss, and suggest guidelines for documenting and preserving natural zebrafish populations. PMID:18041940

  14. Functional inhibition of UQCRB suppresses angiogenesis in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin; Seok, Seung Hyeok; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Chen, James K.; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: ? This is the first functional characterization of UQCRB in vivo model. ? Angiogenesis is inhibited with UQCRB loss of function in zebrafish. ? UQCRB is introduced as a prognostic marker for mitochondria- and angiogenesis-related diseases. -- Abstract: As a subunit of mitochondrial complex III, UQCRB plays an important role in complex III stability, electron transport, and cellular oxygen sensing. Herein, we report UQCRB function regarding angiogenesis in vivo with the zebrafish (Danio rerio). UQCRB knockdown inhibited angiogenesis in zebrafish leading to the suppression of VEGF expression. Moreover, the UQCRB-targeting small molecule terpestacin also inhibited angiogenesis and VEGF levels in zebrafish, supporting the role of UQCRB in angiogenesis. Collectively, UQCRB loss of function by either genetic and pharmacological means inhibited angiogenesis, indicating that UQCRB plays a key role in this process and can be a prognostic marker of angiogenesis- and mitochondria-related diseases.

  15. Coffee inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B in prostate cancer cells and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Marit; Pedersen, Sigrid; Mitake, Maiko; Holm, Kristine Lillebø; Bøhn, Siv Kjølsrud; Blomhoff, Heidi Kiil; Carlsen, Harald; Blomhoff, Rune; Paur, Ingvild

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to prostate cancer and the transcription factor Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-?B) is constitutively active in most such cancers. We examine the effects of coffee on NF-?B and on the regulation of selected genes in human-derived prostate cancer cells (PC3) and in PC3 xenografts in athymic nude mice. PC3 cells stably transduced with an NF-?B-luciferase reporter were used both in vitro and for xenografts. NF-?B activity was measured by reporter assays, DNA binding and in vivo imaging. Gene expression was measured in PC3 cells, xenografts and tumor microenvironment by low-density arrays. Western blotting of activated caspases was used to quantify apoptosis. Coffee inhibited TNF?-induced NF-?B activity and DNA-binding in PC3 cells. Furthermore, coffee increased apoptosis and modulated expression of a number of inflammation- and cancer-related genes in TNF?-treated PC3 cells. In vivo imaging revealed a 31% lower NF-?B-luciferase activation in the xenografts of the mice receiving 5% coffee compared to control mice. Interestingly, we observed major changes in gene expression in the PC3 cells in xenografts as compared to PC3 cells in vitro. In PC3 xenografts, genes related to inflammation, apoptosis and cytoprotection were down-regulated in mice receiving coffee, and coffee also affected the gene expression in the xenograft microenvironment. Our data demonstrate that coffee inhibits NF-?B activity in PC3 cells in vitro and in xenografts. Furthermore, coffee modulates transcription of genes related to prostate cancer and inflammation. Our results are the first to suggest mechanistic links between coffee consumption and prostate cancer in an experimental mouse model. PMID:26419686

  16. Electroretinogram analysis of the visual response in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Chrispell, Jared D; Rebrik, Tatiana I; Weiss, Ellen R

    2015-01-01

    The electroretinogram (ERG) is a noninvasive electrophysiological method for determining retinal function. Through the placement of an electrode on the surface of the cornea, electrical activity generated in response to light can be measured and used to assess the activity of retinal cells in vivo. This manuscript describes the use of the ERG to measure visual function in zebrafish. Zebrafish have long been utilized as a model for vertebrate development due to the ease of gene suppression by morpholino oligonucleotides and pharmacological manipulation. At 5-10 dpf, only cones are functional in the larval retina. Therefore, the zebrafish, unlike other animals, is a powerful model system for the study of cone visual function in vivo. This protocol uses standard anesthesia, micromanipulation and stereomicroscopy protocols that are common in laboratories that perform zebrafish research. The outlined methods make use of standard electrophysiology equipment and a low light camera to guide the placement of the recording microelectrode onto the larval cornea. Finally, we demonstrate how a commercially available ERG stimulator/recorder originally designed for use with mice can easily be adapted for use with zebrafish. ERG of larval zebrafish provides an excellent method of assaying cone visual function in animals that have been modified by morpholino oligonucleotide injection as well as newer genome engineering techniques such as Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9, all of which have greatly increased the efficiency and efficacy of gene targeting in zebrafish. In addition, we take advantage of the ability of pharmacological agents to penetrate zebrafish larvae to evaluate the molecular components that contribute to the photoresponse. This protocol outlines a setup that can be modified and used by researchers with various experimental goals. PMID:25867216

  17. Xenograft survival in two species combinations using total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtle, S.J.; Halperin, E.C.; Bollinger, R.R.

    1987-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) has profound immunosuppressive actions and has been applied successfully to allotransplantation but not xenotransplantation. Cyclosporine (Cs