Science.gov

Sample records for zeolite modification copper

  1. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, Geoffrey L. (Baton Rouge, LA); Kanazirev, Vladislav (Sofia, BG)

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  2. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  3. Chiral modification of copper exchanged zeolite-Y with cinchonidine and its application in the asymmetric Henry reaction.

    PubMed

    Deka, Jogesh; Satyanarayana, L; Karunakar, G V; Bhattacharyya, Pradip Kr; Bania, Kusum K

    2015-12-28

    Chirally modified Cu(2+) exchanged zeolite-Y was synthesized by direct adsorption of cinchonidine under ambient conditions. The chirally modified materials were characterized using various spectrochemical and physicochemical techniques viz. BET, FTIR, MAS ((1)H and (13)C NMR), XPS, SEM, cyclic voltammetry and PXRD. Characteristic peaks of cinchonidine observed in the supported materials confirmed the adsorption of cinchonidine and its coordination with the Cu(2+) active site on copper exchanged zeolite-Y. (13)C SSNMR and XPS analysis however confirmed for the half encapsulation process, only the quinoline ring of cinchonidine gets coordinated to the internal metal sites via the N atom while the quinuclidine moiety extends out of the host surface. Cinchonidine supported Cu(2+)-Y zeolites were found to exhibit good catalytic performance in the asymmetric Henry reaction. (1)H SSNMR studies also confirmed the protonation of the N atom of the quinuclidine ring during the course of the Henry reaction. Heterogeneous chiral catalysts were effective for up to two consecutive cycles. Leaching of cinchonidine after the second cycle was found to have a negative result in the catalytic performance. PMID:26579982

  4. Copper-Exchanged Zeolite L Traps Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Seshan, Panchalam K.

    1991-01-01

    Brief series of simple chemical treatments found to enhance ability of zeolite to remove oxygen from mixture of gases. Thermally stable up to 700 degrees C and has high specific surface area which provides high capacity for adsorption of gases. To increase ability to adsorb oxygen selectively, copper added by ion exchange, and copper-exchanged zeolite reduced with hydrogen. As result, copper dispersed atomically on inner surfaces of zeolite, making it highly reactive to oxygen, even at room temperature. Reactivity to oxygen even greater at higher temperatures.

  5. Optical appearance of copper clusters and nanoparticles in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petranovskii, Vitalii P.; Gurin, Valerij S.; Machorro, Roberto; Abbaspur, Alireza

    2004-08-01

    Copper incorporation into zeolites by the ion-exchange from Cu(II) solutions followed by different heat treatments results in a production of a number of species. Redistribution among different sites after dehydration, spontaneous and forced reduction, cluster and particle aggregation, etc. can occur, and a final copper state depends on type of zeolite, SiO2/Al2O3 molar ratio and processing conditions. Various species where observed: copper ions Cu2+ and Cu+, small particles and clusters Cun. We concentrate on the appearance of small copper clusters feasible in zeolites with size of cavities those match the cluster size. The clusters were simulated with ab initio quantum chemical calculations in the range of sizes 5 < n < 10 those are probable within zeolites cavities. Experimental data available on optical absorption of the reduced copper in the three types of zeolites can argue on the occurrence of the clusters stabilized within channels under mild reduction conditions while the larger copper nanoparticles appear under the harder reduction. The model calculation proposes some few-atomic copper clusters (Cun) as the candidates to fit the zeolite cavities with correspondence of the calculated absorption bands with the experimental spectra.

  6. Copper removal using bio-inspired polydopamine coated natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Shapter, Joseph G; Popelka-Filcoff, Rachel; Bennett, John W; Ellis, Amanda V

    2014-05-30

    Herein, for the first time, natural clinoptilolite-rich zeolite powders modified with a bio-inspired adhesive, polydopamine (PDA), have been systematically studied as an adsorbent for copper cations (Cu(II)) from aqueous solution. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed successful grafting of PDA onto the zeolite surface. The effects of pH (2-5.5), PDA treatment time (3-24h), contact time (0 to 24h) and initial Cu(II) ion concentrations (1 to 500mgdm(-3)) on the adsorption of Cu(II) ions were studied using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The adsorption behavior was fitted to a Langmuir isotherm and shown to follow a pseudo-second-order reaction model. The maximum adsorption capacities of Cu(II) were shown to be 14.93mgg(-1) for pristine natural zeolite and 28.58mgg(-1) for PDA treated zeolite powders. This impressive 91.4% increase in Cu(II) ion adsorption capacity is attributed to the chelating ability of the PDA on the zeolite surface. Furthermore studies of recyclability using NAA showed that over 50% of the adsorbed copper could be removed in mild concentrations (0.01M or 0.1M) of either acid or base. PMID:24731937

  7. Effect of zeolite type upon properties of copper nanoparticles and the clusters produced within them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petranovskii, Vitalii P.; Gurin, Valerij S.; Bogdanchikova, Nina E.; Phatanasri, Suphot; Praserthdam, Piyasan

    2002-06-01

    Copper nanoparticles were produced within the protonated and alkaline forms of several zeolites by the hydrogen reduction of corresponding Cu-exchanged forms. Variation of zeolite structure, reduction temperature and acidity of zeolites were the main factors influencing metal reducibility and appearance of copper reduced forms. They were detected by means of optical absorption using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy technique. The effect of zeolite type upon the plasmon resonance band associated with the reduced copper clusters was investigated experimentally and discussed with eh Mie theory simulation results. The type of this spectral appearance is associated with size of copper nanoparticles formed as the result of reduction and secondary aggregation and dielectric properties of zeolite micro crystals being a matrix for the nanoparticle stabilization.

  8. Coreactant-induced modifications of catalytic behavior in zeolitic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.M.; Chen, J.-K.; John, V.T. )

    1989-11-01

    The complex feed processing over zeolite catalysts, competitive reaction between the feed components results in observed rates and selectivities that cannot be predicted from pure component data alone. Hydroisomerization of paraffins over various Pt/zeolites in the presence of an aromatic cofeed is considered as an illustration. The aromatic affects paraffin reaction rates by occupying catalytic sites and perhaps also by partially blocking the pores. Analysis of Arrhenius plots helps in correlations of zeolite structure and the extent to which the paraffin reaction is affected. It is shown that the coreactant can induce selectivity to a zeolite that would otherwise not be shape selective.

  9. Formation of Catalytically Active Copper Nanoparticles in Natural Zeolites for Complete Oxidation of Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petranovskii, V. P.; Pestryakov, A. N.; Kazantseva, L. K.; Castillon Barraza, F. F.; Faras, M. H.

    Copper catalysts for complete oxidation of hydrocarbons supported on natural zeolites of different structure and origin were prepared by ion-exchange procedure. The catalytic experiments demonstrate that the temperature of beginning of hydrocarbons conversion is in the range of 170-300 C, depending on the composition of the catalyst. The complete conversion can be observed for both zeolites, depending (probably) on Si/Al ratio of the zeolite matrix. Different states of the copper have been identified by the methods of UV-VIS and XPS spectroscopies and TPR by hydrogen. Whereas no changes in XRD and 27Al MAS NMR was observed under condition of catalytic runs, that supports conclusion about stability of bulk material, XPS spectroscopy reveals significant altering in surface composition under different treatments due to appearance of complicated nano-species of copper, which are responsible for catalytic activity.

  10. Conversion of methane to methanol on copper-containing small-pore zeolites and zeotypes.

    PubMed

    Wulfers, M J; Teketel, S; Ipek, B; Lobo, R F

    2015-03-14

    This communication reports the discovery of several small-pore Cu-zeolites and zeotypes that produce methanol from methane and water vapor, and produce more methanol per copper atom than Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-mordenite. The new materials include Cu-SSZ-13, Cu-SSZ-16, Cu-SSZ-39, and Cu-SAPO-34. PMID:25679753

  11. Improving the ammonium ion uptake onto natural zeolite by using an integrated modification process.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhu; Ni, Jinren

    2009-07-15

    Detailed investigation on the development of physical and chemical properties of a natural calcium-rich zeolite modified by an integrated process, as well as the relation between the development and ammonium ion uptake (AIU), was conducted. This process consisted of pretreatment (grinding and sieving), sodium salt modification and calcination. Both pretreatment and salt modification largely increased BET surface area, total pore volume and average pore diameter of the raw zeolite. Individual calcination at temperature above 150 degrees C caused framework collapse, losses of partial clinoptilolite and production of X-ray amorphous material, resulting in pore blockage and the decreases in pore volume and BET surface area. However, the introduction of sodium ion enhanced the heat resistance of the raw material from 150 to 400 degrees C, and Na(+) ion treatment followed by calcination could effectively improved pore and surface properties of zeolite, thus leading to the significant enhancement in ammonium ion exchange and adsorption capabilities. PMID:19135300

  12. A facile top-down protocol for postsynthesis modification of hierarchical aluminum-rich MFI zeolites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengjun; Miao, Shu; Chen, Fucun; Zhang, Shuang; Liu, Zhenni; Xie, Sujuan; Xu, Longya

    2015-01-12

    High aluminum content constitutes a major hurdle for the postsynthesis modification of hierarchical zeolites. A facile protocol comprising fluorination and sequential alkaline treatment is presented for the postsynthesis modification of hierarchical Al-rich MFI zeolites. By virtue of this protocol, uniform intracrystalline mesoporosity is introduced in an Al-rich MFI zeolite (Si/Al = 14.3). The obtained hierarchical zeolites exhibit a significant mesopore size distribution, centered around 6?nm, and show improved conversions in catalytic cracking of bulky aromatic molecules. The fundamental implications of the fluorination-alkaline treatment protocol are related to the formation of F-bearing tetrahedral aluminum species in the antecedent fluorination step, which alleviates the resistance of Al sites to the alkaline medium and causes Al-F complexation for regulated hydrolysis of the Al species during the alkaline treatment process. This top-down protocol and the derived mechanistic understandings are expected to be applied in the synthesis of hierarchical Al-rich zeolites with other framework topologies. PMID:25399674

  13. laser-induced luminescence in reduced copper-exchanged Y zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deson, J.; Lalo, C.; Gédéon, A.; Vasseur, F.; Fraissard, J.

    1996-08-01

    Copper-exchanged sodium Y zeolite exhibit broad-band emission under 240 nm laser photoexcitation. A kinetic study of the decay of the luminescence spectrum reveals three components with contributions which depend on the thermal pretreatment of the sample, dehydration or reduction in hydrogen. Identification of two of the emitting centres as Cu + sites indicates that autoreduction accompanies dehydration. Prolonged reduction in hydrogen diminishes the concentration of these species.

  14. Plasmon resonance of copper nanoparticles within zeolites: the effect of matrix composition and agglomeration temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petranovskii, Vitalii P.; Gurin, Valerij S.; Tamariz Flores, Jose V.

    2001-07-01

    Small copper particles within zeolite (mordenite) matrix produced by copper ion reduction were studied. Variation of SiO2/Al2O3 molar ratio of mordenite does not change crystal structure, but results in different ionic properties. A change of SiO2/Al2O3 ratio leads to transformation of the plasmon resonance from a classical peak to a shoulder in the same wavelength range. These features were simulated by the Mie theory, and calculations outlined additional absorption bands those consistent with the experiment.

  15. Zeolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Zeolites are crystalline aluminosilicates that have complex framework structures. However, there are several features of zeolite crystals that make unequivocal structure determinations difficult. The acquisition of reliable structural information on zeolites is greatly facilitated by the availability of high-quality specimens. For structure determinations by conventional diffraction techniques, large single-crystal specimens are essential. Alternatively, structural determinations by powder profile refinement methods relax the constraints on crystal size, but still require materials with a high degree of crystalline perfection. Studies conducted at CAMMP (Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing) have demonstrated that microgravity processing can produce larger crystal sizes and fewer structural defects relative to terrestrial crystal growth. Principal Investigator: Dr. Albert Sacco

  16. Surface modification of ultra thin PES-zeolite using thermal annealing to increase flux and rejection of produced water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusworo, T. D.; Widayat, Pradini, A. W.; Armeli, Y. P.

    2015-12-01

    Membrane technology is an alternative of water treatment based on filtration that is being developed. Surface Modification using heat treatment has been investigated to improve the performance of ultra thin PES-Zeolite nanocomposite membrane for produced water treatment from Pertamina Balongan. Two types of membranes with surface modification and without modification were prepared to study the effect of surface modification on its permeation properties. Asymmetric ultra thin PES-Zeolite nanocomposite membrane for produced water treatment was casted using the dry/wet phase inversion technique from dope solutions containing polyethersulfone, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent and zeolite as a filler. Experimental results showed that the heat treatment at near glass transition temperature was increase the rejection of COD, Turbidity and ion Ca2+. The better adherence of zeolite particles in the polymer matrix combined with formation of charge transfer complexes (CTCs) and cross-linking might be the main factors to enhance the percent of rejection. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) micrographs showed that the selective layer and the substructure of PES-zeolite membrane became denser and more compact after the heat treatment. The FESEM micrographs also showed that the heat treatment was increased the adherence of zeolite particle and polymer. Membranes treated at 180 C for 15 seconds indicated increase the rejection and small decrease in flux for produced water treatment..

  17. Kinetics of Copper Adsorption from Effluent Stream by ZeoliteNaX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Surinder; Sambi, S. S.; Sharma, S. K.; Pandey, Pankaj Kumar

    2010-06-01

    The batch experiments were conducted to study the copper (II) removal by ZeoliteNaX at temperature of 288+1 K, adsorbent dose of 2 g/L and contact time of 24 hour. Effects of pH, temperature, contact time and Cu (II) ion concentration by the adsorbent were investigated. The data were analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms. Freundlich isotherm was found to correlate the adsorption of Cu (II) better and the mono-layer adsorption capacity for Cu (II) removal was 41.6 mg/g. The adsorbed amounts of Cu (II) reached equilibrium within 150 minutes. The four adsorption kinetic models namely, the first order equation, second order equations, pseudo-first order equation and pseudo second-order equations were also tested to fit the data. The pseudo-first-order equation was found to fit best for the experimental data. Thermodynamic analysis indicated the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the adsorption of Cu (II) by ZeoliteNaX.

  18. Stable copper-zeolite filter media for bacteria removal in stormwater.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya L; McCarthy, David T; Deletic, Ana

    2014-05-30

    Cu(2+)-exchanged zeolite (ZCu) as antibacterial media shows great potential for bacteria removal from stormwater, but its stability in high salinity water needs attention. In this study, stable antibacterial media were developed by modifying ZCu through calcination and in situ Cu(OH)2 coating. Their stability and Escherichia coli removal efficiency along with impact of salinity were examined in gravity-fed columns. While copper leaching from ZCu was 20mg/L in test water of salinity 250μS/cm, it was reduced by over 97% through Cu(OH)2 coating and/or calcination. ZCu coated with Cu(OH)2 followed by heat treatment at 180°C (ZCuCuO180) exhibited more consistent E. coli removal (1.7-2.7 log) than ZCu (1.2-3.3 log) in test water of varied salinity but constant contact time 22min. ZCu calcined at 400°C (ZCu400) effectively inactivated removed bacteria during 24h drying period. In the presence of native microbial communities, new sand filters, particularly those having ZCu400 at the top to inactivate bacteria during drying periods and ZCuCuO180 midway to capture and inactivate microbes during wet events, provided the best bacterial removal (1.7 log, contact time 9min). Copper leaching from this design was 9μg/L, well below long-term irrigation standard of 200μg/L. PMID:24747698

  19. Tailoring the Transport Properties of Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks by Post-Synthetic Thermal Modification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Koros, William J

    2015-10-28

    Understanding how to control transport properties of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) is critical to extend ZIF-based membranes and adsorbents to a wide spectrum of gas and vapor separations. In this work, we report a facile post-synthetic thermal modification (PSTM) technique to tailor ZIFs' transport properties by balancing diffusivity and diffusion selectivity. With controllable dissociation of framework methyl groups from a precursor ZIF (ZIF-8), we have prepared thermally modified ZIFs showing substantially increased n-butane diffusivity and attractive n/iso-butane diffusion selectivity. Hybrid ZIF/polymer mixed-matrix membranes formed using these thermally modified ZIFs are expected to deliver attractive butane isomer separation performance. Membranes based on such materials can potentially be used to retrofit refinery alkylation units for producing premium gasoline blending stocks. PMID:26451850

  20. Optimizing anti-coking abilities of zeolites by ethylene diamine tetraacetie acid modification on catalytic fast pyrolysis of corn stalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhong, Zhaoping; Song, Zuwei; Ding, Kuan; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2015-12-01

    In order to minimize coke yield during biomass catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) process, ethylene diamine tetraacetie acid (EDTA) chemical modification method is carried out to selectively remove the external framework aluminum of HZSM-5 catalyst. X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen (N2)-adsorption and ammonia-temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) techniques are employed to investigate the porosity and acidity characteristics of original and modified HZSM-5 samples. Py-GC/MS and thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) experiments are further conducted to explore the catalytic effect of modified HZSM-5 samples on biomass CFP and to verify the positive effect on coke reduction. Results show that EDTA treatment does not damage the crystal structure of HZSM-5 zeolites, but leads to a slight increase of pore volume and pore size. Meanwhile, the elimination of the strong acid peak indicates the dealumination of outer surface of HZSM-5 zeolites. Treatment time of 2 h (labeled EDTA-2H) is optimal for acid removal and hydrocarbon formation. Among all modified catalysts, EDTA-2H performs the best for deacidification and can obviously increase the yields of positive chemical compositions in pyrolysis products. Besides, EDTA modification can improve the anti-coking properties of HZSM-5 zeolites, and EDTA-2H gives rise to the lowest coke yield.

  1. Corrosion resistance properties of superhydrophobic copper surfaces fabricated by one-step electrochemical modification process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying; Sarkar, D. K.; Gallant, Danick; Chen, X.-Grant

    2013-10-01

    Superhydrophobic copper surfaces have been prepared by a one-step electrochemical modification process in an ethanolic stearic acid solution. In this work, the corrosion properties of hydrophobic copper surface and superhydrophobic copper surfaces were analyzed by means of electrochemical analyses and compared with that of as-received bare copper substrate. The decrease of corrosion current density (icorr) as well as the increase of polarization resistance (Rp) obtained from potentiodynamic polarization curves revealed that the superhydrophobic film on the copper surfaces improved the corrosion resistance performance of the copper substrate.

  2. Modification of surface properties of copper-refractory metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA)

    1993-10-12

    The surface properties of copper-refractory metal (CU-RF) alloy bodies are modified by heat treatments which cause the refractory metal to form a coating on the exterior surfaces of the alloy body. The alloys have a copper matrix with particles or dendrites of the refractory metal dispersed therein, which may be niobium, vanadium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, or tungsten. The surface properties of the bodies are changed from those of copper to that of the refractory metal.

  3. Modification of medical metals by ion implantation of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Y. Z.; Xiong, G. Y.; Liang, H.; Raman, S.; He, F.; Huang, Y.

    2007-10-01

    The effect of copper ion implantation on the antibacterial activity, wear performance and corrosion resistance of medical metals including 317 L of stainless steels, pure titanium, and Ti-Al-Nb alloy was studied in this work. The specimens were implanted with copper ions using a MEVVA source ion implanter with ion doses ranging from 0.5 10 17 to 4 10 17 ions/cm 2 at an energy of 80 keV. The antibacterial effect, wear rate, and inflexion potential were measured as a function of ion dose. The results obtained indicate that copper ion implantation improves the antibacterial effect and wear behaviour for all the three medical materials studied. However, corrosion resistance decreases after ion implantation of copper. Experimental results indicate that the antibacterial property and corrosion resistance should be balanced for medical titanium materials. The marked deteriorated corrosion resistance of 317 L suggests that copper implantation may not be an effective method of improving its antibacterial activity.

  4. Copper stabilization by zeolite synthesis in polluted soils treated with coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Terzano, Roberto; Spagnuolo, Matteo; Medici, Luca; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Janssens, Koen; Ruggiero, Pacifico

    2005-08-15

    This study deals with the process of zeolite formation in an agricultural soil artificially polluted by high amounts of Cu (15 mg of Cu/g of soil dry weight) and treated with fused coal fly ash at 30 and 60 degrees C and how this process affects the mobility and availability of the metal. As a consequence of the treatment, the amount of dissolved Cu, and thus its mobility, was strongly reduced, and the percentage of the metal stabilized in the solid phase increased over time, reaching values of 30% at 30 degrees C and 40% at 60 degrees C. The physicochemical phenomena responsible for Cu stabilization in the solid phase have been evaluated by EDTA sequential extractions and synchrotron radiation based X-ray microanalytical techniques. These techniques were used for the visualization of the spatial distribution and the speciation of Cu in and/or on the neo-formed zeolite particles. In particular, micro XRF (X-ray fluorescence) tomography showed direct evidence that Cu can be entrapped as clusters inside the porous zeolitic structures while mu-XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) spectroscopy determinations revealed Cu to be present mainly as Cu(ll) hydroxide and Cu(ll) oxide. The reported results could be useful as a basic knowledge for planning new technologies for the on site physicochemical stabilization of heavy metals in heavily polluted soils. PMID:16173593

  5. Copper stabilization by zeolite synthesis in polluted soils treated with coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto Terzano; Matteo Spagnuolo; Luca Medici; Bart Vekemans; Laszlo Vincze; Koen Janssens; Pacifico Ruggiero

    2005-08-15

    This paper reports on the process of zeolite formation in an agricultural soil artificially polluted by high amounts of Cu (15 mg of Cu/g of soil dry weight) and treated with fused coal fly ash at 30 and 60 C and how this process affects the mobility and availability of the metal. As a consequence of the treatment, the amount of dissolved Cu, and thus its mobility, was strongly reduced, and the percentage of the metal stabilized in the solid phase increased over time, reaching values of 30% at 30{sup o}C and 40% at 60{sup o}C. The physicochemical phenomena responsible for Cu stabilization in the solid phase have been evaluated by EDTA sequential extractions and synchrotron radiation based X-ray microanalytical techniques. These techniques were used for the visualization of the spatial distribution and the speciation of Cu in and/or on the neo-formed zeolite particles. In particular, micro XRF (X-ray fluorescence) tomography showed direct evidence that Cu can be entrapped as clusters inside the porous zeolitic structures while -{mu}XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) spectroscopy determinations revealed Cu to be present mainly as Cu(II) hydroxide and Cu(II) oxide. The reported results could be useful as a basic knowledge for planning new technologies for the on-site physicochemical stabilization of heavy metals in heavily polluted soils. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Natrolite zeolite supported copper nanoparticles as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for the 1,3-diploar cycloaddition and cyanation of aryl iodides under ligand-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Nasrollahzadeh, Mahmoud; Sajadi, S Mohammad; Rostami-Vartooni, Akbar; Khalaj, Mehdi

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report the preparation of Natrolite zeolite supported copper nanoparticles as a heterogeneous catalyst for 1,3-diploar cycloaddition and synthesis aryl nitriles from aryl iodides under ligand-free conditions. The catalyst was characterized using XRD, SEM, TEM, EDS and TG-DTA. The experimental procedure is simple, the products are formed in high yields and the catalyst can be recycled and reused several times without any significant loss of catalytic activity. PMID:25988488

  7. Modification of commercial NaY zeolite to give high water diffusivity and adsorb a large amount of water.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masahiro; Kimura, Michisato; Sugino, Mao; Horikawa, Toshihide; Nakagawa, Keizo; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    By using NaY zeolites as desiccant materials, commercial NaY zeolite was alkali treated with 1 M NaOH aqueous solution and then Mg(2+) ion-exchanged by 0.5 M Mg(NO3)2 aqueous solution. Alkali treatment (AT) of NaY zeolite removed silicon atoms selectivity from the framework of Y-type zeolite and enhanced water diffusivity of Y-type zeolite. On the other hand, Mg(2+) ion-exchange of NaY zeolite increased the amount of water adsorbed. Prepared Y-AT-Mg zeolite had both water adsorption velocity and a large difference of water adsorbed amount between adsorption at 30 C and desorption at 100 C. PMID:26072446

  8. Surface modification of calcium-copper hydroxyapatites using polyaspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othmani, Masseoud; Aissa, Abdallah; Bachoua, Hassen; Debbabi, Mongi

    2013-01-01

    Mixed calcium-copper hydroxyapatite (Ca-CuHAp), with general formula Ca(10-x)Cux(PO4)6(OH)2, where 0 ? x ? 0.75 was prepared in aqueous medium in the presence of different concentrations of poly-L-aspartic acid (PASP). XRD, IR, TG-DTA, TEM-EDX, AFM and chemical analyses were used to characterize the structure, morphology and composition of the products. All techniques show the formation of new hybrid compounds Ca-CuHAp-PASP. The presence of the grafting moiety on the apatitic material is more significant with increasing of copper amount and/or organic concentration in the starting solution. These increases lead to the affectation of apatite crystallinity. The IR spectroscopy shows the conservation of (Psbnd OH) band of (HPO4)2- groups, suggesting that PASP acid was interacted only with metallic cations of hydroxyapatite.

  9. First principle study of selective catalytic nitrogen oxide reduction over copper-exchanged zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Donghai

    Cu-ZXM5 is as promising catalyst candidate for mobile source (auto truck) NOX emission control. The present work studies this phenomenon from different perspectives. Firstly, a methodology is developed to validate the proposed NO decomposition mechanism with a kinetic Reactor model. The Reactor model involves a plug flow reactor that simulates forty-two elementary reactions. The simulation operates at moderate temperatures (300-1000 K) and the results are compared with micro-reactor experimental results. Secondly, gas phase reaction of NO with NH3 in the thermal deNOX process is studied to reveal origins of ammonia's selectivity for NO over O2. The gas phase study does electronic comparison of the competing reactions of NH3 radical with NO and O2 respectively. NH3 selectivity lies in strongly bound H2NNO adduct that readily rearranges and decompose to N2 and H2O. The pronounced discrimination of NH3 against reaction with O2 is explored through comparison of the electronic structures of the H2NNO and H2NOO radical adducts and provides insight into the selectivity of NH3 in the surface reactions. Thirdly, thermal chemistry of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOX with ammonia over Cu-exchanged zeolites is investigated with density functional theory (DFT). The catalytic reaction pathways are mapped out and compared with those in the gas phase reactions, which reveals that the major activation barriers are lowered in the catalytic reactions.

  10. Preparation and characterization of surfactant-modified hydroxyapatite/zeolite composite and its adsorption behavior toward humic acid and copper(II).

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yanhui; Lin, Jianwei; Li, Jia

    2013-04-01

    A novel composite material, i.e., surfactant-modified hydroxyapatite/zeolite composite, was used as an adsorbent to remove humic acid (HA) and copper(II) from aqueous solution. Hydroxyapatite/zeolite composite (HZC) and surfactant-modified HZC (SMHZC) were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscope. The adsorption of HA and copper(II) on SMHZC was investigated. For comparison purposes, HA adsorption onto HZC was also investigated. SMHZC exhibited much higher HA adsorption capacity than HZC. The HA adsorption capacity for SMHZC decreased slightly with increasing pH from 3 to 8 but decreased significantly with increasing pH from 8 to 12. The copper(II) adsorption capacity for SMHZC increased with increasing pH from 3 to 6.5. The adsorption kinetic data of HA and copper(II) on SMHZC obeyed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption of HA and copper(II) on SMHZC took place in three different stages: fast external surface adsorption, gradual adsorption controlled by both film and intra-particle diffusions, and final equilibrium stage. The equilibrium adsorption data of HA on SMHZC better fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model than the Freundlich isotherm model. The equilibrium adsorption data of copper(II) on SMHZC could be described by the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The presence of copper(II) in solution enhanced HA adsorption onto SMHZC. The presence of HA in solution enhanced copper(II) adsorption onto SMHZC. The mechanisms for the adsorption of HA on SMHZC at pH 7 may include electrostatic attraction, organic partitioning, hydrogen bonding, and Lewis acid-base interaction. The mechanisms for the adsorption of copper(II) on SMHZC at pH 6 may include surface complexation, ion exchange, and dissolution-precipitation. The obtained results indicate that SMHZC can be used as an effective adsorbent to simultaneously remove HA and copper(II) from water. PMID:22961484

  11. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines and polydopamine: The effect on the initial electroless copper deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaubroeck, David; Mader, Lothar; De Geyter, Nathalie; Morent, Rino; Dubruel, Peter; Vanfleteren, Jan

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the influence of polydopamine and polyamine surface modifications of an etched epoxy cresol novolak (ECN) resin on the initial electroless copper deposition. Three different strategies to introduce polyamines on a surface in aqueous environment are applied: via polyethyleneimine adsorption (PEI), via polydopamine and via polyamines grafted to polydopamine. Next, the influence of these surface modifications on the catalytic palladium activation is investigated through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Finally, the initial electroless copper deposition on modified epoxy surfaces is evaluated using SEM and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Grafted polyamines on polydopamine surface modifications result in a large increase of the initial deposited copper.

  12. Surface Modification of Boron-Doped Diamond with Microcrystalline Copper Phthalocyanine: Oxygen Reduction Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Patrick; Foord, John S; Compton, Richard G

    2015-10-01

    Surface modification of boron-doped diamond (BDD) with copper phthalocyanine was achieved using a simple and convenient dropcast deposition, giving rise to a microcrystalline structure. Both unmodified and modified BDD electrodes of different surface terminations (namely hydrogen and oxygen) were compared via the electrochemical reduction of oxygen in aqueous solution. A significant lowering of the cathodic overpotential by about 500?mV was observed after modification of hydrogen-terminated (hydrophobic) diamond, while no voltammetric peak was seen on modified oxidised (hydrophilic) diamond, signifying greater interaction between copper phthalocyanine and the hydrogen-terminated BDD. Oxygen reduction was found to undergo a two-electron process on the modified hydrogen-terminated diamond, which was shown to be also active for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. The lack of a further conversion of the peroxide was attributed to its rapid diffusion away from the triple phase boundary at which the reaction is expected to exclusively occur. PMID:26491640

  13. Surface Modification of Boron-Doped Diamond with Microcrystalline Copper Phthalocyanine: Oxygen Reduction Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Patrick; Foord, John S; Compton, Richard G

    2015-01-01

    Surface modification of boron-doped diamond (BDD) with copper phthalocyanine was achieved using a simple and convenient dropcast deposition, giving rise to a microcrystalline structure. Both unmodified and modified BDD electrodes of different surface terminations (namely hydrogen and oxygen) were compared via the electrochemical reduction of oxygen in aqueous solution. A significant lowering of the cathodic overpotential by about 500 mV was observed after modification of hydrogen-terminated (hydrophobic) diamond, while no voltammetric peak was seen on modified oxidised (hydrophilic) diamond, signifying greater interaction between copper phthalocyanine and the hydrogen-terminated BDD. Oxygen reduction was found to undergo a two-electron process on the modified hydrogen-terminated diamond, which was shown to be also active for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. The lack of a further conversion of the peroxide was attributed to its rapid diffusion away from the triple phase boundary at which the reaction is expected to exclusively occur. PMID:26491640

  14. Simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} abatement using zeolite-supported copper. Progress report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

    1996-12-31

    The bulk of the results from this project, besides being found in the research reports, are in the form of two theses presented for advanced degrees by two different students at two different institutions. Francis E. Porbeni is a Master`s Degree student in Chemistry at Clark Atlanta University and has prepared his Master`s Thesis entitled Simultaneous SO{sub 2} Oxidation and NO Decomposition over Copper Oxide on {gamma}-Alumina Catalysts: An Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Study. Sumit Rao, a Ph.D. student in Chemical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology has defended his thesis entitled Role of Copper Ensemble Size in Silica and Zeolite Supported Catalysts for Nitric Oxide Decomposition. These two documents, which will be forwarded when final copies are available, provide the details of the bulk of the research accomplished over the duration of this project. These two documents are summarized, and other results from the project are given.

  15. Surface modification of titanium using nanothin films of copper for biofouling control.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Vinita; Manoharan, N; George, R P; Dash, S; Kamruddin, M; Tyagi, A K; Daya, R K

    2009-09-01

    Biofouling is one of the major impediment in the use of titanium, which is otherwise excellent material with respect to corrosion resistance and mechanical properties, for seawater-cooled condensers of power plants. The routine chlorination treatment and sponge ball cleaning may not be successful to keep the titanium condenser tube clean over a period extending to years. This brings into focus the relevance of surface modification of titanium to improve the antimicrobial properties, which can effectively supplement the present treatment programmes. In this study antimicrobial thin film of copper (Cu) is developed on titanium surfaces, as copper is known to be very toxic to microorganisms and effectively kills most of the microbes by blocking the respiratory enzyme system. The preparation of nanocrystalline thin films of copper on titanium surfaces was done by pulsed DC magnetron-sputtering technique. Then this thin film was characterized using Glancing Incidence X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Antimicrobial properties of these specimens were evaluated by exposure studies in seawater. Results showed two order decrease in the bacterial density on copper coated surface and epifluorescence micrographs depicted very few fluorescing cells and no biofilm formation clearly demonstrating the superior antibacterial capability of this nanocrystalline copper thin film. PMID:19928248

  16. Modification of the fatigue behavior of copper and stainless steel by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhru, H.; Gibson, W.; Burr, C.; Kumnick, A. J.; Welsch, G. E.

    1981-05-01

    A program was undertaken to study the effect of ion implantation on the fatigue lives of copper and austenitic stainless steel. Neon and nitrogen ions of 2 to 4 MeV were implanted into flat plate flexutral type fatigue specimens using the Dynamitron accelerator at SUNY Albany. By using the rotating target method, uniformity of the depth of lattice defects and of the dose of the implanted species was obtained. Control specimens (not implanted) and ion-implanted specimens were fatigue-cycled in flexture under constant and identical displacement and frequency conditions until failure. A substantial improvement was observed in the fatigue life for the Ne-implanted copper when fatigued in air. The stainless steel specimens implanted with N which were fatigued in argon did not show a measurable increase in fatigue life. In order to investigate whether the fatigue life was influenced by the modification of the near-surface deformation characteristics, e.g., by creating barriers against slip activity and the easy formation of persistent slip bands, a study of the most highly stressed fatigue specimen surfaces was undertaken by scanning electron microscopy. The results on both the copper and stainless steel specimens support the concept of slip modification in the implanted layer. While the fatigued control specimens exhibited extensive surface ridges which appear to be extrusions and intrusions from persistent slip bands, the implanted specimens are devoid of such features.

  17. Managing ammonia emissions from dairy cows by amending slurry with alum or zeolite or by diet modification.

    PubMed

    Meisinger, J J; Lefcourt, A M; Van Kessel, J A; Wilkerson, V

    2001-10-27

    Animal agriculture is a significant source of atmospheric ammonia. Ammonia (NH3) volatilization represents a loss of plant available N to the farmer and a potential contributor to eutrophication in low-nitrogen input ecosystems. This research evaluated on-farm slurry treatments of alum or zeolite and compared three diets for lactating dairy cows in their effectiveness to reduce NH3 emissions. NH3 emissions were compared using a group of mobile wind tunnels. The addition of 2.5% alum or 6.25% zeolite to barn-stored dairy slurry reduced NH3 volatilization by 60% and 55%, respectively, compared to untreated slurry. The alum conserved NH3 by acidifying the slurry to below pH 5, while the zeolite conserved ammonia by lowering the solution-phase nitrogen through cation exchange. The use of alum or zeolite also reduced soluble phosphorus in the slurry. NH3 loss from fresh manure collected from lactating dairy cows was not affected by three diets containing the same level of crude protein but differing in forage source (orchardgrass silage vs. alfalfa silage) or neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content (30% vs. 35% NDF). NH3 losses from the freshly excreted manures occurred very rapidly and included the urea component plus some unidentified labile organic nitrogen sources. NH3 conservation strategies for fresh manures will have to be active within the first few hours after excretion in order to be most effective. The use of alum or zeolites as an on-farm amendment to dairy slurry offers the potential for significantly reducing NH3 emissions. PMID:12805887

  18. Ion-beam-induced modifications in the structural and electrical properties of copper oxide selenite nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Pallavi; Chauhan, R. P.

    2015-04-01

    Irradiation with swift heavy ions (SHIs) with energy in the MeV range is a unique tool for engineering the properties of materials. In this context, the objective of the present work is to study the conduction of charge carriers in pre- and post-ion-irradiated semiconducting nanowires. Copper oxide selenite nanowires were synthesized using a template-assisted electrodeposition technique from an aqueous solution of 0.8 M CuSO45H2O and 8 mM SeO2. The synthesized nanowires were observed to have a monoclinic structure with linear I-V characteristics (IVC). The effect of irradiation with 160 MeV Ni+12 ions on the properties of the copper oxide selenite nanowires was investigated for fluences varying from 1011 to 1013 ions/cm2. XRD spectra confirmed no change in the phase of the swift-heavy-ion-irradiated nanowires, but a modification in the orientation of the planes was observed that depended on the ion fluence. The electrical resistivity of the semiconducting nanowires also varied with the ion fluence. Simultaneous irradiation-induced modifications to the electro-chemical potential gradient and the granular properties of the material may have been the origin of the alteration in the structural and electrical properties of the nanowires.

  19. Simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} abatement using zeolite-supported copper. Progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

    1994-09-01

    The proposed research seeks to advance/improve current flue gas cleanup catalyst technology by modifying promising copper-exchanged zeolite NO decomposition catalysts which reduce NO to elemental nitrogen and oxygen in the absence of an added reducing gas. The authors believe that this approach has great potential. Copper on alumina has been investigated by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) as a NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} abatement catalyst. Copper on alumina acts as a sorbent for SO{sub 2}, forming a surface sulfate upon adsorption in an oxygen-containing atmosphere, and as a catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} using ammonia; both CuO and CuSO{sub 4} on the surfaces of these materials are active SCR catalysts. SO{sub 2} adsorption in the PETC studies was carried out at 673K, a temperature well within the range for active NO decomposition by the Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst. The authors believe that by beginning with a material which decomposes NO without needing an added reducing gas, they will be able to design a catalyst which will act as a regenerable NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} abatement catalyst which does not need ammonia to accomplish NO{sub x} reduction, and which will accomplish SO{sub 2} abatement by adsorption, similar to the copper on alumina catalyst. Coupled with a SO{sub 2} oxidation catalyst, this successful system will be able to remove both NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} from flue gases with no added reducing agent and no waste.

  20. Copper(I)-Y Zeolite-Catalyzed Regio- and Stereoselective [2 + 2 + 2] Cyclotrimerization Cascade: An Atom- and Step-Economical Synthesis of Pyrimido[1,6-a]quinoline.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Devenderan; Pitchumani, Kasi

    2015-10-16

    An elegant copper(I)-Y zeolite-catalyzed tandem process, involving ketenimine-based termolecular [2 + 2 + 2]/[NC + CC + NC] cycloaddition, using sulfonyl azide, alkyne, and quinoline, to prepare pyrimido[1,6-a]quinolines is reported. In this straightforward, highly atom- and step-economical protocol, copper(I) promotes for azide-alkyne [3 + 2] cycloaddition which is followed by ring-rearrangement/ketenimine formation/regio- and stereoselective [2 + 2 + 2] termolecular cycloaddition and dehydrogenation cascade to yield selectively the E-isomer of pyrimido[1,6-a]quinoline. PMID:26390020

  1. Position-dependent performance of copper phthalocyanine based field-effect transistors by gold nanoparticles modification.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao; Li, Yao; Lv, Wenli; Zhao, Feiyu; Sun, Lei; Peng, Yingquan; Wen, Zhanwei; Zhong, Junkang; Zhang, Jianping

    2015-01-21

    A facile fabrication and characteristics of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)-based organic field-effect transistor (OFET) using the gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) modification is reported, thereby achieving highly improved performance. The effect of Au NPs located at three different positions, that is, at the SiO2/CuPc interface (device B), embedding in the middle of CuPc layer (device C), and on the top of CuPc layer (device D), is investigated, and the results show that device D has the best performance. Compared with the device without Au NPs (reference device A), device D displays an improvement of field-effect mobility (?(sat)) from 1.65 10(-3) to 5.51 10(-3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and threshold voltage decreases from -23.24 to -16.12 V. Therefore, a strategy for the performance improvement of the CuPc-based OFET with large field-effect mobility and saturation drain current is developed, on the basis of the concept of nanoscale Au modification. The model of an additional electron transport channel formation by FET operation at the Au NPs/CuPc interface is therefore proposed to explain the observed performance improvement. Optimum CuPc thickness is confirmed to be about 50 nm in the present study. The device-to-device uniformity and time stability are discussed for future application. PMID:25548878

  2. Two-dimensional zeolite-like network in the new caesium copper aluminate Cs2CuAl4O8.

    PubMed

    Shvanskaya, Larisa; Yakubovich, Olga; Massa, Werner; Vasiliev, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Monoclinic dicaesium copper tetraaluminate, Cs2CuAl4O8, space group P2(1)/c, a = 8.4551?(7), b = 10.012?(1), c = 17.073?(2)?, ? = 101.643?(9), Z = 6, was obtained by high-temperature crystallization from a phosphate flux. Its microporous crystal structure presents the first example of double layers built from [AlO4] tetrahedra combined in 4-, 6- and 8-rings, topologically similar to those found in the ATT-type zeolites and isostructural minerals armstrongite, davanite and dalyite. These layers show a rare arrangement of three [AlO4] tetrahedra sharing one oxygen vertex. The aluminate slabs are further linked by chains of edge-sharing [CuO4] square planes to form a mixed anionic three-dimensional framework with Cs(+) cations in channels and cavities. An unusually short CuCs distance of 3.166? is ascribed to the strong Jahn-Teller effect of Cu(2+). The magnetic subsystem demonstrates properties of an alternating antiferromagnetic chain with a gap in the spectrum of magnetic excitations. PMID:26428399

  3. Sorption Kinetics Of Selected Heavy Metals Adsorption To Natural And Fe(III) Modified Zeolite Tuff Containing Clinoptilolite Mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirotiak, Maro; Lipovsk, Marek; Bartoov, Alica

    2015-06-01

    In the research described in this paper, studied was sorption capacity of natural and ferric modification of zeolite tuff containing mineral clinoptilolite from the Nin Hrabovec deposit to remove potentially toxic metals (ionic forms of chromium, nickel, copper and aluminium) from their water solutions. We reported that the Fe (III) zeolite has an enhanced ability to sorption of Cu (II), and a slight improvement occurs in the case of Cr (VI) and Ni (II). On the other hand, the deterioration was observed in the case of Al (III) adsorption.

  4. A novel cysteine sensor based on modification of carbon paste electrode by Fe(II)-exchanged zeolite X nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Habibeh-Sadat; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza; Karimi-Shamsabadi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor based on carbon paste electrode (CPE) modified with iron(II) doped into a synthesized nano-particles of zeolite X (Fe(II)-NX/ZCME) was constructed, which is highly sensitive for detection of cysteine (Cys). The modified electrode showed an excellent electro-activity for oxidation of Cys in phosphate buffer at pH7.4. It has been found that anodic peak potential of Cys oxidation, compared with the unmodified CPE (UCPE), was shifted towards negative values at the surface of the modified electrode under the optimum condition. The peak current increased linearly with the Cys concentration in the wide range of 5.010(-9)-3.010(-3)molL(-1). The very low detection limit was obtained to be 1.510(-10)molL(-1). Finally, the modified electrode was used as a selective, simple and precise new electrochemical sensor for the determination of Cys in the real samples, such as pharmaceutical and biological fluids. PMID:26478313

  5. COPPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a review of current knowledge of the distribution of copper in the environment and living things. Metabolism and the effects of copper in the biosphere are also considered. Copper compounds are common and widely distributed in nature. They are also extensively mined...

  6. Oxidative modification to cysteine sulfonic acid of Cys111 in human copper-zinc superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Noriko; Nakano, Miyako; Kato, Shinsuke; Yoshihara, Daisaku; Ookawara, Tomomi; Eguchi, Hironobu; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Suzuki, Keiichiro

    2007-12-01

    Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) plays a protective role against oxidative stress. On the other hand, recent studies suggest that SOD1 itself is a major target of oxidative damage and has its own pathogenicity in various neurodegenerative diseases, including familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Only human and great ape SOD1s among mammals have the highly reactive free cysteine residue, Cys(111), at the surface of the SOD1 molecule. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Cys(111) in the oxidative damage of the SOD1 protein, by comparing the oxidative susceptibility of recombinant human SOD1 modified with 2-mercaptoethanol at Cys(111) (2-ME-SOD1) to wild-type SOD1. Wild-type SOD1 was more sensitive to oxidation by hydrogen peroxide-generating fragments, oligomers, and charge isomers compared with 2-ME-SOD1. Moreover, wild-type SOD1, but not 2-ME-SOD1, generated an upper shifted band in reducing SDS-PAGE even by air oxidation. Using mass spectrometry and limited proteolysis, this upper band was identified as an oxidized subunit of SOD1; the sulfhydryl group (Cys-SH) of Cys(111) was selectively oxidized to cysteine sulfinic acid (Cys-SO(2)H) and to cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO(3)H). The antibody raised against a synthesized peptide containing Cys(111)-SO(3)H reacted with only the Cys(111)-peroxidized SOD1 by Western blot analysis and labeled Lewy body-like hyaline inclusions and vacuole rims in the spinal cord of human SOD1-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice by immunohistochemical analysis. These results suggest that Cys(111) is a primary target for oxidative modification and plays an important role in oxidative damage to human SOD1, including familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mutants. PMID:17913710

  7. The antibrowning agent sulfite inactivates Agaricus bisporus tyrosinase through covalent modification of the copper-B site.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Tomas F M; Gruppen, Harry; Sforza, Stefano; van Berkel, Willem J H; Vincken, Jean-Paul

    2013-12-01

    Sulfite salts are widely used as antibrowning agents in food processing. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism by which sulfite prevents enzymatic browning has remained unknown. Here, we show that sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO3) irreversibly blocks the active site of tyrosinase from the edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus, and that the competitive inhibitors tropolone and kojic acid protect the enzyme from NaHSO3 inactivation. LC-MS analysis of pepsin digests of NaHSO3 -treated tyrosinase revealed two peptides showing a neutral loss corresponding to the mass of SO3 upon MS(2) fragmentation. These peptides were found to be homologous peptides containing two of the three histidine residues that form the copper-B-binding site of mushroom tyrosinase isoform PPO3 and mushroom tyrosinase isoform PPO4, which were both present in the tyrosinase preparation used. Peptides showing this neutral loss behavior were not found in the untreated control. Comparison of the effects of NaHSO3 on apo-tyrosinase and holo-tyrosinase indicated that inactivation is facilitated by the active site copper ions. These data provide compelling evidence that inactivation of mushroom tyrosinase by NaHSO3 occurs through covalent modification of a single amino-acid residue, probably via addition of HSO3(-) to one of the copper-coordinating histidines in the copper-B site of the enzyme. PMID:24112416

  8. Inactivation of high and low pathogenic avian influenza virus H5 subtypes by copper ions incorporated in zeolite-textile materials.

    PubMed

    Imai, Kunitoshi; Ogawa, Haruko; Bui, Vuong Nghia; Inoue, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Jiro; Ohba, Masayoshi; Yamamoto, Yu; Nakamura, Kikuyasu

    2012-02-01

    The effect of cotton textiles containing Cu(2+) held by zeolites (CuZeo-textile) on the inactivation of H5 subtype viruses was examined. Allantoic fluid (AF) containing a virus (AF virus) (0.1 ml) was applied to the textile (33-cm), and incubated for a specific period at ambient temperature. After each incubation, 0.9 ml of culture medium was added followed by squeezing to recover the virus into the medium. The recovered virus was titrated using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells or 10-day-old embryonated chicken eggs. The highly pathogenic H5N1 and the low pathogenic H5N3 viruses were inactivated on the CuZeo-textile, even after short incubation. The titer of A/chicken/Yamaguchi/7/04 (H5N1) in MDCK cells and in eggs declined by >5.0 log(10) and 5.0 log(10), respectively, in 30 s. The titer of A/whooper swan/Hokkaido/1/08 (H5N1) in MDCK cells declined by 2.3 and 3.5 in 1 and 5 min, respectively. When A/whistling swan/Shimane/499/83 (H5N3) was treated on the CuZeo-textile for 10 min, the titer declined by >5.0 log(10) in MDCK cells and by >3.5 log(10) in eggs. In contrast, no decrease in the titers was observed on cotton textiles containing zeolites alone (Zeo-textile). Neither cytopathic effects nor NP antigens were detected in MDCK cells inoculated with the H5N1 virus treated on the CuZeo-textile. The viral genes (H5, N1, M, and NP) were amplified from the virus treated on the CuZeo-textile by RT-PCR. The hemagglutinating activity of the CuZeo-textile treated virus was unaffected, indicating that virus-receptor interactions were maintained. Electron microscopic analysis revealed a small number of particles with morphological abnormalities in the H5N3 virus samples recovered immediately from the CuZeo-textile, while no particles were detectable in the 10-min treated sample, suggesting the rapid destruction of virions by the Cu(2+) in the CuZeo-textile. The loss of infectivity of H5 viruses could, therefore, be due to the destruction of virions by Cu(2+). Interestingly, CuCl(2) treatment (500 and 5000 ?M) did not have an antiviral effect on the AF viruses (H5N1 and H5N3) even after 48 h of incubation, although the titer of the purified H5N3 virus treated with CuCl(2) declined greatly. The antiviral effect was inhibited by adding the AF to the purified H5N3 virus prior to the CuCl(2) treatment. The known antibacterial/antifungal activities of copper suggest that the CuZeo-textile can be applied at a high level of hygiene in both animals and humans. PMID:22179064

  9. Modification of soil microbial activity and several hydrolases in a forest soil artificially contaminated with copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellas, Rosa; Leirs, M? Carmen; Gil-Sotres, Fernando; Trasar-Cepeda, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    Soils have long been exposed to the adverse effects of human activities, which negatively affect soil biological activity. As a result of their functions and ubiquitous presence microorganisms can serve as environmental indicators of soil pollution. Some features of soil microorganisms, such as the microbial biomass size, respiration rate, and enzyme activity are often used as bioindicators of the ecotoxicity of heavy metals. Although copper is essential for microorganisms, excessive concentrations have a negative influence on processes mediated by microorganisms. In this study we measured the response of some microbial indicators to Cu pollution in a forest soil, with the aim of evaluating their potential for predicting Cu contamination. Samples of an Ah horizon from a forest soil under oakwood vegetation (Quercus robur L.) were contaminated in the laboratory with copper added at different doses (0, 120, 360, 1080 and 3240 mg kg-1) as CuCl22H2O. The soil samples were kept for 7 days at 25 C and at a moisture content corresponding to the water holding capacity, and thereafter were analysed for carbon and nitrogen mineralization capacity, microbial biomass C, seed germination and root elongation tests, and for urease, phosphomonoesterase, catalase and -glucosidase activities. In addition, carbon mineralization kinetics were studied, by plotting the log of residual C against incubation time, and the metabolic coefficient, qCO2, was estimated. Both organic carbon and nitrogen mineralization were lower in polluted samples, with the greatest decrease observed in the sample contaminated with 1080 mg kg-1. In all samples carbon mineralization followed first order kinetics; the C mineralization constant was lower in contaminated than in uncontaminated samples and, in general, decreased with increasing doses of copper. Moreover, it appears that copper contamination not only reduced the N mineralization capacity, but also modified the N mineralization process, since in the contaminated samples all of the inorganic nitrogen was present as ammonium, probably because of inhibition of nitrification. There was a marked decrease in biomass-C with addition of copper, and the decrease was more acute at intermediate doses (average decrease, 73%). Despite the decreases in microbial biomass and mineralized C, the value of qCO2 increased after the addition of copper. Urease activity was strongly affected by the presence of copper and the decrease was proportional to the dose; the activity at the highest dose was only 96% of that in the uncontaminated sample. Phosphomonoesterase activity was also affected by addition of copper; the reduction in activity was less than for urease and the greatest reduction was observed for the dose of 1080 mg kg-1 of copper. Catalase activity was affected by the contamination, but no clear trend was observed in relation to the dose of copper. -glucosidase was scarcely modified by the contamination but an increase in activity was observed at the highest dose of copper. Seed germination was not affected by copper contamination, since it only showed a clear decrease for the sample contaminated with the highest dose of copper, while root elongation decreased sharply with doses higher than 120 mg kg-1 of copper. The combined germination-elongation index followed a similar pattern to that of root elongation. For all investigated properties showing a reduction of more than 50%, the response to copper contamination was fitted to a sigmoidal dose-response model, in order to estimate the ED50 values. The ED50 values were calculated for microbial biomass, urease, root elongation and germination-elongation index, and similar values were obtained, ranging from 340 to 405 mg kg-1 Cu. The ED50 values may therefore provide a good estimation of soil deterioration.

  10. Copper

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper ; CASRN 7440 - 50 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  11. Copper- and magnesium protoporphyrin complexes inhibit oxidative modification of LDL induced by hemin, transition metal ions and tyrosyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Kapiotis, Stylianos; Hermann, Marcela; Exner, Markus; Laggner, Hilde; Gmeiner, Bernhard M K

    2005-11-01

    The oxidative modification of LDL may play an important role in the early events of atherogenesis. Thus the identification of antioxidative compounds may be of therapeutic and prophylactic importance regarding cardiovascular disease. Copper-chlorophyllin (Cu-CHL), a Cu(2+)-protoporphyrin IX complex, has been reported to inhibit lipid oxidation in biological membranes and liposomes. Hemin (Fe(3+)-protoporphyrin IX) has been shown to bind to LDL thereby inducing lipid peroxidation. As Cu-CHL has a similar structure as hemin, one may assume that Cu-CHL may compete with the hemin action on LDL. Therefore, in the present study Cu-CHL and the related compound magnesium-chlorophyllin (Mg-CHL) were examined in their ability to inhibit LDL oxidation initiated by hemin and other LDL oxidizing systems. LDL oxidation by hemin in presence of H(2)O(2) was strongly inhibited by both CHLs. Both chlorophyllins were also capable of effectively inhibiting LDL oxidation initiated by transition metal ions (Cu(2+)), human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and tyrosyl radicals generated by myeloperoxidase (MPO) in presence of H(2)O(2) and tyrosine. Cu- and Mg-CHL showed radical scavenging ability as demonstrated by the diphenylpicrylhydracylradical (DPPH)-radical assay and estimation of phenoxyl radical generated diphenyl (dityrosine) formation. As assessed by ultracentrifugation the chlorophyllins were found to bind to LDL (and HDL) in serum. The present study shows that copper chlorophyllin (Cu-CHL) and its magnesium analog could act as potent antagonists of atherogenic LDL modification induced by various oxidative stimuli. As inhibitory effects of the CHLs were found at concentrations as low as 1 mumol/l, which can be achieved in humans, the results may be physiologically/therapeutically relevant. PMID:16298745

  12. Simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} abatement using zeolite-supported copper. Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

    1994-12-31

    A flow reactor is being constructed at Georgia Tech for the NO decomposition reaction. The reactor is partially complete with the construction of a flow meter/controller system and a temperature controller system in place now. The stainless steel reactor tube and the furnace have been fabricated and fit to the sub-assembly containing the temperature control devices. The reactor sampling system is under fabrication. The authors plan to purchase a GC-MS to determine the composition of the exit gas. They have used Raman spectroscopy to characterize Zeolite A, a cobalt ethylenediamine complex, Co(en){sub 3}Cl{sub 3}, and Zeolite A impregnated with the cobalt complex. The Raman spectra from 1,700--100 cm{sup {minus}1} are shown.

  13. Kinetics of zeolite dealumination in steam

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, C.D.; Labouriau, A.; Crawford, S.N.; Romero, R.; Quirin, J.; Earl, W.L.

    1998-08-01

    Zeolite dealumination is a well known phenomenon that contributes to the deactivation or activation of catalysts in several different applications. The most obvious effect is in acid catalysis where dealumination under reaction conditions removes the Broensted sites, thus deactivating the catalyst. The authors are interested in the use of cation exchanged zeolites as selective reduction catalysts for removal of NO{sub x} from exhaust streams, particularly from automotive exhaust. In this case, copper exchanged ZSM-5 has been shown to be an effective catalyst for the generic reaction of NO{sub x} with hydrocarbons. However, high temperature and steam in combustion exhaust causes dealumination and consequent migration of copper out of the zeolite structure resulting in rapid deactivation of the catalyst. Dealumination of zeolites has been reported by many authors in uncountable papers and cannot be reviewed here. However, to the authors` knowledge there are no reports on the kinetics of dealumination under varying conditions of temperature and steam. By measuring the kinetics of dealumination with different zeolites and exchange cations they expect to develop working models of the dealumination process that will allow control of zeolite deactivation. This manuscript is a description of the basic techniques used and a progress report on the very beginning of this study.

  14. An improved performance of copper phthalocyanine OFETs with channel and source/drain contact modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huanqin, Dang; Xiaoming, Wu; Xiaowei, Sun; Runqiu, Zou; Ruochuan, Zhang; Shougen, Yin

    2015-10-01

    We report an effective method to improve the performance of p-type copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) based organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) by employing a thin para-quaterphenyl (p-4p) film and simultaneously applying V2O5 to the source/drain regions. The p-4p layer was inserted between the insulating layer and the active layer, and V2O5 layer was added between CuPc and Al in the source–drain (S/D) area. As a result, the field-effect saturation mobility and on/off current ratio of the optimized device were improved to 5 × 10‑2 cm2/(V·s) and 104, respectively. We believe that because p-4p could induce CuPc to form a highly oriented and continuous film, this resulted in the better injection and transport of the carriers. Moreover, by introducing the V2O5 electrode's modified layers, the height of the carrier injection barrier could be effectively tuned and the contact resistance could be reduced. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 60676051), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2013A A014201), the Scientific Developing Foundation of Tianjin Education Commission (No. 2011ZD02), the Key Science and Technology Support Program of Tianjin (No. 14ZCZDGX00006), and the Foundation of Key Discipline of Material Physics and Chemistry of Tianjin.

  15. Physical, chemical and catalytic properties of high modules Y zeolite obtained by direct synthesis compared with ultrastable Y zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Levinbuk, M.I.; Melnikov, V.B.; Pavlov, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    Industrial preparation of Y zeolites is widely spread throughout the world. However, unlike the zeolites of pentasil (ZSM) series, their catalytic activity and selectivity are controlled by molar SiO{sub 2}; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio, which is varied by the method of post synthesis modification and not by direct synthesis. Zeolites obtain in such a way (hydrothermal - USY or chemical treatments-LZ-210) with the modulus above 5.5 are called ultrastable. Defects of ultrastable zeolites are: partial distortions of the crystalline framework, appearance of the aluminum in the sample beyond the framework, and the higher cost of zeolite product at expense of construction and operating charges. These additional expenses are due to the necessity of special blocks for modification of NaY zeolite with modulus 4.5-5.0 synthesized by traditional methods.

  16. Modification research on in wall of capillary copper tube with Norland optical adhesive 68 in a double stereo PCR microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Wang, F J; Wang, C Y; Yu, K X; Ma, Y; Chen, T; Li, Y H; Zheng, Y

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a Norland optical adhesive 68 (NOA68) film, approximately 2.2 ?m thick, was manufactured using ultraviolet solidified NOA68 in apparatus manufacturing film on the inwall of a capillary copper pipe, developed in our laboratory. The roughness of the inwall of capillary copper pipe was improved from Ra = 0.766 to 0.204 ?m and the contact angle was improved from approximately 96 to 55, increasing hydrophilicity. Polymerase chain reaction experiments indicated that the ratio of work pressure in the microfluidic chip before modification to that after modification was 2.71/1, indicating that the extension efficiency increased. Our results provide a basis for the construction of a microform chip based on function integration. PMID:26535674

  17. Interfacial studies of bimetallic corrosion in copper/ruthenium systems and silicon surface modification with organic and organometallic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalla, Praveen Reddy

    To form Cu interconnects, dual-damascene techniques like chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) and post-CMP became inevitable for removing the "overburden" Cu and for planarizing the wafer surface. During the CMP processing, Cu interconnects and barrier metal layers experience different electrochemical interactions depending on the slurry composition, pH, and ohmic contact with adjacent metal layers that would set corrosion process. Ruthenium as a replacement of existing diffusion barrier layer will require extensive investigation to eliminate or control the corrosion process during CMP and post CMP. Bimetallic corrosion process was investigated in the ammonium citrate (a complexing agent of Cu in CMP solutions) using micro test patterns and potentiodynamic measurements. The enhanced bimetallic corrosion of copper observed is due to noble behavior of the ruthenium metal. Cu formed Cu(II)-amine and Cu(Il)citrate complexes in alkaline and acidic solutions and a corrosion mechanism has been proposed. The currently used metallization process (PVD, CVD and ALD) require ultra-high vacuum and are expensive. A novel method of Si surface metallization process is discussed that can be achieved at room temperature and does not require ultra-high vacuum. Ruthenation of Si surface through strong Si-Ru covalent bond formation is demonstrated using different ruthenium carbonyl compounds. RBS analysis accounted for monolayer to sub-monolayer coverage of Si surface. Interaction of other metal carbonyl (like Fe, Re, and Rh) is also discussed. The silicon (111) surface modifications with vinyl terminated organic compounds were investigated to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and there after these surfaces were further functionalized. Acrylonitrile and vinylbenzophenone were employed for these studies. Ketone group of vinylbenzophenone anchored to Si surface demonstrated reactivity with reducing and oxidizing agents.

