Science.gov

Sample records for zirconium nitrates

  1. Zirconium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium is the 20th most abundant element in the Earth’s crust. It occurs in a variety of rock types and geologic environments but most often in igneous rocks in the form of zircon (ZrSiO4). Zircon is recovered as a coproduct of the mining and processing of heavy mineral sands for the titanium minerals ilmenite and rutile. The sands are formed by the weathering and erosion of rock containing zircon and titanium heavy minerals and their subsequent concentration in sedimentary systems, particularly in coastal environments. A small quantity of zirconium, less than 10 kt/a (11,000 stpy), compared with total world production of 1.4 Mt (1.5 million st) in 2012, was derived from the mineral baddeleyite (ZrO2), produced from a single source in Kovdor, Russia.

  2. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ZIRCONIUM VALUES FROM HAFNIUM VALUES BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION WITH AN ALKYL PHOSPHATE

    DOEpatents

    Peppard, D.F.

    1960-02-01

    A process of separating hafnium nitrate from zirconium nitrate contained in a nitric acid solution by selectively. extracting the zirconium nitrate with a water-immiscible alkyl phosphate is reported.

  3. Nitrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrate ; CASRN 14797 - 55 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  4. SEPARATION PROCESS FOR ZIRCONIUM AND COMPOUNDS THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, H.W.; Thomas, J.R.

    1959-06-30

    The separation of zirconium from columbium, rare earths, yttrium and the alkaline earth metals, such mixtures of elements occurring in zirconium ores or neutron irradiated uranium is described. According to the invention a suitable separation of zirconium from a one normal acidic aqueous solution containing salts, nitrates for example, of tetravalent zirconium, pentavalent columbium, yttrium, rare earths in the trivalent state and alkaline earths can be obtained by contacting the aqueous solution with a fluorinated beta diketonc alone or in an organic solvent solution, such as benzene, to form a zirconium chelate compound. When the organic solvent is present the zirconium chelate compound is directly extracted; otherwise it is separated by filtration. The zirconium may be recovered from contacting the organic solvent solution containing the chelated compound by back extraction with either an aqueous hydrofluoric acid or an oxalic acid solution.

  5. DISSOLUTION OF ZIRCONIUM AND ALLOYS THEREFOR

    DOEpatents

    Swanson, J.L.

    1961-07-11

    The dissolution of zirconium cladding in a water solution of ammonium fluoride and ammonium nitrate is described. The method finds particular utility in processing spent fuel elements for nuclear reactors. The zirconium cladding is first dissolved in a water solution of ammonium fluoride and ammonium nitrate; insoluble uranium and plutonium fiuorides formed by attack of the solvent on the fuel materiai of the fuel element are then separated from the solution, and the fuel materiai is dissolved in another solution.

  6. METHOD OF IMPROVING CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Shannon, D.W.

    1961-03-28

    An improved intermediate rinse for zirconium counteracts an anomalous deposit that often results in crevices and outof-the-way places when ordinary water is used to rinse away a strong fluoride etching solution designed to promote passivation of the metal. The intermediate rinse, which is used after the etching solution and before the water, is characterized by a complexing agent for fluoride ions such as aluminum or zirconium nitrates or chlorides.

  7. Method for calcining nuclear waste solutions containing zirconium and halides

    DOEpatents

    Newby, Billie J.

    1979-01-01

    A reduction in the quantity of gelatinous solids which are formed in aqueous zirconium-fluoride nuclear reprocessing waste solutions by calcium nitrate added to suppress halide volatility during calcination of the solution while further suppressing chloride volatility is achieved by increasing the aluminum to fluoride mole ratio in the waste solution prior to adding the calcium nitrate.

  8. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  9. Zirconium isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Siddall, M.B.

    1984-12-11

    A method of separating zirconium isotopes by converting the zirconium to its iodide salt prior to separation by usual isotope methods is disclosed. After separation the desired isotopes are converted from the salt to the metal by the van Arkel-de Boer iodide process.

  10. Studies in zirconium oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Drunen, C. J.; Levitan, J.

    1968-01-01

    Study provides insight into the oxidation mechanism of zirconium by combining electrical measurements with oxidation data. The measurement of electrical potential across growing scale on zirconium and the determination of conventional weight-change oxidation data were carried out at 550, 700, and 800 degrees C.

  11. Laser ablated zirconium plasma: A source of neutral zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Dheerendra; Thareja, Raj K.

    2010-10-15

    The authors report spectroscopic investigations of laser produced zirconium (Zr) plasma at moderate laser fluence. At low laser fluence the neutral zirconium species are observed to dominate over the higher species of zirconium. Laser induced fluorescence technique is used to study the velocity distribution of ground state neutral zirconium species. Two-dimensional time-resolved density distributions of ground state zirconium is mapped using planner laser induced fluorescence imaging and total ablated mass of neutral zirconium atoms is estimated. Temporal and spatial evolutions of electron density and temperature are discussed by measuring Stark broadened profile and ratio of intensity of emission lines, respectively.

  12. SEPARATING HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Lister, B.A.J.; Duncan, J.F.

    1956-08-21

    A dilute aqueous solution of zirconyl chloride which is 1N to 2N in HCl is passed through a column of a cation exchange resin in acid form thereby absorbing both zirconium and associated hafnium impurity in the mesin. The cation exchange material with the absorbate is then eluted with aqueous sulfuric acid of a O.8N to 1.2N strength. The first portion of the eluate contains the zirconium substantially free of hafnium.

  13. Radiochemical separation of zirconium and hafnium from other radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Hahn, R B

    1972-11-01

    Radiozirconium and radiohafnium may be separated from all other radionuclides except scandium and protactinium by precipitation with mandelic acid from 5-10 M hydrochloric acid, using commercial zirconyl chloride as carrier. Scandium and protactinium are removed by dissolving the precipitate in sodium carbonate, then adding barium nitrate to precipitate barium carbonate which acts as a scavenger. Zirconium mandelate is finally reprecipitated and the sample weighed and counted in this form. The method was checked by analysing commercial zirconyl chloride and standard rock samples for zirconium and hafnium by neutron-activation analysis. PMID:18961201

  14. ZIRCONIUM-CLADDING OF THORIUM

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.

    1961-11-21

    A method of cladding thorium with zirconium is described. The quality of the bond achieved between thorium and zirconium by hot-rolling is improved by inserting and melting a thorium-zirconium alloy foil between the two materials prior to rolling. (AEC)

  15. Zirconium carbide recrystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Lanin, A.G.; Erin, O.N.; Sul'Yanov, S.N.; Turchin, V.N.

    1986-02-01

    This paper studies the primary recrystallization process of the sintered polycrystalline zirconium carbide with a composition of ZrC /SUB 0.98/ . The properties of zirconium carbide samples deformed under compression are presented; the selected degree of deformation ensures a lower scatter of grain sizes at relative error of +/- 5% in the final deformation measurement. The established mechanisms of structural changes in zirconium carbide during plastic deformation and subsequent high temperature treatment indicate the possibility of using thermomechanical methods for the direct control of the structure of these mechanical methods for the direct control of the structure of these and obviously othe group IV and V carbides obtained by powder metallurgical methods.

  16. Nitrate reduction

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  17. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  18. Electroless deposition process for zirconium and zirconium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, R. E.; Sherman, A. H.

    1981-08-18

    A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer. 1 fig.

  19. Electroless deposition process for zirconium and zirconium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, Robert E.; Sherman, Anna H.

    1981-01-01

    A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer.

  20. Superstoichiometric hydride of zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Kupryazhkin, A.Ya.; Shchepetkin, A.A.; Zabolotskaya, E.V.; Pletnev, R.N.; Alyamovskii, S.I.; Kitaev, G.A.

    1987-12-01

    Superstoichiometric hydrides of zirconium have been obtained all the way up to the composition ZrH/sub 2.4/ by additional hydrogenation of ZrH/sub 2/ as a result of redistribution of hydrogen atoms between t- and o-positions. In the preparation of the hydrides the authors used zirconium iodide with an impurity content no greater than 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup -2/ mole %; the hydrogen and helium used in this work had a minimum purity of 99.95%. The content of hydrogen in the specimens was determined by a volumetric method. The x-ray diffraction analysis was performed in a DRON-2.0 unit (CuK/sub ..cap alpha../ radiation). PMR spectra were recorded in a broad-line spectrometer in the temperature interval 150-450 K.

  1. Process for purifying zirconium sponge

    SciTech Connect

    Abodishish, H.A.M.; Kimball, L.S.

    1992-03-31

    This patent describes a Kroll reduction process wherein a zirconium sponge contaminated with unreacted magnesium and by-product magnesium chloride is produced as a regulus, a process for purifying the zirconium sponge. It comprises: distilling magnesium and magnesium chloride from: a regulus containing a zirconium sponge and magnesium and magnesium chloride at a temperature above about 800{degrees} C and at an absolute pressure less than about 10 mmHg in a distillation vessel to purify the zirconium sponge; condensing the magnesium and the magnesium chloride distilled from the zirconium sponge in a condenser; and then backfilling the vessel containing the zirconium sponge and the condenser containing the magnesium and the magnesium chloride with a gas; recirculating the gas between the vessel and the condenser to cool the zirconium sponge from above about 800{degrees} C to below about 300{degrees} C; and cooling the recirculating gas in the condenser containing the condensed magnesium and the condensed magnesium chloride as the gas cools the zirconium sponge to below about 300{degrees} C.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of zirconium-doped mesoporous nano-crystalline TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bineesh, Kanattukara Vijayan; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Park, Dae-Won

    2010-07-01

    A series of zirconium-doped nano-titania (Zr/TiO2) with various amounts of Zr were prepared by sol-gel method using titanium(iv) isopropoxide and zirconium nitrate as precursors. Zr/TiO2 samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface area-pore volume measurements, infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-vis-diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis-DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. XRD data and Raman spectra indicated that even after 5 mol% doping of zirconium in the crystal lattice of TiO2, the samples were phase pure with the anatase structure. The crystalline size of the anatase decreased with increasing Zr content. An increase in the BET surface area was also observed after doping of zirconium on nano-titania.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of zirconium-doped mesoporous nano-crystalline TiO2.

    PubMed

    Bineesh, Kanattukara Vijayan; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Park, Dae-Won

    2010-07-01

    A series of zirconium-doped nano-titania (Zr/TiO(2)) with various amounts of Zr were prepared by sol-gel method using titanium(iv) isopropoxide and zirconium nitrate as precursors. Zr/TiO(2) samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface area-pore volume measurements, infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-vis-diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis-DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. XRD data and Raman spectra indicated that even after 5 mol% doping of zirconium in the crystal lattice of TiO(2), the samples were phase pure with the anatase structure. The crystalline size of the anatase decreased with increasing Zr content. An increase in the BET surface area was also observed after doping of zirconium on nano-titania. PMID:20648353

  4. SEPARATING HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Lister, B.A.J.; Duncan, J.F.; Hutcheon, J.M.

    1956-08-21

    Substantially complete separation of zirconium from hafnium may be obtained by elution of ion exchange material, on which compounds of the elements are adsorbed, with an approximately normal solution of sulfuric acid. Preferably the acid concentration is between 0.8 N amd 1.2 N, amd should not exceed 1.5 N;. Increasing the concentration of sulfate ion in the eluting solution by addition of a soluble sulfate, such as sodium sulfate, has been found to be advantageous. The preferred ion exchange materials are sulfonated polystyrene resins such as Dowex 50,'' and are preferably arranged in a column through which the solutions are passed.

  5. ZIRCONIUM PHOSPHATE ADSORPTION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Russell, E.R.; Adamson, A.S.; Schubert, J.; Boyd, G.E.

    1958-11-01

    A method is presented for separating plutonium values from fission product values in aqueous acidic solution. This is accomplished by flowing the solutlon containing such values through a bed of zirconium orthophosphate. Any fission products adsorbed can subsequently be eluted by washing the column with a solution of 2N HNO/sub 3/ and O.lN H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Plutonium values may subsequently be desorbed by contacting the column with a solution of 7N HNO/sub 3/ .

  6. Modification in band gap of zirconium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mayank; Singh, J.; Chouhan, S.; Mishra, A.; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of zirconium complexes with amino acid based Schiff bases are reported here. The zirconium complexes show interesting stereo chemical features, which are applicable in organometallic and organic synthesis as well as in catalysis. The band gaps of both Schiff bases and zirconium complexes were obtained by UV-Visible spectroscopy. It was found that the band gap of zirconium complexes has been modified after adding zirconium compound to the Schiff bases.

  7. SEPARATION OF HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Overholser, L.B.; Barton, C.J. Sr.; Ramsey, J.W.

    1960-05-31

    The separation of hafnium impurities from zirconium can be accomplished by means of organic solvent extraction. The hafnium-containing zirconium feed material is dissolved in an aqueous chloride solution and the resulting solution is contacted with an organic hexone phase, with at least one of the phases containing thiocyanate. The hafnium is extracted into the organic phase while zirconium remains in the aqueous phase. Further recovery of zirconium is effected by stripping the onganic phase with a hydrochloric acid solution and commingling the resulting strip solution with the aqueous feed solution. Hexone is recovered and recycled by means of scrubbing the onganic phase with a sulfuric acid solution to remove the hafnium, and thiocyanate is recovered and recycled by means of neutralizing the effluent streams to obtain ammonium thiocyanate.

  8. Determination of zirconium in steels.

    PubMed

    Iyer, C S; Asari, T P

    1989-03-01

    The determination of zirconium in the range 0.01-0.20% is required for some special alloy steels. A method has been developed, based on initial removal of iron as its chloro-complex by extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone, followed by further extraction after addition of potassium thiocyanate, and determination of the zirconium left in the aqueous phase, with Arsenazo III. The absorbance is measured at 665 nm. PMID:18964725

  9. Fine-grained zirconium-base material

    DOEpatents

    Van Houten, G.R.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for making zirconium with inhibited grain growth characteristics, by the process of vacuum melting the zirconium, adding 0.3 to 0.5% carbon, stirring, homogenizing, and cooling. (Official Gazette)

  10. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  11. Zirconium and hafnium in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehmann, W. D.; Chyi, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    The abundances of zirconium and hafnium have been determined in nine stony meteorites by a new, precise neutron-activation technique. The Zr/Hf abundance ratios for the chondrites vary in a rather narrow range, consistent with previously published observations from our group. Replicate analyses of new, carefully selected clean interior samples of the Cl chondrite Orgueil yield mean zirconium and hafnium abundances of 5.2 and 0.10 ppm, respectively. These abundances are lower than we reported earlier for two Cl chondrite samples which we now suspect may have suffered contamination. The new Cl zirconium and hafnium abundances are in closer agreement with predictions based on theories of nucleosynthesis than the earlier data.

  12. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Shor, R.S.; Vogler, S.

    1958-01-21

    A process is described for dissolving binary zirconium-uranium alloys where the uranium content is about 2%. In prior dissolution procedures for these alloys, an oxidizing agent was added to prevent the precipitation of uranium tetrafluoride. In the present method complete dissolution is accomplished without the use of the oxidizing agent by using only the stoichiometric amount or slight excess of HF required by the zirconium. The concentration of the acid may range from 2M to 10M and the dissolution is advatageously carried out at a temperature of 80 deg C.

  13. Thermodynamic properties of zirconium disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Volovik, L.S.; Kovalevskaya, E.I.; Litvinenko, V.F.

    1986-02-01

    This paper uses a method of comparative calculation -- double comparison -for the quantitative evaluation of the themodynamic characteristics of zirconium disulfide. The method enables one to apply known characteristics of compounds of the given or an adjacent group to analogous compounds of elements. The enthalpy of zirconium disulfide was determined by a formula and the calculation was carried out on the basis of data on the enthalpy of hafnium, niobium, and tantalum disulfides measured by the mixing method in the temperature range 500-1800 K.

  14. PROCESS OF PREPARING ZIRCONIUM OXYCHLORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Andrews, M.L.

    1960-06-28

    A process is given for preparing zirconyl chloride by mixing solid zirconyl chloride octahydrate and solid zirconium tetrachloride at room temperature whereby both chlorides are converted to zirconyl chloride trinydrate and hydrogen chloride is formed and volatilized by the reaction heat.

  15. Process for producing zirconium based granules

    SciTech Connect

    Jade, S.S.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a process for the production f amorphous zirconium based granules. It comprises: adding about 2--15 wt % of a suitable phase stabilizer to an aqueous solutio, based upon the total weight of ZrO{sub 2} in solution, to produce an aqueous solution having a pH in the range of about 4 to 7 comprising a zirconium based complex and phase stabilizer and thereafter; drying the aqueous solution comprising the zirconium based complex and the phase stabilizer at a temperature below about 180{degrees} C. for a time sufficient to evaporate the aqueous solution thereby forming amorphous zirconium based granules containing the phase stabilizer.

  16. Zirconium in a sulfuric acid pickling application

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    In 1972, Goodyear discovered that zirconium was an ideal material to construct heating coils for sulfuric acid picking tanks. Recently, localized corrosion and high uniform corrosion were reported with certain zirconium coils. The problems could be attributed to the contamination of chloride and/or fluoride ions. Results of electrochemical and immersion tests are used to discuss the effects of acid concentration and acid impurities, such as iron, chloride and fluoride ions, on zirconium's corrosion properties in H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Possible sources for acid impurities are identified. Recommendations are made for steel picking when zirconium equipment is used.

