Sample records for zeolite modification copper

  1. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  2. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, Geoffrey L. (Baton Rouge, LA); Kanazirev, Vladislav (Sofia, BG)

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  3. Copper-Exchanged Zeolite L Traps Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Seshan, Panchalam K.

    1991-01-01

    Brief series of simple chemical treatments found to enhance ability of zeolite to remove oxygen from mixture of gases. Thermally stable up to 700 degrees C and has high specific surface area which provides high capacity for adsorption of gases. To increase ability to adsorb oxygen selectively, copper added by ion exchange, and copper-exchanged zeolite reduced with hydrogen. As result, copper dispersed atomically on inner surfaces of zeolite, making it highly reactive to oxygen, even at room temperature. Reactivity to oxygen even greater at higher temperatures.

  4. Copper removal using bio-inspired polydopamine coated natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Shapter, Joseph G; Popelka-Filcoff, Rachel; Bennett, John W; Ellis, Amanda V

    2014-05-30

    Herein, for the first time, natural clinoptilolite-rich zeolite powders modified with a bio-inspired adhesive, polydopamine (PDA), have been systematically studied as an adsorbent for copper cations (Cu(II)) from aqueous solution. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed successful grafting of PDA onto the zeolite surface. The effects of pH (2-5.5), PDA treatment time (3-24h), contact time (0 to 24h) and initial Cu(II) ion concentrations (1 to 500mgdm(-3)) on the adsorption of Cu(II) ions were studied using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The adsorption behavior was fitted to a Langmuir isotherm and shown to follow a pseudo-second-order reaction model. The maximum adsorption capacities of Cu(II) were shown to be 14.93mgg(-1) for pristine natural zeolite and 28.58mgg(-1) for PDA treated zeolite powders. This impressive 91.4% increase in Cu(II) ion adsorption capacity is attributed to the chelating ability of the PDA on the zeolite surface. Furthermore studies of recyclability using NAA showed that over 50% of the adsorbed copper could be removed in mild concentrations (0.01M or 0.1M) of either acid or base. PMID:24731937

  5. Modification of Phenolic Oximes for Copper Extraction 

    E-print Network

    Forgan, Ross Stewart

    2008-01-01

    The thesis deals with the modification of salicylaldoxime-based reagents used in hydrometallurgical extraction, addressing rational ligand design to tune copper(II) extractant strengths and also the development of reagents ...

  6. Removal of zinc, copper and lead by natural zeolite—a comparison of adsorption isotherms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Peri?; M. Trgo; N. Vukojevi? Medvidovi?

    2004-01-01

    An uptake of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and lead (Pb) from aqueous solutions by ion exchange on natural zeolitic tuff has been studied. The Croatian zeolite clinoptilolite from the Donje Jesenje deposit has been used as a natural ion exchanger. The efficiency of removal is higher for Pb and Cu than for Zn ions. Measured concentrations of Si in the

  7. Conversion of methane to methanol on copper-containing small-pore zeolites and zeotypes.

    PubMed

    Wulfers, M J; Teketel, S; Ipek, B; Lobo, R F

    2015-02-26

    This communication reports the discovery of several small-pore Cu-zeolites and zeotypes that produce methanol from methane and water vapor, and produce more methanol per copper atom than Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-mordenite. The new materials include Cu-SSZ-13, Cu-SSZ-16, Cu-SSZ-39, and Cu-SAPO-34. PMID:25679753

  8. [Efficiency and mechanism of compound barrier with HCl modification zeolite and calcite to control nitrogen and phosphorus release from sediments].

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian-Wei; Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Zhao, Jian-Fu; Zhan, Yan-Hui; Ma, Hong-Mei

    2007-03-01

    A novel compound barrier constructed with HCl modification zeolite and calcite was reported to control phosphorus and nitrogen release from sediments. Using short-term batch experiments and long-term sediment incubation experiments, the efficiency and mechanism of the compound barrier under anaerobic condition was investigated. For sediment incubation experiments, five kinds of active barrier conditions were applied respectively. The results showed that the calcite barrier reduced the phosphorus release from the sediment effectively, but not for the ammonia release from sediments. The compound barrier constructed with natural zeolite and calcite can reduce both the phosphorus and the ammonia release from sediments. In comparison to natural zeolite, the novel compound barrier constructed with HCl modification zeolite and calcite can control phosphorus released from sediments more effectively. Application of 40 g natural zeolite and 100 g calcite barrier resulted in 84% reduction of phosphorus flux from sediments for 80 days, but 91% reduction was obtained by compound barrier with 40 g HCl modification zeolite and 100 g calcite. In comparison with the natural zeolite, the duration of ammonia release control from sediments was shortened to two-thirds for the compound barrier with HCl modification zeolite. Reduction of Na+ and increment of H+ released from HCl modification zeolite were the possible reasons for the higher efficiency of the compound barrier to control the phosphorus release from the sediments. PMID:17633632

  9. A facile top-down protocol for postsynthesis modification of hierarchical aluminum-rich MFI zeolites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengjun; Miao, Shu; Chen, Fucun; Zhang, Shuang; Liu, Zhenni; Xie, Sujuan; Xu, Longya

    2015-01-12

    High aluminum content constitutes a major hurdle for the postsynthesis modification of hierarchical zeolites. A facile protocol comprising fluorination and sequential alkaline treatment is presented for the postsynthesis modification of hierarchical Al-rich MFI zeolites. By virtue of this protocol, uniform intracrystalline mesoporosity is introduced in an Al-rich MFI zeolite (Si/Al = 14.3). The obtained hierarchical zeolites exhibit a significant mesopore size distribution, centered around 6?nm, and show improved conversions in catalytic cracking of bulky aromatic molecules. The fundamental implications of the fluorination-alkaline treatment protocol are related to the formation of F-bearing tetrahedral aluminum species in the antecedent fluorination step, which alleviates the resistance of Al sites to the alkaline medium and causes Al-F complexation for regulated hydrolysis of the Al species during the alkaline treatment process. This top-down protocol and the derived mechanistic understandings are expected to be applied in the synthesis of hierarchical Al-rich zeolites with other framework topologies. PMID:25399674

  10. An introduction to zeolite molecular sieves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Dyer

    1988-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: What is a zeolite ; Natural zeolites and their occurrence; The structure of zeolites; Zeolite structure identification and characterization; Zeolite syntheses; Zeolites as ion exchangers; Zeolites as molecular sieves and drying agents; The stabilities of zeolite structures and their modification; Zeolites as catalysts; Zeolite-like materials (Zeotypes) containing elements other than Si or Al in

  11. Modification of organo-zeolite surface for the removal of reactive azo dyes in fixed-bed reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. E. Benkli; M. F. Can; M. Turan; M. S. Çelik

    2005-01-01

    Modification of zeolite (clinoptilolite) surface with a quaternary amine, hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (HTAB), to improve the removal efficiency of reactive azo dyes in a zeolite fixed bed was investigated. A series of adsorption tests were conducted to find out the uptake of three types of reactive dyes, i.e. CI Reactive Black 5, Red 239 and Yellow 176. Each run

  12. Zeolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Zeolites are crystalline aluminosilicates that have complex framework structures. However, there are several features of zeolite crystals that make unequivocal structure determinations difficult. The acquisition of reliable structural information on zeolites is greatly facilitated by the availability of high-quality specimens. For structure determinations by conventional diffraction techniques, large single-crystal specimens are essential. Alternatively, structural determinations by powder profile refinement methods relax the constraints on crystal size, but still require materials with a high degree of crystalline perfection. Studies conducted at CAMMP (Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing) have demonstrated that microgravity processing can produce larger crystal sizes and fewer structural defects relative to terrestrial crystal growth. Principal Investigator: Dr. Albert Sacco

  13. Removal of zinc, copper and lead by natural zeolite-a comparison of adsorption isotherms.

    PubMed

    Peri?, J; Trgo, M; Vukojevi? Medvidovi?, N

    2004-04-01

    An uptake of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and lead (Pb) from aqueous solutions by ion exchange on natural zeolitic tuff has been studied. The Croatian zeolite clinoptilolite from the Donje Jesenje deposit has been used as a natural ion exchanger. The efficiency of removal is higher for Pb and Cu than for Zn ions. Measured concentrations of Si in the liquid phase identify the detachment of the aluminosilicate structure during ion exchange in the presence of H(+) and OH(-) ions. The adsorption isotherm equations; Langmuir-Freundlich, Redlich-Petersen, Toth, Dubinin-Radushkevich, modified Dubinin-Radushkevich, and Lineweawer-Burk were derived from the basic empirical equations, and used for calculation of ion exchange parameters. The best fitting of experimental results to the proposed isotherms was observed in models that assume that ionic species bind first at energetically most favorable sites, with multi-layer adsorption taking place subsequently. PMID:15026244

  14. EPR study of some copper heterocyclic azomethine complexes adsorbed on X and Y zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miclaus, V.; Cozar, O.; Todica, M.; David, L.; Chis, V.; Ristoiu, D.; Farcas, S.; Damian, G.

    1999-05-01

    2-Amino-3-cyano-4,5-disubstituted furanes belongs to the type of considerable stable aminofuranes. Analogous azomethines derivatives with 9-formyl-acridine and 3-formyl-pyridine were synthesized because of their possible biological activity. The azomethines were complexed with copper(II) ions from acetate, in methanol and adsorbed on NaX and NaY zeolites. The spectroscopic EPR features of the adsorbed complexes are discussed in association with the strength of the acidic sites of the support surfaces.

  15. Modification of zeolites by multi-charged cations by the use of in-situ formed “active gas-phase species”

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. V. Kucherov; T. N. Kucherova; A. A. Slinkin

    1998-01-01

    A new way of the modification of zeolites is discussed which is based on the use of active gas-phase species formed in situ upon thermal treatment of a [H-zeolite+modifier oxide] mixture with an air flow containing CCl4. The chemical transport reaction, with the formation of reactive and mobile oxychloride fragments in the zeolitic bed, provides effective dissipation of the oxide

  16. Internal surface modification of MFI-type zeolite membranes for high selectivity and high flux for hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhong; Dong, Junhang; Nenoff, Tina M

    2009-05-01

    MFI-type zeolite membranes were modified by depositing molecular silica at a small number of active sites in the internal surface by in situ catalytic cracking of silane precursor. The limited silica deposition reduced the effective size of the zeolitic channels that dramatically enhanced the H(2) selectivity without causing a large increase in H(2) transport resistance. The modified zeolite membrane achieved an extraordinary H(2)/CO(2) permselectivity of 141 with a high H(2) permeance of 3.96 x 10(-7) mol/m(2) x s x Pa at 723 K. The effect of pore modification on the gas transport behavior was studied on the basis of single gas permeation data. PMID:19397346

  17. Evaluation of the bactericidal characteristics of nano-copper oxide or functionalized zeolite coating for bio-corrosion control in concrete sewer pipes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Haile; G. Nakhla; E. Allouche; S. Vaidya

    2010-01-01

    The bactericidal characteristics of nano-copper oxide or functionalized zeolite coated concrete pipes against Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans were studied by measuring the temporal variation of bacterial dry cell weight measurement, cellular Adenosine Triphosphate production, as well as oxygen uptake rate of the aforementioned bacterium. Uncorroded (UC), severely corroded (SC), and moderately corroded (MC) concrete pipes were electrochemically coated with a nano-copper oxide,

  18. Modification of surface properties of copper-refractory metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA)

    1993-10-12

    The surface properties of copper-refractory metal (CU-RF) alloy bodies are modified by heat treatments which cause the refractory metal to form a coating on the exterior surfaces of the alloy body. The alloys have a copper matrix with particles or dendrites of the refractory metal dispersed therein, which may be niobium, vanadium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, or tungsten. The surface properties of the bodies are changed from those of copper to that of the refractory metal.

  19. Modification of medical metals by ion implantation of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Y. Z.; Xiong, G. Y.; Liang, H.; Raman, S.; He, F.; Huang, Y.

    2007-10-01

    The effect of copper ion implantation on the antibacterial activity, wear performance and corrosion resistance of medical metals including 317 L of stainless steels, pure titanium, and Ti-Al-Nb alloy was studied in this work. The specimens were implanted with copper ions using a MEVVA source ion implanter with ion doses ranging from 0.5 × 10 17 to 4 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 at an energy of 80 keV. The antibacterial effect, wear rate, and inflexion potential were measured as a function of ion dose. The results obtained indicate that copper ion implantation improves the antibacterial effect and wear behaviour for all the three medical materials studied. However, corrosion resistance decreases after ion implantation of copper. Experimental results indicate that the antibacterial property and corrosion resistance should be balanced for medical titanium materials. The marked deteriorated corrosion resistance of 317 L suggests that copper implantation may not be an effective method of improving its antibacterial activity.

  20. Copper stabilization by zeolite synthesis in polluted soils treated with coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto Terzano; Matteo Spagnuolo; Luca Medici; Bart Vekemans; Laszlo Vincze; Koen Janssens; Pacifico Ruggiero [University of Bari, Bari (Italy). Dipartimento di Biologia e Chimica Agro-forestale ed Ambientale

    2005-08-15

    This paper reports on the process of zeolite formation in an agricultural soil artificially polluted by high amounts of Cu (15 mg of Cu/g of soil dry weight) and treated with fused coal fly ash at 30 and 60 C and how this process affects the mobility and availability of the metal. As a consequence of the treatment, the amount of dissolved Cu, and thus its mobility, was strongly reduced, and the percentage of the metal stabilized in the solid phase increased over time, reaching values of 30% at 30{sup o}C and 40% at 60{sup o}C. The physicochemical phenomena responsible for Cu stabilization in the solid phase have been evaluated by EDTA sequential extractions and synchrotron radiation based X-ray microanalytical techniques. These techniques were used for the visualization of the spatial distribution and the speciation of Cu in and/or on the neo-formed zeolite particles. In particular, micro XRF (X-ray fluorescence) tomography showed direct evidence that Cu can be entrapped as clusters inside the porous zeolitic structures while -{mu}XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) spectroscopy determinations revealed Cu to be present mainly as Cu(II) hydroxide and Cu(II) oxide. The reported results could be useful as a basic knowledge for planning new technologies for the on-site physicochemical stabilization of heavy metals in heavily polluted soils. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Surface modification of calcium-copper hydroxyapatites using polyaspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othmani, Masseoud; Aissa, Abdallah; Bachoua, Hassen; Debbabi, Mongi

    2013-01-01

    Mixed calcium-copper hydroxyapatite (Ca-CuHAp), with general formula Ca(10-x)Cux(PO4)6(OH)2, where 0 ? x ? 0.75 was prepared in aqueous medium in the presence of different concentrations of poly-L-aspartic acid (PASP). XRD, IR, TG-DTA, TEM-EDX, AFM and chemical analyses were used to characterize the structure, morphology and composition of the products. All techniques show the formation of new hybrid compounds Ca-CuHAp-PASP. The presence of the grafting moiety on the apatitic material is more significant with increasing of copper amount and/or organic concentration in the starting solution. These increases lead to the affectation of apatite crystallinity. The IR spectroscopy shows the conservation of (Psbnd OH) band of (HPO4)2- groups, suggesting that PASP acid was interacted only with metallic cations of hydroxyapatite.

  2. Topotactic conversion of ?-helix-layered silicate into AST-type zeolite through successive interlayer modifications.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Yusuke; Takayama, Ryosuke; Shibue, Toshimichi; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2014-02-10

    AST-type zeolite with a plate morphology can be synthesized by topotactic conversion of a layered silicate (?-helix-layered silicate; HLS) by using N,N-dimethylpropionamide (DPA) to control the layer stacking of silicate layers and the subsequent interlayer condensation. Treatment of HLS twice with 1)?hydrochloric acid/ethanol and 2)?dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) are needed to remove interlayer hydrated Na ions and tetramethylammonium (TMA) ions in intralayer cup-like cavities (intracavity TMA ions), both of which are introduced during the preparation of HLS. The utilization of an amide molecule is effective for the control of the stacking sequence of silicate layers. This method could be applicable to various layered silicates that cannot be topotactically converted into three-dimensional networks by simple interlayer condensation by judicious choice of amide molecules. PMID:24431158

  3. Preparation and characterization of surfactant-modified hydroxyapatite/zeolite composite and its adsorption behavior toward humic acid and copper(II).

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yanhui; Lin, Jianwei; Li, Jia

    2013-04-01

    A novel composite material, i.e., surfactant-modified hydroxyapatite/zeolite composite, was used as an adsorbent to remove humic acid (HA) and copper(II) from aqueous solution. Hydroxyapatite/zeolite composite (HZC) and surfactant-modified HZC (SMHZC) were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscope. The adsorption of HA and copper(II) on SMHZC was investigated. For comparison purposes, HA adsorption onto HZC was also investigated. SMHZC exhibited much higher HA adsorption capacity than HZC. The HA adsorption capacity for SMHZC decreased slightly with increasing pH from 3 to 8 but decreased significantly with increasing pH from 8 to 12. The copper(II) adsorption capacity for SMHZC increased with increasing pH from 3 to 6.5. The adsorption kinetic data of HA and copper(II) on SMHZC obeyed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption of HA and copper(II) on SMHZC took place in three different stages: fast external surface adsorption, gradual adsorption controlled by both film and intra-particle diffusions, and final equilibrium stage. The equilibrium adsorption data of HA on SMHZC better fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model than the Freundlich isotherm model. The equilibrium adsorption data of copper(II) on SMHZC could be described by the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The presence of copper(II) in solution enhanced HA adsorption onto SMHZC. The presence of HA in solution enhanced copper(II) adsorption onto SMHZC. The mechanisms for the adsorption of HA on SMHZC at pH 7 may include electrostatic attraction, organic partitioning, hydrogen bonding, and Lewis acid-base interaction. The mechanisms for the adsorption of copper(II) on SMHZC at pH 6 may include surface complexation, ion exchange, and dissolution-precipitation. The obtained results indicate that SMHZC can be used as an effective adsorbent to simultaneously remove HA and copper(II) from water. PMID:22961484

  4. Copper(II) and lead(II) removal from aqueous solution in fixed-bed columns by manganese oxide coated zeolite.

    PubMed

    Han, Runping; Zou, Weihua; Li, Hongkui; Li, Yanhu; Shi, Jie

    2006-09-21

    The ability of manganese oxide coated zeolite (MOCZ) to adsorb copper and lead ions in single- (non-competitive) and binary- (competitive) component sorption systems was studied in fixed-bed column. The experiments were applied to quantify particle size, bed length, influent flow rate and influent metal concentration on breakthrough time during the removal of copper and lead ions from aqueous solutions using MOCZ column. Results of fixed-bed adsorption showed that the breakthrough time appeared to increase with increase of the bed length and decrease of influent metal concentration, but decreased with increase of the flow rate. The Thomas model was applied to adsorption of copper and lead ions at bed length, MOCZ particle size, different flow rate and different initial concentration to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic parameters of the column useful for process design. The model was found suitable for describing the adsorption process of the dynamic behavior of the MOCZ column. The total adsorbed quantities, equilibrium uptakes and total removal percents of Cu(II) and Pb(II) related to the effluent volumes were determined by evaluating the breakthrough curves obtained at different conditions. The results suggested that MOCZ could be used as an adsorbent for an efficient removal of copper and lead ions from aqueous solution. The removal of metal ion was decreased when other additional heavy metal ion was added, but the total saturation capacity of MOCZ for copper and lead ions was not significantly decreased. This competitive adsorption also showed that adsorption of lead ions was decreased insignificantly when copper ions was added to the influent, whereas a dramatic decrease was observed on the adsorption of copper ions by the presence of lead ions. The removal of copper and lead ion by MOCZ columns followed the descending order: Pb(II) > Cu(II). The adsorbed copper and lead ions were easily desorbed from MOCZ with 0.5 mol l(-1) HNO3 solution. PMID:16621258

  5. Zeolite A functionalized with copper nanoparticles and graphene oxide for simultaneous electrochemical determination of dopamine and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Wang, Wei; Du, Licheng; Dong, Faqin; Deng, Yuequan; Zhang, Tinghong

    2012-08-20

    A novel Cu-zeolite A/graphene modified glassy carbon electrode for the simultaneous electrochemical determination of dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA) has been described. The Cu-zeolite A/graphene composites were prepared using Cu(2+) functionalized zeolite A and graphene oxide as the precursor, and subsequently reduced by chemical agents. The composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectra and scanning electron microscopy. Based on the Cu-zeolite A/graphene-modified electrode, the potential difference between the oxidation peaks of DA and AA was over 200mV, which was adequate for the simultaneous electrochemical determination of DA and AA. Also the proposed Cu-zeolite/graphene-modified electrode showed higher electrocatalytic performance than zeolite/graphene electrode or graphene-modified electrode. The electrocatalytic oxidation currents of DA and AA were linearly related to the corresponding concentration in the range of 1.0×10(-7)-1.9×10(-5)M for DA and 2.0×10(-5)-2.0×10(-4)M for AA. Detection limits (S/N=3) were estimated to be 4.1×10(-8)M for DA and 1.1×10(-5)M for AA, respectively. PMID:22819046

  6. Production of oxidized lipids during modification of low-density lipoprotein by macrophages or copper.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, K L; Wilkins, G M; Fussell, B; Ballantine, J A; Taylor, S E; Mitchinson, M J; Leake, D S

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is implicated in atherosclerosis. Lipids and oxidized lipids were analysed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in human LDL incubated with mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) or copper (II) sulphate in Ham's F-10 medium or medium alone (control). MPM-modification and copper-catalysed oxidation of LDL resulted in the formation of oxysterols, mainly cholest-5-en-3 beta,7 beta-diol (7 beta-OH-CHOL); 7%-19% of the initial cholesterol was converted to 7 beta-OH-CHOL in 24 h. 7 beta-OH-CHOL levels in control LDL were very low. The increase in 7 beta-OH-CHOL in MPM and copper-oxidized LDL was accompanied by decreases in linoleate and arachidonate and increases in the electrophoretic mobility and degradation of LDL protein by 'target' macrophages. The concerted occurrence of these processes and their similarity in both MPM-modification and copper-catalysed oxidation of LDL were suggested by the highly significant cross-correlations. The fall in polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) was accompanied by a directly proportional increase in electrophoretic mobility of the LDL. Production of 7 beta-OH-CHOL and protein degradation by macrophages showed modest elevations during the initial steep fall in PUFA, and showed their greatest increases as the levels of PUFA slowly approached zero. The levels of 7 beta-OH-CHOL and the degradation of LDL by macrophages were directly proportional. The degradation of LDL by macrophages increased rapidly as the electrophoretic mobility of LDL was slowly approaching its maximum level. PMID:7999000

  7. Design and fabrication of zeolite macro- and micromembranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lik Hang Joseph Chau

    2001-01-01

    The chemical nature of the support surface influences zeolite nucleation, crystal growth and elm adhesion. It had been demonstrated that chemical modification of support surface can significantly alter the zeolite film and has a good potential for large-scale applications for zeolite membrane production. The incorporation of titanium and vanadium metal ions into the structural framework of MFI zeolite imparts the

  8. Position-dependent performance of copper phthalocyanine based field-effect transistors by gold nanoparticles modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiao; Li, Yao; Lv, Wenli; Zhao, Feiyu; Sun, Lei; Peng, Yingquan; Wen, Zhanwei; Zhong, Junkang; Zhang, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    A facile fabrication and characteristics of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)-based organic field-effect transistor (OFET) using the gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) modification is reported, thereby achieving highly improved performance. The effect of Au NPs located at three different positions, that is, at the SiO2/CuPc interface (device B), embedding in the middle of CuPc layer (device C), and on the top of CuPc layer (device D), is investigated, and the results show that device D has the best performance. Compared with the device without Au NPs (reference device A), device D displays an improvement of field-effect mobility (?sat) from 1.65 × 10?3 to 5.51 × 10?3 cm2 V?1 s?1, and threshold voltage decreases from ?23.24 to ?16.12 V. Therefore, a strategy for the performance improvement of the CuPc-based OFET with large field-effect mobility and saturation drain current is developed, on the basis of the concept of nanoscale Au modification. The model of an additional electron transport channel formation by FET operation at the Au NPs/CuPc interface is therefore proposed to explain the observed performance improvement. Optimum CuPc thickness is confirmed to be about 50 nm in the present study. The device-to-device uniformity and time stability are discussed for future application.

  9. Position-dependent performance of copper phthalocyanine based field-effect transistors by gold nanoparticles modification.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao; Li, Yao; Lv, Wenli; Zhao, Feiyu; Sun, Lei; Peng, Yingquan; Wen, Zhanwei; Zhong, Junkang; Zhang, Jianping

    2015-01-21

    A facile fabrication and characteristics of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)-based organic field-effect transistor (OFET) using the gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) modification is reported, thereby achieving highly improved performance. The effect of Au NPs located at three different positions, that is, at the SiO2/CuPc interface (device B), embedding in the middle of CuPc layer (device C), and on the top of CuPc layer (device D), is investigated, and the results show that device D has the best performance. Compared with the device without Au NPs (reference device A), device D displays an improvement of field-effect mobility (?(sat)) from 1.65 × 10(-3) to 5.51 × 10(-3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and threshold voltage decreases from -23.24 to -16.12 V. Therefore, a strategy for the performance improvement of the CuPc-based OFET with large field-effect mobility and saturation drain current is developed, on the basis of the concept of nanoscale Au modification. The model of an additional electron transport channel formation by FET operation at the Au NPs/CuPc interface is therefore proposed to explain the observed performance improvement. Optimum CuPc thickness is confirmed to be about 50 nm in the present study. The device-to-device uniformity and time stability are discussed for future application. PMID:25548878

  10. Microscopic single particle characterization of zeolites synthesized in a soil polluted by copper or cadmium and treated with coal fly ash

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Terzano; M. Spagnuolo; L. Medici; K. Janssens; P. Ruggiero

    2007-01-01

    In the perspective of the development of new soil remediation technologies, zeolites can be directly synthesized in soil from fused coal fly ash to reduce heavy metal mobility and availability. Such a process promotes the formation of metal hydroxide\\/oxide precipitates which can be also occluded inside the structure of the forming minerals. In this study, different types of zeolites (zeolite

  11. Luminescent materials derived from the surface-modification of Ln3+-doped zeolite L with a silylated terpyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhiqiao; Li, Hongshi; Wang, Yige

    2014-11-01

    Herein we report luminescent materials of Ln3+ (Ln = Eu or Tb) doped disc shaped zeolite L crystals (Eu3+/ZLD, Tb3+/ZLD) modified with a silylated terpyridine (Terpy-Si). The modified crystals show bright red emission and green emission under UV-light irradiation due to the energy transfer from the Terpy-Si to the Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions. The obtained materials were characterized with FT-IR, SEM, XRD and elemental analysis. Luminescence spectroscopy was used to study the luminescence properties of the modified Eu3+(Tb3+)/ZLD crystals. The formation of europium(III) and terbium(III) Terpy-Si silicon complexes and energy transfer from Terpy-Si to Eu3+ ions and Tb3+ have been confirmed by luminescence spectroscopy.

  12. Erosion and Modifications of Tungsten-Coated Carbon and Copper Under High Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; S, Tamura; K, Tokunaga; N, Yoshida; Zhang, Fu; Xu, Zeng-yu; Ge, Chang-chun; N, Noda

    2003-08-01

    Tungsten-coated carbon and copper was prepared by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) and inert gas plasma spraying (IPS), respectively. W/CFC (Tungsten/Carbon Fiber-Enhanced material) coating has a diffusion barrier that consists of W and Re multi-layers pre-deposited by physical vapor deposition on carbon fiber-enhanced materials, while W/Cu coating has a graded transition interface. Different grain growth processes of tungsten coatings under stable and transient heat loads were observed, their experimental results indicated that the recrystallizing temperature of VPS-W coating was about 1400 °C and a recrystallized columnar layer of about 30 ?m thickness was formed by cyclic heat loads of 4 ms pulse duration. Erosion and modifications of W/CFC and W/Cu coatings under high heat load, such as microstructure changes of interface, surface plastic deformations and cracks, were investigated, and the erosion mechanism (erosion products) of these two kinds of tungsten coatings under high heat flux was also studied.

  13. COPPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a review of current knowledge of the distribution of copper in the environment and living things. Metabolism and the effects of copper in the biosphere are also considered. Copper compounds are common and widely distributed in nature. They are also extensively mined...

  14. The antibrowning agent sulfite inactivates Agaricus bisporus tyrosinase through covalent modification of the copper-B site.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Tomas F M; Gruppen, Harry; Sforza, Stefano; van Berkel, Willem J H; Vincken, Jean-Paul

    2013-12-01

    Sulfite salts are widely used as antibrowning agents in food processing. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism by which sulfite prevents enzymatic browning has remained unknown. Here, we show that sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO3) irreversibly blocks the active site of tyrosinase from the edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus, and that the competitive inhibitors tropolone and kojic acid protect the enzyme from NaHSO3 inactivation. LC-MS analysis of pepsin digests of NaHSO3 -treated tyrosinase revealed two peptides showing a neutral loss corresponding to the mass of SO3 upon MS(2) fragmentation. These peptides were found to be homologous peptides containing two of the three histidine residues that form the copper-B-binding site of mushroom tyrosinase isoform PPO3 and mushroom tyrosinase isoform PPO4, which were both present in the tyrosinase preparation used. Peptides showing this neutral loss behavior were not found in the untreated control. Comparison of the effects of NaHSO3 on apo-tyrosinase and holo-tyrosinase indicated that inactivation is facilitated by the active site copper ions. These data provide compelling evidence that inactivation of mushroom tyrosinase by NaHSO3 occurs through covalent modification of a single amino-acid residue, probably via addition of HSO3(-) to one of the copper-coordinating histidines in the copper-B site of the enzyme. PMID:24112416

  15. Application of zeolite membranes, films and coatings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fujio Mizukami

    1999-01-01

    Preparation methods of zeolite molecular sieve membranes and films with and without support were reviewed. Unsupported films have been prepared by in situ synthesis, casting of zeolite nanoparticles and solid state transformation, and supported films have been obtained by in situ synthesis, vapor-phase synthesis, secondary growth, casting of nanoparticles and their combinations or modifications. It is favorable to use supports

  16. Modification of soil microbial activity and several hydrolases in a forest soil artificially contaminated with copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellas, Rosa; Leirós, M? Carmen; Gil-Sotres, Fernando; Trasar-Cepeda, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    Soils have long been exposed to the adverse effects of human activities, which negatively affect soil biological activity. As a result of their functions and ubiquitous presence microorganisms can serve as environmental indicators of soil pollution. Some features of soil microorganisms, such as the microbial biomass size, respiration rate, and enzyme activity are often used as bioindicators of the ecotoxicity of heavy metals. Although copper is essential for microorganisms, excessive concentrations have a negative influence on processes mediated by microorganisms. In this study we measured the response of some microbial indicators to Cu pollution in a forest soil, with the aim of evaluating their potential for predicting Cu contamination. Samples of an Ah horizon from a forest soil under oakwood vegetation (Quercus robur L.) were contaminated in the laboratory with copper added at different doses (0, 120, 360, 1080 and 3240 mg kg-1) as CuCl2×2H2O. The soil samples were kept for 7 days at 25 °C and at a moisture content corresponding to the water holding capacity, and thereafter were analysed for carbon and nitrogen mineralization capacity, microbial biomass C, seed germination and root elongation tests, and for urease, phosphomonoesterase, catalase and ß-glucosidase activities. In addition, carbon mineralization kinetics were studied, by plotting the log of residual C against incubation time, and the metabolic coefficient, qCO2, was estimated. Both organic carbon and nitrogen mineralization were lower in polluted samples, with the greatest decrease observed in the sample contaminated with 1080 mg kg-1. In all samples carbon mineralization followed first order kinetics; the C mineralization constant was lower in contaminated than in uncontaminated samples and, in general, decreased with increasing doses of copper. Moreover, it appears that copper contamination not only reduced the N mineralization capacity, but also modified the N mineralization process, since in the contaminated samples all of the inorganic nitrogen was present as ammonium, probably because of inhibition of nitrification. There was a marked decrease in biomass-C with addition of copper, and the decrease was more acute at intermediate doses (average decrease, 73%). Despite the decreases in microbial biomass and mineralized C, the value of qCO2 increased after the addition of copper. Urease activity was strongly affected by the presence of copper and the decrease was proportional to the dose; the activity at the highest dose was only 96% of that in the uncontaminated sample. Phosphomonoesterase activity was also affected by addition of copper; the reduction in activity was less than for urease and the greatest reduction was observed for the dose of 1080 mg kg-1 of copper. Catalase activity was affected by the contamination, but no clear trend was observed in relation to the dose of copper. ß-glucosidase was scarcely modified by the contamination but an increase in activity was observed at the highest dose of copper. Seed germination was not affected by copper contamination, since it only showed a clear decrease for the sample contaminated with the highest dose of copper, while root elongation decreased sharply with doses higher than 120 mg kg-1 of copper. The combined germination-elongation index followed a similar pattern to that of root elongation. For all investigated properties showing a reduction of more than 50%, the response to copper contamination was fitted to a sigmoidal dose-response model, in order to estimate the ED50 values. The ED50 values were calculated for microbial biomass, urease, root elongation and germination-elongation index, and similar values were obtained, ranging from 340 to 405 mg kg-1 Cu. The ED50 values may therefore provide a good estimation of soil deterioration.

  17. Copper

    MedlinePLUS

    ... at whether a copper-lowering drug, tetrathiomolybdate (or TM), could help patients with advanced kidney cancer. Some ... more people with advanced cancer. More study of TM and a related drug (ATN-224) is taking ...

  18. Superhydrophilic surface modification of copper surfaces by Layer-by-Layer self-assembly and Liquid Phase Deposition of TiO(2) thin film.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Benjamin T; Cui, Tianhong

    2011-02-01

    A new method has been developed for the superhydrophilic surface modification of copper using versatile solution-based fabrication techniques. The high surface area of TiO(2) nanoparticles was exploited to create a thin film with increased surface energy that transformed copper materials from relatively hydrophobic to superhydrophilic. Copper exposed to ambient conditions resulting in a thin layer of copper oxide has a water contact angle near 90°, but following TiO(2) modification, the contact angle dropped to 0°. The thin film responsible for this drastic improvement in wettability proved durable by retaining its excellent properties throughout an extended application of thermal stress. SEM and Raman Spectroscopic analysis confirmed the structural integrity of the film before and after a durability test. PMID:21047640

  19. Design and modification of zeolite capsule catalyst, a confined reaction field, and its application in one-step isoparaffin synthesis from syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Guohui Yang; Jingjiang He; Yi Zhang; Yoshiharu Yoneyama; Yisheng Tan; Yizhuo Han; Tharapong Vitidsant; Noritatsu Tsubaki [University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan). Department of Applied Chemistry

    2008-05-15

    Four kinds of zeolite capsule catalyst with different crystallization conditions were prepared and utilized for the middle isoparaffin direct synthesis via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) reaction. Characterization results exhibited that these capsule catalysts had a compact, integral H-ZSM-5 shell. In FTS reactions on these zeolite capsule catalysts, hydrocarbons of C11+ were totally suppressed, accompanied by a sharp anti-Anderson-Schultz-Flory (ASF) law product distribution. The selectivity of light isoparaffin was improved obviously, but with the increase of the olefin's selectivity. Two-stage isoparaffin synthesis reaction, using the combination of zeolite capsule catalyst with hydrogenation catalyst of Pd/SiO{sub 2} in a single reactor as dual-bed catalyst, was also conducted for converting the residual olefins produced by the single zeolite capsule catalyst. Dependent on the palladium role of hydrogenation and hydrogen spillover, almost all the olefins effused from the first stage of zeolite capsule catalyst were hydrogenated, mostly converted to isoparaffin. The selectivity of isoparaffin in the final products was increased markedly as expected. 10 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Synthetic zeolites as amendments for sewage sludge-based compost

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. R Nissen; N. W Lepp; R Edwards

    2000-01-01

    The effects of incorporating a synthetic zeolite (Zeolite P) in a range of concentrations (0.1–1.0 w:w) into an experimental horticultural compost, derived from sewage sludge, have been investigated. The impact of zeolite treatment on time-related changes of the labile zinc, copper, iron and manganese pools within the compost was compared to lime incorporation (5% w:w) and to a proprietary unamended

  1. Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . .

    E-print Network

    Servatius, Brigitte

    Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . . Realization 2d Zeolites Finite Zeolites The Layer . . . Holes in Zeolites Motions Open Problems Home Page Title Page Page 1 of 100 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit ·First ·Prev ·Next ·Last ·Go Back ·Full Screen ·Close ·Quit Combinatorial Zeolites Herman Servatius -- Clark

  2. The effects of cold temperature on copper ion exchange by natural zeolite for use in a permeable reactive barrier in Antarctica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Z Woinarski; I Snape; G. W Stevens; S. C Stark

    2003-01-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are an in-situ passive treatment technology that removes dissolved contaminants from polluted waters through the subsurface emplacement of reactive materials such as natural zeolite. While significant work has been achieved using PRBs in temperate climates, adaptations to existing PRB technology and reactive material characteristics will be necessary for the successful treatment of heavy metal contaminated waters

  3. Surface modification of silicon nanowires via copper-free click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Anders; Friedbacher, Gernot; Hoffmann, Helmuth

    2011-06-21

    A two-step process based on copper-free click chemistry is described, by which the surface of silicon nanowires can be functionalized with specific organic substituents. A hydrogen-terminated nanowire surface is first primed with a monolayer of an ?,?-diyne and thereby turned into an alkyne-terminated, clickable platform, which is subsequently coupled with an overlayer of an organic azide carrying the desired terminal functionality. The reactive, electron-deficient character of the employed diyne enabled a quantitative coupling reaction at 50 °C without metal catalysis, which opens up a simple and versatile route for surface functionalization under mild conditions without any potentially harmful additives. PMID:21591646

  4. Design and fabrication of zeolite macro- and micromembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Lik Hang Joseph

    2001-07-01

    The chemical nature of the support surface influences zeolite nucleation, crystal growth and elm adhesion. It had been demonstrated that chemical modification of support surface can significantly alter the zeolite film and has a good potential for large-scale applications for zeolite membrane production. The incorporation of titanium and vanadium metal ions into the structural framework of MFI zeolite imparts the material with catalytic properties. The effects of silica and metal (i.e., Ti and V) content, template concentration and temperature on the zeolite membrane growth and morphology were investigated. Single-gas permeation experiments were conducted for noble gases (He and Ar), inorganic gases (H2, N2, SF6) and hydrocarbons (methane, n-C4, i-C4) to determine the separation performance of these membranes. Using a new fabrication method based on microelectronic fabrication and zeolite thin film technologies, complex microchannel geometry and network (<5 mum), as well as zeolite arrays (<10 mum) were successfully fabricated onto highly orientated supported zeolite films. The zeolite micropatterns were stable even after repeated thermal cycling between 303 K and 873 K for prolonged periods of time. This work also demonstrates that zeolites (i.e., Sil-1, ZSM-5 and TS-1) can be employed as catalyst, membrane or structural materials in miniature chemical devices. Traditional semiconductor fabrication technology was employed in micromachining the device architecture. Four strategies for the manufacture of zeolite catalytic microreactors were discussed: zeolite powder coating, uniform zeolite film growth, localized zeolite growth, and etching of zeolite-silicon composite film growth inhibitors. Silicalite-1 was also prepared as free-standing membrane for zeolite membrane microseparators.

  5. Amino modification of biochar for enhanced adsorption of copper ions from synthetic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang-Xi; Jiang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Biochar was modified as a high efficient and selective absorbent for copper ions (Cu(II)) by nitration and reduction. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analyses indicated that the amino groups were chemically bound to the functional groups on the biochar surface. Kinetics, thermal dynamics, and adsorption and desorption of Cu(II) in fixed-bed were investigated. The results demonstrated that the amino-modified biochar exhibited excellent adsorption performance for Cu(II). The adsorption capacity and bed volume of the modified biochar are five- and eight- folds of the pristine biochar, respectively. The Cu(II) combined with the amino groups through strong complexation based on the comparison of XPS and ATR-FTIR analyses before and after adsorption, which endows it with the high pH stability and ion selectivity. PMID:24183556

  6. Removal of fulvic acids using the surfactant modified zeolite in a fixed-bed reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shuguang Wang; Wenxin Gong; Xianwei Liu; Baoyu Gao; Qinyan Yue

    2006-01-01

    Modification of zeolite (clinoptilolite) surface with a quaternary ammonium, hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium (HDTMA), to improve the removal efficiency of fulvic acids (FA) in a zeolite fixed bed was investigated. The experiment consisted of modifying zeolite with HDTMA followed by adsorption and desorption of FA in the column. The effects of relevant parameters, such as HDTMA loading levels, FA flow rate

  7. Database of Zeolite Structures

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Database of Zeolite Structures is provided by the Structure Commission of the International Zeolite Association. Links include an Atlas of Zeolite Framework Types, Collection of Simulated XRD Powder Patterns for Zeolites, Catalog of Disordered Zeolite Structures, Schemes for Building Zeolite Framework Models, and Zeolite Structure References, as well as various publications. The database can be searched or browsed, and contains several useful tools such as the "input your data" link, which allows the user to enter crystallographic data not available in the database and generate the diffraction pattern.

  8. Interfacial studies of bimetallic corrosion in copper/ruthenium systems and silicon surface modification with organic and organometallic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalla, Praveen Reddy

    To form Cu interconnects, dual-damascene techniques like chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) and post-CMP became inevitable for removing the "overburden" Cu and for planarizing the wafer surface. During the CMP processing, Cu interconnects and barrier metal layers experience different electrochemical interactions depending on the slurry composition, pH, and ohmic contact with adjacent metal layers that would set corrosion process. Ruthenium as a replacement of existing diffusion barrier layer will require extensive investigation to eliminate or control the corrosion process during CMP and post CMP. Bimetallic corrosion process was investigated in the ammonium citrate (a complexing agent of Cu in CMP solutions) using micro test patterns and potentiodynamic measurements. The enhanced bimetallic corrosion of copper observed is due to noble behavior of the ruthenium metal. Cu formed Cu(II)-amine and Cu(Il)citrate complexes in alkaline and acidic solutions and a corrosion mechanism has been proposed. The currently used metallization process (PVD, CVD and ALD) require ultra-high vacuum and are expensive. A novel method of Si surface metallization process is discussed that can be achieved at room temperature and does not require ultra-high vacuum. Ruthenation of Si surface through strong Si-Ru covalent bond formation is demonstrated using different ruthenium carbonyl compounds. RBS analysis accounted for monolayer to sub-monolayer coverage of Si surface. Interaction of other metal carbonyl (like Fe, Re, and Rh) is also discussed. The silicon (111) surface modifications with vinyl terminated organic compounds were investigated to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and there after these surfaces were further functionalized. Acrylonitrile and vinylbenzophenone were employed for these studies. Ketone group of vinylbenzophenone anchored to Si surface demonstrated reactivity with reducing and oxidizing agents.

  9. Simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} abatement using zeolite-supported copper. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

    1995-12-01

    We have significantly improved on our earlier results with a copper-impregnated alumina, obtaining reproducible results for the impregnation procedure and linear behavior with solution concentration of the precursor. The copper acetylacetonate precursor is adsorbed molecularly onto the alumina surface, with no noticeable decomposition. The adsorbed complex appears to form layers on the alumina surface, similar to results found using the same complex with a silica substrate. The materials start out as light blue powders, and after oxidation are light green. Using infrared spectroscopy, we have examined the in situ adsorption and oxidation of SO{sub 2} on the oxidized sorbent, which is dispersed copper oxide supported on aluminum oxide, and have observed that the initial species formed correspond to aluminum sulfate and aluminum sulfate. The sulfate is formed at temperatures much lower than similar experiments studying SO{sub 2} adsorption on alumina and sodium-doped alumina. As a result of oxidation, the adsorbed sulfur species, which begin as aluminum sulfate and sulfate, are converted to copper sulfate.

  10. Preparation of a Versatile Bifunctional Zeolite for Targeted Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ndiege, Nicholas; Raidoo, Renugan; Schultz, Michael K.; Larsen, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Bifunctional zeolite Y was prepared for use in targeted in vivo molecular imaging applications. The strategy involved functionalization of the external surface of zeolite Y with chloropropyltriethoxysilane followed by reaction with sodium azide to form azide-functionalized NaY, which is amenable to copper(1) catalyzed click chemistry. In this study, a model alkyne (4-pentyn-1-ol) was attached to the azide-terminated surface via click chemistry to demonstrate feasibility for attachment of molecular targeting vectors (e.g., peptides, aptamers) to the zeolite surface. The modified particle efficiently incorporates the imaging radioisotope gallium-68 (68Ga) into the pores of the azide-functionalized NaY zeolite to form a stable bifunctional molecular targeting vector. The result is a versatile “clickable” zeolite platform that can be tailored for future in vivo molecular targeting and imaging modalities. PMID:21306141

  11. Metal Oxide/Zeolite Combination Absorbs H2S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1989-01-01

    Mixed copper and molybdenum oxides supported in pores of zeolite found to remove H2S from mixture of gases rich in hydrogen and steam, at temperatures from 256 to 538 degree C. Absorber of H2S needed to clean up gas streams from fuel processors that incorporate high-temperature steam reformers or hydrodesulfurizing units. Zeolites chosen as supporting materials because of their high porosity, rigidity, alumina content, and variety of both composition and form.

  12. Kesetimbangan Adsorpsi Optional Campuran Biner Cd(II) dan Cr(III) dengan Zeolit Alam Terimpregnasi 2-merkaptobenzotiazol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amun Amri; M Fahrurozi; Lab. Pemisahan; Dan Pemurnian

    Natural zeolite is one of adsorbents widely used in adsorption processes to treat water polution caused by heavy metal waste. In some cases, the modification of the zeolit active surface is important to improve its adsorpability and its selectivity. Characteristic of modified natural zeolite can be obtained from the analysis of adsorption equilibrium data which useful for adsorption process design.

  13. ZEOLITES: EFFECTIVE WATER PURIFIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are known for their adsorption, ion exchange and catalytic properties. Various natural zeolites are used as odor and moisture adsorbents and water softeners. Due to their acidic nature, synthetic zeolites are commonly employed as solid acid catalysts in petrochemical ind...

  14. TG and DTA Study of the Thermal Dehydration of Metal-exchanged Zeolite4A Samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Afzal; G. Yasmeen; M. Saleem; P. K. Butt; A. K. Khattak; J. Afzal

    2000-01-01

    Zeolite-4A is a hydrated aluminosilicate which becomes more hydrated when exchanged with transition metals. In this work,\\u000a the dehydration kinetics of cobalt, nickel and copper(II)-exchanged zeolite-4A were studied by means of TG and DTA over the\\u000a temperature range from 20 to 500C, and the numbers of water molecules in the metal-exchanged zeolite samples were calculated.\\u000a It was observed that, as

  15. Systems including catalysts in porous zeolite materials within a reactor for use in synthesizing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Rolllins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-07-24

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  16. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Rollins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  17. Mechanochemical Approach for Selective Deactivation of External Surface Acidity of ZSM-5 Zeolite Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Satoshi; Sato, Koki; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Tatami, Junichi; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Wakihara, Toru

    2015-03-01

    The acid sites associated with the external surface of zeolite particles are responsible for undesirable consecutive reactions, such as isomerization, alkylation, and oligomerization, resulting in a lower selectivity to a target product; therefore, the selective modification (deactivation) of the external surface of zeolite particles has been an important issue in zeolite science. Here, a new method for surface deactivation of zeolite catalyst was tested via a mechanochemical approach using powder composer. Postsynthetic mechanochemical treatment of ZSM-5 zeolite causes a selective deactivation of catalytically active sites existing only on the external surface, as a potentially useful catalyst for highly selective production of p-xylene. PMID:25654542

  18. Zeolite catalysis: technology

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.