  18. Simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} abatement using zeolite-supported copper. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

    1995-12-01

    We have significantly improved on our earlier results with a copper-impregnated alumina, obtaining reproducible results for the impregnation procedure and linear behavior with solution concentration of the precursor. The copper acetylacetonate precursor is adsorbed molecularly onto the alumina surface, with no noticeable decomposition. The adsorbed complex appears to form layers on the alumina surface, similar to results found using the same complex with a silica substrate. The materials start out as light blue powders, and after oxidation are light green. Using infrared spectroscopy, we have examined the in situ adsorption and oxidation of SO{sub 2} on the oxidized sorbent, which is dispersed copper oxide supported on aluminum oxide, and have observed that the initial species formed correspond to aluminum sulfate and aluminum sulfate. The sulfate is formed at temperatures much lower than similar experiments studying SO{sub 2} adsorption on alumina and sodium-doped alumina. As a result of oxidation, the adsorbed sulfur species, which begin as aluminum sulfate and sulfate, are converted to copper sulfate.

  19. Preparation of a Versatile Bifunctional Zeolite for Targeted Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ndiege, Nicholas; Raidoo, Renugan; Schultz, Michael K.; Larsen, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Bifunctional zeolite Y was prepared for use in targeted in vivo molecular imaging applications. The strategy involved functionalization of the external surface of zeolite Y with chloropropyltriethoxysilane followed by reaction with sodium azide to form azide-functionalized NaY, which is amenable to copper(1) catalyzed click chemistry. In this study, a model alkyne (4-pentyn-1-ol) was attached to the azide-terminated surface via click chemistry to demonstrate feasibility for attachment of molecular targeting vectors (e.g., peptides, aptamers) to the zeolite surface. The modified particle efficiently incorporates the imaging radioisotope gallium-68 (68Ga) into the pores of the azide-functionalized NaY zeolite to form a stable bifunctional molecular targeting vector. The result is a versatile clickable zeolite platform that can be tailored for future in vivo molecular targeting and imaging modalities. PMID:21306141

  20. ZEOLITES: EFFECTIVE WATER PURIFIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are known for their adsorption, ion exchange and catalytic properties. Various natural zeolites are used as odor and moisture adsorbents and water softeners. Due to their acidic nature, synthetic zeolites are commonly employed as solid acid catalysts in petrochemical ind...

  1. Metal Oxide/Zeolite Combination Absorbs H2S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1989-01-01

    Mixed copper and molybdenum oxides supported in pores of zeolite found to remove H2S from mixture of gases rich in hydrogen and steam, at temperatures from 256 to 538 degree C. Absorber of H2S needed to clean up gas streams from fuel processors that incorporate high-temperature steam reformers or hydrodesulfurizing units. Zeolites chosen as supporting materials because of their high porosity, rigidity, alumina content, and variety of both composition and form.

  2. Modification of the near-surface layers of a copper foil under the action of a volume gas discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulepov, M. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Goncharenko, I. M.; Koval', N. N.; Kostyrya, I. D.

    2008-04-01

    We have studied the modification of the near-surface layers of a copper foil under the action of a volume gas discharge, which was generated in air at atmospheric pressure by nanosecond high-voltage pulses of both negative and positive polarity applied between the foil and an electrode with a small radius of curvature. It is established that the surface layer of the discharge-treated copper foil in the central region is cleaned from carbon contaminations, while oxygen atoms penetrate in depth of the foil. The depth of a cleaned layer depends on the polarity of voltage pulses. For the positive voltage polarity on the foil, the cleaning takes place up to a depth exceeding 50 nm, while oxygen penetrates up to a depth of about 25 nm.

  3. Zeolite catalysis: technology

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.

    1980-07-01

    Zeolites have been used as catalysts in industry since the early nineteen sixties. The great majority of commercial applications employ one of three zeolite types: zeolite Y; Mordenite; ZSM-5. By far the largest use of zeolites is in catalytic cracking, and to a lesser extent in hydrocracking. This paper reviews the rapid development of zeolite catalysis and its application in industries such as: the production of gasoline by catalytic cracking of petroleum; isomerization of C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ paraffin hydrocarbons; alkylation of aromatics with olefins; xylene isomerization; and conversion of methanol to gasoline.

  4. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Rollins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  5. Systems including catalysts in porous zeolite materials within a reactor for use in synthesizing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Rolllins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-07-24

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  6. Application of diffuse discharges of atmospheric pressure formed by runaway electrons for modification of copper and stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.; Erofeev, M. V.

    2015-12-01

    The results of studies devoted to the influence of a runaway electron pre-ionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) formed in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure on the surface of copper and stainless steel are presented. Nanosecond high-voltage pulses were used to obtain REP DD in different gases at high pressures in a chamber with a flat anode and a cathode possessing a small radius of curvature. This mode of discharge was implemented owing to the generation of runaway electrons and X-rays. The conditions under which the surface of copper and stainless steel was cleaned from carbon and oxidized are described.

  7. The removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution using natural Jordanian zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taamneh, Yazan; Sharadqah, Suhail

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the adsorption process of cadmium and copper using natural Jordanian (NJ) zeolite as adsorbent has been experimentally estimated. The samples of NJ zeolite were obtained from Al Mafraq discrete, north east of Jordan. The influence of the bulk concentration (C o), contact time (t) and different adsorbent masses (m) of NJ zeolite on the removal of heavy metal were evaluated. These variables had a considerable function in promoting the sorption process of heavy metal using the NJ zeolite. The initial concentration of heavy metals in the stock solution was extended between 80 and 600 mg/L. The batch adsorption method was employed to investigate the adsorption process. The experimental data were correlated using Freundlich and Langmuir empirical formula. The ability of NJ zeolite to eliminate cadmium and copper was estimated according to Langmuir isotherm empirical formula and found 25.9 and 14.3 mg/g for cadmium and copper, respectively. The kinetics of adsorption of cadmium and copper have been analyzed and correlated by first-order and second-order reaction model. It was noticed that adsorption of cadmium and copper was better correlated with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The results presented that NJ zeolite is practical adsorbent for removing cadmium and copper ion metal.

  8. Removal of metal cations from water using zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Zamzow, M.J.; Murphy, J.E. )

    1992-11-01

    Zeolites from abundant natural deposits were investigated by the Bureau of Mines for efficiently cleaning up mining industry wastewaters. Twenty-four zeolite samples were analyzed by x-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma. These included clinoptilolite, mordenite, chabazite, erionite, and phillipsite. Bulk densities of a sized fraction ([minus]40, +65 mesh) varied from 0.48 to 0.93 g/ml. Attrition losses ranged from 1 to 18% during an hour-long shake test. The 24 zeolites and an ion-exchange resin were tested for the uptake of Cd, Cu, and Zn. Of the natural zeolites, phillipsite proved to be the most efficient, while the mordenites had the lowest uptakes. Sodium was the most effective exchangeable ion for exchange of heavy metals. Wastewater from an abandoned copper mine in Nevada was used to test the effectiveness of clinoptilolite for treating a multi-ion wastewater. The metal ions Fe[sup 3+], Cu[sup 2+], and Zn[sup 2+] in the copper mine wastewater were removed to below drinking water standards, but Mn[sup 2+] and Ni[sup 2+] were not. Calcium and NH[sub 4][sup +] interfered with the uptake of heavy metals. Adsorbed heavy metals were eluted from zeolites with a 3% NaCl solution. Heavy metals were concentrated in the eluates up to 30-fold relative to the waste solution. Anions were not adsorbed by the zeolites.

  9. Synthesis of 'unfeasible' zeolites.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Michal; Wheatley, Paul S; Navarro, Marta; Roth, Wieslaw J; Poloij, Miroslav; Mayoral, Alvaro; Eliov, Pavla; Nachtigall, Petr; ?ejka, Ji?; Morris, Russell E

    2016-01-01

    Zeolites are porous aluminosilicate materials that have found applications in many different technologies. However, although simulations suggest that there are millions of possible zeolite topologies, only a little over 200 zeolite frameworks of all compositions are currently known, of which about 50 are pure silica materials. This is known as the zeolite conundrum-why have so few of all the possible structures been made? Several criteria have been formulated to explain why most zeolites are unfeasible synthesis targets. Here we demonstrate the synthesis of two such 'unfeasible' zeolites, IPC-9 and IPC-10, through the assembly-disassembly-organization-reassembly mechanism. These new high-silica zeolites have rare characteristics, such as windows that comprise odd-membered rings. Their synthesis opens up the possibility of preparing other zeolites that have not been accessible by traditional solvothermal synthetic methods. We envisage that these findings may lead to a step change in the number and types of zeolites available for future applications. PMID:26673264

  10. Trialkylphosphine-stabilized copper(I) dialkylaluminum(III) ethanedithiolate complexes: single-source precursors and a novel modification of copper aluminum disulfide.

    PubMed

    Kischel, Marcus; Dornberg, Gregor; Krautscheid, Harald

    2014-02-01

    Four types of trialkylphosphine-stabilized copper dialkylaluminum ethanedithiolate complexes with the compositions [(i)Pr3PCuSC2H4SAlR2]2 (R = Me, Et, (i)Pr, (t)Bu, vinyl), [((i)Pr3PCu)3(SC2H4S)2AlR2] (R = Et), [(Me3P)3CuSC2H4SAlR2] (R = Me, Et), and [(Me3P)4Cu][SC2H4SAlR2] (R = Me, Et, (i)Pr) have been synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. The first series features an eight-membered (CuSAlS)2 ring as the core structure. The trimethylphosphine complexes can be distinguished as nonionic and ionic compounds, depending on the amount of trimethylphosphine. In systematic thermogravimetric studies, the complexes were converted into the ternary semiconductor CuAlS2. In this process, a novel wurtzite-type CuAlS2 phase was identified. Binary copper sulfide is observed as a minor side product in thermolysis reactions when volatile trialkylaluminum is released. The thermolysis reactions are completed at temperatures between 330 and 470 C, depending on the aluminum alkyls. The Cu/Al ratio and phase purity of the thermolysis products were determined by Rietveld analysis of the powder X-ray diffraction patterns and by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy measurements. To our knowledge, this is the first study of molecular single-source precursors for CuAlS2. PMID:24450969

  11. Nano- and microsized zeolites as a perspective material for potentiometric biosensors creation.

    PubMed

    Soldatkin, Oleksandr O; Shelyakina, Margaryta K; Arkhypova, Valentyna N; Soy, Esin; Kirdeciler, Salih Kaan; Ozansoy Kasap, Berna; Lagarde, Florence; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Akata Kurç, Burcu; Soldatkin, Alexei P; Dzyadevych, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    A number of potentiometric biosensors based on coimmobilization of enzymes with different types of zeolite on pH-ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) have been developed. Their working characteristics have been determined and compared. It was shown that clinoptilolite and zeolite Beta polymorph A (BEA) are more promising for creating biosensors than zeolite A. Changing the concentration of zeolite BEA in membranes, it is possible to extend the biosensor linear measurement range. The two-layer method of deposition of the enzyme with clinoptilolite was found to provide a significant increase in the biosensor sensitivity to substrates, whereas thermal modification of the zeolite BEA crystals can improve analytical characteristics of potentiometric biosensors for detection of toxic substances. These results show that it is possible to regulate the ISFET characteristics for different enzyme-based biosensors by tailoring the electrode surfaces via different zeolites. This makes zeolites strong candidates for integration into biosensors as ISFET modifiers. PMID:25852356

  12. Oxidative regeneration of toluene-saturated natural zeolite by gaseous ozone: the influence of zeolite chemical surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Alejandro, Serguei; Valdés, Héctor; Manéro, Marie-Hélène; Zaror, Claudio A

    2014-06-15

    In this study, the effect of zeolite chemical surface characteristics on the oxidative regeneration of toluene saturated-zeolite samples is investigated. A Chilean natural zeolite (53% clinoptilolite, 40% mordenite and 7% quartz) was chemically modified by acid treatment with hydrochloric acid and by ion-exchange with ammonium sulphate. Thermal pre-treatments at 623 and 823K were applied and six zeolite samples with different chemical surface characteristics were generated. Chemical modification of natural zeolite followed by thermal out-gassing allows distinguishing the role of acidic surface sites on the regeneration of exhausted zeolites. An increase in Brønsted acid sites on zeolite surface is observed as a result of ammonium-exchange treatment followed by thermal treatment at 623K, thus increasing the adsorption capacity toward toluene. High ozone consumption could be associated to a high content of Lewis acid sites, since these could decompose ozone into atomic active oxygen species. Then, surface oxidation reactions could take part among adsorbed toluene at Brønsted acid sites and surface atomic oxygen species, reducing the amount of adsorbed toluene after the regenerative oxidation with ozone. Experimental results show that the presence of adsorbed oxidation by-products has a negative impact on the recovery of zeolite adsorption capacity. PMID:24794812

  13. Sodium clusters in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobet, P. J.; Martens, L. R. M.; Vermeiren, W. J. M.; Huybrechts, D. R. C.; Jacobs, P. A.

    1989-03-01

    The method of loading sodium clusters in zeolites, consisting of the controlled thermal decomposition of physisorbed sodium azide, is discussed. The influence of the azide loading, the azide decomposition rate and the sintering process on the amount of ionic and metallic sodium clusters in zeolite Y was followed by ESR. The method is compared to other metal deposition techniques.

  14. Influence of crystallite size on cation conductivity in faujasitic zeolites.

    PubMed

    Severance, Michael; Zheng, Yangong; Heck, Elizabeth; Dutta, Prabir K

    2013-12-19

    The influence of particle size on the ionic conductivity of ceramic materials is an active area of research, and novel effects are observed as particles approach the nanoscale in size. Zeolites are crystalline aluminosilicates with ion-exchangeable cations that are responsible for ionic conductivity at high temperatures. In this paper, we present systematic results for the first time of ionic conductivity in alkali metal ion-exchanged faujasitic zeolites with morphologies ranging from a zeolite membrane, micrometer-sized, submicrometer, and nanoparticles of zeolite. Using impedance spectroscopy in the range of 10 MHz to 0.1 Hz, we have obtained the activation energy (E(act)) of cation motion with these various morphologies in the temperature range of 525-625 °C. Overall, the E(act) decreases with Si/Al ratio. Surface modification of the zeolite particles was carried out with a silylating agent, which upon high temperature calcination should lead to the formation of a monolayer Si-O-Si film on the particle surface. This surface modification had minimal influence on the E(act) of micrometer-sized zeolites. However, E(act) increased rapidly as the zeolite particle approached the nanoscale. These observations led us to propose that, for the high-temperature, low-frequency (10(4)-10(5) Hz), long-range ionic conduction in zeolites, cation hopping across grain boundaries is relevant to ion transport, especially as the size of the crystallite approaches the nanoscale. Intergrain boundaries are more defective in the nanosized zeolite and contribute to the higher E(act). PMID:24041267

  15. Removal of Ca2+ and Zn2+ from aqueous solutions by zeolites NaP and KP.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Alias Mohd; Malek, Nik Ahmad Nizam Nik; Kamaruzaman, Nurul Asyikin; Adil, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Zeolites P in sodium (NaP) and potassium (KP) forms were used as adsorbents for the removal of calcium (Ca2+) and zinc (Zn2+) cations from aqueous solutions. Zeolite KP was prepared by ion exchange of K+ with Na+ which neutralizes the negative charge of the zeolite P framework structure. The ion exchange capacity of K+ on zeolite NaP was determined through the Freundlich isotherm equilibrium study. Characterization of zeolite KP was determined using infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. From the characterization, the structure of zeolite KP was found to remain stable after the ion exchange process. Zeolites KP and NaP were used for the removal of Ca and Zn from solution. The amount of Ca2+ and Zn2+ in aqueous solution before and after the adsorption by zeolites was analysed using the flame atomic absorption spectroscopy method. The removal of Ca2+ and Zn2+ followed the Freundlich isotherm rather than the Langmuir isotherm model. This result also revealed that zeolite KP adsorbs Ca2+ and Zn2+ more than zeolite NaP and proved that modification of zeolite NaP with potassium leads to an increase in the adsorption efficiency of the zeolite. Therefore, the zeolites NaP and KP can be used for water softening (Ca removal) and reducing water pollution/toxicity (Zn removal). PMID:20232677

  16. Studies of anions sorption on natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Barczyk, K; Mozgawa, W; Krl, M

    2014-12-10

    This work presents results of FT-IR spectroscopic studies of anions-chromate, phosphate and arsenate - sorbed from aqueous solutions (different concentrations of anions) on zeolites. The sorption has been conducted on natural zeolites from different structural groups, i.e. chabazite, mordenite, ferrierite and clinoptilolite. The Na-forms of sorbents were exchanged with hexadecyltrimethylammonium cations (HDTMA(+)) and organo-zeolites were obtained. External cation exchange capacities (ECEC) of organo-zeolites were measured. Their values are 17mmol/100g for chabazite, 4mmol/100g for mordenite and ferrierite and 10mmol/100g for clinoptilolite. The used initial inputs of HDTMA correspond to 100% and 200% ECEC of the minerals. Organo-modificated sorbents were subsequently used for immobilization of mentioned anions. It was proven that aforementioned anions' sorption causes changes in IR spectra of the HDTMA-zeolites. These alterations are dependent on the kind of anions that were sorbed. In all cases, variations are due to bands corresponding to the characteristic Si-O(Si,Al) vibrations (occurring in alumino- and silicooxygen tetrahedra building spatial framework of zeolites). Alkylammonium surfactant vibrations have also been observed. Systematic changes in the spectra connected with the anion concentration in the initial solution have been revealed. The amounts of sorbed CrO4(2-), AsO4(3-) and PO4(3-) ions were calculated from the difference between their concentrations in solutions before (initial concentration) and after (equilibrium concentration) sorption experiments. Concentrations of anions were determined by spectrophotometric method. PMID:25002191

  17. Potential of sustainable hierarchical zeolites in the valorization of ?-pinene.

    PubMed

    Nuttens, Nicolas; Verboekend, Danny; Deneyer, Aron; Van Aelst, Joost; Sels, Bert F

    2015-04-13

    In the valorization of ?-pinene, which is an important biomass intermediate derived from turpentine oil, hierarchical (mesoporous) zeolites represent a superior class of catalysts. Hierarchical USY, ZSM-5, and beta zeolites have been prepared, characterized, and catalytically evaluated, with the aim of combining the highest catalytic performance with the most sustainable synthetic protocol. These zeolites are prepared by alkaline treatment in aqueous solutions of NH4 OH, NaOH, diethylamine, and NaOH complemented with tetrapropylammonium bromide. The hierarchical USY zeolite is the most attractive catalyst of the tested series, and is able to combine an overall organic-free synthesis with an up to sixfold activity enhancement and comparable selectivity over the conventional USY zeolite. This superior performance relates to a threefold greater activity than that of the commercial standard, namely, H2 SO4 /TiO2 . Correlation of the obtained benefits to the amount of solid lost during the postsynthetic modifications highlights that the highest activity gains are obtained with minor leaching. Furthermore, a highly zeolitic character, as determined by bulk XRD, is beneficial, but not crucial, in the conversion of ?-pinene. The alkaline treatments not only result in a higher overall activity, but also a more functional external surface area, attaining up to four times the pinene conversions per square nanometer. The efficiency of the hierarchical USY zeolite is concomitantly demonstrated in the conversion of limonene and turpentine oil, which emphasizes its industrial potential. PMID:25736719

  18. Diagram of Zeolite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing (CAMMP) in Cambridge, MA, a NASA-sponsored Commercial Space Center, is working to improve zeolite materials for storing hydrogen fuel. CAMMP is also applying zeolites to detergents, optical cables, gas and vapor detection for environmental monitoring and control, and chemical production techniques that significantly reduce by-products that are hazardous to the environment. Depicted here is one of the many here complex geometric shapes which make them highly absorbent. Zeolite experiments have also been conducted aboard the International Space Station

  19. Zeolites: Exploring Molecular Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Derewinski, Mirek

    2015-05-22

    Synthetic zeolites contain microscopic channels, sort of like a sponge. They have many uses, such as helping laundry detergent lather, absorbing liquid in kitty litter, and as catalysts to produce fuel. Of the hundreds of types of zeolites, only about 15 are used for catalysis. PNNL catalysis scientists Ilke Arslan and Mirek Derewinksi are studying these zeolites to understand what make them special. By exploring the mystery of these microscopic channels, their fundamental findings will help design better catalysts for applications such as biofuel production.

  20. ZEOLITE CHARACTERIZATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, W; Herbert Nigg, H

    2007-09-13

    The Savannah River Site isolates tritium from its process streams for eventual recycling. This is done by catalyzing the formation of tritiated water (from process streams) and then sorbing that water on a 3A zeolite (molsieve) bed. The tritium is recovered by regenerating the saturated bed into a Mg-based water cracking unit. The process described has been in use for about 15 years. Recently chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was noted in the system piping. This has resulted in the need to replace the corroded piping and associated molecular sieve beds. The source of chlorine has been debated and one possible source is the zeolite itself. Since new materials are being purchased for recently fabricated beds, a more comprehensive analysis protocol for characterizing zeolite has been developed. Tests on archived samples indicate the potential for mobile chloride species to be generated in the zeolite beds.

  1. Composite zeolite membranes

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.; Ashley, Carol S.; Reed, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of composite zeolite membranes and synthesis techniques therefor has been invented. These membranes are essentially defect-free, and exhibit large levels of transmembrane flux and of chemical and isotopic selectivity.

  2. Lithium modified zeolite synthesis for conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, Muhammad; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Inayat, Abrar

    2014-10-01

    Basic zeolite has received significant attention in the catalysis community. These zeolites modified with alkaline are the potential replacement for existing zeolite catalysts due to its unique features with added advantages. The present paper covers the preparation of lithium modified zeolite Y (Li-ZeY) and its activity for solvent free conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol via etherification process. The modified zeolite was well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Nitrogen Adsorption. The SEM images showed that there was no change in morphology of modified zeolite structure after lithium modification. XRD patterns showed that the structure of zeolite was sustained after lithium modification. The surface properties of parent and modified zeolite was also observed N2 adsortion-desorption technique and found some changes in surface area and pore size. In addition, the basic strength of prepared materials was measured by Hammet indicators and found that basic strength of Li-ZeY was highly improved. This modified zeolite was found highly thermal stable and active heterogamous basic catalyst for conversion of solvent free glycerol to polyglycerol. This reaction was conducted at different temperatures and 260 C was found most active temperature for this process for reaction time from 6 to 12 h over this basic catalyst in the absence of solvent.

  3. Lithium modified zeolite synthesis for conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Ayoub, Muhammad; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Inayat, Abrar

    2014-10-24

    Basic zeolite has received significant attention in the catalysis community. These zeolites modified with alkaline are the potential replacement for existing zeolite catalysts due to its unique features with added advantages. The present paper covers the preparation of lithium modified zeolite Y (Li-ZeY) and its activity for solvent free conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol via etherification process. The modified zeolite was well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Nitrogen Adsorption. The SEM images showed that there was no change in morphology of modified zeolite structure after lithium modification. XRD patterns showed that the structure of zeolite was sustained after lithium modification. The surface properties of parent and modified zeolite was also observed N{sub 2} adsortion-desorption technique and found some changes in surface area and pore size. In addition, the basic strength of prepared materials was measured by Hammet indicators and found that basic strength of Li-ZeY was highly improved. This modified zeolite was found highly thermal stable and active heterogamous basic catalyst for conversion of solvent free glycerol to polyglycerol. This reaction was conducted at different temperatures and 260 °C was found most active temperature for this process for reaction time from 6 to 12 h over this basic catalyst in the absence of solvent.

  4. Controlling electron beam-induced structure modifications and cation exchange in cadmium sulfide-copper sulfide heterostructured nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haimei; Sadtler, Bryce; Habenicht, Carsten; Freitag, Bert; Alivisatos, A Paul; Kisielowski, Christian

    2013-11-01

    The atomic structure and interfaces of CdS/Cu2S heterostructured nanorods are investigated with the aberration-corrected TEAM 0.5 electron microscope operated at 80 kV and 300 kV applying in-line holography and complementary techniques. Cu2S exhibits a low-chalcocite structure in pristine CdS/Cu2S nanorods. Under electron beam irradiation the Cu2S phase transforms into a high-chalcocite phase while the CdS phase maintains its wurtzite structure. Time-resolved experiments reveal that Cu(+)-Cd(2+) cation exchange at the CdS/Cu2S interfaces is stimulated by the electron beam and proceeds within an undisturbed and coherent sulfur sub-lattice. A variation of the electron beam current provides an efficient way to control and exploit such irreversible solid-state chemical processes that provide unique information about system dynamics at the atomic scale. Specifically, we show that the electron beam-induced copper-cadmium exchange is site specific and anisotropic. A resulting displacement of the CdS/Cu2S interfaces caused by beam-induced cation interdiffusion equals within a factor of 3-10 previously reported Cu diffusion length measurements in heterostructured CdS/Cu2S thin film solar cells with an activation energy of 0.96 eV. PMID:23830376

  5. Zeolite A imidazolate frameworks.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hideki; Ct, Adrien P; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; O'Keeffe, Michael; Yaghi, Omar M

    2007-07-01

    Faujasite (FAU) and zeolite A (LTA) are technologically important porous zeolites (aluminosilicates) because of their extensive use in petroleum cracking and water softening. Introducing organic units and transition metals into the backbone of these types of zeolite allows us to expand their pore structures, enhance their functionality and access new applications. The invention of metal-organic frameworks and zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) has provided materials based on simple zeolite structures where only one type of cage is present. However, so far, no metal-organic analogues based on FAU or LTA topologies exist owing to the difficulty imposed by the presence of two types of large cage (super- and beta-cages for FAU, alpha- and beta-cages for LTA). Here, we have identified a strategy to produce an LTA imidazolate framework in which both the link geometry and link-link interactions play a decisive structure-directing role. We describe the synthesis and crystal structures of three porous ZIFs that are expanded analogues of zeolite A; their cage walls are functionalized, and their metal ions can be changed without changing the underlying LTA topology. Hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and argon gas adsorption isotherms are reported and the selectivity of this material for carbon dioxide over methane is demonstrated. PMID:17529969

  6. Zeolite A imidazolate frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Hideki; Ct, Adrien P.; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; O'Keeffe, Michael; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2007-07-01

    Faujasite (FAU) and zeolite A (LTA) are technologically important porous zeolites (aluminosilicates) because of their extensive use in petroleum cracking and water softening. Introducing organic units and transition metals into the backbone of these types of zeolite allows us to expand their pore structures, enhance their functionality and access new applications. The invention of metal-organic frameworks and zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) has provided materials based on simple zeolite structures where only one type of cage is present. However, so far, no metal-organic analogues based on FAU or LTA topologies exist owing to the difficulty imposed by the presence of two types of large cage (super- and ?-cages for FAU, ?- and ?-cages for LTA). Here, we have identified a strategy to produce an LTA imidazolate framework in which both the link geometry and link-link interactions play a decisive structure-directing role. We describe the synthesis and crystal structures of three porous ZIFs that are expanded analogues of zeolite A; their cage walls are functionalized, and their metal ions can be changed without changing the underlying LTA topology. Hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and argon gas adsorption isotherms are reported and the selectivity of this material for carbon dioxide over methane is demonstrated.

  7. Regenerative Cu/La zeolite supported desulfurizing sorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor); Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Efficient, regenerable sorbents for removal of H2S from fluid hydrocarbons such as diesel fuel at moderate condition comprise a porous, high surface area aluminosilicate support, suitably a synthetic zeolite, and most preferably a zeolite having a free lattice opening of at least 6 Angstroms containing from 0.1 to 0.5 moles of copper ions, lanthanum ions or their mixtures. The sorbent removes sulfur from the hydrocarbon fuel in high efficiency and can be repetitively regenerated without loss of activity.

  8. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tu?e

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (?(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The ?(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low ?(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study. PMID:23460541

  9. Study of zeolite influence on analytical characteristics of urea biosensor based on ion-selective field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A possibility of the creation of potentiometric biosensor by adsorption of enzyme urease on zeolite was investigated. Several variants of zeolites (nano beta, calcinated nano beta, silicalite, and nano L) were chosen for experiments. The surface of pH-sensitive field-effect transistors was modified with particles of zeolites, and then the enzyme was adsorbed. As a control, we used the method of enzyme immobilization in glutaraldehyde vapour (without zeolites). It was shown that all used zeolites can serve as adsorbents (with different effectiveness). The biosensors obtained by urease adsorption on zeolites were characterized by good analytical parameters (signal reproducibility, linear range, detection limit and the minimal drift factor of a baseline). In this work, it was shown that modification of the surface of pH-sensitive field-effect transistors with zeolites can improve some characteristics of biosensors. PMID:24636423

  10. Zeolite with trimodal porosity by desilication of zeolite nanocrystals aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuxin; Liu Kaituo; Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 ; He Tao; Wu Jinhu; Fang Yunming

    2012-10-15

    Zeolite with trimodal porosity can be synthesized by desilication of zeolite nanocrystal aggregate. In the desilication process, the originally existed intercrystalline mesopores of zeolite nanocrystal aggregate were enlarged into large mesopore, and the new small intracrystalline mesopore channel was created, thus the Zeolite with trimodal porosity was formed. The structure of resulted zeolite, both on aggregate and mesopore level can be fine tuned by the desilication degree. - Graphical abstract: The Si from the edges and boundary of nanocrystals was first removed resulted the surface roughness and enlarges of the originally existed intercrystalline mesopores. As the degree of alkali-treatment increasing, the Si species inside zeolite nanocrystals was also removed, leading to further enlarges the intercrystalline mesopores and the formation of small intracrystalline mesopores. In case the alkali-treatment is serve enough to completely dissolve the bridges between zeolite nanocrystals, zeolite nanocrystals were exfoliated from the aggregate. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite with trimodal porosity by desilication of zeolite nanocrystals aggregate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The original intercrystalline mesopores were enlarged into large mesopore. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new intracrystalline mesopores were created as the inside Si extracted out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aggregate structure, crystallinity and acidity of parent zeolite remained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Desilication is start on the edges then in the inner part of zeolite.

  11. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Hayashi, Hideki; Banerjee, Rahul; Park, Kyo Sung; Wang, Bo; Cote, Adrien P.

    2014-08-19

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  12. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M; Hayashi, Hideki; Banerjee, Rahul; Park, Kyo Sung; Wang, Bo; Cote, Adrien P

    2012-11-20

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  13. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Wang, Bo

    2013-07-09

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  14. Rapid synthesis of beta zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Wei; Chang, Chun -Chih; Dornath, Paul; Wang, Zhuopeng

    2015-08-18

    The invention provides methods for rapidly synthesizing heteroatom containing zeolites including Sn-Beta, Si-Beta, Ti-Beta, Zr-Beta and Fe-Beta. The methods for synthesizing heteroatom zeolites include using well-crystalline zeolite crystals as seeds and using a fluoride-free, caustic medium in a seeded dry-gel conversion method. The Beta zeolite catalysts made by the methods of the invention catalyze both isomerization and dehydration reactions.

  15. Structural flexibilities and gas adsorption properties of one-dimensional copper(II) polymers with paddle-wheel units by modification of benzoate ligands.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kiyonori; Hoshino, Norihisa; Takeda, Takashi; Noro, Shin-Ichiro; Nakamura, Takayoshi; Takeda, Sadamu; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki

    2015-10-01

    CO2 and N2 gas adsorption/desorption properties of one-dimensional copper(II) polymers with paddle-wheel units [Cu(II)2(p-XBA)4(pyrazine)]? were successfully controlled through the tuning of interchain interactions by modification of para-substituent X groups on the benzoate (BA) ligands (X = Cl, Br, I, and OCH3). Although none of the four crystals had sufficient void space to integrate the crystallization solvents, gate-opening gas adsorption and desorption behaviors coupled with structural phase transitions were observed for CO2 (T = 195 K) and N2 (T = 77 K), with differences depending on the precise substituent. van der Waals interchain interactions, specifically ??, halogen?, and C-H? contacts, were dominant in forming the crystal lattice; their magnitude was associated with gate-opening pressure and hysteresis behaviors. Both the type and magnitude of the interactions were evaluated by Hirshfeld surface analysis, which indicated that structural flexibility decreased as larger halogen atoms were included. Overall, weak interchain interaction and structural flexibility generated new void spaces to adsorb CO2 and N2 gases. PMID:26381225

  16. Modification of algae with zinc, copper and silver ions for usage as natural composite for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Mahltig, B; Soltmann, U; Haase, H

    2013-03-01

    Nanometer sized metal particles are used in many applications as antimicrobial materials. However in public discussion nanoparticular materials are a matter of concern due to potential health risks. Hence there is a certain demand for alternative antimicrobial acting materials. For this, the aim of this work is to realize an antimicrobial active material based on the release of metal ions from a natural depot. By this, the use of elemental metal particles or metal oxide particles in nanometer or micrometer scale is avoided. As natural depot four different algae materials (gained from Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus vesicolosus, Spirulina platensis and Nannochloropsis) are used and loaded by bioabsorption with metal ions Ag(+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). The amount of metal bound by biosorption differs strongly in the range of 0.8 to 5.4 mg/g and depends on type of investigated algae material and type of metal ion. For most samples a smaller release of biosorbed Ag(+) and Cu(2+) is observed compared to a strong release of Zn(2+). The antibacterial activity of the prepared composites is investigated with Escherichia coli. Algae material without biosorbed metal has only a small effect on E. coli. Also by modification of algae with Zn(2+) only a small antibacterial property can be observed. Only with biosorption of Ag(+), the algae materials gain a strong bactericidal effect, even in case of a small amount of released silver ions. These silver modified algae materials can be used as highly effective bactericidal composites which may be used in future applications for the production of antimicrobial textiles, papers or polymer materials. PMID:25427514

  17. The removal of bacteria by modified natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Miln, Z; de Las Pozas, C; Cruz, M; Borja, R; Snchez, E; Ilangovan, K; Espinosa, Y; Luna, B

    2001-01-01

    The removal effect of natural and modified zeolites containing different heavy metals (Ni2+, Zn2+, Fe3+ and Cu2+) on pure cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in a solid medium was evaluated in this work. These experiments were carried out in a continuous mode treating municipal wastewater. Faecal coliform species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were identified. The rate constants of heavy metal lixiviation were determined using a first order kinetic model. The removal effect of modified natural zeolites in both a solid medium and in continuous mode showed an increased elimination of the bacterial population. The results established a decreasing order of the removal effect as follows: Cu2+ > Fe3+ > Zn2+ > Ni2+. The best performance of columns was obtained for inlet bacterial concentrations below 10(6) cells/100 ml. Most of the identified bacterial species were affected by copper modified zeolites, although Serratia marcescens presented the highest sensitivity and Klebsiella pneumoniae the greatest resistance. PMID:11501306

  18. Zeolite-Dye Microlasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vietze, U.; Krauß, O.; Laeri, F.; Ihlein, G.; Schüth, F.; Limburg, B.; Abraham, M.

    1998-11-01

    We present a new class of micro lasers based on nanoporous molecular sieve host-guest systems. Organic dye guest molecules of 1-ethyl-4-[4-( p-dimethylaminophenyl)-1,3-butadienyl]-pyridinium Perchlorat were inserted into the 0.73-nm-wide channel pores of a zeolite AlPO 4-5 host. The zeolitic microcrystal compounds were hydrothermally synthesized according to a particular host-guest chemical process. The dye molecules are found not only to be aligned along the host channel axis, but to be oriented as well. Single mode laser emission at 687 nm was obtained from a whispering gallery mode oscillating in a 8-μm-diameter monolithic microresonator, in which the field is confined by total internal reflection at the natural hexagonal boundaries inside the zeolitic microcrystals.

  19. Process for the exchange of crystalline zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, J.; Brady, M.; Humphries, A.

    1984-07-10

    This invention relates to exchanging the sodium contained in a crystalline zeolite by partially removing sodium by exchange with another cation, partially drying the exchanged zeolite and re-exchanging the dried zeolite.

  20. Synthesis of new zeolite structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiyang; Corma, Avelino; Yu, Jihong

    2015-10-21

    The search for new zeolites is of continuous interest in the field of zeolite science because of their widespread application in catalysis and adsorption-separation. To this end, considerable efforts have been devoted to the preparation of new zeolites with novel porous architectures and compositions. Taking account of the key factors governing the formation of zeolites (e.g., guest species, framework elements, construction processes, etc.), several synthetic strategies have been developed recently. These allow the discovery of many new zeolites with unprecedented structural features, such as hierarchical pores, odd-ring numbers (11-, 15-rings), extra-large pores (16-, 18-, 20-, 28-, and 30-rings), chiral pores, and extremely complex framework topologies, etc. In this review, we will present the advances in the synthesis of new zeolite structures in the last decade, which are achieved by utilization of the synthetic strategies based on pre-designed structure-directing agents, heteroatom substitution, and topotactic transformations. PMID:25740693

  1. Zeolite crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Thompson, Robert W.; Dixon, Anthony G.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of large, uniform zeolite crystals in high yield in space can have a major impact on the chemical process industry. Large zeolite crystals will be used to improve basic understanding of adsorption and catalytic mechanisms, and to make zeolite membranes. To grow large zeolites in microgravity, it is necessary to control the nucleation event and fluid motion, and to enhance nutrient transfer. Data is presented that suggests nucleation can be controlled using chemical compounds (e.g., Triethanolamine, for zeolite A), while not adversely effecting growth rate. A three-zone furnace has been designed to perform multiple syntheses concurrently. The operating range of the furnace is 295 K to 473 K. Teflon-lined autoclaves (10 ml liquid volume) have been designed to minimize contamination, reduce wall nucleation, and control mixing of pre-gel solutions on orbit. Zeolite synthesis experiments will be performed on USML-1 in 1992.

  2. Zeolite exposure and associated pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, K.R.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Rom, W.N.; Moatamed, F.

    1985-06-01

    Naturally occurring zeolite minerals are aluminum silicates widespread in the earth's crust. Several of these minerals have fibrous forms and have been implicated as a possible cause of benign and malignant diseases of the lung and pleura in Turkey. This report describes a patient, living in an area of Nevada rich in zeolites, who presented with idiopathic pleural thickening and pulmonary fibrosis associated with extensive pulmonary deposition of zeolites.

  3. Novel modified zeolites for energy-efficient hydrocarbon separations.

    SciTech Connect

    Arruebo, Manuel; Dong, Junhang; Anderson, Thomas (Burns and McDonnell, Kansas City, MO); Gu, Xuehong; Gray, Gary (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH); Bennett, Ron (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH); Nenoff, Tina Maria; Kartin, Mutlu; Johnson, Kaylynn (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH); Falconer, John; Noble, Richard

    2006-11-01

    We present synthesis, characterization and testing results of our applied research project, which focuses on the effects of surface and skeletal modification of zeolites for significant enhancements in current hydrocarbon (HC) separations. Zeolites are commonly used by the chemical and petroleum industries as catalysts and ion-exchangers. They have high potential for separations owing to their unique pore structures and adsorption properties and their thermal, mechanical and chemical properties. Because of zeolites separation properties, low cost, and robustness in industrial process, they are natural choice for use as industrial adsorbents. This is a multidisciplinary effort to research, design, develop, engineer, and test new and improved materials for the separation of branched vs. linear organic molecules found in commercially important HC streams via adsorption based separations. The focus of this project was the surface and framework modification of the commercially available zeolites, while tuning the adsorption properties and the selectivities of the bulk and membrane separations. In particular, we are interested with our partners at Goodyear Chemical, on how to apply the modified zeolites to feedstock isoprene purification. For the characterization and the property measurements of the new and improved materials powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Residual Gas Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (RGA-MS), Electron Microscopy (SEM/EDAX), temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and surface area techniques were utilized. In-situ carbonization of MFI zeolite membranes allowed for the maximum separation of isoprene from n-pentane, with a 4.1% enrichment of the binary stream with n-pentane. In four component streams, a modified MFI membrane had high selectivities for n-pentane and 1-3-pentadiene over isoprene but virtually no separation for the 2-methyl-2-butene/isoprene pair.

  4. Use of zeolite for removing ammonia and ammonia-caused toxicity in marine toxicity identification evaluations.

    PubMed

    Burgess, R M; Perron, M M; Cantwell, M G; Ho, K T; Serbst, J R; Pelletier, M C

    2004-11-01

    Ammonia occurs in marine waters including effluents, receiving waters, and sediment interstitial waters. At sufficiently high concentrations, ammonia can be toxic to aquatic species. Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods provide researchers with tools for identifying aquatic toxicants. For identifying ammonia toxicity, there are several possible methods including pH alteration and volatilization, Ulva lactuca addition, microbial degradation, and zeolite addition. Zeolite addition has been used successfully in freshwater systems to decrease ammonia concentrations and toxicity for several decades. However, zeolite in marine systems has been used less because ions in the seawater interfere with zeolite's ability to adsorb ammonia. The objective of this study was to develop a zeolite method for removing ammonia from marine waters. To accomplish this objective, we performed a series of zeolite slurry and column chromatography studies to determine uptake rate and capacity and to evaluate the effects of salinity and pH on ammonia removal. We also assessed the interaction of zeolite with several toxic metals. Success of the methods was also evaluated by measuring toxicity to two marine species: the mysid Americamysis bahia and the amphipod Ampelisca abdita. Column chromatography proved to be effective at removing a wide range of ammonia concentrations under several experimental conditions. Conversely, the slurry method was inconsistent and variable in its overall performance in removing ammonia and cannot be recommended. The metals copper, lead, and zinc were removed by zeolite in both the slurry and column treatments. The zeolite column was successful in removing ammonia toxicity for both the mysid and the amphipod, whereas the slurry was less effective. This study demonstrated that zeolite column chromatography is a useful tool for conducting marine water TIEs to decrease ammonia concentrations and characterize toxicity. PMID:15499493

  5. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. We investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by ???70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  6. Modification of surface layers of copper under the action of the volumetric discharge initiated by an avalanche electron beam in nitrogen and CO2 at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulepov, M. A.; Akhmadeev, Yu. Kh.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Kolubaeva, Yu. A.; Krysina, O. V.; Kostyrya, I. D.

    2011-05-01

    The results of experimental investigations of the action of the volumetric discharge initiated by an avalanche electron beam on the surface of copper specimens are presented. The volumetric (diffuse) discharge in nitrogen and CO2 at atmospheric pressure was initiated by applying high voltage pulses of nanosecond duration to a tubular foil cathode. It has been found that the treatment of a copper surface by this type of discharge increases the hardness of the surface layer due to oxidation.

  7. Metallo-hydrazone complexes immobilized in zeolite Y: Synthesis, identification and acid violet-1 degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ayman H.; Thabet, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Copper(II), cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes of hydrazone ligand (SAPH) derived from salicylaldehyde and phenylhydrazine have been encapsulated in zeolite-Y super cages via ship-in-a-bottle synthesis. Detailed characterization of the intrazeolitic complexes were performed by elemental analysis, spectral (FT-IR, UV-Vis.) studies, magnetic measurements and X-ray diffraction. Furthers, surface texture and thermal analysis (TG, DTG, DTA) have provided further evidence for successful immobilization of the metal complexes inside zeolite Y. Investigation of the stereochemistry of these incorporated chelates pointed out that, SAPH ligand is capable to coordinate with the central metal through the (C dbnd N), phenolic (OH) and (NH) groups forming polynuclear structures. The involvement of zeolite oxygen in coordination was postulated in the hybrid materials. The intrazeolitic copper, cobalt and nickel-SAPH complexes have distorted tetrahedral, octahedral and square-pyramidal configurations, respectively. The zeolite encapsulated complexes are thermally stable up to 800 C except Cu(II) sample which is thermally stable up to midpoint 428 C. The assessment of the catalytic activity was performed by the use of the photo-degradation of acid violet-1 dye as a probe reaction in presence of H 2O 2 as an oxidant. Decolorization of acid violet-1 dye was examined under the same conditions whereas the unpromoted zeolite and Cu II, Co II, Ni II-hydrazone complexes supported on zeolite showed 13% and 76%, 53%, 43% color removal, respectively. The results revealed that, the zeolite encapsulated Cu(II) complex generally exhibited better catalytic efficiency (76%) compared with other investigated zeolite encapsulated metal-hydrazone samples.

  8. Sorption of Cu(II) Ions on Chitosan-Zeolite X Composites: Impact of Gelling and Drying Conditions.

    PubMed

    Djelad, Amal; Morsli, Amine; Robitzer, Mike; Bengueddach, Abdelkader; di Renzo, Francesco; Quignard, Franoise

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan-zeolite Na-X composite beads with open porosity and different zeolite contents were prepared by an encapsulation method. Preparation conditions had to be optimised in order to stabilize the zeolite network during the polysaccharide gelling process. Composites and pure reference components were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD); scanning electron microscopy (SEM); N? adsorption-desorption; and thermogravimetric analysis (TG). Cu(II) sorption was investigated at pH 6. The choice of drying method used for the storage of the adsorbent severely affects the textural properties of the composite and the copper sorption effectiveness. The copper sorption capacity of chitosan hydrogel is about 190 mgg(-1). More than 70% of this capacity is retained when the polysaccharide is stored as an aerogel after supercrititcal CO? drying, but nearly 90% of the capacity is lost after evaporative drying to a xerogel. Textural data and Cu(II) sorption data indicate that the properties of the zeolite-polysaccharide composites are not just the sum of the properties of the individual components. Whereas a chitosan coating impairs the accessibility of the microporosity of the zeolite; the presence of the zeolite improves the stability of the dispersion of chitosan upon supercritical drying and increases the affinity of the composites for Cu(II) cations. Chitosan-zeolite aerogels present Cu(II) sorption properties. PMID:26797593

  9. Adamantanes from petroleum, with zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Rollmann, L.D.; Green, L.A.; Bradway, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments with zeolite Beta and zeolite {Upsilon} demonstrate that adamantane and methyl adamantanes can be isolated very effectively from modern refinery streams by mild hydrocracking over Pt- and Pd-containing large pore zeolites. Yield depends importantly on individual refinery crude source and process configuration. Heavy crudes and refineries with conventional hydrocracking and FCC feed hydrotreater facilities are particularly desirable, and an ideal feed for adamantane isolation in such a situation is the 150{degrees}-250{degrees}C fraction of the hydrocracker (HDC) recycle stream. When Pt- or Pd-containing zeolite Beta was used with such a stream, temperatures of some 250{degrees}C and pressures below 3.5 mPa (500 psig) sufficed to remove selectively well over 90% of the non-adamantane hydrocarbon, with little conversion of adamantanes. High selectivity for adamantanes is attributed in large part to size-selective exclusion of these molecules from the pores of zeolite Beta.

  10. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of zeolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios for natural samples of the zeolites analcime, chabazite, clinoptilolite, laumontite, mordenite, and natrolite have been obtained. The zeolite samples were classified into sedimentary, hydrothermal, and igneous groups. The ratios for each species of zeolite are reported. The results are used to discuss the origin of channel water, the role of zeolites in water-rock interaction, and the possibility that a calibrated zeolite could be used as a low-temperature geothermometer.

  11. The effect of positioning cations on acidity and stability of the framework structure of Y zeolite.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changshun; Zhang, Junji; Dong, Lihui; Huang, Meina; Bin Li; Jin, Guangzhou; Gao, Junbin; Zhang, Feiyue; Fan, Minguang; Zhang, Luoming; Gong, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    The investigation on the modification of NaY zeolite on LaHY and AEHY (AE refers Ca and Sr and the molar ratio of Ca and Sr is 1:1) zeolites was proformed by XRD, N2-physisorption (BET), XRF, XPS, NH3-TPD, Py-IR, hydrothermal stability, and catalytic cracking test. These results indicate that HY zeolite with ultra low content Na can be obtained from NaY zeolite through four exchange four calcination method. The positioning capability of La(3+) in sodalite cage is much better than that of AE(2+) and about 12 La(3+) can be well coordinated in sodalite cages of one unit cell of Y zeolite. Appropriate acid amount and strength favor the formation of propylene and La(3+) is more suitable for the catalytic cracking of cyclohexane than that of AE(2+). Our results not only elaborate the variation of the strong and weak acid sites as well as the Brönsted and Lewis acid sites with the change of exchanged ion content but also explore the influence of hydrothermal aging of LaHY and AEHY zeolites and find the optimum ion exchange content for the most reserved acid sites. At last, the coordination state and stabilization of ion exchanged Y zeolites were discussed in detail. PMID:26987306

  12. The effect of positioning cations on acidity and stability of the framework structure of Y zeolite

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Changshun; Zhang, Junji; Dong, Lihui; Huang, Meina; Bin Li; Jin, Guangzhou; Gao, Junbin; Zhang, Feiyue; Fan, Minguang; Zhang, Luoming; Gong, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    The investigation on the modification of NaY zeolite on LaHY and AEHY (AE refers Ca and Sr and the molar ratio of Ca and Sr is 1:1) zeolites was proformed by XRD, N2-physisorption (BET), XRF, XPS, NH3-TPD, Py-IR, hydrothermal stability, and catalytic cracking test. These results indicate that HY zeolite with ultra low content Na can be obtained from NaY zeolite through four exchange four calcination method. The positioning capability of La3+ in sodalite cage is much better than that of AE2+ and about 12 La3+ can be well coordinated in sodalite cages of one unit cell of Y zeolite. Appropriate acid amount and strength favor the formation of propylene and La3+ is more suitable for the catalytic cracking of cyclohexane than that of AE2+. Our results not only elaborate the variation of the strong and weak acid sites as well as the Brönsted and Lewis acid sites with the change of exchanged ion content but also explore the influence of hydrothermal aging of LaHY and AEHY zeolites and find the optimum ion exchange content for the most reserved acid sites. At last, the coordination state and stabilization of ion exchanged Y zeolites were discussed in detail. PMID:26987306

  13. Study of ethylene adsorption on zeolite NaY modified with group I metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sue-aok, Niramai; Srithanratana, Tipaporn; Rangsriwatananon, Kunwadee; Hengrasmee, Sunantha

    2010-04-01

    The adsorption of ethylene by zeolite NaY and zeolite NaY modified by cation exchange with potassium, rubidium, and cesium ions was studied. Cation exchanges were carried out using KNO 3, RbNO 3, and CsNO 3 in the concentration ranges of 0.2-10 mM. XRD patterns and specific surface areas illustrated that modification of NaY zeolite by very dilute solutions containing K +, Rb + and Cs + did not lead to significant changes in the crystallinity. Analysis of metals content (ICP-OES) showed that Cs + can replace Na + better than Rb + and K +. Particle analysis indicated slight decreases in surface area but pore volumes and pore diameters remained unchanged. Ethylene adsorption isotherms indicated that Na-Y zeolite which was modified by 5.0 mM KNO 3, 0.5 mM RbNO 3 and 1.0 mM CsNO 3 could adsorb ethylene better than zeolite Na-Y. K-NaY zeolite adsorbed up to 102.45 cm 3/g ethylene, while Rb-NaY and Cs-NaY zeolites adsorbed up to 98.50 cm 3/g and 90.15 cm 3/g ethylene, respectively. Ethylene adsorption capacities depended on number of adsorption sites and surface interactions.

  14. Laser control of zeolite nucleation.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Marta; Mayoral, Alvaro; Mateo, Ester; Lahoz, Ruth; de la Fuente, Germán F; Coronas, Joaquín

    2012-02-01

    Precursor solutions for the synthesis of zeolites are irradiated by means of a Nd-YAG laser. These solutions are subsequently submitted to a hydrothermal treatment and the results analyzed by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Laser irradiation promotes the formation of silica nanoparticles that nucleate into zeolite (silicalite-1), following a hydrothermal treatment. The average crystal size (in the 0.6-3.6 μm range) of the zeolite exponentially decreases as a function of laser irradiation time. In addition, a longer irradiation time results in a narrower crystal size distribution. PMID:22266775

  15. Probing Cu(I)-exchanged zeolite with CO: DFT modeling and experiment.

    PubMed

    Jardillier, Nicolas; Villagomez, Enrique Ayala; Delahay, Grard; Coq, Bernard; Berthomieu, Dorothe

    2006-08-24

    Addition of CO on Cu-exchanged zeolite was investigated by means of quantum chemical calculations based on density functional theory. The aim of this investigation was to get insights about changes of electronic properties of a copper site with zeolite composition by using a CO probe molecule. Calculated nu(CO) frequency values show that various Si/Al ratios of faujasite zeolite reproduce the expected experimental decrease of the nu(CO) values with decreasing Si/Al ratio. These calculations predict that H/Na ratio variations also induce changes in the nu(CO) values. These results illustrate that different compositions of the zeolite change the electronic properties of copper that are reflected in the nu(CO) frequency values. DFT results showed also that different structures and CO adsorption energies are obtained due to various Si/Al and H/Na ratios of the zeolite. Finally, these calculations evidence the possibility for CO to be connected at the same time to Cu(I) and to a close Na cation, Cu being at site II and Na at site II in Cu(I)-exchanged faujasite. A DRIFT experiment on two samples of faujasite, Cu(28)H(51)NaY and Cu(25)H(0)NaY, supports nu(CO) displacements to higher energy values with increasing H/Na ratio. PMID:16913772

  16. Mesostructured zeolites: bridging the gap between zeolites and MCM-41.

    PubMed

    Prasomsri, Teerawit; Jiao, Wenqian; Weng, Steve Z; Garcia Martinez, Javier

    2015-05-28

    Surfactant-templating is one of the most versatile and useful techniques to implement mesoporous systems into solid materials. Various strategies based on various interactions between surfactants and solid precursors have been explored to produce new structures. Zeolites are invaluable as size- and shape-selective solid acid catalysts. Nevertheless, their micropores impose limitations on the mass transport of bulky feed and/or product molecules. Many studies have attempted to address this by utilizing surfactant-assisting technology to alleviate the diffusion constraints. However, most efforts have failed due to micro/mesopore phase separation. Recently, a new technique combining the uses of cationic surfactants and mild basic solutions was introduced to synthesise mesostructured zeolites. These materials sustain the unique characteristics of zeolites (i.e., strong acidity, crystallinity, microporosity, and hydrothermal stability), including tunable mesopore sizes and degrees of mesoporosity. The mesostructured zeolites are now commercially available through Rive Technology, and show superior performance in VGO cracking. This feature article provides an overview of recent explorations in the introduction of mesoporosity into zeolites using surfactant-templating techniques. Various porous materials, preparation methods, physical and catalytic properties of mesostructured zeolites will be discussed. PMID:25866848

  17. Hydrocracking process using zeolite beta

    SciTech Connect

    Angevine, P.J.; Mitchell, K.M.; Oleck, S.M.; Shih, S.S.

    1986-09-16

    A process is described for the hydrocracking and dewaxing of a petroleum fraction comprising waxy components boiling above 345/sup 0/C., which comprises passing the fraction over a hydrocracking catalyst comprising zeolite beta and a matrix material in the presence of hydrogen and under hydrocracking conditions, the proportion of zeolite beta in the hydrocracking catalyst increasing in the direction in which the fraction is passed.

  18. Utilizing copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition for the surface modification of colloidal particles with electroactive and emissive moieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rungta, Parul

    The development of charge-transporting and fluorescing colloidal particles that can be directly printed into electroluminescent devices may result in a broad impact on the use of electrical energy for illumination. The objective of this work was to design and synthesize electroactive & fluorescing colloidal particles; establish their optical, electronic, and thermodynamic properties; and transition them into a device format for potential applications. The original intended application of this work was to build "better" colloidally-based organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) by creating functional particles with superior electrical and optical performance relative to commercially available technologies, but through the course of the research, the particles that were developed were found to be better suited for medical applications. Nonetheless, the global objective envisioned at the onset of this research was consistent with its final outcomes. The research tasks pursued to accomplish this global objective included: (1) The design and synthesis of electroactive moieties and their conversion into organic light emitting devices; An electron-transporting monomer was synthesized that was structurally & energetically similar to the small molecule 2-biphenyl-4-yl-5-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (tBu-PBD). The monomer was copolymerized with 2-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)ethyl 2-methylacrylate (CE) and the resulting copolymer was utilized in OLEDs which employed fluorescent coumarin 6 (C6) or phosphorescent tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium(III) [Ir(ppy)3] emitters. The copolymer devices exhibited a mean luminance of ca. 400 and 3,552 cd/m2 with the C6 and Ir(ppy)3 emitters, that were stable with thermal aging at temperatures ranging from 23°C to 130°C. Comparable poly(9-vinyl-9H-carbazole)/tBu-PBD blend devices exhibited more pronounced variations in performance with thermal aging. (2) The surface-modification of colloids with electroactive & fluorescing moieties via "click" chemistry; Aqueous-phase 83 nm poly(propargyl acrylate) (PA) nanoparticles were surface-functionalized with sparingly water soluble fluorescent moieties through a copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) (i.e., "click" transformation) to produce fluoroprobes with a large Stokes shift. For moieties which could not achieve extensive surface coverage on the particles utilizing a standard click transformation procedure, the presence of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) during the transformation enhanced the grafting density onto the particles. For an oxadiazole containing molecule (AO), an azide-modified coumarin 6 (AD1) and a polyethylene glycol modified naphthalimide-based emitter (AD2), respectively, an 84%, 17% and 5% increase in the grafting densities were observed, when the transformation was performed in the presence of beta-CD. In contrast, a carbazolyl-containing moiety (AC) exhibited a slight retardation in the final grafting density when beta-CD was employed. Photoluminescence studies indicated that AC & AO when attached to the particles form an exciplex. An efficient energy transfer from the exciplex to the surface attached AD2 resulted in a total Stokes shift of 180 nm for the modified particles. (3) The synthesis and characterization of near-infrared (NIR) emitting particles for potential applications in cancer therapy. PA particles were surface modified through the "click" transformation of an azide-terminated indocyanine green (azICG), an NIR emitter, and poly(ethylene glycol) (azPEG) chains of various molecular weights. The placement of azICG onto the surface of the particles allowed for the chromophores to complex with bovine serum albumin (BSA) when dispersed in PBS that resulted in an enhancement of the dye emission. In addition, the inclusion of azPEG with the chromophores onto the particle surface resulted in a synergistic nine-fold enhancement of the fluorescence intensity, with azPEGs of increasing molecular weight amplifying the response. Preliminary photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies with human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) combined with the modified particles indicated that a minor exposure of 780 nm radiation resulted in a statistically significant reduction in cell growth.

  19. Study on dioxygen reduction by mutational modifications of the hydrogen bond network leading from bulk water to the trinuclear copper center in bilirubin oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Morishita, Hirotoshi; Kurita, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kunishige; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Proton transport pathway in bilirubin oxidase was mutated. • Two intermediates in the dioxygen reduction steps were trapped and characterized. • A specific glutamate for dioxygen reduction by multicopper oxidases was identified. - Abstract: The hydrogen bond network leading from bulk water to the trinuclear copper center in bilirubin oxidase is constructed with Glu463 and water molecules to transport protons for the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. Substitutions of Glu463 with Gln or Ala were attributed to virtually complete loss or significant reduction in enzymatic activities due to an inhibition of the proton transfer steps to dioxygen. The single turnover reaction of the Glu463Gln mutant afforded the highly magnetically interacted intermediate II (native intermediate) with a broad g = 1.96 electron paramagnetic resonance signal detectable at cryogenic temperatures. Reactions of the double mutants, Cys457Ser/Glu463Gln and Cys457Ser/Glu463Ala afforded the intermediate I (peroxide intermediate) because the type I copper center to donate the fourth electron to dioxygen was vacant in addition to the interference of proton transport due to the mutation at Glu463. The intermediate I gave no electron paramagnetic resonance signal, but the type II copper signal became detectable with the decay of the intermediate I. Structural and functional similarities between multicopper oxidases are discussed based on the present mutation at Glu463 in bilirubin oxidase.