  17. Yttrium oxide stabilized zirconium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsko, J.E.; Houck, D.L.; Acla, H.L.R.

    1987-09-22

    This patent describes a process comprising: (a) forming a solution by mixing yttrium hydroxide and a sufficient amount of an aqueous solution of acetic acid to dissolve the yttrium hydroxide. The solution has a concentration of yttrium ion of about 5% to about 20% by weight of the solution, (b) adding from about 80% to about 95% by weight of zirconium oxide having a particle size range from about 1 to about 5 microns to yield a Zr to Y weight ratio of from about 4:1 to about 19:1 and thereby forming a slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to form spherical agglomerates consisting essentially of zirconium oxide and a relatively uniform distribution of yttrium acetate whereby the agglomerates have a size from about 20 to about 200 micrometers, (d) heating the agglomerates to about 600/sup 0/C to about 700/sup 0/C in a neutral or oxidizing atmosphere to convert yttrium acetate to yttrium oxide to thereby form zirconium oxide yttrium oxide agglomerates with about 5% to about 20% by weight of yttrium oxide.

  18. Method for preparing hydrous zirconium oxide gels and spherules

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L.

    2003-08-05

    Methods for preparing hydrous zirconium oxide spherules, hydrous zirconium oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, zirconium monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous zirconium oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, zirconium monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent having a desired crystallinity, zirconium oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, hydrous zirconium oxide fiber materials, zirconium oxide fiber materials, hydrous zirconium oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, zirconium oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite and spherules of barium zirconate. The hydrous zirconium oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process are useful as inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters and ceramics.

  19. DISSOLUTION OF ZIRCONIUM-CONTAINING FUEL ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Horn, F.L.

    1961-12-12

    Uranium is recovered from spent uranium fuel elements containing or clad with zirconium. These fuel elements are placed in an anhydrous solution of hydrogen fluoride and nitrogen dioxide. Within this system uranium forms a soluble complex and zirconium forms an insoluble complex. The uranium can then be separated, treated, and removed from solution as uranium hexafluoride. (AEC)

  20. Method of making crack-free zirconium hydride

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, Richard W.

    1980-01-01

    Crack-free hydrides of zirconium and zirconium-uranium alloys are produced by alloying the zirconium or zirconium-uranium alloy with beryllium, or nickel, or beryllium and scandium, or nickel and scandium, or beryllium and nickel, or beryllium, nickel and scandium and thereafter hydriding.

  1. Zirconium Phosphate Supported MOF Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Kan, Yuwei; Clearfield, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    We report a rare example of the preparation of HKUST-1 metal-organic framework nanoplatelets through a step-by-step seeding procedure. Sodium ion exchanged zirconium phosphate, NaZrP, nanoplatelets were judiciously selected as support for layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of Cu(II) and benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (H3BTC) linkers. The first layer of Cu(II) is attached to the surface of zirconium phosphate through covalent interaction. The successive LBL growth of HKUST-1 film is then realized by soaking the NaZrP nanoplatelets in ethanolic solutions of cupric acetate and H3BTC, respectively. The amount of assembled HKUST-1 can be readily controlled by varying the number of growth cycles, which was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and gas adsorption analyses. The successful construction of HKUST-1 on NaZrP was also supported by its catalytic performance for the oxidation of cyclohexene. PMID:27175935

  2. Method of etching zirconium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, L.S.; Kwiatkowski, B.

    1988-03-31

    The invention described herein may be manufactured, used, and licensed by or for the Government for governmental purposes without the payment to us of any royalty thereon. This invention relates in general to a method of etching, zirconium diboride(ZrB/sub 2/) and, in particular, to a method of dry etching a thin film of ZrB/sub 2/ that has been deposited onto a substrate and patterned using photolithography. U.S. patent application S.N. 156, 124, filed 16 February, 1988, of Linda S. Heath for Method of Etching Titanium Diboride and assigned to a common assignee and with which this application is copending describes and claims a method of etching titanium diboride with a dry etch. Zirconium diboride, like titanium diboride, TiB/sub 2/, has become of interest in laboratory research because of its resistance to change or degradation at high temperatures. By adjusting the process parameters, one is able to attain etch rates of 67 to 140 A/min for ZrB/sub 2/. This is useful for patterning ZrB/sub 2/ as a diffusion barrier or a Schottky contact to semiconductors. The ZrB/sub 2/ film may be on a GaAs substrate.

  3. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  4. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION WITH RESPECT TO ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Vogler, S.; Beederman, M.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating uranium values from a nitric acid aqueous solution containing uranyl values, zirconium values and tetravalent plutonium values. The process comprises contacting said solution with a substantially water-immiscible liquid organic solvent containing alkyl phosphate, separating an organic extract phase containing the uranium, zirconium, and tetravalent plutonium values from an aqueous raffinate, contacting said organic extract phase with an aqueous solution 2M to 7M in nitric acid and also containing an oxalate ion-containing substance, and separating a uranium- containing organic raffinate from aqueous zirconium- and plutonium-containing extract phase.

  5. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33... nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued... potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products and cured poultry products....

  6. ZIRCONIUM OXIDE NANOSTRUCTURES PREPARED BY ANODIC OXIDATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Y. Y.; Bhuiyan, M.S.; Paranthaman, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium oxide is an advanced ceramic material highly useful for structural and electrical applications because of its high strength, fracture toughness, chemical and thermal stability, and biocompatibility. If highly-ordered porous zirconium oxide membranes can be successfully formed, this will expand its real-world applications, such as further enhancing solid-oxide fuel cell technology. Recent studies have achieved various morphologies of porous zirconium oxide via anodization, but they have yet to create a porous layer where nanoholes are formed in a highly ordered array. In this study, electrochemical methods were used for zirconium oxide synthesis due to its advantages over other coating techniques, and because the thickness and morphology of the ceramic fi lms can be easily tuned by the electrochemical parameters, such as electrolyte solutions and processing conditions, such as pH, voltage, and duration. The effects of additional steps such as pre-annealing and post-annealing were also examined. Results demonstrate the formation of anodic porous zirconium oxide with diverse morphologies, such as sponge-like layers, porous arrays with nanoholes ranging from 40 to 75 nm, and nanotube layers. X-ray powder diffraction analysis indicates a cubic crystallographic structure in the zirconium oxide. It was noted that increased voltage improved the ability of the membrane to stay adhered to the zirconium substrate, whereas lower voltages caused a propensity for the oxide fi lm to fl ake off. Further studies are needed to defi ne the parameters windows that create these morphologies and to investigate other important characteristics such as ionic conductivity.

  7. Zirconium Oxide Nanostructures Prepared by Anodic Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Ying Yi; Bhuiyan, Md S; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium oxide is an advanced ceramic material highly useful for structural and electrical applications because of its high strength, fracture toughness, chemical and thermal stability, and biocompatibility. If highly-ordered porous zirconium oxide membranes can be successfully formed, this will expand its real-world applications, such as further enhancing solid-oxide fuel cell technology. Recent studies have achieved various morphologies of porous zirconium oxide via anodization, but they have yet to create a porous layer where nanoholes are formed in a highly ordered array. In this study, electrochemical methods were used for zirconium oxide synthesis due to its advantages over other coating techniques, and because the thickness and morphology of the ceramic films can be easily tuned by the electrochemical parameters, such as electrolyte solutions and processing conditions, such as pH, voltage, and duration. The effects of additional steps such as pre-annealing and post-annealing were also examined. Results demonstrate the formation of anodic porous zirconium oxide with diverse morphologies, such as sponge-like layers, porous arrays with nanoholes ranging from 40 to 75 nm, and nanotube layers. X-ray powder diffraction analysis indicates a cubic crystallographic structure in the zirconium oxide. It was noted that increased voltage improved the ability of the membrane to stay adhered to the zirconium substrate, whereas lower voltages caused a propensity for the oxide film to flake off. Further studies are needed to define the parameters windows that create these morphologies and to investigate other important characteristics such as ionic conductivity.

  8. Methods to treat pyrophoric film on zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, T.L.

    1982-09-01

    Zirconium is a reactive but corrosion resistant metal. However, in a highly oxidizing or an oxygen deficient solution, corrosion of zirconium can be rapid and a pyrophoric film, which ignites easily, may be formed on the surface of zirconium. Although high corrosion rates only infrequently lead to the formation of pyrophoric films, great care should be exercised with testing coupons or equipment where rapid attack is suspected. Laboratory tests were conducted to find methods to treat pyrophoric films on zirconium. Burnable specimens were prepared by placing zirconium coupons in 77.5% sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) with 200-ppm Fe/sup +3/ (as ferric sulfate) at 80/sup 0/C for 10 days withou stirring or agitation. Chemical, X-ray diffraction, and metallographic analyses indicate that the pyrophoric film is composed of ..gamma..-hydride, zirconium oxide, zirconium sulfate, and metallic particles. This pyrophoric film could not be removed easily using common pickling solutions, that is, nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid (HNO/sub 3/-HF) mixtures, or other aggressive media, for example, 80% H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It has been found that the pyrophoric film can be rendered nonpyrophoric by treating with hot air or steam. A 20 to 30 min treatment with 250/sup 0/C air or steam is sufficient to completely eliminate the pyrophoric tendency. Lower temperature air or steam can be used but require longer time: a few hours if the temperature is 200/sup 0/C, and a few days if the temperature is 100/sup 0/C. Use of this treatment in the field has proven effective.

  9. Zirconium: biomedical and nephrological applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, David B N; Roberts, Martin; Bluchel, Christian G; Odell, Ross A

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid increase in the use of zirconium (Zr)-containing compounds in artificial internal organs. Examples include dental implants and other restorative practices, total knee and hip replacement, and middle-ear ossicular chain reconstruction. In nephrological practice, Zr-containing sorbents have been used in hemofiltration, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and in the design and construction of wearable artificial kidneys. Zr compounds continue to be widely and extensively used in deodorant and antiperspirant preparations. In the public health arena, Zr compounds have been studied or used in controlling phosphorus pollution and in the reclamation of poison and bacteria-contaminated water. Experimental and clinical studies support the general consensus that Zr compounds are biocompatible and exhibit low toxicity. Reports on possible Zr-associated adverse reactions are rare and, in general, have not rigorously established a cause-and-effect relationship. Although publications on the use of Zr compounds have continued to increase in recent years, reports on Zr toxicity have virtually disappeared from the medical literature. Nevertheless, familiarity with, and continued vigilant monitoring of, the use of these compounds are warranted. This article provides an updated review on the biomedical use of Zr compounds. PMID:21245802

  10. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  11. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  12. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  13. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  14. Synthesis of zirconium oxide nanoparticle by sol-gel technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H. S.; Ahmad, A.; Hamzah, H.

    2013-11-27

    Zirconium oxide nanoparticle is synthesized using sol-gel technique. Various mole ratio of ammonia solution and nitric acid relative to zirconium propoxide is added in the reaction to study the effect on the crystallinity and particle size on zirconium oxide particle. Zirconium oxide synthesized with nitric acid have the smallest particle size under FESEM image and show the increasing formation of crystalline tetragonal phase under XRD diffractogram.

  15. Cylodextrin Polymer Nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosowski, Bernard; Ruebner, Anja; Statton, Gary; Robitelle, Danielle; Meyers, Curtis

    2000-01-01

    The development of the use of cyclodextrin nitrates as possible components of insensitive, high-energy energetics is outlined over a time period of 12 years. Four different types of cyclodextrin polymers were synthesized, nitrated, and evaluated regarding their potential use for the military and aerospace community. The synthesis of these novel cyclodextrin polymers and different nitration techniques are shown and the potential of these new materials is discussed.

  16. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, John L.; Hallen, Richard T.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  17. Field determination of nitrate using nitrate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.R.; Corrigan, J.S.; Campbell, W.H.

    1997-12-31

    Nitrate is routinely measured in a variety of substrates - water, tissues, soils, and foods - both in the field and in laboratory settings. The most commonly used nitrate test methods involve the reduction of nitrate to nitrite via a copper-cadmium reagent, followed by reaction of the nitrite with the Griess dye reagents. The resulting color is translated into a nitrate concentration by comparison with a calibrated color chart or comparator, or by reading the absorbance in a spectrophotometer. This basic method is reliable and sufficiently sensitive for many applications. However, the cadmium reagent is quite toxic. The trend today is for continued increase in concern for worker health and safety; in addition, there are increasing costs and logistical problems associated with regulatory constraints on transport and disposal of hazardous materials. Some suppliers have substituted a zinc-based reagent powder for the cadmium in an effort to reduce toxicity. We describe here an enzyme-based nitrate detection method as an improvement on the basic Griess method that demonstrates equal or superior sensitivity, superior selectivity, and is more environmentally benign. Comparisons between the enzyme-based method and some standard field test kits being used today are made.

  18. Processing fissile material mixtures containing zirconium and/or carbon

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Michael Ernest; Maloney, Martin David

    2013-07-02

    A method of processing spent TRIZO-coated nuclear fuel may include adding fluoride to complex zirconium present in a dissolved TRIZO-coated fuel. Complexing the zirconium with fluoride may reduce or eliminate the potential for zirconium to interfere with the extraction of uranium and/or transuranics from fission materials in the spent nuclear fuel.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10601 - Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10601 Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... titanium zirconium oxide (PMN P-11-273; CAS No. 1227908-26-0) is subject to reporting under this...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10598 - Lead strontium titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lead strontium titanium zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10598 Lead strontium titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... titanium zirconium oxide (PMN P-11-270; CAS No. 61461-40-3) is subject to reporting under this section...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9973 - Zirconium dichlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Zirconium dichlorides (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9973 Zirconium dichlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as zirconium dichlorides (PMNs...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9973 - Zirconium dichlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Zirconium dichlorides (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9973 Zirconium dichlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as zirconium dichlorides (PMNs...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9973 - Zirconium dichlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Zirconium dichlorides (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9973 Zirconium dichlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as zirconium dichlorides (PMNs...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9973 - Zirconium dichlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Zirconium dichlorides (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9973 Zirconium dichlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as zirconium dichlorides (PMNs...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9973 - Zirconium dichlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Zirconium dichlorides (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9973 Zirconium dichlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as zirconium dichlorides (PMNs...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10708 - Zirconium substituted heteropolycyclic (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Zirconium substituted heteropolycyclic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10708 Zirconium substituted heteropolycyclic (generic). (a) Chemical... as zirconium substituted heteropolycyclic (PMN P-13-152) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. Calculations of oxidation rates of zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Condon, J.B.

    1981-12-01

    The rates of oxidation for zirconium metal in oxygen are calculated using perfusive-precipitation modeling with the boundary conditions that: there is no moving boundary and metal matrix saturation is reached for oxygen solubility. The perfusive-precipitation model is a diffusion model with a chemical reaction. It uses Fick's Second Law of Diffusion with an added sink term. The sink term is an overall second order reaction, first order with respect to each the dissolved oxygen and the metal. The stationary boundary condition is valid for the ductile zirconium as long as the expansion due to the reaction product formation does not cause metal failure or spalling. The metal matrix saturated condition implies an upper limit to the metastable solubility of oxygen in the zirconium metal and is approximated from the phase diagram. The calculated rates are compared to the rates listed in the literature. These calculated rates, using no variable parameters, are in good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Radiation effects on corrosion of zirconium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1989-06-01

    From the wide use of zirconium alloys as components in nuclear reactors, has come clear evidence that reactor radiation is a major corrosion parameter. The evidence emerges from comparisons of zirconium alloy corrosion behavior in different reactor types, for example, BWRs versus PWRs and in corresponding reactor loop chemistries; also, oxidation rates differ with location along components such as fuel rods and reactor pressure tubes. In most respects, oxidation effects on power reactor components are paralleled by oxidation behavior on specimens exposed to radiation in reactor loops.

  9. Superconductivity in zirconium-rhodium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zegler, S. T.

    1969-01-01

    Metallographic studies and transition temperature measurements were made with isothermally annealed and water-quenched zirconium-rhodium alloys. The results clarify both the solid-state phase relations at the Zr-rich end of the Zr-Rh alloy system and the influence upon the superconducting transition temperature of structure and composition.

  10. METHOD AND ALLOY FOR BONDING TO ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    McCuaig, F.D.; Misch, R.D.

    1960-04-19

    A brazing alloy can be used for bonding zirconium and its alloys to other metals, ceramics, and cermets, and consists of 6 to 9 wt.% Ni, 6 to 9 wn~.% Cr, Mo, or W, 0 to 7.5 wt.% Fe, and the balance Zr.