    1980-07-01

    Zeolites have been used as catalysts in industry since the early nineteen sixties. The great majority of commercial applications employ one of three zeolite types: zeolite Y; Mordenite; ZSM-5. By far the largest use of zeolites is in catalytic cracking, and to a lesser extent in hydrocracking. This paper reviews the rapid development of zeolite catalysis and its application in industries such as: the production of gasoline by catalytic cracking of petroleum; isomerization of C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ paraffin hydrocarbons; alkylation of aromatics with olefins; xylene isomerization; and conversion of methanol to gasoline.

  19. Modifications of laccase activities of copper efflux oxidase, CueO by synergistic mutations in the first and second coordination spheres of the type I copper center.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kunishige; Kogi, Hiroki; Tsujimura, Seiya; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-02-15

    The redox potential of type I copper in the Escherichia coli multicopper oxidase CueO was shifted in the positive or negative direction as a result of the single, double, and triple mutations in the first and second coordination spheres: the formation of the NH···S(-)(Cys500 ligand) hydrogen bond, the breakdown of the NH(His443 ligand)···O(-)(Asp439) hydrogen bond, and the substitution of the Met510 ligand for the non-coordinating Leu or coordinating Gln. Laccase activities of CueO were maximally enhanced 140-fold by virtue of the synergistic effect of mild mutations at and at around the ligand groups to type I copper. PMID:23337502

  20. Theoretical investigation of CO interaction with copper sites in zeolites: periodic DFT and hybrid quantum mechanical/interatomic potential function study.

    PubMed

    Bludský, Ota; Silhan, Martin; Nachtigall, Petr; Bucko, T; Benco, L; Hafner, J

    2005-05-19

    Periodic DFT and combined quantum mechanics/interatomic potential function (QM-pot) models were used to describe the interaction of CO with the Cu+ sites in FER. The CO stretching frequencies were calculated using omega(CO)(CCSD(T))/r(CO)(DFT) scaling method relating frequencies determined using a high-level quantum-chemical (coupled clusters) method for simple model carbonyls to CO bond lengths calculated using periodic DFT and QM-pot methods for the Cu+-zeolite system. Both periodic DFT and QM-pot models together with omega(CO)/r(CO) scaling describe the CO stretching dynamics with the "near spectroscopic accuracy", giving nu(CO) = 2156 cm(-1) in excellent agreement with experimental data. Calculations for various Cu+ sites in FER show that both types of Cu+ sites in FER (channel-wall sites and intersection sites) have the same CO stretching frequencies. Thus, the CO stretching frequencies are not site-specific in the CO/Cu+/FER system. The convergence of the results with respect to the model size was analyzed. When the same exchange-correlation functional is used the adsorption energies from periodic DFT and QM-pot are in good agreement (about 2 kcal/mol difference) but substantially larger than those of the experiment. The adsorption energy calculated with the B3LYP functional agrees with available experimental data. The overestimation of the adsorption energy in DFT calculations (periodic or QM-pot) is related to a red-shift of the CO stretching mode, both result from an underestimation of the HOMO(5sigma)-LUMO(2pi) gap of CO and the consequent overestimation of the Cu(+)(d)-CO(2pi*) back-donation. For the adsorption energy, this can be overcome by the use of hybrid B3LYP exchange-correlation functional. For the frequency calculations, the DFT problem can be overcome by the use of the omega(CO)(CCSD(T))/r(CO)(DFT) correlation. PMID:16852159

  1. Nano- and microsized zeolites as a perspective material for potentiometric biosensors creation.

    PubMed

    Soldatkin, Oleksandr O; Shelyakina, Margaryta K; Arkhypova, Valentyna N; Soy, Esin; Kirdeciler, Salih Kaan; Ozansoy Kasap, Berna; Lagarde, Florence; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Akata Kurç, Burcu; Soldatkin, Alexei P; Dzyadevych, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    A number of potentiometric biosensors based on coimmobilization of enzymes with different types of zeolite on pH-ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) have been developed. Their working characteristics have been determined and compared. It was shown that clinoptilolite and zeolite Beta polymorph A (BEA) are more promising for creating biosensors than zeolite A. Changing the concentration of zeolite BEA in membranes, it is possible to extend the biosensor linear measurement range. The two-layer method of deposition of the enzyme with clinoptilolite was found to provide a significant increase in the biosensor sensitivity to substrates, whereas thermal modification of the zeolite BEA crystals can improve analytical characteristics of potentiometric biosensors for detection of toxic substances. These results show that it is possible to regulate the ISFET characteristics for different enzyme-based biosensors by tailoring the electrode surfaces via different zeolites. This makes zeolites strong candidates for integration into biosensors as ISFET modifiers. PMID:25852356

  2. Oxidative regeneration of toluene-saturated natural zeolite by gaseous ozone: the influence of zeolite chemical surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Alejandro, Serguei; Valdés, Héctor; Manéro, Marie-Hélène; Zaror, Claudio A

    2014-06-15

    In this study, the effect of zeolite chemical surface characteristics on the oxidative regeneration of toluene saturated-zeolite samples is investigated. A Chilean natural zeolite (53% clinoptilolite, 40% mordenite and 7% quartz) was chemically modified by acid treatment with hydrochloric acid and by ion-exchange with ammonium sulphate. Thermal pre-treatments at 623 and 823K were applied and six zeolite samples with different chemical surface characteristics were generated. Chemical modification of natural zeolite followed by thermal out-gassing allows distinguishing the role of acidic surface sites on the regeneration of exhausted zeolites. An increase in Brønsted acid sites on zeolite surface is observed as a result of ammonium-exchange treatment followed by thermal treatment at 623K, thus increasing the adsorption capacity toward toluene. High ozone consumption could be associated to a high content of Lewis acid sites, since these could decompose ozone into atomic active oxygen species. Then, surface oxidation reactions could take part among adsorbed toluene at Brønsted acid sites and surface atomic oxygen species, reducing the amount of adsorbed toluene after the regenerative oxidation with ozone. Experimental results show that the presence of adsorbed oxidation by-products has a negative impact on the recovery of zeolite adsorption capacity. PMID:24794812

  3. Cu, Zn-Superoxide Dismutase-driven Free Radical Modifications: Copper- and Carbonate Radical Anion-initiated Protein Radical Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Dario C.; Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E.; Corbett, Jean T.; Deterding, Leesa J.; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The understanding of the mechanism, oxidant(s) involved, and how/what protein radicals are produced during the reaction of wild type Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) with H2O2 and their fate is incomplete, but a better understanding of the role of this reaction is needed. We used immuno-spin trapping and mass spectrometry analysis to study the protein oxidations driven by human (h) and bovine (b) SOD1 when reacting with H2O2 using human serum albumin (HSA) and mouse brain homogenate (mBH) as target models. In order to gain mechanistic information about this reaction, we considered both copper- and carbonate radical anion-initiated protein oxidation. We chose experimental conditions that clearly separated SOD1-driven oxidation via CO3 •? from that initiated by copper released from the SOD1 active site. In the absence of (bi)carbonate, site-specific radical-mediated fragmentation is produced by SOD1 active-site copper. In the presence of (bi)carbonate and DTPA (to suppress copper chemistry), CO3 •? radical produced distinct radical sites in both SOD1 and HSA, which caused protein aggregation without causing protein fragmentation. The CO3 •? produced by reaction of hSOD1 with H2O2 also produced distinctive DMPO nitrone adduct positive protein bands in the mBH. Finally, we propose a biochemical mechanism to explain CO3 •? production from carbon dioxide, enhanced protein radical formation, and protection by (bi)carbonate against H2O2-induced fragmentation of the SOD1 active site. Our study is important for establishing experimental conditions for studying the molecular mechanism and targets of oxidation during the reverse reaction of SOD1 with H2O2; these results are the first step in analyzing the critical targets of SOD1-driven oxidation during such pathological processes as neuroinflammation. PMID:18764780

  4. Ammoniacal nitrogen removal from water by treatment with clays and zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Roži?; Š Cerjan-Stefanovi?; S. Kurajica; V. Van?ina; E. Hodži?

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the removal of nitrogen in the form of ammonium ions (N-NH+4) from aqueous solutions using natural clay and zeolite. The Croatian zeolite clinoptilolite from the area of Donje Jesenje and Croatian bentonite clay from the Kutina area were used as natural filtration materials. Alkaline and acid modification of natural clay was

  5. Studies of anions sorption on natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Barczyk, K; Mozgawa, W; Król, M

    2014-12-10

    This work presents results of FT-IR spectroscopic studies of anions-chromate, phosphate and arsenate - sorbed from aqueous solutions (different concentrations of anions) on zeolites. The sorption has been conducted on natural zeolites from different structural groups, i.e. chabazite, mordenite, ferrierite and clinoptilolite. The Na-forms of sorbents were exchanged with hexadecyltrimethylammonium cations (HDTMA(+)) and organo-zeolites were obtained. External cation exchange capacities (ECEC) of organo-zeolites were measured. Their values are 17mmol/100g for chabazite, 4mmol/100g for mordenite and ferrierite and 10mmol/100g for clinoptilolite. The used initial inputs of HDTMA correspond to 100% and 200% ECEC of the minerals. Organo-modificated sorbents were subsequently used for immobilization of mentioned anions. It was proven that aforementioned anions' sorption causes changes in IR spectra of the HDTMA-zeolites. These alterations are dependent on the kind of anions that were sorbed. In all cases, variations are due to bands corresponding to the characteristic Si-O(Si,Al) vibrations (occurring in alumino- and silicooxygen tetrahedra building spatial framework of zeolites). Alkylammonium surfactant vibrations have also been observed. Systematic changes in the spectra connected with the anion concentration in the initial solution have been revealed. The amounts of sorbed CrO4(2-), AsO4(3-) and PO4(3-) ions were calculated from the difference between their concentrations in solutions before (initial concentration) and after (equilibrium concentration) sorption experiments. Concentrations of anions were determined by spectrophotometric method. PMID:25002191

  6. Potential of Sustainable Hierarchical Zeolites in the Valorization of ?-Pinene.

    PubMed

    Nuttens, Nicolas; Verboekend, Danny; Deneyer, Aron; Van Aelst, Joost; Sels, Bert F

    2015-04-13

    In the valorization of ?-pinene, which is an important biomass intermediate derived from turpentine oil, hierarchical (mesoporous) zeolites represent a superior class of catalysts. Hierarchical USY, ZSM-5, and beta zeolites have been prepared, characterized, and catalytically evaluated, with the aim of combining the highest catalytic performance with the most sustainable synthetic protocol. These zeolites are prepared by alkaline treatment in aqueous solutions of NH4 OH, NaOH, diethylamine, and NaOH complemented with tetrapropylammonium bromide. The hierarchical USY zeolite is the most attractive catalyst of the tested series, and is able to combine an overall organic-free synthesis with an up to sixfold activity enhancement and comparable selectivity over the conventional USY zeolite. This superior performance relates to a threefold greater activity than that of the commercial standard, namely, H2 SO4 /TiO2 . Correlation of the obtained benefits to the amount of solid lost during the postsynthetic modifications highlights that the highest activity gains are obtained with minor leaching. Furthermore, a highly zeolitic character, as determined by bulk XRD, is beneficial, but not crucial, in the conversion of ?-pinene. The alkaline treatments not only result in a higher overall activity, but also a more functional external surface area, attaining up to four times the pinene conversions per square nanometer. The efficiency of the hierarchical USY zeolite is concomitantly demonstrated in the conversion of limonene and turpentine oil, which emphasizes its industrial potential. PMID:25736719

  7. Lithium modified zeolite synthesis for conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Ayoub, Muhammad, E-mail: muhammad.ayoub@petronas.com.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750, Tronoh, Perak, Malaysia and School of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 43000, Pinang (Malaysia); Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi, E-mail: chzuhairi@usm.my [School of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 43000, Pinang (Malaysia); Inayat, Abrar, E-mail: abrar.inayat@petronas.com.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Basic zeolite has received significant attention in the catalysis community. These zeolites modified with alkaline are the potential replacement for existing zeolite catalysts due to its unique features with added advantages. The present paper covers the preparation of lithium modified zeolite Y (Li-ZeY) and its activity for solvent free conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol via etherification process. The modified zeolite was well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Nitrogen Adsorption. The SEM images showed that there was no change in morphology of modified zeolite structure after lithium modification. XRD patterns showed that the structure of zeolite was sustained after lithium modification. The surface properties of parent and modified zeolite was also observed N{sub 2} adsortion-desorption technique and found some changes in surface area and pore size. In addition, the basic strength of prepared materials was measured by Hammet indicators and found that basic strength of Li-ZeY was highly improved. This modified zeolite was found highly thermal stable and active heterogamous basic catalyst for conversion of solvent free glycerol to polyglycerol. This reaction was conducted at different temperatures and 260 °C was found most active temperature for this process for reaction time from 6 to 12 h over this basic catalyst in the absence of solvent.

  8. Lithium modified zeolite synthesis for conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, Muhammad; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Inayat, Abrar

    2014-10-01

    Basic zeolite has received significant attention in the catalysis community. These zeolites modified with alkaline are the potential replacement for existing zeolite catalysts due to its unique features with added advantages. The present paper covers the preparation of lithium modified zeolite Y (Li-ZeY) and its activity for solvent free conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol via etherification process. The modified zeolite was well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Nitrogen Adsorption. The SEM images showed that there was no change in morphology of modified zeolite structure after lithium modification. XRD patterns showed that the structure of zeolite was sustained after lithium modification. The surface properties of parent and modified zeolite was also observed N2 adsortion-desorption technique and found some changes in surface area and pore size. In addition, the basic strength of prepared materials was measured by Hammet indicators and found that basic strength of Li-ZeY was highly improved. This modified zeolite was found highly thermal stable and active heterogamous basic catalyst for conversion of solvent free glycerol to polyglycerol. This reaction was conducted at different temperatures and 260 °C was found most active temperature for this process for reaction time from 6 to 12 h over this basic catalyst in the absence of solvent.

  9. Diagram of Zeolite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing (CAMMP) in Cambridge, MA, a NASA-sponsored Commercial Space Center, is working to improve zeolite materials for storing hydrogen fuel. CAMMP is also applying zeolites to detergents, optical cables, gas and vapor detection for environmental monitoring and control, and chemical production techniques that significantly reduce by-products that are hazardous to the environment. Depicted here is one of the many here complex geometric shapes which make them highly absorbent. Zeolite experiments have also been conducted aboard the International Space Station

  10. Regenerative Cu/La zeolite supported desulfurizing sorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (inventor); Sharma, Pramod K. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Efficient, regenerable sorbents for removal of H2S from fluid hydrocarbons such as diesel fuel at moderate condition comprise a porous, high surface area aluminosilicate support, suitably a synthetic zeolite, and most preferably a zeolite having a free lattice opening of at least 6 Angstroms containing from 0.1 to 0.5 moles of copper ions, lanthanum ions or their mixtures. The sorbent removes sulfur from the hydrocarbon fuel in high efficiency and can be repetitively regenerated without loss of activity.

  11. ZEOLITE CHARACTERIZATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, W; Herbert Nigg, H

    2007-09-13

    The Savannah River Site isolates tritium from its process streams for eventual recycling. This is done by catalyzing the formation of tritiated water (from process streams) and then sorbing that water on a 3A zeolite (molsieve) bed. The tritium is recovered by regenerating the saturated bed into a Mg-based water cracking unit. The process described has been in use for about 15 years. Recently chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was noted in the system piping. This has resulted in the need to replace the corroded piping and associated molecular sieve beds. The source of chlorine has been debated and one possible source is the zeolite itself. Since new materials are being purchased for recently fabricated beds, a more comprehensive analysis protocol for characterizing zeolite has been developed. Tests on archived samples indicate the potential for mobile chloride species to be generated in the zeolite beds.

  12. Composite zeolite membranes

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M. (Albuquerque, NM); Thoma, Steven G. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new class of composite zeolite membranes and synthesis techniques therefor has been invented. These membranes are essentially defect-free, and exhibit large levels of transmembrane flux and of chemical and isotopic selectivity.

  13. Controlling electron beam-induced structure modifications and cation exchange in cadmium sulfide-copper sulfide heterostructured nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haimei; Sadtler, Bryce; Habenicht, Carsten; Freitag, Bert; Alivisatos, A Paul; Kisielowski, Christian

    2013-11-01

    The atomic structure and interfaces of CdS/Cu2S heterostructured nanorods are investigated with the aberration-corrected TEAM 0.5 electron microscope operated at 80 kV and 300 kV applying in-line holography and complementary techniques. Cu2S exhibits a low-chalcocite structure in pristine CdS/Cu2S nanorods. Under electron beam irradiation the Cu2S phase transforms into a high-chalcocite phase while the CdS phase maintains its wurtzite structure. Time-resolved experiments reveal that Cu(+)-Cd(2+) cation exchange at the CdS/Cu2S interfaces is stimulated by the electron beam and proceeds within an undisturbed and coherent sulfur sub-lattice. A variation of the electron beam current provides an efficient way to control and exploit such irreversible solid-state chemical processes that provide unique information about system dynamics at the atomic scale. Specifically, we show that the electron beam-induced copper-cadmium exchange is site specific and anisotropic. A resulting displacement of the CdS/Cu2S interfaces caused by beam-induced cation interdiffusion equals within a factor of 3-10 previously reported Cu diffusion length measurements in heterostructured CdS/Cu2S thin film solar cells with an activation energy of 0.96 eV. PMID:23830376

  14. Micro-scale modification of diamond-like carbon and copper electroplating by scanning probe field emission current method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shigehiro; Antoku, Yuki; Han, Younggun; Choi, Woon; Tomokage, Hajime

    2009-04-01

    Micro-scale modification of nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC) is performed by applying an electric field between a tungsten tip and DLC film surface in vacuum using the scanning probe field emission current (SPFEC) method. The dc voltage ranging from -700 V to -3000 V is applied to the tip. Then, electroplating of Cu is performed on the DLC film surface in CuCl 2 solution by a three electrode-cell. The cathodic polarization curves indicate that the start potential of Cu on modified DLC film is shifted to a lower value than that of Cu on an as-grown DLC film. Cu deposits selectively on the DLC surface modified by an electric field. With this technique, the micro-scale patterning of Cu can be achieved by electroplating without a lithographic process.

  15. Zeolite A imidazolate frameworks.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hideki; Côté, Adrien P; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; O'Keeffe, Michael; Yaghi, Omar M

    2007-07-01

    Faujasite (FAU) and zeolite A (LTA) are technologically important porous zeolites (aluminosilicates) because of their extensive use in petroleum cracking and water softening. Introducing organic units and transition metals into the backbone of these types of zeolite allows us to expand their pore structures, enhance their functionality and access new applications. The invention of metal-organic frameworks and zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) has provided materials based on simple zeolite structures where only one type of cage is present. However, so far, no metal-organic analogues based on FAU or LTA topologies exist owing to the difficulty imposed by the presence of two types of large cage (super- and beta-cages for FAU, alpha- and beta-cages for LTA). Here, we have identified a strategy to produce an LTA imidazolate framework in which both the link geometry and link-link interactions play a decisive structure-directing role. We describe the synthesis and crystal structures of three porous ZIFs that are expanded analogues of zeolite A; their cage walls are functionalized, and their metal ions can be changed without changing the underlying LTA topology. Hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and argon gas adsorption isotherms are reported and the selectivity of this material for carbon dioxide over methane is demonstrated. PMID:17529969

  16. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tu?çe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (?(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The ?(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low ?(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study. PMID:23460541

  17. Microporous Zeolite MembranesMicroporous Zeolite Membranes and Their Potential for Hand Their Potential for H22 ProductionProduction

    E-print Network

    Microporous Zeolite MembranesMicroporous Zeolite Membranes and Their Potential for Hand interest." 22 Zeolites andZeolites and ZeotypesZeotypes ZeoliteZeolite ­­ A crystallineA crystalline zeolites.same structure as known zeolites. MFI Zeolite #12;"...exceptional service in the national interest

  18. New catalysts based on the heteropoly acid-zeolite system for the synthesis of higher ?-olefins by paraffin cracking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. R. Konuspayev; K. A. Kadirbekov; R. K. Nurbayeva; A. T. Sarsekova

    2011-01-01

    Natural zeolites (clinoptilolite) from the Shankanay deposit in Almaty oblast were used to prepare catalysts for the synthesis\\u000a of higher ?-olefins by paraffin cracking. The modification of zeolite with inorganic and organic heteropoly acids resulted\\u000a in an enhancement of catalytic activity. The olefin yield on the zeolite modified with heteropoly acids was as high as 36.6%\\u000a after one run in

  19. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M; Hayashi, Hideki; Banerjee, Rahul; Park, Kyo Sung; Wang, Bo; Cote, Adrien P

    2012-11-20

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  20. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Hayashi, Hideki; Banerjee, Rahul; Park, Kyo Sung; Wang, Bo; Cote, Adrien P.

    2014-08-19

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  1. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Wang, Bo

    2013-07-09

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  2. The removal of bacteria by modified natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Milán, Z; de Las Pozas, C; Cruz, M; Borja, R; Sánchez, E; Ilangovan, K; Espinosa, Y; Luna, B

    2001-01-01

    The removal effect of natural and modified zeolites containing different heavy metals (Ni2+, Zn2+, Fe3+ and Cu2+) on pure cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in a solid medium was evaluated in this work. These experiments were carried out in a continuous mode treating municipal wastewater. Faecal coliform species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were identified. The rate constants of heavy metal lixiviation were determined using a first order kinetic model. The removal effect of modified natural zeolites in both a solid medium and in continuous mode showed an increased elimination of the bacterial population. The results established a decreasing order of the removal effect as follows: Cu2+ > Fe3+ > Zn2+ > Ni2+. The best performance of columns was obtained for inlet bacterial concentrations below 10(6) cells/100 ml. Most of the identified bacterial species were affected by copper modified zeolites, although Serratia marcescens presented the highest sensitivity and Klebsiella pneumoniae the greatest resistance. PMID:11501306

  3. Reclaiming silver from silver zeolite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reimann

    1991-01-01

    Silver zeolite is used to capture radioiodines from air cleaning systems in some nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It may become radioactively contaminated and\\/or poisoned by hydrocarbon vapors, which diminishes its capacity for iodine. Silver zeolite contains up to 38 wt% silver. A pyrometallurgical process was developed to reclaim the silver before disposing of the unserviceable zeolite

  4. Advances in nanosized zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintova, Svetlana; Gilson, Jean-Pierre; Valtchev, Valentin

    2013-07-01

    This review highlights recent developments in the synthesis of nanosized zeolites. The strategies available for their preparation (organic-template assisted, organic-template free, and alternative procedures) are discussed. Major breakthroughs achieved by the so-called zeolite crystal engineering and encompass items such as mastering and using the physicochemical properties of the precursor synthesis gel/suspension, optimizing the use of silicon and aluminium precursor sources, the rational use of organic templates and structure-directing inorganic cations, and careful adjustment of synthesis conditions (temperature, pressure, time, heating processes from conventional to microwave and sonication) are addressed. An on-going broad and deep fundamental understanding of the crystallization process, explaining the influence of all variables of this complex set of reactions, underpins an even more rational design of nanosized zeolites with exceptional properties. Finally, the advantages and limitations of these methods are addressed with particular attention to their industrial prospects and utilization in existing and advanced applications.

  5. Association of structural modifications with bioactivity in three new copper(II) complexes of Schiff base ligands derived from 5-chlorosalicylaldehyde and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Liu, Ya-Hong; Yuan, Ling-Zhi; Ma, Zhong-Ying; Zhao, Chun-Lai; Xie, Cheng-Zhi; Bao, Wei-Guo; Xu, Jing-Yuan

    2015-05-01

    Three novel structurally associated copper(II) complexes [Cu(II)(SalCl-Gly)(H2O)2] (1), [Cu(II)(SalCl-Ala)(H2O)] (2) and [Cu(II)(SalCl-Gly)(bipy)]·0.5H2O (3) (SalCl-Gly=5-chloro-2-hydroxybenzylidene-glycine, SalCl-Ala=5-chloro-2-hydroxybenzylidene-alanine, bipy=2,2'-bipyridine) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, elemental analysis, IR and fluorescence spectroscopy. Single-crystal diffraction reveals that complex 1 is an infinite 1D zigzag chain in which SalCl-Gly serves as both a chelating and a bridging ligand, while complexes 2 and 3 are mononuclear. Cu(II) ions in complexes 1-3 exhibit distorted quasi-hexacoordinated octahedral, tetracoordinated square planar, and pentacoordinated square pyramid geometry, respectively. Their interactions with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been investigated by viscosity measurements and fluorescence spectroscopy. The apparent binding constant (Kapp) values for 1-3 are 1.02×10(5), 0.98×10(5) and 1.57×10(5)M(-1), respectively. All complexes displayed efficient oxidative cleavage of supercoiled DNA in the presence of H2O2. Complex 2, whose ligand can be regarded as a methyl-modification of SalCl-Gly of 1, showed a reduced DNA cleavage activity and a little-changed DNA-binding ability compared with 1. While attaching a 2,2'-bipyridine group to 1, the resulting complex 3 was conferred an enhanced intercalation into DNA. Moreover, cytotoxicity studies of three complexes against HepG-2 (human liver hepatocellular carcinoma) and NCI-H460 (human large-cell lung carcinoma) cells indicated that, thereto, complex 3 possessed the highest inhibition on viability of tested cells. PMID:25771239

  6. The Local Environment of Cu+ in Cu-Y Zeolite and Its Relationship to the Synthesis of Dimethyl Carbonate

    E-print Network

    Bell, Alexis T.

    , 2005 Cu-exchanged Y zeolite was investigated in order to determine the location of the copper cations Al K-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Complimentary information was obtained of the copper cations remain as Cu+, but some oxidation of Cu+ to Cu2+ does occur. It is also concluded

  7. Separations Using Zeolite Membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joaquín Coronas; Jesús Santamaría

    1999-01-01

    This overview describes some of the main features of the use of zeolite membranes for separation applications. Four different types of separations are considered: separation of non-adsorbing compounds, of organic molecules, of permanent gases from vapors, and of water (or polar molecules) from organic (or non-polar) species. Several factors, such as the limiting pore size and pore size distribution, surface

  8. Diffusion in zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas M. Ruthven

    1995-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of intracrystalline diffusion in zeolites by novel macroscopic methods and the results obtained by some of these methods are reviewed. For many systems there is a significant discrepancy between the macroscopic and microscopic (QENS, PFG NMR) diffusivity values. A possible explanation is suggested.

  9. Theoretical study of vanadium oxides interaction with Y-zeolite.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, M; Sansores, L E; Salcedo, R; Montoya, J A

    2008-12-01

    A current problem about oils and feedstock in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is the continuous cumulative deposition of metal contaminants on the catalyst, resulting in important modifications of its properties. Vanadium plays a detrimental role on the catalyst components because enhances the destruction of the Y-zeolite structure during regeneration stage when it is exposed by steam and oxygen at high temperatures. Knowledge of the mechanism interaction of vanadium with the catalyst is important to improve FCC performance. Quantum Molecular Dynamics calculations were done introducing the VO, V2O3, VO2 or V2O5 molecules at the center of a Y-zeolite ring simulating regeneration conditions. The results indicate that the principal reaction is carried out among the zeolite and the vanadium atoms of molecules. This happens, when interaction is presented, since the loss of a hydrogen atom of the active place causes high degree of oxygen reactivity. PMID:19205212

  10. A reliable and reproducible method for the lipase assay in an AOT/isooctane reversed micellar system: Modification of the copper-soap colorimetric method.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Chang Woo; Park, Kyung-Min; Choi, Seung Jun; Chang, Pahn-Shick

    2015-09-01

    The copper-soap method, which is based on the absorbance of a fatty acid-copper complex at 715nm, is a widely used colorimetric assay to determine the lipase activity in reversed micellar system. However, the absorbance of the bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT)-copper complex prevents the use of an AOT/isooctane reversed micellar system. An extraction step was added to the original procedure to remove AOT and eliminate interference from the AOT-copper complex. Among the solvents tested, acetonitrile was determined to be the most suitable because it allows for the generation of a reproducible calibration curve with oleic acid that is independent of the AOT concentrations. Based on the validation data, the modified method, which does not experience interference from the AOT-copper complex, could be a useful method with enhanced accuracy and reproducibility for the lipase assay. PMID:25842332

  11. Novel modified zeolites for energy-efficient hydrocarbon separations.

    SciTech Connect

    Arruebo, Manuel (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Dong, Junhang; Anderson, Thomas (Burns and McDonnell, Kansas City, MO); Gu, Xuehong; Gray, Gary (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH); Bennett, Ron (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH); Nenoff, Tina Maria; Kartin, Mutlu; Johnson, Kaylynn (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH); Falconer, John (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Noble, Richard (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO)

    2006-11-01

    We present synthesis, characterization and testing results of our applied research project, which focuses on the effects of surface and skeletal modification of zeolites for significant enhancements in current hydrocarbon (HC) separations. Zeolites are commonly used by the chemical and petroleum industries as catalysts and ion-exchangers. They have high potential for separations owing to their unique pore structures and adsorption properties and their thermal, mechanical and chemical properties. Because of zeolites separation properties, low cost, and robustness in industrial process, they are natural choice for use as industrial adsorbents. This is a multidisciplinary effort to research, design, develop, engineer, and test new and improved materials for the separation of branched vs. linear organic molecules found in commercially important HC streams via adsorption based separations. The focus of this project was the surface and framework modification of the commercially available zeolites, while tuning the adsorption properties and the selectivities of the bulk and membrane separations. In particular, we are interested with our partners at Goodyear Chemical, on how to apply the modified zeolites to feedstock isoprene purification. For the characterization and the property measurements of the new and improved materials powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Residual Gas Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (RGA-MS), Electron Microscopy (SEM/EDAX), temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and surface area techniques were utilized. In-situ carbonization of MFI zeolite membranes allowed for the maximum separation of isoprene from n-pentane, with a 4.1% enrichment of the binary stream with n-pentane. In four component streams, a modified MFI membrane had high selectivities for n-pentane and 1-3-pentadiene over isoprene but virtually no separation for the 2-methyl-2-butene/isoprene pair.

  12. Zeolite crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Thompson, Robert W.; Dixon, Anthony G.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of large, uniform zeolite crystals in high yield in space can have a major impact on the chemical process industry. Large zeolite crystals will be used to improve basic understanding of adsorption and catalytic mechanisms, and to make zeolite membranes. To grow large zeolites in microgravity, it is necessary to control the nucleation event and fluid motion, and to enhance nutrient transfer. Data is presented that suggests nucleation can be controlled using chemical compounds (e.g., Triethanolamine, for zeolite A), while not adversely effecting growth rate. A three-zone furnace has been designed to perform multiple syntheses concurrently. The operating range of the furnace is 295 K to 473 K. Teflon-lined autoclaves (10 ml liquid volume) have been designed to minimize contamination, reduce wall nucleation, and control mixing of pre-gel solutions on orbit. Zeolite synthesis experiments will be performed on USML-1 in 1992.

  13. Removal of BTEX from produced water using tailored zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Cadena, F. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The exchangeable cations in four natural zeolites (Bowie, CH, Winston and Tilden) were replaced with organic cations (quaternary amines). Two types of organic cations were used to create an organophilic environment suitable for adsorption of single-ring aromatics from water: small organic cations and long- alkyl chain cations. Both types of organic cations displace the natural exchangeable cations in the zeolite during the modification process. An organic layer covers the external surface of the zeolite after the natural inorganic cations are replaced by organic molecules. Two different pollutant adsorption mechanisms are observed in organozeolites. The first mechanism is prevalent when the zeolites are modified with small organic cations. The steric properties of adsorbed compounds are controlled by the intermolecular distance between the organic cations in the first mechanism. Benzene can be preferentially removed from solution over closely-related compounds (toluene and o-xylene) when the distance between organic cations is sufficient to allow this simple planar pollutant to enter into the intermolecular organic gaps. However, intermolecular distances that are significantly smaller than the benzene molecule prevent access to the adsorption sites. Organozeolites with long intermolecular gaps produce insufficient organic-organic interactions to hold the pollutants onto the solid-organic matrix. The selective adsorption produced by small organic cations is benzene >> toluene > xylene. The second mechanism is exhibited by zeolites modified with long-alkyl chains.

  14. Zeolite exposure and associated pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, K.R.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Rom, W.N.; Moatamed, F.

    1985-06-01

    Naturally occurring zeolite minerals are aluminum silicates widespread in the earth's crust. Several of these minerals have fibrous forms and have been implicated as a possible cause of benign and malignant diseases of the lung and pleura in Turkey. This report describes a patient, living in an area of Nevada rich in zeolites, who presented with idiopathic pleural thickening and pulmonary fibrosis associated with extensive pulmonary deposition of zeolites.

  15. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G. [Geological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States); Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Mid-Continent Ecology Div.

    1998-11-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. The authors investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by {ge}70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  16. Spectroscopy and redox chemistry of copper in mordenite.

    PubMed

    Vanelderen, Pieter; Vancauwenbergh, Julie; Tsai, Ming-Li; Hadt, Ryan G; Solomon, Edward I; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F

    2014-01-13

    Copper-containing zeolites, such as mordenite (MOR), have recently gained increased attention as a consequence of their catalytic potential. While the preferred copper loadings in these catalytic studies are generally high, the literature lacks appropriate spectroscopic and structural information on such Cu-rich zeolite samples. Higher copper loadings increase the complexity of the copper identity and their location in the zeolite host, but they also provide the opportunity to create novel Cu sites, which are perhaps energetically less favorable, but possibly more reactive and more suitable for catalysis. In order to address the different role of each Cu site in catalysis, we here report a combined electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), UV/Vis-NIR and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) study on highly copper-loaded MOR. Highly resolved diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra of the CuMOR samples were obtained due to the increased copper loading, allowing the differentiation of two isolated mononuclear Cu(2+) sites and the unambiguous correlation with extensively reported features in the EPR spectrum. Ligand field theory is applied together with earlier suggested theoretical calculations to determine their coordination chemistry and location within the zeolite matrix, and the theoretical analysis further allowed us to define factors governing their redox behavior. In addition to monomeric species, an EPR-silent, possibly dimeric, copper site is present in accordance with its charge transfer absorption feature at 22200 cm(-1), and quantified with TPR. Its full description and true location in MOR is currently being investigated. PMID:24399800

  17. Metallo-hydrazone complexes immobilized in zeolite Y: Synthesis, identification and acid violet-1 degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ayman H.; Thabet, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Copper(II), cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes of hydrazone ligand (SAPH) derived from salicylaldehyde and phenylhydrazine have been encapsulated in zeolite-Y super cages via ship-in-a-bottle synthesis. Detailed characterization of the intrazeolitic complexes were performed by elemental analysis, spectral (FT-IR, UV-Vis.) studies, magnetic measurements and X-ray diffraction. Furthers, surface texture and thermal analysis (TG, DTG, DTA) have provided further evidence for successful immobilization of the metal complexes inside zeolite Y. Investigation of the stereochemistry of these incorporated chelates pointed out that, SAPH ligand is capable to coordinate with the central metal through the (C dbnd N), phenolic (OH) and (NH) groups forming polynuclear structures. The involvement of zeolite oxygen in coordination was postulated in the hybrid materials. The intrazeolitic copper, cobalt and nickel-SAPH complexes have distorted tetrahedral, octahedral and square-pyramidal configurations, respectively. The zeolite encapsulated complexes are thermally stable up to 800 °C except Cu(II) sample which is thermally stable up to midpoint 428 °C. The assessment of the catalytic activity was performed by the use of the photo-degradation of acid violet-1 dye as a probe reaction in presence of H 2O 2 as an oxidant. Decolorization of acid violet-1 dye was examined under the same conditions whereas the unpromoted zeolite and Cu II, Co II, Ni II-hydrazone complexes supported on zeolite showed 13% and 76%, 53%, 43% color removal, respectively. The results revealed that, the zeolite encapsulated Cu(II) complex generally exhibited better catalytic efficiency (76%) compared with other investigated zeolite encapsulated metal-hydrazone samples.

  18. The effect of some transition metal ions exchanged with zeolites on benzaldehyde, benozophenone and cyclohexanone phenylhydrazones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Farzaneh; J. Soleimannejad; M. Ghandi

    1997-01-01

    Phenylhydrazone derivatives of benzaldehyde, benzophenone and cyclohexanone under the catalytic effect of exchanged zeolite NaY (NaA and HS in some cases) with transition metal ions of chromium (III), iron (III), manganese (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) in refluxing benzene resulted in the formation of benzaldehyde, benzophenone and cyclohexanone respectively, Side products like benzonitrile and biphenyl were also identified.

  19. Verified Syntheses of Zeolitic Materials

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From the International Zeolitic Association comes this online version of the special issue of Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, Volume 22, Issues 4-6, featuring a "cookbook" of "recipes" for making zeolites. Zeolites, of which there are over 100 structure types, occur naturally in some cases, but usually are prepared synthetically. Few are available commercially so researchers wanting to test a zeolite in a new application often must attempt the synthesis of the base zeolite in the laboratory. This book is intended to assist in this endeavor, says the editor, Dr. Harry Robson of Louisiana State University. The recipes can be accessed by material name or structure type. A preface, introductory and explanatory notes, and safety information are provided. The recipes include information on source materials, batch preparation and crystallization instructions, product phase, and XRD characterization. The contributor's name, date of entry, and references accompany each recipe.

  20. Utilizing copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition for the surface modification of colloidal particles with electroactive and emissive moieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rungta, Parul

    The development of charge-transporting and fluorescing colloidal particles that can be directly printed into electroluminescent devices may result in a broad impact on the use of electrical energy for illumination. The objective of this work was to design and synthesize electroactive & fluorescing colloidal particles; establish their optical, electronic, and thermodynamic properties; and transition them into a device format for potential applications. The original intended application of this work was to build "better" colloidally-based organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) by creating functional particles with superior electrical and optical performance relative to commercially available technologies, but through the course of the research, the particles that were developed were found to be better suited for medical applications. Nonetheless, the global objective envisioned at the onset of this research was consistent with its final outcomes. The research tasks pursued to accomplish this global objective included: (1) The design and synthesis of electroactive moieties and their conversion into organic light emitting devices; An electron-transporting monomer was synthesized that was structurally & energetically similar to the small molecule 2-biphenyl-4-yl-5-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (tBu-PBD). The monomer was copolymerized with 2-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)ethyl 2-methylacrylate (CE) and the resulting copolymer was utilized in OLEDs which employed fluorescent coumarin 6 (C6) or phosphorescent tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium(III) [Ir(ppy)3] emitters. The copolymer devices exhibited a mean luminance of ca. 400 and 3,552 cd/m2 with the C6 and Ir(ppy)3 emitters, that were stable with thermal aging at temperatures ranging from 23°C to 130°C. Comparable poly(9-vinyl-9H-carbazole)/tBu-PBD blend devices exhibited more pronounced variations in performance with thermal aging. (2) The surface-modification of colloids with electroactive & fluorescing moieties via "click" chemistry; Aqueous-phase 83 nm poly(propargyl acrylate) (PA) nanoparticles were surface-functionalized with sparingly water soluble fluorescent moieties through a copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) (i.e., "click" transformation) to produce fluoroprobes with a large Stokes shift. For moieties which could not achieve extensive surface coverage on the particles utilizing a standard click transformation procedure, the presence of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) during the transformation enhanced the grafting density onto the particles. For an oxadiazole containing molecule (AO), an azide-modified coumarin 6 (AD1) and a polyethylene glycol modified naphthalimide-based emitter (AD2), respectively, an 84%, 17% and 5% increase in the grafting densities were observed, when the transformation was performed in the presence of beta-CD. In contrast, a carbazolyl-containing moiety (AC) exhibited a slight retardation in the final grafting density when beta-CD was employed. Photoluminescence studies indicated that AC & AO when attached to the particles form an exciplex. An efficient energy transfer from the exciplex to the surface attached AD2 resulted in a total Stokes shift of 180 nm for the modified particles. (3) The synthesis and characterization of near-infrared (NIR) emitting particles for potential applications in cancer therapy. PA particles were surface modified through the "click" transformation of an azide-terminated indocyanine green (azICG), an NIR emitter, and poly(ethylene glycol) (azPEG) chains of various molecular weights. The placement of azICG onto the surface of the particles allowed for the chromophores to complex with bovine serum albumin (BSA) when dispersed in PBS that resulted in an enhancement of the dye emission. In addition, the inclusion of azPEG with the chromophores onto the particle surface resulted in a synergistic nine-fold enhancement of the fluorescence intensity, with azPEGs of increasing molecular weight amplifying the response. Preliminary photodynamic therapy (PDT)

  1. Understanding the dissolution of zeolites.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Ryan L; Fogler, H Scott

    2007-05-01

    Scientific knowledge of how zeolites, a unique classification of microporous aluminosilicates, undergo dissolution in aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions is limited. Understanding the dissolution of zeolites is fundamental to a number of processes occurring in nature and throughout industry. To better understand the dissolution process, experiments were carried out establishing that the Si-to-Al ratio controls zeolite framework dissolution, by which the selective removal of aluminum constrains the removal of silicon. Stoichiometric dissolution is observed for Type 4A zeolite in HCl where the Si-to-Al ratio is equal to 1.0. Framework silicon dissolves completely during Type 4A dissolution and is followed by silicate precipitation. However, for the zeolite analcime which has a Si-to-Al ratio of 2.0 dissolves non-stoichiometrically as the selective removal of aluminum results in partially dissolved silicate particles followed by silicate precipitation. In Type Y zeolite, exhibiting a Si-to-Al ratio of 3.0, there is insufficient aluminum to weaken the structure and cause silicon to dissolve in HCl. Thus, little or no precipitation is observed, and amorphous undissolvable silicate particles remain intact. The initial dissolution rates of Type Y and 4A zeolites demonstrate that dissolution is constrained by the number of available reaction sites, and a selective removal rate parameter is applied to delineate the mechanism of particle dissolution by demonstrating the kinetic influence of the Si-to-Al ratio. Zeolite framework models are constructed and used to undergird the basic dissolution mechanism. The framework models, scanning electron micrographs of partially dissolved crystals, and experimentally measured dissolution rates all demonstrate that a zeolite's Si-to-Al framework ratio plays a universal role in the dissolution mechanism, independent of framework type. Consequently, the unique mechanism of zeolite dissolution has general implications on how petroleum reservoir stimulation treatments should be designed. PMID:17429989

  2. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of zeolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios for natural samples of the zeolites analcime, chabazite, clinoptilolite, laumontite, mordenite, and natrolite have been obtained. The zeolite samples were classified into sedimentary, hydrothermal, and igneous groups. The ratios for each species of zeolite are reported. The results are used to discuss the origin of channel water, the role of zeolites in water-rock interaction, and the possibility that a calibrated zeolite could be used as a low-temperature geothermometer.

  3. Copper Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Cu; 24-hour urine copper; Total copper; Non-ceruloplasmin-bound copper; Free copper; Hepatic copper Formal name: Copper (24-hour urine, total and free blood, and hepatic) Related tests: Ceruloplasmin ; Heavy Metals At a Glance Test Sample The Test Common ...

  4. The synthesis of zeolites from fly ash and the properties of the zeolite products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Steenbruggen; G. G Hollman

    1998-01-01

    Fly ash produced during the combustion of powdered coal could be converted up to 45% into zeolite. By varying the experimental conditions different types of zeolite were produced, e.g. zeolite Na-P1, zeolite K-G and zeolite ZK19. By this zeolitization process the cation exchange capacity (CEC) was raised from 0.02 to circa 2.4 meq\\/g. Anionic heavy metals were largely extracted by

  5. Enantioselective dehydration of butan-2-ol using zeolite Y modified with dithiane oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Feast, S.; Siddiqui, H.; Bethell, D. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom)] [and others] [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); and others

    1997-04-15

    Modification of zeolite H-Y by dithiane oxides (2-R-1,3-dithiane 1-oxide; R = H, CH{sub 3}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) is shown to enhance significantly its activity for the acid catalyzed gas phase dehydration of butan-2-ol. The rate enhancement is observed for catalysts that are prepared by adding the dithiane oxide to the zeolite synthesis gel or by adsorption of the dithiane oxide onto commercial samples of zeolite H-Y. The origin of the rate enhancement is considered to result from a specific interaction between the dithiane oxide modifier with both the extra-framework and framework aluminum in the zeolite. Modification of zeolite H-Y with (R)-1,3-dithiane 1-oxide enhances the conversion of (S)-butan-2-ol compared to (R)-butan-2-ol in the temperature range 110-150{degrees}C when the two enantiomers are reacted separately. Modification with (S)-2-phenyl-1,3-dithiane 1-oxide gives a catalyst for which (R)-butan-2-ol is the most reactive of the two enantiomers. Reaction of racemic butan-2-ol over these chirally modified H-Y zeolites demonstrates that this modification procedure makes the zeolite enantiomerically discriminating and one enantiomer preferentially reacts, although both are present in the micropores under the reaction conditions. This effect is considered to be due to enantioselective rate enhancement, since, although the rate of dehydration of both enantiomers is enhanced in the chiral environment, the dehydration rate of one enantiomer is accelerated relative to the other. It is suggested that the effect is due to preferential adsorption at the chiral active site. 34 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Electrode-modified zeolites: Electrode microstructures contained in and on a heterogeneous catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolison, Debra R.; Hayes, E. A.; Nowak, R. J.; Pons, B. Stanley; Fleischmann, Martin

    1988-07-01

    In this work, zeolite-supported Pt(O) microstructures sized less than 10 nm are accessed as electrodes using dispersion electrolysis. Modification of an heterogeneous catalyst with ultramicroelectrodes permits exploration of electrode processes in an interphase dominated by the nature of the heterogeneous catalyst and at electrode sizes where bulk metallic properties may not apply. The systems described are Pt supported on zeolite Type Y and Pt supported on gamma-alumina. The electrolytic response of zeolite-supported Platinum in the absence of added electrolyte salt for water or benzene: Water is markedly more effective than that at alumina-supported Pt and is seen to depend on the size of the Pt particles supported on the exterior of the zeolite surface. Both supported systems behave as ultramicroelectrodes in that electrolysis is sustained in their presence under conditions that are strictly ohmic for the feeder electrodes due to the high resistivity of the media in the absence of electrolyte salt.

  7. Zeolite–Nafion composites as ion conducting membrane materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincenzo Tricoli; Francesco Nannetti

    2003-01-01

    Composite membranes formed of zeolitic fillers embedded in Nafion can be made by evaporating the solvents from a suspension of small zeolite crystals in a Nafion solution. Two natural zeolites were selected as fillers: chabazite and clinoptilolite. Membranes with various zeolite content were obtained. Composite membranes with zeolite content up to 40 vol.% exhibited uniform distribution of the zeolite fillers

  8. Multi-component lanthanide hybrids based on zeolite A/L and zeolite A/L-polymers for tunable luminescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yan, Bing

    2015-02-01

    Some multi-component hybrids based on zeolite L/A are prepared. Firstly, zeolite A/L is loaded with lanthanide complexes (Eu-DBM or Tb-AA (acetylacetone = AA, dibenzoylmethane = DBM)) into its channels. Secondly, 3-methacryloyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (?-MPS) is used to covalently graft onto the surface of functionalized zeolite A/L (Si-[ZA/L?Eu-DBM(Tb-AA)]). Thirdly, lanthanide ions (Eu(3+)/Tb(3+)) are coordinated to the functionalized zeolite A/L and ligands (phen(1,10-phenanthroline) or bipy (2,2'-bipyridyl)) are introduced by a ship-in-bottle method. The inside-outside double modifications of ZA/L with lanthanide complexes afford the final hybrids and these are characterized by means of XRD, FT-IR, UV-vis DRS, SEM and luminescence spectroscopy, some of which display white or near-white light emission. Furthermore, selected above-mentioned hybrids are incorporated into PEMA/PMMA (poly ethyl methylacryate/poly methyl methacrylate) hosts to prepare luminescent polymer films. These results provide abundant data that these hybrid materials can be expected to have potential application in various practical fields. PMID:25411917

  9. Adsorption of unsaturated hydrocarbons on zeolites: the eects of the zeolite framework on adsorption

    E-print Network

    Truong, Thanh N.