  20. Tetraamminecopper(II) complex in zeolite Y. A Raman spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.; Zaykoski, R.E.

    1985-10-09

    This preliminary report indicates that, by careful manipulation of metal-zeolite complexes, it is possible to obtain bonding information by spontaneous Raman spectroscopy. The copper-amine was chosen for study because of the extensive EPR and electronic spectroscopic information on these complexes in zeolites. Also, these complexes are active intermediates in the catalytic oxidation of ammonia. It is important to point out that IR spectroscopy of these systems is not very valuable in the low-frequency region, where metal-ligand virations are expected. 17 references, 2 figures.

  1. Sorption of uranium(6+) and neptunium(5+) by surfactant-modified natural zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Prikryl, J.D.; Pabalan, R.T.

    1999-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the ability of surfactant-modification to enhance the ability of natural zeolites to sorb U(6+) and Np(5+). Natural zeolite material, comprised mainly of clinoptilolite and treated with the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium-bromide (HDTMA), was reacted with U(6+) and Np(5+) solutions open to the atmosphere and having a range of radionuclide concentration, pH, and NaCl concentration. The results indicate surfactant-modification of the zeolite enhances its ability to sorb U(6+), particularly at pHs greater than six where U(6+) sorption on unmodified zeolite is typically low due to formation of anionic U(6+) aqueous carbonate complexes. In contrast, there is little enhancement of Np(5+) sorption onto surfactant-modified zeolite. The presence of chloride anions in solution makes surfactant-modification less effective. The enhanced sorption of U(6+) is interpreted to be due to anion exchange with counterions on the external portion of a surfactant bilayer or admicelles.

  2. Evaluation of operating characteristics for a chabazite zeolite system for treatment of process wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, T.E.; Perona, J.J.; Jennings, H.L.; Lucero, A.J.; Taylor, P.A.

    1998-02-01

    Laboratory and pilot-scale testing were performed for development and design of a chabazite zeolite ion-exchange system to replace existing treatment systems at the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The process wastewater treatment systems at ORNL need upgrading to improve efficiency, reduce waste generation, and remove greater quantities of contaminants from the wastewater. Previous study indicated that replacement of the existing PWTP systems with an ion-exchange system using chabazite zeolite will satisfy these upgrade objectives. Pilot-scale testing of the zeolite system was performed using a commercially available ion-exchange system to evaluate physical operating characteristics and to validate smaller-scale column test results. Results of this test program indicate that (1) spent zeolite can be sluiced easily and completely from a commercially designed vessel, (2) clarification followed by granular anthracite prefilters is adequate pretreatment for the zeolite system, and (3) the length of the mass transfer zone was comparable with that obtained in smaller-scale column tests. Laboratory studies were performed to determine the loading capacity of the zeolite for selected heavy metals. These test results indicated fairly effective removal of silver, cadmium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, and zinc from simple water solutions. Heavy-metals data collected during pilot-scale testing of actual wastewater indicated marginal removal of iron, copper, and zinc. Reduced effectiveness for other heavy metals during pilot testing can be attributed to the presence of interfering cations and the relatively short zeolite/wastewater contact time. Flocculating agents (polyelectrolytes) were tested for pretreatment of wastewater prior to the zeolite flow-through column system. Several commercially available polyelectrolytes were effective in flocculation and settling of suspended solids in process wastewater.

  3. Reclaiming silver from silver zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, G.A.

    1991-10-01

    Silver zeolite is used to capture radioiodines from air cleaning systems in some nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It may become radioactively contaminated and/or poisoned by hydrocarbon vapors, which diminishes its capacity for iodine. Silver zeolite contains up to 38 wt% silver. A pyrometallurgical process was developed to reclaim the silver before disposing of the unserviceable zeolite as a radioactive waste. A flux was formulated to convert the refractory aluminosilicate zeolite structure into a low-melting fluid slag, with Na{sub 2}O added as NAOH instead of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to avoid severe foaming due to CO{sub 2} evolution. A propane-fired furnace was built to smelt 45 kg charges at 1300C in a carbon-bonded silicon carbide crucible. A total of 218 kg (7000 tr oz) of silver was reclaimed from 1050 kg of unserviceable zeolite. Silver recoveries of 97% were achieved, and the radioisotopes were fixed as stable silicates in a vitreous slag that was disposed of as a low level waste. Recovered silver was refined using oxygen and cast into 100 tr oz bars assaying 99.8+% silver and showing no radioactive contamination.

  4. Reclaiming silver from silver zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, G.A.

    1991-10-01

    Silver zeolite is used to capture radioiodines from air cleaning systems in some nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It may become radioactively contaminated and/or poisoned by hydrocarbon vapors, which diminishes its capacity for iodine. Silver zeolite contains up to 38 wt% silver. A pyrometallurgical process was developed to reclaim the silver before disposing of the unserviceable zeolite as a radioactive waste. A flux was formulated to convert the refractory aluminosilicate zeolite structure into a low-melting fluid slag, with Na[sub 2]O added as NAOH instead of Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3] to avoid severe foaming due to CO[sub 2] evolution. A propane-fired furnace was built to smelt 45 kg charges at 1300C in a carbon-bonded silicon carbide crucible. A total of 218 kg (7000 tr oz) of silver was reclaimed from 1050 kg of unserviceable zeolite. Silver recoveries of 97% were achieved, and the radioisotopes were fixed as stable silicates in a vitreous slag that was disposed of as a low level waste. Recovered silver was refined using oxygen and cast into 100 tr oz bars assaying 99.8+% silver and showing no radioactive contamination.

  5. Modification of the charge transport properties of the copper phthalocyanine/poly(vinyl alcohol) interface using cationic or anionic surfactant for field-effect transistor performance enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastrombek, Diana; Nawaz, Ali; Koehler, Marlus; Meruvia, Michelle S.; Hmmelgen, Ivo A.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the performance enhancement of organic field-effect transistors prepared using cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) as gate dielectric and copper phthalocyanine as channel semiconductor through gate dielectric surface treatment. The gate dielectric surface was treated using either a cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), or an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). We determined the charge-carrier field-effect mobility (?? FET) in these transistors as a function of the effective channel thickness in the channel bottleneck, near to the transistor source. When compared to the untreated devices, in the devices treated with CTAB or SDS, the channel formation occurs at lower gate voltage and the carrier mobility in the thinnest channel region, corresponding to the immediate vicinity of the insulator/semiconductor interface, is significantly higher. The surfactant treatment leads to a tenfold increase in ? FET and significant enhancement in capacitance, on/off current ratio and transconductance of the transistor.

  6. Constructing Hierarchical Porous Zeolites via Kinetic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Kunlun; Corma, Avelino; Maci-Agull, Juan Antonio; Hu, Jerry G; Krmer, Stephan; Stair, Peter C; Stucky, Galen D

    2015-09-01

    Zeolites are crystalline inorganic solids with microporous structures, having widespread applications in the fields of catalysis, separation, adsorption, microelectronics, and medical diagnosis. A major drawback of zeolites is the mass transfer limitation due to the small size of the micropores (less than 1 nm). Numerous efforts have been dedicated to integrating mesopores with the microporous zeolite structures by using templating and/or destructive approaches. Here we provide a new strategy for hierarchical pore size zeolite synthesis, without using supramolecular or hard templates. The branching epitaxial growth behavior, as a result of aluminum-zoning, contributes to the formation of the hierarchical porous zeolite structures. PMID:26322625

  7. Parameters influencing zeolite incorporation in PDMS membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Vankelecom, I.F.J.; Scheppers, E.; Heus, R.; Uytterhoeven, J.B. )

    1994-11-24

    The incorporation of several types of zeolite in PDMS membranes is studied, by measuring the tensile strength, xylene sorption, and density of the membranes. The zeolite is shown to be involved in the cross-linking of the membrane. The interaction between the PDMS matrix and the zeolites results in reinforced membranes in the case of zeolite Y. The parameters influencing the dispersion of the zeolite in the membrane are investigated, as well as several aspects of the preparation method. Finally, the idea of cross-linking is applied to explain the results of water/ethanol pervaporation. 25 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Zeolite-like liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Silvio; Lehmann, Anne; Scholte, Alexander; Prehm, Marko; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Tschierske, Carsten

    2015-10-01

    Zeolites represent inorganic solid-state materials with porous structures of fascinating complexity. Recently, significant progress was made by reticular synthesis of related organic solid-state materials, such as metal-organic or covalent organic frameworks. Herein we go a step further and report the first example of a fluid honeycomb mimicking a zeolitic framework. In this unique self-assembled liquid crystalline structure, transverse-lying ?-conjugated rod-like molecules form pentagonal channels, encircling larger octagonal channels, a structural motif also found in some zeolites. Additional bundles of coaxial molecules penetrate the centres of the larger channels, unreachable by chains attached to the honeycomb framework. This creates a unique fluid hybrid structure combining positive and negative anisotropies, providing the potential for tuning the directionality of anisotropic optical, electrical and magnetic properties. This work also demonstrates a new approach to complex soft-matter self-assembly, by using frustration between space filling and the entropic penalty of chain extension.

  9. Zeolites with Continuously Tuneable Porosity**

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Paul S; Chlubn-Eliov, Pavla; Greer, Heather; Zhou, Wuzong; Seymour, Valerie R; Dawson, Daniel M; Ashbrook, Sharon E; Pinar, Ana B; McCusker, Lynne B; Opanasenko, Maksym; ?ejka, Ji?; Morris, Russell E

    2014-01-01

    Zeolites are important materials whose utility in industry depends on the nature of their porous structure. Control over microporosity is therefore a vitally important target. Unfortunately, traditional methods for controlling porosity, in particular the use of organic structure-directing agents, are relatively coarse and provide almost no opportunity to tune the porosity as required. Here we show how zeolites with a continuously tuneable surface area and micropore volume over a wide range can be prepared. This means that a particular surface area or micropore volume can be precisely tuned. The range of porosity we can target covers the whole range of useful zeolite porosity: from small pores consisting of 8-rings all the way to extra-large pores consisting of 14-rings. PMID:25284344

  10. Suspending Zeolite Particles In Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    1999-01-19

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is in the process of removing waste (sludge and salt cake) from million gallon waste tanks. The current practice for removing waste from the tanks is adding water, agitating the tanks with long shaft vertical centrifugal pumps, and pumping the sludge/salt solution from the tank to downstream treatment processes. This practice has left sludge heels ({tilde} 30,000 gallons) in the bottom of the tanks. SRS is evaluating shrouded axial impeller mixers for removing the sludge heels in the waste tanks. The authors conducted a test program to determine mixer requirements for suspending sludge heels using the shrouded axial impeller mixers. The tests were performed with zeolite in scaled tanks which have diameters of 1.5, 6.0, and 18.75 feet. The mixer speeds required to suspend zeolite particles were measured at each scale. The data were analyzed with various scaling methods to compare their ability to describe the suspension of insoluble solids with the mixers and to apply the data to a full-scale waste tank. The impact of changes in particle properties and operating parameters was also evaluated. The conclusions of the work are: Scaling of the suspension of fast settling zeolite particles was best described by the constant power per unit volume method. Increasing the zeolite particle concentration increased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Decreasing the zeolite particle size from 0.7 mm ? 0.3 mm decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Increasing the number of mixers in the tank decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. A velocity of 1.6 ft/sec two inches above the tank bottom is needed to suspend zeolite particles.

  11. Studies of zeolite-based artificial photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haoyu

    Two ruthenium polypyridyl compounds of structural formula [(bpy) 2RuL]2+ (RuL) and [(bpy)2RuLDQ]4+ (RuLDQ) (where bpy = bipyridine, L = trans-1,2-bis-4-(4'-methyl)-2,2'-bipyridyl) ethane, LDQ = 1-[4-(4'-methyl)-2,2'-bipyridyl)]-2-[4-(4'-N,N'-tetramethylene-2,2'-bipyridinium)] ethene) were synthesized and purified. From pH titrations, it was found that the Ru complex was a stronger base (pKa* = 6) in the excited state than in the ground state (pKa = 4). Photolysis of the RuL complex in solutions at pH 7 and 12 led to formation of species with increased emission quantum yields, 55 nm blue-shift of the emission maximum to 625 nm and disappearance of the absorption band at 330 nm, the latter arising from the olefinic bond of the L ligand. Photoproducts formed at neutral pH have been analyzed. It was found that the major product was a dimer of RuL, dimerizing around the double bond. Photoreactions did not occur in the dark or in the aprotic solvent acetonitrile. We proposed that a Ru(III) radical intermediate was formed by photoinduced excited-state electron and proton transfer, which initiated the dimerization. The radical intermediate also underwent photochemical degradative reductions. Below pH 4, the emission quenching was proposed to arise via protonation of the monoprotonated RuLH + followed by electron transfer to the viologen-type moiety created by protonation. The products of photodegradation at pH > 12 were different from those of pH 7, but the mechanism of the degradation at pH > 12 was not elucidated. RuLDQ was stable under visible irradiation. We examined nanocrystalline zeolite as a host for light absorbing sensitizers (electron donors) and electron acceptors. Nanocrystalline zeolite Y (NanoY) with uniform particle size, pure phase was prepared. NanoY was obtained by periodically removing nanocrystals from the mother liquor and recycling the unused reagents. The nanoparicles were characterized by XRD and TEM. Optically clear colloidal solutions of NanoY were obtained. The Ru complexes were anchored on the surface of zeolites via ion-exchange or "ship-in-bottle" synthesis. The spectroscopic properties of the NanoY-entrapped species including methyl viologen (MV2+), RuL were measured via transmission techniques. The zeolite-encapsulated species were found to have red-shift absorption and emission bands and longer MLCT life times. By incorporating both donors Ru complexes and acceptors MV2+ in NanoY, electron transfer kinetics was examined. LFP study showed a slower back-electron-transfer rate as compared to forward electron transfer. Photochemically generated long-lived charge separation is the key step in processes that aim for conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. We incorporated RuL complex on the surface of a pinhole-free zeolite membrane by quaternization of L and surrounded with intrazeolitic bipyridinium ions (N,N'-trimethyl-2,2'-bipyridinium ion, 3DQ2+). Visible-light irradiation of the Ru complex side of the membrane in the presence of a sacrificial electron donor led to formation of PVS- on the other side. Pore-blocking disilazane-based chemistry allows for Na+ to migrate through the membrane to maintain charge balance, while keeping the 3DQ2+ entrapped in the zeolite. These results provided encouragement that the zeolite membrane based architecture has the necessary features for not only incorporating molecular assemblies with long-lived charge separation but also for ready exploitation of the spatially separated charges to store visible light energy in chemical species. The pore-narrowing strategy applied under mild conditions can be used in control-release of active substances such as drug, pesticides, and herbicides. Methyl viologen (MV2+) was chosen as the guest molecule, since it is widely used as an herbicide and its release is of interest in agricultural applications. To explore the controlled-release capability of the surface-modified zeolite, MV2+-encapsulated zeolite Y particles were used as a model system. A MV2+-loaded zeolite was treated with disilazane reagents under ambient conditions and the grafting of siloxy functionality on the zeolite was confirmed by infrared, NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Surface modification of MV2+-loaded zeolites encapsulated the guest molecules in the zeolite cages and release of MV2+ by ion-exchange with sodium ions was studied. The total amount of MV2+ released was dependent on the concentration of Na+ in solution, and was similar for the derivatized and underivatized samples. In the absence of surface modification, equilibration occurred within 20 minutes, whereas with surface modification, the equilibration time was extended to 7 days. These kinetics are reflected in the effective diffusion coefficients (D) of MV2+, with D = 1.2 x 10-15 cm 2 s-1 for derivatized zeolite Y and D = 0.2 -1.1 x 10-7 cm2 s-1 for the underivatized sample. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  12. Gas-phase adsorption in dealuminated natural clinoptilolite and liquid-phase adsorption in commercial DAY zeolite and modified ammonium Y zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Hernandez, Alba Nydia

    The adsorption of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is a very important tool for the material characterization. On the other hand, in separation and recovery technology, the adsorption of the CO2 is important to reduce the concentration of this gas considered as one of the greenhouse gases. Natural zeolites, particularly clinoptilolite, are widely applied to eliminate some pollutants from the environment. One of the goals of this research is to study the structure, composition and morphology of one natural clinoptilolite dealuminated with ammonium hexafluorosilicate (AHFi) and with orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4). Each modified sample was characterized using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Carbon Dioxide adsorption at 0 C, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (SEM-EDAX). In addition, the surface chemistry of the modified clinoptilolites was analyzed with Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The adsorption measurements were also used to study of the interaction of CO2 molecule within the adsorption space of these modified clinoptilolites. It was concluded that one of the modified clinoptilolites, (CSW-HFSi-0.1M), showed a great quality as adsorbent and as catalytic comparable to commercial synthetic zeolites. As far as we know, the modification of clinoptilolite with HFSi to improve their adsorption properties had not been previously attempted. In the second part of this dissertation, the dynamic adsorption of three isomers of nitrophenols using as adsorbent a commercial DAY zeolite was investigated. Also, the dynamic adsorption of methanol in a less hydrophobic zeolite, Ammonium Y Zeolite was investigated. The obtained breakthrough curves showed that the commercial DAY zeolite could be a suitable adsorbent to the liquid-phase adsorption of the phenolic compounds. Notwithstanding the modified ammonium Y zeolite had a low Si/Al ratio (less hydrophobic) than commercial DAY zeolite; this modified zeolite was useful for the dynamic adsorption of polar compound such as methanol. The obtained results were consistent with those reported in other studies related with the use of zeolites in the removal of organic compounds from the liquid phase.

  13. Structural Characterization of Zeolite Beta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsam, J. M.; Treacy, M. M. J.; Koetsier, W. T.; de Gruyter, C. B.

    1988-12-01

    Crystallographic faulting in zeolite structures affects both the catalytic and sorption properties, and can greatly complicate attempts at structural characterization. A near extreme example of stacking disorder is provided by zeolite beta, a large pore, high-silica zeolite that was first reported in 1967. We describe here the determination of the framework structure of zeolite beta, using primarily high-resolution electron microscopy, electron diffraction, computer-assisted modelling and powder X-ray diffraction. Zeolite beta can be regarded as a highly intergrown hybrid of two distinct, but closely related structures that both have fully three-dimensional pore systems with 12-rings as the minimum constricting apertures. One end member, polymorph A, forms an enantiomorphic pair, space group symmetries P4_122 and P4_322, with a = 1.25 nm, c = 2.66 nm. Polymorph B is achiral, space group C2/c with a = 1.76 nm, b = 1.78 nm, c = 1.44 nm, ? = 114.5^circ. Both structures are constructed from the same centrosymmetric tertiary building unit (TBU), arranged in layers that, successively, interconnect in either a left- (L) or a right- (R) handed fashion. Polymorph A represents an uninterrupted sequence of RRRR... (or LLLL...) stacking. Polymorph B has an alternating RLRL... stacking sequence. The TBU has no intrinsic preference for either mode of connection, enabling both to occur with almost equal probability in zeolite beta, giving rise to a near random extent of interplanar stacking faults and, to a lesser extent, intraplanar defects terminated by hydroxyl groups. The faulting does not significantly affect the accessible pore volume, but influences the tortuosity of the pore connectivity along the c direction. The high stacking fault densities give rise to complex powder X-ray diffraction (PXD) patterns for zeolite beta materials that comprise both sharp and broad features. By exploiting recursive relations between possible stacking sequences, PXD patterns have been calculated as a function of faulting probability. Reasonable agreement with observed PXD profiles is observed for a ca. 60% faulting probability in the chiral stacking sequence, suggesting a slight preference for polymorph B. The framework building units observed in zeolite beta can also be used to construct other frameworks.

  14. Spectroscopic signatures of nitrogen-substituted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Karl D; Dogan, Fulya; Tompsett, Geoffrey A; Agarwal, Vishal; Conner, W Curtis; Grey, Clare P; Auerbach, Scott M

    2008-11-12

    Nanoporous acid catalysts such as zeolites form the backbone of catalytic technologies for refining petroleum. With the promise of a biomass economy, new catalyst systems will have to be discovered, making shape-selective base catalysts especially important because of the high oxygen content in biomass-derived feedstocks. Strongly basic zeolites are attractive candidates, but such materials are notoriously difficult to make due to the strong inherent acidity of aluminosilicates. Several research groups have endeavored to produce strongly basic zeolites by treating zeolites with amines, but to date there is no compelling evidence that nitrogen is incorporated into zeolite frameworks. In this communication, we detail synthesis, NMR spectroscopy, and quantum mechanical calculations showing that nitrogen adds onto both surface and interior sites while preserving the framework structure of zeolites. This finding is crucial for the rational design of new biomass-refinement catalysts, allowing 50 years of zeolite science to be brought to bear on the catalytic synthesis of biofuels. PMID:18855470

  15. Enhanced selectivity of zeolites by controlled carbon deposition

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.; Kartin, Mutlu

    2006-05-09

    A method for carbonizing a zeolite comprises depositing a carbon coating on the zeolite pores by flowing an inert carrier gas stream containing isoprene through a regenerated zeolite at elevated temperature. The carbonized zeolite is useful for the separation of light hydrocarbon mixtures due to size exclusion and the differential adsorption properties of the carbonized zeolite.

  16. Liquid-phase benzene oxidation to phenol with molecular oxygen catalyzed by Cu-zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Tsuyoshi; Nishiyama, Satoru; Tsuruya, Shigeru

    1995-08-01

    The oxidation of benzene to form phenol using cuprous chloride as a catalyst has been reported by Sasaki and his co-workers, who used reaction system oxygen molecules as the oxidant. Takehira and his co-workers have studied benzene oxidation with molecular oxygen catalyzed by Cu(II) salts in the presence of ascorbic acid. Cu ion-exchanged zeolites have been reported to be useful as catalysts for the gas-phase oxidation of some organic materials, and copper ions in zeolites have been indicated to have redox properties according to physicochemical measurements. Armed with this knowledge, the authors have tried the liquid-phase oxidation of benzene with molecular oxygen under atmospheric pressure at room temperature using Cu ion-exchanged zeolite catalysts in the presence of ascorbic acid as a reducing reagent for Cu ions. The catalytic behavior of the Cu zeolites for the benzene oxidation was compared with that of nonanchored cupric and cuprous chloride catalysts. Also, some Cu catalysts impregnated on some amorphous oxide supports, in addition to the zeolites, were tested as catalysts for benzene oxidation with molecular oxygen. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Synthesis and testing of nanosized zeolite Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Davood

    This work focuses on the synthesis and testing of nanosized zeolite Y. The synthesis formulations of faujasite-type structure of zeolite Y prepared in nanosized form are described. The synthetic zeolite Y is the most widely employed for the preparation of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts. The synthesis of zeolite Y is very complicated process. The mean particle size of zeolite Y is 1800 nm. The major challenge of this work involved reducing this average particle size to less than 500 nm. The preliminary experiments were conducted to obtain the pure zeolite Y using the soluble silicates as a silica source. This was achieved by applying the experimental design approach to study the effects of many parameters. The ageing time turned out to be the most significant variable affecting product purity. Based on the preliminary results, a detailed investigation was carried out to determine the effects of silica-alumina precursor preparations on zeolite Y synthesis. Aluminosilicate precursors were prepared by gelling and precipitation of soluble silicate. The as-prepared precursors were used for the hydrothermal synthesis of zeolite Y. The procedure of the precipitation of soluble silicate yielded pure zeolite Y at the conventional synthesis conditions. The extent of purity of zeolite Y depends on the surface areas of aluminosilicate precursors. A novel approach to zeolite Y synthesis was employed for the preparation of the pure nanosized zeolite Y. This was achieved by applying the method of impregnation of precipitated silica. This novel method of impregnation for zeolite Y preparation allows eliminating the vigorous agitation step required for the preparation of a homogeneous silica solution, thereby simplifying the synthesis of zeolite Y in one single vessel. In case of the synthesis of nanosized zeolite Y, the effect of varying the organic templates on the formation of nanosized particles of zeolite Y was investigated, while all other reaction parameters were kept constant. The extent to which the nanosized zeolite Y was formed depended on the types and amount of the organic templates as well as the ageing duration. The activity testing of four FCC catalysts prepared by using CREY (Calcined Rare Earth ion-exchanged) zeolites with different particle sizes was carried out in a fluidized bench-scale batch riser simulator reactor. The starting zeolites NaY of different particle sizes were subjected to two cycles of ion exchange treatment. The particle size of the supported zeolites was varied between 150 and 1800 nm. The preparation of FCC catalysts was conducted by mixing the CREY zeolite with silica-alumina matrix and silica sol binder. Each catalyst contained 25% zeolite. The results of catalytic cracking demonstrated the significant effect of size reduction of the starting zeolite Y on catalytic performance of FCC catalyst. Keywords. Zeolite NaY, Faujasite, Nanosized particles, Nanozeolite, Nanotechnology, Synthesis, Crystallization, Seeding, Ageing, Precipitated silica, Sylopol silica, Fumed silica, Silica sol, Soluble silicates, Alumina, SAR or SiO2/Al2O3 Ratios, Sodium hydroxide, Sodium aluminate, Organic templates, TMAOH, Surfactant (CTAB), Ammonium Sulfate, BET surface area, BJH Pore Size Distribution, Zetasizer Particle Size Distribution, Powder XRD, 27Al Solid-State NMR, Catalytic Impregnation, CREY Zeolite, Silica-Alumina Matrix, Ion Exchange, FCC Catalyst, Catalytic cracking, Riser SimulatorRTM, Steaming, Zeolite HY, Utrastable Zeolite Y (USY)

  18. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  19. New insights into alkylammonium-functionalized clinoptilolite and Na-P1 zeolite: Structural and textural features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Barbara; Matusik, Jakub; Bajda, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The area of zeolites' application could be expanded by utilizing their surfaces. Zeolites are frequently modified to increase their hydrophobicity and to generate the negative charge of the surface. The main objective of the study was to investigate and compare the features of natural clinoptilolite and synthetic zeolite Na-P1 modified by selected surfactants involving quaternary ammonium salts. The FTIR study indicates that with increasing carbon chain length in the surfactant attached to the zeolites surface the molecules adopt a more disordered structure. FTIR was also used to determine the efficiency of surface modification. Thermal analysis revealed that the presence of surfactant results in additional exothermic effects associated with the breaking of electrostatic bonds between zeolites and surfactants. The mass losses are in line with ECEC and CHN data. The textural study indicates that the synthetic zeolite Na-P1 has better sorption properties than natural clinoptilolite. The modification process always reduces the SBET and porosity of the material. With an increasing carbon chain length of surfactants all the texture parameters decrease.

  20. Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsapatsis, Michael; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Elyassi, Bahman; Lima, Fernando; Iyer, Aparna; Agrawal, Kumar; Sabnis, Sanket

    2015-04-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and evaluate an innovative membrane technology at process conditions that would be representative of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) advanced power generation with pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide (CO2). This research focused on hydrogen (H2)-selective zeolite membranes that could be utilized to separate conditioned syngas into H2-rich and CO2-rich components. Both experiments and process design and optimization calculations were performed to evaluate the concept of ultra-thin membranes made from zeolites nanosheets. In this work, efforts in the laboratory were made to tackle two fundamental challenges in application of zeolite membranes in harsh industrial environments, namely, membrane thickness and membrane stability. Conventional zeolite membranes have thicknesses in the micron range, limiting their performance. In this research, we developed a method for fabrication of ultimately thin zeolite membranes based on zeolite nanosheets. A range of layered zeolites (MWW, RWR, NSI structure types) suitable for hydrogen separation was successfully exfoliated to their constituent nanosheets. Further, membranes were made from one of these zeolites, MWW, to demonstrate the potential of this group of materials. Moreover, long-term steam stability of these zeolites (up to 6 months) was investigated in high concentrations of steam (35 mol% and 95 mole%), high pressure (10 barg), and high temperatures (350 °C and 600 °C) relevant to conditions of water-gas-shift and steam methane reforming reactions. It was found that certain nanosheets are stable, and that stability depends on the concentration of structural defects. Additionally, models that represent a water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor equipped with the zeolite membrane were developed for systems studies. These studies had the aim of analyzing the effect of the membrane reactor integration into IGCC plants in terms of performance and economic aspects of the plants. Specifically, simulation and design optimization studies were performed using the developed stand-alone membrane reactor models to identify the membrane selectivity and permeance characteristics necessary to achieve desired targets of CO2 capture and H2 recovery, as well as guide the selection of the optimal reactor design that minimizes the membrane cost as a function of its surface area required. The isothermal membrane reactor model was also integrated into IGCC system models using both the MATLAB and Aspen software platforms and techno-economic analyses of the integrated plants have been carried out to evaluate the feasibility of replacing current technologies for pre-combustion capture by the proposed novel approach in terms of satisfying stream constraints and achieving the DOE target goal of 90% CO2 capture. The results of the performed analyses based on present value of annuity calculations showed break even costs for the membrane reactor within the feasible range for membrane fabrication. However, the predicted membrane performance used in these simulations exceeded the performance achieved experimentally. Therefore, further work is required to improve membrane performance.

  1. UTILITY OF ZEOLITES IN HAZARDOUS METAL REMOVAL FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange, adsorption and acid catalysis properties. Different inorganic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature by using synthetic zeolites. Zeolite Faujasite Y has been used to remove inorganic pollutants including arseni...

  2. The influence of using Jordanian natural zeolite on the adsorption, physical, and mechanical properties of geopolymers products.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Rushdi Ibrahim; El-Eswed, Bassam; Alshaaer, Mazen; Khalili, Fawwaz; Khoury, Hani

    2009-06-15

    Geopolymers consist of an amorphous, three-dimensional structure resulting from the polymerization of aluminosilicate monomers that result from dissolution of kaolin in an alkaline solution at temperatures around 80 degrees C. One potential use of geopolymers is as Portland cement replacement. It will be of great importance to provide a geopolymer with suitable mechanical properties for the purpose of water storage and high adsorption capacity towards pollutants. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of using Jordanian zeolitic tuff as filler on the mechanical performance and on the adsorption capacity of the geopolymers products. Jordanian zeolitic tuff is inexpensive and is known to have high adsorption capacity. The results confirmed that this natural zeolitic tuff can be used as a filler of stable geopolymers with high mechanical properties and high adsorption capacity towards methylene blue and Cu(II) ions. The XRD measurements showed that the phillipsite peaks (major mineral constituent of Jordanian zeolite) were disappeared upon geopolymerization. The zeolite-based geopolymers revealed high compressive strength compared to reference geopolymers that employ sand as filler. Adsorption experiments showed that among different geopolymers prepared, the zeolite-based geopolymers have the highest adsorption capacity towards methylene blue and copper(II) ions. PMID:19036505

  3. Modification of dietary copper levels on the early stage of tumor-promotion with propylthiouracil in a rat two-stage thyroid carcinogenesis model.

    PubMed

    Shima, Tomomi; Nishimura, Jihei; Dewa, Yasuaki; Saegusa, Yukie; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Kawai, Masaomi; Harada, Tomoaki; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2009-07-15

    To investigate the role of copper (Cu)-related cellular responses on thyroid carcinogenesis, the expression of ceruloplasmin (Cp) and metallothionein (MT)-1/2 were examined in relation to the activities of cell proliferation/apoptosis in the thyroid of rats at an early stage of tumor promotion under different dietary Cu levels. Male F344 rats were initiated with N-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)nitrosamine by single subcutaneous injection at 2800 mg/kg body weight, and 1 week later promoted with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil at 12 ppm in the drinking water for 4 weeks. Animals were fed a diet containing Cu at 0.6, 6 or 60 ppm from the time point of initiator-treatment to create marginally deficient, normal, or non-toxic supplementary levels of Cu. At both 0.6 and 60 pm, the multiplicity of preneoplastic focal follicular cell hyperplasias (FFCHs) was decreased as compared with 6 ppm Cu, while adenomas also decreased at 0. 6 ppm Cu. Both 0.6 and 60 ppm Cu levels revealed decreased Ki-67-immunoreactive proliferating cells in both FFCHs and surrounding follicles accompanied by mRNA downregulation of Cdc2a and Ccnb1, while TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were unaltered with change of dietary Cu. Both Cp and MT-1/2 were immunolocalized in FFCHs and adenomas, with higher distribution in the latter. At both 0.6 and 60 ppm, the immunoreactivities and/or thyroidal mRNA levels of Cp and MT-1/2 were also decreased. Transcript levels of several antioxidant enzymes were up- or downregulated in the same direction at both Cu levels. Serum levels of thyroid-related hormones were unaltered at both Cu levels, except for non-significant reduction of thyroid-stimulating hormone at 0.6 ppm. These results suggest an involvement of Cp and MT-1/2 on the thyroid tumor promotion that can be suppressed by dietary Cu level through inhibition of cell proliferation associated with altered redox balance. PMID:19497425

  4. Copper Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Copper testing is primarily used to help diagnose Wilson disease , a rare inherited disorder that can lead ... unbound) blood copper test is also ordered. If Wilson disease is suspected, genetic testing may be performed ...

  5. Spin probes of chemistry in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Werst, D.W.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1997-09-01

    Electron spin resonance (EPR) studies in zeolites are reviewed in which radiolysis was used to ionize the zeolite lattice, create reactive intermediates, spin label reaction products and to provide a window onto chemistry and transport of adsorbates and matrix control of chemistry. The review examines reactions of radical cations and the influence of the geometry constraints inside the zeolite, explores how zeolite model systems can be used to learn about energy and charge transfer in solids and illustrates the use of radiolysis and EPR for in situ spectroscopic studies of solid-acid catalysis. The various spin probes created inside the zeolite pores report on properties of the zeolites as well as shed light on radiolytic processes.

  6. Synthesis of highly selective zeolite topology molecular sieve for adsorption of benzene gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lin; Chen, Yunlin; Zhang, Baoping; Zu, Zhinan

    2013-02-01

    Shangdong fly ash (SFA), Fangshan fly ash (FFA) and Heilongjiang fly ash (HFA) were selected as the raw materials to be used for synthesis of highly selective zeolite topology molecular sieve. Twice foaming method was studied in terms of synthetic zeolite. The experimental products were characterized by means of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and automated surface area & pore size analyser. The results indicated that 10 M NaOH was chosen as modification experiment condition to process SFA. Crystallization temperature and time were 140 C and 8 h, respectively. Zeolite topology molecular sieve was prepared with Si/Al molar ratio of 7.9, and its adsorption ratio of benzene gas was up to 66.51%.

  7. A novel concept for photovoltaic cells: clusters of titanium dioxide encapsulated within zeolites as photoactive semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Alvaro, Mercedes; Carbonell, Esther; Atienzar, Pedro; García, Hermenegildo

    2006-09-11

    Discrete clusters of TiO(2) (of only a few titanium atoms) are prepared within the internal micropore space of zeolite Y (4.8 wt % Ti loading) and characterized by Raman spectroscopy (rutile- and anatase-like structures), electron microscopy combined with elemental analyses (coincident Si and Ti spatial distribution), and X-ray diffraction (minor zeolite crystallinity decrease). The parent TiO(2)@Y sample is modified either by adsorption of acid-organic compounds (benzoic and 4-aminobenzoic acids or catechol) or by nitrogen doping. After modification, the optical UV/Vis spectrum of the parent TiO(2)@Y (onset of the absorption band at wavelengths <300 nm and bandgap of 4.2 eV) changes, and the appearance of new bands expanding to the visible region is observed. In contrast to the inactive zeolite Y matrix, all the zeolite-encapsulated TiO(2) species exhibit a photovoltaic response. The influence of the I(2)/I(3) (-) concentration in the electrolyte solution on the temporal profile of the photovoltage clearly shows that I(2)/I(3) (-) is also a suitable carrier for the positive charge in zeolite-based photovoltaic devices. The photocurrent response and the efficiency of the photovoltaic cell based on zeolite-encapsulated TiO(2) materials depend on the nature of the organic modifier and on the N-doping. The most efficient photovoltaic cell is that based on N-doped TiO(2)@Y, which exhibits a V(OC) (voltage at open circuit) of 270 mV, an I(SC) of 5.8 muA (current at short circuit), and a fill factor (FF) of 0.4. Although these values are low compared to current dye-sensitized TiO(2) solar cells, our findings could open up a promise for a stimulating research on the photovoltaic activity of zeolite-based host-guest solids. PMID:16921574

  8. Phosphorus promotion and poisoning in zeolite-based materials: synthesis, characterisation and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    van der Bij, Hendrik E.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus and microporous aluminosilicates, better known as zeolites, have a unique but poorly understood relationship. For example, phosphatation of the industrially important zeolite H-ZSM-5 is a well-known, relatively inexpensive and seemingly straightforward post-synthetic modification applied by the chemical industry not only to alter its hydrothermal stability and acidity, but also to increase its selectivity towards light olefins in hydrocarbon catalysis. On the other hand, phosphorus poisoning of zeolite-based catalysts, which are used for removing nitrogen oxides from exhaust fuels, poses a problem for their use in diesel engine catalysts. Despite the wide impact of phosphorus–zeolite chemistry, the exact physicochemical processes that take place require a more profound understanding. This review article provides the reader with a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of the academic literature, from the first reports in the late 1970s until the most recent studies. In the first part an in-depth analysis is undertaken, which will reveal universal physicochemical and structural effects of phosphorus–zeolite chemistry on the framework structure, accessibility, and strength of acid sites. The second part discusses the hydrothermal stability of zeolites and clarifies the promotional role that phosphorus plays. The third part of the review paper links the structural and physicochemical effects of phosphorus on zeolite materials with their catalytic performance in a variety of catalytic processes, including alkylation of aromatics, catalytic cracking, methanol-to-hydrocarbon processing, dehydration of bioalcohol, and ammonia selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx. Based on these insights, we discuss potential applications and important directions for further research. PMID:26051875

  9. Phosphorus promotion and poisoning in zeolite-based materials: synthesis, characterisation and catalysis.

    PubMed

    van der Bij, Hendrik E; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-10-21

    Phosphorus and microporous aluminosilicates, better known as zeolites, have a unique but poorly understood relationship. For example, phosphatation of the industrially important zeolite H-ZSM-5 is a well-known, relatively inexpensive and seemingly straightforward post-synthetic modification applied by the chemical industry not only to alter its hydrothermal stability and acidity, but also to increase its selectivity towards light olefins in hydrocarbon catalysis. On the other hand, phosphorus poisoning of zeolite-based catalysts, which are used for removing nitrogen oxides from exhaust fuels, poses a problem for their use in diesel engine catalysts. Despite the wide impact of phosphorus-zeolite chemistry, the exact physicochemical processes that take place require a more profound understanding. This review article provides the reader with a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of the academic literature, from the first reports in the late 1970s until the most recent studies. In the first part an in-depth analysis is undertaken, which will reveal universal physicochemical and structural effects of phosphorus-zeolite chemistry on the framework structure, accessibility, and strength of acid sites. The second part discusses the hydrothermal stability of zeolites and clarifies the promotional role that phosphorus plays. The third part of the review paper links the structural and physicochemical effects of phosphorus on zeolite materials with their catalytic performance in a variety of catalytic processes, including alkylation of aromatics, catalytic cracking, methanol-to-hydrocarbon processing, dehydration of bioalcohol, and ammonia selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx. Based on these insights, we discuss potential applications and important directions for further research. PMID:26051875

  10. Process for preparing silicon substituted zeolite compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Skeels, G.W.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes the process for substituting silicon into the crystal lattice of zeolites in place of extracted lattice aluminum atoms to achieve zeolite products of higher silicon content. It comprises: providing a starting aluminosilicate zeolite having a framework SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratio of at least 2 and pore diameters of at least 3 Angstroms; contacting the starting zeolite at a temperature of 25{degrees} C. to 95{degrees} C. with an aqueous solution of a fluorosilicate salt containing from 0.5 to 1.5 moles per liter of the fluorosilicate salt dissolved therein, the proportions of zeolite and fluorosilicate salt being at least 0.1 moles of salt per 100 grams of anhydrous zeolite; maintaining contact between the zeolite and the salt solution for a period not in excess of 5 hours; removing from contact with the zeolite the liquid medium containing at least 90 percent of the by-product fluoroaluminate salt produced by the reaction of the fluorosilicate salt with the zeolite.

  11. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James (Knoxville, TN); Klett, Lynn (Knoxville, TN); Kaufman, Jonathan (Leonardtown, MD)

    2008-11-25

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  12. Synthesis of ‘unfeasible’ zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Michal; Wheatley, Paul S.; Navarro, Marta; Roth, Wieslaw J.; Položij, Miroslav; Mayoral, Alvaro; Eliášová, Pavla; Nachtigall, Petr; Čejka, Jiří; Morris, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    Zeolites are porous aluminosilicate materials that have found applications in many different technologies. However, although simulations suggest that there are millions of possible zeolite topologies, only a little over 200 zeolite frameworks of all compositions are currently known, of which about 50 are pure silica materials. This is known as the zeolite conundrum—why have so few of all the possible structures been made? Several criteria have been formulated to explain why most zeolites are unfeasible synthesis targets. Here we demonstrate the synthesis of two such ‘unfeasible’ zeolites, IPC-9 and IPC-10, through the assembly–disassembly–organization–reassembly mechanism. These new high-silica zeolites have rare characteristics, such as windows that comprise odd-membered rings. Their synthesis opens up the possibility of preparing other zeolites that have not been accessible by traditional solvothermal synthetic methods. We envisage that these findings may lead to a step change in the number and types of zeolites available for future applications.

  13. Amine-functionalized, silver-exchanged zeolite NaY: Preparation, characterization and antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanim, Siti Aishah Mohd; Malek, Nik Ahmad Nizam Nik; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2016-01-01

    Amine-functionalized, silver-exchanged zeolite NaY (ZSA) were prepared with three different concentrations of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) (0.01, 0.20 and 0.40 M) and four different concentrations of silver ions (25%, 50%, 100% and 200% from zeolite cation exchange capacity (CEC)). The samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), surface area analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and zeta potential (ZP) analysis. The FTIR results indicated that the zeolite was functionalized by APTES and that the intensity of the peaks corresponding to APTES increased as the concentration of APTES used was increased. The antibacterial activities of the silver-exchanged zeolite NaY (ZS) and ZSA were studied against Escherichia coli ATCC11229 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC6538 using the disc diffusion technique (DDT) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The antibacterial activity of ZSA increased with the increase in APTES on ZS, and E. coli was more susceptible towards the sample compared to S. aureus. The FESEM micrographs of the bacteria after contact with the ZSA suggested different mechanisms of bacterial death for these two bacteria due to exposure to the studied sample. The functionalization of ZS with APTES improved the antibacterial activity of the silver-zeolite, depending on the concentration of silver ions and APTES used during modification.

  14. Arsenic removal from groundwater by MnO2-modified natural clinoptilolite zeolite: effects of pH and initial feed concentration.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Lucy M; Parra, Ramona R; Deng, Shuguang

    2011-05-15

    Adsorption of arsenic (As(5+)) on natural and MnO(2)-modified clinoptilolite-Ca zeolite adsorbents was investigated to explore the feasibility of removing arsenic from groundwater using natural zeolite adsorbents. The natural and MnO(2)-modified clinoptilolite-Ca zeolite adsorbents were characterized with nitrogen adsorption at 77K for pore textural properties, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence for morphology, elemental composition and distribution. Batch adsorption equilibrium experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH and initial feed concentration on arsenic removal efficiency. It was found that the amphoteric properties and arsenic removal efficiency of the natural clinoptilolite-Ca zeolite were significantly improved after modification with MnO(2). The MnO(2)-modified zeolite could effectively remove arsenic from water at a wide pH range, and the arsenic removal efficiency that is basically independent of the pH of feed solutions varies slightly with the initial arsenic concentration in the feed solutions. The removal efficiency obtained on the modified zeolite was doubled as compared to that obtained on the unmodified zeolite. The MnO(2)-modified clinoptilolite-Ca zeolite appears to be a promising adsorbent for removing trace arsenic amounts from water. PMID:21398033

  15. Factors affecting adsorption characteristics of Zn2+ on two natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, Ali Hakan; Kaya, Abidin

    2006-04-17

    Mining-related and industrial wastes are primary sources of heavy metal contamination in soils and groundwater. The limitation of such waste in drinking water needs to meet government requirements in order to safeguard human health and environment. Zinc, one of the most preponderant pollutants, is difficult to remove from wastewater rather than other heavy metals (i.e. lead, copper and cadmium). This paper investigates Zn2+ adsorption characteristics of two natural zeolites found in the regions of Gordes and Bigadic, in western Turkey. The results show that the Zn2+ adsorption behavior of both zeolites is highly dependent on the pH. Adsorption dependence on lower pH values (pH<4) is explained by the dissolution of crystal structure and the competition of the zinc ions with the H+. Between pH 4 and 6, the basic mechanism is the ion exchange process. The results also showed that decrease in grain size does not increase the adsorption capacity of zeolite from Gordes, yet it increases that of zeolite from Bigadic about 23%. The results also reveal that an increase in the initial concentration of Zn2+ in the system causes an increase in the adsorption capacity to a degree, then it becomes more constant at higher concentrations. With this, the removal efficiency of Gordes zeolite is two times higher than that of Bigadic zeolite. Results show that an increase in slurry concentration results in a lower uptake of Zn2+. In the final part of the paper, we compared the experimental data with the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The results show that there is a good fit between the experimental data and empirical isotherms. PMID:16266781

  16. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  17. Zeolite-like liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Poppe, Silvio; Lehmann, Anne; Scholte, Alexander; Prehm, Marko; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Tschierske, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites represent inorganic solid-state materials with porous structures of fascinating complexity. Recently, significant progress was made by reticular synthesis of related organic solid-state materials, such as metal-organic or covalent organic frameworks. Herein we go a step further and report the first example of a fluid honeycomb mimicking a zeolitic framework. In this unique self-assembled liquid crystalline structure, transverse-lying ?-conjugated rod-like molecules form pentagonal channels, encircling larger octagonal channels, a structural motif also found in some zeolites. Additional bundles of coaxial molecules penetrate the centres of the larger channels, unreachable by chains attached to the honeycomb framework. This creates a unique fluid hybrid structure combining positive and negative anisotropies, providing the potential for tuning the directionality of anisotropic optical, electrical and magnetic properties. This work also demonstrates a new approach to complex soft-matter self-assembly, by using frustration between space filling and the entropic penalty of chain extension. PMID:26486751

  18. Zeolite-like liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, Silvio; Lehmann, Anne; Scholte, Alexander; Prehm, Marko; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Tschierske, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites represent inorganic solid-state materials with porous structures of fascinating complexity. Recently, significant progress was made by reticular synthesis of related organic solid-state materials, such as metal-organic or covalent organic frameworks. Herein we go a step further and report the first example of a fluid honeycomb mimicking a zeolitic framework. In this unique self-assembled liquid crystalline structure, transverse-lying π-conjugated rod-like molecules form pentagonal channels, encircling larger octagonal channels, a structural motif also found in some zeolites. Additional bundles of coaxial molecules penetrate the centres of the larger channels, unreachable by chains attached to the honeycomb framework. This creates a unique fluid hybrid structure combining positive and negative anisotropies, providing the potential for tuning the directionality of anisotropic optical, electrical and magnetic properties. This work also demonstrates a new approach to complex soft-matter self-assembly, by using frustration between space filling and the entropic penalty of chain extension. PMID:26486751

  19. Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use By MFI Zeolite Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Lee; Liangxiong Li

    2008-03-31

    Desalination of brines produced from oil and gas fields is an attractive option for providing potable water in arid regions. Recent field-testing of subsurface sequestration of carbon dioxide for climate management purposes provides new motivation for optimizing efficacy of oilfield brine desalination: as subsurface reservoirs become used for storing CO{sub 2}, the displaced brines must be managed somehow. However, oilfield brine desalination is not economical at this time because of high costs of synthesizing membranes and the need for sophisticated pretreatments to reduce initial high TDS and to prevent serious fouling of membranes. In addition to these barriers, oil/gas field brines typically contain high concentrations of multivalent counter cations (eg. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that can reduce efficacy of reverse osmosis (RO). Development of inorganic membranes with typical characteristics of high strength and stability provide a valuable option to clean produced water for beneficial uses. Zeolite membranes have a well-defined subnanometer pore structure and extreme chemical and mechanical stability, thus showing promising applicability in produced water purification. For example, the MFI-type zeolite membranes with uniform pore size of {approx}0.56 nm can separate ions from aqueous solution through a mechanism of size exclusion and electrostatic repulsion (Donnan exclusion). Such a combination allows zeolite membranes to be unique in separation of both organics and electrolytes from aqueous solutions by a reverse osmosis process, which is of great interest for difficult separations, such as oil-containing produced water purification. The objectives of the project 'Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use by MFI Zeolite Membranes' are: (1) to conduct extensive fundamental investigations and understand the mechanism of the RO process on zeolite membranes and factors determining the membrane performance, (2) to improve the membranes and optimize operating conditions to enhance water flux and ion rejection, and (3) to perform long-term RO operation on tubular membranes to study membrane stability and to collect experimental data necessary for reliable evaluations of technical and economic feasibilities. Our completed research has resulted in deep understanding of the ion and organic separation mechanism by zeolite membranes. A two-step hydrothermal crystallization process resulted in a highly efficient membrane with good reproducibility. The zeolite membranes synthesized therein has an overall surface area of {approx}0.3 m{sup 2}. Multichannel vessels were designed and machined for holding the tubular zeolite membrane for water purification. A zeolite membrane RO demonstration with zeolite membranes fabricated on commercial alpha-alumina support was established in the laboratory. Good test results were obtained for both actual produced water samples and simulated samples. An overall 96.9% ion rejection and 2.23 kg/m{sup 2}.h water flux was achieved in the demonstration. In addition, a post-synthesis modification method using Al{sup 3+}-oligomers was developed for repairing the undesirable nano-scale intercrystalline pores. Considerable enhancement in ion rejection was achieved. This new method of zeolite membrane modification is particularly useful for enhancing the efficiency of ion separation from aqueous solutions because the modification does not need high temperature operation and may be carried out online during the RO operation. A long-term separation test for actual CBM produced water has indicated that the zeolite membranes show excellent ion separation and extraordinary stability at high pressure and produced water environment.

  20. Nanocrystalline Zeolites: Synthesis, Mechanism, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severance, Michael Andrew

    Nanocrystalline zeolite particles are becoming an important material in many technical applications (e.g. zeolite membranes). Synthetic methods that minimize the zeolite crystal diameter, while providing a narrow particle size distribution, are of primary importance in these technical applications. However, there are several limitations to currently existing synthetic routes aimed at producing nanozeolites and zeolite membrane devices. For example, zeolite growth in these contexts typically requires days to weeks at high temperature to crystallize. Despite excellent performance of zeolite membranes in several separation applications, the long synthesis times required undermine any practical application of these technologies. This work focuses on chemical manipulation of zeolite nucleation processes in sol gel systems in effort to address such limitations. The primary findings indicate that careful control of the nucleation stage of a clear zeolite synthesis (optically transparent sol gel) allow the formation of zeolite Y nanocrystals less than 50 nm in diameter with a polydispersity index less than 0.2. Furthermore, chemical perturbations made during the nucleation stage of zeolite Y hydrogel synthesis is shown to accelerate crystal growth by a factor of 3-4, depending on the specific sol gel chemistry. These findings are applied to the nanocrystal seeding and rapid hydrothermal growth of zeolite Y membranes on inexpensive polymeric supports. A novel synthetic method is developed to this end. Also, the chemical and physical properties of monodisperse nanocrystalline zeolite Y synthesized herein are explored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is found that the particle interface plays an important role in the ionic conductivity of nanocrystalline zeolites in contrast to their larger zeolite counterparts in analogy to other ceramic and metal oxide ion conductors. Finally, the possibility to produce novel organic and inorganic composite systems through zeolite host-guest chemistry is explored. A nanozeolite-silver nanoparticle host-guest system is synthesized and a mechanism describing its evolution is developed. Also, the photochemistry of a colloidal nanozeolite-organic dye host-guest system is explored with ultrafast transient UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. This allows some of the fastest chemical events to be probed within the host-guest system.

  1. Enhanced reduction of chromate and PCE by pelletized surfactant-modified zeolite/zerovalent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Jones, H.K.; Bowman, R.S.; Helferich, R.

    1999-12-01

    The current research focuses on enhanced removal of chromate and perchloroethylene from contaminated water by a combination of a reduction material (represented by zerovalent iron, ZVI) and a sorption material (represented by surfactant-modified zeolite, SMZ). Natural zeolite and ZVI were homogenized and pelletized to maintain favorable hydraulic properties while minimizing material segregation due to bulk density differences. The zeolite/ZVI pellets were modified with the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide to increase contaminant sorption and, thus, the contaminant concentration on the solid surface. Results of chromate sorption/reduction indicate that the chromate sorption capacity of pelletized SMZ/ZVI is at least 1 order of magnitude higher than that of zeolite/ZVI pellets. Compared to SMZ pellets, the chromate removal capacity of SMZ/ZVI pellets in a 24-h period is about 80% higher, due to the combined effects o sorption by SMZ and reduction by ZVI. The chromate and PCE degradation rates with and without surfactant modification were determined separately. The pseudo-first-order reduction constant increased by a factor of 3 for PCE and by a factor of 9 for chromate following surfactant modification. The enhanced contaminant reduction capacity of SMZ/ZVI pellets may lead to a decrease in the amount of material required to achieve a given level of contaminant removal.

  2. Metal/zeolite catalysts of methane dehydroaromatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamonov, N. A.; Fadeeva, E. V.; Grigoriev, D. A.; Mikhailov, M. N.; Kustov, Leonid M.; Alkhimov, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    Results of studying methane dehydroaromatization over metal/zeolite catalysts have been reviewed. Special attention has focused on molybdenum catalysts based on HZSM-5 zeolites. The effect of catalyst synthesis and reaction conditions on the catalytic properties of the systems has been scrutinized. Information on the mechanism of the process and the nature of active sites has been reported. The bibliography includes 137 references.

  3. SEQUESTERING MANURE N WITH SYNTHETIC ZEOLITES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural zeolites have a long and successful history of agricultural use in Japan and more recently in the U.S. However the price (often > $US500 Mg -1) limits their use in agriculture. Zeolites can be synthesized from fly ash by reaction with sodium hydroxide solutions and low temperature. The proje...

  4. Optical response of Cu clusters in zeolite template.

    PubMed

    Lpez-Bastidas, Catalina; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Machorro, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Optical properties of Cu clusters embedded in mordenite are studied experimentally and theoretically. In this work we discuss spectral features of the system at various reduction steps and compare then with the results of spectra obtained within a theoretical model. The model employed consists of Cu clusters embedded in a homogeneous matrix. A second model employed introduced further variation considering a three component system where air or water can be present. The macroscopic dielectric response of the system is obtained within the Maxwell Garnett approximation. In this approach the complex non-local in homogeneous dielectric response of the zeolite+copper system is replaced by an effective homogeneous dielectric function. Metallic clusters can occupy specific available cavities in the zeolite framework. The presence of clusters that are smaller than the cavities in which they reside can lead to an air-Cu or water-Cu interface which allows shifts in surface plasmon resonance energies. As observed experimentally the energy of the main resonance is seen to be insensitive to the filling fraction ratios and highly susceptible to the embedding matrix properties. Reflectance spectra have been obtained which can be explained within this model. PMID:22440728

  5. Copper Coordination in Cu-SSZ-13 and Cu-SSZ-16 Investigated by Variable-Temperature XRD

    SciTech Connect

    Fickel, D.; Lobo, R

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) are a major atmospheric pollutant produced through the combustion of fossil fuels in internal combustion engines. Copper-exchanged zeolites are promising as selective catalytic reduction catalysts for the direct conversion of NO into N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, and recent reports have shown the enhanced performance of Cu-CHA catalysts over other zeolite frameworks in the NO decomposition of exhaust gas streams. In the present study, Rietveld refinement of variable-temperature XRD synchrotron data obtained for Cu-SSZ-13 and Cu-SSZ-16 is used to investigate the location of copper cations in the zeolite pores and the effect of temperature on these sites and on framework stability. The XRD patterns show that the thermal stability of SSZ-13 is increased significantly when copper is exchanged into the framework compared with the acid form of the zeolite, H-SSZ-13. Cu-SSZ-13 is also more thermally stable than Cu-SSZ-16. From the refined diffraction patterns, the atomic positions of atoms, copper locations and occupancies, and thermal displacement parameters were determined as a function of temperature for both zeolites. Copper is found in the cages coordinated to three oxygen atoms of the six-membered rings.

  6. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  7. UTILITY OF ZEOLITES IN ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange and adsorption properties. So far the cation exchanger properties of zeolites have been extensively studied and utilized. The anion exchanger properties of zeolites are less studied. Zeolite Faujasite Y has been used to remove arseni...

  8. Noble metal acidic zeolites for isomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, A.E.

    1991-02-12

    This patent describes a method for producing a noble metal containing zeolite catalyst for isomerization of paraffinic hydrocarbons. Contacting a zeolite material selected from the group consisting of acidic fayjasites. LZ-210 faujasites, and mordenite with a noble-metal compound selected from Pt(acetylacetonate){sub 2} and Pd(acetylacetonate){sub 2} for an effective amount of time to incorporate Pt and/or Pd into the pore surface regions of the zeolite, but not to disperse the Pt and/or Pd throughout the entire zeolite; and calcining the so treated zeolite at a temperature from about 250 {degrees} C, to about 600 {degrees} C. for an effective amount of time.

  9. Catalytic activation of OKO zeolite with intersecting pores of 10- and 12-membered rings using atomic layer deposition of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, E; Pulinthanathu Sree, S; Thomas, K; Dendooven, J; De Prins, M; Vanbutsele, G; Breynaert, E; Gilson, J-P; Kirschhock, C E A; Detavernier, C; Martens, J A

    2014-05-01

    Tetrahedral framework aluminium was introduced in all-silica zeolite -COK-14 using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) involving alternating exposure to trimethylaluminium and water vapour. The modification causes permanent conversion of the originally interrupted framework of -COK-14 to a fully connected OKO type framework, and generates catalytic activity in the acid catalysed hydrocarbon conversion reaction. PMID:24667934

  10. Evaluation of zeolite-sand mixtures as reactive materials protecting groundwater at waste disposal sites.

    PubMed

    Joanna, Fronczyk; Kazimierz, Garbulewski

    2013-09-01

    To recognize properties of a mixture of Vistula sand (medium sand acc. to USCS) with Slovak zeolite as reactive materials suitable for permeable reactive barriers proposed for protection of groundwater environment in vicinity of old landfills comprehensive laboratory investigations were performed. The present study investigates the removal of contaminants specific for landfill leachates onto zeolite-sand mixtures containing 20%, 50% and 80% of zeolite (ZS20, ZS50 and ZS80). Taking into account the results of batch tests it was concluded that the Langmuir isotherm best fitted the data. It was observed that the presence of ammonium, calcium and magnesium decreases the removal efficiency of copper by 32%. Column tests of contaminant migration through the attenuation zone of the reactive materials were interpreted using the software package CXTFIT, which solves a one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation. Column test results also indicate the strong influence of the presence of interfering substances on copper immobilisation; dynamic sorption capacities decrees twofold. Throughout the landfill leachate flow through ZS80 sample, a constant reduction of NH4+ (at 100%), K+ (at 93%) and Fe(total) (at an average of 86%) were observed. There was no reduction in chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand. PMID:24520718

  11. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  12. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  13. Dispersion strengthened copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1988-12-05

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  14. Water nanodroplets confined in zeolite pores.