  11. Intercalation chemistry of zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Svoboda, Jan; Zima, Vítězslav; Melánová, Klára; Beneš, Ludvík; Trchová, Miroslava

    2013-12-15

    Zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate is a layered material which can be employed as a host for the intercalation reactions with basic molecules. A wide range of organic compounds were chosen to represent intercalation ability of zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate. These were a series of alkylamines from methylamine to dodecylamine, 1,4-phenylenediamine, p-toluidine, 1,8-diaminonaphthalene, 1-aminopyrene, imidazole, pyridine, 4,4′-bipyridine, poly(ethylene imine), and a series of amino acids from glycine to 6-aminocaproic acid. The prepared compounds were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis and IR spectroscopy and probable arrangement of the guest molecules in the interlayer space of the host is proposed based on the interlayer distance of the prepared intercalates and amount of the intercalated guest molecules. - Graphical abstract: Nitrogen-containing organic compounds can be intercalated into the interlayer space of zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate. - Highlights: • Zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate was examined as a host material in intercalation chemistry. • A wide range of nitrogen-containing organic compounds were intercalated. • Possible arrangement of the intercalated species is described.

  12. Zirconium modified nickel-copper alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved material for use in a catalytic reactor which reduces nitrogen oxide from internal combustion engines is in the form of a zirconium-modified, precipitation-strengthened nickel-copper alloy. This material has a nominal composition of Ni-30 Cu-0.2 Zr and is characterized by improved high temperature mechanical properties.

  13. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

    1992-06-02

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  14. The Chilean nitrate deposits.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ericksen, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The nitrate deposits in the arid Atacama desert of northern Chile consist of saline-cemented surficial material, apparently formed in and near a playa lake that formerly covered the area. Many features of their distribution and chemical composition are unique. The author believes the principal sources of the saline constituents were the volcanic rocks of late Tertiary and Quaternary age in the Andes and that the nitrate is of organic origin. Possible sources of the nitrate, iodate, perchlorate and chromate are discussed. -J.J.Robertson

  15. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; zirconium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Towner, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Zircon, a zirconium silicate, is currently the most important commercial zirconium-bearing mineral. Baddeleyite, a natural form of zirconia, is less important but has some specific end uses. Both zircon and baddeleyite occur in hard-rock and placer deposits, but at present all zircon production is from placer deposits. Most baddeleyite production is from hard-rock deposits, principally as a byproduct of copper and phosphate-rock mining. World zirconium resources in identified, economically exploitable deposits are about 46 times current production rates. Of these resources, some 71 percent are in South Africa, Australia, and the United States. The principal end uses of zirconium minerals are in ceramic applications and as refractories, abrasives, and mold linings in foundries. A minor amount, mainly of zircon, is used for the production of hafnium-free zirconium metal, which is used principally for sheathing fuel elements in nuclear reactors and in the chemical-processing industry, aerospace engineering, and electronics. Australia and South Africa are the largest zircon producers and account for more than 70 percent of world output; the United States and the Soviet Union account for another 20 percent. South Africa accounts for almost all the world's production of baddeleyite, which is about 2 percent of world production of contained zirconia. Australia and South Africa are the largest exporters of zircon. Unless major new deposits are developed in countries that have not traditionally produced zircon, the pattern of world production is unlikely to change by 2020. The proportions, however, of production that come from existing producing countries may change somewhat.

  16. Zirconium oxidation on the atomic scale.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Daniel; Cerezo, Alfred; Smith, George D W

    2009-04-01

    Zirconium alloys are used in the nuclear industry as fuel rod cladding. They are chosen for this role because of their good mechanical properties and low thermal neutron absorption. Oxidation of these alloys by coolant is one of the chief limiting factors of the fuel burn-up efficiency. The aim of the present study is to understand these oxidation mechanisms. As a first step, a fundamental study of the oxidation of commercially pure zirconium has been conducted using the 3D atom probe (3DAP). The current generation of 3DAPs allows both voltage and laser pulsing, providing data sets of many millions of ions. According to the literature the only stable oxide of zirconium is ZrO(2). However, the 3DAP shows that an initial layer a few nanometres thick forms with a composition of ZrO(1-)(x) when subjected to light oxidation. This result confirms and extends the work of Wadman et al. [Colloque de Physique 50 (1989) C8 303; Journal de Physique, 11 (1988) C6 49] and Wadman and Andrén [in: C.M. Euchen, A.M. Garde (Eds.), Zirconium in the Nuclear Industry: Ninth Symposium, ASTM STP 1132, ASTM, USA, 1991, p. 461], who used 1DAP techniques, obtaining reduced data sets. Segregation of hydrogen to the metal-oxide interface and a distinct ZrH phase were observed in this study. A novel kinetics study of the room temperature oxidation of zirconium showed the ZrO layer to be non-protective over the time period investigated (up to 1h). PMID:19101084

  17. METHOD OF MAKING DELTA ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE MONOLITHIC MODERATOR PIECES

    DOEpatents

    Vetrano, J.B.

    1962-01-23

    A method is given for preparing large, sound bodies of delta zirconium hydride. The method includes the steps of heating a zirconium body to a temperature of not less than l000 deg C, providing a hydrogen atmosphere for the zirconium body at a pressure not greater than one atmosphere, reducing the temperature slowly to 800 deg C at such a rate that cracks do not form while maintaining the hydrogen pressure substantially constant, and cooling in an atmosphere of hydrogen. (AEC)

  18. ELECTROLYTIC CLADDING OF ZIRCONIUM ON URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Wick, J.J.

    1959-09-22

    A method is presented for coating uranium with zircoalum by rendering the uranium surface smooth and oxidefree, immersing it in a molten electrolytic bath in NaCI, K/sub 2/ZrF/sub 6/, KF, and ZrO/sub 2/, and before the article reaches temperature equilibrium with the bath, applying an electrolyzing current of 60 amperes per square dectmeter at approximately 3 volts to form a layer of zirconium metal on the uranium.

  19. Thermal sprayed zirconium coatings for corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bamola, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) is conducted in inert reduced pressures. This results in higher particle velocities than in atmospheric plasma spraying. Reverse arc sputter cleaning and pre-heating of the workpiece lead to elevated substrate temperatures during deposition, allowing sintering of the coating and, thus, enhanced densities and bond strengths. Inert Environment Electric Arc Spraying (IEAS) is performed in inert gas chambers, utilizing wire as the feedstock. This leads to lower gas content in the coating, since the initial gas content in wire is lower than that of the powder feedstock used in VPS. Controlled atmosphere sprayed zirconium coatings had inferior mechanical and corrosion properties when compared with bulk zirconium. The VPS coatings displayed higher bond strengths and better cavitation erosion resistance than did the IEAS coatings. The IEAS coatings had lower gas content and showed better electrochemical and corrosion behavior. The lower gas content for IEAS was due to a lower initial gas level in the wire feedstock used in this process. Also, scanning electron microscopy revealed that larger particles result in the IEAS process. Thus, a smaller surface-area-to-volume ratio is available for gas-metal reactions to occur. Improvements in mechanical and corrosion properties for the IEAS coatings were due to elevated substrate temperatures during deposition. Compressive surface stresses induced by post-spray shot-peening enhanced corrosion and cavitation resistance of IEAS coatings. Coating porosity caused failure during immersion testing. Therefore, it was concluded that controlled environment thermal spraying of zirconium is not suitable for forming corrosion resistant coatings on steel. ZrN coatings were formed by electric arc spraying using a nitrogen shroud and post-spray nitriding. Two phases; ZrN and zirconium solid solution, exist in the as-sprayed coating. Nitriding increases the proportion of ZrN.

  20. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Mulac, B.L.; Edwards, G.R.; Burt, R.P.; David, S.A.

    1997-12-01

    When gas-tungsten arc welded, iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure which is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Titanium inoculation effectively refined the fusion zone microstructure in iron aluminide weldments, but the inoculated weldments had a reduced fracture strength despite the presence of a finer microstructure. The weldments fractured by transgranular cleavage which nucleated at cracked second phase particles. With titanium inoculation, second phase particles in the fusion zone changed shape and also became more concentrated at the grain boundaries, which increased the particle spacing in the fusion zone. The observed decrease in fracture strength with titanium inoculation was attributed to increased spacing of second phase particles in the fusion zone. Current research has focused on the weldability of zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides. Preliminary work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has shown that zirconium and carbon additions affect the weldability of the alloy as well as the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the weldments. A sigmajig hot cracking test apparatus has been constructed and tested at Colorado School of Mines. Preliminary characterization of hot cracking of three zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides, each containing a different total concentration of zirconium at a constant zirconium/carbon ratio of ten, is in progress. Future testing will include low zirconium alloys at zirconium/carbon ratios of five and one, as well as high zirconium alloys (1.5 to 2.0 atomic percent) at zirconium/carbon ratios of ten to forty.

  1. Manufacturing process to reduce large grain growth in zirconium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Rosecrans, P.M.

    1984-08-01

    It is an object of the present invention to provide a procedure for desensitizing zirconium-based alloys to large grain growth (LGG) during thermal treatment above the recrystallization temperature of the alloy. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a method for treating zirconium-based alloys which have been cold-worked in the range of 2 to 8% strain to reduce large grain growth. It is another object of the present invention to provide a method for fabricating a zirconium alloy clad nuclear fuel element wherein the zirconium clad is resistant to large grain growth.

  2. High temperature behavior of zirconium germanates

    SciTech Connect

    Utkin, A.V.; Baklanova, N.I.; Vasilyeva, I.G.

    2013-05-01

    The high temperature behavior of zirconium germanates ZrGeO₄ and Zr₃GeO₈ up to 2300 °C has been studied using the original photoemission thermal analysis technique with the comprehensive physicochemical study of solid and gaseous intermediate and final products. The two-stage process of incongruent sublimation of GeO₂ was established and the phase boundary of the homogeneity range for ZrGeO₄ and Zr₃GeO₈ were deduced from the thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy studies. A high tendency to sintering of the final ZrO₂ product is discussed. - Graphical abstract: The decomposition of zirconium germanates leads to the formation of gaseous GeO₂ and solid sintered ZrO₂ and occurs via two stages with the formation of intermediate ZrO₂-rich solid solution. Highlights: •Thermal behavior of ZrGeO₄ and Zr₃GeO₈ was studied using the original thermal analysis technique in wide temperature range. •The decomposition occurs via two stages with the formation of intermediate ZrO₂-rich solid solution. •The decomposition of zirconium germanates leads to the formation of gaseous GeO₂ and solid sintered ZrO₂. •The temperature of decomposition is strongly depended on the total gas pressure.

  3. Fluorometric determination of zirconium in minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alford, W.C.; Shapiro, L.; White, C.E.

    1951-01-01

    The increasing use of zirconium in alloys and in the ceramics industry has created renewed interest in methods for its determination. It is a common constituent of many minerals, but is usually present in very small amounts. Published methods tend to be tedious, time-consuming, and uncertain as to accuracy. A new fluorometric procedure, which overcomes these objections to a large extent, is based on the blue fluorescence given by zirconium and flavonol in sulfuric acid solution. Hafnium is the only element that interferes. The sample is fused with borax glass and sodium carbonate and extracted with water. The residue is dissolved in sulfuric acid, made alkaline with sodium hydroxide to separate aluminum, and filtered. The precipitate is dissolved in sulfuric acid and electrolysed in a Melaven cell to remove iron. Flavonol is then added and the fluorescence intensity is measured with a photo-fluorometer. Analysis of seven standard mineral samples shows excellent results. The method is especially useful for minerals containing less than 0.25% zirconium oxide.

  4. From Zirconium Nanograins to Zirconia Nanoneedles.

    PubMed

    Zalnezhad, E; Hamouda, A M S; Jaworski, J; Do Kim, Young

    2016-01-01

    Combinations of three simple techniques were utilized to gradually form zirconia nanoneedles from zirconium nanograins. First, a physical vapor deposition magnetron sputtering technique was used to deposit pure zirconium nanograins on top of a substrate. Second, an anodic oxidation was applied to fabricate zirconia nanotubular arrays. Finally, heat treatment was used at different annealing temperatures in order to change the structure and morphology from nanotubes to nanowires and subsequently to nanoneedles in the presence of argon gas. The size of the pure zirconium nanograins was estimated to be approximately 200-300 nm. ZrO2 nanotubular arrays with diameters of 70-120 nm were obtained. Both tetragonal and monoclinic ZrO2 were observed after annealing at 450 °C and 650 °C. Only a few tetragonal peaks appeared at 850 °C, while monoclinic ZrO2 was obtained at 900 °C and 950 °C. In assessing the biocompatibility of the ZrO2 surface, the human cell line MDA-MB-231 was found to attach and proliferate well on surfaces annealed at 850 °C and 450 °C; however, the amorphous ZrO2 surface, which was not heat treated, did not permit extensive cell growth, presumably due to remaining fluoride. PMID:27623486

  5. PROCESS FOR DISSOLVING BINARY URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM OR ZIRCONIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Jonke, A.A.; Barghusen, J.J.; Levitz, N.M.

    1962-08-14

    A process of dissolving uranium-- zirconium and zircaloy alloys, e.g. jackets of fuel elements, with an anhydrous hydrogen fluoride containing from 10 to 32% by weight of hydrogen chloride at between 400 and 450 deg C., preferably while in contact with a fluidized inert powder, such as calcium fluoride is described. (AEC)

  6. Standard specification for zirconium and zirconium alloy sheet, strip, and plate for nuclear application. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-10 on Reactive and Refractory Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B10.02 on Zirconium and Hafnium. Current edition approved Oct. 10, 1997. Published April 1998. Originally published as B 352-60T. Last previous edition B 352-92.

  7. Standard specification for zirconium and zirconium alloy strip, sheet, and plate. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-10 on Reactive and Refractory Metals and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B10.02 on Zirconium and Hafnium. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1997. Published May 1998. Originally published as B 551-71. Last previous edition B 551-92.

  8. [The clinical application of zirconium-dioxide-ceramics. Case report].

    PubMed

    Somfai, Dóra; Zsigmond, Ágnes; Károlyházy, Katalin; Kispély, Barbara; Hermann, Péter

    2015-12-01

    Due to its outstanding physical, mechanical and esthetic properties, zirconium-dioxide is one of the most popular non-metal denture, capable of surpassing PFM in most cases. The recent advances of CAD/CAM technology makes it a good alternitve. Here we show the usefulness of zirconium-dioxide in everyday dental practice through three case reports. PMID:26863816

  9. 40 CFR 721.10602 - Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10602 Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lead niobium...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10602 - Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10602 Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lead niobium...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10250 - Zirconium lysine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Zirconium lysine complex (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10250 Zirconium lysine complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  12. NEUTRON REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT UTILIZING ZIRCONIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Saller, H.A.; Keeler, J.R.; Szumachowski, E.R.

    1957-11-12

    This patent relates to clad fuel elements for use in neutronic reactors and is drawn to such a fuel element which consists of a core of fissionable material, comprised of an alloy of zirconium and U/sup 235/ enriched uranium, encased in a jacket of a binary zirconium-tin alloy in which the tin content ranges between 1 and 15% by weight.

  13. 40 CFR 721.10250 - Zirconium lysine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Zirconium lysine complex (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10250 Zirconium lysine complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10250 - Zirconium lysine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Zirconium lysine complex (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10250 Zirconium lysine complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  15. Process of precipitating zirconium or hafnium from spent pickling solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, C.L.; Walker, R.G.

    1991-12-31

    This patent describes a process for regenerating a spent, fluoride-containing pickle solution used in the pickling of zirconium or hafnium metal or their alloys. It comprises adding to the spent pickle solution a sufficient amount of sodium sulfate to precipitate sodium zirconium or hafnium fluoride.

  16. Uranium-preextraction in zirconium/hafnium separations processs

    SciTech Connect

    Feuling, R.J.

    1990-04-03

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for recovering zirconium values from uranium containing zircon ore. The process comprising a fluidized bed carbochlorination of the zircon ore at 800{degrees}--1250{degrees} C., producing a relatively impure, hafnium-containing zirconium tetrachloride stream and by-product silicon tetrachloride, which silicon tetrachloride by-product is separated by differential condensation, and wherein uranium chloride is volatilized at the ore chlorinator temperature and follows as an impurity in the zirconium-hafnium tetrachloride stream, mixing the zirconium-hafnium tetrachloride with water to produce a zirconium-hafnium oxychloride solution, and removing iron impurities by liquid--liquid iron extraction with a methyl isobutyl ketone extractant.

  17. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  18. Evaluation of localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, J.; Holmes, D.; Yau, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconium is prone to localized corrosion in acidic chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}) solutions contaminated by oxidizing ions, such as ferric or cupric ions. This tendency can be reduced by ensuring that the zirconium surface is clean and smooth. The effect of surface condition on localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions was predicted using potentiodynamic polarization scans. Predictions were confirmed by mass-loss tests on various combinations of surface finish and acid concentrations. A real-time indication of localized corrosion was derived by monitoring electrochemical noise produced between two similar electrodes immersed in an acidic chloride solution. Electrochemical noise monitoring correlated well with predictions from the potentiodynamic polarization and mass-loss experiments. Electrochemical noise results showed a more anodic potential caused by ferric ion (Fe{sup 3+}) contamination might be necessary for localized corrosion but that it was not a sufficient condition. A clean zirconium surface reduced localized corrosion of zirconium.