    Adsorption of unsaturated hydrocarbons on zeolites: the eects of the zeolite framework-FAU) and H-ZSM-5 zeolites have been investigated by both the cluster and embedded cluster approaches with the experimental observation that the ZSM-5 is more acidic than that of FAU zeolite. The adsorption energy

  10. Behavior of Holocarbons in Zeolitic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Anthony K. Cheetham

    2003-12-08

    This report describes results on this grant over the 3 year period, 1999-2002. The emphasis of the work has continued to shift during 2001-2 from halocarbon adsorption in zeolites towards other separation processes in zeolites. These additional areas include (i) work on lithium-containing zeolites for non-cryogenic air separation, and (ii) the study of nickel phosphate molecular sieves for hydrogen storage. Nevertheless, they continued their experimental and computational work on halocarbons in zeolites.

  11. Zeolites as media for hydrogen storage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Weitkamp; M. Fritz; S. Ernst

    1995-01-01

    The use of zeolites as media for hydrogen storage was investigated using zeolites of different pore architecture and composition at temperatures from 293 to 573K and pressures from 2.5 to 10.0 MPa. The results suggest that zeolites containing sodalite cages in their structure are particularly suitable. Accordingly, the highest storage capacity was obtained with sodalite, i.e. the zeolite with the

  12. Evaluation of operating characteristics for a chabazite zeolite system for treatment of process wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, T.E.; Perona, J.J.; Jennings, H.L.; Lucero, A.J.; Taylor, P.A.

    1998-02-01

    Laboratory and pilot-scale testing were performed for development and design of a chabazite zeolite ion-exchange system to replace existing treatment systems at the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The process wastewater treatment systems at ORNL need upgrading to improve efficiency, reduce waste generation, and remove greater quantities of contaminants from the wastewater. Previous study indicated that replacement of the existing PWTP systems with an ion-exchange system using chabazite zeolite will satisfy these upgrade objectives. Pilot-scale testing of the zeolite system was performed using a commercially available ion-exchange system to evaluate physical operating characteristics and to validate smaller-scale column test results. Results of this test program indicate that (1) spent zeolite can be sluiced easily and completely from a commercially designed vessel, (2) clarification followed by granular anthracite prefilters is adequate pretreatment for the zeolite system, and (3) the length of the mass transfer zone was comparable with that obtained in smaller-scale column tests. Laboratory studies were performed to determine the loading capacity of the zeolite for selected heavy metals. These test results indicated fairly effective removal of silver, cadmium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, and zinc from simple water solutions. Heavy-metals data collected during pilot-scale testing of actual wastewater indicated marginal removal of iron, copper, and zinc. Reduced effectiveness for other heavy metals during pilot testing can be attributed to the presence of interfering cations and the relatively short zeolite/wastewater contact time. Flocculating agents (polyelectrolytes) were tested for pretreatment of wastewater prior to the zeolite flow-through column system. Several commercially available polyelectrolytes were effective in flocculation and settling of suspended solids in process wastewater.

  13. Xylenes Reactions and Diffusions in ZSM-5 Zeolite based Catalyst S. Al-Khattaf*

    E-print Network

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    to observe the #12;3 effects of site modification on the reaction. The kinetic, diffusion, and adsorption. The effectiveness factor for all xylene isomers reactions was found based on two different diffusivities used fromXylenes Reactions and Diffusions in ZSM-5 Zeolite based Catalyst S. Al-Khattaf* Department

  14. POLYMER-ZEOLITE NANOCOMPOSITE HIGH-TEMPERATURE

    E-print Network

    POLYMER-ZEOLITE NANOCOMPOSITE HIGH-TEMPERATURE PROTON-EXCHANGE-MEMBRANE FOR FUEL CELLS Prepared For SMALL GRANT (EISG) PROGRAM INDEPENDENT ASSESSMENT REPORT (IAR) POLYMER-ZEOLITE NANOCOMPOSITE HIGH://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 Polymer-Zeolite Nanocomposite High Temperature Proton-Exchange- Membrane for Fuel Cells EI

  15. Reclaiming silver from silver zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, G.A.

    1991-10-01

    Silver zeolite is used to capture radioiodines from air cleaning systems in some nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It may become radioactively contaminated and/or poisoned by hydrocarbon vapors, which diminishes its capacity for iodine. Silver zeolite contains up to 38 wt% silver. A pyrometallurgical process was developed to reclaim the silver before disposing of the unserviceable zeolite as a radioactive waste. A flux was formulated to convert the refractory aluminosilicate zeolite structure into a low-melting fluid slag, with Na[sub 2]O added as NAOH instead of Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3] to avoid severe foaming due to CO[sub 2] evolution. A propane-fired furnace was built to smelt 45 kg charges at 1300C in a carbon-bonded silicon carbide crucible. A total of 218 kg (7000 tr oz) of silver was reclaimed from 1050 kg of unserviceable zeolite. Silver recoveries of 97% were achieved, and the radioisotopes were fixed as stable silicates in a vitreous slag that was disposed of as a low level waste. Recovered silver was refined using oxygen and cast into 100 tr oz bars assaying 99.8+% silver and showing no radioactive contamination.

  16. Reclaiming silver from silver zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, G.A.

    1991-10-01

    Silver zeolite is used to capture radioiodines from air cleaning systems in some nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It may become radioactively contaminated and/or poisoned by hydrocarbon vapors, which diminishes its capacity for iodine. Silver zeolite contains up to 38 wt% silver. A pyrometallurgical process was developed to reclaim the silver before disposing of the unserviceable zeolite as a radioactive waste. A flux was formulated to convert the refractory aluminosilicate zeolite structure into a low-melting fluid slag, with Na{sub 2}O added as NAOH instead of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to avoid severe foaming due to CO{sub 2} evolution. A propane-fired furnace was built to smelt 45 kg charges at 1300C in a carbon-bonded silicon carbide crucible. A total of 218 kg (7000 tr oz) of silver was reclaimed from 1050 kg of unserviceable zeolite. Silver recoveries of 97% were achieved, and the radioisotopes were fixed as stable silicates in a vitreous slag that was disposed of as a low level waste. Recovered silver was refined using oxygen and cast into 100 tr oz bars assaying 99.8+% silver and showing no radioactive contamination.

  17. Inhibition of copper corrosion by self-assembled films of new Schiff bases and their modification with alkanethiols in aqueous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehteshamzade, M.; Shahrabi, T.; Hosseini, M. G.

    2006-02-01

    The inhibitive action of self-assembled films derived from two ligands Schiff bases, including N, N'-ethylen-bis (salicylidenimine) and N, N'- ortho-phenylen-bis (salicylidenimine) on copper surface has been studied by electrochemical techniques in chloride and acidic solutions. It was found that when the concentration of the inhibitors was increased the inhibition efficiency was increased, too. The results of the electrochemical studies have illustrated that the inhibition efficiency of S- o-ph-S is higher than S-E-S. Both the Schiff bases obeyed the Langmuir isotherm and thermodynamics calculations revealed that S- o-ph-S had larger adsorption constant and more negative free energy of adsorption with respect to S-E-S. When the films were modified by propanethiol and 1-dodecanethiol, the corrosion resistance of mixed films was significantly increased.

  18. Gas-phase adsorption in dealuminated natural clinoptilolite and liquid-phase adsorption in commercial DAY zeolite and modified ammonium Y zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Hernandez, Alba Nydia

    The adsorption of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is a very important tool for the material characterization. On the other hand, in separation and recovery technology, the adsorption of the CO2 is important to reduce the concentration of this gas considered as one of the greenhouse gases. Natural zeolites, particularly clinoptilolite, are widely applied to eliminate some pollutants from the environment. One of the goals of this research is to study the structure, composition and morphology of one natural clinoptilolite dealuminated with ammonium hexafluorosilicate (AHFi) and with orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4). Each modified sample was characterized using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Carbon Dioxide adsorption at 0° C, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (SEM-EDAX). In addition, the surface chemistry of the modified clinoptilolites was analyzed with Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The adsorption measurements were also used to study of the interaction of CO2 molecule within the adsorption space of these modified clinoptilolites. It was concluded that one of the modified clinoptilolites, (CSW-HFSi-0.1M), showed a great quality as adsorbent and as catalytic comparable to commercial synthetic zeolites. As far as we know, the modification of clinoptilolite with HFSi to improve their adsorption properties had not been previously attempted. In the second part of this dissertation, the dynamic adsorption of three isomers of nitrophenols using as adsorbent a commercial DAY zeolite was investigated. Also, the dynamic adsorption of methanol in a less hydrophobic zeolite, Ammonium Y Zeolite was investigated. The obtained breakthrough curves showed that the commercial DAY zeolite could be a suitable adsorbent to the liquid-phase adsorption of the phenolic compounds. Notwithstanding the modified ammonium Y zeolite had a low Si/Al ratio (less hydrophobic) than commercial DAY zeolite; this modified zeolite was useful for the dynamic adsorption of polar compound such as methanol. The obtained results were consistent with those reported in other studies related with the use of zeolites in the removal of organic compounds from the liquid phase.

  19. Zeolite-dye micro lasers

    E-print Network

    Vietze, U; Laeri, F; Ihlein, G; Schüth, F; Limburg, B; Abraham, M

    1998-01-01

    We present a new class of micro lasers based on nanoporous molecular sieve host-guest systems. Organic dye guest molecules of 1-Ethyl-4-(4-(p-Dimethylaminophenyl)-1,3-butadienyl)-pyridinium Perchlorat were inserted into the 0.73-nm-wide channel pores of a zeolite AlPO$_4$-5 host. The zeolitic micro crystal compounds where hydrothermally synthesized according to a particular host-guest chemical process. The dye molecules are found not only to be aligned along the host channel axis, but to be oriented as well. Single mode laser emission at 687 nm was obtained from a whispering gallery mode oscillating in a 8-$\\mu$m-diameter monolithic micro resonator, in which the field is confined by total internal reflection at the natural hexagonal boundaries inside the zeolitic microcrystals.

  20. Enhanced selectivity of zeolites by controlled carbon deposition

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.; Kartin, Mutlu

    2006-05-09

    A method for carbonizing a zeolite comprises depositing a carbon coating on the zeolite pores by flowing an inert carrier gas stream containing isoprene through a regenerated zeolite at elevated temperature. The carbonized zeolite is useful for the separation of light hydrocarbon mixtures due to size exclusion and the differential adsorption properties of the carbonized zeolite.

  1. Fundamentals and applications of pervaporation through zeolite membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Travis C. Bowen; Richard D. Noble; John L. Falconer

    2004-01-01

    Zeolite membranes have uniform, molecular-sized pores, and they separate molecules based on differences in the molecules’ adsorption and diffusion properties. Zeolite membranes are thus well suited for separating liquid-phase mixtures by pervaporation, and the first commercial application of zeolite membranes has been for dehydrating organic compounds. Because of the large number of zeolites that can be prepared, zeolite membranes have

  2. 2.5 Zeolites 2.5.1 Introduction

    E-print Network

    58 2.5 Zeolites 2.5.1 Introduction Zeolites are a well-established technology used in a range of processes and industries. Zeolites are not new materials--they have been investigated for over two in agriculture (St. Cloud 2007, BRZ Zeolite 2007, Zeolite Australia 2007), horticulture (ZeoPro 2007), gas

  3. UTILITY OF ZEOLITES IN HAZARDOUS METAL REMOVAL FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange, adsorption and acid catalysis properties. Different inorganic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature by using synthetic zeolites. Zeolite Faujasite Y has been used to remove inorganic pollutants including arseni...

  4. Arsenic removal from groundwater by MnO2-modified natural clinoptilolite zeolite: effects of pH and initial feed concentration.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Lucy M; Parra, Ramona R; Deng, Shuguang

    2011-05-15

    Adsorption of arsenic (As(5+)) on natural and MnO(2)-modified clinoptilolite-Ca zeolite adsorbents was investigated to explore the feasibility of removing arsenic from groundwater using natural zeolite adsorbents. The natural and MnO(2)-modified clinoptilolite-Ca zeolite adsorbents were characterized with nitrogen adsorption at 77K for pore textural properties, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence for morphology, elemental composition and distribution. Batch adsorption equilibrium experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH and initial feed concentration on arsenic removal efficiency. It was found that the amphoteric properties and arsenic removal efficiency of the natural clinoptilolite-Ca zeolite were significantly improved after modification with MnO(2). The MnO(2)-modified zeolite could effectively remove arsenic from water at a wide pH range, and the arsenic removal efficiency that is basically independent of the pH of feed solutions varies slightly with the initial arsenic concentration in the feed solutions. The removal efficiency obtained on the modified zeolite was doubled as compared to that obtained on the unmodified zeolite. The MnO(2)-modified clinoptilolite-Ca zeolite appears to be a promising adsorbent for removing trace arsenic amounts from water. PMID:21398033

  5. One-dimensional zeolites as hydrocarbon traps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth F Czaplewski; Thomas L Reitz; Yoo Joong Kim; Randall Q Snurr

    2002-01-01

    Several zeolites with varying pore dimensionality have been investigated as hydrocarbon (HC) traps by studying the temperature programmed desorption of propane and toluene mixtures. In one-dimensional (1-D) zeolites, the diffusive motion of propane is blocked by the more-strongly adsorbed toluene thus raising the desorption temperature of propane above its single-component desorption temperature. In the 1-D zeolite EUO, propane is trapped

  6. Behavior of Holocarbons in Zeolitic Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony K. Cheetham

    2003-01-01

    This report describes results on this grant over the 3 year period, 1999-2002. The emphasis of the work has continued to shift during 2001-2 from halocarbon adsorption in zeolites towards other separation processes in zeolites. These additional areas include (i) work on lithium-containing zeolites for non-cryogenic air separation, and (ii) the study of nickel phosphate molecular sieves for hydrogen storage.

  7. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James (Knoxville, TN); Klett, Lynn (Knoxville, TN); Kaufman, Jonathan (Leonardtown, MD)

    2008-11-25

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  8. Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use By MFI Zeolite Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Lee; Liangxiong Li

    2008-03-31

    Desalination of brines produced from oil and gas fields is an attractive option for providing potable water in arid regions. Recent field-testing of subsurface sequestration of carbon dioxide for climate management purposes provides new motivation for optimizing efficacy of oilfield brine desalination: as subsurface reservoirs become used for storing CO{sub 2}, the displaced brines must be managed somehow. However, oilfield brine desalination is not economical at this time because of high costs of synthesizing membranes and the need for sophisticated pretreatments to reduce initial high TDS and to prevent serious fouling of membranes. In addition to these barriers, oil/gas field brines typically contain high concentrations of multivalent counter cations (eg. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that can reduce efficacy of reverse osmosis (RO). Development of inorganic membranes with typical characteristics of high strength and stability provide a valuable option to clean produced water for beneficial uses. Zeolite membranes have a well-defined subnanometer pore structure and extreme chemical and mechanical stability, thus showing promising applicability in produced water purification. For example, the MFI-type zeolite membranes with uniform pore size of {approx}0.56 nm can separate ions from aqueous solution through a mechanism of size exclusion and electrostatic repulsion (Donnan exclusion). Such a combination allows zeolite membranes to be unique in separation of both organics and electrolytes from aqueous solutions by a reverse osmosis process, which is of great interest for difficult separations, such as oil-containing produced water purification. The objectives of the project 'Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use by MFI Zeolite Membranes' are: (1) to conduct extensive fundamental investigations and understand the mechanism of the RO process on zeolite membranes and factors determining the membrane performance, (2) to improve the membranes and optimize operating conditions to enhance water flux and ion rejection, and (3) to perform long-term RO operation on tubular membranes to study membrane stability and to collect experimental data necessary for reliable evaluations of technical and economic feasibilities. Our completed research has resulted in deep understanding of the ion and organic separation mechanism by zeolite membranes. A two-step hydrothermal crystallization process resulted in a highly efficient membrane with good reproducibility. The zeolite membranes synthesized therein has an overall surface area of {approx}0.3 m{sup 2}. Multichannel vessels were designed and machined for holding the tubular zeolite membrane for water purification. A zeolite membrane RO demonstration with zeolite membranes fabricated on commercial alpha-alumina support was established in the laboratory. Good test results were obtained for both actual produced water samples and simulated samples. An overall 96.9% ion rejection and 2.23 kg/m{sup 2}.h water flux was achieved in the demonstration. In addition, a post-synthesis modification method using Al{sup 3+}-oligomers was developed for repairing the undesirable nano-scale intercrystalline pores. Considerable enhancement in ion rejection was achieved. This new method of zeolite membrane modification is particularly useful for enhancing the efficiency of ion separation from aqueous solutions because the modification does not need high temperature operation and may be carried out online during the RO operation. A long-term separation test for actual CBM produced water has indicated that the zeolite membranes show excellent ion separation and extraordinary stability at high pressure and produced water environment.

  9. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  10. The relation betwen the 129Xe NMR chemical shifts of xenon in the zeolites NaX, NaY and CuNaY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boddenberg, B.; Hartmann, M.

    1993-02-01

    The adsorption isotherms and 129Xe NMR chemical shifts of xenon in the voids of zeolite Y with 0%, 53%, 75%, and 95% exchange of copper (II) for sodium ions were determined. With increasing copper content the shifts go upfield. The local chemical shifts of xenon at a crystallographic SII site with and without the charge compensating sodium ion are condluced to be 60 and 32 ppm, respectively.

  11. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  12. UTILITY OF ZEOLITES IN ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange and adsorption properties. So far the cation exchanger properties of zeolites have been extensively studied and utilized. The anion exchanger properties of zeolites are less studied. Zeolite Faujasite Y has been used to remove arseni...

  13. Durability of Hydrophilic and Antimicrobial Zeolite Coatings under Water Immersion

    E-print Network

    Chen, Wilfred

    Durability of Hydrophilic and Antimicrobial Zeolite Coatings under Water Immersion Cory O-exchanged zeolite A (Ag-ZA) coatings have been shown to have excellent hydrophilicity and are highly antimicrobial Keywords: zeolite coating, zeolite A, hydrophilic, antimicrobial, gravity Introduction Condensing heat

  14. Silver supported on natural Mexican zeolite as an antibacterial material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Rivera-Garza; M. T Olgu??n; I Garc??a-Sosa; D Alcántara; G Rodr??guez-Fuentes

    2000-01-01

    The antimicrobial effect of the Mexican zeolitic mineral from Taxco, Guerrero exchanged with silver ions was investigated. The zeolitic mineral as well as sodium and silver zeolitic minerals were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and IR spectroscopy techniques. The elementary composition of the zeolitic mineral was determined by atomic absorption and microanalyses (EDAX). Escherichia coli and Streptococcus faecalis

  15. Selective anisotropic growth of zeolite crystals

    E-print Network

    Desai, Tasha April

    2013-02-22

    . To achieve this end we are attempting to grow zeolite particles in the confined water spaces formed in water/surfactant systems, using these "nanoreactors" to modulate zeolite growth. Our work to date has focused on the synthesis of two-dimensional (5x100x...

  16. SEQUESTERING MANURE N WITH SYNTHETIC ZEOLITES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural zeolites have a long and successful history of agricultural use in Japan and more recently in the U.S. However the price (often > $US500 Mg -1) limits their use in agriculture. Zeolites can be synthesized from fly ash by reaction with sodium hydroxide solutions and low temperature. The proje...

  17. Zeolitic Materials, Vol. 3, No. 1, December 2002, 20-28 20 Copyright 2002 Korean Zeolite Association

    E-print Network

    Kim, Ji Man

    Zeolitic Materials, Vol. 3, No. 1, December 2002, 20-28 20 Copyright ¨Ï 2002 Korean Zeolite activity than ZSM-5 zeolite, and also has higher catalytic stability than MCM-41- SO3H. Keywords: Periodic. / Synthesis and Alkylation of Phenol over PMO-SO3H Zeolitic Materials, Vol. 3, No. 1, December 2002 21

  18. Zeolitic Materials, Vol. 3, No. 1, December 2002, 29-35 Copyright 2002 Korean Zeolite Association 29

    E-print Network

    Kim, Ji Man

    Zeolitic Materials, Vol. 3, No. 1, December 2002, 29-35 Copyright ¨Ï 2002 Korean Zeolite Association 29 Etherification Reaction of 2-Naphtol with Ethanol Using Dealuminated Beta Zeolite Jin Won Kim Korea *To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: Yie@ajou.ac.kr ABSTRACT Zeolite H

  19. Copper hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-10-01

    The world production of copper is steadily increasing. Although humans are widely exposed to copper-containing items on the skin and mucosa, allergic reactions to copper are only infrequently reported. To review the chemistry, biology and accessible data to clarify the implications of copper hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common. As a metal, it possesses many of the same qualities as nickel, which is a known strong sensitizer. Cumulative data on subjects with presumed related symptoms and/or suspected exposure showed that a weighted average of 3.8% had a positive patch test reaction to copper. We conclude that copper is a very weak sensitizer as compared with other metal compounds. However, in a few and selected cases, copper can result in clinically relevant allergic reactions. PMID:25098945

  20. Proton Adsorption Selectivity of Zeolites in Aqueous Media: Effect of Si/Al Ratio of Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Munthali, Moses Wazingwa; Elsheikh, Mohammed Abdalla; Johan, Erni; Matsue, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their well-known uses as catalysts, zeolites are utilized to adsorb and remove various cations from aqueous system. The adsorption of the cations is ascribed to the negative charge of zeolites derived from isomorphous substitution of Si by Al. The amount of Na+ adsorption on 4A, X, Y, Na-P1 and mordenite type zeolites were determined in aqueous media, in a two-cation (Na+ and H+) system. Although each zeolite has a constant amount of negative charge, the amount of Na+ adsorption of each zeolite decreased drastically at low pH-pNa values, where pH-pNa is equal to log{(Na+)/(H+)}. By using the plot of the amount of Na+ adsorption versus pH-pNa, an index of the H+ selectivity, which is similar to the pKa of acids, of each zeolite was estimated, and the index tended to increase with decreasing Si/Al ratio of zeolites. These indicate that zeolites with lower Si/Al and higher negative charge density have higher H+ adsorption selectivity, and in fact, such a zeolite species (4A and X) adsorbed considerable amount of H+ even at weakly alkaline pH region. The adsorption of H+ results in the decrease of cation adsorption ability, and may lead to the dissolution of zeolites in aqueous media. PMID:25493632

  1. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN); Blake, Rodger D. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  2. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN); Blake, Rodger D. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  3. Dispersion strengthened copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1988-12-05

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  4. The effect of pore dimension of zeolites on the separation of gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, Sang Eun

    We examined the effect of the pore dimension of zeolites on the separation of gas mixtures using atomistic simulation methods. We studied two categories of the zeolites with small pores: pore modified silicalite for H2/CH4 separation and small pore silica zeolites for CO2/CH4 separation. The effect of pore modification of silicalite on the H2/CH4 separation was examined. Under some degrees of surface modification, the CH4 flux was reduced much more than the H2 flux, resulting in high ideal selectivities. The use of small pore zeolites for CO2/CH4 separations was studied. In DDR, we showed that CO2 diffusion rates are only weakly affected by the presence of CH4, even though the latter molecules diffuse very slowly. Consequently, therefore, the permeance of CO 2 in the equimolar mixtures is similar to the permeance for pure CO 2, while the CH4 permeance in the mixture is greatly reduced relatively to the pure component permeance. The calculated CO2/CH 4 separation selectivities are higher than 100 for a wide range of feed pressure, indicating excellent separation capabilities of DDR based membranes. Inspired by the observation in DDR we also examined the separation capabilities of 10 additional pure silica small pore zeolites for CO2/CH 4 separations. From these considerations, we predict that SAS, MTF and RWR will exhibit high separation selectivities because of their very high adsorption selectivities for CO2 over CH4. CHA and IHW, which have similar pore structures to DDR, showed comparable separation selectivities to DDR because of large differences in the diffusion rates of CO2 and CH4.

  5. Synthesis of dimethyl ether (DME) on modified HY zeolite and modified HY zeolite-supported Cu–Mn–Zn catalysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jinhua Fei; Zhaoyin Hou; Bing Zhu; Hui Lou; Xiaoming Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Synthesis of dimethyl ether (DME) via methanol dehydration were investigated over HY zeolite and over Fe-, Co-, Ni-, Cr-, or Zr-modified HY zeolite, and via direct CO hydrogenation over modified HY zeolite-supported Cu–Mn–Zn catalysts. Zr- and Ni-modified HY zeolite exhibited higher activity and stability for methanol dehydration, while Fe-, Co-, and Cr-modified HY zeolite deactivated quickly due to carbon deposition.

  6. Emission control through Cu-exchanged X-zeolite catalysts: Experimental studies and theoretical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Das, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    Catalysts based on X-zeolite have been developed by exchanging its Na{sup +} ion with Copper ions and its effectiveness in reducing NO{sub x} in an actual SI engine exhaust has been tested. Unlike noble metals, the doped X-zeolite catalysts, studied here, exhibit significant NO{sub x} reduction for a wide {lambda} range and exhibit a slow rate of decrease with increase in {lambda} ratio. Back pressure developed across the catalyst bed was found to be well-affordable and power loss due to back pressure is only minimal. During 30 hours of testing of the catalyst, no significant deactivation was observed. Additionally a mathematical model has been developed to predict the performance of the catalyst and to validate that against experimental results. Results predicted by the mathematical model agree well with the experimental results and absolute average deviation of experimental conversion efficiency is found to be less than 5% of the predicted value.

  7. Zeolites: Can they be synthesized by design

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.E. (California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States))

    1994-09-01

    Zeolites and zeolite-like molecular sieves are crystalline oxides that have high surface-to-volume ratios and are able to recognize, discriminate, and organize molecules with differences of < 1 [angstrom]. The close connection between the atomic structure and macroscopic properties of these materials has led to uses in molecular recognition. For example, zeolites and zeolite-like molecular sieves can reveal marvelous molecular recognition specificity and sensitivity that can be applied to catalysis, separations technology, and chemical sensing. Additionally, they can serve as hosts to organize guest atoms and molecules that endow composite materials with optoelectric and electrochemical properties. Because of the high level of structural control necessary to create high-performance materials with zeolites or zeolite-like molecular sieves, the design and synthesis of these solids with specific architectures and properties are highly desired. Although this lofty goal is still elusive, advances have been made to allow the serious consideration of designing molecular sieves. Here, the author covers two aspects of this ongoing effort. First, he discusses the feasibility of designing pore architectures through the use of organic structure-directing agents. Second, he explores the possibility of creating zeolites through ''Lego chemistry.''

  8. Zeolites on Mars: Prospects for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, E. S.; Singer, R. B.; Kunkle, T. D.

    1985-01-01

    The Martian surface composition measured by Viking can be represented by several combinations of minerals incorporating major fractions of zeolites known to occur in altered mafic rocks and polar soils on Earth. The abundant occurrence of zeolites on Mars is consistent with what is known about both the physical and chemical environment of that planet. The laboratory reflectance spectra (0.65 to 2.55 microns) of a number of relatively pure zeolite minerals and some naturally occurring zeolite-clay soils were measured. All of the spectra measured are dominated by strong absorption near 1.4 and 1.9 microns and a steep reflectance drop longward of about 2.2 microns, all of which are due to abundant H2O. Weaker water overtone bands are also apparent, and in most cases there is spectral evidence for minor Fe(3+). In these features the zeolite spectra are similar to spectra of smectite clays which have abundant interlayer water. The most diagnostic difference between clay and zeolite spectra is the total absence in the zeolites of the weak structural OH absorption.

  9. Photochemical charge separation in zeolites: Electron transfer dynamics, nanocrystals and zeolitic membranes. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    2001-09-30

    Aluminosilicate zeolites provide an excellent host for photochemical charge separation. Because of the constraints provided by the zeolite, the back electron transfer from the reduced acceptor to the oxidized sensitizer is slowed down. This provides the opportunity to separate the charge and use it in a subsequent reaction for water oxidation and reduction. Zeolite-based ruthenium oxide catalysts have been found to be efficient for the water splitting process. This project has demonstrated the usefulness of zeolite hosts for photolytic splitting of water.

  10. Multipore zeolites: synthesis and catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Moliner, Manuel; Martínez, Cristina; Corma, Avelino

    2015-03-16

    In the last few years, important efforts have been made to synthesize so-called "multipore" zeolites, which contain channels of different dimensions within the same crystalline structure. This is a very attractive subject, since the presence of pores of different sizes would favor the preferential diffusion of reactants and products through those different channel systems, allowing unique catalytic activities for specific chemical processes. In this Review we describe the most attractive achievements in the rational synthesis of multipore zeolites, containing small to extra-large pores, and the improvements reported for relevant chemical processes when these multipore zeolites have been used as catalysts. PMID:25664421

  11. Luminescence quenching measurements on zeolite L monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Q.; Zabala Ruiz, Arantzazu; Li, Huanrong; De Cola, Luisa; Calzaferri, Gion

    2006-04-01

    The luminescence quenching of the oxygen sensitive Ru 2+ complex (Ru-ph4-TMS) used as a stopcock and attached to a zeolite L monolayer has been investigated. The luminescence lifetime of the attached Ru-ph4-TMS was the same under N II and under O II atmosphere. This remarkable result is attributed to the shielding provided by the channels of the zeolite L crystals arranged as a monolayer. The emitting 3MLCT state of the Ru-ph4-TMS stopcock is localized on the ligand bearing the phenyl groups forming the tail of this complex, which deeply penetrates into the zeolite L channel.

  12. Mixing of zeolite powders and molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, C.; Zyryanov, V.N.; Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1996-05-01

    Transuranics and fission products in a molten salt can be incorporated into zeolite A by an ion exchange process and by a batch mixing or blending process. The zeolite is then mixed with glass and consolidated into a monolithic waste form for geologic disposal. Both processes require mixing of zeolite powders with molten salt at elevated temperatures (>700 K). Complete occlusion of salt and a uniform distribution of chloride and fission products are desired for incorporation of the powders into the final waste form. The relative effectiveness of the blending process was studied over a series of temperature, time, and composition profiles. The major criteria for determining the effectiveness of the mixing operations were the level and uniformity of residual free salt in the mixtures. High operating temperatures (>775 K) improved salt occlusion. Reducing the chloride levels in the mixture to below 80% of the full salt capacity of the zeolite significantly reduced the free salt level in the final product.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of nitrogen substituted zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Fulya

    The interest in basic solid materials, particularly for basic zeolites has considerably increased in the last two decades because of their potential use in catalysis and separation. Basic zeolites have most often been obtained by ion-exchange or impregnation with alkali metal cations or grafting of organic bases onto zeolite pore walls. Such materials often suffer from instability and/or pore blockage, because none of these approaches places basic sites directly into the zeolite framework. Recently zeolitic materials have been made with some of the bridging oxygen atoms in Si--O--Si and/or Si--O--Al linkages replaced by NH groups, i.e. by substitution of framework oxygen by nitrogen. As a result, the basic strength of the framework increases due to the lower electronegativity of nitrogen with respect to oxygen. In this study, solid base catalysts are obtained by nitrogen substitution of the faujasite type of zeolites under ammonia flow at high temperatures. The efficiency of the reaction is tested by using zeolites with different aluminum contents and extraframework cations and varying the reaction conditions such as ammonia flow rate, reaction temperature and duration. The characterization studies show that high levels of nitrogen substitution can be achieved while maintaining porosity, particularly for NaY and low-aluminum HY zeolites, without a significant loss in the crystallinity. 27Al and 29 Si MAS NMR experiments performed on the nitrogen substituted zeolites show dealumination of the framework and preferential substitution for Si--OH--Al sites at the early stages of the reaction (temperatures at 750--800 °C). No preference is seen for reactions performed at higher temperatures and longer reaction times (e.g., 850 °C and 48 h). X-ray PDF analysis performed on the modified zeolites show that the Si-N distance in the 1st shell is longer than Si-O bond distance and Si-Si/Al bond distance of the Si-O/N-Si/Al linkage decreases, as an indication of a decrease in bond angle. The basicity experiments performed on the zeolites show an increase basicity with increase of the nitrogen content.

  14. Tailoring the structure of hierarchically porous zeolite beta through modified orientated attachment growth in a dry gel system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiao; Hua, Weiming; Xiao, Yu; Huo, Qisheng; Zhu, Kake; Zhou, Xinggui

    2014-11-01

    The crystallization of zeolite beta in a dry gel system is found to follow the orientated attachment growth route, escorted with a temporal morphology change from bulky gel, through aggregation of the particulate to large zeolitic crystals. Modification of the precrystallized gel with organosilanes can be used to tune the morphology of the ultimate beta. When hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HTS) is employed to modify precrystallized gel, a resumed secondary growth produces a hybrid mesocrystal of agglomerated nanozeolites. Combustive removal of organics leads to the formation of hierarchically porous zeolite beta of 100 to 160?nm, composed of nanocrystal building units ranging from 20 to 40?nm, with a noticeable micropore volume of 0.19?mL?g(-1) and a meso/macropore size between 5 and 80?nm. Conversely, when 1,8-bis(triethoxysilyl)octane (BTO) is utilized to modify the same precrystallized gel, assemblages of discrete beta nanozeolite of around 35?nm are generated. These assemblages construct a hierarchical zeolite beta with a micropore volume of 0.20?mL?g(-1) and auxiliary pores ranging from 5 to 100?nm. Both organosilanes bring about well-connected hierarchical pore networks. HTS has little effect on the Brønsted/Lewis acidity, whereas BTO causes a substantial reduction of strong Brønsted acid sites. The hierarchical beta zeolite-supported Pt catalyst exhibits improved catalytic performance for the hydroisomerization of n-heptane. PMID:25233842

  15. Bis(?-oxo) versus mono(?-oxo)dicopper cores in a zeolite for converting methane to methanol: an in situ XAS and DFT investigation.

    PubMed

    Alayon, Evalyn Mae C; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Bodi, Andras; Ranocchiari, Marco; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2015-03-11

    Dicopper species have been identified as the active sites in converting methane to methanol in Cu-zeolites. To understand the formation of these copper cores in mordenite, we used in situ time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy during heat treatment. Significant dehydration enabled the reduction of the copper cores, after which molecular oxygen was cleaved. The activated oxygen bridged two copper atoms to make the reactive precursor for the activation of methane. Even though the active bridging oxygen was detected, the XAS data were unable to distinguish a bis(?-oxo)dicopper core from a mono(?-oxo)dicopper core since XAS measures the average structure of the total copper population and the sample contains a mixture of copper species. We therefore used DFT calculations to understand the energetics of the formation of the active copper species and found that if a copper dimer exists in a zeolite, the mono(?-oxo)dicopper species is an energetically plausible structure. This is in contrast to molecular dicopper cores where the bis(?-oxo)dicopper core is preferentially formed. PMID:25732559

  16. Optical control and dynamic patterning of zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woerdemann, Mike; Alpmann, Christina; Hörner, Florian; Devaux, André; De Cola, Luisa; Denz, Cornelia

    2010-08-01

    Zeolite crystals have a wide use as model systems for artificial light harvesting systems, as nano-containers for supramolecular organization or as building blocks for 1D and 2D assemblies of several crystals. In particular the assembly of zeolite L crystals with the aim to bridge the gap between the nano- and the macroscopic world has been a focus of research during the last years. However, almost all available approaches to order, assemble and pattern Zeolite L are restricted to large amounts of crystals. Although these approaches have proven to be powerful for many applications, but they have only limited control over positioning or orientation of single crystals and are lacking if patterns or structures are required which are composed of a few or up to a few hundred individual crystals. We demonstrate here that holographic optical tweezers are a powerful and versatile instrument to control zeolite L on the single crystal level. It is shown that full three-dimensional positioning, including rotational control, of any zeolite L crystal can be achieved. Finally, we demonstrate fully reversible, dynamic patterning of a multitude of individually controlled zeolite L crystals.

  17. Thermodynamic modeling of natural zeolite stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1997-06-01

    Zeolites occur in a variety of geologic environments and are used in numerous agricultural, commercial, and environmental applications. It is desirable to understand their stability both to predict future stability and to evaluate the geochemical conditions resulting in their formation. The use of estimated thermodynamic data for measured zeolite compositions allows thermodynamic modeling of stability relationships among zeolites in different geologic environments (diagenetic, saline and alkaline lakes, acid rock hydrothermal, basic rock, deep sea sediments). This modeling shows that the relative cation abundances in both the aqueous and solid phases, the aqueous silica activity, and temperature are important factors in determining the stable zeolite species. Siliceous zeolites (e.g., clinoptilolite, mordenite, erionite) present in saline and alkaline lakes or diagenetic deposits formed at elevated silica activities. Aluminous zeolites (e.g., natrolite, mesolite/scolecite, thomsonite) formed in basic rocks in association with reduced silica activities. Likewise, phillipsite formation is favored by reduced aqueous silica activities. The presence of erionite, chabazite, and phillipsite are indicative of environments with elevated potassium concentrations. Elevated temperature, calcic water conditions, and reduced silica activity help to enhance the laumontite and wairakite stability fields. Analcime stability increases with increased temperature and aqueous Na concentration, and/or with decreased silica activity.

  18. Properties of glass-bonded zeolite monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Fischer, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Murphy, C.D. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1994-05-01

    It has been shown that mineral waste forms can be used to immobilize waste salt generated during the pyrochemical processing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Solid, leach resistant monoliths were formed by hot-pressing mixtures of salt-occluded zeolite A powders and glass frit at 990 K and 28 MPa. Additional samples have now been fabricated and tested. Normalized release rates for all elements, including iodide and chloride, were less than 1 g/m{sup 2}d in 28-day tests in deionized water and in brine at 363 K (90{degrees}C). Preliminary results indicate that these rates fall with time with both leachants and that the zeolite phase in the glass-bonded zeolite does not function as an ion exchanger. Some material properties were measured. The Poisson ratio and Young`s modulus were slightly smaller in glass-bonded zeolite than in borosilicate glass. Density depended on zeolite fraction. The glass-bonded zeolite represents a promising mineral waste form for IFR salt.

  19. Salt-occluded zeolite waste forms: Crystal structures and transformability

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J.W. Jr. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Div.

    1996-12-31

    Neutron diffraction studies of salt-occluded zeolite and zeolite/glass composite samples, simulating nuclear waste forms loaded with fission products, have revealed complex structures, with cations assuming the dual roles of charge compensation and occlusion (cluster formation). These clusters roughly fill the 6--8 {angstrom} diameter pores of the zeolites. Samples are prepared by equilibrating zeolite-A with complex molten Li, K, Cs, Sr, Ba, Y chloride salts, with compositions representative of anticipated waste systems. Samples prepared using zeolite 4A (which contains exclusively sodium cations) as starting material are observed to transform to sodalite, a denser aluminosilicate framework structure, while those prepared using zeolite 5A (sodium and calcium ions) more readily retain the zeolite-A structure. Because the sodalite framework pores are much smaller than those of zeolite-A, clusters are smaller and more rigorously confined, with a correspondingly lower capacity for waste containment. Details of the sodalite structures resulting from transformation of zeolite-A depend upon the precise composition of the original mixture. The enhanced resistance of salt-occluded zeolites prepared from zeolite 5A to sodalite transformation is thought to be related to differences in the complex chloride clusters present in these zeolite mixtures. Data relating processing conditions to resulting zeolite composition and structure can be used in the selection of processing parameters which lead to optimal waste forms.

  20. Effect of different glasses in glass bonded zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Verma, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-05-01

    A mineral waste form has been developed for chloride waste salt generated during the pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of salt-occluded zeolite powders bound within a glass matrix. The zeolite contains the salt and immobilizes the fission products. The zeolite powders are hot pressed to form a mechanically stable, durable glass bonded zeolite. Further development of glass bonded zeolite as a waste form requires an understanding of the interaction between the glass and the zeolite. Properties of the glass that enhance binding and durability of the glass bonded zeolite need to be identified. Three types of glass, boroaluminosilicate, soda-lime silicate, and high silica glasses, have a range of properties and are now being investigated. Each glass was hot pressed by itself and with an equal amount of zeolite. MCC-1 leach tests were run on both. Soda-lime silicate and high silica glasses did not give a durable glass bonded zeolite. Boroaluminosilicate glasses rich in alkaline earths did bind the zeolite and gave a durable glass bonded zeolite. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the boroaluminosilicate glasses wetted the zeolite powders better than the other glasses. Development of the glass bonded zeolite as a waste form for chloride waste salt is continuing.

  1. The zeolite deposits of Greece

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamatakis, M.G.; Hall, A.; Hein, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Zeolites are present in altered pyroclastic rocks at many localities in Greece, and large deposits of potential economic interest are present in three areas: (1) the Evros region of the province of Thrace in the north-eastern part of the Greek mainland; (2) the islands of Kimolos and Poliegos in the western Aegean; and (3) the island of Samos in the eastern Aegean Sea. The deposits in Thrace are of Eocene-Oligocene age and are rich in heulandite and/or clinoptilolite. Those of Kimolos and Poliegos are mainly Quaternary and are rich in mordenite. Those of Samos are Miocene, and are rich in clinoptilolite and/or analcime. The deposits in Thrace are believed to have formed in an open hydrological system by the action of meteoric water, and those of the western Aegean islands in a similar way but under conditions of high heat flow, whereas the deposits in Samos were formed in a saline-alkaline lake.

  2. Zeolites US market to reach $1 billion by 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1997-02-05

    This article describes the growth of the U.S. market for zeolites, specifically sodium aluminosilicate. The largest application for zeolites is for petrochemical and petroleum catalysts; however, detergents are also a specific application addressed in the article.

  3. The effects of surface modification on the speciation of metal ions intercalated into aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, S.R.; Giaquinta, D.M.; Yuchs, S.E.; Soderholm, L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

    1996-12-31

    Microporous aluminosilicates, including clay minerals and zeolites, are ion-exchange materials. In their most common forms, they have the ability to incorporate cationic species within their matrices. Because of this property, microporous aluminosilicates have been proposed as storage media for hazardous waste. In this paper the authors use X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to examine the structure of cations held within smectite clay minerals and to determine how modification of the surface of the clay using an organic monolayer affects the coordination of the stored cation. The effects of hydrothermal and thermal processing on the coordination of the ions contained within these systems are also investigated. The presence of the monolayer changes the surface of the clay from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. It inhibits the interlayer ions from exchanging freely into environmental water and reduces the leach rate of cations out of the clay by approximately a factor of 20. Significant changes are observed when these coated samples are treated under hydrothermal and thermal conditions. Reductions of uranium (VI), in the form of uranyl, and cupric ions occur. In addition, the uranium aggregates, forming small particles that appear similar to UO{sub 2}. Comparable conglomeration occurs with lead cations and with the reduced copper species.

  4. Low-temperature synthesis of zeolite from perlite waste — Part II: characteristics of the products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Król, Magdalena; Morawska, Justyna; Mozgawa, W?odzimierz; Pichór, Waldemar

    2014-12-01

    The paper investigates the properties of sodium zeolites synthesized using the hydrothermal method under autogenous pressure at low temperature with NaOH solutions of varying concentrations. During this modification, zeolites X, Na-P1 and hydroxysodalite were synthesized. The synthesis parameters, and thus, phase composition of resulting samples, significantly affected the specific surface area (SSA) and cation exchange capacity (CEC). SSA increased from 2.9 m2/g to a maximum of 501.2 m2/g, while CEC rose from 16 meq/100 g to a maximum of 500 meq/100 g. The best properties for use as a sorbent were obtained for perlite waste modified with 4.0 M NaOH at 70 °C or 80 °C.

  5. Single and Multiple Heteroatom Incorporation in MFI Zeolites

    E-print Network

    Garcia Vargas, Nataly

    2012-11-05

    .e. incorporation of other elements in their framework) to expand their applications. The present dissertation makes advances in this regard. Zeolites with novel compositions that include elements such as titanium and tin have been reported to have great... of zeolites topologies and local structures, and the introduction of fluoride media for zeolite synthesis35-37 (which later allowed the synthesis of many novel structures and heterosubstituted zeolites). During the 1980s and 1990s, AlPOs (aluminophosphates...

  6. Hydrothermal conversion of FAU zeolite into LEV zeolite in the presence of non-calcined seed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiki, Ayako; Honda, Koutaro; Fujimoto, Ayumi; Shibata, Shohei; Ide, Yusuke; Sadakane, Masahiro; Sano, Tsuneji

    2011-06-01

    Hydrothermal conversion of Faujasite-type (FAU) zeolite into Levynite (LEV) zeolite without the use of an organic structure-directing agent (OSDA) was successfully achieved in the presence of non-calcined seed crystals. The interzeolite conversion depended strongly upon the alkalinity (OH -/SiO 2) of the starting gel, the Si/Al ratio of the starting FAU zeolite and the type of alkaline metal employed. Successful conversion of FAU zeolites into pure LEV zeolite was achieved only for FAU zeolites with Si/Al ratios in the range of 19-26, under highly alkaline conditions (OH -/SiO 2=0.6) by using NaOH as an alkali source. Although the yield of LEV zeolite prepared by this method was lower (18-26%) than that of the conventional hydrothermal synthesis with the use of SDA, the obtained LEV zeolite exhibited a unique core/shell structure.