    PubMed

    Coudert, Franois-Xavier; Cailliez, Fabien; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Fuchs, Alain H; Boutin, Anne

    2009-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive depiction of the behaviour of a nanodroplet of approximately equal to 20 water molecules confined in the pores of a series of 3D-connected isostructural zeolites with varying acidity, by means of molecular simulations. Both grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations using classical interatomic forcefields and first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics were used in order to characterise the behaviour of confined water by computing a range of properties, from thermodynamic quantities to electronic properties such as dipole moment, including structural and dynamical information. From the thermodynamic point of view, we have identified the all-silica zeolite as hydrophobic, and the cationic zeolites as hydrophilic; the condensation transition in the first case was demonstrated to be of first order. Furthermore, in-depth analysis of the dynamical and electronic properties of water showed that water in the hydrophobic zeolite behaves as a nanodroplet trying to close its hydrogen-bond network onto itself, with a few short-lived dangling OH groups, while water in hydrophilic zeolites "opens up" to form weak hydrogen bonds with the zeolite oxygen atoms. Finally, the dipole moment of confined water is studied and the contributions of water self-polarisation and the zeolite electric field are discussed. PMID:19227366

  15. Zeolites on Mars: Prospects for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, E. S.; Singer, R. B.; Kunkle, T. D.

    1985-01-01

    The Martian surface composition measured by Viking can be represented by several combinations of minerals incorporating major fractions of zeolites known to occur in altered mafic rocks and polar soils on Earth. The abundant occurrence of zeolites on Mars is consistent with what is known about both the physical and chemical environment of that planet. The laboratory reflectance spectra (0.65 to 2.55 microns) of a number of relatively pure zeolite minerals and some naturally occurring zeolite-clay soils were measured. All of the spectra measured are dominated by strong absorption near 1.4 and 1.9 microns and a steep reflectance drop longward of about 2.2 microns, all of which are due to abundant H2O. Weaker water overtone bands are also apparent, and in most cases there is spectral evidence for minor Fe(3+). In these features the zeolite spectra are similar to spectra of smectite clays which have abundant interlayer water. The most diagnostic difference between clay and zeolite spectra is the total absence in the zeolites of the weak structural OH absorption.

  16. The role of zeolite in the Fischer–Tropsch synthesis over cobalt–zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sineva, L. V.; Asalieva, E. Yu; Mordkovich, V. Z.

    2015-11-01

    The review deals with the specifics of the Fischer–Tropsch synthesis for the one-stage syncrude production from CO and H2 in the presence of cobalt–zeolite catalytic systems. Different types of bifunctional catalysts (hybrid, composite) combining a Fischer–Tropsch catalyst and zeolite are reviewed. Special attention focuses on the mechanisms of transformations of hydrocarbons produced in the Fischer–Tropsch process on zeolite acid sites under the synthesis conditions. The bibliography includes 142 references.

  17. Photoinduced electron transfer reactions in zeolite cages

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes work in the two areas of zeolites and layered double hydroxides. Results of studies on structural aspects of Ru(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+]-zeolite Y are summarized. Photoinduced electron transfer between entrapped Ru(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] and methylviologen (MV) in neighboring supercages was examined. Benzylviologen was also used. Since molecules larger than 13 [angstrom] cannot be accomodated in zeolite cages, the layered double metal hydroxides (LDH) LiAl[sub 2](OH)[sub 6][sup +]X[sup [minus

  18. Pulsed laser deposition of zeolitic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Peachey, N.M.; Dye, R.C.; Ries, P.D.

    1995-02-01

    The pulsed laser deposition of zeolites to form zeolitic thin films is described. Films were grown using both mordenite and faujasite targets and were deposited on various substrates. The optimal films were obtained when the target and substrate were separated by 5 cm. These films are comprised of small crystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the amorphous material is largely porous and that the pores appear to be close to the same size as the parent zeolite. Zeolotic thin films are of interest for sensor, gas separation, and catalytic applications.

  19. Preparation and characterization of zeolitic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Shuanshi Fan; Chunhua Li; Jinqu Wang

    1994-12-31

    Zeolites with less than 10 {angstrom} pores are desirable membrane materials, due to their crystallinity, resistance to high temperature, and chemical inertness. Although several works have been done on them, zeolitic membranes have not been developed so perfect at present. In this paper, the authors reported the preparation and some properties of an asymmetric zeolitic membrane synthesized by hydrothermal process on the intermediate layer which was made on a porous ceramic support, meanwhile the results of separation of ethanol-water mixture on pervaporation were discussed.

  20. Photochemical charge separation in zeolites: Electron transfer dynamics, nanocrystals and zeolitic membranes. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    2001-09-30

    Aluminosilicate zeolites provide an excellent host for photochemical charge separation. Because of the constraints provided by the zeolite, the back electron transfer from the reduced acceptor to the oxidized sensitizer is slowed down. This provides the opportunity to separate the charge and use it in a subsequent reaction for water oxidation and reduction. Zeolite-based ruthenium oxide catalysts have been found to be efficient for the water splitting process. This project has demonstrated the usefulness of zeolite hosts for photolytic splitting of water.

  1. Zeolite membranes fabricated by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Peachey, N.M.; Espinoza, B.F.; Dye, R.C.

    1995-12-01

    The well-defined cavities of the zeolite cage provides an attractive structure around which a membrane can be constructed. However, the fabrication of useful thin film zeolite membranes has presented difficulties since these crystals are not readily formed into thin, defect-free materials. Recently, pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been used to make thin film sensors. In this process, a laser beam is used to create a plume of particles having reactive edges or dangling bonds. These can then react on a support material to form porous zeolites embedded in a dense phase material. The use of differing wavelengths of laser light can provide a degree of control of the energy of the particles oblated from the target. These novel thin film zeolites provide a unique approach to the synthesis of separation membranes and sensors.

  2. Mixing of zeolite powders and molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, C.; Zyryanov, V.N.; Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1996-05-01

    Transuranics and fission products in a molten salt can be incorporated into zeolite A by an ion exchange process and by a batch mixing or blending process. The zeolite is then mixed with glass and consolidated into a monolithic waste form for geologic disposal. Both processes require mixing of zeolite powders with molten salt at elevated temperatures (>700 K). Complete occlusion of salt and a uniform distribution of chloride and fission products are desired for incorporation of the powders into the final waste form. The relative effectiveness of the blending process was studied over a series of temperature, time, and composition profiles. The major criteria for determining the effectiveness of the mixing operations were the level and uniformity of residual free salt in the mixtures. High operating temperatures (>775 K) improved salt occlusion. Reducing the chloride levels in the mixture to below 80% of the full salt capacity of the zeolite significantly reduced the free salt level in the final product.

  3. Complexation of porphyrins with nanoparticles of zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulkhandanyan, Anna G.; Zakoyan, Anna A.; Sargsyan, Hakob H.; Ghazaryan, Robert K.; Sheyranyan, Marina A.; Gyulkhandanyan, Grigor V.

    2015-06-01

    The binding of nanoparticles zeolite with a number of cationic porphyrins are studied. Previously, it was established that the main mechanism of binding the zeolite nanoparticles with cationic porphyrins is an ionic bond. Since binding of porphyrins as ligands to nanoparticles at the initial stage of interaction is determined by the Brownian motion of porphyrins, it is obvious that the interaction of porphyrins with nanoparticles may depend on the temperature. In the present paper by methods of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy was studied the complexation of porphyrins with zeolite nanoparticles at different temperature conditions. It was established that there is a clear temperature dependence of the complexation of cationic metalloporphyrins with zeolite naonoparticles, and for correct determination of the percentage of binding must be strict thermostating of the experimental conditions.

  4. Characterizing the dealumination of environmentally relevant zeolites using IR, NMR and neutron diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Paffett, M.T.; Szanyi, J.; Jacubinas, R.M.; Ott, K.C.; VonDreele, R.; Hughes, C.D.; Earl, W.L.

    1997-07-01

    Results of characterization studies monitoring the sequential chemical bond breaking events, local site symmetry, and long range structural modifications of specific zeolites (H-ZSM-5, TS-1) during hydrothermal treatment of these catalyst materials are described. These characterization techniques include infrared spectroscopy of selected probe molecules, magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, and powder neutron diffraction. Information regarding selected examples from each of these techniques is presented and the inherent strengths of each is discussed. The experimental insight into the chemical and structural modifications of high surface area microporous catalyst materials as a function of deactivation conditions (hydrothermal conditioning) is highlighted.

  5. Thermodynamic modeling of natural zeolite stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1997-06-01

    Zeolites occur in a variety of geologic environments and are used in numerous agricultural, commercial, and environmental applications. It is desirable to understand their stability both to predict future stability and to evaluate the geochemical conditions resulting in their formation. The use of estimated thermodynamic data for measured zeolite compositions allows thermodynamic modeling of stability relationships among zeolites in different geologic environments (diagenetic, saline and alkaline lakes, acid rock hydrothermal, basic rock, deep sea sediments). This modeling shows that the relative cation abundances in both the aqueous and solid phases, the aqueous silica activity, and temperature are important factors in determining the stable zeolite species. Siliceous zeolites (e.g., clinoptilolite, mordenite, erionite) present in saline and alkaline lakes or diagenetic deposits formed at elevated silica activities. Aluminous zeolites (e.g., natrolite, mesolite/scolecite, thomsonite) formed in basic rocks in association with reduced silica activities. Likewise, phillipsite formation is favored by reduced aqueous silica activities. The presence of erionite, chabazite, and phillipsite are indicative of environments with elevated potassium concentrations. Elevated temperature, calcic water conditions, and reduced silica activity help to enhance the laumontite and wairakite stability fields. Analcime stability increases with increased temperature and aqueous Na concentration, and/or with decreased silica activity.

  6. Three Mile Island zeolite vitirification demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, D.H.; Knowlton, D.E.; Shupe, M.W.

    1981-06-01

    The cleanup of the high-activity-level water at Three Mile Island (TMI) provides an opportunity to further develop waste management technology. Approximately 790,000 gallons of high-activity-level water at TMI's Unit-2 Nuclear Power Station will be decontaminated at the site using the submerged demineralizer system (SDS). In the SDS process, the cesium and strontium in the water are sorbed onto zeolite that is contained within metal liners. The Department of Energy has asked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to take a portion of the zeolite from the SDS process and demonstrate, on a production scale, that this zeolite can be vitrified using the in-can melting process. This paper is a brief overview of the TMI zeolite vitrification program. The first section discusses the formulation of a glass suitable for immobilizing SDS zeolite. The following section describes a feed system that was developed to feed zeolite to the in-can melter. It also describes the in-can melting process and the government owned facilities in which the demonstrations will take place. Finally, the schedule for completing the program activities is outlined.

  7. Probing zeolites by vibrational spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Bordiga, Silvia; Lamberti, Carlo; Bonino, Francesca; Travert, Arnaud; Thibault-Starzyk, Frdric

    2015-10-21

    This review addresses the most relevant aspects of vibrational spectroscopies (IR, Raman and INS) applied to zeolites and zeotype materials. Surface Brnsted and Lewis acidity and surface basicity are treated in detail. The role of probe molecules and the relevance of tuning both the proton affinity and the steric hindrance of the probe to fully understand and map the complex site population present inside microporous materials are critically discussed. A detailed description of the methods needed to precisely determine the IR absorption coefficients is given, making IR a quantitative technique. The thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process that can be extracted from a variable-temperature IR study are described. Finally, cutting-edge space- and time-resolved experiments are reviewed. All aspects are discussed by reporting relevant examples. When available, the theoretical literature related to the reviewed experimental results is reported to support the interpretation of the vibrational spectra on an atomic level. PMID:26435467

  8. The zeolite deposits of Greece

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamatakis, M.G.; Hall, A.; Hein, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Zeolites are present in altered pyroclastic rocks at many localities in Greece, and large deposits of potential economic interest are present in three areas: (1) the Evros region of the province of Thrace in the north-eastern part of the Greek mainland; (2) the islands of Kimolos and Poliegos in the western Aegean; and (3) the island of Samos in the eastern Aegean Sea. The deposits in Thrace are of Eocene-Oligocene age and are rich in heulandite and/or clinoptilolite. Those of Kimolos and Poliegos are mainly Quaternary and are rich in mordenite. Those of Samos are Miocene, and are rich in clinoptilolite and/or analcime. The deposits in Thrace are believed to have formed in an open hydrological system by the action of meteoric water, and those of the western Aegean islands in a similar way but under conditions of high heat flow, whereas the deposits in Samos were formed in a saline-alkaline lake.

  9. Luminescent host–guest materials of electrostatically adsorbed Eu{sup 3+}(tta){sub 3}-tpyIL on zeolite L crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Wang, Dongyue; Liang, Dong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuming; Wang, Yige

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Luminescent host–guest materials exhibiting tunable emission colors by changing the excitation wavelength are obtained by surface modification of terbium(III) bipyridine-loaded zeolite L crystals with the ionic europium(III) complexes. - Highlights: • Luminescent ionic europium(III) complex was synthesized. • Outer surface of zeolite L was modified by electrostatic adsorption of the ionic complex. • Luminescent host–guest material with tunable emission color was obtained. - Abstract: The surface modification of zeolite L crystals with lanthanide complexes was achieved by electrostatic adsorption of ionic europium(III) complexes that are prepared by the reaction of tris(2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate) europium(III) dehydrate with an organic salt containing terpyridine moieties on the negative charge-bearing surfaces of zeolite L crystals. Luminescent host–guest materials exhibiting tunable emission colors by changing the excitation wavelength are obtained by surface modification of terbium(III) bipyridine-loaded zeolite L crystals with the ionic europium(III) complexes.

  10. Zeolite LTA Nanoparticles Prepared by Laser-Induced Fracture of Zeolite Microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Nichols, William T; Kodaira, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Yukichi; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2006-01-12

    Zeolite LTA nanoparticles are prepared by laser-induced fragmentation of zeolite LTA microparticles using a pulsed laser. Zeolite nanoparticle formation is attributed to absorption of the laser at impurities or defects within the zeolite microcrystal generating thermoelastic stress that mechanically fractures the microparticle into smaller nanoparticle fragments. Experimentally, it is found that nanoparticles have a wide size and morphology distribution. Large nanoparticles (>200 nm) are typically irregularly shaped crystals of zeolite LTA, whereas small nanoparticles (<50 nm) tend to be spherical, dense, and amorphous, indicative of destruction of the original LTA crystal structure. Results of the fragmentation versus laser parameters show that shorter laser wavelengths are more efficient at producing zeolite nanoparticles, which is explained based on a larger cross section for optical absorption in the zeolite crystal. Increasing the laser energy density irradiating the sample was found to be a trade-off between increasing the amount of fragmentation and increasing the amount of structural damage to the zeolite crystal. It is suggested that in the presence of strongly absorbing defects, plasma formation is induced resulting in dramatically higher temperatures. On the basis of these results it is suggested the optimal laser processing conditions are 355 nm and 10 mJ/pulse laser energy for our LTA samples. PMID:16471503

  11. Influence of zeolite crystal size on zeolite-polyamide thin film nanocomposite membranes.

    PubMed

    Lind, Mary L; Ghosh, Asim K; Jawor, Anna; Huang, Xiaofei; Hou, William; Yang, Yang; Hoek, Eric M V

    2009-09-01

    Zeolite-polyamide thin film nanocomposite membranes were coated onto polysulfone ultrafiltration membranes by interfacial polymerization of amine and acid chloride monomers in the presence of Linde type A zeolite nanocrystals. A matrix of three different interfacial polymerization chemistries and three different-sized zeolite crystals produced nanocomposite thin films with widely varying structure, morphology, charge, hydrophilicity, and separation performance (evaluated as reverse osmosis membranes). Pure polyamide film properties were tuned by changing polymerization chemistry, but addition of zeolite nanoparticles produced even greater changes in separation performance, surface chemistry, and film morphology. For fixed polymer chemistry, addition of zeolite nanoparticles formed more permeable, negatively charged, and thicker polyamide films. Smaller zeolites produced greater permeability enhancements, but larger zeolites produced more favorable surface properties; hence, nanoparticle size may be considered an additional "degree of freedom" in designing thin film nanocomposite reverse osmosis membranes. The data presented offer additional support for the hypothesis that zeolite crystals alter polyamide thin film structure when they are present during the interfacial polymerization reaction. PMID:19527039

  12. Effect of different glasses in glass bonded zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.; Verma, S.

    1995-05-01

    A mineral waste form has been developed for chloride waste salt generated during the pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of salt-occluded zeolite powders bound within a glass matrix. The zeolite contains the salt and immobilizes the fission products. The zeolite powders are hot pressed to form a mechanically stable, durable glass bonded zeolite. Further development of glass bonded zeolite as a waste form requires an understanding of the interaction between the glass and the zeolite. Properties of the glass that enhance binding and durability of the glass bonded zeolite need to be identified. Three types of glass, boroaluminosilicate, soda-lime silicate, and high silica glasses, have a range of properties and are now being investigated. Each glass was hot pressed by itself and with an equal amount of zeolite. MCC-1 leach tests were run on both. Soda-lime silicate and high silica glasses did not give a durable glass bonded zeolite. Boroaluminosilicate glasses rich in alkaline earths did bind the zeolite and gave a durable glass bonded zeolite. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the boroaluminosilicate glasses wetted the zeolite powders better than the other glasses. Development of the glass bonded zeolite as a waste form for chloride waste salt is continuing.

  13. Zeolite-based SCR catalysts and their use in diesel engine emission treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya K; Yang, Xiaofan

    2015-03-24

    A catalyst comprising a zeolite loaded with copper ions and at least one trivalent metal ion other than Al.sup.+3, wherein the catalyst decreases NO.sub.x emissions in diesel exhaust. The trivalent metal ions are selected from, for example, trivalent transition metal ions, trivalent main group metal ions, and/or trivalent lanthanide metal ions. In particular embodiments, the catalysts are selected from Cu--Fe-ZSM5, Cu--La-ZSM-5, Fe--Cu--La-ZSM5, Cu--Sc-ZSM-5, and Cu--In-ZSM5. The catalysts are placed on refractory support materials and incorporated into catalytic converters.

  14. Tailoring the structure of hierarchically porous zeolite beta through modified orientated attachment growth in a dry gel system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiao; Hua, Weiming; Xiao, Yu; Huo, Qisheng; Zhu, Kake; Zhou, Xinggui

    2014-11-01

    The crystallization of zeolite beta in a dry gel system is found to follow the orientated attachment growth route, escorted with a temporal morphology change from bulky gel, through aggregation of the particulate to large zeolitic crystals. Modification of the precrystallized gel with organosilanes can be used to tune the morphology of the ultimate beta. When hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HTS) is employed to modify precrystallized gel, a resumed secondary growth produces a hybrid mesocrystal of agglomerated nanozeolites. Combustive removal of organics leads to the formation of hierarchically porous zeolite beta of 100 to 160?nm, composed of nanocrystal building units ranging from 20 to 40?nm, with a noticeable micropore volume of 0.19?mL?g(-1) and a meso/macropore size between 5 and 80?nm. Conversely, when 1,8-bis(triethoxysilyl)octane (BTO) is utilized to modify the same precrystallized gel, assemblages of discrete beta nanozeolite of around 35?nm are generated. These assemblages construct a hierarchical zeolite beta with a micropore volume of 0.20?mL?g(-1) and auxiliary pores ranging from 5 to 100?nm. Both organosilanes bring about well-connected hierarchical pore networks. HTS has little effect on the Brnsted/Lewis acidity, whereas BTO causes a substantial reduction of strong Brnsted acid sites. The hierarchical beta zeolite-supported Pt catalyst exhibits improved catalytic performance for the hydroisomerization of n-heptane. PMID:25233842

  15. Preparation of environmentally friendly alkylglucoside surfactants using zeolites as catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Corma, A.; Iborra, S.; Miquel, S.; Primo, J.

    1996-07-01

    Acid zeolites were evaluated for glycosidation activity of D-glucose and n-butanol. Zeolites with high Si/Al ratios such as faujasite and beta are the most suitable catalysts. 24 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. 11. EASTERN END OF ZEOLITE BUILDING. NOTE DIAL TO LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. EASTERN END OF ZEOLITE BUILDING. NOTE DIAL TO LEFT OF CLOCK GAUGING TOTAL ZEOLITE INFLUENT IN MILLIONS OF GALLONS PER DAY. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Thin layer of Ni-modified 13X zeolite on glassy carbon support as an electrode material in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojovi?, Z.; Mentus, S.; Krsti?, I.

    2007-09-01

    A new type of an electrode material, zeolite modified by the incorporation of Ni or NiO clusters into its cavities, was synthesized by multiple impregnation of zeolite 13X with a Ni-acetylacetonate solution followed by solvent evaporation and thermal degradation of the nickel compound. Samples with a Ni/13X mass ratio within the range 0.2-1.0 were synthesized. Modification by both Ni and NiO clusters, depending on whether the atmosphere was reducing (H2) or oxidizing (air), respectively, was used to finish the sample. After modification, the zeolite kept its original crystallographic structure, as proven by X-ray diffractommetry. The dimensions of the incorporated clusters were limited by the diameter of the zeolite cavities (reaching 1.3 nm). This material, homogenized with 10 wt % of nanodispersed carbon, was bonded in the form of a thin layer to a glassy carbon disc by means of Nafion and used as an electrode material in an aqueous 0.1 M NaOH solution. The cyclovoltammograms of this thin-layer electrode resemble those of a smooth nickel electrode in alkaline solutions.

  18. Low-temperature synthesis of zeolite from perlite waste — Part II: characteristics of the products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Król, Magdalena; Morawska, Justyna; Mozgawa, Włodzimierz; Pichór, Waldemar

    2014-12-01

    The paper investigates the properties of sodium zeolites synthesized using the hydrothermal method under autogenous pressure at low temperature with NaOH solutions of varying concentrations. During this modification, zeolites X, Na-P1 and hydroxysodalite were synthesized. The synthesis parameters, and thus, phase composition of resulting samples, significantly affected the specific surface area (SSA) and cation exchange capacity (CEC). SSA increased from 2.9 m2/g to a maximum of 501.2 m2/g, while CEC rose from 16 meq/100 g to a maximum of 500 meq/100 g. The best properties for use as a sorbent were obtained for perlite waste modified with 4.0 M NaOH at 70 °C or 80 °C.

  19. Molecular simulations and experimental studies of zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloy, Eric C.

    Zeolites are microporous aluminosilicate tetrahedral framework materials that have symmetric cages and channels with open-diameters between 0.2 and 2.0 nm. Zeolites are used extensively in the petrochemical industries for both their microporosity and their catalytic properties. The role of water is paramount to the formation, structure, and stability of these materials. Zeolites frequently have extra-framework cations, and as a result, are important ion-exchange materials. Zeolites also play important roles as molecular sieves and catalysts. For all that is known about zeolites, much remains a mystery. How, for example, can the well established metastability of these structures be explained? What is the role of water with respect to the formation, stabilization, and dynamical properties? This dissertation addresses these questions mainly from a modeling perspective, but also with some experimental work as well. The first discussion addresses a special class of zeolites: pure-silica zeolites. Experimental enthalpy of formation data are combined with molecular modeling to address zeolitic metastability. Molecular modeling is used to calculate internal surface areas, and a linear relationship between formation enthalpy and internal surface areas is clearly established, producing an internal surface energy of approximately 93 mJ/m2. Nitrate bearing sodalite and cancrinite have formed under the caustic chemical conditions of some nuclear waste processing centers in the United States. These phases have fouled expensive process equipment, and are the primary constituents of the resilient heels in the bottom of storage tanks. Molecular modeling, including molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, and density functional theory, is used to simulate these materials with respect to structure and dynamical properties. Some new, very interesting results are extracted from the simulation of anhydrous Na6[Si6Al 6O24] sodalite---most importantly, the identification of two distinct oxygen sites (rather than one), and formation of a new supercell. New calorimetric measurements of enthalpy are used to examine the energetics of the hydrosodalite family of zeolites---specifically, formation enthalpies and hydration energies. Finally, force-field computational methods begin the examination of water in terms of energetics, structure, and radionuclide containment and diffusion.

  20. Synthesis of novel perfluoroalkylglucosides on zeolite and non-zeolite catalysts.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Janusz; Mokrzycki, ?ukasz; Sulikowski, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoroalkylglucosides comprise a very important class of fluorine-containing surfactants. These compounds can be synthesized by using the Fisher reaction, starting directly from glucose and the required perfluoroalcohols. We wish to report on the use of zeolite catalysts of different structure and composition for the synthesis of perfluoroalkylglucosides when using glucose and 1-octafluoropentanol as substrates. Zeolites of different pore architecture have been chosen (ZSM-5, ZSM-12, MCM-22 and Beta). Zeolites were characterized by XRD, nitrogen sorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and solid-state 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy. The activity of the zeolite catalysts in the glycosidation reaction was studied in a batch reactor at 100 C below atmospheric pressure. The performance of zeolites was compared to other catalysts, an ion-exchange resin (Purolite) and a montmorillonite-type layered aluminosilicate. The catalytic performance of zeolite Beta was the highest among the zeolites studied and the results were comparable to those obtained over Purolite and montmorillonite type catalysts. PMID:25856063

  1. Zeolites as catalysts in oil refining.

    PubMed

    Primo, Ana; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2014-11-21

    Oil is nowadays the main energy source and this prevalent position most probably will continue in the next decades. This situation is largely due to the degree of maturity that has been achieved in oil refining and petrochemistry as a consequence of the large effort in research and innovation. The remarkable efficiency of oil refining is largely based on the use of zeolites as catalysts. The use of zeolites as catalysts in refining and petrochemistry has been considered as one of the major accomplishments in the chemistry of the XXth century. In this tutorial review, the introductory part describes the main features of zeolites in connection with their use as solid acids. The main body of the review describes important refining processes in which zeolites are used including light naphtha isomerization, olefin alkylation, reforming, cracking and hydrocracking. The final section contains our view on future developments in the field such as the increase in the quality of the transportation fuels and the coprocessing of increasing percentage of biofuels together with oil streams. This review is intended to provide the rudiments of zeolite science applied to refining catalysis. PMID:24671148

  2. Italian zeolitized rocks of technological interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de'Gennaro, M.; Langella, A.

    1996-09-01

    Large areas of Italian territory are covered by thick and widespread deposits of zeolite-bearing volcaniclastic products. The main zeolites are phillipsite and chabazite spread over the whole peninsula, and clinoptilolite recorded only in Sardinia. A trachytic to phonolitic glassy precursor accounts for the formation of the former zeolites characterized by low Si/Al ratios (?3.00), while clinoptilolite is related to more acidic volcanism. The genesis of most of these zeolitized deposits is linked to pyroclastic flow emplacement mechanisms characterized by quite high temperatures and by the presence of abundant fluids. The main utilization of these materials has been and still is as dimension stones in the building industry. Currently, limited amounts are also employed in animal farming (dietary supplement, pet litter and manure deodorizer) and in agriculture as soil improvement and slow-release fertilizers. New fields of application have been proposed for these products on account of their easy availability, very low cost, their high-grade zeolites (50 70%), and good technological features such as high cation exchange capacities and adsorption properties.

  3. Studies in reduction-roast leaching ion exchange of copper converter slag from an Indian copper complex, Ghatshila

    SciTech Connect

    Bodas, M.G.; Mathur, S.B.

    1997-12-01

    Large quantities of converter and anode slags are generated in different unit operations for the production of copper in I.C.C. Ghatshila. The converter slag contains about 2.75% copper, 0.9% nickel, 52.0% iron, and 0.6% cobalt and cannot be rejected due to its economic importance. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies revealed the presence of copper in elemental, oxide, and silicate phases and iron in silicate (Feyalite) and oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) phases. From the earlier work on leaching by an acetic acid lixiviant up to 55% copper could be extracted at 250 mL of acetic acid/100 g of slag, 125 C temperature, and 35 atm of oxygen pressure. Low copper recovery was attributed to the presence of copper silicate and sulfide phases which could not be detected by XRD. Therefore, reduction roasting by noncoking coal was done to increase the copper recovery. A coal sample from Talchar which contained 30% fixed carbon, 40% volatile, and 30% ash was used for reduction roasting. Maximum percent extraction of copper and nickel (97% Cu and 20% Ni) could be achieved at the temperature of 720 C for 90 min of roasting with 20% reductant. The acetic acid requirement was 130 mL/100 g of reduced pellets, while leaching at the oxygen pressure of 35 atm for 120 min at 120 C. Iron dissolution was minimum (max 1%) in all the experiments. The ion-exchange technique was employed to separate copper from acetate solution. Zeolite resin was found to be suitable for the separation of copper from leach liquor. About 92% copper was recovered by geolite. 2.5 N H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was found to be most effective for the stripping of the copper from resin.

  4. Growth of zeolite crystals in the microgravity environment of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, A., Jr.; Sand, L. B.; Collette, D.; Dieselman, K.; Crowley, J.; Feitelberg, A.

    1986-01-01

    Zeolites are hydrated, crystalline aluminosilicates with alkali and alkaling earth metals substituted into cation vacancies. Typically zeolite crystals are 3 to 8 microns. Larger cyrstals are desirable. Large zeolite crystals were produced (100 to 200 microns); however, they have taken restrictively long times to grow. It was proposed if the rate of nucleation or in some other way the number of nuclei can be lowered, fewer, larger crystals will be formed. The microgravity environment of space may provide an ideal condition to achieve rapid growth of large zeolite crystals. The objective of the project is to establish if large zeolite crystals can be formed rapidly in space.

  5. Crystallization of zeolite A: a spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.; Shieh, D.C.

    1986-05-22

    The transformation of aluminosilicate gel to zeolite A was investigated by Raman spectroscopy, supported by x-ray diffraction and NMR measurements. The gel, even though amorphous, has a structure consisting of predominantly four-membered rings connected in a random fashion. It is considerably depolymerized, consisting of Si atoms with one and two nonbonded oxygen atoms. For the transformation of this gel to zeolite A to proceed, it is essential to have Al(OH)/sub 4//sup -/ species in solution. During the nucleation period, the gel reorganizes its structure by interaction with these Al(OH)/sub 4//sup -/ ions and forms nuclei of zeolite A. The crystallization curve obtained by Raman spectroscopy closely resembles that from x-ray diffraction.

  6. Spectroscopic characterization of bismuth embedded Y zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong-Tao; Sakka, Yoshio; Miwa, Yuji; Shirahata, Naoto; Fujii, Minoru; Gao, Hong

    2010-09-01

    Bismuth embedded Y zeolites were studied by using UV-vis- near infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance, Raman, and steady-state NIR photoluminescence spectroscopy. The results suggest that Bi53+ and Bi+ active centers coexist in the dehydrated and hydrated zeolite framework, both of which contribute to NIR emission. Furthermore, it was revealed that the high-temperature annealing leads to the formation of Bi2O3 clusters, which act as blocks for selectively closing down the "in-out windows" of H2O and O2 molecules in the zeolites. It is believed that these materials can find a wide array of applications as active media of broadly tunable micro or nano-optical sources.

  7. Hydrogen Purification Using Natural Zeolite Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelValle, William

    2003-01-01

    The School of Science at Universidad del Turabo (UT) have a long-lasting investigation plan to study the hydrogen cleaning and purification technologies. We proposed a research project for the synthesis, phase analysis and porosity characterization of zeolite based ceramic perm-selective membranes for hydrogen cleaning to support NASA's commitment to achieving a broad-based research capability focusing on aerospace-related issues. The present study will focus on technology transfer by utilizing inorganic membranes for production of ultra-clean hydrogen for application in combustion. We tested three different natural zeolite membranes (different particle size at different temperatures and time of exposure). Our results show that the membranes exposured at 900 C for 1Hr has the most higher permeation capacity, indicated that our zeolite membranes has the capacity to permeate hydrogen.

  8. Copper cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper cyanide ; CASRN 544 - 92 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  9. Crystal engineering of zeolites with graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Paul; Pattinson, Sebastian W.; Ren, Zhibin; Cooke, David J.; Elliott, James A.; Eder, Dominik

    2014-06-01

    Achieving control over the morphology of zeolite crystals at the nanoscale is crucial for enhancing their performance in diverse applications including catalysis, sensors and separation. The complexity and sensitivity of zeolite synthesis processes, however, often make such control both highly empirical and difficult to implement. We demonstrate that graphene can significantly alter the morphology of titanium silicalite (TS-1) particles, in particular being able to reduce their dimensions from several hundreds to less than 10 nm. Through electron microscopy and molecular mechanics simulations we propose a mechanism for this change based on the preferential interaction of specific TS-1 surfaces with benzyl-alcohol-mediated graphene. These findings suggest a facile new means of controlling the zeolite morphology and thereby also further demonstrate the potential of graphene in hybrid materials. Moreover, the generality of the mechanism points the way to a new avenue of research in using two-dimensional materials to engineer functional inorganic crystals.Achieving control over the morphology of zeolite crystals at the nanoscale is crucial for enhancing their performance in diverse applications including catalysis, sensors and separation. The complexity and sensitivity of zeolite synthesis processes, however, often make such control both highly empirical and difficult to implement. We demonstrate that graphene can significantly alter the morphology of titanium silicalite (TS-1) particles, in particular being able to reduce their dimensions from several hundreds to less than 10 nm. Through electron microscopy and molecular mechanics simulations we propose a mechanism for this change based on the preferential interaction of specific TS-1 surfaces with benzyl-alcohol-mediated graphene. These findings suggest a facile new means of controlling the zeolite morphology and thereby also further demonstrate the potential of graphene in hybrid materials. Moreover, the generality of the mechanism points the way to a new avenue of research in using two-dimensional materials to engineer functional inorganic crystals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00320a

  10. Natural zeolite reactivity towards ozone: the role of compensating cations.

    PubMed

    Valds, Hctor; Alejandro, Serguei; Zaror, Claudio A

    2012-08-15

    Among indoor pollutants, ozone is recognised to pose a threat to human health. Recently, low cost natural zeolites have been applied as alternative materials for ozone abatement. In this work, the effect of compensating cation content of natural zeolite on ozone removal is studied. A Chilean natural zeolite is used here as starting material. The amount of compensating cations in the zeolite framework was modified by ion exchange using an ammonium sulphate solution (0.1 mol L(-1)). Characterisation of natural and modified zeolites were performed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption at 77K, elemental analysis, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectroscopy (TGA-MS), and temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH(3)-TPD). Ozone adsorption and/or decomposition on natural and modified zeolites were studied by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Results show that the zeolite compensating cation content affects ozone interaction with zeolite active sites. Ammonium ion-exchange treatments followed by thermal out-gassing at 823 K, reduces ozone diffusion resistance inside the zeolite framework, increasing ozone abatement on zeolite surface active sites. Weak and strong Lewis acid sites of zeolite surface are identified here as the main active sites responsible of ozone removal. PMID:22633878

  11. A cationic cesium continuum in zeolite x.

    PubMed

    Sun, T; Seff, K; Heo, N H; Petranovskii, V P

    1993-01-22

    A cesium continuum that fills the channels and cavities of zeolite X has been prepared, and its structure has been determined by single-crystal x-ray crystallography. The three-dimensional continuum is cationic to balance the negative charge of the zeolite framework. Its valence electrons, only 0.3 per Cs(+) ion, are widely delocalized over 95 percent of the cesium ions in the crystal. The continuum has a unit cell formula of (Cs(122))(86+) and contains Cs(13) and Cs(14) clusters (one per supercage) arranged like the atoms in diamond, with one Cs(2) appendix (in the sodalite cavity) per cluster. PMID:17734168

  12. Formation of Gold Nanoparticles in Zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestryakov, A.; Tuzovskaya, I.; Smolentseva, E.; Bogdanchikova, N.; Jentoft, F. C.; Knop-Gericke, A.

    The formation of gold nanoparticles in mordenites has been studied by the methods of FTIR spectroscopy of adsorbed CO and diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectroscopy. Different states of ionic and metallic gold were detected in the zeolite cavities and on the external surface of the zeolite - Au+ and Au3+ ions, charged clusters Aun?+, and neutral nanoparticles Aum. The relative amount of these states depends on the method of sample preparation, type of redox treatment and the SiO2/Al2O3 molar ratio.

  13. A Cationic Cesium Continuum in Zeolite X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Seff, Karl; Heo, Nam Ho; Petranovskii, Vitalli P.

    1993-01-01

    A cesium continuum that fills the channels and cavities of zeolite X has been prepared, and its structure has been determined by single-crystal x-ray crystallography. The three-dimensional continuum is cationic to balance the negative charge of the zeolite framework. Its valence electrons, only 0.3 per Cs^+ ion, are widely delocalized over 95 percent of the cesium ions in the crystal. The continuum has a unit cell formula of (Cs122)86+ and contains Cs13 and Cs14 clusters (one per supercage) arranged like the atoms in diamond, with one Cs_2 appendix (in the sodalite cavity) per cluster.

  14. Fly ash zeolite catalyst support for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campen, Adam

    This dissertation research aimed at evaluating a fly ash zeolite (FAZ) catalyst support for use in heterogeneous catalytic processes. Gas phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) over a fixed-bed of the prepared catalyst/FAZ support was identified as an appropriate process for evaluation, by comparison with commercial catalyst supports (silica, alumina, and 13X). Fly ash, obtained from the Wabash River Generating Station, was first characterized using XRD, SEM/EDS, particle size, and nitrogen sorption techniques. Then, a parametric study of a two-step alkali fusion/hydrothermal treatment process for converting fly ash to zeolite frameworks was performed by varying the alkali fusion agent, agent:flyash ratio, fusion temperature, fused ash/water solution, aging time, and crystallization time. The optimal conditions for each were determined to be NaOH, 1.4 g NaOH: 1 g fly ash, 550 °C, 200 g/L, 12 hours, and 48 hours. This robust process was applied to the fly ash to obtain a faujasitic zeolite structure with increased crystallinity (40 %) and surface area (434 m2/g). Following the modification of fly ash to FAZ, ion exchange of H+ for Na+ and cobalt incipient wetness impregnation were used to prepare a FTS catalyst. FTS was performed on the catalysts at 250--300 °C, 300 psi, and with a syngas ratio H2:CO = 2. The HFAZ catalyst support loaded with 11 wt% cobalt resulted in a 75 % carbon selectivity for C5 -- C18 hydrocarbons, while methane and carbon dioxide were limited to 13 and 1 %, respectively. Catalyst characterization was performed by XRD, N2 sorption, TPR, and oxygen pulse titration to provide insight to the behavior of each catalyst. Overall, the HFAZ compared well with silica and 13X supports, and far exceeded the performance of the alumina support under the tested conditions. The successful completion of this research could add value to an underutilized waste product of coal combustion, in the form of catalyst supports in heterogeneous catalytic processes.

  15. Structure of nanochannel entrances in stopcock-functionalized zeolite?L composites.

    PubMed

    Tabacchi, Gloria; Fois, Ettore; Calzaferri, Gion

    2015-09-14

    Multifunctional hybrid materials are obtained by modifying zeolite?L (ZL) with stopcock molecules, consisting of a tail group that can enter the ZL nanochannels and a head group too large to pass the channel opening. However, to date no microscopic-level structural information on modified ZL materials has been reported. Herein we draw atomistic pictures of channel openings and stopcock-functionalized ZL based on first-principles calculations. We elucidate the interactions of the tail group with the inner surface of ZL channels and the space-filling properties of the stopcocks, revealing cork- or lid-sealing modes. Water is essential to obtain stable modifications. Al?OH groups are the preferred modification sites, bipodal modifications suffer from strain, and tripod binding is ruled out. Our results suggest the viability of recursive functionalization by cross-linking. PMID:26255642

  16. Copper peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, L.

    1988-01-01

    A number of oxidizing agents, including chlorine, bromine, ozone and other peroxides, were allowed to act on copper solutions with the intention of forming copper peroxide. The only successful agent appears to be hydrogen peroxide. It must be used in a neutral 50 to 30 percent solution at a temperature near zero. Other methods described in the literature apparently do not work. The excess of hydrogen must be quickly sucked out of the brown precipitate, which it is best to wash with alcohol and ether. The product, crystalline under a microscope, can be analyzed only approximately. It approaches the formula CuO2H2O. In alkaline solution it appears to act catalytically in causing the decomposition of other peroxides, so that Na2O2 cannot be used to prepare it. On the addition of acids the H2O2 is regenerated. The dry substance decomposes much more slowly than the moist but is not very stable.

  17. Zeolite 5A Catalyzed Etherification of Diphenylmethanol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Henderson, Eric J.; Lightbody, Owen C.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment for the synthetic undergraduate laboratory is described in which zeolite 5A catalyzes the room temperature dehydration of diphenylmethanol, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOH, producing 1,1,1',1'-tetraphenyldimethyl ether, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOCH(C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]. The…

  18. SODIUM ZEOLITE A SUPPLEMENTATION TO DAIRY CALVES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium zeolite A (SZA), an aluminosilicate, has been used in a number of animal studies, but alterations in mineral metabolism and tissue composition have not been fully investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of SZA on mineral metabolism and tissue mineral composition...

  19. Multicomponent liquid ion exchange with chabazite zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.M.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Byers, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In spite of the increasing commercial use of zeolites for binary and multicomponent sorption, the understanding of the basic mass-transfer processes associated with multicomponent zeolite ion-exchange systems is quite limited. This study was undertaken to evaluate Na-Ca-Mg-Cs-Sr ion exchange from an aqueous solution using a chabazite zeolite. Mass-transfer coefficients and equilibrium equations were determined from experimental batch-reactor data for single and multicomponent systems. The Langmuir isotherm was used to represent the equilibrium relationship for binary systems, and a modified Dubinin-Polyani model was used for the multicomponent systems. The experimental data indicate that diffusion through the microporous zeolite crystals is the primary diffusional resistance. Macropore diffusion also significantly contributes to the mass-transfer resistance. Various mass-transfer models were compared to the experimental data to determine mass-transfer coefficients. Effective diffusivities were obtained which accurately predicted experimental data using a variety of models. Only the model which accounts for micropore and macropore diffusion occurring in series accurately predicted multicomponent data using single-component diffusivities. Liquid and surface diffusion both contribute to macropore diffusion. Surface and micropore diffusivities were determined to be concentration dependent.

  20. Zeolite 5A Catalyzed Etherification of Diphenylmethanol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Henderson, Eric J.; Lightbody, Owen C.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment for the synthetic undergraduate laboratory is described in which zeolite 5A catalyzes the room temperature dehydration of diphenylmethanol, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOH, producing 1,1,1',1'-tetraphenyldimethyl ether, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOCH(C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]. The

  1. Framework Al zoning in zeolite ECR-1.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jiho; Ahn, Nak Ho; Cho, Sung June; Ren, Limin; Xiao, Feng-Shou; Hong, Suk Bong

    2014-02-25

    Rietveld analyses of the synchrotron X-ray diffraction data for various cation forms of zeolite ECR-1 have demonstrated framework Al zoning, which parallels the alternation of Al-rich maz and Al-poor mor layers. This can be further supported by notable differences in the average bond valence of its 10 crystallographically distinct tetrahedral sites. PMID:24409461

  2. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H. (Evanston, IL); Tzou, Ming-Shin (Evanston, IL); Jiang, Hui-Jong (Evanston, IL)

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  3. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  4. MERCURY SEPARATION FROM POLLUTANT WATER USING ZEOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is known to be a hazardous contaminant in drinking water that causes arsenical dermatitis and skin cancer. In the present work, the potential use of a variety of synthetic zeolites for removal of arsenic from water has been examined at room temperature. Experiments have...

  5. ARSENIC SEPARATION FROM WATER USING ZEOLITES: SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA-01134 Shevade, S, Ford*, R., and Puls*, R.W. "Arsenic Separation from Water Using Zeolites." In: 222nd ACS National Meeting, ACS Environmental Chemistry Division Symposia, Chicago, IL, 08/26-30/2001. 2001. 04/23/2001 This...

  6. ARSENIC SEPARATION FROM WATER USING ZEOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is known to be a hazardous contaminant in drinking water. The presence of arsenic in water supplies has been linked to arsenical dermatosis and skin cancer . Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange capacities. In the present work, the potential use of a variety of ...

  7. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  8. COPPER AND BRAIN FUNCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing evidence shows that brain development and function are impaired when the brain is deprived of copper either through dietary copper deficiency or through genetic defects in copper transport. A number of copper-dependent enzymes whose activities are lowered by copper deprivation form the ba...

  9. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, M; Ng, E-P; Bakhtiari, K; Vinciguerra, M; Ahmad, H Ali; Awala, H; Mintova, S; Daghighi, M; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F; de Vries, M; Motazacker, M M; Peppelenbosch, M P; Mahmoudi, M; Rezaee, F

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12?nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy. PMID:26616161

  10. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, M.; Ng, E.-P.; Bakhtiari, K.; Vinciguerra, M.; Ahmad, H. Ali; Awala, H.; Mintova, S.; Daghighi, M.; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F.; de Vries, M.; Motazacker, M. M.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Mahmoudi, M.; Rezaee, F.

    2015-11-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8–12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy.

  11. Conversion of Ethanol to Hydrocarbons on Hierarchical HZSM-5 Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-12-15

    This study reports synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of the nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolite with high mesoporosity produced via a solvent evaporation procedure. Further, this study compares hierarchical zeolites with conventional HZSM-5 zeolite with similar Si/Al ratios for the ethanol-to-hydrocarbon conversion process. The catalytic performance of the hierarchical and conventional zeolites was evaluated using a fixed-bed reactor at 360 C, 300 psig, and a weight hourly space velocity of 7.9 h-1. For the low Si/Al ratio zeolite (~40), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical HZSM-5 was approximately 2 times greater than the conventional HZSM-5 despite its coking amount deposited 1.6 times higher than conventional HZSM-5. For the high Si/Al ratio zeolite (~140), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical zeolite was approximately 5 times greater than the conventional zeolite and the amount of coking deposited was 2.1 times higher. Correlation was observed between catalyst life time, porosity, and the crystal size of the zeolite. The nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolites containing mesoporosity demonstrated improved catalyst life-time compared to the conventional catalyst due to faster removal of products, shorter diffusion path length, and the migration of the coke deposits to the external surface from the pore structure.

  12. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, M.; Ng, E.-P.; Bakhtiari, K.; Vinciguerra, M.; Ahmad, H. Ali; Awala, H.; Mintova, S.; Daghighi, M.; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F.; de Vries, M.; Motazacker, M. M.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Mahmoudi, M.; Rezaee, F.

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8–12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy. PMID:26616161

  13. Energetics of sodium-calcium exchanged zeolite A.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Wu, D; Guo, X; Shen, B; Navrotsky, A

    2015-05-01

    A series of calcium-exchanged zeolite A samples with different degrees of exchange were prepared. They were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). High temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry measured the formation enthalpies of hydrated zeolites CaNa-A from constituent oxides. The water content is a linear function of the degree of exchange, ranging from 20.54% for Na-A to 23.77% for 97.9% CaNa-A. The enthalpies of formation (from oxides) at 25 C are -74.50 1.21 kJ mol(-1) TO2 for hydrated zeolite Na-A and -30.79 1.64 kJ mol(-1) TO2 for hydrated zeolite 97.9% CaNa-A. Dehydration enthalpies obtained from differential scanning calorimetry are 32.0 kJ mol(-1) H2O for hydrated zeolite Na-A and 20.5 kJ mol(-1) H2O for hydrated zeolite 97.9% CaNa-A. Enthalpies of formation of Ca-exchanged zeolites A are less exothermic than for zeolite Na-A. A linear relationship between the formation enthalpy and the extent of calcium substitution was observed. The energetic effect of Ca-exchange on zeolite A is discussed with an emphasis on the complex interactions between the zeolite framework, cations, and water. PMID:25827491

  14. [Lifestyle modifications].

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yuhei

    2015-11-01

    Lifestyle modifications are important in the prevention and treatment of hypertension. The Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension (JSH2014) recommend salt reduction (< 6 g/day), increased intake of vegetables/fruit and fish (fish oil), reduced intake of cholesterol and saturated fatty acids, weight loss (body mass index < 25kg/m2), exercise (≥ 30 min/day), reduction of alcohol intake (≤ 20-30 mL/day in men, ≤ 10-20 mL/day in women as ethanol), and quitting smoking. These lifestyle modifications are capable of reducing blood pressure and ameliorating other cardiovascular risk factors. However, the reduction in blood pressure is mild to moderate and the adherence to lifestyle modifications has been still suboptimal. PMID:26619658

  15. MCM-41 impregnated with A zeolite precursor: Synthesis, characterization and tetracycline antibiotics removal from aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minmin; Hou, Li-an; Yu, Shuili; Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Xunfeng

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the MCM-41 has been modified by impregnation with zeolite A to prepare a kind of new adsorbent. The adsorption of TC from aqueous solutions onto modified MCM-41 has been studied. It was discovered that the adsorption capability of zeolite A modified MCM-41 (A-MCM-41) increased dramatically after modification. The modified MCM-41 was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorptiondesorption, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, and 29Si and 27Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. The modified MCM-41 structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A but the surface area and pore diameter decreased due to pore blockage. The adsorption of TC on modified MCM-41 was discussed regarding various parameters such as pH, initial TC concentration, and the reaction time. The pH effects on TC adsorption indicated that the adsorbents had better adsorption performances in acidic and neutral conditions. The adsorption isotherms were fitted well by the Langmuir model. The adsorption kinetics was well described by both pseudo-second order equation and the intra-particle diffusion model. The adsorption behavior in a fixed-bed column system followed Thomas model. The adsorption behavior of TC was the chemical adsorption with an ion exchange process and electrostatic adsorption. PMID:24976787

  16. Bioinspired conical copper wire with gradient wettability for continuous and efficient fog collection.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jie; Xiao, Kai; Yao, Xi; Bai, Hao; Jiang, Lei

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the efficient fog collection on cactus spines, conical copper wires with gradient wettability are fabricated through gradient electrochemical corrosion and subsequent gradient chemical modification. These dual-gradient copper wires' fog-collection ability is demonstrated to be higher than that of conical copper wires with pure hydrophobic surfaces or pure hydrophilic surfaces, and the underlying mechanism is also analyzed. PMID:24038211

  17. UTILITY OF ZEOLITES IN REMOVAL OF INORGANIC AND ORGANIC WATER POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange, adsorption and acid catalysis properties. Different inorganic and organic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature using various zeolites. Synthetic zeolite Faujasite Y has been used to remove inorganic pollutants...

  18. Novel multi-component hybrids through double luminescent lanthanide unit functionalized zeolite L and titania.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yan, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Zeolite L (ZL) is functionalized with inside-outside double modification paths (gas disperse ("ship in bottle") and covalently grafting) with two kinds of luminescent lanthanide species (Tb(3+) complex of acetylacetone (AA), lanthanide polyoxometalate (NaLnW10O3632H2O, abbreviated as LnW10, Ln=Eu, Tb)) to prepare the hybrid materials. The prepared hybrids show the red and green luminescence, which provides a useful path to obtain multi-component lanthanide hybrids. PMID:26125989

  19. In situ DRIFTS-MS studies on the oxidation of adsorbed NH3 by NOx over a Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haiyang; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2013-04-30

    DRIFT spectroscopy combined with mass spectrometry was used to investigate the oxidation of adsorbed ammonia by NO2, NO+O2 and NO2+O2 on a copper ion exchanged SSZ 13 (Cu-SSZ-13) zeolite. Compared with both NO2 and NO, the adsorption of ammonia is much stronger on the Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite. Two adsorbed ammonia species were found over the Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite studied here; notably ammonia on Brnsted acid sites (proton) and ammonia on Lewis acid sites (copper ions). These adsorbed ammonia species present different activity profiles and selectivity to N2 during NH3 oxidation. The results obtained suggest that ammonia adsorbed onto copper ions in Cu-SSZ-13 are more active at low temperatures than proton-adsorbed NH3, and give rise to a higher selectivity to N2. The formation of N2O is associated primarily with the reaction of NOx with proton-adsorbed NH3 via the formation and subsequent thermal decomposition of NH4NO3. Financial support was provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Portions of this work were performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The EMSL is a national scientific user facility supported by the US DOE, Office of Biological and Environmental Research. PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  20. CO2 SEPARATIONS USING ZEOLITE MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Noble; John L. Falconer

    2001-06-30

    Zeolite and other inorganic molecular sieve membranes have shown potential for separations based on molecular size and shape because of their small pore sized, typically less than 1 nm, and their narrow pore size distribution. The high thermal and chemical stability of these inorganic crystals make them ideal materials for use in high temperature applications such as catalytic membrane reactors. Most of the progress with zeolite membranes has been with MFI zeolites prepared on porous disks and tubes. The MFI zeolite is a medium pore size structure having nearly circular pores with diameters between .53 and .56 nm. Separation experiments through MFI membranes indicate that competitive adsorption separates light gas mixtures. Light gas selectivities are typically small, however, owing to small differences in adsorption strengths and their small sizes relative to the MFI pore opening. Furthermore, competitive adsorption does not work well at high temperature where zeolite membranes are stable and have potential application. Separation by differences in size has a greater potential to work at high temperature than competitive adsorption, but pores smaller than those in MFI zeolites are required. Therefore, some studies focused on the synthesis of a small, 8-membered-pore structures such as zeolite A (0.41-nm pore diameter) and SAPO-34, a chabazite (about .4-nm pore diameter with about 1.4 nm cages) analog. The small pore size of the zeolite A and SAPO-34 structures made the separation of smaller molecules by differences in size possible. Zeolite MFI and SAPO-34 membranes were prepared on the inside surface of porous alumina tubes by hydrothermal synthesis, and single gas and binary mixture permeances were measured to characterize the membrane's performance. A mathematical diffusion model was developed to determine the relative quantities of zeolite and non-zeolite pores in different membranes by modeling the permeation date of CO{sub 2}. This model expresses the total flux through the membrane as the sum of surface diffusion through zeolite pores and viscous flow and Knudsen diffusion through non-zeolite pores. As predicted by the model, the permeance of CO{sub 2} decrease with increasing pressure at constant pressure drop for membranes with few non-zeolite pores, but the permeance increased through viscous flow pores and was constant through pores allowing Knudsen diffusion. Membranes having more non-zeolite pores had lower CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivities. The SAPO-34 membranes were characterized for light gas separation applications, and the separation mechanisms were identified. Single gas permeances of CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} decreased with increasing kinetic diameter. For the best membrane at 300K, the He and H{sub 2} permeances were less than that of CO{sub 2}, because He, H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} were small compared to the SAPO-34 pore, and differences in the heat of adsorption determined the permeance order. The small component permeated the fastest in CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures between 300 and 470 K. For H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures, which were separated by competitive adsorption at room temperature, the larger component permeated faster below 400K. The room temperature CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity was 36 and decreased with temperature. The H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} mixture selectivity was 8 and constant with temperature up to 480 K. Calcination, slow temperature cycles, and exposure to water vapor had no permanent effect on membrane performance, but temperature changes of approximately 30 K/min decreased the membrane's effectiveness. The effects of humidity on gas permeation were studied with SAPO-34 membranes of different qualities. Membranes with high CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivities (greater than 20) were stable in water vapor under controlled conditions, but degradation was seen for some membranes. The degradation opened non-SAPO-34 pores that were larger than SAPO-34 pores as shown by the IC{sub 4}H{sub 10} permeance, CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity, and CO{sub 2} flux pressure dependence. In SAPO-34 pores, water apparently adsorbed and increased the gas permeances. Thus, the effect of water on gas permeation is a useful indicator of the membrane quality.

  1. Synthesis strategies in the search for hierarchical zeolites.

    PubMed

    Serrano, D P; Escola, J M; Pizarro, P

    2013-05-01

    Great interest has arisen in the past years in the development of hierarchical zeolites, having at least two levels of porosities. Hierarchical zeolites show an enhanced accessibility, leading to improved catalytic activity in reactions suffering from steric and/or diffusional limitations. Moreover, the secondary porosity offers an ideal space for the deposition of additional active phases and for functionalization with organic moieties. However, the secondary surface represents a discontinuity of the crystalline framework, with a low connectivity and a high concentration of silanols. Consequently, hierarchical zeolites exhibit a less "zeolitic behaviour" than conventional ones in terms of acidity, hydrophobic/hydrophilic character, confinement effects, shape-selectivity and hydrothermal stability. Nevertheless, this secondary surface is far from being amorphous, which provides hierarchical zeolites with a set of novel features. A wide variety of innovative strategies have been developed for generating a secondary porosity in zeolites. In the present review, the different synthetic routes leading to hierarchical zeolites have been classified into five categories: removal of framework atoms, surfactant-assisted procedures, hard-templating, zeolitization of preformed solids and organosilane-based methods. Significant advances have been achieved recently in several of these alternatives. These include desilication, due to its versatility, dual templating with polyquaternary ammonium surfactants and framework reorganization by treatment with surfactant-containing basic solutions. In the last two cases, the materials so prepared show both mesoscopic ordering and zeolitic lattice planes. Likewise, interesting results have been obtained with the incorporation of different types of organosilanes into the zeolite crystallization gels, taking advantage of their high affinity for silicate and aluminosilicate species. Crystallization of organofunctionalized species favours the formation of organic-inorganic composites that, upon calcination, are transformed into hierarchical zeolites. However, in spite of this impressive progress in novel strategies for the preparation of hierarchical zeolites, significant challenges are still ahead. The overall one is the development of methods that are versatile in terms of zeolite structures and compositions, capable of tuning the secondary porosity properties, and being scaled up in a cost-effective way. Recent works have demonstrated that it is possible to scale-up easily the synthesis of hierarchical zeolites by desilication. Economic aspects may become a significant bottleneck for the commercial application of hierarchical zeolites since most of the synthesis strategies so far developed imply the use of more expensive procedures and reagents compared to conventional zeolites. Nevertheless, the use of hierarchical zeolites as efficient catalysts for the production of high value-added compounds could greatly compensate these increased manufacturing costs. PMID:23138888

  2. Chemical Interactions in Multimetal/Zeolite Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.

    2004-04-16

    This two-year project has led to a significant improvement in the fundamental understanding of the catalytic action of zeolite-supported redox catalysts. It turned out to be essential that we could combine four strategies for the preparation of catalysts containing transition metal (TM) ions in zeolite cavities: (1) ion exchange from aqueous solution; (2) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of a volatile halide onto a zeolite in its acidic form; (3) solid state ion exchange; and (4) hydrothermal synthesis of a zeolite having TM ions in its lattice, followed by a treatment transporting these ions to ''guest positions''. Technique (2) enables us to position more TM ions into cavities than permitted by the conventional technique (1).viz one positive charge per Al centered tetrahedron in the zeolite lattice. The additional charge is compensated by ligands to the TM ions, for instance in oxo-ions such as (GaO){sup +} or dinuclear [Cu-O-Cu]{sup 2+}. While technique (3) is preferred over CVD where volatile halides are not available, technique (4) leads to rather isolated ''ex lattice'' oxo-ions. Such oxo-ions tend to be mono-nuclear, in contrast to technique (2) which preferentially creates dinuclear oxo-ions of the same TM element. A favorable element for the present research was that the PI is also actively engaged in a project on the reduction of nitrogen oxides, sponsored by EMSI program of the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy, Office of Science. This combination created a unique opportunity to test and analyze catalysts for the one step oxidation of benzene to phenol and compare them with catalysts for the reduction of nitrogen oxides, using hydrocarbons as the reductant. In both projects catalysts have been used which contain Fe ions or oxo-ions in the cavities the zeolite MFI, often called ZSM-5. With Fe as the TM-element and MFI as the host zeolite we found that catalysts with high Fe content, prepared by technique (2) were optimal for the De-NO{sub x} reaction, but extremely unselective for benzene oxidation to phenol. Conversely, the catalysts prepared with (4) had the highest turnover frequency for benzene oxidation, but performed very poorly for NO{sub x} reduction with so-butane. In fact the Fe concentration in the former catalysts were so low that it was necessary to design a special experimental program for the sole purpose of showing that it is really the Fe which catalyzes the benzene oxidation, not some acid center as has been proposed by other authors. For this purpose we used hydrogen sulfide to selectively poison the Fe sites, without deactivating the acidic sites. In addition we could show that the hydrothermal treatment of catalysts prepared by technique (4) is essential to transform iron ions in the zeolite lattice to ''ex lattice ions'' in guest positions. That line of the work required very careful experimentation, because a hydrothermal treatment of a zeolite containing Fe ions in its cavities can also lead to agglomeration of such ions to nano-particles of iron oxide which lowers the selectivity for the desired formation of phenol. This part of the program showed convincingly that indeed Fe is responsible for the benzene oxidation catalysis. The results and conclusion of this work, including the comparison of different catalysts, was published in a number of papers in the scientific literature, listed in the attached list. In these papers also our analysis of the reaction orders and the possible mechanism of the used test reaction are given.