  19. In situ hydrogen loading on zirconium powder

    PubMed Central

    Maimaitiyili, Tuerdi; Blomqvist, Jakob; Steuwer, Axel; Bjerkén, Christina; Zanellato, Olivier; Blackmur, Matthew S.; Andrieux, Jérôme; Ribeiro, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, various hydride phases in a zirconium–hydrogen system have been prepared in a high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiation beamline and their transformation behaviour has been studied in situ. First, the formation and dissolution of hydrides in commercially pure zirconium powder were monitored in real time during hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, then whole pattern crystal structure analysis such as Rietveld and Pawley refinements were performed. All commonly reported low-pressure phases presented in the Zr–H phase diagram are obtained from a single experimental arrangement. PMID:26134803

  20. ZIRCONIUM-TITANIUM-BERYLLIUM BRAZING ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Gilliland, R.G.; Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.; Williams, L.C.

    1962-06-12

    A new and improved ternary alloy is described which is of particular utility in braze-bonding parts made of a refractory metal selected from Group IV, V, and VI of the periodic table and alloys containing said metal as a predominating alloying ingredient. The brazing alloy contains, by weight, 40 to 50 per cent zirconium, 40 to 50 per cent titanium, and the balance beryllium in amounts ranging from 1 to 20 per cent, said alloy having a melting point in the range 950 to 1400 deg C. (AEC)

  1. Cherenkov and Scintillation Properties of Cubic Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M.J.; Adams, J.H.; Parnell, T.A.; Kuznetsov, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconium (CZ) is a high index of refraction (n =2.17) material that we have investigated for Cherenkov counter applications. Laboratory and proton accelerator tests of an 18cc sample of CZ show that the expected fast Cherenkov response is accompanied by a longer scintillation component that can be separated by pulse shaping. This presents the possibility of novel particle spectrometers which exploits both properties of CZ. Other high index materials being examined for Cherenkov applications will be discussed. Results from laboratory tests and an accelerator exposure will be presented and a potential application in solar energetic particle instruments will be discussed

  2. Short-time oxidation of zirconium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, L. P.; Archbold, T. F.

    1972-01-01

    Study of zirconium oxidation kinetics for maximum exposure times of 3 min and in the temperature range 440 to 850 C. 'Discontinuous' oxidation runs were employed whereby a specimen was inserted into the gas stream for a predetermined time, removed and weighed, and reinserted into the oxidation atmosphere. It is considered that the increase in the observed activation energy for the early stage parabolic oxidation is a manifestation of a change from an n-type oxide to a predominantly p-type oxide, in agreement with the authors' earlier conclusion (1971) based on pressure effects.

  3. METHOD FOR DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM-URANIUM COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Gens, T.A.

    1961-07-18

    A method is descrioed for treating a zirconium-- uranium composition to form a stable solution from which uranium and other values may be extracted by contacting the composition with at least a 4 molar aqueous solution of ammonium fluoride at a temperature of about 100 deg C, adding a peroxide, in incremental amounts, to the heated solution throughout the period of dissolution until all of the uranium is converted to soluble uranyl salt, adding nitric acid to the resultant solution to form a solvent extraction feed solution to convert the uranyl salt to a solvent extractable state, and thereafter recovering the uranium and other desired values from the feed solution by solvent extraction.

  4. Diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium foil

    SciTech Connect

    Schur, D.V.; Pishuk, V.K.; Adejev, V.M.; Zaginaichenko, S.Y.

    1998-12-31

    The authors of present research have used in experiments the atomic hydrogen and metallic foil 25--30 {micro}m thick. It has been supposed that these technical operations will permit excluding the influence of surface and diffusional processes on the rate of Me-H interaction. The series of experiments have been carried out and they confirm this assumption. It has been shown that hydrogenation reaction of zirconium foil in atomic hydrogen conforms to the topochemical model of volume segregation of interaction product, and the rate of its flow is independent of the surface processes and hydrogen diffusion in volume.

  5. Shell model description of zirconium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sieja, K.; Nowacki, F.; Langanke, K.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.

    2009-06-15

    We calculate the low-lying spectra and several high-spin states of zirconium isotopes (Z=40) with neutron numbers from N=50 to N=58 using a large valence space with the {sup 78}Ni inert core, which a priori allows one to study the interplay between spherical and deformed configurations, necessary for the description of nuclides in this part of the nuclear chart. The effective interaction is derived by monopole corrections of the realistic G matrix. We reproduce essential nuclear properties, such as subshell closures in {sup 96}Zr and {sup 98}Zr. The spherical-to-deformed shape transition in {sup 100}Zr is addressed as well.

  6. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., described and defined as an oxidizer by the regulations of 49 CFR part 173 is handled, stored, stowed...) must be eliminated or plugged. Note: See 49 CFR 176.415 for permit requirements for nitro carbo nitrate... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section...

  7. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., described and defined as an oxidizer by the regulations of 49 CFR part 173 is handled, stored, stowed...) must be eliminated or plugged. Note: See 49 CFR 176.415 for permit requirements for nitro carbo nitrate... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section...

  8. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., described and defined as an oxidizer by the regulations of 49 CFR part 173 is handled, stored, stowed...) must be eliminated or plugged. Note: See 49 CFR 176.415 for permit requirements for nitro carbo nitrate... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section...

  9. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., described and defined as an oxidizer by the regulations of 49 CFR part 173 is handled, stored, stowed...) must be eliminated or plugged. Note: See 49 CFR 176.415 for permit requirements for nitro carbo nitrate... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section...

  10. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., described and defined as an oxidizer by the regulations of 49 CFR part 173 is handled, stored, stowed...) must be eliminated or plugged. Note: See 49 CFR 176.415 for permit requirements for nitro carbo nitrate... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section...

  11. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  12. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coburn, M.D.; Stinecipher, M.M.

    1981-11-17

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  13. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M.; Coburn, Michael D.

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  14. Retrospective Reactor Dosimetry with Zirconium Alloy Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Foster, John P.

    2009-11-01

    Retrospective measurements are routinely performed with stainless steel samples. Recent experiments have been successfully conducted using zirconium alloy samples, involving somewhat different neuron activation reactions than are normally encountered with stainless steel samples. The alloy composition consisted of nominally 1% (by weight) niobium, 1% tin, and 0.1% iron, with the balance zirconium. The activation products observed in the samples by gamma spectroscopy included Zr-95, Nb-95, Sn-113, Sb-125, Mn-54, Co-60, Nb-94, and Ta-182. The niobium was then chemically separated following ASTM procedure E1297 and the Nb-93m activities were measured by x-ray spectroscopy. The thermal neutron fluences, as determined independently by the neutron capture gamma reactions to Zr-95, Sn-113, Nb-94, and Sn/Sb-125, were in excellent agreement. The fast neutron fluences, as determined separately by the Fe-54(n,p)Mn-54 and Nb-93(n,n’)Nb-93m reactions, were also in good agreement, thus demonstrating the versatility of the retrospective dosimetry technique.

  15. Nitrate Storage and Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction by Eukaryotic Microbes.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations. PMID:26734001

  16. Nitrate Storage and Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction by Eukaryotic Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations. PMID:26734001

  17. Amine-intercalated α-zirconium phosphates as lubricant additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Huaping; Dai, Wei; Kan, Yuwei; Clearfield, Abraham; Liang, Hong

    2015-02-01

    In this study, three types of amines intercalated α-zirconium phosphate nanosheets with different interspaces were synthesized and examined as lubricant additives to a mineral oil. Results from tribological experiments illustrated that these additives improved lubricating performance. Results of rheological experiments showed that the viscosity of the mineral oil was effectively reduced with the addition of α-zirconium phosphate nanosheets. The two-dimensional structure, with larger interspaces, resulting from amine intercalation, exhibited improved effectiveness in reducing viscosity. This study demonstrates that the nanosheet structure of α-zirconium phosphates is effective in friction reduction. The manufacture of lubricants with tailored viscosity is possible by using different intercalators.

  18. METHOD OF PREPARING SINTERED ZIRCONIUM METAL FROM ITS HYDRIDES

    DOEpatents

    Angier, R.P.

    1958-02-11

    The invention relates to the preparation of metal shapes from zirconium hydride by powder metallurgical techniques. The zirconium hydride powder which is to be used for this purpose can be prepared by rendering massive pieces of crystal bar zirconium friable by heat treatment in purified hydrogen. This any then be ground into powder and powder can be handled in the air without danger of it igniting. It may then be compacted in the normal manner by being piaced in a die. The compact is sintered under vacuum conditions preferably at a temperature ranging from 1200 to 1300 deg C and for periods of one to three hours.

  19. SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM AND NIOBIUM BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Voiland, E.E.

    1958-05-01

    A process for separation of the uranium from zirconium and/or niobium values contained in 3 to 7M aqueous nitric acid solutions is described. This is accomplished by adding phosphoric acid anions to the nitric acid solution containing the uranium, zirconium, and/or niobium in an amount sufficient to make the solution 0.05 to 0.2M in phosphate ion and contacting the solution with an organic water-immiscible solvent such as MEK, whereby the uranyl values are taken up by the extract phase while the zirconium and niobium preferentially remain in the aqueous raffinate.

  20. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM-URANIUM NUCLEAR FUELS

    DOEpatents

    Gens, T.A.

    1962-07-10

    An improvement was made in a process of recovering uranium from a uranium-zirconium composition which was hydrochlorinated with gsseous hydrogen chloride at a temperature of from 350 to 800 deg C resulting in volatilization of the zirconium, as zirconium tetrachloride, and the formation of a uranium containing nitric acid insoluble residue. The improvement consists of reacting the nitric acid insoluble hydrochlorination residue with gaseous carbon tetrachloride at a temperature in the range 550 to 600 deg C, and thereafter recovering the resulting uranium chloride vapors. (AEC)

  1. Nitrate biosensors and biological methods for nitrate determination.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Manzar; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2016-06-01

    The inorganic nitrate (NO3‾) anion is present under a variety of both natural and artificial environmental conditions. Nitrate is ubiquitous within the environment, food, industrial and physiological systems and is mostly present as hydrated anion of a corresponding dissolved salt. Due to the significant environmental and toxicological effects of nitrate, its determination and monitoring in environmental and industrial waters are often necessary. A wide range of analytical techniques are available for nitrate determination in various sample matrices. This review discusses biosensors available for nitrate determination using the enzyme nitrate reductase (NaR). We conclude that nitrate determination using biosensors is an excellent non-toxic alternative to all other available analytical methods. Over the last fifteen years biosensing technology for nitrate analysis has progressed very well, however, there is a need to expedite the development of nitrate biosensors as a suitable alternative to non-enzymatic techniques through the use of different polymers, nanostructures, mediators and strategies to overcome oxygen interference. PMID:27130094

  2. Nitrate therapy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Alpert, J S

    1990-06-01

    Changes in the heart and blood vessels with age alter the response of the cardiovascular system to pharmacologic agents. Nitrate plasma half-life is longer and volume of distribution is larger in older persons. Apparently, these pharmacokinetic differences in older persons lead to increased venous smooth muscle responsivity to nitrates which, in turn, leads to greater reductions in central venous and pulmonary arterial pressures after nitrate administration. This is probably the explanation for the greater frequency of nitrate-induced severe hypotension and bradycardia in elderly patients with myocardial infarction compared with younger patients. Clinicians should be cognizant of the changes in the cardiovascular system which occur with age that sensitize the elderly patient to the action of organic nitrates. Initial dosages of nitrates should accordingly be less than in younger patients. PMID:2112335

  3. COMPARISON OF MUTAGENIC ACTIVITIES OF SEVERAL PEROXYACYL NITRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 was exposed to a series of peroxyacyl nitrates including peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), peroxypropionyl nitrate peroxybutyryl nitrate (PBN), peroxybenzoyl nitrate (PBzN), and chlororoxyacetyl nitrate (CPAN). as phase concentrations for the individ...

  4. COMPARISON OF MUTAGENIC ACTIVITIES OF SEVERAL PEROXYACL NITRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmonella typhimurium, strain TA100 was exposed to a series of peroxyacyl nitrates including peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), peroxypropionyl nitrate (PPN), peroxybutyryl nitrate (PBN), peroxybenzoyl nitrate (PBzN), and chloroperoxyacetyl nitrate (CPAN). as-phase concentrations for t...

  5. Plastic deformation of polycrystalline zirconium carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darolia, R.; Archbold, T. F.

    1976-01-01

    The compressive yield strength of arc-melted polycrystalline zirconium carbide has been found to vary from 77 kg per sq mm at 1200 C to 19 kg per sq mm at 1800 C. Yield drops were observed with plastic strain-rates greater than 0.003/sec but not with slower strain rates. Strain-rate change experiments yielded values for the strain-rate sensitivity parameter m which range from 6.5 at 1500 C to 3.8 at 1800 C, and the product dislocation velocity stress exponent times T was found to decrease linearly with increasing temperature. The deformation rate results are consistent with the Kelly-Rowcliffe model in which the diffusion of carbon assists the motion of dislocations.

  6. Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asquith, J. G.; Mason, D. G.; Stamp, S.

    1972-01-01

    The Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor being designed and fabricated at Atomics International is intended for a wide range of potential applications. Throughout the program a series of reactor designs have been evaluated to establish the unique requirements imposed by coupling with various power conversion systems and for specific applications. Current design and development emphasis is upon a 100 kilowatt thermal reactor for application in a 5 kwe thermoelectric space power generating system, which is scheduled to be fabricated and ground tested in the mid 70s. The reactor design considerations reviewed in this paper will be discussed in the context of this 100 kwt reactor and a 300 kwt reactor previously designed for larger power demand applications.

  7. A thermodynamic database for zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupin, N.; Ansara, I.; Servant, C.; Toffolon, C.; Lemaignan, C.; Brachet, J. C.

    1999-11-01

    A thermodynamic database, Zircobase, was developed for zirconium alloys for use in the nuclear industry. Two examples of the assessments concerning the Sn-Zr and H-Zr systems are given. The complete set for the binary systems, compiled or assessed during the course of this study, is to be found on the web site: www.inpg.fr/ltpcm/base/zircobase. The utility of this database is demonstrated in examples of thermodynamic calculations of the α/β phase transformation temperatures performed on industrial Zr-Nb and Zy4 type alloys. These last results show fairly good predictions, using extrapolations of the actual thermodynamic database to ternary or higher order systems.

  8. Process for massively hydriding zirconium--uranium fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Katz, N.H.

    1973-12-01

    A method is described of hydriding uranium-zirconium alloy by heating the alloy in a vacuum, introducing hydrogen and maintaining an elevated temperature until occurrence of the beta--delta phase transformation and isobarically cooling the composition. (Official Gazette)

  9. Nucleation Pathways For Freezing Of Two Grades Of Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Rulison, Aaron; Bayuzick, Robert; Hofmeister, William; Morton, Craig

    1996-01-01

    Report discusses classical nucleation theory of freezing and describes experimental study of nucleation mechanisms that predominate during freezing of spherical specimens of initially molten zirconium levitated electrostatically in vacuum.

  10. Investigation of Electrochemical Recovery of Zirconium from Spent Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Simpson; II-Soon Hwang

    2014-06-01

    This project uses both modeling and experimental studies to design optimal electrochemical technology methods for recovery of zirconium from used nuclear fuel rods for more effective waste management. The objectives are to provide a means of efficiently separating zirconium into metallic high-level waste forms and to support development of a process for decontamination of zircaloy hulls to enable their disposal as low- and intermediate-level waste. Modeling work includes extension of a 3D model previously developed by Seoul National University for uranium electrorefining by adding the ability to predict zirconium behavior. Experimental validation activities include tests for recovery of zirconium from molten salt solutions and aqueous tests using surrogate materials. *This is a summary of the FY 2013 progress for I-NERI project # 2010-001-K provided to the I-NERI office.

  11. PRECIPITATION OF ZIRCONIUM AND FLUORIDE IONS FROM SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Newby, B.J.

    1963-06-11

    A process is given for removing zirconium and fluorine ions from aqueous solutions also containing uranium(VI). The precipitation is carried out with sodium formate, and the uranium remains in solution. (AEC)

  12. Critical role of nitrogen during high temperature scaling of zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, E. B.; Tsangarakis, N.; Probst, H. B.; Garibotti, N. J.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanisms of scale cracking, scale color changes, and scale growth, and their interrelations, were studied in zirconium specimens at elevated temperatures in air, oxygen and nitrogen. Nitrogen was found to be responsible for monoclinic-to-cubic ZrO2 conversion, for scale cracking and breakaway on zirconium nitride, and for the formation of ZrN on the metal interface underneath an outer oxide layer.

  13. Zirconium alkoxide interfaces for adhesion enhancement and electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderkam, Susan Killian

    Tetra(tert-butoxy)zirconium was chemisorbed onto the native oxide layers of aluminum, iron, copper, and porous silicon, forming surface bound di- or tri-alkoxy zirconium species. Poly(ethylene- co-acrylic acid) was subsequently reacted with the surface forming chemically bound copolymer through carboxyzirconium linkages. Copolymer bound through the zirconium complex adhered to the metal oxide surfaces better than without the zirconium alkoxide intermediate, as determined by FTIR spectroscopy. Copper substrates were subjected to a variety of stability tests, including exposure to ambient conditions, base washing, and chronocoulometry. The copper-zirconium-copolymer ensemble was shown to be very stable in all of these tests. Indium tin oxide (ITO) powder was titrated to determine surface hydroxyl content per unit area. ITO-coated glass slides were reacted with tetra( tert-butoxy)zirconium, and subsequently with both carboxylic acid and phenol derivatives. Ferrocene-carboxyzirconium-coated ITO was characterized electrochemically, and the surface loading of ferrocene was found to be approximately one monolayer. Phenoxyzirconium-coated ITO was also characterized electrochemically and tested for electrocatalytic properties for the oxidation of several compounds in solution. Phenoxyzirconium-coated ITO was found to improve the oxidation kinetics for ferrocene and tetramethylphenylenediamine in acetonitrile.