  7. Development of low-cost integrated zeolite collector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. I. Tchernev

    1981-01-01

    The optimum zeolite loading and the best zeolite for this purpose were determined by careful mathematical analysis, followed by experimental test, to confirm the theoretical results. The integrated collector design was then completed and the collector was constructed. After sealing and vacuum testing the zeolite panels and heat exchanges, the collector was coated with flat black paint and provided with

  8. OPTIMUM DILUTION PROFILES OF COMPOSITE ZEOLITES IN PACKED BEDS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PANAGIOTIS G. SMIRNIOTIS; ELI RUCKENSTEIN

    1991-01-01

    The paper examines theoretically the conversion of methanol over composite zeolite spherical catalytic particles in a fixed bed reactor. The composite zeolite contains small zeolite particles uniformly distributed in an amorphous silica-alumina matrix. Two problems are considered. The first is concerned with the effect of dilution of the catalyst with amorphous silica-alumina on the concentrations of species and temperature along

  9. Cesium incorporation and diffusion in cancrinite, sodalite, zeolite, and allophane

    E-print Network

    Flury, Markus

    Cesium incorporation and diffusion in cancrinite, sodalite, zeolite, and allophane Jarai Mon of silicate minerals and precipitation of new aluminosilicate minerals. Cancrinite, sodalite, LTA zeolite in sodalite and cancrinite was far more difficult to replace than that in LTA zeolite or allophane. Most

  10. Characterization and environmental application of a Chilean natural zeolite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. Englert; J. Rubio

    2005-01-01

    The use of natural zeolites for environmental applications is gaining new research interests mainly due to their properties and significant worldwide occurrence. The present work describes the characterization of a natural Chilean zeolite and the results as adsorbent for ammonia from aqueous solutions. The zeolitic-rich tuff sample, mainly composed of clinoptilolite and mordenite, consisted of 13 ?m mean volumetric particle

  11. Diameter and Chirality Distribution of SWNTs Grown from Zeolite Surfaces

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Diameter and Chirality Distribution of SWNTs Grown from Zeolite Surfaces Yoichi Murakami1-8656 Zeolites are microporous, crystalline aluminosilicates constructed from tetrahedral base units. We have been using the b-surfaces of silicalite-1 zeolite (framework: MFI) as catalyst support for catalytic

  12. Microstructural Optimization of a Zeolite Membrane for Organic

    E-print Network

    Kokkoli, Efie

    #12;Microstructural Optimization of a Zeolite Membrane for Organic Vapor Separation Zhiping Lai,1 growth method for the fabrication of high-permeance, high-separa- tion-factor zeolite (siliceous ZSM-5, such as twin overgrowths and random nucleation. Organic polycations are used as zeolite crystal shape modifiers

  13. Zeolite membranes – state of their development and perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Caro; M Noack; P Kölsch; R Schäfer

    2000-01-01

    An ideal zeolite membrane combines the general advantages of inorganic membranes (temperature stability, solvent resistance) with a perfect shape selectivity. Due to their “molecular sieve” function, zeolite membranes can principally discriminate the components of gaseous or liquid mixtures dependent on their molecular size. This molecular sieving principle requires a pinhole- and crack-free zeolite membrane. Remarkable separation effects can also be

  14. Crystal engineering of zeolites with graphene Paul Gebhardt,a

    E-print Network

    Elliott, James

    Crystal engineering of zeolites with graphene Paul Gebhardt,a Sebastian W. Pattinson,b Zhibin Ren,b David J. Cooke,c James A. Elliottb and Dominik Eder*a Achieving control over the morphology of zeolite catalysis, sensors and separation. The complexity and sensitivity of zeolite synthesis processes, however

  15. MATERIALS, INTERFACES, AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PHENOMENA Hydrophilic Zeolite Coatings for Improved

    E-print Network

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    MATERIALS, INTERFACES, AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PHENOMENA Hydrophilic Zeolite Coatings for Improved Heat on the surface of a bare, ZSM-5 coated, and Zeolite-A coated stainless steel 304 substrate at different initial surface temperatures was experimentally studied. ZSM-5 and Zeolite-A coated SS-304 are more much more

  16. Molecular simulations and experimental studies of zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloy, Eric C.

    Zeolites are microporous aluminosilicate tetrahedral framework materials that have symmetric cages and channels with open-diameters between 0.2 and 2.0 nm. Zeolites are used extensively in the petrochemical industries for both their microporosity and their catalytic properties. The role of water is paramount to the formation, structure, and stability of these materials. Zeolites frequently have extra-framework cations, and as a result, are important ion-exchange materials. Zeolites also play important roles as molecular sieves and catalysts. For all that is known about zeolites, much remains a mystery. How, for example, can the well established metastability of these structures be explained? What is the role of water with respect to the formation, stabilization, and dynamical properties? This dissertation addresses these questions mainly from a modeling perspective, but also with some experimental work as well. The first discussion addresses a special class of zeolites: pure-silica zeolites. Experimental enthalpy of formation data are combined with molecular modeling to address zeolitic metastability. Molecular modeling is used to calculate internal surface areas, and a linear relationship between formation enthalpy and internal surface areas is clearly established, producing an internal surface energy of approximately 93 mJ/m2. Nitrate bearing sodalite and cancrinite have formed under the caustic chemical conditions of some nuclear waste processing centers in the United States. These phases have fouled expensive process equipment, and are the primary constituents of the resilient heels in the bottom of storage tanks. Molecular modeling, including molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, and density functional theory, is used to simulate these materials with respect to structure and dynamical properties. Some new, very interesting results are extracted from the simulation of anhydrous Na6[Si6Al 6O24] sodalite---most importantly, the identification of two distinct oxygen sites (rather than one), and formation of a new supercell. New calorimetric measurements of enthalpy are used to examine the energetics of the hydrosodalite family of zeolites---specifically, formation enthalpies and hydration energies. Finally, force-field computational methods begin the examination of water in terms of energetics, structure, and radionuclide containment and diffusion.

  17. Growth of zeolite crystals in the microgravity environment of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, A., Jr.; Sand, L. B.; Collette, D.; Dieselman, K.; Crowley, J.; Feitelberg, A.

    1986-01-01

    Zeolites are hydrated, crystalline aluminosilicates with alkali and alkaling earth metals substituted into cation vacancies. Typically zeolite crystals are 3 to 8 microns. Larger cyrstals are desirable. Large zeolite crystals were produced (100 to 200 microns); however, they have taken restrictively long times to grow. It was proposed if the rate of nucleation or in some other way the number of nuclei can be lowered, fewer, larger crystals will be formed. The microgravity environment of space may provide an ideal condition to achieve rapid growth of large zeolite crystals. The objective of the project is to establish if large zeolite crystals can be formed rapidly in space.

  18. Capturing Ultrasmall EMT Zeolite from Template-Free Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eng-Poh; Chateigner, Daniel; Bein, Thomas; Valtchev, Valentin; Mintova, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Small differences between the lattice energies of different zeolites suggest that kinetic factors are of major importance in controlling zeolite nucleation. Thus, it is critical to control the nucleation kinetics in order to obtain a desired microporous material. Here, we demonstrate how careful investigation of the very early stages of zeolite crystallization in colloidal systems can provide access to important nanoscale zeolite phases while avoiding the use of expensive organic templates. We report the effective synthesis of ultrasmall (6- to 15-nanometer) crystals of the large-pore zeolite EMT from template-free colloidal precursors at low temperature (30°C) and very high yield.

  19. Copper Cleanup

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-12-05

    In this hands-on experiment, kids use chemistry to explore whether acids or bases are better at restoring a penny’s shine. Kids follow the scientific process to test a common household cleaning products alongside ketchup, cola, and other kitchen staples, and may be surprised by the results! A downloadable data sheet is available on the Copper Cleanup activity resources page.

  20. Hydrogen Purification Using Natural Zeolite Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelValle, William

    2003-01-01

    The School of Science at Universidad del Turabo (UT) have a long-lasting investigation plan to study the hydrogen cleaning and purification technologies. We proposed a research project for the synthesis, phase analysis and porosity characterization of zeolite based ceramic perm-selective membranes for hydrogen cleaning to support NASA's commitment to achieving a broad-based research capability focusing on aerospace-related issues. The present study will focus on technology transfer by utilizing inorganic membranes for production of ultra-clean hydrogen for application in combustion. We tested three different natural zeolite membranes (different particle size at different temperatures and time of exposure). Our results show that the membranes exposured at 900 C for 1Hr has the most higher permeation capacity, indicated that our zeolite membranes has the capacity to permeate hydrogen.

  1. Towards a sustainable manufacture of hierarchical zeolites.

    PubMed

    Verboekend, Danny; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2014-03-01

    Hierarchical zeolites have been established as a superior type of aluminosilicate catalysts compared to their conventional (purely microporous) counterparts. An impressive array of bottom-up and top-down approaches has been developed during the last decade to design and subsequently exploit these exciting materials catalytically. However, the sustainability of the developed synthetic methods has rarely been addressed. This paper highlights important criteria to ensure the ecological and economic viability of the manufacture of hierarchical zeolites. Moreover, by using base leaching as a promising case study, we verify a variety of approaches to increase reactor productivity, recycle waste streams, prevent the combustion of organic compounds, and minimize separation efforts. By reducing their synthetic footprint, hierarchical zeolites are positioned as an integral part of sustainable chemistry. PMID:24520034

  2. Photophysical properties of metal ion functionalized NaY zeolite.

    PubMed

    Duan, Tian-Wei; Yan, Bing

    2014-01-01

    A series of luminescent ion exchanged zeolite are synthesized by introducing various ions into NaY zeolite. Monometal ion (Eu(3+), Tb(3+), Ce(3+), Y(3+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+)) exchanged zeolite, rare-earth ion (Eu(3+), Tb(3+), Ce(3+)) exchanged zeolite modified with Y(3+) and rare-earth ion (Eu(3+), Tb(3+), Ce(3+)) exchanged zeolite modified with Zn(2+) are discussed here. The resulting materials are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrum radiometer (FTIR), XRD, scanning electronic microscope (SEM), PLE, PL and luminescence lifetime measurements. The photoluminescence spectrum of NaY indicates that emission band of host matrix exhibits a blueshift of about 70 nm after monometal ion exchange process. The results show that transition metal ion exchanged zeolites possess a similar emission band due to dominant host luminescence. A variety of luminescence phenomenon of rare-earth ion broadens the application of zeolite as a luminescent host. The Eu(3+) ion exchanged zeolite shows white light luminescence with a great application value and Ce(3+) exchanged zeolite steadily exhibits its characteristic luminescence in ultraviolet region no matter in monometal ion exchanged zeolite or bimetal ions exchanged zeolite. PMID:24392790

  3. Existence of Colloidal Primitive Building Units Exhibiting Memory Effects in Zeolite Growth Compositions

    E-print Network

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    Existence of Colloidal Primitive Building Units Exhibiting Memory Effects in Zeolite Growth of crystallization of nanocrystalline sodalite, zeolite A, and zeolite Y. Characterization of the freeze-dried mother zeolites A and Y, and 5 nm regions of crystallinity could be identified in zeolite Y. Upon adding

  4. Association of indigo with zeolites for improved colour stabilization , Martinetto P.a,*

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Association of indigo with zeolites for improved colour stabilization Dejoie C.a , Martinetto P on the association of indigo #12;blue with several zeolitic matrices (LTA zeolite, mordenite, MFI zeolite of the MFI zeolite matrix, we show that matching the pore size with the dimensions of the guest indigo

  5. Biomimetic oxidation on Fe complexes in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Panov, G.I.; Sobolev, V.I.; Dubkov, K.A. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    One-step hydroxylation of aromatic nucleus with nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is among recently discovered organic reactions. A high efficiency of FeZSM-5 zeolites in this reaction relates to a pronounced biomimetic-type activity of iron complexes stabilized in ZSM-5 matrix. N{sub 2}O decomposition on these complexes produces particular atomic oxygen form (a-oxygen), whose chemistry is similar to that performed by the active oxygen of enzyme monooxygenases. Room temperature oxidation reactions of {alpha}-oxygen as well as the data on the kinetic isotope effect and Moessbauer spectroscopy show FeZSM-5 zeolite to be a successful biomimetic model.

  6. Polymerization of methylacetylene in hydrogen zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, S.D.; Stucky, G.D. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (USA))

    1991-01-24

    Acid zeolites as media for the alignment and packaging of included conjugated polymers were investigated with the goal of producing materials with enhanced nonlinear optical properties. Methylacetylene gas was absorbed onto acid forms of Mordenite, Omega, L, Y, Beta ZSM-5, and SAPO-5 at room temperature. The resulting yellow to red-brown powders were characterized by mass uptake, powder XRD, TPD-TGA, {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR, {sup 1}H MAS NMR, UV-vis, ESR, FTIR, heptane absorption, ammonia bleaching, and chemical extraction techniques. The data show that large, conjugated, oligomeric species are formed within the internal void spaces of the zeolites.

  7. Fly ash zeolite catalyst support for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campen, Adam

    This dissertation research aimed at evaluating a fly ash zeolite (FAZ) catalyst support for use in heterogeneous catalytic processes. Gas phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) over a fixed-bed of the prepared catalyst/FAZ support was identified as an appropriate process for evaluation, by comparison with commercial catalyst supports (silica, alumina, and 13X). Fly ash, obtained from the Wabash River Generating Station, was first characterized using XRD, SEM/EDS, particle size, and nitrogen sorption techniques. Then, a parametric study of a two-step alkali fusion/hydrothermal treatment process for converting fly ash to zeolite frameworks was performed by varying the alkali fusion agent, agent:flyash ratio, fusion temperature, fused ash/water solution, aging time, and crystallization time. The optimal conditions for each were determined to be NaOH, 1.4 g NaOH: 1 g fly ash, 550 °C, 200 g/L, 12 hours, and 48 hours. This robust process was applied to the fly ash to obtain a faujasitic zeolite structure with increased crystallinity (40 %) and surface area (434 m2/g). Following the modification of fly ash to FAZ, ion exchange of H+ for Na+ and cobalt incipient wetness impregnation were used to prepare a FTS catalyst. FTS was performed on the catalysts at 250--300 °C, 300 psi, and with a syngas ratio H2:CO = 2. The HFAZ catalyst support loaded with 11 wt% cobalt resulted in a 75 % carbon selectivity for C5 -- C18 hydrocarbons, while methane and carbon dioxide were limited to 13 and 1 %, respectively. Catalyst characterization was performed by XRD, N2 sorption, TPR, and oxygen pulse titration to provide insight to the behavior of each catalyst. Overall, the HFAZ compared well with silica and 13X supports, and far exceeded the performance of the alumina support under the tested conditions. The successful completion of this research could add value to an underutilized waste product of coal combustion, in the form of catalyst supports in heterogeneous catalytic processes.

  8. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  9. MCM-41 impregnated with A zeolite precursor: Synthesis, characterization and tetracycline antibiotics removal from aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minmin; Hou, Li-an; Yu, Shuili; Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Xunfeng

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the MCM-41 has been modified by impregnation with zeolite A to prepare a kind of new adsorbent. The adsorption of TC from aqueous solutions onto modified MCM-41 has been studied. It was discovered that the adsorption capability of zeolite A modified MCM-41 (A-MCM-41) increased dramatically after modification. The modified MCM-41 was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, and 29Si and 27Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. The modified MCM-41 structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A but the surface area and pore diameter decreased due to pore blockage. The adsorption of TC on modified MCM-41 was discussed regarding various parameters such as pH, initial TC concentration, and the reaction time. The pH effects on TC adsorption indicated that the adsorbents had better adsorption performances in acidic and neutral conditions. The adsorption isotherms were fitted well by the Langmuir model. The adsorption kinetics was well described by both pseudo-second order equation and the intra-particle diffusion model. The adsorption behavior in a fixed-bed column system followed Thomas model. The adsorption behavior of TC was the chemical adsorption with an ion exchange process and electrostatic adsorption. PMID:24976787

  10. MCM-41 impregnated with A zeolite precursor: Synthesis, characterization and tetracycline antibiotics removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minmin; Hou, Li-An; Yu, Shuili; Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Xunfeng

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the MCM-41 has been modified by impregnation with zeolite A to prepare a kind of new adsorbent. The adsorption of TC from aqueous solutions onto modified MCM-41 has been studied. It was discovered that the adsorption capability of zeolite A modified MCM-41 (A-MCM-41) increased dramatically after modification. The modified MCM-41 was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, and (29)Si and (27)Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. The modified MCM-41 structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A but the surface area and pore diameter decreased due to pore blockage. The adsorption of TC on modified MCM-41 was discussed regarding various parameters such as pH, initial TC concentration, and the reaction time. The pH effects on TC adsorption indicated that the adsorbents had better adsorption performances in acidic and neutral conditions. The adsorption isotherms were fitted well by the Langmuir model. The adsorption kinetics was well described by both pseudo-second order equation and the intra-particle diffusion model. The adsorption behavior in a fixed-bed column system followed Thomas model. The adsorption behavior of TC was the chemical adsorption with an ion exchange process and electrostatic adsorption. PMID:24976787

  11. Chemical interactions in multimetal/zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, W.M.H.

    1992-02-07

    Mechanistic explanations have been found for the migration of atoms and ions through the zeolite channels leading to specific distribution of ions and the metal clusters. In this report, we summarize the state of understanding attained on a number of topics in the area of mono- and multimetal/zeolite systems, to which our recent research has made significant contributions. The following topics are discussed: (1) Formation of isolated metal atoms in sodalite cages; (2) differences of metal/zeolite systems prepared by ion reduction in channels or via isolated atoms; (3) rejuvenation of Pd/NaY and Pd/HY catalysts by oxidative redispersion of the metal; (4) formation of mono- or bimetal particles in zeolites by programmed reductive decomposition of volatile metal complexes; (5) cation-cation interaction as a cause of enhanced reducibility; (6) formation of palladium carbonyl clusters in supercages; (7) enhanced catalytic activity of metal particle-proton complexes for hydrocarbon conversion reactions; (8) stereoselectivity of catalytic reactions due to geometric constraints of particles in cages.

  12. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H. (Evanston, IL); Tzou, Ming-Shin (Evanston, IL); Jiang, Hui-Jong (Evanston, IL)

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  13. MERCURY SEPARATION FROM POLLUTANT WATER USING ZEOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is known to be a hazardous contaminant in drinking water that causes arsenical dermatitis and skin cancer. In the present work, the potential use of a variety of synthetic zeolites for removal of arsenic from water has been examined at room temperature. Experiments have...

  14. C-14 tracer studies on zeolite catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, F.; Bilz, E.; Freyer, A.

    2006-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of hydrocarbon conversion on zeolite catalysts, small amount of 14C-labelled substances were added to the regular feed. Catalytic studies on isomerization of m-xylene and n-butene were carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor and the 14C distribution was determined by Radio-GC and Radio-HPLC.

  15. Zeolite 5A Catalyzed Etherification of Diphenylmethanol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Henderson, Eric J.; Lightbody, Owen C.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment for the synthetic undergraduate laboratory is described in which zeolite 5A catalyzes the room temperature dehydration of diphenylmethanol, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOH, producing 1,1,1',1'-tetraphenyldimethyl ether, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOCH(C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]. The…

  16. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  17. SODIUM ZEOLITE A SUPPLEMENTATION TO DAIRY CALVES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium zeolite A (SZA), an aluminosilicate, has been used in a number of animal studies, but alterations in mineral metabolism and tissue composition have not been fully investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of SZA on mineral metabolism and tissue mineral composition...

  18. ARSENIC SEPARATION FROM WATER USING ZEOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is known to be a hazardous contaminant in drinking water. The presence of arsenic in water supplies has been linked to arsenical dermatosis and skin cancer . Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange capacities. In the present work, the potential use of a variety of ...

  19. ARSENIC SEPARATION FROM WATER USING ZEOLITES: SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA-01134 Shevade, S, Ford*, R., and Puls*, R.W. "Arsenic Separation from Water Using Zeolites." In: 222nd ACS National Meeting, ACS Environmental Chemistry Division Symposia, Chicago, IL, 08/26-30/2001. 2001. 04/23/2001 This...

  20. Conversion of Ethanol to Hydrocarbons on Hierarchical HZSM-5 Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-12-15

    This study reports synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of the nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolite with high mesoporosity produced via a solvent evaporation procedure. Further, this study compares hierarchical zeolites with conventional HZSM-5 zeolite with similar Si/Al ratios for the ethanol-to-hydrocarbon conversion process. The catalytic performance of the hierarchical and conventional zeolites was evaluated using a fixed-bed reactor at 360 °C, 300 psig, and a weight hourly space velocity of 7.9 h-1. For the low Si/Al ratio zeolite (~40), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical HZSM-5 was approximately 2 times greater than the conventional HZSM-5 despite its coking amount deposited 1.6 times higher than conventional HZSM-5. For the high Si/Al ratio zeolite (~140), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical zeolite was approximately 5 times greater than the conventional zeolite and the amount of coking deposited was 2.1 times higher. Correlation was observed between catalyst life time, porosity, and the crystal size of the zeolite. The nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolites containing mesoporosity demonstrated improved catalyst life-time compared to the conventional catalyst due to faster removal of products, shorter diffusion path length, and the migration of the coke deposits to the external surface from the pore structure.

  1. UTILITY OF ZEOLITES IN REMOVAL OF INORGANIC AND ORGANIC WATER POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange, adsorption and acid catalysis properties. Different inorganic and organic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature using various zeolites. Synthetic zeolite Faujasite Y has been used to remove inorganic pollutants...

  2. DOI: 10.1002/anie.200702628 Aluminum Siting in Silicon-Rich Zeolite Frameworks: A Combined

    E-print Network

    Sklenak, Stepan

    Zeolites DOI: 10.1002/anie.200702628 Aluminum Siting in Silicon-Rich Zeolite Frameworks: A Combined- graphic position of aluminum in zeolite frameworks governs the location of the active sites, which in turn

  3. One-step brazing process to join CFC composites to copper and copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvo, Milena; Casalegno, Valentina; Rizzo, Stefano; Smeacetto, Federico; Ferraris, Monica; Merola, Mario

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a new single-step brazing technique to join carbon fibre reinforced carbon composite (CFC) to pure copper (Cu) and copper alloy (CuCrZr) for nuclear fusion applications. In order to increase the wettability of CFC by a copper-based brazing alloy containing no active metal, the composite surface was modified by direct reaction with chromium, which forms a carbide layer and allows a large reduction of the contact angle. After the CFC surface modification, the commercial Gemco ® alloy (Cu/Ge) was successfully used to braze CFC to pure copper and pure copper to CuCrZr by the same heat treatment. The shear strength of the CFC/Cu joints measured by single lap shear tests at room temperature was (34 ± 4) MPa, comparable to the values obtained by other joining processes and higher than the intrinsic CFC shear strength.

  4. Copper in diet

    MedlinePLUS

    Diet - copper ... Copper works with iron to help the body form red blood cells. It also helps keep the ... organ meats (kidneys, liver) are good sources of copper. Dark leafy greens, dried fruits such as prunes, ...

  5. Copper Extraction Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Summary This demonstration uses sulfuric acid and crushed copper ore (malachite) to produce a solution of copper sulfate and carbonic acid in a beaker. When a freshly sanded nail is dropped into the copper sulfate ...

  6. CO2 SEPARATIONS USING ZEOLITE MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Noble; John L. Falconer

    2001-06-30

    Zeolite and other inorganic molecular sieve membranes have shown potential for separations based on molecular size and shape because of their small pore sized, typically less than 1 nm, and their narrow pore size distribution. The high thermal and chemical stability of these inorganic crystals make them ideal materials for use in high temperature applications such as catalytic membrane reactors. Most of the progress with zeolite membranes has been with MFI zeolites prepared on porous disks and tubes. The MFI zeolite is a medium pore size structure having nearly circular pores with diameters between .53 and .56 nm. Separation experiments through MFI membranes indicate that competitive adsorption separates light gas mixtures. Light gas selectivities are typically small, however, owing to small differences in adsorption strengths and their small sizes relative to the MFI pore opening. Furthermore, competitive adsorption does not work well at high temperature where zeolite membranes are stable and have potential application. Separation by differences in size has a greater potential to work at high temperature than competitive adsorption, but pores smaller than those in MFI zeolites are required. Therefore, some studies focused on the synthesis of a small, 8-membered-pore structures such as zeolite A (0.41-nm pore diameter) and SAPO-34, a chabazite (about .4-nm pore diameter with about 1.4 nm cages) analog. The small pore size of the zeolite A and SAPO-34 structures made the separation of smaller molecules by differences in size possible. Zeolite MFI and SAPO-34 membranes were prepared on the inside surface of porous alumina tubes by hydrothermal synthesis, and single gas and binary mixture permeances were measured to characterize the membrane's performance. A mathematical diffusion model was developed to determine the relative quantities of zeolite and non-zeolite pores in different membranes by modeling the permeation date of CO{sub 2}. This model expresses the total flux through the membrane as the sum of surface diffusion through zeolite pores and viscous flow and Knudsen diffusion through non-zeolite pores. As predicted by the model, the permeance of CO{sub 2} decrease with increasing pressure at constant pressure drop for membranes with few non-zeolite pores, but the permeance increased through viscous flow pores and was constant through pores allowing Knudsen diffusion. Membranes having more non-zeolite pores had lower CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivities. The SAPO-34 membranes were characterized for light gas separation applications, and the separation mechanisms were identified. Single gas permeances of CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} decreased with increasing kinetic diameter. For the best membrane at 300K, the He and H{sub 2} permeances were less than that of CO{sub 2}, because He, H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} were small compared to the SAPO-34 pore, and differences in the heat of adsorption determined the permeance order. The small component permeated the fastest in CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures between 300 and 470 K. For H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures, which were separated by competitive adsorption at room temperature, the larger component permeated faster below 400K. The room temperature CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity was 36 and decreased with temperature. The H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} mixture selectivity was 8 and constant with temperature up to 480 K. Calcination, slow temperature cycles, and exposure to water vapor had no permanent effect on membrane performance, but temperature changes of approximately 30 K/min decreased the membrane's effectiveness. The effects of humidity on gas permeation were studied with SAPO-34 membranes of different qualities. Membranes with high CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivities (greater than 20) were stable in water vapor under controlled conditions, but degradation was seen for some membranes. The degradation opened non-SAPO-34 pores that were larger than SAPO-34 pores as shown by the IC{sub 4}H{sub 10} permeance, C

  7. Seeding of Porous Alumina Substrate with MFI Zeolite Nanocrystals using Spin-coating Technique

    E-print Network

    Baroud, T.

    Zeolite membranes offer a great potential for applications in many challenging separation processes. Controlled thickness of zeolite membrane allows high flux and excellent selectivity commercially available; producing ...

  8. Molecular Structure of Copper

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-04-10

    Man has known of copper since antiquity. Copper is known for its unique reddish hue, its good electrical and thermal conductivity, and widespread abundance. It is malleable and extremely ductile. Copper melts at 1357 degrees kelvin and boils at 2840 degrees kelvin. Copper crystals are commonly found in cubic and dodecahedral forms. Copper is widely used in wiring and electronics. Two important alloys of copper are brass and bronze. Also, all American coins are now made of copper alloys. Humans require trace amounts of copper; larger doses result in poisoning.

  9. Conversion of rice husk ash to zeolite beta.

    PubMed

    Prasetyoko, Didik; Ramli, Zainab; Endud, Salasiah; Hamdan, Halimaton; Sulikowski, Bogdan

    2006-01-01

    White rice husk ash (RHA), an agriculture waste containing crystalline tridymite and alpha-cristobalite, was used as a silica source for zeolite Beta synthesis. The crystallization of zeolite Beta from RHA at 150 degrees C in the presence of tetraethylammonium hydroxide was monitored by XRD, FTIR and (29)Si MAS NMR techniques. It was found that zeolite Beta started to form after 12h and the complete crystallization of zeolite Beta phase was achieved after 2d. XRD, (29)Si MAS NMR and solid yield studies indicate that the transformation mechanism of silica present in RHA to zeolite Beta involves dissolution of the ash, formation of an amorphous aluminosilicate after 6h of crystallization, followed by dissolution in the mother liquor and final transformation to pure zeolite Beta crystals. PMID:16274981

  10. Paranitrophenol liquid-phase adsorption in dealuminated Y zeolite.

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Lopez, C; Duconge, J; Roque-Malherbe, R

    2009-01-01

    Was studied the liquid-phase paranitrophenol (PNP) dynamic adsorption in a packed bed adsorption reactor (PBAR), filled with dealuminated Y zeolite (DAY) and granulated active carbon (GAC). In addition, was measured the equilibrium maximum amount of adsorption for the system: PNP aqueous solution-DAY zeolite, at 300 K, to compare it with other adsorbents. The DAY zeolite and the GAC were characterized with adsorption methods. The DAY zeolite was, as well, characterized with: XRD, SEM and EDAX. Some of the operational parameters which characterize the performance of the PBAR were calculated. To evaluate these results, was considered the breakthrough experiment as a frontal analysis chromatographic event and were applied the DeVault and van Deemter equations. It was concluded that the reactor filled with the DAY zeolite operates more efficiently than those filled with the GAC, because of the stronger adsorbate-adsorbent interaction in the case of the DAY zeolite. PMID:18930242

  11. Atomic sites and stability of Cs+ captured within zeolitic nanocavities

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kaname; Toyoura, Kazuaki; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Nakahira, Atsushi; Kurata, Hiroki; Ikuhara, Yumi H.; Sasaki, Yukichi

    2013-01-01

    Zeolites have potential application as ion-exchangers, catalysts and molecular sieves. Zeolites are once again drawing attention in Japan as stable adsorbents and solidification materials of fission products, such as 137Cs+ from damaged nuclear-power plants. Although there is a long history of scientific studies on the crystal structures and ion-exchange properties of zeolites for practical application, there are still open questions, at the atomic-level, on the physical and chemical origins of selective ion-exchange abilities of different cations and detailed atomic structures of exchanged cations inside the nanoscale cavities of zeolites. Here, the precise locations of Cs+ ions captured within A-type zeolite were analyzed using high-resolution electron microscopy. Together with theoretical calculations, the stable positions of absorbed Cs+ ions in the nanocavities are identified, and the bonding environment within the zeolitic framework is revealed to be a key factor that influences the locations of absorbed cations. PMID:23949184

  12. Atomic sites and stability of Cs+ captured within zeolitic nanocavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kaname; Toyoura, Kazuaki; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Nakahira, Atsushi; Kurata, Hiroki; Ikuhara, Yumi H.; Sasaki, Yukichi

    2013-08-01

    Zeolites have potential application as ion-exchangers, catalysts and molecular sieves. Zeolites are once again drawing attention in Japan as stable adsorbents and solidification materials of fission products, such as 137Cs+ from damaged nuclear-power plants. Although there is a long history of scientific studies on the crystal structures and ion-exchange properties of zeolites for practical application, there are still open questions, at the atomic-level, on the physical and chemical origins of selective ion-exchange abilities of different cations and detailed atomic structures of exchanged cations inside the nanoscale cavities of zeolites. Here, the precise locations of Cs+ ions captured within A-type zeolite were analyzed using high-resolution electron microscopy. Together with theoretical calculations, the stable positions of absorbed Cs+ ions in the nanocavities are identified, and the bonding environment within the zeolitic framework is revealed to be a key factor that influences the locations of absorbed cations.

  13. Zeolite catalysis in conversion of cellulosics. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.

    1994-02-01

    The authors have studied the kinetics of oxylose/xylulose isomerization in significant detail over a variety of zeolites and obtained the pseudo-first order reaction rate constants. The authors have found that HY zeolite is still the best material and zeolites are more selective than homogeneous acid catalysts where decomposition of the sugar compounds is much faster. They have completed, as described in the Year 2 Work Plan, the study of cellobiose hydrolysis with an ion exchange resin. The kinetics of the solid-catalyzed reaction is qualitatively similar to that for catalysis by homogeneous acids. The planned program of NMR studies has revealed the dynamics of sugar molecules within the zeolite cavities. Two chemisorbed and a physisorbed state have been identified in HY zeolite. A new state, accounting for as much as a half of the sugar, has been found in ZSM-5 zeolite.

  14. Chemical Interactions in Multimetal/Zeolite Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.

    2004-04-16

    This two-year project has led to a significant improvement in the fundamental understanding of the catalytic action of zeolite-supported redox catalysts. It turned out to be essential that we could combine four strategies for the preparation of catalysts containing transition metal (TM) ions in zeolite cavities: (1) ion exchange from aqueous solution; (2) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of a volatile halide onto a zeolite in its acidic form; (3) solid state ion exchange; and (4) hydrothermal synthesis of a zeolite having TM ions in its lattice, followed by a treatment transporting these ions to ''guest positions''. Technique (2) enables us to position more TM ions into cavities than permitted by the conventional technique (1).viz one positive charge per Al centered tetrahedron in the zeolite lattice. The additional charge is compensated by ligands to the TM ions, for instance in oxo-ions such as (GaO){sup +} or dinuclear [Cu-O-Cu]{sup 2+}. While technique (3) is preferred over CVD where volatile halides are not available, technique (4) leads to rather isolated ''ex lattice'' oxo-ions. Such oxo-ions tend to be mono-nuclear, in contrast to technique (2) which preferentially creates dinuclear oxo-ions of the same TM element. A favorable element for the present research was that the PI is also actively engaged in a project on the reduction of nitrogen oxides, sponsored by EMSI program of the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy, Office of Science. This combination created a unique opportunity to test and analyze catalysts for the one step oxidation of benzene to phenol and compare them with catalysts for the reduction of nitrogen oxides, using hydrocarbons as the reductant. In both projects catalysts have been used which contain Fe ions or oxo-ions in the cavities the zeolite MFI, often called ZSM-5. With Fe as the TM-element and MFI as the host zeolite we found that catalysts with high Fe content, prepared by technique (2) were optimal for the De-NO{sub x} reaction, but extremely unselective for benzene oxidation to phenol. Conversely, the catalysts prepared with (4) had the highest turnover frequency for benzene oxidation, but performed very poorly for NO{sub x} reduction with so-butane. In fact the Fe concentration in the former catalysts were so low that it was necessary to design a special experimental program for the sole purpose of showing that it is really the Fe which catalyzes the benzene oxidation, not some acid center as has been proposed by other authors. For this purpose we used hydrogen sulfide to selectively poison the Fe sites, without deactivating the acidic sites. In addition we could show that the hydrothermal treatment of catalysts prepared by technique (4) is essential to transform iron ions in the zeolite lattice to ''ex lattice ions'' in guest positions. That line of the work required very careful experimentation, because a hydrothermal treatment of a zeolite containing Fe ions in its cavities can also lead to agglomeration of such ions to nano-particles of iron oxide which lowers the selectivity for the desired formation of phenol. This part of the program showed convincingly that indeed Fe is responsible for the benzene oxidation catalysis. The results and conclusion of this work, including the comparison of different catalysts, was published in a number of papers in the scientific literature, listed in the attached list. In these papers also our analysis of the reaction orders and the possible mechanism of the used test reaction are given.

  15. Development of low-cost integrated zeolite collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernev, D. I.

    1981-07-01

    The optimum zeolite loading and the best zeolite for this purpose were determined by careful mathematical analysis, followed by experimental test, to confirm the theoretical results. The integrated collector design was then completed and the collector was constructed. After sealing and vacuum testing the zeolite panels and heat exchanges, the collector was coated with flat black paint and provided with double glazing, aluminum frame and insulation. Preliminary testing indicates close agreement with theoretical predictions of its performance.

  16. Zeolite (clinoptilolite) as feed additive to reduce manure mineral content.

    PubMed

    Leung, S; Barrington, S; Wan, Y; Zhao, X; El-Husseini, B

    2007-12-01

    Clinoptilolite (a species of zeolite) as grower hog feed additive can potentially improve nutrient ingestion and lower manure nutrient levels. A first objective was to establish the optimal particle size of the zeolite powder, as a fine size increases the adsorption surface while a coarse size can facilitate handling. The second objective tested the effect of feeding zeolite on manure nutrient levels. For the first objective, three zeolite powders (250-500 microm; 50-250 microm, and 50-500 microm) were exposed to an NH(4)(+) solution under a pH of either 7.0 or 2.0. The resulting solutions were tested for cation exchange. A commercial zeolite was also tested for the pH of 2.0 to evaluate zeolite stability. At 0%, 5% and 10% humidity, the same three particle size powders were subjected to shear tests to determine the zeolite's angle of friction. For the second objective using metabolic cages, female hogs were subjected to one of four rations (a control and three with zeolite) while collecting and analyzing their manures. For the first objective, the coarse particle zeolite performed best, adsorbing 158 and 123 Cmol(+)/kg of NH(4)(+) under neutral and acid pH, respectively, and releasing an equivalent amount of minerals only under neutral pH. The commercial zeolite with less clinoptilolite released more Al, Fe, Cu and Pb, showing less stability. The high internal angle of friction of zeolite did not vary with particle size and moisture, indicating funnel flow under gravity. For the second objective, hogs fed a zeolite diet produced manure with 15% and 22% less N and P, respectively, and demonstrated a better feed conversion, although not statistically significant (P>0.05). These results show that there is some potential in using high quality clinoptilolite in the ration of grower hogs. PMID:16905313

  17. CO2 adsorption equilibria of the honeycomb zeolite beds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Kamiuto; Ermalina; K. Ihara

    2001-01-01

    The CO2 adsorption equilibria of the honeycomb zeolite beds consisting of MS-13X or MS-4A were determined from breakthrough curves for various CO2-N2 mixtures, and the fitness of the Dubinin-Astakhov equation (Dubinin MM, Astakhov VA. Description of adsorption equilibria of vapors on zeolite over wide ranges of temperature and pressure. In: Flanigen M, Sand LB, editors. Molecular sieves zeolite II. Washington:

  18. CO 2 adsorption equilibria of the honeycomb zeolite beds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Kamiuto; Ermalina; K. Ihara

    2001-01-01

    The CO2 adsorption equilibria of the honeycomb zeolite beds consisting of MS-13X or MS-4A were determined from breakthrough curves for various CO2–N2 mixtures, and the fitness of the Dubinin–Astakhov equation (Dubinin MM, Astakhov VA. Description of adsorption equilibria of vapors on zeolite over wide ranges of temperature and pressure. In: Flanigen M, Sand LB, editors. Molecular sieves zeolite II. Washington:

  19. Thermal analysis of fly ash-based zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Majchrzak-Kuc?ba; W. Nowak

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents research results on dehydration properties and thermal behaviour of zeolites synthesized from fly ash,\\u000a applying TG (thermogravimetry), DTG (derivative thermogravimetry) and SDTA (simultaneous differential thermal analysis) methods.\\u000a In result of the analysis conducted water contents in zeolite samples were defined. On the basis of the data obtained from\\u000a the thermogravimetric analysis, thermal behaviour of zeolites was assessed.

  20. Large zeolites - Why and how to grow in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of zeolite crystals which are considered to be the most valuable catalytic and adsorbent materials of the chemical processing industry are discussed. It is proposed to use triethanolamine as a nucleation control agent to control the time release of Al in a zeolite A solution and to increase the average and maximum crystal size by 25-50 times. Large zeolites could be utilized to make membranes for reactors/separators which will substantially increase their efficiency.

  1. Synthesis of NaA zeolite membrane by microwave heating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaochun Xu; Weishen Yang; Jie Liu; Liwu Lin

    2001-01-01

    The synthesis of NaA zeolite membrane on a porous ?-Al2O3 support by microwave heating (MH) was investigated. The formation of a NaA zeolite membrane was drastically promoted by MH. The synthesis time was reduced from 3 h for conventional heating (CH) to 15 min for MH. Surface seeding cannot only promote the formation of NaA zeolite on the support, but

  2. Microwave synthesis of LTA zeolite membranes without seeding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yanshuo Li; Hongliang Chen; Jie Liu; Weishen Yang

    2006-01-01

    A new method called “in-situ aging—microwave synthesis” was developed for zeolite membrane synthesis. High quality LTA zeolite membranes were successfully microwave-synthesized without seeding by this method. It was found that the formed zeolite layer was composed of sphere grains with undefined crystal facets. The necessity of in-situ aging was discussed. The effects of synthesis parameters including in-situ aging temperature, time

  3. Origin of strong acidity in lanthanum-exchanged zeolites

    E-print Network

    Carvajal Freese, Ralf R.

    1989-01-01

    material, the high temperatures and acidity of hydrocracking processes can result in the collapse of the zeolite crystalline structure (17). These features require a thermally and chemically stable catalyst. As a large amount of structural aluminum... of this research was to determine the factors which give rise to strong acidity in zeolites. There is a linear relation between catalytic activity and zeolite framework aluminum number in the range of' 0 to 32 aluminum atoms per unit cell, whereas at higher...

  4. Transesterification of soybean oil with zeolite and metal catalysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Galen J. Suppes; Mohanprasad A. Dasari; Eric J. Doskocil; Pratik J. Mankidy; Michael J. Goff

    2004-01-01

    Transesterification of soybean oil with methanol was carried out at 60, 120, and 150°C in the presence of a series NaX faujasite zeolite, ETS-10 zeolite, and metal catalysts. The stock zeolites were exchanged with potassium and cesium; NaX containing occluded sodium oxide (NaOx\\/NaX) and occluded sodium azide (NaOx\\/NaX*). The catalysts were calcined at 500°C prior to use in order to

  5. Effects of zeolites on cultures of marine micro-algae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adriano Fachini; Maria Teresa S. D. Vasconcelos

    2006-01-01

    Goal, Scope and Background  The cation-exchange capacity of zeolites is well known and has been increasingly explored in different fields with both economic\\u000a and environmental successes. In aquatic medium with low salinity, zeolites have found multiple applications. However, a review\\u000a of the literature on the applications of zeolites in salt waters found relatively few articles, including some recently published\\u000a papers. The

  6. Zeolite Crystal Growth in Microgravity and on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing (CAMMP), a NASA-sponsored Research Partnership Center, is working to improve zeolite materials for storing hydrogen fuel. CAMMP is also applying zeolites to detergents, optical cables, gas and vapor detection for environmental monitoring and control, and chemical production techniques that significantly reduce by-products that are hazardous to the environment. Shown here are zeolite crystals (top) grown in a ground control experiment and grown in microgravity on the USML-2 mission (bottom). Zeolite experiments have also been conducted aboard the International Space Station.

  7. Method for the recovery of silver from silver zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, George A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1986-01-01

    High purity silver is recovered from silver exchanged zeolite used to capture radioactive iodine from nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel reprocessing environments. The silver exchanged zeolite is heated with slag formers to melt and fluidize the zeolite and release the silver, the radioactivity removing with the slag. The silver containing metallic impurities is remelted and treated with oxygen and a flux to remove the metal impurities. About 98% of the silver in the silver exchanged zeolite having a purity of 99% or better is recoverable by the method.

  8. Method for the recovery of silver from silver zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, G.A.

    1985-03-05

    High purity silver is recovered from silver exchanged zeolite used to capture radioactive iodine from nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel reprocessing environments. The silver exchanged zeolite is heated with slag formers to melt and fluidize the zeolite and release the silver, the radioactivity removing with the slag. The silver containing metallic impurities is remelted and treated with oxygen and a flux to remove the metal impurities. About 98% of the silver in the silver exchanged zeolite having a purity of 99% or better is recoverable by the method.

  9. Electrical Response of PEDOT-PSS/FAU Zeolite Composites toward SO2: Controlling the Adsorption Properties of FAU Zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanthaanont, Pojjawan; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2012-02-01

    In our work, we propose to combine a conductive polymer, Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT-PSS), with FAU zeolites to investigate the potential of the composites for use as SO2 sensing materials.Composites with PEDOT-PSS as a matrix containing faujasite zeolites of various cation types (divalent transition metal ions: Fe^2+, Co^2+, Ni^2+ and Cu^2+), were fabricated to investigate the effect of the cation type of the faujasite zeolites on the electrical conductivity response when exposed to SO2. The composite was tested through repeated sensing and recovery processes to investigate the reversibility and reproducibility. During the recovery process, the electrical conductivity of the composites were recovered, which proves that the sensing characteristics are repeatable. Responses and the interaction mechanism of the conductive polymer/zeolite composites were investigated. The composite with 20% (v/v) of zeolite content gives the highest sensitivity. The electrical conductivity responses of PEDOT-PSS/Zeolite composites can be altered due to the available adsorption sites for gas molecules. The addition of zeolites to the pristine PEDOT-PSS improved the electrical conductivity sensitivity of the composites by enhancing the interaction between PEDOT-PSS and SO2. The type of cation in the zeolite pores effected the sensitivity of the composites, depending on the acidity of the ion-exchanged zeolites.

  10. Pf/Zeolite Catalyst for Tritium Stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.

    2001-03-26

    This report described promising hydrogen (protium and tritium) stripping results obtained with a Pd/zeolite catalyst at ambient temperature. Preliminary results show 90-99+ percent tritium stripping efficiency may be obtained, with even better performance expected as bed configuration and operating conditions are optimized. These results suggest that portable units with single beds of the Pd/zeolite catalyst may be utilized as ''catalytic absorbers'' to clean up both tritium gas and tritiated water. A cart-mounted prototype stripper utilizing this catalyst has been constructed for testing. This portable stripper has potential applications in maintenance-type jobs such as tritium line breaks. This catalyst can also potentially be utilized in an emergency stripper for the Replacement Tritium Facility.

  11. Raman spectra of zeolites exchanged with uranyl(VI) cations—II. Zeolite X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, John R.; Cooney, Ralph P.

    1989-01-01

    The formation of hydrolysed uranyl(VI) species in UO 2X zeolites prepared by various methods has been investigated by Raman spectroscopy. Ion-exchange in aqueous (pH>3) and non-aqueous (anhydrous methanol and uranyl nitrate melts) media resulted in the formation of hydroxy-bridged complexes such as [(UO 2) 3(OH) 4] 2+, [(UO 2) 3(OH) 5] +, and [(UO 2) 4(OH) 7] +. Ion-exchange in more acidic media (initial pH < 3) was accompanied by the formation of a disordered phase incorporating UO 3, following extensive collapse of the zeolite framework structure. Cation speciation in the UO 2X system is compared to that in UO 2Y zeolites.

  12. COPPER CORROSION RESEARCH UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Copper release and corrosion related issues continue to be important to many water systems. The objective of this presentation is to discuss the current state of copper research at the USEPA. Specifically, the role of aging on copper release, use of phosphates for copper corrosio...

  13. Metal loading and reactivity of Zeolite Y

    E-print Network

    Sa?enz, Marc Gerard

    1988-01-01

    be loaded with as much as fifty weight percent MoOs without destroying the zeolite structure. The final calcined product was bound with SiOi and crushed. The crushed par- ticles were 210 to 495 pm in diameter. The nitrogen adsorption specific surface... (', . Nickel Ion Exchange D. Molybdenum Irr&pregnat ion E. Calcination F. Reactivity 31 31 37 47 VI. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 57 REFERENCES APPENDIX A: DETAILED PROCEDURES APPENDIX B: GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY CONDITIONS 60 62 75 VITA 77 LIST...

  14. Polymerization of methylacetylene in hydrogen zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sherman D. Cox; Galen D. Stucky

    1991-01-01

    Acid zeolites as media for the alignment and packaging of included conjugated polymers were investigated with the goal of producing materials with enhanced nonlinear optical properties. Methylacetylene gas was absorbed onto acid forms of Mordenite, Omega, L, Y, Beta ZSM-5, and SAPO-5 at room temperature. The resulting yellow to red-brown powders were characterized by mass uptake, powder XRD, TPD-TGA, ¹³C

  15. Microporous and Photoluminescent Chalcogenide Zeolite Analogs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nanfeng Zheng; Xianhui Bu; Bing Wang; Pingyun Feng

    2002-01-01

    Crystalline semiconducting sulfide and selenide zeolite analogs were synthesized that possess four-connected, three-dimensional tetrahedral networks built from tetravalent (M4+ = Ge4+ or Sn4+, where M = meta) and trivalent (M3+ = Ga3+ or In3+) cations. Microporous materials were obtained in all four combinations of M4+ and M3+, and some of them were thermally stable up to at least 380°C. These

  16. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology. PMID:24672633

  17. Zeolite compositions as proxies for eruptive paleoenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Joanne S.; Smellie, John L.

    2007-03-01

    We report chemical compositions of authigenic alteration minerals in subglacially erupted hyaloclastite breccias from James Ross Island, Antarctica, which provide a geochemical proxy for paleoenvironment. Analyses of zeolites (phillipsite and chabazite) from several lava-fed deltas on the island were compared with published compositions of zeolites from known freshwater and marine environments. Using values of (Na + K)/Ca = 3.0 (for phillipsites) and 1.0 (for chabazites), the data successfully distinguish between marine and freshwater alteration. However, our study also suggests that volcanic breccias may not be sealed to fluids, even when the pore spaces are completely filled. The James Ross Island data show that, at higher elevations in lava-fed deltas, the zeolites preserve their original freshwater-influenced (i.e., glacial) compositions, whereas at lower elevations, (Na + K)/Ca ratios are generally higher and indicate a later marine influence. We suggest that water may penetrate several kilometers into the volcanic pile by movement along fractures and/or grain boundaries.

  18. Copper Data Center Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Copper Development Association

    The Copper Data Center Database is provided free of charge by the Copper Development Association "to increase knowledge and awareness of copper, related technologies, and the role of copper in the environment." The database is an online bibliographic search engine of literature on copper, copper alloys and copper technology dating back to 1965 and is described as covering copper technology from smelting and hydrometallurgy through the performance of copper and copper alloys in their end-use applications and service environments. Users can search by standard methods including using keywords and titles or an impressive advanced search feature is also available. Although full text listings are not available, anyone interested in related subjects will appreciate this well designed and unique tool.