  3. The use of zeolites as slow release anthelmintic carriers.

    PubMed

    Dyer, A; Morgan, S; Wells, P; Williams, C

    2000-06-01

    This work examines the ability of commercial zeolite Y to act as a slow release agent for a number of anthelmintic drugs. Administration to rats, dosed with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, of pyrantel and/or fenbendazole and pigs, dosed with Ascaris and Oesophagostomum, of dichlorvos (DDVP) loaded onto zeolite Y was more successful in killing adult worms than administration of the pure drug alone. The zeolite Y was used as supplied for initial studies and then later dealuminated for further studies. The drug loadings were monitored by thermal analysis and the loaded zeolites were used in several field trials. The results indicate that zeolite Y is a suitable vehicle for the slow release of some anthelmintics. The slow release of drug from the zeolite matrix improved its efficacy. PMID:10881284

  4. Preparation of Robust, Thin Zeolite Membrane Sheet for Molecular Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jian; Canfield, Nathan L.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2011-10-19

    This paper reports a feasibility study on the preparation of zeolite membrane films on a thin, porous metal support sheet (50-{micro}m thick). Zeolite sodium A (NaA) and silicalite zeolite frameworks are chosen to represent synthesis of respective hydrophilic-type and hydrophobic-type zeolite membranes on this new support. It is found that a dense, continuous inter-grown zeolite crystal layer at a thickness less than 2 {micro}m can be directly deposited on such a support by using direct and secondary growth techniques. The resulting membrane shows excellent adhesion on the metal sheet. Molecular-sieving functions of the prepared membranes are characterized with ethanol/water separation, CO2 separation, and air dehumidification. The results show great potential to make flexible metal-foil-like zeolite membranes for a range of energy conversion and environmental applications.

  5. Atomic sites and stability of Cs+ captured within zeolitic nanocavities

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kaname; Toyoura, Kazuaki; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Nakahira, Atsushi; Kurata, Hiroki; Ikuhara, Yumi H.; Sasaki, Yukichi

    2013-01-01

    Zeolites have potential application as ion-exchangers, catalysts and molecular sieves. Zeolites are once again drawing attention in Japan as stable adsorbents and solidification materials of fission products, such as 137Cs+ from damaged nuclear-power plants. Although there is a long history of scientific studies on the crystal structures and ion-exchange properties of zeolites for practical application, there are still open questions, at the atomic-level, on the physical and chemical origins of selective ion-exchange abilities of different cations and detailed atomic structures of exchanged cations inside the nanoscale cavities of zeolites. Here, the precise locations of Cs+ ions captured within A-type zeolite were analyzed using high-resolution electron microscopy. Together with theoretical calculations, the stable positions of absorbed Cs+ ions in the nanocavities are identified, and the bonding environment within the zeolitic framework is revealed to be a key factor that influences the locations of absorbed cations. PMID:23949184

  6. The ADOR mechanism for the synthesis of new zeolites.

    PubMed

    Eliov, Pavla; Opanasenko, Maksym; Wheatley, Paul S; Shamzhy, Mariya; Mazur, Michal; Nachtigall, Petr; Roth, Wieslaw J; Morris, Russell E; ?ejka, Ji?

    2015-10-21

    A novel methodology, called ADOR (assembly-disassembly-organisation-reassembly), for the synthesis of zeolites is reviewed here in detail. The ADOR mechanism stems from the fact that certain chemical weakness against a stimulus may be present in a zeolite framework, which can then be utilized for the preparation of new solids through successive manipulation of the material. In this review, we discuss the critical factors of germanosilicate zeolites required for application of the ADOR protocol and describe the mechanism of hydrolysis, organisation and condensation to form new zeolites starting from zeolite UTL. Last but not least, we discuss the potential of this methodology to form other zeolites and the prospects for future investigations. PMID:25946705

  7. Conversion of rice husk ash to zeolite beta.

    PubMed

    Prasetyoko, Didik; Ramli, Zainab; Endud, Salasiah; Hamdan, Halimaton; Sulikowski, Bogdan

    2006-01-01

    White rice husk ash (RHA), an agriculture waste containing crystalline tridymite and alpha-cristobalite, was used as a silica source for zeolite Beta synthesis. The crystallization of zeolite Beta from RHA at 150 degrees C in the presence of tetraethylammonium hydroxide was monitored by XRD, FTIR and (29)Si MAS NMR techniques. It was found that zeolite Beta started to form after 12h and the complete crystallization of zeolite Beta phase was achieved after 2d. XRD, (29)Si MAS NMR and solid yield studies indicate that the transformation mechanism of silica present in RHA to zeolite Beta involves dissolution of the ash, formation of an amorphous aluminosilicate after 6h of crystallization, followed by dissolution in the mother liquor and final transformation to pure zeolite Beta crystals. PMID:16274981

  8. Zeolite and swine inoculum effect on poultry manure biomethanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kougias, P. G.; Fotidis, I. A.; Zaganas, I. D.; Kotsopoulos, T. A.; Martzopoulos, G. G.

    2013-03-01

    Poultry manure is an ammonia-rich substrate that inhibits methanogenesis, causing severe problems to the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, the effect of different natural zeolite concentrations on the mesophilic anaerobic digestion of poultry waste inoculated with well-digested swine manure was investigated. A significant increase in methane production was observed in treatments where zeolite was added, compared to the treatment without zeolite.Methane production in the treatment with 10 g dm-3 of natural zeolite was found to be 109.75% higher compared to the treatment without zeolite addition. The results appear to be influenced by the addition of zeolite, which reduces ammonia toxicity in anaerobic digestion and by the ammonia-tolerant swine inoculum.

  9. Advanced zeolites used in FCC catalysts boost motor octane number

    SciTech Connect

    Letzsch, W.S.; Magee, J.S.; Upson, L.L.; Valeri, F. )

    1988-10-31

    Fluid catalytic cracking catalysts that contain an advanced zeolite called LZ-210, have been shown, by commercial trials, to increase the motor octane number (MON) of the FCC gasoline produced. The zeolite crystal utilizes lower unit cell size, lower sodium in the zeolite, less alumina debris in the zeolite structure, and silica reinsertion into the zeolite structure to accomplish the MON increase. Data from commercial trials are presented to support the MON increases, along with some explanations of how the advanced zeolite accomplishes them. A strong gasoline market and the removal of lead have combined to place a premium on clear gasoline octanes. Because gasoline from fluid catalytic cracking units is the largest segment of the refinery pool (up to 40%), its octane numbers are particularly important. Traditional emphasis has been on the research octance number (RON) but motor octanes frequently limit the blending process.

  10. Zeolite catalysis in conversion of cellulosics. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.

    1994-02-01

    The authors have studied the kinetics of oxylose/xylulose isomerization in significant detail over a variety of zeolites and obtained the pseudo-first order reaction rate constants. The authors have found that HY zeolite is still the best material and zeolites are more selective than homogeneous acid catalysts where decomposition of the sugar compounds is much faster. They have completed, as described in the Year 2 Work Plan, the study of cellobiose hydrolysis with an ion exchange resin. The kinetics of the solid-catalyzed reaction is qualitatively similar to that for catalysis by homogeneous acids. The planned program of NMR studies has revealed the dynamics of sugar molecules within the zeolite cavities. Two chemisorbed and a physisorbed state have been identified in HY zeolite. A new state, accounting for as much as a half of the sugar, has been found in ZSM-5 zeolite.

  11. One-step brazing process to join CFC composites to copper and copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvo, Milena; Casalegno, Valentina; Rizzo, Stefano; Smeacetto, Federico; Ferraris, Monica; Merola, Mario

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a new single-step brazing technique to join carbon fibre reinforced carbon composite (CFC) to pure copper (Cu) and copper alloy (CuCrZr) for nuclear fusion applications. In order to increase the wettability of CFC by a copper-based brazing alloy containing no active metal, the composite surface was modified by direct reaction with chromium, which forms a carbide layer and allows a large reduction of the contact angle. After the CFC surface modification, the commercial Gemco alloy (Cu/Ge) was successfully used to braze CFC to pure copper and pure copper to CuCrZr by the same heat treatment. The shear strength of the CFC/Cu joints measured by single lap shear tests at room temperature was (34 4) MPa, comparable to the values obtained by other joining processes and higher than the intrinsic CFC shear strength.

  12. Zeolite membranes - a review and comparison with MOFs.

    PubMed

    Rangnekar, N; Mittal, N; Elyassi, B; Caro, J; Tsapatsis, M

    2015-10-21

    The latest developments in zeolite membranes are reviewed, with an emphasis on the synthesis techniques, including seed assembly and secondary growth methods. This review also discusses the current industrial applications of zeolite membranes, the feasibility of their use in membrane reactors and their hydrothermal stability. Finally, zeolite membranes are compared with metal-organic framework (MOF) membranes and the latest advancements in MOF and mixed matrix membranes are highlighted. PMID:26155855

  13. Zeolite (clinoptilolite) as feed additive to reduce manure mineral content.

    PubMed

    Leung, S; Barrington, S; Wan, Y; Zhao, X; El-Husseini, B

    2007-12-01

    Clinoptilolite (a species of zeolite) as grower hog feed additive can potentially improve nutrient ingestion and lower manure nutrient levels. A first objective was to establish the optimal particle size of the zeolite powder, as a fine size increases the adsorption surface while a coarse size can facilitate handling. The second objective tested the effect of feeding zeolite on manure nutrient levels. For the first objective, three zeolite powders (250-500 microm; 50-250 microm, and 50-500 microm) were exposed to an NH(4)(+) solution under a pH of either 7.0 or 2.0. The resulting solutions were tested for cation exchange. A commercial zeolite was also tested for the pH of 2.0 to evaluate zeolite stability. At 0%, 5% and 10% humidity, the same three particle size powders were subjected to shear tests to determine the zeolite's angle of friction. For the second objective using metabolic cages, female hogs were subjected to one of four rations (a control and three with zeolite) while collecting and analyzing their manures. For the first objective, the coarse particle zeolite performed best, adsorbing 158 and 123 Cmol(+)/kg of NH(4)(+) under neutral and acid pH, respectively, and releasing an equivalent amount of minerals only under neutral pH. The commercial zeolite with less clinoptilolite released more Al, Fe, Cu and Pb, showing less stability. The high internal angle of friction of zeolite did not vary with particle size and moisture, indicating funnel flow under gravity. For the second objective, hogs fed a zeolite diet produced manure with 15% and 22% less N and P, respectively, and demonstrated a better feed conversion, although not statistically significant (P>0.05). These results show that there is some potential in using high quality clinoptilolite in the ration of grower hogs. PMID:16905313

  14. Raman spectroscopic study of the synthesis of zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.; Shieh, D.C.; Puri, M.

    1987-04-23

    The formation of zeolite Y from colloidal silica and soluble silicate species was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The role of aging of the reactant mixture was studied. During the nucleation period, the solid amorphous phase consists of predominantly six-membered aluminosilicate rings, which act as building blocks for the formation of zeolite Y. It is essential to have polymeric, highly condensed silicate units as a reactant if zeolite Y crystallization is to take place.

  15. Large zeolites - Why and how to grow in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of zeolite crystals which are considered to be the most valuable catalytic and adsorbent materials of the chemical processing industry are discussed. It is proposed to use triethanolamine as a nucleation control agent to control the time release of Al in a zeolite A solution and to increase the average and maximum crystal size by 25-50 times. Large zeolites could be utilized to make membranes for reactors/separators which will substantially increase their efficiency.

  16. Ionic Liquid assisted Synthesis of Zeolite-TON

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuyang; McPherson, Matthew J; Wheatley, Paul S; Morris, Russell E

    2014-01-01

    An ionic liquid assisted strategy for the synthesis of zeolitic material is reported. This strategy is a solid state synthetic method and the ionic liquid is employed as structure directing agent. A TON-type zeolite, which contains one-dimensional 10-member-ring, is successfully synthesized with the assistance of the ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide. This finding improves our understanding about the challenge of ionothermally synthesizing siliceous and aluminosilicate zeolites. PMID:26213423

  17. Fluoride-assisted synthesis of bimodal microporous SSZ-13 zeolite.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaochun; Kosinov, Nikolay; Hofmann, Jan P; Mezari, Brahim; Qian, Qingyun; Rohling, Roderigh; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Ruiz-Martnez, Javier; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2016-02-11

    The presence of small amount of fluoride in alkaline hydrothermal synthesis of SSZ-13 zeolite yields bimodal microporous particles with substantially improved performance in the methanol-to-olefins (MTO) reaction. Hydrocarbon uptake measurements and fluorescence microspectroscopy of spent catalysts demonstrate enhanced diffusion through micropores at the grain boundaries of nanocrystals running through the zeolite particles. Fluoride-assisted SSZ-13 synthesis is a cheap and scalable approach to optimize the performance of MTO zeolite catalysts. PMID:26810114

  18. Comparing gas separation performance between all known zeolites and their zeolitic imidazolate framework counterparts.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Álvarez, Paula; Hamad, Said; Haranczyk, Maciej; Ruiz-Salvador, A Rabdel; Calero, Sofia

    2015-12-14

    To find optimal porous materials for adsorption-based separations is a challenging task due to the extremely large number of possible pore topologies and compositions. New porous material classes such as Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are emerging, and hope to replace traditionally used materials such as zeolites. Computational screening offers relatively fast searching for candidate structures as well as side-by-side comparisons between material families. This work is pioneering at examining the families comprised by the experimentally known zeolites and their respective Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework (ZIF) counterparts in the context of a number of environmental and industrial separations involving carbon dioxide, nitrogen, methane, oxygen, and argon. Additionally, unlike related published work, here all the targeted structures have been previously relaxed through energy minimization. On the first level of characterization, we considered a detailed pore characterization, identifying 24 zeolites as promising candidates for gas separation based on adsorbate sizes. The second level involved interatomic potential-based calculations to assess the adsorption performance of the materials. We found no correlation in the values of heat of adsorption between zeolites and ZIFs sharing the same topology. A number of structures were identified as potential experimental targets for CO2/N2, and CO2/CH4 affinity-based separations. PMID:26600432

  19. Peculiarities of the dielectric response of natural zeolite composites prepared by using zeolite and silicon powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk Koc, S.; Orbukh, V. I.; Eyvazova, G. M.; Lebedeva, N. N.; Salamov, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    We present the real and imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity of natural zeolite composites prepared by using zeolite and silicon powders. The dielectric response (DR) dependences on the frequency (3-300 GHz) of electric field and different Si concentrations (5-33%) are non-monotonic and a maximum peak is observed. This peak position is practically independent on the frequency and its maximum is observed in zeolite composites which included 9% of the Si-powder. Also the maximum peak is decreased by about an order of magnitude when frequency increases from 500 Hz to 5 kHz. Addition of the conductive Si-particles to zeolite-powder leads to two opposite effects. Firstly, the movement of electrons in the Si-particles provides increase of DR. Secondly, cations which leaving from zeolite pores can be neutralized by the particles of Si in the intercrystalline-space. Such a peculiar mechanism for recombination of Si electrons and cations from pores leads to a reduction of DR for large silicon concentrations. Due to the fact that the contribution of free carriers in the decreasing of the DR as the frequency increases, it is consistent with the suggestion that the maximum peak decreases with increasing frequency.

  20. Rapid crystallization of faujasitic zeolites: mechanism and application to zeolite membrane growth on polymer supports.

    PubMed

    Severance, Michael; Wang, Bo; Ramasubramanian, Kartik; Zhao, Lin; Ho, W S Winston; Dutta, Prabir K

    2014-06-17

    Zeolites are microporous, crystalline aluminosilicates with the framework made up of T-O-T (T = Si, Al) bonds and enclosed cages and channels of molecular dimensions. Influencing and manipulating the nucleation and growth characteristics of zeolites can lead to novel frameworks and morphologies, as well as decreased crystallization time. In this study, we show that manipulating the supersaturation during synthesis of zeolite X/Y (FAU) via dehydration led to extensive nucleation. Controlled addition of water to this nucleated state promotes the transport of nutrients, with a 4-fold increase in the rate of crystal growth, as compared to conventional hydrothermal process. Structural signature of the nucleated state was obtained by electron microscopy, NMR, and Raman spectroscopy. This extensively intermediate nucleated state was isolated and used as the starting material for zeolite membrane synthesis on porous polymer supports, with membrane formation occurring within an hour. With this time frame for growth, it becomes practical to fabricate zeolite/polymer membranes using roll-to-roll technology, thus making possible new commercial applications. PMID:24758695

  1. Anomalous strain behavior in CO2-saturated zeolitic tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dralus, D. E.; Vanorio, T.; Mavko, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Zeolites are aluminosilicate minerals with open, cage-like structures and negatively charged frames. Some naturally-occurring zeolites are stabile at geothermal temperatures and have cage structures large enough that small molecules can traverse the intracrystalline cage network easily. This, in addition to their negatively-charged frames, makes these zeolites strong adsorbents (and potentially absorbents) of carbon dioxide. We present a short series of experiments to determine what mechanical effects result from carbon dioxide interaction with zeolitic tuff samples. Three samples were tested: a non-zeolitized grey tuff from the Campi Flegrei region, a zeolitized yellow tuff from the same region, and a zeolite-rich tuff from southern California. The samples were tested in a hydrostatic pressure vessel up to 12 MPa confining pressure. Strains and ultrasonic acoustic velocities were measured under dry conditions as well as during helium injection and carbon dioxide injection. Results show acoustic velocities depend only on differential pressure and not on pore fluid type. Both zeolitized tuffs show decreased strain with gaseous carbon dioxide in the pore space; the decreased strain (or swelling) represents an 8%-16% deviation from the total strain in the helium-saturated case. This indicates that it is the interaction between zeolite minerals and carbon dioxide causing the anomalous strain readings.

  2. Zeolite Crystal Growth in Microgravity and on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing (CAMMP), a NASA-sponsored Research Partnership Center, is working to improve zeolite materials for storing hydrogen fuel. CAMMP is also applying zeolites to detergents, optical cables, gas and vapor detection for environmental monitoring and control, and chemical production techniques that significantly reduce by-products that are hazardous to the environment. Shown here are zeolite crystals (top) grown in a ground control experiment and grown in microgravity on the USML-2 mission (bottom). Zeolite experiments have also been conducted aboard the International Space Station.

  3. Method for the recovery of silver from silver zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, George A.

    1986-01-01

    High purity silver is recovered from silver exchanged zeolite used to capture radioactive iodine from nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel reprocessing environments. The silver exchanged zeolite is heated with slag formers to melt and fluidize the zeolite and release the silver, the radioactivity removing with the slag. The silver containing metallic impurities is remelted and treated with oxygen and a flux to remove the metal impurities. About 98% of the silver in the silver exchanged zeolite having a purity of 99% or better is recoverable by the method.

  4. Method for the recovery of silver from silver zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, G.A.

    1985-03-05

    High purity silver is recovered from silver exchanged zeolite used to capture radioactive iodine from nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel reprocessing environments. The silver exchanged zeolite is heated with slag formers to melt and fluidize the zeolite and release the silver, the radioactivity removing with the slag. The silver containing metallic impurities is remelted and treated with oxygen and a flux to remove the metal impurities. About 98% of the silver in the silver exchanged zeolite having a purity of 99% or better is recoverable by the method.

  5. Ion exchange properties of Japanese natural zeolites in seawater.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    Ion exchange properties of five different Japanese natural zeolites in seawater were examined. Sodium ions could be reduced by all zeolites, although anions, Cl(-) and SO(4)(2-), in seawater showed barely changes. Natural zeolite desalination treatment mainly depends on the ion exchange between Na(+), K(+) and Mg(2+) in seawater and Ca(2+) in natural zeolite. This study found that mordenite is superior to clinoptilolite for use in Na(+) reduction. Mordenite with high cation exchange capacity containing Ca(2+) resulted in the highest Na(+) reduction from seawater. PMID:23303099

  6. Dry method for recycling iodine-loaded silver zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Thomas R.; Staples, Bruce A.; Murphy, Llewellyn P.

    1978-05-09

    Fission product iodine is removed from a waste gas stream and stored by passing the gas stream through a bed of silver-exchanged zeolite until the zeolite is loaded with iodine, passing dry hydrogen gas through the bed to remove the iodine and regenerate the bed, and passing the hydrogen stream containing the hydrogen iodide thus formed through a lead-exchanged zeolite which adsorbs the radioactive iodine from the gas stream and permanently storing the lead-exchanged zeolite loaded with radioactive iodine.

  7. Fabrication of 3D copper oxide structure by holographic lithography for photoelectrochemical electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Woo-Min; Kang, Ji-Hwan; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2010-11-01

    We fabricated three-dimensional copper oxide structure by holographic lithography and electroless deposition. A five-beam interference pattern defined a woodpile structure of SU-8. The surface modification of SU-8 structure was achieved by multilayer coating of polyelectrolyte, which is critical for activating the surface for the reduction of copper. Copper was deposited onto the surface of the structure by electroless deposition, and subsequent calcinations removed the SU-8 structure and simultaneously oxidized the copper into copper oxide. The porous copper oxide structure was used as a photoelectrochemical electrode. Because of the highly porous structure, our structure showed higher photocurrent efficiency. PMID:21062017

  8. Acidity of two-dimensional zeolites.

    PubMed

    Rybicki, Marcin; Sauer, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    Hybrid quantum mechanics:molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations of absolute deprotonation energies are performed with periodic boundary conditions for Brnsted sites of aluminosilicate bilayers with various Al/Si ratios (two-dimensional zeolite). The supercell method is applied and density functional theory is used. Much lower values are obtained (1042, 1069 and 1091 kJ mol(-1) for Al/Si = 1/63, 1/7 and 1/3, respectively) than those for bulk zeolites (1233 kJ mol(-1) for H-chabazite with Al/Si = 1/11). We ascribe the much lower deprotonation energy to the smaller effective dielectric constant (1.6-1.9) of an ultra-thin dielectric in a vacuum compared to that of the corresponding bulk systems (3.0 for H-chabazite), which leads to a better stabilization of the charge created upon deprotonation. PMID:26437870

  9. Delaminated zeolites: Combining the benefits of zeolites and mesoporous materials for catalytic uses

    SciTech Connect

    Corma, A.; Fornes, V.; Martinez-Triguero, J.; Pergher, S.B.

    1999-08-15

    The delamination of the layered precursor of the MCM-22 zeolite (MWW structure) affords monolayers of a crystalline aluminosilicate with more than 700 m{sup 2}/g of a well defined external surface formed by cups of 0.7 x 0.7 nm. In this layered structure the circular 10-member-ring microporous system is preserved. The resultant material presents the strong acidity and stability characteristic of the zeolites but, at the same time, offers the high accessibility to large molecules characteristic of the amorphous aluminosilicates. The cracking behavior during the process of small and large molecules has been compared with that of the zeolite MCM-22 and pillared laminar precursor MCM-36.

  10. Electrical Response of PEDOT-PSS/FAU Zeolite Composites toward SO2: Controlling the Adsorption Properties of FAU Zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanthaanont, Pojjawan; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2012-02-01

    In our work, we propose to combine a conductive polymer, Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT-PSS), with FAU zeolites to investigate the potential of the composites for use as SO2 sensing materials.Composites with PEDOT-PSS as a matrix containing faujasite zeolites of various cation types (divalent transition metal ions: Fe^2+, Co^2+, Ni^2+ and Cu^2+), were fabricated to investigate the effect of the cation type of the faujasite zeolites on the electrical conductivity response when exposed to SO2. The composite was tested through repeated sensing and recovery processes to investigate the reversibility and reproducibility. During the recovery process, the electrical conductivity of the composites were recovered, which proves that the sensing characteristics are repeatable. Responses and the interaction mechanism of the conductive polymer/zeolite composites were investigated. The composite with 20% (v/v) of zeolite content gives the highest sensitivity. The electrical conductivity responses of PEDOT-PSS/Zeolite composites can be altered due to the available adsorption sites for gas molecules. The addition of zeolites to the pristine PEDOT-PSS improved the electrical conductivity sensitivity of the composites by enhancing the interaction between PEDOT-PSS and SO2. The type of cation in the zeolite pores effected the sensitivity of the composites, depending on the acidity of the ion-exchanged zeolites.

  11. Hydrocarbon zeolite catalyst employed in hydrocracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.W.

    1987-05-12

    A hydrocracking process is described which comprises contacting a hydrocarbon feedstock under hydrocracking conditions with hydrogen in the presence of a catalyst comprising at least one hydrogenation component, a crystalline aluminosilicate zeolite having catalytic activity for cracking hydrocarbons, and a dispersion of silica-alumina in a matrix consisting essentially of alumina, wherein the catalyst comprises particles in the shape of a three-leaf clover.

  12. Effect of NaX zeolite-modified graphite felts on hexavalent chromium removal in biocathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiayuan; Tong, Fei; Yong, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Lixiong; Jia, Honghua; Wei, Ping

    2016-05-01

    Two kinds of NaX zeolite-modified graphite felts were used as biocathode electrodes in hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))-reducing microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The one was fabricated through direct modification, and the other one processed by HNO3 pretreatment of graphite felt before modification. The results showed that two NaX zeolite-modified graphite felts are excellent bio-electrode materials for MFCs, and that a large NaX loading mass, obtained by HNO3 pretreatment (the HNO3-NaX electrode), leads to a superior performance. The HNO3-NaX electrode significantly improved the electricity generation and Cr(VI) removal of the MFC. The maximum Cr(VI) removal rate increased to 10.39±0.28mg/Lh, which was 8.2 times higher than that of the unmodified control. The improvement was ascribed to the strong affinity that NaX zeolite particles, present in large number on the graphite felt, have for microorganisms and Cr(VI) ions. PMID:26852205

  13. Zeolite thin films: from computer chips to space stations.

    PubMed

    Lew, Christopher M; Cai, Rui; Yan, Yushan

    2010-02-16

    Zeolites are a class of crystalline oxides that have uniform and molecular-sized pores (3-12 A in diameter). Although natural zeolites were first discovered in 1756, significant commercial development did not begin until the 1950s when synthetic zeolites with high purity and controlled chemical composition became available. Since then, major commercial applications of zeolites have been limited to catalysis, adsorption, and ion exchange, all using zeolites in powder form. Although researchers have widely investigated zeolite thin films within the last 15 years, most of these studies were motivated by the potential application of these materials as separation membranes and membrane reactors. In the last decade, we have recognized and demonstrated that zeolite thin films can have new, diverse, and economically significant applications that others had not previously considered. In this Account, we highlight our work on the development of zeolite thin films as low-dielectric constant (low-k) insulators for future generation computer chips, environmentally benign corrosion-resistant coatings for aerospace alloys, and hydrophilic and microbiocidal coatings for gravity-independent water separation in space stations. Although these three applications might not seem directly related, they all rely on the ability to fine-tune important macroscopic properties of zeolites by changing their ratio of silicon to aluminum. For example, pure-silica zeolites (PSZs, Si/Al = infinity) are hydrophobic, acid stable, and have no ion exchange capacity, while low-silica zeolites (LSZs, Si/Al < 2) are hydrophilic, acid soluble, and have a high ion exchange capacity. These new thin films also take advantage of some unique properties of zeolites that have not been exploited before, such as a higher elastic modulus, hardness, and heat conductivity than those of amorphous porous silicas, and microbiocidal capabilities derived from their ion exchange capacities. Finally, we briefly discuss our more recent work on polycrystalline zeolite thin films as promising biocompatible coatings and environmentally benign wear-resistant and antifouling coatings. When zeolites are incorporated into polymer thin films in the form of nanocrystals, we also show that the resultant composite membranes can significantly improve the performance of reverse osmosis membranes for sea water desalination and proton exchange membrane fuel cells. These diverse applications of zeolites have the potential to initiate new industries while revolutionizing existing ones with a potential economic impact that could extend into the hundreds of billions of dollars. We have licensed several of these inventions to companies with millions of dollars invested in their commercial development. We expect that other related technologies will be licensed in the near future. PMID:20158246

  14. Impact of Zeolite Aging in Hot Liquid Water on Activity for Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Derewinski, Miroslaw A; Fulton, John L; Camaioni, Donald M; Lercher, Johannes A

    2015-08-19

    The location and stability of Brnsted acid sites catalytically active in zeolites during aqueous phase dehydration of alcohols were studied on the example of cyclohexanol. The catalytically active hydronium ions originate from Brnsted acid sites (BAS) of the zeolite that are formed by framework tetrahedral Si atom substitution by Al. Al K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and (27)Al magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to determine the distribution of tetrahedral Al sites (Al T-sites) both qualitatively and quantitatively for both parent and HBEA catalysts aged in water prior to catalytic testing. The aging procedure leads to partial degradation of the zeolite framework evidenced from the decrease of material crystallinity (XRD) as well as sorption capacity (BET). With the exception of one commercial zeolite sample, which had the highest concentration of framework silanol-defects, there is no evidence of Al coordination modification after aging in water. The catalyst weight-normalized dehydration rate correlated best with the sum of strong and weak Brnsted acidic protons both able to generate the hydrated hydronium ions. All hydronium ions were equally active for the acid-catalyzed reactions in water. Zeolite aging in hot water prior to catalysis decreased the weight normalized dehydration reaction rate compared to that of the parent HBEA, which is attributed to the reduced concentration of accessible Brnsted acid sites. Sites are hypothesized to be blocked due to reprecipitation of silica dissolved during framework hydrolysis in the aging procedure. PMID:26237038

  15. New antiaxillary odour deodorant made with antimicrobial Ag-zeolite (silver-exchanged zeolite).

    PubMed

    Nakane, T; Gomyo, H; Sasaki, I; Kimoto, Y; Hanzawa, N; Teshima, Y; Namba, T

    2006-08-01

    The causative substances for axillary osmidrosis, which are often found in apocrine sweat, are the decomposed/denatured products of short-chain fatty acid and other biological metabolite compounds produced by axillary-resident bacteria. Conventional underarm deodorants suppress the process of odour production mostly by the following mechanism: (1) suppression of perspiration, (2) reduction in numbers of resident bacteria, (3) deodorization and (4) masking. The most important and effective method to reduce odour is to suppress the growth of resident bacteria with antimicrobials, which have several drawbacks, especially in their safety aspect. To solve these problems, we focused on Ag-zeolite (silver-exchanged zeolite) that hold stable Ag, an inorganic bactericidal agent, in its structure, and therefore, poses less risk in safety. Its bactericidal effect on skin-resident bacteria was found to be excellent and comparable with that of triclosan, a most frequently used organic antimicrobial in this product category. The dose-response study of Ag-zeolite powder spray (0-40 w/w%) using 39 volunteers revealed that 5-40 w/w% Ag-zeolite could show a sufficient antimicrobial effect against skin-resident bacteria. The comparison study using 0.2 w/w% triclosan as the control and 10 w/w% Ag-zeolite indicated that: (1) one application of the powder spray containing 10 w/w% Ag-zeolite could show a sufficient antimicrobial effect against the resident bacteria and its effect continued for 24 h, (2) a powder spray containing 0.2 w/w% triclosan was unable to show a sufficient antimicrobial effect, and (3) no adverse event was observed. These studies show that Ag-zeolite has a superior antimicrobial ability that is rarely found in conventional antimicrobials used in deodorant products and a strong antiaxillary odour deodorant ability because of its long-lasting effect. During clinical study, patch tests with humans and other clinical studies of this product showed no adverse events related to the treatment with the Ag-zeolite product. PMID:18489270

  16. Copper and copper proteins in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Montes, Sergio; Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology. PMID:24672633

  17. Disorders of copper transport.

    PubMed

    Cox, D W

    1999-01-01

    Copper is an essential component of a number of important enzymes. Efficient systems have developed for providing sufficient copper for essential functions, while eliminating excess to avoid tissue toxicity. Copper transport is disrupted in two human diseases: Wilson disease and Menkes disease. Both have defects in copper transporting membrane proteins. Many other proteins are involved in copper transport. Some of these proteins have been identified through a study of the similar copper pathway in yeast. This suggests other copper transport diseases are yet to be discovered. Molecular diagnosis holds promise for reliable diagnosis of patients. Testing of flanking markers is a reliable way to detect presymptomatic sibs of a definite patient. PMID:10746345

  18. Ni(2+)-zeolite/ferrosphere and Ni(2+)-silica/ferrosphere beads for magnetic affinity separation of histidine-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Vereshchagina, T A; Fedorchak, M A; Sharonova, O M; Fomenko, E V; Shishkina, N N; Zhizhaev, A M; Kudryavtsev, A N; Frank, L A; Anshits, A G

    2016-01-19

    Magnetic Ni(2+)-zeolite/ferrosphere and Ni(2+)-silica/ferrosphere beads (Ni-ferrosphere beads - NFB) of a core-shell structure were synthesized starting from coal fly ash ferrospheres having diameters in the range of 0.063-0.050 mm. The strategy of NFB fabrication is an oriented chemical modification of the outer surface preserving the magnetic core of parent beads with the formation of micro-mesoporous coverings. Two routes of ferrosphere modification were realized, such as (i) hydrothermal treatment in an alkaline medium resulting in a NaP zeolite layer and (ii) synthesis of micro-mesoporous silica on the glass surface using conventional methods. Immobilization of Ni(2+) ions in the siliceous porous shell of the magnetic beads was carried out via (i) the ion exchange of Na(+) for Ni(2+) in the zeolite layer or (ii) deposition of NiO clusters in the zeolite and silica pores. The final NFB were tested for affinity in magnetic separation of the histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (GFP) directly from a cell lysate. Results pointed to the high affinity of the magnetic beads towards the protein in the presence of 10 mM EDTA. The sorption capacity of the ferrosphere-based Ni-beads with respect to GFP was in the range 1.5-5.7 mg cm(-3). PMID:26688000

  19. In Situ SAXS/WAXS of Zeolite Microwave Synthesis: NaY, NaA, and Beta Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Panzarella,B.; Tompsett, G.; Conner, W.; Jones, K.

    2007-01-01

    A custom waveguide apparatus is constructed to study the microwave synthesis of zeolites by in situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The WR-284 waveguide is used to heat precursor solutions using microwaves at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. The reaction vessels are designed to include sections of thin-walled glass, which permit X-rays to pass through the precursor solutions with minimal attenuation. Slots were machined into the waveguide to provide windows for X-ray energy to enter and scatter from solutions during microwave heating. The synthesis of zeolites with conventional heating is also studied using X-ray scattering in the same reactor. SAXS studies show that the crystallization of beta zeolite and NaY zeolite is preceded by a reorganization of nanosized particles in their precursor solutions or gels. The evolution of these particles during the nucleation and crystallization stages of zeolite formation depends on the properties of the precursor solution. The synthesis of NaA and NaX zeolites and sodalite from a single zeolite precursor is studied by microwave and conventional heating. Microwave heating shifts the selectivity of this synthesis in favor of NaA and NaX over sodalite; conventional heating leads to the formation of sodalite for synthesis from the same precursor. The use of microwave heating also led to a more rapid onset of NaA zeolite product crystallization compared to conventional heating. Pulsed and continuous microwave heating are compared for zeolite synthesis. The resulting rates of formation of the zeolite products, and the relative amounts of the products determined from the WAXS spectra, are similar when either pulsed or continuous microwave heating is applied in the reactor while maintaining the same synthesis temperature. The consequences of these results in terms of zeolite synthesis are discussed.

  20. Characterization and antibacterial activity of silver exchanged regenerated NaY zeolite from surfactant-modified NaY zeolite.

    PubMed

    Salim, Mashitah Mad; Malek, Nik Ahmad Nizam Nik

    2016-02-01

    The antibacterial activity of regenerated NaY zeolite (thermal treatment from cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB)-modified NaY zeolite and pretreatment with Na ions) loaded with silver ions were examined using the broth dilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method against Escherichia coli (E. coli ATCC 11229) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus ATCC 6538). X-ray diffraction (XRD), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and chemical elemental analyses were used to characterize the regenerated NaY and AgY zeolites. The XRD patterns indicated that the calcination and addition of silver ions on regenerated NaY zeolite did not affect the structure of the regenerated NaY zeolite as the characteristic peaks of the NaY zeolite were retained, and no new peaks were observed. The regenerated AgY zeolite showed good antibacterial activity against both bacteria strains in distilled water, and the antibacterial activity of the samples increased with increasing Ag loaded on the regenerated AgY zeolite; the regenerated AgY zeolite was more effective against E. coli than S. aureus. However, the antibacterial activity of the regenerated AgY was not effective in saline solution for both bacteria. The study showed that CTAB-modified NaY zeolite materials could be regenerated to NaY zeolite using thermal treatment (550°C, 5h) and this material has excellent performance as an antibacterial agent after silver ions loading. PMID:26652350

  1. Silanization-Based Zeolite Crystallization: Participation Degree and Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yueer; Azhati, Arepati; Guo, Xiao; Zhang, Yahong; Tang, Yi

    2015-08-17

    A clear and deep understanding of zeolite crystallization with the addition of organosilane is desirable for the reasonable design and preparation of hierarchical zeolites. Herein, the effects of different organosilanes on zeolite crystallization were systematically studied. It was found that organosilane plays the role of an inhibitor in the silanization-based zeolite preparation, and this inhibition effect was determined by its participation degree. An organosilane with a high participation degree can result in the prolongation of nucleation and growth periods of zeolite as well as the variation of product properties. More importantly, a dynamic participation pathway of organosilane is proposed, that is, the growth of zeolite is accompanied by the continuous removal of organosilane, leading to an increase of product crystallinity as well as the decrease of mesoporosity. This study gives a new insight into the role that organosilane plays in zeolite crystallization, which will help to direct the rational selection of organosilane and design of crystallization condition for the optimal synthesis of hierarchical zeolites. PMID:26173899

  2. Crewmember working on the mid deck Zeolite Crystal Growth experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    View showing Payload Specialist Bonnie Dunbar, in the mid deck, conducting the Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) Experiment in the mid deck stowage locker work area. View shows assembly of zeolite sample in the metal autoclave cylinders prior to insertion into the furnace.

  3. Factors that Determine Zeolite Stability in Hot Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Kuizhi; Chen, Banghao; White, Jeffery L; Resasco, Daniel E

    2015-09-16

    The susceptibility of zeolites to hot liquid water may hamper their full utilization in aqueous phase processes, such as those involved in biomass conversion and upgrading reactions. Interactions of zeolites with water strongly depend on the presence of hydrophilic moieties including Brnsted acid sites (BAS), extraframework cations, and silanol defects, which facilitate wetting of the surface. However, it is not clear which of these moieties are responsible for the susceptibility of zeolites to liquid water. Previous studies have offered contradictory explanations because the role of each of these characteristics has not been investigated independently. In this work, a systematic comparison has been attempted by relating crystallinity losses to the variation of each of the five zeolite characteristics that may influence their stability in liquid water, including number of BAS, Si-O-Si bonds, framework type, silanol defects, and extraframework Al. In this study, we have systematically monitored the crystallinity changes of a series of HY, H-ZSM-5, and H-? zeolite samples with varying Si/Al ratio, density of BAS, zeolite structure, and density of silanol defects upon exposure to liquid water at 200 C. The results of this comparison unambiguously indicate that the density of silanol defects plays the most crucial role in determining susceptibility of zeolites to hot liquid water. By functionalizing the silanol defects with organosilanes, the hydrophobicity of defective zeolite is increased and the tolerance to hot liquid water is significantly enhanced. PMID:26301890

  4. FUNDAMENTALS AND APPLICATIONS OF PERVAPORATION THROUGH ZEOLITE MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolite membranes are well suited for separating liquid-phase mixtures by pervaporation because of their molecular-sized pores and their hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature, and the first commercial application of zeolite membranes has been for dehydrating organics [1]. Because of ...

  5. Ion exchange in a zeolite-molten chloride system

    SciTech Connect

    Woodman, R.H.; Pereira, C.

    1997-07-01

    Electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel results in a secondary waste stream of radioactive fission products dissolved in chloride salt. Disposal plans include a waste form that can incorporate chloride forms featuring one or more zeolites consolidated with sintered glass. A candidate method for incorporating fission products in the zeolites is passing the contaminated salt over a zeolite column for ion exchange. To date, the molten chloride ion-exchange properties of four zeolites have been investigated for this process: zeolite A, IE95{reg_sign}, clinoptilolite, and mordenite. Of these, zeolite A has been the most promising. Treating zeolite 4A, the sodium form of zeolite A , with the solvent salt for the waste stream-lithium-potassium chloride of eutectic melting composition, is expected to provide a material with favorable ion-exchange properties for the treatment of the waste salt. The authors constructed a pilot-plant system for the ion-exchange column. Initial results indicate that there is a direct relationship between the two operating variable of interest, temperature, and initial sodium concentration. Also, the mass ratio has been about 3--5 to bring the sodium concentration of the effluent below 1 mol%.

  6. Zeolitization of tuffaceous rocks of the green river formation, wyoming.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, J H; Surdam, R C

    1967-07-21

    The alkali-rich zeolites mordenite and clinoptilolite have been discovered in tuffaceous rocks of the Green River Formation, Wyoming. This occurrence strongly supports the alteration of glass to alkali-rich zeolite to analcime as the paragenetic sequence of alteration of tuffaceous rocks deposited in ancient Lake Gosiute. PMID:17734226

  7. Selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    2000-01-01

    A process for selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls is carried out in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  8. Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, H.; Blatter, F.; Sun, H.

    1999-06-22

    A process is described for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts. 19 figs.

  9. Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    1999-01-01

    A process for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  10. Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    2001-01-01

    A process for a combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  11. CATION CONTROLLED SINGLET OXYGEN MEDIATED OXIDATION OF OLEFINS WITHIN ZEOLITES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidation of trialkyl olefins has been performed within zeolites employing thionin as the singlet oxygen sensitizer. Unusual selectivity in favor of secondary hydroperoxides is observed within zeolites. In light of the fact that in solution such a selectivity is never observed the selectivity report...

  12. Zeolites in the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, William H.; Bush, Alfred L.; Gude, Arthur J., 3rd

    1982-01-01

    Zeolites of possible commercial value occur in the Brule Formation of Oligocene age and the Sharps Formation (Harksen, 1961) of Miocene age which crop out in a wide area in the northern part of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The thickness of the zeolite-bearing Interval and the extent of areas within the Interval which contain significant amounts of zeolites are far greater than was expected prior to this investigation. The shape of the zeolite-bearing Interval is tabular and the dimensions of Its exposure are roughly 10 ml x 200 mi x 150 ft (16 km x 160 km x 45 m) thick. Within the study area, there are tracts in which the zeolite resource potential is significant (see pl. 2). This report is intended to inform the Oglala Sioux Tribe of some of the most promising zeolite occurrences. Initial steps can then be taken by the Tribe toward possible development of the resources, should they wish to do so. The data contained herein identify areas of high zeolite potential, but are not adequate to establish economic value for the deposits. If development is recommended by the tribal government, we suggest that the tribal government contact companies involved in research and production of natural zeolites and provide them with the data in this report.

  13. Computational characterization of zeolite porous networks: an automated approach.

    PubMed

    First, Eric L; Gounaris, Chrysanthos E; Wei, James; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2011-10-14

    An automated method has been developed to fully characterize the three-dimensional structure of zeolite porous networks. The proposed optimization-based approach starts with the crystallographic coordinates of a structure and identifies all portals, channels, and cages in a unit cell, as well as their connectivity. We apply our algorithms to known zeolites, hypothetical zeolites, and zeolite-like structures and use the characterizations to calculate important quantities such as pore size distribution, accessible volume, surface area, and largest cavity and pore limiting diameters. We aggregate this data over many framework types to gain insights about zeolite selectivity. Finally, we develop a continuous-time Markov chain model to estimate the probability of occupancy of adsorption sites throughout the porous network. ZEOMICS, an online database of structure characterizations and web tool for the automated approach is freely available to the scientific community (http://helios.princeton.edu/zeomics/). PMID:21881655

  14. Modified zeolite-based catalyst for effective extinction hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, T.Y. )

    1989-10-01

    The shape selectivity of zeolites makes them generally ineffective for extinction hydrocracking of polycyclic aromatic feeds. To overcome this problem, the zeolite can be modified with an amorphous cracking component to form a composite catalyst. This composite catalyst will be effective for extinction hydrocracking and retain the superior performance characteristics of a zeolite catalyst at the same time because the zeolite and the amorphous components of the catalyst operate complementarily. To illustrate this principle, NiW/REX-NiW/SiO/sub 2/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ composite catalyst was tested in the pilot plant. It was active, low in aging rate, resistant to nitrogen poisoning and high in selectivities for naphthas. The aged catalyst could be oxidatively regenerated to fully recover the activity and the product selectivities. This composite catalyst was superior to both individual (zeolite and amorphous) components for extinction hydrocracking. Catalysts similar to this have been used commercially for many years.

  15. Selectivity of zeolite catalysts of hydrocracking of paraffin hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Shakun, A.N.; Il'icheva, L.F.; Nikitina, N.L.; Nefedov, B.K.; Konoval'chikov, L.D.; Alekseeva, T.V.

    1988-09-20

    The selectivity of catalysts of hydrocracking based on three types of zeolites: HKE, HM, and HTsVM was studied in comparable conditions and it was found that in rigorous conditions of conducting the process (longer contact time, deeper conversion of the normal paraffin), the contribution of nonselective hydrocracking which takes place on the external crystalline surface of the zeolites becomes marked on all of the catalysts. Incorporation of a hydrogenating component in the zeolite-containing catalyst results in an increase in nonselective hydrocracking on the external crystalline surface of the zeolites, and addition of significant amounts of molybdenum oxide also results in a decrease in the total conversion of the n-paraffin. The contribution of nonselective hydrocracking decreases with an increase in the intracrystalline activity of the zeolite.

  16. Synthesis and catalytic applications of combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials

    PubMed Central

    Vernimmen, Jarian; Cool, Pegie

    2011-01-01

    Summary In the last decade, research concerning nanoporous siliceous materials has been focused on mesoporous materials with intrinsic zeolitic features. These materials are thought to be superior, because they are able to combine (i) the enhanced diffusion and accessibility for larger molecules and viscous fluids typical of mesoporous materials with (ii) the remarkable stability, catalytic activity and selectivity of zeolites. This review gives an overview of the state of the art concerning combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials. Focus is put on the synthesis and the applications of the combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials. The different synthesis approaches and formation mechanisms leading to these materials are comprehensively discussed and compared. Moreover, Ti-containing nanoporous materials as redox catalysts are discussed to illustrate a potential implementation of combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials. PMID:22259762

  17. Health implications of natural fibrous zeolites for the Intermountain west

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Casey, K.R.; Parry, W.T.; Mjaatvedt, C.H.; Moatamed, F.

    1983-02-01

    Fibrous zeolites have recently been implicated in an endemic outbreak of malignant pleural mesothelioma in several villages in Cappadocia in central Turkey. The possible association between fibrous zeolites and mesothelioma and the potential biological activity of fibrous erionite from the United States are reviewed. The zeolite minerals comprise a group of over forty hydrated aluminum silicates. More than 300 probable deposits of various natural zeolites are located in 25 states in the United States. Reserves of perhaps 10 trillion tons are present in the western United States; about 120 million tons are deposited near the surface. Several zeolites, including erionite and mordenite, may occur with a fibrous habit. Fibrous erionite is found in several well-defined deposits in Arizona, Nevada, Oregon, and Utah, where it occurs as thin, pure beds within sedimentary tuff sequences, or as outcrops in desert valleys of the Intermountain region. (JMT)

  18. Rheological Influence of Synthetic Zeolite on Cement Pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldino, N.; Gabriele, D.; Frontera, P.; Crea, F.; de Cindio, B.

    2008-07-01

    Self Compacting Concrete (SCC) is characterized by specific and particular mechanical properties, often due to the addition of components, able to modify the paste rheology. Concrete properties are strongly affected by characteristics of the fresh cement paste that is the continuous phase dispersing larger aggregates. Therefore, aiming to characterize mechanical properties of final concrete is relevant to know rheological properties of the base cement paste. In this work cement pastes for SCC were prepared by using, as additive, synthetic zeolite 5A in different amounts and they were analyzed by small amplitude oscillations. Experimental results have shown a relationship between dynamic moduli and zeolite content, identifying a proper level of zeolite addition. Moreover samples containing traditional fine additives, such as silica fume and limestone, were prepared and experimental data were compared to those obtained by using zeolite. It was found that zeolite seems to give better properties to cement paste than other additives can do.

  19. Raman spectroscopic studies of zeolite framework. Hydrated Zeolite A and the influence of cations

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.; Del Barco, B.

    1985-05-09

    Raman spectra of hydrated zeolite A completely exchanged with Li/sup +/, Na/sup +/, K/sup +/, Tl/sup +/, and NH/sub 4//sup +/ ions are reported in this paper. The emphasis has been on the high-frequency region between 300 and 1200 cm/sup -1/, where the intramolecular modes of the aluminosilicate framework are expected. The Raman bands cluster in three regions of the spectrum: (a) 300-500 cm/sup -1/, assigned to T-O deformation modes; (b) 650-750 cm/sup -1/, assigned to Al-O stretching vibrations; and (c) 900-1100 cm/sup -1/, assigned to Si-O stretching motions. The Raman spectra of the ion-exchanged zeolites suggest that Li/sup +/ distorts the zeolite framework, whereas in Na/sup +/-, K/sup +/-, and Tl/sup +/-A, the zeolite structure remains unchanged. In NH/sub 4/-A, there is strong spectroscopic evidence for H-bond formation between the cation and the lattice oxygens. 31 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  20. Influence of NaA Zeolite Crystal Expansion/Contraction on Zeolite Membrane Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, Stephanie G; Payzant, E Andrew; Gibbons, Will T; Soydas, Belma; Kita, Hidetoshi; Noble, Richard D; Falconer, John L.

    2011-01-01

    In-situ powder XRD measurements showed that the NaA zeolite unit cell contracts and expands upon adsorption, and these changes in zeolite crystal size correlate with permeation changes through NaA zeolite membranes. These membranes had high pervaporation selectivities, even though gas permeation was mainly through defects, as indicated by Knudsen selectivities for gases. At 300 K and a thermodynamic activity of 0.03, water contracted the NaA crystals by 0.22 vol%, and this contraction increased the helium flux through two NaA membranes by approximately 80%. Crystal contraction also increased the fluxes of i-butane during vapor permeation and i-propanol (IPA) during pervaporation (~ 0.03 wt% water). At activities above 0.07, water expanded NaA crystals and correspondingly decreased the membrane fluxes of helium, i-butane, and IPA. Similarly, methanol contracted NaA crystals by 0.05 vol% at an activity of 0.02, and this contraction slightly increased the helium and i-butane fluxes through a NaA membrane. Above an activity of 0.06, methanol expanded the crystals, and the fluxes of helium and i-butane through a NaA membrane decreased. The adsorbate-induced changes explain some pervaporation behavior reported by others, and they indicate that crystal expansion and contraction may increase or decrease zeolite NaA membrane selectivity by changing the defect sizes.

  1. Photophysical properties of pyrene in zeolites: Adsorption and distribution of pyrene molecules on the surfaces of zeolite L and mordenite

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xinsheng; Thomas, J.K.

    1994-12-01

    Adsorption of pyrene on the surfaces of zeolites L and mordenite is investigated using photophysical techniques. Although the internal surfaces of both zeolites are polar, their external surfaces may not be the same. A difference is observed for mordenite. No pyrene excimers can be produced in mordenite, while excimers are readily formed in zeolite L. Due to structural constraints, 30-35% of pyrene adsorbed in mordenite cannot be quenched by O{sub 2}. Rotational movement of pyrene molecules in mordenite is also restricted by the zeolite structure. Laser photolysis produces pyrene cation and anion radicals, the former having a larger yield than the latter in both zeolites. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Characteristics of Lead Sorption by Zeolite Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sewailem, M. S.

    Lead adsorption behavior was investigated using four Zeolite minerals (clinoptilolite, analcime, phillipsite and chabazite). The used Pb2+ concentrations were 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 5 mol mL-1. Results indicated that Pb2+ sorption followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, but over limited concentration ranges for clinoptilolite and analcime. The bindg energy (Kd) reached, 2.400 and 0.875 g L-1 for phillipsite and chabazite, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity for such minerals reached 208.33 and 204.08 mg g-1 with correlation coefficient (R2) reached, 0.997 and 0.995, respectively. Meanwhile, two stages for Pb2+adsorption were observed with clinoptilolite and analcime in the low and high concentrations of the applied Pb2+. Data also was applicable to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm over the used entire Pb2+ concentration ranges. The binding energy (n) reached, 1.014, 1.005, 1.001 and 1.001 g L-1 for clinoptilolite, analcime, phillipsite and chabazite, respectively. However, the b values (maximum adsorption capacity) reached 202.582, 201.651, 207.062 and 206.871 mg g-1 with correlation coefficient (R2) nearly one for all studying minerals, respectively. Desorption data indicated that most of the sorbed Pb2+ was extractedin the 1st extraction following the adsorption experiment. The ability of the used zeolite minerals to retain Pb2+ was high and there were differences between the studied minerals in sorption of Pb2+. In conclusion, data eliminated that, zeolite minerals especially, philipsite and chabazite, could be successfully used as packing material in subsurface reactive barriers intercepting ground water plumes and for fixed bed reactors designed to remove Pb2+ from industrial wastewater.

  3. [Zeolite catalysis in conversion of cellulosics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.

    1992-01-01

    To transform biomass into fermentable substrate for yeast, we are using zeolites instead of enzymes to catalyze the two bottleneck reactions in biomass conversion, xylose isomerization and ceuobiose hydrolysis. The experimental results on these reactions carried out over various zeolites and other catalysts are presented herein. The advantages and disadvantages of using these catalysts over enzymes are also discussed. Heterogeneous solid catalysts other than zeolites has been employed for cellobiose-to-glucose hydrolysis. The size and shape selectivity that makes zeoutes unique for some reactions can add diffusional hindrance. We have spent some time screening various known solid acidic catalysts. We report that a class of cationic ion exchange resins in the acidified form (e.g. Amberlite) has worked well as an acidic catalyst in hydrolyzing cellobiose to glucose. Our experimental results, together with those obtained from a homogeneous acid catalyst (e.g. sulfuric acid) for comparison are provided. Having succeeded in finding an alternative solid acid catalyst for hydrolysis, we explored other solid resin or other homogeneous but non-enzyme catalyst to carry out the xylose-to-xylulose isomerization. A fairly extensive search has been made. We explored the use of sodium aluminates in the homogeneous phase isomerization of glucose to fructose and obtained a very high conversion of glucose to fructose with the final mixture containing 85% of fructose instead of the common 45%. Fructose apparently complexes with aluminates, and its equilibrium concentration is shifted to considerably higher values than permitted by simple glucose/fructose equilibrium. We have recently found a number of catalysts capable of promoting isomerization between aldoses and ketoses. One solid resin, known as polyvinyl pyridine (PVP), is able to convert xylose to xylulose at a pH below 7. Our usage of alternative isomerization catalysts, including PVP, are described.

  4. [Zeolite catalysis in conversion of cellulosics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.

    1992-12-31

    To transform biomass into fermentable substrate for yeast, we are using zeolites instead of enzymes to catalyze the two bottleneck reactions in biomass conversion, xylose isomerization and ceuobiose hydrolysis. The experimental results on these reactions carried out over various zeolites and other catalysts are presented herein. The advantages and disadvantages of using these catalysts over enzymes are also discussed. Heterogeneous solid catalysts other than zeolites has been employed for cellobiose-to-glucose hydrolysis. The size and shape selectivity that makes zeoutes unique for some reactions can add diffusional hindrance. We have spent some time screening various known solid acidic catalysts. We report that a class of cationic ion exchange resins in the acidified form (e.g. Amberlite) has worked well as an acidic catalyst in hydrolyzing cellobiose to glucose. Our experimental results, together with those obtained from a homogeneous acid catalyst (e.g. sulfuric acid) for comparison are provided. Having succeeded in finding an alternative solid acid catalyst for hydrolysis, we explored other solid resin or other homogeneous but non-enzyme catalyst to carry out the xylose-to-xylulose isomerization. A fairly extensive search has been made. We explored the use of sodium aluminates in the homogeneous phase isomerization of glucose to fructose and obtained a very high conversion of glucose to fructose with the final mixture containing 85% of fructose instead of the common 45%. Fructose apparently complexes with aluminates, and its equilibrium concentration is shifted to considerably higher values than permitted by simple glucose/fructose equilibrium. We have recently found a number of catalysts capable of promoting isomerization between aldoses and ketoses. One solid resin, known as polyvinyl pyridine (PVP), is able to convert xylose to xylulose at a pH below 7. Our usage of alternative isomerization catalysts, including PVP, are described.

  5. Carbon dioxide sensitivity of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks.

    PubMed

    Mottillo, Cristina; Fri?i?, Tomislav

    2014-07-14

    Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks of zinc, cobalt, and cadmium, including the framework ZIF-8 commercially sold as Basolite Z1200, exhibit surprising sensitivity to carbon dioxide under mild conditions. The frameworks chemically react with CO2 in the presence of moisture or liquid water to form carbonates. This effect, which has been previously not reported in metal-organic framework chemistry, provides an explanation for conflicting reports on ZIF-8 stability to water and is of outstanding significance for evaluating the potential applications of metal-organic frameworks, especially for CO2 sequestration. PMID:24889776

  6. Electron trapping in polar-solvated zeolites.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Eric H

    2005-11-01

    Of current interest in our laboratory is the nature of photoinduced processes in the cavities of zeolites completely submerged in polar solvents, or polar-solvated zeolites (PSZ). The present study addresses the nature of electron trapping in PSZ with emphasis on the zeolites NaX and NaY. Free electrons were generated by two-photon, pulsed-laser excitation of either pyrene or naphthalene included in zeolite cavities. Trapped electrons were monitored by diffuse transmittance, transient absorption spectroscopy at visible wavelengths. In anhydrous alcohols, electron trapping by Na(4)(4+) ion clusters was observed in both NaX and NaY. The resulting trapped electrons decayed over the course of tens of milliseconds. No evidence for alcohol-solvated electrons was found. More varied results were observed in solvents containing water. In NaX submerged in CH(3)OH containing 5% or higher water, species having microsecond lifetimes characteristic of solvated electrons were observed. By contrast, a 2 h exposure of NaY to 95/5 CH(3)OH/H(2)O had no effect on electron trapping relative to anhydrous CH(3)OH. The difference between NaX and NaY was explained by how fast water migrates into the sodalite cage. Prolonged exposure to water at room temperature or exposure to water at elevated temperatures was necessary to place water in the sodalite cages of NaY and deactivate Na(4)(4+) as an electron trap. Additional studies in NaY revealed that solvent clusters eventually become lower energy traps than Na(4)(4+) as the water content in methanol increases. In acetonitrile-water mixtures, electron trapping by Na(4)(4+) was eliminated and no equivalent species characteristic of solvated electrons in methanol-water mixtures was observed. This result was explained by the formation of low energy solvated electrons which cannot be observed in the visible region of the spectrum. Measurements of the rate of O(2) quenching in anhydrous solvents revealed rate constants for the quenching of ion cluster trapped electrons that were 2-4 times higher than that for pyrene triplets. In NaX, the rate constant in methanol was 10(4) times smaller than that in cyclohexane, showing greater inhibition of O(2) reactivity in the medium of PSZ. The results of this study point out the conditions under which Na(4)(4+) is active as an electron trap in PSZ and that water must be present in the sodalite cage to produce solvated electrons in the supercage. PMID:16853643

  7. Zeolite-sorbate interactions from Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R.G. ); Deckman, H.W.; Witzke, H.; McHenry, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been used as a direct structural probe to study sorbate-framework interactions for water sorption into the zeolite potassium-ZK5. Equilibrium adsorbate-induced deformations of intertetrahedral angles are quantitatively measured and analyzed in terms of a structural isotherm for each counterion site. All of the structural changes result from the first molecules sorbed. Kinetic studies of the structural deformation are used to determine a diffusion coefficient for the water molecules deforming the six-membered ring site of {approximately} 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}.

  8. Structural analysis of hierarchically organized zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Sharon; Pinar, Ana B.; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Paolo; Krger, Jrg; Prez-Ramrez, Javier

    2015-10-01

    Advances in materials synthesis bring about many opportunities for technological applications, but are often accompanied by unprecedented complexity. This is clearly illustrated by the case of hierarchically organized zeolite catalysts, a class of crystalline microporous solids that has been revolutionized by the engineering of multilevel pore architectures, which combine unique chemical functionality with efficient molecular transport. Three key attributes, the crystal, the pore and the active site structure, can be expected to dominate the design process. This review examines the adequacy of the palette of techniques applied to characterize these distinguishing features and their catalytic impact.