  14. Quercetin as colorimetric reagent for determination of zirconium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; White, C.E.

    1953-01-01

    Methods described in the literature for the determination of zirconium are generally designed for relatively large amounts of this element. A good procedure using colorimetric reagent for the determination of trace amounts is desirable. Quercetin has been found to yield a sensitive color reaction with zirconium suitable for the determination of from 0.1 to 50?? of zirconium dioxide. The procedure developed involves the separation of zirconium from interfering elements by precipitation with p-dimethylaminoazophenylarsonic acid prior to its estimation with quercetin. The quercetin reaction is carried out in 0.5N hydrochloric acid solution. Under the operating conditions it is indicated that quercetin forms a 2 to 1 complex with zirconium; however, a 2 to 1 and a 1 to 1 complex can coexist under special conditions. Approximate values for the equilibrium constants of the complexes are K1 = 0.33 ?? 10-5 and K2 = 1.3 ?? 10-9. Seven Bureau of Standards samples of glass sands and refractories were analyzed with excellent results. The method described should find considerable application in the analysis of minerals and other materials for macro as well as micro amounts of zirconium.

  15. Zirconium behaviour during electrorefining of actinide-zirconium alloy in molten LiCl-KCl on aluminium cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R.; Souček, P.; Malmbeck, R.; Krachler, M.; Rodrigues, A.; Claux, B.; Glatz, J.-P.; Fanghänel, Th.

    2016-04-01

    A pyrochemical electrorefining process for the recovery of actinides from metallic nuclear fuel based on actinide-zirconium alloys (An-Zr) in a molten salt is being investigated. In this process actinides are group-selectively recovered on solid aluminium cathodes as An-Al alloys using a LiCl-KCl eutectic melt at a temperature of 450 °C. In the present study the electrochemical behaviour of zirconium during electrorefining was investigated. The maximum amount of actinides that can be oxidised without anodic co-dissolution of zirconium was determined at a selected constant cathodic current density. The experiment consisted of three steps to assess the different stages of the electrorefining process, each of which employing a fresh aluminium cathode. The results indicate that almost a complete dissolution of the actinides without co-dissolution of zirconium is possible under the applied experimental conditions.

  16. TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

    1958-06-10

    The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

  17. Some History of Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Dennis W.

    2003-12-01

    The history of saltpeter is an interesting combination of chemistry, world trade, technology, politics, and warfare. Originally it was obtained from the dirt floors of stables, sheep pens, pigeon houses, caverns, and even peasants' cottages; any place manure and refuse accumulated in soil under dry conditions. When these sources became inadequate to meet demand it was manufactured on saltpeter plantations, located in dry climates, where piles of dirt, limestone, and manure were allowed to stand for three to five years while soil microbes oxidized the nitrogen to nitrate—an example of early bioengineering. Extensive deposits of sodium nitrate were mined in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile from 1830 until the mid 1920s when the mines were displaced by the Haber Ostwald process.

  18. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, Arthur; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2013-10-11

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450{degree}C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC-based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800{degree}C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation

  19. Mortality of nitrate fertiliser workers.

    PubMed

    Al-Dabbagh, S; Forman, D; Bryson, D; Stratton, I; Doll, R

    1986-08-01

    An epidemiological cohort study was conducted to investigate the mortality patterns among a group of workers engaged in the production of nitrate based fertilisers. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that individuals exposed to high concentrations of nitrates might be at increased risk of developing cancers, particularly gastric cancer. A total of 1327 male workers who had been employed in the production of fertilisers between 1946 and 1981 and who had been occupationally exposed to nitrates for at least one year were followed up until 1 March 1981. In total, 304 deaths were observed in this group and these were compared with expected numbers calculated from mortality rates in the northern region of England, where the factory was located. Analysis was also carried out separately for a subgroup of the cohort who had been heavily exposed to nitrates--that is, working in an environment likely to contain more than 10 mg nitrate/m3 for a year or longer. In neither the entire cohort nor the subgroup was any significant excess observed for all causes of mortality or for mortality from any of five broad categories of cause or from four specific types of cancer. A small excess of lung cancer was noted more than 20 years after first exposure in men heavily exposed for more than 10 years. That men were exposed to high concentrations of nitrate was confirmed by comparing concentrations of nitrates in the saliva of a sample of currently employed men with control men, employed at the same factory but not in fertiliser production. The men exposed to nitrate had substantially raised concentrations of nitrate in their saliva compared with both controls within the industry and with men in the general population and resident nearby. The results of this study therefore weight against the idea that exposure to nitrates in the environment leads to the formation in vivo of material amounts of carcinogens. PMID:3015194

  20. Nitrate concentrations under irrigated agriculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaporozec, A.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, considerable interest has been expressed in the nitrate content of water supplies. The most notable toxic effect of nitrate is infant methemoglobinemia. The risk of this disease increases significantly at nitrate-nitrogen levels exceeding 10 mg/l. For this reason, this concentration has been established as a limit for drinking water in many countries. In natural waters, nitrate is a minor ionic constituent and seldom accounts for more than a few percent of the total anions. However, nitrate in a significant concentration may occur in the vicinity of some point sources such as septic tanks, manure pits, and waste-disposal sites. Non-point sources contributing to groundwater pollution are numerous and a majority of them are related to agricultural activities. The largest single anthropogenic input of nitrate into the groundwater is fertilizer. Even though it has not been proven that nitrogen fertilizers are responsible for much of nitrate pollution, they are generally recognized as the main threat to groundwater quality, especially when inefficiently applied to irrigated fields on sandy soils. The biggest challenge facing today's agriculture is to maintain the balance between the enhancement of crop productivity and the risk of groundwater pollution. ?? 1982 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  1. Equilibrium properties of hcp titanium and zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.; Singh, D.; Krakauer, H.

    1987-11-15

    The electronic and structural properties of hexagonal-close-packed titanium and zirconium are determined from self-consistent linearized augmented-plane-wave (LAPW) calculations within the framework of the local-density-functional approximation (LDA). The equilibrium lattice parameters, bulk moduli, Poisson's ratios, and cohesive energies are obtained from the total energies calculated as functions of the a and c lattice parameters. As found in other LDA calculations, the cohesive energies are overestimated compared to experiment, but otherwise generally good agreement with experiment is obtained. The uncertainty in the results due to the particular choice of the LDA exchange-correlation potential is also examined by performing parallel calculations using the Kohn-Sham-Gaspar X..cap alpha.. (..cap alpha.. = (2/3) exchange-only potential. We find that these calculations yield equilibrium volumes which differ by 6--8 % (with the X..cap alpha.. results in better agreement with experiment) with proportional differences in other structural properties, which we take to be an indication of the intrinsic reliability of the LDA.

  2. Equilibrium properties of hcp titanium and zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhi-Wei; Singh, David; Krakauer, Henry

    1987-11-01

    The electronic and structural properties of hexagonal-close-packed titanium and zirconium are determined from self-consistent linearized augmented-plane-wave (LAPW) calculations within the framework of the local-density-functional approximation (LDA). The equilibrium lattice parameters, bulk moduli, Poisson's ratios, and cohesive energies are obtained from the total energies calculated as functions of the a and c lattice parameters. As found in other LDA calculations, the cohesive energies are overestimated compared to experiment, but otherwise generally good agreement with experiment is obtained. The uncertainty in the results due to the particular choice of the LDA exchange-correlation potential is also examined by performing parallel calculations using the Kohn-Sham-Gaspar Xα (α=(2/3) exchange-only potential. We find that these calculations yield equilibrium volumes which differ by 6-8 % (with the Xα results in better agreement with experiment) with proportional differences in other structural properties, which we take to be an indication of the intrinsic reliability of the LDA.

  3. In situ ion irradiation of zirconium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Christopher J.; Motta, Arthur T.; Kirk, Mark A.

    2015-11-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is a candidate material for use in one of the layers of TRISO coated fuel particles to be used in the Generation IV high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor, and thus it is necessary to study the effects of radiation damage on its structure. The microstructural evolution of ZrCx under irradiation was studied in situ using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. Samples of nominal stoichiometries ZrC0.8 and ZrC0.9 were irradiated in situ using 1 MeV Kr2+ ions at various irradiation temperatures (T = 20 K-1073 K). In situ experiments made it possible to continuously follow the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation using diffraction contrast imaging. Images and diffraction patterns were systematically recorded at selected dose points. After a threshold dose during irradiations conducted at room temperature and below, black-dot defects were observed which accumulated until saturation. Once created, the defect clusters did not move or get destroyed during irradiation so that at the final dose the low temperature microstructure consisted only of a saturation density of small defect clusters. No long-range migration of the visible defects or dynamic defect creation and elimination were observed during irradiation, but some coarsening of the microstructure with the formation of dislocation loops was observed at higher temperatures. The irradiated microstructure was found to be only weakly dependent on the stoichiometry.

  4. Mechanical properties of zirconium alloys and zirconium hydrides predicted from density functional perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Tikare, Veena; Mitchell, John A.

    2015-10-13

    Here, the elastic properties and mechanical stability of zirconium alloys and zirconium hydrides have been investigated within the framework of density functional perturbation theory. Results show that the lowest-energy cubic Pn-3m with combining macron]m polymorph of δ-ZrH1.5 does not satisfy all the Born requirements for mechanical stability, unlike its nearly degenerate tetragonal P42/mcm polymorph. Elastic moduli predicted with the Voigt–Reuss–Hill approximations suggest that mechanical stability of α-Zr, Zr-alloy and Zr-hydride polycrystalline aggregates is limited by the shear modulus. According to both Pugh's and Poisson's ratios, α-Zr, Zr-alloy and Zr-hydride polycrystalline aggregates can be considered ductile. The Debye temperatures predicted for γ-ZrH, δ-ZrH1.5 and ε-ZrH2 are θD = 299.7, 415.6 and 356.9 K, respectively, while θD = 273.6, 284.2, 264.1 and 257.1 K for the α-Zr, Zry-4, ZIRLO and M5 matrices, i.e. suggesting that Zry-4 possesses the highest micro-hardness among Zr matrices.

  5. Mechanical properties of zirconium alloys and zirconium hydrides predicted from density functional perturbation theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Tikare, Veena; Mitchell, John A.

    2015-10-13

    Here, the elastic properties and mechanical stability of zirconium alloys and zirconium hydrides have been investigated within the framework of density functional perturbation theory. Results show that the lowest-energy cubic Pn-3m with combining macron]m polymorph of δ-ZrH1.5 does not satisfy all the Born requirements for mechanical stability, unlike its nearly degenerate tetragonal P42/mcm polymorph. Elastic moduli predicted with the Voigt–Reuss–Hill approximations suggest that mechanical stability of α-Zr, Zr-alloy and Zr-hydride polycrystalline aggregates is limited by the shear modulus. According to both Pugh's and Poisson's ratios, α-Zr, Zr-alloy and Zr-hydride polycrystalline aggregates can be considered ductile. The Debye temperatures predicted formore » γ-ZrH, δ-ZrH1.5 and ε-ZrH2 are θD = 299.7, 415.6 and 356.9 K, respectively, while θD = 273.6, 284.2, 264.1 and 257.1 K for the α-Zr, Zry-4, ZIRLO and M5 matrices, i.e. suggesting that Zry-4 possesses the highest micro-hardness among Zr matrices.« less

  6. Extraction chromatography of quadrivalent titanium and zirconium from succinate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Shete, S.D.; Shinde, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    Liquid ion exchangers such as tri-n-octyl amine (TOA), tri-iso-octylamine (TIOA) and Aliquat 336 have been used in this laboratory for analytical separation of vanadium(V) and niobium(V), indium(III), thalium(III), thorium(IV), cerium(IV) from succinate solutions. Extension of this study has revealed that benzene solutions of TOA, TIOA and Aliquat 336 could be used for anion exchange extraction of quadrivalent titanium and zirconium from succinate solution. The metal ions from the organic phase are stripped and determined spectrophotometrically. Solvent extraction methods for titanium(IV) and zirconium(IV) have been reviewed by De et al. and Korkisch in their monographs. Diethylamine, tri-ethylamine and tributylamine have been used for extraction of titanium from thiocyanate and citrate solution. Similarly high molecular weight amines such as TOA and TIOA have been used for the extraction of zirconium from mineral acids, but systematic solvent extraction separation of titanium(IV) and zirconium(IV) is lacking. In this communication we propose a new method for selective extraction and separation of titaium(IV) and zirconium(IV) from metal ions such as Mn, Cr, Mo, V, U, La, Ta, Th and Hf. The proposed method is comparatively free from drawbacks such as pre-equilibration of phases, multiple scrubbing, multiple extraction and coextraction of a large number of cations and anions.

  7. An investigation of the luminescence behaviour of zirconium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueh, Hsiang-Ken

    Corrosion of zirconium fuel cladding is a limiting factor in deciding the useful lifetime of fuel bundles for high burnups. Under irradiation conditions, the oxidation rate of zirconium is greatly enhanced. At present it is not clear how the alloying elements are incorporated into the oxide, and therefore, how they affect the corrosion behaviour. This prompted great interest in the investigation of the incorporation of alloying elements and impurities in the oxide during the zirconium oxidation process. Due to the low solubility of the alloying elements in the matrix oxide, the Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) technique does not have the sensitivity needed for their detection in areas away from the second phase particles where most of the transition metal additives (Fe, Cr, Ni) are segregated. In this study scanning electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence techniques are used to gain some insights into the effect of elements such as iron on the corrosion behaviour of zirconium alloys. Iron appears to migrate away from the second phase particles relatively easily, and to diffuse to free surfaces such as cracks within the oxide films. In these conditions it stimulates the cathodoluminescence locally. Other elements present in zirconium alloys either stimulate (Cu, Mo, Ti, Tb) light emission or suppress it (Sn, Nb), but do not appear to be localised in the oxide in the same way that iron is.

  8. Irradiation simulation of zirconium using high energy argon implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, D. Q.; Bai, X. D.; Pan, F.

    2007-03-01

    In order to simulate the irradiation damage, the argon ion was implanted in the zirconium with fluence ranging from 1×10 16 to 1×10 17 ions/cm 2, using accelerating implanter at an extraction voltage of 190 kV at liquid nitrogen temperature. Then the effect of argon ion implantation on the aqueous corrosion behavior of zirconium was studied. The valence states of elements in the surface layer of the samples were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) was employed to examine the phase transformation due to the argon ion implantation. The potentiodynamic polarization technique was employed to evaluate the aqueous corrosion resistance of implanted zirconium in a 1 M H 2SO 4 solution. From XPS, there existed adsorbed carbon and a little of oxygen (depth less than 20 nm) in the surface of samples, zirconium changed from zirconia to metallic zirconium along the depth direction. From GAXRD, the argon-implanted samples are little oxidized. It was found that the corrosion resistance of implanted samples declined with increasing the fluence, which is attributed to the removing of oxide protection layer and the irradiation damage.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of a mesoporous hydrous zirconium oxide used for arsenic removal from drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Bortun, Anatoly; Bortun, Mila; Pardini, James; Khainakov, Sergei A.; Garcia, Jose R.

    2010-02-15

    Powder (20-50 {mu}m) mesoporous hydrous zirconium oxide was prepared from a zirconium salt granular precursor. The effect of some process parameters on product morphology, porous structure and adsorption performance has been studied. The use of hydrous zirconium oxide for selective arsenic removal from drinking water is discussed.

  10. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  11. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  12. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10089 - Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified salicylic acid, zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10089 Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (PMN P-00-552) is subject to reporting under...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10089 - Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified salicylic acid, zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10089 Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (PMN P-00-552) is subject to reporting under...

  15. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  16. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  17. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  18. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10089 - Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified salicylic acid, zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10089 Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (PMN P-00-552) is subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10089 - Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified salicylic acid, zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10089 Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (PMN P-00-552) is subject to reporting under...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10089 - Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified salicylic acid, zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10089 Modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified salicylic acid, zirconium complex (PMN P-00-552) is subject to reporting under...

  3. Thermal decomposition of isooctyl nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, H.O.

    1989-03-01

    The diesel ignition improver DII-3, made by Ethyl Corporation, also known as isooctyl nitrate, is a mixture whose principal constituent (about 95%) is 2-ethyl hexyl nitrate. This note describes an investigation of the thermal decomposition that is not exhaustive, but that is intended to provide sufficient information on the rate and the mechanism so as to make possible the educated guesses needed for modeling the effect of isooctyl nitrate on the diesel ignition process. As is the case with other alkyl nitrates, the decomposition of the neat material is a complex one giving a complicated pressure versus time curve, unsuitable for a quick derivation of the rate constant. However, in the presence of toluene, whose intended purpose is to trap reactive free radicals and thereby simplify the overall mechanism, the pressure rises approximately exponentially to a limit; thus, on the assumption that the reaction is homogeneous and of first order, the rate constants can be determined from the half-life.