  19. Use of natural clinoptilolite for the removal of lead, copper and zinc in fixed bed column.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Marinos A; Hadjiconstantinou, Michalis P; Inglezakis, Vasilis J; Moustakas, Konstantinos G; Loizidou, Maria D

    2007-05-01

    This work deals with the removal of lead, copper and zinc from aqueous solutions by using natural zeolite (clinoptilolite). Fixed bed experiments were performed, using three different volumetric flow rates of 5, 7 and 10bed volume/h, under a total normality of 0.01N, at initial pH of 4 and ambient temperature (25 degrees C). The removal efficiency increased when decreasing the flow rate and the following selectivity series was found: Pb(2+)>Zn(2+)> or =Cu(2+). Conductivity measurements showed that lead removal follows mainly ion exchange mechanism, while copper and zinc removal follows ion exchange and sorption mechanism as well. PMID:17118535

  20. Production of aromatic hydrocarbons by catalytic pyrolysis of microalgae with zeolites: catalyst screening in a pyroprobe.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhenyi; Ma, Xiaochen; Li, Yun; Chen, Paul; Liu, Yuhuan; Lin, Xiangyang; Lei, Hanwu; Ruan, Roger

    2013-07-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of microalgae and egg whites was investigated to evaluate the performance of different zeolites for the production of aromatic hydrocarbons. Three zeolites with different structures (H-Y, H-Beta and H-ZSM5) were used to study the effect of catalyst type on the aromatic yield. All three catalysts significantly increased the aromatic yields from pyrolysis of microalgae and egg whites compared with non-catalytic runs, and H-ZSM5 was most effective with a yield of 18.13%. Three H-ZSM5 with silica-to-alumina ratios of 30, 80 and 280 were used to study the effect of Si/Al ratio on the aromatic yield. The maximum yield was achieved at the Si/Al ratio of 80, which provides moderate acidity to achieve high aromatic production and reduce coke formation simultaneously. Aromatic production increased with the incorporation of copper or gallium to HZSM-5. However, other studied metals either had no significant influence or led to a lower aromatic yield. PMID:23642438

  1. Oxygen transport in zeolite Y measured by quenching of encapsulated tris(bipyridyl)ruthenium

    E-print Network

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    Oxygen transport in zeolite Y measured by quenching of encapsulated tris(bipyridyl)ruthenium Abstract This study deals with emission quenching of zeolite encapsulated trisbipyridyl ruthenium (II) (Ru the migration of O2 within zeolites using the emis- sion quenching of zeolite encapsulated ruthenium

  2. Study on Preparation of Zeolite\\/Ag+ Composite Particles Material and Its Air Purification Property

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hao Ding; Ning Liang; Bai Kun Wang; Hong Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Zeolit\\/Ag+ composite particles material (ZACPM) had been prepared using zeolite as carrier by carrying Ag+, solidifying Ag+ stably in the holes of zeolite and enhancing the adsorption property of zeolite. The effects of technological parameters on preparation of ZACPM, the air purification properties such as antibacterial property and the function of eliminating harmful gases and the microstructure of ZACPM were

  3. Zeolites in Eocene basaltic pillow lavas of the Siletz River Volcanics, Central Coast Range, Oregon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keith, T.E.C.; Staples, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    Zeolites and associated minerals occur in a tholeiitic basaltic pillow lava sequence. Although the zeolite assemblages are similar to those found in other major zeolite occurrences in basaltic pillow lavas, regional zoning of the zeolite assemblages is not apparent. The formation of the different assemblages is discussed.-D.F.B.

  4. Amphiphilic organosilane-directed synthesis of crystalline zeolite with tunable mesoporosity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Minkee Choi; Hae Sung Cho; Rajendra Srivastava; Chithravel Venkatesan; Dae-Heung Choi; Ryong Ryoo

    2006-01-01

    Zeolites are a family of crystalline aluminosilicate materials widely used as shape-selective catalysts, ion exchange materials, and adsorbents for organic compounds. In the present work, zeolites were synthesized by adding a rationally designed amphiphilic organosilane surfactant to conventional alkaline zeolite synthesis mixtures. The zeolite products were characterized by a complementary combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen sorption, scanning electron microscopy

  5. 1 Flexibility As an Indicator of Feasibility of Zeolite Frameworks 2 Colby J. Dawson,

    E-print Network

    Thorpe, Michael

    1 Flexibility As an Indicator of Feasibility of Zeolite Frameworks 2 Colby J. Dawson, Vitaliy Kapko two 6 million unique hypothetical zeolite structures. By a simple flexibility calculation, we have 7 feasibility as zeolites. 78 out of 97 officially approved zeolite framework types 9 that occur in the database

  6. Zeolite Nanoslabs? On the TEM and AFM Evidence of Zeosil Nanoslabs

    E-print Network

    Kokkoli, Efie

    Zeolite Nanoslabs? On the TEM and AFM Evidence of Zeosil Nanoslabs Present during the Synthesis · nanoslabs · silicates · zeolites The mechanism of formation of syn- thetic zeolite structures has been a subject of many recent investigations.[1­3] One of the commonly studied zeolites is silicalite-1

  7. SO2 REMOVAL FROM FLUE GASES USING UTILITY SYNTHESIZED ZEOLITES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Grutzeck

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that natural and synthetic zeolites (molecular sieves) can adsorb gaseous SOâ from flue gas and do it more efficiently than lime based scrubbing materials. Unfortunately their cost ($500-$800 per ton) has deterred their use in this capacity. It is also known that zeolites are easy to synthesize from a variety of natural and man-made materials. The

  8. CATION CONTROLLED SINGLET OXYGEN MEDIATED OXIDATION OF OLEFINS WITHIN ZEOLITES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidation of trialkyl olefins has been performed within zeolites employing thionin as the singlet oxygen sensitizer. Unusual selectivity in favor of secondary hydroperoxides is observed within zeolites. In light of the fact that in solution such a selectivity is never observed the selectivity report...

  9. Selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Basel, CH); Sun, Hai (Saint Charles, MO)

    2000-01-01

    A process for selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls is carried out in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  10. Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Basel, CH); Sun, Hai (Saint Charles, MO)

    2001-01-01

    A process for a combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  11. Selectivity of zeolite catalysts of hydrocracking of paraffin hydrocarbons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. N. Shakun; L. F. Ilicheva; N. L. Nikitina; B. K. Nefedov; L. D. Konovalchikov; T. V. Alekseeva

    1988-01-01

    The selectivity of catalysts of hydrocracking based on three types of zeolites: HKE, HM, and HTsVM was studied in comparable conditions and it was found that in rigorous conditions of conducting the process (longer contact time, deeper conversion of the normal paraffin), the contribution of nonselective hydrocracking which takes place on the external crystalline surface of the zeolites becomes marked

  12. Separation of fructooligosaccharides using zeolite fixed bed columns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raquel Cristine Kuhn; Francisco Maugeri Filho

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the chromatographic separation of mixtures of monosaccharides and disaccharides may be improved by employing Y zeolites, a procedure which holds promise in the separation of oligosaccharides. In the present study, a column packed with zeolite was employed to study the separation of fructooligosaccharides (FOS). FOS were produced by an enzyme isolated from Rhodotorula sp., which

  13. Liquid holdup and flow dispersion in zeolite packed beds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. J. Inglezakis; M. Lemonidou; H. P. Grigoropoulou

    2001-01-01

    A simple tracing method, based on residence time distribution measurements, is presented for the evaluation of the liquid holdup and dispersion in zeolite packed beds. Two tracers and two different materials, one porous (zeolite clinoptilolite) and one non-porous (SiC), were used in experiments on seven packed beds of different dimensions, operating under downflow or upflow condition, in the range of

  14. Crewmember working on the mid deck Zeolite Crystal Growth experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    View showing Payload Specialist Bonnie Dunbar, in the mid deck, conducting the Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) Experiment in the mid deck stowage locker work area. View shows assembly of zeolite sample in the metal autoclave cylinders prior to insertion into the furnace.

  15. Zeolites in the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, William H.; Bush, Alfred L.; Gude, Arthur J., 3rd

    1982-01-01

    Zeolites of possible commercial value occur in the Brule Formation of Oligocene age and the Sharps Formation (Harksen, 1961) of Miocene age which crop out in a wide area in the northern part of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The thickness of the zeolite-bearing Interval and the extent of areas within the Interval which contain significant amounts of zeolites are far greater than was expected prior to this investigation. The shape of the zeolite-bearing Interval is tabular and the dimensions of Its exposure are roughly 10 ml x 200 mi x 150 ft (16 km x 160 km x 45 m) thick. Within the study area, there are tracts in which the zeolite resource potential is significant (see pl. 2). This report is intended to inform the Oglala Sioux Tribe of some of the most promising zeolite occurrences. Initial steps can then be taken by the Tribe toward possible development of the resources, should they wish to do so. The data contained herein identify areas of high zeolite potential, but are not adequate to establish economic value for the deposits. If development is recommended by the tribal government, we suggest that the tribal government contact companies involved in research and production of natural zeolites and provide them with the data in this report.

  16. Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Basel, CH); Sun, Hai (Saint Charles, MO)

    1999-01-01

    A process for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  17. FUNDAMENTALS AND APPLICATIONS OF PERVAPORATION THROUGH ZEOLITE MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolite membranes are well suited for separating liquid-phase mixtures by pervaporation because of their molecular-sized pores and their hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature, and the first commercial application of zeolite membranes has been for dehydrating organics [1]. Because of ...

  18. Synthesis of zeolites from coal fly ash: an overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X Querol; N Moreno; J. C Umaña; A Alastuey; E Hernández; A López-Soler; F Plana

    2002-01-01

    Coal combustion by-products production in USA and EU is estimated in around 115 million tons per year. A large portion of this production is accounted for the coal fly ash (CFA). Cement and concrete manufacturing consumes most of the CFA produced. Zeolite synthesized from CFA is a minor but interesting product, with high environmental applications. Zeolites may be easily obtained

  19. Effects of heating on salt-occluded zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Hash, M.C.; Pereira, C.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1996-05-01

    The electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel generates a waste stream of fission products in the electrolyte, LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. Argonne National Laboratory is developing a mineral waste form for this waste stream. The waste form consists of a composite formed by hot pressing salt-occluded zeolite and a glass binder. Pressing conditions must be judiciously chosen. For a given pressure, increasing temperatures and hold times give denser products but the zeolite is frequently converted to sodalite. Reducing the temperature or hold time leads to a porous zeolite composite. Therefore, conditions that affect the thermal stability of salt-occluded zeolite both with and without glass are being investigated in an ongoing study. The parameters varied in this stage of the work were heating time, temperature, salt loading, and glass content. The heat-treated samples were examined primarily by X-ray diffraction. Large variations were found in the rate at which salt-occluded zeolite converted to other phases such as nepheline, salt, and sodalite. The products depended on the initial salt loading. Heating times required for these transitions depended on the procedure and temperature used to prepare the salt-occluded zeolite. Mixtures of glass and zeolite reacted much faster than the pure salt-occluded zeolite and were almost always converted to sodalite.

  20. Transport properties of alkanes through ceramic thin zeolite MFI membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. A. E. P. Vroon; K. Keizer; M. J. Gilde; H. Verweij; A. J. Burggraaf

    1996-01-01

    Polycrystalline randomly oriented defect free zeolite layers on porous ?-Al2O3 supports are prepared with a thickness of less than 5 ?m by in situ crystallisation of silicalite-1. The flux of alkanes is a function of the sorption and intracrystalline diffusion. In mixtures of strongly and weakly adsorbing gases and a high loadings of the strongly adsorbing molecule in the zeolite

  1. Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium of phenol drifts on three zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koubaissy, Bachar; Toufaily, Joumana; El-Murr, Maya; Jean Daou, T.; Hafez, Hala; Joly, Guy; Magnoux, Patrick; Hamieh, Tayssir

    2012-09-01

    In this study, the sorption of phenol drifts was studied by performing batch kinetic sorption experiments. The equilibrium kinetic data was analyzed using the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Fowler-Guggenheim model gives a perfect fitting with the isotherm data. The influence of porous structure of a zeolite particle on phenol adsorption from aqueous solutions is analyzed and discussed. The adsorption for phenol drifts on zeolite was proved to be an exothermic process. Thus the solubility of the phenolic compound and the pH of the solution play also an important role in adsorption phenomena. The relative affinity of the phenolic compound toward the zeolite was related to the electron donor-acceptor complexes that were formed between the basic sites on the zeolite (oxygen) and hydrogens (acidic site) of the phenols. Finally zeolite seems to be an efficient adsorbent; it can be easily regenerated by methanol leaching.

  2. Selectivity of zeolite catalysts of hydrocracking of paraffin hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Shakun, A.N.; Il'icheva, L.F.; Nikitina, N.L.; Nefedov, B.K.; Konoval'chikov, L.D.; Alekseeva, T.V.

    1988-09-20

    The selectivity of catalysts of hydrocracking based on three types of zeolites: HKE, HM, and HTsVM was studied in comparable conditions and it was found that in rigorous conditions of conducting the process (longer contact time, deeper conversion of the normal paraffin), the contribution of nonselective hydrocracking which takes place on the external crystalline surface of the zeolites becomes marked on all of the catalysts. Incorporation of a hydrogenating component in the zeolite-containing catalyst results in an increase in nonselective hydrocracking on the external crystalline surface of the zeolites, and addition of significant amounts of molybdenum oxide also results in a decrease in the total conversion of the n-paraffin. The contribution of nonselective hydrocracking decreases with an increase in the intracrystalline activity of the zeolite.

  3. Mineral resource of the month: natural and synthetic zeolites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.

    2008-01-01

    Robert Virta, mineral commodity specialist for the U.S. Geological Survey, prepared the following information about the zeolite industry. Volcanic rocks containing natural zeolites — hydrated aluminosilicate minerals that contain alkaline and alkaline-earth metals — have been mined worldwide for more than 1,000 years for use as cements and building stone. For centuries, people thought natural zeolites occurred only in small amounts inside cavities of volcanic rock. But in the 1950s and early 1960s, large zeolite deposits were discovered in volcanic tuffs in the western United States and in marine tuffs in Italy and Japan. And since then, similar deposits have been found around the world, from Hungary to Cuba to New Zealand. The discovery of these larger deposits made commercial mining of natural zeolite possible.

  4. Probing zeolites with organic molecules: Supercages of X and Y zeolites are superpolar

    SciTech Connect

    Uppili, S.; Thomas, K.J.; Crompton, E.M.; Ramamurthy, V.

    2000-01-11

    Supercages of Li{sup +}- and Na{sup +}-exchanged X and Y zeolites are much more polar than even water. The extent of polarity depends on the nature and the number of cations present within a supercage. The polarity of Li{sup +}- and Na{sup +}-exchanged X and Y zeolites decreases in the presence of water. In presence of water the contribution of cations toward polarity is much smaller than water itself. In this study polarity has been monitored with organic probe molecules, Nile red, pyrene 1-carboxaldehyde and coumarin-500. A connection between polarity and electric field within a cage has also been established. Since the supercages are much more polar than all organic solvents, they can be characterized as superpolar. Because of this one may be able to achieve excited-state switching of carbonyl compounds within a zeolite while such may not be possible in organic solvents. The n{pi}*-{pi}{pi}* state switching of acetophenones is easily achieved within a zeolite while such does not occur in polar solvent methanol-ethanol mixture.

  5. Effect of zeolite in surface discharge plasma on the decomposition of toluene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seung-Min Oh; Hyun-Ha Kim; Atsushi Ogata; Hisahiro Einaga; Shigeru Futamura; Dong-Wha Park

    2005-01-01

    Toluene was decomposed in a surface discharge plasma reactor packed with various zeolites. The positioning effect of the zeolite bed was also investigated Reactor-B, in which the zeolite bed was located upstream, performed much better than Reactor-A, in which the zeolite bed was located downstream. Furthermore, the decomposition efficiency in Reactor-B increased with the capacity for toluene adsorption on zeolite,

  6. Charge Transport through a Novel Zeolite Y Membrane by a Self-Exchange Process Hyunjung Lee and Prabir K. Dutta*

    E-print Network

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    Charge Transport through a Novel Zeolite Y Membrane by a Self-Exchange Process Hyunjung Lee, and relatively pinhole-free zeolitic membranes is described. Nanocrystalline zeolite Y (100-200 nm) is used zeolite membranes toward this end.3 Zeolitic membranes are an active area of research because

  7. In-situ x-ray absorption study of copper films in ground watersolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kvashnina, K.O.; Butorin, S.M.; Modin, A.; Soroka, I.; Marcellini, M.; Nordgren, J.; Guo, J.-H.; Werme, L.

    2007-10-29

    This study illustrates how the damage from copper corrosion can be reduced by modifying the chemistry of the copper surface environment. The surface modification of oxidized copper films induced by chemical reaction with Cl{sup -} and HCO{sub 3}{sup -} in aqueous solutions was monitored by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that corrosion of copper can be significantly reduced by adding even a small amount of sodium bicarbonate. The studied copper films corroded quickly in chloride solutions, whereas the same solution containing 1.1 mM HCO{sub 3}{sup -} prevented or slowed down the corrosion processes.

  8. [Zeolite catalysis in conversion of cellulosics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.

    1992-01-01

    To transform biomass into fermentable substrate for yeast, we are using zeolites instead of enzymes to catalyze the two bottleneck reactions in biomass conversion, xylose isomerization and ceuobiose hydrolysis. The experimental results on these reactions carried out over various zeolites and other catalysts are presented herein. The advantages and disadvantages of using these catalysts over enzymes are also discussed. Heterogeneous solid catalysts other than zeolites has been employed for cellobiose-to-glucose hydrolysis. The size and shape selectivity that makes zeoutes unique for some reactions can add diffusional hindrance. We have spent some time screening various known solid acidic catalysts. We report that a class of cationic ion exchange resins in the acidified form (e.g. Amberlite) has worked well as an acidic catalyst in hydrolyzing cellobiose to glucose. Our experimental results, together with those obtained from a homogeneous acid catalyst (e.g. sulfuric acid) for comparison are provided. Having succeeded in finding an alternative solid acid catalyst for hydrolysis, we explored other solid resin or other homogeneous but non-enzyme catalyst to carry out the xylose-to-xylulose isomerization. A fairly extensive search has been made. We explored the use of sodium aluminates in the homogeneous phase isomerization of glucose to fructose and obtained a very high conversion of glucose to fructose with the final mixture containing 85% of fructose instead of the common 45%. Fructose apparently complexes with aluminates, and its equilibrium concentration is shifted to considerably higher values than permitted by simple glucose/fructose equilibrium. We have recently found a number of catalysts capable of promoting isomerization between aldoses and ketoses. One solid resin, known as polyvinyl pyridine (PVP), is able to convert xylose to xylulose at a pH below 7. Our usage of alternative isomerization catalysts, including PVP, are described.

  9. [Zeolite catalysis in conversion of cellulosics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.

    1992-12-31

    To transform biomass into fermentable substrate for yeast, we are using zeolites instead of enzymes to catalyze the two bottleneck reactions in biomass conversion, xylose isomerization and ceuobiose hydrolysis. The experimental results on these reactions carried out over various zeolites and other catalysts are presented herein. The advantages and disadvantages of using these catalysts over enzymes are also discussed. Heterogeneous solid catalysts other than zeolites has been employed for cellobiose-to-glucose hydrolysis. The size and shape selectivity that makes zeoutes unique for some reactions can add diffusional hindrance. We have spent some time screening various known solid acidic catalysts. We report that a class of cationic ion exchange resins in the acidified form (e.g. Amberlite) has worked well as an acidic catalyst in hydrolyzing cellobiose to glucose. Our experimental results, together with those obtained from a homogeneous acid catalyst (e.g. sulfuric acid) for comparison are provided. Having succeeded in finding an alternative solid acid catalyst for hydrolysis, we explored other solid resin or other homogeneous but non-enzyme catalyst to carry out the xylose-to-xylulose isomerization. A fairly extensive search has been made. We explored the use of sodium aluminates in the homogeneous phase isomerization of glucose to fructose and obtained a very high conversion of glucose to fructose with the final mixture containing 85% of fructose instead of the common 45%. Fructose apparently complexes with aluminates, and its equilibrium concentration is shifted to considerably higher values than permitted by simple glucose/fructose equilibrium. We have recently found a number of catalysts capable of promoting isomerization between aldoses and ketoses. One solid resin, known as polyvinyl pyridine (PVP), is able to convert xylose to xylulose at a pH below 7. Our usage of alternative isomerization catalysts, including PVP, are described.

  10. Characteristics of Lead Sorption by Zeolite Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sewailem, M. S.

    Lead adsorption behavior was investigated using four Zeolite minerals (clinoptilolite, analcime, phillipsite and chabazite). The used Pb2+ concentrations were 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 5 µmol mL-1. Results indicated that Pb2+ sorption followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, but over limited concentration ranges for clinoptilolite and analcime. The bindg energy (Kd) reached, 2.400 and 0.875 g L-1 for phillipsite and chabazite, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity for such minerals reached 208.33 and 204.08 mg g-1 with correlation coefficient (R2) reached, 0.997 and 0.995, respectively. Meanwhile, two stages for Pb2+adsorption were observed with clinoptilolite and analcime in the low and high concentrations of the applied Pb2+. Data also was applicable to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm over the used entire Pb2+ concentration ranges. The binding energy (n) reached, 1.014, 1.005, 1.001 and 1.001 g L-1 for clinoptilolite, analcime, phillipsite and chabazite, respectively. However, the b values (maximum adsorption capacity) reached 202.582, 201.651, 207.062 and 206.871 mg g-1 with correlation coefficient (R2) nearly one for all studying minerals, respectively. Desorption data indicated that most of the sorbed Pb2+ was extractedin the 1st extraction following the adsorption experiment. The ability of the used zeolite minerals to retain Pb2+ was high and there were differences between the studied minerals in sorption of Pb2+. In conclusion, data eliminated that, zeolite minerals especially, philipsite and chabazite, could be successfully used as packing material in subsurface reactive barriers intercepting ground water plumes and for fixed bed reactors designed to remove Pb2+ from industrial wastewater.

  11. Growth of large zeolite crystals in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, A., Jr.; Dixon, A.; Thompson, R.; Scott, G.; Ditr, J.

    1988-01-01

    Synthesis studies performed using close analogs of triethanolamine (TEA) have shown that all three hydroxyl groups and the amine group in this molecule are necessary to provide nucleation suppression. Studies using C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) revealed that the hydroxyl ions and the amine group are involved in the formation of an aluminum complex. It was also shown that silicate species fo not interact this way with TEA in an alkaline solution. These results suggest that successful aluminum complexation leads to nucleation in zeolite-A crystallization.

  12. HEALTH MATTERS Copper T IUD

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    HEALTH MATTERS Copper T IUD What is the Copper T IUD? The Copper T IUD is one of two types of intrauterine devices available in the United States. The Copper T IUD is a small, flexible device made of soft pregnancy. How effective is the Copper T IUD? The Copper T IUD is extremely effective and can last up to 12

  13. Synthesis of zeolite phases from combustion by-products.

    PubMed

    Pimraksa, Kedsarin; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Setthaya, Naruemon

    2010-12-01

    Synthesis of zeolites from combustion by-products, including fly ash, bottom ash and rice husk ash, was studied. A molar ratio of SiO2/Al2O3 of 1.5 was used for the syntheses. Refluxing and hydrothermal methods were also used for synthesis for comparison. The reaction temperatures of refluxing and hydrothermal methods were 100 degrees C and 130 degrees C, respectively. Sodalite, phillipsite-K, and zeolite P1 with analcime were obtained when fly ash, bottom ash and rice husk ash were used as starting materials, respectively. With rice husk ash as a starting material, zeolite P1 was produced. This result had advantages over previous studies as there was no prior activation required for the synthesis. The concentrations and types of alkaline used in the synthesis also determined the zeolite type. The different zeolites obtained from three systems were measured for specific surface area and pore size by using BET and Hg-porosimetry, respectively. Ammonium exchange capacities of the synthesised powders containing zeolites, sodalite, zeolite P1 and phillipsite-K were 38.5, 65.0 and 154.7 meq 100 g(-1), respectively. PMID:20421244

  14. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  15. Copper: Technology & Standards

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Art Cohen

    This article explains modern copper mining, ore extraction, and casting processes and details innovative copper products, major markets, service activities, and the future of copper in industry and everyday life. It was published in the November 1998 issue of the online magazine Innovations.

  16. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA)

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  17. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  18. State of molybdenum ions in ultrastable Y zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Kupcha, L.A.; Rusak, M.F.; Kozlov, N.S.; Potapovich, A.K.; Urbanovich, I.I.

    1987-10-01

    The methods of diffuse-reflection optical spectroscopy and EPR were used to study the state of molybdenum in catalysts prepared by impregnating ultrastable zeolite with molybdenum salt solutions and by mixing in the solid phase with MoCl/sub 5/. It has been shown that molybdenum introduced into zeolites in small amounts is found basically in the form of isolated hexavalent ions of molybdenum. In addition, Mo/sup 5 +/ and Mo/sup 4 +/ ions are also present. Heteropolycompounds also form. The molybdenum ions are most readily reduced in the zeolite prepared by impregnation with a solution of ammonium paramolybdate.

  19. Hierarchical zeolites from class F coal fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitta, Pallavi

    Fly ash, a coal combustion byproduct is classified as types class C and class F. Class C fly ash is traditionally recycled for concrete applications and Class F fly ash often disposed in landfills. Class F poses an environmental hazard due to disposal and leaching of heavy metals into ground water and is important to be recycled in order to mitigate the environmental challenges. A major recycling option is to reuse the fly ash as a low-cost raw material for the production of crystalline zeolites, which serve as catalysts, detergents and adsorbents in the chemical industry. Most of the prior literature of fly ash conversion to zeolites does not focus on creating high zeolite surface area zeolites specifically with hierarchical pore structure, which are very important properties in developing a heterogeneous catalyst for catalysis applications. This research work aids in the development of an economical process for the synthesis of high surface area hierarchical zeolites from class F coal fly ash. In this work, synthesis of zeolites from fly ash using classic hydrothermal treatment approach and fusion pretreatment approach were examined. The fusion pretreatment method led to higher extent of dissolution of silica from quartz and mullite phases, which in turn led to higher surface area and pore size of the zeolite. A qualitative kinetic model developed here attributes the difference in silica content to Si/Al ratio of the beginning fraction of fly ash. At near ambient crystallization temperatures and longer crystallization times, the zeolite formed is a hierarchical faujasite with high surface area of at least 360 m2/g. This work enables the large scale recycling of class F coal fly ash to produce zeolites and mitigate environmental concerns. Design of experiments was used to predict surface area and pore sizes of zeolites - thus obviating the need for intense experimentation. The hierarchical zeolite catalyst supports tested for CO2 conversion, yielded hydrocarbons up to C9, a performance attesting the hierarchal pore structure. The preliminary techno-economic feasibility assessment demonstrates a net energy saving of 75% and cost saving of 63% compared to the commercial zeolite manufacturing process.

  20. Method of preparing sodalite from chloride salt occluded zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, M.A.; Pereira, C.

    1997-03-18

    A method is described for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal starting with a substantially dry zeolite and sufficient glass to form leach resistant sodalite with occluded radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material. The zeolite and glass are heated to a temperature up to about 1000 K to convert the zeolite to sodalite and thereafter maintained at a pressure and temperature sufficient to form a sodalite product near theoretical density. Pressure is used on the formed sodalite to produce the required density.

  1. Method of preparing sodalite from chloride salt occluded zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Michele A. (Naperville, IL); Pereira, Candido (Lisle, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal starting with a substantially dry zeolite and sufficient glass to form leach resistant sodalite with occluded radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material. The zeolite and glass are heated to a temperature up to about 1000.degree. K. to convert the zeolite to sodalite and thereafter maintained at a pressure and temperature sufficient to form a sodalite product near theoretical density. Pressure is used on the formed sodalite to produce the required density.

  2. Zeolite crystal growth in space - What has been learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, A., Jr.; Thompson, R. W.; Dixon, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    Three zeolite crystal growth experiments developed at WPI have been performed in space in last twelve months. One experiment, GAS-1, illustrated that to grow large, crystallographically uniform crystals in space, the precursor solutions should be mixed in microgravity. Another experiment evaluated the optimum mixing protocol for solutions that chemically interact ('gel') on contact. These results were utilized in setting the protocol for mixing nineteen zeolite solutions that were then processed and yielded zeolites A, X and mordenite. All solutions in which the nucleation event was influenced produced larger, more 'uniform' crystals than did identical solutions processed on earth.

  3. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Fulton, John L.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Pin, Sonia; Mei, Donghai; Schenter, Gregory K.; Govind, Niranjan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Hu, Jian Z.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-06-11

    The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the oxygen-terminated tetrahedra (Al T-sites) of zeolites determines the concentration of ion-exchange and Brønsted acid sites. As the location of the tetrahedra and the associated subtle variations in bond angles influence the acid strength, quantitative information about Al T-sites in the framework is critical to rationalize catalytic properties and to design new catalysts. A quantitative analysis is reported that uses a combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy supported by DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. To discriminate individual Al atoms, sets of ab initio EXAFS spectra for various T-sites are generated from DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations allowing quantitative treatment of the EXAFS single- and multiple-photoelectron scattering processes out to 3-4 atom shells surrounding the Al absorption center. It is observed that identical zeolite types show dramatically different Al-distributions. A preference of Al for T-sites that are part of one or more 4-member rings in the framework over those T-sites that are part of only 5- and 6-member rings in the HBEA150 sample has been determined from a combination of these methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

  4. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-44 aluminosilicate zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-04-29

    A new family of aluminosilicate zeolites designated UZM-44 has been synthesized. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.k+T.sub.tAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.sub.z where "n" is the mole ratio of Na to (Al+E), M represents a metal or metals from zinc, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, "m" is the mole ratio of M to (Al+E), "k" is the average charge of the metal or metals M, T is the organic structure directing agent or agents, and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-44 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  5. Design of composite photocatalyst of TiO2 and Y-zeolite for degradation of 2-propanol in the gas phase under UV and visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kamegawa, Takashi; Ishiguro, Yasushi; Kido, Ryota; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobic Y-zeolite (SiO2/Al2O3 = 810) and TiO2 composite photocatalysts were designed by using two different types of TiO2 precursors, i.e., titanium ammonium oxalate and ammonium hexafluorotitanate. The porous structure, surface property and state of TiO2 were investigated by various characterization techniques. By using an ammonium hexafluorotitanate as a precursor, hydrophobic modification of the Y-zeolite surface and realizing visible light sensitivity was successfully achieved at the same time after calcination at 773 K in the air. The prepared sample still maintained the porous structure of Y-zeolite and a large surface area. Highly crystalline anatase TiO2 was also formed on the Y-zeolite surface by the role of fluorine in the precursor. The usages of ammonium hexafluorotitanate were effective for the improvement of the photocatalytic performance of the composite in the degradation of 2-propanol in the gas phase under UV and visible light (? > 420 nm) irradiation. PMID:25314607

  6. Hydrophobic high surface area zeolites derived from fly ash for oil spill remediation.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Tamilselvan; Reid, David L; Goldstein, Ian; Hench, Larry; Seal, Sudipta

    2013-06-01

    Fly ash, a coal combustion byproduct with a predominantly aluminosilicate composition, is modified to develop an inexpensive sorbent for oil spill remediation. The as-produced fly ash is a hydrophilic material with poor sorption capacity. A simple two-step chemical modification process is designed to improve the oil sorption capacity. First, the fly ash was transformed to a zeolitic material via an alkali treatment, which increased the specific surface area up to 404 m(2) g(-1). Then, the material was surface functionalized to form a hydrophobic material with high contact angle up to 147° that floats on the surface of an oil-water mixture. The reported oil sorption capacities of X-type zeolite sorbent with different surface functionalization (propyl-, octyl-, octadecyl-trimethoxysilane and esterification) were estimated to 1.10, 1.02, 0.86, and 1.15 g g(-1), respectively. Oil sorption was about five times higher than the as-received fly ash (0.19 g g(-1)) and also had high buoyancy critical for economic cleanup of oil over water. PMID:23634731

  7. Modified Copper Soap Solvent Extraction Method for Measuring Free Fatty Acids in Milk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. F. Shipe; G. F. Senyk; K. B. Fountain

    1980-01-01

    A modified copper soap method was developed to provide a sensitive, rapid method for determining the free fatty acids in milk and estimating the intensity of lipolyzed flavor. The modification is simpler and more rapid than the original copper soap method. Only a small sample (.5 ml) of milk is needed for this colori- metric test, so it would be

  8. Molecular Chemistry in a Zeolite: Genesis of a Zeolite Y-Supported Ruthenium Complex Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, I.; Gates, B.C.

    2009-05-22

    Dealuminated zeolite Y was used as a crystalline support for a mononuclear ruthenium complex synthesized from cis-Ru(acac){sub 2}(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}. Infrared (IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra indicated that the surface species were mononuclear ruthenium complexes, Ru(acac)(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup 2+}, tightly bonded to the surface by two Ru-O bonds at Al{sup 3+} sites of the zeolite. The maximum loading of the anchored ruthenium complexes was one complex per two Al{sup 3+} sites; at higher loadings, some of the cis-Ru(acac){sub 2}(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} was physisorbed. In the presence of ethylene and H{sub 2}, the surface-bound species entered into a catalytic cycle for ethylene dimerization and operated stably. IR data showed that at the start of the catalytic reaction, the acac ligand of the Ru(acac)(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup 2+} species was dissociated and captured by an Al{sup 3+} site. Ethylene dimerization proceeded 600 times faster with a cofeed of ethylene and H{sub 2} than without H{sub 2}. These results provide evidence of the importance of the cooperation of the Al{sup 3+} sites in the zeolite and the H{sub 2} in the feed for the genesis of the catalytically active species. The results presented here demonstrate the usefulness of dealuminated zeolite Y as a nearly uniform support that allows precise synthesis of supported catalysts and detailed elucidation of their structures.

  9. Isobutane/2-butene alkylation on ultrastable Y zeolites: Influence of zeolite unit cell size

    SciTech Connect

    Corma, A.; Martinez, A.; Martinez, C. (Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica, Valencia (Spain))

    1994-03-01

    The alkylation reaction of isobutane with trans-2-butene has been carried out on a series of steam-dealuminated Y zeolites with unit cell sizes ranging from 2.450 to 2.426 nm. A fixed-bed reactor connected to an automatized multiloop sampling system allowed differential product analysis from very short (1 min or less) to longer times on stream. A maximum in the initial 2-butene conversion was found on samples with unit cell sizes between 2.435 and 2.450 nm. However, the TMP/DMH ratio, i.e., the alkylation-to-oligomerization ratio, continuously increased with zeolite unit cell size. The concentration of reactants in the pores, the strength distribution of Bronsted acid sites, and the extent of hydrogen transfer reactions, which in turn depend on the framework Si/Al ratio of a given zeolite, were seen to affect activity and product distribution of the catalysts. Finally, the influence of these factors on the aging characteristics of the samples was also discussed. 17 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Iba of Zeolites Exchanged with Lithium for Co2 Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, E.; Alfaro, S.; Valenzuela, M. A.; Solis, C.; Zaval, E. P.; Rocha, M. F.; Cruz, J.; Pfeiffer, H.; Bosch, P.; Contreras, C.; Baptiste, J.

    2009-03-01

    A great concern on the global climatic change, partially due to industry CO2 expelled to the atmosphere, has motivated the search of new materials able to retain this gas. Clays, perovskites, zeolites and membranes have been utilized to trap the CO2. Zeolites are widely used as molecular sieves in different industrial processes related to gas purification or gas separation. Synthetic zeolites exchanged with lithium were prepared as potential material for CO2 retention. A NRA method using the 7Li (p,?)4He was performed in order to measure the the Li contents. With SEM-EDS the atomic concentrations of elements as C, Na, Si, Al, K, Ca, Fe, etc. were determined. Zeolites were also characterized by XRD.

  11. CO2 capture using zeolite 13X prepared from bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Park, Dong-Wha; Ahn, Wha-Seung

    2014-02-01

    Zeolite 13X was prepared using bentonite as the raw material by alkaline fusion followed by a hydrothermal treatment without adding any extra silica or alumina sources. The prepared zeolite 13X was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, N2-adsorption-desorption measurements, and scanning electron microscopy. The CO2 capture performance of the prepared zeolite 13X was examined under both static and flow conditions. The prepared zeolite 13X showed a high BET surface area of 688 m2/g with a high micropore volume (0.30 cm3/g), and exhibited high CO2 capture capacity (211 mg/g) and selectivity to N2 (CO2/N2 = 37) at 25 °C and 1 bar. In addition, the material showed fast adsorption kinetics, and stable CO2 adsorption-desorption recycling performance at both 25 and 200 °C.

  12. Reactivity of isobutane on zeolites: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaobo; Blowers, Paul

    2006-02-23

    In this work, ab initio and density functional theory methods are used to study isobutane protolytic cracking, primary hydrogen exchange, tertiary hydrogen exchange, and dehydrogenation reactions catalyzed by zeolites. The reactants, products, and transition-state structures are optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G* level, and the final energies are calculated using the CBS-QB3 composite energy method. The computed activation barriers are 52.3 kcal/mol for cracking, 29.4 kcal/mol for primary hydrogen exchange, 29.9 kcal/mol for tertiary hydrogen exchange, and 59.4 kcal/mol for dehydrogenation. The zeolite acidity effects on the reaction barriers are also investigated by changing the cluster terminal Si-H bond lengths. The analytical expressions between activation barriers and zeolite deprotonation energies for each reaction are proposed so that accurate activation barriers can be obtained when using different zeolites as catalysts. PMID:16480305

  13. The efficiency of Jordanian natural zeolite for heavy metals removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taamneh, Yazan; Al Dwairi, Reyad

    2013-03-01

    The capability of Jordanian natural zeolite to remove nickel from aqueous solutions was experimentally investigated using a packed bed column. The zeolite samples were obtained from Jabal AL Aritayn in the northeast of Jordan. The effects of the initial concentration of nickel ( C 0), the packed bed length ( L) and the zeolite grain size ( D p) on the adsorption process were considered. The finding indicated that these parameters named had a significant effect on the removal of nickel by the Jordanian zeolite. The characteristic breakthrough curves of the adsorption process were measured. The Klinkenberg model was adopted to explain the kinetic behavior of the adsorption phenomena, and we attempted to fit the packed bed experimental data to the breakthrough curve. The effective diffusivity was estimated and used to predict breakthrough curves under other adsorption conditions.

  14. Investigation of Zeolite Nucleation and Growth Using NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Rivas Cardona, Alejandra

    2012-02-14

    and control of the zeolite properties. The primary objective of this dissertation is to determine the strength of organicinorganic interactions (i.e., the adsorption Gibbs energy) in transparent synthesis mixtures using PFG NMR spectroscopy, in order...

  15. Zeolite - A Natural Filter Material for Lead Polluted Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neam?u, Corina Ioana; Pic?, Elena Maria; Rusu, Tiberiu

    2014-11-01

    Reducing the concentration of lead ions in a wastewater using zeolite has proven to be a successful water treatement method, all over the world. Putting the two media (solid and liquid) in contact in static conditions had good results regarding the concentration of the filtered solution, the pH and the electric conductivity, depending on the values of certain parameters such as the amount of the zeolite, volume of the solution or interaction time. The present study highlights the zeolite ability to retain the lead ions from a solution, in dynamic interaction conditions between the two environments, in a short interaction time. The results confirmed the effectiveness of ion exchange water treatment method in the conditions set, emphasizing once again the properties of the filter material - the zeolite

  16. Hydration and dehydration of Zeolitic Tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, R. L.; Bish, D. L.; Blacic, J. D.

    1989-10-01

    Naturally occurring zeolites expand and contract when hydrated or dehydrated. In tuffaceous rock composed largely of such zeolites, the entire rock may swell or contract significantly as the rock becomes saturated or dries out. If such rock is constrained, significant stresses may develop as a result of hydration or dehydration. We present experimental results that substantiate this. In a zeolitized, non-welded tuff from Yucca Mountain, NV, rock permeability governs the swelling rate since the major constituent, clinoptilolite, hydrates as fast as it can be exposed to water. At Yucca Mountain, where a nuclear waste repository is proposed, strata of welded, devitrified tuff overlie non-welded, zeolitic tuff. Should the hydration state of the units change significantly over the repository lifetime, additional stresses on the same order of magnitude as now exist may develop.

  17. Mechanochemical approach for preparation of Mo-containing ? -zeolite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. G. Kostova; A. A. Spojakina; E. Dutková; P. Baláz

    2007-01-01

    The catalytically active solid materials were prepared by mechanochemical synthesis and impregnation. The starting material used as a support was ?-zeolite with a ratio SiO2\\/Al2O3=66. The molybdenum precursor was 12-molybdophosphoric heteropoly acid (HPMo). The samples were characterized by TPR and IR methods. The test reaction was thiophene hydrodesulfurization at atmospheric pressure. The interaction between HPMo and ?-zeolite in the catalyst

  18. Isomerization of ?-pinene over dealuminated ferrierite-type zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rafal Rachwalik; Zbigniew Olejniczak; Jian Jiao; Jun Huang; Michael Hunger; Bogdan Sulikowski

    2007-01-01

    Isomerization of ?-pinene was performed on a series of dealuminated ferrierite (FER)-type zeolites in liquid phase at 363 K using a batch reactor. The course of zeolite dealumination was followed in detail using 29Si, 27Al, 1H MAS NMR, XRD, FTIR, and sorption of nitrogen. The ammonium form of FER was dealuminated with aqueous solutions of HCl. While retaining the crystallinity

  19. Study of 63Ni adsorption on NKF-6 zeolite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hui Zhang; Xianjin Yu; Lei Chen; Yongjie Jing; Zhiwei Ge

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of 63Ni from aqueous solutions using NKF-6 zeolite was investigated by a batch technique under ambient conditions. The adsorption was investigated as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, humic substances (FA\\/HA) and temperature. The kinetic adsorption was well described by the pseudo-second-order rate equation. The adsorption of 63Ni on NKF-6 zeolite was strongly dependent

  20. SO2 REMOVAL FROM FLUE GASES USING UTILITY SYNTHESIZED ZEOLITES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL GRUTZECK

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that natural and synthetic zeolites (molecular sieves) can adsorb gaseous SO2<\\/sub> from flue gas and do it more efficiently than lime based scrubbing materials. Unfortunately their cost ($500-$800 per ton) has deterred their use in this capacity. It is also known that zeolites are easy to synthesize from a variety of natural and man-made materials. The

  1. Cadmium adsorption on vermiculite, zeolite and pumice: Batch experimental studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Rosaria Panuccio; Agostino Sorgonà; Marcella Rizzo; Giovanni Cacco

    2009-01-01

    Batch experiments were performed to evaluate the combined effects of ionic activity, pH, and contact time on the cadmium sorption in three different minerals, vermiculite, zeolite, and pumice, commonly employed as substrata in nurseries and recently considered for their potential use in remediation methods. The extent of cadmium sorption was vermiculite>zeolite>pumice, as shown by the Langmuir and Freundlich parameters, and

  2. NMR signatures of the active sites in Sn-? zeolite.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Patrick; Valla, Maxence; Rossini, Aaron J; Comas-Vives, Aleix; Núñez-Zarur, Francisco; Malaman, Bernard; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Copéret, Christophe; Hermans, Ive

    2014-09-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR (DNP-SENS), Mössbauer spectroscopy, and computational chemistry were combined to obtain structural information on the active-site speciation in Sn-? zeolite. This approach unambiguously shows the presence of framework Sn(IV)-active sites in an octahedral environment, which probably correspond to so-called open and closed sites, respectively (namely, tin bound to three or four siloxy groups of the zeolite framework). PMID:25079352

  3. Bimetallic Zeolite Catalyst for CO 2 Reforming of Methane

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Frontera; A. Aloise; A. Macario; P. L. Antonucci; F. Crea; G. Giordano; J. B. Nagy

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic activity of Ni–Rh on the synthesized BEA zeolite in carbon dioxide reforming of methane has been investigated.\\u000a Catalysts were prepared using the incipient wetness impregnation method, with a total content of metals up to 5 wt%. Catalysts\\u000a were characterized through XRD, TPR, N2 adsorption, SEM, AAS, TG\\/DSC analyses. The prepared Ni–Rh zeolites were tested for their catalytic activity at

  4. Poly(2-ethylaniline) in zeolite hosts: Conjugated nanometer size filaments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Enzel; Thomas Bein

    1992-01-01

    Poly(2-ethylaniline) chains were synthesized within the three-dimensional channels of dehydrated zeolites X and Y. The Na- and acidic forms of the zeolite hosts were loaded with the monomer from hexane solution, which was subsequently oxidized with aqueous (NH4)2S2O8. The steric demands for the polymerization are illustrted by the inability of the polymer to form in the one-dimensional channel system of

  5. Adsorption of hydrogen in nickel and rhodium exchanged zeolite X

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. P. Prasanth; Renjith S. Pillai; H. C. Bajaj; R. V. Jasra; H. D. Chung; T. H. Kim; S. D. Song

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption of hydrogen in zeolite NaX and its nickel and rhodium exchanged forms were investigated at 77.4K using a static volumetric adsorption system up to 1bar, and at 303 and 333K in a gravimetric adsorption system up to 5bar. Hydrogen adsorption at 77.4K for NaX and the nickel and rhodium exchanged zeolite X was found to be reversible with pressure.

  6. Commander Bowersox Tends to Zeolite Crystal Samples Aboard Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Expedition Six Commander Ken Bowersox spins Zeolite Crystal Growth sample tubes to eliminate bubbles that could affect crystal formation in preparation of a 15 day experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Zeolites are hard as rock, yet are able to absorb liquids and gases like a sponge. By using the ISS microgravity environment to grow better, larger crystals, NASA and its commercial partners hope to improve petroleum manufacturing and other processes.

  7. Zeolites in the Cascade Range of northern Oregon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-three zeolite minerals were identified during secondary mineralogy studies of late Tertiary volcanic rock outcrop samples and\\/or late Tertiary to Quaternary geothermal drill-hole specimens in three areas of the Oregon Cascade Range (near Mount Hood, the Breiten bush-Austin Hot Springs area, and Newberry volcano). The Neogene to Holocene volcanic rocks contain euhedral to subhedral zeolite crystals in open spaces of

  8. Removal of Metal Cations from Water Using Zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Zamzow; J. E. Murphy

    1992-01-01

    Zeolites from abundant natural deposits were investigated by the Bureau of Mines for efficiently cleaning up mining industry wastewaters. Twenty-four zeolite samples were analyzed by x-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma. These included clinoptilolite, mordenite, chabazite, erionite, and phillipsite. Bulk densities of a sized fraction (-40, +65 mesh) varied from 0.48 to 0.93 g\\/mL. Attrition losses ranged from 1 to

  9. Microstructural Optimization of a Zeolite Membrane for Organic Vapor Separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhiping Lai; Griselda Bonilla; Isabel Diaz; Jose Geraldo Nery; Khristina Sujaoti; Miguel A. Amat; Efrosini Kokkoli; Osamu Terasaki; Robert W. Thompson; Michael Tsapatsis; Dionisios G. Vlachos

    2003-01-01

    A seeded growth method for the fabrication of high-permeance, high-separation-factor zeolite (siliceous ZSM-5, [Si96O192]-MFI) membranes is reported. The method consists of growing the crystals of an oriented seed layer to a well-intergrown film by avoiding events that lead to a loss of preferred orientation, such as twin overgrowths and random nucleation. Organic polycations are used as zeolite crystal shape modifiers

  10. Metal ion exchange by natural and modified zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. ?urkovi?; Š. Cerjan-Stefanovi?; T. Filipan

    1997-01-01

    The lead and cadmium removal from wastewaters by natural and pretreatment zeolites was examined by using a batch-type method. The results demonstrated that the natural zeolites contained a complement of exchangeable Na, K and Ca ions but exposing them to 2 M NaCl solution at 22 and 70°C, respectively, converted them to a near homoionic state in Na-form. Lead and

  11. COPPER DEFICIENCY PROPHYLAXIS IN GRAZING SHEEP BY COPPER OXIDE INJECTION

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    COPPER DEFICIENCY PROPHYLAXIS IN GRAZING SHEEP BY COPPER OXIDE INJECTION M. LAMAND Claudine LAB R of insoluble and non ionized form of injected copper has been shown in a previous paper (Lamand, 1978 it appeared that copper oxide was preferable to metallic copper, being slightly less caustic. Inflammation

  12. Solvent Evaporation Assisted Preparation of Oriented Nanocrystalline Mesoporous MFI Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Kake; Sun, Junming; Liu, Jun; Wang, Li Q.; Wan, Haiying; Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles HF; Nie, Zimin

    2011-07-01

    A solvent evaporation route to produce hierarchically porous zeolites with an oriented MFI nanocrystalline structure has been developed, and the method is scalable and productive. In this method, hexadecyltrimethoxysilane is added to an ethanol solution containing zeolitic precursors. A hard gel is formed during the evaporation process. Subsequent hydrothermal treatments produce the hierarchically porous zeolite. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies suggest that misoriented zeolite nuclei are produced in the very early stages of the hydrothermal treatment, but further reactions lead to single crystal-like aggregates composed of intergrowth nanocrystals with a mean interparticle pore diameter of 12 nm. All Al atoms exist in tetrahedral sites, as confirmed by 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). Variable temperature hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe NMR spectroscopy suggest a fast molecular diffusion process from the interconnection between micro- and mesopores. Catalytic conversion of acetone to the isobutene reactions show comparable (with respect to conventional zeolites) selectivity to isobutene. However, hierarchically porous zeolites display enhanced activity and durability because of the more accessible acidic sites in the hierarchically porous structures.