  9. Growth of large zeolite crystals in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, A., Jr.; Dixon, A.; Thompson, R.; Scott, G.; Ditr, J.

    1988-01-01

    Synthesis studies performed using close analogs of triethanolamine (TEA) have shown that all three hydroxyl groups and the amine group in this molecule are necessary to provide nucleation suppression. Studies using C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) revealed that the hydroxyl ions and the amine group are involved in the formation of an aluminum complex. It was also shown that silicate species fo not interact this way with TEA in an alkaline solution. These results suggest that successful aluminum complexation leads to nucleation in zeolite-A crystallization.

  10. Silicon substituted y zeolite composition lz-210

    SciTech Connect

    Skeels, G.W.; Breck, D.W.

    1987-12-08

    A crystalline zeolitic aluminosilicate is described having at least some of its original framework aluminum atoms replaced by extraneous silicon atoms and having a mole ratio of oxides in the anhydrous state of wherein M is a cation having a valence of ''n''; ''x'' has a value greater than 6.0; has a X-ray powder diffraction pattern having at least the d-spacings of Table A; and has extraneous silicon atoms in the crystal lattice in the form of framework SiO/sub 4/ tetrahedra.

  11. Structural analysis of hierarchically organized zeolites

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sharon; Pinar, Ana B.; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Paolo; Kärger, Jörg; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Advances in materials synthesis bring about many opportunities for technological applications, but are often accompanied by unprecedented complexity. This is clearly illustrated by the case of hierarchically organized zeolite catalysts, a class of crystalline microporous solids that has been revolutionized by the engineering of multilevel pore architectures, which combine unique chemical functionality with efficient molecular transport. Three key attributes, the crystal, the pore and the active site structure, can be expected to dominate the design process. This review examines the adequacy of the palette of techniques applied to characterize these distinguishing features and their catalytic impact. PMID:26482337

  12. Structural analysis of hierarchically organized zeolites.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sharon; Pinar, Ana B; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Paolo; Krger, Jrg; Prez-Ramrez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Advances in materials synthesis bring about many opportunities for technological applications, but are often accompanied by unprecedented complexity. This is clearly illustrated by the case of hierarchically organized zeolite catalysts, a class of crystalline microporous solids that has been revolutionized by the engineering of multilevel pore architectures, which combine unique chemical functionality with efficient molecular transport. Three key attributes, the crystal, the pore and the active site structure, can be expected to dominate the design process. This review examines the adequacy of the palette of techniques applied to characterize these distinguishing features and their catalytic impact. PMID:26482337

  13. Lab Tracker and Copper Calculator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Copper Calculator WDA Publications Copper Connection Newsletter Stories Lab Tracker and Copper Calculator Serum Copper (mcg/dl) ... Michael Schilsky, we are pleased to offer the Lab Tracker in two convenient formats. We recommend that ...

  14. Synthesis of zeolite phases from combustion by-products.

    PubMed

    Pimraksa, Kedsarin; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Setthaya, Naruemon

    2010-12-01

    Synthesis of zeolites from combustion by-products, including fly ash, bottom ash and rice husk ash, was studied. A molar ratio of SiO2/Al2O3 of 1.5 was used for the syntheses. Refluxing and hydrothermal methods were also used for synthesis for comparison. The reaction temperatures of refluxing and hydrothermal methods were 100 degrees C and 130 degrees C, respectively. Sodalite, phillipsite-K, and zeolite P1 with analcime were obtained when fly ash, bottom ash and rice husk ash were used as starting materials, respectively. With rice husk ash as a starting material, zeolite P1 was produced. This result had advantages over previous studies as there was no prior activation required for the synthesis. The concentrations and types of alkaline used in the synthesis also determined the zeolite type. The different zeolites obtained from three systems were measured for specific surface area and pore size by using BET and Hg-porosimetry, respectively. Ammonium exchange capacities of the synthesised powders containing zeolites, sodalite, zeolite P1 and phillipsite-K were 38.5, 65.0 and 154.7 meq 100 g(-1), respectively. PMID:20421244

  15. Synthetic zeolites as a new tool for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Rimoli, Maria G; Rabaioli, Maria R; Melisi, Daniela; Curcio, Annalisa; Mondello, Sandro; Mirabelli, Rosella; Abignente, Enrico

    2008-10-01

    Synthetic zeolites were studied in order to investigate their ability to encapsulate and to release drugs. In particular, a zeolite X and a zeolitic product obtained from a cocrystallization of zeolite X and zeolite A were examined. These materials were characterized by chemical analyses (ICP-AES), X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption isotherm, scanning electron microscopy, laser diffraction, and infrared spectroscopy. Since ketoprofen was chosen as a model drug for the formulation of controlled-release dosage forms, it was encapsulated into these two types of synthetic zeolites by a soaking procedure. Drug-loaded matrices were then characterized for entrapped drug amount and thermogravimetric behavior. In both types of activated zeolites, the total amount of ketoprofen (800 mg) was encapsulated in 2 g of matrix. By using HPLC measurements, ketoprofen release studies were done at different pH conditions so as to mimick gastrointestinal fluids. The absence of release in acid conditions and a double phased release, at two different pH values (5 and 6.8), suggest that after activation these materials offer good potential for a modified release delivery system of ketoprofen. PMID:18085645

  16. Radiolytic preparation of nanosized Pt particles in sodium zeolite A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalakshmi, R.; Kapoor, S.; Kulshreshtha, S. K.

    2002-04-01

    Nanosized platinum metal particles in zeolite NaA have been prepared by four different methods, namely, (I) ?-radiolysis of zeolite A sample exchanged with [Pt(NH 3) 4] 2+, (II) ?-radiolysis of precursor gel containing Pt 2+ ions followed by hydrothermal crystallisation to form zeolite A, (III) hydrogen reduction of Pt 2+ ions containing precursor gel followed by hydrothermal crystallisation and (IV) impregnation of zeolite A with H 2PtCl 6 solution followed by reduction at 200 C in hydrogen flow. The size of Pt metal particles has been evaluated from X-ray line broadening and TEM and is found to be in the range of 5-15 nm for samples II, III and IV. Based on catalytic activity of these samples for hydrogenation of ethylene and cyclohexene, it is inferred that for sample I, Pt metal particles are confined to the pores of zeolite A. Unlike this, the Pt metal particles are randomly distributed in the zeolite matrix for samples II and III. For sample IV, the Pt metal particles are present over the surface of zeolite A.

  17. Microcalorimetric study of silica- and zeolite-supported platinum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.B.; Dumesic, J.A. ); Miller, J.T. )

    1994-07-01

    Microcalorimetric measurements of the differential heats of hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption versus adsorbate coverate were made at 403 K for platinum supported on silica, magnesia/alumina, L-zeolite, Y-zeolite, and ZSM-5. The differential heats at zero coverage for hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption were 90 and 140 kJ/mol, respectively, for platinum supported on silica and nonacidic zeolites. The differential heats were large by approximately 20 kJ/mol for hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption on platinum particles supported on basis supports such as potassium/silica, magnesia/alumina, and zeolites containing basic cations (K[sup +], Ba[sup 2+]) exchanged in excess of the zeolite framework aluminum content. The microcalorimetric results suggest that the high paraffin aromatization activity and selectivity observed for L-zeolite-supported platinum catalysts do not appear to be caused solely by changes in the adsorptive properties of the cluster-size platinum particles located within the zeolite. 35 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) Flight on USML-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Bac, Nurcan; Warzywoda, Juliusz; Guray, Ipek; Marceau, Michelle; Sacco, Teran L.; Whalen, Leah M.

    1997-01-01

    The extensive use of zeolites and their impact on the world's economy has resulted in many efforts to characterize their structure, and improve the knowledge base for nucleation and growth of these crystals. The zeolite crystal growth (ZCG) experiment on USML-2 aimed to enhance the understanding of nucleation and growth of zeolite crystals, while attempting to provide a means of controlling the defect concentration in microgravity. Zeolites A, X, Beta, and Silicalite were grown during the 16 day - USML-2 mission. The solutions where the nucleation event was controlled yielded larger and more uniform crystals of better morphology and purity than their terrestrial/control counterparts. The external surfaces of zeolite A, X, and Silicalite crystals grown in microgravity were smoother (lower surface roughness) than their terrestrial controls. Catalytic studies with zeolite Beta indicate that crystals grown in space exhibit a lower number of Lewis acid sites located in micropores. This suggests fewer structural defects for crystals grown in microgravity. Transmission electron micrographs (TEM) of zeolite Beta crystals also show that crystals grown in microgravity were free of line defects while terrestrial/controls had substantial defects.

  19. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  20. Quantitative proteomic profiling of the Escherichia coli response to metallic copper surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Renu; Espirito Santo, Christophe; Madayiputhiya, Nandakumar; Grass, Gregor

    2011-06-01

    Metallic copper surfaces have strong antimicrobial properties and kill bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, within minutes in a process called contact killing. These bacteria are exposed to acute copper stress under dry conditions which is different from chronic copper stress in growing liquid cultures. Currently, the physiological changes of E. coli during the acute contact killing process are largely unknown. Here, a label-free, quantitative proteomic approach was employed to identify the differential proteome profiles of E. coli cells after sub-lethal and lethal exposure to dry metallic copper. Of the 509 proteins identified, 110 proteins were differentially expressed after sub-lethal exposure, whereas 136 proteins had significant differences in their abundance levels after lethal exposure to copper compared to unexposed cells. A total of 210 proteins were identified only in copper-responsive proteomes. Copper surface stress coincided with increased abundance of proteins involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis, transport and catabolism, including efflux proteins and multidrug resistance proteins. Proteins involved in translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis functions were down-regulated after contact to metallic copper. The set of changes invoked by copper surface-exposure was diverse without a clear connection to copper ion stress but was different from that caused by exposure to stainless steel. Oxidative posttranslational modifications of proteins were observed in cells exposed to copper but also from stainless steel surfaces. However, proteins from copper stressed cells exhibited a higher degree of oxidative proline and threonine modifications. PMID:21384090

  1. In silico modeling of the Menkes copper-translocating P-type ATPase 3rd metal binding domain predicts that phosphorylation regulates copper-binding.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, N A; Kuiper, M J; Dobson, R C J; Pearson, R B; Camakaris, J

    2011-06-01

    The Menkes (ATP7A) P(1B)-type ATPase is a transmembrane copper-translocating protein. It contains six similar high-affinity metal-binding domains (MBDs) in the N-terminal cytoplasmic tail that are important for sensing intracellular copper and regulating ATPase function through the transfer of copper between domains. Molecular characterization of copper-binding and transfer is predominantly dependent on NMR structures derived from E. coli expression systems. A limitation of these models is the exclusion of post-translational modifications. We have previously shown that the third copper-binding domain, MBD3, uniquely contains two phosphorylated residues: Thr-327, which is phosphorylated only in the presence of elevated copper; and Ser-339, which is constitutively phosphorylated independent of copper levels. Here, using molecular dynamic simulations, we have incorporated these phosphorylated residues into a model based on the NMR structures of MBD3. Our data suggests that constitutively phosphorylated Ser-339, which is in a loop facing the copper-binding site, may facilitate the copper transfer process by exposing the CxxC copper-binding region of MBD3. Copper-induced phosphorylation of Thr327 is predicted to stabilize this change in conformation. This offers new molecular insights into how cell signaling (phosphorylation) can affect MBD structure and dynamics and how this may in turn affect copper-binding and thus copper-translocation functions of ATP7A. PMID:21258844

  2. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Fulton, John L.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Pin, Sonia; Mei, Donghai; Schenter, Gregory K.; Govind, Niranjan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Hu, Jian Z.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-06-11

    The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the oxygen-terminated tetrahedra (Al T-sites) of zeolites determines the concentration of ion-exchange and Brnsted acid sites. As the location of the tetrahedra and the associated subtle variations in bond angles influence the acid strength, quantitative information about Al T-sites in the framework is critical to rationalize catalytic properties and to design new catalysts. A quantitative analysis is reported that uses a combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy supported by DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. To discriminate individual Al atoms, sets of ab initio EXAFS spectra for various T-sites are generated from DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations allowing quantitative treatment of the EXAFS single- and multiple-photoelectron scattering processes out to 3-4 atom shells surrounding the Al absorption center. It is observed that identical zeolite types show dramatically different Al-distributions. A preference of Al for T-sites that are part of one or more 4-member rings in the framework over those T-sites that are part of only 5- and 6-member rings in the HBEA150 sample has been determined from a combination of these methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

  3. Direct vibrational energy transfer in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugmans, Marco J. P.; Bakker, Huib J.; Lagendijk, Ad

    1996-01-01

    With two-color picosecond infrared laser spectroscopy the dynamics of O-H and O-D stretch vibrations in zeolites are investigated. Zeolites appear to be good model systems to study transfer of vibrational energy in a solid. For the O-D vibrations, transient spectral holes are burnt in the inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands by saturating the absorption with a strong pump pulse. From the spectral hole widths the homogeneous absorption linewidths are obtained. The excited population lifetimes are determined using a time-resolved pump-probe technique, and in combination with the homogeneous linewidth the pure dephasing time is revealed as well. For high concentrations of O-H oscillators the vibrational stretch excitations are found to diffuse spectrally through the inhomogeneous absorption band. This spectral diffusion process is explained by direct site-to-site transfer of the excitations due to dipole-dipole coupling (Förster transfer). The dependences of the transient spectral signals on oscillator concentration and the results of one-color polarization resolved experiments confirm this explanation. The spectral transients are satisfactorily described by simulations in which the site-to-site transfer by dipole-dipole coupling is taken into account.

  4. Gallium Zeolites for Light Paraffin Aromatization

    SciTech Connect

    Price, G.L.; Dooley, K.M.

    1999-02-10

    The primary original goal of this project was to investigate the active state of gallium-containing MFI catalysts for light paraffin aromatization, in particular the state of gallium in the active material. Our original hypothesis was that the most active and selective materials were those which contained gallium zeolitic cations, and that previously reported conditions for the activation of gallium-containing catalysts served to create these active centers. We believed that in high silica materials such as MFI, ion-exchange is most effectively accomplished with metals in their 1+ oxidation state, both because of the sparsity of the anionic ion-exchange sites associated with the zeolite, and because the large hydration shells associated with aqueous 3+ cations hinder transport. Metals such as Ga which commonly exist in higher oxidation states need to be reduced to promote ion-exchange and this is the reason that reduction of gallium-containing catalysts for light paraffin aromatization often yields a dramatic enhancement in catalytic activity. We have effectively combined reduction with ion-exchange and we term this combined process ''reductive solid-state ion-exchange''. Our hypothesis has largely been proven true, and a number of the papers we have published directly address this hypothesis.

  5. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-44 aluminosilicate zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-04-29

    A new family of aluminosilicate zeolites designated UZM-44 has been synthesized. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.k+T.sub.tAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.sub.z where "n" is the mole ratio of Na to (Al+E), M represents a metal or metals from zinc, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, "m" is the mole ratio of M to (Al+E), "k" is the average charge of the metal or metals M, T is the organic structure directing agent or agents, and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-44 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  6. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-44 aluminosilicate zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of aluminosilicate zeolites designated UZM-44 has been synthesized. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.k+T.sub.tAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.sub.z where "n" is the mole ratio of Na to (Al+E), M represents a metal or metals from zinc, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, "m" is the mole ratio of M to (Al+E), "k" is the average charge of the metal or metals M, T is the organic structure directing agent or agents, and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-44 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  7. Zeolite crystal growth in space - What has been learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, A., Jr.; Thompson, R. W.; Dixon, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    Three zeolite crystal growth experiments developed at WPI have been performed in space in last twelve months. One experiment, GAS-1, illustrated that to grow large, crystallographically uniform crystals in space, the precursor solutions should be mixed in microgravity. Another experiment evaluated the optimum mixing protocol for solutions that chemically interact ('gel') on contact. These results were utilized in setting the protocol for mixing nineteen zeolite solutions that were then processed and yielded zeolites A, X and mordenite. All solutions in which the nucleation event was influenced produced larger, more 'uniform' crystals than did identical solutions processed on earth.

  8. Method of preparing sodalite from chloride salt occluded zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, M.A.; Pereira, C.

    1997-03-18

    A method is described for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal starting with a substantially dry zeolite and sufficient glass to form leach resistant sodalite with occluded radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material. The zeolite and glass are heated to a temperature up to about 1000 K to convert the zeolite to sodalite and thereafter maintained at a pressure and temperature sufficient to form a sodalite product near theoretical density. Pressure is used on the formed sodalite to produce the required density.

  9. Alkylation of phenol with methanol on high-silica zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Agaev, A.A.; Tagrev, D.B.

    1986-06-01

    This paper presents results obtained in a study of alkylation of phenol with methanol on high-silica zeolites of the TsVM type. The results of the study of alklation at different temperatures show that at relatively low temperatures the predominant reaction product on HTsVM zeolite is anisole, the yield of which reaches 45.7-65.7%. Rise of temperature influences the isomeric composition of cresols, favoring formation of the meta isomer. It is shown that Pd cations have a beneficial effect on the activity and selectivity of zeolite catalysts inthis reaction.

  10. Accelerated crystallization of zeolites via hydroxyl free radicals.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guodong; Cheng, Peng; Yan, Wenfu; Boronat, Mercedes; Li, Xu; Su, Ji-Hu; Wang, Jianyu; Li, Yi; Corma, Avelino; Xu, Ruren; Yu, Jihong

    2016-03-11

    In the hydrothermal crystallization of zeolites from basic media, hydroxide ions (OH(-)) catalyze the depolymerization of the aluminosilicate gel by breaking the Si,Al-O-Si,Al bonds and catalyze the polymerization of the aluminosilicate anions around the hydrated cation species by remaking the Si,Al-O-Si,Al bonds. We report that hydroxyl free radicals (•OH) are involved in the zeolite crystallization under hydrothermal conditions. The crystallization processes of zeolites-such as Na-A, Na-X, NaZ-21, and silicalite-1-can be accelerated with hydroxyl free radicals generated by ultraviolet irradiation or Fenton's reagent. PMID:26965626

  11. Electrical Characteristics of Mesoporous Pure-Silica-Zeolite Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Toshiki; Yoshino, Takenobu; Cho, Yoshinori; Hata, Nobuhiro; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2007-09-01

    The dependence of the electrical characteristics of hydrothermally crystallized pure-silica-zeolite films on the water concentration in the precursor was investigated. Zeolite was crystallized in a silica-zeolite composite film after spin-coating the precursor, which was composed of tetraethylorthosilicate, tetrabutylammonium hydroxide, ethylalcohol, and deionized (DI) water, followed by calcinations at 400 °C. The results of Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy indicated that the number of Si-OH and O-H bonds decreased with an increase in the water concentration in the precursor. The dielectric constant of the film decreased with an increase in water concentration, while the leakage current increased.

  12. Hierarchical zeolites from class F coal fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitta, Pallavi

    Fly ash, a coal combustion byproduct is classified as types class C and class F. Class C fly ash is traditionally recycled for concrete applications and Class F fly ash often disposed in landfills. Class F poses an environmental hazard due to disposal and leaching of heavy metals into ground water and is important to be recycled in order to mitigate the environmental challenges. A major recycling option is to reuse the fly ash as a low-cost raw material for the production of crystalline zeolites, which serve as catalysts, detergents and adsorbents in the chemical industry. Most of the prior literature of fly ash conversion to zeolites does not focus on creating high zeolite surface area zeolites specifically with hierarchical pore structure, which are very important properties in developing a heterogeneous catalyst for catalysis applications. This research work aids in the development of an economical process for the synthesis of high surface area hierarchical zeolites from class F coal fly ash. In this work, synthesis of zeolites from fly ash using classic hydrothermal treatment approach and fusion pretreatment approach were examined. The fusion pretreatment method led to higher extent of dissolution of silica from quartz and mullite phases, which in turn led to higher surface area and pore size of the zeolite. A qualitative kinetic model developed here attributes the difference in silica content to Si/Al ratio of the beginning fraction of fly ash. At near ambient crystallization temperatures and longer crystallization times, the zeolite formed is a hierarchical faujasite with high surface area of at least 360 m2/g. This work enables the large scale recycling of class F coal fly ash to produce zeolites and mitigate environmental concerns. Design of experiments was used to predict surface area and pore sizes of zeolites - thus obviating the need for intense experimentation. The hierarchical zeolite catalyst supports tested for CO2 conversion, yielded hydrocarbons up to C9, a performance attesting the hierarchal pore structure. The preliminary techno-economic feasibility assessment demonstrates a net energy saving of 75% and cost saving of 63% compared to the commercial zeolite manufacturing process.

  13. Method of preparing sodalite from chloride salt occluded zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Michele A. (Naperville, IL); Pereira, Candido (Lisle, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal starting with a substantially dry zeolite and sufficient glass to form leach resistant sodalite with occluded radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material. The zeolite and glass are heated to a temperature up to about 1000.degree. K. to convert the zeolite to sodalite and thereafter maintained at a pressure and temperature sufficient to form a sodalite product near theoretical density. Pressure is used on the formed sodalite to produce the required density.

  14. Zeolite-filled PDMS membranes. 1. Sorption of halogenated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Vankelecom, I.F.J.; Dotermont, C.; Morobe, M.; Uytterhoeven, J.B.; Vandecasteele, C.

    1997-03-20

    Aiming at a more thorough understanding of the influence of zeolite fillers in PDMS membranes on the pervaporation of chlorinated hydrocarbons from aqueous solutions, the sorption aspect of this separation process was studied. Firstly, the sorption of water and five different chlorinated hydrocarbons was investigated in the zeolite and the polymer separately. Secondly, the composite system was considered and conclusions were drawn concerning interactions at the zeolite-polymer interphase. Finally, the sorption results obtained on the self-synthesized membranes were compared with measurements on commercially available PDMS membranes (GFT). 23 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Ion exchange with natural zeolites: an alternative for water softening?

    PubMed

    Cinar, S; Beler-Baykal, B

    2005-01-01

    Possibility of using natural zeolites for water softening was investigated. Quantitative data regarding separation of calcium from water at various levels of hardness through ion exchange with the ammonium selective natural zeolite clinoptilolite is reported. Capacity of the zeolite towards calcium removal in the presence of ammonium at low concentrations and calcium at higher concentrations, and breakthrough characteristics are presented. The results have revealed that removal of calcium, and hence hardness, through ion exchange with clinoptilolite under those circumstances is a promising alternative, with surface capacities reaching 11 mg calcium/g clinoptilolite. PMID:16114619

  16. Copper-tantalum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  17. On copper peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, L.

    1988-01-01

    The action of hydrogen superoxide on copper salts in alcoholic solutions is studied. The action of hydrogen peroxide on copper hydroxide in alcoholic suspensions, and the action of ethereal hydrogen peroxide on copper hydroxide are discussed. It is concluded that using the procedure proposed excludes almost entirely the harmful effect of hydrolysis.

  18. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  19. Evaluation of natural zeolite as microorganism support medium in nitrifying batch reactors: influence of zeolite particle size.

    PubMed

    Mery, C; Guerrero, L; Alonso-Gutirrez, J; Figueroa, M; Lema, J M; Montalvo, S; Borja, R

    2012-01-01

    An evaluation of natural zeolite as a microorganism carrier in nitrifying reactors operated in batch mode was carried out. Specifically, the influence of zeolite particle sizes of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mm in diameter on microorganism adherence to zeolite, ammonium adsorption capacity and the identification of microbial populations were assessed. The greatest amount of total biomass adhered was observed for a zeolite particle size of 1 mm (0.289 g) which was achieved on the 12th day of operation. The highest ammonium adsorption capacity was observed for a zeolite particle size of 0.5 mm, which was 64% and 31% higher than that observed for particle sizes of 1.0 and 2.0 mm, respectively. The maximum de-sorption values were also found for a zeolite particle size of 0.5 mm, although when equilibrium was reached the ammonium concentrations were similar to those observed for a zeolite particle size of 1.0 mm. It was also found that the experimental data on ammonium adsorption fitted very well to the Freundlich isotherm for the three particle sizes studied. Finally, the nitrifying reactors showed similar microbial populations independently of the particle size used as microorganism carrier. The dominant bacterial community was Gammaproteobacteria making up 80% of the total population found. Betaproteobacteria were also identified and made up 12% approx. of the total population. Ammonium Oxidant Betaproteobacteria and Nitrobacter were also detected. PMID:22320694

  20. In-situ x-ray absorption study of copper films in ground watersolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kvashnina, K.O.; Butorin, S.M.; Modin, A.; Soroka, I.; Marcellini, M.; Nordgren, J.; Guo, J.-H.; Werme, L.

    2007-10-29

    This study illustrates how the damage from copper corrosion can be reduced by modifying the chemistry of the copper surface environment. The surface modification of oxidized copper films induced by chemical reaction with Cl{sup -} and HCO{sub 3}{sup -} in aqueous solutions was monitored by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that corrosion of copper can be significantly reduced by adding even a small amount of sodium bicarbonate. The studied copper films corroded quickly in chloride solutions, whereas the same solution containing 1.1 mM HCO{sub 3}{sup -} prevented or slowed down the corrosion processes.

  1. Alkaline hydrothermal conversion of fly ash filtrates into zeolites 2: utilization in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Vernon; Petrik, Leslie; Iwuoha, Emmanuel

    2005-01-01

    Filtrates were collected using a codisposal reaction wherein fly ash was reacted with acid mine drainage. These codisposal filtrates were then analyzed by X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry for quantitative determination of the SiO2 and Al2O3 content. Alkaline hydrothermal zeolite synthesis was then applied to the filtrates to convert the fly ash material into zeolites. The zeolites formed under the experimental conditions were faujasite, sodalite, and zeolite A. The use of the fly ash-derived zeolites and a commercial zeolite was explored in wastewater decontamination experiments as it was applied to acid mine drainage in different dosages. The concentrations of Ni, Zn, Cd, As, and Pb metal ions in the treated wastewater were investigated. The results of the treatment of the acid mine drainage with the prepared fly ash zeolites showed that the concentrations of Ni, Zn, Cd, and Hg were decreased as the zeolite dosages of the fly ash zeolite (FAZ1) increased. PMID:15991728

  2. Mimicking high-silica zeolites: highly stable germanium- and tin-rich zeolite-type chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qipu; Bu, Xianhui; Mao, Chengyu; Zhao, Xiang; Sasan, Koroush; Feng, Pingyun

    2015-05-20

    High-silica zeolites, as exemplified by ZSM-5, with excellent chemical and thermal stability, have generated a revolution in industrial catalysis. In contrast, prior to this work, high-silica-zeolite-like chalcogenides based on germanium/tin remained unknown, even after decades of research. Here six crystalline high-germanium or high-tin zeolite-type sulfides and selenides with four different topologies are reported. Their unprecedented framework compositions give these materials much improved thermal and chemical stability with high surface area (Langmuir surface area of 782 m(2)/g(-1)) comparable to or better than zeolites. Among them, highly stable CPM-120-ZnGeS allows for ion exchange with diverse metal or complex cations, resulting in fine-tuning in porosity, fast ion conductivity, and photoelectric response. Being among the most porous crystalline chalcogenides, CPM-120-ZnGeS (exchanged with Cs(+) ions) also shows reversible adsorption with high capacity and affinity for CO2 (98 and 73 cm(3) g(-1) at 273 and 298 K, respectively, isosteric heat of adsorption = 40.05 kJ mol(-1)). Moreover, CPM-120-ZnGeS could also function as a robust photocatalyst for water reduction to generate H2. The overall activity of H2 production from water, in the presence of Na2S-Na2SO3 as a hole scavenger, was 200 ?mol h(-1)/(0.10 g). Such catalytic activity remained undiminished under illumination by UV light for as long as measured (200 h), demonstrating excellent resistance to photocorrosion even under intense UV radiation. PMID:25950820

  3. Molecular Chemistry in a Zeolite: Genesis of a Zeolite Y-Supported Ruthenium Complex Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, I.; Gates, B.C.

    2009-05-22

    Dealuminated zeolite Y was used as a crystalline support for a mononuclear ruthenium complex synthesized from cis-Ru(acac){sub 2}(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}. Infrared (IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra indicated that the surface species were mononuclear ruthenium complexes, Ru(acac)(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup 2+}, tightly bonded to the surface by two Ru-O bonds at Al{sup 3+} sites of the zeolite. The maximum loading of the anchored ruthenium complexes was one complex per two Al{sup 3+} sites; at higher loadings, some of the cis-Ru(acac){sub 2}(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} was physisorbed. In the presence of ethylene and H{sub 2}, the surface-bound species entered into a catalytic cycle for ethylene dimerization and operated stably. IR data showed that at the start of the catalytic reaction, the acac ligand of the Ru(acac)(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup 2+} species was dissociated and captured by an Al{sup 3+} site. Ethylene dimerization proceeded 600 times faster with a cofeed of ethylene and H{sub 2} than without H{sub 2}. These results provide evidence of the importance of the cooperation of the Al{sup 3+} sites in the zeolite and the H{sub 2} in the feed for the genesis of the catalytically active species. The results presented here demonstrate the usefulness of dealuminated zeolite Y as a nearly uniform support that allows precise synthesis of supported catalysts and detailed elucidation of their structures.

  4. Comparative study of CO{sub 2} capture by carbon nanotubes, activated carbons, and zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chungsying Lu; Hsunling Bai; Bilen Wu; Fengsheng Su; Jyh Feng Hwang

    2008-09-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), granular activated carbon (GAC), and zeolites were modified by 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTS) and were selected as adsorbents to study their physicochemical properties and adsorption behaviors of CO{sub 2} from gas streams. The surface nature of these adsorbents was changed after the modification, which make them adsorb more CO{sub 2} gases. Under the same conditions, the modified CNTs possess the greatest adsorption capacity of CO{sub 2}, followed by the modified zeolites and then the modified GAC. The mechanism of CO{sub 2} adsorption on these adsorbents appears mainly attributable to physical force, which makes regeneration of spent adsorbents at a relatively low temperature become feasible. The APTS-modified CNTs show good performance of CO{sub 2} adsorption as compared to many types of modified carbon and silica adsorbents reported in the literature. This suggests that the APTS-modified CNTs are efficient CO{sub 2} adsorbents and that they possess potential applications for CO{sub 2} capture from gas streams. 27 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Isobutane/2-butene alkylation on ultrastable Y zeolites: Influence of zeolite unit cell size

    SciTech Connect

    Corma, A.; Martinez, A.; Martinez, C. )

    1994-03-01

    The alkylation reaction of isobutane with trans-2-butene has been carried out on a series of steam-dealuminated Y zeolites with unit cell sizes ranging from 2.450 to 2.426 nm. A fixed-bed reactor connected to an automatized multiloop sampling system allowed differential product analysis from very short (1 min or less) to longer times on stream. A maximum in the initial 2-butene conversion was found on samples with unit cell sizes between 2.435 and 2.450 nm. However, the TMP/DMH ratio, i.e., the alkylation-to-oligomerization ratio, continuously increased with zeolite unit cell size. The concentration of reactants in the pores, the strength distribution of Bronsted acid sites, and the extent of hydrogen transfer reactions, which in turn depend on the framework Si/Al ratio of a given zeolite, were seen to affect activity and product distribution of the catalysts. Finally, the influence of these factors on the aging characteristics of the samples was also discussed. 17 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Uniformly microsized luminescent materials obtained through a solid state reaction of WO{sub 3} with Ln{sup 3+}-exchanged zeolite L at 700 C

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yige; Fang, Yi; Zhang, Wenjun; Zhang, Li; Chen, Yuhuan; Yu, Xiaoyan

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: We have reported the modification of Ln3+/ZL microcrystals by the tungstate-oxygen species via a solid state reaction of WO{sub 3} and Ln{sup 3+}-exchanged zeolite L at 700 C. Highlights: ? Luminescent materials were obtained from zeolite L crystals. ? The materials show characteristic luminescence of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions. ? The framework of zeolite L crystals has been kept during the annealing process. ? Energy transfer from tungstate-oxygen species to lanthanide was confirmed. - Abstract: In this work, we report the uniformly microsized luminescent materials prepared by a solid state reaction of WO{sub 3} and Ln{sup 3+}-exchanged zeolite L at 700 C. The obtained materials were investigated by SEM, XRD and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of tungstate-oxygen species on the morphology and luminescence of the materials were discussed in detail. Energy transfer from the tungstate-oxygen species to Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions have been demonstrated by the photoluminescence spectra, implying the loading of tungstate-oxygen species into the nanochannels of the crystals and the close proximity of which to Eu{sup 3+} ions.

  7. Design of composite photocatalyst of TiO2 and Y-zeolite for degradation of 2-propanol in the gas phase under UV and visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kamegawa, Takashi; Ishiguro, Yasushi; Kido, Ryota; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobic Y-zeolite (SiO2/Al2O3 = 810) and TiO2 composite photocatalysts were designed by using two different types of TiO2 precursors, i.e., titanium ammonium oxalate and ammonium hexafluorotitanate. The porous structure, surface property and state of TiO2 were investigated by various characterization techniques. By using an ammonium hexafluorotitanate as a precursor, hydrophobic modification of the Y-zeolite surface and realizing visible light sensitivity was successfully achieved at the same time after calcination at 773 K in the air. The prepared sample still maintained the porous structure of Y-zeolite and a large surface area. Highly crystalline anatase TiO2 was also formed on the Y-zeolite surface by the role of fluorine in the precursor. The usages of ammonium hexafluorotitanate were effective for the improvement of the photocatalytic performance of the composite in the degradation of 2-propanol in the gas phase under UV and visible light (? > 420 nm) irradiation. PMID:25314607

  8. Metal loaded zeolite adsorbents for hydrogen cyanide removal.

    PubMed

    Ning, Ping; Qiu, Juan; Wang, Xueqian; Liu, Wei; Chen, Wei

    2013-04-01

    Metal (Cu, Co, or Zn) loaded ZSM-5 and Y zeolite adsorbents were prepared for the adsorption of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) toxic gas. The results showed that the HCN breakthrough capacity was enhanced significantly when zeolites were loaded with Cu. The physical and chemical properties of the adsorbents that influence the HCN adsorption capacity were analyzed. The maximal HCN breakthrough capacities were about the same for both zeolites at 2.2 mol of HCN/mol of Cu. The Cu2p XPS spectra showed that the possible species present were Cu2O and CuO. The N1s XPS data and FT-IR spectra indicated that CN(-) would be formed in the presence of Cu+/Cu2+ and oxygen gas, and the reaction product could be adsorbed onto Cu/ZSM-5 zeolite more easily than HCN. PMID:23923791

  9. Comparative study of the removal of coke from protonic zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Gnep, N.S.; Roger, P.; Magnoux, P.; Guisnet, M.

    1993-12-31

    The transformation of methanol was carried out at 400{degrees}C on four protonic zeolites: USHY (framework Si/Al ratio equal to 5), HZSM5 (Si/Al = 45), two mordenites HMOR (Si/Al = 7.5) and HMORDA (Si/Al = 80) prepared by dealumination of HMOR through hydrothermal and acid treatments. The composition of coke determined through the method developed in the authors` laboratory depended slightly on the zeolite. The amount of coke removed for the zeolites through oxidative treatment was determined as function of the temperature and for various coke contents. The rate of coke removal depended slightly on the coke content and on the coke composition by very much on the zeolite. In particular the coke of HMORDA and of HZSM5 was eliminated at high temperature only.

  10. 12. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 2, ORIGINAL ZEOLITE PLANT, AT WEYMOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 2, ORIGINAL ZEOLITE PLANT, AT WEYMOUTH LOOKING WEST TO FOUNTAIN. STAIRWAY RUNS DOWN TO FILTRATION BAYS. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Dealumination of HZSM-5 zeolites. I. Calcination and hydrothermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.M.; Bibby, D.M.; Meinhold, R.H.

    1996-06-01

    The effect of calcination and hydrothermal treatments on the structure and properties of HZSM-5 zeolites with a range of aluminum contents has been investigated. Characterization of the treated zeolites was undertaken with solid-waste NMR ({sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si), infrared, nitrogen and water adsorption, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy. Both calcination and hydrothermal treatment were found to cause dealumination of the zeolite lattice and formation of extralattice aluminum species of low symmetry which remain within the pores of the zeolite. HZSM-5 with low aluminum content was found to be more resistant to dealumination by either method and the degree of dealumination was greater when steam was present in the treatment. {sup 129}Xe NMR was found to be a useful probe for the presence of extralattice aluminum in the pores of lattice dealuminated HZSM-5. 35 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. CO2 capture using zeolite 13X prepared from bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Park, Dong-Wha; Ahn, Wha-Seung

    2014-02-01

    Zeolite 13X was prepared using bentonite as the raw material by alkaline fusion followed by a hydrothermal treatment without adding any extra silica or alumina sources. The prepared zeolite 13X was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, N2-adsorption-desorption measurements, and scanning electron microscopy. The CO2 capture performance of the prepared zeolite 13X was examined under both static and flow conditions. The prepared zeolite 13X showed a high BET surface area of 688 m2/g with a high micropore volume (0.30 cm3/g), and exhibited high CO2 capture capacity (211 mg/g) and selectivity to N2 (CO2/N2 = 37) at 25 °C and 1 bar. In addition, the material showed fast adsorption kinetics, and stable CO2 adsorption-desorption recycling performance at both 25 and 200 °C.

  13. Hydrogen Adsorption in Zeolite Studied with Sievert and Thermogravimetric Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnicenoks, P.; Sivars, A.; Grinberga, L.; Kleperis, J.

    2012-08-01

    Natural clinoptilolite (mixture from clinoptilolite, quartz and muscovite) is activated with palladium and tested for hydrogen adsorption capability at temperatures RT - 200C. Thermogravimetric and volumetric methods showed that zeolite activated with palladium (1.25%wt) shows markedly high hydrogen adsorption capacity - up to 3 wt%. Lower amount of adsorbed hydrogen (~1.5 wt%) was found for raw zeolite and activated with higher amount of palladium sample. Hypothesis is proposed that the heating of zeolite in argon atmosphere forms and activates the pore structure in zeolite material, where hydrogen encapsulation (trapping) is believed to occur when cooling down to room temperature. An effect of catalyst (Pd) on hydrogen sorption capability is explained by spillover phenomena were less-porous fractions of natural clinoptilolite sample (quartz and muscovite) are involved.

  14. Zeolite containing catalyst support for denitrogenation of oil feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Angevine, P. J.; Mizrahi, S.; Oleck, S. M.; Wilson Jr., R. C.

    1985-05-28

    There is provided a zeolite containing catalyst support for denitrogenation of oil feedstocks such as shale oil. The denitrogenation catalyst contains an active hydrogenation catalyst component such as a nickel/molybdenum catalyst.

  15. Influence of the cluster formation on the zeolite crystal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnakov, Yurii A.; Mitypov, Bair B.; Petranovskii, Vitalii P.; Poborchii, Vladimir V.; Kasuya, Atsuo; Peralez Perez, Oskar J.

    1999-06-01

    Clusters of CdS were prepared inside the framework voids of zeolites NaX and chabazite by multistage ion exchange chemical reaction. It was observed that each stage of reaction affects the structure of zeolites crystals. Aluminum atoms change their coordination state at the first stage because of hydrolytic decomposition of some Al-O tetrahedral bonds. Partially reversible relaxation of aluminum atoms of zeolite framework occurs during the second stage of chemical reaction. This spontaneous transition of the coordination number of aluminum atoms took place without changing of their positions of framework atoms. Such kind of the interaction between framework atoms of alumosilicates and doping ions, which are precursors of the clusters in the zeolite hosts, give indirect information about mechanism of the `ship-in-the-bottle' synthesis of semiconductor materials.

  16. Commander Bowersox Tends to Zeolite Crystal Samples Aboard Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Expedition Six Commander Ken Bowersox spins Zeolite Crystal Growth sample tubes to eliminate bubbles that could affect crystal formation in preparation of a 15 day experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Zeolites are hard as rock, yet are able to absorb liquids and gases like a sponge. By using the ISS microgravity environment to grow better, larger crystals, NASA and its commercial partners hope to improve petroleum manufacturing and other processes.

  17. Zeolite catalysts for hdyrocracking polynuclear aromatics - phenanthrene kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Wuu, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    Three zeolite-based catalysts were tested for the hydrocracking reaction of polynuclear aromatics (phenanthrene) by using the gradientless Berty-type reactor at three different temperatures (258/sup 0/C, 281/sup 0/C, and 298/sup 0/C) and 95 atm. operating pressure. Three commercially used silica-alumina-based catalysts were also tested at the same operating conditions for the purpose of comparison. The experimental studies were made to determine the catalytic activity of three zeolite-based catalysts, the kinetic scheme of hydrocracking reaction of phenanthrene, to compare the activity of the amphorous silica-alumina catalyst and zeolite-based catalyst in the hydrocracking reaction of polynuclear aromatic compounds, and to evaluate the activity of the zeolite-based catalyst for upgrading coal-derived liquids and shale-oil derived liquids. The hydrocracking phenanthrene activity of zeolite-based catalyst is greater than that of silica-alumina-based catalysts. The hydrocracking phenanthrene activity increases with the order CoMo sulfides < Ni-Mo sulfides < Ni-W sulfides of bimetallic combinations. Ni-W/USY is the most active catalyst in all six-tested catalysts. The deactivation rate of the catalyst is minimal for the zeolite-based catalysts. On the other hand, the deactivation rate is high in the silica-alumina-based catalysts under similar operating conditions as zeolite-based catalysts. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood dual-site mechanisms is the best model to describe the hydrocracking reaction of polynuclear aromatics over zeolite-based catalysts.

  18. Zeolite synthesis from fly ash and cement kiln dust

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzeck, M.W.

    1996-12-31

    Zeolites added to portland cement paste normally undergo a pozzolanic reaction. However, if the composition of the cement is modified by blending it with fly ash, the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) that forms has a low CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio which allows it to coexist with a zeolite. In fact, if one adds alkali to the system, it then becomes possible to nucleate and grow a zeolitic phase with C-S-H. Normally zeolites that form from fly ash and NaOH include NaP-1 and analcime. But when the fly ash and NaOH are mixed with cement kiln dust, cancrinite-like phases and tobermorite form instead. This implies that a zeolite-containing monolith could be produced that would exhibit both the cation-exchange and adsorptive properties of zeolites while retaining the characteristic strength and ease of use attributable to cement based materials. These composites show promise as a new class of inexpensive cation exchange and/or chemical adsorbents that can be used for large scale applications.

  19. Characterization of Chemical Properties, Unit Cell Parameters and Particle Size Distribution of Three Zeolite Reference Materials: RM 8850 - Zeolite Y, RM 8851 - Zeolite A and RM 8852 - Ammonium ZSM-5 Zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Turner,S.; Sieber, J.; Vetter, T.; Zeisler, R.; Marlow, A.; Moreno-Ramirez, M.; Davis, M.; Kennedy, G.; Borghard, W.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Zeolites have important industrial applications including use as catalysts, molecular sieves and ion exchange materials. In this study, three zeolite materials have been characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as reference materials (RMs): zeolite Y (RM 8850), zeolite A (RM 8851) and ZSM-5 zeolite (RM 8852). They have been characterized by a variety of chemical and physical measurement methods: X-ray fluorescence (XRF), gravimetry, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), calorimetry, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, laser light extinction, laser light scattering, electric sensing zone, X-ray sedimentation, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. The chemical homogeneity of the materials has been characterized. Reference values are given for the major components (major elements, loss on ignition [LOI] and loss on fusion [LOF]), trace elements and Si/Al and Na/Al ratios. Information values are given for enthalpies of formation, unit cell parameters, particle size distributions, refractive indices and variation of mass with variation in relative humidity (RH). Comparisons are made to literature unit cell parameters. The RMs are expected to provide a basis for intercomparison studies of these zeolite materials.

  20. Nanocellulose-Zeolite Composite Films for Odor Elimination.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Neda; Mashayekhy Rad, Farshid; Mace, Amber; Ansari, Farhan; Akhtar, Farid; Nilsson, Ulrika; Berglund, Lars; Bergstrm, Lennart

    2015-07-01

    Free standing and strong odor-removing composite films of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) with a high content of nanoporous zeolite adsorbents have been colloidally processed. Thermogravimetric desorption analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy combined with computational simulations showed that commercially available silicalite-1 and ZSM-5 have a high affinity and uptake of volatile odors like ethanethiol and propanethiol, also in the presence of water. The simulations showed that propanethiol has a higher affinity, up to 16%, to the two zeolites compared with ethanethiol. Highly flexible and strong free-standing zeolite-CNF films with an adsorbent loading of 89 w/w% have been produced by Ca-induced gelation and vacuum filtration. The CNF-network controls the strength of the composite films and 100 ?m thick zeolite-CNF films with a CNF content of less than 10 vol % displayed a tensile strength approaching 10 MPa. Headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis showed that the CNF-zeolite films can eliminate the volatile thiol-based odors to concentrations below the detection ability of the human olfactory system. Odor removing zeolite-cellulose nanofibril films could enable improved transport and storage of fruits and vegetables rich in odors, for example, onion and the tasty but foul-smelling South-East Asian Durian fruit. PMID:26061093

  1. Inhibition of palm oil oxidation by zeolite nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kok-Hou; Awala, Hussein; Mukti, Rino R; Wong, Ka-Lun; Rigaud, Baptiste; Ling, Tau Chuan; Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Koleva, Iskra Z; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Mintova, Svetlana; Ng, Eng-Poh

    2015-05-13

    The efficiency of zeolite X nanocrystals (FAU-type framework structure) containing different extra-framework cations (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+)) in slowing the thermal oxidation of palm oil is reported. The oxidation study of palm oil is conducted in the presence of zeolite nanocrystals (0.5 wt %) at 150 C. Several characterization techniques such as visual analysis, colorimetry, rheometry, total acid number (TAN), FT-IR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and Karl Fischer analyses are applied to follow the oxidative evolution of the oil. It was found that zeolite nanocrystals decelerate the oxidation of palm oil through stabilization of hydroperoxides, which are the primary oxidation product, and concurrently via adsorption of the secondary oxidation products (alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters). In addition to the experimental results, periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to elucidate further the oxidation process of the palm oil in the presence of zeolite nanocrystals. The DFT calculations show that the metal complexes formed with peroxides are more stable than the complexes with alkenes with the same ions. The peroxides captured in the zeolite X nanocrystals consequently decelerate further oxidation toward formation of acids. Unlike the monovalent alkali metal cations in the zeolite X nanocrystals (K(+), Na(+), and Li(+)), Ca(2+) reduced the acidity of the oil by neutralizing the acidic carboxylate compounds to COO(-)(Ca(2+))1/2 species. PMID:25897618

  2. Nanosized zeolites as a perspective material for conductometric biosensors creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, Ivan; Soldatkin, Oleksandr; Kasap, Berna Ozansoy; Kirdeciler, Salih Kaan; Kurc, Burcu Akata; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Soldatkin, Alexei; Lagarde, Florence; Dzyadevych, Sergei

    2015-05-01

    In this work, the method of enzyme adsorption on different zeolites and mesoporous silica spheres (MSS) was investigated for the creation of conductometric biosensors. The conductometric transducers consisted of gold interdigitated electrodes were placed on the ceramic support. The transducers were modified with zeolites and MSS, and then the enzymes were adsorbed on the transducer surface. Different methods of zeolite attachment to the transducer surface were used; drop coating with heating to 200°C turned out to be the best one. Nanozeolites beta and L, zeolite L, MSS, and silicalite-1 (80 to 450 nm) were tested as the adsorbents for enzyme urease. The biosensors with all tested particles except zeolite L had good analytical characteristics. Silicalite-1 (450 nm) was also used for adsorption of glucose oxidase, acetylcholinesterase, and butyrylcholinesterase. The glucose and acetylcholine biosensors were successfully created, whereas butyrylcholinesterase was not adsorbed on silicalite-1. The enzyme adsorption on zeolites and MSS is simple, quick, well reproducible, does not require use of toxic compounds, and therefore can be recommended for the development of biosensors when these advantages are especially important.

  3. An analysis of commerical zeolite catalysts by multinuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, L.

    1990-09-21

    This work involves studying two commercial hydrocracking catalysts by solid state multinuclear NMR silicon 29 and aluminum 27 with the goal of developing a method of determining the fraction zeolite in the catalysts. The zeolite fraction is known to be one of the faujasite zeolites type X or Y. The clay matrix of the catalyst is assumed to be kaolinite. Fresh, air-exposed commercial hydrocracking catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. Sample 33351-86 was known to be a physical mixture of a Y zeolite and a clay matrix. The other catalyst, 33351-20, was composed of a faujasite zeolite grown within a clay matrix. Both were suspected of being about 20 wt % zeolite. Nothing is known about the state of pretreatment or cation exchange. A portion of each catalyst was calcined in a porcelain crucible in air at 500{degree}C for two hours with a hour heating ramp preceding and a two hour cooling ramp following calcination. 64 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Probing the dynamics of instability in zeolitic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, Neville; Meneau, Florian

    2004-08-01

    Zeolites collapse under modest pressure or temperature, their microporous structures transforming into glasses of conventional density. Using in situ synchrotron radiation diffraction methods we show how pressure and temperature-induced amorphization are equivalent processes and that these are mirrored by changes in the local structure of charge compensating cations. Evidence for a low density amorphous phase and a high density amorphous phase present during zeolite collapse emerges from small angle scattering experiments. Combining powder diffraction with increasing temperature or pressure, we find that the thermobaric characteristics for zeolite collapse have negative d T/d P slopes, consistent with increasing density during amorphization. However, this is not confined to a single melting curve but, instead, the regime extends over a significant region of T-P space. Moreover, zeolite amorphization involves depressurization and cavitation effects which can be used to set empirical boundaries for the stability of the low density amorphous phase. Within the region of zeolite instability the pressure or temperature of amorphization is found to be governed by the rate at which the stress is introducedthe more rapid this is, the higher the pressure or temperature the zeolite structure survives to. The temperature dependence of the rate of collapse is Arrhenian, suggesting that the initial low density amorphous phase has the characteristics of a superstrong liquid in contrast to the fragility of a conventionally melt quenched glass. Possibilities for creating 'perfect glasses' from the collapse of microporous crystals are discussed.

  5. Following the movement of Cu ions in a SSZ-13 zeolite during dehydration, reduction and adsorption: a combined in situ TP-XRD, XANES/DRIFTS study

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Varga, Tamas; Peden, Charles HF; Gao, Feng; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Szanyi, Janos

    2014-05-05

    Cu-SSZ-13 has been shown to possess high activity and superior N2 formation selectivity in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx under oxygen rich conditions. Here, a combination of synchrotron-based (XRD and XANES) and vibrational (DRIFTS) spectroscopy tools have been used to follow the changes in the location and coordination environment of copper ions in a Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite during calcinations, reduction with CO, and adsorption of CO and H2O. XANES spectra collected during these procedures provides critical information not only on the variation in the oxidation state of the copper species in the zeolite structure, but also on the changes in the coordination environment around these ions as they interact with the framework, and with different adsorbates (H2O and CO). Time-resolved XRD data indicate the movement of copper ions and the consequent variation of the unit cell parameters during dehydration. DRIFT spectra provide information about the adsorbed species present in the zeolite, as well as the oxidation states of and coordination environment around the copper ions. A careful analysis of the asymmetric T-O-T vibrations of the CHA framework perturbed by copper ions in different coordination environments proved to be especially informative. The results of this study will aid the identification of the location, coordination and oxidation states of copper ions obtained during in operando catalytic studies. Financial support was provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Part of this work (sample preparation) was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The EMSL is a national scientific user facility supported by the US DOE, Office of Biological and Environmental Research. PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for the US DOE by Battelle. All of the spectroscopy work reported here was carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). NSLS is a national scientific user facility supported by the US DOE.

  6. Single-site trinuclear copper oxygen clusters in mordenite for selective conversion of methane to methanol

    PubMed Central

    Grundner, Sebastian; Markovits, Monica A.C.; Li, Guanna; Tromp, Moniek; Pidko, Evgeny A.; Hensen, Emiel J.M.; Jentys, Andreas; Sanchez-Sanchez, Maricruz; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Copper-exchanged zeolites with mordenite structure mimic the nuclearity and reactivity of active sites in particulate methane monooxygenase, which are enzymes able to selectively oxidize methane to methanol. Here we show that the mordenite micropores provide a perfect confined environment for the highly selective stabilization of trinuclear copper-oxo clusters that exhibit a high reactivity towards activation of carbon–hydrogen bonds in methane and its subsequent transformation to methanol. The similarity with the enzymatic systems is also implied from the similarity of the reversible rearrangements of the trinuclear clusters occurring during the selective transformations of methane along the reaction path towards methanol, in both the enzyme system and copper-exchanged mordenite. PMID:26109507

  7. Synthesis of copper nanostructures on silica-based particles for antimicrobial organic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palza, Humberto; Delgado, Katherine; Curotto, Nicolás

    2015-12-01

    Sol-gel based silica nanoparticles of 100 nm were used to interact with copper ions from the dissolution of CuCl2 allowing the synthesis of paratacamite (Cu2(OH)3Cl) nanocrystals of around 20 nm. The method produced well dispersed copper nanostructures directly supported on the surface of the SiO2 particles and was generalized by using a natural zeolite microparticle as support with similar results. These hybrid Cu based nanoparticles released copper ions when immersed in water explaining their antimicrobial behavior against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus as measured by the minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC). Noteworthy, when these nanostructured particles were mixed with an organic coating the resulting film eliminated until a 99% of both bacteria at concentrations as low as 0.01 wt%.

  8. The local environment of Cu+ in Cu-Y zeolite and its relationship to the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Drake, Ian J; Zhang, Yihua; Briggs, Daniel; Lim, Bomyi; Chau, Tanguy; Bell, Alexis T

    2006-06-22

    Cu-exchanged Y zeolite was investigated in order to determine the location of the copper cations relative to the zeolite framework and to determine which Cu cations are active for the oxidative carbonylation of methanol to dimethyl carbonate (DMC). Cu-Y zeolite was prepared by vapor-phase exchange of H-Y with CuCl. The oxidation state, local coordination, and bond distances of Al and Cu were determined using Al K-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Complimentary information was obtained by H2 temperature-programmed reduction and by in-situ infrared spectroscopy. Cu-Y has a Cu/Al ratio of unity and very little occluded CuCl. The average Al-O and Al-Cu bond distances are 1.67 angstroms and 2.79 angstroms, respectively, and the average Cu-O and Cu-Si(Al) bond distances are 1.99 angstroms and 3.13 angstroms, respectively. All of the Cu exchanged is present as Cu+ in sites I', II, and III'. Cu-Y is active for the oxidative carbonylation of methanol, and at low reactant contact time produces DMC as the primary product. With increasing reactant contact time, DMC formation decreases in preference to the formation of dimethoxy methane (DMM) and methylformate (MF). The formation of DMM and MF is attributed to the hydrogenation of DMC and the hydrogenolysis of DMM, respectively. Observation of the catalyst under reaction conditions reveals that most of the copper cations remain as Cu+, but some oxidation of Cu+ to Cu2+ does occur. It is also concluded that only those copper cations present in site II and III' positions are accessible to the reactants, and hence are catalytically active. The dominant adsorbed species on the surface are methoxy groups, and adsorbed CO is present as a minority species. The relationship of these observations to the kinetics of DMC synthesis is discussed. PMID:16800460

  9. Utilization of zeolites synthesized from coal fly ash for the purification of acid mine waters.

    PubMed

    Moreno, N; Querol, X; Ayora, C; Pereira, C F; Janssen-Jurkovicov, M

    2001-09-01

    Two pilot plant products containing 65 and 45% NaP1 zeolite were obtained from two Spanish coal fly ashes (Narcea and Teruel Power Station, respectively). The zeolitic product obtained showed a cation exchange capacity (CEC) of 2.7 and 2.0 mequiv/g, respectively. Decontamination tests of three acid mine waters from southwestern Spain were carried out using the zeolite derived from fly ash and commercial synthetic zeolite. The results demonstrate that the zeolitic material could be employed for heavy metal uptake in the water purification process. Doses of 5-30 g of zeolite/L have been applied according on the zeolite species and the heavy metal levels. Moreover, the application of zeolites increases the pH. This causes metal-bearing solid phases to precipitate and enhances the efficiency of the decontamination process. PMID:11563657

  10. Preparation of zeolite NaA for CO2 capture from nickel laterite residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tao; Liu, Li-ying; Xiao, Penny; Che, Shuai; Wang, He-ming

    2014-08-01

    Zeolite NaA was successfully prepared from nickel laterite residue for the first time via a fusion-hydrothermal procedure. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized zeolite NaA were characterized with a range of experimental techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. It was revealed that the structures of the produced zeolites were dependent on the molar ratios of the reactants and hydrothermal reaction conditions, so the synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain pure zeolite NaA. Adsorption of nitrogen and carbon dioxide on the prepared zeolite NaA was also measured and analyzed. The results showed that zeolite NaA could be prepared with reasonable purity, it had physicochemical properties comparable with zeolite NaA made from other methods, and it had excellent gas adsorption properties, thus demonstrating that zeolite NaA could be prepared from nickel laterite residue.

  11. Reaction of propionaldehyde over Rh-Y zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, N.; Takizawa, M.; Sato, Y.

    1986-03-01

    During the desorption of propionaldehyde from the Rh-Y zeolite into a He-CO(10%) stream, the concentration of propionaldehyde decreased with desorption time. n-Propanol formation was enhanced in the desorption of propionaldehyde into a He-H/sub 2/(10%) stream, while no appreciable enhancement was observed in the desorption into a He-H/sub 2/(10%)-CO(10%) stream. A faster decrease in the concentration of propionaldehyde was observed during the desorption into a helium stream than the desorption into the He-CO stream. In the desorption into the helium stream, formation of pentene was observed. However, no formation of pentene was observed in the desorption into a He-C/sub 2/H/sub 4/(10%) stream. In the desorption into a He-C/sub 3/H/sub 6/(10%) stream, the rate of pentene formation was lower than that in the desorption into the helium stream. These results suggest that the pentene is not formed by ethylene-propylene codimerization. The reduced RhCl/sub 3//SiO/sub 2/ catalyst which was physically mixed with the Na-Y zeolite showed comparable activity for pentene formation to that of Rh-Y zeolite in the reaction of propionaldehyde. However, neither the RhCl/sub 3//SiO/sub 2/ catalyst nor the Na-Y zeolite was effective by itself for pentene formation. The reduced RhCl/sub 3//SiO/sub 2/ and Rh-Y zeolite catalysts also showed activity for pentene formation in the reaction of 2-methyl-2-pentenal which is the product of aldol condensation of propionaldehyde. On the basis of the results, two sequential reactions, aldol condensation of propionaldehyde by the zeolite support followed by decarbonylation of 2-methyl-2-pentenal by rhodium metal particles, are proposed as a reaction path for the formation of pentene over the Rh-Y zeolite.

  12. Synthesis of mesoporous zeolite single crystals with cheap porogens

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Haixiang; Li Changlin; Ren Jiawen; Wang Yanqin; Lu Guanzhong

    2011-07-15

    Mesoporous zeolite (silicalite-1, ZSM-5, TS-1) single crystals have been successfully synthesized by adding soluble starch or sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to a conventional zeolite synthesis system. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen sorption analysis, {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 27}Al MAS NMR), temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH{sub 3}-TPD) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis). The SEM images clearly show that all zeolite crystals possess the similar morphology with particle size of about 300 nm, the TEM images reveal that irregular intracrystal pores are randomly distributed in the whole crystal. {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra indicate that nearly all of the Al atoms are in tetrahedral co-ordination in ZSM-5, UV-vis spectra confirm that nearly all of titanium atoms are incorporated into the framework of TS-1. The catalytic activity of meso-ZSM-5 in acetalization of cyclohexanone and meso-TS-1 in hydroxylation of phenol was also studied. The synthesis method reported in this paper is cost-effective and environmental friendly, can be easily expended to prepare other hierarchical structured zeolites. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous zeolite single crystals were synthesized by using cheap porogens as template. Highlights: > Mesoporous zeolite (silicalite-1, ZSM-5, TS-1) single crystals were synthesized. > Soluble starch or sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was used as porogens. > The mesoporous zeolites had connected mesopores although closed pores existed. > Higher catalytic activities were obtained.

  13. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, Henry

    1993-01-01

    A process for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.