  4. Nitrates in Wisconsin ground water.

    PubMed

    Schuknecht, B; Lawton, G W; Steinka, P; Delfino, J J

    1975-01-01

    Nitrate analyses were performed on ground water well samples originating from sources throughout Wisconsin. The data ranged from below the analytical detection limit up to 140 mg NO3-N/1. Over nine percent of all wells sampled has nitrate concentrations in excess of 10 mg NO3-N/1. Six individual counties had more than 10 mg NO3-N/1 in at least twenty percent of the wells covered in this survey. However, data reported for over eight thousand new wells driven in 1971-1972 showed only slightly more than two percent with nitrate levels above 10 mg NO3-N/1. This reflected the trend toward drilling deeper wells which are influenced less by nitrate seepage as well as adherence to new and stricter well construction codes. PMID:1183417

  5. METHOD OF FABRICATING A URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, I.F.; Goeddel, W.V.

    1960-03-22

    A method is described of evenly dispersing uranlum metal in a zirconium hydride moderator to produce a fuel element for nuclear reactors. According to the invention enriched uranium hydride and zirconium hydride powders of 200 mesh particle size are thoroughly admixed to form a mixture containing 0.1 to 3% by weight of U/sup 235/ hydride. The mixed powders are placed in a die and pressed at 100 tons per square inch at room temperature. The resultant compacts are heated in a vacuum to 300 deg C, whereby the uranium hydride deoomposes into uranium metal and hydrogen gas. The escaping hydrogen gas forms a porous matrix of zirconium hydride, with uramum metal evenly dispersed therethrough. The advantage of the invention is that the porosity and uranium distribution of the final fuel element can be more closely determined and controlled than was possible using prior methods of producing such fuel ele- ments.

  6. Process for electroless deposition of metals on zirconium materials

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    A process for the electroless deposition of a metal layer on an article comprised of zirconium or a zirconium alloy is disclosed. The article is activated in an aged aqueous solution comprising from about 10 to about 20 grams per liter ammonium bifluoride and from about 0.75 to about 2 grams per liter of sulfuric acid. The solution is aged by immersion of pickled zirconium in the solution for at least about 10 minutes. The loosely adhering film formed on the article in the activating step is removed and the article is contacted with an electroless plating solution containing the metal to be deposited on the article upon sufficient contact with the article.

  7. Process for electrolytic deposition of metals on zirconium materials

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, Robert E.

    1979-01-30

    A process for the electrolytic deposition of a metal layer on an article comprised of zirconium or a zirconium alloy is disclosed. The article is activated in an aged aqueous solution comprising from about 10 to about 20 grams per liter ammonium bifluoride and from about 0.75 to about 2 grams per liter of sulfuric acid. The solution is aged by immersion of pickled zirconium in the solution for at least about 10 minutes. The loosely adhering film formed on the article in the activating step is removed and the article is contacted with an electrolytic plating solution containing the metal to be deposited on the article in the presence of an electrode receiving current.

  8. Synthesis of micro-dispersed zirconium oxide for glass manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharuk, V.; Starodubtsev, P.; Maslennikova, I.

    2016-01-01

    A rather simple and original method for processing of zirconium-containing raw material form Algoma deposit (Khabarovsk region, Russia) was suggested, which comprised fluorination of the initial sample with a diluted HF solution followed by the thermal treatment of fluorination products and pyrohydrolysis of zirconium tetrafluoride. Water vapors obtained by hydrogen and oxygen burning in a hydrogen torch as well as by simple evaporation were used for pyrohydrolysis. The feed rate of the water and its temperature were regulated. The temperature of water vapors reached 800-1200 °C. Zirconium dioxide with a purity of 99.97% or more and a dispersity of 0.1 gm or less was synthesized.

  9. Studies on synthesis esterified zirconium glyphosates and their hydrophobic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaqing; Li, Minglei; Ji, Xuemei; Xu, Qinghong

    2010-03-01

    A series of new organic-modified zirconium glyphosate compounds were synthesized based on the reactions between esterified glyphosates and ZrOCl 2. FT-IR spectra, solid-state 31P MAS NMR and elementary analysis proved the formation of these new compounds. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images proved these compounds had lamellar structures. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM) images showed that solvents used in synthesis had great influence on the morphologies of products. Water contact angle measurements showed that the hydrophobic property of the products was a function of the number of carbon in esterified glyphosates, increased from 0° of zirconium glyphosate to 133° of dodecyl zirconium glyphosate. The present study offered a new route to synthesize organic-modified α-Zr(HPO 4) 2·H 2O (α-ZrP) materials with various morphology and controllable hydrophobic property.

  10. Proof-of-Principle Measurements on Unirradiated Zirconium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

    2007-04-18

    The ability to determine fuel assembly burnup has important non-proliferation implications since proliferation activities involve either irradiating fuel assemblies to a much lower level of burnup than is normal in commercial Light Water Reactor (LWR) practice, and/or irradiation of separate targets. Similarly, a method of determining burnup could be used to confirm declared operation for a reactor that is operating under IAEA safeguards. It is possible to determine fuel assembly burnup by measuring gamma radiation from specific fission products; however this technique is only useable after the fuel assembly has been out of the reactor for at least a year, and is not very useful after the assembly has been out of the reactor for 10 years or more. The use of isotope ratio measurements to measure the level of neutron exposure that material has received is well-known for graphite applications. The current project is an attempt to demonstrate that isotope ratio measurements can be performed on zirconium alloys used in LWR fuel assemblies. Zirconium alloys are used for structural elements of fuel assemblies and for the fuel element cladding. This report covers proof-of-principle measurements done on unirradiated zirconium alloys, these measurements show that: Titanium 48/Titanium 49 ratios can be measured in zirconium alloys using a Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) - enough Titanium was present in each of 6 samples tried to allow resolving the peaks associated with each isotope, and correction of interfering ions. The Ti 48/49 ratio measured in unirradiated zirconium alloy is, within a narrow error band, the same as that found in natural, unirradiated zirconium.

  11. Stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, S.M.; Abraham, D.P.; Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Park, J.Y.

    1996-07-01

    An electrometallurgical treatment process has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to convert various types of spent nuclear fuels into stable storage forms and waste forms for repository disposal. The first application of this process will be to treat spent fuel alloys from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. Three distinct product streams emanate from the electrorefining process: (1) refined uranium; (2) fission products and actinides extracted from the electrolyte salt that are processed into a mineral waste form; and (3) metallic wastes left behind at the completion of the electrorefining step. The third product stream (i.e., the metal waste stream) is the subject of this paper. The metal waste stream contains components of the chopped spent fuel that are unaffected by the electrorefining process because of their electrochemically ``noble`` nature; this includes the cladding hulls, noble metal fission products (NMFP), and, in specific cases, zirconium from metal fuel alloys. The selected method for the consolidation and stabilization of the metal waste stream is melting and casting into a uniform, corrosion-resistant alloy. The waste form casting process will be carried out in a controlled-atmosphere furnace at high temperatures with a molten salt flux. Spent fuels with both stainless steel and Zircaloy cladding are being evaluated for treatment; thus, stainless steel-rich and Zircaloy-rich waste forms are being developed. Although the primary disposition option for the actinides is the mineral waste form, the concept of incorporating the TRU-bearing product into the metal waste form has enough potential to warrant investigation.

  12. Hydrogen pickup mechanism of zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couet, Adrien

    Although the optimization of zirconium based alloys has led to significant improvements in hydrogen pickup and corrosion resistance, the mechanisms by which such alloy improvements occur are still not well understood. In an effort to understand such mechanisms, a systematic study of the alloy effect on hydrogen pickup is conducted, using advanced characterization techniques to rationalize precise measurements of hydrogen pickup. The hydrogen pick-up fraction is accurately measured for a specially designed set of commercial and model alloys to investigate the effects of alloying elements, microstructure and corrosion kinetics on hydrogen uptake. Two different techniques to measure hydrogen concentrations were used: a destructive technique, Vacuum Hot Extraction, and a non-destructive one, Cold Neutron Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis. The results indicate that hydrogen pickup varies not only from alloy to alloy but also during the corrosion process for a given alloy. For instance Zircaloy type alloys show high hydrogen pickup fraction and sub-parabolic oxidation kinetics whereas ZrNb alloys show lower hydrogen pickup fraction and close to parabolic oxidation kinetics. Hypothesis is made that hydrogen pickup result from the need to balance charge during the corrosion reaction, such that the pickup of hydrogen is directly related to (and indivisible of) the corrosion mechanism and decreases when the rate of electron transport or oxide electronic conductivity sigmao xe through the protective oxide increases. According to this hypothesis, alloying elements (either in solid solution or in precipitates) embedded in the oxide as well as space charge variations in the oxide would impact the hydrogen pick-up fraction by modifying sigmaox e, which drives oxidation and hydriding kinetics. Dedicated experiments and modelling were performed to assess and validate these hypotheses. In-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) experiments were performed on Zircaloy-4 tubes

  13. In-situ stabilization of radioactive zirconium swarf

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Clay C.

    1997-12-01

    The method for treating ignitable cutting swarf in accordance with the present invention involves collecting cutting swarf in a casting mold underwater and injecting a binder mixture comprising vinyl ester styrene into the vessel to fill void volume; and form a mixture comprising swarf and vinyl ester styrene; and curing the mixture. The method is especially useful for stabilizing the ignitable characteristics of radioactive zirconium cutting swarf, and can be used to solidify zirconium swarf, or other ignitable finely divided material, underwater. The process could also be performed out of water with other particulate wastes.

  14. A new conducting nanocomposite -- PPy-zirconium (IV) oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, A.; De, A.; Sarkar, S.; Ganguly, K.M.

    1996-05-01

    Pyrrole was polymerized in the presence of ultrafine zirconium (IV) oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles which act as a dispersant for pyrrole. Room temperature conductivities of the resulting polypyrrole-zirconium (IV) oxide nanocomposites having different ZrO{sub 2} particle concentrations were measured and were compared with that of bare polypyrrole. It was observed that the conductivities of the nanocomposites were higher than that of the polypyrrole without ZrO{sub 2} and increased with ZrO{sub 2} concentration up to a certain limit. From transmission electron microscope studies, particle size and morphology of the nanocomposites and ZrO{sub 2} particles were obtained.

  15. Zirconium diboride nanofiber generation via microwave arc heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldridge, Tyson; Gupta, Mool C.

    2008-07-01

    Ultrahigh temperature zirconium diboride nanofibers were produced by microwave arc heating using micron-sized raw powder. While microwave heating the ZrB2 powder, the development of local arcing led to rapid heating and solidification of the samples, along with the creation of nanofibers. The morphology of these high aspect ratio nanofibers was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction showed the composition to contain zirconium, boron, nitrogen, aluminum and oxygen as well as the crystallographic orientation. ZrB2 nanofiber applications include aerospace and other harsh environments.

  16. In-situ stabilization of radioactive zirconium swarf

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Clay C.

    1999-01-01

    The method for treating ignitable cutting swarf in accordance with the present invention involves collecting cutting swarf in a casting mold underwater and injecting a binder mixture comprising vinyl ester styrene into the vessel to fill void volume; and form a mixture comprising swarf and vinyl ester styrene; and curing the mixture. The method is especially useful for stabilizing the ignitable characteristics of radioactive zirconium cutting swarf, and can be used to solidify zirconium swarf, or other ignitable finely divided material, underwater. The process could also be performed out of water with other particulate wastes.

  17. In-situ stabilization of radioactive zirconium swarf

    DOEpatents

    Hess, C.C.

    1999-08-31

    The method for treating ignitable cutting swarf in accordance with the present invention involves collecting cutting swarf in a casting mold underwater and injecting a binder mixture comprising vinyl ester styrene into the vessel to fill void volume; and form a mixture comprising swarf and vinyl ester styrene; and curing the mixture. The method is especially useful for stabilizing the ignitable characteristics of radioactive zirconium cutting swarf, and can be used to solidify zirconium swarf, or other ignitable finely divided material, underwater. The process could also be performed out of water with other particulate wastes. 6 figs.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium in nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J A; Griess, J C; Boyd, W K

    1980-01-01

    The susceptibility of zirconium and its common alloys to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nitric acid was investigated by slow strain-rate and constant deflection techniques. Cracking occurred at 25/sup 0/C over a wide range of acid concentrations and electrochemical potentials. The crack velocity increased slightly with increasing temperature. The failure mode was transgranular and the morphology was similar to SCC failures of zirconium alloys in other environments. The fracture was very orientation-dependent suggesting that it occurs on a single crystallographic plane in the material. The results of the study are not consistent with a hydrogen mechanism for cracking.

  19. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  20. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  1. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  2. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  3. EXTRACTION OF URANYL NITRATE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Furman, N.H.; Mundy, R.J.

    1957-12-10

    An improvement in the process is described for extracting aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions with an organic solvent such as ether. It has been found that the organic phase will extract a larger quantity of uranyl nitrate if the aqueous phase contains in addition to the uranyl nitrate, a quantity of some other soluble nitrate to act as a salting out agent. Mentioned as suitable are the nitrates of lithium, calcium, zinc, bivalent copper, and trivalent iron.

  4. Chemistry of zirconium related to the behavior of nuclear fuel cladding. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cubicciotti, D.

    1980-03-26

    Studies of the chemistry of the zirconium-iodine and zirconium-oxygen systems were undertaken to elucidate their thermodynamics and kinetics. It is anticipated that the results obtained will lead to an improved understanding of the chemical processes involved in chemically assisted fuel rod failures. This project not only has classified the thermodynamics of both the gas phase and the solids in the zirconium-iodine system, it has also provided valuable information on the chemisorption of iodine and of oxygen on zirconium surfaces at high temperatures. In addition, the kinetics of reactions on zirconium surfaces were studied. These results have already been helpful in understanding the stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy.

  5. Characterization of uranium and uranium-zirconium deposits produced in electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Totemeier, T.C.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the metallurgical characterization of deposits produced in molten salt electrorefining of uranium and uranium - 10.% zirconium alloy. The techniques of characterization are described with emphasis on considerations given to the radioactive and pyrophoric nature of the samples. The morphologies observed and their implications for deposit performance are also presented - samples from pure uranium deposits were comprised of chains of uranium crystals with a characteristic rhomboidal shape, while morphologies of samples from deposits containing zirconium showed more polycrystalline features. Zirconium was found to be present as a second, zirconium metal phase at or very near the uranium-zirconium dendrite surfaces. Higher collection efficiencies and total deposit weights were observed for the uranium-zirconium deposits; this performance increase is likely a result of better mechanical properties exhibited by the uranium-zirconium dendrite morphology. 18 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Influence of zirconium on microstructure and toughness of low-alloy steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, V. B.; Mello, R. S. T.; Payão, J. C.; Paranhos, R. P. R.

    2006-06-01

    The influence of zirconium on microstructure and toughness of low-alloy steel weld metal was studied. Weld metals with different zirconium contents were obtained adding iron-zirconium alloy in the welding flux formulation. Weld metal chemical composition proved that zirconium was able to be transferred from the flux to the weld metal. The addition of zirconium refined the weld metal microstructure, increasing the acicular ferrite content. Weld metal toughness, determined by means of impact Charpy-V tests, showed that the zirconium addition is beneficial up to a content of 0.005 wt.%. Above this level, zirconium was not able to produce further microstructure refinement, although the toughness was reduced, possibly due to the formation of microconstituent such as the martensite-austenite constituent (M-A), which is considered to be deleterious to the weld metal toughness.

  7. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  8. Enhanced removal of fluoride by polystyrene anion exchanger supported hydrous zirconium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bingcai; Xu, Jingsheng; Wu, Bing; Li, Zhigang; Liu, Xitong

    2013-08-20

    Here we fabricated a novel nanocomposite HZO-201, an encapsulated nanosized hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO) within a commercial porous polystyrene anion exchanger D201, for highly efficient defluoridation of water. HZO-201 exhibited much higher preference than activated alumina and D201 toward fluoride removal when competing anions (chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and bicarbonate) coexisted at relatively high levels. Fixed column adsorption indicated that the effective treatable volume of water with HZO-201 was about 7-14 times as much as with D201 irrespective of whether synthetic solution or groundwater was the feeding solution. In addition, HZO-201 could treat >3000 BV of the acidic effluent (around 3.5 mg F(-)/L) per run at pH 3.5, compared to only ∼4 BV with D201. The exhausted HZO-201 could be regenerated by NaOH solution for repeated use without any significant capacity loss. Such attractive performance of HZO-201 resulted from its specific hybrid structure, that is, the host anion exchanger D201 favors the preconcentration of fluoride ions inside the polymer based on the Donnan principle, and the encapsulated nanosized HZO exhibits preferable sequestration of fluoride through specific interaction, as further demonstrated by XPS spectra. The influence of solution pH, competitive anions, and contact time was also examined. The results suggested that HZO-201 has a great potential in efficient defluoridation of groundwater and acidic mine drainage. PMID:23909842

  9. Sensing of NO2 with Zirconium Hydroxide via Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Coleman; Soliz, Jennifer; Klevitch, Andrew; Rossin, Joseph; Fountain, Augustus, III; Peterson, Gregory; Hauser, Adam

    Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) is a brown gas mainly produced as a byproduct of burning fossil fuels, such as automobiles and power plants. Nitrogen oxides can form acid rain and smog by reacting with air, can form toxic organic nitrates by reacting with soil, and can react with oxygen in water, destroying marine life due to a lack of breathable oxygen. Any concentration beyond 53 ppb (air quality standard) can cause irritation to the lungs and respiratory infections, and higher dosages can be fatal. As such, research in NO2 detection is incredibly important to human welfare. Zirconium hydroxide (Zr(OH)4) has been investigated as a candidate NO2 dielectric sensor using impedance spectroscopy analysis. Impedance changes of several orders of magnitude are seen down to our dosage minimum of 50 ppmhr. Changes in impedance correlate with nitrogen and oxygen atomic ratio increases observed via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that Zr(OH)4 may be a strong candidate for use in impedance-based NO2 detection devices. A.J.H., J.R.S., A.W.F. and G.W. P. acknowledge funding under Army Research Office STIR Award #W911F-15-1-0104. J.R.S. acknowledges funding under a NRC fellowship and is advised by Dr. Christopher Karwacki, ECBC.