  13. Moderate-temperature zeolitic alteration in a cooling pyroclastic deposit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levy, S.S.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The locally zeolitized Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff (13 Myr.), Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S.A., is part of a thick sequence of zeolitized pyroclastic units. Most of the zeolitized units are nonwelded tuffs that were altered during low-temperature diagenesis, but the distribution and textural setting of zeolite (heulandite-clinoptilolite) and smectite in the densely welded Topopah Spring tuff suggest that these hydrous minerals formed while the tuff was still cooling after pyroclastic emplacement and welding. The hydrous minerals are concentrated within a transition zone between devitrified tuff in the central part of the unit and underlying vitrophyre. Movement of liquid and convected heat along fractures from the devitrified tuff to the ritrophyre caused local devitrification and hydrous mineral crystallization. Oxygen isotope geothermometry of cogenetic quartz confirms the nondiagenetic moderate temperature origin of the hydrous minerals at temperatures of ??? 40-100??C, assuming a meteoric water source. The Topopah Spring tuff is under consideration for emplacement of a high-level nuclear waste repository. The natural rock alteration of the cooling pyroclastic deposit may be a good natural analog for repository-induced hydrothermal alteration. As a result of repository thermal loading, temperatures in the Topopah Spring vitrophyre may rise sufficiently to duplicate the inferred temperatures of natural zeolitic alteration. Heated water moving downward from the repository into the vitrophyre may contribute to new zeolitic alteration. ?? 1989.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline and mesoporous zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petushkov, Anton

    2011-12-01

    Mesoporous aggregates of nanocrystalline zeolites with MFI and BEA frameworks have been synthesized using a one-pot and single structure directing agent. The effect of different reaction conditions, such as temperature, time, pH and water content, on the particle size, surface area and mesopore volume has been studied. Nanocrystalline and mesoporous ZSM-5, beta and Y zeolites were modified with different transition metals and the resulting single- and double metal containing catalyst materials were characterized. Nanocrystalline Silicalite-1 zeolite samples with varying particle size were functionalized with different organosilane groups and the cytotoxic activity of the zeolite nanocrystals was studied as a function of particle size, concentration, organic functional group type, as well as the type of cell line. Framework stability of nanocrystalline NaY zeolite was tested under different pH conditions. The synthesized zeolites used in this work were characterized using a variety of physico-chemical methods, including powder X-ray diffraction, Solid State NMR, nitrogen sorption, electron microscopy, Inductively Coupled Plasma -- Optical Emission Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

  15. Zeolite synthesis from fly ash and cement kiln dust

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzeck, M.W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Zeolites added to portland cement paste normally undergo a pozzolanic reaction. However, if the composition of the cement is modified by blending it with fly ash, the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) that forms has a low CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio which allows it to coexist with a zeolite. In fact, if one adds alkali to the system, it then becomes possible to nucleate and grow a zeolitic phase with C-S-H. Normally zeolites that form from fly ash and NaOH include NaP-1 and analcime. But when the fly ash and NaOH are mixed with cement kiln dust, cancrinite-like phases and tobermorite form instead. This implies that a zeolite-containing monolith could be produced that would exhibit both the cation-exchange and adsorptive properties of zeolites while retaining the characteristic strength and ease of use attributable to cement based materials. These composites show promise as a new class of inexpensive cation exchange and/or chemical adsorbents that can be used for large scale applications.

  16. Synthesis of core-shell structured zeolite-A@mesoporous silica composites for butyraldehyde adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijun; Lv, Yingying; Ma, Kuoyan; Wang, Changguo; Xue, Zhaoteng; Zhao, Yujuan; Deng, Yonghui; Dai, Ya; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2014-08-15

    A simple sol-gel process is followed to construct a thin layer of mesoporous silica shell core-shell structure on micrometer sized and nanometer sized zeolite A (micro-zeolite A@SiO2 and nano-zeolite A@SiO2 respectively). Further thickness of the silica shells has been tuned from 20 to 50 nm while the zeolite A particle size changes from nanometer to micrometer. Pores of the silica shells arranged orderly on the crystal-faces of zeolite-A cores. Typically, adsorption amount of the butyraldehyde towards these core-shell composite materials is investigated well and is verified to be almost double than that of the pristine zeolite A. Interestingly the nano-zeolite A core containing core-shell composite absorbs maximum butyraldehyde (314 mg/g) compared to the micro-zeolite A (266 mg/g), even if the mesoporous shell thickness of the nano-zeolite A@SiO2 composites is less (20 nm) than that of micro-zeolite A@SiO2 (50 nm). Both of these values are significantly larger than the pristine zeolite A (nano-zeolite A; 151 mg/g and micro-zeolite A; 146 mg/g). PMID:24910060

  17. Following the movement of Cu ions in a SSZ-13 zeolite during dehydration, reduction and adsorption: a combined in situ TP-XRD, XANES/DRIFTS study

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Varga, Tamas; Peden, Charles HF; Gao, Feng; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Szanyi, Janos

    2014-05-05

    Cu-SSZ-13 has been shown to possess high activity and superior N2 formation selectivity in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx under oxygen rich conditions. Here, a combination of synchrotron-based (XRD and XANES) and vibrational (DRIFTS) spectroscopy tools have been used to follow the changes in the location and coordination environment of copper ions in a Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite during calcinations, reduction with CO, and adsorption of CO and H2O. XANES spectra collected during these procedures provides critical information not only on the variation in the oxidation state of the copper species in the zeolite structure, but also on the changes in the coordination environment around these ions as they interact with the framework, and with different adsorbates (H2O and CO). Time-resolved XRD data indicate the movement of copper ions and the consequent variation of the unit cell parameters during dehydration. DRIFT spectra provide information about the adsorbed species present in the zeolite, as well as the oxidation states of and coordination environment around the copper ions. A careful analysis of the asymmetric T-O-T vibrations of the CHA framework perturbed by copper ions in different coordination environments proved to be especially informative. The results of this study will aid the identification of the location, coordination and oxidation states of copper ions obtained during in operando catalytic studies. Financial support was provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Part of this work (sample preparation) was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The EMSL is a national scientific user facility supported by the US DOE, Office of Biological and Environmental Research. PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for the US DOE by Battelle. All of the spectroscopy work reported here was carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). NSLS is a national scientific user facility supported by the US DOE.

  18. Dehydrogenation of isobutane over a zeolitic catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.J.

    1988-02-23

    A method of producing isobutane from isobutane is described comprising contacting the isobutane with a dehydrogenation catalyst in the presence of a sulfur-containing gas at a temperature of from 850/sup 0/F to 1250/sup 0/F, a pressure of less than 20 psig. a liquid hourly space velocity of below 40, and an H/sub 2/HC of less than 10; wherein the dehydrogenation catalyst comprises: (a) a sulfided, L zeolite containing from 8% to 10% by weight barium, from 0.6% to 1.0% by weight platinum, and tin at an atom ratio with the platinum of about 1:1; and (b) an inorganic binder selected from the group consisting of silica, alumina, and aluminosilicates.

  19. "A Novel Synthesis of Zeolite W..."

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.

    1999-05-07

    Zeolite W has been synthesized using organometallic silicon and aluminum precursors in two hydrothermal systems: organocation containing and organocation-free. The reaction using the organocation yielded a fully crystalline, relatively uniform crystal size product, with no organic molecules occluded in the pores. In contrast, the product obtained from an identical reaction, except for the absence of the organocation, contained amorphous as well as crystalline material and the crystalline phase showed a large diversity of both crystal size and morphology. The use of organometallic precursors, either with or without an organocation, allows for the crystallization of the MER framework at much lower 0H/Si02 and (K+ Na - Al)/Si ratios than is typical of inorganic systems. The reaction products were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS, and thermal analyses.

  20. Pyrolysis of scrap tyres with zeolite USY.

    PubMed

    Shen, Boxiong; Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Rui; Guo, Binbin; Liang, Cai

    2006-09-21

    A zeolite catalyst of ultrastable Y-type (USY) was investigated in the research of two staged pyrolysis-catalysis of scrap tyres. Scrap tyres were pyrolysed in a fixed bed reactor and the evolved pyrolysis gases were passed through a secondary catalytic reactor. The main objective of this paper was to investigate the effect of zeolite USY on the yield of products and the composition of derived oil. The influences of several parameters such as pyrolysis temperature, catalytic temperature, catalyst/tyre ratio, heating rate, etc. on the yield of the derived oil, char and gas were investigated. It showed that the increase of catalytic temperature and catalyst/tyre ratio resulted in high yield of gas at the expense of the oil yield. For example, when the catalyst/tyre ratio increased from 0.25 to 1.0, the yield of gas increased from 30.5 to 49.9 wt.%, and the oil yield decreased nearly two-fold from 31.6 to 12.7 wt.%. The concentration of light naphtha (boiling point < 160 degrees C) was also investigated in this study. And the high catalyst/tyre ratio favored to increase the concentration of light naphtha (< 160 degrees C) in oil. In order to study the composition of derived oil, a distilled fraction (< 280 degrees C), which was 92.5 wt.% of the oil obtained from catalytic pyrolysis of scrap tyre at a pyrolysis temperature, catalytic temperature and catalyst/tyre ratio of 500, 400 degrees C and 0.5, respectively, was analyzed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The distillate was found to contain 1.23 wt.% benzene, 9.35 wt.% toluene, 3.68 wt.% ethylbenzene, 12.64 wt.% xylenes, 1.81 wt.% limonene and 13.89 wt.% PAHs, etc., where the single ring aromatics represented a significant potential use as chemicals. PMID:16704900

  1. The local environment of Cu+ in Cu-Y zeolite and its relationship to the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Drake, Ian J; Zhang, Yihua; Briggs, Daniel; Lim, Bomyi; Chau, Tanguy; Bell, Alexis T

    2006-06-22

    Cu-exchanged Y zeolite was investigated in order to determine the location of the copper cations relative to the zeolite framework and to determine which Cu cations are active for the oxidative carbonylation of methanol to dimethyl carbonate (DMC). Cu-Y zeolite was prepared by vapor-phase exchange of H-Y with CuCl. The oxidation state, local coordination, and bond distances of Al and Cu were determined using Al K-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Complimentary information was obtained by H2 temperature-programmed reduction and by in-situ infrared spectroscopy. Cu-Y has a Cu/Al ratio of unity and very little occluded CuCl. The average Al-O and Al-Cu bond distances are 1.67 angstroms and 2.79 angstroms, respectively, and the average Cu-O and Cu-Si(Al) bond distances are 1.99 angstroms and 3.13 angstroms, respectively. All of the Cu exchanged is present as Cu+ in sites I', II, and III'. Cu-Y is active for the oxidative carbonylation of methanol, and at low reactant contact time produces DMC as the primary product. With increasing reactant contact time, DMC formation decreases in preference to the formation of dimethoxy methane (DMM) and methylformate (MF). The formation of DMM and MF is attributed to the hydrogenation of DMC and the hydrogenolysis of DMM, respectively. Observation of the catalyst under reaction conditions reveals that most of the copper cations remain as Cu+, but some oxidation of Cu+ to Cu2+ does occur. It is also concluded that only those copper cations present in site II and III' positions are accessible to the reactants, and hence are catalytically active. The dominant adsorbed species on the surface are methoxy groups, and adsorbed CO is present as a minority species. The relationship of these observations to the kinetics of DMC synthesis is discussed. PMID:16800460

  2. Preparation of zeolite NaA for CO2 capture from nickel laterite residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tao; Liu, Li-ying; Xiao, Penny; Che, Shuai; Wang, He-ming

    2014-08-01

    Zeolite NaA was successfully prepared from nickel laterite residue for the first time via a fusion-hydrothermal procedure. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized zeolite NaA were characterized with a range of experimental techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. It was revealed that the structures of the produced zeolites were dependent on the molar ratios of the reactants and hydrothermal reaction conditions, so the synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain pure zeolite NaA. Adsorption of nitrogen and carbon dioxide on the prepared zeolite NaA was also measured and analyzed. The results showed that zeolite NaA could be prepared with reasonable purity, it had physicochemical properties comparable with zeolite NaA made from other methods, and it had excellent gas adsorption properties, thus demonstrating that zeolite NaA could be prepared from nickel laterite residue.

  3. Adsorption and isothermal models of atrazine by zeolite prepared from Egyptian kaolin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Tarek S.; Gad-Allah, Tarek A.; Ibrahim, Hanan S.; Saleh, Tamer S.

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of Atrazine on zeolites, prepared from Egyptian kaolin, has been studied in order to consider the application of these types of zeolites in water purification. The batch mode has been employed, using atrazine solution of concentration ranging from 2 to 10 mg /l. The adsorption capacity and distribution coefficients ( Kd) were determined for the adsorption system as a function of sorbate concentration. It was found that, under the studies concentrations, the percent of adsorbed atrazine on both zeolites match to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. The constants of each model were calculated to assess the adsorption behavior of atrazine on each type of zeolite. According to the equilibrium studies, adsorption of atrazine on zeolite X at lower concentrations is much better than that on zeolite A. The application of Dublin-Kaganer-Radushkevich model revealed physisorption endothermic adsorption process for both zeolites. These results show that natural zeolites hold great potential to remove hazardous materials such as atrazine from water.

  4. The use Na, Li, K cations for modification of ZSM-5 zewolite to control hydrocarbon cold-start emission

    SciTech Connect

    Golubeva V.; Rohatgi U.; Korableva, A.; Anischenko, O.; Kustov, L.; Nissenbaum, V; Viola, M.B.

    2012-08-29

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling hydrocarbon emissions from cold-start of engines by investigating the adsorbents which could adsorb the hydrocarbons at cold temperatures and hold them to 250-300 ?. The materials, that has been studied, are based on the modification of ZSM-5 (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 35) zeolite with Li, K, Na cations. It has been shown that the introduction of Li, Na and K in an amount that is equivalent to the content of Al in zeolite results in occurrence of toluene temperature desorption peaks at high-temperatures. The toluene temperature desorption curves for 5%Li-ZSM-5 and 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolites are identical and have peak toluene desorption rate between 200 to 400 ?. Upon analysis of toluene adsorption isotherms for 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 and 5%Li-ZSM-5, it was concluded that the toluene diffusion inside of the modified zeolites channels is extremely slow and the sorption capacity of 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 is higher than with 5%Li-ZSM-5. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 didn't change toluene temperature programmed desorption (TPD) rate of curve after the treatment in environment with 10% ?{sub 2}? at 750-800 ? for about 28 h. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolite is very promising as adsorbent to control the cold-start hydrocarbon emissions.

  5. One-pot synthesis of hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicates for selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Haiyan; Yuan, Pei; Yu, Chengzhong; Bao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Iron-modified ZSM-5 zeolites (FeZSM-5s) have been considered to be a promising catalyst system to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, one of the most important global environmental issues, but their synthesis faces enormous economic and environmental challenges. Herein we report a cheap and green strategy to fabricate hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicate minerals via a nanoscale depolymerization-reorganization method. Our strategy is featured by neither using any aluminum-, silicon-, or iron-containing inorganic chemical nor involving any mesoscale template and any post-synthetic modification. Compared with the conventional FeZSM-5 synthesized from inorganic chemicals with the similar Fe content, the resulting hierarchical FeZSM-5 with highly-dispersed iron species showed superior catalytic activity in the selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3. PMID:25791958

  6. One-pot synthesis of hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicates for selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Haiyan; Yuan, Pei; Yu, Chengzhong; Bao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Iron-modified ZSM-5 zeolites (FeZSM-5s) have been considered to be a promising catalyst system to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, one of the most important global environmental issues, but their synthesis faces enormous economic and environmental challenges. Herein we report a cheap and green strategy to fabricate hierarchical FeZSM-5 zeolites from natural aluminosilicate minerals via a nanoscale depolymerization-reorganization method. Our strategy is featured by neither using any aluminum-, silicon-, or iron-containing inorganic chemical nor involving any mesoscale template and any post-synthetic modification. Compared with the conventional FeZSM-5 synthesized from inorganic chemicals with the similar Fe content, the resulting hierarchical FeZSM-5 with highly-dispersed iron species showed superior catalytic activity in the selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3. PMID:25791958

  7. Microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of zeolite films on ceramic supports

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. D. Madhusoodana; R. N. Das; Y. Kameshima; K. Okada

    2006-01-01

    Zeolite films were formed on ceramic supports by a novel microwave-assisted hydrothermal method and were characterized by\\u000a XRD, SEM, FTIR and BET surface area. The two-stage synthesis technique consists of microwave heating of supports saturated\\u000a with precursor solution to form a thin layer of zeolite nano-seeds, followed by hydrothermal treatment to crystallize MFI\\u000a zeolite. The resulting zeolite formation time was

  8. Fast formation of NaA zeolite membrane in the microwave field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaochun Xu; Weishen Yang; Jie Liu; Liwu Lin

    2000-01-01

    NaA zeolite membrane was successfully synthesized on the porous ?-Al2O3 support by microwave heating. The synthesis of NaA zeolite membrane in the microwave field only needs 15 min and the synthesis\\u000a time is 10 times shorter than that by conventional heating. SEM characterization indicates that the zeolite crystals in the\\u000a NaA zeolite membrane synthesized by microwave heating are uniform in

  9. Adsorption of Cr(VI) on hexadecylpyridinium bromide (HDPB) modified natural zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yubin Zeng; Heesoo Woo; Gwanghun Lee

    2010-01-01

    Adsorption of Cr(VI) on Pohang zeolite (PZ) and Haruna zeolite (HZ) modified with surfactant hexadecylpyridinium bromide (HDPB) was investigated by batch studies, X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. The results show that Cr(VI) adsorption on HDPB-zeolites have quick initial speed and adsorption kinetics follow pseudo-second order kinetic model within the initial adsorption stage. HDPB-zeolites have

  10. Tubular-type pervaporation module with zeolite NaA membrane

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masakazu Kondo; Mitsuru Komori; Hidetoshi Kita; Ken-ichi Okamoto

    1997-01-01

    Zeolite NaA membranes were prepared on the surfaces of porous tubular supports composed of mullite, ?-alumina and\\/or cristobalite using the hydrothermal synthesis. The zeolite NaA crystals and the surface morphologies of the membranes were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM. EPMA analysis revealed that the zeolite composite membranes consisted of three layers — the zeolite layer, the intermediate layer and

  11. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, Henry (Tesuque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A process for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.

  12. Removal of heavy metals from mine waters by natural zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ulla Wingenfelder; Carsten Hansen; Gerhard Furrer; Rainer Schulin [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland). Institute of Terrestrial Ecology

    2005-06-15

    The study investigated the removal of Fe, Pb, Cd, and Zn from synthetic mine waters by a natural zeolite. The emphasis was given to the zeolite's behavior toward a few cations in competition with each other. Pb was removed efficiently from neutral as well as from acidic solutions, whereas the uptake of Zn and Cd decreased with low pH and high iron concentrations. With increasing Ca concentrations in solution, elimination of Zn and Cd became poorer while removal of Pb remained virtually unchanged. The zeolite was stable in acidic solutions. Disintegration was only observed below pH 2.0. Forward- and back-titration of synthetic acidic mine water were carried out in the presence and absence of zeolite to simulate the effects of a pH increase by addition of neutralizing agents and a re-acidification which can be caused by subsequent mixing with acidic water. The pH increase during neutralization causes precipitation of hydrous ferric oxides and decreased dissolved metal concentrations. Zeolite addition further diminished Pb concentrations but did not have an effect on Zn and Cd concentrations in solution. During re-acidification of the solution, remobilization of Pb was weaker in the presence than in the absence of zeolite. No substantial differences were observed for Fe, Cd, and Zn immobilization. The immobilization of the metals during pH increase and the subsequent remobilization caused by re-acidification can be well described by a geochemical equilibrium speciation model that accounts for metal complexation at hydrous ferric oxides, for ion exchange on the zeolite surfaces, as well as for dissolution and precipitation processes. 42 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Development of low-cost integrated zeolite collector. Final report, September 25, 1978September 24, 1980

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tchernev

    1981-01-01

    The goal to design, construct and test an integrated solar zeolite collector, capable of providing hot water during the day and chilled water at night, which will act as one-for-one replacement for existing hot water solar collectors was achieved using the following steps: The optimum zeolite loading and the best zeolite for this purpose were determined by careful mathematical analysis,

  14. Ion exchange of zeolite membranes by a vacuum `flow-through' Seok-Jhin Kim a

    E-print Network

    Nair, Sankar

    Ion exchange of zeolite membranes by a vacuum `flow-through' technique Seok-Jhin Kim October 2014 Keywords: Ion exchange Zeolite membrane Flow-through technique Separation Catalysis a b s t r a c t Ion exchange of nanoporous (e.g., zeolite) membranes is of increasing importance

  15. Competitive adsorption of malachite green and Pb ions on natural zeolite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shaobin Wang; Eko Ariyanto

    2007-01-01

    A natural zeolite was employed as adsorbent for removal of malachite green and Pb2+ ions from aqueous solution. A batch system was applied to study the adsorption behaviour of the dye and heavy metal in single and binary systems on the natural zeolite. Kinetic studies indicate that malachite green and Pb2+ adsorption on the natural zeolite in a single component

  16. Catalytic Transformation of C7-C9 Methyl Benzenes over USY-based FCC Zeolite Catalyst

    E-print Network

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    Catalytic Transformation of C7-C9 Methyl Benzenes over USY-based FCC Zeolite Catalyst S. Al (toluene, m-xylene, and 1,2,4-trimethyl benzene) has been investigated over USY based FCC zeolite catalyst investigated over the USY zeolite. This phenomenon can be explained by the complex inter-relationship between

  17. Strategies for total NOx measurement with minimal CO interference utilizing a microporous zeolitic catalytic filter

    E-print Network

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    at temperatures greater than 400 8C. By using a Pt-loaded zeolite Yas a catalyst filter bed placed before a sensorStrategies for total NOx measurement with minimal CO interference utilizing a microporous zeolitic a layer of the Pt-zeolite catalyst filter material directly onto a Pt electrode, a pseudo-reference to NOx

  18. Enhancement of the heat and mass transfer in compact zeolite layers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Lang; T. Westerfeld; A. Gerlich; K. F. Knoche

    1996-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer during the adsorption of water on zeolite has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. A dynamic simulation model of a zeolite layer has been developed to estimate the predominant transport resistances and calculations were carried out to assist the simultaneous experimental investigations. On one hand, a metallic matrix was added to the compact zeolite layer to

  19. Zeolite-Mediated Photochemical Charge Separation Using a Surface-Entrapped Ruthenium-Polypyridyl Complex

    E-print Network

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    Zeolite-Mediated Photochemical Charge Separation Using a Surface-Entrapped Ruthenium)ethenyl]benzene (L), a polypyridyl complex of ruthenium(II) was tethered on the surface of zeolite Y. Electrochemical photolysis of the ruthenium-zeolite solid ion-exchanged with diquat and suspended in a propyl viologen

  20. Catalytic Transformation of Toluene over High Acidity Y-Zeolite Based S. Al-Khattaf*

    E-print Network

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    Catalytic Transformation of Toluene over High Acidity Y-Zeolite Based Catalyst S. Al in the temperature range of 400-500o C to understand the transformation of toluene over high acidity Y-based zeolite Abstract Catalytic transformation of toluene has been investigated over Y-zeolite based catalysts

  1. Properties of Zeolite A Obtained from Powdered Laundry Detergent: An Undergraduate Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smoot, Alison L.; Lindquist, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Presents experiments that introduce students to the myriad properties of zeolites using the sodium form of zeolite A (Na-A) from laundry detergent. Experiments include extracting Na-A from detergent, water softening properties, desiccant properties, ion-exchange properties, and Zeolite HA as a dehydration catalyst. (JRH)

  2. UTILITY OF SYNTHETIC ZEOLITES IN REMOVAL OF INORGANIC AND ORGANIC WATER POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange and adsorption properties. Different inorganic and organic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature using various zeolites. Synthetic zeolites like ZSM-5, Ferrierite, Beta and Faujasite Y have been used to remove i...

  3. Framework stabilization of Si-rich LTA zeolite prepared in organic-free media.

    PubMed

    Conato, Marlon T; Oleksiak, Matthew D; Peter McGrail, B; Motkuri, Radha K; Rimer, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Zeolite HOU-2 (LTA type) is prepared with the highest silica content (Si/Al = 2.1) reported for Na-LTA zeolites without the use of an organic structure-directing agent. The rational design of Si-rich zeolites has the potential to improve their thermal stability for applications in catalysis, gas storage, and selective separations. PMID:25347029

  4. Micro/macroporous system: MFI-type zeolite crystals with embedded macropores.

    PubMed

    Machoke, Albert G; Beltrán, Ana M; Inayat, Alexandra; Winter, Benjamin; Weissenberger, Tobias; Kruse, Nadine; Güttel, Robert; Spiecker, Erdmann; Schwieger, Wilhelm

    2015-02-01

    Zeolite crystals with an embedded and interconnected macropore system are prepared by using mesoporous silica particles as a silica source and as a sacrificial macroporogen. These novel hierarchical zeolite crystals are expected to reduce diffusion limitations in all zeolite-catalyzed reactions, especially in the transformation of larger molecules like in the catalytic cracking of polymers and the conversion of biomass. PMID:25535114

  5. ZEOLITE PERFORMANCE AS AN ANION EXCHANGER FOR ARSENIC SEQUESTRATION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their use in ion exchange and acid catalysis reactions. The use of zeolites in anion or ligand exchange reactions is less studied. The NH4+ form of zeolite Y (NY6, Faujasite) has been tested in this work to evaluate its performance for arsenic removal...

  6. On the introduction of intracrystalline mesoporosity in zeolites upon desilication in alkaline medium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Groen; L. A. A. Peffer; J. A. Moulijn; J. Pérez-Ram??rez

    2004-01-01

    The development of considerable mesoporosity without destruction of the intrinsic zeolite properties has been attained in various commercial zeolites by treatment in alkaline medium. Zeolites MFI, BEA, MOR and FER appear to be susceptible to extensive mesopore formation by extraction of framework Si in the parent material (desilication). Each structure requires particular treatment conditions. Variation of treatment time and temperature

  7. Optical studies of nanoscale materials incorporated in the space of zeolite crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Ikemoto; T. Nakano; Y. Nozue; O. Terasaki; S. Qiu

    1997-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy is used for the characterization of the quantum electronic state of nanoscale materials incorporated in zeolite crystals. Alkali metal clusters generated in zeolite exhibit interesting phenomena in optical properties as well as magnetic ones. Potassium clusters incorporated in zeolite LTA have shown ferromagnetism at low temperatures. The origin of the ferromagnetism was explained by the itinerant electron model.

  8. Spectroscopic investigations of the decomposition of CCl 2F 2 on three different types of zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Hannus; Z. Kónya; T. Kollár; Y. Kiyozumi; F. Mizukami; P. Lentz; J. B. Nagy; I. Kiricsi

    1999-01-01

    Adsorption and decomposition of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-12) in different zeolites were studied by means of IR and multinuclear NMR spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. It is shown that the decomposition of CFC-12 is simultaneously accompanied by the destruction of zeolite structure. Consequently, the decomposition of CFC- 12 should be regarded as a chemical reaction with the zeolite rather than

  9. Sorption of arsenic by surfactant-modified zeolite and kaolinite Zhaohui Li a,*, Ryan Beachner a

    E-print Network

    Li, Zhaohui

    Sorption of arsenic by surfactant-modified zeolite and kaolinite Zhaohui Li a,*, Ryan Beachner Available online 2 April 2007 Abstract In this study, the feasibility of using surfactant-modified zeolite- adecyltrimethylammonium, a cationic surfactant, on zeolite and kaolinite surfaces exceeded monolayer coverage

  10. MFI lamellae are unique among the availa-ble aluminosilicate zeolite lamellae because they

    E-print Network

    Zare, Richard N.

    MFI lamellae are unique among the availa- ble aluminosilicate zeolite lamellae because they have the potential of single­unit cell layers in applications beyond petrochemical processing. Branching of zeolite- plicable to all zeolite structures that can (i) be grown anisotropically as thin layers and (ii) can

  11. Spectroscopic Studies of Colloidal Solutions of Nanocrystalline Ru(bpy)3 2+-Zeolite Y

    E-print Network

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    Spectroscopic Studies of Colloidal Solutions of Nanocrystalline Ru(bpy)3 2+-Zeolite Y Norma B of Ru(bpy)3 2+-zeolite Y has made it possible to use conventional optical transmission spectroscopic methods to examine the entrapped Ru(bpy)3 2+ species within the zeolite. To prepare the suspensions

  12. The comparative ion exchange capacities of natural sedimentary and synthetic zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. D. Mondale; R. M. Carland; F. F. Aplan

    1995-01-01

    A large tonnage of natural, sedimentary zeolites is found in the Western United States and world-wide. They offer a substantial potential for a variety of industrial uses including the removal of cations from acid mine drainage and industrial waste waters. There is a wide variation in the cation exchange capacity of zeolites because of the differing nature of various zeolite

  13. Spectroscopic study of the dehydration and/or dehydroxylation of phyllosilicate and zeolite minerals

    E-print Network

    Glotch, Timothy D.

    Spectroscopic study of the dehydration and/or dehydroxylation of phyllosilicate and zeolite, and chlorite) and two natural zeolites are reported here. Pressed powders of sizeseparated phyllosilicate and natural zeolite samples were heated incrementally from 100°C to 900°C, cooled to room temperature

  14. Microporous and Mesoporous Materials 21( 1998)403-409 Combination of single crystal zeolites and microfabrication

    E-print Network

    Gimzewski, James

    Microporous and Mesoporous Materials 21( 1998)403-409 Combination of single crystal zeolites and microfabrication: Two applications towards zeolite nanodevices L. Scandella a, G. Binder a, T. Mezzacasa a, J;accepted12January 1998 Abstract We present two novel approaches to using zeolite crystals for `nanodevices

  15. Neutron and infrared study of the dynamical behaviour of methane in NaA zeolite *

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1029 Neutron and infrared study of the dynamical behaviour of methane in NaA zeolite * E. Cohen de methane molecule adsorbed in the synthetic zeolite NaA shows several interesting features : i-1038 JUILLET 1981, Classification Physics Abstracts 68.45 1. Introduction. - Zeolites are porous alumino

  16. Synthesis and Catalytic Properties of Metal Clusters Encapsulated within Small-Pore (SOD, GIS, ANA) Zeolites

    E-print Network

    Iglesia, Enrique

    ) Zeolites Sarika Goel, Zhijie Wu, Stacey I. Zones, and Enrique Iglesia* Department of Chemical.28 nm), GIS (Gismondine, 0.45 nm × 0.31 nm), and ANA (Analcime, 0.42 nm × 0.16 nm) zeolites zeolites1-5 can protect such clusters against sintering and also prevent their contact with toxic

  17. Toward a Database of Hypothetical Zeolite Structures David J. Earl, and Michael W. Deem*,

    E-print Network

    Earl, David J.

    Toward a Database of Hypothetical Zeolite Structures David J. Earl, and Michael W. DeemNP, United Kingdom We present a computational method to identify zeolite-like frameworks by sampling a zeolite figure of merit. Monte Carlo methods, including simulated annealing, are used to perform

  18. Algebraic Description of Coordination Sequences and Exact Topological Densities for Zeolites

    E-print Network

    Sloane, Neil J. A.

    Algebraic Description of Coordination Sequences and Exact Topological Densities for Zeolites R- dimensional sphere packings. Although was known that for many zeolites the terms the CS grow quadratically with systematic investigation had been carried out. 2000 terms have now been calculated for the zeolites tabulated

  19. Methyl rotational tunneling dynamics of p-xylene confined in a crystalline zeolite host

    E-print Network

    Nair, Sankar

    Methyl rotational tunneling dynamics of p-xylene confined in a crystalline zeolite host Sankar-xylene confined in nanoporous zeolite crystals has been measured by inelastic neutron scattering INS and proton to the methyl-zeolite interactions. The INS tunneling spectra from the crystals space group P212121 with four

  20. UV-Raman spectroscopy on nanotubes@zeolite Wavelength dependence Ab initio calculations

    E-print Network

    Nabben, Reinhard

    UV-Raman spectroscopy on nanotubes@zeolite June, 2005 Wavelength dependence Ab initio calculations involving the peak at 650 cm-1. Nanotubes grown inside the channels of zeolite crystals are constrained in the zeolite. · Further peaks cannot be explained by only 4 °A-diameter nanotubes. · Calculations

  1. Zeolite Surface as a Catalyst Support Material for Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 Zeolite Surface as a Catalyst Support Material for Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes support material. Although zeolite has been frequently used as a catalyst support material for the synthesis of SWNTs, detailed surface properties of previously employed zeolites, and thus their role

  2. Temperature dependent thermal conductivity of pure silica MEL and MFI zeolite thin films

    E-print Network

    Pilon, Laurent

    Temperature dependent thermal conductivity of pure silica MEL and MFI zeolite thin films Jin Fang,1 dependent cross-plane thermal conductivity of pure silica zeolite (PSZ) MFI and MEL thin films measured of MFI zeolite was predicted and discussed using the Callaway model based on the Debye approximation. VC

  3. Author's personal copy Mixed-linker zeolitic imidazolate framework mixed-matrix membranes

    E-print Network

    Nair, Sankar

    Author's personal copy Mixed-linker zeolitic imidazolate framework mixed-matrix membranes online 10 July 2013 Keywords: Zeolitic imidazolate framework Mixed-matrix membranes Gas separation Plasticization CO2 capture a b s t r a c t Zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF) materials are a promising

  4. Effects of composition and phonon scattering mechanisms on thermal transport in MFI zeolite films

    E-print Network

    Nair, Sankar

    Effects of composition and phonon scattering mechanisms on thermal transport in MFI zeolite films of different phonon scattering processes on thermal transport in the nanoporous zeolite MFI of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2776006 I. INTRODUCTION Zeolites are nanoporous mixed-oxide crystals with com

  5. Effect of Micropore Topology on the Structure and Properties of Zeolite Polymer Replicas

    E-print Network

    Effect of Micropore Topology on the Structure and Properties of Zeolite Polymer Replicas Stacy A Received September 10, 1997X Zeolites were used as templates to prepare microporous polymer replicas. Phenol- formaldehyde polymers were synthesized and cured within the channel networks of zeolites Y

  6. ZEOLITES: GEOMETRY AND COMBINATORICS Brigitte Servatius1,, Herman Servatius1 and M.F. Thorpe2,

    E-print Network

    Thorpe, Michael

    ZEOLITES: GEOMETRY AND COMBINATORICS Brigitte Servatius1,, Herman Servatius1 and M.F. Thorpe2, 1 University, Tempe, US Abstract We study the background associated with phenomena observed in zeolites using com- binatorial and geometric techniques. We define combinatorial d-dimensional zeolites and show

  7. Thermal conductivity of pure silica MEL and MFI zeolite thin films Thomas Coquil,1

    E-print Network

    Pilon, Laurent

    Thermal conductivity of pure silica MEL and MFI zeolite thin films Thomas Coquil,1 Christopher M temperature cross-plane thermal conductivity of pure silica zeolite PSZ MEL and MFI thin films. PSZ MEL thin cross- talk noise, and iii power consumption.5 Pure silica zeolites PSZs are crystalline microporous

  8. Interaction of Dimethylmethylphosphonate with Zeolite Y: Impedance-Based Sensor for Detecting Nerve Agent Simulants

    E-print Network

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    Interaction of Dimethylmethylphosphonate with Zeolite Y: Impedance-Based Sensor for Detecting Nerve of DMMP on the ionic conductivity of zeolite Y is investigated by impedance spectroscopy. In the presence of 20-100 ppm of DMMP, the ionic conductivity of the sodium exchanged form of the zeolite showed

  9. Microwave-assisted preparation of zeolite KH from alumatrane and Mathavee Sathupunya a

    E-print Network

    Gulari, Erdogan

    Microwave-assisted preparation of zeolite K­H from alumatrane and silatrane Mathavee Sathupunya-loaded zeolite was synthesized for the first time, via sol­gel processing and microwave heating techniques on x-ray diffraction analysis, the synthesized product is a K­H zeolite of hitherto unknown structure

  10. Theoretical Simulation of n-Alkane Cracking on Zeolites Joseph A. Swisher,,|

    E-print Network

    Bell, Alexis

    Theoretical Simulation of n-Alkane Cracking on Zeolites Joseph A. Swisher,,| Niels Hansen,,| Theo of alkane cracking in zeolites MFI and FAU have been simulated theoretically from first principles molecules per unit mass of zeolite that are close enough to a Brønsted-acid site to be in the reactant state

  11. Photochemical processes in zeolites: new developments Prabir K. Dutta *, Yanghee Kim

    E-print Network

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    Photochemical processes in zeolites: new developments Prabir K. Dutta *, Yanghee Kim Department 2004; accepted 28 February 2004 Abstract The organized channels and cages of zeolites provide a novel medium for carrying out photochemical reactions. Besides the confinement effect, the role of zeolite

  12. Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks as H2 Adsorbents: Ab Initio Based Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulation

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks as H2 Adsorbents: Ab Initio Based Grand Canonical Monte CarloVed: June 1, 2010 We report the H2 uptake behavior of 10 zeolitic-imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs), based organic linkers and zeolite topologies) than in MOFs. In particular, the ZIFs uptake larger amounts of H2

  13. Zeolite Growth by Addition of Subcolloidal Particles: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    E-print Network

    Kokkoli, Efie

    Zeolite Growth by Addition of Subcolloidal Particles: Modeling and Experimental Validation on nucleation and growth of zeolites, their growth mechanism remains elusive. Elucidating the primary growth units partici- pating in and the colloidal interactions that may affect growth of zeolite particles

  14. Modeling Spontaneous Formation of Precursor Nanoparticles in Clear-Solution Zeolite Synthesis

    E-print Network

    Auerbach, Scott M.

    Modeling Spontaneous Formation of Precursor Nanoparticles in Clear-Solution Zeolite Synthesis M zeolite. Silica condensation/hydrolysis is modeled by a nearest-neighbor attraction, while growth by Ostwald ripening. We suggest that this mechanism may play a role in the growth of zeolite

  15. Theoretical Study of Zeolite-Catalyzed Dimethoxymethane Carbonylation to Methyl Methoxyacetate

    E-print Network

    Bell, Alexis

    Theoretical Study of Zeolite-Catalyzed Dimethoxymethane Carbonylation to Methyl Methoxyacetate be catalyzed by acid zeolites. This reaction is a critical step in the synthesis of monoethylene glycol (MEG-FAU zeolites has been investigated using density functional theory. We find that the reaction involves three

  16. Density Functional Theory Study of Transformations of Nitrogen Oxides Catalyzed by Cu-Exchanged Zeolites

    E-print Network

    Adams, James B

    -Exchanged Zeolites W. F. Schneider* and K. C. Hass Ford Research Laboratory, MD 3083/SRL, Dearborn, Michigan 48121 density-functional-theory-based model of NO decomposition in Cu-exchanged zeolites (Schneider, W. F.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101, 4353) is extended to consider more generally the Cu-zeolite catalyzed

  17. Density Functional Theory Investigations of the Direct Oxidation of Methane on an Fe-Exchanged Zeolite

    E-print Network

    Bell, Alexis T.

    -Exchanged Zeolite WanZhen Liang,,,§ Alexis T. Bell,*, Martin Head-Gordon, and Arup K. Chakraborty, Department-exchange site in the zeolite] is lower in energy by 7.7 kcal/mol, assuming a spin multiplicity M ) 6-exchanged ZSM-5 zeolite pretreated at an elevated temperature with N2O and then exposed to methane at room

  18. Opening ZIF-8: A Catalytically Active Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework of Sodalite Topology with Unsubstituted Linkers

    E-print Network

    Opening ZIF-8: A Catalytically Active Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework of Sodalite Topology: A zeolitic imidazolate framework material of SOD topology possessing primarily unsubstituted imidazolate (im-ray diffraction. SALEM-2 is the first example of a porous Zn(im)2 ZIF possessing a truly zeolitic topology

  19. Locating stationary points of sorbate-zeolite potential energy surfaces using interval analysis

    E-print Network

    Stadtherr, Mark A.

    Locating stationary points of sorbate-zeolite potential energy surfaces using interval analysis in a zeolite can be studied using transition-state theory. In this application, and other applications points, transition states, zeolites, diffusion, interval-Newton method Author to whom all correspondence

  20. ALUMINUM SITING IN THE ZSM-22 AND THETA-1 ZEOLITES REVISITED: A QM/MM STUDY

    E-print Network

    Sklenak, Stepan

    ALUMINUM SITING IN THE ZSM-22 AND THETA-1 ZEOLITES REVISITED: A QM/MM STUDY Stepan SKLENAKa1 on the occasion of his 80th birthday. The Al siting in the silicon rich ZSM-22 and Theta-1 zeolites of the TON. Keywords: QM/MM calculations; Ab initio calculations; BLYP; GIAO; Zeolites; 27 Al 3Q MAS NMR spectroscopy

  1. Does lattice vibration drive diffusion in zeolites? Dmitry I. Kopelevich and Hsueh-Chia Chang

    E-print Network

    Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    Does lattice vibration drive diffusion in zeolites? Dmitry I. Kopelevich and Hsueh-Chia Chang force for sorbate diffusion in zeolites is proposed. A realistic lattice model is employed to cut off is then estimated for a variety of sorbate­zeolite pairs. Lattice vibration is found to be a negligible driving

  2. Investigation into the shape selectivity of zeolite catalysts for biomass conversion Jungho Jae a

    E-print Network

    Auerbach, Scott M.

    Investigation into the shape selectivity of zeolite catalysts for biomass conversion Jungho Jae January 2011 Available online 4 March 2011 Keywords: Zeolite Pyrolysis Glucose Kinetic diameter Pore size Shape selectivity a b s t r a c t We investigate the influence of zeolite pore size and shape

  3. Algebraic Description of Coordination Sequences and Exact Topological Densities for Zeolites

    E-print Network

    Sloane, Neil J. A.

    Algebraic Description of Coordination Sequences and Exact Topological Densities for Zeolites R. Although it was known that for many zeolites the terms of the CS grow quadratically with k, no systematic investigation had been carried out. Up to 2000 terms have now been calculated for all the zeolites tabulated

  4. Synthesis and characterization of isostructural cadmium zeolitic imidazolate frameworks via solvent-assisted linker exchange

    E-print Network

    Synthesis and characterization of isostructural cadmium zeolitic imidazolate frameworks via solvent present the first examples of solvent-assisted linker exchange (SALE) in zeolitic imidazolate frameworks are isostructural (RHO zeolitic topology) and highly porous. Despite the high thermal and chemical stability of ZIFs

  5. Infrared reflectance measurements of zeolite film thickness, refractive index and other characteristics

    E-print Network

    Nair, Sankar

    Infrared reflectance measurements of zeolite film thickness, refractive index and other-destructive measurement of zeolite membrane characteristics by means of infrared (IR) reflectance measurements in the non with a polynomial expansion for the refractive index function, to interpret reflectance measurements from zeolite

  6. Influence of Zeolite Catalyst Supports on the Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 Influence of Zeolite Catalyst Supports on the Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes; catalytic CVD; metal catalyst; Zeolite ABSTRACT: Choice of the catalyst support is an important factor) method. Zeolites, which are a class of microporous crystalline material, have also been known

  7. An investigation into the mechanism and kinetics of dimethoxymethane carbonylation over FAU and MFI zeolites

    E-print Network

    Bell, Alexis

    zeolites Fuat E. Celik, Taejin Kim, Anton N. Mlinar, Alexis T. Bell * Department of Chemical Engineering Zeolite FTIR Infrared Faujasite Carbon monoxide Dimethoxymethane Methyl methoxyacetate Disproportionation a b s t r a c t In situ IR spectroscopy was used to observe the intermediates formed on zeolites FAU

  8. Molecular simulations of hydrogen and methane permeation through pore mouth modified zeolite Sang Eun Jeea

    E-print Network

    McGaughey, Alan

    Molecular simulations of hydrogen and methane permeation through pore mouth modified zeolite from gas mixtures in order to use hydrogen in energy-related applications. Zeolite membranes are robust zeolite membranes whose pore mouths have been chemically modified. An important challenge for materials

  9. Purification and characterization of zeolite-supported single-walled carbon nanotubes catalytically synthesized from

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Purification and characterization of zeolite-supported single-walled carbon nanotubes catalytically complete removal of zeolite particles and Fe/Co catalysts from raw single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs-scale production of quasi-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles on zeolite by CCVD, in which acetylene

  10. Surface Structure of Zeolite (MFI) Crystals Isabel Diaz,, Efrosini Kokkoli, Osamu Terasaki, and Michael Tsapatsis*,

    E-print Network

    Kokkoli, Efie

    Articles Surface Structure of Zeolite (MFI) Crystals Isabel Di´az,,§ Efrosini Kokkoli, Osamu type MFI) is an important zeolite that, in addition to conventional applications such as adsorption in studies of zeolite crystal growth. The surface structure of silicalite-1 crystals with two different

  11. Helicity Selective Separation of Zeolite-supported Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized from

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 Helicity Selective Separation of Zeolite-supported Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized on metal supported Zeolite.10,11 Purification and helicity selective separation of SWNTs is still an important challenge. Two methods for purification, removal of metal catalysts and Zeolite, of SWNTs produced

  12. Theoretical Studies on VPI5. 3. The MSQ Force Field for Alu minophosphate Zeolites

    E-print Network

    Çagin, Tahir

    9/22/98 Theoretical Studies on VPI­5. 3. The MS­Q Force Field for Alu­ minophosphate Zeolites Osamu 91125 Abstract Aluminophosphate zeolite is an artificial material which shows strange hydrophilic­ ity of this zeolite depended on the local geometric deformation, and speculated that the site­specific hydrophilicity

  13. Identification of iron cyclam complexes encapsulated inside zeolite Y Xile Hu, Karsten Meyer *

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Karsten

    Identification of iron cyclam complexes encapsulated inside zeolite Y Xile Hu, Karsten Meyer complexes formed inside the supercages of zeolite-Y. Especially interesting is the identification Fe(V) nitrido species. # 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Zeolite; Cage

  14. Removal of Heavy Metals and Other Cations from Wastewater Using Zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Zamzow; B. R. Eichbaum; K. R. Sandgren; D. E. Shanks

    1990-01-01

    Zeolites from abundant natural deposits were investigated by the Bureau of Mines for efficiently cleaning up mining industry wastewaters. Twenty-two zeolites were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma analysis (ICP). These included clinoptilolite, mordenite, chabazite, erionite, and phillipsite. The zeolites were primarily in the sodium or calcium form, but potassium and magnesium counter ions were also present. Bulk

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER Formation of Mg(OH)2 nanowhiskers on LTA zeolite surfaces

    E-print Network

    Nair, Sankar

    ORIGINAL PAPER Formation of Mg(OH)2 nanowhiskers on LTA zeolite surfaces using a sol­gel method to synthesize Mg(OH)2 nanowhiskers on micron- sized zeolite 5A particle surfaces at room temperature Mg(OH)2 structures on the zeolite surface. The optimum conditions for one dimensional Mg(OH)2 whisker

  16. Modified activated carbon for the removal of copper, zinc, chromium and cyanide from wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lotfi Monser; Nafaâ Adhoum

    2002-01-01

    Modified activated carbon are carbonaceous adsorbents which have tetrabutyl ammonium iodide (TBAI) and sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate (SDDC) immobilised at their surface. This study investigates the adsorption of toxic ions, copper, zinc, chromium and cyanide on these adsorbents that have undergone surface modification with tetrabutyl ammonium (TBA) and SDDC in wastewater applications. The modification technique enhance the removal capacity of carbon

  17. Improved Electroformed Structural Copper and Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Hudson, W.; Babcock, B.; Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electroforming offers a superior means for fabricating internally cooled heat exchangers and structures subjected to thermal environments. Copper is deposited from many such applications because of the good thermal conductivity. It suffers from mediocre yield strength as a structural material and loses mechanical strength at intermediate temperatures. Mechanical properties similar to those of electroformed nickel are desired. Phase 1 examined innovative means to improve deposited copper structural performance. Yield strengths as high as 483 MPa (70 ksi) were obtained with useful ductility while retaining a high level of purity essential to good thermal conductivity. Phase 2 represents a program to explore new additive combinations in copper electrolytes to produce a more fine, equiaxed grain which can be thermally stabilized by other techniques such as alloying in modest degrees and dispersion strengthening. Evaluation of new technology - such as the codeposition of fullerness (diamond-like) particles were made to enhance thermal conductivity in low alloys. A test fire quality tube-bundle engine was fabricated using these copper property improvement concepts to show the superiority of the new coppers and fabrications methods over competitive technologies such as brazing and plasma deposition.