  14. ZEOLITE PERFORMANCE AS AN ANION EXCHANGER FOR ARSENIC SEQUESTRATION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their use in ion exchange and acid catalysis reactions. The use of zeolites in anion or ligand exchange reactions is less studied. The NH4+ form of zeolite Y (NY6, Faujasite) has been tested in this work to evaluate its performance for arsenic removal...

  15. Framework Stabilization of Si-Rich LTA Zeolite Prepared in Organic-Free Media

    SciTech Connect

    Conato, Marlon T.; Oleksiak, Matthew D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Motkuri, Radha K.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2014-10-16

    Zeolite HOU-2 (LTA type) is prepared with the highest silica content (Si/Al = 2.1) reported for Na-LTA zeolites without the use of an organic structure-directing agent. The rational design of Si-rich zeolites has the potential to improve their thermal stability for applications in catalysis, gas storage, and selective separations.

  16. Properties of Zeolite A Obtained from Powdered Laundry Detergent: An Undergraduate Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smoot, Alison L.; Lindquist, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Presents experiments that introduce students to the myriad properties of zeolites using the sodium form of zeolite A (Na-A) from laundry detergent. Experiments include extracting Na-A from detergent, water softening properties, desiccant properties, ion-exchange properties, and Zeolite HA as a dehydration catalyst. (JRH)

  17. UTILITY OF SYNTHETIC ZEOLITES IN REMOVAL OF INORGANIC AND ORGANIC WATER POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange and adsorption properties. Different inorganic and organic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature using various zeolites. Synthetic zeolites like ZSM-5, Ferrierite, Beta and Faujasite Y have been used to remove i...

  18. Micro/macroporous system: MFI-type zeolite crystals with embedded macropores.

    PubMed

    Machoke, Albert G; Beltrn, Ana M; Inayat, Alexandra; Winter, Benjamin; Weissenberger, Tobias; Kruse, Nadine; Gttel, Robert; Spiecker, Erdmann; Schwieger, Wilhelm

    2015-02-01

    Zeolite crystals with an embedded and interconnected macropore system are prepared by using mesoporous silica particles as a silica source and as a sacrificial macroporogen. These novel hierarchical zeolite crystals are expected to reduce diffusion limitations in all zeolite-catalyzed reactions, especially in the transformation of larger molecules like in the catalytic cracking of polymers and the conversion of biomass. PMID:25535114

  19. Zeolites in catalysis. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the preparation, properties, and activity of zeolites used as catalysts in chemical reactions and chemical apparatus. Topics include catalytic cracking, reduction, processing, and various catalytic effects of zeolites and zeolite-containing compounds for a wide variety of applications. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Zeolite Membrane for Dehydration of Isopropylalcohol-Water Mixture by Vapor Permeation.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Ken-ichi; Furuhata, Taisuke; Sekine, Yasushi; Kikuchi, Eiichi; Subramanian, Bharathi; Matsukata, Masahiko

    2015-07-01

    Highly stable FAU-type zeolite membrane for the separation of isopropanol (IPA)-water mixture by pervaporation is described. FAU membrane showed high water permselectivity and permeance. Comparison of FAU membrane with a conventional LTA-type zeolite membrane revealed superior stability of FAU zeolite membrane in a mixture containing a large water content. PMID:26076213

  1. Properties of Zeolite A Obtained from Powdered Laundry Detergent: An Undergraduate Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, David A.; Smoot, Alison L.

    1997-05-01

    Zeolites, crystalline porous aluminosilicates, are valued for their ability to absorb ions and molecules as well as function as catalysts. A number of laboratory experiments using zeolites filtered from a suspension of powdered laundry detergent are described. The various experiments illustrate the myriad uses of zeolites as desiccants, ion exchange materials, and catalysts.

  2. The use Na, Li, K cations for modification of ZSM-5 zewolite to control hydrocarbon cold-start emission

    SciTech Connect

    Golubeva V.; Rohatgi U.; Korableva, A.; Anischenko, O.; Kustov, L.; Nissenbaum, V; Viola, M.B.

    2012-08-29

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling hydrocarbon emissions from cold-start of engines by investigating the adsorbents which could adsorb the hydrocarbons at cold temperatures and hold them to 250-300 ?. The materials, that has been studied, are based on the modification of ZSM-5 (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 35) zeolite with Li, K, Na cations. It has been shown that the introduction of Li, Na and K in an amount that is equivalent to the content of Al in zeolite results in occurrence of toluene temperature desorption peaks at high-temperatures. The toluene temperature desorption curves for 5%Li-ZSM-5 and 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolites are identical and have peak toluene desorption rate between 200 to 400 ?. Upon analysis of toluene adsorption isotherms for 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 and 5%Li-ZSM-5, it was concluded that the toluene diffusion inside of the modified zeolites channels is extremely slow and the sorption capacity of 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 is higher than with 5%Li-ZSM-5. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 didn't change toluene temperature programmed desorption (TPD) rate of curve after the treatment in environment with 10% ?{sub 2}? at 750-800 ? for about 28 h. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolite is very promising as adsorbent to control the cold-start hydrocarbon emissions.

  3. One-pot synthesis of hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicates for selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Haiyan; Yuan, Pei; Yu, Chengzhong; Bao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Iron-modified ZSM-5 zeolites (FeZSM-5s) have been considered to be a promising catalyst system to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, one of the most important global environmental issues, but their synthesis faces enormous economic and environmental challenges. Herein we report a cheap and green strategy to fabricate hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicate minerals via a nanoscale depolymerization-reorganization method. Our strategy is featured by neither using any aluminum-, silicon-, or iron-containing inorganic chemical nor involving any mesoscale template and any post-synthetic modification. Compared with the conventional FeZSM-5 synthesized from inorganic chemicals with the similar Fe content, the resulting hierarchical FeZSM-5 with highly-dispersed iron species showed superior catalytic activity in the selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3. PMID:25791958

  4. One-pot synthesis of hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicates for selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Haiyan; Yuan, Pei; Yu, Chengzhong; Bao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Iron-modified ZSM-5 zeolites (FeZSM-5s) have been considered to be a promising catalyst system to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, one of the most important global environmental issues, but their synthesis faces enormous economic and environmental challenges. Herein we report a cheap and green strategy to fabricate hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicate minerals via a nanoscale depolymerization-reorganization method. Our strategy is featured by neither using any aluminum-, silicon-, or iron-containing inorganic chemical nor involving any mesoscale template and any post-synthetic modification. Compared with the conventional FeZSM-5 synthesized from inorganic chemicals with the similar Fe content, the resulting hierarchical FeZSM-5 with highly-dispersed iron species showed superior catalytic activity in the selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3. PMID:25791958

  5. Improved Electroformed Structural Copper and Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Hudson, W.; Babcock, B.; Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electroforming offers a superior means for fabricating internally cooled heat exchangers and structures subjected to thermal environments. Copper is deposited from many such applications because of the good thermal conductivity. It suffers from mediocre yield strength as a structural material and loses mechanical strength at intermediate temperatures. Mechanical properties similar to those of electroformed nickel are desired. Phase 1 examined innovative means to improve deposited copper structural performance. Yield strengths as high as 483 MPa (70 ksi) were obtained with useful ductility while retaining a high level of purity essential to good thermal conductivity. Phase 2 represents a program to explore new additive combinations in copper electrolytes to produce a more fine, equiaxed grain which can be thermally stabilized by other techniques such as alloying in modest degrees and dispersion strengthening. Evaluation of new technology - such as the codeposition of fullerness (diamond-like) particles were made to enhance thermal conductivity in low alloys. A test fire quality tube-bundle engine was fabricated using these copper property improvement concepts to show the superiority of the new coppers and fabrications methods over competitive technologies such as brazing and plasma deposition.

  6. Fabrication of zeolite/polymer multilayer composite membranes for carbon dioxide capture: Deposition of zeolite particles on polymer supports.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanian, Kartik; Severance, Michael A; Dutta, Prabir K; Ho, W S Winston

    2015-08-15

    Membranes, due to their smaller footprint and potentially lower energy consumption than the amine process, offer a promising route for post-combustion CO2 capture. Zeolite Y based inorganic selective layers offer a favorable combination of CO2 permeance and CO2/N2 selectivity, membrane properties crucial to the economics. For economic viability on large scale, we propose to use flexible and scalable polymer supports for inorganic selective layers. The work described in this paper developed a detailed protocol for depositing thin zeolite Y seed layers on polymer supports, the first step in the synthesis of a polycrystalline zeolite Y membrane. We also studied the effects of support surface morphology (pore size and surface porosity) on the quality of deposition and identified favorable supports for the deposition. Two different zeolite Y particles with nominal sizes of 200 nm and 40 nm were investigated. To obtain a complete coverage of zeolite particles on the support surface with minimum defects and in a reproducible manner, a vacuum-assisted dip-coating technique was developed. Images obtained using both digital camera and optical microscope showed the presence of color patterns on the deposited surface which suggested that the coverage was complete. Electron microscopy revealed that the particle packing was dense with some drying cracks. Layer thickness with the larger zeolite Y particles was close to 1 μm while that with the smaller particles was reduced to less than 0.5 μm. In order to reduce drying cracks for layers with smaller zeolite Y particles, thickness was reduced by lowering the dispersion concentration. Transport measurement was used as an additional technique to characterize these layers. PMID:25950846

  7. SO2 REMOVAL FROM FLUE GASES USING UTILITY SYNTHESIZED ZEOLITES

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL GRUTZECK

    1998-10-31

    It is well known that natural and synthetic zeolites (molecular sieves) can adsorb gaseous SO2 from flue gas and do it more efficiently than lime based scrubbing materials. Unfortunately their cost ($500-$800 per ton) has deterred their use in this capacity. It is also known that zeolites are easy to synthesize from a variety of natural and man-made materials. The overall objective of the current work has been to evaluate the feasibility of having a utility synthesize its own zeolites, on-site, from fly ash and other recycled materials and then use these zeolites to adsorb SO2 from their flue gases. Work to date has shown that the efficiency of the capture process is related to the degree of crystallinity and the type of zeolite that forms in the samples. Normally, those samples cured at 150C contained a greater proportion of zeolite and as such were more SO2 adsorptive than their low-temperature counterparts. However, in order for the project to be successful, on site synthesis must remain an option, i.e. _100C synthesis. In light of this, the experimental focus now has two aspects. First, compositions of the starting materials are being altered by blending the current suite of fly ashes with other fly ashes, ground glass cullet and silica fume to promote the formation and growth of well crystallized and highly adsorptive zeolites. Second, greater degrees of reaction at significantly lower temperatures are being promote by ball milling the fly ash prior to use, by the use of more concentrated caustic solutions, and by the addition of zeolite seeds to the reactants. In all cases studies will focus on the effect of structure type and degree of conversion on SO2 adsorption. Future work will concentrate on the study of the effect of weathering on the suitability of converting fly ash into zeolites. This is an especially important study, considering the acres of fly ash now in storage throughout the country.

  8. SO2 REMOVAL FROM FLUE GASES USING UTILITY SYNTHESIZED ZEOLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Grutzeck

    1999-04-30

    It is well known that natural and synthetic zeolites (molecular sieves) can adsorb gaseous SO{sub 2} from flue gas and do it more efficiently than lime based scrubbing materials. Unfortunately their cost ($500-$800 per ton) has deterred their use in this capacity. It is also known that zeolites are easy to synthesize from a variety of natural and man-made materials. The overall objective of the current work has been to evaluate the feasibility of having a utility synthesize its own zeolites, on-site, from fly ash and other recycled materials and then use these zeolites to adsorb SO{sub 2} from their flue gases. Work to date has shown that the efficiency of the capture process is related to the degree of crystallinity and the type of zeolite that forms in the samples. Normally, those samples cured at 150 C contained a greater proportion of zeolite and as such were more SO{sub 2} adsorptive than their low-temperature counterparts. However, in order for the project to be successful, on site synthesis must remain an option, i.e. 100 C synthesis. In light of this, the experimental focus now has two aspects. First, compositions of the starting materials are being altered by blending the current suite of fly ashes with ground glass cullet and silica fume to promote the formation and growth of well crystallized and highly adsorptive zeolites. Second, greater degrees of reaction at significantly lower temperatures are being promote by ball milling the fly ash prior to use, by the use of more concentrated caustic solutions, and by the addition of zeolite seeds to the reactants. In all cases studies will focus on the effect of structure type and degree of conversion on SO{sub 2} adsorption. Future work will concentrate on the study of the effect of weathering on the suitability of converting fly ash into zeolites. This is an especially important study, considering the acres of fly ash now in storage throughout the US.

  9. Copper Delivery by Metallochaperone Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Copper is an essential element in all living organisms, serving as a cofactor for many important proteins and enzymes. Metallochaperone proteins deliver copper ions to specific physiological partners by direct protein-protein interactions. The Atx1-like chaperones transfer copper to intracellular copper transporters, and the CCS chaperones shuttle copper to copper,zinc superoxide dismutase. Crystallographic studies of these two copper chaperone families have provided insights into metal binding and target recognition by metallochaperones and have led to detailed molecular models for the copper transfer mechanism.

  10. Use of synthetic zeolites for arsenate removal from pollutant water.

    PubMed

    Shevade, Siddhesh; Ford, Robert G

    2004-01-01

    Arsenic is known to be a hazardous contaminant in drinking water that causes arsenical dermatitis and skin cancer. In the present work, the potential use of a variety of synthetic zeolites for removal of arsenic from water below the current and proposed EPA MCL has been examined at room temperature. Experiments have been conducted to examine the extent of arsenic removal as a function of pH. The effect of initial arsenic concentration and liquid to solid ratio in the batch reactions has also been studied. Zeolite NH4+/Y (NY6) showed significant arsenate removal capacity over a wide initial pH range of 2-12. Zeolite NY6 achieved this performance by buffering the initial pH to within a range of 3.5 < pH < 7 where uptake of arsenate onto aluminol surface groups is at a maximum. The high aluminum content of NY6 (i.e. low Si/Al ratio) was an important factor governing the improved performance of this zeolite relative to other tested zeolites with higher Si/Al ratio. The pH buffering capacity of NY6 could lead to savings in cost and process time for industrial effluent treatment due to avoidance of a pH pre-conditioning step prior to arsenate removal. PMID:15276735

  11. Cadmium adsorption on vermiculite, zeolite and pumice: batch experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Panuccio, Maria Rosaria; Sorgon, Agostino; Rizzo, Marcella; Cacco, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Batch experiments were performed to evaluate the combined effects of ionic activity, pH, and contact time on the cadmium sorption in three different minerals, vermiculite, zeolite, and pumice, commonly employed as substrata in nurseries and recently considered for their potential use in remediation methods. The extent of cadmium sorption was vermiculite>zeolite>pumice, as shown by the Langmuir and Freundlich parameters, and it was highly dependent on mineral characteristics. The percentage of cadmium sorption in zeolite and vermiculite did not depend on cadmium concentration, while in pumice this percentage was positively correlated to the initial cadmium concentration. At low cadmium concentrations (30-120 microM), the metal sorbed on zeolite was mainly present in the nonexchangeable form (70%) at levels much higher than those found for vermiculite and pumice. The primary variable responsible for determination of cadmium mobility in these minerals was confirmed to be pH. The ionic concentrations of Hoagland nutrient solution were significantly modified by both pH and mineral composition, while the presence of cadmium caused no changes. With vermiculite and zeolite, the time-course of cadmium sorption was related to mineral composition to a greater extent than to cadmium concentration. While with pumice, the percentage of cadmium sorbed after 6 weeks was lower than with the other two minerals, and it was inversely correlated to the initial cadmium concentration. PMID:18082309

  12. Catalytic activities of zeolite compounds for decomposing aqueous ozone.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Ai; Kitayama, Mikito; Ohta, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP), chemical oxidation using aqueous ozone in the presence of appropriate catalysts to generate highly reactive oxygen species, offers an attractive option for removing poorly biodegradable pollutants. Using the commercial zeolite powders with various Si/Al ratios and crystal structures, their catalytic activities for decomposing aqueous ozone were evaluated by continuously flowing ozone to water containing the zeolite powders. The hydrophilic zeolites (low Si/Al ratio) with alkali cations in the crystal structures were found to possess high catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. The hydrophobic zeolite compounds (high Si/Al ratio) were found to absorb ozone very well, but to have no catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Their catalytic activities were also evaluated by using the fixed bed column method. When alkali cations were removed by acid rinsing or substituted by alkali-earth cations, the catalytic activities was significantly deteriorated. These results suggest that the metal cations on the crystal surface of the hydrophilic zeolite would play a key role for catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. PMID:25078817

  13. Risk assessment for the transportation of radioactive zeolite liners

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The risk is estimated for the shipment of radioactive zeolite liners in support of the Zeolite Vitrification Demonstration Program currently underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. This program will establish the feasibility of zeolite vitrification as an effective means of immobilizing high-specific-activity wastes. In this risk assessment, it is assumed that two zeolite liners, each loaded around July 1, 1981 to 60,000 Ci, will be shipped by truck around January 1, 1982. However, to provide a measure of conservatism, each liner is assumed to initially hole 70,000 Ci, with the major radioisotopes as follow: /sup 90/Sr = 3000 Ci, /sup 134/Cs = 7000 Ci, /sup 137/Cs = 60,000 Ci. Should shipment take place with essentially no delay after initial loading (regardless of loading date), the shipment loading would be only 2.7% higher than that for the assumed six-month delay. This would negligibly affect the overall risk. As a result of this risk assessment, it is concluded that the transport of the radioactive zeolite liners from TMI to PNL by truck can be conducted at an insignificant level of risk to the public.

  14. Phenol removal from wastewater by adsorption on zeolitic composite.

    PubMed

    Bizerea Spiridon, Otilia; Preda, Elena; Botez, Alexandru; Pitulice, Laura

    2013-09-01

    It is well known that adsorption is an efficient method of removal of various pollutants from wastewater. The present study examines the phenol removal from water by adsorption on a new material, based on zeolitic volcanic tuff. This compound contains zeolitic tuff and cellulose, another known adsorbent, in a mass ratio of 4 to 1. The performances of the new adsorbent composite were compared with those of a widely used adsorbent material, zeolitic volcanic tuff. The adsorbent properties were tested on batch synthetic solutions containing 1-10mgL(-1) (1-10ppm) phenol, at room temperature without pH adjustment. The influence of the adsorbent dose, pH and contact time on the removal degree of phenol from water was investigated. The experimental data were modeled using the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin adsorption isotherms. The Langmuir model was found to best represent our data revealing a monolayer adsorption with a maximum adsorption capacity between 0.12 and 0.53mgg(-1) at 25C, for 2.00g of adsorbent, depending on the initial phenol concentration. The adsorption kinetic study was performed using a pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order kinetic models illustrating that phenol adsorption on zeolite composite is well described by pseudo-first kinetic equations. Our results indicated that phenol adsorption on the new adsorbent composite is superior to that on the classic zeolite. PMID:23589237

  15. Zeolites for the selective adsorption of sulfur hexafluoride.

    PubMed

    Matito-Martos, I; lvarez-Ossorio, J; Gutirrez-Sevillano, J J; Doblar, M; Martin-Calvo, A; Calero, S

    2015-07-21

    Molecular simulations have been used to investigate at the molecular level the suitability of zeolites with different topology on the adsorption, diffusion and separation of a nitrogen-sulfur hexafluoride mixture containing the latter at low concentration. This mixture represents the best alternative for the sulfur hexafluoride in industry since it reduces the use of this powerful greenhouse gas. A variety of zeolites are tested with the aim to identify the best structure for the recycling of sulfur hexafluoride in order to avoid its emission to the atmosphere and to overcome the experimental difficulties of its handling. Even though all zeolites show preferential adsorption of sulfur hexafluoride, we identified local structural features that reduce the affinity for sulfur hexafluoride in zeolites such as MOR and EON, providing exclusive adsorption sites for nitrogen. Structures such as ASV and FER were initially considered as good candidates based on their adsorption features. However, they were further discarded based on their diffusion properties. Regarding operation conditions for separation, the range of pressure that spans from 3 10(2) to 3 10(3) kPa was identified as the optimal to obtain the highest adsorption loading and the largest SF6/N2 selectivity. Based on these findings, zeolites BEC, ITR, IWW, and SFG were selected as the most promising materials for this particular separation. PMID:26099734

  16. Bendable Zeolite Membranes: Synthesis and Improved Gas Separation Performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Ho, W S Winston; Figueroa, Jose D; Dutta, Prabir K

    2015-06-23

    Separation and sequestration of CO2 emitted from fossil energy fueled electric generating units and industrial facilities will help in reducing anthropogenic CO2, thereby mitigating its adverse climate change effects. Membrane-based gas separation has the potential to meet the technical challenges of CO2 separation if high selectivity and permeance with low costs for large-scale manufacture are realized. Inorganic zeolite membranes in principle can have selectivity and permeance considerably higher than polymers. This paper presents a strategy for zeolite growth within the pores of a polymer support, with crystallization time of an hour. With a thin coating of 200-300 nm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on the zeolite-polymer composite, transport data for CO2/N2 separation indicate separation factors of 35-45, with CO2 permeance between 1600 and 2200 GPU (1 GPU = 3.35 10(-10) mol/(m(2) s Pa)) using dry synthetic mixtures of CO2 and N2 at 25 C. The synthesis process results in membranes that are highly reproducible toward transport measurements and exhibit long-term stability (3 days). Most importantly, these membranes because of the zeolite growth within the polymer support, as contrasted to conventional zeolite growth on top of a support, are mechanically flexible. PMID:26030505

  17. Graphene synthesis and characterization on copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsin, Ali

    Graphene, two dimensional sheet of carbon atoms has recently gained attention as some of its properties are promising for electronics applications e.g. higher mobility that translates to higher operating frequency for devices geared towards radio frequency applications. Excellent optical transmittance combined with its semi metallic behavior makes it an important material for transparent contacts in solar cells. To bring graphene to the production level, synthesis methods are needed for its growth on wafer scale. It has been shown that chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is one of the techniques that can potentially synthesize wafer scale graphene. Recently copper has gained popularity as an important substrate material for graphene growth due to its lower carbon solubility, which allows better control over number of graphene layers. Here we report optimization of graphene growth on copper foils with our home made atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) setup. Graphene growth on copper under APCVD was non self-limiting similar to other reports. It was found that apart from growth parameters surface texture plays a very important role in graphene growth. In fact, few layer and bilayer graphene were obtained on the regions where copper surface was not uniform, confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. To improve copper surface texture thin layer of copper film was evaporated by electron beam evaporation before the graphene growth process. After this modification, monolayer graphene was obtained on areas as large as 300 microm x 300 microm confirmed by Raman area maps. Graphene transfer procedure was also optimized so that graphene on metal surface could be transferred to insulating substrate.

  18. COPPER RESEARCH UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides an update and overview of new research results and remaining research needs with respect to copper corrosion control issues. The topics to be covered include: occurrence of elevated copper release in systems that meet the Action Level; impact of water c...

  19. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  20. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-10-07

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and shown to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  1. Mechanical durability of superhydrophobic and oleophobic copper meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Linting; Yang, Jin; Tang, Yongcai; Chen, Lin; Liu, Can; Tang, Hua; Li, Changsheng

    2014-10-01

    We developed a simple and inexpensive method to prepare the superhydrophobic and oleophobic copper meshes with rough structures fabrication and chemical modification. The achieved surfaces displayed liquid-repellent toward water and several organic liquids (such as hexadecane), which possessed much lower surface tension than that of water. Liquid repellency of the fabricated superhydrophobic copper mesh was demonstrated by visible experiment results and contact angle measurements. Even if the superhydrophobic copper mesh was rolled up, it still kept the superhydrophobicity. The mechanical durability was investigated by finger touch and mechanical abrasion tests. The results indicated that the copper mesh can maintain its superhydrophobicity against an abrasion length of 300 cm under a high pressure (77.2 kPa). The superhydrophobicity and oleophobicity, combined with mechanical durability, would promote the superhydrophobic surface to practical application in industry in the future.

  2. Synthesis of chiral polymorph A-enriched zeolite Beta with an extremely concentrated fluoride route

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Mingquan; Zhang, Daliang; Fan, Weibin; Xu, Jun; Zhu, Liangkui; Guo, Wen; Yan, Wenfu; Yu, Jihong; Qiu, Shilun; Wang, Jianguo; Deng, Feng; Xu, Ruren

    2015-01-01

    Chiral zeolitic materials with intrinsically chiral frameworks are highly desired because they can combine both shape selectivity and enantioselectivity. In the field of zeolite, the synthesis of chiral polymorph A of zeolite Beta or chiral polymorph A-enriched zeolite Beta is one of the biggest challenges. We demonstrate here a generalized extremely concentrated fluoride route for the synthesis of chiral polymorph A-enriched zeolite Beta in the presence of five achiral organic structure-directing agents. The polymorph A-enriched Ti-Beta shows a higher enantioselectivity for the asymmetric epoxidation of alkenes than the normal Ti-Beta. PMID:26096214

  3. Selective sensing of alcohols in water influenced by chemically Zeolite coatings on optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Marziyeh; Hill, Matthew R.; Duke, Mikel; Sidiroglou, Fotios; Collins, Stephen F.

    2014-05-01

    The application of a MFI type zeolite coating on the end of an optical fiber is presented. Zeolite coatings were directly grown on the freshly cleaved endface of optical fibers. It was found that the produced integrated zeolite-fiber sensors exhibit specific chemical sensitivity towards certain chemicals. The molecular adsorption induced change of zeolite refractive index was studied to understand the sensing mechanisms of the developed sensor system. This work can lead to a new class of portable zeolite thin film enabled miniaturized fiber optic sensors.

  4. Direct Dual-Template Synthesis of MWW Zeolite Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Margarit, Vicente J; Martínez-Armero, Marta E; Navarro, M Teresa; Martínez, Cristina; Corma, Avelino

    2015-11-01

    A two-dimensional zeolite with the topology of MWW sheets has been obtained by direct synthesis with a combination of two organic structure-directing agents. The resultant material consists of approximately 70% single and double layers and displays a well-structured external surface area of about 300 m(2) g(-1). The delaminated zeolite prepared by means of this single-step synthetic route has a high delamination degree, and the structural integrity of the MWW layers is well preserved. The new zeolite material displayed excellent activity, selectivity, and stability when used as a catalyst for the alkylation of benzene with propylene and found to be superior to the catalysts that are currently used for producing cumene. PMID:26381669

  5. Thermal transpiration in zeolites: A mechanism for motionless gas pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Naveen K.; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2008-11-01

    We explore the use of a naturally occurring zeolite, clinoptilolite, for a chip-scale, thermal transpiration-based gas pump. The nanopores in clinoptilolite enable the required free-molecular flow, even at atmospheric pressure. The pump utilizes a foil heater located between zeolite disks in a plastic package. A 2.3mm thick zeolite disk generates a typical gas flow rate of 6.610-3 cc/min-cm2 with an input power of <300mW/cm2. The performance is constrained by imperfections in clinoptilolite, which provide estimated leakage apertures of 10.2-13.5?m/cm2 of flow cross section. The transient response of the pump is studied to quantify nonidealities.

  6. Modeling and Analysis on Pervaporation Separation of Composite Zeolite Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Stewart

    Pervaporation is a membrane separation technology that has had industrial application and which is the subject of ongoing research. Two major factors are important in judging the quality of a membrane: selectivity and permeation flux. Although many types of materials can be used for the separation layer, zeolites will be the material considered in this thesis. A simple mathematical model has been developed to demonstrate the inter-relationships between relative permeation flux, reduced selectivity, and the relative resistance to mass transfer of the support to the zeolite layer. The model was applied to several membranes from our laboratory and to two examples from the literature. The model offers a useful way of conceptualizing membrane performance and facilitates the comparison of different membrane performances. The model predicts the effect of different supports on zeolite supported membrane performance.

  7. The rheology of collapsing zeolites amorphized by temperature and pressure.

    PubMed

    Greaves, G N; Meneau, F; Sapelkin, A; Colyer, L M; ap Gwynn, I; Wade, S; Sankar, G

    2003-09-01

    Low-density zeolites collapse to the rigid amorphous state at temperatures that are well below the melting points of crystals of the same composition but of conventional density. Here we show, by using a range of experimental techniques, how the phenomenon of amorphization is time dependent, and how the dynamics of order-disorder transitions in zeolites under temperature and pressure are equivalent. As a result, thermobaric regions of instability can be charted, which are indicative of polyamorphism. Moreover, the boundaries of these zones depend on the rate at which temperature or pressure is ramped. By directly comparing the rheology of collapse with structural relaxation in equivalent melts, we conclude that zeolites amorphize like very strong liquids and, if compression occurs slowly, this is likely to lead to the synthesis of perfect glasses. PMID:12942072

  8. The rheology of collapsing zeolites amorphized by temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, G. N.; Meneau, F.; Sapelkin, A.; Colyer, L. M.; Ap Gwynn, I.; Wade, S.; Sankar, G.

    2003-09-01

    Low-density zeolites collapse to the rigid amorphous state at temperatures that are well below the melting points of crystals of the same composition but of conventional density. Here we show, by using a range of experimental techniques, how the phenomenon of amorphization is time dependent, and how the dynamics of order-disorder transitions in zeolites under temperature and pressure are equivalent. As a result, thermobaric regions of instability can be charted, which are indicative of polyamorphism. Moreover, the boundaries of these zones depend on the rate at which temperature or pressure is ramped. By directly comparing the rheology of collapse with structural relaxation in equivalent melts, we conclude that zeolites amorphize like very strong liquids and, if compression occurs slowly, this is likely to lead to the synthesis of perfect glasses.

  9. Optical spectra of noble metal nanoparticles supported on zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lpez Bastidas, Catalina; Smolentseva, Elena; Machorro, Roberto; Petranovskii, Vitalii

    2014-09-01

    Optical spectra of noble metal nano-particles supported on different types of zeolites are studied and compared. The absorbance spectra of Cu, Ag and Au nanoparticles supported on mordenite, ?-zeolite, Na/Y and H/Y zeolites respectively are reported. Spectra for pre-exchanged Au-Cu/Na/Y, Au-Ni/Na/Y and Au-Fe/Na/Y are also studied. A simple effective medium approach (Maxwell-Garnett) is used to obtain a theoretical complex effective dielectric function of the composite and to asses the sensibility of the plasmon resonance to the sample characteristics. The knowledge of these properties can hopefully be applied to the development of optical tools to monitor the synthetic path.

  10. Bioaccessibility and Solubility of Copper in Copper-Treated Lumber

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper (MC)-treated lumber is a recent replacement for Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) and Ammonium Copper (AC)-treated lumbers; though little is known about the potential risk of copper (Cu) exposure from incidental ingestion of MC-treated wood. The bioaccessibility o...

  11. Statistical Approach to the Transformation of Fly Ash into Zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkowski, Arkadiusz; Michalik, Marek

    2007-01-01

    The experimental conversion of F-class fly ash into zeolites is described. The ash, composed mainly of aluminosilicate glass, mullite and quartz, was collected in the Cracow power plant (southern Poland). The experiments involved the heating of fly ash samples in PTFE vessels. Time, temperature and solution composition were the reaction parameters considered in the experiments and in the subsequent modeling. A series of reactions with 0.5, 3 and 5M NaOH solutions (and some with additional 3M NaCl) were carried out at 70, 100 and 150C for 12-48 hours under autogenic pressure (not measured) and at a constant ash-to-solution ratio of 33.3 g/l. The following zeolite phases were synthesized: sodalite (SOD structure), hydroxysodalite (SOD), CAN type phases, Na-X (FAU), and NaP1 (GIS). Statistically calculated relationships based on the mineral- and chemical compositions of the reaction products support the conclusion that the type of zeolite phase that crystallizes depends on the concentration of OH- and Cl- in solution and on the temperature of the reaction. The duration of reaction, if on the order of tens of hours, is of less significance. The nature of the zeolite phase that crystalises is controlled by the intensity and selectivity of the substrate dissolution. That dissolution can favour, in sequence, one or other of the components in the substrate, resulting in Si/Al variation in the reaction solutions. Mullite dissolution (decreasing solution Si/Al) characterizes the most advanced reaction stages. The sequence of crystallization of the zeolite phases mirrors the sequential dissolution of substrate components, and the composition of the crystallizing zeolite crystals reflects the changes in the solution Si/Al.

  12. Monodispersed Ultrafine Zeolite Crystal Particles by Microwave Hydrothermal Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Michael Z.; Harris, Michael Tyrone; Khatri, Lubna

    2008-01-01

    Microwave hydrothermal synthesis of zeolites is reviewed. Monodispersed ultrafine crystal particles of zeolite (Silicalite-1) have been synthesized in batch reactor vessels by microwave irradiation heating of aqueous basic silicate precursor solutions with tetra propyl ammonium hydroxide as the templating molecule. The effects of major process parameters (such as synthesis temperature, microwave heating rate, volume ratio (i.e., the volume of the initial synthesis solution over the total volume of the reactor vessel), and synthesis time on the zeolite particle characteristics are studied using a computer-controlled microwave reactor system that allows real-time monitoring and control of reaction medium temperature. The changes in the morphology, size and crystal structure of the particles are investigated using scanning electron microscope, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, and BET surface analysis. We have found that the synthesis temperature, volume ratio, and heating rate play a significant role in controlling the particle size, uniformity, and morphology. Microwave processing has generated new morphologies of zeolite particles (i.e., uniform block-shaped particles that contain mixed gel-nanocrystallites and agglomerated crystal particles) that could not be made by a conventional hydrothermal process. At higher synthesis temperature and lower volume ratio, irregular block-shaped particles were produced, whereas increasing the volume ratio promoted the formation of monodispersed single-crystal particles with uniform shape. Our results clearly demonstrate that faster microwave heating is advantageous to enhance the zeolite crystallization kinetics and produces larger-size crystal particles in shorter time. In addition, zeolite crystallization mechanisms, depending on the microwave heating rate, were also discussed.

  13. Influence of Crystal Expansion/Contraction on Zeolite Membrane Permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, Stephanie G; Payzant, E Andrew; Noble, Richard D; Falconer, John L.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray diffraction was used to measure the unit cell parameters of B-ZSM-5, SAPO-34, and NaA zeolite powders as a function of adsorbate loading at 303 K, and in one case, at elevated temperatures. Most adsorbates expanded the zeolite crystals below saturation loading at 303 K: n-hexane and SF6 in B-ZSM-5, methanol and CO2 in SAPO-34, and methanol in NaA zeolite. As the loadings increased, the crystals expanded more. Changes in the unit cell volumes of B-ZSM-5 and SAPO-34 zeolite powders correlated with changes in permeation through zeolite membranes defects. When the zeolite crystals expanded or contracted upon adsorption, the defect sizes decreased or increased. In B-ZSM-5 membranes, the fluxes through defects decreased dramatically when n-hexane or SF6 adsorbed. In contrast, i-butane adsorption at 303 K contracted B-ZSM-5 crystals at low loadings and expanded them at higher loadings. Correspondingly, the flux through B-ZSM-5 membrane defects increased at low i-butane loadings and decreased at high loading because the defects increased in size at low loading and decreased at high loadings. At 398 K and 473 K, n-hexane expanded the B-ZSM-5 unit cell more as the temperature increased from 303 to 473 K. The silicalite-1 and B-ZSM-5 unit cell volumes expanded similarly upon n-hexane adsorption at 303 K; boron substitution had little effect on volume expansion.

  14. Squaraines inside Zeolites: Preparation, Stability, and Photophysical Properties.

    PubMed

    Cano, María Luz; Cozens, Frances L.; Esteves, María A.; Márquez, Francisco; García, Hermenegildo

    1997-10-17

    A series of four symmetrical squaraines (ditoylyl, di-m-xylyl, dianisyl, and diresorcinyl) incorporated inside zeolites Y, mordenite, and ZSM-5 have been obtained by treating squaric acid and the corresponding arene in the presence of acid zeolites. Acid sites and high reaction temperatures (150 degrees C) were found to be crucial for the success of the preparation procedure. Surprisingly, this method failed for the preparation of the squaraine derived from N,N-dimethylaniline, which is known to be readily formed from squaric acid in homogeneous phase without a catalyst. The solid samples containing squaraines were characterized by diffuse reflectance and Raman spectroscopies and by thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry. Among the hosts, mordenite was found to be the most general and convenient zeolite for the preparation of the squaraines, while in the other solids either the organic content adsorbed was comparatively smaller (ZSM-5) or some squaraines were not very stable (Y zeolite for ditolyl and dixylyl squaraines). The absorption spectra of the samples correspond to the J-aggregation state of the squaraines, except for some ZSM-5 samples, where simultaneous observation of the bands due to both monomers and aggregates occurs. Aggregation also changes with the water content of the samples. Treatment of the zeolite-bound diresorcinyl squaraine with basic aqueous solutions leads to remarkable variations in the diffuse reflectance and Raman spectra. These changes in the Raman spectrum of the diresorcinyl squaraine were found to be reversible by basic or acid washings. Laser flash photolysis using the 355- or 532-nm output of a Nd-YAG laser (<10 ns pulses; zeolite host. On the basis of the similarity of the UV-vis absorption spectra obtained in solution, these transients have been identified as the radical cation (HY) and the triplet excited state (HMor) of the incorporated squaraine. PMID:11671815

  15. Behavior Modification in Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Annette Rutt; Stillman, Stephen M.

    1979-01-01

    An example of behavior modification used in athletic coaching is presented. The case study involves a member of a women's basketball team and details the use of behavior modification for both weight reduction and skill improvement. (JMF)

  16. Zeolite catalysis in the synthesis of isobutylene from hydrous ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Cory Bernard

    1999-11-01

    This work deals with the synthesis of isobutylene from a hydrous ethanol feedstock over zeolites. The synthesis is accomplished in three steps: (1) low-temperature direct ethanol conversion to ethylene on H-ZSM-5 zeolite, (2) ethylene conversion to butene products over metal-exchanged zeolites, and (3) butene skeletal rearrangement to isobutylene over FER zeolites. The key to understanding and optimizing each synthesis step lies in the ability to control and regulate the zeolite acidity (Bronsted and Lewis)---both strength and number. Therefore, the continuous temperature programmed amine desorption (CTPAD) technique was further developed to simultaneously count the Bronsted acid sites and quantitatively characterize their strength. The adsorption of ethanol, reaction products, amines, coke and ethanol-derived residue (EDR) were monitored gravimetrically using the highly sensitive, novel Tapered Element Oscillating Microreactor (TEOM) apparatus. The TEOM was also used also in conjunction with CTPAD to characterize Bronsted acidity which is a new application for the instrument. For the first synthesis step, a parallel reaction exists which simultaneously produces diethyl ether and ethylene directly over H-ZSM-5. The reaction rates for each pathway were measured directly using a differential reactor operating at low temperatures (<473 K). Water in the ethanol feed enhances the rate of ethylene formation. A mechanism and kinetic expression are proposed for this reaction over H-ZSM-5, with diethyl-ether desorption and ethylene formation as the rate limiting steps. Heat of adsorption values measured from the independent microcalorimetry work reported in the literature are incorporated into the kinetic analysis which reduces the number of regressed parameters. For the remaining synthesis steps, several zeolite structures (ZSM-5, Y, FER) partially exchanged with Pd, Ti, Ni and Au were prepared and tested. It was determined from this screening study that the zeolites containing Pd are the most efficient catalysts for the dimerization reaction. Characterization results from x-ray diffraction (XRD), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and CTPAD suggest a stable, Pd species with a low oxidation state as part of the active site in Pd-exchanged zeolites. Isobutylene was present in the C4 fraction at reasonable quantities for most of the catalyst candidates, especially those containing an alkali metal co-cation.

  17. Method for encapsulating nanoparticles in a zeolite matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Eric N.

    2007-12-11

    A method for preparing a metal nanocluster composite material. A porous zeolitic material is treated with an aqueous metal compound solution to form a metal ion-exchanged zeolitic material, heated at a temperature ramp rate of less than 2.degree. C./min to an elevated temperature, cooled, contacted with an organic monomer and heating to induce polymerization, and heating the composite material to greater than 350.degree. C. under non-oxidizing conditions to form a metal nanocluster-carbon composite material with nanocluster sizes between approximately 0.6 nm and 10 nm.

  18. Hydrocracking coal distillate cuts on bifunctional zeolitic catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Braslavskii, B.I.; Anufriev, D.M.; Kuznetsov, P.N.; Kirilets, V.M.; Plopskii, E.Y.; Nefedov, B.K.; Adler, T.T.

    1987-05-01

    The authors tested a bifunctional cobalt-molybdenum catalyst based on zeolite of the TsVM type (high-silica) and a commercial alumina-nickel-molybdenum hydrotreating catalyst GK-35 containing Y zeolite; these catalysts were tested in the process of hydrocracking coal distillates. The feedstocks for hydrocracking were neutral oil cuts from the product obtained by supercritical dissolution of lignite from the Irsha-Borodino deposit. The dissolution of the coal was performed by heating in an autoclave with isopropyl alcohol, following procedures given.

  19. Solvent-free synthesis of zeolites from anhydrous starting raw solids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinming; Liu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Longfeng; Ding, Lihong; Gao, Pan; Wang, Xiong; Pan, Shuxiang; Bian, Chaoqun; Meng, Xiangju; Xu, Jun; Deng, Feng; Maurer, Stefan; Mller, Ulrich; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-28

    Development of sustainable routes for synthesis of zeolites is very important because of wide applications of zeolites at large scale in the fields of catalysis, adsorption, and separation. Here we report a novel and generalized route for synthesis of zeolites in the presence of NH4F from grinding the anhydrous starting solid materials and heating at 140-240 C. Accordingly, zeolites of MFI, BEA*, EUO, and TON structures have been successfully synthesized. The presence of F(-) drives the crystallization of these zeolites from amorphous phase. Compared with conventional hydrothermal synthesis, the synthesis in this work not only simplifies the synthesis process but also significantly enhances the zeolite yields. These features should be potentially of great importance for industrial production of zeolites at large scale in the future. PMID:25574592

  20. Experiments with Zeolites at the Secondary School Level: Experience from The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, Eric N.; Davis, Pamela J.; Kerkstra, Aonne; van Bekkum, Herman

    1999-10-01

    This article describes a number of experiments that involve zeolites and are suitable for secondary-school chemistry laboratories. The experiments have been introduced successfully into secondary schools in The Netherlands. Zeolites are used in enormous quantities as builders (water softeners) in laundry detergents; they account for 15-30 wt % of most laundry detergents currently on the European market. In a series of experiments, students test the hardness of tap water before and after treatment with some zeolite and perform tests with a range of commercial laundry detergents containing zeolites. Zeolites are also used as catalysts in numerous industrial processes; another experiment described here highlights the use of zeolites as recyclable catalysts in an esterification reaction. A duplicate reaction is carried out in parallel, but using the conventional sulfuric acid catalyst instead of the zeolite. This experiment provides a good example of the benefit of a recyclable, heterogeneous catalyst over the conventional homogeneous one that is discarded as waste material.

  1. Erythrocyte membrane proteins in copper-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.T.; Kramer, T.R.

    1987-05-01

    Increased osmotic stability and decreased survivability of erythrocytes caused by Cu deficiency suggest that low copper status may lead to modification in the organization of erythrocyte membrane proteins. Accordingly Cu deficiency was produced in rats by feeding a diet containing < 1 ppm Cu. The effects of low copper status on erythrocyte membrane proteins were assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacylamide electrophoresis. A 170,000 dalton protein (170K) amounted to 2.68 +/- 0.11% of the total membrane protein in erythrocytes from copper-deficient rats (n = 25) and 1.42 +/- 0.10% in erythrocytes from rats fed adequate Cu. When erythrocyte membranes from copper-deficient rats were extracted with 0.5% (v/v) Triton X-100, 170K remained associated with the cytoskeletal proteins, spectrin and actin. Thus, copper deficiency can alter the composition of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. Furthermore, hematocrit levels in copper-deficient rats were negatively correlated to the amount of 170K suggesting that alteration of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton may be a factor that contributes to the anemia associated with copper deficiency.

  2. Methanobactin and the Link between Copper and Bacterial Methane Oxidation.

    PubMed

    DiSpirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D; Murrell, J Colin; Gallagher, Warren H; Dennison, Christopher; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    Methanobactins (mbs) are low-molecular-mass (<1,200 Da) copper-binding peptides, or chalkophores, produced by many methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). These molecules exhibit similarities to certain iron-binding siderophores but are expressed and secreted in response to copper limitation. Structurally, mbs are characterized by a pair of heterocyclic rings with associated thioamide groups that form the copper coordination site. One of the rings is always an oxazolone and the second ring an oxazolone, an imidazolone, or a pyrazinedione moiety. The mb molecule originates from a peptide precursor that undergoes a series of posttranslational modifications, including (i) ring formation, (ii) cleavage of a leader peptide sequence, and (iii) in some cases, addition of a sulfate group. Functionally, mbs represent the extracellular component of a copper acquisition system. Consistent with this role in copper acquisition, mbs have a high affinity for copper ions. Following binding, mbs rapidly reduce Cu(2+) to Cu(1+). In addition to binding copper, mbs will bind most transition metals and near-transition metals and protect the host methanotroph as well as other bacteria from toxic metals. Several other physiological functions have been assigned to mbs, based primarily on their redox and metal-binding properties. In this review, we examine the current state of knowledge of this novel type of metal-binding peptide. We also explore its potential applications, how mbs may alter the bioavailability of multiple metals, and the many roles mbs may play in the physiology of methanotrophs. PMID:26984926

  3. Fabrication of high wettability gradient on copper substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ding-Jun; Leu, Tzong-Shyng

    2013-09-01

    Copper is one of the most widely used materials in condensation heat transfer. Recently there has been great interest in improving the condensation heat transfer efficiency through copper surface modification. In this study, we describe the fabrication processes of how copper surfaces were modified to be superhydrophilic (CA ? 10) and superhydrophobic (CA > 150) by means of H2O2 immersion and fluorination with Teflon. The wettability gradient of copper surfaces with contact angles (CA) changing from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic are also demonstrated. Unlike previous studies on gradient surfaces in which the wettability gradient is controlled either non-precisely or entirely uncontrolled, in this study, the contact angles along wettability gradient copper surfaces vary with a precisely designed gradient. It is demonstrated that a high wettability gradient copper surface can be successfully fabricated using photolithography to define the area ratios between superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic patterns within a short distance. The fabricated wettability gradient of copper surfaces is expected to be able to enhance the condensation heat transfer efficiency.

  4. A new method for application of the water-soluble dye SPADNS in a carbon paste electrode for determination of trace amounts of copper.

    PubMed

    Rohani, Tahereh; Taher, Mohammad Alu

    2008-01-01

    2-(P-sulfophenylazo)-1,8-dihydroxy-3,6-naphthalene disulfate (SPADNS) was adsorbed on surfactant modified zeolite type A by electrostatic interaction in the aqueous phase. The dye was strongly retained and not easily leached from the surfactant-modified zeolite matrix. This compound was incorporated into a carbon paste electrode for anodic stripping voltammetric determination of trace amounts of copper. The calibration plot was linear over the copper concentration range 2.0-800 microg/L. The detection limit was found to be 0.4 microg/L Cu(II), and for 5 successive determinations of 50 and 150 microg/L Cu(II) the relative standard deviations were 1.6 and 1.2%, respectively. The modified electrode prepared in this study could be used for the determination of Cu(II) in water samples and human hair with good results. PMID:19202811

  5. Introducing copper phthalocyanine as a qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Marc; Din, Salahud; Gardener, Jules; Morley, Gavin W.; Wu, Wei; Stoneham, Marshall; Fisher, Andrew J.; Heutz, Sandrine; Kay, Christopher W. M.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2012-02-01

    Quantum information processing (QIP) has been shown to solve certain useful problems faster than its classical counterpart. However finding a physical system upon which to execute these algorithms is a challenging task. One promising implementation is to use an electron spin in a magnetic field as the information bearing quantum system. Numerous options have been proposed along these lines. Here I discuss a new candidate qubit, copper phthalocyanine. The copper atom at the centre of the molecule carries an unpaired electron. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of relaxation times reveal that it has potential for QIP. We measure the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times of this electron and demonstrate single qubit manipulations. Solid-state electronic devices can be built with this low cost material, which is optically active, and offers great opportunities for chemical and physical modification, leading to significant control of magnetic and other properties.

  6. COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Chelsea Hubbard

    2001-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D&D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness of separating out radioactive contamination, the copper cable was coated with a surrogate contaminant. The demonstration took place at the Bonneville County Technology Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  7. Zeolite coatings on metal alloys for corrosion resistance, hydrophilicity, and microbiocidal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beving, Derek Eugene

    The recent advent of polycrystalline zeolite coatings on metal alloys has heralded a paradigm shift in zeolitic application and function as well as their requisite synthesis. The prevailing paradigm for zeolite utilization and employment was through the exploitation of their uniform microporosity. We have demonstrated the utility of the non-porous as-synthesized form of high-silica-zeolite (HSZ) MFI coatings on aluminum alloys for corrosion resistance. A single chemical formulation was able to generate excellent corrosion-resistant HSZ MFI coatings on all aluminum alloys studied. Functional zeolite coatings have traditionally been synthesized as coatings comprised of single zeolite species. We have successfully generated functional zeolite hybrid coatings comprised of disparate zeolite species with controlled composition. A three-layer zeolite coating was developed to apply a low-silica-zeolite (LSZ), zeolite Y (ZY), to aluminum substrates. The middle layer was a zeolite hybrid coating of ZY crystals embedded within a MFI matrix. The mixed zeolite middle layer allowed for the adhesion of the single species HSZ MFI bottom layer to the single species LSZ ZY, top layer. A two-layer hydrophilic and antimicrobial hybrid zeolite coating on aluminum alloys was also developed. The base layer was a HSZ MFI coating and the top layer consisted of zeolite A (ZA) crystals embedded within a matrix of HSZ MFI. The ZA crystals are still present at the surface of the hybrid layer, as such; their hydrophilicity is accessible and can be exploited for their hydrophilic and antimicrobial potential. The great utility of the zeolite hybrid layer is realized with the formation of single-layer hybrid coatings on metal alloys. The hybrid coating is made of mixed inorganic crystalline species imbedded in a matrix of HSZ MFI. The inorganic species used is not limited to zeolite types; other inorganic crystalline species can be used. We have generated hybrid coatings made from LSZ ZY and HSZ MR, and hybrid coatings made from hydrotalcite, an inorganic crystalline species distinctly different from zeolite, and HSZ MFI. The single layer hybrid coatings have great utility and their function and application can be easily tuned by changing the zeolite or crystalline inorganic species used to generate them.

  8. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  9. Copper as a biocidal tool.

    PubMed

    Borkow, Gadi; Gabbay, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Copper ions, either alone or in copper complexes, have been used to disinfect liquids, solids and human tissue for centuries. Today copper is used as a water purifier, algaecide, fungicide, nematocide, molluscicide as well as an anti-bacterial and anti-fouling agent. Copper also displays potent anti-viral activity. This article reviews (i) the biocidal properties of copper; (ii) the possible mechanisms by which copper is toxic to microorganisms; and (iii) the systems by which many microorganisms resist high concentrations of heavy metals, with an emphasis on copper. PMID:16101497

  10. The growth of zeolites A, X and mordenite in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Bac, N.; Coker, E. N.; Dixon, A. G.; Warzywoda, J.; Thompson, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    Zeolites are a class of crystalline aluminosilicate materials that form the backbone of the chemical process industry worldwide. They are used primarily as adsorbents and catalysts and support to a significant extent the positive balance of trade realized by the chemical industry in the United States (around $19 billion in 1991). The magnitude of their efforts can be appreciated when one realizes that since their introduction as 'cracking catalysts' in the early 1960's, they have saved the equivalent of 60 percent of the total oil production from Alaska's North Slope. Thus the performance of zeolite catalysts can have a profound effect on the U.S. economy. It is estimated that a 1 percent increase in yield of the gasoline fraction per barrel of oil would represent a savings of 22 million barrels of crude oil per year, representing a reduction of $400 million in the United States' balance of payments. Thus any activity that results in improvement in zeolite catalyst performance is of significant scientific and industrial interest. In addition, due to their 'stability,' uniformity, and, within limits, their 'engineerable' structures, zeolites are being tested as potential adsorbents to purify gases and liquids at the parts-per-billion levels needed in today's electronic, biomedical, and biotechnology industries and for the environment. Other exotic applications, such as host materials for quantum-confined semiconductor atomic arrays, are also being investigated. Because of the importance of this class of material, extensive efforts have been made to characterize their structures and to understand their nucleation and growth mechanisms, so as to be able to custom-make zeolites for a desired application. To date, both the nucleation mechanics and chemistry (such as what are the 'key' nutrients) are, as yet, still unknown for many, if not all, systems. The problem is compounded because there is usually a 'gel' phase present that is assumed to control the degree of supersaturation, and this gel undergoes a continuous 'polymerization' type reaction during nucleation and growth. Generally, for structure characterization and diffusion studies, which are useful in evaluating zeolites for improving yield in petroleum refining as well as for many of the proposed new applications (e.g., catalytic membranes, molecular electronics, chemical sensors) large zeolites (greater than 100 to 1000 times normal size) with minimum lattice defects are desired. Presently, the lack of understanding of zeolite nucleation and growth precludes the custom design of zeolites for these or other uses. It was hypothesized that the microgravity levels achieved in an orbiting spacecraft could help to isolate the possible effects of natural convection (which affects defect formation) and minimize sedimentation, which occurs since zeolites are twice as dense as the solution from which they are formed. This was expected to promote larger crystals by allowing growing crystals a longer residence time in a high-concentration nutrient field. Thus it was hypothesized that the microgravity environment of Earth orbit would allow the growth of large, more defect-free zeolite crystals in high yield.

  11. Structural modification of mordenite zeolite with Fe for the photo-degradation of EDTA.

    PubMed

    Emara, Mostafa M; Tourky, Amal S M; El-Moselhy, Medhat M

    2009-07-15

    Fe(2+) was incorporated inside mordenite through ion exchange technique in aqueous solution. The amount of Fe loading was 25-100 wt %, using FeSO(4).7H(2)O as precursor and Na-mordenite starting material Na-M. The Fe incorporated (Fe-M) thus prepared was characterized by XRD, FTIR and N(2) adsorption measurements. It was found that Fe mordenite retained the same structure as that for Na-mordenite which may indicate that Fe well dispersed into mordenite channels. BET indicated that Fe-M samples possessed higher surface area compared to the parent Na-M. Photocatalytic degradation of EDTA was carried out in presence of the prepared Fe-M catalysts. Effects of catalyst concentration and temperature were also studied. Thermodynamic parameters calculated for 50% Fe-M showed the highest catalytic activity toward EDTA degradation. PMID:19117676

  12. Infrared spectroscopic examination of the interaction of urea with the naturally occurring zeolite clinoptilolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byler, D.M.; Gerasimowicz, W.V.; Stockette, V.M.; Eberl, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has shown for the first time that the naturally occurring zeolite clinoptilolite can absorb urea, (NH2)2CO, under ambient conditions from either aqueous or ethanolic solutions. The two strongest NH stretching bands at 3441 and 3344 cm-1 in pure, solid urea shift to higher frequency (about 3504 and 3401 cm-1) after absorption. Two of the four urea bands in the 1800-1300 cm-1 range (at 1683 and 1467 cm-1) undergo marked downward shifts to about 1670 and 1445 cm-1. The other two bands show little change in frequency. The strong band at 1602 cm-1, however, diminishes in intensity to little more than an ill-defined shoulder on the 1626-cm-1 peak. When clinoptilolite is heated to 450 ??C and then treated with molten urea (ca. 140 ??C) for several minutes, and finally washed twice with ethanol to remove excess unreacted urea, further changes become apparent in the spectrum of the urea-treated clinoptilolite. The two NH stretching bands broaden without significant change in frequency. Two new bands appear in the midfrequency range at 1777 (weak) and 1719 (medium strong) cm-1. Of the four original midfrequency peaks, the one at 1602 cm-1 is now absent. Two others (1627 and 1440 cm-1) exhibit little change, while the fourth has broadened and shifted down to 1663 cm-1, where it appears as a shoulder on the band at 1627 cm-1. Both treatments clearly induce interaction between urea and the zeolite which seems to result in significant modifications in the nature of the hydrogen bonding of the substrate. ?? 1991.

  13. Targeting copper in cancer therapy: 'Copper That Cancer'.

    PubMed

    Denoyer, Delphine; Masaldan, Shashank; La Fontaine, Sharon; Cater, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient involved in fundamental life processes that are conserved throughout all forms of life. The ability of copper to catalyze oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, which can inadvertently lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), necessitates the tight homeostatic regulation of copper within the body. Many cancer types exhibit increased intratumoral copper and/or altered systemic copper distribution. The realization that copper serves as a limiting factor for multiple aspects of tumor progression, including growth, angiogenesis and metastasis, has prompted the development of copper-specific chelators as therapies to inhibit these processes. Another therapeutic approach utilizes specific ionophores that deliver copper to cells to increase intracellular copper levels. The therapeutic window between normal and cancerous cells when intracellular copper is forcibly increased, is the premise for the development of copper-ionophores endowed with anticancer properties. Also under investigation is the use of copper to replace platinum in coordination complexes currently used as mainstream chemotherapies. In comparison to platinum-based drugs, these promising copper coordination complexes may be more potent anticancer agents, with reduced toxicity toward normal cells and they may potentially circumvent the chemoresistance associated with recurrent platinum treatment. In addition, cancerous cells can adapt their copper homeostatic mechanisms to acquire resistance to conventional platinum-based drugs and certain copper coordination complexes can re-sensitize cancer cells to these drugs. This review will outline the biological importance of copper and copper homeostasis in mammalian cells, followed by a discussion of our current understanding of copper dysregulation in cancer, and the recent therapeutic advances using copper coordination complexes as anticancer agents. PMID:26313539

  14. Fabrication of superhydrophobic-superoleophilic copper mesh via thermal oxidation and its application in oil-water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanlong, Shi; Wu, Yang; Xiaojuan, Feng; Yongsheng, Wang; Guoren, Yue; Shuping, Jin

    2016-03-01

    A copper mesh with superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity was fabricated via thermal oxidation and subsequent surface modification. After surface treatment, the copper mesh exhibited self-cleaning properties, striking loading capacities, and superior anticorrosion. In addition, the copper mesh could be used in a separator for separating oil from oily water with high efficiency. The presented approach may provide a promising strategy for the design and construction of superhydrophobic-superoleophilic materials which can be used for separating oil from oily water.

  15. Volatility of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.A.; Simonson, J.M.; Joyce, D.B.

    1996-08-01

    The relevant aqueous thermodynamics of copper and its oxides are evaluated and summarized with emphasis on solubility, hydrolysis, and complexation. The solubilities of metallic copper, solid cuprous and cupric oxides in steam measured by Pocock and Stewart in 1963 are discussed and the latter data are fitted in the form of established empirical equations and compared to other existing results. No other sources of data were found for the solubility of copper and cupric oxide in steam and even these data are very limited. Discussion of corresponding available solubility data on both oxide phases in liquid water is given. The possible effects of complexing agents are considered. A brief discussion is provided of the role of surface adsorption in determining the fate of dissolved copper in the boiler. 37 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Mechanochromic luminescence of copper iodide clusters.

    PubMed

    Benito, Quentin; Maurin, Isabelle; Cheisson, Thibaut; Nocton, Gregory; Fargues, Alexandre; Garcia, Alain; Martineau, Charlotte; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre; Perruchas, Sandrine

    2015-04-01

    Luminescent mechanochromic materials are particularly appealing for the development of stimuli-responsive materials. Establishing the mechanism responsible for the mechanochromism is always an issue owing to the difficulty in characterizing the ground phase. Herein, the study of real crystalline polymorphs of a mechanochromic and thermochromic luminescent copper iodide cluster permits us to clearly establish the mechanism involved. The local disruption of the crystal packing induces changes in the cluster geometry and in particular the modification of the cuprophilic interactions, which consequently modify the emissive states. This study constitutes a step further toward the understanding of the mechanism involved in the mechanochromic luminescent properties of multimetallic coordination complexes. PMID:25755012

  17. Zeolite formation from coal fly ash and its adsorption potential.

    PubMed

    Ruen-ngam, Duangkamol; Rungsuk, Doungmanee; Apiratikul, Ronbanchob; Pavasant, Prasert

    2009-10-01

    The possibility in converting coal fly ash (CFA) to zeolite was evaluated. CFA samples from the local power plant in Prachinburi province, Thailand, were collected during a 3-month time span to account for the inconsistency of the CFA quality, and it was evident that the deviation of the quality of the raw material did not have significant effects on the synthesis. The zeolite product was found to be type X. The most suitable weight ratio of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to CFA was approximately 2.25, because this gave reasonably high zeolite yield with good cation exchange capacity (CEC). The silica (Si)-to-aluminum (Al) molar ratio of 4.06 yielded the highest crystallinity level for zeolite X at 79% with a CEC of 240 meq/100 g and a surface area of 325 m2/g. Optimal crystallization temperature and time were 90 degrees C and 4 hr, respectively, which gave the highest CEC of approximately 305 meq/100 g. Yields obtained from all experiments were in the range of 50-72%. PMID:19842322

  18. Characterization of natural zeolite clinoptilolite for sorption of contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xingu-Contreras, E.; García-Rosales, G.; García-Sosa, I.; Cabral-Prieto, A.; Solache-Ríos, M.