  10. Reduction of nitrate in Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin Koo; Barua, Sumitra; Reed, SB; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrikson, JK; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  11. Surface modification of layered zirconium phosphate with PNIPAM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuezhen; Zhao, Di; Medina, Ilse B Nava; Diaz, Agustin; Wang, Huiliang; Clearfield, Abraham; Mannan, M Sam; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-04-01

    A new method was reported to modify layered zirconium phosphate (ZrP) with thermoresponsive polymer PNIPAM (poly N-isopropylacrylamide). PNIPAM was proved to be covalently grafted onto ZrP. (60)Co γ-rays irradiation produced peroxide groups on the surface which, upon heating, initiated free radical polymerization and subsequent attachment of PNIPAM. PMID:26966882

  12. 40 CFR 721.10601 - Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... zirconium oxide (PMN P-11-270; CAS No. 61461-40-3); Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-271; CAS No. 1262279-31-1); Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-272;...

  13. Mn-Ti-Zr (Manganese-Titanium-Zirconium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materials Science International Team MSIT

    This document is part of Subvolume C3 'Non-Ferrous Metal Systems. Part 3: Selected Soldering and Brazing Systems' of Volume 11 'Ternary Alloy Systems - Phase Diagrams, Crystallographic and Thermodynamic Data critically evaluated by MSIT®' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It provides data of the ternary system Manganese-Titanium-Zirconium.

  14. Cu-Ti-Zr (Copper-Titanium-Zirconium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materials Science International Team MSIT

    This document is part of Subvolume C3 'Non-Ferrous Metal Systems. Part 3: Selected Soldering and Brazing Systems' of Volume 11 'Ternary Alloy Systems - Phase Diagrams, Crystallographic and Thermodynamic Data critically evaluated by MSIT®' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It provides data of the ternary system Copper-Titanium-Zirconium.

  15. Mineral resource of the month: zirconium and hafnium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Zirconium and hafnium are corrosion-resistant metals that are grouped in the same family as titanium on the periodic table. The two elements commonly occur in oxide and silicate minerals and have significant economic importance in everything from ink, ceramics and golf shoes to nuclear fuel rods.

  16. Manufacturing process to reduce large grain growth in zirconium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Rosecrans, Peter M.

    1987-01-01

    A method of treating cold-worked zirconium alloys to reduce large grain gth during thermal treatment at temperatures above the recrystallization temperature of the alloy comprising heating the cold-worked alloy between about 1300.degree.-1350.degree. F. for 1 to 3 hours prior to treatment above its recrystallization temperature.

  17. Nanophase Nickel-Zirconium Alloys for Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Whitacre, jay; Valdez, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Nanophase nickel-zirconium alloys have been investigated for use as electrically conductive coatings and catalyst supports in fuel cells. Heretofore, noble metals have been used because they resist corrosion in the harsh, acidic fuel cell interior environments. However, the high cost of noble metals has prompted a search for less-costly substitutes. Nickel-zirconium alloys belong to a class of base metal alloys formed from transition elements of widely different d-electron configurations. These alloys generally exhibit unique physical, chemical, and metallurgical properties that can include corrosion resistance. Inasmuch as corrosion is accelerated by free-energy differences between bulk material and grain boundaries, it was conjectured that amorphous (glassy) and nanophase forms of these alloys could offer the desired corrosion resistance. For experiments to test the conjecture, thin alloy films containing various proportions of nickel and zirconium were deposited by magnetron and radiofrequency co-sputtering of nickel and zirconium. The results of x-ray diffraction studies of the deposited films suggested that the films had a nanophase and nearly amorphous character.

  18. Bronchopulmonary Cellular Response to Aluminum and Zirconium Salts

    PubMed Central

    Stankus, Richard P.; Schuyler, Mark R.; D'Amato, Robert A.; Salvaggio, John E.

    1978-01-01

    The bronchopulmonary cellular immunological response to repeated intratracheal inoculation of aluminum chlorhydrate, sodium zirconium lactate, and zirconium aluminum glycine was examined in rabbits. Results of a dose-response experiment using 0.1, 1.0, and 10.0-mg intratracheal inoculations of each metallic salt demonstrated significant bronchopulmonary histopathology in the 10.0-mg dose-response groups only. Acute lesions were histologically characterized by an inflammatory response centered around respiratory bronchioles. Although epithelioid cell formation was evident in 10.0 mg of aluminum salt (aluminum chlorhydrate and zirconium aluminum glycine) -injected animals, no well-defined granulomas characterized by an orderly arrangement of epithelioid cells, lymphocytes, and giant cells were evident in any of the experimental groups employed. All three metallic salts induced “activated” bronchopulmonary macrophages as determined by an in vitro phagocytic assay. This activation was likely nonimmunological since no measurable differences were observed in metallic salt-induced delayed skin reactivity or migration inhibition factor production between inoculated and uninoculated rabbits. The above observations suggest that aluminum and zirconium salts administered in comparatively high dosage via the respiratory tract route can induce respiratory bronchiolitis and activation of alveolar macrophages in the absence of demonstrable delayed hypersensitivity. Images PMID:352963

  19. Cu-Si-Zr (Copper-Silicon-Zirconium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materials Science International Team MSIT

    This document is part of Subvolume C2 'Non-Ferrous Metal Systems. Part 2: Selected Copper Systems' of Volume 11 'Ternary Alloy Systems - Phase Diagrams, Crystallographic and Thermodynamic Data critically evaluated by MSIT®' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It provides data of the ternary system Copper-Silicon-Zirconium.

  20. Surface characterization of anodized zirconium for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, A. Gomez; Schreiner, W.; Duffó, G.; Ceré, S.

    2011-05-01

    Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of zirconium make this material suitable for biomedical implants. Its good in vivo performance is mainly due to the presence of a protective oxide layer that minimizes corrosion rate, diminishes the amount of metallic ions released to the biological media and facilitates the osseointegration process. Since the implant surface is the region in contact with living tissues, the characteristics of the surface film are of great interest. Surface modification is a route to enhance both biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of permanent implant materials. Anodizing is presented as an interesting process to modify metal surfaces with good reproducibility and independence of the geometry. In this work the surface of zirconium before and after anodizing in 1 mol/L phosphoric acid solution at a fixed potential between 3 and 30 V, was characterized by means of several surface techniques. It was found that during anodization the surface oxide grows with an inhomogeneous coverage on zirconium surface, modifying the topography. The incorporation of P from the electrolyte to the surface oxide during the anodizing process changes the surface chemistry. After 30 days of immersion in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) solution, Ca-P rich compounds were present on anodized zirconium.

  1. Phosphorus Recovery Using Zirconium-Loaded Saponified Orange Juice Residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Mitsunori; Biswas, Biplob K.; Ohura, Seichirou; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Ishikawa, Susumu; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Ohto, Keisuke

    Zirconium was immobilized to orange juice residue, to investigate the feasibility of using zirconium-loaded saponified orange juice residue (Zr-SOJR) for phosphorus recovery from secondary effluent and the extraction solution from incinerated sewage sludge ash by using H2SO4 and HCl. These had phosphorus concentrations of 68.2 mg/dm3 and 5.9 mg/dm3, respectively. The phosphorus removal rate secondary effluent increased with an increasing solid/liquid ratio in batch experiments. The adsorption capacity of Zr-SOJR was also compared with those obtained using a synthetic phosphorus solution and using zirconium-loaded ferrite. The prepared absorbent was effective for phosphorus removal and exhibited a reasonably high sorption capacity, twice that of zirconium ferrite. Secondary effluent was treated by packed column, and this reached break-through after 300 bed volumes. The results from phosphorous extraction from the ash indicate that can be treated with acid to efficiently recover phosphorous and thus can be absorbed by Zr-SOJR.

  2. Characterization of titanium and zirconium valerate sol-gel films

    SciTech Connect

    Severin, K.G.; Ledford, J.S.; Torgerson, B.A.; Berglund, K.A. )

    1994-07-01

    FTIR and XPS have been used to characterize titanium and zirconium valerate thin films prepared using sol-gel techniques. Films were prepared by hydrolysis of titanium(IV) isopropoxide or zirconium(IV) n-propoxide in excess valeric acid at room temperature. Film solution chemistry, from precursors to cast films, was followed with FTIR. The structure and chemical composition of films spin cast from fresh and day-old solutions were determined. Results of these studies suggest that all films consist of a metal-oxygen polymer backbone coordinated with bidentate valerate ligands. No evidence for the presence of alkoxide ligands has been found. A small amount of water is present in all cast films. While solution aging experiments indicate that the zirconium film structure does not change with solution reaction time, carboxylate ligand concentrations are higher in titanium films made from aged solutions. Titanium films made from aged solutions contain slightly less than 1.5 valerate ligands/titanium atom. Zirconium films are more highly carboxylated with almost two valerate groups per metal center. 57 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Helium ion implantation in zirconium: Bubble formation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totemeier, Aaron Robert

    To evaluate the behavior of inert helium gas bubbles in zirconium three variants of the metal were implanted with 140 keV helium ions to a total fluence of 3x1017 cm--2 and characterized in cross-section TEM in their as-implanted state as well as during annealing at different temperatures. The three zirconium alloys included high-purity crystal bar material, Zircaloy-4, and a powder-metallurgically extruded material with high carbon and oxygen concentrations. At a sample depth consistent with a helium concentration of approximately 5 atomic percent, a change in the structure of the zirconium was observed a high density region of small (4nm diameter) bubbles formed at concentrations above 10 atom percent. Initial bubble formation and growth was observed to occurred at a temperature between 400-450 °C and these initial bubbles had a unique planar geometry prior to migration and coalescence into more three-dimensional bubbles. These planar bubbles appear to be aligned with major axes parallel to the TEM specimen surface and their formation and growth is possibly due to an increase in the thermal vacancy flux within the zirconium. The observations of bubble response to high temperature annealing suggest that in zirconium, as in other metals, maximum bubble size is weakly dependent on annealing time, whereas the bubble size distribution is strongly dependent on time. Specimens that underwent a prolonged room temperature aging developed a multimodal bubble size distribution within the high density region of small bubbles, concentrated near the highest helium concentration depth.

  4. A biological source of oceanic alkyl nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, E. E.; Lewis, C. B.; Velasco, F. L.; Escobar, C.; Kellogg, D.; Velcamp, M.

    2013-12-01

    Alkyl nitrates are an important component of reactive nitrogen in the troposphere. The oceans are a source of alkyl nitrates to the atmosphere, however the source of alkyl nitrates in the oceans is unknown. It has been demonstrated that the reaction of alkyl peroxy radicals (ROO) with nitric oxide (NO) produces alkyl nitrates in the aqueous phase. We hypothesize that alkyl nitrates may be formed by organisms through the same reaction and therefore biological production could be a source of alkyl nitrates to the troposphere. This work focuses on the production of alkyl nitrates by the diatoms Chaetoceros muelleri and Thalassiosira weisfloggi. Using chemostats, we measure alkyl nitrates formed under nitrate limited conditions. We also use triggers and inhibitors of nitric oxide formation to determine if alkyl nitrate formation is affected by changes in NO production. To date, the rates of production of alkyl nitrates in our cultures, lead us to estimate a production rate on the order of femtomolar/day for C1-C3 alkyl nitrates by diatom species in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. This suggests that diatoms may contribute to the overall ocean source of alkyl nitrates; however, it is possible that other types of phytoplankton, such as cyanobacteria, that are more abundant in the open ocean, may contribute to a greater extent.

  5. Syntheses and structural characterization of zirconium-tin and zirconium-lead binary and ternary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Y.U.

    1991-01-28

    The binary zirconium-tin system was reinvestigated. The A15 phase appears to be a line phase with a Zr{sub 4}Sn composition. The Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 3} (Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type) and Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 4} (Ti{sub 5}Ga{sub 4}-type) compounds are line phases below 1000{degree}C, the latter being a self-interstitial phase of the former. ZrSn{sub 2} is the tin-richest phase. There is an one-phase region between these phases with partial self-interstitials at high temperatures. The zirconium-lead system behaves similarly: there are an A15 phase with a Zr{sub {approximately}5.8}Pb composition, Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub 3} (Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type) and Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub 4} (Ti{sub 5}Ga{sub 4-type}) compounds, and a high temperature solid solution between Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub >3.5} and Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub 4} from below 1000{degree}C; however, the ZrSn{sub 2} analogue is not formed. The Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type phases in these systems can accommodate third elements interstitially to form stoichiometric compounds Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 3}Z (Z = B, C, N, O, Al, Si, P, S, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, and As and Se) and Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub 3}Z (Z = Al, Si, P, S, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb and Te) as well as their self-interstitial derivatives. The systems Zr-Sn-T, T = Fe, Co and Ni, did not produce stoichiometric interstitial phases Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 3}T. Instead, the interstitial phases for these elements are formed only with excess tin that partially occupies the interstitial site together with a T element. Reducing the amount of tin in these systems yields two new phases; Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 2+x}Fe{sub 1-x} (0 {le} {times} {le} 0.28) (W{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type) and Zr{sub 6}Sn{sub 2}Fe (Zr{sub 6}Al{sub 2}Co-type) as characterized by X-ray single crystal analyses. A cobalt analogue for the latter was also synthesized.

  6. Layered zirconium phosphonate with inorganic–organic hybrid structure: Preparation and its assembly with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li-Min; Lu, Guo-Yuan; Jiang, Li-Ping; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-07-01

    An aminoethoxy-functionalized zirconium phosphonate (Zr(O{sub 3}POCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}){sub 2}·3H{sub 2}O), abbreviated as ZrRP (R=OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}), with layered structure has been synthesized. This layered compound possesses the characteristic of inorganic–organic hybrid, due to the covalently linked aminoethoxy in the host layer. The anion exchanged property of this zirconium phosphonate is suitable for the direct intercalation of negatively charged DNA, which is different from these reported zirconium phosphates or zirconium phosphonates. As a precursor, this prepared zirconium phosphonate was utilized to fabricate a novel DNA/ZrRP binary hybrid via a delamination-reassembly procedure. The release behavior of DNA from the DNA/ZrRP composite was investigated at different medium pH, because the combination between zirconium phosphonate sheets and DNA was pH-dependent sensitively. Moreover, the helical conformation of DNA was almost retained after the intercalation and release process. These properties of the DNA/ZrRP composite suggested the potential application of layered zirconium phosphonate as a non-viral vector in gene delivery. - Graphical abstract: The intercalation of DNA into zirconium phosphonate and the release of DNA from the interlayer of zirconium phosphonate. - Highlights: ●A layered aminoethoxy-functionalized zirconium phosphonate has been synthesized. ●DNA was intercalated directly into the prepared zirconium phosphonate. ●A novel zirconium phosphonate/DNA binary hybrid was fabricated. ●DNA can be reversibly released from the interlayer of zirconium phosphonate. ●The intercalation/release processes do not induce the denaturalization of DNA.

  7. Short-Term Effects of a High Nitrate Diet on Nitrate Metabolism in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bondonno, Catherine P.; Liu, Alex H.; Croft, Kevin D.; Ward, Natalie C.; Puddey, Ian B.; Woodman, Richard J.; Hodgson, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary nitrate, through the enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, can improve blood pressure and arterial stiffness. How long systemic nitrate and nitrite remain elevated following cessation of high nitrate intake is unknown. In 19 healthy men and women, the time for salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite to return to baseline after 7 days increased nitrate intake from green leafy vegetables was determined. Salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite was measured at baseline [D0], end of high nitrate diet [D7], day 9 [+2D], day 14 [+7D] and day 21 [+14D]. Urinary nitrite and nitrate was assessed at D7 and +14D. Increased dietary nitrate for 7 days resulted in a more than fourfold increase in saliva and plasma nitrate and nitrite (p < 0.001) measured at [D7]. At [+2D] plasma nitrite and nitrate had returned to baseline while saliva nitrate and nitrite were more than 1.5 times higher than at baseline levels. By [+7D] all metabolites had returned to baseline levels. The pattern of response was similar between men and women. Urinary nitrate and nitrate was sevenfold higher at D7 compared to +14D. These results suggest that daily ingestion of nitrate may be required to maintain the physiological changes associated with high nitrate intake. PMID:25774606

  8. Dietary nitrate and cardiovascular health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahluwalia, A.; Gladwin, M.T.; Harman, Jane L.; Ward, M.H.; Nolan, Bernard T.