  18. Copper Delivery by Metallochaperone Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, A.C. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    Copper is an essential element in all living organisms, serving as a cofactor for many important proteins and enzymes. Metallochaperone proteins deliver copper ions to specific physiological partners by direct protein-protein interactions. The Atx1-like chaperones transfer copper to intracellular copper transporters, and the CCS chaperones shuttle copper to copper,zinc superoxide dismutase. Crystallographic studies of these two copper chaperone families have provided insights into metal binding and target recognition by metallochaperones and have led to detailed molecular models for the copper transfer mechanism.

  19. SO2 REMOVAL FROM FLUE GASES USING UTILITY SYNTHESIZED ZEOLITES

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL GRUTZECK

    1998-10-31

    It is well known that natural and synthetic zeolites (molecular sieves) can adsorb gaseous SO2 from flue gas and do it more efficiently than lime based scrubbing materials. Unfortunately their cost ($500-$800 per ton) has deterred their use in this capacity. It is also known that zeolites are easy to synthesize from a variety of natural and man-made materials. The overall objective of the current work has been to evaluate the feasibility of having a utility synthesize its own zeolites, on-site, from fly ash and other recycled materials and then use these zeolites to adsorb SO2 from their flue gases. Work to date has shown that the efficiency of the capture process is related to the degree of crystallinity and the type of zeolite that forms in the samples. Normally, those samples cured at 150°C contained a greater proportion of zeolite and as such were more SO2 adsorptive than their low-temperature counterparts. However, in order for the project to be successful, on site synthesis must remain an option, i.e. _100°C synthesis. In light of this, the experimental focus now has two aspects. First, compositions of the starting materials are being altered by blending the current suite of fly ashes with other fly ashes, ground glass cullet and silica fume to promote the formation and growth of well crystallized and highly adsorptive zeolites. Second, greater degrees of reaction at significantly lower temperatures are being promote by ball milling the fly ash prior to use, by the use of more concentrated caustic solutions, and by the addition of zeolite seeds to the reactants. In all cases studies will focus on the effect of structure type and degree of conversion on SO2 adsorption. Future work will concentrate on the study of the effect of weathering on the suitability of converting fly ash into zeolites. This is an especially important study, considering the acres of fly ash now in storage throughout the country.

  20. SO2 REMOVAL FROM FLUE GASES USING UTILITY SYNTHESIZED ZEOLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Grutzeck

    1999-04-30

    It is well known that natural and synthetic zeolites (molecular sieves) can adsorb gaseous SO{sub 2} from flue gas and do it more efficiently than lime based scrubbing materials. Unfortunately their cost ($500-$800 per ton) has deterred their use in this capacity. It is also known that zeolites are easy to synthesize from a variety of natural and man-made materials. The overall objective of the current work has been to evaluate the feasibility of having a utility synthesize its own zeolites, on-site, from fly ash and other recycled materials and then use these zeolites to adsorb SO{sub 2} from their flue gases. Work to date has shown that the efficiency of the capture process is related to the degree of crystallinity and the type of zeolite that forms in the samples. Normally, those samples cured at 150 C contained a greater proportion of zeolite and as such were more SO{sub 2} adsorptive than their low-temperature counterparts. However, in order for the project to be successful, on site synthesis must remain an option, i.e. 100 C synthesis. In light of this, the experimental focus now has two aspects. First, compositions of the starting materials are being altered by blending the current suite of fly ashes with ground glass cullet and silica fume to promote the formation and growth of well crystallized and highly adsorptive zeolites. Second, greater degrees of reaction at significantly lower temperatures are being promote by ball milling the fly ash prior to use, by the use of more concentrated caustic solutions, and by the addition of zeolite seeds to the reactants. In all cases studies will focus on the effect of structure type and degree of conversion on SO{sub 2} adsorption. Future work will concentrate on the study of the effect of weathering on the suitability of converting fly ash into zeolites. This is an especially important study, considering the acres of fly ash now in storage throughout the US.

  1. Co-remediation of the lead-polluted garden soil by exogenous natural zeolite and humic acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei-yu Shi; Hong-bo Shao; Hua Li; Ming-an Shao; Sheng Du

    2009-01-01

    The current study reported the co-remediation effect on the lead-polluted garden soil by zeolite and humic acids (HA), which was from comparing with the remediation of single zeolite in term of the lead fraction of sequential extraction in the soil and the distribution of lead in different parts of rape. Mixed treatment (zeolite and HA) and single treatment (zeolite) were,

  2. Catalytic activities of zeolite compounds for decomposing aqueous ozone.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Ai; Kitayama, Mikito; Ohta, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP), chemical oxidation using aqueous ozone in the presence of appropriate catalysts to generate highly reactive oxygen species, offers an attractive option for removing poorly biodegradable pollutants. Using the commercial zeolite powders with various Si/Al ratios and crystal structures, their catalytic activities for decomposing aqueous ozone were evaluated by continuously flowing ozone to water containing the zeolite powders. The hydrophilic zeolites (low Si/Al ratio) with alkali cations in the crystal structures were found to possess high catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. The hydrophobic zeolite compounds (high Si/Al ratio) were found to absorb ozone very well, but to have no catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Their catalytic activities were also evaluated by using the fixed bed column method. When alkali cations were removed by acid rinsing or substituted by alkali-earth cations, the catalytic activities was significantly deteriorated. These results suggest that the metal cations on the crystal surface of the hydrophilic zeolite would play a key role for catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. PMID:25078817

  3. Ion exchangers in radioactive waste management: natural Iranian zeolites.

    PubMed

    Nilchi, A; Maalek, B; Khanchi, A; Ghanadi Maragheh, M; Bagheri, A; Savoji, K

    2006-01-01

    Five samples of natural zeolites from different parts of Iran were chosen for this study. In order to characterize and determine their structures, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectrometry were carried out for each sample. The selective absorption properties of each zeolite were found by calculating the distribution coefficient (K(d)) of various simulated wastes which were prepared by spiking the radionuclides with (131)I, (99)Mo, (153)Sm, (140)La and (147)Nd. All the zeolite samples used in this study had extremely high absorption value towards (140)La; clinoptolite from Mianeh and analsite from Ghalehkhargoshi showed good absorption for (147)Nd; clinoptolite from Semnan and clinoptolite from Firozkoh showed high absorption for (153)Sm; mesolite from Arababad Tabas showed good absorption for (99)Mo; and finally mesolite from Arababad Tabas, clinoptolite from Semnan and clinoptolite from Firozkoh could be used to selectively absorb (131)I from the stimulated waste which was prepared. The natural zeolites chosen for these studies show a similar pattern to those synthetic ion exchangers in the literature and in some cases an extremely high selectivity towards certain radioactive elements. Hence the binary separation of radioactive elements could easily be carried out. Furthermore, these zeolites, which are naturally occurring ion exchangers, are viable economically and extremely useful alternatives in this industry. PMID:16099667

  4. A high acid mesoporous USY zeolite prepared by alumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinghong; Kang, Yuhong; Ma, Ning; Hao, Wenming; Wang, Yan; Li, Ruifeng

    2013-01-01

    A high-acidity HUSY zeolite with mesoporous structure was prepared by alumination with a dilute aqueous NaAlO2 solution and characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption, IR framework vibration and 29Si MAS NMR methods. The results indicated the extra-framework aluminum was reinserted into the tetrahedral framework through isomorphic substitution of framework Si (0Al) sites by Al ions, whereas the crystal and micropore structure were unaltered. FTIR spectra of hydroxyl vibrations and pyridine adsorbed on realuminated zeolites showed that the number of Brønsted acid sites and strong Lewis acid sites increased whereas weak Lewis acid sites decreased twice. The mesoporous structure composed of inter-and intra-crystalline pores in the aluminated HUSY increased the external surface area of the zeolite, improving accessibility of molecules to the active sites and enhancing its catalytic ability. The realuminated HUSY zeolite supported with Ru catalyst exhibited a higher catalytic activity for benzene hydrogenation than the parent HUSY zeolite; the reaction rate in comparison to the mesozeolite increased by 5.5 times.

  5. Risk assessment for the transportation of radioactive zeolite liners

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The risk is estimated for the shipment of radioactive zeolite liners in support of the Zeolite Vitrification Demonstration Program currently underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. This program will establish the feasibility of zeolite vitrification as an effective means of immobilizing high-specific-activity wastes. In this risk assessment, it is assumed that two zeolite liners, each loaded around July 1, 1981 to 60,000 Ci, will be shipped by truck around January 1, 1982. However, to provide a measure of conservatism, each liner is assumed to initially hole 70,000 Ci, with the major radioisotopes as follow: /sup 90/Sr = 3000 Ci, /sup 134/Cs = 7000 Ci, /sup 137/Cs = 60,000 Ci. Should shipment take place with essentially no delay after initial loading (regardless of loading date), the shipment loading would be only 2.7% higher than that for the assumed six-month delay. This would negligibly affect the overall risk. As a result of this risk assessment, it is concluded that the transport of the radioactive zeolite liners from TMI to PNL by truck can be conducted at an insignificant level of risk to the public.

  6. COPPER RESEARCH UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides an update and overview of new research results and remaining research needs with respect to copper corrosion control issues. The topics to be covered include: occurrence of elevated copper release in systems that meet the Action Level; impact of water c...

  7. Erythrocyte membrane proteins in copper-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.T.; Kramer, T.R.

    1987-05-01

    Increased osmotic stability and decreased survivability of erythrocytes caused by Cu deficiency suggest that low copper status may lead to modification in the organization of erythrocyte membrane proteins. Accordingly Cu deficiency was produced in rats by feeding a diet containing < 1 ppm Cu. The effects of low copper status on erythrocyte membrane proteins were assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacylamide electrophoresis. A 170,000 dalton protein (170K) amounted to 2.68 +/- 0.11% of the total membrane protein in erythrocytes from copper-deficient rats (n = 25) and 1.42 +/- 0.10% in erythrocytes from rats fed adequate Cu. When erythrocyte membranes from copper-deficient rats were extracted with 0.5% (v/v) Triton X-100, 170K remained associated with the cytoskeletal proteins, spectrin and actin. Thus, copper deficiency can alter the composition of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. Furthermore, hematocrit levels in copper-deficient rats were negatively correlated to the amount of 170K suggesting that alteration of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton may be a factor that contributes to the anemia associated with copper deficiency.

  8. Selective sensing of alcohols in water influenced by chemically Zeolite coatings on optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Marziyeh; Hill, Matthew R.; Duke, Mikel; Sidiroglou, Fotios; Collins, Stephen F.

    2014-05-01

    The application of a MFI type zeolite coating on the end of an optical fiber is presented. Zeolite coatings were directly grown on the freshly cleaved endface of optical fibers. It was found that the produced integrated zeolite-fiber sensors exhibit specific chemical sensitivity towards certain chemicals. The molecular adsorption induced change of zeolite refractive index was studied to understand the sensing mechanisms of the developed sensor system. This work can lead to a new class of portable zeolite thin film enabled miniaturized fiber optic sensors.

  9. [Changes in the blood system of white mice with long-term zeolite administration].

    PubMed

    Kartashev, A G; Baskurian, A K

    1995-01-01

    The biological effectiveness of zeolites in the postnatal ontogeny was investigated according to the red blood shoot of white mice during prolonged permanent addition of them to the common ration of food. The use of zeolites in the juvenile period of development induces slight changes in the erythron system. The more prolonged use of zeolites in the involutionary period causes disturbances in adaptation systems of the red blood shoot. In our view the use of zeolites necessitates elaboration of the time regulation depending on the age state and zeolite feeding of animals. PMID:8846321

  10. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-10-07

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and shown to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  11. Mechanochemical approach for preparation of Mo-containing ?-zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostova, N. G.; Spojakina, A. A.; Dutková, E.; Baláž, P.

    2007-05-01

    The catalytically active solid materials were prepared by mechanochemical synthesis and impregnation. The starting material used as a support was ?-zeolite with a ratio SiO2/Al2O3=66. The molybdenum precursor was 12-molybdophosphoric heteropoly acid (HPMo). The samples were characterized by TPR and IR methods. The test reaction was thiophene hydrodesulfurization at atmospheric pressure. The interaction between HPMo and ?-zeolite in the catalyst sample, prepared by mechanochemical synthesis, is a weak one compared to that in the sample obtained on the basis of impregnation. The hydrodesulfurization activity of the milling sample is stabilized at a level about 50% higher than that of the sample prepared by impregnating HPMo on ?-zeolite. The higher hydrogenating activity of the mechanochemically treated sample is an additional advantage.

  12. Optical spectra of noble metal nanoparticles supported on zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Bastidas, Catalina; Smolentseva, Elena; Machorro, Roberto; Petranovskii, Vitalii

    2014-09-01

    Optical spectra of noble metal nano-particles supported on different types of zeolites are studied and compared. The absorbance spectra of Cu, Ag and Au nanoparticles supported on mordenite, ?-zeolite, Na/Y and H/Y zeolites respectively are reported. Spectra for pre-exchanged Au-Cu/Na/Y, Au-Ni/Na/Y and Au-Fe/Na/Y are also studied. A simple effective medium approach (Maxwell-Garnett) is used to obtain a theoretical complex effective dielectric function of the composite and to asses the sensibility of the plasmon resonance to the sample characteristics. The knowledge of these properties can hopefully be applied to the development of optical tools to monitor the synthetic path.

  13. Multiple zeolite structures from one ionic liquid template.

    PubMed

    Martínez Blanes, José María; Szyja, Bart?omiej M; Romero-Sarria, Francisca; Centeno, Miguel Ángel; Hensen, Emiel J M; Odriozola, José Antonio; Ivanova, Svetlana

    2013-02-01

    This study reports the use of 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium methanesulfonate ionic liquid as a template in the synthesis of zeolites. It is found that the silicon source determines the formation of beta (BEA), mordenite framework inverted (MFI), or analcime (ANA) zeolites. Depending on this source, different preorganized complexes are obtained that drive the formation of the different zeolite structures. In the presence of ethanol, the ionic liquid form preorganized complexes that drive the formation of MFI. In its absence, BEA is obtained. Whereas, the large amount of sodium present when using sodium metasilicate leads to ANA formation. A molecular simulation study of the relative stability of the template-framework system and location of the template provides further insight into the mechanism of synthesis. PMID:23255393

  14. Synthesis of self-pillared zeolite nanosheets by repetitive branching.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueyi; Liu, Dongxia; Xu, Dandan; Asahina, Shunsuke; Cychosz, Katie A; Agrawal, Kumar Varoon; Al Wahedi, Yasser; Bhan, Aditya; Al Hashimi, Saleh; Terasaki, Osamu; Thommes, Matthias; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2012-06-29

    Hierarchical zeolites are a class of microporous catalysts and adsorbents that also contain mesopores, which allow for fast transport of bulky molecules and thereby enable improved performance in petrochemical and biomass processing. We used repetitive branching during one-step hydrothermal crystal growth to synthesize a new hierarchical zeolite made of orthogonally connected microporous nanosheets. The nanosheets are 2 nanometers thick and contain a network of 0.5-nanometer micropores. The house-of-cards arrangement of the nanosheets creates a permanent network of 2- to 7-nanometer mesopores, which, along with the high external surface area and reduced micropore diffusion length, account for higher reaction rates for bulky molecules relative to those of other mesoporous and conventional MFI zeolites. PMID:22745424

  15. Water adsorption in hydrophilic zeolites: experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Juan Manuel; Silvestre-Albero, Juaquin; Rodriguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Vlugt, Thijs J H; Calero, Sofia

    2013-10-28

    We have measured experimental adsorption isotherms of water in zeolite LTA4A, and studied the regeneration process by performing subsequent adsorption cycles after degassing at different temperatures. We observed incomplete desorption at low temperatures, and cation rearrangement at successive adsorption cycles. We also developed a new molecular simulation force field able to reproduce experimental adsorption isotherms in the range of temperatures between 273 K and 374 K. Small deviations observed at high pressures are attributed to the change in the water dipole moment at high loadings. The force field correctly describes the preferential adsorption sites of water at different pressures. We tested the influence of the zeolite structure, framework flexibility, and cation mobility when considering adsorption and diffusion of water. Finally, we performed checks on force field transferability between different hydrophilic zeolite types, concluding that classical, non-polarizable water force fields are not transferable. PMID:24022609

  16. Effects of TS1 zeolite structures on physical properties and enzymatic degradation of Poly (butylene succinate) (PBS)\\/TS1 zeolite hybrid composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sung Yeon Hwang; Eui Sang Yoo; Seung Soon Im

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how the water uptake features and carrier characteristics of the TS-1 zeolite affected the physical and rheological properties, morphological parameters, and enzymatic hydrolysis of Poly (butylene succinate) (PBS). The introduction of TS-1 zeolite as catalyst was developed for the preparation of PBS\\/TS-1 zeolite hybrid composites (PTHC) without heavy metal toxic substance in

  17. Bicontinuous zeolite polymer composite membranes prepared via float casting.

    PubMed

    Kiesow, Ina; Marczewski, Dawid; Reinhardt, Lutz; Mühlmann, Marcel; Possiwan, Mario; Goedel, Werner A

    2013-03-20

    We prepared bicontinuous composite membranes comprising zeolite A particles. The particles form a monolayer which is embedded in a polymer sheet in such a way that each particle penetrates both surfaces of the polymer sheet. Preparation was done via "float casting"; a mixture of hydrophobized zeolite particles and an appropriate volume of a nonvolatile polymerizable organic liquid monomer was applied onto a water surface. The monomer was solidified via photopolymerization to form the above-mentioned membrane. In as-prepared state (without extensive drying), this membrane is permeable for water vapor (in case of zeolite 4A permeance = 8 × 10(-9) mol m(-2) s(-1) Pa(-1), permeability = 1.65 × 10(-14) mol m(-1) s(-1) Pa(-1) = 49 barrer) but impermeable for nitrogen (permeance below detection limit of 5 × 10(-12) mol m(-2) s(-1) Pa(-1), permeability below detection limit of 1 × 10(-17) mol m(-1) s(-1) Pa(-1) = 0.03 barrer). The permeance for water vapor increases with increasing pore size of the zeolite (in case of zeolite 5A, all other parameters being unchanged, permeance = 12 × 10(-9) mol m(-2) s(-1) Pa(-1), permeability = 2.4 × 10(-14) mol m(-1) s(-1) Pa(-1) = 72 barrer). These observations indicate that the water molecules are predominantly transported through the zeolite channels and at the same time block the passage of other molecules. The impermeability for nitrogen in as-prepared state indicates a low amount of defects that are not blocked by water. Furthermore, the composite nature of the membrane gives rise to a reduced brittleness; membranes can be handled manually without support structure and thus might be promising candidates for separation technology. PMID:23398555

  18. Monodispersed Ultrafine Zeolite Crystal Particles by Microwave Hydrothermal Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL; Harris, Michael Tyrone [ORNL; Khatri, Lubna [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Microwave hydrothermal synthesis of zeolites is reviewed. Monodispersed ultrafine crystal particles of zeolite (Silicalite-1) have been synthesized in batch reactor vessels by microwave irradiation heating of aqueous basic silicate precursor solutions with tetra propyl ammonium hydroxide as the templating molecule. The effects of major process parameters (such as synthesis temperature, microwave heating rate, volume ratio (i.e., the volume of the initial synthesis solution over the total volume of the reactor vessel), and synthesis time on the zeolite particle characteristics are studied using a computer-controlled microwave reactor system that allows real-time monitoring and control of reaction medium temperature. The changes in the morphology, size and crystal structure of the particles are investigated using scanning electron microscope, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, and BET surface analysis. We have found that the synthesis temperature, volume ratio, and heating rate play a significant role in controlling the particle size, uniformity, and morphology. Microwave processing has generated new morphologies of zeolite particles (i.e., uniform block-shaped particles that contain mixed gel-nanocrystallites and agglomerated crystal particles) that could not be made by a conventional hydrothermal process. At higher synthesis temperature and lower volume ratio, irregular block-shaped particles were produced, whereas increasing the volume ratio promoted the formation of monodispersed single-crystal particles with uniform shape. Our results clearly demonstrate that faster microwave heating is advantageous to enhance the zeolite crystallization kinetics and produces larger-size crystal particles in shorter time. In addition, zeolite crystallization mechanisms, depending on the microwave heating rate, were also discussed.

  19. Removal of free fatty acid in waste frying oil by esterification with methanol on zeolite catalysts.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyong-Hwan; Chang, Duck-Rye; Park, Byung-Geon

    2008-11-01

    The removal of free fatty acid (FFA) in waste frying oil by esterification with methanol was conducted using various zeolite catalysts. The ZSM-5 (MFI), mordenite (MOR), faujasite (FAU), beta (BEA) zeolites, and silicalite were employed with different Si/Al molar ratio in the reaction. The effects of acidic properties and pore structure of the zeolite catalysts were discussed relating to the conversion of the FFA. The MFI zeolite induced an improvement of the removal efficiency of FFA by cracking to the FFA in its pore structure due to its narrow pore mouth. The catalytic activity for FFA removal was lowered with decreasing of acid strength of the zeolites. The strong acid sites of zeolites induced the high conversion of FFA comparatively. The acid strength and pore structure of acidic zeolites affected the catalytic activity in FFA removal. PMID:18387298

  20. Solvent-free synthesis of zeolites from anhydrous starting raw solids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinming; Liu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Longfeng; Ding, Lihong; Gao, Pan; Wang, Xiong; Pan, Shuxiang; Bian, Chaoqun; Meng, Xiangju; Xu, Jun; Deng, Feng; Maurer, Stefan; Müller, Ulrich; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-28

    Development of sustainable routes for synthesis of zeolites is very important because of wide applications of zeolites at large scale in the fields of catalysis, adsorption, and separation. Here we report a novel and generalized route for synthesis of zeolites in the presence of NH4F from grinding the anhydrous starting solid materials and heating at 140-240 °C. Accordingly, zeolites of MFI, BEA*, EUO, and TON structures have been successfully synthesized. The presence of F(-) drives the crystallization of these zeolites from amorphous phase. Compared with conventional hydrothermal synthesis, the synthesis in this work not only simplifies the synthesis process but also significantly enhances the zeolite yields. These features should be potentially of great importance for industrial production of zeolites at large scale in the future. PMID:25574592

  1. The piezoresistance coefficients of copper and copper-nickel alloys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Changyi Hu; Yiqun Gao; Zhongyi Sheng

    2000-01-01

    This paper attempts to further a better understanding of the piezoresistance coefficients by studying the piezoresistive effects in copper and copper-nickel alloys. The experimental evidence of isotropic piezoresistance coefficients (p11?=?p12) has been obtained for the annealed copper and copper-nickel alloys. The piezoresistance coefficients of the cold-worked copper and Cu60Ni40 alloy are of the tensor character (p11???p12). A physical explanation has

  2. Copper tolerance in Silene cucubalus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. C. Lolkema; R. Vooijs

    1986-01-01

    The uptake, translocation and subcellular distribution of copper as well as its effect on chloroplasts and plastocyanin synthesis were studied in a copper-sensitive and a copper-tolerant population of Silene cucubalus (L.) Wib. As a function of time, the copper concentration in roots of tolerant plants increased more slowly than that in roots of sensitive ones. Translocation to the shoot occurred

  3. Copper sensitivity of Gonyaulax tamarensis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Anderson; F. M. M. Morel

    1978-01-01

    The copper sensitivity of the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax tamarensis was examined in artificial seawater medium. Two short term responses of the organism to copper toxicity are rapid loss of motility and reduced photosynthetic carbon fixation. The chelators tris(hydroxymethylamino)methane (Tris) and ethylenedinitrilotetraacetic acid (EDTA) were used to demonstrate that copper toxicity is a unique function of cupric ion activity. Copper additions to

  4. CO2 adsorption on LTA zeolites: Effect of mesoporosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Ahn, Wha-Seung

    2014-08-01

    Highly mesoporous LTA zeolite (Meso-LTA) was prepared using an organosilane surfactant, dimethyloctadecyl[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ammonium chloride, as a mesopore-generating agent. Meso-LTA was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm at 77 K, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and then investigated for CO2 adsorption at 298 K. Compared to a solely microporous LTA zeolite (Micro-LTA), Meso-LTA showed faster CO2 adsorption kinetics at 1 bar and higher CO2 adsorption capacities under high pressure conditions (>10 bar).

  5. Zeolite catalysis in the synthesis of isobutylene from hydrous ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Cory Bernard

    1999-11-01

    This work deals with the synthesis of isobutylene from a hydrous ethanol feedstock over zeolites. The synthesis is accomplished in three steps: (1) low-temperature direct ethanol conversion to ethylene on H-ZSM-5 zeolite, (2) ethylene conversion to butene products over metal-exchanged zeolites, and (3) butene skeletal rearrangement to isobutylene over FER zeolites. The key to understanding and optimizing each synthesis step lies in the ability to control and regulate the zeolite acidity (Bronsted and Lewis)---both strength and number. Therefore, the continuous temperature programmed amine desorption (CTPAD) technique was further developed to simultaneously count the Bronsted acid sites and quantitatively characterize their strength. The adsorption of ethanol, reaction products, amines, coke and ethanol-derived residue (EDR) were monitored gravimetrically using the highly sensitive, novel Tapered Element Oscillating Microreactor (TEOM) apparatus. The TEOM was also used also in conjunction with CTPAD to characterize Bronsted acidity which is a new application for the instrument. For the first synthesis step, a parallel reaction exists which simultaneously produces diethyl ether and ethylene directly over H-ZSM-5. The reaction rates for each pathway were measured directly using a differential reactor operating at low temperatures (<473 K). Water in the ethanol feed enhances the rate of ethylene formation. A mechanism and kinetic expression are proposed for this reaction over H-ZSM-5, with diethyl-ether desorption and ethylene formation as the rate limiting steps. Heat of adsorption values measured from the independent microcalorimetry work reported in the literature are incorporated into the kinetic analysis which reduces the number of regressed parameters. For the remaining synthesis steps, several zeolite structures (ZSM-5, Y, FER) partially exchanged with Pd, Ti, Ni and Au were prepared and tested. It was determined from this screening study that the zeolites containing Pd are the most efficient catalysts for the dimerization reaction. Characterization results from x-ray diffraction (XRD), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and CTPAD suggest a stable, Pd species with a low oxidation state as part of the active site in Pd-exchanged zeolites. Isobutylene was present in the C4 fraction at reasonable quantities for most of the catalyst candidates, especially those containing an alkali metal co-cation.

  6. Chromium uptake from tricomponent solution in zeolite fixed bed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. S. D. Barros; A. S. Zola; P. A. Arroyo; C. R. G. Tavares; E. F. Sousa-Aguiar

    2006-01-01

    Removal of Cr3+,Ca2+,Mg2+ and K+ in equilibrium isotherms and in tricomponent solutions (Cr\\/Ca\\/K, Cr\\/Ca\\/Mg and Cr\\/Mg\\/K) were investigated in NaX and NaY packed\\u000a beds at 30?C. The equilibrium selectivity was obtained as Cr+3 > Mg2+ > Ca2+?K+ for zeolite NaY and Ca2 +?Cr3 + > Mg2 +?K+ for zeolite NaX. The breakthrough curves showed sequential ion exchange where chromium ions

  7. Zeolites replacing plant fossils in the Denver formation, Lakewood, Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Verbeek, E.R.; Grout, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Well-developed crystals of heulandite and stilbite, within fossil wood, occur in sedimentary rocks in Lakewood, Jefferson County. The rocks belong to the Denver formation, a locally fossiliferous deposit of fluvial claystone, siltstone, sandstone and conglomerate, containing some volcanic mudflows (andesitic) of late Cretaceous to Palaeocene age. Altered volcanic glass released Na and Ca into the ground-water and subsequently zeolites were crystallized in the open spaces between grains and within fossil plant structures. Minor pyrite, quartz (jasper), calcite and apatite also occur as replacements of fossil wood. Similar zeolite occurrences in other areas are reviewed.-R.S.M.

  8. COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Chelsea Hubbard

    2001-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D&D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness of separating out radioactive contamination, the copper cable was coated with a surrogate contaminant. The demonstration took place at the Bonneville County Technology Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  9. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  10. Infrared spectroscopic examination of the interaction of urea with the naturally occurring zeolite clinoptilolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byler, D.M.; Gerasimowicz, W.V.; Stockette, V.M.; Eberl, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has shown for the first time that the naturally occurring zeolite clinoptilolite can absorb urea, (NH2)2CO, under ambient conditions from either aqueous or ethanolic solutions. The two strongest NH stretching bands at 3441 and 3344 cm-1 in pure, solid urea shift to higher frequency (about 3504 and 3401 cm-1) after absorption. Two of the four urea bands in the 1800-1300 cm-1 range (at 1683 and 1467 cm-1) undergo marked downward shifts to about 1670 and 1445 cm-1. The other two bands show little change in frequency. The strong band at 1602 cm-1, however, diminishes in intensity to little more than an ill-defined shoulder on the 1626-cm-1 peak. When clinoptilolite is heated to 450 ??C and then treated with molten urea (ca. 140 ??C) for several minutes, and finally washed twice with ethanol to remove excess unreacted urea, further changes become apparent in the spectrum of the urea-treated clinoptilolite. The two NH stretching bands broaden without significant change in frequency. Two new bands appear in the midfrequency range at 1777 (weak) and 1719 (medium strong) cm-1. Of the four original midfrequency peaks, the one at 1602 cm-1 is now absent. Two others (1627 and 1440 cm-1) exhibit little change, while the fourth has broadened and shifted down to 1663 cm-1, where it appears as a shoulder on the band at 1627 cm-1. Both treatments clearly induce interaction between urea and the zeolite which seems to result in significant modifications in the nature of the hydrogen bonding of the substrate. ?? 1991.

  11. Mechanochromic luminescence of copper iodide clusters.

    PubMed

    Benito, Quentin; Maurin, Isabelle; Cheisson, Thibaut; Nocton, Gregory; Fargues, Alexandre; Garcia, Alain; Martineau, Charlotte; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre; Perruchas, Sandrine

    2015-04-01

    Luminescent mechanochromic materials are particularly appealing for the development of stimuli-responsive materials. Establishing the mechanism responsible for the mechanochromism is always an issue owing to the difficulty in characterizing the ground phase. Herein, the study of real crystalline polymorphs of a mechanochromic and thermochromic luminescent copper iodide cluster permits us to clearly establish the mechanism involved. The local disruption of the crystal packing induces changes in the cluster geometry and in particular the modification of the cuprophilic interactions, which consequently modify the emissive states. This study constitutes a step further toward the understanding of the mechanism involved in the mechanochromic luminescent properties of multimetallic coordination complexes. PMID:25755012

  12. The growth of zeolites A, X and mordenite in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Bac, N.; Coker, E. N.; Dixon, A. G.; Warzywoda, J.; Thompson, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    Zeolites are a class of crystalline aluminosilicate materials that form the backbone of the chemical process industry worldwide. They are used primarily as adsorbents and catalysts and support to a significant extent the positive balance of trade realized by the chemical industry in the United States (around $19 billion in 1991). The magnitude of their efforts can be appreciated when one realizes that since their introduction as 'cracking catalysts' in the early 1960's, they have saved the equivalent of 60 percent of the total oil production from Alaska's North Slope. Thus the performance of zeolite catalysts can have a profound effect on the U.S. economy. It is estimated that a 1 percent increase in yield of the gasoline fraction per barrel of oil would represent a savings of 22 million barrels of crude oil per year, representing a reduction of $400 million in the United States' balance of payments. Thus any activity that results in improvement in zeolite catalyst performance is of significant scientific and industrial interest. In addition, due to their 'stability,' uniformity, and, within limits, their 'engineerable' structures, zeolites are being tested as potential adsorbents to purify gases and liquids at the parts-per-billion levels needed in today's electronic, biomedical, and biotechnology industries and for the environment. Other exotic applications, such as host materials for quantum-confined semiconductor atomic arrays, are also being investigated. Because of the importance of this class of material, extensive efforts have been made to characterize their structures and to understand their nucleation and growth mechanisms, so as to be able to custom-make zeolites for a desired application. To date, both the nucleation mechanics and chemistry (such as what are the 'key' nutrients) are, as yet, still unknown for many, if not all, systems. The problem is compounded because there is usually a 'gel' phase present that is assumed to control the degree of supersaturation, and this gel undergoes a continuous 'polymerization' type reaction during nucleation and growth. Generally, for structure characterization and diffusion studies, which are useful in evaluating zeolites for improving yield in petroleum refining as well as for many of the proposed new applications (e.g., catalytic membranes, molecular electronics, chemical sensors) large zeolites (greater than 100 to 1000 times normal size) with minimum lattice defects are desired. Presently, the lack of understanding of zeolite nucleation and growth precludes the custom design of zeolites for these or other uses. It was hypothesized that the microgravity levels achieved in an orbiting spacecraft could help to isolate the possible effects of natural convection (which affects defect formation) and minimize sedimentation, which occurs since zeolites are twice as dense as the solution from which they are formed. This was expected to promote larger crystals by allowing growing crystals a longer residence time in a high-concentration nutrient field. Thus it was hypothesized that the microgravity environment of Earth orbit would allow the growth of large, more defect-free zeolite crystals in high yield.

  13. Modification of acid sites in ZSM-5 by ion-exchange: An in-situ FTIR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiqiang; Weitz, Eric

    2014-10-01

    A study of the acid sites in Mn+-ZSM-5 zeolites (Mn+ = H+, Al3+, Ca2+, and Ba2+), synthesized by ion-exchange from the NH4+ form, has been carried out using X-ray diffraction, 27Al MAS NMR, and in-situ FTIR spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction data indicate that the crystalline structure of ZSM-5 is maintained on ion-exchange. 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy confirms that Lewis acid sites in all of the Mn+-ZSM-5 zeolites are mainly located on the tetrahedral aluminum atoms in the zeolite framework. However, octahedral extra-framework aluminum is another source of Lewis acid sites in H+-ZSM-5 and Al3+-ZSM-5. Brønsted acid sites are identified as originating from the hydroxyl groups that bridge Al and Si atoms. The acid sites in Mn+-ZSM-5 have been characterized by in-situ FTIR spectroscopy with pyridine as the probe molecule. FTIR spectroscopy demonstrated that the number of accessible acid sites and ratio of Lewis to Brønsted acid sites in Mn+-ZSM-5 can be effectively modified by ion-exchange. The number of acid sites in Mn+-ZSM-5 increases in the same order as the acidity of cations with Ba2+ < Ca2+ < NH4+ < Al3+ < H+. Though the strength of both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites is virtually identical for all Mn+-ZSM-5 zeolites, the ratio of Brønsted to Lewis acid sites varies as a result of the loaded cation. In addition, modification of acid sites in Mn+-ZMS-5 by loading different cations is discussed in terms of the accessibility of the surface of the zeolite channels and the reactivity of the cations with Brønsted acid hydroxyls. We conclude that larger cations can effectively constrict the zeolite channels and impede the ability of pyridine to access acid sites on the surface of the channels.

  14. Chemical interactions in multimetal/zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, W.M.H.

    1992-02-07

    For Pt/NaY catalysts our analysis of the mechanism of metal particle formation has enabled us to produce at will samples which contain either the majority of the Pt particles in supercages, without filling these cages completely, or the Pt particles bulge into neighboring cages. The catalytic selectivity is distinctly different for these preparations, in the former case molecules can enter a supercage which is partially filled by the Pt cluster, in the second case adsorption takes place through the cage window. Applying the same principles of catalyst preparation of bimetallic catalysts enables us to produce PtCu particles in supercages of NaY, which contain, initially a Pt core, surrounded by a Cu mantle. Earlier we have found that Ni ions migrate into hexagonal prisms during calcination of Ni/NaY; this process can be partially suppressed by first filling these prisms with Mn or Cr ions. In more recent work we found that addition of Pt strongly lowers the temperature of Ni reduction. Part of the Ni ions is reduced by hydrogen while still inside the smaller cages. This reduction process is, however, reversible; at elevated temperature and in an inert atmosphere protons re-oxidize the Ni atoms and dihydrogen gas is developed. In this way it seems possible to count the Ni atoms in small cages. The calcination stage in the preparation of zeolite supported metals has been studied in considerable detail for Pd/NaY. The Pd is introduced as a tetrammin complex; during calcination the ammine ligands are successively oxidized. Once three ammine ligands are destroyed, the Pd ions which carry only one ligand, surprisingly jump from the supercages to the sodalite cage.

  15. Computational studies of polyelectrolytes containing zeolite fragments.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-C.; Curtiss, L. A.; Ratner, M. A.; Shriver, D. F.; Northwestern Univ.

    1999-08-05

    The structures and sodium affinities of a series of zeolitic fragments [H{sub 3}Al(OCH{sub 3}){sub x}(OSiH{sub 3}){sup -}{sub 1-x}, 2T, H{sub 2}Al(OCH{sub 3}){sub x}(OSiH{sub 3}){sup -}{sub 2-x}, 3T, Al(OCH3){sub x}(OSiH{sub 3}){sup -}{sub 4-x}, 5T] that mimic the charge sites in polyelectrolytes are calculated by ab initio molecular orbital methods at different levels of theory. At the HF/6-31G* level, the decrease in the sodium affinity due to the substitution of an OCH{sub 3} group by an OSiH{sub 3} group is about 8 kcal/mol in the 2T and 3T systems. In the 5T systems, the replacement of a sodium-coordinated OCH{sub 3} group by an OSiH{sub 3} group causes a decrease of 7 kcal/mol in the sodium affinity, while the substitution for a non-sodium-coordinated OCH{sub 3} group results in a 2.7 kcal/mol decrease. The lower sodium affinity indicates a weaker Coulombic interaction, suggesting an enhanced ionic conductivity with the substitution of carbon by silicon, consistent with experimental results. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses show that silicon-bonded oxygen atoms have smaller lone-pair dipole moments, resulting in a lower sodium affinity. The substitution of aluminum by boron leads to a higher sodium affinity, although the effect of replacing an OCH{sub 3} group by an OSiH{sub 3} group still reduces the sodium affinity. The effect of the sodium cation on the bond angles in these systems is also investigated.

  16. Computational studies of polyelectrolytes containing zeolitic fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.C.; Ratner, M.A.; Shriver, D.F. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)] [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Curtiss, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Materials Science Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Materials Science Div.

    1999-08-05

    The structures and sodium affinities of a series of zeolitic fragments [H{sub 3}Al(OCH{sub 3}){sub x}(OSiH{sub 3}){sub 1{minus}x}{sup {minus}}, 2T, H{sub 2}Al(OCH{sub 3}){sub x}(OSiH{sub 3}){sub 2{minus}x}{sup {minus}}, Al(OCH{sub 3}){sub x}(OSiH{sub 3}){sub 4{minus}x}{sup {minus}}, 5T], that mimic the charge sites in polyelectrolytes are calculated by ab initio molecular orbital methods at different levels of theory. At the HF/6-31G{sup *} level, the decrease in the sodium affinity due to the substitution of an OCH{sub 3} group by an OSiH{sub 3} group is about 8 kcal/mol in the 2T and 3T systems. In the 5T systems, the replacement of a sodium-coordinated OCH{sub 3} group by an OSiH{sub 3} group causes a decrease of 7 kcal/mol in the sodium affinity, while the substitution for a non-sodium-coordinated OCH{sub 3} group results in a 2.7 kcal/mol decrease. The lower sodium affinity indicates a weaker Coulombic interaction, suggesting an enhanced ionic conductivity with the substitution of carbon by silicon, consistent with experimental results. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses show that silicon-bonded oxygen atoms have smaller lone-pair dipole moments, resulting in a lower sodium affinity. The substitution of aluminum by boron leads to a higher sodium affinity, although the effect of replacing an OCH{sub 3} group by an OSiH{sub 3} group still reduces the sodium affinity. The effect of the sodium cation on the bond angles in these systems is also investigated.

  17. Drinking Water Problems: Copper

    E-print Network

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-01-25

    Monty C. Dozier, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, Mark McFarland, Professor and Extension Soil Fertlity Specialist, Bruce J. Lesikar, Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Texas Cooperative Extension, The Texas A&M University... of electrical currents. Proper testing of the water and diagnosis of the cause of elevated copper concentrations in the water are essential to identify a treatment system that will control or correct the problem. What are the indications of copper present...

  18. Copper tolerance and copper accumulation of herbaceous plants colonizing inactive California copper mines

    SciTech Connect

    Kruckeberg, A.L.; Wu, L. (Department of Environmental Horticulture, University of California, Davis (United States))

    1992-06-01

    Herbaceous plant species colonizing four copper mine waste sites in northern California were investigated for copper tolerance and copper accumulation. Copper tolerance was found in plant species colonizing soils with high concentrations of soil copper. Seven of the eight plant species tested were found at more than one copper mine. The mines are geographically isolated, which makes dispersal of seeds from one mine to another unlikely. Tolerance has probably evolved independently at each site. The nontolerant field control population of Vulpia microstachya displays significantly higher tolerance to copper at all copper concentration levels tested than the nontolerant Vulpia myrous population, and the degree of copper tolerance attained by V. microstachya at the two copper mines was much greater than that found in V. myrous. It suggests that even in these two closely related species, the innate tolerance in their nontolerant populations may reflect their potential for evolution of copper tolerance and their ability to initially colonize copper mine waste sites. The shoot tissue of the copper mine plants of Arenaria douglasii, Bromous mollis, and V. microstachya accumulated less copper than those plants of the same species from the field control sites when the two were grown in identical conditions in nutrient solution containing copper. The root tissue of these mine plants contain more copper than the roots of the nonmine plants. This result suggests that exclusion of copper from the shoots, in part by immobilization in the roots, may be a feature of copper tolerance. No difference in the tissue copper concentration was detected between tolerant and nontolerant plants of Lotus purshianus, Lupinus bicolor, and Trifolium pratense even though the root tissue had more copper than the leaves.

  19. Entrainment behavior of copper and copper matte in copper smelting operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. W. Ip; J. M. Toguri

    1992-01-01

    In copper smelting, the loss of copper to the slag due to entrainment is largely influenced by the flotation of copper metal\\u000a and\\/or matte in the slag phase. To evaluate this behavior, the surface tension of copper as a function of temperature and\\u000a oxygen pressure and the interfacial tension of the copper-iron matte-slag system as a function of matte grade

  20. Bidisperse pore diffusion model for zeolite pressure swing adsorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Doong; R. T. Yang

    1987-01-01

    The published theoretical models for pressure swing adsorption (PSA) are of either the equilibrium type, i.e., instantaneous equilibrium is assumed between the gas and adsorbed phases, or the diffusion type considering only a monodisperse pore structure. There is reason for doubt that either type of model is applicable to adsorption processes using zeolite sorbent, which has a bidisperse pore structure.

  1. Zeolite formation from coal fly ash and its adsorption potential

    SciTech Connect

    Duangkamol Ruen-ngam; Doungmanee Rungsuk; Ronbanchob Apiratikul; Prasert Pavasant [Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2009-10-15

    The possibility in converting coal fly ash (CFA) to zeolite was evaluated. CFA samples from the local power plant in Prachinburi province, Thailand, were collected during a 3-month time span to account for the inconsistency of the CFA quality, and it was evident that the deviation of the quality of the raw material did not have significant effects on the synthesis. The zeolite product was found to be type X. The most suitable weight ratio of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to CFA was approximately 2.25, because this gave reasonably high zeolite yield with good cation exchange capacity (CEC). The silica (Si)-to-aluminum (Al) molar ratio of 4.06 yielded the highest crystallinity level for zeolite X at 79% with a CEC of 240 meq/100 g and a surface area of 325 m{sup 2}/g. Optimal crystallization temperature and time were 90{sup o}C and 4 hr, respectively, which gave the highest CEC of approximately 305 meq/100 g. Yields obtained from all experiments were in the range of 50-72%. 29 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.

  2. High-pressure alchemy on a small-pore zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.

    2011-12-01

    While an ever-expanding variety of zeolites with a wide range of framework topology is available, it is desirable to have a way to tailor the chemistry of the zeolitic nanopores for a given framework topology via controlling both the coordination-inclusion chemistry and framework distortion/relaxation. This is, however, subjected to the ability of a zeolitic nanopore to allow the redistribution of cations-water assembly and/or insertion of foreign molecules into the pores and channels. Small-pore zeolites such as natrolite (Na16Al16Si24O80x16H2O), however, have been known to show very limited capacity for any changes in the confinement chemistry. We have recently shown that various cation-exchanged natrolites can be prepared under modest conditions from natural sodium natrolite and exhibit cation-dependent volume expansions by up to 18.5% via converting the elliptical channels into progressively circular ones. Here, we show that pressure can be used as a unique and clean tool to further manipulate the chemistry of the natrolite nanopores. Our recent crystallographic and spectroscopic studies of pressure-insertion of foreign molecules, trivalent-cation exchange under pressure, and pressure-induced inversion of cation-water coordination and pore geometry in various cation-exchanged natrolites will be presented.

  3. Multi-elemental characterization of Cuban natural zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Díaz Rizo; E. F. Herrera Peraza

    1997-01-01

    Concentrations of 38 elements in samples from four important Cuban zeolite beds have been obtained by Instrumental Neutron Activation (INAA) and X-ray Fluorescence analyses (XRFA). In comparison with other analytical techniques good agreement was reached. The concentration values of minor element Ba, Sr, Zn and Mn and 25 trace element (including 9 REE) are at the first time reported in

  4. Hydroxyl groups in zeolites CaNaA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mix, H.; Pfeifer, H.; Staudte, B.

    1988-05-01

    OH groups on shallow-bed-treated zeolites CaNaA were studied using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy in the near-infrared region. For activation temperatures in the range 160-280°C bridging OH groups were found. The bulk of OH groups, however, are AlOH on extra-framework aluminium.

  5. Calibration analysis of zeolites by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hor?á?ková, M.; Grolmusová, Z.; Hor?á?ek, M.; Rakovský, J.; Hudec, P.; Veis, P.