    2015-06-01

    The nanoparticles technology has received considerable attention for its potential applications in groundwater treatment for the removal of various pollutants as Cadmium. In this work, iron boride nanoparticles were synthesized in pure form and in presence of homo-ionized zeolite clinoptilolite, as support material. These materials were used for removing Cd (II) from aqueous solutions containing 10, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300 and 400 mg/L. The characterization of these materials was made by using X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Mössbauer Spectroscopy. Pure iron boride particles show a broad X-ray diffraction peak centered at 45∘ (2 𝜃), inferring the presence of nanocrystals of Fe2B as identified from Mössbauer Spectroscopy. The size of these Fe2B particles was within the range of 50 and 120 nm. The maximum sorption capacities for Cd (II) of iron boride particles and supported iron boride particles in homo-ionized zeolitic material were nearly 100 %. For homo-ionized zeolite and homo-ionized zeolite plus sodium borohydride was ≥ 95 %.

  19. Calibration analysis of zeolites by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horňáčková, M.; Grolmusová, Z.; Horňáček, M.; Rakovský, J.; Hudec, P.; Veis, P.

    2012-08-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy was used for calibration analysis of different types of microporous crystalline aluminosilicates with exactly ordered structure — zeolites. The LIBS plasma was generated using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at the wavelength of 532 nm and providing laser pulses of 4 ns duration. Plasma emission was analysed by echelle type emission spectrometer, providing wide spectral range 200-950 nm. The spectrometer was equipped with intensified CCD camera providing rapid spectral acquisition (gating time from 5 ns). The optimum experimental conditions (time delay, gate width and laser pulse energy) have been determined for reliable use of LIBS for quantitative analysis. Samples of different molar ratios of Si/Al were used to create the calibration curves. Calibration curves for different types of zeolites (mordenite, type Y and ZSM-5) were constructed. Molar ratios of Si/Al for samples used for calibration were determined by classical wet chemical analysis and were in the range 5.3-51.8 for mordenite, 2.3-12.8 for type Y and 14-600 for ZSM-5. Zeolites with these molar ratios of Si/Al are usually used as catalysts in alkylation reactions. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy is a suitable method for analysis of molar ratio Si/Al in zeolites, because it is simple, fast, and does not require sample preparation compared with classical wet chemical analysis which are time consuming, require difficult sample preparation and manipulation with strong acids and bases.

  20. Synthesis of mesoporous zeolite single crystals with cheap porogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Haixiang; Li, Changlin; Ren, Jiawen; Wang, Yanqin; Lu, Guanzhong

    2011-07-01

    Mesoporous zeolite (silicalite-1, ZSM-5, TS-1) single crystals have been successfully synthesized by adding soluble starch or sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to a conventional zeolite synthesis system. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen sorption analysis, 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ( 27Al MAS NMR), temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH 3-TPD) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis). The SEM images clearly show that all zeolite crystals possess the similar morphology with particle size of about 300 nm, the TEM images reveal that irregular intracrystal pores are randomly distributed in the whole crystal. 27Al MAS NMR spectra indicate that nearly all of the Al atoms are in tetrahedral co-ordination in ZSM-5, UV-vis spectra confirm that nearly all of titanium atoms are incorporated into the framework of TS-1. The catalytic activity of meso-ZSM-5 in acetalization of cyclohexanone and meso-TS-1 in hydroxylation of phenol was also studied. The synthesis method reported in this paper is cost-effective and environmental friendly, can be easily expended to prepare other hierarchical structured zeolites.

  1. Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks for kinetic separation of propane and propene

    DOEpatents

    Li, Jing; Li, Kunhao; Olson, David H.

    2014-08-05

    Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIFs) characterized by organic ligands consisting of imidazole ligands that are either essentially all 2-chloroimidazole ligands or essentially all 2-bromoimidazole ligands are disclosed. Methods for separating propane and propene with the ZIFs of the present invention, as well as other ZIFs, are also disclosed.

  2. Biogas cleaning and upgrading with natural zeolites from tuffs.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Valerio; Petracchini, Francesco; Guerriero, Ettore; Bencini, Alessandro; Drigo, Serena

    2016-06-01

    CO2 adsorption on synthetic zeolites has become a consolidated approach for biogas upgrading to biomethane. As an alternative to synthetic zeolites, tuff waste from building industry was investigated in this study: indeed, this material is available at a low price and contains a high fraction of natural zeolites. A selective adsorption of CO2 and H2S towards CH4 was confirmed, allowing to obtain a high-purity biomethane (CO2 <2 g m(-3), i.e. 0.1%; H2S <1.5 mg m(-3)), suitable for injection in national grids or as vehicle fuel. The loading capacity was found to be 45 g kg(-1) and 40 mg kg(-1), for CO2 and H2S, respectively. Synthetic gas mixtures and real biogas samples were used, and no significant effects due to biogas impurities (e.g. humidity, dust, moisture, etc.) were observed. Thermal and vacuum regenerations were also optimized and confirmed to be possible, without significant variations in efficiency. Hence, natural zeolites from tuffs may successfully be used in a pressure/vacuum swing adsorption process. PMID:26563442

  3. Hydrocracking process employing a new zeolite, SSZ-16

    SciTech Connect

    Zones, S.I.

    1986-05-20

    A process is described for hydrocracking a hydrocarbonaceous feed under hydrocracking conditions, the improvement comprising contacting a hydrocarbonaceous feed with a catalyst composition comprising a zeolite having a mole ratio of an oxide selected from silicon oxide, germanium oxide, and mixtures thereof to an oxide selected from aluminum oxide, gallium oxide, and mixtures thereof greater than about 5:1.

  4. Upgrading of nascent pyrolysis products over zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chareonpanich, M.; Zhang, Z.G.; Tomita, A.; Nishijima, A.

    1994-12-31

    Among various products generated in coal pyrolysis, the yields of valuable chemicals such as benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) are generally low. In order to increase the yields of these products, the authors have been carrying out the catalytic hydrocracking of nascent coal volatile matter by using a two-stage reactor which can be operated under a high hydrogen pressure. The authors found that zeolite catalyst is suited for this purpose. The present study is undertaken to determine the optimum condition for the BTX production from Millmerran coal under a hydrogen pressure of 5 MPa, in the presence of zeolite catalyst. The temperature, for primary pyrolysis and secondary cracking were generally 800 and 600 C, respectively. Under these conditions, BTX yield of 14% (daf) was achieved by using ultra stable Y-zeolite as a catalyst for the secondary reaction. The authors found no deactivation of this catalyst under the present reaction conditions. The performance of various types of zeolite catalysts were also examined.

  5. Association of Indigo with Zeolites for Improved Color Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejoie, Catherine; Martinetto, Pauline; Dooryhe, Eric; van Elslande, Elsa; Blanc, Sylvie; Bordat, Patrice; Brown, Ross; Porcher, Florence; Anne, Michel

    2010-10-01

    The durability of an organic colour and its resistance against external chemical agents and exposure to light can be significantly enhanced by hybridizing the natural dye with a mineral. In search for stable natural pigments, the present work focuses on the association of indigo blue with several zeolitic matrices (LTA zeolite, mordenite, MFI zeolite). The manufacturing of the hybrid pigment is tested under varying oxidising conditions, using Raman and UV-visible spectrometric techniques. Blending indigo with MFI is shown to yield the most stable composite in all of our artificial indigo pigments. In absence of defects and substituted cations such as aluminum in the framework of the MFI zeolite matrix, we show that matching the pore size with the dimensions of the guest indigo molecule is the key factor. The evidence for the high colour stability of indigo@MFI opens a new path for modeling the stability of indigo in various alumino-silicate substrates such as in the historical Maya Blue pigment.

  6. Selective photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Berkeley, CA); Sun, Hai (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A selective photooxidation process for the conversion of hydrocarbon molecules to partially oxygenated derivatives, which comprises the steps of adsorbing a hydrocarbon and oxygen onto a dehydrated zeolite support matrix to form a hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair, and subsequently exposing the hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair to visible light, thereby forming a partially oxygenated derivative.

  7. Zeolite formation from coal fly ash and its adsorption potential

    SciTech Connect

    Duangkamol Ruen-ngam; Doungmanee Rungsuk; Ronbanchob Apiratikul; Prasert Pavasant

    2009-10-15

    The possibility in converting coal fly ash (CFA) to zeolite was evaluated. CFA samples from the local power plant in Prachinburi province, Thailand, were collected during a 3-month time span to account for the inconsistency of the CFA quality, and it was evident that the deviation of the quality of the raw material did not have significant effects on the synthesis. The zeolite product was found to be type X. The most suitable weight ratio of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to CFA was approximately 2.25, because this gave reasonably high zeolite yield with good cation exchange capacity (CEC). The silica (Si)-to-aluminum (Al) molar ratio of 4.06 yielded the highest crystallinity level for zeolite X at 79% with a CEC of 240 meq/100 g and a surface area of 325 m{sup 2}/g. Optimal crystallization temperature and time were 90{sup o}C and 4 hr, respectively, which gave the highest CEC of approximately 305 meq/100 g. Yields obtained from all experiments were in the range of 50-72%. 29 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.

  8. High-pressure alchemy on a small-pore zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.

    2011-12-01

    While an ever-expanding variety of zeolites with a wide range of framework topology is available, it is desirable to have a way to tailor the chemistry of the zeolitic nanopores for a given framework topology via controlling both the coordination-inclusion chemistry and framework distortion/relaxation. This is, however, subjected to the ability of a zeolitic nanopore to allow the redistribution of cations-water assembly and/or insertion of foreign molecules into the pores and channels. Small-pore zeolites such as natrolite (Na16Al16Si24O80x16H2O), however, have been known to show very limited capacity for any changes in the confinement chemistry. We have recently shown that various cation-exchanged natrolites can be prepared under modest conditions from natural sodium natrolite and exhibit cation-dependent volume expansions by up to 18.5% via converting the elliptical channels into progressively circular ones. Here, we show that pressure can be used as a unique and clean tool to further manipulate the chemistry of the natrolite nanopores. Our recent crystallographic and spectroscopic studies of pressure-insertion of foreign molecules, trivalent-cation exchange under pressure, and pressure-induced inversion of cation-water coordination and pore geometry in various cation-exchanged natrolites will be presented.

  9. USE OF SYNTHETIC ZEOLITES FOR ARSENATE REMOVAL FROM POLLUTANT WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is known to be a hazardous contaminant in drinking water that causes arsenical dermatitis and skin cancer. In the present work, the potential use of a variety of synthetic zeolites for removal of arsenic from water below the current and proposed EPA MCL has been examined...

  10. Differential thermal analysis as an acidity probe in zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Aboul-Gheit, A.K.; Al-Hajjaji, M.A.; Menoufy, M.F.; Abdel-Hamid, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis is used as an acidity strength probe for a series of mordenite (zeolite) catalysts via determining the temperature at which presorbed pyridine completely desorbs from the catalyst. The findings obtained for metal(s) containing mordenite catalysts have been correlated with the Pearson's assumption concerning Lewis acids and bases and the Pauling's electronegativity of the metals contained and found compatible.

  11. DIFFUSION MEASUREMENTS DURING PERVAPORATION THROUGH A ZEOLITE MEMBRANE

    EPA Science Inventory


    An isotopic-transient technique was used to directly measure diffusion times of H2O, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetone in pure and binary mixture feeds transporting through a zeolite membrane under steady-state pervaporation conditions. Diffusivities can be determ...

  12. Mobil/Badger to market zeolite-based cumene technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1993-02-24

    Badger (Cambridge, MA) and Mobil (Fairfax, VA) are ready to jointly license a new cumene technology that they say achieves higher yields and product purity than existing processes. The zeolite-based technology is scheduled to be introduced at next month's DeWitt Petrochemical Review in Houston. The Mobil/Badger technology aims to challenge the dominant position of UOP's (Des Plaines, IL) solid phosphoric acid (SPA) catalyst process - which accounts for 80%-90% of the world's cumene production. In addition, Monsanto/Kellogg's aluminum chloride-based technology has gained significant momentum since its introduction in the 1980s. And late last year, ABB Lummus Crest (Bloomfield, NJ) also began marketing a zeolite-based cumene technology. While all the technologies make cumene via the alkylation of benzene with propylene, the Mobil/Badger process uses a zeolite-containing catalyst designed by Mobil to selectively catalyze the benzene/propylene reaction, avoiding unwanted propylene oligomerization. Because the olefin reactions are so fast, says Frank A. Demers, Badger's v.p./technology development and marketing, other zeolite technologies are forced to use complex reactor arrangements to stop the propylene-propylene reactions. However, he says, Mobil has designed a catalyst that wants to react benzene with propylene to make cumene.'

  13. Development of a prototype expert system for catalysis by zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevoo, Hugues; Derouane, Eric G.; Vercauteren, Daniel P.

    1995-04-01

    A prototype Expert System (ES) that handles aromatic reactions catalyzed by zeolite frameworks is presented. This prototype ES is written in PROLOG using frame knowledge representation to transfer chemical information from the literature and expert minds to the Knowledge Base (KB). The knowledge base module of this ES is built around two specific but interrelated parts: an `empirical KB' and a `physicochemical KB'.

  14. ADSORPTION AND CATALYTIC DESTRUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN HYDROPHOBIC ZEOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several chromium exchanged ZSM-5 zeolites of varying SiO2/Al2O3 ratio were prepared and investigated for ambient (23 ?C) adsorption and subsequent oxidative destruction (250-400 ?C) of gaseous trichloroethylene (TCE, Cl2C=CHCl) in a humid air stream. With an increase in the SiO2...

  15. Zeolite in horizontal permeable reactive barriers for artificial groundwater recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Mara; Martnez-Hernndez, Virtudes; Lillo, Javier; Meffe, Raffaella; de Bustamante, Irene

    2013-04-01

    The Spanish Water Reuse Royal Decree 1620/2007 considers groundwater recharge as a feasible use of reclaimed water. To achieve the water quality established in the above-mentioned legislation, a tertiary wastewater treatment is required. In this context, the infiltration of effluents generated by secondary wastewater treatments through a Horizontal Permeable Reactive Barrier (HPRB) may represent a suitable regeneration technology. Some nutrients (phosphate and ammonium) and some Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) are not fully removed in conventional wastewater treatment plants. To avoid groundwater contamination when effluents of wastewater treatments plants are used in artificial recharge activities, these contaminants have to be removed. Due to its sorption capacities, zeolite is among the most used reactive materials in Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB). Therefore, the main goal of this study is to evaluate the zeolite retention effectiveness of nutrients and PPCPs occurring in treated wastewater. Batch sorption experiments using synthetic wastewater (SWW) and zeolite were performed. A 1:4 zeolite/SWW ratio was selected due to the high sorption capacity of the reactive material.The assays were carried out by triplicate. All the bottles containing the SWW-zeolite mixture were placed on a mechanical shaker during 24 hours at 140 rpm and 25 C. Ammonium and phosphate, as main nutrients, and a group of PPCPs were selected as compounds to be tested during the experiments. Nutrients were analyzed by ion chromatography. For PPCPs determination, Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) was applied before their analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry time of flight (LC-MS/ TOF). The experimental data were fitted to linearized Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations to obtain sorption parameters. In general, Freundlich model shows a greater capability of reproducing experimental data. To our knowledge, sorption of the investigated compounds on zeolite has rarely been addressed and this holds true especially for PPCPs. Therefore, the obtained results will be useful for the design and characterization of those HPRBs in which zeolite will be employed to regenerate treated wastewater for artificial recharge activities.

  16. Copper tolerance and copper accumulation of herbaceous plants colonizing inactive California copper mines

    SciTech Connect

    Kruckeberg, A.L.; Wu, L. )

    1992-06-01

    Herbaceous plant species colonizing four copper mine waste sites in northern California were investigated for copper tolerance and copper accumulation. Copper tolerance was found in plant species colonizing soils with high concentrations of soil copper. Seven of the eight plant species tested were found at more than one copper mine. The mines are geographically isolated, which makes dispersal of seeds from one mine to another unlikely. Tolerance has probably evolved independently at each site. The nontolerant field control population of Vulpia microstachya displays significantly higher tolerance to copper at all copper concentration levels tested than the nontolerant Vulpia myrous population, and the degree of copper tolerance attained by V. microstachya at the two copper mines was much greater than that found in V. myrous. It suggests that even in these two closely related species, the innate tolerance in their nontolerant populations may reflect their potential for evolution of copper tolerance and their ability to initially colonize copper mine waste sites. The shoot tissue of the copper mine plants of Arenaria douglasii, Bromous mollis, and V. microstachya accumulated less copper than those plants of the same species from the field control sites when the two were grown in identical conditions in nutrient solution containing copper. The root tissue of these mine plants contain more copper than the roots of the nonmine plants. This result suggests that exclusion of copper from the shoots, in part by immobilization in the roots, may be a feature of copper tolerance. No difference in the tissue copper concentration was detected between tolerant and nontolerant plants of Lotus purshianus, Lupinus bicolor, and Trifolium pratense even though the root tissue had more copper than the leaves.

  17. Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Kim, Do Heui; Li, Xiaohong S.; Tran, Diana N.; Peden, Charles HF

    2011-12-22

    This annual report describes recent progress on a collaborative project between scientists and engineers in the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at PNNL and at Ford Motor Company, involving investigations of laboratory- and engine-aged SCR catalysts, containing mainly base metal zeolites. These studies are leading to a better understanding of various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of SCR catalysts and improve the correlation between laboratory and engine aging, saving experimental time and cost. We are investigating SCR catalysts with reduced ammonia slip, increased low temperature activity, and increased product selectivity to N2. More recent recognition that high temperature performance, under regimes that sometimes cause deactivation, also needs to be improved is driving current work focused on catalyst materials modifications needed to achieve this enhanced performance. We are also studying materials effective for the temporary storage of HC species during the cold-start period. In particular, we examine the adsorption and desorption of various HC species produced during the combustion with different fuels (e.g., gasoline, E85, diesel) over potential HC adsorber materials, and measure the kinetic parameters to update Fords HC adsorption model.

  18. Clinoptilolite zeolitized tuff from Central Alborz Range, North Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghipour, Batoul

    2010-05-01

    Zeolites are hydrated alumino-silicates of the alkaline and alkaline earth cations, principally sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium (Iijima 1980; Hay 1981). Zeolites occur principally in unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks and are particularly widespread in volcani-clastic strata (Hay, 1978). Clinoptilolite is a natural zeolite of the heulandite group with the simplified formula of (Na, K)6 Si30 Al6 O72 .nH2. It is the most common natural zeolite found mainly in sedimentary rocks of volcanic origin. Alborz zone is one of the important geological divisions in Iran. This zone is restricted to Kopeh dagh zone in North & Central Iranian zone in South and is a region of active deformation within the broad Arabian-Eurasia collision zone (Allen et al. 2003). The zeolitized green tuff belt from Central Alborz which introduce here are made of volcanoclastic sequence of Karaj Formation. This belt is about 40 km long along Alborz Range and is Eocene in age. Zeolites and associated minerals of this altered vitric tuff studied. Zeolitization took place in some beds of Karaj Formations, with average range of 3 to 300 meters thickness. There are several gypsum lenses which interbed with a widespread green tuff succession in the studied area. On the basis of chemical composition these tuffs are in the range of acid to intermediate volcanic rocks. Also magmatic affinity is calc-alkaline and geological setting of the area belongs to volcanic arc granitoid. Petrographic data has shown that various shape and size of shard glass are the main component of tuffs. Based on the field studies, detail microscopy, XRD and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), the following main minerals are determined: Clinoptilolite+montmorillonite+crystobalite. Clinoptilolite and smectite are predominant minerals in all altered samples. Concerning the Si/Al ratio of 40 point analyses of glass shards the Alborz tuff has clinoptilolite composition. Otherwise the chemical composition of altered shard glass is very similar to clinoptilolite structural formula. By using medium results of chemical data the structural formula for Firuzkuh clinoptilolite is as follow: Si 29.91 Al 6.01 Fe2+ 951 Mg2+ 0.393 Ca 0.222 Na 3.162 K 1.422 Paleogeographic conditions have provided a marginal shallow seawater environment which has been filled by volcanoclastics sequence. In Eocene the zeolitization occur as layers which are confined stratigraphically, it seems this process that took place only in preferred tuffaceous horizons which enriched by shard glass. So the term staratabound can be used for this type zeolitization. In altered tuffs there are a close relationship between clinoptiloite and montmorilonite in some deposits. Alborz range, there was an occasionally marine environment (existence of marine microfossils) with humid climate (remnants of plants in some points). Transformation process (glass zeolite + smectite) provides a further silica contribution to the system, which finally in supersaturation and decreasing pH favors the precipitation of silica in altered tuff. This may have occurred when ground water flow become to mix with saline water to lowering the pH.

  19. Facile synthesis of hollow zeolite microspheres through dissolutionrecrystallization procedure in the presence of organosilanes

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Haixiang; Ren, Jiawen; Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Yanqin; Lu, Guanzhong

    2013-04-15

    Hollow zeolite microspheres have been hydrothermally synthesized in the presence of organosilanes via a dissolutionrecrystallization procedure. In the presence of organosilanes, zeolite particles with a core/shell structure formed at the first stage of hydrothermal treatment, then the core was consumed and recrystallized into zeolite framework to form the hollow structure during the second hydrothermal process. The influence of organosilanes was discussed, and a related dissolutionrecrystallization mechanism was proposed. In addition, the hollow zeolite microspheres exhibited an obvious advantage in catalytic reactions compared to conventional ZSM-5 catalysts, such as in the alkylation of toluene with benzyl chloride. - Graphical abstract: Hollow zeolite spheres with aggregated zeolite nanocrystals were synthesized via a dissolutionrecrystallization procedure in the presence of organosiline. Highlights: ? Hollow zeolite spheres with aggregated zeolite nanocrystals were synthesized via a dissolutionrecrystallization procedure. ? Organosilane influences both the morphology and hollow structure of zeolite spheres. ? Hollow zeolite spheres showed an excellent catalytic performance in alkylation of toluene with benzyl chloride.

  20. Exploitation of Unique Properties of Zeolites in the Development of Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yangong; Li, Xiaogan; Dutta, Prabir K.

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties of microporous zeolites, including ion-exchange properties, adsorption, molecular sieving, catalysis, conductivity have been exploited in improving the performance of gas sensors. Zeolites have been employed as physical and chemical filters to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of gas sensors. In addition, direct interaction of gas molecules with the extraframework cations in the nanoconfined space of zeolites has been explored as a basis for developing new impedance-type gas/vapor sensors. In this review, we summarize how these properties of zeolites have been used to develop new sensing paradigms. There is a considerable breadth of transduction processes that have been used for zeolite incorporated sensors, including frequency measurements, optical and the entire gamut of electrochemical measurements. It is clear from the published literature that zeolites provide a route to enhance sensor performance, and it is expected that commercial manifestation of some of the approaches discussed here will take place. The future of zeolite-based sensors will continue to exploit its unique properties and use of other microporous frameworks, including metal organic frameworks. Zeolite composites with electronic materials, including metals will lead to new paradigms in sensing. Use of nano-sized zeolite crystals and zeolite membranes will enhance sensor properties and make possible new routes of miniaturized sensors. PMID:22666081

  1. Catalase-like activity studies of the manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćiçek, Ekrem; Dede, Bülent

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of manganese(II) adsorbed on zeolite 3A, 4A, 5A. AW-300, ammonium Y zeolite, organophilic, molecular sieve and catalase-like enzyme activity of manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites are reported herein. Firstly zeolites are activated at 873 K for two hours before contact manganese(II) ions. In order to observe amount of adsorption, filtration process applied for the solution. The pure zeolites and manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites were analysed by FT-IR. As a result according to the FT-IR spectra, the incorporation of manganese(II) cation into the zeolite structure causes changes in the spectra. These changes are expected particularly in the pseudolattice bands connected with the presence of alumino and silicooxygen tetrahedral rings in the zeolite structure. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated in the presence of imidazole. The Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites display efficiency in the disproportion reactions of hydrogen peroxide, producing water and dioxygen in catalase-like activity.

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Silver Ions Released from Zeolites Immobilized on Cellulose Nanofiber Mats.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Katrina A; Cho, Hong Je; Yeung, Hiu Fai; Fan, Wei; Schiffman, Jessica D

    2016-02-10

    In this study, we exploit the high silver ion exchange capability of Linde Type A (LTA) zeolites and present, for the first time, electrospun nanofiber mats decorated with in-house synthesized silver (Ag(+)) ion exchanged zeolites that function as molecular delivery vehicles. LTA-Large zeolites with a particle size of 6.0 ?m were grown on the surface of the cellulose nanofiber mats, whereas LTA-Small zeolites (0.2 ?m) and three-dimensionally ordered mesoporous-imprinted (LTA-Meso) zeolites (0.5 ?m) were attached to the surface of the cellulose nanofiber mats postsynthesis. After the three zeolite/nanofiber mat assemblies were ion-exchanged with Ag(+) ions, their ion release profiles and ability to inactivate Escherichia coli (E. coli) K12 were evaluated as a function of time. LTA-Large zeolites immobilized on the nanofiber mats displayed more than an 11 times greater E. coli K12 inactivation than the Ag-LTA-Large zeolites that were not immobilized on the nanofiber mats. This study demonstrates that by decorating nanometer to micrometer scale Ag(+) ion-exchanged zeolites on the surface of high porosity, hydrophilic cellulose nanofiber mats, we can achieve a tunable release of Ag(+) ions that inactivate bacteria faster and are more practical to use in applications over powder zeolites. PMID:26788882

  3. Exploitation of unique properties of zeolites in the development of gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yangong; Li, Xiaogan; Dutta, Prabir K

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties of microporous zeolites, including ion-exchange properties, adsorption, molecular sieving, catalysis, conductivity have been exploited in improving the performance of gas sensors. Zeolites have been employed as physical and chemical filters to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of gas sensors. In addition, direct interaction of gas molecules with the extraframework cations in the nanoconfined space of zeolites has been explored as a basis for developing new impedance-type gas/vapor sensors. In this review, we summarize how these properties of zeolites have been used to develop new sensing paradigms. There is a considerable breadth of transduction processes that have been used for zeolite incorporated sensors, including frequency measurements, optical and the entire gamut of electrochemical measurements. It is clear from the published literature that zeolites provide a route to enhance sensor performance, and it is expected that commercial manifestation of some of the approaches discussed here will take place. The future of zeolite-based sensors will continue to exploit its unique properties and use of other microporous frameworks, including metal organic frameworks. Zeolite composites with electronic materials, including metals will lead to new paradigms in sensing. Use of nano-sized zeolite crystals and zeolite membranes will enhance sensor properties and make possible new routes of miniaturized sensors. PMID:22666081

  4. The influence of chemisorbed molecules on mass transfer in H-ZSM-5-type zeolites and the location of Broensted acid sites

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, J.; Buelow, M. ); Kaerger, J.; Pfeifer, H. )

    1988-11-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is one of the most important applications of zeolites. Therefore, various methods have been developed to determine the strength and concentration of Bronsted acid sites in zeolites. Among them, in the last few years, {sup 1}H MAS NMR has become a powerful tool. In addition to the accessibility of the acid sites probed by chemisorption of N-bases, the steric environment of these catalytically active sites is of importance since it imposes constraints on the geometry of the transition state. However, only a few studies have been reported on this topic. Information was obtained from quantum chemical calculations, catalytic experiments, I.R. spectroscopy, and the arrangement of guest molecules. From these investigations it has been concluded that in H-ZSM-5 the channel intersections should be preferential location centers for the Bronsted acid sites. In adsorption technology, in the use of zeolites as shape-selective adsorbents, modification of the molecular sieve properties by chemisorption of nitrogen-containing bases (N-compounds) has become a common technique. The authors have applied the NMR pulsed field gradient technique to study the influence of chemisorbed N-compounds on transport properties of molecular sieves, considering the chemisorbed compounds as transport obstacles.

  5. Methane emissions abatement by multi-ion-exchanged zeolite A prepared from both commercial-grade zeolite and coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Hui, K S; Chao, C Y H

    2008-10-01

    The performance of multimetal-(Cu, Cr, Zn, Ni, and Co)-ion-exchanged zeolite A prepared from both a commercial-grade sample and one produced from coal fly ash in methane emissions abatement was evaluated in this study. The ion-exchange process was used to load the metal ions in zeolite A samples. The methane conversion efficiency by the samples was studied under various parameters including the amount of metal loading (7.3-19.4 wt%), reaction temperature (25-500 degrees C), space velocity (8400-41 900 h(-1)), and methane concentration (0.5-3.2 vol %). At 500 degrees C, the original commercial-grade zeolite A catalyzed 3% of the methane only, whereas the addition of different percentages of metals in the sample enhanced the methane conversion efficiency by 40-85%. Greater methane conversion was observed by increasing the percentage of metals added to the zeolite even though the BET surface area of the zeolite consequently decreased. Higher percentage methane conversion over the multi-ion-exchanged samples was observed at lower space velocities indicating the importance of the mass diffusion of reactants and products in the zeolite. Compared to the multi-ion-exchanged zeolite A prepared from the commercial-grade zeolite, the one produced from coal fly ash demonstrated similar performances in methane emissions abatement, showing the potential use of this low cost recycled material in gaseous pollutant treatment. PMID:18939576

  6. Potential and challenges of zeolite chemistry in the catalytic conversion of biomass.

    PubMed

    Ennaert, Thijs; Van Aelst, Joost; Dijkmans, Jan; De Clercq, Rik; Schutyser, Wouter; Dusselier, Michiel; Verboekend, Danny; Sels, Bert F

    2016-02-01

    Increasing demand for sustainable chemicals and fuels has pushed academia and industry to search for alternative feedstocks replacing crude oil in traditional refineries. As a result, an immense academic attention has focused on the valorisation of biomass (components) and derived intermediates to generate valuable platform chemicals and fuels. Zeolite catalysis plays a distinct role in many of these biomass conversion routes. This contribution emphasizes the progress and potential in zeolite catalysed biomass conversions and relates these to concepts established in existing petrochemical processes. The application of zeolites, equipped with a variety of active sites, in Brnsted acid, Lewis acid, or multifunctional catalysed reactions is discussed and generalised to provide a comprehensive overview. In addition, the feedstock shift from crude oil to biomass involves new challenges in developing fields, like mesoporosity and pore interconnectivity of zeolites and stability of zeolites in liquid phase. Finally, the future challenges and perspectives of zeolites in the processing of biomass conversion are discussed. PMID:26691750

  7. Effects of ultrasonic treatment on zeolite NaA synthesized from by-product silica.

    PubMed

    Vai?iukynien?, Danut?; Kantautas, Aras; Vaitkevi?ius, Vitoldas; Jakevi?ius, Leonas; Rudionis, ymantas; Pakevi?ius, Mantas

    2015-11-01

    The synthesis of zeolite NaA from silica by-product was carried out in the presence of 20 kHz ultrasound at room temperature. Zeolites obtained in this type of synthesis were compared to zeolites obtained by performing conventional static syntheses under similar conditions. The sonication effects on zeolite NaA synthesis were characterized by phase identification, crystallinity etc. The effects of different parameters such as crystallization time and initial materials preparation methods on the crystallinity and morphology of the synthesized zeolites were investigated. The final products were characterized by XRD and FT-IR. It was possible to obtain crystalline zeolite NaA from by-product silica in the presence of ultrasound. PMID:26186874

  8. Effects of Surface and Morphological Properties of Zeolite on Impedance Spectroscopy-Based Sensing Performance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianwei; Li, Xiaogan; White, Jeremy; Dutta, Prabir K.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement by impedance spectroscopy of the changes in intrazeolitic cation motion of pressed pellets of zeolite particles upon adsorption of dimethylmethylphosphonate (DMMP) provides a strategy for sensing DMMP, a commonly used simulant for highly toxic organophosphate nerve agents. In this work, two strategies for improving the impedance spectroscopy based sensing of DMMP on zeolites were investigated. The first one is the use of cerium oxide (CeO2) coated on the zeolite surface to neutralize acidic groups that may cause the decomposition of DMMP, and results in better sensor recovery. The second strategy was to explore the use of zeolite Y membrane. Compared to pressed pellets, the membranes have connected supercages of much longer length scales. The zeolite membranes resulted in higher sensitivity to DMMP, but recovery of the device was significantly slower as compared to pressed zeolite pellets. PMID:23201996

  9. XAFS Study on TiO2 Photocatalyst Loaded on Zeolite Synthesized from Steel Slag

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, Yasutaka; Ohmichi, Tetsutaro; Mori, Kosuke; Katayama, Iwao; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2007-02-02

    The convenient route for the synthesis of Y-zeolites by utilizing steel slag as a material source was developed. Through hydrothermal treatment, well-crystallized Y-zeolite was obtained. We also synthesized TiO2-loaded Y-zeolites by an impregnation method. The structure of titanium oxide species highly dispersed on the zeolite, which couldn't be detected by XRD patterns, was investigated by XAFS analysis. Photocatalytic activity for decomposition of 2-propanol in liquid phase was found to be enhanced by the hydrophobic surface property of zeolite. It has been demonstrated that the zeolite synthesized from steel slag would be applicable as a promising support of TiO2 photocatalyst.

  10. Dispersible Exfoliated Zeolite Nanosheets and Their Application as a Selective Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Varoon, Kumar; Zhang, Xueyi; Elyassi, Bahman; Brewer, Damien D.; Gettel, Melissa; Kumar, Sandeep; Lee, J. Alex; Maheshwari, Sundeep; Mittal, Anudha; Sung, Chun-Yi; Cococcioni, Matteo; Francis, Lorraine F.; McCormick, Alon V.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2011-10-06

    Thin zeolite films are attractive for a wide range of applications, including molecular sieve membranes, catalytic membrane reactors, permeation barriers, and low-dielectric-constant materials. Synthesis of thin zeolite films using high-aspect-ratio zeolite nanosheets is desirable because of the packing and processing advantages of the nanosheets over isotropic zeolite nanoparticles. Attempts to obtain a dispersed suspension of zeolite nanosheets via exfoliation of their lamellar precursors have been hampered because of their structure deterioration and morphological damage (fragmentation, curling, and aggregation). We demonstrated the synthesis and structure determination of highly crystalline nanosheets of zeolite frameworks MWW and MFI. The purity and morphological integrity of these nanosheets allow them to pack well on porous supports, facilitating the fabrication of molecular sieve membranes.

  11. Preparation of zeolite A and faujasite membranes from a clear solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kumakiri, Izumi; Yamaguchi, Takeo; Nakao, Shinichi

    1999-12-01

    Zeolite A and faujasite- (FAU-)type zeolite membranes were prepared under identical conditions from solutions of the same composition, with the only difference being the seed crystal used. The zeolite A membrane was formed on a substrate seeded with zeolite A crystals, while the FAU membrane was formed with zeolite Y seeds. The induction period of clear solution was used to prevent the influence of precipitated crystals that will eventually form in the clear solution and to keep the composition of the synthesis solution constant. Zeolite crystals increased in size with synthesis time and formed a continuous membrane on a porous substrate. Selectivity in a liquid mixture separation by pervaporation increased as crystals grew, indicating a decrease in intercrystalline region size.

  12. The Ameliorative Effect of Artificial Zeolite on Barley under Saline Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Busaidi, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Irshad, M.

    This investigation was aimed to evaluate the effects of zeolite in conjunction with seawater irrigation on barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) growth and salt composition of soil. A sand dune soil was amended with Ca-type zeolite at the rate of 1 and 5% and the seawater was diluted up to the electrical conductivity of 3 and 16 dS mG1. Present results showed that zeolite application significantly increased water holding capacity of the soil and accumulated more salts. The zeolite mixed soils improved plant growth compared to the un-amended control. Higher saline water significantly suppressed the growth of barley than the water with low salinity. The restricted plant growth due to the effects of specific ion or Na+/Ca2+ imbalance may be ameliorated using Ca-type zeolite. We may conclude that soil amendment with zeolite could alleviate the adverse effects of salts on plants following irrigation with higher saline water.

  13. Enhanced Perchloroethylene Reduction Using Surfactant-Modified Zeolite/Zero-Valent Iron Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Tao, X.; Bowman, R. S.

    2001-12-01

    We determined the effect of surfactant modification on perchloroethylene (PCE) reduction by zeolite/zero-valent iron (ZVI) pellets. We packed the pellets into four columns (30-cm long, 4.8-cm diameter) and modified two of the columns by sorbing the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (HDTMA-Cl) onto the pellets. We then continuously injected 11.0 ? M PCE into the columns and monitored the effluent concentrations of PCE, trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-, trans-, and 1,1-dichloroethylene (DCE), and vinyl chloride. The effluent PCE concentrations for the surfactant-modified columns were significantly lower than those for the unmodified columns (i.e., by factors of 6, 4, and 3 at pore water velocities of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 m/day, respectively). PCE reduction rate constants were three times higher for the modified columns relative to the unmodified columns at the three velocities. For a given column, the PCE reduction rate constant did not decrease as the pore water velocity increased from 0.5 m/day to 2.0 m/day. TCE was observed in the effluent of the modified and unmodified columns, with the concentrations for the modified columns (0.2, 0.4, and 0.7 ? M at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 m/day, respectively) roughly 10 times higher than those for the unmodified columns. No cis-DCE was detected in the effluent of the unmodified columns, whereas noticeable amounts (0.01-0.03 ? M) of cis-DCE were observed in the effluent of the modified columns. No trans-DCE, 1,1-DCE, or vinyl chloride was detected in the effluents of the modified or unmodified columns. Our results clearly demonstrate that the modification of zeolite/ZVI pellets with HDTMA significantly enhances PCE reduction. The enhanced PCE reduction may be due to an increased local PCE concentration in the vicinity of ZVI surface as a result of PCE sorption by the modified pellets. Our data also suggest that the PCE reduction mechanism for the modified pellets differs from that for the unmodified pellets, as seen by the much higher TCE and cis-DCE generation with the modified pellets.

  14. Bacterial Killing by Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces?

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Esprito; Lam, Ee Wen; Elowsky, Christian G.; Quaranta, Davide; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Metallic copper surfaces rapidly and efficiently kill bacteria. Cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated large amounts of copper ions, and this copper uptake was faster from dry copper than from moist copper. Cells suffered extensive membrane damage within minutes of exposure to dry copper. Further, cells removed from copper showed loss of cell integrity. Acute contact with metallic copper surfaces did not result in increased mutation rates or DNA lesions. These findings are important first steps for revealing the molecular sensitive targets in cells lethally challenged by exposure to copper surfaces and provide a scientific explanation for the use of copper surfaces as antimicrobial agents for supporting public hygiene. PMID:21148701

  15. Zeolite for extraction of strontium from concentrated solutions of sodium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyavskaya, N.B.; Andreeva, N.R.; Zhdanov, S.P.; Shubaeva, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The sorption of strontium from 5 M sodium chloride solutions on zeolites of differing structure was investigated. It was shown that a synthetic potassium zeolite of the Chabazite type K-G (13) can be used to remove radionuclides of strontium from these solutions. The strontium capacity of zeolite K-G (13) in a 5 M sodium chloride solution is 0.65 mmole/g.

  16. Mode of Bactericidal Action of Silver Zeolite and Its Comparison with That of Silver Nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Yoshinobu; Yoshikata, Kuniaki; Kunisaki, Shin-ichi; Tsuchido, Tetsuaki

    2003-01-01

    The properties of the bactericidal action of silver zeolite as affected by inorganic salts and ion chelators were similar to those of silver nitrate. The results suggest that the contact of the bacterial cell with silver zeolite, the consequent transfer of silver ion to the cell, and the generation of reactive oxygen species in the cell are involved in the bactericidal activity of silver zeolite. PMID:12839814

  17. Fiber ring laser interrogated zeolite-coated singlemode-multimode-singlemode structure for trace chemical detection.

    PubMed

    Lan, X; Huang, J; Han, Q; Wei, T; Gao, Z; Jiang, H; Dong, J; Xiao, H

    2012-06-01

    Zeolite thin films were synthesized on the claddingless multimode portion of a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fiber structure to construct a chemical vapor sensor. The zeolite-coated SMS structure was inserted into a fiber ring amplifier to produce a laser line. Combining the strong molecular adsorption capability of the nanoporous zeolite and the high signal-to-noise ratio of the fiber laser, the device was demonstrated for chemical vapor sensing with a low detection limit. PMID:22660100

  18. Analysis Si/Al ratio in zeolites type FAU by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, W. A.; Cabanzo, R.; Mejía-Ospino, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to determine the Si/Al ratio of Zeolite type Y. The catalytic activity of zeolite is strongly dependent of the Si/Al ratio. We have used Si lines in the spectral region between 245-265 nm to determine temperature of the plasma generated on pelletized sample of zeolite, and stoichiometry relation between Si and Al.

  19. Effective solidification/stabilisation of mercury-contaminated wastes using zeolites and chemically bonded phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoqing; Zhang, Xinyan; Xiong, Ya; Wang, Guoping; Zheng, Na

    2015-02-01

    In this study, two kinds of zeolites materials (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) were added to the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic processes to treat mercury-contaminated wastes. Strong promotion effects of zeolites (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) on the stability of mercury in the wastes were obtained and these technologies showed promising advantages toward the traditional Portland cement process, i.e. using Portland cement as a solidification agent and natural or thiol-functionalised zeolite as a stabilisation agent. Not only is a high stabilisation efficiency (lowered the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure Hg by above 10%) obtained, but also a lower dosage of solidification (for thiol-functionalised zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.5 g g(-1) and 0.7 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) and stabilisation agents (for natural zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.35 g g(-1) and 0.4 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) were used compared with the Portland cement process. Treated by thiol-functionalised zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic under optimum parameters, the waste containing 1500 mg Hg kg(-1) passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test. Moreover, stabilisation/solidification technology using natural zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic also passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test (the mercury waste containing 625 mg Hg kg(-1)). Moreover, the presence of chloride and phosphate did not have a negative effect on the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic/thiol-functionalised zeolite treatment process; thus, showing potential for future application in treatment of 'difficult-to-manage' mercury-contaminated wastes or landfill disposal with high phosphate and chloride content. PMID:25568090

  20. Synthesis and characterization of zeolites prepared from industrial fly ash.

    PubMed

    Franus, Wojciech; Wdowin, Magdalena; Franus, Małgorzata

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the possibility of using fly ash to produce synthetic zeolites. The synthesis class F fly ash from the Stalowa Wola SA heat and power plant was subjected to 24 h hydrothermal reaction with sodium hydroxide. Depending on the reaction conditions, three types of synthetic zeolites were formed: Na-X (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaOH, 75 °C), Na-P1 (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaOH, 95 °C), and sodalite (20 g fly ash, 0.8 dm(3) of 5 mol · dm(-3) NaOH + 0.4 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaCl, 95 °C). As synthesized materials were characterized to obtain mineral composition (X-ray diffractometry, Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometry), adsorption properties (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, N2 isotherm adsorption/desorption), and ion exchange capacity. The most effective reaction for zeolite preparation was when sodalite was formed and the quantitative content of zeolite from X-ray diffractometry was 90 wt%, compared with 70 wt% for the Na-X and 75 wt% for the Na-P1. Residues from each synthesis reaction were the following: mullite, quartz, and the remains of amorphous aluminosilicate glass. The best zeolitic material as characterized by highest specific surface area was Na-X at almost 166 m(2) · g(-1), while for the Na-P1 and sodalite it was 71 and 33 m(2) · g(-1), respectively. The ion exchange capacity decreased in the following order: Na-X at 1.8 meq · g(-1), Na-P1 at 0.72 meq · g(-1), and sodalite at 0.56 meq · g(-1). The resulting zeolites are competitive for commercially available materials and are used as ion exchangers in industrial wastewater and soil decontamination. PMID:24838802

  1. Silver confined within zeolite EMT nanoparticles: preparation and antibacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, B.; Belkhair, S.; Zaarour, M.; Fisher, L.; Verran, J.; Tosheva, L.; Retoux, R.; Gilson, J.-P.; Mintova, S.

    2014-08-01

    The preparation of pure zeolite nanocrystals (EMT-type framework) and their silver ion-exchanged (Ag+-EMT) and reduced silver (Ag0-EMT) forms is reported. The template-free zeolite nanocrystals are stabilized in water suspensions and used directly for silver ion-exchange and subsequent chemical reduction under microwave irradiation. The high porosity, low Si/Al ratio, high concentration of sodium and ultrasmall crystal size of the EMT-type zeolite permitted the introduction of a high amount of silver using short ion-exchange times in the range of 2-6 h. The killing efficacy of pure EMT, Ag+-EMT and Ag0-EMT against Escherichia coli was studied semi-quantitatively. The antibacterial activity increased with increasing Ag content for both types of samples (Ag+-EMT and Ag0-EMT). The Ag0-EMT samples show slightly enhanced antimicrobial efficacy compared to that of Ag+-EMT, however, the differences are not substantial and the preparation of Ag nanoparticles is not viable considering the complexity of preparation steps.The preparation of pure zeolite nanocrystals (EMT-type framework) and their silver ion-exchanged (Ag+-EMT) and reduced silver (Ag0-EMT) forms is reported. The template-free zeolite nanocrystals are stabilized in water suspensions and used directly for silver ion-exchange and subsequent chemical reduction under microwave irradiation. The high porosity, low Si/Al ratio, high concentration of sodium and ultrasmall crystal size of the EMT-type zeolite permitted the introduction of a high amount of silver using short ion-exchange times in the range of 2-6 h. The killing efficacy of pure EMT, Ag+-EMT and Ag0-EMT against Escherichia coli was studied semi-quantitatively. The antibacterial activity increased with increasing Ag content for both types of samples (Ag+-EMT and Ag0-EMT). The Ag0-EMT samples show slightly enhanced antimicrobial efficacy compared to that of Ag+-EMT, however, the differences are not substantial and the preparation of Ag nanoparticles is not viable considering the complexity of preparation steps. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Zeta potential data of Ag-EMT suspensions, pore-size distributions and antibacterial data for Ag-EMT 2 h samples. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03169e

  2. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    SciTech Connect

    Dormon, J.M.; Cottrell, C.M.; Allen, D.G.; Ackerman, J.D.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-04-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper and copper alloy sheet proved to be highly effective in preventing biofouling by zebra mussels over a three-year period. Further studies were conducted with copper and copper-nickel mesh (lattice of expanded metal) and screen (woven wire with a smaller hole size), which reduced the amount of copper used. Copper screen was also found to be strongly biofouling-resistant with respect to zebra mussels, while copper mesh reduced zebra mussel biofouling in comparison to controls, but did not prevent it entirely. Preliminary investigations into the mechanism of copper antifouling, using galvanic couples, indicated that the release of copper ions from the surface of the exposed metal into the surrounding water is directly or indirectly responsible for the biofouling resistance of copper.

  3. Preparation of high purity copper fluoride by fluorinating copper hydroxyfluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Lundquist, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    Copper fluoride containing no more than 50 ppm of any contaminating element was prepared by the fluorination of copper hydroxyfluoride. The impurity content was obtained by spark source mass spectrometry. High purity copper fluoride is needed as a cathode material for high energy density batteries.

  4. Permit application modifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils.

  5. Modifications of mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 15, discusses modifications of mitosis, including endoreduplication, polyteny, endomitosis, C-mitosis, restitution, amitosis and multipolar mitoses. Apart from multipolar mitosis, all other mitotic modifications are characterized by an absent or defective spindle, and in most cases these result in the duplication of the chromosome number. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  6. 24-hour urine copper test

    MedlinePLUS

    The 24-hour urine copper test measures the amount of copper in a urine sample. ... A 24-hour urine sample is needed. On day 1, urinate into the toilet when you get up in the morning. Afterwards, collect ...

  7. Fabrication of silver nanoparticles doped in the zeolite framework and antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Zargar, Mohsen; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa

    2011-01-01

    Using the chemical reduction method, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were effectively synthesized into the zeolite framework in the absence of any heat treatment. Zeolite, silver nitrate, and sodium borohydride were used as an inorganic solid support, a silver precursor, and a chemical reduction agent, respectively. Silver ions were introduced into the porous zeolite lattice by an ion-exchange path. After the reduction process, Ag NPs formed in the zeolite framework, with a mean diameter of about 2.123.11 nm. The most favorable experimental condition for the synthesis of Ag/zeolite nanocomposites (NCs) is described in terms of the initial concentration of AgNO3. The Ag/zeolite NCs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared. The results show that Ag NPs form a spherical shape with uniform homogeneity in the particle size. The antibacterial activity of Ag NPs in zeolites was investigated against Gram-negative bacteria (ie, Escherichia coli and Shigella dysentriae) and Gram-positive bacteria (ie, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) by disk diffusion method using MuellerHinton agar at different sizes of Ag NPs. All of the synthesized Ag/zeolite NCs were found to have antibacterial activity. These results show that Ag NPs in the zeolite framework can be useful in different biological research and biomedical applications. PMID:21383858

  8. First direct observation of reactive carbenes in the cavities of cation-exchanged Y zeolites.

    PubMed

    Moya-Barrios, Reinaldo; Cozens, Frances L

    2004-03-18

    [reaction: see text] Herein we report the first direct observation of reactive carbenes within the cavities of cation-exchanged Y zeolites. Chloro(phenyl)- and bromo(phenyl)carbenes were generated upon laser photolysis of 3-halo-3-phenyldiazirines incorporated within dry zeolites and the absolute reactivity of the carbenes was investigated as a function of counterbalancing cation and coincorporated quenchers in order to elucidate the behavior of these intermediates within zeolites. Product analysis performed upon thermolysis of the diazirine in Y zeolites yielded products that were identified as those derived from the carbene. PMID:15012055

  9. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2007-09-30

    The objective of this project is to synthesize nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y nanoclusters, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates, and evaluate the 'zeolite Y/Nanoporous host' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. In comparison to conventionally-used zeolite Y catalysts of micron size particles, the nanocrystals (< 100 nm particle size) which contain shorter path lengths, are expected to allow faster diffusion of large hydrocarbon substrates and the catalysis products within and out of the zeolite's channels and cages (<1 nm size). This is expected to significantly reduce deactivation of the catalyst and to prolong their period of reactivity. Encapsulating zeolite Y nanocrystals within the nanoporous materials is expected to protect its external surfaces and pore entrances from being blocked by large hydrocarbon substrates, since these substrates will initially be converted to small molecules by the nanoporous host (a catalyst in its own right). The project consisted of four major tasks as follows: (1) synthesis of the nanoparticles of zeolite Y (of various chemical compositions) using various techniques such as the addition of organic additives to conventional zeolite Y synthesis mixtures to suppress zeolite Y crystal growth; (2) synthesis of nanoporous silicate host materials of up to 30 nm pore diameter, using poly (alkylene oxide) copolymers which when removed will yield a mesoporous material; (3) synthesis of zeolite Y/Nanoporous Host composite materials as potential catalysts; and (4) evaluation of the catalyst for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks.

  10. Influence of zeolites in PDMS membranes. Pervaporation of water/alcohol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Vankelecom, I.F.J.; Depre, D.; De Beukelaer, S.; Uytterhoeven, J.B.

    1995-08-31

    A strong influence of the zeolite was found on the pervaporation of alcohol/water mixtures using filled PDMS membranes. In all cases, the zeolites reduced the swelling of the PDMS. Incorporation of the hydrophilic zeolite Y increased water fluxes, while ZSM-5 reduced both water and alcohol fluxes due to a partial retention of these molecules in the zeolite. For branched alcohols, the extreme importance of diffusion led to a strong dependency of selectivity and flux on temperature. Compared with commercially available PDMS membranes, better results were realized with the self-prepared membranes. 19 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Improved Efficiency for Partial Oxidation of Methane by Controlled Copper Deposition on Surface‐Modified ZSM‐5

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Thomas; Daly, Helen; Goguet, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The mono(μ‐oxo) dicopper cores present in the pores of Cu‐ZSM‐5 are active for the partial oxidation of methane to methanol. However, copper on the external surface reduces the ratio of active, selective sites to unselective sites. More efficient catalysts are obtained by controlling the copper deposition during synthesis. Herein, the external exchange sites of ZSM‐5 samples were passivated by bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) followed by calcination, promoting selective deposition of intraporous copper during aqueous copper ion exchange. At an optimum level of 1–2 wt % SiO2, IR studies showed a 64 % relative reduction in external copper species and temperature‐programmed oxidation analysis showed an associated increase in the formation of methanol compared with unmodified Cu‐ZSM‐5 samples. It is, therefore, reported that the modified zeolites contained a significantly higher proportion of active, selective copper species than their unmodified counterparts with activity for partial methane oxidation to methanol. PMID:26925172

  12. Use of copper shavings to remove mercury from contaminated groundwater or wastewater by amalgamation.

    PubMed

    Huttenloch, Petra; Roehl, Karl Ernst; Czurda, Kurt

    2003-09-15

    The efficacy of copper shavings (Cu(0)) for the removal of Hg2+ from aqueous solution by amalgamation is demonstrated. Two kinds of copper shavings were investigated: (a) chemically processed shavings (Fluka) and (b) recycled shavings from scrap metal. Batch sorption experiments yielded very high retardation coefficients of 28 850-82 830 for the concentration range studied (1-10 000 microg/L Hg2+ dissolved in distilled water or in a 0.01 M CaCl2 matrix solution). Sorption data were well-described bythe Freundlich isotherm equation. Kinetic batch sorption experiments showed that 96-98% of Hg2+ was removed within 2 h. Column experiments were performed with a mercury solution containing 1000 microg/L Hg in a 0.01 M CaCl2 matrix with a flow rate of 0.5 m/d. No mercury breakthrough (c/c(0) = 0.5) could be detected after more than 2300 percolated pore volumes, and the high retardation coefficients determined in the batch studies could be confirmed. Copper was released from the shavings due to the amalgamation process and to copper corrosion by oxygen, resulting in concentrations of mobilized copper of 0.2-0.6 mg/L. Due to their high efficiency in removing Hg2+ from aqueous solution, the use of copper shavings for the removal of mercury from contaminated water is suggested, employing a sequential system of mercury amalgamation followed by the removal of mobilized copper by an ion exchanger such as zeolites. Possible applications could be in environmental technologies such as wastewater treatment or permeable reactive barriers for in situ groundwater remediation. PMID:14524463

  13. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, H.

    1993-09-21

    A process is described for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing the surface of an aluminum or steel substrate for the electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to either substrate.

  14. SOURCES OF COPPER AIR EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to update estimates of atmospheric emissions of copper and copper compounds in the U.S. Source categories evaluated included: metallic minerals, primary copper smelters, iron and steel making, combustion, municipal incineration, secondary coppe...

  15. Brazing copper to dispersion-strengthened copper

    SciTech Connect

    Ryding, D.G.; Allen, D.; Lee, R.

    1996-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a state-of-the-art synchrotron light source that will produce intense x-ray beams, which will allow the study of smaller samples and faster reactions and processes at a greater level of detail that has been possible to date. The beam is produced by using third-generation insertion devices in a 7 GeV electron/positron storage ring that is 1100 meters in circumference. The heat load from these intense high power devices is very high and certain components must sustain total heat loads of 3 to 15 kW and heat fluxes of 30 W/mm{sup 2}. Because the beams will cycle on and off many times, thermal shock and fatigue will be a problem. High heat flux impinging on a small area causes a large thermal gradient that results in high stress. GlidCop{reg_sign}, a dispersion strengthened copper, is the desired material because of its high thermal conductivity and superior mechanical properties as compared to copper and its alloys. GlidCop is not amenable to joining by fusion welding, and brazing requires diligence because of high diffusivity. Brazing procedures were developed using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Interaction of a copper oxide particle with copper in drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginov, Yu. N.; Demakov, S. L.; Illarionov, A. G.; Ivanova, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    The forming of copper near a copper oxide particle is determined during multiple-pass drawing. The interaction of the copper oxide particle with copper is studied by the calculation of the state of stress in a finite element formulation and using scanning electron microscopy data. The results obtained demonstrate that pores appear around copper oxide particles when strain accumulates in multiple-pass drawing machines. The pore length increases with the accumulated strain, which can result in breaks of a wire in a highly cold-worked state.

  17. Modified Asphalt Binder with Natural Zeolite for Warm Mix Asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubravský, Marián; Mandula, Ján

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, warm mix asphalt (WMA) is becoming more and more used in the asphalt industry. WMA provide a whole range of benefits, whether economic, environmental and ecological. Lower energy consumption and less pollution is the most advantages of this asphalt mixture. The paper deals with the addition of natural zeolite into the sub base asphalt layers, which is the essential constituent in the construction of the road. Measurement is focused on basic physic - mechanical properties declared according to the catalog data sheets. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the ability of addition the natural zeolite into the all asphalt layers of asphalt pavement. All asphalt mixtures were compared with reference asphalt mixture, which was prepared in reference temperature.

  18. Template-free nanosized faujasite-type zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awala, Hussein; Gilson, Jean-Pierre; Retoux, Richard; Boullay, Philippe; Goupil, Jean-Michel; Valtchev, Valentin; Mintova, Svetlana

    2015-04-01

    Nanosized faujasite (FAU) crystals have great potential as catalysts or adsorbents to more efficiently process present and forthcoming synthetic and renewable feedstocks in oil refining, petrochemistry and fine chemistry. Here, we report the rational design of template-free nanosized FAU zeolites with exceptional properties, including extremely small crystallites (10-15 nm) with a narrow particle size distribution, high crystalline yields (above 80%), micropore volumes (0.30 cm3 g-1) comparable to their conventional counterparts (micrometre-sized crystals), Si/Al ratios adjustable between 1.1 and 2.1 (zeolites X or Y) and excellent thermal stability leading to superior catalytic performance in the dealkylation of a bulky molecule, 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene, probing sites mostly located on the external surface of the nanosized crystals. Another important feature is their excellent colloidal stability, which facilitates a uniform dispersion on supports for applications in catalysis, sorption and thin-to-thick coatings.

  19. Effect of metal on zeolite catalysts for extinction hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, T.Y. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper reports on the slow diffusivity of large molecules into the micropores which results in shape selectivity in the conversion of mixed feeds. The metals deposit on the zeolite, as the hydrogenation components further reduce this diffusivity through pore filling and pore mouth blocking, leading to ineffective catalysts for extinction hydrocracking. By using active metals at low loadings, these adverse effects can be minimized. To demonstrate this principle, experimental catalysts were compared. Unlike NiW/REX (REX = rare earth exchanged X-type zeolite), the experimental catalysts Pt and Pd on REX at 0.5 wt% levels were effective for the extinction hydrocracking of heavy gas oil blends. There was no heavy-end buildup in the recycle feed. The catalysts were active, low in aging rate, and high in selectivity for naphthas.

  20. Acid centers and catalytic activity of high-silica zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chukin, G.O.; Khusid, B.L.; Lupina, M.I.; Zhdan, P.A.; Nefedov, B.K.

    1988-04-01

    The physicochemical properties of the H form of the high-silica zeolites TsVK-I, TsVK-XI, and TsVM have been studied and data on their catalytic properties in m-xylene isomerization reaction have been obtained by IRS and XPES. It was found that the zeolites have B and L acid centers localized on the outer and inner surfaces of their channels and that the number of B centers localized inside the channels and the selectivity of the reaction yielding p-xylene diminish in the order TsVK-I > TsVK-XI > TsVM. Heat and steam treatment increase the selectivity of p-xylene production on account of restriction of the acid centers on the outer surface.