    2014-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened this workshop to discuss the results of recent research on the effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite on the cardiovascular system, possible long term effects of these compounds in the diet and drinking water, and future research needs including population-wide effects examined through epidemiological studies.

  9. Biological denitrification of high concentration nitrate waste

    DOEpatents

    Francis, Chester W.; Brinkley, Frank S.

    1977-01-01

    Biological denitrification of nitrate solutions at concentrations of greater than one kilogram nitrate per cubic meter is accomplished anaerobically in an upflow column having as a packing material a support for denitrifying bacteria.

  10. Nitrate reduction in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Marietou, Angeliki

    2016-08-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) gain their energy by coupling the oxidation of organic substrate to the reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Several SRBs are able to use alternative terminal electron acceptors to sulfate such as nitrate. Nitrate-reducing SRBs have been isolated from a diverse range of environments. In order to be able to understand the significance of nitrate reduction in SRBs, we need to examine the ecology and physiology of the nitrate-reducing SRB isolates. PMID:27364687

  11. A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

  12. Plasma nitrate and nitrite are increased by a high nitrate supplement, but not by high nitrate foods in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Gary D.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Dove, Robin W.; Beavers, Daniel; Presley, Tennille; Helms, Christine; Bechtold, Erika; King, S. Bruce; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of dietary nitrate on the nitrate/nitrite/NO (nitric oxide) cycle in older adults. We examined the effect of a 3-day control diet vs. high nitrate diet, with and without a high nitrate supplement (beetroot juice), on plasma nitrate and nitrite kinetics, and blood pressure using a randomized four period cross-over controlled design. We hypothesized that the high nitrate diet would show higher levels of plasma nitrate/nitrite and blood pressure compared to the control diet, which would be potentiated by the supplement. Participants were eight normotensive older men and women (5 female, 3 male, 72.5±4.7 yrs) with no overt disease or medications that affect NO metabolism. Plasma nitrate and nitrite levels and blood pressure were measured prior to and hourly for 3 hours after each meal. The mean daily changes in plasma nitrate and nitrite were significantly different from baseline for both control diet+supplement (p<0.001 and =0.017 for nitrate and nitrite, respectively) and high nitrate diet+supplement (p=0.001 and 0.002), but not for control diet (p=0.713 and 0.741) or high nitrate diet (p=0.852 and 0.500). Blood pressure decreased from the morning baseline measure to the three 2 hr post-meal follow-up time-points for all treatments, but there was no main effect for treatment. In healthy older adults, a high nitrate supplement consumed at breakfast elevated plasma nitrate and nitrite levels throughout the day. This observation may have practical utility for the timing of intake of a nitrate supplement with physical activity for older adults with vascular dysfunction. PMID:22464802

  13. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  14. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  15. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  16. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  17. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  18. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  19. Nitration of Naphthol: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Dwight F.

    1982-01-01

    Products of nitrations, upon distillation or steam distillation, may produce dermatitis in some students. A procedure for nitration of beta-naphthol producing a relatively non-volatile product not purified by steam distillation is described. Nitration of alpha-naphthol by the same procedure yields Martius Yellow dye which dyes wool yellow or…

  20. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a...

  1. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food... ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing agent in the processing of...

  2. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  3. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  4. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  5. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Denitrification beds are being promoted to reduce nitrate concentrations in agricultural drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution in surface water. In this system, water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transfor...

  6. Efflux Of Nitrate From Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Aslam, M.; Ward, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to measure influx, and efflux of nitrate from hydroponically grown wheat seedlings. Ratio between efflux and influx greater in darkness than in light; increased with concentration of nitrate in nutrient solution. On basis of experiments, authors suggest nutrient solution optimized at lowest possible concentration of nitrate.

  7. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  8. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  9. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified foods in accordance with...

  10. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  11. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  12. Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film

    DOEpatents

    Lupica, S.B.

    1975-12-23

    An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent.

  13. Method of purifying zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride in a vapor stream

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, T.S.; Stolz, R.A.

    1992-04-07

    This patent describes a method of purifying zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride in a vapor stream from a sand chlorinator in which the silicon and metals present in sand fed to the chlorinator are converted to chlorides at temperatures over about 800{degrees} C. It comprises cooling a vapor stream from a sand chlorinator, the vapor stream containing principally silicon tetrachloride, zirconium tetrachloride, and hafnium tetrachloride contaminated with ferric chloride, to a temperature of from about 335{degrees} C to about 600{degrees} C; flowing the vapor stream through a gaseous diffusion separative barrier to produce a silicon tetrachloride-containing vapor stream concentrated in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride and a silicon tetrachloride-containing vapor stream depleted in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride; adsorbing the ferric chloride in the separative barrier; and recovering the silicon tetrachloride stream concentrated in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride separately from the silicon tetrachloride stream depleted in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride.

  14. Protective effect of salivary nitrate and microbial nitrate reductase activity against caries.

    PubMed

    Doel, J J; Hector, M P; Amirtham, C V; Al-Anzan, L A; Benjamin, N; Allaker, R P

    2004-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that a combination of high salivary nitrate and high nitrate-reducing capacity are protective against dental caries, 209 children attending the Dental Institute, Barts and The London NHS Trust were examined. Salivary nitrate and nitrite levels, counts of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp., and caries experience were recorded. Compared with control subjects, a significant reduction in caries experience was found in patients with high salivary nitrate and high nitrate-reducing ability. Production of nitrite from salivary nitrate by commensal nitrate-reducing bacteria may limit the growth of cariogenic bacteria as a result of the production of antimicrobial oxides of nitrogen, including nitric oxide. PMID:15458501

  15. Effects of solutes on damage production and recovery in zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Zee, R.H.; Birtcher, R.C.; MacEwen, S.R.; Abromeit, C.

    1986-04-01

    Dilute zirconium-based alloys and pure zirconium were irradiated at 10 K with spallation neutrons at IPNS. Four types of alloys - Zr-Ti, Zr-Sn, Zr-Dy and Zr-Au - each with three concentration levels, were used. Low-temperature resistivity damage rates are enhanced by the presence of any of the four solutes. The greatest enhancement was produced by Au while the least by Dy. Within each alloy group, damage production also increased but at a decreasing rate, with increasing concentration. Post-irradiation annealing experiments, up to 400 K, showed that all four solutes suppress recovery due to interstitial migration, indicative of interstitial trapping by the solutes. Vacancy recovery is also suppressed by the presence of Sn, Dy or Au. The effect of Ti is to shift this stage to lower temperature. No clear correlation between the results with solute size was detected.

  16. Radioactivity in zirconium oxide powders used in industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Lischinsky, J; Vigliani, M A; Allard, D J

    1991-06-01

    Recent work involving the decommissioning of a former ceramic manufacturing facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for activities involving depleted uranium oxide has uncovered the presence of unexpected high levels of natural radioactivity in non-licensed zirconium oxide powders also used in the same facility. A comparison between the levels of source material found in samples of this material and the current regulatory guidance for licensed activities and decommissioning has been conducted. It has been determined that the radioactivity in the zirconium oxide is of a high enough magnitude to raise health physics concerns in the areas of licensing and regulatory compliance, decontamination criteria, and worker health and safety. An examination of these areas has been conducted and the implications associated with our findings are presented. PMID:2032840

  17. Process for producing high purity zirconium and hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Y.J.

    1987-05-26

    An improved process is described for producing zirconium or hafnium. The process is of the type wherein a tetrachloride of zirconium or hafnium is reduced by magnesium and the resulting metal is subjected to a distillation treatment. The improvement comprises: introducing magnesium chloride into a combination reduction-distillation vessel. An inner liner with at least one bottom drain opening with the drain opening providing fluid communication between the vessel and the liner. The magnesium chloride is added in a quantity to fill the vessel and the inner liner to a level above the liner bottom drain opening, whereby the magnesium chloride provides a seal which prevents magnesium in the inner liner from flowing out of the inner liner.

  18. Controlled deposition of plasma activated coatings on zirconium substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Behnam; Bilek, Marcela

    2015-12-01

    Zirconium-based alloys are promising materials for orthopedic prostheses due to their low toxicity, superb corrosion resistivity, and favorable mechanical properties. The integration of such bio-implantable devices with local host tissues can strongly be improved by the development of a plasma polymerized acetylene and nitrogen (PPAN) that immobilizes bio-active molecules. The surface chemistry of PPAN is critically important as it plays a key role in affecting the surface free energy that alters the functionality of bio-active molecules at the surface. The cross-linking degree of PPAN is another key property that directly influences the water-permeability and thus also the stability of films in aqueous media. In this study we demonstrate that by simply tuning the zirconium bias voltage, control over the surface chemistry and cross-linking degree of PANN is achieved.

  19. Alternative Processing of High Temperature Hafnium and Zirconium Based Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Gusman, Michael; Ellerby, Don; Irby, Edward; Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of refractory hafnium and zirconium based materials are being investigated at NASA Ames as part of ongoing research aimed at developing superior heat resistant materials for aerospace applications. Hafnium and zirconium diboride based materials have shown high temperature capabilities in simulated reentry environments indicating that these materials may successfully operate as reusable oxidation resistant components for leading edge applications. Due to the refractory nature of these materials, processing of fine-grained uniform microstructures poses a number of challenges. To better understand the process-property-microstructure relationship, processing of these materials has been carried out with conventional hot pressing in addition to the novel approach of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The two processing methods are compared and contrasted in an evaluation of the sintering behavior of high temperature diboride based materials and preliminary physical and mechanical properties are presented.

  20. Modelling zirconium hydrides using the special quasirandom structure approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Chroneos, A; Jiang, C; Schwingenschlögl, U

    2013-05-28

    The study of the structure and properties of zirconium hydrides is important for understanding the embrittlement of zirconium alloys used as cladding in light water nuclear reactors. Simulation of the defect processes is complicated due to the random distribution of the hydrogen atoms. We propose the use of the special quasirandom structure approach as a computationally efficient way to describe this random distribution. We have generated six special quasirandom structure cells based on face centered cubic and face centered tetragonal unit cells to describe ZrH(2-x) (x = 0.25-0.5). Using density functional theory calculations we investigate the mechanical properties, stability, and electronic structure of the alloys. PMID:23588997

  1. Charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potential for zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordhoek, Mark J.; Liang, Tao; Lu, Zizhe; Shan, Tzu-Ray; Sinnott, Susan B.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2013-10-01

    An interatomic potential for zirconium is developed within the charge-optimized many-body (COMB) formalism. The potential correctly predicts the hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structure as the ground state with cohesive energy, lattice parameters, and elastic constants matching experiment well. The most stable interstitial position is the basal octahedral followed by basal split, in agreement with recent first principles calculations. Stacking fault energies within the prism and basal planes satisfactorily match first principles calculations. A tensile test using nanocrystalline zirconium exhibits both prismatic {1 0 1bar 0}<1 1 2bar 0> slip and pyramidal {1 1 2bar 2}<1 1 2bar 3bar> slip, showing the model is capable of reproducing the mechanical deformation modes observed in experiments.

  2. Adhesion Improvement of Zirconium Coating on Polyurethane Modified by Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Hao, Xiaofei; Liu, Jiwei

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the adhesion of the middle frequency magnetic sputtered zirconium coating on a polyurethane film, an anode layer source was used to pretreat the polyurethane film with nitrogen and oxygen ions. SEMs and AFM roughness profiles of treated samples and the contrast groups were obtained. Besides, XPS survey spectrums and high resolution spectrums were also investigated. The adhesion test revealed that ion bombardment could improve the adhesion to the polyurethane coating substrate. A better etching result of oxygen ions versus nitrogen predicts a higher bonding strength of zirconium coating on polyurethane and, indeed, the highest bonding strengths are for oxygen ion bombardment upto 13.3 MPa. As demonstrated in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the oxygen ion also helps to introduce more active groups, and, therefore, it achieves a high value of adhesion strength.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium used in the reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Chiaki; Motooka, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2007-07-01

    We investigated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of zirconium by constant load test and the small-scale mock-up test simulated the fuel dissolve. These tests operated in the simulated solution, which substituted non-radioactive elements, i.e. V with radioactive elements such as Pu and Np. From the results of constant load test, the cracks were not observed on 150 MPa after 908 hours in approximately 3 % strain. However a lot of cracks caused by SCC were observed over 20 % strain under high tensile stress in the simulated solution and the heat-transfer condition having more corrosive circumstance and noble potential accelerated the susceptibility of SCC. The cracking behavior would be caused by the creep phenomena. The small-scale mock-up test had been operated for about 50000 hours during 7 year. From the results, zirconium showed excellent corrosion resistance and no SCC was observed during these long-term operations. (authors)

  4. The effect of zirconium on the cyclic oxidation of NiCrAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Khan, A. S.; Lowell, C. E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper examines results with cyclic oxidation tests of Ni(9-20) Cr(15-30) Al-(x)Zr alloys carried out at 1100 C and 1200 C in static air. The concentration of zirconium varies from 0 to 0.63 atomic percent. Significant aluminum penetration is found in metallographic and electron microscopic examination of oxidized surfaces. Small amounts of zirconium lead to minimal penetration, and with increased zirconium content pronounced oxide penetration is observed.

  5. Polyimide nanocomposites based on cubic zirconium tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramanian Sharma, Gayathri

    2009-12-01

    In this research, cubic zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8) was used as a filler to reduce the CTE of polyimides (PI), and the effect of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles on the bulk polymer properties was studied. Polyimides are high performance polymers with exceptional thermal stability, and there is a need for PIs with low CTEs for high temperature applications. The nanofiller, cubic ZrW2O8, is well known for its isotropic negative thermal expansion (NTE) over a wide temperature range from -272.7 to 777°C. The preparation of nanocomposites involved the synthesis of ZrW 2O8 nanofiller, engineering the polymer-filler interface using linker groups and optimization of processing strategies to prepare free-standing PI nanocomposite films. A hydrothermal method was used to synthesize ZrW 2O8 nanoparticles. Polyimide-ZrW2O8 interface interaction was enhanced by covalently bonding linker moieties to the surface of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles. Specifically, ZrW 2O8 nanoparticles were functionalized with two different linker groups: (1) a short aliphatic silane, and (2) low molecular weight PI. The surface functionalization was confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Reprecipitation blending was used to prepare the freestanding PI-ZrW2O8 nanocomposite films with up to 15 volume% filler loading. SEM images showed the improvements in polymer-filler wetting behavior achieved using interface engineering. SEM images indicated that there was better filler dispersion in the PI matrix using reprecipitation blending, compared to the filler dispersion achieved in the nanocomposites prepared using conventional blending technique. The structure-property relationships in PI-ZrW2O8 nanocomposites were investigated by studying the thermal degradation, glass transition, tensile and thermal expansion properties of the nanocomposites. The properties were studied as a function of filler loading and interface linker groups. Addition of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles did not

  6. Influence of Temperature on the Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, Juan P.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Martinez, Daniel T.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Lebensohn, Ricardo A.; Gray, George T.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of temperature on the dynamic tensile behavior of Zr has been investigated. Bullet-shaped Zr samples with two different textures were dynamically extruded at room temperature and 523 K (250 °C). A higher ductility was measured for samples deformed at elevated temperature as compared to those extruded at room temperature. This difference in ductility is discussed in terms of zirconium's ability to accommodate plastic deformation via thermally enhanced slip activity, as evidenced by examination of the deformed microstructures.

  7. Structure and thermal behavior of zirconium tungstate under heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedova, E. S.; Shutilova, E. S.; Geber, R.; Gomze, L. A.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    The morphology and properties of powders ZrW2O7(OH)2·2H2O and ZrW2O8, obtained under the conditions of hydrothermal synthesis was studied. Using the high-temperature X-ray analysis, the mechanism of formation of zirconium tungstate was established. The influence of temperature on the structure and properties of materials was studied using shadow-casting method.

  8. Oxidation characteristics of molybdenum-zirconium oxide cermets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitzinger, B.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation of molybdenum is affected by the factors of temperature, the oxygen pressure in the oxidizing atmosphere, and the time of exposure. Studies of the oxidation characteristics of Mo show that the oxidation rate increases strongly when the temperature exceeds 600 C. Investigations of the behavior of cermets with various percentages of zirconium oxide are discussed, taking into account oxidation conditions at temperatures under and above the melting point of molybdenum trioxide.

  9. Dissolution-passivation model for zirconium alloys in fluorinated media

    SciTech Connect

    Prono, J.; Caprani, A.; Jaszay, T.; Frayret, J.P.

    1992-12-31

    Considering the shape of the steady state current-potential curve, we proposed a dissolution-passivation model composed of five determining steps and we calculated the associated elementary rates. Two different compounds of tetravalent zirconium are involved in the formation of the surface film. The influence of temperature on the elementary rates allows us to consider the chemical dissolution as the slowest steps and to involve fluoride in the formation of the film in the vicinity of the corrosion potential.

  10. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM IONS FROM SOLUTION BY ADSORPTION ON ZIRCONIUM PYROPHOSPHATE

    DOEpatents

    Stoughton, R.W.

    1961-01-31

    A method is given for separating plutonium in its reduced, phosphate- insoluble state from other substances. It involves contacting a solution containing the plutonium with granular zirconium pyrophosphate.