    2012-08-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy was used for calibration analysis of different types of microporous crystalline aluminosilicates with exactly ordered structure — zeolites. The LIBS plasma was generated using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at the wavelength of 532 nm and providing laser pulses of 4 ns duration. Plasma emission was analysed by echelle type emission spectrometer, providing wide spectral range 200-950 nm. The spectrometer was equipped with intensified CCD camera providing rapid spectral acquisition (gating time from 5 ns). The optimum experimental conditions (time delay, gate width and laser pulse energy) have been determined for reliable use of LIBS for quantitative analysis. Samples of different molar ratios of Si/Al were used to create the calibration curves. Calibration curves for different types of zeolites (mordenite, type Y and ZSM-5) were constructed. Molar ratios of Si/Al for samples used for calibration were determined by classical wet chemical analysis and were in the range 5.3-51.8 for mordenite, 2.3-12.8 for type Y and 14-600 for ZSM-5. Zeolites with these molar ratios of Si/Al are usually used as catalysts in alkylation reactions. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy is a suitable method for analysis of molar ratio Si/Al in zeolites, because it is simple, fast, and does not require sample preparation compared with classical wet chemical analysis which are time consuming, require difficult sample preparation and manipulation with strong acids and bases.

  6. DIFFUSION MEASUREMENTS DURING PERVAPORATION THROUGH A ZEOLITE MEMBRANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An isotopic-transient technique was used to directly measure diffusion times of H2O, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetone in pure and binary mixture feeds transporting through a zeolite membrane under steady-state pervaporation conditions. Diffusivities can be determ...

  7. USE OF SYNTHETIC ZEOLITES FOR ARSENATE REMOVAL FROM POLLUTANT WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is known to be a hazardous contaminant in drinking water that causes arsenical dermatitis and skin cancer. In the present work, the potential use of a variety of synthetic zeolites for removal of arsenic from water below the current and proposed EPA MCL has been examined...

  8. Binary diffusion of unequal sized molecules in zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Narasimhan Sundaram; Ralph T Yang

    2000-01-01

    Multicomponent diffusivities in zeolites are predicted using the framework of the theory of irreversible thermodynamics, for which the information on equilibrium mixture adsorption isotherms is a critical requirement. Two thermodynamically consistent mixture isotherms, a multi-site Langmuir model and a modified Dubinin-type expansion facilitate quantification of the thermodynamic effect. In both these isotherms, saturation capacities of the species are allowed to

  9. Selective photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Berkeley, CA); Sun, Hai (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A selective photooxidation process for the conversion of hydrocarbon molecules to partially oxygenated derivatives, which comprises the steps of adsorbing a hydrocarbon and oxygen onto a dehydrated zeolite support matrix to form a hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair, and subsequently exposing the hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair to visible light, thereby forming a partially oxygenated derivative.

  10. Association of Indigo with Zeolites for Improved Color Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejoie, Catherine; Martinetto, Pauline; Dooryhée, Eric; van Elslande, Elsa; Blanc, Sylvie; Bordat, Patrice; Brown, Ross; Porcher, Florence; Anne, Michel

    2010-10-01

    The durability of an organic colour and its resistance against external chemical agents and exposure to light can be significantly enhanced by hybridizing the natural dye with a mineral. In search for stable natural pigments, the present work focuses on the association of indigo blue with several zeolitic matrices (LTA zeolite, mordenite, MFI zeolite). The manufacturing of the hybrid pigment is tested under varying oxidising conditions, using Raman and UV-visible spectrometric techniques. Blending indigo with MFI is shown to yield the most stable composite in all of our artificial indigo pigments. In absence of defects and substituted cations such as aluminum in the framework of the MFI zeolite matrix, we show that matching the pore size with the dimensions of the guest indigo molecule is the key factor. The evidence for the high colour stability of indigo@MFI opens a new path for modeling the stability of indigo in various alumino-silicate substrates such as in the historical Maya Blue pigment.

  11. ADSORPTION AND CATALYTIC DESTRUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN HYDROPHOBIC ZEOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several chromium exchanged ZSM-5 zeolites of varying SiO2/Al2O3 ratio were prepared and investigated for ambient (23 ?C) adsorption and subsequent oxidative destruction (250-400 ?C) of gaseous trichloroethylene (TCE, Cl2C=CHCl) in a humid air stream. With an increase in the SiO2...

  12. Ammonium removal from wastewaters using natural New Zealand zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. Nguyen; C. C. Tanner

    1998-01-01

    Ammoniacal nitrogen (ammonia and ammonium) in agricultural wastewaters can promote eutrophication of receiving waters and be potentially toxic to fish and other aquatic life. Zeolites, which are hydrated aluminum?silicate minerals, have an affinity for ammonium ions (NH4 ) and are, therefore, potentially useful in removing this contaminant from wastewaters. The major objectives of this study were to evaluate the capacity

  13. Synthesis of Na-zeolites from fly ash

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xavier Querol; Felicià Plana; Andrés Alastuey; Angel López-Soler

    1997-01-01

    The present study focuses on the synthesis of zeolites after fly ash activation, the major objectives being: (a) to study the activation processes; (b) to elucidate the activation conditions for maximum synthesis efficiency; (c) to optimize the conditions for the monomineral synthesis; and (d) to test synthesis efficiencies for different fly ash types. Fly ash was activated by NaOH and

  14. Facile synthesis of hollow zeolite microspheres through dissolution–recrystallization procedure in the presence of organosilanes

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Haixiang; Ren, Jiawen; Liu, Xiaohui [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry, Research Institute of Industrial Catalysis, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, Yanqin, E-mail: wangyanqin@ecust.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry, Research Institute of Industrial Catalysis, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Lu, Guanzhong, E-mail: gzhlu@ecust.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry, Research Institute of Industrial Catalysis, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Hollow zeolite microspheres have been hydrothermally synthesized in the presence of organosilanes via a dissolution–recrystallization procedure. In the presence of organosilanes, zeolite particles with a core/shell structure formed at the first stage of hydrothermal treatment, then the core was consumed and recrystallized into zeolite framework to form the hollow structure during the second hydrothermal process. The influence of organosilanes was discussed, and a related dissolution–recrystallization mechanism was proposed. In addition, the hollow zeolite microspheres exhibited an obvious advantage in catalytic reactions compared to conventional ZSM-5 catalysts, such as in the alkylation of toluene with benzyl chloride. - Graphical abstract: Hollow zeolite spheres with aggregated zeolite nanocrystals were synthesized via a dissolution–recrystallization procedure in the presence of organosiline. Highlights: ? Hollow zeolite spheres with aggregated zeolite nanocrystals were synthesized via a dissolution–recrystallization procedure. ? Organosilane influences both the morphology and hollow structure of zeolite spheres. ? Hollow zeolite spheres showed an excellent catalytic performance in alkylation of toluene with benzyl chloride.

  15. Exploitation of unique properties of zeolites in the development of gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yangong; Li, Xiaogan; Dutta, Prabir K

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties of microporous zeolites, including ion-exchange properties, adsorption, molecular sieving, catalysis, conductivity have been exploited in improving the performance of gas sensors. Zeolites have been employed as physical and chemical filters to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of gas sensors. In addition, direct interaction of gas molecules with the extraframework cations in the nanoconfined space of zeolites has been explored as a basis for developing new impedance-type gas/vapor sensors. In this review, we summarize how these properties of zeolites have been used to develop new sensing paradigms. There is a considerable breadth of transduction processes that have been used for zeolite incorporated sensors, including frequency measurements, optical and the entire gamut of electrochemical measurements. It is clear from the published literature that zeolites provide a route to enhance sensor performance, and it is expected that commercial manifestation of some of the approaches discussed here will take place. The future of zeolite-based sensors will continue to exploit its unique properties and use of other microporous frameworks, including metal organic frameworks. Zeolite composites with electronic materials, including metals will lead to new paradigms in sensing. Use of nano-sized zeolite crystals and zeolite membranes will enhance sensor properties and make possible new routes of miniaturized sensors. PMID:22666081

  16. 21 CFR 73.1125 - Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper...CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1125 Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper...Identity. (1) The color additive potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin is...

  17. Zeolite in horizontal permeable reactive barriers for artificial groundwater recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, María; Martínez-Hernández, Virtudes; Lillo, Javier; Meffe, Raffaella; de Bustamante, Irene

    2013-04-01

    The Spanish Water Reuse Royal Decree 1620/2007 considers groundwater recharge as a feasible use of reclaimed water. To achieve the water quality established in the above-mentioned legislation, a tertiary wastewater treatment is required. In this context, the infiltration of effluents generated by secondary wastewater treatments through a Horizontal Permeable Reactive Barrier (HPRB) may represent a suitable regeneration technology. Some nutrients (phosphate and ammonium) and some Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) are not fully removed in conventional wastewater treatment plants. To avoid groundwater contamination when effluents of wastewater treatments plants are used in artificial recharge activities, these contaminants have to be removed. Due to its sorption capacities, zeolite is among the most used reactive materials in Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB). Therefore, the main goal of this study is to evaluate the zeolite retention effectiveness of nutrients and PPCPs occurring in treated wastewater. Batch sorption experiments using synthetic wastewater (SWW) and zeolite were performed. A 1:4 zeolite/SWW ratio was selected due to the high sorption capacity of the reactive material.The assays were carried out by triplicate. All the bottles containing the SWW-zeolite mixture were placed on a mechanical shaker during 24 hours at 140 rpm and 25 °C. Ammonium and phosphate, as main nutrients, and a group of PPCPs were selected as compounds to be tested during the experiments. Nutrients were analyzed by ion chromatography. For PPCPs determination, Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) was applied before their analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry time of flight (LC-MS/ TOF). The experimental data were fitted to linearized Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations to obtain sorption parameters. In general, Freundlich model shows a greater capability of reproducing experimental data. To our knowledge, sorption of the investigated compounds on zeolite has rarely been addressed and this holds true especially for PPCPs. Therefore, the obtained results will be useful for the design and characterization of those HPRBs in which zeolite will be employed to regenerate treated wastewater for artificial recharge activities.

  18. Clinoptilolite zeolitized tuff from Central Alborz Range, North Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghipour, Batoul

    2010-05-01

    Zeolites are hydrated alumino-silicates of the alkaline and alkaline earth cations, principally sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium (Iijima 1980; Hay 1981). Zeolites occur principally in unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks and are particularly widespread in volcani-clastic strata (Hay, 1978). Clinoptilolite is a natural zeolite of the heulandite group with the simplified formula of (Na, K)6 Si30 Al6 O72 .nH2. It is the most common natural zeolite found mainly in sedimentary rocks of volcanic origin. Alborz zone is one of the important geological divisions in Iran. This zone is restricted to Kopeh dagh zone in North & Central Iranian zone in South and is a region of active deformation within the broad Arabian-Eurasia collision zone (Allen et al. 2003). The zeolitized green tuff belt from Central Alborz which introduce here are made of volcanoclastic sequence of Karaj Formation. This belt is about 40 km long along Alborz Range and is Eocene in age. Zeolites and associated minerals of this altered vitric tuff studied. Zeolitization took place in some beds of Karaj Formations, with average range of 3 to 300 meters thickness. There are several gypsum lenses which interbed with a widespread green tuff succession in the studied area. On the basis of chemical composition these tuffs are in the range of acid to intermediate volcanic rocks. Also magmatic affinity is calc-alkaline and geological setting of the area belongs to volcanic arc granitoid. Petrographic data has shown that various shape and size of shard glass are the main component of tuffs. Based on the field studies, detail microscopy, XRD and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), the following main minerals are determined: Clinoptilolite+montmorillonite+crystobalite. Clinoptilolite and smectite are predominant minerals in all altered samples. Concerning the Si/Al ratio of 40 point analyses of glass shards the Alborz tuff has clinoptilolite composition. Otherwise the chemical composition of altered shard glass is very similar to clinoptilolite structural formula. By using medium results of chemical data the structural formula for Firuzkuh clinoptilolite is as follow: Si 29.91 Al 6.01 Fe2+ 951 Mg2+ 0.393 Ca 0.222 Na 3.162 K 1.422 Paleogeographic conditions have provided a marginal shallow seawater environment which has been filled by volcanoclastics sequence. In Eocene the zeolitization occur as layers which are confined stratigraphically, it seems this process that took place only in preferred tuffaceous horizons which enriched by shard glass. So the term staratabound can be used for this type zeolitization. In altered tuffs there are a close relationship between clinoptiloite and montmorilonite in some deposits. Alborz range, there was an occasionally marine environment (existence of marine microfossils) with humid climate (remnants of plants in some points). Transformation process (glass zeolite + smectite) provides a further silica contribution to the system, which finally in supersaturation and decreasing pH favors the precipitation of silica in altered tuff. This may have occurred when ground water flow become to mix with saline water to lowering the pH.

  19. Bacterial Killing by Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces?

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Lam, Ee Wen; Elowsky, Christian G.; Quaranta, Davide; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Metallic copper surfaces rapidly and efficiently kill bacteria. Cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated large amounts of copper ions, and this copper uptake was faster from dry copper than from moist copper. Cells suffered extensive membrane damage within minutes of exposure to dry copper. Further, cells removed from copper showed loss of cell integrity. Acute contact with metallic copper surfaces did not result in increased mutation rates or DNA lesions. These findings are important first steps for revealing the molecular sensitive targets in cells lethally challenged by exposure to copper surfaces and provide a scientific explanation for the use of copper surfaces as antimicrobial agents for supporting public hygiene. PMID:21148701

  20. Histone onco-modifications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Füllgrabe; E Kavanagh; B Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Post-translational modification of histones provides an important regulatory platform for processes such as gene expression, DNA replication and repair, chromosome condensation and segregation and apoptosis. Disruption of these processes has been linked to the multistep process of carcinogenesis. We review the aberrant covalent histone modifications observed in cancer, and discuss how these epigenetic changes, caused by alterations in histone-modifying enzymes,

  1. Modifications of mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 15, discusses modifications of mitosis, including endoreduplication, polyteny, endomitosis, C-mitosis, restitution, amitosis and multipolar mitoses. Apart from multipolar mitosis, all other mitotic modifications are characterized by an absent or defective spindle, and in most cases these result in the duplication of the chromosome number. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Oxidative DNA modifications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henrik E. Poulsen

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative DNA modifications are frequent in mammalian DNA and have been suggested an important mechanism in carcinogenesis, diabetes and ageing. The foundations for this suggestion are:Evidence for the importance of oxidative DNA modifications in cancer development is: high levels of oxidative lesions in cancer tissue; highly conserved and specific DNA repair systems targeting oxidative lesions; high levels of oxidative DNA

  3. Permit application modifications

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils.

  4. XAFS Study on TiO2 Photocatalyst Loaded on Zeolite Synthesized from Steel Slag

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, Yasutaka; Ohmichi, Tetsutaro; Mori, Kosuke; Katayama, Iwao; Yamashita, Hiromi [Divisions of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2007-02-02

    The convenient route for the synthesis of Y-zeolites by utilizing steel slag as a material source was developed. Through hydrothermal treatment, well-crystallized Y-zeolite was obtained. We also synthesized TiO2-loaded Y-zeolites by an impregnation method. The structure of titanium oxide species highly dispersed on the zeolite, which couldn't be detected by XRD patterns, was investigated by XAFS analysis. Photocatalytic activity for decomposition of 2-propanol in liquid phase was found to be enhanced by the hydrophobic surface property of zeolite. It has been demonstrated that the zeolite synthesized from steel slag would be applicable as a promising support of TiO2 photocatalyst.

  5. Supercritical fluid removal of hydrocarbons adsorbed on wide pore zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch

    2005-06-01

    The effect of zeolite pore structure on coke removal by supercritical fluid regeneration (SFR) was studied on a series of wide pore zeolite catalysts, which included acidic Y, beta, L, and mordenite zeolites. Catalyst samples were deactivated under liquid phase isobutane/butene alkylation reaction conditions and treated under flowing supercritical isobutane for 60 min. The chemical nature of the species remaining on the catalyst surface before and after SFR was analyzed by temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. Zeolite pore structure played an important role not only in hydrocarbon deposition during alkylation but also in hydrocarbon transformation and removal during SFR. During SFR, the formation of unsaturated cyclic or polycyclic compounds, which likely affects catalyst long-term activity after cyclic alkylation/SFR treatments, was hindered on beta zeolites and favored on catalysts containing periodic expansions or cages, such as Y and L zeolites.

  6. Effects of Surface and Morphological Properties of Zeolite on Impedance Spectroscopy-Based Sensing Performance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianwei; Li, Xiaogan; White, Jeremy; Dutta, Prabir K.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement by impedance spectroscopy of the changes in intrazeolitic cation motion of pressed pellets of zeolite particles upon adsorption of dimethylmethylphosphonate (DMMP) provides a strategy for sensing DMMP, a commonly used simulant for highly toxic organophosphate nerve agents. In this work, two strategies for improving the impedance spectroscopy based sensing of DMMP on zeolites were investigated. The first one is the use of cerium oxide (CeO2) coated on the zeolite surface to neutralize acidic groups that may cause the decomposition of DMMP, and results in better sensor recovery. The second strategy was to explore the use of zeolite Y membrane. Compared to pressed pellets, the membranes have connected supercages of much longer length scales. The zeolite membranes resulted in higher sensitivity to DMMP, but recovery of the device was significantly slower as compared to pressed zeolite pellets. PMID:23201996

  7. Dispersible Exfoliated Zeolite Nanosheets and Their Application as a Selective Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Varoon, Kumar [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Zhang, Xueyi [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Elyassi, Bahman [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Brewer, Damien D. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Gettel, Melissa [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Kumar, Sandeep [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Lee, J. Alex [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Maheshwari, Sundeep [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Mittal, Anudha [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sung, Chun-Yi [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Cococcioni, Matteo [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Francis, Lorraine F. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); McCormick, Alon V. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Mkhoyan, K. Andre [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Tsapatsis, Michael [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2011-10-06

    Thin zeolite films are attractive for a wide range of applications, including molecular sieve membranes, catalytic membrane reactors, permeation barriers, and low-dielectric-constant materials. Synthesis of thin zeolite films using high-aspect-ratio zeolite nanosheets is desirable because of the packing and processing advantages of the nanosheets over isotropic zeolite nanoparticles. Attempts to obtain a dispersed suspension of zeolite nanosheets via exfoliation of their lamellar precursors have been hampered because of their structure deterioration and morphological damage (fragmentation, curling, and aggregation). We demonstrated the synthesis and structure determination of highly crystalline nanosheets of zeolite frameworks MWW and MFI. The purity and morphological integrity of these nanosheets allow them to pack well on porous supports, facilitating the fabrication of molecular sieve membranes.

  8. The Ameliorative Effect of Artificial Zeolite on Barley under Saline Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Busaidi, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Irshad, M.

    This investigation was aimed to evaluate the effects of zeolite in conjunction with seawater irrigation on barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) growth and salt composition of soil. A sand dune soil was amended with Ca-type zeolite at the rate of 1 and 5% and the seawater was diluted up to the electrical conductivity of 3 and 16 dS mG1. Present results showed that zeolite application significantly increased water holding capacity of the soil and accumulated more salts. The zeolite mixed soils improved plant growth compared to the un-amended control. Higher saline water significantly suppressed the growth of barley than the water with low salinity. The restricted plant growth due to the effects of specific ion or Na+/Ca2+ imbalance may be ameliorated using Ca-type zeolite. We may conclude that soil amendment with zeolite could alleviate the adverse effects of salts on plants following irrigation with higher saline water.

  9. Copper trafficking to the mitochondrion and assembly of copper metalloenzymes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul A. Cobine; Fabien Pierrel; Dennis R. Winge

    2006-01-01

    Copper is required within the mitochondrion for the function of two metalloenzymes, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) and superoxide dismutase (Sod1). Copper metallation of these two enzymes occurs within the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is mediated by metallochaperone proteins. Cox17 is a key copper donor to two accessory proteins, Sco1 and Cox11, to form the two copper centers in the mature

  10. Copper Proteins and Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Frieden, Earl; Osaki, Shigemasa; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    1965-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of the interaction of the copper proteins and oxygen is presented including a correlation of structure, function, and other properties of the known copper oxidases and of hemocyanin. The origin of their blue color and the structure of copper complexes and copper proteins are related to the oxidation state of copper ion and relevant electronic transitions probably arising from the formation of charge transfer complexes. The oxygen reactions of hemocyanin, ceruloplasmin, and cytochrome oxidase show half-saturation values far below the other Cu enzymes. The formation of hydrogen peroxide as a reaction product is associated with the presence of one Cu atom per oxidase molecule or catalytic system. Water is the corresponding product of the other Cu oxidases with four or more Cu atoms per molecule, except for monoamine oxidase. Mechanisms for the oxidase action of the two and four electron transfer Cu oxidases and tyrosinase are proposed. These reactions account for the number, the oxidation-reduction potential, and the oxidation state of Cu in the resting enzyme, the cyclical change from Cu(II) to Cu(I), the diatomic nature of O2, the sequence of the oxidation and reduction reactions, and other salient features. The catalytic reactions involved in the oxidation of ascorbic acid by plant ascorbate oxidase, ceruloplasmin, and Cu(II) are compared. Finally the substrate specificity, inhibitory control, and the detailed mechanism of the oxidase activity of ceruloplasmin are summarized. PMID:4285728

  11. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    SciTech Connect

    Dormon, J.M.; Cottrell, C.M.; Allen, D.G.; Ackerman, J.D.; Spelt, J.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-04-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper and copper alloy sheet proved to be highly effective in preventing biofouling by zebra mussels over a three-year period. Further studies were conducted with copper and copper-nickel mesh (lattice of expanded metal) and screen (woven wire with a smaller hole size), which reduced the amount of copper used. Copper screen was also found to be strongly biofouling-resistant with respect to zebra mussels, while copper mesh reduced zebra mussel biofouling in comparison to controls, but did not prevent it entirely. Preliminary investigations into the mechanism of copper antifouling, using galvanic couples, indicated that the release of copper ions from the surface of the exposed metal into the surrounding water is directly or indirectly responsible for the biofouling resistance of copper.

  12. Preparation of high purity copper fluoride by fluorinating copper hydroxyfluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Lundquist, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    Copper fluoride containing no more than 50 ppm of any contaminating element was prepared by the fluorination of copper hydroxyfluoride. The impurity content was obtained by spark source mass spectrometry. High purity copper fluoride is needed as a cathode material for high energy density batteries.

  13. LABORATORY EXPERIMENT 7 Determination of Copper in Copper Alloys

    E-print Network

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    LABORATORY EXPERIMENT 7 Determination of Copper in Copper Alloys Two procedures for Cu determination in the same alloy sample will be used. Both are based on Cu2+ reduction. I. The Electrogravimetric Determination of Copper in Alloy A convenient example of an electrogravimetric method of analysis

  14. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane M. Dormon; Catherine M. Cottrell; D. Grant Allen; Joseph D. Ackerman; Jan K. Spelt

    1996-01-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper

  15. Selective divalent copper chelation for the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G J S

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been identified by many workers as key pathogenic mechanisms in ageing-related metabolic, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases (for example diabetes mellitus, heart failure and Alzheimer's disease). However, although numerous molecular mechanisms have been advanced to account for these processes, their precise nature remains obscure. This author has previously suggested that, in such diseases, these two mechanisms are likely to occur as manifestations of a single underlying disturbance of copper regulation. Copper is an essential but highly-toxic trace metal that is closely regulated in biological systems. Several rare genetic disorders of copper homeostasis are known in humans: these primarily affect various proteins that mediate intracellular copper transport processes, and can lead either to tissue copper deficiency or overload states. These examples illustrate how impaired regulation of copper transport pathways can cause organ damage and provide important insights into the impact of defects in specific molecular processes, including those catalyzed by the copper-transporting ATPases, ATP7A (mutated in Menkes disease), ATP7B (Wilson's disease), and the copper chaperones such as those for cytochrome c oxidase, SCO1 and SCO2. In diabetes, impaired copper regulation manifests as elevations in urinary CuII excretion, systemic chelatable-CuII and full copper balance, in increased pro-oxidant stress and defective antioxidant defenses, and in progressive damage to the blood vessels, heart, kidneys, retina and nerves. Linkages between dysregulated copper and organ damage can be demonstrated by CuII-selective chelation, which simultaneously prevents/reverses both copper dysregulation and organ damage. Pathogenic structures in blood vessels that contribute to binding and localization of catalytically-active CuII probably include advanced glycation end products (AGEs), as well as atherosclerotic plaque: the latter probably undergoes AGE-modification itself. Defective copper regulation mediates organ damage through two general processes that occur simultaneously in the same individual: elevation of CuII-mediated pro-oxidant stress and impairment of copper-catalyzed antioxidant defence mechanisms. This author has proposed that diabetes-evoked copper dysregulation is an important new target for therapeutic intervention to prevent/reverse organ damage in diabetes, heart failure, and neurodegenerative diseases, and that triethylenetetramine (TETA) is the first in a new class of anti-diabetic molecules, which function by targetting these copper-mediated pathogenic mechanisms. TETA prevents tissue damage and causes organ regeneration by acting as a highly-selective CuII chelator which suppresses copper-mediated oxidative stress and restores anti-oxidant defenses. My group has employed TETA in a comprehensive programme of nonclinical studies and proof-of-principle clinical trials, thereby characterizing copper dysregulation in diabetes and identifying numerous linked cellular and molecular mechanisms though which TETA exerts its therapeutic actions. Many of the results obtained in nonclinical models with respect to the molecular mechanisms of diabetic organ damage have not yet been replicated in patients' tissues so their applicability to the human disease must be considered as inferential until the results of informative clinical studies become available. Based on evidence from the studies reviewed herein, trientine is now proceeding into the later stages of pharmaceutical development for the treatment of heart failure and other diabetic complications. PMID:22455587

  16. Cyclisation of citronellal over zirconium zeolite beta— a highly diastereoselective catalyst to (±)-isopulegol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhu Yongzhong; Nie Yuntong; Stephan Jaenicke; Gaik-Khuan Chuah

    2005-01-01

    The catalytic cyclisation of citronellal was studied over Zr-zeolite beta, micro\\/mesoporous Al-MSU-SFAU, and microporous HY catalysts. All samples showed good activity in the cyclisation of citronellal to form isopulegols with >97% selectivity. A high diastereoselectivity for (±)-isopulegol of ?93% was observed over Zr-zeolite beta, whereas Al-MSU-SFAU and HY showed a lower selectivity of ?65%. Zr-zeolite beta was synthesised in a

  17. Organic group-bridged hybrid materials with a Faujasite X zeolite structure (ZOF-X)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. L. Su; M. Roussel; K. Vause; X. Y. Yang; F. Gilles; L. Shi; E. Leonova; M. Edén; X. Zou

    2007-01-01

    Zeolites with organic group-bridged inorganic frameworks (ZOFs) with a Faujasite X zeolite structure (ZOF-X) and a Si\\/Al ratio around 1.3 have been synthesized for the first time, where oxygen atoms in the zeolite frameworks are partially replaced by methylene groups using methylene-bridged bis[triethoxysilyl]methane (BTESM) as a unique silicon source. The phases were examined by powder X-ray diffraction and the presence

  18. Effect of pH on ammonium adsorption by natural Zeolite clinoptilolite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mussolini Kithome; John W. Paul; Les M. Lavkulich; Art A. Bomke

    1999-01-01

    Clinoptilolite, a zeolite mineral with a high cation exchange capacity and surface area, has ion?exchange properties that can be utilized to adsorb NH4 , protecting it from losses during composting of N?rich animal manures. Ammonium adsorption by the natural zeolite clinoptilolite was studied to ascertain the effectiveness of the zeolite as an NH4 adsorbent at pH 4, 5, 6, and

  19. Conversion of methanol and other O-compounds to hydrocarbons over zeolite catalysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. D. Chang; A. J. Silvestri

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data show that Mobil Research and Development Corp.'s new gasoline synthesis from methanol on zeolites of pore dimensions intermediate between faujasites and zeolite A (described in patent literature) gives similar product distributions from methanol, tert.-butanol and 1-heptanol. The shape-selective zeolite produces essentially no hydrocarbons above Cââ, mainly isoparaffins, isoolefins, and methylsubstituted benzenes. Xylenes are produced in equilibrium amounts, but

  20. Metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors utilizing a Cr-zeolite catalytic layer for improved selectivity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. P. Mann; T. Paraskeva; K. F. E. Pratt; I. P. Parkin; D. E. Williams

    2005-01-01

    A novel method of improving the selectivity of metal oxide sensors has been developed. The addition of zeolites, catalytically modified with chromium, results in controlled selectivity to alkanes based on shape and size effects. The cracking patterns of n-alkanes over Cr-zeolite Y and Cr-zeolite beta between 200 °C and 400 °C have been ascertained using a novel system involving a

  1. Metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors utilizing a Cr-zeolite catalytic layer for improved selectivity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D P Mann; T Paraskeva; K F E Pratt; I P Parkin; D E Williams

    2005-01-01

    A novel method of improving the selectivity of metal oxide sensors has been developed. The addition of zeolites, catalytically modified with chromium, results in controlled selectivity to alkanes based on shape and size effects. The cracking patterns of n-alkanes over Cr-zeolite Y and Cr-zeolite ? between 200 °C and 400 °C have been ascertained using a novel system involving a

  2. Adsorption and thermal regeneration of acetone and toluene vapors in dealuminated Y-zeolite bed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dong-Geun Lee; Jong-Hwa Kim; Chang-Ha Lee

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption and thermal regeneration dynamics of acetone and toluene on dealuminated Y-zeolite (DAY-zeolite) were studied experimentally and theoretically. The isotherms of acetone on DAY-zeolite changed from Type-II to Type-III with an increase in temperature, whereas the isotherms of toluene were Type-I. The adsorption amount of acetone was higher than that of toluene at low temperatures, but its adsorption affinity was

  3. Treatment of wastewater from red and tropical fruit wine production by zeolite anaerobic fluidized bed reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Montalvo; L. Guerrero; R. Borja; I. Cortés; E. Sánchez; M. F. Colmenarejo

    2008-01-01

    A study of the anaerobic treatment of wastewaters derived from red (RWWW) and tropical fruit wine (TFWWW) production was carried out in four laboratory-scale fluidized bed reactors with natural zeolite as bacterial support. These reactors operated at mesophilic temperature (35°C). Reactors R1 and R2 contained Chilean natural zeolite, while reactors R3 and R4 used Cuban natural zeolite as microorganism support.

  4. Hot-gas desorption of hydrocarbons from NaX zeolites after dearomatization of liquid paraffins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. F. Fominykh; Yu. V. Shevelev; E. L. Shafranskii; A. A. Lukanova; I. I. Kondrat'ev

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the hot-gas desorption of hydrocarbons from NaX zeolites after the dearomatization of liquid paraffins. As the feed we used paraffins from a 190-260~ cut, recovered by adsorption on zeolites, with an aromatic hydrocarbon content of 1% by weight. The adsorbent was an NaX zeolite produced by the Salavat Petrochemical Combine. The studies were performed in adsorption--desorption units

  5. Influence of activation conditions of dynamic activity of zeolite in drying xylene fraction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. F. Fominykh; K. G. Asylova

    1974-01-01

    1.Thermal, thermal-gas, and thermal-vacuum activation procedures have been applied to CaA zeolite at temperatures from 250 to 600°C, in order to determine their effects on subsequent use of the zeolite in drying a xylene cut.2.It has been shown that the dynamic activity of the CaA zeolite for moisture first increases with increasing activation temperature, then drops off; this same pattern

  6. ZEOLITE COATING SYSTEM FOR CORROSION CONTROL TO ELIMINATE HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DOD APPLICATIONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derek E. Beving; Cory R. O'Neill; Yushan Yan; Nicole Anderson

    Zeolites are microporous crystalline aluminosilicates with uniform and molecular sized pores. They are non-toxic and have been explored for medical applications. We have been investigating the application of zeolite films as chromium-free protective coatings on aluminum alloys. We have shown that as-synthesized organic template containing high-silica-zeolite (HSZ) MFI coatings on AA-2024-T3 are non-porous and have excellent corrosion resistance in strong

  7. Effective solidification/stabilisation of mercury-contaminated wastes using zeolites and chemically bonded phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoqing; Zhang, Xinyan; Xiong, Ya; Wang, Guoping; Zheng, Na

    2015-02-01

    In this study, two kinds of zeolites materials (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) were added to the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic processes to treat mercury-contaminated wastes. Strong promotion effects of zeolites (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) on the stability of mercury in the wastes were obtained and these technologies showed promising advantages toward the traditional Portland cement process, i.e. using Portland cement as a solidification agent and natural or thiol-functionalised zeolite as a stabilisation agent. Not only is a high stabilisation efficiency (lowered the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure Hg by above 10%) obtained, but also a lower dosage of solidification (for thiol-functionalised zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.5 g g(-1) and 0.7 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) and stabilisation agents (for natural zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.35 g g(-1) and 0.4 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) were used compared with the Portland cement process. Treated by thiol-functionalised zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic under optimum parameters, the waste containing 1500 mg Hg kg(-1) passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test. Moreover, stabilisation/solidification technology using natural zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic also passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test (the mercury waste containing 625 mg Hg kg(-1)). Moreover, the presence of chloride and phosphate did not have a negative effect on the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic/thiol-functionalised zeolite treatment process; thus, showing potential for future application in treatment of 'difficult-to-manage' mercury-contaminated wastes or landfill disposal with high phosphate and chloride content. PMID:25568090

  8. Characterisation and environmental application of an Australian natural zeolite for basic dye removal from aqueous solution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shaobin Wang; Z. H. Zhu

    2006-01-01

    An Australian natural zeolite was collected, characterised and employed for basic dye adsorption in aqueous solution. The natural zeolite is mainly composed of clinoptiloite, quartz and mordenite and has cation-exchange capacity of 120meq\\/100g. The natural zeolite presents higher adsorption capacity for methylene blue than rhodamine B with the maximal adsorption capacity of 2.8×10?5 and 7.9×10?5mol\\/g at 50°C for rhodamine B

  9. Environmental Applications of Natural Zeolitic Materials Based on Their Ion Exchange Properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Colella; Piazza Ie; V. Tecchio

    \\u000a Present and potential use of natural zeolites as cation exchangers in environmental protection is reviewed. Siliceous zeolites,\\u000a such as chabazite, clinoptilolite, mordenite and phillipsite, exhibit good selectivities for cations with low charge density,\\u000a e.g., Cs+ and NH4\\u000a +, and for cations with low hydration energy, such as Pb2+. Zeolitised tuffs, containing the mentioned zeolites, may therefore be utilised for removing

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis of NaA zeolite membrane together with microwave heating and conventional heating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aisheng Huang; Weishen Yang

    2007-01-01

    Uniform and dense NaA zeolite membrane was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis method together with microwave heating and conventional heating. The properties of the as-synthesized zeolite membrane were investigated by XRD, SEM and pervaporation evaluation for dehydration of 95 wt.% isopropanol\\/water mixture at 343 K, respectively. After microwave heating, the ?-Al2O3 support surface was covered with homogeneous zeolite nuclei, which facilitated to form

  11. High capacity cation exchanger by hydrothermal zeolitization of coal fly ash

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Berkgaut; A. Singer

    1996-01-01

    During; hydrothermal treatment in NaOH medium coal fly ash partially transformed to zeolite P and\\/or hydroxysodalite, while quartz slowly dissolved and mullite remained stable. Residual coal favored the formation of zeolite P. The relative proportion of the two zeolites could be changed by seeding. During fusion of fly ash with NaOH an endothermic reaction at 170–180°C occurred, resulting in formation

  12. Synthesis and characterization of various zeolites and study of dynamic adsorption of dimethyl methyl phosphate over them

    SciTech Connect

    Khanday, Waheed Ahmad, E-mail: khanday.waheed@yahoo.com [S.O.S in Chemistry, Jiwaji University, Gwalior, M.P. 474011 (India); Majid, Sheikh Abdul [S.O.S in Chemistry, Jiwaji University, Gwalior, M.P. 474011 (India); Chandra Shekar, S. [Defence R and D Establishment, Jhansi Road, Gwalior, M.P. 474002 (India); Tomar, Radha [S.O.S in Chemistry, Jiwaji University, Gwalior, M.P. 474011 (India)

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Thermal desorption pattern of DMMP over various zeolites (a) 1st desorption and (b) 2nd desorption. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Zeolite-A, MCM-22, Zeolite-X and Erionite by hydrothermal method. • Zeolites were characterized by using XRD, FTIR, BET, NH{sub 3}-TPD, SEM and EDS techniques. • Dynamic adsorption of DMMP on zeolites was carried out using TPD plus chemisorption system. • Thermal desorption of DMMP on zeolites was carried using the same system. - Abstract: Zeolite-A, MCM-22, Zeolite-X and Erionite were synthesized successfully under hydrothermal conditions and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area analysis and thermal programmed desorption (TPD). Dynamic adsorption of dimethyl methyl phosphate (DMMP) was carried out on these zeolites. Zeolite-X having high surface area among all four zeolites shows highest adsorption capacity followed by Erionite and MCM-22 where as Zeolite-A shows the least. For all zeolites adsorption was found to be high initially and it then decreases with increase in injected volume. Then desorption pattern was analyzed which shows two types of peaks, sharp peak representing desorption of physisorbed DMMP and a broad peak representing desorption of strongly chemisorbed DMMP.

  13. Exploring for Copper Deposits

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, students assume the role of a geologist prospecting for copper deposits. From the background material, they will learn what ore deposits are and some important factors in their origin; and learn about a type of ore deposit known as a porphyry copper deposit. They will plot data from a table onto maps and use a geologic map, a soil geochemistry map, and a sediment geochemistry map to help locate the porphyry copper deposit. As a result of this activity, the students will be able to calculate an ore grade and determine whether or not an ore deposit is economically profitable based on its grade, size, and production costs. Worksheets and data tables are included.

  14. Silver confined within zeolite EMT nanoparticles: preparation and antibacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, B.; Belkhair, S.; Zaarour, M.; Fisher, L.; Verran, J.; Tosheva, L.; Retoux, R.; Gilson, J.-P.; Mintova, S.

    2014-08-01

    The preparation of pure zeolite nanocrystals (EMT-type framework) and their silver ion-exchanged (Ag+-EMT) and reduced silver (Ag0-EMT) forms is reported. The template-free zeolite nanocrystals are stabilized in water suspensions and used directly for silver ion-exchange and subsequent chemical reduction under microwave irradiation. The high porosity, low Si/Al ratio, high concentration of sodium and ultrasmall crystal size of the EMT-type zeolite permitted the introduction of a high amount of silver using short ion-exchange times in the range of 2-6 h. The killing efficacy of pure EMT, Ag+-EMT and Ag0-EMT against Escherichia coli was studied semi-quantitatively. The antibacterial activity increased with increasing Ag content for both types of samples (Ag+-EMT and Ag0-EMT). The Ag0-EMT samples show slightly enhanced antimicrobial efficacy compared to that of Ag+-EMT, however, the differences are not substantial and the preparation of Ag nanoparticles is not viable considering the complexity of preparation steps.The preparation of pure zeolite nanocrystals (EMT-type framework) and their silver ion-exchanged (Ag+-EMT) and reduced silver (Ag0-EMT) forms is reported. The template-free zeolite nanocrystals are stabilized in water suspensions and used directly for silver ion-exchange and subsequent chemical reduction under microwave irradiation. The high porosity, low Si/Al ratio, high concentration of sodium and ultrasmall crystal size of the EMT-type zeolite permitted the introduction of a high amount of silver using short ion-exchange times in the range of 2-6 h. The killing efficacy of pure EMT, Ag+-EMT and Ag0-EMT against Escherichia coli was studied semi-quantitatively. The antibacterial activity increased with increasing Ag content for both types of samples (Ag+-EMT and Ag0-EMT). The Ag0-EMT samples show slightly enhanced antimicrobial efficacy compared to that of Ag+-EMT, however, the differences are not substantial and the preparation of Ag nanoparticles is not viable considering the complexity of preparation steps. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Zeta potential data of Ag-EMT suspensions, pore-size distributions and antibacterial data for Ag-EMT 2 h samples. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03169e

  15. Synthesis and characterization of zeolites prepared from industrial fly ash.

    PubMed

    Franus, Wojciech; Wdowin, Magdalena; Franus, Ma?gorzata

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the possibility of using fly ash to produce synthetic zeolites. The synthesis class F fly ash from the Stalowa Wola SA heat and power plant was subjected to 24 h hydrothermal reaction with sodium hydroxide. Depending on the reaction conditions, three types of synthetic zeolites were formed: Na-X (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm(3) of 3 mol?·?dm(-3) NaOH, 75 °C), Na-P1 (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm(3) of 3 mol?·?dm(-3) NaOH, 95 °C), and sodalite (20 g fly ash, 0.8 dm(3) of 5 mol?·?dm(-3) NaOH?+?0.4 dm(3) of 3 mol?·?dm(-3) NaCl, 95 °C). As synthesized materials were characterized to obtain mineral composition (X-ray diffractometry, Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometry), adsorption properties (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, N2 isotherm adsorption/desorption), and ion exchange capacity. The most effective reaction for zeolite preparation was when sodalite was formed and the quantitative content of zeolite from X-ray diffractometry was 90 wt%, compared with 70 wt% for the Na-X and 75 wt% for the Na-P1. Residues from each synthesis reaction were the following: mullite, quartz, and the remains of amorphous aluminosilicate glass. The best zeolitic material as characterized by highest specific surface area was Na-X at almost 166 m(2)?·?g(-1), while for the Na-P1 and sodalite it was 71 and 33 m(2)?·?g(-1), respectively. The ion exchange capacity decreased in the following order: Na-X at 1.8 meq?·?g(-1), Na-P1 at 0.72 meq?·?g(-1), and sodalite at 0.56 meq?·?g(-1). The resulting zeolites are competitive for commercially available materials and are used as ion exchangers in industrial wastewater and soil decontamination. PMID:24838802

  16. BTEX removal from aqueous solutions by HDTMA-modified Y zeolite.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Carla B; Raulino, Giselle S C; Barros, Allen L; Lima, Ari C A; Ribeiro, Jefferson P; Pires, Marçal J R; Nascimento, Ronaldo F

    2012-12-15

    Various technologies have been used for the treatment and remediation of areas contaminated by BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes), which are organic compounds that are of particular concern due to their toxicity. Potential applications of synthetic zeolites for environmental fieldwork have also been reported worldwide. In this work, a hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA) surfactant-modified synthetic zeolite was investigated for its efficiency in removing BTEX from aqueous solutions. Three surfactant-modified zeolites were synthesized, with amounts of surfactant corresponding to 50%, 100%, and 200% of the total cation-exchange capacity (CEC) of the synthetic zeolite Y. The results of the BTEX adsorption experiments onto both synthetic zeolite and surfactant-modified zeolites (SMZ) showed that the SMZ-100 (zeolite modified with surfactant levels at 100% of CEC) was the most efficient modified zeolite for BTEX removal. Kinetics studies indicated that the multicomponent adsorption equilibrium was reached within 6 h and followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. The Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Temkin models were used to evaluate the BTEX adsorption capacity by SMZ-100. The Temkin model was found to be suitable for all BTEX compounds in a multicomponent system. Regeneration cycles of the modified zeolite were also performed, and the results showed that the adsorbent could be used efficiently in as many as four adsorption cycles, except for benzene. PMID:22922136

  17. Fabrication of silver nanoparticles doped in the zeolite framework and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Zargar, Mohsen; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa

    2011-01-01

    Using the chemical reduction method, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were effectively synthesized into the zeolite framework in the absence of any heat treatment. Zeolite, silver nitrate, and sodium borohydride were used as an inorganic solid support, a silver precursor, and a chemical reduction agent, respectively. Silver ions were introduced into the porous zeolite lattice by an ion-exchange path. After the reduction process, Ag NPs formed in the zeolite framework, with a mean diameter of about 2.12-3.11 nm. The most favorable experimental condition for the synthesis of Ag/zeolite nanocomposites (NCs) is described in terms of the initial concentration of AgNO(3). The Ag/zeolite NCs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared. The results show that Ag NPs form a spherical shape with uniform homogeneity in the particle size. The antibacterial activity of Ag NPs in zeolites was investigated against Gram-negative bacteria (ie, Escherichia coli and Shigella dysentriae) and Gram-positive bacteria (ie, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) by disk diffusion method using Mueller-Hinton agar at different sizes of Ag NPs. All of the synthesized Ag/zeolite NCs were found to have antibacterial activity. These results show that Ag NPs in the zeolite framework can be useful in different biological research and biomedical applications. PMID:21383858

  18. Fabrication of silver nanoparticles doped in the zeolite framework and antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Zargar, Mohsen; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa

    2011-01-01

    Using the chemical reduction method, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were effectively synthesized into the zeolite framework in the absence of any heat treatment. Zeolite, silver nitrate, and sodium borohydride were used as an inorganic solid support, a silver precursor, and a chemical reduction agent, respectively. Silver ions were introduced into the porous zeolite lattice by an ion-exchange path. After the reduction process, Ag NPs formed in the zeolite framework, with a mean diameter of about 2.12–3.11 nm. The most favorable experimental condition for the synthesis of Ag/zeolite nanocomposites (NCs) is described in terms of the initial concentration of AgNO3. The Ag/zeolite NCs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared. The results show that Ag NPs form a spherical shape with uniform homogeneity in the particle size. The antibacterial activity of Ag NPs in zeolites was investigated against Gram-negative bacteria (ie, Escherichia coli and Shigella dysentriae) and Gram-positive bacteria (ie, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) by disk diffusion method using Mueller–Hinton agar at different sizes of Ag NPs. All of the synthesized Ag/zeolite NCs were found to have antibacterial activity. These results show that Ag NPs in the zeolite framework can be useful in different biological research and biomedical applications. PMID:21383858

  19. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2007-09-30

    The objective of this project is to synthesize nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y nanoclusters, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates, and evaluate the 'zeolite Y/Nanoporous host' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. In comparison to conventionally-used zeolite Y catalysts of micron size particles, the nanocrystals (< 100 nm particle size) which contain shorter path lengths, are expected to allow faster diffusion of large hydrocarbon substrates and the catalysis products within and out of the zeolite's channels and cages (<1 nm size). This is expected to significantly reduce deactivation of the catalyst and to prolong their period of reactivity. Encapsulating zeolite Y nanocrystals within the nanoporous materials is expected to protect its external surfaces and pore entrances from being blocked by large hydrocarbon substrates, since these substrates will initially be converted to small molecules by the nanoporous host (a catalyst in its own right). The project consisted of four major tasks as follows: (1) synthesis of the nanoparticles of zeolite Y (of various chemical compositions) using various techniques such as the addition of organic additives to conventional zeolite Y synthesis mixtures to suppress zeolite Y crystal growth; (2) synthesis of nanoporous silicate host materials of up to 30 nm pore diameter, using poly (alkylene oxide) copolymers which when removed will yield a mesoporous material; (3) synthesis of zeolite Y/Nanoporous Host composite materials as potential catalysts; and (4) evaluation of the catalyst for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks.

  20. [Enlargement test of synthesis of MCM-22 zeolite by means of XRD].

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian-gong; Lu, Guan-zhong; Cao, Gang; Yu, Xiao-dong

    2007-05-01

    On the basis of MCM-22 zeolite synthesis at the static condition in 100 mL lined PTFE autoclave, 250 and 1000 mL stainless steel autoclave respectively, the synthesis of MCM-22 zeolite was studied at the rotating condition in 2, 5 and 200 L autoclave respectively. The samples as-synthesized and calcined were characterized by means of XRD and so on. The resultsshow that all the synthesized samples are the pure MCM-22 zeolites, and their crystallinities were high, and MCM-22 zeolite can be synthesized successfully at the rotating condition in 200 L stainless steel autoclave. PMID:17655132